Sample records for red sand beds

  1. White Sands, Carrizozo Lava Beds, NM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A truly remarkable view of White Sands and the nearby Carrizozo Lava Beds in southeast NM (33.5N, 106.5W). White Sands, site of the WW II atomic bomb development and testing facility and later post war nuclear weapons testing that can still be seen in the cleared circular patterns on the ground.

  2. Incipient motion design of sand bed channels affected by bed suction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bimlesh Kumar; Gopu Srinivasulu; Achanta Ramakrishna Rao

    2010-01-01

    Seepage through sand bed channels in a downward direction (suction) reduces the stability of particles and initiates the sand movement. Incipient motion of sand bed channel with seepage cannot be designed by using the conventional approach. Metamodeling techniques, which employ a non-linear pattern analysis between input and output parameters and solely based on the experimental observations, can be used to

  3. Channel bed evolution and sediment transport under declining sand inputs

    E-print Network

    Montgomery, David R.

    Channel bed evolution and sediment transport under declining sand inputs Karen B. Gran,1,2 David R structure development and sediment transport as sand inputs decline. On the Pasig-Potrero River, we investigated channel recovery following emplacement of sand-rich pyroclastic deposits in the 1991 eruption

  4. 20. View of sand filtration bed. Wheelbarrow was used to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. View of sand filtration bed. Wheelbarrow was used to remove schmutzdeck (top, dirty sand layer containing particulate contamination, dead microorganisms and debris) for cleaning and or disposal. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Filtration Plant, South side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  5. Coupled changes in sand grain size and sand transport driven by changes in the upstream supply of sand in the Colorado River: relative importance of changes in bed-sand grain size and bed-sand area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Topping, D.J.; Rubin, D.M.; Melis, T.S.

    2007-01-01

    Sand transport in the Colorado River in Marble and Grand canyons was naturally limited by the upstream supply of sand. Prior to the 1963 closure of Glen Canyon Dam, the river exhibited the following four effects of sand supply limitation: (1) hysteresis in sediment concentration, (2) hysteresis in sediment grain size coupled to the hysteresis in sediment concentration, (3) production of inversely graded flood deposits, and (4) development or modification of a lag between the time of a flood peak and the time of either maximum or minimum (depending on reach geometry) bed elevation. Construction and operation of the dam has enhanced the degree to which the first two of these four effects are evident, and has not affected the degree to which the last two effects of sand supply limitation are evident in the Colorado River in Marble and Grand canyons. The first three of the effects involve coupled changes in suspended-sand concentration and grain size that are controlled by changes in the upstream supply of sand. During tributary floods, sand on the bed of the Colorado River fines; this causes the suspended sand to fine and the suspended-sand concentration to increase, even when the discharge of water remains constant. Subsequently, the bed is winnowed of finer sand, the suspended sand coarsens, and the suspended-sand concentration decreases independently of discharge. Also associated with these changes in sand supply are changes in the fraction of the bed that is covered by sand. Thus, suspended-sand concentration in the Colorado River is likely regulated by both changes in the bed-sand grain size and changes in the bed-sand area. A physically based flow and suspended-sediment transport model is developed, tested, and applied to data from the Colorado River to evaluate the relative importance of changes in the bed-sand grain size and changes in the bed-sand area in regulating suspended-sand concentration. Although the model was developed using approximations for steady, uniform flow, and other simplifications that are not met in the Colorado River, the results nevertheless support the idea that changes in bed-sand grain size are much more important than changes in bed-sand area in regulating the concentration of suspended sand.

  6. Different bed surface and flow resistance characteristics for gravel and sand bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, N.; Yang, K.; Nie, R.; Liu, X.

    2014-12-01

    Bed forms affect both bed load transport and flow resistance strongly and change their shapes and sizes depending on underlying grain size distribution and shear stress. A series of flume experiments were conducted at the Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory to study the effect of bed form dynamics on flow turbulence and sediment transport with both gravel and sand as bed material and different flow conditions. From the experimental data, the spectrum of bed elevation time series, the PDFs of bed elevation increments and the flow resistance characteristics are all analyzed. The wavelet-based spectral analysis shows that the slopes of the elevation spectrums are -2 and -3 for gravel and sand bed surfaces, respectively. The slope -3 indicates that the surface is self-similar, in another words, the ratios of bed form heights and lengths for different bed forms are the same; however, the slope of -2 indicates that the surface is self-affine, and in such case (-2) the ratios of bed form heights and lengths for different bed forms are not correlated at all. We interpret that the relative size of grain and boundary layer affects the bed form characteristics significantly, e.g., grain size of sand is of the same scale as the thickness of boundary layer, but both are much smaller than the grain size of gravel. Our results suggest that the PDFs of bed elevation increments for both gravel and sand beds can be fitted well with two-sided asymmetric exponential function. Furthermore, we show that the flow resistance (Darcy-Weisbach coefficients f) are much higher for sand bed than gravel bed, and the former is contributed by form drags, which is much larger than grain drags. For gravel bed, f and the skewness of bed elevation increments increases with flow discharge whereas for the sand bed, both f and the skewness of bed elevation increments decreases which corresponds to the transition in hydraulic conditions for dune to dynamic flat surface in our experiments. The analysis highlights the need to incorporate several different topics such as boundary layer, bed form development, flow resistance and bed load transport together.

  7. The 3-D spread of saltation sand over a flat bed surface in aeolian sand transport

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bin Yang; Yuan Wang; Yang Zhang

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigated the 3-D motion of saltation sand by high-speed photography and stereo particle image velocimetry (SPIV). By the high-speed camera, the sand particle trajectories in the transverse plane near bed surface have been obtained. It could be found that the collision between the particle and the bed surface would in principle cause the transverse motion of the particle

  8. Effect of Bed Sand Content on the Turbulent Flows Associated with Clusters on an

    E-print Network

    Curran, Joanna C.

    Effect of Bed Sand Content on the Turbulent Flows Associated with Clusters on an Armored Gravel Bed often develops clusters as part of its structure. The influence of sand on armoring and the impact created from four different sediments, which progressively increased from 1­38% sand in the bed sediment

  9. Effect of Sand Supply on Transport Rates in a Gravel-Bed Channel

    E-print Network

    Curran, Joanna C.

    Effect of Sand Supply on Transport Rates in a Gravel-Bed Channel Joanna C. Curran, A.M.ASCE,1 depth, and gravel feed rate, sand feed rates were varied from 0.16 to 6.1 times that of gravel. The bed slope decreased with increasing sand supply, indicating that the gravel could be transported at the same

  10. Recovery of Ilmenite and Other Heavy Minerals from Teri Sands (Red Sands) of Tamil Nadu, India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Babu; N. Vasumathi; R. Bhima Rao

    The red sand which is known as Teri sand in Tamil Nadu consists of 5.5% Total Heavy Minerals (THM) out of which 3.7% is ilmenite. The other minerals, zircon, sillimanite and garnet are in the order of abundance identified. On processing this feed to recover ilmenite by using spirals followed by dry high intensity magnetic separator and high tension separator,

  11. Acoustic bed velocity and bed load dynamics in a large sand bed river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaeuman, D.; Jacobson, R.B.

    2006-01-01

    Development of a practical technology for rapid quantification of bed load transport in large rivers would represent a revolutionary advance for sediment monitoring and the investigation of fluvial dynamics. Measurement of bed load motion with acoustic Doppler current profiles (ADCPs) has emerged as a promising approach for evaluating bed load transport. However, a better understanding of how ADCP data relate to conditions near the stream bed is necessary to make the method practical for quantitative applications. In this paper, we discuss the response of ADCP bed velocity measurements, defined as the near-bed sediment velocity detected by the instrument's bottom-tracking feature, to changing sediment-transporting conditions in the lower Missouri River. Bed velocity represents a weighted average of backscatter from moving bed load particles and spectral reflections from the immobile bed. The ratio of bed velocity to mean bed load particle velocity depends on the concentration of the particles moving in the bed load layer, the bed load layer thickness, and the backscatter strength from a unit area of moving particles relative to the echo strength from a unit area of unobstructed bed. A model based on existing bed load transport theory predicted measured bed velocities from hydraulic and grain size measurements with reasonable success. Bed velocities become more variable and increase more rapidly with shear stress when the transport stage, defined as the ratio of skin friction to the critical shear stress for particle entrainment, exceeds a threshold of about 17. This transition in bed velocity response appears to be associated with the appearance of longer, flatter bed forms at high transport stages.

  12. Acoustic bed velocity and bed load dynamics in a large sand bed river

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Gaeuman; Robert B. Jacobson

    2006-01-01

    Development of a practical technology for rapid quantification of bed load transport in large rivers would represent a revolutionary advance for sediment monitoring and the investigation of fluvial dynamics. Measurement of bed load motion with acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) has emerged as a promising approach for evaluating bed load transport. However, a better understanding of how ADCP data relate

  13. Selective Classification of Mineral Sand Slimes in an Air Fluidized Bed

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Veerendra Singh; S. Mohan Rao

    2010-01-01

    Studies were carried out for selective classification of mineral sands to remove unwanted slimes (particles of <0.63 µm in size). Vertical and arched fluidized bed setups were tested to retain the coarser heavy mineral particles from fluidized mineral sand beds. Theoretically calculated process parameters were used to develop the experimental setups. The mathematical model given by Nguyentranlam and Galvin (“Particle classification

  14. The sand-deposition impact of artificial gravel beds on the protection of the Mogao Grottoes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guo Shuai; Qu, Jian Jun; Li, Xu Zhi; Wang, Wan Fu

    2014-01-01

    Gravel beds can prevent sand-dust emission and weaken sand-dust flux. We used wind-tunnel experiments and field observations on artificial gravel beds above the Mogao Grottoes to quantify their impact. In the report, we identified a significant correlation between gravel roughness and its ability to trap wind-transported sand. The optimal combinations of gravel diameter and coverage were determined. The greatest roughness is achieved when small gravel coverage is 75%, medium 40% and large 45%. We found that initial wind speed and gravel coverage are the key factors controlling the amount of sand trapped by the gravel beds. PMID:24614183

  15. The sand-deposition impact of artificial gravel beds on the protection of the Mogao Grottoes.

    PubMed

    Li, Guo Shuai; Qu, Jian Jun; Li, Xu Zhi; Wang, Wan Fu

    2014-01-01

    Gravel beds can prevent sand-dust emission and weaken sand-dust flux. We used wind-tunnel experiments and field observations on artificial gravel beds above the Mogao Grottoes to quantify their impact. In the report, we identified a significant correlation between gravel roughness and its ability to trap wind-transported sand. The optimal combinations of gravel diameter and coverage were determined. The greatest roughness is achieved when small gravel coverage is 75%, medium 40% and large 45%. We found that initial wind speed and gravel coverage are the key factors controlling the amount of sand trapped by the gravel beds. PMID:24614183

  16. The importance of bed sediment sand content for the structure of a static armor layer in a gravel bed river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curran, Joanna Crowe; Waters, Kevin A.

    2014-07-01

    The surface structure of static armor layers generated from water-worked gravel bed channels was investigated with primary focus on the influence of sand content and flow rate. Flume experiments were conducted in which four sediment mixtures with sand contents between 1% and 38% were armored under one of three different flow rates. First- and second-order statistical analyses were applied to digital elevation models of unarmored, armored, and clustered bed surface areas to identify changes in surface structure. Results were combined with data from previous research to create an extended data set of armored bed surfaces. Water-worked, unarmored bed surfaces established under a dynamic equilibrium flow rate impacted the topographic variability and structure of the armored beds. Surface complexity decreased with armor formation as surface grains preferentially aligned with the flow direction. The bed surface became smoother, and where sediment mixture sand content was constant, there was greater smoothing of the surface during higher armoring flows as grains rearranged more easily. As bulk sand content increased, statistical analyses of the expanded data set showed that beds with very little sand content developed static armor layers that remained rough and had greater topographic variability than armor layers from sediments with higher sand contents. The bulk sediment sand content exerted a stronger influence over the change in surface roughness and structure upon armoring than that of the flow rate during armor formation. When combined with the knowledge of the local flow regime, the sand content may aid in predictions related to armored bed surface structure.

  17. Density stratification effects in sand-bed rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, S.; Parker, G.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper the effects of density stratification in sand-bed rivers are studied by the application of a model of vertical velocity and concentration profiles, coupled through the use of a turbulence closure that retains the buoyancy terms. By making the governing equations dimensionless, it is revealed that the slope is the additional dimensionless parameter introduced by inclusion of the buoyancy terms. The primary new finding is that in general density stratification effects tend to be greater in large, low-slope rivers than in their smaller, steeper brethren. Under high flow conditions the total suspended load and size distribution of suspended sediment can be significantly affected by density stratification, and should be accounted for in any general theory of suspended transport. ?? ASCE.

  18. Scaling laws in aeolian sand transport: Erodible versus Non-erodible bed

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    the incoming transport rate, there exists a critical nominal velocity be- low which the air flow is not ableScaling laws in aeolian sand transport: Erodible versus Non-erodible bed A. Valance , T. D. Ho , A transport. We analyzed two different bed configurations: one with a sandy erodible bed and the other

  19. Algorithm for resistance to flow and transport in sand-bed channels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennett, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    An algorithm is developed that relates depth to discharge and determines bed- and suspended-load transport for the entire range of bed forms found in sand-bed channels; equilibrium-state geometry of lower flow regime bedforms is also predicted. A Meyer-Peter-type formulation is used to compute sand transport in the bed-load layer and for computing suspended sand transport, McLean's procedure is adopted. A bed-form classifcation scheme is developed. The algorithm produces overall geometric averages of predicted to observed depth and predicted to observed transport of 1.00. For a verification data set of 855 observations, mostly from rivers and canals, the overall geometric averages of predicted to observed depth and transport are 0.87 and 1.14. -from Author

  20. Australian Red Dune Sand: A Potential Martian Regolith Analog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, K. R.; Marshall, J.; Evans, N. D.; Luttge, A.

    2001-01-01

    To demonstrate the potential scientific and technical merits of in situ microscopy on Mars, we analyzed a possible Martian regolith analog - an acolian red dune sand from the central Australian desert (near Mt. Olga). This sand was chosen for its ubiquitous red coating and the desert environment in which is it found. Grains of this sand were analyzed using a variety of microanalytical techniques. A database of detailed studies of such terrestrial analogs would assist the study of geological and astrobiological specimens in future missions to Mars. Potential instrument concepts for in situ deployment on Mars include local electrode atom probe nanoanalysis (LEAP), vertical scanning white light interferometry (VSWLI), scanning electron microscopies, energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis (EDX), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). While in situ deployment of these techniques is many years away, ground-based studies using these analytical techniques extend our understanding of the data obtained from instruments to be flown in the near future.

  1. Formation of ripples over a sand bed submitted to a turbulent shear flow

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Valance

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the process of ripple formation when a\\u000asand bed is submitted to a steady and turbulent liquid flow. \\u000aThe sand transport dynamics is described in terms of a simple\\u000arelaxation law which accounts for the fact that\\u000athe transport rate does not adapt instantaneously to its\\u000aequilibrium value. \\u000aThe equilibrium sand flux is evaluated using a standard\\u000alaw

  2. Sand Transport, Flow Turbulence, and Bed Forms over an Immobile Gravel Bed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Channels downstream of dams often become armored because the sediment supply from upstream is cut off. Sand is generally supplied to these armored reaches intermittently from tributaries downstream of the dam or from sand bypassing. Accurate predictions of the rate of transport of sand over and th...

  3. Response of fishes and aquatic habitats to sand-bed stream restoration using large woody debris

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Douglas Shields Jr.; Scott S. Knight; Nathalie Morin; Joanne Blank

    2003-01-01

    Effects of habitat rehabilitation of Little Topashaw Creek, a sinuous, sand-bed stream draining 37 km2 in northwest Mississippi are described. The rehabilitation project consisted of placing 72 large woody debris structures along eroding concave banks and planting 4000 willow cuttings in sandbars. Response was measured by monitoring flow, channel geometry, physical aquatic habitat, and fish populations. Initially, debris structures reduced

  4. RESPONSE OF FISHES AND AQUATIC HABITATS TO SAND-BED STREAM RESTORATION USING LARGE WOODY DEBRIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Large woody debris structures hold promise as cost-effective stream corridor rehabilitation measures. Pre- and post construction data are presented that describe effects of habitat rehabilitation of Little Topashaw Creek, a sinuous, fourth-order sand-bed stream draining 37 km2 in northwest Mississip...

  5. Longitudinal variability in hydraulic geometry and substrate characteristics of a Great Plains sand-bed river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costigan, Katie H.; Daniels, Melinda D.; Perkin, Joshuah S.; Gido, Keith B.

    2014-04-01

    Downstream trends in hydraulic geometry and substrate characteristics were investigated along a 200 km reach of the Ninnescah River in south central Kansas, USA. The Ninnescah River is a large sand-bed, perennial, braided river located in the Central Plains physiographic province and is a tributary of the Arkansas River. Hydraulic geometry characteristics were measured at eleven reaches and included slope, sinuosity, bankfull channel width, and bankfull channel depth. Results indicated that the Ninnescah River followed a predicted trend of decreasing slope and increasing depth and width downstream. There were localized divergences in the central tendency, most notability downstream of a substantial tributary that is impounded and at the end of the surveying reach where the Ninnescah River approaches the Arkansas River. Surface grain-size samples were taken from the top 10 cm of the bed at five points across the wetted cross-section within each of the 11 reaches. Sediment analyses demonstrated a significant trend in downstream fining of surface grain-sizes (D90 and D50) but unlike previous studies of sand-bedded rivers we observed coarsening of substrates downstream of the major tributary confluence. We propose that the overall low discharge from the tributary was the primary reason for coarsening of the bed downstream of the tributary. Results of this study provide valuable baseline information that can provide insight in to how Great Plains sand-bed systems may be conserved, managed, and restored in the future.

  6. The Unified Gravel-Sand (TUGS) Model: Simulating Sediment Transport and Gravel\\/Sand Grain Size Distributions in Gravel-Bedded Rivers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yantao Cui

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents The Unified Gravel-Sand (TUGS) model that simulates the transport, erosion, and deposition of both gravel and sand. TUGS model employs the surface-based bed load equation of Wilcock and Crowe (2003) and links grain size distributions in the bed load, surface layer, and subsurface with the gravel transfer function of Hoey and Ferguson (1994) and Toro-Escobar et al.

  7. Development of an inclined liquid fluidized bed for tar sand processing

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, L.A. Jr.

    1989-12-01

    An inclined liquid fluidized-bed reactor (ILFBR) system has been developed and successfully operated for 24 hours. Modifications to the previously tested ILFBR systems include incorporation of a oil fluidizing zone in the front of the fluid bed, an increase in the angle of the fluid bed to {minus}12{degree} (the minus sign shows that the discharges is below the horizontal level of the inlet), and reduction of the fluidizing gas velocities equal to or below the minimum fluidization velocity. These changes produced a functional bubbling slurry bed for the processing of tar sand. The produced oils and spent sand resemble the products from screw pyrolysis reactor (SPR) tests suggesting that the ILFBR system functioned similar to the SPR systems with the recycle oil pyrolysis and extraction (ROPE{copyright}) process. With slight modifications in the heater control and placement, the system will be ready for development of operational parameters for the surface processing of tar sand. 10 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Aeolian Sand Transport in the Planetary Context: Respective Roles of Aerodynamic and Bed-Dilatancy Thresholds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J. R.; Borucki, J.; Bratton, C.

    1999-09-01

    The traditional view of aeolian sand transport generally estimates flux from the perspective of aerodynamic forces creating the airborne grain population, although it has been recognized that "reptation" causes a significant part of the total airborne flux; reptation involves both ballistic injection of grains into the air stream by the impact of saltating grains as well as the "nudging" of surface grains into a creeping motion. Whilst aerodynamic forces may initiate sand motion, it is proposed here that within a fully-matured grain cloud, flux is actually governed by two thresholds: an aerodynamic threshold, and a bed-dilatancy threshold. It is the latter which controls the reptation population, and its significance increases proportionally with transport energy. Because we only have experience with terrestrial sand transport, extrapolations of aeolian theory to Mars and Venus have adjusted only the aerodynamic factor, taking gravitational forces and atmospheric density as the prime variables in the aerodynamic equations, but neglecting reptation. The basis for our perspective on the importance of reptation and bed dilatancy is a set of experiments that were designed to simulate sand transport across the surface of a martian dune. Using a modified sporting crossbow in which a sand-impelling sabot replaced the bolt-firing mechanism, individual grains of sand were fired at loose sand targets with glancing angles typical of saltation impact; grains were projected at about 80 m/s to simulate velocities commensurate with those predicted for extreme martian aeolian conditions. The sabot impelling method permitted study of individual impacts without the masking effect of bed mobilization encountered in wind-tunnel studies. At these martian impact velocities, grains produced small craters formed by the ejection of several hundred grains from the bed. Unexpectedly, the craters were not elongated, despite glancing impact; the craters were very close to circular in planform. High-speed photography showed them to grow in both diameter and depth after the impactor had ricochetted from the crater site. The delayed response of the bed was "explosive" in nature, and created a miniature ejecta curtain spreading upward and outward for many centimeters for impact of 100-300 micron-diameter grains into similar material. Elastic energy deposited in the bed by the impacting grain creates a subsurface stress regime or "quasi-Boussinesq" compression field. Elastic recovery of the bed occurs by dilatancy; shear stresses suddenly convert the grains from closed to open packing, and grains are consequently able to eject themselves forcefully from the impact site. Random jostling of the grains causes radial homogenization of stress vectors and a resulting circular crater. There is a great temptation to draw parallels with cratering produced by meteorite impacts, but a rigorous search for common modelling ground between the two phenomena has not been conducted at this time. For every impact of an aerodynamically energized grain, there are several hundred grains ejected into the wind for the high-energy transport that might occur on Mars. Many of these grains will themselves become subject to the boundary layer's aerodynamic lift forces (their motion will not immediately die and add to the creep population), and these grains will become indistinguishable from those lifted entirely by aerodynamic forces. As each grain impacts the bed, it will eject even more grains into the flow. A cascading effect will take place, but because it must be finite in its growth, damping will occur as the number of grains set in motion causes mid-air collisions that prevent much of the impact energy from reaching the surface of the bed -thus creating a dynamic equilibrium in a high-density saltation cloud. It is apparent that for a given impact energy, the stress field permits a smaller volume of grains to convert to open packing as the size of the bed grains increases, or as the energy of the "percussive" grain decreases

  9. Relationship of Fish Mesohabitat to Flow in a Sand-Bed Southwestern River

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jon W. Kehmeier; Richard A. Valdez; C. Nicolas Medley; Orrin B. Myers

    2007-01-01

    We quantified the availability and utilization of habitat types by eight small-bodied cyprinid fish species, including the federally threatened Pecos bluntnose shiner Notropis simus pecosensis, in the Pecos River, New Mexico. The Pecos River is a medium-sized, sand-bed river with a highly variable hydrograph and some reaches characterized by historic and recent periods of flow intermittency. Fish habitat was described

  10. Upper Pleistocene turbidite sand beds and chaotic silt beds in the channelized, distal, outer-fan lobes of the Mississippi fan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Hans Nelson; H. L. Lee; D. C. Twichell; W. C. Schwab; Neil H. Kenyon

    1992-01-01

    Cores from a Mississippi outer-fan depositional lobe demonstrate that sublobes at the distal edge contain a complex local network of channelized-turbidite beds of graded sand and debris-flow beds of chaotic silt. Off-lobe basin plains lack siliciclastic coarse-grained beds. The basin-plain mud facies exhibit low acoustic backscatter on SeaMARC IA sidescan sonar images, whereas high acoustic backscatter is characteristic of the

  11. Development and design of a fluidized bed\\/upflow sand filter configuration for use in recirculating aquaculture systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1988-01-01

    A fluidized bed\\/upflow sand filter configuration, was developed and designed for utilization in recirculating aquaculture system, specifically the soft-shell crab and soft-shell crawfish industries. These filters were selected and designed because of their ability to withstand clogging and still maintain high levels of water quality for aquaculture production. The effectiveness of sand grain size was used to evaluate fluidized bed

  12. Evaluation of an experimental LiDAR for surveying a shallow, braided, sand-bedded river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kinzel, P.J.; Wright, C.W.; Nelson, J.M.; Burman, A.R.

    2007-01-01

    Reaches of a shallow (<1.0m), braided, sand-bedded river were surveyed in 2002 and 2005 with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Experimental Advanced Airborne Research LiDAR (EAARL) and concurrently with conventional survey-grade, real-time kinematic, global positioning system technology. The laser pulses transmitted by the EAARL instrument and the return backscatter waveforms from exposed sand and submerged sand targets in the river were completely digitized and stored for postflight processing. The vertical mapping accuracy of the EAARL was evaluated by comparing the ellipsoidal heights computed from ranging measurements made using an EAARL terrestrial algorithm to nearby (<0.5m apart) ground-truth ellipsoidal heights. After correcting for apparent systematic bias in the surveys, the root mean square error of these heights with the terrestrial algorithm in the 2002 survey was 0.11m for the 26 measurements taken on exposed sand and 0.18m for the 59 measurements taken on submerged sand. In the 2005 survey, the root mean square error was 0.18m for 92 measurements taken on exposed sand and 0.24m for 434 measurements on submerged sand. In submerged areas the waveforms were complicated by reflections from the surface, water column entrained turbidity, and potentially the riverbed. When applied to these waveforms, especially in depths greater than 0.4m, the terrestrial algorithm calculated the range above the riverbed. A bathymetric algorithm has been developed to approximate the position of the riverbed in these convolved waveforms and preliminary results are encouraging. ?? 2007 ASCE.

  13. [Experimental study of the red-bed pigment with diffuse reflectance spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lian-Ting; Chen, Guo-Neng; Peng, Zhuo-Lun

    2013-10-01

    Red pigment of continental red-bed is known originating from the fine-particle hematite in the rocks. Advance of researches on the origin of continental red-bed demonstrates that the red pigment of red-bed originated from its diagenetic but not depositional process. The high diagenetic temperature causes the dehydration of iron hydrate to form hematite, generating the red pigment. For examining the above hypothesis, the authors of this paper designed an experiment to approach the reddening process, i.e. formation of the red pigment of continental red-bed. Black ooze sampled from the Holocene sediments of the Pearl River Delta was heated in different ways. The diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) of those heated ooze samples were detected with Perkin-Elmer Lamdba 950 ultraviolet/visible/near-infrared spectrophotometer, and moreover, red-values of the samples were calculated for determining their coloring levels. Iron in black ooze sediment is predominantly in the form of goethite. Experimental results verified that initial dehydration-temperature of goethite is about 150 degrees C, either enhancing temperature or prolonging heating time is accompanied with decreasing goethite and increasing hematite, and a positive relationship exists between red-value of samples and peak-height of hematite. The experimental results strongly support the idea of thermal origin of continental red-bed. PMID:24409725

  14. Bed Material Flux and Suspended Sand Measurements Within the Lower (Tidally Influenced) Mississippi River: Effects of Water Discharge Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nittrouer, J. A.; Allison, M. A.; Mohrig, D.

    2006-12-01

    Recent studies within the lower (tidally influenced) Mississippi River have sought to quantify bed-material transport rates using a repeat multibeam bathymetric methodology. Data were collected over range of water discharge conditions, and used to measure changes in bed elevation induced by the down-river migration of large dunes within a 24-hr survey period. A series of processing algorithms removed erroneous soundings, and determined mass flux from the translation of the river-bottom topography. Annual bed-material transport rates scale to an unexpectedly small proportion relative to the overall sediment load for the river (0.1%), and USGS data indicate suspended sand loads are two orders of magnitude greater than the bed-material component. The bathymetry data also define the spatial distribution of bedforms within the river channel. Straight-reach segments (20-30 m depth) are commonly mantled with dune forms across the entire cross-section, while bends are typically zones of focused scour (50-65 m depth), with no evidence of bedforms. These observations are interpreted to indicate a transport system that is relatively "starved" of bed material sediment. The exact locations of transitions between the sediment-mantled and scoured bed varies as a function of river discharge. This relationship further demonstrates the importance of suspension as a means for sand transport within the lower Mississippi River; presumably any sand moving as bed material lifts off into suspension upon approach to a high-energy bend, with some finite amount returning to bed material load within the straight channel segment, thus enabling reestablishment of a dune field. Analysis of bathymetry data on monthly/yearly timescales enables a calculation for sand storage in straight- reach portions of the Mississippi River. Distribution and depth of dune troughs, when compared between extreme high- and low-flow events (2-4 y recurrence interval), indicates bed aggradation of nearly 3 m. This vertical flux is equivalent to 3 x 106 tons, or roughly 1/8 of the total estimated annual sand discharge from the Mississippi River. Future studies seek to measure suspended sand concentrations within the water column for a range of river discharge conditions, in both straight segments and bends. These data coupled with bed material transport values will be used to develop conceptual and numerical models that constrain the mechanisms for sand transport and sequestration in large, sand-bed rivers. Furthermore, these mass estimates are of particular importance for coastal restoration efforts within the surrounding Mississippi River wetlands and delta.

  15. Microscopic examination of lignite ash and silica sand agglomerates formed in a 2-inch fluidized bed reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Bobman, M.H.; Ketelle, D.T.; Kalmanovitch, D.P.

    1986-02-01

    Fluidized bed combustion of North Dakota lignite may result in severe agglomeration of ash and bed material; the nature of mineral impurities, operating temperatures, gaseous environment, and bed material composition are significant factors which influence agglomerate formation. Tests were performed in a 18-inch fluid bed combustor (FBC) at UNDERC using a wide range of low-rank coals and various bed materials. More recently, a 2-inch fluidized bed reactor was constructed and operated to evaluate interactions of North Dakota lignite ash and silica sand bed material at typical combustor operating temperatures. Samples of the bed material were prepared in polished thick sections for optical and electron microscopy. Detailed analysis by energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy showed that when sulfur dioxide was present in the gas stream, calcium, sulfur, and silica were present at the boundary between the silica sand particle and its ash coating. The ash coating consisted of discrete fly ash particles in a homogeneous matrix. The photomicrograph below was taken of a cross-section of an agglomerate formed at 1450/sup 0/F when sulfur dioxide was added. The particle diameter is more than twice that of the initial silica sand grain. In contrast, a very thin ash coating resulted when sulfur dioxide was not present in the fluidizing gas, and cemented agglomerates consisting of several sand grains, were not observed. The significance of this work relates to the need for understanding mechanisms by which agglomeration occurs in fluidized bed combustion. Using a small bench-scale system allows for careful control of experimental variables at a reasonable cost. The results of such an experimental program may be used by utility, engineering, and mining firms to assess the potential for serious agglomeration when combusting a fuel with high ash content or ''bad acting'' minerals in a fluidized bed. 2 refs.

  16. Continuous adsorption of Pb(II) and methylene blue by engineered graphite oxide coated sand in fixed-bed column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Ji-Lai; Zhang, Yong-Liang; Jiang, Yan; Zeng, Guang-Ming; Cui, Zhi-Hui; Liu, Ke; Deng, Can-Hui; Niu, Qiu-Ya; Deng, Jiu-Hua; Huan, Shuang-Yan

    2015-03-01

    The mixture of several effluents, caused by the improper handling and management of effluents, generated multi-component wastewater containing both metals and dyes, leading to the complicated treatment process. In this study, a continuous adsorption of Pb(II) and methylene blue (MB) has been studied in single and binary solutions by using graphite oxide coated sand (GO-sand) as an adsorbent in a fixed-bed column. GO-sand was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy before and after analyte adsorption. Compared with sand filter, adsorption quantity and capacity for Pb(II) and MB by GO-sand filter were greatly increased. In Pb(II) and MB single solutions, the experimental parameters were investigated in detail including initial concentration, flow rate, bed depth and pH. Exhaustion time decreased with increasing initial concentration and flow rate, and increased with increasing bed depth and pH. In the Pb(II)-MB binary solution, exhaustion time significantly decreased for Pb(II) adsorption, but increased for MB adsorption. The reason was explained that the more favorable adsorption for MB onto the surface of GO-sand than that for Pb(II), which was derived from ?-? interaction between MB and GO on sand surface in packed filter. The Yoon-Nelson model was applied at different concentration of Pb(II) and MB to predict the breakthrough curves. The experimental data were well fit with the model indicating that it was suitable for this column design.

  17. Validating Experimental Bedform Dynamics on Cohesive Sand-Mud Beds in the Dee Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baas, Jaco H.; Baker, Megan; Hope, Julie; Malarkey, Jonathan; Rocha, Renata

    2014-05-01

    Recent laboratory experiments and field measurements have shown that small quantities of cohesive clay, and in particular 'sticky' biological polymers, within a sandy substrate dramatically reduce the development rate of sedimentary bedforms, with major implications for sediment transport rate calculations and process interpretations from the sedimentary record. FURTHER INFORMATION Flow and sediment transport predictions from sedimentary structures found in modern estuaries and within estuarine geological systems are impeded by an almost complete lack of process-based knowledge of the behaviour of natural sediments that consist of mixtures of cohesionless sand and biologically-active cohesive mud. Indeed, existing predictive models are largely based on non-organic cohesionless sands, despite the fact that mud, in pure form or mixed with sand, is the most common sediment on Earth and also the most biologically active interface across a range of Earth-surface environments, including rivers and shallow seas. The multidisciplinary COHBED project uses state-of-the-art laboratory and field technologies to measure the erosional properties of mixed cohesive sediment beds and the formation and stability of sedimentary bedforms on these beds, integrating the key physical and biological processes that govern bed evolution. The development of current ripples on cohesive mixed sediment beds was investigated as a function of physical control on bed cohesion versus biological control on bed cohesion. These investigations included laboratory flume experiments in the Hydrodynamics Laboratory (Bangor University) and field experiments in the Dee estuary (at West Kirby near Liverpool). The flume experiments showed that winnowing of fine-grained cohesive sediment, including biological stabilisers, is an important process affecting the development rate, size and shape of the cohesive bedforms. The ripples developed progressively slower as the kaolin clay fraction in the sandy substrate bed was increased. The same result was obtained for xanthan gum, which is a proxy for biological polymers produced by microphytobenthos. Yet, the xanthan gum was several orders more effective in slowing down ripple development than kaolin clay, suggesting that the cohesive forces for biological polymers are much higher than for clay minerals, and that sedimentological process models should refocus on biostabilisation processes. The first results of the field experiments show that the winnowing of fines from developing ripples and the slowing down of current ripple development in mixed cohesive sediment is mimicked on intertidal flats in the Dee estuary. In particular, these field data revealed that current ripples in cohesive sediment are smaller with more two-dimensional crestlines than in non-cohesive sand. The wider implications of these findings will be discussed. COHBED Project Team (NERC): Alan Davies (Bangor University); Daniel Parsons, Leiping Ye (University of Hull); Jeffrey Peakall (University of Leeds); Dougal Lichtman, Louise O'Boyle, Peter Thorne (NOC Liverpool); Sarah Bass, Andrew Manning, Robert Schindler (University of Plymouth); Rebecca Aspden, Emma Defew, Julie Hope, David Paterson (University of St Andrews)

  18. Numerical simulation of widening and bed deformation of straight sand-bed rivers. II: Model evaluation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Darby, S.E.; Thorne, C.R.; Simon, A.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper the numerical model presented in the companion paper is tested and applied. Assessment of model accuracy was based on two approaches. First, predictions of evolution of a 13.5 km reach of the South Fork of the Forked Deer River, in west Tennessee, were compared to observations over a 24-yr period. Results suggest that although the model was able to qualitatively predict trends of widening and deepening, quantitative predictions were not reliable. Simulated widths and depths were within 15% of the corresponding observed values, but observed change in these parameters at the study sites were also close to these values. Simulated rates of depth adjustment were within 15% of observed rates, but observed rates of channel widening at the study sites were approximately three times those simulated by the model. In the second approach, the model was used to generate relationships between stable channel width and bank-full discharge. The model was able to successfully replicate the form of empirically derived regime-width equations. Simulations were used to demonstrate the model's ability to obtain more realistic predictions of bed evolution in widening channels.

  19. Biodegradation of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol and associated hydraulic conductivity reduction in sand-bed columns

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Blanca Antizar-Ladislao; Noah I. Galil

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate the long-term hydraulic conductivity changes in sand-bed columns exposed to 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (TCP). Continuous flow laboratory studies were conducted using sand-bed columns (15cm i.d.; 200cm length) at 20±1°C during 365d. The influence of (i) initial loads of 2,4,6-TCP (15, 30, 45 and 60mgkg?1 of 2,4,6-TCP), and (ii) recirculating water velocity (0.09, 0.56 and

  20. Thermal origin of continental red beds in SE China: An experiment study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lianting; Chen, Guoneng; Grapes, Rodney; Peng, Zhuolun

    2015-04-01

    The origin of continental red beds in SE China is the result of high diagenetic temperatures, rather than an arid climate during their deposition. Here we present results from an experimental study where black mud was heated to demonstrate the formation of red beds. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) of heated samples enables determination of the relative proportion of goethite and hematite. Iron in black mud is predominantly in the form of goethite that has an initial dehydration temperature of ca.150 °C. Increasing temperature or prolonged heating time is accompanied by decreasing goethite and organic content, increasing hematite and red colouration. Heat provided to subsiding red bed basins is supplied by cooling of an intracrustal granitic magma layer. The thermal model can explain vertical colour, temperature, redox and mineral zonation in red bed sequences, from red (hematite-bearing), through green-yellow (Cu, Zn, V sulphide mineralization) to grey-black (hydrocarbon, halite-bearing) sediments. The model can also be used to help prospect for hydrocarbon and halite deposits in the SE China red bed basins.

  1. Ecological Responses to Hydrogeomorphic Fluctuations in a Sand Bed Prairie River: River Complexity, Habitat Availability, and Benthic Invertebrates

    E-print Network

    O'Neill, Brian James

    2010-04-02

    Ecological Responses to Hydrogeomorphic Fluctuations in a Sand Bed Prairie River: River Complexity, Habitat Availability, and Benthic Invertebrates By Brian J. O’Neill Submitted to the graduate degree program in Ecology and Evolutionary..., Habitat Availability, and Benthic Invertebrates Committee: _____________________________ Chairperson Date Approved_____________________ 3 Abstract Rivers...

  2. Mathematical model on grain-size distribution in suspension over sand-gravel bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Debasish; Ghoshal, Koeli

    2014-04-01

    In this study, the grain-size distribution in suspension over a sand-gravel bed in an open channel turbulent flow is investigated from theoretical point of view. On the basis of diffusion equation, a model on grain-size distribution is developed incorporating the effect of stratification and hindered settling due to increased suspension concentration. The hydrodynamic diffusion related to particle-particle interaction is considered in the computation of reference level and the influence of incipient motion probability, non-ceasing probability and pick-up probability of the sediment particles are considered in the computation of reference concentration. Due to inclusion of several factors, the proposed model predicts well the grain-size distribution of suspended load when compared with the experimental data and also shows its prediction superiority with respect to other existing models.

  3. Development and design of a fluidized bed/upflow sand filter configuration for use in recirculating aquaculture systems

    SciTech Connect

    Burden, D.G.

    1988-01-01

    A fluidized bed/upflow sand filter configuration, was developed and designed for utilization in recirculating aquaculture system, specifically the soft-shell crab and soft-shell crawfish industries. These filters were selected and designed because of their ability to withstand clogging and still maintain high levels of water quality for aquaculture production. The effectiveness of sand grain size was used to evaluate fluidized bed filter performance with filter loadings ranging from 16 to 1285 pounds of crawfish per cubic foot of filter sand. A coarse sand grain size was recommended as a filter media because of it's ability to shear excessive biofilm growth from the and, thus prohibiting clogging from occurring within the filter bed. The fluidized bed/upflow sand filter combination was evaluated in terms of nitrification and oxygen consumption when used with a recirculating crab shedding system. The filter combination's carrying capacity (700 crabs per cubic foot of sand media) exceeded that observed with the submerged rock filter by more than 20 times and was largely explained by the filter's solids removal ability which significantly reduced the filter's oxygen loading rate (OLR). Nitrification rates with the filter combination were extremely high as total ammonia and nitrite levels remained below 1.0 mg-N/l. Verification of a volumetric loading criteria (150 pounds per cubic foot) for this filter combination was further established with performance data obtained from a commercial soft-shell crawfish facility. Water quality monitoring results indicated that the filters maintained total ammonia and nitrite levels below 1.0 mg-N/l under typical operating conditions. Shock loading, pH control, and over-feeding, rather than filter capacity, dominated water quality fluctuations, thereby indicating that the loading criteria was sufficient for commercial operation.

  4. New England Shellfish Beds Reopen After Toxic Red Algae Recedes

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Annie Schleicher

    This PBS article describes red tide, a phenomenon caused by phytoplankton in coastal waters. The site includes brief summaries of the causes and impacts of red tide, both on health and the tourism industry. A link to a PDF version of the article is provided.

  5. Scaling of Sediment Dynamics in a Reach-Scale Laboratory Model of a Sand-Bed Stream with Riparian Vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorrick, S.; Rodriguez, J. F.

    2011-12-01

    A movable bed physical model was designed in a laboratory flume to simulate both bed and suspended load transport in a mildly sinuous sand-bed stream. Model simulations investigated the impact of different vegetation arrangements along the outer bank to evaluate rehabilitation options. Preserving similitude in the 1:16 laboratory model was very important. In this presentation the scaling approach, as well as the successes and challenges of the strategy are outlined. Firstly a near-bankfull flow event was chosen for laboratory simulation. In nature, bankfull events at the field site deposit new in-channel features but cause only small amounts of bank erosion. Thus the fixed banks in the model were not a drastic simplification. Next, and as in other studies, the flow velocity and turbulence measurements were collected in separate fixed bed experiments. The scaling of flow in these experiments was simply maintained by matching the Froude number and roughness levels. The subsequent movable bed experiments were then conducted under similar hydrodynamic conditions. In nature, the sand-bed stream is fairly typical; in high flows most sediment transport occurs in suspension and migrating dunes cover the bed. To achieve similar dynamics in the model equivalent values of the dimensionless bed shear stress and the particle Reynolds number were important. Close values of the two dimensionless numbers were achieved with lightweight sediments (R=0.3) including coal and apricot pips with a particle size distribution similar to that of the field site. Overall the moveable bed experiments were able to replicate the dominant sediment dynamics present in the stream during a bankfull flow and yielded relevant information for the analysis of the effects of riparian vegetation. There was a potential conflict in the strategy, in that grain roughness was exaggerated with respect to nature. The advantage of this strategy is that although grain roughness is exaggerated, the similarity of bedforms and resulting drag can return similar levels of roughness to those in the field site.

  6. SIGNIFICANCE OF DIGGING BEHAVIOR TO MORTALITY OF RED IMPORTED FIRE ANT WORKERS, SOLENOPSIS INVICTA BUREN, IN FIPRONIL TREATED SAND

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of fipronil treated sand on digging behavior and mortalities of red imported fire ant workers, Solenopsis invicta Buren, was examined in the laboratory. No-choice digging bioassays where fipronil treated sand was the only available digging substrate, were conducted on two colonies at fip...

  7. Upper Cretaceous oceanic red beds (CORBs) in the Tethys: occurrences, lithofacies, age, and environments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiumian Hu; Luba Jansa; Chengshan Wang; Massimo Sarti; Krzysztof Bak; Michael Wagreich; Jozef Michalik; Ján Soták

    2005-01-01

    A major change in oceanic sedimentation from mid-Cretaceous organic carbon-enriched deep-sea deposits to predominantly Upper Cretaceous oceanic red beds (CORBs), represented mainly by deep-sea red shales and marls, occurred during the Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary in the Tethys. A variety of earth processes such as organic carbon draw-down, tectonic, palaeoceanographic, eustatic and palaeoclimatic changes, or a combination of these

  8. [Ectoparasites. Part 2: Bed bugs, Demodex, sand fleas and cutaneous larva migrans].

    PubMed

    Nenoff, P; Handrick, W; Krüger, C; Herrmann, J; Schmoranzer, B; Paasch, U

    2009-09-01

    Ectoparasites or epidermal parasites include a very heterogenous group of infections of the outer layers of the skin. Worldwide the most common are scabies, lice, tungiasis, and hookworm-induced cutaneous larva migrans. In recent years, bed bug infestations in hotels or vacation homes seem to have become more frequent. Demodex folliculorum and Demodex brevis are found in the facial and scalp hair follicles in 95% of individuals. Classic Demodex folliculitis is often overlooked in differential diagnostic considerations. This inflammatory sebaceous gland disease as well as Demodex blepharitis both provide a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Permethrin can be used topically against demodicosis. Vacationers who go barefoot on beaches in tropical Africa, South America and subtropical Asia risk infestations from female sand fleas. The lesions can be curetted or removed with a punch biopsy, then treated with antiseptics or even systemic antibiotics if a secondary infection develops. Cutaneous larva migrans is one of the most common imported ectoparasite infections from the tropics. Topical treatment measures include thiabendazole or cryotherapy. If the infestation is severe, systemic antihelminthics or ivermectin can be employed. PMID:19701614

  9. Rock-magnetic properties of multicomponent natural remanent magnetization in alluvial red beds (NE Spain)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pauline P. Kruiver; Cor G. Langereis; Mark J. Dekkers; Wout Krijgsman

    2003-01-01

    An earlier study of the cyclic Miocene red bed sequence of La Gloria (Spain) by Krijgsman et al. indicated complicated behaviour of the natural remanent magnetization (NRM) in parts of the section, particularly close to reversal boundaries. We resampled part of the section with high resolution and used extensive rock-magnetic analyses to characterize the magnetic remanence carriers. Below a conspicuous

  10. The mobility and distribution of heavy metals during the formation of first cycle red beds.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zielinski, R.A.; Bloch, S.; Walker, T.R.

    1983-01-01

    Analysis of the heavy metal content in a Holocene-Pliocene red bed sequence near San Felipe in N Baja California, Mexico, has yielded new information on the mobility and distribution of these metals during ageing of iron oxyhydroxides from the amorphous to the crystalline state. Whole-rock samples (27) and a series of successive leachates were analysed for V, Al, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn by ICP spectrometry and for U by a delayed neutron technique. These data are supported by a variety of other mineralogical and petrographical observations. The results indicate that the metal content of the samples is predominantly inherited from the constituent detrital minerals. Reddening of the whole-rock samples does not promote major open-system migration of the heavy metals; rather, contained metals redistribute themselves on an intergranular scale, moving from detrital mineral hosts to the secondary iron oxides. The amount of secondary iron oxides and the fraction of whole-rock metals associated with these oxides increase during red-bed development. In addition, the abundance of well- crystallized iron oxides increases during this period. Differences in the leaching efficiency for various metals are related to differences in metal site distribution and intergranular permeability. Inferred conditions for rapid vs limited removal of metals from red beds are summarized. It is suggested that developed red beds which are well flushed by suitable pore fluids may be sources of significant quantities of heavy metals. -J.E.S.

  11. High Resolution, Millennial-Scale Patterns of Bed Compensation on a Sand-Rich Submarine Lobe, Western Niger Delta Slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jobe, Z. R.

    2014-12-01

    Existing facies models of submarine lobes suggest a thick, sand-rich proximal and axial part and thin, muddy distal and lateral fringes. This model was developed from observations in many areas where turbidity flows encounter a decrease in slope and collapse, depositing sand proximally and mud distally. This facies model is commonly used to explain stacking patterns encountered in outcrops and wellbores as well as to build reservoir models of lobe deposits. A submarine lobe on the modern seafloor of the western Niger Delta slope imaged with three-dimensional seismic data and sampled with 28 piston cores suggests that the traditional lobe facies model is not applicable. Fed by a single channel, the roughly symmetrical (9 km x 8 km) sand body occurs on a low gradient 'step' on the slope. The feeder channel ends abruptly at the apex of the lobe as the gradient decreases, and the lobe is not channelized. Seismic amplitudes are high across the lobe, and piston cores validate that these amplitudes correspond to sand. There is no significant change in sand percentage across the lobe, either parallel to or across flow direction. Bed thickness and grain size data do not show a decreasing trend downdip or laterally from the feeder channel. Radiocarbon age dating demonstrates bed-scale compensation across the lobe, with progressively younger turbidite sand beds stepping from north to south during a 2,000 year time interval (15,000-13,000 years before present) before lobe abandonment at 12,000 years before present. This progressive compensation, however, does not result in any facies change or any channelization on the lobe. At the downdip edge of the lobe, steeper gradients led to the development of a knickpoint and associated channel that continues downslope. The even sand distribution, lack of channelization, and downdip knickpoint suggest that the depositing turbidity flows must have been much larger than the accommodation, leading to sand deposition across the entire lobe and significant bypass downslope. The facies patterns seen in this lobe indicates that existing facies models for lobes are not ubiquitously valid and should be applied with caution, particularly in topographically complex settings and areas where flows are suspected to be large relative to the size of the receiving accommodation.

  12. Palaeogeography of Late Triassic red-beds in Singapore and the Indosinian Orogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, Grahame; Prave, Anthony

    2013-10-01

    A red-bed facies of the Upper Triassic Jurong Formation has been logged on Sentosa Island, Singapore. An overall coarsening and thickening-upward pattern is well developed. The lower part of the section is dominated by purple-red, massive to finely laminated illite-smectite-kaolin-rich mudstones containing thin, discontinuous lenses of fine sandstone marked by low-angle lamination and small ripples. One dinosaur-like foot print has been discovered in a loose block of red mudstone. It is concluded that this is a lacustrine sequence and it is proposed to name the lake, Lake Sentosa. The upper part of the sequence consists of flat-laminated to trough cross-bedded medium-grained sandstone and granule to cobble conglomerates alternating with purple-red mudstone. The mudstone-sandstone packages are arranged in decametre-scale coarsening-upward cycles. The channelling and decimetre-scale cross-bedding characterising the sandstone and conglomeratic beds is evidence for deposition by flashy fluvial flood processes, possibly feeding into the lake as a fresh water delta. One possible dinosaur trackway in granule size conglomerate has been located. Detrital zircon U-Pb ages vary from 2.7 Ba to 209 Ma with significant populations at ˜245 Ma and 220 Ma. These ages throw light on the timing of the Indosinian Orogeny. The molasse red-beds of the Jurong Formation were deposited in a half graben formed in the hangingwall of the Bukit Timah Fault when central Peninsular Malaysia went into extension following the climax of the Indosinian Orogeny in the Late Triassic.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of black, red and yellow nanoparticles pigments from the iron sand

    SciTech Connect

    Mufti, Nandang, E-mail: nandangmufti@gmail.com; Atma, T., E-mail: nandangmufti@gmail.com; Fuad, A., E-mail: nandangmufti@gmail.com [Department of Physics, University of Malang, Jl Semarang-65145, Malang (Indonesia); Sutadji, E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Malang, Jl Semarang-65145, Malang (Indonesia)

    2014-09-25

    The aim of this research is to synthesize nanoparticles of black pigment of Magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}), red pigment of hematite (?-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}), and yellow pigment of ghoetite (?-FeOOH) from the iron sand. The black pigment of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and the yellow pigment ?-FeOOH nanoparticles were synthesized by coprecipitation method with variation of pH. Whereas, the red pigment Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} was synthesized by sintering Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles at temperature between 400 °C and 700 7°C for 1 hour. All the pigments has been characterized using X-ray diffraction and SEM. The XRD results shown that the particle size of the black pigmen Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, red pigment Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and yellow pigment ?-FeOOH are around 12, 32, and 30 nm respectively. The particle size of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles increase by increasing sintering temperature from 32 nm at 400 °C to 39 nm at 700 °C. For yellow pigment of ?-FeOOH, the particle size increase by increasing pH from 30,54 nm at pH 4 to 48,60 nm at pH 7. The SEM results shown that the morphologies of black, yellow and red pigments are aglomarated.

  14. Application of CFD modeling to hydrodynamics of CycloBio fluidized sand bed in recirculating aquaculture systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yao; Song, Xiefa; Liang, Zhenlin; Peng, Lei

    2013-11-01

    To improve the efficiency of a CycloBio fluidized sand bed (CB FSB) in removal of dissolved wastes in recirculating aquaculture systems, the hydrodynamics of solid-liquid flow was investigated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling tools. The dynamic characteristics of silica sand within the CB FSB were determined using three-dimensional, unsteady-state simulations with the granular Eulerian multiphase approach and the RNG k-? turbulence model, and the simulation results were validated using available lab-scale measurements. The bed expansion of CB FSB increased with the increase in water inflow rate in numerical simulations. Upon validation, the simulation involving 0.55 mm particles, the Gidaspow correlation for drag coefficient model and the Syamlal-O'Brien correlation for kinetic granular viscosity showed the closest match to the experimental results. The volume fraction of numerical simulations peaked as the wall was approached. The hydrodynamics of a pilot-scale CB FSB was simulated in order to predict the range of water flow to avoid the silica sand overflowing. The numerical simulations were in agreement with the experimental results qualitatively and quantitatively, and thus can be used to study the hydrodynamics of solid-liquid multiphase flow in CB FSB, which is of importance to the design, optimization, and amplification of CB FSBs.

  15. Development of an inclined liquid fluidized bed for tar sand processing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Johnson; L. A. Jr

    1989-01-01

    An inclined liquid fluidized-bed reactor (ILFBR) system has been developed and successfully operated for 24 hours. Modifications to the previously tested ILFBR systems include incorporation of a oil fluidizing zone in the front of the fluid bed, an increase in the angle of the fluid bed to -12° (the minus sign shows that the discharges is below the horizontal level

  16. Pedogenic slickensides, indicators of strain and deformation processes in red bed sequences of the Appalachian foreland

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. B. Gray; R. P. Nickelsen

    1989-01-01

    Pedogenic slickensides are convex-concave slip surfaces that form during expansion\\/contraction in expansive clay soils such as Vertisols. In the central Appalachians, they occur near the tops of fining-upward cycles in Paleozoic red beds such as the Bloomsburg, Catskill, and Mauch Chunk Formations. Pedogenic slickensides are found in association with other pedogenic (or paleosol) features such as clay-skinned peds, in situ

  17. Cretaceous oceanic red beds (CORBs): Different time scales and models of origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiumian; Scott, Robert W.; Cai, Yuanfeng; Wang, Chengshan; Melinte-Dobrinescu, Mihaela C.

    2012-12-01

    The Cretaceous oceanic red bed (CORB) is a newly opened window on global oceanic and climate changes during the Cretaceous greenhouse world. As a result of the International Geoscience Programmes 463, 494 and 555 (2002-2010), CORBs have been documented in many places by numerous publications. The principle goal of this paper is to summarize scientific advances on CORBs including chronostratigraphy, sedimentology, mineralogy, elemental and isotopic geochemistry, and their relationship to oceanic anoxic events (OAEs), palaeoclimate and palaeoceanography. We propose a new geochemical classification of the CORBs using CaO, Al2O3 and SiO2 values, which lithologically refer to marly, clayey, and cherty CORBs respectively. Detailed mineralogical studies indicate that hematite, goethite and Mn2 +-bearing calcite are the minerals imparting the red color of CORBs. Hematite clusters of several to tens of nanometers in the calcite structure are the main cause of the red coloring of limestones, and the Mn2 +-bearing calcite gives additional red color. Goethite was thought to form originally with hematite, and was subsequently transformed to hematite during late diagenesis. Chronostratigraphic data allow the distinction of two groups of CORBs by their durations. Short-term CORBs are generally less than 1 myr in duration, and seem to be on the scale of Milankovitch cycles. During the deposition of Cretaceous reddish intervals from ODP cores 1049 and 1050, low primary productivity and relatively high surface temperature resulted in low organic carbon flux into the sediments which reduced oxygen demand and produced oxidizing early diagenetic conditions. In such an oxic environment, iron oxides formed imparting the reddish color. The long-term CORBs' depositional events lasted longer than 4 myr, and may be a possible consequence of the OAEs. Enhanced amounts of organic carbon and pyrite burial during and after the OAEs would have resulted in a large and abrupt fall in atmospheric CO2 concentration, which probably induced significant global climatic cooling during and after the OAEs. Global cooling would have enhanced formation of cold deep water, increasing its oxidizing capacity due to the greater content of dissolved oxygen and would promote formation of oceanic red beds. Sedimentological, mineralogical and geochemical data indicate that CORBs were deposited under highly oxic, oligotrophic conditions probably at a low sedimentation rate. The Cretaceous red and white limestones from Italy have similar compositions of terrestrial input-sensitive elements (Al, Ti, K, Mg, Rb, Zr), higher contents of Fe2O3, and depleted redox-sensitive elements (V, Cr, Ni, and U) and micronutrient elements Cu, Zn, indicating similar provenance sources but red limestones were deposited under more oxic conditions at the sediment-water interface than white limestones. The Cretaceous red shales such as those from the North Atlantic and Tibet have similar mineralogy and geochemistry as the Late Cenozoic red clays in the Pacific Ocean and the environment where both are formed was well-oxidizing at a very low sedimentation rate. We compiled seventeen published stratigraphic examples of Phanerozoic oceanic red beds including the Late Cenozoic red clays in the Pacific. Different hypotheses explain the origin of red pigmentation of limestones and shales including (1) detrital origin of iron derived from continental weathering; (2)iron-bacterial mediation at the time of sedimentation; and (3) iron oxidation in oligotrophic, highly oxic environment. Additional research on Phanerozoic oceanic red beds is needed in order to better document their origin and palaeoceanographic and palaeoclimatic significance.

  18. Cretaceous black shale and the oceanic red beds: Process and mechanisms of oceanic anoxic events and oxic environment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhenguo Zhang; Nianqiao Fang; Lianfeng Gao; Baoling Gui; Muhua Cui

    2008-01-01

    The Cretaceous is an important period in which many geological events occurred, especially the OAEs (oceanic anoxic events)\\u000a which are characterized by black shale, and the oxic process characterized by CORBs (Cretaceous oceanic red beds). In this\\u000a paper, the causative mechanism behind the formation of black shale and the oceanic red beds are described in detail. This\\u000a may explain how

  19. Granulation of Fe–Al–Ce nano-adsorbent for fluoride removal from drinking water by spray coating on sand in a fluidized bed

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lin Chen; Hai-Xia Wu; Ting-Jie Wang; Yong Jin; Yu Zhang; Xiao-Min Dou

    2009-01-01

    A technology for the granulation of Fe–Al–Ce nano-adsorbent (Fe–Al–Ce) in a fluidized bed was developed. The coating reagent, a mixture of Fe–Al–Ce and a polymer latex, was sprayed onto sand in a fluidized bed. The granule morphology, coating layer thickness, granule stability in water and adsorption capacity for fluoride was investigated by analyzing samples for different coating time. The coating

  20. The Relation of Variability in Sand Bed Topography to Sediment Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McElroy, B.; Mohrig, D.

    2006-05-01

    The estimation of bed material flux by comparing successive bathymetric surveys was developed under a deterministic light. However, an analogous stochastic treatment can be straightforwardly cast as an extension to the original bedload equation. Instead of an analysis that presumes a regular, geometrically defined bed topography, this accepts the natural noisiness of sandy systems and uses it to explicitly calculate sediment flux. Further, the sediment flux can be treated as the sum of 2 components, a translative flux and a deformative flux. The terminology for these two parts is explicitly related to their relative impacts on the bed. Because the translational part is exactly the same as the original, deterministic model, it estimates only the flux that advects the bed topography. In contrast, the deformational part encompasses all of the remaining bed material flux, the component that serves to change the shape or arrangement of the bed topography. Also, the deformative flux is constant of integration obtained a from manipulation of Exner's equation into average flux; this has been assumed null since the inception of the bedload equation. Analysis of data from the N. Loup River, Nebraska, show that the ratio of deformative to translative fluxes is constant over relevant timescales. The consequences of this are twofold. First, the amount of deformation can be directly calculated and the associated estimates of moved sediment volume are valid as the bed translates many characteristic lengths. In this case the Qtotal=1.8*Qtranslative. Second, it suggests that the fraction of deformation can be explicitly related to the characteristic length of beds. If true, it would greatly improve estimates of flux for all sandy systems and not just those for which extensive amounts of data have been collected.

  1. Life Cycle Impacts of Flexible-fiber Deep-bed Filter Compared to Sand-Filter including Coagulation and Sedimentation in Water Treatment Plant

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Soo-gap Uh; Ji-won Kim; Kiback Han; Changwon Kim

    Recently a new technology called the flexible-fiber deep-bed filter (FDF) claimed to replace the conventional sand filter including coagulation and sedimentation filter (CSF) processes in the water treatment plant. Therefore the life cycle assessment (LCA) approach was applied for evalua- ting the life cycle impacts of FDF compared with those of CSF. The used LCA softwares were the Simapro 6

  2. The importance of mangroves, mud and sand flats, and seagrass beds as feeding areas for juvenile fishes in Chwaka Bay, Zanzibar : gut content and stable isotope analyses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. R. Lugendo; I. Nagelkerken; G. van der Velde; Y. D. Mgaya

    2006-01-01

    The relative importance of bay habitats, consisting of mangrove creeks and channel, seagrass beds, and mud and sand flats, as feeding grounds for a number of fish species was studied in Chwaka Bay, Zanzibar, Tanzania, using gut content analysis and stable isotope analysis of carbon and nitrogen. Gut content analysis revealed that within fish species almost the same food items

  3. Stream power criterion and design of sand bed channels at incipient motion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Achanta Ramakrishna Rao; Gopu Sreenivasulu

    2009-01-01

    The critical stream power criterion may be used to describe the incipient motion of cohesionless particles of plane sediment beds. The governing equation relating “critical stream power” to “shear Reynolds number” is developed by using the present experimental data as well as the data from several other sources. Simultaneously, a resistance equation, relating the “particle Reynolds number to the “shear

  4. Effect of accelerating and decelerating flows on incipient motion in sand bed streams

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Adel Emadzadeh; Yee Meng Chiew; Hossein Afzalimehr

    2010-01-01

    The effect of flow acceleration and deceleration on velocity, von Kármán constant, Reynolds and normal stress distributions under incipient motion were experimentally investigated in this study using eight positive and negative bed slopes (±0.7%, ±0.9%, ±1.25% and ±1.5%) and three uniform sediments with median grain sizes d50=1.8, 1.3 and 0.8mm. By using an Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV), the instantaneous velocities

  5. Pedogenic slickensides, indicators of strain and deformation processes in red bed sequences of the Appalachian foreland

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, M.B. (Univ. or Rochester, NY (USA)); Nickelsen, R.P. (Bucknell Univ., Lewisburg, PA (USA))

    1989-01-01

    Pedogenic slickensides are convex-concave slip surfaces that form during expansion/contraction in expansive clay soils such as Vertisols. In the central Appalachians, they occur near the tops of fining-upward cycles in Paleozoic red beds such as the Bloomsburg, Catskill, and Mauch Chunk Formations. Pedogenic slickensides are found in association with other pedogenic (or paleosol) features such as clay-skinned peds, in situ calcareous nodules, and root impressions. Repeated movements along these shear planes during pedogenesis produce strongly aligned clay particles adjacent to pedogenic slickensides; as a result, they are preserved as discrete fractures throughout diagenesis, compaction, and superimposed tectonic deformation. During whole-rock deformation, pedogenic slickensides segregate penetratively deformed rocks into independent, foliate packets and serve as discontinuities that are followed by later structural features. Because the original morphology of pedogenic slickensides is known, they can be used as crude strain markers.

  6. Detection and Population Estimation for Small-Bodied Fishes in a Sand-Bed River

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ann M. Widmer; Laura L. Burckhardt; Jon W. Kehmeier; Eric J. Gonzales; C. Nicolas Medley; Richard A. Valdez

    2010-01-01

    Multiple-pass removal by use of small-mesh seines within enclosed areas was performed to estimate numbers of nine small-bodied fish species at 17 sites in the Pecos River, New Mexico, during October 2007. Site-level population estimates were most precise for age-0 red shiners Cyprinella lutrensis (coefficient of variation [CV, calculated as SE\\/mean] = 0.02–0.06) and least precise for age-1 and older

  7. Technical note: whole-pen assessments of nutrient excretion and digestibility from dairy replacement heifers housed in sand-bedded freestalls.

    PubMed

    Coblentz, W K; Hoffman, P C; Esser, N M; Bertram, M G

    2013-10-01

    Our objectives were to describe and test refined procedures for quantifying excreta produced from whole pens of dairy heifers. Previous research efforts attempting to make whole-pen measurements of excreta output have been complicated by the use of organic bedding, which requires cumbersome analytical techniques to quantify excreta apart from the bedding. Research pens equipped with sand-bedded freestalls offer a unique opportunity for refinement of whole-pen fecal collection methods, primarily because sand-bedded freestall systems contain no organic bedding; therefore, concentrations of ash within the manure, sand, and feces can be used to correct for contamination of manure by sand bedding. This study was conducted on a subset of heifers from a larger production-scale feeding trial evaluating ensiled eastern gamagrass [Tripsacum dactyloides (L.) L.] haylage (EGG) that was incorporated into a corn silage/alfalfa haylage-based blended diet at rates of 0, 9.1, 18.3, or 27.4% of total DM. The diet without EGG also was offered on a limit-fed basis. Eighty Holstein dairy heifers were blocked (heavy weight, 424 ± 15.9 kg; light weight, 324 ± 22.4 kg) and then assigned to 10 individual pens containing 8 heifers/pen. One pen per block was assigned to each of the 5 research diets, and whole-pen fecal collections were conducted twice for each pen. Grab fecal samples also were gathered from individual heifers within each pen, and subsequent analysis of these whole-pen composites allowed reasonable estimates of OM and NDF excreta output. Under the conditions of our experimental design, pooled SEM for the excreta DM, OM, NDF, and NDF (ash corrected) output were 0.113, 0.085, 0.093, and 0.075 kg·heifer(-1)·d(-1), respectively. For DM excretion, this represented about one-third of the SEM reported for previous whole-pen collections from bedded-pack housing systems. Subsequent calculations of apparent DM and OM digestibilities indicated that the technique was sensitive, and linear trends (P ? 0.027) associated with the inclusion rates of EGG within the diet were detected. This technique allows estimation of apparent diet digestibilities on multiple animals simultaneously, thereby mitigating the need for isolating individual animals to obtain digestibility coefficients. The approach appears viable but requires hand labor for collections of multiple pens and thorough mixing of large volumes of manure as well as analytical corrections for sand ingested by lounging heifers. PMID:23965394

  8. Microscopic examination of lignite ash and silica sand agglomerates formed in a 2-inch fluidized bed reactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. H. Bobman; D. T. Ketelle; D. P. Kalmanovitch

    1986-01-01

    Fluidized bed combustion of North Dakota lignite may result in severe agglomeration of ash and bed material; the nature of mineral impurities, operating temperatures, gaseous environment, and bed material composition are significant factors which influence agglomerate formation. Tests were performed in a 18-inch fluid bed combustor (FBC) at UNDERC using a wide range of low-rank coals and various bed materials.

  9. Treatment of oil sands process-affected water using moving bed biofilm reactors: With and without ozone pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yijing; Huang, Chunkai; Rocha, Ketley Costa; El-Din, Mohamed Gamal; Liu, Yang

    2015-09-01

    Two moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBRs) were operated to treat raw (untreated) and 30mg/L ozone-treated oil sands process-affected water (OSPW). After 210days, the MBBR process showed 18.3% of acid-extractable fraction (AEF) and 34.8% of naphthenic acids (NAs) removal, while the ozonation combined MBBR process showed higher removal of AEF (41.0%) and NAs (78.8%). Biodegradation of raw and ozone treated OSPW showed similar performance. UPLC/HRMS analysis showed a highest NAs removal efficiency with a carbon number of 14 and a -Z number of 4. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) showed thicker biofilms in the raw OSPW MBBR (97±5?m) than in the ozonated OSPW MBBR (71±12?m). Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR) results showed higher abundance of gene copies of total bacteria and nitrogen removal relevant bacteria in the ozonated OSPW MBBR, but no significant difference was found. MiSeq sequencing showed Proteobacteria, Nitrospirae, and Acidobacteria were dominant. PMID:26038326

  10. Strength and failure characteristics of Jurassic Red-Bed sandstone under cyclic wetting-drying conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhenhua; Jiang, Qinghui; Zhou, Chuangbing; Liu, Xinting

    2014-08-01

    Due to cyclic fluctuations of reservoir water levels, bank slopes in drawdown areas are subjected to wetting-drying cycles. In order to reasonably evaluate the stabilities of sandstone slopes in the drawdown area of the Three Gorges Reservoir, it is a primary premise to obtain the strength and failure characteristics of the sandstones undergoing wetting-drying cycles. In this paper, the conventional triaxial compression tests, ultrasonic velocity and porosity measurements and microstructural observations were conducted on Jurassic Red-Bed sandstone (JRS) specimens undergoing wetting-drying cycles. The results from the triaxial experiments indicate that the peak strengths of the JRS are dramatically reduced after the first wetting-drying cycle, and then remain approximately constant with increasing number of wetting-drying cycles. The failure modes of the JRS samples undergoing different wetting-drying cycles are all brittle failures under low confining pressures ( ? 15 MPa). The decrease in P-wave velocity and increase in porosity with increasing number of wetting-drying cycles reveals the raise of damage level of the sandstone specimens, which is the main reason for the decline of peak strength. Detailed microstructural analysis has shown obvious argillization phenomena after undergoing wetting-drying cycles, which weakens the cements between grains in the sandstone and increases the damage of the sandstone.

  11. The Tayiba Red Beds: Transitional marine-continental deposits in the precursor Suez Rift, Sinai, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refaat, A. A.; Imam, M. M.

    1999-04-01

    The Tayiba Red Beds, exposed in the Abu Zenima area, west-central Sinai, have been intensively studied for their clay mineralogy and charophytes assemblages. Three surface sections exposed at Wadi El-Tayiba and Wadi Nukhul were studied. The Tayiba Formation uncomformably overlies the Middle Eocene Khaboba Formation at Wadi Nukhul and the Late Eocene Tanka Formation at Wadi El-Tayiba and commonly underlies the Early Miocene Nukhul Formation with unconformable relationships. The Tayiba Formation at Wadi Nukhul consists predominantly of continental coarse clastic sediments represented by polymictic conglomerates, alternating with red to pinkish mudstone, ferruginous sandstone and varicoloured mottled siltstone with plant remains. At Wadi El-Tayiba, the Tayiba Formation is represented by marine, yellow mudstone and red siltstone, alternating with greyish and reddish-yellow argillaceous to sandy limestone, highly fossiliferous with reworked Nummulites spp. and molluscan shell fragments. The mineralogical composition of the studied clay size fraction showed that most samples are dominated by illite, together with smectite, kaolinite and illite/smectite mixed layers. The relative proportion of these constituents shows wide variation. Smectite is more abundant than other constituents at Wadi El-Tayiba. The high content of smectite is usually accompanied by a terrigenous influx in the form of kaolinite and illite, reflecting deposition in an inner neritic shallow marine environment. The sediments of Wadi Nukhul are characterised by an appreciable proportion of illite, together with an illite/smectite mixed layer and minor amounts of kaolinite, suggesting deposition in fluviatile environments. The detailed investigation of charophytes (green algae) in the investigated sections showed that Wadi El-Tayiba is nearly barren of these microflorae, except for some benthic foraminifera from a shallow marine environment. In contrast, Wadi Nukhul yielded a high frequency and great diversity of charophytes, where 15 species have been identified, described and illustrated for the first time. The utilisation of the ranges of these species allowed the subdivision of the section into three charophyte zones, which are correlated with other zones recorded in Europe, as well as the standard mammal levels in the world. These biozones strongly assign the Tayiba Formation to the Late Eocene to Late Oligocene (Late Priabonian to Chattian). A depositional model was suggested for the Tayiba Formation in west-central Sinai.

  12. THE POTENTIAL OF SELECTED BEDDING MATERIALS FOR VERMICOMPOSTING WITH RED WIGGLER WORMS EISENIA FETIDA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nordin Bin Mamat

    Laboratory experiments were performed to determine the composting potential of Eisenia fetida over a period of 70 using different substrates as bedding materials. The study indicates that oil palm leaves, acacia leaves, newspaper and sawdust showed different potentials as bedding materials for vermicomposting. However, proper initial preparation of the bedding material is critical to ensure efficient vermicomposting where precomposting of

  13. Sand particle dislodgement in windblown sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, Tian-Li; Li, Zheng; Zheng, Xiao-Jing

    2014-12-01

    The incipient motion of sand particle from sand bed plays a very important role in the prediction of windblown sand. In this paper, we proposed a new method for predicting the incipient motion of sand particle based on wind speed fluctuation as follows, when the wind speed is larger than the critical wind speed, if the total impulse on sand particle is larger than the critical impulse, incipient motion of sand particle would take place, otherwise if not. Furthermore, from the analysis of entrainment in the rolling and lifting modes, we come to the following conclusion. When the average wind speed is smaller than the critical wind speed, if the average wind speed is used to judge the incipient motion of sand particle, one will underestimate the number of sand particles jumping from the bed, if the instantaneous wind speed is used to judge incipient motion of sand particle, one will overestimate the number of sand particles jumping from the bed; When the average wind speed is larger than the critical wind speed, either the average or the instantaneous wind speeds is used to judge the incipient motion of sand particles, one will overestimate the number of sand particles jumping from the bed.

  14. Characteristics of turbulent unidirectional flow over rough beds: Double-averaging perspective with particular focus on sand dunes and gravel beds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. R. McLean; V. I. Nikora

    2006-01-01

    We address some unsolved methodological issues in modeling of natural rough-bed flows by critically examining existing approaches that parameterize rough-bed flows. These often utilize loosely defined variables. Here we suggest that double-averaging (in time and in a volume occupying a thin slab in a plane parallel to the mean bed) provides a rigorous, straightforward alternative that can aid in the

  15. Tight Abo gas sands, east-central New Mexico

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Broadhead

    1983-01-01

    Red-bed sandstones of the Abo Formation (Lower Permian) currently produce natural gas from the Pecos Slope Abo field in northern Chaves County, New Mexico. The Pecos Slope Abo field is on the northwest shelf of the Permian basin. The tight-sand designation greatly stimulated drilling and over 250 wells have been drilled since field discovery in 1977. Because of low permeability,

  16. Differences Among Fish Assemblages Associated with Nearshore Posidonia oceanica Seagrass Beds, Rocky algal Reefs and Unvegetated Sand Habitats in the Adriatic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidetti, P.

    2000-04-01

    Fish assemblages associated with nearshore Posidonia oceanica seagrass beds, rocky-algal reefs and unvegetated sandy substrates were studied at two sampling localities, Otranto (Apulian coast) and S. Domino (Tremiti Islands), located in the Southern and Central Adriatic Seas (Mediterranean Sea), respectively. Data were collected in situ by using non-destructive diver visual census methodology. A higher species richness and fish density were observed over the Posidonia seagrass and, in turn, the rocky-algal reef and unvegetated sand habitats. Planktivorous fish species ( Spicara maena, Spicara smaris and Chromis chromis) showing patchy distributions were dominant in terms of abundance at both localities. The two former species did not show any particular habitat preference, while C. chromis was common over both the Posidonia and rocky-algal habitats and was only occasionally recorded over sand. Symphodus ocellatus , Diplodus annularis and Spondyliosoma cantharus were the most common species in the P. oceanica seagrass beds. Symphodus roissali, Symphodus tinca and Diplodus sargus were mainly associated with the rocky-algal reef habitats, while other species, such as Gymnammodytes cicerellus, Lithognathus mormyrus , Gobius geniporus, Mullus barbatus and Uranoscopus scaber, were censused over the unvegetated sand habitats. A cluster analysis performed on the entire fish density data set showed distinct groupings for seagrass, rocky-algal and bare sand fish assemblages, regardless of season and sampling site. Fish assemblages in the more structured (seagrass and rocky-algal reef) habitats were relatively similar to each other but quite different from those of the unstructured bare sands. With regard to small-sized specimens (juvenile stages including recruits), those of S. ocellatus, Symphodus mediterraneus, Serranus cabrilla, D. annularis, S. cantharus and Sarpa salpa were mainly censused over P. oceanica beds, while juveniles of C. chromis inhabited predominantly rocky-algal bottoms rich in crevices. Small individuals of Coris julis were censused over both P. oceanica and rocky-algal habitats. No juveniles of any species were observed over bare sand. These results suggest that differences in fish species richness and abundance are primarily related to habitat structure. Different habitat preferences were evidenced for the juveniles and adults of several fish species. The ecological importance and need for protection of such shallow inshore habitats are discussed in relation to their crucial role as nurseries for many fish species, and their overall importance in maintaining littoral fish populations and species diversity is emphasized.

  17. Mediative adjustment of river dynamics: The role of chute channels in tropical sand-bed meandering rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenfell, M. C.; Nicholas, A. P.; Aalto, R.

    2014-03-01

    This paper examines processes of chute channel formation in four tropical sand-bed meandering rivers; the Strickland and Ok Tedi in Papua New Guinea, the Beni in Bolivia, and the lower Paraguay on the Paraguay/Argentina border. Empirical planform analyses highlight an association between meander bend widening and chute initiation that is consistent with recent physics-based modelling work. GIS analyses indicate that bend widening may be driven by a variety of mechanisms, including scour and cutbank bench formation at sharply-curving bends, point bar erosion due to cutbank impingement against cohesive terrace material, rapid cutbank erosion at rapidly extending bends, and spontaneous mid-channel bar formation. Chute channel initiation is observed to be predominantly associated with two of these widening mechanisms; i) an imbalance between cutbank erosion and point bar deposition associated with rapid bend extension, and ii) bank erosion forced by spontaneous mid-channel bar development. The work extends previous empirical analyses, which highlighted the role of bend extension (elongation) in driving chute initiation, with the observation that the frequency of chute initiation increases once bend extension rates and/or widening ratios exceed a reach-scale threshold. A temporal pattern of increased chute initiation frequency on the Ok Tedi, in response to channel steepening and mid-channel bar development following the addition of mine tailings, mirrors the inter- and intra-reach spatial patterns of chute initiation frequency on the Paraguay, Strickland and Beni Rivers, where increased stream power and sediment load are associated with increased bend extension and chute initiation rates. The process of chute formation is shown to be rate-dependent, and the threshold values of bend extension and widening ratio for chute initiation are shown to scale with measures of river energy, reminiscent of slope-ratio thresholds in river avulsion. Furthermore, Delft3D simulations suggest that chute formation can exert negative feedback on shear stress and bank erosion in the adjacent mainstem bifurcate, such that the process of chute formation may also be rate-limiting. Chute formation is activated iteratively in space and time in response to changes in river energy (and sediment load), predominantly affecting sites of rapid channel elongation, and thereby mediating the river response.

  18. Diagenetic crystallization and oxidation of siderite in red bed (Buntsandstein) sediments from the Central Iberian Chain, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stel, Harry

    2009-01-01

    Compactional deformation facilitated replacement of dolomite and calcite by siderite and its subsequent oxidation in carbonate cemented red beds of the Triassic Buntsandstein in the Iberian Chain. Locally, the sedimentary clasts were cemented by carbonate that was derived from dissolution of locally exposed dolomite in the basement. Microstructures indicate that during sedimentation of the rocks, oxidizing conditions prevailed in the sediments and the basement was reddened by impregnation of hematite. Reducing conditions prevailed during deformation of the sediments. Ferric iron was reduced to Fe 2+, that reacted with deformed dolomite and calcite cement to produce fine grained siderite. At a later stage, siderite crystallites were (partly) oxidized to form a secondary phase of brown ferric oxide (goethite). Locally, goethite transformed to fine grained hematite that caused secondary reddening of the sediments. The reactions are associated with a combined volume loss of the solid phases of c. 50% per reaction mol; this was accommodated by the formation of pores. Oxidation of siderite was associated with release of CO 2; localized dissolution took place of feldspar and concurrently growth of kaolinite occurred by acidifying condition during release of CO 2. The relation of redox reactions and deformation is comparable to those in red bed conglomerates in the region. Reductive dissolution occurred at sites of stress concentration, particularly at contact points of pebbles. Late stage precipitation of ferric oxides and pyrolusite took place at oxidizing conditions in association with uplift.

  19. Characterization of CO2-induced (?) bleaching phenomena in German red bed sediments by combined geochemical and evolved gas analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilse, Ulrike; Goepel, Andreas; Pudlo, Dieter; Heide, Klaus; Gaupp, Reinhard

    2010-05-01

    We investigated varied coloured Buntsandstein and Rotliegend sandstones in Central Germany (Thuringian Vorderrhön, Altmark) by thermogravimetric/pyrolytic (DEGAS- directly coupled evolved gas analysis) and geochemical (ICP-MS/OES) means to evaluate geochemical/mineralogical characteristics of red bed rocks and their presumably altered, bleached modifications. Commonly bleaching of primary red bed sediments is regarded as a result of fluid-rock reactions by the participation of CO2. This study is performed in the framework of the special research program 'GEOTECHNOLOGIEN' (funded by the German Ministry of Education and Research - BMBF) and is part of two BMBF sponsored projects - 'COMICOR', an analogue study on potential effects of CO2-bearing fluids on Buntsandstein and Rotliegend deposits in Hesse and Thuringia and 'CLEAN', an enhanced gas recovery (EGR) pilot project in cooperation with GDF SUEZ E&P Deutschland GmbH. The intention of CLEAN is to evaluate the feasibility of EGR techniques and the suitability of depleted natural gas reservoirs for potential industrial CO2 sequestration projects. According to rock colour variations two slices of handspecimens (M49, A1) were split into 12 and 15 equally sized samples for analytical work. The medium grained Lower Buntsandstein sample M49 from Thuringia is of fluvial origin and partially bleached with transitions from red (unbleached) to light colours (bleached). Bulk rock geochemistry of red bed and bleached subsamples of M49 are almost similar, including rare earth element (REE) content. Only the content of iron and related metals is depleted in bleached samples compared to the red bed types. All PAAS normalized pattern of M49 show positive Eu and slightly negative Ce anomalies, most likely caused by the presence of apatite and illite in the rocks. The degassing behavior observed by DEGAS of M49 subsamples is mainly controlled by the breakdown of sheet silicates, hydroxides and hydrates, as well as of carbonates and sulphates. DEGAS pattern show no obvious systematic differences between the varied coloured zones of this specimen. Sample A1 consists of totally bleached medium grained, lithoclast rich Rotliegend sandstone which was deposited on a flood plain with braided rivers and aeolian dunes. Subsamples of A1 are grouped into three zones - all are bleached, with colours ranging from white to dark grey. Grey and dark grey zones (A1-1 to A1-6, A1-15) are cemented by Ca-rich carbonates and contain microscopically identified bitumina. In contrast the pore space of white zones (A1-7 to A1-14) is filled by anhydrite. These mineralogical differences are also reflected in the bulk rock geochemistry. In comparison to grey rocks white subsamples are depleted in iron and related elements as well as in REEs. Moreover, correlations between rock colour and degassing behavior exist. White samples display typical degassing signatures of sulphates, whereas dark grey zones reveal minor sulphate content, but also the presence of an additional S-species (sulphide) and CO2 (carbonate). Similar features were obtained regarding the specification and abundance of hydrocarbon components. In all samples of A1 methane, ethane and carbonylsulphide were detected, with higher contents in the more whitish parts. In grey rocks an additional, long-chained hydrocarbon component occurs. The relevance of this species is not yet resolved and will be investigated further in more detail. Mass spectrometric gas analytical and related geochemical data confirm major differences in rock composition of Buntsandstein and Rotliegend samples, mainly caused by primary rock composition and by the involvement of variable fluid composition during burial diagenetic alteration. In this study DEGAS was applied for the first time to characterize sandstone geochemistry. Our results constrain that this method might be a complementary analytical tool appropriate for petrological sedimentary research.

  20. Multiscale bed form interactions and their implications for the abruptness and stability of the downwind dune field margin at White Sands, New Mexico, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelletier, Jon D.; Jerolmack, Douglas J.

    2014-11-01

    The downwind margin of White Sands dune field is an abrupt transition from mobile aeolian dunes to a dune-free vegetated surface. This margin is also relatively stable; over the past 60 years it has migrated several times more slowly than the slowest dunes within the dune field, resulting in a zone of dune coalescence, aggradation, and, along most of the margin, development of a dune complex (i.e., dunes superimposed on draas). Repeat terrestrial laser scanning surveys conducted over a 3 month period demonstrate that sediment fluxes within the dune complex decrease on approach to the margin. Computational fluid dynamics modeling indicates that this decrease is due, in part, to a decrease in mean turbulent bed shear stress on the lee side of the dune complex as a result of flow line divergence or sheltering of the lee-side dunes by the stoss side of the dune complex. Conservation of mass demands that this decrease in bed shear stress causes aggradation. We speculate that aggradation on the lee side of the dune complex further enhances the sheltering effect in a positive feedback, contributing to the growth and/or maintenance of the dune complex and a relatively abrupt and stable dune field margin. Our model and data add to a growing body of evidence that aeolian dune field patterns are influenced by feedbacks that occur at scales larger than individual dunes.

  1. The Cyborg Astrobiologist: Scouting Red Beds for Uncommon Features with Geological Significance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patrick Charles McGuire; Enrique Díaz Martínez; Jens Ormö; Javier Gómez-Elvira; José Antonio Rodríguez Manfredi; Eduardo Sebastián-Martínez; Helge Ritter; Robert Haschke; Markus Oesker; Jörg Ontrup

    2005-01-01

    Abstract The ‘Cyborg Astrobiologist’ has undergone a second geologi cal field trial, at a site in northern Guadalajara, Spain, near Riba de Santiuste. The site at Riba de Santiuste is dominated by layered deposits of red sandstones. The Cyborg Astrobiologist is a wearable,computer,and video camera system that has demonstrated,a capability to find uncommon interest points in geological imagery in realtime

  2. Fluidization Characteristics of Sand and Chopped Switchgrass Sand Mixtures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. N. Patil; T. J. Bowser; D. D. Bellmer; R. L. Huhnke

    A laboratory, fluidized-bed gasifier is being researched as a means to gasify feedstocks in a process to produce ethanol from biomass. Fluidization characteristics of the bed, especially minimum (Umf) and complete (Ucf) fluidization velocities, were measured because they are critical to the operation of the gasifier. Fluidization properties of sand and chopped switchgrass- sand mixtures of different particle sizes and

  3. An Experimental Study of Sand Transport over an Immobile Gravel Substrate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of a stepwise addition of sand to an immobile gravel bed on the sand transport rate and configuration of the sand bed was investigated in a laboratory flume channel. Detailed measurements of sand transport rate, bed texture, and bed topography were collected for four different discharge...

  4. Form drag is a major component of bed shear stress associated with tidal flow in the vicinity of an isolated sand bank, Torres Strait, northern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Michael G.; Harris, Peter T.; Heap, Andrew; Hemer, Mark. A.

    2008-09-01

    Tidal current and elevation data were collected from five oceanographic moorings during October 2004 in Torres Strait, northern Australia, to assess the effects of large bedforms (i.e., sand banks) on the drag coefficient ( C D) used for estimating bed shear stress in complex shallow shelf environments. Ten minute averages of tidal current speed and elevation data were collected for 18 days at an on-bank site (<7 m water depth) and an off-bank site (<10 m). These data were compared to data collected simultaneously from two shelf locations (<11 m) occupied to measure regional tidal behaviour. Overall C D estimates at the on- and off-bank sites attained 7.0±0.1×10 -3 and 6.6±0.1×10 -3, respectively. On-bank C D estimates also differed between the predominant east-west tidal streams, with easterly directed flows experiencing C D=7.8±0.18×10 -3 and westerly directed flows C D=6.4±0.12×10 -3. Statistically significant differences between the off-bank and on-bank sites are attributed to the large form drag exerted by the sand banks on the regional tidal currents, and statistically significant differences between the westward and eastward flows is ascribed to bedform asymmetry. Form drag from the large bedforms in Torres Strait comprises up to 65% of the total drag coefficient. When constructing sediment transport models, different C D estimates must therefore be applied to shelf regions containing steep bedforms compared to regions that do not. Our results extend the limited inventory of seabed drag coefficients for shallow shelf environments, and can be used to improve existing regional seabed mobilisation models, which have direct application to environmental management in Torres Strait.

  5. Impact of ozonation pre-treatment of oil sands process-affected water on the operational performance of a GAC-fluidized bed biofilm reactor.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Shahinoor; Dong, Tao; McPhedran, Kerry N; Sheng, Zhiya; Zhang, Yanyan; Liu, Yang; Gamal El-Din, Mohamed

    2014-11-01

    Treatment of oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) using biodegradation has the potential to be an environmentally sound approach for tailings water reclamation. This process is both economical and efficient, however, the recalcitrance of some OSPW constituents, such as naphthenic acids (NAs), require the pre-treatment of raw OSPW to improve its biodegradability. This study evaluated the treatment of OSPW using ozonation followed by fluidized bed biofilm reactor (FBBR) using granular activated carbon (GAC). Different organic and hydraulic loading rates were applied to investigate the performance of the bioreactor over 120 days. It was shown that ozonation improved the adsorption capacity of GAC for OSPW and improved biodegradation by reducing NAs cyclicity. Bioreactor treatment efficiencies were dependent on the organic loading rate (OLR), and to a lesser degree, the hydraulic loading rate (HLR). The combined ozonation, GAC adsorption, and biodegradation process removed 62 % of chemical oxygen demand (COD), 88 % of acid-extractable fraction (AEF) and 99.9 % of NAs under optimized operational conditions. Compared with a planktonic bacterial community in raw and ozonated OSPW, more diverse microbial communities were found in biofilms colonized on the surface of GAC after 120 days, with various carbon degraders found in the bioreactor including Burkholderia multivorans, Polaromonas jejuensis and Roseomonas sp. PMID:25104220

  6. Pilot-scale demonstration of red water treatment by wet air oxidation and circulating bed combustion. Volume 1. Final project summary report, September 1993-October 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Scoville, W.; Hoye, R.; Acharya, P.; Martin, J.

    1995-10-01

    As part of the Army`s ongoing research and development program related to red water (KO47) treatment, the U.S. Army Environmental Center (USAEC) contracted IT Corporation to prepare conceptual designs and plans for pilot scale demonstrations of two treatment technologies: wet air oxidation (WAO) and circulating bed combustion (CBC). The Project Summary Report presents the conceptual designs. Because red water is not currently available for testing and the test site (host facility) where the demonstrations will be conducted has not been identified, these documents are intended to be generic in nature.

  7. Pilot scale demonstration of red water treatment by wet air oxidation and circulating bed combustion. Volume 2. Final project summary report, September 1993-October 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Scoville, W.; Hoye, R.; Acharya, P.; Martin, J.

    1995-10-11

    As part of the Army`s ongoing research and development program related to red water (KO47) treatment, the U.S. Army Environmental Center (USAEC) contracted IT Corporation to prepare conceptual designs and plans for pilot scale demonstrations of two treatment technologies: wet air oxidation (WAO) and circulating bed combustion (CBC). The Project Summary Report presents the conceptual designs. Because red water is not currently available for testing and the test site (host facility) where the demonstrations will be conducted has not been identified, these documents are intended to be generic in nature.

  8. Pilot scale demonstration of red water treatment by wet air oxidation and circulating bed combustion. Volume 3. Final project summary report, September 1993-October 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Scoville, W.; Hoye, R.; Acharya, P.; Martin, J.

    1995-10-11

    As part of the Army`s ongoing research and development program related to red water (KO47) treatment, the U.S. Army Environmental Center (USAEC) contracted IT Corporation to prepare conceptual designs and plans for pilot scale demonstrations of two treatment technologies: wet air oxidation (WAO) and circulating bed combustion (CBC). The Project Summary Report presents the conceptual designs. Because red water is not currently available for testing and the test site (host facility) where the demonstrations will be conducted has not been identified, these documents are intended to be generic in nature.

  9. Pilot scale demonstration of red water treatment by wet air oxidation and circulating bed combustion. Volume 4. Final project summary report, September 1993-October 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Scoville, W.; Hoye, R.; Acharya, P.; Martin, J.

    1995-10-11

    As part of the Army`s ongoing research and development program related to red water (KO47) treatment, the U.S. Army Environmental Center (USAEC) contracted IT Corporation to prepare conceptual designs and plans for pilot scale demonstrations of two treatment technologies: wet air oxidation (WAO) and circulating bed combustion (CBC). The Project Summary Report presents the conceptual designs. Because red water is not currently available for testing and the test site (host facility) where the demonstrations will be conducted has not been identified, these documents are intended to be generic in nature.

  10. A Devonian paleomagnetic pole from red beds of the Tarim Block, China

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yianping; McWilliams, M.; Sharps, R.; Cox, A. (Stanford Univ., California (USA)); Li, Yongan; Li, Qiang; Gao, Zhengjia (Geology Bureau of Xinjiang, Urumqi (China)); Zhang, Zhengkun (Chinese Academy of Geological Sciences, Beijing (China)); Zhai, Yongjian (China Univ. of Geosciences, Beijing (China))

    1990-11-10

    The authors present new Devonian paleomagnetic results from 59 sites in three stratigraphic sections exposed on the northwestern margin of the Tarim Block. At one section, 1,998 m of red sandstone is continuously exposed; the other two sections can be correlated with the first on both magnetostratigraphic and lithologic grounds. Progressive thermal demagnetization reveals three characteristic magnetizations. One is a Late Permian overprint which is isolated below 578C at sites near contacts with Late Permian dikes. The other two components are approximately antipodal, have a much higher unblocking temperature than the overprint, and are directionally distinct from the Late Permian overprint. They believe that these are characteristic Devonian magnetizations. Within the continuous 1,998 m section, results denote a 395 m reversed polarity zone overlying a 1,603 m normal polarity zone. One reversed event is recorded at the base of the section. A paleomagnetic pole calculated by averaging results from 47 normal and reversed sites lies at {lambda}{sub p}=16.5{degree}N, {phi}{sub p}=165.0{degree}E, K=25, and A{sub 95}=4.3{degree}. This pole is statistically distinct from a previously reported Late Devonian pole for Tarim. On the basis of field geologic and rock magnetic studies, they believe that the previously reported pole, in addition to results from one of their three sections, reflects at least partial contamination in the form of a thermal overprint caused by Late Permian igneous activity. An analysis of Devonian to Late Carboniferous polar wander suggests that the Tarim Block was attached to a subducting plate, and moved northward and rotated clockwise during the late Paleozoic. Comparison of the Devonian paleolatitudes of Siberian, Kazakhstan, Tarim and South China Blocks indicates that both the Tarim and South China Blocks were located in equatorial regions and were far south of the northern Angaran plate (Siberia and Kazakhstan).

  11. Decolorization and biosorption for Congo red by system rice hull- Schizophyllum sp. F17 under solid-state condition in a continuous flow packed-bed bioreactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xudong Li; Rong Jia

    2008-01-01

    Synthetic dyes are important chemical pollutants from various industries. This work developed an efficient and relatively simple continuous decolorization system rice hull-Schizophyllum sp. F17 under solid-state condition in a packed-bed bioreactor, for decolorizing Congo red. In the decolorization system, two decolorization mechanisms exist, one is decolorization by Schizophyllum sp. F17, the other is biosorption by rice hull. The decolorization efficiency

  12. Palaeomagnetism and magnetic anisotropy of Carboniferous red beds from the Maritime Provinces of Canada: evidence for shallow palaeomagnetic inclinations and implications for North American apparent polar wander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilardello, Dario; Kodama, Kenneth P.

    2010-03-01

    A palaeomagnetic and magnetic anisotropy study was conducted on the lower-middle Carboniferous Maringouin and Shepody red bed formations of the Maritime Provinces of Canada to detect and correct inclination shallowing. Because of the shallow inclinations commonly observed in red beds and the strong dependence of North America's Palaeo-Mesozoic apparent polar wander (APW) on red beds, inclination shallowing may substantially affect large portions of North America's APW path. Hematite is the primary magnetic mineral carrier in these red beds, accompanied by secondary magnetite, maghemite, goethite and pigmentary hematite. Thermal and chemical demagnetization of the Shepody Fm. successfully isolated characteristic remanence directions of D = 177°, I = 20.4°, ?95 = 6.5°, N = 19 and D = 177.8° I = 17.7°, ?95 = 6.9°, N = 16, respectively. Thermal demagnetization of the Maringouin Fm. isolated a characteristic remanence direction of D = 178.7°, I = 24.9°, ?95 = 14.5°, N = 9. High field anisotropy of isothermal remanence followed by alternating field and thermal cleaning on leached samples was used to isolate the fabric of hematite. Individual particle anisotropy was measured directly from magnetic separates using a new technique. Hematite's magnetic fabric and particle anisotropy were used to apply an inclination correction. Our inclination corrections indicate up to 10° of inclination shallowing, corresponding to corrected palaeopole positions of 27.2°N, 118.3°E, A95 = 6.2° and 27.4°N, 117.2°E, A95 = 13.1° for the Shepody and Maringouin formations, respectively. This correction corresponds to a ~ 6° increase in colatitude for Carboniferous North America, which translates into approximately a 650 km change in North America's palaeogeographic position. The proposed position of North America supports a Pangea B-type reconstruction.

  13. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Sand Filters

    E-print Network

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-10-23

    Sand filters are beds of granular material, or sand, drained from underneath so that pretreated wastewater can be treated, collected and distributed to a land application system. This publication explains the treatment, design, operation...

  14. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Sand Filters 

    E-print Network

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-10-23

    Sand filters are beds of granular material, or sand, drained from underneath so that pretreated wastewater can be treated, collected and distributed to a land application system. This publication explains the treatment, design, operation...

  15. technology offer SandTES -High Temperature Sand Thermal Energy Storage

    E-print Network

    Szmolyan, Peter

    technology offer SandTES - High Temperature Sand Thermal Energy Storage key words: High Temperature together with Dr. Eisl of ENRAG GmbH. Background Thermal energy storage (TES) systems are essential Energy Storage | Fluidized Bed | Sand | The invention consists of a fluidized bed with internal heat

  16. Visualization of bed material movement in a simulated fluidized bed heat exchanger by neutron radiography

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hisashi Umekawa; Mamoru Ozawa; Nobuyuki Takenaka; Masahito Matsubayashi

    1999-01-01

    The bulk movement of fluidized bed material was visualized by neutron radiography by introducing tracers into the bed materials. The simulated fluidized bed consisted of aluminum plates, and the bed material was sand of 99.7% SiO2 (mean diameter: 0.218mm, density: 2555kg\\/m3). Both materials were almost transparent to neutrons. Then the sand was colored by the contamination of the sand coated

  17. Paleomagnetism and Its Tectonic Implication of the Red Beds of Oligocene Kangtuo Formation in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, J.; Zhang, S.; Chen, W.; Li, H.; Wu, H.; Yang, T.; Zhang, K.

    2014-12-01

    Available paleomagnetic data show that after the collision, additional convergence of ~3000 km took place between the Indian Craton and Eurasian plate, of which ~1800 km was between the Indian Craton and the Lhasa terrane. According to the "fill-the-gap" solution, this shortening is interpreted as the evidence for the existence of the "Greater India". Intraplate shortening takes place often in the forms of folding and thrusting, and the major thrusts in the Himalayan orogen remained active after the Oligocene. Estimating the amount of the shortening quantitatively is of great importance for understanding the tectonic modeling for the evolution of this magnificent collision zone. To better understand the continental shortening after the India-Eurasia collision, a paleomagnetic study on the red beds of the Oligocene Kangtuo Formation (Fm) was carried out in the Gerze Basin of the Lhasa terrane. A total of 700 samples were collected from 37 sites. Stepwise thermal demagnetization revealed that the main magnetic carrier is hematite. The natural remnant magnetization (NRM) consists of two components. A low-temperature component (LTC) is identified below 300°C, whereas a high temperature component (HTC) unblocks at ~665-690°C. The HTC distributions show a clear east-west elongated distribution, which is considered as reflecting inclination flattening. After inclination calibration using the E/I method, the HTC could pass both a reversal test and a fold test at 95% confidentce level, showing the mean direction at Ds=340.3°, Is=44.2°, with k=54.9, and ?95=3.3°, corresponding to a paleopole at 71.7°N, 340.7°E (A95=3.3°), and the paleolatitude of the sampling site at 25.9±3.3°N. Comparing our new data with the apparent polar wander paths of East Asian blocks, Europe, and India, we have reached the following conclusions. (1) There is no significant paleolatitudinal difference between the Lhasa terrane and other central and northern Asian terranes at ~30 Ma. (2) The observed paleolatitude of the Kangtuo Fm is 8.0±5.0° lower than the expected paleolatitude deduced from the data of stable Europe, but is 4.6±5.2° higher than that deduced from the data of the India Plate, likely presenting a ~506±572 km shortening between the India and Lhasa terrane since the Oligocene.

  18. Health and safety plan for pilot-scale demonstration of red water treatment by wet air oxidation and circulating bed combustion. Final report, September 1993-October 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Scoville, W.; Hoye, R.; Acharya, P.; Martin, J.

    1995-10-11

    As part of the Army`s ongoing research and development program related to red water (KO47) treatment, the U.S. Army Environmental Center (USAEC) contracted IT Corporation to prepare conceptual designs and plans for pilot scale demonstrations of two treatment technologies: wet air oxidation (WAO) and circulating bed combustion (CBC). This Project Summary Report and the Test Plan and Health and Safety Plan are intended to serve as guides for development of complete project plans when the technology demonstration program is implemented. Because red water is not currently available for testing and the test site (host facility) where the demonstrations will be conducted has not been identified, these documents are intended to be generic in nature.

  19. Test plan for pilot-scale demonstration of red water treatment by wet air oxidation and circulating bed combustion. Final report, September 1993-October 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Scoville, W.; Hoye, R.; Acharya, P.; Martin, J.

    1995-10-11

    As part of the Army`s ongoing research and development program related to red water (KO47) treatment, the U.S. Army Environmental Center (USAEC) contracted IT Corporation to prepare conceptual designs and plans for pilot scale demonstrations of two treatment technologies: wet air oxidation (WAO) and circulating bed combustion (CBC). The project objectives included development of a Test Plan and a Health and Safety Plan for these demonstrations. The Project Summary Report presents the conceptual designs. This Project Summary Report and the Test Plan and Health and Safety Plan are intended to serve as guides for development of complete project plans when the technology demonstration program is implemented. Because red water is not currently available for testing and the test site (host facility) where the demonstrations will be conducted has not been identified, these documents are intended to be generic in nature.

  20. The paleoclimatic and geochronologic utility of coring red beds and evaporites: a case study from the RKB core (Permian, Kansas, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soreghan, Gerilyn S.; Benison, Kathleen C.; Foster, Tyler M.; Zambito, Jay; Soreghan, Michael J.

    2014-08-01

    Drill core is critical for robust and high-resolution reconstructions of Earth's climate record, as well demonstrated from both marine successions and modern long-lived lake systems. Deep-time climate reconstructions increasingly require core-based data, but some facies, notably red beds and evaporites, have garnered less attention for both paleoclimatic and geochronologic analyses. Here, we highlight studies from the Rebecca K. Bounds (RKB) core, a nearly continuous, >1.6 km drill core extending from the Cretaceous to the Mississippian, recovered from the US Midcontinent by Amoco Production Company in 1988, and serendipitously made available for academic research. Recent research conducted on this core illustrates the potential to recover high-resolution data for geochronologic and climatic reconstructions from both the fine-grained red bed strata, which largely represent paleo-loess deposits, and associated evaporite strata. In this case, availability of core was instrumental for (1) accessing a continuous vertical section that establishes unambiguous superposition key to both magnetostratigraphic and paleoclimatic analyses, and (2) providing pristine sample material from friable, soluble, and/or lithofacies and mineralogical species otherwise poorly preserved in surface exposures. The potential for high-resolution paleoclimatic reconstruction from coring of deep-time loess strata in particular remains severely underutilized.

  1. SAND REPORT SAND2002xxxx

    E-print Network

    Newman, Alantha

    SAND REPORT SAND2002­xxxx Unlimited Release August 2002 Discrete Optimization Models for Protein://www.ntis.gov/ordering.htm DEPARTMENTOF ENERGY . . UNITED STATES OF AMERICA #12; SAND2002-xxxx Unlimited Release Printed August 2002

  2. Gas percolation through sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proud, W. G.

    2014-05-01

    Previous research has determined the shock properties of quartz sand. The effect of the physical processes occurring with varying moisture content and particle size were shock presented. In this study the same quartz sand, in a column is subjected to blast waves over a range of pressure. The diagnostics used are pressure sensors and high-speed photography. The effect of grain size on propagation time and the effect of moisture content are determined. Aspects of particle and liquid movement are also discussed. While the velocity of the percolation through the bed is primarily controlled by grain size the effect of moisture and liquids reveals a more complex dependence.

  3. Integration of bed characteristics, geochemical tracers, current measurements, and numerical modeling for assessing the provenance of beach sand in the San Francisco Bay coastal system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnard, Patrick L.; Foxgrover, Amy C.; Elias, Edwin P.L.; Erikson, Li H.; Hein, James R.; McGann, Mary; Mizell, Kira; Rosenbauer, Robert J.; Swarzenski, Peter W.; Takesue, Renee K.; Wong, Florence L.; Woodrow, Donald L.

    2013-01-01

    Over 150 million m3 of sand-sized sediment has disappeared from the central region of the San Francisco Bay Coastal System during the last half century. This enormous loss may reflect numerous anthropogenic influences, such as watershed damming, bay-fill development, aggregate mining, and dredging. The reduction in Bay sediment also appears to be linked to a reduction in sediment supply and recent widespread erosion of adjacent beaches, wetlands, and submarine environments. A unique, multi-faceted provenance study was performed to definitively establish the primary sources, sinks, and transport pathways of beach-sized sand in the region, thereby identifying the activities and processes that directly limit supply to the outer coast. This integrative program is based on comprehensive surficial sediment sampling of the San Francisco Bay Coastal System, including the seabed, Bay floor, area beaches, adjacent rock units, and major drainages. Analyses of sample morphometrics and biological composition (e.g., Foraminifera) were then integrated with a suite of tracers including 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd isotopes, rare earth elements, semi-quantitative X-ray diffraction mineralogy, and heavy minerals, and with process-based numerical modeling, in situ current measurements, and bedform asymmetry to robustly determine the provenance of beach-sized sand in the region.

  4. Integration of bed characteristics, geochemical tracers, current measurements, and numerical modeling for assessing the provenance of beach sand in the San Francisco Bay Coastal System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnard, Patrick L.; Foxgrover, Amy; Elias, Edwin P.L.; Erikson, Li H.; Hein, James; McGann, Mary L.; Mizell, Kira; Rosenbauer, Robert J.; Swarzenski, Peter W.; Takesue, Renee K.; Wong, Florence L.; Woodrow, Don

    2013-01-01

    Over 150 million m3 of sand-sized sediment has disappeared from the central region of the San Francisco Bay Coastal System during the last half century. This enormous loss may reflect numerous anthropogenic influences, such as watershed damming, bay-fill development, aggregate mining, and dredging. The reduction in Bay sediment also appears to be linked to a reduction in sediment supply and recent widespread erosion of adjacent beaches, wetlands, and submarine environments. A unique, multi-faceted provenance study was performed to definitively establish the primary sources, sinks, and transport pathways of beach-sized sand in the region, thereby identifying the activities and processes that directly limit supply to the outer coast. This integrative program is based on comprehensive surficial sediment sampling of the San Francisco Bay Coastal System, including the seabed, Bay floor, area beaches, adjacent rock units, and major drainages. Analyses of sample morphometrics and biological composition (e.g., Foraminifera) were then integrated with a suite of tracers including 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd isotopes, rare earth elements, semi-quantitative X-ray diffraction mineralogy, and heavy minerals, and with process-based numerical modeling, in situ current measurements, and bedform asymmetry to robustly determine the provenance of beach-sized sand in the region.

  5. Identifying beach sand sources and pathways in the San Francisco Bay Coastal System through the integration of bed characteristics, geochemical tracers, current measurements, and numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, P.; Foxgrover, A. C.; Elias, E.; Erikson, L. H.; Hein, J. R.; McGann, M. L.; Mizell, K.; Rosenbauer, R. J.; Swarzenski, P. W.; Takesue, R. K.; Wong, F. L.; Woodrow, D. L.

    2012-12-01

    A unique, multi-faceted provenance study was performed to definitively establish the primary sources, sinks, and transport pathways of beach sized-sand in the San Francisco Bay Coastal System. This integrative program is based on comprehensive surficial sediment sampling of the San Francisco Bay Coastal System, including the seabed, bay floor, area beaches, adjacent rock units, and major drainages. Analyses of sample morphometrics and biological composition (e.g., foraminifera) were then integrated with a suite of tracers including 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd isotopes, rare earth elements, semi-quantitative X-ray diffraction mineralogy, and heavy minerals, and with process-based numerical modeling, in situ current measurements, and bedform asymmetry, to robustly determine the provenance of beach-sized sand in the region. Cross-validating geochemical analyses, numerical modeling, physical process measurements, and proxy-based techniques (e.g., bedform asymmetry, grain size morphometrics) is proved an effective technique for confidently defining sources, pathways, and sinks of sand in complex coastal-estuarine systems. The consensus results highlight the regional impact of a sharp reduction in the primary sediment source, the Sierras, to the San Francisco Bay Coastal System over the last century in driving erosion of the bay floor, ebb-tidal delta, and the outer coast south of the Golden Gate.A) Calculated transport directions based on the integration of the provenance techniques. B) Number of techniques applied for each grid cell to determine the final transport directions.

  6. Sedimentology of freshwater lacustrine shoreless in the Eocene Scheggs Bed of the Tipton Tongue of the Green River Formation, Sand Wash Basin, Northwest Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Roehler, H.W.

    1990-12-01

    In this paper two freshwater shorelines, 40-274 ft thick, were investigated in the Scheggs Bed along Hardgrove Rim, 8 mi north of Maybell, Colorado. The rocks comprising the shorelines consist of interbedded quartzose sandstone, conglomerate, siltstone, shale, oil shale, carbonaceous shale, and coal. The shorelines are divisible into fluvial channel, mudflat, swamp, strandline, nearshore, and offshore lithofacies, which are identified by their stratigraphic positions, characteristic lithologies, and sedimentary structures. A columnar section is presented as a model for similar deposition in other members of the Green River Formation.

  7. Sand Storage

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A sand storage silo at Steamtown National Historic Site. Sand was stored in a dome on top of the engine and, as the train traveled the tracks, the sand would be sprinkled down pipes to land on the tracks in front of the wheels. This would aid the wheels in gripping the tracks, especially when the ra...

  8. Sand Stories

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Hilary Christensen

    The objective of this project is to use a sample of sand from a give are to tell its geologic history. Each student is given a 50 mL tube of sand labeled with the latitude and longitude of where it was found. They must then use this information along with analysis of the sand itself to tell the story of its formation.

  9. Visualization of bed material movement in a simulated fluidized bed heat exchanger by neutron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umekawa, Hisashi; Ozawa, Mamoru; Takenaka, Nobuyuki; Matsubayashi, Masahito

    1999-11-01

    The bulk movement of fluidized bed material was visualized by neutron radiography by introducing tracers into the bed materials. The simulated fluidized bed consisted of aluminum plates, and the bed material was sand of 99.7% SiO 2 (mean diameter: 0.218 mm, density: 2555 kg/m 3). Both materials were almost transparent to neutrons. Then the sand was colored by the contamination of the sand coated by CdSO 4. Tracer particles of about 2 mm diameter were made by the B 4C, bonded by the vinyl resin. The tracer was about ten times as large as the particle of fluidized bed material, but the traceability was enough to observe the bed-material bulk movement owing to the large effective viscosity of the fluidized bed. The visualized images indicated that the bubbles and/or wakes were important mechanism of the behavior of the fluidized bed movement.

  10. SLOW SAND FILTRATIONSLOW SAND FILTRATION

    E-print Network

    SLOW SAND FILTRATIONSLOW SAND FILTRATION:: Timeless Technology and Recent Advances SYSTEMTREATMENT SYSTEM Source Water Collection/ Protection Filtration Treatment Distribution/ Storage PretreatmentSmall Systems Packaged Coagulation TreatmentPackaged Coagulation Treatment SystemsSystems Pressure Filtration

  11. Discovering Sand and Sand Paintings

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    John Eichinger

    2009-05-30

    This activity blends social studies and art with math and science. First, students will explore the visible characteristics of sand, and then they will make Navajo-style sand paintings with paper, glue, and colored sand. In the process, they will hone the

  12. Paleomagnetism of the Middle-Late Jurassic to Cretaceous red beds from the Peninsular Thailand: Implications for collision tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Itaru; Surinkum, Adichat; Wada, Yutaka; Fujihara, Makoto; Yokoyama, Masao; Zaman, Haider; Otofuji, Yo-ichiro

    2011-02-01

    Jurassic to Cretaceous red sandstones were sampled at 33 sites from the Khlong Min and Lam Thap formations of the Trang Syncline (7.6°N, 99.6°E), the Peninsular Thailand. Rock magnetic experiments generally revealed hematite as a carrier of natural remanent magnetization. Stepwise thermal demagnetization isolates remanent components with unblocking temperatures of 620-690 °C. An easterly deflected declination ( D = 31.1°, I = 12.2°, ?95 = 13.9°, N = 9, in stratigraphic coordinates) is observed as pre-folding remanent magnetization from North Trang Syncline, whereas westerly deflected declination ( D = 342.8°, I = 22.3°, ?95 = 12.7°, N = 13 in geographic coordinates) appears in the post-folding remanent magnetization from West Trang Syncline. These observations suggest an occurrence of two opposite tectonic rotations in the Trang area, which as a part of Thai-Malay Peninsula received clockwise rotation after Jurassic together with Shan-Thai and Indochina blocks. Between the Late Cretaceous and Middle Miocene, this area as a part of southern Sundaland Block experienced up to 24.5° ± 11.5° counter-clockwise rotation with respect to South China Block. This post-Cretaceous tectonic rotation in Trang area is considered as a part of large scale counter-clockwise rotation experienced by the southern Sundaland Block (including the Peninsular Malaysia, Borneo and south Sulawesi areas) as a result of Australian Plate collision with southeast Asia. Within the framework of Sundaland Block, the northern boundary of counter-clockwise rotated zone lies between the Trang area and the Khorat Basin.

  13. Biomass development in slow sand filters.

    PubMed

    Campos, L C; Su, M F J; Graham, N J D; Smith, S R

    2002-11-01

    Microbial biomass development in the sand and schmutzdecke layer was determined in two full-scale slow sand filters, operated with and without a light excluding cover. A standard chloroform fumigation-extraction technique was adapted to routinely measure microbial biomass concentrations in the sand beds. Sand was sampled to a depth of 10 cm and schmutzdecke was also collected at the same random positions on the uncovered filter. Interstitial microbial biomass in the uncovered sand bed increased with time and decreased with sampling depth. There was a small accumulation of sand biomass with time in the covered filter, but no relationship was apparent between biomass concentration and depth in this filter. Schmutzdecke did not develop on the covered filter and was spatially highly variable in the uncovered condition compared to the consistent patterns observed in interstitial biomass production. It is speculated that microbial biomass in the sand of uncovered filters is largely related to carbon inputs from photosynthetic activity in the schmutzdecke and involves mechanisms that spatially distribute carbon substrate from the schmutzdecke to the sand. However, total organic carbon and dissolved organic carbon removals were similar in both filters suggesting that relatively small biomass populations in covered filters are sufficient to remove residual labile carbon during advanced water treatment and little further advantage to water purification and organic carbon removal is gained by the increased production of biomass in uncovered slow sand filter beds. PMID:12418657

  14. THE SIMULATION OF WIND-BLOWN SAND MOVEMENT AND PROBABILITY DENSITY FUNCTION OF LIFT-OFF VELOCITIES OF SAND GRAINS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurately describing the probability density function (PDF) of lift-off or initial velocities of wind-blown sand ejecting from a sand bed is fundamental to understanding the mechanisms of wind-blown sand movement. Our objective was to investigate the efficacy of developing the PDF of lift-off veloc...

  15. Prediction of Bed Load Transport on Small Gravel-Bed Streams

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rates and size distributions of bed load were calculated using 3 transport relations and compared to data collected on three streams with sand-gravel beds in the Goodwin Creek Experimental Watershed in north central Mississippi, USA. Bed load transport rates were greatly over predicted by two of th...

  16. Influence of sand grain diameter and wind velocity on lift-off velocities of sand particles.

    PubMed

    Bo, Tian-Li; Zheng, Xiao-Jing; Duan, Shao-Zhen; Liang, Yi-Rui

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, the velocities of sand particles near the sand bed in the saltation cloud were measured in a wind tunnel through an improved experimental scheme of the Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system. The influences of the diameter of sand particles in the saltation cloud and wind velocity on the probability distribution function (PDF) of lift-off velocities of sand particles were investigated. Results demonstrate that for the sand particles saltating above the sand bed with the mean grain diameter (d m = 0.3 mm), smaller and larger ones have the same velocity distribution, and wind velocity has no obvious influence on the distribution shape of the lift-off velocities, i.e., the PDFs of the horizontal and vertical lift-off velocities both follow a lognormal distribution, but the diameter of sand particles in the saltation cloud and wind velocity have an influence on the parameters of the PDF of horizontal and vertical lift-off velocities. Eventually, we present formulas to describe the PDF of lift-off velocities of sand particles with regard to the influence of wind velocity and the diameter of sand particles in the saltation cloud above the sand bed with d m = 0.3 mm. PMID:23695368

  17. The extraction of bitumen from western tar sands. Annual report, July 1990--July 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Oblad, A.G.; Bunger, J.W.; Deo, M.D.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1992-04-01

    Contents of this report include the following: executive summary; characterization of the native bitumen from the Whiterocks oil sand deposit; influence of carboxylic acid content on bitumen viscosity; water based oil sand separation technology; extraction of bitumen from western oil sands by an energy-efficient thermal method; large- diameter fluidized bed reactor studies; rotary kiln pyrolysis of oil sand; catalytic upgrading of bitumen and bitumen derived liquids; ebullieted bed hydrotreating and hydrocracking; super critical fluid extraction; bitumen upgrading; 232 references; Appendix A--Whiterocks tar sand deposit bibliography; Appendix B--Asphalt Ridge tar sand deposit bibliography; and Appendix C--University of Utah tar sands bibliography.

  18. High temperature thermal energy storage in moving sand

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. H. Turner; H. I. Awaya

    1978-01-01

    Several high-temperature (to 500 C) heat-storage systems using sand as the storage medium are described. The advantages of sand as a storage medium include low cost for sand, widespread availability, non-toxicity, non-degradation characteristics, easy containment, and safety. The systems considered include: stationary sand with closely spaced tubes throughout the volume, the use of a fluidized bed, use of conveyor belt

  19. Sands-on Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandervoort, Frances S.

    1989-01-01

    Provides information for the development of a lesson which teaches students about sand, discusses facts about sands, sand studies, life in the sands, and sand activities. Includes diagrams showing the range in sand grain shape, formation of sand ripples, and sand samples from around the world. (RT)

  20. Reovirus removal and inactivation by slow-rate sand filtration.

    PubMed

    McConnell, L K; Sims, R C; Barnett, B B

    1984-10-01

    Laboratory column studies were conducted at the Utah Water Research Laboratory, Logan, Utah, to evaluate reovirus removal from drinking water supplies by slow-rate sand filtration (SSF). Columns, constructed to simulate a full-scale SSF field operation, were inoculated with reovirus at ca. 1,000-times-greater concentrations than those typically found in domestic sewage. Reovirus removal and inactivation were investigated as functions of filter maturity and other filter sand characteristics. Reovirus removal studies demonstrated that the SSF process is capable of reducing reovirus in influent water by a minimum of 4 log concentration units under certain conditions of water quality, flow rate, and sand bed construction. Infectious reovirus was not detected in effluent samples from any of the sand beds studied, after inoculation of the SSF columns; therefore, removal efficiencies were not affected significantly by characteristics, including age, of the two filter sands evaluated. Studies conducted with radioactively labeled reovirus demonstrated that reovirus removed from influent water was distributed throughout the entire length of the filter beds. Concentrations of reovirus in the filter sands decreased with increasing bed depth. The greatest removal occurred in the top few centimeters of all sand beds. No infectious reovirus could be detected in clean or mature sand bed media, indicating that reoviruses were inactivated in the filter. PMID:6508290

  1. Booming Sands

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2007-04-19

    This video segment, adapted from NOVA scienceNOW, presents basic concepts of physics behind booming sand dunes. See how surface tension affects potential and kinetic energy and how it all works together to create sound.

  2. SLUDGE DEWATERING AND DRYING ON SAND BEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dewatering of water and wastewater treatment sludges was examined through mathematical modeling and experimental work. The various components of the research include: (1) chemical analyses of water treatment sludges, (2) drainage and drying studies of sludges, (3) a mathematical ...

  3. Defrosting Sand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    2 September 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a patch of frost-covered, dark sand that, at the time the picture was acquired in June 2005, had begun to defrost. The frost is carbon dioxide. Dunes and other patches of sand are usually the first polar features to develop dark spots as the frost begins to sublime away.

    Location near: 78.9oS, 80.2oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  4. SAND REPORT SAND2003-0799

    E-print Network

    Ho, Cliff

    SAND REPORT SAND2003-0799 Unlimited Release Printed March 2003 Field Demonstrations://www.ntis.gov/help/ordermethods.asp?loc=7-4-0#online #12;3 SAND2003-0799 Unlimited Release Printed March 2003 Field Demonstrations

  5. Beach Sand

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Francis Eberle

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this assessment probe is to elicit students' ideas about weathering, erosion, deposition, and landforms. It is designed to determine if students recognize that sand on a beach may have come from distant mountains and landforms as a result of the weathering of rock, subsequent erosion, and deposition.

  6. Tar sands development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1973-01-01

    Tar sands (also known as oil sands and bituminous sands) are sand deposits which are impregnated with dense viscous petroleum. Ultimate world reserves of bitumen in tar sands are about equal to ultimate reserves of crude oil in the U.S. However, the only tar-sand deposit of present commercial importance is in the Athabasca area of Alberta, Canada. The pioneer venture

  7. Red Bluff, Marion County, Mississippi: a Citronelle braided-stream deposit

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.L.; Meylan, M.A.

    1983-09-01

    Red Bluff is an erosional escarpment located on the western margin of the Pearl River flood plain in northwestern Marion County, Mississippi. The sand grains are composed primarily of quartz, with small amounts of heavy minerals and feldspar. The gravel is composed of varying percentages of chert, flint, jasper, rip-up clasts, quartz, and tripoli, including a small fraction of silicified Paleozoic fossils. Grain-size analysis of the sediment and investigation of the sedimentary structures suggest a braided-fluvial environment of deposition. The most conspicuous sedimentary structures at Red Bluff are graded bedding, low-angle to medium-angle cross-bedding, and well-developed paleochannels. A statistical comparison (discriminant analysis) of the seven most abundant heavy minerals of Red Bluff, with the same suite of heavy minerals found at the type section of the Citronelle Formation (Pliocene-Pleistocene), and outcrops of a known Miocene coarse clastic unit indicates a correlation of Red Bluff to the Citronelle Formation. These heavy minerals are kyanite, staurolite, rutile, tourmaline, zircon, black opaques (primarily ilmenite and magnetite), and white opaques (primarily leucoxene). The suite of heavy minerals present at Red Bluff belongs to the east Gulf province. This metamorphic assemblage of heavy minerals implies the source area of the sediments at Red Bluff to be the southern Appalachians. The silicified pebble-size Devonian-Mississippian fossils were derived most likely from formations flanking the southern Appalachians in northern Alabama.

  8. Reclamation of disturbed land at Great Canadian Oil Sands

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. D. Shopik; W. L. Cary

    1977-01-01

    Practical application of reclamation methods developed over 6 yr at an operating oil-sands plant is described. The details of numerous successes and failures in developing this methodology for overburden and tailings sand dikes in a northern boreal forest ecology are given. Seed-bed preparations, seeding methods, and follow up treatments are described. Unique equipment problems were encountered on the slopes of

  9. Solids-liquid separation of swine manure with polymer treatment and sand filtration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Small particles typical of liquid swine manure often clog sand filter beds and fine filters. We evaluated the effectiveness of polymer flocculants to improve drainage and filtration performance of sand filter beds by increasing the effective particle size. A pilot unit was evaluated at the Swine U...

  10. SOLID-LIQUID SEPARATION OF SWINE MANURE WITH POLYMER TREATMENT AND SAND FILTRATION

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. B. Vanotti; J. M. Rice; A. Q. Ellison; P. G. Hunt; F. J. Humenik; C. L. Baird

    Small particles typical of liquid swine manure often clog sand filter beds and fine filters. We evaluated the effec- tiveness of polymer flocculants to improve drainage and filtration performance of sand filter beds by increasing the particle size of manure. A pilot separation unit was evaluated at the Swine Unit of the NCSU Lake Wheeler Road Laboratory in Ra- leigh,

  11. Bed bugs.

    PubMed

    Foulke, Galen T; Anderson, Bryan E

    2014-09-01

    The term bed bug is applied to 2 species of genus Cimex: lectularius describes the common or temperate bed bug, and hemipterus its tropical cousin. Cimex lectularius is aptly named; its genus and species derive from the Latin words for bug and bed, respectively. Though the tiny pest is receiving increased public attention and scrutiny, the bed bug is hardly a new problem. PMID:25577850

  12. Defrosting Sand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    19 June 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows dark spots formed in carbon dioxide frost that covers the surfaces of patches of sand in the south polar region. As spring arrived this year in the martian southern hemisphere, so began the annual defrosting process. The fact that sand dunes begin to defrost earlier than other surfaces, and that the defrosting process involves the formation of spots like these, has been known since the earliest days of the MGS mission.

    Location near: 66.8oS, 15.7oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  13. Arkosic conglomerate beds in Mason, Menard, and Kimble counties, Texas 

    E-print Network

    Rogers, Luther Franklin

    1955-01-01

    + S102 This hypothesis 1s substantiated by the pzesence of similar cement in Pleistocene gravel terrace deposits over- 12 lying the Newby glauconitic sand (Eocene, Rekiaw) and a glauconitic bed in ths C+uesn City formation (Eocene) in Buzleson... approximately 1/8 inch thick at the base of the conglomerate bed. Both the thickness and elevation of the conglomerate bed change rapidly laterally. It ls distinctly' channelled into the bed of sandy clay that lies beneath it, The thickness...

  14. Percolation of Blast Waves though Sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proud, William

    2013-06-01

    Previous research has concentrated on the physical processes occurring when samples of sand, of varying moisture content, were shock compressed. In this study quartz sand samples are subjected to blast waves over a range of pressure and duration. Aspects of particle movement are discussed; the global movement of a bed hundreds of particles thick is a fraction of particle width. The main diagnostics used are pressure sensors and high-speed photography. Results are presented for a range of particle sizes, aspect ratio, density and moisture content. While the velocity of the percolation through the bed is primarily controlled by density and porosity the effect of moisture reveals a more complex dependence. Previous research has concentrated on the physical processes occurring when samples of sand, of varying moisture content, were shock compressed. In this study quartz sand samples are subjected to blast waves over a range of pressure and duration. Aspects of particle movement are discussed; the global movement of a bed hundreds of particles thick is a fraction of particle width. The main diagnostics used are pressure sensors and high-speed photography. Results are presented for a range of particle sizes, aspect ratio, density and moisture content. While the velocity of the percolation through the bed is primarily controlled by density and porosity the effect of moisture reveals a more complex dependence. The ISP acknowledges the support of the Atomic Weapons Establishment and Imperial College London.

  15. Formation of Two-Dimensional Sand Ripples under Laminar Shear Flow Vincent Langlois and Alexandre Valance

    E-print Network

    Formation of Two-Dimensional Sand Ripples under Laminar Shear Flow Vincent Langlois and Alexandre 20 June 2005) The process of ripple formation on a two-dimensional sand bed sheared by a viscous fluid is investigated theoretically. The sand transport is described taking into account both the local

  16. Intertidal sand body migration along a megatidal coast, Kachemak Bay, Alaska

    E-print Network

    Intertidal sand body migration along a megatidal coast, Kachemak Bay, Alaska Peter N. Adams,1 the timing and magnitude of alongshore migration of intertidal sand bed forms over a cobble substrate during a 22-month observation period. Two separate sediment packages (sand bodies) of 1­2 m amplitude and $200

  17. The extraction of bitumen from western oil sands. Final report, July 1989--September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Oblad, A.G.; Bunger, J.W.; Dahlstrom, D.A.; Deo, M.D.; Fletcher, J.V.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1994-03-01

    Research and development of surface extraction and upgrading processes of western tar sands are described. Research areas included modified hot water, fluidized bed, and rotary kiln pyrolysis of tar sands for extraction of bitumen. Bitumen upgrading included solvent extraction of bitumen, and catalytic hydrotreating of bitumen. Characterization of Utah tar sand deposits is also included.

  18. Controls on the abruptness of gravel-sand transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venditti, J. G.; Church, M. A.; Lamb, M. P.; Domarad, N.; Rennie, C. D.

    2014-12-01

    As gravel-bedded rivers fine downstream, they characteristically exhibit an abrupt transition from gravel- to sand-bed. This is the only abrupt transition in grain-size that occurs in the fluvial system and has attracted considerable attention. A number of competing theories have been proposed to account for the abruptness of the transition, including base-level control, attrition of ~10mm gravel to produce sand, and sediment sorting processes. The prevailing theory for the emergence of abrupt transitions is size selective sorting of bimodal sediment wherein gravel deposits due to downstream declining shear stress, fining the bedload until a sand-bed emerges. We explored this hypothesis by examining grain-size, shear stress, gravel mobility and sand suspension thresholds through the gravel-sand transition (GST) of the Fraser River, British Columbia. The Fraser GST is an arrested gravel wedge with patches of gravel downstream of the wedge forming a diffuse extension. There is an abrupt change in bed slope through the transition that leads to an abrupt change in shear stress. The GST, bed-slope change and backwater caused by the ocean are all coincident spatially, which enhances the sharpness of the GST. Interestingly, the bimodal reach of the river occurs downstream of the GST and exhibits no downstream gradients in shear stress, suspended sediment flux, gravel mobility or sand suspension thresholds. This calls into question the prevailing theory for the emergence of an abrupt GST by size selective sorting. We provide evidence, both empirical and theoretical, that suggests the emergence of an abrupt GST is caused by rapid deposition of sand when fine gravel deposits. We argue that the emergence of gravel-sand transitions is a consequence of gravel-bedded rivers adopting a steeper slope than sand-bedded rivers. The abruptness arises because the bed slope required to convey the gravel load fixes the distal location of a terminal gravel wedge, and once the river has lost the capacity to carry the gravel mixture, the river adopts the lower slope required to pass the sand load. Progressive downstream fining of a gravel-sand mixture is not a necessary condition for the emergence of a gravel-sand transition.

  19. Scaling laws in aeolian sand transport.

    PubMed

    Ho, T D; Valance, A; Dupont, P; Ould El Moctar, A

    2011-03-01

    We report on wind tunnel measurements on saltating particles in a turbulent boundary layer and provide evidence that over an erodible bed the particle velocity in the saltation layer and the saltation length are almost invariant with the wind strength, whereas over a nonerodible bed these quantities vary significantly with the air friction speed. It results that the particle transport rate over an erodible bed does not exhibit a cubic dependence with the air friction speed, as predicted by Bagnold, but a quadratic one. This contrasts with saltation over a nonerodible bed where the cubic Bagnold scaling holds. Our findings emphasize the crucial role of the boundary conditions at the bed and may have important practical consequences for aeolian sand transport in a natural environment. PMID:21405627

  20. The extraction of bitumen from western oil sands: Volume 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Oblad, A.G.; Dahlstrom, D.A.; Deo, M.D.; Fletcher, J.V.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1997-11-26

    The program is composed of 20 projects, of which 17 are laboratory bench or laboratory pilot scale processes or computer process simulations that are performed in existing facilities on the University of Utah campus in north-east Salt Lake City. These tasks are: (1) coupled fluidized-bed bitumen recovery and coked sand combustion; (2) water-based recovery of bitumen; (3) oil sand pyrolysis in a continuous rotary kiln reactor; (4) oil sand pyrolysis in a large diameter fluidized bed reactor; (5) oil sand pyrolysis in a small diameter fluidized bed reactor; (6) combustion of spent sand in a transport reactor; (7) recovery and upgrading of oil sand bitumen using solvent extraction methods; (8) fixed-bed hydrotreating of Uinta Basin bitumens and bitumen-derived hydrocarbon liquids; (9) ebullieted bed hydrotreating of bitumen and bitumen derived liquids; (10) bitumen upgrading by hydropyrolysis; (11) evaluation of Utah`s major oil sand deposits for the production of asphalt, high-energy jet fuels and other specialty products; (12) characterization of the bitumens and reservoir rocks from the Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (13) bitumen upgrading pilot plant recommendations; (14) liquid-solid separation and fine tailings thickening; (15) in-situ production of heavy oil from Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (16) oil sand research and development group analytical facility; and (17) process economics. This volume contains reports on nine of these projects, references, and a bibliography. 351 refs., 192 figs., 65 tabs.

  1. The extraction of bitumen from western oil sands: Volume 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Oblad, A.G.; Dahlstrom, D.A.; Deo, M.D.; Fletcher, J.V.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1997-11-26

    The program is composed of 20 projects, of which 17 are laboratory bench or laboratory pilot scale processes or computer process simulations that are performed in existing facilities on the University of Utah campus in north-east Salt Lake City. These tasks are: (1) coupled fluidized-bed bitumen recovery and coked sand combustion; (2) water-based recovery of bitumen; (3) oil sand pyrolysis in a continuous rotary kiln reactor; (4) oil sand pyrolysis in a large diameter fluidized bed reactor; (5) oil sand pyrolysis in a small diameter fluidized bed reactor; (6) combustion of spent sand in a transport reactor; (7) recovery and upgrading of oil sand bitumen using solvent extraction methods; (8) fixed-bed hydrotreating of Uinta Basin bitumens and bitumen-derived hydrocarbon liquids; (9) ebullieted bed hydrotreating of bitumen and bitumen derived liquids; (10) bitumen upgrading by hydropyrolysis; (11) evaluation of Utah`s major oil sand deposits for the production of asphalt, high-energy jet fuels and other specialty products; (12) characterization of the bitumens and reservoir rocks from the Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (13) bitumen upgrading pilot plant recommendations; (14) liquid-solid separation and fine tailings thickening; (15) in-situ production of heavy oil from Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (16) oil sand research and development group analytical facility; and (17) process economics. This volume contains an executive summary and reports for five of these projects. 137 figs., 49 tabs.

  2. Occurrence of Radium-224, Radium-226 and Radium-228 in Water from the Vincentown and Wenonah-Mount Laurel Aquifers, the Englishtown Aquifer System, and the Hornerstown and Red Bank Sands, Southwestern and South-Central New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    dePaul, Vincent T.; Szabo, Zoltan

    2007-01-01

    This investigation is the first regionally focused study of the presence of natural radioactivity in water from the Vincentown and Wenonah-Mount Laurel aquifers, Englishtown aquifer system, and the Hornerstown and Red Bank Sands. Geologic materials composing the Vincentown and Wenonah-Mount Laurel aquifers and the Hornerstown and Red Bank Sands previously have been reported to contain radioactive (uranium-enriched) phosphatic strata, which is common in deposits from some moderate-depth coastal marine environments. The decay of uranium and thorium gives rise to natural radioactivity and numerous radioactive progeny, including isotopes of radium. Naturally occurring radioactive isotopes, especially those of radium, are of concern because radium is a known human carcinogen and ingestion (especially in water used for drinking) can present appreciable health risks. A regional network in southwestern and south-central New Jersey of 39 wells completed in the Vincentown and Wenonah-Mount Laurel aquifers, the Englishtown aquifer system, and the Hornerstown and Red Bank Sands was sampled for determination of gross alpha-particle activity; concentrations of radium radionuclides, major ions, and selected trace elements; and physical properties. Concentrations of radium-224, radium-226, and radium-228 were determined for water from 28 of the 39 wells, whereas gross alpha-particle activity was determined for all 39. The alpha spectroscopic technique was used to determine concentrations of radium-224, which ranged from less than 0.5 to 2.7 pCi/L with a median concentration of less than 0.5pCi/L, and of radium-226, which ranged from less than 0.5 to 3.2 pCi/L with a median concentration of less than 0.5 pCi/L. The beta-counting technique was used to determine concentrations of radium-228. The concentration of radium-228 ranged from less than 0.5 to 4.3 pCi/L with a median of less than 0.5. Radium-228, when quantifiable, had the greatest concentration of the three radium radioisotopes in 9 of the 12 samples (75 percent). The concentration of radium-224 exceeded that of radium-226 in five of the six (83 percent) samples when both were quantifiable. The radium concentration distribution differed by aquifer, with the highest Ra-228 concentrations present in the Englishtown aquifer system and the highest Ra-226 concentrations present in the Wenonah-Mount Laurel aquifer. Radium-224 generally contributed a considerable amount of gross alpha-particle activity to water produced from all the sampled aquifers, but was not the dominant radionuclide as it is in water from the Kirkwood-Cohansey aquifer system, nor were concentrations greater than 1 pCi/L of radium-224 widespread. Gross alpha-particle activity was found to exceed the U.S Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) of 15 pCi/L in one sample (16 pCi/L) from the Vincentown aquifer. A greater part of the gross alpha-particle activity in water from the Wenonah-Mount Laurel aquifer resulted from the decay of Ra-226 than did the gross alpha-particle activity in the other sampled aquifers; this relation is consistent with the concentration distribution of the Ra-226 itself. Concentrations of radium-224 correlate strongly with those of both radium-226 and radium-228 (Spearman correlation coefficients, r, +0.86 and +0.66, respectively). The greatest concentrations of radium-224, radium-226, and radium-228 were present in the most acidic ground water. All radium-224, radium-226, and radium-228 concentrations greater than 2.5 pCi/L were present in ground-water samples with a pH less than 5.0. The presence of combined radium-226 and radium-228 concentrations greater than 5 pCi/L in samples from the Vincentown and Wenonah-Mount Laurel aquifers and the Englishtown aquifer system was not nearly as common as in samples from the Kirkwood-Cohansey aquifer system, likely because of the slightly higher pH of water from these aquifers relative to that of Kirkwood-Cohansey aqu

  3. Benthic infauna of eelgrass, Zostera marina , beds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert J. Orth

    1973-01-01

    The infauna ofZostera beds in the Chesapeake Bay-York River estuary and Chincoteague Bay was sampled in March and July 1970 using a corer. Sediments\\u000a were fine sand or very fine sand. Sorting of sediments varied from poorly sorted to moderately well-sorted and appeared to\\u000a be positively correlated with the density ofZostera at the respective stations.\\u000a \\u000a A total of 117 macroinvertebrate

  4. Using AMS of weakly deformed red beds for determining the spatial and temporal evolution of layer parallel shortening fabrics in the Cordilleran of Wyoming, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonkee, A.; Weil, A. B.

    2010-12-01

    Integrated anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) analysis, paleomagnetic, and structural studies are underway to better understand the 3-D kinematic evolution and mechanical processes that generated Cordilleran deformation in Wyoming. AMS sampling has been concentrated in the Triassic Chugwater Group from multiple basement-cored arches across the Laramide foreland of Wyoming and in the Triassic Ankareh Formation from multiple thrust sheets in the Wyoming salient of the Sevier orogneic belt. Magnetic susceptibility of these samples originates from ferromagnetic hematite and paramagnetic phyllosilicates. A general progression of AMS ellipsoids is developed as primary sedimentary fabrics are overprinted by weak tectonic fabrics. Primary sedimentary fabrics have distinctly oblate AMS ellipsoids with Kmin axes perpendicular to bedding. With increasing deformation, a composite fabric develops with triaxial AMS ellipsoids and Kmax axes (magnetic susceptibility lineations) sub-parallel to the intersection of weak layer-parallel shortening (LPS) fabrics (defined by rotated and recrystallized phyllosilicates and hematite) with bedding. Most sampled sites have well developed Kmax directions with 95% uncertainties < 10 degrees, which are typically sub-parallel to structural trend. AMS directions have been compared with minor fault kinematic, strain and cleavage/fracture data to test the viability of AMS as a proxy for LPS fabrics. Correlations, quantified using a refined weighted least squares method that incorporates both measurement and fabric uncertainties, indicate that AMS is a powerful tool in defining LPS directions in weakly deformed rocks. LPS directions in thrust sheets of the Sevier belt define an overall radial pattern and are interpreted to reflect stresses transmitted from the hinterland through the wedge and topographic stresses along the growing front of the wedge. LPS directions in the Laramide foreland are interpreted to partly reflect basal traction during flat slab subduction beneath cratonic lithosphere, along with spatial-temporal variations in stress related to basement anisotropy and evolving fault systems.

  5. Sand resistance of sunscreens.

    PubMed

    Caswell, Michael; Wood, Caryl; Martinez, Alexa

    2012-01-01

    Like water resistance in sunscreens, sand resistance in sunscreens is the ability of the sunscreen to retain its effectiveness while undergoing sand treatment. The influence of the type of sand on the sand resistance of sunscreens has not been described. The sand resistance of a control standard sunscreen, P2, and data on three grades of Quickrete commercial grade sand, #1961, #1962, and #1152, are described. These sands represent a fine sand, a medium sand, and an all-purpose sand. Using the methodology described in the 2007 proposed amendment of the Final Monograph (1) with one exception, we obtained an SPF of 16.5 (1.6) for the control standard, compared to the expected SPF of 16.3 (3.4). After a five-minute treatment of sand #1961, #1962, or #1151, the SPF of the control standard was 18.3 (1.6), 18.4 (2.0), and 17.5 (2.2), respectively. Thus, all three sands exhibited a similar sand-resistance response. Thus, there was no significant difference in the average SPF with and without sand. The medium grade sand, Quickrete commercial grade #1962, was preferred for sand-resistance testing because the fine sand was difficult to remove from the subject's backs and the coarse sand was unpleasant to the subjects. PMID:23193889

  6. The performance of pumice as a filter bed material under rapid filtration conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Burhanettin Farizoglu; Alper Nuhoglu; Ergun Yildiz; Bulent Keskinler

    2003-01-01

    Deep bed sand filters are used extensively in drinking water and wastewater treatment. In this study, sand and pumice were used as a filtration media under rapid filtration conditions and performance results for both were compared. Turbidity removal performance and head losses were investigated as functions of filtration rate, bed depth and particle size. Under the same experimental conditions such

  7. SAND REPORT SAND2005-7937

    E-print Network

    SAND REPORT SAND2005-7937 Unlimited Release Printed January 2006 Agent-Based Control of Distributed@ntis.fedworld.gov Online order: http://www.ntis.gov/help/ordermethods.asp?loc=7-4-0#online #12;3 SAND2005-7937 Unlimited

  8. SAND REPORT SAND2003-0112

    E-print Network

    Fuerschbach, Phillip

    SAND REPORT SAND2003-0112 Unlimited Release Printed January 2003 Cold War Context Statement Sandia://www.ntis.gov/help/ordermethods.asp?loc=7-4-0#online #12;3 SAND2003-0112 Unlimited Release Printed January 2003 Cold War Context Statement

  9. Evolution of radiative sand ridge field of the South Yellow Sea and its sedimentary characteristics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ying Wang; Dakui Zhu; Kunyuan You; Shaoming Pan; Xiaodong Zhu; Xinqing Zou; Yongzhan Zhang

    1999-01-01

    A sand ridge field of 22 470 km2 consists of fine sands and silts originally from the old Changjiang River sediment during the late Pleistocene period. Late\\u000a Holocene sand stratum with its well-preserved larmnary bedding of more clay particles reflects the influence from the Yellow\\u000a River. There are three genetic types of morphology of sand ridge field as follows: (i)

  10. Diagenetic effects on porosity-permeability relationships in red beds of the Lower Triassic Bunter Sandstone Formation in the North German Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivarius, Mette; Weibel, Rikke; Hjuler, Morten L.; Kristensen, Lars; Mathiesen, Anders; Nielsen, Lars H.; Kjøller, Claus

    2015-05-01

    Carbonate and anhydrite cement, clay clasts and inter-granular clay are the main components that reduce reservoir quality in the studied Bunter Sandstone Formation. The impacts of these parameters on porosity and permeability are determined by combining petrographic mineral quantification with conventional core analysis of samples from the Danish part of the North German Basin. The depositional environments are considered because they largely control the distribution of cements, clays and grain sizes. The lateral variability of depositional environments is defined by the position in the basin and the proximity to the source areas. The stratigraphic distribution of depositional environments is related both to local topography and to climate because high aridity promoted aeolian deposition. The Bunter Sandstone Formation has high porosity and permeability in most of the sandstone intervals in the northern North German Basin. The reservoir quality is good as long as the cements and clays are present as confined bodies that leave the remaining pore spaces available for flow. In contrast, inter-granular clay and pervasive cementation hinder virtually all flow through the sandstone. The ephemeral fluvial deposits have an average porosity and permeability of 20.3% and 810 mD, respectively, and the values are 24.6% and 807 mD for the aeolian sandstones, excluding the unconsolidated aeolian sands which presumably have higher porosity and permeability. The aeolian sandstones of the Volpriehausen Member have very good reservoir quality since they have a thickness of about 25 m, are laterally continuous, are largely clay-free and the cement occurs in small amounts. The sandstones of the Solling Member consist mainly of ephemeral fluvial deposits, which generally have good reservoir quality. However, some intervals have high contents of inter-granular clays or pervasive carbonate, anhydrite or halite cement and these components reduce the permeability significantly. The lateral distribution of the ephemeral fluvial sandstones is variable and therefore difficult to predict when planning a geothermal exploration well. Thus, the Volpriehausen Member is the preferred target.

  11. Experimental Studies on the Saltating Sand Particle Transport and Wind-Sand Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Lee, Sang Joon

    2009-11-01

    Saltation is the major transport mode of wind-blown sand particles, accounting for about 75% of total sand transport through saltation, suspension and surface creep. The complex interactions among the saltating sand particles, the particles on the surface and the turbulent flow have not been fully understood owing to lack of experimental data. Various state-of-the-art flow measurement techniques were applied to comprehensively examine three different types of natural sand in a simulated atmospheric boundary layer. Firstly, digital high-speed photography was used to capture images of the saltating sand particles at 2000 frames per second, which resolved the particle motion adjacent to the sand bed surface. Secondly, instantaneous velocities of the saltating sand particles were extracted from the high-speed particle images using the particle tracking velocimetry (PTV). The particle resultant velocity, concentration and the stream-wise mass flux were evaluated as a function of height. Finally, the velocity fields of wind and wind-blown sand particles were simultaneously measured by using the PTV and the particle imaging velocimetry (PIV), respectively. This experimental study shed new lights on the complicated saltation motion, and will be helpful in enhancing formulation of theoretical models and development of effective control measures of wind erosion.

  12. Wet sand flows better than dry sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Christian

    2015-03-01

    Wet sand that does not contain too much water is known to be stiff enough to build sand castles or in physical words has a significant yield stress. However, we could recently show that there are quite a few conditions under which such wet sand opposes less resistant to flow than its dry counterpart. This effect might have been already known to the old Egyptians: The Ancient painting of El Bersheh at the tomb of Tehutihetep shows that there was liquid poured in front of the sledge that was used to transport heavy weight stones and statues. While archeologist have attributed this to a sacral ceremony, our data clearly show that wetting the sand ground drastically decreases the effective sliding friction coefficient. We first study the stress-strain behavior of sand with and without small amounts of liquid under steady and oscillatory shear. Using a technique to quasistatically push the sand through a tube with an enforced parabolic (Poiseuille-like) profile, we minimize the effect of avalanches and shear localization. We observe that the resistance against deformation of the wet (partially saturated) sand is much smaller than that of the dry sand, and that the latter dissipates more energy under flow. Second we show experimentally that the sliding friction on sand is greatly reduced by the addition of some--but not too much--water. The formation of capillary water bridges increases the shear modulus of the sand, which facilitates the sliding.

  13. Evaluation of integrated anaerobic/aerobic fixed-bed sequencing batch biofilm reactor for decolorization and biodegradation of azo dye acid red 18: comparison of using two types of packing media.

    PubMed

    Hosseini Koupaie, E; Alavi Moghaddam, M R; Hashemi, S H

    2013-01-01

    Two integrated anaerobic/aerobic fixed-bed sequencing batch biofilm reactor (FB-SBBR) were operated to evaluate decolorization and biodegradation of azo dye Acid Red 18 (AR18). Volcanic pumice stones and a type of plastic media made of polyethylene were used as packing media in FB-SBBR1 and FB-SBBR2, respectively. Decolorization of AR18 in both reactors followed first-order kinetic with respect to dye concentration. More than 63.7% and 71.3% of anaerobically formed 1-naphthylamine-4-sulfonate (1N-4S), as one of the main sulfonated aromatic constituents of AR18 was removed during the aerobic reaction phase in FB-SBBR1 and FB-SBBR2, respectively. Based on statistical analysis, performance of FB-SBBR2 in terms of COD removal as well as biodegradation of 1N-4S was significantly higher than that of FB-SBBR1. Spherical and rod shaped bacteria were the dominant species of bacteria in the biofilm grown on the pumice stones surfaces, while, the biofilm grown on surfaces of the polyethylene media had a fluffy structure. PMID:23138064

  14. Sand waves, bars, and wind-blown sands of the Rio Orinoco, Venezuela and Colombia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nordin, Carl F.; Perez-Hernandez, David

    1989-01-01

    During March 1982, a reconnaissance study was carried out along a reach of the Rio Orinoco between Puerto Ayacucho and Ciudad Bolivar. This was the low-flow season. Samples of bed material and suspended sediments were collected, sonic records of the bed were obtained at several locations, and the exposed bars and sand waves were studied at four locations. Sounding records were obtained at two of these locations during June and November when flow covered the bars, and additional studies were made on the ground at some of these same sites during March 1983. The bed of the river is mostly sand with small quantities, about 5 percent by weight on average, of gravel. Suspended- sediment concentrations were low, ranging between 20 milligrams per liter above Rio Apure to almost 40 milligrams per liter below its confluence with the Rio Orinoco. The annual sediment load is estimated to be 240x10 6 megagrams per year. During the dry season, 35 percent or more of the bed is exposed in the form of large bars composed of many sand waves. Trade winds blow upriver and there is substantial upriver transport of river sediments by the wind. If the bars contain very coarse sands and fine gravel, deflation forms a lag deposit that armors the bar surface and prevents further erosion. Theoretical calculations show that the lower limit for the fraction of the bed that needs to be covered with nonmoving particles to prevent further erosion and the smallest size of the armor particles depend only on wind speed. Calculations of bed-material transport were made for a typical wide and narrow section of the river; the annual load, excluding the wash load, is about 30 x 10 6 megagrams per year. A new definition for wash load is proposed; it is material that can be suspended as soon as its motion is initiated. For the Rio Orinoco, this is material finer than 0.1 millimeters.

  15. Effects of bed particle size on heat transfer in circulating fluidized bed boilers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B.-Å. Andersson

    1996-01-01

    Local values of heat transfer to membrane walls of a circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler were measured for three sizes of the same silica sand, with mean diameters of 0.22, 0.34 and 0.44 mm. A change from 0.44 to 0.22 mm sand at constant fluidization velocity led to a considerable increase in particle concentration and, hence, heat transfer. However, at

  16. Wet Sand flows better than dry sand

    E-print Network

    Jorge E. Fiscina; Christian Wagner

    2007-11-19

    We investigated the yield stress and the apparent viscosity of sand with and without small amounts of liquid. By pushing the sand through a tube with an enforced Poiseuille like profile we minimize the effect of avalanches and shear localization. We find that the system starts to flow when a critical shear of the order of one particle diameter is exceeded. In contrast to common believe, we observe that the resistance against the flow of wet sand is much smaller than that of dry sand. For the dissipative flow we propose a non-equilibrium state equation for granular fluids.

  17. Paleoenvironment and depositional environment of Miocene Olcese Sand, Bakersfield, California

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, H.C.

    1986-04-01

    The Olcese Sand near Bakersfield, California, contains evidence of a range of paleoenvironments including nonmarine, estuarine, and outer shelf depositional settings. Foraminifera from surface and subsurface samples place the Olcese in the Saucesian and Relizian of the California benthic stages. A pumice bed in the Olcese has been dated by fission track methods at 15.5 Ma. The Olcese Sand interfingers with the underlying Freeman Silt and the overlying Round Mountain Silt. In the type area, in Round Mountain oil field, the Olcese is 300-360 m thick. The Olcese is subdivided into three environmental facies. In the Knob Hill Quadrangle, the lower Olcese consists of (1) thinly bedded to blocky white tuffaceous silt and sand, or (2) planar cross-bedded fine to coarse-grained sand with pumice pebbles lining the bedding surfaces. Fossil mollusks and skate teeth indicate a shallow marine environment for the lower Olcese. Although the Olcese is predominantly a marine unit, the middle Olcese is nonmarine, with lenses of marine deposition. The middle Olcese is well exposed in the Knob Hill, Oil Center, and Rio Bravo Ranch Quadrangles, and is characterized by fine to coarse sand with occasional gravel lenses, strong cross-bedding, and a blue-gray color. The upper Olcese is a very fine to medium-grained, marine sand that fines upward into a sandy siltstone southward toward the Kern River. Foraminifera and mollusks from outcrops in the Rio Bravo Ranch Quadrangle indicate outer shelf to estuarine environments for the upper Olcese. The varying environments in the Olcese Sand reflect slight but frequent fluctuations in water depth and can be used to interpret the basin-margin history.

  18. Design and management of conventional fluidized-sand biofilters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven T. Summerfelt

    2006-01-01

    Fluidized-sand beds are an efficient, relatively compact, and cost-competitive technology for removing dissolved wastes from recirculating aquaculture systems, especially in relatively cool or coldwater applications that require maintaining consistently low levels of ammonia and nitrite. This paper describes several types of flow injection mechanisms used in commercial fluidized-sand biofilters and provides criteria for design of flow distribution mechanisms at the

  19. China Dust and Sand

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... article title:  Dust and Sand Sweep Over Northeast China     View Larger Image ... these views of the dust and sand that swept over northeast China on March 10, 2004. Information on the height of the dust and an ...

  20. Mineral Sands Down Under

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This resource describes what mineral sands are, and discusses the heavy, dark-colored minerals that they contain (rutile, ilmenite, zircon, monazite). A map shows locations of mineral sands deposits in Australia.

  1. Contribution of aeolian sand to backbarrier marsh sedimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Antonio B.; Fegley, Stephen R.; Ridge, Justin T.; VanDusen, Beth M.; Anderson, Noel

    2013-01-01

    The frequency of island overwash is commonly assumed to be the main factor regulating sand flux to backbarrier marshes; however, aeolian transport of sand across a barrier has received little attention in saltmarsh research. The contribution of aeolian sand to backbarrier marshes is examined here with marsh cores and measurements of wind-blown sediment transport across transgressive and regressive parts of a barrier island. Backbarrier marshes fronted by a wide washover fan or a high-elevation dune ridge were supplied with aeolian sand that significantly contributed to vertical accretion, especially near the marsh - barrier island edge. The percent volume of the marsh originating from aeolian sand, based on the upper 1 cm of marsh sediment, decreased by an order of magnitude only ˜20 m from the dune - marsh boundary. Sandy beds sampled in every marsh core at depth are composed of aeolian sand and were likely emplaced over time after storms deposited a sandy washover fan near the marsh and/or reduced vegetation cover across the island. Sand beds preserved within backbarrier marsh deposits are commonly thought to have been emplaced rapidly during a storm; however, post-storm aeolian transport should also be considered as an important mechanism for forming sand beds over a longer period of time within saltmarsh strata. The contribution of aeolian sand to backbarrier marsh accretion should increase as sea level continues to rise causing many barrier islands to narrow thereby reducing transport distances between the dune and marsh. Along developed coastlines, however, anthropogenic factors associated with increased development largely decrease the connectivity between the dunes and backbarrier marsh.

  2. The Unified Gravel-Sand (TUGS) Model: Simulating the Transport of Gravel-Sand Mixtures in Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Y.

    2006-12-01

    TUGS Model was developed by employing the surface-based bedload equation of Wilcock and Crowe (2003) and linking grain size distributions in the bedload, surface layer, and subsurface sediment deposit with the gravel transfer function of Hoey and Ferguson (1994) and Toro-Escobar et al. (1996), and a hypothetical sand transfer function. The unmodified model was applied to simulate the sedimentation process in Marmot Reservoir, Sandy River, Oregon and produced similar stratified sediment deposit as observed through coring exercises. The model was also examined with three runs of large-scale flume experiments conducted at St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (SAFL) by Seal et al. (1995). With a very minor modification to Wilcock and Crowe (2003) equation, the model excellently reproduced the longitudinal profiles, gravel grain size distributions and sand fractions in the deposits for all the three SAFL runs. Following its examination, TUGS model was applied to simulate the sediment transport dynamics in the Sandy River, Oregon under a few hypothetical scenarios, focusing on the dynamics of sand fractions in gravel-bedded channel deposits. Results of the exploratory runs on the Sandy River indicate that (a) surface and subsurface sand fractions generally increase in the downstream direction, similar to observed in the field; (b) sand fraction in the deposit is positively correlated with sand supply as expected; (c) extremely high sand supply under similar gravel supply and hydrologic conditions can transform the river into predominantly sand-bedded; (d) increased discharge under the same sand and gravel supply conditions results in decreased sand fraction in the deposit as expected; and (e) there can be significant increase in surface and subsurface sand fractions in the backwater zones near the mouth of the river as expected.

  3. Sand for Traction

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Steam engines used high-grade silica sand for traction on the rails. Sand was stored in a dome on top of the engine and, as the train traveled the tracks, the sand would be sprinkled down pipes to land on the tracks in front of the wheels. This would aid the wheels in gripping the tracks, especially...

  4. Bed Bugs

    E-print Network

    Gold, Roger E.; Howell Jr., Harry N.

    2001-11-15

    . the limb. This elongated, spindle shape distin- guishes the welts from those from mosquito or flea bites. If its feeding is undisturbed, a full-grown bed bug becomes engorged with blood in 3 to 5 min- utes. It then crawls to its hiding place, where...

  5. Fluid-bed heat-exchanger optimization and bed materials selection. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-02-01

    A study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of material properties on heat exchanger costs for waste gas streams from 500 to 3000/sup 0/F. 400, 800, 1200, and 1600/sup 0/F bed temperatures were used. The cost of the major heat exchanger components was identified and related directly to bed material properties. The overall heat exchanger costs were determined and used in a comparative analysis to assess the merit of each material. Two hundred materials were reviewed: metals, alloys, oxides, minerals, carbides, borides, intermetallics, and cermets. Compared to the lowest cost heat exchanger based on the best bed material, at 400/sup 0/F, the cost of the heat exchanger for sand is 14% higher; at 800/sup 0/F, 29% higher; at 1200/sup 0/F, 23% higher, and at 1600/sup 0/F, 25% higher. In comparing the heat transfer performance at 400/sup 0/F, the sand bed had a 50% lower heat transfer coefficient compared to the top performer, resulting in 62% more heat transfer surface area. The general trend showed that the oxides and minerals were the most cost effective at the lower bed temperatures and the metallic bed materials at the higher bed temperature.

  6. Recovery of heavy oil and tar sands using a high-temperature nuclear steam supply

    SciTech Connect

    Quade, R.N.; Rao, R.

    1984-04-01

    In this paper, the application of the HTGR to enhanced oil recovery is explored using a typical California heavy oil field (Midway-Sunset) and a tar sands field (Maverick County, Texas) as two examples. Cost comparisons are made with available alternates, centralized coal, jumbo boilers for heavy oil, and an atmospheric fluidized bed (AFB) for tar sands. 10 references, 7 figures, 5 tables.

  7. Recovery of heavy oil and tar sands using a high-temperature nuclear steam supply

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. N. Quade; R. Rao

    1984-01-01

    In this paper, the application of the HTGR to enhanced oil recovery is explored using a typical California heavy oil field (Midway-Sunset) and a tar sands field (Maverick County, Texas) as two examples. Cost comparisons are made with available alternates, centralized coal, jumbo boilers for heavy oil, and an atmospheric fluidized bed (AFB) for tar sands. 10 references, 7 figures,

  8. Recovery of heavy oil and tar sands using a high-temperature nuclear steam supply

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. N. Quade; R. Rao

    1984-01-01

    In this paper, the application of the HTGR to enhanced oil recovery is explored using a typical California heavy oil field (Midway-Sunset) and a tar sands field (Maverick County, Texas) as two examples. Cost comparisons are made with available alternates, centralized coal, jumbo boilers for heavy oil, and an atmospheric fluidized bed (AFB) for tar sands.

  9. Recovery of heavy oil and tar sands using a high-temperature nuclear steam supply

    SciTech Connect

    Quade, R.N.; Rao, R.

    1984-08-01

    In this paper, the application of the HTGR to enhanced oil recovery is explored using a typical California heavy oil field (Midway-Sunset) and a tar sands field (Maverick County, Texas) as two examples. Cost comparisons are made with available alternates, centralized coal, jumbo boilers for heavy oil, and an atmospheric fluidized bed (AFB) for tar sands.

  10. Turbulence intensity in the wave boundary layer and bottom friction under (mainly) flat bed conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John P. Newgard; Alex E. Hay

    2007-01-01

    Variations with wave energy of near-bed turbulence and the wave friction factor are investigated in the near-shore zone for bed states spanning low-steepness sand ripples and flat bed, and for wave energies extending well into the sheet flow regime. The measurements were made using a 1.7-MHz pulse-coherent Doppler profiler in ca. 3-m mean water depth. Near-bed turbulence intensities, phase-averaged over

  11. Sand dunes on the central Delmarva Peninsula, Maryland and Delaware

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Denny, Charles Storrow; Owens, James Patrick

    1979-01-01

    Inconspicuous ancient sand dunes are present in parts of the central Delmarva Peninsula, Maryland and Delaware. Many dunes are roughly V-shaped, built by northwest winds, especially on the east sides of some of the large rivers. On the uplands, the form and spacing of the dunes are variable. A surficial blanket composed mainly of medium and fine-grained sand-the Parsonsburg Sand-forms both the ancient dunes and the broad plains between the dunes. The sand that forms the dunes is massive and intensely burrowed in the upper part; traces of horizontal or slightly inclined bedding appear near the base. Quartz is the dominant mineral constituent of the sand. Microline is abundant in the very fine to fine sand fraction. The heavy-mineral assemblages (high zircon, tourmaline, rutile) are more mature than in most of the possible source rocks. The most abundant minerals in the clay-sized fraction are dioctahedral vermiculite, kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite, and gibbsite. The first four minerals are common in deposits of late Wisconsin and Holocene age. The gibbsite may be detrital, coming from weathered rocks of Tertiary age. The soil profile in the dune sand is weakly to moderately developed. At or near the base of the Parsonsburg Sand are peaty beds that range in age from about 30,000 to about 13,000 radiocarbon years B.P. Microfloral assemblages in the peaty beds suggest that the dunes on the uplands formed in a spruce parkland during the late Wisconsin glacial maximum. The river dunes may also be of late Wisconsin age, but could be Holocene.

  12. Punctuated sand transport in the lowermost Mississippi River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nittrouer, Jeffrey A.; Mohrig, David; Allison, Mead

    2011-12-01

    Measurements of sand flux and water flow in the Mississippi River are presented for a portion of the system 35-50 km upstream from the head of its subaerial delta. These data are used to provide insight into how nonuniform flow conditions, present in the lower reaches of large alluvial rivers, affect the timing and magnitude of sand transport near the river outlet. Field surveys during both low and high water discharge include (1) sequential digital bathymetric maps defining mobile river bottom topography which were used to estimate bed material flux, (2) multiple water velocity profiles, and (3) multiple suspended sediment profiles collected using a point-integrated sampler. These data show that total sand transport increases by two orders of magnitude over the measured range in water discharge (11,300 to 38,400 m3 s-1). During low water discharge no sand is measured in suspension, and sand discharge via bed form migration is minimal. During high water discharge 54% of the sand discharge is measured in suspension while 46% of the sand discharge is part of bed form migration. The component of boundary shear stress associated with moving this sediment is estimated using a set of established sediment transport algorithms, and values for the total boundary shear stress are predicted by fitting logarithmic velocity functions to the measured profiles. The estimates of boundary shear stress, using measurements of suspended sand transport, bed form transport, and downstream oriented velocity profiles are internally consistent; moreover, the analyses show that boundary shear stress increases by nearly 10-fold over the measured water discharge range. We show how this increase in shear stress is consistent with backwater flow arising where the river approaches its outlet. The hydrodynamic properties of backwater flow affect the timing and magnitude of sand flux and produce punctuated sand transport through the lowermost Mississippi River. Our field data are used to evaluate the influence of this sand transport style on development of the mixed bedrock alluvial channel for the lowermost Mississippi River.

  13. Bed material agglomeration during fluidized bed combustion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. C. Brown; M. R. Dawson; S. Noble

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to determine the physical and chemical reactions which led to the undesired agglomeration of bed material during fluidized bed combustion and to relate these reactions to specific causes. Survey of industrial-scale fluidized bed combustors is being conducted to determine the occurrence of bed agglomeration and the circumstances under which agglomeration took place. This task

  14. LONG TERM RECHARGE OF TRICKLING FILTER EFFLUENT INTO SAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rapid infiltration of trickling filter effluent onto natural delta sand beds at the Lake George Village Sewage Treatment Plant has been shown to produce the equivalent of tertiary treatment to the domestic wastewater since 1939 with no indication of exhaustion of the purifica...

  15. Motion of Waves in Shallow Water. Interaction between Waves and Sand Bottoms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. A. Bagnold; Geoffrey Taylor

    1946-01-01

    The loss of energy of a travelling water wave, due to the mechanism of the formation of sand ripples and water vortices on a sandy bed, becomes of practical importance when models are used to predict full-scale foreshore movements. On the assumption that the bottom-water oscillation is nearly simply harmonic, the mechanism was studied by oscillating a section of bed

  16. The role of velocity, pressure, and bed stress fluctuations in bed load transport over bed forms: numerical simulation downstream of a backward-facing step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeeckle, M. W.

    2014-07-01

    Bed load transport over ripples and dunes in rivers exhibits strong spatial and temporal variability due to the complex turbulence field caused by flow separation at bedform crests. A turbulence-resolving flow model downstream of a backward-facing step, coupled with a model integrating the equations of motion of individual sand grains, is used to investigate the physical interaction between bed load motion and turbulence downstream of separated flow. Large bed load transport events are found to correspond to low-frequency, positive pressure fluctuations. Episodic penetration of fluid into the bed increases the bed stress and moves grains. Fluid penetration events are larger in magnitude near the point of reattachment than further downstream. Models of bed load transport over ripples and dunes must incorporate the effects of these penetration events of high stress and sediment flux.

  17. Two-Phase Abrasion in Eolian Transport of Gypsum Sand, White Sands NM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, S.; Jerolmack, D. J.; Miller, K. L.

    2014-12-01

    Downstream rounding of grains is consistently observed in natural sediment transport settings. A recent theory put forth by Domokos et al. (2014) attributes particle rounding and size reduction to a geometric curvature-driven abrasion process. This process occurs in two phases, in which irregularly shaped or angular particles round to convex shapes with negligible change in axis dimension, then slowly reduce in particle diameter. Miller et al (in review) establish the existence of two-phase abrasion in the natural setting of a fluvial gravel stream. This study examines field samples from White Sands, NM to investigate the presence of two-phase abrasion in a different, non-idealized natural environment - a high-energy, eolian gypsum dunefield. Analysis of grain shapes from White Sands confirms the two-phase abrasion process, dependent upon mode of sediment transport. We find that large sand grains carried in saltation bed load transport exhibit shape change indicative of two-phase abrasion, while smaller particles carried in suspension do not. We observe rapid shape change in bed load particles approaching a convex shape, followed by slower reduction in grain axis dimensions. Confirmation of this process in a natural, non-idealized setting establishes two-phase abrasion as a general application for bed load transport.

  18. Growth performance and health of dairy calves bedded with different types of materials.

    PubMed

    Panivivat, R; Kegley, E B; Pennington, J A; Kellogg, D W; Krumpelman, S L

    2004-11-01

    Granite fines, sand, rice hulls, long wheat straw, and wood shavings were compared as bedding for 60 female dairy calves. Growth, health, stress indices, and behavior of newly born calves, along with physical characteristics and bacterial counts of bedding, were evaluated for 42 d during August to October, 2002. Overall average daily gain and dry matter intake of calves did not differ due to bedding type, although during wk 2 calves housed on rice hulls had the greatest dry matter intake and those housed on wood shavings had the lowest. During wk 2, calves housed on granite fines and sand were treated more often for scours, and calves housed on long wheat straw received the fewest antibiotic treatments (week by bedding material interaction). Granite fines formed a harder surface than other bedding, and calves housed on granite fines scored the dirtiest. When bedding materials were evaluated, sand was scored to be the dirtiest, while pens bedded with rice hulls, long wheat straw, and wood shavings scored cleaner. Long wheat straw had the warmest surface temperature, and rice hulls and wood shavings were warmer than granite fines and sand. Serum cortisol, alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein, immunoglobulin G concentrations, and the neutrophil:lymphocyte ratio were not affected by bedding type. On d 0, coliform counts were greatest in rice hulls. After use, coliform counts were greatest in long wheat straw (week by bedding material interaction). On d 42, the concentration of ammonia at 10 cm above the bedding was lowest for long wheat straw. Growth performance of calves bedded for 42 d with 5 bedding types did not differ; however, the number of antibiotic treatments given for scours was greatest on granite fines and sand; coliform counts in the bedding were highest in rice hulls before use and in long wheat straw after 42 d of use. PMID:15483157

  19. Washington Gas makes switch to recycled concrete bedding

    SciTech Connect

    Gunther, K.M. (Washington Gas Light Co., Springfield, VA (United States). Materials Testing Lab.)

    1993-08-01

    Washington Gas Light Co., following extensive testing, is successfully using recycled concrete as bedding with plastic pipe that has produced cost savings and environmental benefits. The search for new bedding material for use with plastic pipe started in the mid-1970's, when the traditionally used sand was becoming increasingly more difficult to purchase at any price. Sand bedding has been used with plastic services and mains because it provided maximum scratch and rock impingement protection. Although it added to installation cost, sand was accepted as a necessary expense. Decision to use recycled concrete followed studies conducted in 1990. It was discovered that polyethylene was not severely scratched by the concrete or even some of the materials that were rejected during testing in 1976. Toughness improvements in modern polyethylenes explains the difference in the results and proved safe for use with virtually any commercial backfill material.

  20. Forces encountered by a sphere during impact into sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joubaud, Sylvain; Homan, Tess; Gasteuil, Y.; Lohse, Detlef; van der Meer, Devaraj

    2014-12-01

    We describe direct measurements of the acceleration of an object impacting on a loosely packed granular bed under various pressures, using an instrumented sphere. The sphere acts as a noninvasive probe that measures and continuously transmits the acceleration as it penetrates into the sand, using a radio signal. The time-resolved acceleration of the sphere reveals the detailed dynamics during the impact that cannot be resolved from the position information alone. Because of the unobstructed penetration, we see a downward acceleration of the sphere at the moment the air cavity collapses. The compressibility of the sand bed is observed through the oscillatory behavior of the acceleration curve for various ambient pressures; it shows the influence of interstitial air on the compaction of the sand as a function of time.

  1. Forces encountered by a sphere during impact into sand.

    PubMed

    Joubaud, Sylvain; Homan, Tess; Gasteuil, Y; Lohse, Detlef; van der Meer, Devaraj

    2014-12-01

    We describe direct measurements of the acceleration of an object impacting on a loosely packed granular bed under various pressures, using an instrumented sphere. The sphere acts as a noninvasive probe that measures and continuously transmits the acceleration as it penetrates into the sand, using a radio signal. The time-resolved acceleration of the sphere reveals the detailed dynamics during the impact that cannot be resolved from the position information alone. Because of the unobstructed penetration, we see a downward acceleration of the sphere at the moment the air cavity collapses. The compressibility of the sand bed is observed through the oscillatory behavior of the acceleration curve for various ambient pressures; it shows the influence of interstitial air on the compaction of the sand as a function of time. PMID:25615033

  2. Quantification of Bed-Load Transport on the Upper Mississippi River Using Multibeam Survey Data and Traditional Methods

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David D. Abraham; Thad Pratt

    PURPOSE: This Coastal and Hydraulics Engineering Technical Note (CHETN) describes the progress made in using multibeam bathymetric data to determine bed-load transport in large sand bed rivers. Work was conducted as part of the Monitoring of Completed Navigation Projects (MCNP) Program in coordination with the Coastal Inlets Research Program (CIRP). INTRODUCTION: The need for quantifying bed-load transport is universal in

  3. Fluid Bed Combustion Applied to Industrial Waste 

    E-print Network

    Mullen, J. F.; Sneyd, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    Conference, Houston, TX, May 12-15, 1985 4. Combustible materials entering the bed are subject to the full combustion temperature for res idence times on the order of 5 to 8 seconds or more. This insures efficient destruction of organic materials... have al ready been di scussed: the cold wi ndbox for autogenous fue 1s, the hot wi ndbox for subautogenous fuel sand the cold windbox with bed coils for superautogenous fuels. Figures 3, 4 and 5 are the process flow diagrams for the three systems...

  4. Design and Operation of Fluid Beds for Heating, Cooling and Quenching Operations 

    E-print Network

    Kemp, W. E.

    1981-01-01

    A commercial foundry has been established which makes extensive use of fluid beds in the production of heat treated alloy steel castings. The castings are cooled immediately after solidification by fluidizing the mold sand in which they were cast...

  5. Process and apparatus to produce crude oil from tar sands. Final report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. D. Seader; L. M. Smart

    1984-01-01

    A two-staged fluidized-bed reactor for the energy-efficient, thermal recovery of bitumen from Utah tar sands has been constructed. This reactor is a scaled-up version of an earlier system investigated at the University of Utah, and involves the use of three liquid-potassium heat pipes which thermally couple an upper pyrolysis bed with a lower combustion bed. The reactor has been studied

  6. Spring Greenhouse Bedding Plants

    E-print Network

    1 Spring Greenhouse Bedding Plants Spring GreenhouseSpring GreenhouseSpring GreenhouseSpring Greenhouse Bedding PlantsBedding PlantsBedding PlantsBedding Plants Purdue University Authors: Raymond A others. In the northern part of the country, these plants are typically grown in greenhouses in late

  7. Periodic saltation over hydrodynamically rough, erodible beds: Aeolian to Aquatic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berzi, Diego; Jenkins, James; Valance, Alexandre

    2015-04-01

    We determine approximate, analytical solutions for average, periodic trajectories of particles accelerated by the turbulent shearing of a fluid between collisions with a hydrodynamically rough, particle bed. The viscosity of the fluid may influence the collisions with the bed. The approximate solutions compare well with periodic solutions that are generated numerically. From the former, we can determine the relations between particle flux and the strength of the shearing flow over a range of particle and fluid properties that vary between those for sand in air and sand in water.

  8. Red Tide

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    U.S. Centers for Disease Control

    This CDC web page includes links to PDF or html formatted files containing information about Karenia brevis, a phytoplankton responsible for toxic red tide events. Links include information about red tide, what the CDC is doing about red tide, links to other red tide related sites, and publications about red tide.

  9. Update on Regulation of Sand Transport in the Colorado River by Changes in the Surface Grain Size of Eddy Sandbars over Multiyear Timescales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Topping, David J.; Rubin, David M.; Schmidt, John C.

    2008-01-01

    In settings where the transport of sand is partially or fully supply limited, changes in the upstream supply of sand are coupled to changes in the grain size of sand on the bed. In this manner, the transport of sand under the supply-limited case is ?grain-size regulated.? Since the closure of Glen Canyon Dam in 1963, the downstream reach of the Colorado River in Marble and Grand Canyons has exhibited evidence of sand-supply limitation. Sand transport in the river is now about equally regulated by changes in the discharge of water and changes in the grain sizes of sand on the channel bed and eddy sandbars. Previous work has shown that changes in the grain size of sand on the channel bed (driven by changes in the upstream supply of sand owing to both tributary floods and high dam releases) are important in regulating sand transport over timescales of days to months. In this study, suspended-sand data are analyzed in conjunction with bed grain-size data to determine whether changes in the sand grain size on the channel bed, or changes in the sand grain size on the surface of eddy sandbars, have been more important in regulating sand transport in the postdam Colorado River over longer, multiyear timescales. The results of this study show that this combined theory- and field-based approach can be used to deduce which environments in a complicated setting are most important for regulating sediment transport. In the case of the regulated Colorado River in Marble and upper Grand Canyons, suspended-sand transport has been regulated mostly by changes in the surface grain size of eddy sandbars.

  10. Regulation of sand transport in the Colorado River by changes in the surface grain size of eddy sandbars over multi-year timescales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Topping, D.J.; Rubin, D.M.; Schmidt, J.C.

    2005-01-01

    In settings where the transport of sand is partially or fully supply limited, changes in the upstream supply of sand are coupled to changes in the grain size of sand on the bed. In this manner, the transport of sand under the supply-limited case is 'grain-size regulated'. Since the closure of Glen Canyon Dam in 1963, the downstream reach of the Colorado River in Marble and Grand Canyons has exhibited evidence of sand-supply limitation. Sand transport in the river is now approximately equally regulated by changes in the discharge of water and changes in the grain sizes of sand on the channel bed and eddy sandbars. Previous work has shown that changes in the grain size of sand on the bed of the channel (driven by changes in the upstream supply of sand owing to both tributary floods and high dam releases) are important in regulating sand transport over timescales of days to months. In this study, suspended-sand data are analysed in conjunction with bed grain-size data to determine whether changes in the grain size of sand on the bed of the channel or changes in the grain size of sand on the surface of eddy sandbars have been more important in regulating sand transport in the post-dam Colorado River over longer, multi-year timescales. The results of this study show that this combined theory- and field-based approach can be used to deduce which environments in a complicated setting are the most important environments for regulating sediment transport. In the case of the regulated Colorado River in Marble and Upper Grand Canyons, suspended-sand transport has been regulated mostly by changes in the surface grain size of eddy sandbars. ?? 2005 International Association of Sedimentologists.

  11. Reinforced sand cores

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Martin Zoldan

    2005-01-01

    Engine blocks and cylinder heads (castings) are made of aluminum or cast iron. Molten metal, poured into molds, forms the shape of engine blocks and cylinder heads. Molds create the outside of the casting and sand cores create cavities within the casting. ^ Typically, sand cores must maintain small aspect ratios to preserve structural integrity during the casting process. The

  12. Use of microresistivity from the dipmeter to improve formation evaluation in thin sands, Northeast Kalimantan, Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Sallee, J.E.; Wood, B.R.

    1984-09-01

    Estimation of reserves in lenticular reservoirs consisting of many thin-bedded sand/shale sequences is complicated by an overly pessimistic evaluation of sand count and hydrocarbon in place when conventional log interpretation techniques are used. It is probable that thin clean sand lenses have connected permeability. Their contribution to production should be considered in the estimation of reserves. An approach has been devised to improve the evaluation of thin clean sands by introducing accurate bed boundaries between sand and shale laminae as identified clearly on the dipmeter microresistivity curve processing presentation (GEODIP). Dipmeter data are integrated into conventional computer log analyses to yield more realistic estimates of porosity and hydrocarbon saturation throughout the reservoir. The method and the results attained to date are described.

  13. Circulating Fluid Bed Combustor 

    E-print Network

    Fraley, L. D.; Do, L. N.; Hsiao, K. H.

    1982-01-01

    The circulating bed combustor represents an alternative concept of burning coal in fluid bed technology, which offers distinct advantages over both the current conventional fluidized bed combustion system and the pulverized coal boilers equipped...

  14. Circulating Fluid Bed Combustor

    E-print Network

    Fraley, L. D.; Do, L. N.; Hsiao, K. H.

    1982-01-01

    The circulating bed combustor represents an alternative concept of burning coal in fluid bed technology, which offers distinct advantages over both the current conventional fluidized bed combustion system and the pulverized coal boilers equipped...

  15. Red clover

    MedlinePLUS

    Red clover is a plant. The flower tops are used to make medicine. Red clover is used for many conditions, but so ... lowering cholesterol or controlling hot flashes in women. Red clover is used for cancer prevention, indigestion, high ...

  16. Red Clover

    MedlinePLUS

    ... links Read our disclaimer about external links Menu Red Clover Common Names: red clover, cow clover, meadow clover, wild clover Latin ... Introduction This fact sheet provides basic information about red clover—common names, what the science says, potential ...

  17. Evaluation of fluid bed heat exchanger optimization parameters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-03-01

    Uncertainty in the relationship of specific bed material properties to gas-side heat transfer in fluidized beds has inhibited the search for optimum bed materials and has led to over-conservative assumptions in the design of fluid bed heat exchangers. An experimental program was carried out to isolate the effects of particle density, thermal conductivity, and heat capacitance upon fluid bed heat transfer. A total of 31 tests were run with 18 different bed material loads on 12 material types; particle size variations were tested on several material types. The conceptual design of a fluidized bed evaporator unit was completed for a diesel exhaust heat recovery system. The evaporator heat transfer surface area was substantially reduced while the physical dimensions of the unit increased. Despite the overall increase in unit size, the overall cost was reduced. A study of relative economics associated with bed material selection was conducted. For the fluidized bed evaporator, it was found that zircon sand was the best choice among materials tested in this program, and that the selection of bed material substantially influences the overall system costs. The optimized fluid bed heat exchanger has an estimated cost 19% below a fin augmented tubular heat exchanger; 31% below a commercial design fluid bed heat exchanger; and 50% below a conventional plain tube heat exchanger. The comparisons being made for a 9.6 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/h waste heat boiler. The fluidized bed approach potentially has other advantages such as resistance to fouling. It is recommended that a study be conducted to develop a systematic selection of bed materials for fluidized bed heat exchanger applications, based upon findings of the study reported herein.

  18. Slow sand filtration of secondary clarifier effluent for wastewater reuse.

    PubMed

    Langenbach, K; Kuschk, P; Horn, H; Kästner, M

    2009-08-01

    Appropriate technologies are needed for disinfection of wastewater to allow safe reuse. Slow sand filtration is a simple technology used for pathogen and particle removal in drinking water purification. We investigated removal of fecal indicator bacteria relevant for wastewater reuse, particle removal, and runtime in slow sand filtration of secondary clarifier effluent. The key process parameters hydraulic loading rate, sand grain size distribution, and filter bed depth were systematically varied. Slow sand filters for tertiary treatment of wastewater seem promising for wastewater reuse, especially in arid developing countries. They eliminated 1.9-2.6 log10-units of E. coli and 1.9-3.0 log10-units of intestinal Enterococci reaching effluent concentrations of 11-142 CFU per 100 mL of E. coli and 2-24 CFU per 100 mL of intestinal Enterococci. Bacteria removal was shown to be a function of sand surface area, dirt layer, and supernatant water. Sand surface area per filter surface area should not be chosen below 2000 m2/m2. Slow sand filters removed 70-84% of total suspended solids reaching effluent concentrations of 1.2-2.3 mg/L and turbidity levels of 0.5-0.8 NTU. Average runtime was between 59 and 148 days. PMID:19731694

  19. Growth Performance and Health of Dairy Calves Bedded with Different Types of Materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Panivivat; E. B. Kegley; J. A. Pennington; D. W. Kellogg; S. L. Krumpelman

    2004-01-01

    Granite fines, sand, rice hulls, long wheat straw, and wood shavings were compared as bedding for 60 female dairy calves. Growth, health, stress indices, and behavior of newly born calves, along with physical characteristics and bacterial counts of bedding, were evaluated for 42 d during August to October, 2002. Overall average daily gain and dry matter intake of calves did

  20. Textural trends in turbidites and slurry beds from the Oligocene flysch of the East Carpathians, Romania

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zoltan Sylvester; Donald R. Lowe

    2004-01-01

    Deep-water sandstone beds of the Oligocene Fusaru Sandstone and Lower Dysodilic Shale, exposed in the Buza ùu Valley area of the East Carpathian flysch belt, Romania, can be described in terms of the standard turbidite divisions. In addition, mud-rich sand layers are common, both as parts of otherwise 'normal' sequences of turbidite divisions and as individual event beds. Eleven units,

  1. Continental sedimentation in the protorift of the northwest Red Sea and Gulf of Suez

    SciTech Connect

    Orszag-Sperber, F.; Plaziat, J.C.; Purser, B.H. (Universite Paris XI, Orsay (France))

    1988-08-01

    Late Oligocene-early Miocene tectonics associated with lateral and vertical displacements resulted in a series of elongate half-grabens and tilted horsts whose multidirectional orientations are oblique or parallel to the axis of the rift. The morphological-structural depressions were areas of fluviatile sedimentation whose textures and bedding clearly express early rift morphology. Prerift Eocene sediments are generally preserved, indicating the protorift in the northwest Red Sea was not associated with major doming but with the creation of blocks of moderate relief. Basal rift sediments include conglomerates and sands whose nonerosional base and inclined bedding indicate proximal slope deposition. Mudstones deposited on alluvial plains confirm moderate relief and subhorizontal morphologies in the depressions. Erosional channels and playa deposits are best developed toward the top of the continental series, suggesting increasing relief. Finally, the protorift continental beds are strongly tilted and deformed along the edges of grabens by the strike-slip and vertical movements prior to the succeeding early Miocene marine transgression. This 200 to 300 m-thick continental series exhibits many synsedimentary deformational structures deposited on sub-horizontal substrates. These structures which express repeated earthquake activity, are typical of both the continental and marine sediments and are important sedimentary expressions of early rift tectonics.

  2. Vent of Sand Volcano

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Vent of sand volcano produced by liquefaction is about 4 ft across in strawberry field near Watsonville. Strip spanning vent is conduit for drip irrigation system. Furrow spacing is about 1.2 m (4 ft) on center....

  3. Hydraulic Fracturing Sand

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Fine-grained silica sand is mixed with chemicals and water before being pumped into rock formations to prevent the newly created artificial fractures from closing after hydraulic fracturing is completed....

  4. The Morwell interseam “sands

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. M. Barton

    1971-01-01

    Interseam “sands” of Morwell form part of a sequence of brown?coal seams, sediments and volcanic rocks which, together, make up the Tertiary Latrobe Valley Coal Measures. A detailed investigation and computer analysis of the “sands” show that they are fluviatile deposits which accumulated within the tectonically stable Latrobe Valley Depression.On an inclusive?graphic comparative scale, particle?size analyses show that the sediments

  5. Packing variations on a ripple of nearly monodisperse dry sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louge, M. Y.; Valance, A.; Ould El-Moctar, A.; Dupont, P.

    2010-06-01

    Dielectric measurements reveal that bulk density on the surface of recently mobilized dry ripples of a nearly monodisperse desert sand varies from the random jammed packing at troughs to the minimum value for a stable packing at crests, suggesting that active ripples are relatively loose structures moving above a more consolidated substratum. Although the wind-driven evolution of static pressure on the surface induces air seepage through sand, we show that such internal flow is not strong enough to swell the bed and explain variations of bulk density on the surface.

  6. BLAISDELL SLOW SAND FILTER WASHING MACHINE. VIEW LOOKING SOUTH. THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BLAISDELL SLOW SAND FILTER WASHING MACHINE. VIEW LOOKING SOUTH. THE SUCTION (INTAKE) HOSE IS SEEN AT THE LEFT RESTING ON THE FILTER BED SURFACE; THE DISCHARGE HOSE IS AT THE RIGHT, RUNNING FROM THE BOTTOM OF THE CENTRAL VERTICAL AXLE TO THE CENTRIFUGAL PUMP. FROM THE PUMP WATER IS DISCHARGED THROUGH THE HORIZONTAL PIPE LOCATED UNDER THE EDGE OF PLATFORM DECK INTO THE WASTE-WATER TROUGH (NOT SEEN IN THIS VIEW). - Yuma Main Street Water Treatment Plant, Blaisdell Slow Sand Filter Washing Machine, Jones Street at foot of Main Street, Yuma, Yuma County, AZ

  7. Incident Angle of Saltating Particles in Wind-Blown Sand

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Lin-Tao; Bo, Tian-Li; Gu, Hai-Hua; Zheng, Xiao-Jing

    2013-01-01

    Incident angle of saltating particles plays a very important role in aeolian events. In this paper, the incident angles of sand particles near the sand bed were measured in wind tunnel. It reveals that the incident angles range widely from 0° to 180° and thereby the means of angles are larger than published data. Surprisingly, it is found the proportion that angles of 5°–15° occupy is far below previous reports. The measuring height is probably the most important reason for the measurement differences between this study and previous investigations. PMID:23874470

  8. Experimental study and modeling of fluidized bed coating and agglomeration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Saleh; D. Steinmetz; M. Hemati

    2003-01-01

    This work deals with the fluidized bed coating and agglomeration of solid particles. The effect of particle size on coating criteria was investigated using sand particles as the coating support and aqueous solutions containing NaCl as coating liquid. The results showed that both growth rate and efficiency increase with decreasing the particle size. The growth was mainly governed by layering

  9. Filtration of nano-particles by a gas–solid fluidized bed

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kuang-Yu Liu; Ming-Yen Wey

    2007-01-01

    The filtration of 80nm SiO2 and Al2O3 particles in a gas stream using fluidized beds was studied. Silica sand and activated carbon (A.C.) were adopted as bed materials to filtrate 80nm SiO2 and Al2O3 particles. The collected particles were elutriated from the fluidized bed, so the filtration was a dynamic process and the variations of the removal efficiency with time

  10. Fluidized bed combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgkin, A.F.

    1980-12-16

    The invention relates to fluidized bed combustors that might tilt in use so that the depth of the bed progressively changes across its width. Air is supplied from two or more sources and means are provided to vary the flow from the sources as the bed tilts so that the air supplied to the portion of the bed of increased depth is increased relatively to the air supplied to the portion of the bed of lesser depth.

  11. A sand budget for Marble Canyon, Arizona: implications for long-term monitoring of sand storage change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grams, Paul E.

    2013-01-01

    Recent U.S. Geological Survey research is providing important insights into how best to monitor changes in the amount of tributary-derived sand stored on the bed of the Colorado River and in eddies in Marble Canyon, Arizona. Before the construction of Glen Canyon Dam and other dams upstream, sandbars in Glen, Marble, and Grand Canyons were replenished each year by sediment-rich floods. Sand input into the Colorado River is crucial to protecting endangered native fish, animals, and plants and cultural and recreational resources along the river in Glen Canyon National Recreation Area and Grand Canyon National Park.

  12. Fundamentals of agglomeration in a fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.S.

    1985-01-01

    A visually observable fluidized bed, which can be operated under conditions in which agglomeration of the bed materials occurs, was designed and constructed. Polyethylene particles and silica sand coated with a thin layer of Elvax were chosen as bed materials. The coated particles used were in three different size ranges +180-250, +250-425, +425-600 ..mu..m and had three different coating thicknesses, 1, 3, and 5 ..mu..m. Two types of fluidized gas distributors were used: a porous plate with an independently fed jet at the center. The fluidized bed could be operated in either continuous-feed mode or in batch mode. In the case of polyethylene particles as bed material in the batch system, the amount of agglomerates increased linearly with residence time and increased exponentially with either auxiliary air or jet air temperature. The amount of agglomerates increased with jet nozzle size at the constant jet air flow rate. For a given jet nozzle size the agglomeration rate increased initially with jet air velocity, reached a maximum value and then decreased. In the case of coated particle as bed material, in the batch fluidized bed, the amount of agglomerates increased with residence time and then leveled off. It increased sharply with jet air temperature, coating thickness, concentration of coated particles and decreasing particle sizes. The agglomeration rate constants calculated from the model agree reasonably well with those obtained from experimental data. The model provides the better understanding of the complicated phenomena of agglomeration and could be an initial guide in choosing the operating conditions of an agglomerating fluidized bed.

  13. Effects of stratification in a fluidized bed bioreactor during treatment of metalworking wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Schreyer, H.B.; Coughlin, R.W. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1999-04-20

    During wastewater treatment, biofilm-coated sand particles stratified in a fluidized bed bioreactor (FBB); particles coated by thicker biofilm segregated toward the top of the bed. Stratification was so well developed that at least two co-existing regions of significantly different mean biofilm thickness were visually distinct within the operating FBB. The observed stratification is attributed to differences in forces of drag, buoyancy, shear, and collisional impact, as well as differences of collision rate within the different regions. Particles with thick biofilm near the top of the bed consumed substrate at significantly lower rates per unit biomass than particles with thin biofilm near the bottom of the bed, thereby suggesting that substrate mass-transfer resistance through biofilm may limit biodegradation rates in the upper portion of the FBB. Large agglomerates of biomass floc and sand, which formed at the top of the fluidized bed, and sand particles with thick biofilm were susceptible to washout from the FBB, causing operational and treatment instability. Radial injection of supplemental liquid feed near the top of the bed increased shear and mixing, thereby preventing formation and washout of agglomerates and thickly coated sand particles. Supplemental liquid injection caused the mean specific biomass loading on the sand to increase and also increased the total biomass inventory in the FBB. Rates of biodegradation in the FBB appeared to be limited by penetration of substrates into the biofilm and absorption of oxygen from air into the wastewater.

  14. Effects of shear elasticity on sea bed scattering: numerical examples.

    PubMed

    Ivakin, A N; Jackson, D R

    1998-01-01

    It is known that marine sediments can support both compressional and shear waves. However, published work on scattering from irregular elastic media has not examined the influence of shear on sea bed scattering in detail. A perturbation model previously developed by the authors for joint roughness-volume scattering is used to study the effects of elasticity for three sea bed types: sedimentary rock, sand with high shear speed, and sand with "normal" shear wave speed. Both bistatic and monostatic cases are considered. For sedimentary rock it is found that shear elasticity tends to increase the importance of volume scattering and decrease the importance of roughness scattering relative to the fluid case. Shear effects are shown to be small for sands. PMID:9440329

  15. RBF modeling of Incipient Motion of Plane Sand Bed Channels

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gopu Sreenivasulu; Bimlesh Kumar; Achanta Ramakrishna Rao

    2008-01-01

    To define or predict incipient motion in an alluvial channel, most of the investigators use a standard or modified form of Shields' diagram. Shields' diagram does give a process to determine the incipient motion parameters but an iterative one. To design properly (without iteration), one should have another equation for resistance. Absence of a universal resistance equation also magnifies the

  16. Sound-Producing Sand Avalanches

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Bretz, Michael

    This site presents an analysis of the theories and experiments done so far on sound-producing (e.g., roaring, booming) sand avalanches. Several reference articles are cited, and a link to the summary of an article, "Booming Sand", in Scientific American volume 277, number 3, is provided. An on site version of another article, "Sound Producing Sand Avalanches", in Contemporary Physics, volume 38, number 5, is also presented in three different formats: PDF, HTML, and Postscript Preprint.The other main features of this site are sound recordings of booming sand, compressed squeaking sand, and croaking sand, as well as, and images and micrographs of booming dunes.

  17. Birthmarks - red

    MedlinePLUS

    Red birthmarks are skin markings created by blood vessels close to the skin surface. They develop before ... There are two main categories of birthmarks: Red birthmarks are made ... vascular birthmarks. Pigmented birthmarks are areas in which ...

  18. Eye redness

    MedlinePLUS

    Bloodshot eyes; Red eyes; Scleral infection; Conjunctival infection ... There are many causes of a red eye or eyes. Some are medical emergencies and some are a cause for concern, but not an emergency. Others are nothing to ...

  19. National Metal Casting Research Institute final report. Volume 1, Sand reclamation

    SciTech Connect

    Vondra, L.F.; Burningham, J.S. [University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA (United States). Dept. of Industrial Technology

    1995-08-01

    A mobile thermal foundry sand reclamation unit was designed and constructed. This unit consisted of thermal and mechanical sand reclamation equipment installed on the bed of a 50 foot low-boy trailer. It was transported to a number of Midwest foundries for on-site demonstration of the sand reclamation process. This allowed participating foundries to have their own refuse sand (10-100 tons) processed and then reused in production for evaluation. The purpose for building the unit was to demonstrate to foundries through ``hands on`` experience that refuse sands can be reclaimed and successfully reused particularly in regard to product quality. Most of the participating foundries indicated a high level of satisfaction with the reclaimed sand. Laboratory testing of samples of the used sand, before and after processing by the demonstration unit, verified the usability of the reclaimed sand. One of the foundries participating was a brass foundry, the sand from this foundry contained lead and is classified as a hazardous material. After reclamation the sand was no longer hazardous and could also be reused in the foundry.

  20. Ganges Chasma Sand Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Our topic for the weeks of April 4 and April 11 is dunes on Mars. We will look at the north polar sand sea and at isolated dune fields at lower latitudes. Sand seas on Earth are often called 'ergs,' an Arabic name for dune field. A sand sea differs from a dune field in two ways: 1) a sand sea has a large regional extent, and 2) the individual dunes are large in size and complex in form.

    Today's sand sheet is located in the Ganges Chasma portion of Valles Marineris. As with yesterday's image, note that the dune forms are seen only at the margin and that the interior of the sand sheet at this resolution appears to completely lack dune forms.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -6.4, Longitude 310.7 East (49.3 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  1. Red Sea

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    article title:  The Red Sea     View Larger Image ... Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) image of the Red Sea was acquired on August 13, 2000. Located between the East African coast and the Saudi Arabian peninsula, the Red Sea got its name because the blooms of a type of algae,  Trichodesmium ...

  2. Characterization of the L-1 sand using well logs and amplitude attribute analysis

    E-print Network

    Ratliff, Thomas Lee

    1989-01-01

    University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Joel S. Watkins The L-1 sand (located in the Gulf Coastal Plain of Texas) is the first sand of the Miocene and lies just above the Anahuac marine shale. Its thickness ranges from 9? 64 feet throughout the study... of the Early Miocene B Petrophysical properties determined using well logs C Using SP logs to determine depositional environment D Resolution, amplitude, and bed thickness E Pore fluid tie acoustic impedence F Reflection strength and instantaneous phase...

  3. Heterogeneous catalytic ozonation of benzothiazole aqueous solution promoted by volcanic sand

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Valdés; F. A. Murillo; J. A. Manoli; C. A. Zaror

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results on the catalytic effect of volcanic sands on benzothiazole ozonation. Experiments were assessed at laboratory scale, in a differential circular flow reactor composed of a volcanic sand fixed bed column of 19cm3 and a 1dm3 storage tank, operated in batch mode at 20°C and pH 2–7. Experimental results show that ozone self-decomposition is enhanced by

  4. A Multiphase First Order Model for Non-Equilibrium Sand Erosion, Transport and Sedimentation

    E-print Network

    Preziosi, Luigi; Bruno, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Three phenomena are involved in sand movement: erosion, wind transport, and sedimentation. This paper presents a comprehensive easy-to-use multiphase model that include all three aspects with a particular attention to situations in which erosion due to wind shear and sedimentation due to gravity are not in equilibrium. The interest is related to the fact that these are the situations leading to a change of profile of the sand bed.

  5. Phosphorus accummulation in reed bed treatment filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karczmarczyk, A.; Bary?a, A.

    2009-04-01

    Introduction Constructed wetlands are well known method for alternative wastewater treatment in rural areas in Poland. There are mainly used as a biological treatment step of domestic wastewater. The most popular are subsurface flow constructed wetlands (reed bed systems) with bed filled with site soil (mainly clayey sand or sandy clay). Over 30 such plants with daily flow above 5 m3 per day is operated in Poland. Object and goal of research Many researches have been made on estimation constructed wetlands treatment efficiency, however there are mostly concentrated on inlet outlet concentration compartments. In this study preliminary results of phosphorus accumulation in the bed of horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetland are presented. Monitored plant treats wastewater from 150 inhabitants in the volume of 14 m3 d-1 at average and is under operation from December 1998. The goal of research was to asses the distribution of phosphorus in the wetland bed after 8 years of treatment of domestic wastewater. Obtained results are shown on the background of organic matter (TOC) distribution. The methods applied The bed of the constructed wetland (30 m width and 33 m length) was divided by net of 20 points. In every point two soil samples, one from the depth of 0-10 cm and one from the depth of 20-30 cm, were collected. The samples were analyzed for organic matter and total phosphorus content. Investigation findings The results showed variation of measured indexes on the length and depth of treatment bed. In generally, the highest accumulation occurred near the inlet zone of wetland. The relation is rather clear in case of organic matter, but in case of phosphorus high contents were also observed at the outlet zone of wetland. Higher organic matter concentrations were observed in deeper layer (20-30 cm) than in upper layer (0-10 cm) of the bed.

  6. Bed rest during pregnancy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... welcome break. But you will find that bed rest during pregnancy can be as much work as it is ... normally do. If you're on complete bed rest during pregnancy, you might not even be able to shower ...

  7. Bed material agglomeration during fluidized bed combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.C.; Dawson, M.R.; Noble, S.

    1993-02-01

    The purpose of this project is to determine the physical and chemical reactions which led to the undesired agglomeration of bed material during fluidized bed combustion and to relate these reactions to specific causes. Survey of industrial-scale fluidized bed combustors is being conducted to determine the occurrence of bed agglomeration and the circumstances under which agglomeration took place. This task should be finished by the end of February. Samples of bed material, agglomerate material, and boiler deposits are being requested from boiler operators as part of the survey. Once received, these sample will be analyzed to determine chemical and mineralogic composition. The bulk chemical determination will be performed using x-ray fluorescence and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission (ICP). Mineralogy will be detected by x-ray diffraction (XRD). Chemical and mineral reactions will be determined by scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy, and electron microprobe.

  8. Joaquim Sande Silva Francisco Rego

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Joaquim Sande Silva Francisco Rego Paulo Fernandes Eric Rigolot (editors) Towards Integrated Fire ­ Outcomes of the European Project Fire Paradox Joaquim Sande Silva, Francisco Rego, Paulo Fernandes and Eric

  9. Sand Hill Rd. Junipero Serra

    E-print Network

    Stanford University

    Alpine 280 101 Campus Drive Sand Hill Rd. University Palm StockFarm Junipero Serra Page Mill Oregon Floor, South Wing right next to Peet's Coffee. Directions from 280 North or South - Exit Sand Hill Rd

  10. Bed Bugs FAQs

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for long periods of time, even without a blood meal. Bed bugs are usually transported from place to place as people travel. The bed bugs travel in the seams and folds of luggage, overnight bags, folded clothes, bedding, furniture, and anywhere else where ...

  11. Making a Bed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wexler, Anthony; Stein, Sherman

    2005-01-01

    The origins of this paper lay in making beds by putting pieces of plywood on a frame: If beds need to be 4 feet 6 inches by 6 feet 3 inches, and plywood comes in 4-foot by 8-foot sheets, how should one cut the plywood to minimize waste (and have stable beds)? The problem is of course generalized.

  12. Sand and sandstone

    SciTech Connect

    Pettijohn, F.J.; Potter, P.E.; Siever, R.

    1987-01-01

    Here is a new, second edition of a classical textbook in sedimentology, petrology, and petrography of sand and sandstones. It has been extensively revised and updated, including: new techniques and their utility; new literature; new illustrations; new, explicitly stated problems for the student; and a wider scope.

  13. Building with Sand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2010-01-01

    Children playing in damp sand invariably try to make a tower or a tunnel. By providing experiences with a variety of materials, alone and together, teachers set up the conditions for children to learn through their senses and ensure that a class approaches a topic with a common set of experiences to build on. Learning about the properties of…

  14. Introduction Sand sole, Psettichthys melanostictus,

    E-print Network

    67(4) 9 Introduction Sand sole, Psettichthys melanostictus, is a common nearshore pleuronectid flat- fish in the northeast Pacific Ocean.Also known as fringe sole, spotted flounder, or sand flounder catches (Kramer et al., 1995). Commercial landings of sand sole in California, Oregon, and Wash- ington

  15. Intramural Sports Sand Volleyball League

    E-print Network

    Escher, Christine

    Intramural Sports Sand Volleyball League Summer 2014 Intramural Sports Calendar of Events Summer_SCIM Sports@oregonstate.edu Free Agents Free Agent players without a teammate for the Summer Sand Volleyball Thursday, June 26th Monday, June 30th Sand Volleyball League Thursday, June 26th Tuesday, July 1st Futsal

  16. Special report: Athabasca tar sands

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. A. Bachman; D. H. Stormont

    1967-01-01

    A synthetic crude oil is being produced from the Athabasca oil sands region of northeastern Alberta. The Athabasca operations are broken down into 3 divisions: mining, extraction of oil from the sand, and pipelining to market. The entire project, operated by Great Canadian Oil Sands, Ltd., an affiliate of Sun Oil Co., is self-sufficient except for the water supply. By-

  17. Oil sands fulfill their promise

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chaapel

    2009-01-01

    The Great Canadian Oil Sands plant, a $300 million investment for Sun Oil Co., is the first commercial facility to wrest oil from the Alberta tar sands. Energy companies are poised to invest more than $3 billion in oil sands development in the next several years. Construction already underway, planning for projects to come, and the widening scope of oil

  18. Northern Sand Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Our topic for the weeks of April 4 and April 11 is dunes on Mars. We will look at the north polar sand sea and at isolated dune fields at lower latitudes. Sand seas on Earth are often called 'ergs,' an Arabic name for dune field. A sand sea differs from a dune field in two ways: 1) a sand sea has a large regional extent, and 2) the individual dunes are large in size and complex in form.

    This VIS image was taken at 82 degrees North latitude during Northern spring. The image is completely dominated by dunes. In sand seas, it is very common for a single type of dune to occur, and for a single predominate wind to control the alignment of the dunes.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 82.2, Longitude 152.5 East (207.5 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  19. CADMIUM EFFECTS ON THE NITROGEN FIXATION SYSTEM OF RED ALDER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Red alder (Alnus rubra) was grown in sand culture in the greenhouse to obtain data on the effects of cadmium (Cd) on a symbiotic nitrogen (N) fixation system which contributes to the fertility of forest soils. Treatment of red alder seedlings for 11 weeks with 0.545 to 136 microm...

  20. Simulation on hydraulic scale model of sand and silt transport in the lower Mississippi River

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, S. [Hydropower and River Engineering, Le Beausset (France); Laukhuff, R.L. Jr. [Louisiana Hydroelectric, Vidalia, LA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Since many years river sediment transport of sand and silt has been successfully reproduced on scale models by using light density materials. Compared to geometric distortion of the model scales where the secondary currents are not correctly reproduced, the sediment density distortion enables a more precise simulation of total sediment transport process (bed load and suspended load). The paper discussed among other model studies carried out with light density material the model study of the old River Control outflow channel improvement and bank stabilization studies using a 1 to 100 scale physical model. Some of the aspects of the channel bed and bank evolution could not have been simulated if the model bed material behaved always as bed load. Because in a river or channel carrying sand and silt, depending on the flow turbulence the same material at times my represent the bed load and at another time the suspended load. On a scale model only certain type of light density material is capable of such representation. Various model studies to date enables us to confirm that, 1 to 100 scale model using treated sawdust of given grain size distribution and specific weight, reproduces correctly the river sand and silt transport in the Old River Control area of the Lower Mississippi River. The paper also discusses the use of a midget echosounder system for quick and precise hydroelectric survey of the model bed and bank morphology variations and evaluation of scour and deposit volumes after running a given flood hydrograph.

  1. Map showing high-purity silica sand of Middle Ordovician age in the Midwestern states

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ketner, Keith B.

    1979-01-01

    Certain quartz sands of Middle Ordovician age in the Midwestern States are well known for their purity and are exploited for a wide variety of industrial uses. The principal Middle Ordovician formations containing high-purity sands are the St. Peter Sandstone which crops out extensively from Minnesota to Arkansas; the Everton Formation principally of Arkansas; and the Oil Creek, McLish, and Tulip Creek Formations (all of the Simpson Group) of Oklahoma. The St. Peter and sandy beds in the other formations are commonly called "sandstones," but a more appropriate term is "sands" for in most fresh exposures they are completely uncemented or very weakly cemented. On exposure to air, uncemented sands usually become "case hardened" where evaporating ground water precipitates mineral matter at the surface; but this is a surficial effect. This report summarizes the available information on the extent of exposures, range of grain size, and chemical composition of the Middle Ordovician sands.

  2. Multiple dust sources in the Sahara Desert: The importance of sand dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouvi, Onn; Schepanski, Kerstin; Amit, Rivka; Gillespie, Alan R.; Enzel, Yehouda

    2012-07-01

    We determine the current sources of dust in the Sahara Desert using quantitative correlation between the number of days with dust storms (NDS), derived from remote-sensing data of high temporal resolution, with the distribution of the soil types and geomorphic units. During 2006-8 the source of over 90% of the NDS was found to be sand dunes, leptosols, calcisols, arenosols, and rock debris. In contrast to previous studies, only few dust storms originated from playas and dry lake beds. Land erodibility was estimated by regressing the NDS to the number of days with high-speed wind events, and was found to be high for sand dunes. Clay and fine-silt grains and aggregates are scarce in sand dunes, which most likely produce dust particles through aeolian abrasion of sand grains. Thus, saltating sand grains impacting clay aggregates on playa surfaces cannot be the sole process for generating dust in the Sahara.

  3. Exercise Training During Bed Rest Attenuates Deconditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Hargens, Alan R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    A 30-day 6 deg. head-down bed rest study was conducted to evaluate high-intensity, short-duration, alternating isotonic cycle ergometer exercise (ITE) training and high-intensity intermittent isokinetic exercise (IKE) training regiments designed to maintain peak VO2 and muscle mass, strength, and endurance at ambulatory control levels throughout prolonged bed rest. Other elements of the deconditioning (acclimation) syndrome, such as proprioception, psychological performance, hypovolemia, water balance, body composition, and orthostatic tolerance, were also measured. Compared with response during bed rest of the no exercise (NOE) control group: the ITE training regimen (a) maintained work capacity (peak VO2), (b) maintained plasma and red cell volume, (c) induced positive body water balance, (d) decreased quality of sleep and mental concentration, and (e) had no effect on the decrease in orthostatic tolerance; the IKE training regimen (a) attenuated the decrease in peak VO2 by 50%, (b) attenuated loss of red cell volume by 40%, but had no effect on loss of plasma volume, (c) induced positive body water balance, (d) had no adverse effect on quality of sleep or concentration, and (e) had no effect on the decrease in orthostatic tolerance. These findings suggest that various elements of the deconditioning syndrome can be manipulated by duration and intensity of ITE or IKE training regiments, and that several different training protocols will be required to maintain or restore physiological and psychological performance of individuals confined to prolonged bed rest.

  4. An investigation of the heat transfer behavior of longitudinal finned membrane water wall tubes in circulating fluidized bed boilers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anusorn Chinsuwan; Animesh Dutta

    2009-01-01

    Experiments were conducted in a cold model circulating fluidized bed (CFB) having riser cross sectional area of 100 mm×100 mm, height of 4.8 m, bed temperature of 75°C and superficial velocity of 8 ms?1. Local sand having average diameter of 231 ?m, particle density of 2774 kg m?3 and bulk density of 1515 kg m?3 was used as bed material. The experiments were conducted for three

  5. Operation Characteristics in a Fluidized Bed Gasifier with Triple-beds and Dual Circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Takahiro; Asai, Minoru; Suzuki, Yoshizo

    A new type of circulating fluidized bed gasifier was proposed. The main features of this proposed gasifier are the adoption of a triple-beds structure (comprising pyrolyzer, gasifier, and combustor), the separation of a circulation path for tar-absorbing material and that for the fuel and silica sand. Independent circulation systems are employed for the fuel system and for the tar-absorbing particles, and the pyrolyzer and gasifier each have a two-stage fluidized bed: the lower stage is for the fuel system and the upper stage is for the tar-absorbing system. The two circulation systems each have an independent combustor. This new gasifier is called “a fluidized bed gasifier with triple-beds and dual circulation”. The objectives of this work are to clarify the operation characteristics by using a laboratory-scale cold model. As a result, the stable circulation of the particle in upper and lower stages was able to be verified. Additionally, a wide range of the particle circulation rate, which contains the target value, was obtained. The particle circulation rate can be arranged by pressure drop of riser.

  6. Hyporheic exchange of solutes and colloids with moving bed forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packman, Aaron I.; Brooks, Norman H.

    2001-10-01

    Stream-subsurface exchange provides the opportunity for stream-borne substances to interact with streambed sediments in the subsurface hyporheic mixing zone. The downstream transport of both solutes and colloids can be substantially affected by this exchange, with significant implications for contaminant transport and stream ecology. Several previous studies have demonstrated that bed form-induced advective flows (pumping) and scour/deposition of bed sediments (turnover) will often be the dominant processes controlling local exchange with the streambed. A new model is presented for combined turnover and pumping exchange due to relatively fast-moving bed forms, i.e., when turnover dominates the exchange in the upper part of the bed where active bed sediment transport occurs. While turnover rapidly mixes the upper layer of the bed, advective pumping produces exchange with the deeper, unsecured region of the subsurface. The net exchange due to these processes was analyzed using fundamental hydraulic principles: the initial exchange was calculated using an existing geometric model for turnover, and then the later exchange was determined by analyzing the advective flow induced under the moving bed form field. The exchange of colloidal particles due to moving bed forms was also modeled by considering the further effects of particle settling and filtration in the subsurface. Experiments were conducted in a recirculating flume to evaluate solute (conservative Li+) and colloid (kaolinite) exchange with a sand bed. The solute and colloid exchange models performed well for fast-moving bed forms, but underpredicted the colloid exchanges observed with lower rates of bed sediment transport. For very slowly moving bed forms it was found that turnover could be completely neglected, and observed colloid exchanges were represented well by a pure pumping model. In the intermediate case where turnover and pumping rates are similar, water carried into the bed by turnover is immediately released by pumping, and vice versa. Thus, while this work further elucidated the basic processes controlling solute and colloid exchange with a bed covered by bed forms and provided a fundamental model for exchange due to fast-moving bed forms, exchange in the intermediate case where turnover and pumping tend to compete can only be bounded by current models.

  7. Numerical simulation of bed morphodynamics in natural waterways: From ripples to dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiropoulos, F.; Khosronejad, A.

    2012-12-01

    We develop and validate a 3D numerical model for coupled simulations of turbulence and sand-bed morphodynamics in natural waterways under live bed conditions. We employ the Fluid-Structure Interaction Curvilinear Immersed Boundary (FSI-CURVIB) method of Khosronejad et al. (Adv. in Water Res., 2011). The mobile channel bed is discretized with an unstructured triangular grid and treated as the sharp-interface immersed boundary embedded in a background curvilinear mesh. Transport of bed load and suspended load sediments are combined in the non-equilibrium form of the Exner-Poyla for the bed surface elevation, which evolves due to the spatio-temporally varying bed shear stress and velocity vector induced by the turbulent flow field. Both unsteady RANS and large-eddy simulation (LES) models are implemented to simulate the effects of turbulence. Simulations are carried out for a wide range of waterways, from small scale streams to large-scale rivers with and without embedded in stream structures, and the simulated sand-waves are quantitatively compared to available measurements. It is shown that the model can accurately capture sand-wave formation, growth, and migration processes observed in nature. The simulated bed-forms are found to have amplitude and wave length scales ranging from the order of centimeters up to several meters.

  8. Bed form initiation from a flat sand bed Jeremy G. Venditti1,2

    E-print Network

    Venditti, Jeremy G.

    -shaped forms that migrate independently of the initial pattern. The chevrons eventually align to form incipient by Anderson [1953], perturbation theory involves the linearization of the equations of motion of both fluid

  9. Red Tides

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Communications Directorate, Department of Fisheries and Oceans

    This comprehensive website answers questions such as: what is red tide, where are they found, why do they occur, how do they affect marine organisms, how do they affect humans, how are shellfish tested for the toxin, and what is being done to remediate the red tide problem. The site features color pictures and black and white maps.

  10. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Evapotranspiration Bed

    E-print Network

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    1999-09-01

    such as tire chips, or storage systems such as leaching chambers, may be used for the storage trenches. A water-permeable soil barrier (a geotextile filter fabric) is placed over the rock. A loam soil is added to fill the bed to within two inches of the top... inches to a maximum of 36 inches deep. Divert rainfall runoff around the system 2 to 3 inch perforated monitoring pipe Geotextile fabricLoam soil Sand cushion PVC liner 2 foot maximum spacing 4 foot space Alternate crushed stone bed 12" 18" min 36" max...

  11. Fluidized bed combustor modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horio, M.; Rengarajan, P.; Krishnan, R.; Wen, C. Y.

    1977-01-01

    A general mathematical model for the prediction of performance of a fluidized bed coal combustor (FBC) is developed. The basic elements of the model consist of: (1) hydrodynamics of gas and solids in the combustor; (2) description of gas and solids contacting pattern; (3) kinetics of combustion; and (4) absorption of SO2 by limestone in the bed. The model is capable of calculating the combustion efficiency, axial bed temperature profile, carbon hold-up in the bed, oxygen and SO2 concentrations in the bubble and emulsion phases, sulfur retention efficiency and particulate carry over by elutriation. The effects of bed geometry, excess air, location of heat transfer coils in the bed, calcium to sulfur ratio in the feeds, etc. are examined. The calculated results are compared with experimental data. Agreement between the calculated results and the observed data are satisfactory in most cases. Recommendations to enhance the accuracy of prediction of the model are suggested.

  12. Removal of microcystins by slow sand filtration.

    PubMed

    Grützmacher, Gesche; Böttcher, Gabriele; Chorus, Ingrid; Bartel, Hartmut

    2002-01-01

    To assess the elimination potential of slow sand filters for cyanobacterial hepatotoxins (microcystins), two full-scale experiments were conducted using the German Federal Environment Agency's experimental field in Berlin, Germany. One experiment was carried out with dissolved microcystins extracted from a cyanobacterial bloom on one of Berlin's lakes, dosed as short-term, single-pulse application. The other experiment simulated natural conditions more closely, with a longer-term exposure of the filter to living cyanobacterial cells (collected from the same lake) so that most toxins were initially contained inside the cells. The microcystins were detected by ELISA and HPLC/photodiode array detector and subsequently identified by MALDI-TOF MS. The experiment with dissolved microcystins yielded very high elimination rates (>95%) inside the filter bed attributed to biodegradation, whereas retardation by adsorption was low. The obtained half-lives for the microcystins detected by ELISA were about 1 h. The second experiment, which was with mostly cell-bound microcystins, showed similar results during the first days after application of cyanobacteria (elimination >85%). As the population declined in late autumn, the proportion of extracellular to cell-bound microcystins increased. At the same time the elimination rates declined to values <60%. This decline is most likely attributable to retarded biodegradation at temperatures of <4 degrees C. Altogether the results of the experiments show that under moderate temperatures, with an intact schmutzdecke (biofilm) with previous contact with microcystins, slow sand filtration is an effective treatment for eliminating microcystins from drinking water. PMID:12203961

  13. Hydraulic Sorting of Heavy-Mineral Grains by Swash on a Medium-Sand Beach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MICHAEL G. HUGHES; JOCK B. KEENE; REBECCA G. JOSEPH

    2000-01-01

    Hydraulic sorting of detrital mineral grains in the swash zone was investigated using data on sedimentology and flow dynamics obtained from Fishermans Beach, on the east coast of Australia. The beach is characteristically reflective, displaying a steep beach face com- posed of medium sand and virtually no surf zone. Samples were taken from two beds enriched in heavy minerals, and

  14. Numerical modeling of wave overwash on low-crested sand barriers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Q. Tuan; H. J. Verhagen; P. J. Visser; M. Stive

    2006-01-01

    For management of coastal breaching hazards it is critical to be able to assess the potential of coastal barrier breaching as a result of wave actions during storm surges (wave overwash). This phenomenon is known as the breach initiation phase; the mechanisms behind this are not very well understood. In the present study, laboratory experiments of mobile-bed (sand) barrier were

  15. Bed rest in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Bigelow, Catherine; Stone, Joanne

    2011-01-01

    The use of bed rest in medicine dates back to Hippocrates, who first recommended bed rest as a restorative measure for pain. With the formalization of prenatal care in the early 1900s, maternal bed rest became a standard of care, especially toward the end of pregnancy. Antepartum bed rest is a common obstetric management tool, with up to 95% of obstetricians utilizing maternal activity restriction in some way in their practice. Bed rest is prescribed for a variety of complications of pregnancy, from threatened abortion and multiple gestations to preeclampsia and preterm labor. Although the use of bed rest is pervasive, there is a paucity of data to support its use. Additionally, many well-documented adverse physical, psychological, familial, societal, and financial effects have been discussed in the literature. There have been no complications of pregnancy for which the literature consistently demonstrates a benefit to antepartum bed rest. Given the well-documented adverse effects of bed rest, disruption of social relationships, and financial implications of this intervention, there is a real need for scientific investigation to establish whether this is an appropriate therapeutic modality. Well-designed randomized, controlled trials of bed rest versus normal activity for various complications of pregnancy are required to lay this debate to rest once and for all. PMID:21425272

  16. GEOPHYSICALRESEARCHLETTERS, VOL. 11, NO. 3, PAGES229-232, MARCH1984 MAGNETIC REMANENCE AND FABRIC PROPERTIES OF LABORATORY-DEPOSITED HEMATITE-BEARING RED SANDSTONE

    E-print Network

    Torsvik, Trond Helge

    PROPERTIES OF LABORATORY-DEPOSITED HEMATITE-BEARING RED SANDSTONE R. L·vlie and T. Torsvik Geophysical magnetization in red beds is generally attributed to either diagenetic formation of hematite, by which of DRM in red beds is still a matter of dispute, partly due to incomplete knowledge of the properties

  17. Compressive behavior of fine sand.

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Bradley E. (Air Force Research Laboratory, Eglin, FL); Kabir, Md. E. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Song, Bo; Chen, Wayne (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN)

    2010-04-01

    The compressive mechanical response of fine sand is experimentally investigated. The strain rate, initial density, stress state, and moisture level are systematically varied. A Kolsky bar was modified to obtain uniaxial and triaxial compressive response at high strain rates. A controlled loading pulse allows the specimen to acquire stress equilibrium and constant strain-rates. The results show that the compressive response of the fine sand is not sensitive to strain rate under the loading conditions in this study, but significantly dependent on the moisture content, initial density and lateral confinement. Partially saturated sand is more compliant than dry sand. Similar trends were reported in the quasi-static regime for experiments conducted at comparable specimen conditions. The sand becomes stiffer as initial density and/or confinement pressure increases. The sand particle size become smaller after hydrostatic pressure and further smaller after dynamic axial loading.

  18. Bedding Sample Information Tag Farm Name: ________________________________________

    E-print Network

    Keinan, Alon

    Bedding Sample Information Tag Farm Name: ________________________________________ Address? _____ How often cleaned/bedded per week? _____ Bedding Sample Information Tag Farm Name? _____ Bedding Sample Information Tag Farm Name: ________________________________________ Address

  19. Red Sky with Red Mesa

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2014-06-23

    The Red Sky/Red Mesa supercomputing platform dramatically reduces the time required to simulate complex fuel models, from 4-6 months to just 4 weeks, allowing researchers to accelerate the pace at which they can address these complex problems. Its speed also reduces the need for laboratory and field testing, allowing for energy reduction far beyond data center walls.

  20. Red Sky with Red Mesa

    SciTech Connect

    None

    2011-04-14

    The Red Sky/Red Mesa supercomputing platform dramatically reduces the time required to simulate complex fuel models, from 4-6 months to just 4 weeks, allowing researchers to accelerate the pace at which they can address these complex problems. Its speed also reduces the need for laboratory and field testing, allowing for energy reduction far beyond data center walls.

  1. Bed Bug Information Website Resources

    E-print Network

    Sibille, Etienne

    stage immature bed bugs are light colored, somewhat translucent and only 1mm in length Adult bed bugsBed Bug Information Website Resources: www.bedbugger.com www.bedbugcentral.com http are approximately ¼ inch in length and are reddish ­brown in color Bed bugs are nocturnal Can be found in bed

  2. Red Capes, Red Herrings, and Red Flags.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiske, Donald W.

    The argument that the personality structures obtained from retrospective ratings reflect semantic similarity structures has been as provocative as a red cape in the bull ring. High congruence between those two kinds of structures seems well established. What is less clear is how and why those structures differ from that for immediate judgments of…

  3. Laboratory singing sand avalanches.

    PubMed

    Dagois-Bohy, Simon; Ngo, Sandrine; du Pont, Sylvain Courrech; Douady, Stéphane

    2010-02-01

    Some desert sand dunes have the peculiar ability to emit a loud sound up to 110 dB, with a well-defined frequency: this phenomenon, known since early travelers (Darwin, Marco Polo, etc.), has been called the song of dunes. But only in late 19th century scientific observations were made, showing three important characteristics of singing dunes: first, not all dunes sing, but all the singing dunes are composed of dry and well-sorted sand; second, this sound occurs spontaneously during avalanches on a slip face; third this is not the only way to produce sound with this sand. More recent field observations have shown that during avalanches, the sound frequency does not depend on the dune size or shape, but on the grain diameter only, and scales as the square root of g/d--with g the gravity and d the diameter of the grains--explaining why all the singing dunes in the same vicinity sing at the same frequency. We have been able to reproduce these singing avalanches in laboratory on a hard plate, which made possible to study them more accurately than on the field. Signals of accelerometers at the flowing surface of the avalanche are compared to signals of microphones placed above, and it evidences a very strong vibration of the flowing layer at the same frequency as on the field, responsible for the emission of sound. Moreover, other characteristics of the booming dunes are reproduced and analyzed, such as a threshold under which no sound is produced, or beats in the sound that appears when the flow is too large. Finally, the size of the coherence zones emitting sound has been measured and discussed. PMID:19880153

  4. ANAEROBIC DEGRADATION OF COMPLEX SUBSTRATES IN FLUIDIZED BED BIOFILM REACTORS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Fuentes; C. Thompson; M. C. Mussati; P. A. Aguirre

    A study of the anaerobic digestion of synthetic complex substrates, containing carbohydrates and proteins, was carried out in two lab-scale, mesophilic fluidized-bed reactors, using sand as inert support for biofilm attachment. After start-up using a soluble substrate based on glucose and acetate, particulate substrates were fed to bioreactors. One reactor was fed with a mixture of sucrose and albumin (RAS

  5. Red Giant Red Giant White Giant

    E-print Network

    Bechtold, Jill

    Red Giant Red Giant White Giant Red Giant White Giant White Giant Blue Giant Blue Giant Blue Giant. Proxima Centauri, the closest star to the Sun, is a red giant. Mass: 1- 4 Solar Mass StarPower Points: 7

  6. ACULEATA HYMENOPTERA OF SAND MOUNTAIN AND BLOW SAND MOUNTAINS, NEVADA

    E-print Network

    Hanks, Lawrence M.

    ACULEATA HYMENOPTERA OF SAND MOUNTAIN AND BLOW SAND MOUNTAINS, NEVADA R. W. Rust1, L. !\\1. Hanks,l.2, and R. C. BechteJ3 ABsTRACT.- There were 198 species of aculeata Hymenoptera in 15 families on the acu leate Hymenoptera collected during the study. Over 2,000 specimens were obtained, representing 198

  7. Fluidized bed calciner apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Owen, Thomas J. (West Richland, WA); Klem, Jr., Michael J. (Richland, WA); Cash, Robert J. (Richland, WA)

    1988-01-01

    An apparatus for remotely calcining a slurry or solution feed stream of toxic or hazardous material, such as ammonium diurante slurry or uranyl nitrate solution, is disclosed. The calcining apparatus includes a vertical substantially cylindrical inner shell disposed in a vertical substantially cylindrical outer shell, in which inner shell is disposed a fluidized bed comprising the feed stream material to be calcined and spherical beads to aid in heat transfer. Extending through the outer and inner shells is a feed nozzle for delivering feed material or a cleaning chemical to the beads. Disposed in and extending across the lower portion of the inner shell and upstream of the fluidized bed is a support member for supporting the fluidized bed, the support member having uniform slots for directing uniform gas flow to the fluidized bed from a fluidizing gas orifice disposed upstream of the support member. Disposed in the lower portion of the inner shell are a plurality of internal electric resistance heaters for heating the fluidized bed. Disposed circumferentially about the outside length of the inner shell are a plurality of external heaters for heating the inner shell thereby heating the fluidized bed. Further, connected to the internal and external heaters is a means for maintaining the fluidized bed temperature to within plus or minus approximately 25.degree. C. of a predetermined bed temperature. Disposed about the external heaters is the outer shell for providing radiative heat reflection back to the inner shell.

  8. Volunteer Shelter Bed Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little (Arthur D.), Inc., Washington, DC.

    The volunteer shelter bed program development guidelines in this booklet are offered as a community-based alternative to the institutionalization of status offenders. The volunteer shelter bed program is described as a nonsecure residential alternative for status offenders, which can be implemented without the creation of new facilities or the…

  9. Bed bug deterrence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kenneth F Haynes; Mark H Goodman; Michael F Potter

    2010-01-01

    A recent study in BMC Biology has determined that the immature stage of the bed bug (the nymph) signals its reproductive status to adult males using pheromones and thus avoids the trauma associated with copulation in this species. The success of this nymphal strategy of deterrence is instructive. Against the background of increasing problems with bed bugs, this research raises

  10. Effects of weak bed load on the universal law of the wall

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Giselher Gust; John B. Southard

    1983-01-01

    Two-dimensional equilibrium boundary-layer flows were investigated in an open water channel with a width\\/depth ratio of 6 for a smooth bed of 0.16 mm quartz grains (dso) and compared with those of an immobile smooth cemented bed with the same sand roughness. For flows at Reynolds numbers between 20,000, representing onset of erosion, and 28,000, before appearance of rhomboid ripples,

  11. Linking bed morphology changes of two sediment mixtures to sediment transport predictions in unsteady flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, Kevin A.; Curran, Joanna Crowe

    2015-04-01

    Flume experiments were conducted to measure bed morphology adjustments in sand/gravel and sand/silt sediment mixtures during repeated hydrographs and to link these changes to sediment transport patterns over multiple time scales. Sediment composition and hydrograph flow magnitude greatly influenced channel morphology, which impacted sediment yield, hysteresis, and transport predictions. Bed load yields were larger and more variable for the sand/silt mixture, as gravel in the sand/gravel sediment inhibited grain entrainment, limited bed form growth, and acted to stabilize the bed. Hysteresis patterns varied due to bed form and surface structure adjustments, as well as the stabilizing effect of antecedent low flows. Using half the data set, a dimensionless fractional transport equation was derived based on excess shear stress. Dimensionless reference shear stresses were estimated in two ways: as bulk values from all transport measurements and by applying a separate limb approach in which values were estimated for each limb of each hydrograph. For the other half of the data set, transport predictions with the separate limb approach were more accurate than those from six existing transport equations and the fractional relationship applied with bulk reference shear stresses. Thus, hydrograph limb-dependent dimensionless reference shear stress links changing bed morphology and sediment transport, providing a parameter to improve transport predictions during individual flood events and in unsteady flow regimes. This approach represents a framework with which to develop site-specific transport relationships for varying flow regimes, particularly in cases where detailed bed morphology measurements are not feasible and heterogeneous sediment complicates bed structure over time.

  12. Geologic history of natural coal-bed fires, Powder River basin, USA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. L Heffern; D. A Coates

    2004-01-01

    Coal-bed fires ignited by natural processes have baked and fused overlying sediments to form clinker, a hard red or varicolored rock, through much of the northern Great Plains of the United States (USA). The gently dipping coal beds in the region burn when regional downwasting brings them above the local water table. The resulting clinker forms a rim along the

  13. Sedimentology and stratigraphy of tidal sand ridges southwest Florida inner shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R.A. Jr.; Klay, J.; Jewell, P. (Univ. of South Florida, Tampa (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Detailed investigation of linear shelf sand ridges located off the southwest coast of Florida shows them to be tide-dominated sand bodies. These ridges are remarkably similar to the large sand ridges of the North Sea, and they have abundant apparent analogs in the stratigraphic record, many of which are important petroleum producers. The Florida ridges are asymmetric in profile, about 10 km long, 1 km wide, with relief of 3-4 m with the adjacent sea bed. Extensive tidal current monitoring, sediment distribution patterns and side scan sonar surveys permit characterizing their morphodynamics. Tidal currents show distinct bidirectional patterns with speeds up to 70 cm/s. There is slight flood-dominance, and currents show much higher velocities in the troughs as compared to the crests of the ridges. Megaripples and sand waves are widespread and migrate obliquely across the ridges at opposite directions on the gentle and steep side of the ridge. Shallow, high-resolution seismic data and 39 vibracores din the area of the ridges show a consistent sequence characterized by three ascending Holocene lithofacies: (1) muddy quartz sand with limestone clasts; (2) bioturbated muddy shelly quartz sand; and (3) well-sorted, cross-stratified quartz sand that characterizes the sand ridges themselves. Each of the tidal sand ridges displays a coarsening-upward sequence of fine, well-sorted sand. Small-scale, multidirectional, cross stratification dominates the stratigraphy of the cores in this facies, but megaripple cross stratification is also present. All data indicate that these tidal ridges are good modern analogs for many of the shelf sand bodies in the ancient record, especially the Mesozoic of the mid-continent area.

  14. Legged locomotion on sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chen; Umbanhowar, Paul; Komsuoglu, Haldun; Koditschek, Daniel; Goldman, Daniel

    2009-11-01

    To understand how and why animals modulate foot kinematics to achieve effective locomotion on granular media, we study the speed of a six-legged robot with c-shaped legs, SandBot, moving on granular media for varying volume fraction, ?, limb frequency, f, and gait timing parametersfootnotetextLi et. al, PNAS, 106, 3029, 2009. Speed is determined by step length which in turn depends on limb penetration. At low f and high ? penetration is small, step length is large, and SandBot advances with a rotary walking gait in which c-legs rotate about their centers by slipping relative to stationary grains. In the opposite extreme, grains cannot support the robot; its underside always contacts the ground and it advances slowly via thrust generated as the c-legs translate through the grains. For varied gait parameters, high speeds are only observed in a small area of parameter space. A yield stress based model predicts the speed and reveals that performance is maximized when gait parameters minimize limb acceleration and interference, and limbs utilize the solidification properties of the media.

  15. Legged locomotion on sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chen; Umbanhowar, Paul; Komsuoglu, Haldun; Koditschek, Daniel; Goldman, Daniel

    2009-11-01

    To understand how and why animals modulate foot kinematics to achieve effective locomotion on granular media, we study the speed of a six-legged robot with c-shaped legs, SandBot, moving on granular media for varying volume fraction, ?, limb frequency, f, and gait timing parameters.footnotetextLi et. al, PNAS, 106, 3029, 2009 Speed is determined by step length which in turn depends on limb penetration. At low f and high ? penetration is small, step length is large, and SandBot advances with a rotary walking gait in which c-legs rotate about their centers by slipping relative to stationary grains. In the opposite extreme, grains cannot support the robot; its underside always contacts the ground and it advances slowly via thrust generated as the c-legs translate through the grains. For varied gait parameters, high speeds are only observed in a small area of parameter space. A yield stress based model predicts the speed and reveals that performance is maximized when gait parameters minimize limb acceleration and interference, and limbs utilize the solidification properties of the media.

  16. Response of phlebotomine sand flies to light-emitting diode-modified light traps in southern Egypt.

    PubMed

    Hoel, D F; Butler, J F; Fawaz, E Y; Watany, N; El-Hossary, S S; Villinski, J

    2007-12-01

    Centers For Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) light traps were modified for use with light-emitting diodes (LED) and compared against a control trap (incandescent light) to determine the effectiveness of blue, green, and red lights against standard incandescent light routinely used for sand fly surveillance. Light traps were baited with dry ice and rotated through a 4 x 4 Latin square design during May, June, and July, 2006. Trapping over 12 trap nights yielded a total of 2,298 sand flies in the village of Bahrif, 6 km north of Aswan on the east bank of the Nile River in southern Egypt. Phlebotomus papatasi comprised 94.4% of trap collections with five other species collected in small numbers. Over half (55.13%) of all sand flies were collected from red light traps and significantly more sand flies (P < 0.05) were collected from red light traps than from blue, green, or incandescent light traps. Red light traps collected more than twice as many sand flies as control (incandescent) traps and > 4 x more than blue and green light traps. Results indicate that LED red light is a more effective substitute for standard incandescent light when surveying in areas where P. papatasi is the predominant sand fly species. Each LED uses approximately 15% of the energy that a standard CDC lamp consumes, extending battery life and effective operating time of traps. Our prototype LED-modified traps performed well in this hot, arid environment with no trap failures. PMID:18260521

  17. Design and Operation of Fluid Beds for Heating, Cooling and Quenching Operations

    E-print Network

    Kemp, W. E.

    1981-01-01

    processing time. 3. Cooling and Quenching Capabilities An integral part of the Luling process is the cool ine of castings after pour by fluidizing the sand bed in which they are molded. 4. Compatibility with Sand System Since all foundry molding..., and in the quenching of castings as a heat treatment technique. It appears the quenching capability of fluidized baths for the type casting used at Luling Steel is as good as an oil bath without the accompanying mess and safety hazards. 4. Compatibility with Sand...

  18. Sex-Associated Effects on Hematologic and Serum Chemistry Analytes in Sand Rats (Psammomys obesus)

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Julie D; Steinbach, Thomas J; Sturdivant, Rodney X; Burks, Robert E

    2012-01-01

    We sought to determine whether sex had a significant effect on the hematologic and serum chemistry analytes in adult sand rats (Psammomys obesus) maintained under normal laboratory conditions. According to the few data available for this species, we hypothesized that levels of hematologic and serum chemistry analytes would not differ significantly between clinically normal male and female sand rats. Data analysis revealed several significant differences in hematologic parameters between male and female sand rats but none for serum biochemistry analytes. The following hematologic parameters were greater in male than in female sand rats: RBC count, hemoglobin, hematocrit, red cell hemoglobin content, and percentage monocytes. Red cell distribution width, hemoglobin distribution width, mean platelet volume, and percentage lymphocytes were greater in female than in male sand rats. The sex of adult sand rats is a source of variation that must be considered in terms of clinical and research data. The data presented here likely will prove useful in the veterinary medical management of sand rat colonies and provide baseline hematologic and serum chemistry analyte information for researchers wishing to use this species. PMID:23294882

  19. Science Learning in the Sand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sexton, Ursula

    1997-01-01

    Presents activities that allow students to think about the Earth in a contextual manner and become familiar with constructive and destructive processes as they relate to sand - its origins, cyclical processes, and yielding of new products. Explores the bigger idea with a developmentally appropriate study of water, rocks, sand, physical phenomena,…

  20. WASTEWATER TREATMENT OVER SAND COLUMNS

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    93/0096 WASTEWATER TREATMENT OVER SAND COLUMNS TREATMENT YIELDS, LOCALISATION OF THE BIOMASS Domestic wastewater treatment by infiltration-percolation is a process that becomming common in France, a greater depth for desinfection purposes. KEYWORDS Wastewater treatment, Infiltration-percolation. Sand

  1. Sand and Dust on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Haberle, Robert M.

    1991-01-01

    Mars is a planet of high scientific interest. Various studies are currently being made that involve vehicles that have landed on Mars. Because Mars is known to experience frequent wind storms, mission planners and engineers require knowledge of the physical and chemical properties of Martian windblown sand and dust, and the processes involved in the origin and evolution of sand and dust storms.

  2. Sand swimming lizard: sandfish

    E-print Network

    Maladen, Ryan D; Kamor, Adam; Goldman, Daniel I

    2009-01-01

    We use high-speed x-ray imaging to reveal how a small (~10cm) desert dwelling lizard, the sandfish (Scincus scincus), swims within a granular medium [1]. On the surface, the lizard uses a standard diagonal gait, but once below the surface, the organism no longer uses limbs for propulsion. Instead it propagates a large amplitude single period sinusoidal traveling wave down its body and tail to propel itself at speeds up to ~1.5 body-length/sec. Motivated by these experiments we study a numerical model of the sandfish as it swims within a validated soft sphere Molecular Dynamics granular media simulation. We use this model as a tool to understand dynamics like flow fields and forces generated as the animal swims within the granular media. [1] Maladen, R.D. and Ding, Y. and Li, C. and Goldman, D.I., Undulatory Swimming in Sand: Subsurface Locomotion of the Sandfish Lizard, Science, 325, 314, 2009

  3. Unchanging Desert Sand Dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadhiraju, S.; Banerjee, B.; Buddhiraju, K.; Shah, V.

    2013-12-01

    Deserts are one of the major landforms on earth. They occupy nearly 20% of the total land area but are relatively less studied. With the rise in human population, desert regions are being gradually occupied for settlement posing a management challenge to the concerned authorities. Unrestrained erosion is generally a feature of bare dunes. Stabilized dunes, on the other hand, do not undergo major changes in textures, and can thus facilitate the growth of vegetation. Keeping in view of the above factors, better mapping and monitoring of deserts and particularly of sand dunes is needed. Mapping dunes using field instruments is very arduous and they generate relatively sparse data. In this communication, we present a method of clustering and monitoring sand dunes through imagery captured by remote sensing sensors. Initially Radon spectrum of an area is obtained by decomposition of the image into various projections sampled at finer angular directions. Statistical features such as mode, entropy and standard deviation of Radon spectrum are used in delineation and clustering of regions with different dune orientations. These clustered boundaries are used to detect if there are any changes occurring in the dune regions. In the experiment's, remote sensing data covering various dune regions of the world are observed for possible changes in dune orientations. In all the cases, it is seen that there are no major changes in desert dune orientations. While these findings have implications for understanding of dune geomorphology and changes occurring in dune directions, they also highlight the importance of a wider study of dunes and their evolution both at regional and global scales. Results for Dataset 1 & Dataset 2 Results for Dataset 3

  4. Erosion of a granular bed driven by laminar fluid flow

    E-print Network

    A. E. Lobkovsky; A. V. Orpe; R. Molloy; A. Kudrolli; D. H. Rothman

    2008-05-01

    Motivated by examples of erosive incision of channels in sand, we investigate the motion of individual grains in a granular bed driven by a laminar fluid to give us new insights into the relationship between hydrodynamic stress and surface granular flow. A closed cell of rectangular cross-section is partially filled with glass beads and a constant fluid flux $Q$ flows through the cell. The refractive indices of the fluid and the glass beads are matched and the cell is illuminated with a laser sheet, allowing us to image individual beads. The bed erodes to a rest height $h_r$ which depends on $Q$. The Shields threshold criterion assumes that the non-dimensional ratio $\\theta$ of the viscous stress on the bed to the hydrostatic pressure difference across a grain is sufficient to predict the granular flux. Furthermore, the Shields criterion states that the granular flux is non-zero only for $\\theta >\\theta_c$. We find that the Shields criterion describes the observed relationship $h_r \\propto Q^{1/2}$ when the bed height is offset by approximately half a grain diameter. Introducing this offset in the estimation of $\\theta$ yields a collapse of the measured Einstein number $q^*$ to a power-law function of $\\theta - \\theta_c$ with exponent $1.75 \\pm 0.25$. The dynamics of the bed height relaxation are well described by the power law relationship between the granular flux and the bed stress.

  5. Experiment and grey relational analysis of CWS spheres combustion in a fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect

    Hui Wang; Xiumin Jiang; Jianguo Liu; Weigang Lin [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China). School of Mechanical Engineering

    2007-08-15

    In order to study the combustion of coal water slurry (CWS) in fluidized bed boilers, artificial CWS droplet spheres were used for simulation of the spheres formed from CWS droplets which fall from the furnace top to the bed. The artificial spheres were introduced to a bench-scale fluidized bed furnace. Quartz sand was used as the bed material. The influence of the operation conditions (e.g., bed temperature, superficial gas velocity, and bed height) on the combustion characteristics was investigated. The bed temperatures were varied at 650, 750, 850, and 950{sup o}C. The gas velocities were in a range of fluidization numbers W (defined as U/U{sub mf}) of 3, 3.5, 4, and 4.5. The bed heights were varied 30, 50, 70, and 90 mm. The CWS spheres were taken out at five residence times (15, 30, 45, 60, and 75 s). The mass ratio of the residue fixed carbon to parent fixed carbon was calculated for studying the influential factors. Under the reference conditions, it is shown that the burnout time is less than 150 s. The grey relational analysis was used to study the degree of relative importance of the influential factors. The results showed that the influence of the bed height is the least, the fluidization number has the greatest influence in the early and later stages, and the bed temperature contributes most in the intermediate stages. 16 refs., 16 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. Fluidized bed combustion of solid organic wastes and low-grade coals: Research and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Borodulya, V.A.; Dikalenko, V.I.; Palchonok, G.I.; Stanchits, L.K. [Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Minsk (Belarus). A.V. Luikov Heat and Mass Transfer Inst.

    1995-12-31

    Experimental studies were carried out to investigate devolatilization and combustion of single spherical particles of wood, hydrolytic lignin from ethanol production, leather processing sewage sludge, and low-grade Belarusian brown coals in a fluidized bed of sand. A two-phase model of fluidized bed combustion of biowaste is proposed. The model takes into account combustion of both volatiles and char in the bed as well as in the freeboard. Experimentally obtained characteristics of devolatilization and char combustion are used as parameters of the model proposed.

  7. Saltation of Non-Spherical Sand Particles

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhengshi; Ren, Shan; Huang, Ning

    2014-01-01

    Saltation is an important geological process and the primary source of atmospheric mineral dust aerosols. Unfortunately, no studies to date have been able to precisely reproduce the saltation process because of the simplified theoretical models used. For example, sand particles in most of the existing wind sand movement models are considered to be spherical, the effects of the sand shape on the structure of the wind sand flow are rarely studied, and the effect of mid-air collision is usually neglected. In fact, sand grains are rarely round in natural environments. In this paper, we first analyzed the drag coefficients, drag forces, and starting friction wind speeds of sand grains with different shapes in the saltation process, then established a sand saltation model that considers the coupling effect between wind and the sand grains, the effect of the mid-air collision of sand grains, and the effect of the sand grain shape. Based on this model, the saltation process and sand transport rate of non-spherical sand particles were simulated. The results show that the sand shape has a significant impact on the saltation process; for the same wind speed, the sand transport rates varied for different shapes of sand grains by as much as several-fold. Therefore, sand shape is one of the important factors affecting wind-sand movement. PMID:25170614

  8. Arsenic removal from water using natural iron mineral-quartz sand columns.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huaming; Stüben, Doris; Berner, Zolt

    2007-05-15

    The study has investigated the feasibility of using siderite-coated quartz sand and/or hematite-coated quartz sand columns for removing As from water. Arsenic-spiked tap water and synthetic As solution with As concentrations from 200 to 500 mug/L were used for the experiments. Since three coating methods employed to prepare siderite-coated quartz sand and hematite-coated quartz sand had no significant impact on As adsorption in batch tests, the column fillings were produced by means of the simplest one involving mechanically mixing the Fe mineral with quartz sand. Fixed bed tests show that the combination of siderite-coated quartz sand and hematite-coated quartz sand greatly promoted the column performance in removing As and the presence of As(III) in the influent improved the removal efficiency of the column. The relatively low capacity in treating As-spiked tap water arose from the suppression of FeCO(3) dissolution in the presence of high HCO(3)(-) concentration (333 mg/L), which consequently limited the formation of fresh Fe(III) oxides. However, the H(2)O(2)-conditioning greatly increased As adsorption capacity of the column for remediating As-spiked tap water. The Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) test shows that the spent adsorbents were not hazardous and could be safely disposed of to landfill. PMID:17363038

  9. Electrification of saltating particles in wind-blown sand: Experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huan; Zheng, Xiao-Jing; Bo, Tianli

    2013-11-01

    The electrification of sand particles is a common phenomenon in wind-blown sand movement. The charge-to-mass ratio of particles is an important parameter to characterize the property of charged particles. However, understanding of the charge-to-mass ratio remains open, and significant discrepancies exist between previous contact electrification models and measurements. This work focuses on the charge-to-mass ratio of saltating particles in wind-blown sand. Experiments were carried out in a wind tunnel using sand particles with the mean diameter d>¯=160 µm. The motions of the saltating particles in the air flow were analyzed by particle image velocimetry, and the charge-to-mass ratios were determined by measuring both the charge and mass of saltating sand particles collected in a Faraday cup. The measured results show that the charge-to-mass ratio increases exponentially with the height above the surface and the vertical profiles of the charge-to-mass ratios can be reproduced well by considering the multiple collisions process between saltating particles and sand bed. In addition, the results suggest that the charge-to-mass ratio is determined by the number of collisions, impacting velocity, and sand grain diameter combined.

  10. Fluidized bed combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Daudet, H.C.; Bagley, W.D.

    1986-07-01

    A fluidized bed combustor is described which consists of: a vertical housing; a bed of granular, generally non-combustible material disposed in a lower portion of the housing; means for delivering combustion air into the housing for upward flow through the bed to maintain the granular material in a fluidized state; means for delivering fuel to the bed for combustion therein to generate heat; heat exchanger means adopted to carry a cycle fluid and arranged in the housing for transferring heat of combustion to the cycle fluid, the heat exchanger means including first and second heat exchangers, the first heat exchanger immersed within the bed for promoting heat transfer primarily through solid-to-solid surface contact between the granular material and the first heat exchanger; the housing having a portion with a relatively large horizontal cross-section extending vertically above the bed for maintaining a relatively low superficial vertical velocity of combustion effluent therein to optimize the heat transfer by solid-to-solid contact; and a venturi disposed above the portion of the housing for substantially increasing the velocity of combustion effluent passing therethrough without disturbing the low superficial velocity of effluent in the portion of the housing.

  11. Wave-induced ripples development in mixed clay-sand substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xuxu; Parsons, Daniel; Baas, Jaco Hugo; McLelland, Stuart; Amoudry, Laurent; Mouazé, Dominique; Eggenhuisen, Jorris; Cartigny, Matthieu; Ruessink, Gerben

    2015-04-01

    Wave-induced ripples development in mixed clay-sand substrates A large-scale flume experiment (as part of EU HYDRALAB IV) was conducted in the Total Environment Simulator, University of Hull from 27th August to 25th September, 2013. The purpose of the experiments was to provide full quantification of near-bed turbulence and sediment transport interactions over rippled beds of clay-sand mixtures under oscillatory flow conditions. A series of state-of-the-art measurements were employed to quantify interactions of near-bed hydrodynamics, sediment transport, and turbulence over rippled beds formed by wave action. The experimental results demonstrate the significant influence of the amount of cohesive materials in the substrate on bedform evolution under regular surface waves. Most importantly, the time of initial ripples appearance is delayed around 30 minutes in substrates with higher percentages of cohesive clays (Run 5, 5.3%; Run 6, 5.5%) compared with experiments conducted with well-sorted sand (a median diameter of ~ 496

  12. Red Rocks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tom Grillo; John Sipple; Ethan Weitzman

    2010-01-01

    This film explores the background and issues surrounding Senate bill 799 - A bill to designate as wilderness certain Federal portions of the red rock canyons of the Colorado Plateau and the Great Basin Deserts in the State of Utah for the benefit of present and future generations of people in the United States.

  13. Wind Tunnel Measurement of Near-Bed Pressure Gradients in the Presence of Saltation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. L. McKenna Neuman

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports on a wind tunnel study in which the pressure gradient was measured rapidly (100Hz) within 2 mm of the surface of a sand bed. The experiments reported here are part of an extended study of the effects of varied temperature upon the threshold of motion and transport of particles in air. In clean air flow over a

  14. The behaviour of segregating fluidized beds and its relevance to ash management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. R. Bemrose; J. S. M. Botterill; J. Bridgwater; A. W. Nienow; Y. Weiping

    1987-01-01

    Visual observation of the movement of large segregated particles across a transparent, drilled plate distributor on which a grid had been scribed allowed their directional and RMS velocities to be determined. The movements of marbles, other regularly shaped bodies and natural pebbles were followed in beds of sand of mean sizes between 0.6 and 1.4 mm and of defluidized depths

  15. Drying Beds. Sludge Treatment and Disposal Course #166. Instructor's Guide [and] Student Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klopping, Paul H.

    Provided in this lesson is introductory material on sand and surfaced sludge drying beds. Typical construction and operation, proper maintenance, and safety procedures are considered. The lesson includes an instructor's guide and student workbook. The instructor's guide contains a description of the lesson, estimated presentation time,…

  16. Microbial sulfate reduction under sequentially acidic conditions in an upflow anaerobic packed bed bioreactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tony Jong; David L. Parry

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to operate an upflow anaerobic packed bed reactor (UAPB) containing sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) under acidic conditions similar to those found in acid mine drainage (AMD). The UAPB was filled with sand and operated under continuous flow at progressively lower pH and was shown to be capable of supporting sulfate reduction at pH values

  17. Design and shakedown of an inclined liquid fluid-bed reactor system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. A. Jr. Johnson; Chang Yul Cha

    1987-01-01

    This report describes the design and shakedown testing of an inclined liquid fluid-bed reactor system. The system is being developed for processing tar sand with a recycle oil pyrolysis and extraction process to produce a high yield of specialty products. Also reported are the results of cold-flow model tests, which were used to assist in the design of the reactor

  18. Bursting phenomenon and incipient motion of solid particles in bed-load transport

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Sechet; B. Le Guennec

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, we present the results of an experimental investigation aiming at understanding the interaction between near-wall coherent structures (or burst) and bedload transport in an open channel flow. This experiment associates Laser Doppler Anemometry measurements of the instantaneous velocity near the wall with real time measurement of sand particle trajectories on the smooth bed of a hydraulic flume.

  19. Biosorption of Direct Red 28 (Congo Red) from Aqueous Solutions by Eggshells: Batch and Column Studies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Papita Das Saha; Shamik Chowdhury; Madhurima Mondal; Keka Sinha

    2012-01-01

    The feasibility of using eggshells as a low-cost biosorbent for the removal of Direct Red 28 (DR 28) from aqueous solutions was studied in batch and dynamic flow modes of operation. The effect of biosorption process variables such as particle size, solution pH, initial dye concentration, contact time, temperature, feed flow rate, and bed height were investigated. Both the Langmuir

  20. Biosorption of Direct Red 28 (Congo Red) From Aqueous Solutions by Eggshells: Batch and Column Studies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Papita Das Saha; Shamik Chowdhury; Madhurima Mondal; Keka Sinha

    2011-01-01

    The feasibility of using eggshells as a low-cost biosorbent for the removal of Direct Red 28 (DR 28) from aqueous solutions was studied in batch and dynamic flow modes of operation. Effect of biosorption process variables such as particle size, solution pH, initial dye concentration, contact time, temperature, feed flow rate and bed height were investigated. Both Langmuir and Freundlich

  1. The influence of the density of a gas–solid fluidized bed on the dry dense medium separation of lump iron ore

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jun Oshitani; Tetsuya Kawahito; Mikio Yoshida; Kuniaki Gotoh; George V. Franks

    A gas–solid fluidized bed was used for dry dense medium separation of lump iron ore particles based on their floating and sinking in the fluidized bed. The density of the bed was adjusted to different values using mixtures of zircon sand and iron powder as the fluidized media. Float–sink experiments using 30mm diameter density adjusted spheres in the range of

  2. Volatiles combustion in fluidized beds. Final technical report, 4 September 1992--4 June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Pendergrass, R.A. II; Raffensperger, C.; Hesketh, R.P.

    1996-02-29

    The goal of this project is to investigate the conditions in which volatiles will burn within both the dense and freeboard regions of fluidized beds. Experiments using a fluidized bed operated at incipient fluidization are being conducted to characterize the effect of particle surface area, initial fuel concentration, and particle type on the inhibition of volatiles within a fluidized bed. A review of the work conducted under this grant is presented in this Final Technical Report. Both experimental and theoretical work have been conducted to examine the inhibition of the combustion by the fluidized bed material, sand. It has been shown that particulate phase at incipient fluidization inhibits the combustion of propane by free radical destruction at the surface of sand particles within the particulate phase. The implications of these findings is that at bed temperatures lower than the critical temperatures, gas combustion can only occur in the bubble phase or at the top surface of a bubbling fluidized bed. In modeling fluidized bed combustion this inhibition by the particulate phase should be included.

  3. Replicating the microbial community and water quality performance of full-scale slow sand filters in laboratory-scale filters.

    PubMed

    Haig, Sarah-Jane; Quince, Christopher; Davies, Robert L; Dorea, Caetano C; Collins, Gavin

    2014-09-15

    Previous laboratory-scale studies to characterise the functional microbial ecology of slow sand filters have suffered from methodological limitations that could compromise their relevance to full-scale systems. Therefore, to ascertain if laboratory-scale slow sand filters (L-SSFs) can replicate the microbial community and water quality production of industrially operated full-scale slow sand filters (I-SSFs), eight cylindrical L-SSFs were constructed and were used to treat water from the same source as the I-SSFs. Half of the L-SSFs sand beds were composed of sterilized sand (sterile) from the industrial filters and the other half with sand taken directly from the same industrial filter (non-sterile). All filters were operated for 10 weeks, with the microbial community and water quality parameters sampled and analysed weekly. To characterize the microbial community phyla-specific qPCR assays and 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene were used in conjunction with an array of statistical techniques. The results demonstrate that it is possible to mimic both the water quality production and the structure of the microbial community of full-scale filters in the laboratory - at all levels of taxonomic classification except OTU - thus allowing comparison of LSSF experiments with full-scale units. Further, it was found that the sand type composing the filter bed (non-sterile or sterile), the water quality produced, the age of the filters and the depth of sand samples were all significant factors in explaining observed differences in the structure of the microbial consortia. This study is the first to the authors' knowledge that demonstrates that scaled-down slow sand filters can accurately reproduce the water quality and microbial consortia of full-scale slow sand filters. PMID:24908577

  4. Micromechanical Modeling for the Deformation of Sand with Non-coaxiality Between Stress and Material Axes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, K. C.; Chang, C. S.; Borja, R. I.

    2011-12-01

    This research project has taken the micromechanics approach to model the strength and deformation behavior of inherently anisotropic sand subjected to stresses non-coaxial with the material axes. Asymmetric sand grains, such as elongated sand grains, are likely to develop a preferred orientation when deposited during the process of alluvial sedimentation, creating an inherently anisotropic material fabric with horizontally oriented bedding planes. Sand thus exhibits different strength and stress-strain behavior dependent on the direction of loading with respect to the axes of the soil. Accounting for non-coaxiality between the stress and material axes is paramount for the accurate prediction of soil's response to applied loads; however, despite the numerous advancements in constitutive models and numerical methods for geotechnical analysis, the problem of accounting for the effect of non-coaxiality between stress and material axes on soil behavior has not been satisfactorily addressed. Drained hollow cylinder torsional shear (HCTS) compression tests on Toyoura sand were simulated, where the direction of the major principal stresses were applied at various angles to the material axes ranging from 0° to 90° from vertical (i.e., ranging from normal to parallel with the bedding plane). Anisotropic behavior has been attributed to interlocking of the sand particles, where the interlocking is least and sliding occurs most easily on the bedding plane. The degree of interlocking was taken as a material property which varies in three dimensions with respect to the material axes, and has been shown to account for observed anisotropy of material strength. Anisotropy of elastic and plastic strain was accounted for, as was the volumetric strain behavior. The developed micromechanics model has been shown to be capable of predicting anisotropy of strength and stress-strain behavior resulting from non-coaxiality of the stress and material axes.

  5. Formation of aeolian ripples and sand sorting

    E-print Network

    Edgar Manukyan; Leonid Prigozhin

    2008-12-09

    We present a continuous model capable of demonstrating some salient features of aeolian sand ripples: the realistic asymmetric ripple shape, coarsening of ripple field at the nonlinear stage of ripple growth, saturation of ripple growth for homogeneous sand, typical size segregation of sand and formation of armoring layers of coarse particles on ripple crests and windward slopes if sand is inhomogeneous.

  6. Animating Sand as a Fluid Yongning Zhu

    E-print Network

    Bridson, Robert

    Animating Sand as a Fluid by Yongning Zhu B.Sc., Peking University, 2003 A THESIS SUBMITTED;Abstract My thesis presents a physics-based simulation method for animating sand. To allow for efficiently scaling up to large volumes of sand, we abstract away the individual grains and think of the sand

  7. Diurnal patterns of blowing sand

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The diurnal pattern of blowing sand results from a complex process that involves an interaction between solar heating, thermal instability, atmospheric turbulence, wind strength, and surface threshold conditions. During the day, solar heating produces thermal instability, which enhances the convect...

  8. Steamflooding strategy for thin sands

    SciTech Connect

    Doscher, T.M.; El-Arabi, M.A.

    1983-03-01

    A description is presented of the design of a steam drive in the Chanac sand, which is only 15 to 20 feet in thickness, at a depth of approximately 1250 feet in the Edison Groves field (Kern County, California).

  9. Optimization of Solid Circulation Rate in Compartmented Fluidized Bed Gasifier for Power Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chok, V. S.; Wee, S. K.; Ariffin, M. Z. Mohd.; Gorin, A.; Chua, H. B.; Yan, H. M.

    2008-10-01

    The present paper reports the optimization of solid circulation rate (SCR) in Compartmented Fluidized Bed Gasifier (CFBG), an indirectly heated fluidized bed that incorporates two sets of v-valves and risers to control the solid circulation across the two compartments, i.e. combustor and gasifier of a pilot plant scale (the height and ID are 1.8m and 0.66m respectively). Sand was used as inert fluidized by air. Four operating variables were studied i.e. bed height, riser, v-valve and main bed flowrate. Based on 24 full factorial design of experiment in Yates' algorithm, at confidence level ?95%, ANOVA analysis has revealed six important effects. The steepest ascent method was applied on linear regression generated from these effects to design the subsequent optimization experiments. The optimum values of SCR have been estimated for both low and high bed level at specific operating parameters.

  10. Minimal Model for Sand Dunes

    E-print Network

    Klaus Kroy; Gerd Sauermann; Hans J. Herrmann

    2002-03-02

    We propose a minimal model for aeolian sand dunes. It combines an analytical description of the turbulent wind velocity field above the dune with a continuum saltation model that allows for saturation transients in the sand flux. The model provides a qualitative understanding of important features of real dunes, such as their longitudinal shape and aspect ratio, the formation of a slip face, the breaking of scale invariance, and the existence of a minimum dune size.

  11. Modern Graywacke-Type Sands.

    PubMed

    Hollister, C D; Heezen, B C

    1964-12-18

    A preliminary study of more than 100 deep-sea cores from abyssal plains has revealed two examples of recent muddy sands of the graywacke type which, together with the microcrystalline matrix, form a bimodal-size distribution sands have a well-sorted framework of quartz, feldspar, and rock fragments which, together with the microcrystalline matrix, form a bimodal-size distribution that is also typical of ancient graywackes. The matrix is considered to be primary. PMID:17775982

  12. Modern Graywacke-Type Sands

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charles D. Hollister; Bruce C. Heezen

    1964-01-01

    A preliminary study of more than 100 deep-sea cores from abyssal plains has revealed two examples of recent muddy sands of the graywacke type which, together with the microcrystalline matrix, form a bimodal-size distribution sands have a well-sorted framework of quartz, feldspar, and rock fragments which, together with the microcrystalline matrix, form a bimodal-size distribution that is also typical of

  13. Sewage plume in a sand and gravel aquifer, Cape Cod, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LeBlanc, Denis R.

    1984-01-01

    Secondarily treated domestic sewage has been disposed of on surface sand beds at the sewage treatment facility at Otis Air Force Base, Massachusetts, since 1936. Infiltration of the sewage through the sand beds into the underlying unconfined sand and gravel aquifer has resulted in a plume of sewage-contaminated ground water that is 2,500 to 3,500 feet wide, 75 feet thick, and more than 11,000 feet long. The plume extends south and southwest of the sand beds in the same direction as the regional flow of ground water, and is overlain by 20 to 50 feet of ground water derived from precipitation that recharges the aquifer. The bottom of the plume generally coincides with the contact between the permeable sand and gravel and underlying finer grained sediments. The distributions in the aquifer of specific conductance, temperature, boron, chloride, sodium, phosphorus, nitrogen (total of all species), ammonia, nitrate, dissolved oxygen, and detergents are used to delineate the plume. In ground water outside the plume, the detergent concentration is less than 0.1 milligrams per liter as MBAS (methylene blue active substances), the ammonia-nitrogen concentration is less than 0.1 milligrams per liter, the boron concentration is less than 50 micrograms per liter, and specific conductance is less than 80 mircromhos per centimeter. In the center of the plume, detergent concentrations as high as 2.6 milligrams per liter as MBAS, ammonia-nitrogen concentrations as high as 20 milligrams per liter, boron concentrations as high as 400 micrograms per liter, and specific conductance as high as 405 micromhos per centimeter were measured. Chloride, sodium, and boron are transported by the southward-flowing ground water without significant retardation, and seem to be diluted only by hydrodynamic dispersion. The movement of phosphorus is greatly restricted by sorption. Phosphorus concentrations do not exceed 0.05 milligrams per liter farther than 2,500 feet from the sand beds. Detergent concentrations in the plume are highest between 3,000 and 10,000 feet from the sand beds and reflect the introduction of nonbiodegradable detergents in 1946 and the conversion to biodegradable detergents in 1964. The center of the plume as far as 5,000 feet from the sand beds contains nitrogen as ammonia, but no nitrate and no dissolved oxygen. Ammonia is gradually oxidized to nitrate between 5,000 and 8,000 feet from the sand beds, and at distances greater than 8,000 feet oxidation of ammonia is essentially complete. Ammonia also is oxidized to nitrate along the top and sides of the plume within 5,000 of the beds where the contaminated ground water mixes with uncontaminated ground water that contains up to 11 milligrams per liter dissolved oxygen.

  14. Sand transport in the lower Mississippi River does not yield to dams: Applications for building deltaic land in Louisiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nittrouer, J. A.; Viparelli, E.

    2013-12-01

    The Mississippi Delta is presently undergoing a catastrophic drowning, whereby 5000 km2 of low-lying wetlands have converted to open water. This land loss is primarily the result of: a) relative sea-level rise, occurring due to the combined effect of rapid subsidence associated with subsurface fluids extraction and eustatic rise; b) leveeing and damming of the river and its tributaries, which restricts sediment delivery to and dispersal within the delta; and c) severe excavation of the delta for navigation channels. It has been argued that continued net land loss of the Mississippi Delta is inevitable due to declining measured total (sand and mud) suspended sediment loads over the past 6 decades. However, recent research has documented that the key to delta growth is deposition of sand, which accounts for ~50-70% of modern and ancient (up to 9 m.a.) Mississippi Delta deposits, but comprises only ~20% of the sampled portion of the total load. Here we present new analysis of existing data to show that sand transport has not diminished since dam construction. Furthermore, we produce a numerical model based on the mass balance of bed material loads over the lower 1600 km of the Mississippi River to show that mining of sand from the channel bed continues to replenish downstream sand loads. For example, our model results indicate that it requires approximately 240 years for a reduced sand load to reach the delta apex. Furthermore, our calculations indicate that sand load at the delta apex is reduced by a noticeable amount (17%) only after about 600 years. We also show how channel bed elevations are predicted to change over the lower 1600 km of the river channel due to channel mining. Channel-bed degradation is greatest at the upstream end of the study reach and decreases downstream. After 300 years the wave of significant degradation has just passed ~800 km downstream, or roughly half of our model domain. These results are in contrast to the measurements which concern the reduction of total suspended sediment load, and here we provide a reasonable hypothesis to help explain: sand possesses a much slower time scale of movement through a sand-bed river compared to mud, because sand exchanges with the bed, building dunes and bars that migrate gradually downstream, whereas the mud travels the length of the system in suspension as washload. This produces orders-of-magnitude difference in transport timescales between mud -- which accounts for ~80% of the total suspended sediment load of the Mississippi River -- and sand (bedload and suspended load). Combined with the abundance and availability of sand to be mined within the main channel, the river effectively buffers the reduction of sand load arising due to main-channel dams. Thus the bed of the lower Mississippi River downstream will provide a stable supply of sand to the delta for the foreseeable future.

  15. Laboratory Measurements of Radar Penetration of Sand and Dust: Implications for Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, K. K.

    2002-12-01

    Over the past two decades, imaging radar has become a useful remote sensing tool for planetary mapping. Because much of the bedrock geology on Mars is likely covered by sand and dust, a radar imaging system should be considered a necessary compliment to other remote sensing instruments at or planned for Mars. In anticipation of such a mission and future terrestrial radar missions, radar backscatter and transmission experiments were conducted for dry and wet sand and a Mars analog dust. To address the ability of radar to penetrate sand and dust, the experiments measured the change in radar signal for various radar and target properties to determine attenuation (dB/m), or the decrease in signal per meter. The transmission experiments were conducted using dry sand (0.3% water), two wet sands (5 and 11% water), and dry Carbondale Red Clay (CRC), an analog for martian dust because of its grain size (2 ?m) and iron content (19% Al2O3 and 12% Fe2O3). The backscatter experiment was performed using dry sand, and all experiments were run over the frequency range of imaging radars (0.5 to 12 GHz). Results show that dry sand, sand with 5% water content, and dry CRC dust all result in attenuation less than 2 dB/m at 0.5 GHz. Sand with 11% water results in attenuation of only 4 dB/m. Although it is expected that low-frequency radar will have low attenuation, the low attenuations for wet sand challenge previous claims that subsurface penetration requires extremely dry sand. Those attenuations also question the ability of a low frequency Mars radar to detect moist soil efficiently. At higher frequencies, attenuation due to wet sand increases rapidly to values that prohibit significant penetration, but dry sand exhibits a much slower increase in attenuation. At 9.6 GHz, dry sand causes attenuation of only 5.9 dB/m. It is therefore expected that higher-frequency (shorter wavelength) radar energy can penetrate dry sand deposits, possibly as much as a meter depending on the sensitivity of the radar. The attenuation due to the CRC dust is still low (5.8 dB/m) at 1.24 GHz but rises to 67.4 dB/m at 9.6 GHz. These results suggest that a multi-frequency Mars imaging radar would be most useful. Results can also help select other radar parameters to meet the science goals of future radar missions.

  16. Stochastic analysis of particle movement over a dune bed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Baum K.; Jobson, Harvey E.

    1977-01-01

    Stochastic models are available that can be used to predict the transport and dispersion of bed-material sediment particles in an alluvial channel. These models are based on the proposition that the movement of a single bed-material sediment particle consists of a series of steps of random length separated by rest periods of random duration and, therefore, application of the models requires a knowledge of the probability distributions of the step lengths, the rest periods, the elevation of particle deposition, and the elevation of particle erosion. The procedure was tested by determining distributions from bed profiles formed in a large laboratory flume with a coarse sand as the bed material. The elevation of particle deposition and the elevation of particle erosion can be considered to be identically distributed, and their distribution can be described by either a ' truncated Gaussian ' or a ' triangular ' density function. The conditional probability distribution of the rest period given the elevation of particle deposition closely followed the two-parameter gamma distribution. The conditional probability distribution of the step length given the elevation of particle erosion and the elevation of particle deposition also closely followed the two-parameter gamma density function. For a given flow, the scale and shape parameters describing the gamma probability distributions can be expressed as functions of bed-elevation. (Woodard-USGS)

  17. Treatment bed microbiological control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janauer, Gilbert E.; Fitzpatrick, Timothy W.; Kril, Michael B.; Wilber, Georgia A.; Sauer, Richard L.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of microbial fouling on treatment bed (TB) performance are being studied. Fouling of activated carbon (AC) and ion exchange resins (IEX) by live and devitalized bacteria can cause decreased capacity for selected sorbates with AC and IEX TB. More data are needed on organic species removal in the trace region of solute sorption isotherms. TB colonization was prevented by nonclassical chemical disinfectant compositions (quaternary ammonium resins) applied in suitable configurations. Recently, the protection of carbon beds via direct disinfectant impregnation has shown promise. Effects (of impregnation) upon bed sorption/removal characteristics are to be studied with representative contaminants. The potential need to remove solutes added or produced during water disinfection and/or TB microbiological control must be investigated.

  18. The Bed & Breakfast Channel

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    With this site, founders Eric and Liz Goldreyer provide travelers with "comprehensive, user-friendly, up-to-date information on bed and breakfasts and inns" via the Internet. The primary focus is on providing access to bed and breakfast listings in North America (over 20,000), although there is also a growing collection of listings from around the world. In the Quick Search, users may search for accommodations by city, state or country. Users who don't have a specific destination in mind, can browse geographically with the World Search. Basic entries include the name, address, and phone number, as well as a link to a city map. Bed and breakfast owners may include additional information, photos, or a link to their own web site, for a fee.

  19. Fluid bed material transfer method

    DOEpatents

    Pinske, Jr., Edward E. (Akron, OH)

    1994-01-01

    A fluidized bed apparatus comprising a pair of separated fluid bed enclosures, each enclosing a fluid bed carried on an air distributor plate supplied with fluidizing air from below the plate. At least one equalizing duct extending through sidewalls of both fluid bed enclosures and flexibly engaged therewith to communicate the fluid beds with each other. The equalizing duct being surrounded by insulation which is in turn encased by an outer duct having expansion means and being fixed between the sidewalls of the fluid bed enclosures.

  20. Apparatus for controlling fluidized beds

    DOEpatents

    Rehmat, A.G.; Patel, J.G.

    1987-05-12

    An apparatus and process are disclosed for control and maintenance of fluidized beds under non-steady state conditions. An ash removal conduit is provided for removing solid particulates from a fluidized bed separate from an ash discharge conduit in the lower portion of the grate supporting such a bed. The apparatus and process of this invention is particularly suitable for use in ash agglomerating fluidized beds and provides control of the fluidized bed before ash agglomeration is initiated and during upset conditions resulting in stable, sinter-free fluidized bed maintenance. 2 figs.

  1. Combustion behaviours of tobacco stem in a thermogravimetric analyser and a pilot-scale fluidized bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zixu; Zhang, Shihong; Liu, Lei; Li, Xiangpeng; Chen, Hanping; Yang, Haiping; Wang, Xianhua

    2012-04-01

    Despite its abundant supply, tobacco stem has not been exploited as an energy source in large scale. This study investigates the combustion behaviours of tobacco stem in a thermogravimetric analyser (TGA) and a pilot-scale fluidized bed (FB). Combustion characteristics, including ignition and burnout index, and combustion reaction kinetics were studied. Experiments in the FB investigated the effects of different operating conditions, such as primary air flow, secondary air flow and feeding rates, on the bed temperature profiles and combustion efficiency. Two kinds of bed materials cinder and silica sand were used in FB and the effect of bed materials on agglomeration was studied. The results indicated that tobacco stem combustion worked well in the FB. When operation condition was properly set, the tobacco stem combustion efficiency reached 94%. In addition, compared to silica sand, cinder could inhibit agglomeration during combustion because of its high aluminium content. PMID:22374152

  2. 7 CFR 3201.15 - Bedding, bed linens, and towels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...the finished product. The 12 percent biobased content must be of a qualifying biobased feedstock. Cotton, wool, linen, and silk are not qualifying biobased feedstocks for the purpose of determining the biobased content of bedding, bed linens, and...

  3. 7 CFR 3201.15 - Bedding, bed linens, and towels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...the finished product. The 12 percent biobased content must be of a qualifying biobased feedstock. Cotton, wool, linen, and silk are not qualifying biobased feedstocks for the purpose of determining the biobased content of bedding, bed linens, and...

  4. 7 CFR 3201.15 - Bedding, bed linens, and towels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...the finished product. The 12 percent biobased content must be of a qualifying biobased feedstock. Cotton, wool, linen, and silk are not qualifying biobased feedstocks for the purpose of determining the biobased content of bedding, bed linens, and...

  5. Fluidized bed coal desulfurization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravindram, M.

    1983-01-01

    Laboratory scale experiments were conducted on two high volatile bituminous coals in a bench scale batch fluidized bed reactor. Chemical pretreatment and posttreatment of coals were tried as a means of enhancing desulfurization. Sequential chlorination and dechlorination cum hydrodesulfurization under modest conditions relative to the water slurry process were found to result in substantial sulfur reductions of about 80%. Sulfur forms as well as proximate and ultimate analyses of the processed coals are included. These studies indicate that a fluidized bed reactor process has considerable potential for being developed into a simple and economic process for coal desulfurization.

  6. Sedimentary structures and textures of Rio Orinoco channel sands, Venezuela and Colombia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKee, Edwin Dinwiddie

    1989-01-01

    Most sedimentary structures represented in sand bodies of the Rio Orinoco are tabular-planar cross-strata which, together with some wedge-planar cross-strata, are the products of sand-wave deposition. Locally, in areas of river meander where point bars characteristically form, trough structures forming festoon patterns are numerous. At a few localities, sets of nearly horizontal strata occur between tabular-planar sets and are interpreted to be the deposits of very fast currents of the upper flow regime; elsewhere, uncommon lenses and beds of silt, clay, or organic matter consisting of leaves and twigs, seem to be the result of quiet-water settling through gravity. By far the most common grain size represented in the tabular-planar and wedge-planar cross-strata of the sandwave deposits is medium sand (? - ? millimeter) as determined by screen analyses. Many samples, however, also contain moderate quantities of coarse or very coarse sand. Eolian dunes on top of the sand-wave deposits are dominantly fine grained. The river channel sands were determined to be largely moderately well sorted, although in some places they were mostly well sorted, and in others, mostly moderately sorted.

  7. Comparisons of housing, bedding, and cooling options for dairy calves.

    PubMed

    Hill, T M; Bateman, H G; Aldrich, J M; Schlotterbeck, R L

    2011-04-01

    Housing, bedding, and summer cooling were management options evaluated. Holstein calves (42±2 kg of body weight) initially 2 to 5 d of age were managed in southwest Ohio in poly hutches or wire mesh pens in a curtain-sided nursery with no supplemental heat. Calves were fed milk replacer (27% crude protein, 17% fat fed at 0.657 kg of dry matter per calf daily), starter (20% crude protein dry matter, textured, fed free-choice), and water (free-choice). Measurements were for 56 d. In trial 1, 28 calves per treatment were bedded with straw and housed in either hutches or nursery pens. This trial was conducted from September to March; the average temperature was 8°C and ranged from -17 to 31°C. In trial 2a, 16 calves per treatment were managed in nursery pens bedded with straw, in nursery pens bedded with sand, or in hutches bedded with sand. This trial was conducted from May to September; the average temperature was 21°C and ranged from 7 to 33°C. In trial 2b, 26 calves per treatment were housed in nursery pens and bedded with straw. This trial was conducted from May to September; the average temperature was 22°C and ranged from 8 to 34°C. One treatment was cooled with fans between 0800 and 1700 h and the other was not. Data were analyzed as repeated measures in a completely randomized block design by trial, with calf as the experimental unit. In trial 3, air in the nursery and calf hutches used above was sampled 35 d apart for calves aged 5 and 40 d. Air in individual hutches on 2 commercial farms was sampled for 5- and 40-d-old calves for 2 hutch types. Air in the multi-calf hutches was sampled for calves of 75 and 110 d of age. Bacterial concentrations of air samples were analyzed (log10) as odds ratios by Proc Logistic in SAS software (SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC); differences were declared at P<0.05. In trial 1, weight gain of calves in nursery pens was 6% greater and feed efficiency was 4% greater than that of calves in hutches. In trial 2a, weight gain and starter intake of calves in the nursery with straw bedding were greater and scouring was less than that in calves bedded with sand in the nursery or hutches. The relative humidity was greater in the hutches than in the nursery pens. In trial 2b, weight gain, feed efficiency, and hip width change were greater and breaths per minute were less for calves cooled with fans compared with calves that were not cooled. In trial 3, airborne bacteria concentrations were greater in the hutches than in the nursery pens. Straw bedding (vs. sand), nursery pens (vs. hutches), and summer daytime cooling with fans improved calf weight gain. PMID:21427006

  8. EXPANDED BED BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A three-year pilot-scale research investigation at the EPA Lebanon Pilot Plant was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of a unique biological secondary treatment process, designated the Expanded Bed Biological Treatment Process (EBBT). The EBBT process is a three-phase (oxygen/...

  9. ELECTRIFIED BED EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an evaluation of a prototype electrified bed (EFB) particulate collection device. The 500 cfm unit, which uses mechanical and electrical mechanisms for collection, was installed at an asphalt roofing plant during the tests. Fractional efficiency was de...

  10. Pliocene Lignite Bed

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Seam or bed of Pliocene lignite from a mine in the Balkan endemic nephropathy (BEN) area of Romania. Rainwater falling onto the surface penetrates into the ground, becoming ground water, and leaches toxic organic substances from this coal. The ground water continues to BEN villages in the valleys be...

  11. Continuous measurements of suspended sand concentration in a wave dominated nearshore environment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel M. Hanes; David A. Huntley

    1986-01-01

    A miniature optical backscatter sensor (MOBS) and an electro-magnetic flowmeter were deployed seaward of the surf zone at Pte Sapin, New Brunswick during the first Canadian Coastal Sediment Study (C2S2), autumn 1983. The MOBS had sensing elements at five vertical locations above the sea bed, and was sampled at 10 Hz. The suspension of sand is well correlated with the

  12. Holocene stratigraphy of the Alabama inner continental shelf: Influence of shelf sand ridges on determining lithofacies architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, D.J.; Parker, S.J. (Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States). Energy and Coastal Geology Div.)

    1993-03-01

    Surface and subsurface distribution of lithofacies from Holocene sediments of the AL inner continental shelf was determined from a series of 59 vibracores and associated surface sediment grab sediments. Five Holocene lithofacies composed of 12 discrete microfacies were delineated based on grain size, color, sedimentary structures, shell content, and fabric of samples. These lithofacies include: (1) Graded Shelly Sand Lithofacies; (2) Clean Sand Lithofacies; (3) Dirty Sand Lithofacies; (4) Biogenic Sediment Lithofacies; and (5) Muddy Sediment Lithofacies. These represent four major depositional environments: The Shelf Sand Sheet Environment (lithofacies 1 and 2); the Sand Ridge Environment (lithofacies 1, 2, and 3); the Bay/Lagoon Environment (lithofacies 3, 4 and 5); and the Muddy Shelf Environment (lithofacies 5). East of the Main Pass of Mobile Bay, the seafloor is composed of a clean Shelf Sand Sheet with oblique shelf sand ridges; Clean Sand and Graded Shelly Sand are the dominant surface sediment types. Coarse shell beds that grade up to quartz sand units (total thickness 0.1 to 3+m) interpreted as tempestites comprise most of the upper portion of the ridges. West of the Pass, the muddier lithofacies (3 and 5) dominate surface samples. Microfacies at depth represent the early Holocene transgressive systems tract; these include the Muddy Shelf Depositional Environment and the filled estuaries and bays of the flooded Pleistocene fluvial valleys represented by the Bay/Lagoon Depositional Environment. The AL inner shelf provides an excellent model of the variability of sedimentation mode in time and space during deposition of a transgressive systems tract. Development of the palimpsest sand sheet/ridge complex progressed on the eastern shelf due to shut off of sediment influx, westward longshore currents, and episodic incidence of major hurricanes. On the western shelf a patchy distribution of muddier sediments developed from input of floodwaters from Mobile Bay.

  13. Packed Bed Combustion: An Overview

    E-print Network

    Hallett, William L.H.

    Packed Bed Combustion: An Overview William Hallett Dept. of Mechanical Engineering Université d'Ottawa - University of Ottawa #12;Packed Bed Combustion - University of Ottawa - CICS 2005 Introduction air fuel feedproducts xbed grate Packed Bed Combustion: fairly large particles of solid fuel on a grate, air supplied

  14. Design method for adsorption beds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakely, R. L.; Jackson, J. K.

    1970-01-01

    Regenerable adsorption beds for long-term life support systems include synthetic geolite to remove carbon dioxide and silica gel to dehumidify the atmospheric gas prior to its passage through the geolite beds. Bed performance is evaluated from adsorption characteristics, heat and mass transfer, and pressure drop.

  15. A thick Tethyan multi-bed tsunami deposit preserving a dinosaur megatracksite within a coastal lagoon (Barremian, eastern Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarrete, Rocío; Liesa, Carlos L.; Castanera, Diego; Soria, Ana R.; Rodríguez-López, Juan P.; Canudo, José I.

    2014-11-01

    A Thick multiple-bed tsunami deposit consisting of sandstones and conglomerates has been discovered and investigated in the Camarillas Formation (~ 130.6-128.4 Ma, Barremian age) in eastern Spain. The tsunami deposit is interbedded within red mudstones deposited in mud flats of a back-barrier system. It crops out along 7 km in length and at its base a great number of dinosaur tracks assigned to sauropods, ornithopods and theropods have been preserved as natural casts; then constituting an exceptional regional megatracksite associated with tsunami deposits. On the basis of sedimentological features and the lateral and vertical architecture of the involved lithofacies, up to five couplets of inflow-backflow deposits, formed by a tsunami wave train, have been recognized overlying the tracks. Although sedimentation mainly took place during backflow currents, inflows led to the removal of sand from a fronting barrier island and the rip-up of lagoonal carbonate and clay pebbles, depositing them in the protected back-barrier lagoon. Its unusually great thickness is interpreted, among others, as being the result of the filling of the previous low topography of the back-barrier lagoon.

  16. Sands at Gusev Crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrol, Nathalie A.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth; Knoll, Andrew H.; Farmer, Jack; Arvidson, Raymond; Grin, Edmond; Li, Ronxing; Fenton, Lori; Cohen, Barbara; Bell, James F.; Aileen Yingst, R.

    2014-05-01

    Processes, environments, and the energy associated with the transport and deposition of sand at Gusev Crater are characterized at the microscopic scale through the comparison of statistical moments for particle size and shape distributions. Bivariate and factor analyses define distinct textural groups at 51 sites along the traverse completed by the Spirit rover as it crossed the plains and went into the Columbia Hills. Fine-to-medium sand is ubiquitous in ripples and wind drifts. Most distributions show excess fine material, consistent with a predominance of wind erosion over the last 3.8 billion years. Negative skewness at West Valley is explained by the removal of fine sand during active erosion, or alternatively, by excess accumulation of coarse sand from a local source. The coarse to very coarse sand particles of ripple armors in the basaltic plains have a unique combination of size and shape. Their distribution display significant changes in their statistical moments within the ~400 m that separate the Columbia Memorial Station from Bonneville Crater. Results are consistent with aeolian and/or impact deposition, while the elongated and rounded shape of the grains forming the ripples, as well as their direction of origin, could point to Ma'adim Vallis as a possible source. For smaller particles on the traverse, our findings confirm that aeolian processes have dominated over impact and other processes to produce sands with the observed size and shape patterns across a spectrum of geologic (e.g., ripples and plains soils) and aerographic settings (e.g., wind shadows).

  17. Coal Bed Aquifer Tests: a Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weeks, E. P.

    2005-12-01

    Coal bed methane development is proceeding at a rapid pace in the USA and in several other countries. Development of coal bed methane requires the simultaneous co-production of water in a manner that maximizes the amount of drawdown while minimizing the amount of water pumped. Determination of optimal well spacing and production rates to achieve such drawdowns requires knowledge of the hydraulic properties of the coal aquifer. Natural closely spaced fractures, termed cleats, develop during coal formation as an orthogonal fracture network that creates anisotropic transmissivity. Water held in the matrix porosity of the coal is released slowly to the cleat system during pumping, resulting in coal beds behaving as dual-porosity aquifers. Knowledge of the magnitude and orientation of the principal axes of the transmissivity tensor, as well as of the late-time dual-porosity storage coefficient, are needed to optimally design well fields for the exploitation of coal bed methane. An aquifer test with three observation wells was conducted to determine these properties for a 7.6- m thick coal bed located in the Powder River Basin, southeast Montana. The test results exhibit all the features that would be expected for a test on an anisotropic dual-porosity medium. However, the test was initially misinterpreted, providing a cautionary tale. The initial interpretation assumed a single-porosity aquifer, and the late-time break in slope was assumed to represent the effects of a hidden boundary. Despite their apparent plausibility, the results of the analysis raised several red flags. An attempt to determine the location of the hidden boundary failed, the indicated specific storage was implausibly small, and the analysis of recovery data provided transmissivity values that were in disagreement with those determined from the drawdown analysis. Reanalysis of the test using type curves developed for a dual-porosity aquifer resulted in a transmissivity value that is about 25% smaller and a storage coefficient about 4 times larger (and of more plausible magnitude), than was determined from the single-porosity aquifer analysis. Values for the anisotropy ratio and orientation of the major transmissivity axis are nearly identical for the two analyses, however. A post-mortem analysis of the recovery data indicates that a reliable value for transmissivity will be obtained only if very late recovery data are available. In summary, multiple-well aquifer tests on coal aquifers can provide very useful information for the design of coal-bed methane well fields. However, as for all aquifer tests, misinterpretation will result if all aspects of the prevailing hydrogeologic conditions are not fully taken into account.

  18. Stream/aquifer interactions at Great Sand Dunes National Monument, Colorado: influences on interdunal wetland disappearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurster, Frederic C.; Cooper, David J.; Sanford, William E.

    2003-02-01

    Between 1937 and 1995 a complex of more than 100 interdunal wetlands disappeared from Great Sand Dunes National Monument, Colorado. We investigated three hypotheses that could explain wetland disappearance: (1) dune movement during a severe drought in the 1950s buried the wetlands, (2) agriculture related ground water pumping lowered the regional water table, and (3) changes in local hydrologic processes led to wetland loss. We used regional stream flow records, ground water level measurements, natural stable isotope analyses, soil stratigraphy, buried seed banks, and ground water modeling to address these hypotheses. Hydrologic data and stable isotope analyses illustrated the interaction between Sand Creek, a nearby stream, and the unconfined aquifer in the area where wetlands occurred. When the intermittent Sand Creek flows, seepage through its bed creates a large ground water mound under the creek. The seasonal development and dispersion of this mound propagates pressure waves through the aquifer that influence ground water levels up to 2 km from Sand Creek. Our data suggest the primary factors contributing to wetland disappearance were recent climatic fluctuations and incision of the Sand Creek channel. Below average stream flow between 1950 and 1980 reduced the duration of Sand Creek flow across the dune complex, minimizing ground water mound development. Consequently, the water table in the unconfined aquifer dropped ˜1.0 m and interdunal wetlands dried up. Twentieth Century incision of Sand Creek's channel reduced ground water mound height ˜2.5 m, decreasing seasonal water table fluctuations at interdunal wetlands and contributing to the overall water table decline. Long-term wet and dry cycles affect the water table elevation more than channel incision, leading us to conclude that many interdunal wetlands are ephemeral features. Wetland area is maximized during consecutive years of above average Sand Creek discharge and minimized as the water table drops during dry periods.

  19. Loose sand habitat at the Mojave desert

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Katie Hale (California State University, Fullerton; Student. Biological Sciences)

    2007-01-06

    Loose sand soil lacks moisture but contains adequate moisture and nutrients for drought tolerant plants. Loose sand soil is insufficient for animals to find or make shelter. Organisms find shade and shelter under the large shrubs.

  20. Compression and Creep of Venice Lagoon Sands

    E-print Network

    Sanzeni, Alex

    A laboratory test program was conducted to evaluate the one-dimensional (1D) compression and creep properties of intact sand (and silty-sand) samples from a deep borehole at the Malamocco Inlet to the Venice Lagoon. The ...

  1. Finding Red

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Sciencenter

    2014-08-27

    In this chemistry challenge, learners systematically investigate which combination of four solutions produces a deep red color. The four solutions are iron(III) chloride, ammonium thiocyanate, tannic acid, and oxalic acid. Background information explains that it is the iron ions in solution combining with ions from the other solutions to create the different colors. After learners discover the different colors, they are encouraged to add a third solution to see if the color can be changed, an example of how chemical equilibrium can be shifted. This activity may take a bit more time with younger learners. For safety reasons, adult supervision is recommended and can be conducted as a demonstration for younger audiences.

  2. Behavior of Windblown Sand on Mars: Results from Single-Particle Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J. R.; Borucki, J.; Sagan, C.

    1999-09-01

    Experiments are investigating the behavior of individual sand grains in the high-energy martian aeolian regime. Energy partitioning during impact of a saltating grain determines grain longevity, but it also influences the way in which the bed becomes mobilized by reptation. When single grains of sand are fired into loose beds, the bed can absorb up to 90% of the impact energy by momentum transfer to other grains; it has been discovered that the impacting grains cause circular craters even at low impact angles. Hundreds of grains can be splashed by a single high-velocity (100 m/s) impact causing more bed disturbance through reptation than previously thought. The research is supported by NASA's PG&G Program. Because the martian aeolian environment in both high energy and of long duration, the most mobile fractions of windblown sand should have eradicated themselves by attrition, unless sand supply has kept pace with destruction. It is therefore important to understand the rate of grain attrition in order to make sense of the existence of vast dune fields on Mars. Attrition, has been addressed in other studies, but precise data for a single saltating grain striking a loose bed of sand have not been acquired -- the quintessential case to be understood for dunes on Mars. To acquire these data, we are employing a compound crossbow which has the bolt-firing mechanism replaced with a pneumatically-automated sabot system. The sabot can launch individual grains of sand of any size between several millimeters and about 50 microns, at velocities up to 100m/s. This is around the maximum velocity expected for saltating grains on Mars. The sabot sled is equipped with photoelectric sensors for measuring shot velocity. Baffling of the grain's exit orifice has enabled projection of single grains without significant aerodynamic effects from the sabot. Grains are fired into loose beds of sand at about 15 degrees from the horizontal (typical saltation trajectory at impact) while being filmed on high-speed video. High-intensity pulse illumination for the grains is triggered by the solenoid-operated bow trigger. A 45 degree mirror over the impact site provides simultaneous horizontal and vertical images of the impact on each video frame. UV fluorescence is enabling grain and grain-fragment recovery. At 100 m/s, grains of all sizes shatter into many fragments when the sand is replaced with a solid target. Kinetic energy of the grains at this velocity exceeds the critical energy for catastrophic failure of minerals. Although probably exceptional as a grain speed, it suggests that conditions on Mars might elevate materials into an attrition regime not encountered on other planets; individual grains blown across rock pavements on Mars will have short lifespans. When experimental grains impact loose (dune) sand, much, if not most of the kinetic energy is converted into momentum of other grains. Using high-speed filming, the energy involved in splashing grains at the impact site can be derived from the size of the crater, the speed of the splashed grains, and the rebound speed of the impactor. The amount of energy partitioned into material failure (as opposed to momentum) is too small a fraction of the total to be calculated under these circumstances. This does not necessarily mean that little damage occurs to the grains (the full extent of the damage has yet to be determined) because only a small fraction of the impact energy is required for inducing brittle fracture. Damage is orders of magnitude less than during impact against solid surfaces.

  3. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN BENTHIC ORGANIC MATTER AND MACROINVERTEBRATES IN SAND SUBSTRATES

    E-print Network

    Notre Dame, University of

    RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN BENTHIC ORGANIC MATTER AND MACROINVERTEBRATES IN SAND SUBSTRATES OF NORTHERN #12;RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN BENTHIC ORGANIC MATTER AND MACROINVERTEBRATES IN SAND SUBSTRATES OF NORTHERN studied in sand habitats, despite the abundance of sand in many streams. These relationships were

  4. Aqueous sand-control processes conserve fuels

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bleakley

    1974-01-01

    The shortage of diesel fuel and organic solvents is responsible, in part, for the development of new sand-control processes that show promise in field tests. Halliburton Services now has 2 sand-control techniques that use water-based solutions for preflush, spacer, and catalyst. One of these, called Hydrofix, is a sand consolidation process. The other--Hydropac--is a method for controlling sand by placing

  5. Effect Of Leg Exercise On Vascular Volumes During Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Vernikos, J.; Wade, C. E.; Barnes, P. R.

    1993-01-01

    Report describes experiments on effects of no-exercise regimen and of two leg-exercise regimens on volumes of plasma, volumes of red blood cells, densities of bodies, and water balances of 19 men (32 to 42 years old) confined to minus 6 degrees-head-down bed rest for 30 days. Purpose of study to determine whether either or both exercise regimens maintain plasma volume and to relate levels of hypovolemia to body fluid balances. Results showed during bed rest, plasma volume maintained in isotomic group but not in other two groups, and no significant differences in body densities, body weights, or water balances among three groups. Concludes isotonic-exercise regimen better than isokinetic-exercise regimen for maintaining plasma volume during prolonged exposure to bed rest.

  6. NU Intramural Sports Sand Volleyball

    E-print Network

    Sridhar, Srinivas

    in either an unsportsmanlike penalty or an ejection depending on the severity of the action. Intramural. THE GAME AND FIELD: 1. As court conditions may change, the playing area may be revised to maintain fairness will be played at the Willis Hall Sand Volleyball Court. 3. Footwear: Players may play barefoot, in socks

  7. Diurnal patterns of blowing sand

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The diurnal pattern of blowing sand results from a complex process that involves the interaction between the sun, wind, and earth. During the day, solar heating produces thermal instability, which enhances the convective mixing of high momentum winds from the upper levels of the atmosphere to the s...

  8. Sand and Water Table Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Ann H.; White, Mary J.; Stone, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    The authors observed preschoolers engaged at the sand and water table to determine if math could be found within their play. Wanting to understand how children interact with provided materials and what kinds of math ideas they explore during these interactions, the authors offer practical examples of how such play can promote mathematical…

  9. Geology on a Sand Budget

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Jacqueline

    2004-01-01

    Earth science teachers know how frustrating it can be to spend hundreds of dollars on three-dimensional (3-D) models of Earth's geologic features, to use the models for only a few class periods. To avoid emptying an already limited science budget, the author states that teachers can use a simple alternative to the expensive 3-D models--sand. She…

  10. SLOW SAND FILTRATION IN THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Interest in slow sand filtration has increased dramatically in the United States in the past ten years. esearch conducted to evaluate removal of Giardia cysts and bacteria, showed that slow sand filtration is very effective in removal of these contaminants. low sand filters are m...

  11. Sand Dome on a Steam Engine

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Steam engines used high-grade silica sand for traction on the rails. Sand was stored in a dome on top of the engine and, as the train traveled the tracks, the sand would be sprinkled down pipes to land on the tracks in front of the wheels. This would aid the wheels in gripping the tracks, especially...

  12. ccsd00003208, Basic properties for sand automata

    E-print Network

    ccsd­00003208, version 1 ­ 4 Nov 2004 Basic properties for sand automata J. Cervelle #3; E injectivity and surjectivity for sand automata. Moreover, we begin the exploration of the dynamical behavior of sand automata proving that the property of nilpotency is undecidable. We believe that the proof

  13. Animating Sand as a Fluid Yongning Zhu

    E-print Network

    Teschner, Matthias

    Animating Sand as a Fluid Yongning Zhu University of British Columbia Robert Bridson University of British Columbia Figure 1: The Stanford bunny is simulated as water and as sand. Abstract We present a physics-based simulation method for animating sand. To allow for efficiently scaling up to large volumes

  14. Determining GAC bed life

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas E. T. Gillogly; Vernon L. Snoeyink; John C. Vogel; Claude M. Wilson; Earl P. Royal

    1999-01-01

    This study developed a way to rapidly and effectively evaluate the remaining life of a granular activated carbon (GAC) bed used to mitigate taste and odor episodes. The maximum attenuation of a 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) episode, a representative taste and odor compound, can rapidly be determined using laboratory-scale columns packed with partially spent GAC taken from full-scale operating adsorbers. These laboratory-scale

  15. Monitoring Granulation Rate Processes Using Three PAT Tools in a Pilot-Scale Fluidized Bed

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ai Tee Tok; Xueping Goh; Wai Kiong Ng; Reginald B. H. Tan

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to analyze and compare the responses of three Process Analytical Technology (PAT) techniques\\u000a applied simultaneously to monitor a pilot-scale fluidized bed granulation process. Real-time measurements using focused beam\\u000a reflectance measurement (Lasentec FBRM) and near-infra red spectroscopy (Bruker NIR) were taken by inserting in-line probes\\u000a into the fluidized bed. Non-intrusive acoustic emission measurements (Physical Acoustic

  16. Design of immobilised dextransucrase for fluidised bed application.

    PubMed

    Berensmeier, S; Ergezinger, M; Bohnet, M; Buchholz, K

    2004-11-01

    Immobilisation of dextransucrase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL B-512F in alginate is optimised for applications in a fluidised bed reactor with high concentrated sugar solutions, in order to allow a continuous formation of defined oligosaccharides as prebiotic isomalto-oligosaccharides. Efficient design of fluidised bed immobilised biocatalyst in high density solutions requires particles with elevated density, high effectiveness and both thermal and mechanical stability. Inert silica flour/sand (Mikrosil 300) as supplement turned out to be best suited for increasing the density up to 1400 kg m(-3) of the alginate beads and generating a stable expanded bed without diffusional restrictions. Kinetic investigations demonstrate that low effectiveness of immobilised enzyme due to close association to dextranpolymers (dextran content of enzyme preparation >90%) is compensated by reducing the particle size and/or by decreasing the dextran content. A low dextran content (5%) is sufficient to immobilise and stabilise the enzyme, thus diffusional limitation is reduced essentially while operational stability is maintained. Fluidisation behaviour and bed expansion proved to be appropriate for the intended application. Both calculated and measured expansion coefficients showed good agreement for different conditions. PMID:15522435

  17. Field Observation and Numerical Modeling of Bed-Material Transport Dynamics in the Lower Mississippi River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, M. T.; Allison, M. A.; Meselhe, E. A.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding specific pathways for sand transport through the lower reaches of large rivers like the Mississippi is a key to addressing (1) significant source-to-sink geologic problems for sediment and particulate organic carbon and (2) environmental restoration efforts in deltas under threat from climate change. Five field studies were performed in the Mississippi River 75-100 km upstream of the Gulf of Mexico outlet in 2010 and 2011 at discharges ranging from 18,500 to 32,000 m3 s-1 to examine sand transport phenomena in the river channel. These studies utilized multibeam sonar bathymetric surveys, acoustic Doppler current profiler measurements of current velocity and acoustic backscatter, point-integrated isokinetic suspended sediment sampling, and channel-bed grab sampling to examine fluid flow and suspended/bedload sediment transport. Substantial interaction was observed between flow conditions in the river (boundary shear stress, turbulence intensity), channel-bed morphology (size and extent of sandy bedforms), and bed-material sand transport (quantity, transport mode, and spatial distribution). A lateral shift was observed in the region of maximum dune size and water column turbulence intensity from deep to shallow areas of lateral sand bars as water discharge increased, and is associated with the expansion of the bar top area experiencing critical shear stress conditions. Bed material was transported both in traction and in suspension at these water discharges, with the highest suspended mass flux rates associated with the part of the channel cross-section where the largest dunes were present, as a result of a relationship between bed shear stress, dune size, and turbulence intensity. We posit that the downriver flux of sand grains alternates between these two modes over relatively short spatial (up to a few km) and temporal scales. These results complicate the task of using cross-sectional flux measurements taken in lower reaches of large river channels to infer bed-material discharge to the ocean because the transport trajectories and velocities of individual grains can vary appreciably. This suggests that 3D numerical simulations, calibrated and validated by comprehensive field measurements, will provide the path forward in understanding bed material fluxes in these systems. These model simulations, utilizing Delft3D and Flow3D and these observational data, are under development to investigate the relationship between flow conditions and sediment transport at finer spatial scales.

  18. Litter ammonia generation: moisture content and organic versus inorganic bedding materials.

    PubMed

    Miles, D M; Rowe, D E; Cathcart, T C

    2011-06-01

    Negative impacts on the environment, bird well-being, and farm worker health indicate the need for abatement strategies for poultry litter NH(3) generation. Type of bedding affects many parameters related to poultry production including NH(3) losses. In a randomized complete block design, 3 trials compared the cumulative NH(3) volatilization for laboratory-prepared litter (4 bedding types mixed with excreta) and commercial litter (sampled from a broiler house during the second flock on reused pine wood chips). Litters were assessed at the original moisture content and 2 higher moisture contents. Broiler excrement was mixed with pine wood shavings, rice hulls, sand, and vermiculite to create litter samples. Volumetrically uniform litter samples were placed in chambers receiving humidified air where the exhaust passed through H(3)BO(3) solution, trapping litter-emitted NH(3). At the original moisture content, sand and vermiculite litters generated the most NH(3) (5.3 and 9.1 mg of N, respectively) whereas wood shavings, commercial, and rice hull litters emitted the least NH(3) (0.9-2.6 mg of N). For reducing NH(3) emissions, the results support recommendations for using wood shavings and rice hulls, already popular bedding choices in the United States and worldwide. In this research, the organic bedding materials generated the least NH(3) at the original moisture content when compared with the inorganic materials. For each bedding type, incremental increases in litter moisture content increased NH(3) volatilization. However, the effects of bedding material on NH(3) volatilization at the increased moisture levels were not clearly differentiated across the treatments. Vermiculite generated the most NH(3) (26.3 mg of N) at the highest moisture content. Vermiculite was a novel bedding choice that has a high water absorption capacity, but because of high NH(3) generation, it is not recommended for further study as broiler bedding material. Controlling unnecessary moisture inputs to broiler litter is a key to controlling NH(3) emissions. PMID:21597054

  19. May 2009, Volume 31, Number 2 New Mexico GeoloGy 31 Newly discovered pumice beds in axial-flu-

    E-print Network

    Dunbar, Nelia W.

    May 2009, Volume 31, Number 2 New Mexico GeoloGy 31 Abstract Newly discovered pumice beds in axial. The Lucero pumice in the Doña Ana Mountains is 1­1.5 m thick and consists of granule- and pebble-sized pumice intercalated with fluvial sand, whereas the Mud Springs pumice along the southeastern flank of the Mud Springs

  20. EXPERIMENTAL AND ENGINEERING SUPPORT FOR THE CAFB (CHEMICALLY ACTIVE FLUID-BED) DEMONSTRATION: RESIDUE DISPOSAL/UTILIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an investigation of the disposal and utilization of spent sulfur sorbent from the Chemically Active Fluid-bed (CAFB) process. Lignite ash with a minimum of 10% CaO can be used as a replacement for sand or medium aggregate or as a partial replacement fo...

  1. Lithostratigraphic analysis of sand and silt facies from NGHP 01 gas hydrate accumulations in the Krishna-Godavari Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, K. K.; Boswell, R. M.; Johnson, J.; Nghp 01, S.

    2008-12-01

    In 2006, an international effort led by the Indian National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP) and the U.S. Geological Survey conducted the first large-scale exploration of gas hydrate accumulations. Seven sites were drilled within the Krishna-Godavari (KG) basin, a large syn-tectonic rift basin off the eastern shore of India, with the deepest hole penetrating ~300 mbsf. The sedimentary section in the KG basin includes up to 7 kilometers of Late Carboniferous to Holocene sediments from which commercial oil and natural gas production has been established. Detailed lithologic descriptions and physical properties measurements obtained from cores were combined with electrical log data to characterize the sedimentology and stratigraphy at each site. Our analyses indicate that sediments within the Gas Hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) in the KG basin record a Quaternary (<2MYA) history of deposition dominated by dark grey to black colored nannofossil bearing to rich clay and silty clay sourced from the nearby Krishna and Godavari Rivers. Relatively minor amounts of silt to fine sand beds and lamina (1-5 cm thick) were also observed as well as visible terrestrial organic material. The most pervasive mode of gas hydrate occurrence observed during NGHP-01 in the KG basin sites were disseminated hydrates in low-permeability silt-clay facies. Secondary gas hydrate accumulations were recovered in fracture fill, nodular and lens-like occurrences, or as pore-filling cement in the more permeable sand-silt beds and lamina. Thin sand beds and lamina were recovered at 6 of the 7 sites in the KG basin. ~330 sand beds were reported for all 6 sites with a typical bed thickness of ~3 cm. Net sand to gross sediment ratios ranged from 0.026 to 0.405. No major sand beds (>1 m thick) were recovered at any of the sites. Underlying the GHSZ in the KG basin are Pliocene and Pleistocene age sediments deposited during low-stand conditions. However, rising sea-level from the late Pleistocene to the present resulted in a gradual decrease in the volume of coarse grained material transported across the shelf, and slope related deposition during the Holocene has largely been controlled by episodic failure of shelf-edge deltaic deposits via turbidity flows in slope channels. At two KG sites, significantly greater net sand to gross sediment ratios were observed, perhaps indicating a closer proximity of those sites to turbidite channel-levee systems. While the channels may contain sand facies, given the slope dominant location of the NGHP well locations, it is likely that transported sand bypassed the well sites and was deposited in base-of-slope fans in deeper water to the east. Therefore, exploration for gas hydrate-bearing sands in the KG region should focus on the identification and location of the slope levee sand deposits or toe of slope sand rich fans within the GHSZ. gas/FutureSupply/MethaneHydrates/projects/DOEProjects/NETL-

  2. Bed drain cover assembly for a fluidized bed

    DOEpatents

    Comparato, Joseph R. (Bloomfield, CT); Jacobs, Martin (Hartford, CT)

    1982-01-01

    A loose fitting movable cover plate (36), suitable for the severe service encountered in a fluidized bed combustor (10), restricts the flow of solids into the combustor drain lines (30) during shutdown of the bed. This cover makes it possible to empty spent solids from the bed drain lines which would otherwise plug the piping between the drain and the downstream metering device. This enables use of multiple drain lines each with a separate metering device for the control of solids flow rate.

  3. Modeling of flood-deposited sand distributions in a reach of the Colorado River below the Little Colorado River, Grand Canyon, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiele, S.M.

    1998-01-01

    A release from Glen Canyon Dam during March-April 1996 was designed to test the effectiveness with which the riparian environment could be renewed with discharges greatly in excess of the normal powerplant-restricted maximum. Of primary concern was the rebuilding of sand deposits along the channel sides that are important to the flora and fauna along the river corridor and that provide the only camp sites for riverside visitors to the Grand Canyon National Park. Analysis of the depositional processes with a model of flow, sand transport, and bed evolution shows that the sand deposits formed along the channel sides early during the high flow were affected only slightly by the decline in suspended-sand concentrations over the course of the controlled flood. Modeling results suggest that the removal of a large sand deposit over several hours was not a response to declining suspended-sand concentrations. Comparisons of the controlled-flood deposits with deposits formed during a flood in January 1993 on the Little Colorado River that contributed sufficient sand to raise the suspended-sand concentrations to predam levels in the main stem show that the depositional pattern as well as the magnitude is strongly influenced by the suspended-sand concentrations.

  4. Drag Reduction using Superhydrophobic Sanded Teflon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Dong; Daniello, Robert; Rothstein, Jonathan

    2013-11-01

    In this talk, we present a series of microfluidic experiments designed to investigate drag reduction using series of roughened Teflon surfaces. The Teflon surfaces where made superhydrophobic by imparting surface texture through sanding with sand papers with a range of grit sizes. Our previous work showed that there exists an optimal sand paper grit (240 grit) for eliminating contact angle hysteresis. We will show that a Teflon surface roughened with the same sand paper grit also maximizes the drag reduction and the slip length observed in laminar flows. Increasing or decreasing the grit size was found to reduce the drag reduction and slip length. A number of different sanding protocols were investigated including sanding preferentially in the flow direction, normal to the flow direction and with a randomized circular pattern. Of these three techniques, sanding in the flow direction was found to maximize the slip length.

  5. Removal of As(V) and Cr(VI) by enhanced sand filtration

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, X.; Dermatas, D. [Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, NJ (United States)

    1995-12-31

    In this study, an iron injection-sand filtration process for selective removal of arsenate (As(V)) and chromate (Cr(VI)) was investigated. The process involved treatment of packed-bed sand columns using small amount of iron solution during filtration. The advantage of this technique was the continues formation of high adsorptive iron hydroxide in the column. The saturated columns could be regenerated by backwash at neutral pH. No chemicals were needed for the regeneration of the saturated sand columns. The filtration process was more effective than iron coagulation treatment for As(V) removal. Moreover, existing conventional sand filters can be modified to the iron injection filters. Pilot filtration results demonstrated that As(V) could be removed from 2,000 ppb down to less than 5 ppb using two treated sand columns in series. When influent As(V) concentration was 20 ppb, one treated column could filter 700 pore volumes (700 L) of the water with effluent As(V) concentration less than 1 ppb in one filtration run. However, the process was not effective in treating waste water containing As(V) concentrations {ge}10,000 ppb.

  6. Contribution of the colmation layer to the elimination of coliphages by slow sand filtration.

    PubMed

    Dizer, H; Grützmacher, G; Bartel, H; Wiese, H B; Szewzyk, R; López-Pila, J M

    2004-01-01

    River bank or slow sand filtration is a major procedure for processing surface water to drinking water in central europe. In order to model the performance of river bank and slow sand filtration plants, we are studying the different mechanisms by which the elimination of pathogens is realized. An important question concerning the mode of action of slow sand filters and river bank filtration units is the role of the colmation layer or "schmutzdecke" on the elimination of human pathogens. The schmutzdecke is an organic layer which develops at the surface of the sand filter short after the onset of operation. We have inoculated a pilot plant for slow sand filtration with coliphages and determined their rate of breakthrough and their final elimination. In the first experiment, with a colmation layer still missing, the breakthrough of the coliphages in the 80 cm mighty sandy bed amounted to ca. 40 %. In contrast, less than 1 % of coliphages escaped from the filter as the same experiment was repeated two months later, when a substantial colmation layer had developed. Our preliminary conclusions are that the colmation layer is extremely efficient in eliminating of viruses. PMID:15344793

  7. Forensic source differentiation of petrogenic, pyrogenic, and biogenic hydrocarbons in Canadian oil sands environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhendi; Yang, C; Parrott, J L; Frank, R A; Yang, Z; Brown, C E; Hollebone, B P; Landriault, M; Fieldhouse, B; Liu, Y; Zhang, G; Hewitt, L M

    2014-04-30

    To facilitate monitoring efforts, a forensic chemical fingerprinting methodology has been applied to characterize and differentiate pyrogenic (combustion derived) and biogenic (organism derived) hydrocarbons from petrogenic (petroleum derived) hydrocarbons in environmental samples from the Canadian oil sands region. Between 2009 and 2012, hundreds of oil sands environmental samples including water (snowmelt water, river water, and tailings pond water) and sediments (from river beds and tailings ponds) have been analyzed. These samples were taken from sites where assessments of wild fish health, invertebrate communities, toxicology and detailed chemistry are being conducted as part of the Canada-Alberta Joint Oil Sands Monitoring Plan (JOSMP). This study describes the distribution patterns and potential sources of PAHs from these integrated JOSMP study sites, and findings will be linked to responses in laboratory bioassays and in wild organisms collected from these same sites. It was determined that hydrocarbons in Athabasca River sediments and waters were most likely from four sources: (1) petrogenic heavy oil sands bitumen; (2) biogenic compounds; (3) petrogenic hydrocarbons of other lighter fuel oils; and (4) pyrogenic PAHs. PAHs and biomarkers detected in snowmelt water samples collected near mining operations imply that these materials are derived from oil sands particulates (from open pit mines, stacks and coke piles). PMID:24632369

  8. Sand as a stable and sustainable resource for nourishing the Mississippi River delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nittrouer, Jeffrey A.; Viparelli, Enrica

    2014-05-01

    The Mississippi River delta is undergoing a catastrophic drowning, whereby 5,000 km2 of low-lying wetlands have converted to open water over at least the past eight decades, as a result of many anthropogenic and natural factors. Continued net land loss has been thought inevitable due to a decline in the load of total suspended sediment--both sand and mud--carried by the river. However, sand--which accounts for ~50-70% of modern and ancient Mississippi delta deposits but comprises only ~20% of the sampled portion of the total load--could be more important than mud for subaerial delta growth. Historically, half of the Mississippi River sediment load is supplied by the Missouri River. Here we analyse suspended sediment load data from two locations downstream from the lowest Missouri River dam to show that the measured sand load in the lower 1,100 km of the Mississippi River has not significantly diminished since dam construction. A one-dimensional numerical model of river morphodynamics predicts that the sand load feeding the delta will decrease only gradually over the next several centuries, with an estimated decline from current values of no more than about 17% within the coming six centuries. We conclude that the lower Mississippi River channel holds a significant reservoir of sand that is available to replenish diminished loads via bed scour and substantially mitigate land loss.

  9. Fluidized bed combustion of low-grade coal and wastes: Research and development

    SciTech Connect

    Borodulya, V.A.; Dikalenko, V.I.; Palchonok, G.I.; Vinogradov, L.M. [Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Minsk (Belarus). A.V. Luikov Heat and Mass Transfer Inst.; Dobkin, S.M.; Telegin, E.M. [Special Design Office, Brest (Belarus)

    1994-12-31

    Experimental studies were carried out to investigate devolatilization of fuel as single spherical particles of wood, hydrolytic lignin, leather sewage sludge and Belarussian brown coals in a fluidized bed of sand. It is found that the devolatilization process depends on moisture and ash contents in fuel and on the external heat and mass transfer rate. The char combustion occurs largely in the intermediate region. Kinetic parameters of the devolatilization and char combustion are obtained. A low-capacity fluidized bed boiler suitable for combustion of coal and different wastes is described.

  10. Sand stresses around a wellbore

    SciTech Connect

    Risnes, R.; Bratli, R.; Horsrud, P.

    1982-12-01

    The authors have studied theoretically the stresses in a poorly consolidated sand around a cylindrical well, assuming axial symmetry. Applying theories of elasticity and plasticity on this three-dimensional (3D) model, analytical solutions for all three stress components have been worked out. The existence of a plastic zone around an uncased wellbore is confirmed, and the size of the zone is determined. When allowing an incompressible fluid to flow radially into the wellbore, a stability criterion describing the failure of the sand is found to exist. This criterion relates fluid flow forces to rock strength properties. Consideration also has been given to the stress distribution around a cased hole. It is shown that a decrease in the size of the plastic zone relative to an uncased hole occurs.

  11. Fluidized bed boiler feed system

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Brian C. (Windsor, CT)

    1981-01-01

    A fluidized bed boiler feed system for the combustion of pulverized coal. Coal is first screened to separate large from small particles. Large particles of coal are fed directly to the top of the fluidized bed while fine particles are first mixed with recycled char, preheated, and then fed into the interior of the fluidized bed to promote char burnout and to avoid elutriation and carryover.

  12. Laboratory compaction of cohesionless sands 

    E-print Network

    Delphia, John Girard

    1998-01-01

    laboratory compaction methods have focused on determining the maximum This thesis follows the style and format of the Canadian Geotechnical JournaL possible dry unit weight of the soil (i. e. vibrating table compaction test, modified vibrating table... on the effectiveness of laboratory compaction. 2) Determine the effect of three different laboratory compaction procedures (i. e. Standard Proctor, Modified Proctor and the Vibrating Hammer tests) on the compaction of cohesionless sands. 3 ) Correlate the various...

  13. Sewage plume in a sand and gravel aquifer, Cape Cod, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LeBlanc, D.R.

    1982-01-01

    Secondarily treated domestic sewage has been disposed of to a sand and gravel aquifer by infiltration through sand beds at Otis Air Force Base, Massachusetts, since 1936. The disposal has formed a plume of contaminated ground water that is more than 11 ,000 feet long, is 2,500 to 3,500 feet wide and 75 feet thick, and is overlain by 20 to 50 feet of uncontaminated ground water derived from precipitation. The distributions of specific conductance, temperature, boron chloride, sodium, phosphorus, nitrogen, ammonia, nitrate, dissolved oxygen, and detergents are used to delineate the plume. The center of the plume contains up to 2.6 milligrams per liter detergents as MBAS (methylene blue active substances), 0.4 milligram per liter boron, 20 milligrams per liter ammonia-nitrogen, and specific conductance as high as 405 micromhos per centimeter. Corresponding levels in uncontaminated ground water are less than 0.1 milligram per liter detergents, less than 0.1 ammonia-nitrogen, less than 0.05 milligram per liter boron, and less than 80 micromhos per centimeter specific conductance. Chloride, sodium, and boron concentrations seem to be affected only by hydrodynamic dispersion. Phosphorus movement is greatly retarded by sorption. Detergent concentrations exceed 0.5 milligram per liter from 3 ,000 to 10,000 feet from the sand beds and reflect the use of nonbiodegradable detergents from 1946 through 1964. The center of the plume as far as 5,000 feet from the sand beds contains nitrogen as ammonia, no nitrate, and no dissolved oxygen. Ammonia is oxidized to nitrate gradually with distance from the center of the plume. (USGS)

  14. Particle bed reactor modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sapyta, Joe; Reid, Hank; Walton, Lew

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: particle bed reactor (PBR) core cross section; PBR bleed cycle; fuel and moderator flow paths; PBR modeling requirements; characteristics of PBR and nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) modeling; challenges for PBR and NTP modeling; thermal hydraulic computer codes; capabilities for PBR/reactor application; thermal/hydralic codes; limitations; physical correlations; comparison of predicted friction factor and experimental data; frit pressure drop testing; cold frit mask factor; decay heat flow rate; startup transient simulation; and philosophy of systems modeling.

  15. Blood volume responses of men and women to bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortney, S. M.; Turner, C.; Steinmann, L.; Driscoll, T.; Alfrey, C.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews a series of studies that indicate that estrogens play an important role in blood volume regulation. The first study illustrates that the plasma volume (PV) of ambulatory women fluctuates during the menstrual cycle, increasing during periods of elevated estrogens. In the second study, it was shown that exogenous and endogenous elevations in blood estrogens attenuate the decrease in PV during bed rest. In the third study, the hypothesis was tested that women, who naturally have a higher blood estrogen content compared with men, will have a smaller loss of PV during bed rest. Ten men and ten women underwent a 13-day, 6 degrees head-down bed rest. Plasma volume and red cell mass (RCM) were measured before and after bed rest using 125I and 51Cr labeling, respectively. Before bed rest, the men and women had similar blood volume (BV) and PV (mL/kg body weight), but the women had a smaller (P < .01) RCM (22.2 +/- 0.9 versus 26.2 +/- 0.8 mL/kg, mean +/- SE). During bed rest, the decrease in RCM (mL/kg) was similar in men and women. However, the decrease in BV was greater in men (8.0 +/- 0.8 mL/kg versus 5.8 +/- 0.8 mL/kg), because of a greater reduction in PV (6.3 +/- 0.6 mL/kg versus 4.1 +/- 0.6 mL/kg). Because the decline in BV has been proposed to contribute to the cardiovascular deconditioning after bed rest, it is possible that women may experience less cardiac and circulatory strain on reambulation.

  16. Intertidal sand body migration along a megatidal coast, Kachemak Bay, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adams, P.N.; Ruggiero, P.; Schoch, G.C.; Gelfenbaum, G.

    2007-01-01

    Using a digital video-based Argus Beach Monitoring System (ABMS) on the north shore of Kachemak Bay in south central Alaska, we document the timing and magnitude of alongshore migration of intertidal sand bed forms over a cobble substrate during a 22-month observation period. Two separate sediment packages (sand bodies) of 1-2 m amplitude and ???200 m wavelength, consisting of well-sorted sand, were observed to travel along shore at annually averaged rates of 278 m/yr (0.76 m/d) and 250 m/ yr (0.68 m/d), respectively. Strong seasonality in migration rates was shown by the contrast of rapid winter and slow summer transport. Though set in a megatidal environment, data indicate that sand body migration is driven by eastward propagating wind waves as opposed to net westward directed tidal currents. Greatest weekly averaged rates of movement, exceeding 6 m/d, coincided with wave heights exceeding 2 m suggesting a correlation of wave height and sand body migration. Because Kachemak Bay is partially enclosed, waves responsible for sediment entrainment and transport are locally generated by winds that blow across lower Cook Inlet from the southwest, the direction of greatest fetch. Our estimates of sand body migration translate to a littoral transport rate between 4,400-6,300 m3/yr. Assuming an enclosed littoral cell, minimal riverine sediment contributions, and a sea cliff sedimentary fraction of 0.05, we estimate long-term local sea cliff retreat rates of 9-14 cm/yr. Applying a numerical model of wave energy dissipation to the temporally variable beach morphology suggests that sand bodies are responsible for enhancing wave energy dissipation by ???13% offering protection from sea cliff retreat. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. Fluidized bed deposition of diamond

    DOEpatents

    Laia, Jr., Joseph R. (Los Alamos, NM); Carroll, David W. (Los Alamos, NM); Trkula, Mitchell (Los Alamos, NM); Anderson, Wallace E. (Los Alamos, NM); Valone, Steven M. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1998-01-01

    A process for coating a substrate with diamond or diamond-like material including maintaining a substrate within a bed of particles capable of being fluidized, the particles having substantially uniform dimensions and the substrate characterized as having different dimensions than the bed particles, fluidizing the bed of particles, and depositing a coating of diamond or diamond-like material upon the substrate by chemical vapor deposition of a carbon-containing precursor gas mixture, the precursor gas mixture introduced into the fluidized bed under conditions resulting in excitation mechanisms sufficient to form the diamond coating.

  18. Method for packing chromatographic beds

    DOEpatents

    Freeman, David H. (Potomac, MD); Angeles, Rosalie M. (Germantown, MD); Keller, Suzanne (Rockville, MD)

    1991-01-01

    Column chromatography beds are packed through the application of static force. A slurry of the chromatography bed material and a non-viscous liquid is filled into the column plugged at one end, and allowed to settle. The column is transferred to a centrifuge, and centrifuged for a brief period of time to achieve a predetermined packing level, at a range generally of 100-5,000 gravities. Thereafter, the plug is removed, other fixtures may be secured, and the liquid is allowed to flow out through the bed. This results in an evenly packed bed, with no channeling or preferential flow characteristics.

  19. Dynamics of sand ridges in coastal seas: the effect of storms, tides and grain sorting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walgreen, M.

    2003-10-01

    The work presented in this thesis concerns the dynamics of shoreface-connected ridges and tidal sand ridges. These large-scale bedforms are observed on the inner and outer shelf of coastal seas in water depths of 10-20m. The motivation of this work is to improve the understanding of the mechanisms related to their formation and the processes that determine their main characteristics. This is done with the use of idealised morphodynamic models. The basic assumption underlying these models is that large-scale sand ridges can solely form as free instabilities on a flat sea bottom. Mathematical methods based on a stability analysis are applied, whereas analytical and numerical methods are used to solve the equations. Existing models are extended with new physical processes, in particular including the role of grain sorting. An important part of this thesis concerns the unresolved question about the origin of the observed mean grain size pattern over the ridges. It explores the hydrodynamic processes that can lead to sediment sorting and the formation of large-scale sand ridges. The model results indicate that the dynamics for different forcing conditions strongly differ. Shoreface-connected sand ridges mainly form during storm conditions, whereas if fair weather conditions prevail the more offshore located tidal sand ridges develop. A probabilistic formulation of these two realisation of the model is used to find conditions for which both types of large-scale bedforms occur simultaneously, as is the case in the southern North Sea. These conditions turn out to be a low storm fraction and the presence of both tidal and storm-driven currents. The transport of non-uniform sediment is described by formulations for both bed load and suspended load, both of which account for dynamic hiding effects. A one-layer model for the bed evolution is used and two grain size classes (fine and coarse sand) are considered. The results of the model for storm conditions indicate that the observed phase shift between bed topography and mean grain size for shoreface-connected ridges (finest sand on seaward flanks) is due to the selective transport via suspended load of grains with different sizes. Parameter values are based on the sand ridges along the Atlantic coast of North America. A net stabilising effect on the initial growth and an enhanced migration is predicted. A physical explanation for the model results is given. During fair weather or tidally dominated conditions, when bed load transport of sediment is dominant, the results indicate an increase in initial growth and migration rates of tidal sand ridges for a bimodal sediment mixture. A symmetrical tidal current results in a grain size distribution, with the coarsest sand found at the crest of the ridges. Results are compared with the tidal ridges on the Belgian coastal shelf. The investigation of the long-term evolution of shoreface-connected ridges focuses on storm-dominated micro-tidal shelves. It is shown that, starting from an initial state without bedforms, a pattern of ridges with a finite height develops. The evolution of the spatial patterns in the mean grain size and bottom topography are shown and discussed in terms of physical mechanisms.

  20. Removal of sulfamethoxazole and sulfapyridine by carbon nanotubes in fixed-bed columns.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuan; Gao, Bin; Morales, Verónica L; Chen, Hao; Wang, Yu; Li, Hui

    2013-03-01

    Sulfamethoxazole (SMX) and sulfapyridine (SPY), two representative sulfonamide antibiotics, have gained increasing attention because of the ecological risks these substances pose to plants, animals, and humans. This work systematically investigated the removal of SMX and SPY by carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in fixed-bed columns under a broad range of conditions including: CNT incorporation method, solution pH, bed depth, adsorbent dosage, adsorbate initial concentration, and flow rate. Fixed-bed experiments showed that pH is a key factor that affects the adsorption capacity of antibiotics to CNTs. The Bed Depth Service Time model describes well the relationship between service time and bed depth and can be used to design appropriate column parameters. During fixed-bed regeneration, small amounts of SMX (3%) and SPY (9%) were irreversibly bonded to the CNT/sand porous media, thus reducing the column capacity for subsequent reuse from 67.9 to 50.4 mg g(-1) for SMX and from 91.9 to 72.9 mg g(-1) for SPY. The reduced column capacity resulted from the decrease in available adsorption sites and resulting repulsion (i.e., blocking) of incoming antibiotics from those previously adsorbed. Findings from this study demonstrate that fixed-bed columns packed with CNTs can be efficiently used and regenerated to remove antibiotics from water. PMID:23232047

  1. Genetic features of soils on marine sands and their windblown derivatives on the White Sea coast (the Kola Peninsula)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereverzev, V. N.; Kazakov, L. A.; Chamin, V. A.

    2011-01-01

    The Quaternary deposits on the Tersk coast of the White Sea are represented by marine deposits (the Tersk sands) enriched in the sea-sorted eluvium of the red Tersk sandstone. These deposits and the soils developed from them are characterized by the predominance of the fine sand fraction and the absence of gravel and the coarser fractions. The sediments derived from the red Tersk sandstone have an impoverished chemical composition (the silica content reaches 75-80%). The iron-illuvial podzols developed from them are characterized by the slightly pronounced differentiation of the main oxides and by the eluvial-illuvial redistribution of the amorphous Al and Fe compounds. Sandy soils—psammozems—with undifferentiated soil profiles are developed from windblown sands subjected to afforestation and from coastal marine sands under a relatively thin natural plant cover. Iron-illuvial podzols buried under a thin sand layer preserve the Al-Fe-humus type of the profile differentiation. In the recently deposited sand layer, the eluvial-illuvial redistribution of the chemical elements is absent.

  2. DCS of Syrtis Major Sand Migration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released August 2, 2004 This image shows two representations of the same infra-red image of craters and lava flow features in Syrtis Major. On the left is a grayscale image showing surface temperature, and on the right is a false-color composite made from 3 individual THEMIS bands. The false-color image is colorized using a technique called decorrelation stretch (DCS), which emphasizes the spectral differences between the bands to highlight compositional variations.

    The prominent rim of the large crater at the top of the image is blocking migrating sand from entering the crater. This produces a very distinct compositional boundary between the pink/magenta basaltic sand and the green dust covering the crater rim and floor. Many of the smaller craters in this region have dust trails behind them, indicating the prevailing wind direction. At the top of the image, the prevailing wind direction is to the northwest, while at the bottom of the image, the prevailing winds have shifted towards the southwest.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude 9.2, Longitude 68.4 East (291.6 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  3. Sand Sheet on Crater Floor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Our topic for the weeks of April 4 and April 11 is dunes on Mars. We will look at the north polar sand sea and at isolated dune fields at lower latitudes. Sand seas on Earth are often called 'ergs,' an Arabic name for dune field. A sand sea differs from a dune field in two ways: 1) a sand sea has a large regional extent, and 2) the individual dunes are large in size and complex in form.

    As with yesterday's image, this dune field is located inside a crater, in this case an unnamed crater at 26 degrees North latitude. In this VIS image the dunes are coalescing into a sand sheet, note the lack of dune forms to the north of the small hills. The presence of ridges and hills in the area is affecting the dune shapes.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 26.4, Longitude 62.7 East (297.3 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  4. An evaluation of the Rouse theory for sand transport in the Oka estuary, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ragum, A.; Monge-Ganuzas, M.; Amos, C. L.; Cearreta, A.; Townend, I.; Manca, E.

    2014-04-01

    The Rouse profile has been traditionally used to represent the vertical distribution of suspended sand in a marine benthic boundary layer. Yet it is one of the biggest unknowns in estuarine morphodynamics, largely due to uncertainties of the ratio of the sediment fall velocity to bed friction on which the Rouse exponent (R=ws/?ku*) is based. A field campaign was carried out at three different locations in the Oka estuary, northern Spain, in order to examine these uncertainties. Each location differed in grain size and flow condition thus offering a wide range of settings. The first survey was inside the estuary (wave sheltered, flood tide dominated and relatively broad estuary section), the second was at the distal ebb delta (ebb tide dominated and narrow estuary section), and the third was over the wave exposed proximal ebb delta (wave/flood tidal current combined flows and open sea). The aim of this study is to evaluate the applicability of the Rouse (1937) theory for the distribution of sand in suspension throughout a turbulent benthic boundary layer. A modified version of a Helley-Smith sampler was used to trap sand and measure the vertical distribution of sand in the water column. As well, a 1200 ADCP was used to measure flow velocity and backscatter together with an ADV (turbulence). The sand traps were found to have a sampling efficiency of 44%. The grain size at all stations was finer near the surface and coarser near the bed. The sand transport inside the estuary (Station 1) is inwards dominant. By contrast, the sand concentration during the ebb tide was ten times higher than during the flood tide at Station 2 and even higher at Station 3, which suggests that the sand transport over the ebb delta is seawards. The average Rouse parameters for Stations 1, 2, and 3 are 0.48±0.035, 0.78±0.23, and 0.46±0.06 respectively, which correspond to a coefficient of proportionality of the movability number, (?) of 4 (Van Rijn, 1993). These differ from previous findings of Villatoro et al. (2010) and Amos et al. (2010b).

  5. [Environmental toxicity of waste foundry sand].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Feng; Wang, Yu-Jue; Wang, Jin-Lin; Huang, Tian-You; Xiong, Ying

    2013-03-01

    The metal leaching characteristics and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of five different types of waste foundry sands were analyzed with the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) and head space-gas chromatography (HS-GC). Microtox and soil dehydrogenase activity (DHA) tests were then used to evaluate the bio-effects of these waste sands. The results showed that due to the different metals poured and casting materials used to make the sand molds, there was significant difference among the five waste foundry sands in the compositions and concentrations of metal and organic pollutants. The concentrations of Fe in the leachates of iron and steel casting waste foundry sand exceeded the maximal allowable concentrations specified in the National Standard of Drinking Water Quality, whereas the As concentration in the leachate of aluminum casting waste foundry sand exceeded the standard. The five waste foundry sands had quite different compositions and levels of VOCs, which resulted in different levels of inhibition effects on the luminescent bacteria (30% and 95%). Additionally, the soil DHA tests suggested that metal pollutants in waste foundry sands may inhibit the soil microbial activity, whereas organics in the sands may slightly promote the microbial activity. The results of this study indicated that the waste foundry sands may pose considerable threat to the environment when improperly disposed. PMID:23745431

  6. The Holocene evolution of the beach and inland aeolian sand of the north-central Mediterranean coast of Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roskin, Joel; Sivan, Dorit; Bookman, Revital; Shteinberg, Gilad

    2015-04-01

    Israel's coastal geomorphology, situated within a Mediterranean climate zone, is characterized by parallel Pleistocene aeolianite ridges, coastal cliffs of aeolianite, and sandy beaches. Lobe-like fields of predominantly stable transverse and parabolic quartz sand dunes protrude 2-7 km inland from the current Mediterranean Sea coastline. However, their migration and accumulation history is still not well-defined. This study focuses on the Holocene appearance, chronology and drivers of beach sand deposition and inland aeolian sand transport along the Caesarea-Hadera dunefield in the north-central coastal plain of Israel. In order to achieve these goals, a detailed field survey and sampling campaign was carried out along a west-east and southwest-northeast transect, loyal to the advancement orientations of the currently stable dunes and directions of dominant sand transporting winds. Beach sand, a foredune, a linear dune, and interdunes of parabolic and transverse dunes were sampled down to their aeolianite or red loam (locally named hamra) palaeosol substrate by drilling and analyzing exposed sections. The sampled sediments were sedimentologically analyzed and twenty-five were dated by optically stimulated luminescence (OSL). The results indicate that beach sand started to accumulate rapidly around 6 ka probably in response to global sea level stabilization. Until around 4 ka, thin sand sheets encroached 2-3 km inland. Sand ages in the range of 1.2-1.1 ka (8th-9th century CE -- Early Moslem period) were found throughout the study area, suggesting a major mobilization of sand, followed by stabilization around 0.6 ka and pedogenesis. By 1.2 ka, the sands had reached their current extent of 5-7 km inland, suggesting transport in a southwest-northeast orientation similar to the advancement orientation of the current transverse and parabolic dunes. The particle-size distributions of the fine to medium-sized aeolian sand showed minor variation linked to inland transport distance and age and did not significantly differ from the values of beach sand. The spatial distribution and temporal clustering of the 1.2-1.1 ka ages does not seem stochastic. However, this age range does not coincide with any local or regional climate change or anthropogenic anomaly that could explain the enhanced sand mobility. Assuming no late Holocene change in coastal sand supply and availability, sand transport may have been due to short term climate (multi-annual) episodes of increased windiness that may have followed short-term or cumulative removal of stabilizing dune vegetation by man, a hypothesis that requires further investigation.

  7. BEd(PE)/BEd(PE)(Hons) College of Education

    E-print Network

    Hickman, Mark

    13 BEd(PE)/BEd(PE)(Hons) College of Education Bachelor of Education (Physical Education) / Bachelor of Education (Physical Education) with Honours #12;Disclaimer All the information in this booklet was correct at the time of printing. #12;3 The Bachelor of Education (Physical Education) and Bachelor of Education

  8. Experimental Study on a New Dual-Layer Granular Bed Filter for Removing Particulates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Guo-hua YANG; Jiang-hua ZHOU

    2007-01-01

    A new dual-layer granular bed filter for hot gas cleanup was invented and studied experimentally. Fine sand, 0.5–1 mm grain size and about 1350 kg\\/m3 bulk density, was used as the lower layer of the filter. Expanded perlite particles, 2–5 mm grain size and about 70 kg\\/m3 bulk density, was used for the upper layer of the filter in this

  9. Carbon attrition during the circulating fluidized bed combustion of a packaging-derived fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Mastellone, M.L. [Univ. Federico II of Naples, Napoli (Italy). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [Univ. Federico II of Naples, Napoli (Italy). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Arena, U. [National Research Council, Napoli (Italy). Inst. for Combustion Research] [National Research Council, Napoli (Italy). Inst. for Combustion Research; [Univ. of Naples, Caserta (Italy). Dept. of Environmental Sciences

    1999-05-01

    Cylindrical pellets of a market-available packaging-derived fuel, obtained from a mono-material collection of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles, were batchwise fed to a laboratory scale circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustor. The apparatus, whose riser was 41 mm ID and 4 m high, was operated under both inert and oxidizing conditions to establish the relative importance of purely mechanical attrition and combustion-assisted attrition in generating carbon fines. Silica sand particles of two size distributions were used as inert materials. For each run, carbon load and carbon particle size distribution in the riser and rates of attrited carbon fines escaping the combustor were determined as a function of time. A parallel investigation was carried out with a bubbling fluidized bed (BFB) combustor to point out peculiarities of attrition in CFB combustors. After devolatilization, PET pellets generated fragile aggregates of char and sand, which easily crumbled, leading to single particles, partially covered by a carbon-rich layer. The injected fixed carbon was therefore present in the bed in three phases: an A-phase, made of aggregates of sand and char, an S-phase, made of individual carbon-covered sand particles and an F-phase, made of carbon fines, abraded by the surfaces of the A- and S-phases. The effects of the size of inert material on the different forms under which fixed carbon was present in the bed and on the rate of escape of attrited carbon fines from the combustor were investigated. Features of carbon attrition in CFB and BFB combustors are discussed.

  10. Influence of the bank vegetation on the river bed variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruei Ke, Bo; Chan, Hsun-Chuan; Chen, You-Cheng

    2014-05-01

    In the natural rivers, woody vegetation commonly grows along the riverbank. When flood flows run through the woody vegetation zones, the stream processes are markedly affected. This study experimentally discusses the characteristics of flow fields and the changes of river bedform while water flows through woody vegetation zones. The experiments were produced in a flume with 20m long, 1m wide, and a fixed slope of 0.001. The woody vegetation was set in 10 square centimeters at one side of the flume. Experimental vegetation was simulated by the steel columns due to the stem of emergent woody vegetation near bed is rigid. The experimental flow was steady and flow velocity was adopted to near the critical flow for the initiation of sediment motion. Uniform sand with a median size of 0.88 mm was used as the bed sediment. The three dimensional flow fields of time-averaged velocity distributions and turbulent characteristics were measured by an Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter(ADV). The bed morphology of equilibrium scour condition was measured by a Laser Distance Meter. The interactions between water flows and river bed with vegetation ware investigated by observing the scour and deposition processes around the vegetation zone. In addition, the flow fields at flat bed and equilibrium scour conditions are measured separately. Furthermore, the influence of vegetation density on the flow and bedform was investigated by using the present experiment. When the flows passed through the vegetation zones, the approaching flow was retarded by the vegetation zone along the vegetation-bank side and accelerated in the main channel. The flow velocities also reduced downstream of the vegetation zones and the water depths dropped significantly in the streamwise direction. It was observed that the levels of the sediment deposition decreased at downstream of the vegetation zones as the vegetation density increased. Near the vegetation zone, the size of the scour hole increased as the vegetation density increased.

  11. LSP Composite Test Bed Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, Arthur C.; Griess, Kenneth H.

    2013-01-01

    This document provides standalone information for the Lightning Strike Protection (LSP) Composite Substrate Test Bed Design. A six-sheet drawing set is reproduced for reference, as is some additional descriptive information on suitable sensors and use of the test bed.

  12. How to Find Bed Bugs

    MedlinePLUS

    ... old box spring covering that is housing adults, skin castings, feces, and eggs. (Photo courtesy of Dr. Louis Sorkin) When not feeding, bed bugs hide in a variety of places. Around the bed, they can be found near the piping, seams and tags of the mattress and box spring, and in ...

  13. Design and shakedown of an inclined liquid fluid-bed reactor system

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, L.A. Jr.; Cha, Chang Yul

    1987-09-01

    This report describes the design and shakedown testing of an inclined liquid fluid-bed reactor system. The system is being developed for processing tar sand with a recycle oil pyrolysis and extraction process to produce a high yield of specialty products. Also reported are the results of cold-flow model tests, which were used to assist in the design of the reactor system. Shakedown tests showed the potential of the process to recover the majority of the bitumen from Asphalt Ridge tar sand and also provided data for the future modifications to improve the reactor performance. Recommendations based on shakedown test results are made for improvements in the tar sand feed, product collection, and disparger components of the reactor system to permit better reactor control and operation. 2 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Solvent extraction process for tar sands

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. W. Funk; W. G. May; J. C. Pirkle

    1982-01-01

    A solvent extraction process for tar sands is disclosed wherein a low boiling solvent having a normal boiling point of from 20* to 70* C. Is used to extract tar sands. The solvent is mixed with tar sands in a dissolution zone, the solvent:bitumen weight ratio being maintained at from about 0.5:1 to 2:1. This mixture is passed to a

  15. Paleobiology of the Sand Beneath the Valders Diamicton at Valders, Wisconsin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Louis J. Maher; Norton G. Miller; Richard G. Baker; B. Brandon Curry; David M. Mickelson

    1998-01-01

    Previously undescribed pollen, plant macrofossils, molluscs, and ostracodes were recovered from a 2.5-m-thick glaciolacustrine unit of silty sand and clay at Valders, Wisconsin. The interstadial sediment was deposited about 12,20014C yr B.P. after retreat of the Green Bay lobe that deposited diamicton of the Horicon Formation, and before advance of the Lake Michigan lobe that deposited the red-brown diamicton of

  16. A branching process model for sand avalanches

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Pelayo, R.; Salazar, I.; Schieve, W.C. (Univ. of Texas, Austin (United States))

    1993-07-01

    An analytically solvable model for sand avalanches of noninteracting grains of sand, based on the Chapman-Kolmogorov equations, is presented. For a single avalanche, distributions of lifetimes, sizes of overflows and avalanches, and correlation functions are calculated. Some of these are exponentials, some are power laws. Spatially homogeneous distributions of avalanches are also studied. Computer simulations of avalanches of interacting grains of sand are compared to the solutions to the Chapman-Kolmogorov equations. It is found that within the range of parameters explored in the simulation, the approximation of noninteracting grains of sand is a good one. 20 refs., 4 figs.

  17. The importance of coastal sand dunes for terrestrial invertebrates in Wales and the UK, with particular reference to aculeate Hymenoptera (bees, wasps & ants)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. A. Howe; G. T. Knight; C. Clee

    2010-01-01

    Although most UK sand dune systems are now fossilized, with little mobility and reducing amounts of bare sand, they support\\u000a important populations and assemblages of terrestrial invertebrates. Offering open conditions, warm substrates and a range\\u000a of habitats and habitat structures, they have become increasingly significant as other coastal habitats have been lost. In\\u000a Wales, 680 Red Data Book and Nationally

  18. Investigating Sand on the Coast of Oregon and Washington.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Komar, Paul D.

    2002-01-01

    Describes factors affecting sand composition and distribution along coastlines. Uses variations in sand types along the Oregon coast to illustrate the influences of sand grain density, wave action, and headlands on sand movements. Describes the seasonal movement of sand across beaches. (DLH)

  19. Sun glitter imaging analysis of submarine sand waves in HJ-1A/B satellite CCD images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huaguo; He, Xiekai; Yang, Kang; Fu, Bin; Guan, Weibing

    2014-11-01

    Submarine sand waves are a widespread bed-form in tidal environment. Submarine sand waves induce current convergence and divergence that affect sea surface roughness thus become visible in sun glitter images. These sun glitter images have been employed for mapping sand wave topography. However, there are lots of effect factors in sun glitter imaging of the submarine sand waves, such as the imaging geometry and dynamic environment condition. In this paper, several sun glitter images from HJ-1A/B in the Taiwan Banks are selected. These satellite sun glitter images are used to discuss sun glitter imaging characteristics in different sensor parameters and dynamic environment condition. To interpret the imaging characteristics, calculating the sun glitter radiance and analyzing its spatial characteristics of the sand wave in different images is the best way. In this study, a simulated model based on sun glitter radiation transmission is adopted to certify the imaging analysis in further. Some results are drawn based on the study. Firstly, the sun glitter radiation is mainly determined by sensor view angle. Second, the current is another key factor for the sun glitter. The opposite current direction will cause exchanging of bright stripes and dark stripes. Third, brightness reversal would happen at the critical angle. Therefore, when using sun glitter image to obtain depth inversion, one is advised to take advantage of image properties of sand waves and to pay attention to key dynamic environment condition and brightness reversal.

  20. Sedimentary processes associated with sand and boulder deposits formed by the 2011 Tohoku-oki tsunami at Sabusawa Island, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Kazuhisa; Sugawara, Daisuke; Ikema, Satoko; Miyagi, Toyohiko

    2012-12-01

    This paper reports on the sedimentary processes of sand and boulder deposition at Sabusawa Island, Japan as a result of the 2011 Tohoku-oki tsunami. Boulders were composed of tuffaceous rocks and sourced from an earthquake-triggered slope failure as well as concrete fragments of seawall. They were scattered over the ground surface and did not form boulder ridges, although there was some local imbrication. The boulders were deposited on top of a sand layer indicating that the latter, possibly deposited from bed load, covered the ground surface first. This sand layer probably reduced friction allowing boulders to be transported more easily than might be expected across a hard ground with a high bottom friction. Sand deposits showed landward thinning and fining features, while the boulders showed a landward coarsening (tuffaceous boulders) or a landward fining (concrete boulders), indicating that large clasts were not necessarily scattered randomly but rather might have a clast size gradient with distance inland. These features are explained by the local topographic setting that constrained the directions of incoming and returning tsunami flows. Some clasts at the inland extent of the boulder field were covered by an upward fining sand layer. This feature suggests that the boulders were deposited prior to the suspended sands, with the latter subsequently laid down before the water level dropped below the top of the boulders. Such modern investigations of the sedimentary features of various sizes of grains and clasts immediately after a tsunami provide invaluable data for the reconstruction of inundation processes.

  1. On bed particle diffusion in gravel bed flows under weak bed load transport

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vladimir Nikora; Helmut Habersack; Thomas Huber; Ian McEwan

    2002-01-01

    We introduce a new conceptual model for longitudinal and transverse diffusion of moving bed particles under weak bed load transport. For both rolling\\/sliding and saltating modes the model suggests that the particle motion is diffusive and comprises at least three ranges of temporal and spatial scales with different diffusion regimes: (1) the local range (ballistic diffusion), (2) the intermediate range

  2. [Spatial distribution patterns of dry sand layer on windward slope of dunes in Horqin Sand Land].

    PubMed

    Zong, Qin; Lamusa, A; Luo, Yong-Ming; Niu, Cun-Yang; Chen, Xue-Feng; Wang, Hai-Yang

    2012-04-01

    An observation was conducted on the thickness of dry sand layer on the windward slope of mobile and fixed dunes in west Horqin Sand Land, with the spatial distribution of the dry sand layer analyzed. Most of the dry sand layer had a thickness of 5-15 cm, and 92.0% and 98.6% of the mobile and fixed dunes had the dry sand layer with this thickness, respectively. Sand-fixing plants affected the thickness and the spatial distribution of the dry sand layer. There was an obvious spatial difference in the thickness of the dry sand layer on mobile dunes, being much thicker in the upper west areas while much thinner in the lower east areas. The thickness of the dry sand layer varied from 0 to 40 cm, with an average of 9.58 +/- 3.95 cm, and the CV was 41%. The variogram of the spatial distribution of dry sand layer on mobile dunes was expressed as spherical model, with a moderate spatial correlation. In contrast, the thickness of dry sand layer on fixed dunes showed obvious homogeneity, and had less spatial difference. The thickness of the dry sand layer ranged from 0 to 20 cm, with an average of 10.91 +/- 1.70 cm, and the CV was only 16%. PMID:22803448

  3. Theoretical prediction of liftoff angular velocity distributions of sand particles in windblown sand flux

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiaojing Zheng; Li Xie; Xue-Yong Zou

    2006-01-01

    The liftoff angular velocities, including the rebound ones and the ejected ones, of sand particles in a windblown sand flux have a significant influence on the saltation trajectories and the transport flux and so on. However, they are not easy to determine actually both in field and in a wind tunnel, especially when the sand particles are small and the

  4. Fluidized bed gasification of waste-derived fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Arena, Umberto, E-mail: umberto.arena@unina2.i [Department of Environmental Sciences, Second University of Naples, Via A. Vivaldi, 43, 81100 Caserta (Italy); AMRA s.c. a r.l., Via Nuova Agnano, 11, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Zaccariello, Lucio [Department of Environmental Sciences, Second University of Naples, Via A. Vivaldi, 43, 81100 Caserta (Italy); Mastellone, Maria Laura [Department of Environmental Sciences, Second University of Naples, Via A. Vivaldi, 43, 81100 Caserta (Italy); AMRA s.c. a r.l., Via Nuova Agnano, 11, 80125 Napoli (Italy)

    2010-07-15

    Five alternative waste-derived fuels obtained from municipal solid waste and different post-consumer packaging were fed in a pilot-scale bubbling fluidized bed gasifier, having a maximum feeding capacity of 100 kg/h. The experimental runs utilized beds of natural olivine, quartz sand or dolomite, fluidized by air, and were carried out under various values of equivalence ratio. The process resulted technically feasible with all the materials tested. The olivine, a neo-silicate of Fe and Mg with an olive-green colour, has proven to be a good candidate to act as a bed catalyst for tar removal during gasification of polyolefin plastic wastes. Thanks to its catalytic activity it is possible to obtain very high fractions of hydrogen in the syngas (between 20% and 30%), even using air as the gasifying agent, i.e. in the most favourable economical conditions and with the simplest plant and reactor configuration. The catalytic activity of olivine was instead reduced or completely inhibited when waste-derived fuels from municipal solid wastes and aggregates of different post-consumer plastic packagings were fed. Anyhow, these materials have given acceptable performance, yielding a syngas of sufficient quality for energy applications after an adequate downstream cleaning.

  5. Iron-rich nanoparticles formed by aeolian abrasion of desert dune sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baddock, Matthew; Boskovic, Lucija; Strong, Craig; McTainsh, Grant; Bullard, Joanna; Agranovski, Igor; Cropp, Roger

    2013-09-01

    Iron-rich nanoparticles in aeolian mineral dust are of considerable importance to biogeochemical cycles. A major determinant of the chemical characteristics of nanoparticles is the parent sediment they are sourced from. The abrasion of dune sand has previously been shown to produce coarse dust (>1 ?m) during the occurrence of aeolian saltation. In this study, Australian red dune sands were laboratory abraded and emission of particles 18-414 nm was observed throughout the experiment duration (˜1 h). The mean size of particles was 130 nm at the start of the test, but this gradually decreased to 110 nm at the end. The number concentration of particles approximately trebled over the course of the experiment with results suggesting that collisions between mobile sand grains led to the production of new nanosized particles over time. Chemical analysis revealed that these nanoparticles were highly abundant in iron, with some aluminium present. This chemical composition suggests that nanoparticles are produced from the clay coatings surrounding the parent sand grains. The study shows that abrasion from saltation occurring in Australian dune sands can release iron-rich nanoparticles, making them available for downwind transport during blowing dust events.

  6. Community structure and spatial variation of benthic invertebrates associated with Zostera marina (L.) beds in the northern Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boström, Christoffer; Bonsdorff, Erik

    1997-05-01

    The distribution and bed structure of eelgrass ( Zostera marina L.), and its importance for associated faunal communities in the coastal areas of the northern Baltic Sea are poorly known. The spatial distribution of the fauna associated with Zostera was studied at five localities in SW Finland in 1993-1994. Zostera was common on all localities, but the beds varied in terms of area (1-5 m diameter), density (50-500 shoots/m 2) and blade length (20-110 cm). A total of about 40 species or taxa were recorded. The zoobenthic infauna showed significant spatial differences, and total abundance and species diversity were significantly higher in the Zostera beds than in adjacent bare sand. The total abundance in Zostera ranged from 25 000 to 50 000 ind/m 2 and in sand from 2500 to 15 000 ind/m 2 The mean number of species in Zostera ranged from 5.9 to 8.8 spp ( H' = 1.76-2.54) and in sand from 2.2 to 5.5 spp ( H' = 1.67-2.31). The epifauna in Zostera was numerically dominated by grazing gastropods (Hydrobiidae) and copepods. The epifauna is an important community component, which contributes to the total diversity of the Zostera assemblage. These systems are among the most species-rich components of the shallow soft-bottom ecosystems in the northern Baltic Sea. The mechanisms structuring both the Zostera and the ambient sand-bottom habitats are presented.

  7. Particle pressures in fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, C.S.; Rahman, K.; Hu, X.; Jin, C.; Potapov, A.V.

    1992-01-01

    This is an experimental project to make detailed measurements of the particle pressures generated in fluidized beds. The focus lies in two principle areas: (1) the particle pressure distribution around single bubbles rising in a two-dimensional gas-fluidized bed and (2) the particle pressures measured in liquid-fluidized beds. This first year has largely been to constructing the experiments The design of the particle pressure probe has been improved and tested. A two-dimensional gas-fluidized bed has been constructed in order to measure the particle pressure generated around injected bubbles. The probe is also being adapted to work in a liquid fluidized bed. Finally, a two-dimensional liquid fluidized bed is also under construction. Preliminary measurements show that the majority of the particle pressures are generated in the wake of a bubble. However, the particle pressures generated in the liquid bed appear to be extremely small. Finally, while not directly associated with the particle pressure studies, some NERSC supercomputer time was granted alongside this project. This is being used to make large scale computer simulation of the flow of granular materials in hoppers.

  8. Red Fork sandstone of Oklahoma: depositional history and reservoir distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Shelton, J.W.; Fritz, R.D.; Johnson, C.

    1989-03-01

    The Middle Pennsylvanian Red Fork sandstone formed as a result of progradation across eastern Kansas and most of Oklahoma. The Red Fork is one of several transgressive-regressive sequences (cyclothems) developed within the Desmoinesian Cherokee Group. Sea level changes, together with varying subsidence, were dominant factors controlling the general stratigraphic (correlative) characteristics of the Red Fork interval. Progradation was episodic, with sand deposition in the more active part of the basin during lower sea level stands and valley-fill deposition in the more stable areas during sea level rises. A map of Red Fork sand trends reveals an alluvial-deltaic complex covering most of Oklahoma. The Red Fork consists primarily of alluvial-valley and plain (fluvial) bodies in the northernmost part of northeastern Oklahoma, alluvial-deltaic bodies in most of the remaining parts of the shelf area, and off-shelf submarine-fan and slope basinal-floor complexes within the deeper part of the Anadarko basin. Determination of reservoir trend and genesis requires integration of rock and log data. Logs need to be calibrated to cores in order to estimate depositional environments accurately and to make a reasonable assessment of diagenetic overprints. Much of the oil and gas has been trapped in stratigraphic traps, and a significant amount of oil is in channel sandstones with trends at high angles to the structural grain. In some areas, secondary clay, in particular chloritic clay, has resulted in microporosity, high water saturation, and correspondingly low resistivities in oil reserves.

  9. Character of shell beds flanking Herod Point shoal, southeastern Long Island Sound, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppe, L.J.; Williams, S.J.; Babb, Ivar G.

    2011-01-01

    High biogenic productivity, strong tidal currents, shoal topography, and short transport distances combine to favor shell-bed formation along the lower flanks of a cape-associated shoal off Herod Point on Long Island, New York. This shell bed has a densely packed, clast-supported fabric composed largely of undegraded surf clam (Spisula solidissima) valves. It is widest along the central part of the western flank of the shoal where topographic gradients are steep and a stronger flood tide results in residual flow. The bed is narrower and thinner toward the landward margins where currents are too weak to transport larger valves and topographic gradients are gentle, limiting bed-load transport mechanisms by which the shells are concentrated. Reconnaissance mapping off Roanoke Point suggests that shell beds are also present at the other cape-associated shoals off northeastern Long Island, where relatively similar geomorphic and oceanographic conditions exist. These shell beds are important to the Long Island Sound ecosystem because they provide complex benthic habitats of rough and hard substrates at the boundary between the muddy basin floor and mobile sand of the shoals. ?? 2011, the Coastal Education & Research Foundation (CERF).

  10. Avionics test bed development plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, L. H.; Parks, J. M.; Murdock, C. R.

    1981-01-01

    A development plan for a proposed avionics test bed facility for the early investigation and evaluation of new concepts for the control of large space structures, orbiter attached flex body experiments, and orbiter enhancements is presented. A distributed data processing facility that utilizes the current laboratory resources for the test bed development is outlined. Future studies required for implementation, the management system for project control, and the baseline system configuration are defined. A background analysis of the specific hardware system for the preliminary baseline avionics test bed system is included.

  11. Bed load transport above a bimodal sediment bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lajeunesse, Eric; Houssais, Morgane

    2013-04-01

    Despite several decades of investigations, accounting for the effect of the wide range of grain sizes composing the bed of rivers on bedload transport remains a challenging problem. We investigate this problem by studying experimentally the influence of grain size distribution on bedload transport in the simple configuration of a bimodal sediment bed composed of a mixture of 2 populations of quartz grains of sizes D1 = 0.7 ± 0.1mm and D2 = 2.2 ± 0.4mm, respectively. The experiments are carried out in a tilted rectangular flume inside which the sediment bed is sheared by a steady and spatially uniform turbulent flow. Using a high-speed video imaging system, we focus on the measurement of the average particle velocity and the surface density of moving particles, defined as the number of moving particles per unit surface of the bed. These two quantities are measured separately for each population of grains as a function of the dimensionless shear stress (or Shields number) and the fraction of the bed surface covered with small grains. We show that the average velocity and the surface density of moving particles obey the same equations as those reported by Lajeunesse [2010] for a bed of homogeneous grain size. Once in motion, the grains follow therefore similar laws whether the bed is made of uniform sediment or of a bimodal mixture. This suggests that the erosion-deposition model established by Lajeunesse [2010] for a bed of uniform sediment can be generalized to the case of a bimodal one. The only difference evidenced by our experiments concerns the critical Shields number for incipient sediment motion. Above a uniform sediment bed, the latter depends on the particle Reynolds number through the Shields curve [Shields, 1936]. In the case of a bimodal bed, our experiments show that the critical Shields numbers of both populations of grains decrease linearly with the fraction of the bed surface covered with small grains. We propose a simple model to account for this observation.

  12. Fluvial processes and local lithology controlling abundance, structure, and composition of mussel beds.

    PubMed

    Vannote, R L; Minshall, G W

    1982-07-01

    In the Salmon River Canyon, Idaho, the fresh-water pearl mussel, Margaritifera falcata, attains maximum density and age in river reaches where large block-boulders structurally stabilize cobbles and interstitial gravels. We hypothesize that block-boulders prevent significant bed scour during major floods, and these boulder-sheltered mussel beds, although rare, may be critical for population recruitment elsewhere within the river, especially after periodic flood scour of less protected mussel habitat. Mussel shells in Indian middens adjacent to these boulder-stabilized areas suggest that prehistoric tribes selectively exploited the high-density old-aged mussel beds. Locally, canyon reaches are aggrading with sand and gravel, and M. falcata is being replaced by Gonidea angulata. PMID:16593208

  13. Fluvial processes and local lithology controlling abundance, structure, and composition of mussel beds

    PubMed Central

    Vannote, Robin L.; Minshall, G. Wayne

    1982-01-01

    In the Salmon River Canyon, Idaho, the fresh-water pearl mussel, Margaritifera falcata, attains maximum density and age in river reaches where large block-boulders structurally stabilize cobbles and interstitial gravels. We hypothesize that block-boulders prevent significant bed scour during major floods, and these boulder-sheltered mussel beds, although rare, may be critical for population recruitment elsewhere within the river, especially after periodic flood scour of less protected mussel habitat. Mussel shells in Indian middens adjacent to these boulder-stabilized areas suggest that prehistoric tribes selectively exploited the high-density old-aged mussel beds. Locally, canyon reaches are aggrading with sand and gravel, and M. falcata is being replaced by Gonidea angulata. PMID:16593208

  14. The pediatric red eye.

    PubMed

    Wong, Melissa M; Anninger, William

    2014-06-01

    There is a broad differential for the pediatric red eye, which may range from benign conditions to vision- and/or life-threatening conditions. This article presents a systematic differential, red flags for referral, and treatment options. PMID:24852155

  15. American Red Cross

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Latest News Investing in Haiti: Helping Families Rebuild Red Cross Helps 5 States Affected by Severe Storms ... Supermodel Niki Taylor Underscores Importance of Giving Blood Red Cross Lesson Helps 8-Year-Old Save Sister ...

  16. NEARSHORE SAND SOURCES FOR AMERICAN SAMOA: AN ALTERNATIVE TO USING BEACH SAND.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dingler, John R.; Reiss, Thomas E.

    1987-01-01

    Using a combination of geophysical techniques, in situ observations, and sampling by scuba divers, we investigated along the south shore of Tutuila Island, American Samoa, for nearshore sand deposits. To minimize the impact of future sand dredging on the island's littoral sediments, the search took place in a narrow zone between the outside of the fringing reef and the 30-m bathymetric contour. Because the sand will be used by the Samoans in a variety of ways, an area high in siliciclastic sand - Nua-Se'etaga Bay - and two areas containing only carbonate sand - Faga'itua Bay and Nafanua Bank - were inspected in detail. Results of the exploration program are discussed.

  17. 13. SANDSORTING BUILDING, THIRD FLOOR, VIBRATING SCREENS FOR SAND SORTING, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. SAND-SORTING BUILDING, THIRD FLOOR, VIBRATING SCREENS FOR SAND SORTING, LOOKING SOUTHWEST - Mill "C" Complex, Sand-Sorting Building, South of Dee Bennet Road, near Illinois River, Ottawa, La Salle County, IL

  18. UMore Park Sand and Gravel Resources Project University of Minnesota

    E-print Network

    Netoff, Theoden

    UMore Park Sand and Gravel Resources Project University of Minnesota Public Comment Forum and Open ­ Steven Lott, Co-project manager, UMore Park Sand and Gravel Resources Project 6:40 The UMore Park Sand

  19. Elastic properties of unconsolidated porous sand reservoirs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. N. Domenico

    1977-01-01

    The effect of compressive stress and pore fluid properties on elastic properties of unconsolidated sand reservoirs was determined by laboratory velocity and pore volume measurements on two specimens. These consisted of a naturally occurring very fine grained sand and glass beads, each with a porosity of approximately 38 percent. Compressional- and shear-wave velocities and pore compressibility were measured in the

  20. Dinural patterns of blowing sand and dust

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The diurnal pattern of blowing sand results from a complex interaction between the sun, the atmosphere, and the sand surface. During the day, solar heating produces thermal instability, which enhances convective mixing of high momentum winds from the upper levels of the atmosphere to the surface la...

  1. DRINKING WATER TREATMENT USING SLOW SAND FILTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent re-interest in slow sand filtration was brought about by the needs for small communities to install treatment technologies that are effective, less costly, and easier to operate and maintain than the more sophisticated rapid sand filters. These simpler technologies for sma...

  2. Invasive plants on disturbed Korean sand dunes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. D. Kim

    2005-01-01

    The sand dunes in coastal regions of South Korea are important ecosystems because of their small size, the rare species found in this habitat, and the beautiful landscapes they create. This study investigated the current vegetative status of sand dunes on three representative coasts of the Korean peninsula, and on the coasts of Cheju Island, and assessed the conditions caused

  3. Sand Tray Group Counseling with Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper, Kay; Ritter, Kelli B.; Willingham, Elizabeth U.

    2003-01-01

    Sand tray group counseling with adolescents is an activity-based intervention designed to help participants address specific intrapersonal concerns, learn important skills of socialization, and develop a caring community. The main focus of the group is building small worlds with miniature figures in individual trays of sand and having an…

  4. SANDIA REPORT SAND2004-4596

    E-print Network

    Ho, Cliff

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2004-4596 Unlimited Release Printed September 2004 Sensors for Environmental@ntis.fedworld.gov Online order: http://www.ntis.gov/help/ordermethods.asp?loc=7-4-0#online 2 #12;SAND2004-4596 Unlimited

  5. SANDIA REPORT SAND2014-16800

    E-print Network

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2014-16800 Unlimited Release Printed August 2014 A Comparison of Platform Options://www.ntis.gov/help/ordermethods.asp?loc=7-4-0#online #12;3 SAND2014-16800 Unlimited Release Printed August 2014 A Comparison of Platform

  6. SANDIA REPORT SAND2014-17460

    E-print Network

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2014-17460 Unlimited Release Printed September 2014 Wave Energy Converter Effects@ntis.fedworld.gov Online order: http://www.ntis.gov/help/ordermethods.asp?loc=7-4-0#online #12;3 SAND2014-17460 Unlimited

  7. SANDIA REPORT SAND2007-0383P

    E-print Network

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2007-0383P Unlimited Release September 2007 Impacts of IPv6 on Infrastructure@ntis.fedworld.gov Online order: http://www.ntis.gov/help/ordermethods.asp?loc=7-4-0#online #12;SAND2007-0383P Unlimited

  8. SANDIA REPORT SAND 2012-4417

    E-print Network

    SANDIA REPORT SAND 2012-4417 Unlimited Release Printed June 2012 Site Environmental Report for 2011@ntis.fedworld.gov Online order: http://www.ntis.gov/ordering.htm #12;3 SAND 2012-4417 Unlimited Release Printed June 2012

  9. SANDIA REPORT SAND 2011-3446

    E-print Network

    SANDIA REPORT SAND 2011- 3446 Unlimited Release Printed October 2011 Phoenix: Complex Adaptive@ntis.fedworld.gov Online order: http://www.ntis.gov/help/ordermethods.asp?loc=7-4-0#online #12;3 SAND 2011-3446 Unlimited

  10. SANDIA REPORT SAND2012-0304

    E-print Network

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2012-0304 Unlimited Release Printed January 2012 A Retrospective of VAWT://www.ntis.gov/help/ordermethods.asp?loc=7-4- 0#online #12;-3- SAND2012-0304 Unlimited Release Printed January 2012 A Retrospective of VAWT

  11. RADIUM REMOVAL USING SORPTION TO FILTER SAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study evaluated the use of a novel sand filtration process that exploits the natural capacity of filter sand to sorb radium through the use of a periodic dilute acid rinse to maintain its sorptive capacity. Batch studies were conducted to determine distribution coefficients s...

  12. Introduction to Exploring Sand and Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Early Childhood Today, 2006

    2006-01-01

    What happens when children pour water through a funnel? They begin to understand science and math concepts such as flow, force, gravity, and volume. What happens when children mold sand to create a tunnel? They develop skills in areas such as problem solving and predicting. They also gain knowledge about absorption and the properties of sand and…

  13. Liquefaction in Subsurface Layer of Sand

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Ground shaking triggered liquefaction in a subsurface layer of sand, producing differential lateral and vertical movement in a overlying carapace of unliquified sand and silt, which moved from right to left toward the Pajaro River. This mode of ground failure, termed "lateral spreading,

  14. Curious Spherical Masses in Ashdown Sands

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Geo. Abbott

    1923-01-01

    MR. HARRY E. BURNS, of Crowborough, this spring informed me of some remarkable spherical masses of sandstone in the Ashdown Sands at High Hurst Wood Quarry, and was good enough later to supply one about 10 inches in diameter to our Museum. He suggested that they might be sand casts of reptilian eggs like that of the Iguanodon. They consist

  15. Colonization patterns in Sand Martins Riparia riparia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gareth Jones

    1987-01-01

    Settlement patterns of Sand Martins at a sand quarry in central Scotland are described. Older birds returned to the colony before first-year individuals, and thus had the widest choice of subcolony in which to nest. A model of subcolony settlement was developed which assumed that individuals nested in subcolonies where their reproductive success was maximized. The colonization patterns observed fitted

  16. International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Sitemap Go to top The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) is the world's largest humanitarian ... member National Societies . As part of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement, our work is ...

  17. Optical dating of tsunami-laid sand from an Oregon coastal lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ollerhead, J.; Huntley, D.J.; Nelson, A.R.; Kelsey, H.M.

    2001-01-01

    Optical ages for five samples of tsunami-laid sand from an Oregon coastal lake were determined using an infrared optical-dating method on K-feldspar separates and, as a test of accuracy, compared to ages determined by AMS 14C dating of detrital plant fragments found in the same beds. Two optical ages were about 20% younger than calibrated 14C ages of about 3.1 and 4.3 ka. Correction of the optical ages using measured anomalous fading rates brings them into agreement with the 14C ages. The approach used holds significant promise for improving the accuracy of infrared optical-dating methods. Luminescence data for the other three samples result in optical age limits much greater than the 14C ages. These data provide a textbook demonstration of the correlation between scatter in the luminescence intensity of individual sample aliquots and their normalization values that is expected when the samples contain sand grains not adequately exposed to daylight just prior to or during deposition and burial. Thus, the data for these three samples suggest that the tsunamis eroded young and old sand deposits before dropping the sand in the lake. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Lifeguarding American Red Cross

    E-print Network

    Carter, John

    Lifeguarding Manual #12;American Red Cross Lifeguarding Manual The following organizations provided review of the materials and/or support American Red Cross Lifeguarding: #12;This manual is part of the American Red Cross Lifeguarding program. By itself, it does not constitute complete and comprehensive

  19. Ecological release in White Sands lizards

    PubMed Central

    Roches, S Des; Robertson, J M; Harmon, L J; Rosenblum, E B

    2011-01-01

    Ecological opportunity is any change that allows populations to escape selection from competition and predation. After encountering ecological opportunity, populations may experience ecological release: enlarged population size, broadened resource use, and/or increased morphological variation. We identified ecological opportunity and tested for ecological release in three lizard colonists of White Sands, New Mexico (Sceloporus undulatus, Holbrookia maculata, and Aspidoscelis inornata). First, we provide evidence for ecological opportunity by demonstrating reduced species richness and abundance of potential competitors and predators at White Sands relative to nearby dark soils habitats. Second, we characterize ecological release at White Sands by demonstrating density compensation in the three White Sands lizard species and expanded resource use in White Sands S. undulatus. Contrary to predictions from ecological release models, we observed directional trait change but not increased trait variation in S. undulatus. Our results suggest that ecological opportunity and ecological release can be identified in natural populations, especially those that have recently colonized isolated ecosystems. PMID:22393523

  20. Investigation of the statistical features of sand creep motion with wind tunnel experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Wang, Yuan; Jia, Pan

    2014-03-01

    A wind tunnel experiment has been adopted to investigate aeolian sand creep motion which has not been sufficiently documented thus far. An image sequence that describes continuous creep motion on a flat sand bed is recorded by high-speed photography, from which numerous creep trajectories are reconstructed by a particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) algorithm. A double-peak pattern present in the distribution of the starting velocity, which indicates the first stepping velocity of creep trajectory, is used to categorize all creep trajectories into flow- or collision-initiated groups. Increased friction velocity is shown to improve the proportion of collision-initiated creep motion. The proportion of the collision-initiated starting velocity against all stepping velocities increases with friction velocity; however, that of the flow-initiated starting velocity remains steady. These results indicate that a stronger wind intensifies the intermittency (the inverse of lifespan) of creep motion by converting it into saltation.

  1. The Dynamics of Suspended Sediment over Bedforms in Mixed Sand-Clay-EPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Leiping; Parsons, Daniel; Schindler, Robert; Manning, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    Quantifying and modeling sediment dynamics in flows, including the complexities of sediment mixtures and their biological status, is a key to parameterizing physical processes at the flow-bed interface and ultimately to predicting natural sediment transport (French, 2010). Such predictions rely strongly on accurate knowledge of relationships between hydrodynamics and sediment properties. The work presented here describes laboratory experiments that have been conducted using mixed cohesive and non-cohesive sediment and Xanthan gum as a proxy for the biological stickiness of Extracellular Polymeric Substances (EPS) (Vardy et al., 2007). The dynamics of suspended sediments and bed morphology were monitored and analyzed continuously in a set of experiments in a laboratory flume (at the University of Hull's Total Environment Simulator) facility. The tank was sectioned into a 10 x 2 m channel and during the study period, a total of 16 runs with varying bed sediment compositions were used (various ratios of sand, clay and EPS). Unidirectional flow rates were generated via recirculated pumped saline water (at 15 PSU). Suspended sediments were observed through (1) physical water samples (via pump) (2) vertically spaced OBS sensors, (3) LISST-100X, (4) ABS profiles. In addition, water samples were analyzed for flocculation properties using LabSFLOC (e.g. Manning et al., 2002), allowing the effects of varying suspended sands, clays and EPS on flocculation were monitored throughout. The results revealed a strong temporal variability in suspended sediment transport with the various proportions of substrate sand, clay and EPS. Work is ongoing and more details will be presented.

  2. Bed surface bed profile adjustments to a series of water pulses in gravel bed rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer-Boix, C.; Hassan, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    This research aims to explore the interactions between the bed surface texture, the bed topography and the sediment transport (rate and grain size distribution) to a series of water pulses in gravel bed-rivers. We conducted a set of runs in a 18 m-long tilting flume, 1 m-wide. Low flow discharges (Q = 65 l/s) during periods of variable duration (between t = 10 h and t = 1 h) were alternated with high flow rates (Q = 90 l/s) of constant duration (t = 1.5 h). Sediment was fed at a constant rate (Qfeed = 7.5 kg/h) throughout the runs. Eight experiments were consecutively conducted: the final configuration of the previous run was the initial condition for the subsequent experiment. The initial bed texture of the experiments was obtained after a 280 h-long run at low flow, the last 40 h of which under starving conditions. The initial bed slope was S0 = 0.022 m/m. A poorly-sorted grain size distribution (Dg = 5.65 mm and sg = 3.05) was used as a feeding material. The same material was used as the initial condition for the antecedent experiment (280 h-long). Intensive measurements of the bed surface, bed topography and sediment transport were taken during the runs. Provisional results of the experimental campaign demonstrate that: (i) bed topography rapidly adjusts to water pulses: bed aggrades during low flow periods to subsequently degrade during water pulses. However, the rate of change of the bed profile decreases with the number of water pulses; (ii) the surface texture maintains an approximately invariant texture during the runs with no significant changes before and after the pulses; (iii) bedload transport dramatically adjusts to water pulses (increasing its rate and getting coarser). The relative increase in the bedload transport during the pulses diminishes as the number of pulses increases. A detailed analysis of the evolution of the bed profile shows the formation of transverse ribs during low flow periods which slowly migrate upstream. These bedforms are not vanished during the water pulses. On the contrary, their amplitude increases during pulses and decreases during low flow periods. The experiments also show that the bed surface locally adjusts to allow a rapid increase in the bedload transport rate while keeping an overall constant grain size distribution.

  3. Sintering of ash during fluidized bed combustion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. J. Bkrifvars; Mikko Hupa; Matti Hiltunen

    1992-01-01

    Agglomeration of bed material and fuel ash may sometimes cause problems during fluidized bed combustion. In this paper a laboratory test method has been applied on different coal ashes to predict how they behave in temperatures typical for circulating fluidized bed boilers. The method is also useful when the influence of the different bed compounds on the sintering is studied

  4. Responses of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea) to growth in naphthalene-contaminated sand: xenobiotic stress versus water stress.

    PubMed

    Balasubramaniyam, Anuluxshy; Chapman, Mark M; Harvey, Patricia J

    2015-05-01

    The adaptations of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea) arising from growth in naphthalene-contaminated sand (0.8 g kg(-1) sand dry weight (dw)) were investigated in the contexts of xenobiotic stress and water stress. The transfer of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) across the root endodermis was investigated using the hydrophobic Nile red stain as a PAH homologue. Nile red was applied to the epidermis of a living root to visualise uptake into the root through the transpiration stream, and the distance travelled by the stain into the root tissues was investigated using epi-fluorescence microscopy (Nikon Eclipse 90i). The results showed that the Nile red applied to the roots grown in naphthalene-contaminated sand was unable to penetrate the roots beyond the endodermis, whereas those grown in 'clean' sand showed evidence of uptake into the xylem vessels beyond the endodermis. Furthermore, partial collapse was observed in the cortex of naphthalene-treated roots, suggesting drought stress. Interestingly, the treated plants showed visual resilience to drought stress whilst the leaves of the control plants showed signs of wilting. PMID:25874421

  5. BMM SHAKEOUT AND VIBRATING CONVEYOR TRANSPORT SAND AND CASTINGS TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BMM SHAKEOUT AND VIBRATING CONVEYOR TRANSPORT SAND AND CASTINGS TO SEPARATIONS SCREENS. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Shaking, Degating & Sand Systems, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  6. Code Red 2 kills off Code Red 1

    E-print Network

    Paxson, Vern

    #12;#12;Code Red 2 kills off Code Red 1 Code Red 2 settles into weekly pattern Nimda enters the ecosystem Code Red 2 dies off as programmed CR 1 returns thanks to bad clocks #12;Code Red 2 dies off as programmed Nimda hums along, slowly cleaned up With its predator gone, Code Red 1 comes back, still

  7. Bed bugs in healthcare settings.

    PubMed

    Munoz-Price, L Silvia; Safdar, Nasia; Beier, John C; Doggett, Stephen L

    2012-11-01

    Infestations caused by bed bugs have resurfaced during the past decade across all continents. Even though bed bugs primarily cause skin manifestations in humans, a major stigma is placed upon people or institutions found to carry them. It is important for healthcare facilities to be prepared for this pest by implementing policies, carefully selecting materials used for hospital furniture, and educating providers on early identification and control. PMID:23041813

  8. Hematite Outlier and Sand Dunes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 4 December 2003

    This image shows a crater just south of the edge of the famous hematite-bearing surface, which is visible in the context image as a smooth area to the north. The crater has two features of immediate note. The first is a layered mound in the north part of the crater floor. This mound contains hematite, and it is an outlying remnant of the greater deposits to the north that have otherwise completely disappeared in this crater. The second feature is a dune field in the center of the crater floor, with dark dunes indicating winds from the northwest. The dunes grade into a dark sand sheet with no coherent structure, indicating that the sand layer thins out to the south and east.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -4.4, Longitude 357.3 East (2.7 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  9. The Red Kite

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Gigrin, a family-run sheep farm in Wales with a conservation mindset, offers this Web site devoted to the red kite, a small raptor that humans have attempted to protect longer than for any other bird species in the world. Readers can expect a solid introduction to red kite natural history, and an encouraging example of conservation by private landowners. The main Web page provides a general background information about the red kite, including a short audio clip of a red kite call. The following pages contain photos, detailed descriptions of nesting and feeding habits, and links to other organizations involved in protecting the red kite.

  10. Fluidized bed gasification of agricultural residue

    E-print Network

    Groves, John David

    1979-01-01

    advances in gasification technology have occurred. Among these are the use of oxygen, operation at elevated pressures, operation in a molten suspension, and use of' fluid beds (Rase, 1977). Fixed Bed Gasifiers Fixed bed gasifiers are currently being... and Horsfield (1977). The fuel gas obtained from the producer was used to power a small internal combustion engine attached to a ten kilowatt generator. Fluidized Bed Gasifiers One of the first systems to use a fluidized bed unit for gasification...

  11. Red Rice Research and Control. 

    E-print Network

    Baker, John B.; Baldwin, Ford L.; Bourgeois, W.J.; Cox, Clodis H.; Craigmiles, Julian P.; Dishman, William D.; Eastin, E. Ford; Helpert, Charles W.; Hill, Lewis C.; Huey, Bobby A.; Klosterboer, Arlen D.; Sonnier, Earl A.

    1980-01-01

    ...................................................... INTRODUCTION 5 J. P. Craigmiles RED RICE PROBLEMS - A SEEDSMAN'S VIEWPOINT ........................ 7 C. H. Cox ........................ RED RICE PROBLEMS - A PRODUCER'S VIEWPOINT 9 W. D. Dishman CULTURAL CONTROL OF RED RICE... ...................................... 10 E. A. Sonnier RED RICE CONTROL IN ALTERNATE CROPS ................................ 16 F. L. Baldwin ..# RED RICE CONTROL ..................................................lg B. A. Huey and F. L. Baldwin RED RICE HERBICIDE SCREENING TESTS...

  12. Stratigraphy and paleoenvironments of the early to middle Holocene Chipalamawamba Beds (Malawi Basin, Africa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Bocxlaer, B.; Salenbien, W.; Praet, N.; Verniers, J.

    2012-05-01

    We describe the Chipalamawamba Beds, early to middle Holocene deposits at the southern margin of long-lived Lake Malawi. The beds are exposed because of downcutting of the upper Shire River. The Chipalamawamba sediments are medium to coarse, yellow to brown sands deposited in lenses varying in horizontal extent from a few meters to several hundreds of meters. Four units are recognized; the first three mainly contain lacustrine sediments deposited during lake high-stands about 10.6-9.7 cal ka BP (Unit 1), 7.6-6.5 cal ka BP (Unit 2) and 5.9-5.3 cal ka BP. Sediments of Unit 4 top units 1 to 3, are coarser and display regular foresets and oblique-bedding, suggesting deposition in riverine environments after installation of the Shire River (~5.0 ka BP). Freshwater mollusk assemblages and bioturbations regularly occur in the lacustrine sediments, but are largely absent from Unit 4. Diverse and often contradicting hypotheses on the lake levels of Lake Malawi have been proposed for the early and middle Holocene. The Chipalamawamba Beds allow straight-forward recognition of water levels and provide strong evidence for oscillating lake levels during this period, rather than continuous high or low levels. Sedimentation rates have been high and individual shell beds have typically been deposited during a few decades. Because the Chipalamawamba Beds contain a sequence of mollusk assemblages with intervals between subsequent shell beds ranging from a century to a few millennia, they enable paleontological analysis of the fauna with unusually high temporal resolution. That some mollusk lineages inhabiting Lake Malawi are in the early stages of diversification and radiation increases the paleobiological relevance of these beds.

  13. Stratigraphy and paleoenvironments of the early to middle Holocene Chipalamawamba Beds (Malawi Basin, Africa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Bocxlaer, B.; Salenbien, W.; Praet, N.; Verniers, J.

    2012-11-01

    We describe the Chipalamawamba Beds, early to middle Holocene deposits at the southern margin of long-lived Lake Malawi. The beds are exposed because of downcutting of the upper Shire River. The Chipalamawamba sediments are medium to coarse, yellow to brown sands deposited in lenses varying in horizontal extent from a few meters to several hundreds of meters. Four units are recognized; the first three mainly contain lacustrine sediments deposited during lake high stands about 10.6-9.7 cal ka BP (Unit 1), 7.6-6.5 cal ka BP (Unit 2) and 5.9-5.3 cal ka BP (Unit 3). Sediments of Unit 4 overlay Units 1 to 3, are coarser and display regular foresets and oblique-bedding, suggesting deposition in riverine environments after installation of the Shire River (~ 5.5-5.0 ka BP). Freshwater mollusk assemblages and bioturbation regularly occur in the lacustrine sediments, but are largely absent from Unit 4. Diverse and often contradicting hypotheses on the lake levels of Lake Malawi have been proposed for the early and middle Holocene. The Chipalamawamba Beds allow straightforward recognition of water levels and provide strong evidence for oscillating lake levels during this period, rather than continuous high or low levels. Sedimentation rates have been high and individual shell beds have typically been deposited during a few decades. Because the Chipalamawamba Beds contain a sequence of mollusk assemblages with intervals between subsequent shell beds ranging from a century to a few millennia, they enable paleontological analysis of the fauna with an unusually high temporal resolution. That some mollusk lineages inhabiting Lake Malawi are in the early stages of diversification and radiation increases the paleobiological relevance of these beds.

  14. Critical state of sand matrix soils.

    PubMed

    Marto, Aminaton; Tan, Choy Soon; Makhtar, Ahmad Mahir; Kung Leong, Tiong

    2014-01-01

    The Critical State Soil Mechanic (CSSM) is a globally recognised framework while the critical states for sand and clay are both well established. Nevertheless, the development of the critical state of sand matrix soils is lacking. This paper discusses the development of critical state lines and corresponding critical state parameters for the investigated material, sand matrix soils using sand-kaolin mixtures. The output of this paper can be used as an interpretation framework for the research on liquefaction susceptibility of sand matrix soils in the future. The strain controlled triaxial test apparatus was used to provide the monotonic loading onto the reconstituted soil specimens. All tested soils were subjected to isotropic consolidation and sheared under undrained condition until critical state was ascertain. Based on the results of 32 test specimens, the critical state lines for eight different sand matrix soils were developed together with the corresponding values of critical state parameters, M, ?, and ?. The range of the value of M, ?, and ? is 0.803-0.998, 0.144-0.248, and 1.727-2.279, respectively. These values are comparable to the critical state parameters of river sand and kaolin clay. However, the relationship between fines percentages and these critical state parameters is too scattered to be correlated. PMID:24757417

  15. Critical State of Sand Matrix Soils

    PubMed Central

    Marto, Aminaton; Tan, Choy Soon; Makhtar, Ahmad Mahir; Kung Leong, Tiong

    2014-01-01

    The Critical State Soil Mechanic (CSSM) is a globally recognised framework while the critical states for sand and clay are both well established. Nevertheless, the development of the critical state of sand matrix soils is lacking. This paper discusses the development of critical state lines and corresponding critical state parameters for the investigated material, sand matrix soils using sand-kaolin mixtures. The output of this paper can be used as an interpretation framework for the research on liquefaction susceptibility of sand matrix soils in the future. The strain controlled triaxial test apparatus was used to provide the monotonic loading onto the reconstituted soil specimens. All tested soils were subjected to isotropic consolidation and sheared under undrained condition until critical state was ascertain. Based on the results of 32 test specimens, the critical state lines for eight different sand matrix soils were developed together with the corresponding values of critical state parameters, M, ?, and ?. The range of the value of M, ?, and ? is 0.803–0.998, 0.144–0.248, and 1.727–2.279, respectively. These values are comparable to the critical state parameters of river sand and kaolin clay. However, the relationship between fines percentages and these critical state parameters is too scattered to be correlated. PMID:24757417

  16. Fecal indicators in sand, sand contact, and risk of enteric illness among beachgoers

    PubMed Central

    Heaney, Christopher D.; Sams, Elizabeth; Dufour, Alfred P.; Brenner, Kristen P.; Haugland, Richard A.; Chern, Eunice; Wing, Steve; Marshall, Stephen; Love, David C.; Serre, Marc; Noble, Rachel; Wade, Timothy J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Beach sand can harbor fecal indicator organisms and pathogens, but enteric illness risk associated with sand contact remains unclear. Methods In 2007, visitors at two recreational marine beaches were asked on the day of their visit about sand contact. Ten to 12 days later, participants answered questions about health symptoms since the visit. F+ coliphage, Enterococcus, Bacteroidales, fecal Bacteroides, and Clostridium spp. in wet sand were measured using culture and molecular methods. Results We analyzed 144 wet sand samples and completed 4,999 interviews. Adjusted odds ratios (aORs) were computed, comparing those in the highest tertile of fecal indicator exposure with those who reported no sand contact. Among those digging in sand compared with those not digging in sand, a molecular measure of Enterococcus spp. (calibrator cell equivalents/g) in sand was positively associated with gastrointestinal (GI) illness (aOR = 2.0 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.2–3.2]) and diarrhea (2.4 [1.4–4.2]). Among those buried in sand, point estimates were greater for GI illness (3.3 [1.3–7.9]) and diarrhea (4.9 [1.8–13]). Positive associations were also observed for culture-based Enterococcus (colony-forming units/g) with GI illness (aOR digging = 1.7 [1.1–2.7]) and diarrhea (2.1 [1.3–3.4]). Associations were not found among non-swimmers with sand exposure. Conclusions We observed a positive relationship between sand contact activities and enteric illness as a function of concentrations of fecal microbial pollution in beach sand. PMID:22157306

  17. Dependence of ripple dimensions on cohesive and non-cohesive bed properties in the intertidal Dee Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtman, Ian; Thorne, Peter; Baas, Jacobus; O'Boyle, Louise; Cooke, Richard; Amoudry, Laurent; Bell, Paul; Aspden, Rebecca; Bass, Sarah; Davies, Alan; Hope, Julie; Malarkey, Jonathan; Manning, Andrew; Parsons, Daniel; Paterson, David; Peakall, Jeffrey; Schindler, Robert; Ye, Leiping

    2014-05-01

    There is a need to better understand the effects of cohesive and mixed sediments on coastal processes, to improve sediment transport models for the management of coastal erosion, siltation of navigation channels and habitat change. Although reasonable sediment transport predictors are available for pure sands, it still is not the case for mixed cohesive and non-cohesive sediments. Existing predictors mostly relate ripple dimensions to hydrodynamic conditions and median sediment grain diameter, assuming a narrow unimodal particle size distribution. Properties typical of mixed conditions, such as composition and cohesion for example, are not usually taken into account. This presents severe shortcomings to predictors' abilities. Indeed, laboratory experiments using mixed cohesive sediments have shown that bedform dimensions decrease with increasing bed mud content. In the field, one may expect current predictors to match data for well-sorted sands closely, but poorly for mixed sediments. Our work is part of the COHBED project and aims to: (1) examine, in field conditions, if ripple dimensions are significantly different for mixed cohesive sediment beds compared to beds with pure sand; (2) compare the field data with laboratory results that showed reduced ripple length due to cohesive mud content; and (3) assess the performance of a selection of ripple predictors for mixed sediment data. The COHBED project was set up to undertake laboratory experiments and fieldwork to study how physical and biological processes influence bedform development in a mixed cohesive-cohesionless sediment environment. As part of COHBED, a suite of instruments was deployed on tidal flats in the Dee Estuary (on the NW coast of England), collecting co-located measurements of the hydrodynamics, suspended sediment properties and bed morphology. The instruments occupied three sites collecting data over different bed compositions during a two week period (21 May to 4 June 2013). One site was located above a sandy bed, and the two others were above mixed beds of different mud content. The tide covered a full cycle from neaps to neaps and the weather provided onshore and offshore winds of varying strength. Bedform measurements were taken every half an hour using an Acoustic Ripple Profiler (ARP) that covered an area of about two square metres. Dynamic measurements of tides and waves were made using an Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) at 8 Hz. Bed samples were taken when the tidal flats dried out at low tide and a sediment trap collected suspended load near the bed. In the presentation, comparisons of the sites will be made from measurements of the proportion of mud and biological sediment binders at each site and the ripple dimensions for different hydrodynamic conditions. Key words: bed morphology, current ripple, mixed sediment, cohesion, hydrodynamics, observations, tidal flat, estuary, Dee

  18. Invasive plants on disturbed Korean sand dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kee Dae

    2005-01-01

    The sand dunes in coastal regions of South Korea are important ecosystems because of their small size, the rare species found in this habitat, and the beautiful landscapes they create. This study investigated the current vegetative status of sand dunes on three representative coasts of the Korean peninsula, and on the coasts of Cheju Island, and assessed the conditions caused by invasive plants. The relationships between the degree of invasion and 14 environmental variables were studied. Plots of sand dunes along line transects perpendicular to the coastal lines were established to estimate vegetative species coverage. TWINSPAN (Two-Way Indicator Species Analysis), CCA (Canonical Correspondence Analysis), and DCCA (Detrended Canonical Correspondence Analysis) were performed to classify communities on sand dunes and assess species composition variation. Carex kobomugi, Elymus mollis, and Vitex rotundifolia were found to be the dominant species plotted on the east, the west, and the peripheral coasts of Cheju Island, respectively. Vegetation on the south coast was totally extinct. The 19 communities, including representative C. kobomugi, C. kobomugi- Ixeris repens, C. kobomugi- Oenothera biennis, E. mollis, Lolium multiflorum- Calystegia soldanella, and V. rotundifolia- C. kobomugi, were all classified according to TWINSPAN. Oenothera biennis and L. multiflorum were exotics observed within these native communities. CCA showed that invasive native and exotic species distribution was segregated significantly, according to disturbance level, exotic species number, gravel, sand and silt contents, as well as vegetation size. It further revealed that human disturbance can strongly favor the settlement of invasive and exotic species. Restoration options to reduce exotic plants in the South Korean sand dune areas were found to be the introduction of native plant species from one sand dune into other sand dune areas, prohibition of building and the introduction of exotic soils, and conservation of surrounding sand dune areas.

  19. Quantifying Stream Bed Gravel Mobility from Friction Angle Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, M. A.; Dunne, T.

    2012-12-01

    A method to measure friction angles using force gauges was field tested to determine its utility at quantifying critical shear stress in a gravel bedded reach of the San Joaquin River in California. Predictions of mobility from friction angles were compared with observations of the movement of tagged particles from locations for which local shear stress was quantified with a validated 2-D flow model. The observations of movement, distance of travel, and location of the end of travel were made after extended flow releases from Friant dam. Determining the critical shear stress for gravel bed material transport currently depends upon bedload sampling or tracer studies. Often, such measurements can only be made during occasional and untimely flow events, and at limited, suboptimal locations. Yet, theoretical studies conclude that the friction angle is an important control on the critical shear stress for mobility of any grain size, and therefore of the excess shear stress which strongly influences bedload transport rate. The ability to predict bed mobility at ungauged and unmonitored locations is also an important requirement for planning of flow regimes and channel design. Therefore, a method to measure friction angles that can be performed quickly in low flow conditions would prove useful for river management and research. To investigate this promising method friction angle surveys were performed at two riffle sites where differences in bed material size and distribution, and channel slope were observed. The friction angle surveys are sensitive enough to detect differences between the sites as well as spatially and temporally within a single riffle. Low friction angles were observed along the inside of a long bend where sand content was greater (by ~20%) than other surveyed locations. Friction angles decreased slightly after a depositional event associated with transient large woody debris and bank erosion, and increased again after a 5 year return interval flow reorganized the sediment. The shear stress capable of mobilizing bed material at the sites was also determined from monitored RFID tagged tracer gravel-cobbles and computed from a 2-D hydraulic model. These computed bed mobilizing shear stresses are compared with those predicted from observations and measurements made during the force gauge surveys thereby demonstrating their capability to quantify the critical shear stress and the applicability of the method.

  20. Quantitative Measurements of Bedform Transport Rates and Sand Sheet Character in the Lower Mississippi River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nittrouer, J. A.; Allison, M. A.; Campanella, R.

    2005-05-01

    Channel sand volume and downstream flux in the Mississippi River have important implications for proposed mitigation projects (dredging and pipelines) that seek to utilize this resource for replenishing neighboring barrier islands and restoring Louisiana's deteriorating wetlands. This study quantifies bedform migration-induced sand flux through the lower river on daily and seasonal timescales, and evaluates the sedimentary character of the bedload component. Observations and measurements were conducted along three study grids (Audubon Park, English Turn and Venice) over a range of river discharges between April 2003 and January 2005. Two multibeam bathymetric profiles of the study grids were conducted 24 h apart to document bedform migration, and stratigraphy and thickness of the sand layer were confirmed by CHIRP seismic profiling. Downstream transport is evaluated from bed elevation changes for a 1 m grid after correcting for river stage, and utilized to calculate bedload sand fluxes for larger, averaged grid cells after visual examination confirmed dunes had migrated <1 wavelength. Algorithms were formulated to remove spurious grid cells created by vessel motion, navigation and swath-matching errors. Initial data analysis indicates flux rates conform to expected trends: values are proportional to river discharge and are higher in the channel thalweg of straight reaches relative to shallower water. Bedform size also increases with river discharge and spatial changes in flux rates; height ranges from <1 m to 10 m, and wavelength from 10 m to 100 m. Seasonal trends in sand sheet thickness are evident, particularly in deeper meander reaches, where aggradation occurs at low flow and scour is observed during high flow. At highest discharges observed (35,000 m3/sec), bedform troughs bottom out on exposed relict fluvio-deltaic strata that the river has incised (i.e., sediment starved). A spatially uniform grab sampling effort (250 samples) provided grain size data of the active sand sheet for the lower 135 km of the river. A downstream trend of decreasing grain size (2.6 to 2.0 ?) is likely due to the finest sand fraction leaving suspension and becoming bedload as river gradient and velocity progressively decrease. Locally, grain size increases in the deepest portions of the channel as a result of enhanced flow scouring the fine and medium sand fraction.

  1. Skin friction for steel piles in sand 

    E-print Network

    Sulaiman, Ibrahim Hikmat

    1967-01-01

    - The Arkansas Pile Test iv vii 12 Art. 2. 5 - Skin Friction, Soil Shear Strength, snd Pile Movement Chapter III, Laboratory Tests on Small Piles in Sand Az't. 3. 1 ? Soil Classification Art. 3. 2 - Testing Apparatus 23 25 Art. 3. 3 ? Preparation... 12. 13. Grain Size Distribution by Sieve Analysis Triaxial Cell Arranged for Loading 24 26 14. Skin Friction Versus Pile Movement for Firm Sand. Iaboratory Test, Data 33 15. Skin Friction Versus Pile Movement for Dense Sand. Laboratory Test...

  2. Skin friction for steel piles in sand

    E-print Network

    Sulaiman, Ibrahim Hikmat

    1967-01-01

    SkiN FRICTION FOR STEZL PIIZS IN SAND A Theeia by I. H. Sulaiman Submittei io the graduate College of t, he Texan AAB Univen-ity in Ixantial fulfil. ment of bhe zequiremenbu for the degree of NASTZR 0F SCISNCZ May 196'7 bsrjor Subject...: Civil Engineering SKIN FRICTION FOR STEEL PILES IN SAND A Thesis by I. H. Sulaiman Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of C mmittee Head of Department Memb Member 111 Skin Friction For Steel Piles in Sand (May 1967) Ibr shim Hikmat...

  3. Regionally extensive altered air-fall ash for use in correlation of lithofacies in Upper Cretaceous Williams Fork Formation, northeastern Piceance Creek and southern Sand Wash Basins, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, E.A.

    1986-08-01

    The Williams Fork Formation of the Mesaverde Group in northwest Colorado consists of nonmarine to marginal marine lithofacies that were deposited along the western edge of the Cretaceous Western Interior seaway. Complex intertonguing, characteristic of the Mesaverde, commonly makes correlation of lithofacies difficult when using time-transgressive sandstone units or coal beds of limited areal extent. An altered ash bed, the Yampa bed, has been identified in the Williams Fork and is currently used in regional correlations within the Piceance Creek and Sand Wash basins, Colorado. The Yampa bed is a 0.5 to 5-ft thick, regionally persistent claystone consistently identifiable in the lower part of the Williams Fork. It is easily recognized on geophysical logs by a low-resistivity response. Based on preliminary x-ray diffraction analysis of selected outcrop and drill-hole samples, the bed consists principally of kaolinite and smectite in varying proportions. The following evidence indicates that the bed is probably a diagenetically altered air-fall ash: (1) petrographic studies of thin sections revealed a relict vitroclastic texture presumably produced by clay-mineral replacement of glass shards; (2) samples characteristically contain phenocrysts of euhedral to subhedral ..beta..-quartz (..cap alpha.. quartz after ..beta..-quartz), biotite, sanidine, and zircon; and (3) outcrop and subsurface studies indicate the Yampa bed is widespread areally. The Yampa bed is useful as a regional datum in the correlation of intertonguing lithofacies within the Williams Fork Formation and in paleogeographic reconstructions for the lower part of the formation.

  4. 69. Red Butte-Red Fir Ridge (Shasta Red Fir) (Imper 1988b, Cheng 1996d)

    E-print Network

    Standiford, Richard B.

    69. Red Butte-Red Fir Ridge (Shasta Red Fir) (Imper 1988b, Cheng 1996d) Location This established (fig. 139). Ecological subsection ­ High Cascades (M261Df). Target Element Red Fir (Abies magnifica) Distinctive Features Shasta Red Fir Forest: Taxonomically, the description of Shasta red fir (Abies magnifica

  5. Characterization of hydrodynamics and solids mixing in fluidized beds involving biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fotovat, Farzam

    This thesis focuses on the characterization of hydrodynamics and mixing phenomena in fluidized beds containing mixtures of sand and irregular biomass particles. The first objective of this study is understanding the effect of the large biomass particles on the bubbling characteristics and gas distribution pattern of sand fluidized beds. The second objective is the characterization of mixing/segregation of biomass and sand particles under fluidization conditions. A variety of experimental techniques are employed to study the behavior of two constituting phases of a fluidized bed, i.e., dilute (bubble) and dense (emulsion) phases. Exploring the characteristic fluidization velocities of sand-biomass mixtures unveils that the onset of bubbling in these systems occurs at a higher gas velocity compared to that of the initial fluidization velocity (Uif). The initial bubbling velocity (Uib), the final fluidization velocity ( Uff), and the transition gas velocity from bubbling to turbulent regime (Uc) rise by increasing the fraction of biomass in the mixture. Statistical analysis of the pressure signal at top of the bed reveals that increasing the biomass load hinders the evolution of bubbles at a low gas velocity (U<0.6 m/s), while at high velocities, the bubbling trend of beds containing different fractions of biomass is comparable. The addition of biomass particles to a bed of sand leads to an increase in the mean voidage of the bed; however, the voidage of each phase remains unaffected. It is observed that large biomass particles trigger a break-up of the bubbles, which results in boosting bubbling frequency. The fraction of bubbles at the center of the bed increases with the load of biomass. At the wall region, however, it starts to decrease by adding 2% wt. biomass to pure sand and then increases with the further addition of biomass. The Radioactive Particle Tracking (RPT) technique is implemented in the second section of this work to study the motion and distribution of biomass particles at U=0.36 m/s and U=0.64 m/s. In this regard, an active biomass particle is tracked for a long period of time and its instantaneous position is recorded. The acquired data is then processed to achieve the time-averaged concentration profile of biomass particles. This profile represents the segregation of biomass particles, which tend to accumulate in the upper levels of the bed. Changes in the fraction of biomass with increasing gas velocity are inferred from the local changes of the time-averaged pressure drop values at the top of the bed. To determine the parameters affecting the movement and segregation of biomass particles, their circulatory motion is also scrutinized using the RPT data. The circulation of biomass is impeded when the load of biomass rises at U=0.36 m/s, resulting in a more pronounced segregation of sand and biomass. The opposite trend is observed at U=0.64 m/s. This prompts a more uniform distribution of particles along the bed and brings about a higher degree of mixing. The average rise velocity of biomass is 0.2 times the bubble velocity, regardless of the biomass load or fluidization velocity. A one-dimensional model is proposed to predict the volume fraction of biomass along the bed. Some of the terms of this model are linked to the fluidizing behavior of biomass particles as deduced from the RPT findings. The fluidization of sand and cylindrical biomass particles is also simulated using the BARRACUDA CPFD software, which is based on the Lagrangian-Eulerian approach. Simulation and experimental results are compared in order to evaluate the capability of the numerical approach to predict the bubbling characteristics of the sand-biomass mixture for systems differing in composition and fluidization velocity. The last part of this thesis is devoted to the separation of the main components of the shredded bulky waste. A step-wise process has been developed based on the elutriation and density segregation techniques. After removal of the light and interwoven species of the shredded waste by elutriation, the nonelutri

  6. A Physical Taxonomy of Martian Sand and Dust Grainsat the Phoenix Landing Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, John; Stoker, Carol

    2014-11-01

    A quantitative taxonomy of martian sand and dust grains for soil samples at the Phoenix lander site has been developed from the mission’s optical microscope data with a resolution of 4 ?m per pixel. Approx. 3-4000 grains were analyzed for color, hue, size, shape, surface texture, aspect ratio, and optical properties. At least 26 types of sand and dust grains have been identified. Grain colors include black, brown, orange, red, white, and clear. Most grains are opaque, but many are translucent or transparent. Grain shapes range from botryoidal, blackberry-like, bead-like and rounded, to subrounded, elongate, angular, and highly irregular forms. Surface textures range from knobbly, rough, and multifaceted to smooth and polished. Surface reflectivity varied from dull to shiny to specularly reflective. Materials may include augite, pyroxenes, olivine, volcanic glass, hematite, other iron oxides, and salts. Grain size of the sand has a modal value of ~90 ?m, but there is no gradation into dust sizes, indicating a bimodal distribution of the samples. The dust was probably imported into the region from aeolian dust storms. This accords with a mineralogical dissimilarity between the sand and dust grain populations. The sand is dominated by black and brown grains; the dust is dominated by orange grains. The Phoenix site also has centimeter and larger stones in abundance that again have no apparent gradation into the sand size material. Thus, the Phoenix landing site soil appears multimodal. The soil appears to be magnetically susceptible, but it is unclear what the source of magnetism might be. Specific magnetic minerals were not identified in the samples with the possible exception of paramagnetic microbotryoidal hematite. The soil was nevertheless adhesive to the substrates and internally cohesive (forming spherical aggregates) owing to van der Waals forces and possibly salt/moisture bonding.

  7. Toxicity of nickel to the earthworm and the applicability of the neutral red retention assay

    E-print Network

    Hopkin, Steve

    Toxicity of nickel to the earthworm and the applicability of the neutral red retention assay JANECK of nickel on survival, growth, and reproduction of Eisenia veneta were investigated following 4 weeks of exposure to a nickel-chloride spiked loamy sand soil. The ability of a simple earthworm biomarker

  8. Antioxidant activity of the polysaccharide of the red microalga Porphyridium sp

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tehila Tannin-Spitz; Margalit Bergman; Dorit van-Moppes; Shlomo Grossman

    2005-01-01

    The cells of the red microalga Porphyridium UTEX 637 are encapsulated within a sulfated polysaccharide whose external part (i.e., the soluble fraction) dissolves into the medium. It is thought that the main function of the polysaccharide is to protect the algal cells from the extreme environmental conditions, such as drought and high light, prevailing in their native sea-sand habitat. In

  9. Clinical physiology of bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, John E.

    1993-01-01

    Maintenance of optimal health in humans requires the proper balance between exercise, rest, and sleep as well as time in the upright position. About one-third of a lifetime is spent sleeping; and it is no coincidence that sleeping is performed in the horizontal position, the position in which gravitational influence on the body is minimal. Although enforced bed rest is necessary for the treatment of some ailments, in some cases it has probably been used unwisely. In addition to the lower hydrostatic pressure with the normally dependent regions of the cardiovascular system, body fuid compartments during bed rest in the horizontal body position, and virtual elimination of compression on the long bones of the skeletal system during bed rest (hypogravia), there is often reduction in energy metabolism due to the relative confinement (hypodynamia) and alteration of ambulatory circadian variations in metabolism, body temperature, and many hormonal systems. If patients are also moved to unfamiliar surroundings, they probably experience some feelings of anxiety and some sociopsychological problems. Adaptive physiological responses during bed rest are normal for that environment. They are attempts by the body to reduce unnecessary energy expenditure, to optimize its function, and to enhance its survival potential. Many of the deconditioning responses begin within the first day or two of bed rest; these early responses have prompted physicians to insist upon early resumption of the upright posture and ambulation of bedridden patients.

  10. Laser Sintering of Silica Sand – Mechanism and Application to Sand Casting Mould

    Microsoft Academic Search

    X. H. Wang; J. Y. H. Fuh; Y. S. Wong; Y. X. Tang

    2003-01-01

    Silica sand is commonly used in the foundry industry. With a high melting point of 160° C, the silica sand is normally sintered in a high-temperature furnace. However, silica with contents of calcium, aluminium, magnesium, and chlorine, etc. can form low-melting point eutectics. Therefore, a relatively low-power laser can be used to sinter the silica sand directly. The investigation of

  11. Modeling the response of shoreface-connected sand ridges to sand extraction on an inner shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nnafie, A.; de Swart, H. E.; Calvete, D.; Garnier, R.

    2014-05-01

    Shoreface-connected sand ridges are rhythmic bedforms that occur on many storm-dominated inner shelves. The ridges span several kilometers, are a few meters high, and they evolve on a timescale of centuries. A process-based model is used to gain a fundamental insight into the response of these ridges to extraction of sand. Different scenarios of sand extraction (depth, location, and geometry of the extraction area; multiple sand extractions) are imposed. For each scenario, the response timescale as well as the characteristics of the new equilibrium state are determined. Results show that ridges partially restore after extraction, i.e., the disturbed bathymetry recovers on decadal timescales. However, in the end, the ridge original sand volume is not recovered. Initially, most sand that accomplishes the infill of the pit originates from the area upstream of the extraction, as well as from the areas surrounding the pit. The contribution of the latter strongly decreases in the subsequent time period. Depending on the location of the pit, additional sand sources contribute: First, if the pit is located close to the downstream trough, the pit gains sand by reduction of sand transport from the ridge to this trough. Second, if the pit is located close to the adjacent outer shelf, the ridge recovery is stronger due to an import of sand from that area. Furthermore, pits that are located close to the nearshore zone have a weak recovery, deeper pits have longer recovery timescales, wide and shallow pits recover most sand, while multiple sand pits slow down the recovery process.

  12. 1. SAND DRAINING & DRYING BUILDING (RIGHT), COVERED INCLINE CONVEYOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. SAND DRAINING & DRYING BUILDING (RIGHT), COVERED INCLINE CONVEYOR (LOWER RIGHT) THAT EXTENDS TO THE SAND-SORTING BUILDING, AND REMAINS OF ORIGINAL (1917) WASHING, DRAINING & DRYING BUILDING (LEFT), VIEW LOOKING WEST FROM TOP OF SAND-SORTING BUILDING - Mill "C" Complex, Sand Draining & Drying Building, South of Dee Bennet Road, near Illinois River, Ottawa, La Salle County, IL

  13. Dynamical evolution of sand ripples under water Alexandre Stegner1

    E-print Network

    Wesfreid, José Eduardo

    Dynamical evolution of sand ripples under water Alexandre Stegner1 and Jose´ Eduardo Wesfreid2 1 an experimental study on the evolution of sand ripples formed under the action of an oscillatory flow. An annular sand-water cell was used in order to investigate a wide range of parameters. The sand ripples follow

  14. 1 INTRODUCTION Oil sand has unique properties exhibits performance

    E-print Network

    Joseph, Tim Grain

    1 INTRODUCTION Oil sand has unique properties exhibits performance akin to sandstone in winter seated on oil sand can sink after a number of cycles with ground softening oc- curring rapidly due true for unconsolidated sands such as oil sand. 2 ASSUMPTIONS Following the work of Sharif-Abadi (2006

  15. Retrieval of sand density from hyperspectral BRDF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, Charles M.; Abelev, Andrei; Philpot, William; Doctor, Katarina Z.; Montes, Marcos J.; Fusina, Robert; Li, Rong-Rong; van Roggen, Elena

    2014-06-01

    In past work, we have shown that density effects in hyperspectral bi-directional reflectance function (BRDF) data are consistent in laboratory goniometer data, field goniometer measurements with the NRL Goniometer for Portable Hyperspectral Earth Reflectance (GOPHER), and airborne CASI-1500 hyperspectral imagery. Density effects in granular materials have been described in radiative transfer models and are known, for example, to influence both the overall level of reflectance as well as the size of specific characteristics such as the width of the opposition effect in the BRDF. However, in mineralogically complex sands, such as coastal sands, the relative change in reflectance with density depends on the composite nature of the sand. This paper examines the use of laboratory and field hyperspectral goniometer data and their utility for retrieving sand density from airborne hyperspectral imagery. We focus on limitations of current models to describe density effects in BRDF data acquired in the field, laboratory setting, and from airborne systems.

  16. On the nature of Athabasca Oil Sands.

    PubMed

    Czarnecki, Jan; Radoev, Boryan; Schramm, Laurier L; Slavchev, Radomir

    2005-06-30

    The existence of a thin aqueous film, separating bitumen (a form of heavy oil) from inorganic solids in Athabasca Oil Sands, is analysed based on "first principles". There is a general consensus in the literature on the hydrophilic character of the solids in oil sands. However, a review of the references cited in support of the solids being encapsulated in thin water envelopes produced a surprising lack of evidence. A theoretical analysis indicates that a water film separating clean, hydrophilic quartz and bitumen is stable under most conditions, and unstable for acidic oil sand ores. The existence of water-wet solids in the Athabasca Oil Sands remains a reasonable yet unproven postulate. It could therefore be dangerous to accept the water-wet solids postulate and then use it to interpret other phenomena. PMID:15936283

  17. The search for a source rock for the giant Tar Sand triangle accumulation, southeastern Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huntoon, J.E.; Hansley, P.L.; Naeser, N.D.

    1999-01-01

    A large proportion (about 36%) of the world's oil resource is contained in accumulations of heavy oil or tar. In these large deposits of degraded oil, the oil in place represents only a fraction of what was present at the time of accumulation. In many of these deposits, the source of the oil is unknown, and the oil is thought to have migrated over long distances to the reservoirs. The Tar Sand triangle in southeastern Utah contains the largest tar sand accumulation in the United States, with 6.3 billion bbl of heavy oil estimated to be in place. The deposit is thought to have originally contained 13-16 billion bbl prior to the biodegradation, water washing, and erosion that have taken place since the middle - late Tertiary. The source of the oil is unknown. The tar is primarily contained within the Lower Permian White Rim Sandstone, but extends into permeable parts of overlying and underlying beds. Oil is interpreted to have migrated into the White Rim sometime during the Tertiary when the formation was at a depth of approximately 3500 m. This conclusion is based on integration of fluid inclusion analysis, time-temperature reconstruction, and apatite fission-track modeling for the White Rim Sandstone. Homogenization temperatures cluster around 85-90??C for primary fluid inclusions in authigenic, nonferroan dolomite in the White Rim. The fluid inclusions are associated with fluorescent oil-bearing inclusions, indicating that dolomite precipitation was coeval with oil migration. Burial reconstruction suggests that the White Rim Sandstone reached its maximum burial depth from 60 to 24 Ma, and that maximum burial was followed by unroofing from 24 to 0 Ma. Time-temperature modeling indicates that the formation experienced temperatures of 85-90??C from about 35 to 40 Ma during maximum burial. Maximum formation temperatures of about 105-110??C were reached at about 24 Ma, just prior to unroofing. Thermal modeling is used to examine the history of potential source rocks for the White Rim oil. The most attractive potential sources for White Rim oil include beds within one or more of the following formations: the Proterozoic Chuar Group, which is present in the subsurface southwest of the Tar Sand triangle; the Mississippian Delle Phosphatic Member of the Deseret Limestone and equivalent formations, the Permian Kaibab Limestone, the Sinbad Limestone Member of the Triassic Moenkopi Formation, and the Jurassic Arapien Shale, Twin Creek Limestone, and Carmel Formation, which are present west of the Tar Sand triangle; the Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation in the Paradox basin east of the Tar Sand triangle; and the Permian Park City Formation northwest of the Tar Sand triangle. Each formation has a high total organic carbon content and is distributed over a wide enough geographic area to have provided a huge volume of oil. Source beds in all of the formations reached thermal maturity at times prior to or during the time that migration into the White Rim is interpreted to have occurred. Based on all available data, the most likely source for the Tar Sand triangle appears to be the Mississippian Delle Phosphatic Member of the Deseret Limestone. Secondary migration out of the Delle is interpreted to have occurred during the Cretaceous, during Sevier thrusting. Subsequent tertiary migration into the Tar Sand triangle reservoir is interpreted to have occurred later, during middle Tertiary Laramide deformation.

  18. Humate in coastal sands of northwest Florida

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. E. Swanson; J. G. Palacas

    1965-01-01

    Layers of dune and beach sand along the north coast of the Gulf of Mexico are cemented or impregnated with a conspicuous dark-brown to black water-solute organic substance herein called humate. The humate-cemented sand, generally 6 inches to 3 feet thick but as much as 15 feet thick in some places, forms one or several irregular layers in the subsurfaces

  19. Tar sands leachate study. Final report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. W. Grosse; L. McGowan

    1984-01-01

    An inhouse research project was conducted by the EPA's Industrial Environmental Research Laboratory (IERL) at the TandE Facility in Cincinnati, Ohio, to provide information concerning the potential for release of contaminants to groundwater from in-situ and above-ground processed tar sands. This study examined the composition of the leachate that may be generated from raw tar sand cores and spent tar

  20. Cleaning and Heat Transfer in Heat Exchanger with Circulating Fluidized Beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Ho Keun; Ahn, Soo Whan; Choi, Jong Woong; Lee, Byung Chang

    2010-06-01

    Fluidized bed type heat exchangers are known to increase the heat transfer and prevent the fouling. For proper design of circulating fluidized bed heat exchanger it is important to know the effect of design and operating parameters on the bed to the wall heat transfer coefficient. The present experimental and numerical study was conducted to investigate the effects of circulating solid particles on the characteristics of fluid flow, heat transfer and cleaning effect in the fluidized bed vertical shell and tube type heat exchanger with counterflow, at which a variety of solid particles such as glass (3 mmF), aluminum (2˜3 mmF), steel (2˜2.5 mmF), copper (2.5 mmF) and sand (2˜4 mmF) were used in the fluidized bed with a smooth tube. Seven different solid particles have the same volume, and the effects of various parameters such as water flow rates, particle diameter, materials and geometry were investigated. The present experimental and numerical results showed that the flow velocity range for collision of particles to the tube wall was higher with heavier density solid particles, and the increase in heat transfer was in the order of sand, copper, steel, aluminum, and glass. This behaviour might be attributed to the parameters such as surface roughness or particle heat capacity. Fouling examination using 25,500 ppm of ferric oxide (Fe2O3) revealed that the tube inside wall is cleaned by a mild and continuous scouring action of fluidized solid particles. The fluidized solid particles not only keep the surface clean, but they also break up the boundary layer improving the heat transfer coefficient even at low fluid velocities.

  1. Aeolian sand transport systems on Mars and Earth: Thermal infrared remote sensing of the volcaniclastic Shifting Sand Dunes, Christmas Lake Valley, Oregon, U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgett, Kenneth S.

    1994-12-01

    Satellite images of desert regions provide synoptic views useful for deciphering aeolian sand composition and transport paths. Multispectral thermal infrared data from the Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer and the Earth Observing System Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflectance Radiometer will be obtained starting 1998. These will be ideally suited for detection of mineral variation and mixing. To prepare for these capabilities, I have examined a dune field of Mars-like composition using images from the airborne Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) flown by the NASA Ames Research Center C-130 Earth Resources Program. The Shifting Sand Dunes of Christmas Lake Valley, Oregon, are composed of glass fragments, plagioclase crystals, ash aggregates, basalt lithics, and pyroxenes. The compositions, lack of quartz, and setting (at the downwind side of a flat-floored basin) are analogs to intracrater dune fields on Mars. The dunes record a minimum of two major dune-building events in the past 9000 years. A linear unmixing model was applied to 6-band (8-12 micron) TIMS emissivity images obtained September 1991. The results show three distinct sand types, two that are themselves mixtures and the third is composed of volcanic ash aggregates derived from a specific ash layer in the dry lake sediments. The other sands appear to be (1) dominated by reworked airfall from the 6800 BP terminal eruptions of Mt. Mazama and (2) from aeolian deflation of older volcanic sediment in the Pluvial Fort Rock Lake bed. The ash aggregates are contributed from local sources and do not transport through the entire dune field. The TIMS images also demonstrate the use of thermal emissivity to distinguish active dunes from inactive and interdune surfaces. Work supported under P. R. Christensen by NASA grant NAGW 943. M. S. Ramsey developed the thermal infrared unmixing model.

  2. Staged cascade fluidized bed combustor

    DOEpatents

    Cannon, Joseph N. (4103 Farragut St., Hyattsville, MD 20781); De Lucia, David E. (58 Beacon St., Apt. No. 2, Boston, MA 02108); Jackson, William M. (5300 McArthur Blvd., NW., Washington, DC 20016); Porter, James H. (P.O. Box 1131, Daggett Ave., Vineyard Haven, MA 02568)

    1984-01-01

    A fluid bed combustor comprising a plurality of fluidized bed stages interconnected by downcomers providing controlled solids transfer from stage to stage. Each stage is formed from a number of heat transfer tubes carried by a multiapertured web which passes fluidizing air to upper stages. The combustor cross section is tapered inwardly from the middle towards the top and bottom ends. Sorbent materials, as well as non-volatile solid fuels, are added to the top stages of the combustor, and volatile solid fuels are added at an intermediate stage.

  3. Hyporheic and Total Transient Storage in Small Sand-Bed Streams

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Key processes in stream ecosystems are linked to hydraulic retention, which is the departure of stream flow from ideal “plug flow,” and reflects fluid movement through surface and hyporheic storage zones. Most existing information about hyporheic exchange is based on flume studies or field measureme...

  4. Crayfish use of trash versus natural cover in incised, sand-bed streams.

    PubMed

    Adams, Susan B

    2014-02-01

    Historic land use changes and subsequent river channelization created deeply incised, unstable stream channels largely devoid of natural cover throughout the Yazoo River basin, Mississippi, USA. Large trash (e.g., televisions, toilets, car parts) dumped in streams provided shelter for some aquatic fauna. To determine whether trash served as a surrogate for natural cover, I examined crayfish use of both cover types. I sampled crayfishes by kick-seining 2 × 1-m plots in three cover classes: trash, natural cover, and no cover. I captured 415 crayfishes from 136 of the 294 plots. Most crayfishes were in natural cover (253), followed by trash (154), and no-cover (8) plots. Trash use varied by crayfish genus and size. Frequencies of all size classes of Procambarus and of the smallest Cambarus were higher in natural cover than trash. Many of the smallest individuals were found in live root mats. As Cambarus and Orconectes grew, they shifted more toward trash, and the largest Orconectes size class was significantly more abundant than expected in trash. Trash served as "artificial reefs," providing cover for crayfishes and other fauna, but functioned differently than the remaining natural cover. The results confirmed that stream substrate did not provide adequate instream cover for crayfishes in the study area and suggested that high-quality natural cover for large crayfishes was in short supply, at least for some species. Land management that provides for abundant, ongoing input and retention of complex cover, such as trees and live roots, to stream channels should be beneficial for crayfish assemblages. PMID:24248331

  5. Thermally Induced Wettability Change During SAGD for Oil Sand Extraction

    E-print Network

    Unal, Yasin

    2014-08-20

    appreciated. vi NOMENCLATURE 2D two-dimensional AOSTRA Alberta Oil Sands Technology and Research Authority BDNS barium dinonyl naphthalene sulfonate BIC Brookhaven Instruments Corporation CMG Computer Modelling Group Ltd. CSS cyclic steam....) is from oil sands. Most of these oil sands are located in Alberta. A typical oil sand is composed of approximately 83% sand, 14% bitumen, and 3% water by weight, and almost 90% of the solid matrix is quartz, with the rest being silt and clay (Nasr...

  6. Nail Bed Reconstruction with Split-Thickness Nail Bed Grafts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. C. YONG; L. C. TEOH

    1992-01-01

    The results of reconstruction of chronic post-traumatic nail deformities are thought to be unpredictable. We have reviewed eight patients treated by split-thickness nail bed grafts for deformities arising from defects in the sterile matrix. Appearance, adherence and function were improved in all cases, with no significant morbidity of the donor area.

  7. Improvements and validation of the erythropoiesis control model for bed rest simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, J. I.

    1977-01-01

    The most significant improvement in the model is the explicit formulation of separate elements representing erythropoietin production and red cell production. Other modifications include bone marrow time-delays, capability to shift oxyhemoglobin affinity and an algorithm for entering experimental data as time-varying driving functions. An area of model development is suggested by applying the model to simulating onset, diagnosis and treatment of a hematologic disorder. Recommendations for further improvements in the model and suggestions for experimental application are also discussed. A detailed analysis of the hematologic response to bed rest including simulation of the recent Baylor Medical College bed rest studies is also presented.

  8. Utility of Recycled Bedding for Laboratory Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Toru; Li, Zhixia; Kibushi, Tomomi; Okano, Shinya; Yamasaki, Nakamichi; Kasai, Noriyuki

    2009-01-01

    Animal facilities generate a large amount of used bedding containing excrement as medical waste. We developed a recycling system for used bedding that involves soft hydrothermal processing. In this study, we examined the effects of bedding type on growth, hematologic and serum biochemical values, and organ weights of female and male mice reared on either recycled or fresh bedding from 3 to 33 wk of age. Neither growth nor physiology differed between mice housed on recycled bedding compared with fresh bedding. When 14-wk-old mice were bred, litter size and total number of weaned pups showed no significant differences between animals raised on recycled or fresh bedding. Because bedding type influences the environment within cages and animal rooms, we evaluated particulate and ammonia data from cages and animal rooms. Values were significantly lower from cages and rooms that used recycled bedding than from those using fresh bedding, thus indicating that recycled bedding has the potential to improve the environment within both cages and animal rooms. Overall, this study revealed that recycled bedding is an excellent material for use in housing laboratory rodents. Specifically, recycled bedding may reduce medical waste and maintain healthy environments within cages and animal rooms. PMID:19653951

  9. The timing of climbing dune formation in southwestern Niger: fluvio-aeolian interactions and the rôle of sand supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rendell, Helen M.; Clarke, Michèle L.; Warren, Andrew; Chappell, Adrian

    2003-05-01

    Contemporary gully erosion has exposed sections in a climbing dune which is banked up against ferricrete terraces along the southern bank of the Niger River in southwestern Niger. The main sand transport direction in this area is from northeast to southwest, and the immediate source of the dune sand is the Niger River. Dune stratigraphy contains evidence of episodic, fluvially controlled accretion, separated by two palaeosols. Channel fills and stone stringers suggest occasional alluvial and colluvial reworking. Infra-red stimulated luminescence dating of the aeolian sands shows that dune development occurred episodically during the African Humid Period (15-5 ka), probably in response to an increase in sediment supply from the Niger River. Soil development occurred during the relatively short-lived period of enhanced aridity associated with the Younger Dryas, driven by weakening of the southwesterly monsoon circulation. Climate-driven dune accretion and further soil development occurred during the Holocene period.

  10. Effects of advanced oxidation on green sand properties via iron casting into green sand molds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yujue; Cannon, Fred S; Voigt, Robert C; Komarneni, Sridhar; Furness, J C

    2006-05-01

    The effects of advanced oxidation (AO) processing on the properties of green sand were studied via pouring cast iron into green sand molds. Upon cooling, the green sand molds were autopsied at various distances from the metal-sand interface. Autopsy green sand samples collected from a mold that incorporated AO water were characterized and compared to controlled samples collected from a similar autopsied mold made with conventional tap water (TAP). It was found that the AO processing removed a coating of coal pyrolysis products from the clay surface that typically accumulated on the clay surface. As a result, the AO-conditioned green sand retained 10-15% more active clay as measured bythe standard ultrasonic methylene blue titration than did the TAP-conditioned green sand. The AO processing also nearly doubled the generation of activated carbon from the normalized amount of coal composition of the green sand during the casting process. The AO-enhanced activated carbon generation and the AO-incurred clay surface cleaning provided the AO-conditioned green sand with higher normalized pore volume, and thus higher normalized m-xylene adsorption capacity, i.e., relative to before-metal-pouring conditions. Furthermore, mathematical analysis indicated that the AO-conditioned green sand better retained its important properties after pouring than did the TAP-conditioned green sand. Effectively, this meant after metal pouring, the AO-conditioned sample offered about the same net properties as the TAP-conditioned sample, even though the AO-conditioned sample contained less clay and coal before metal pouring. These results conformed to the full-scale foundry empirical finding that when AO is used, foundries need less makeup clay and coal addition through each casting cycle, and they release less air emissions. PMID:16719117

  11. Bottom Zone Flow Properties of a Square Circulating Fluidized Bed with Air Staging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhengyang; Sun, Shaozeng; Qin, Xiangbin; Deng, Qigang; Wu, Shaohua

    The recycled solids fed to the circulating fluidized bed (CFB) riser on one wall have a limited lateral dispersion rate, which results in an uneven solids distribution in the bottom zone of the bed. Using a reflective optical fiber solids concentration measuring system and visual observation, the flow properties in the bottom zone of a fluidized bed was investigated. The cold model CFB riser has a square cross-section of 0.25m×0.25m and a height of 6.07m with quartz sand as bed material (dp=276?m). At the condition of u 0=4m/s, Gs=21kg/m2s, the back feeding particles can penetrate the gas-solid flow in the riser and get to the opposite wall. It makes a denser region near the front wall of the bed. When air-staging is adopted, solids holdup increases below the secondary air (SA) injection ports with the increase of the rate of the secondary air to the total air (SAR). The solids holdup increase also exists above the secondary air injection ports but the incremental amount decreases quickly along the riser. At SAR=0.3, a denser bottom zone limits the back feeding particles' penetration and a relatively even solids distribution is formed in the bottom bed. A W-shaped solids concentration profile is formed just above the SA injection level. At SAR=0.5, uneven solids concentration profile exists in the bottom bed and no W-shaped solids concentration profile is formed for the deeper penetration of SA jets.

  12. Width adjustment in experimental gravel-bed channels in response to overbank flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitlick, John; Marr, Jeff; Pizzuto, Jim

    2013-06-01

    We conducted a series of flume experiments to investigate the response of self-formed gravel-bed channels to floods of varying magnitude and duration. Floods were generated by increasing the discharge into a channel created in sand- and gravel-sized sediment with a median grain size of 2 mm. Flooding increased the Shields stress along the channel perimeter, causing bank erosion and rapid channel widening. The sediment introduced to the channel by bank erosion was not necessarily deposited on the channel bed, but was rather transported downstream, a process likely facilitated by transient fining of the bed surface. At the end of each experiment, bank sediments were no longer in motion, "partial bed load transport" characterized the flat-bed portion of the channel, and the Shields stress approached a constant value of 0.056, about 1.2 times the critical Shields stress for incipient motion. Furthermore, the discharge was entirely accommodated by flow within the channel: the creation of a stable channel entirely eliminated overbank flows. We speculate that similar processes may occur in nature, but only where bank sediments are non-cohesive and where channel-narrowing processes cannot counteract bank erosion during overbank flows. We also demonstrate that a simple model of lateral bed load transport can reproduce observed channel widening rates, suggesting that simple methods may be appropriate for predicting width increases in channels with non-cohesive, unvegetated banks, even during overbank flows. Last, we present a model for predicting the equilibrium width and depth of a stable gravel-bed channel with a known channel-forming Shields stress.

  13. Production of red mold rice using a modified Nagata type koji maker

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chiu-Hsia Chiu; Kuang-Huei Ni; Yuan-Kuang Guu; Tzu-Ming Pan

    2006-01-01

    In this research, a commercial koji maker with a rotary perforated bed of 5-m diameter was modified for red mold rice production. Monascus purpureus BCRC 31499 was selected for its high production capacities of monacolin K and red pigment. The selected strain was first cultivated in a 120-l submerged type fermentor at 34°C and 2 vvm aeration rate with 60 rpm agitation

  14. Red Raider Orientation COLLEGE DISMISSAL

    E-print Network

    Rock, Chris

    Red Raider Orientation COLLEGE DISMISSAL #12;#12;RED RAIDER ORIENTATION Reminders Parking: Wall · Last Chance Info Fair ­ SUB Courtyard and Matador Room #12;RED RAIDER ORIENTATION Raiderlink www · View bills · Register for classes #12;RED RAIDER ORIENTATION #12;RED RAIDER ORIENTATION Reminder about

  15. Bed load transport in a proglacial river (Fagge, Gepatschferner, Tyrol)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morche, David; Baewert, Henning; Bryk, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    Large amounts of solid load are transported in proglacial streams. This material originates mainly from bedrock eroding glaciers (supra-, en- and subglacial stores). While suspended sediment dynamics in glacier-fed streams are quite well investigated, data on the bed load component of the total load are still rare. Due to the ongoing glacier melt down in high mountain areas it is highly debated whether more solid load (higher sediment availability) or less solid load (trapping effect of proglacial lakes) is transported in the near future. We present measurements of fine to medium sized bed load and discharge recordings from a proglacial river responding to the dramatic glacier retreat in the last years. The measurements have been carried out in cross sections close to the glacier snout of the Gepatschferner in Tyrol (Austria). First results show the more or less continuous transport of coarse sand and fine to medium sized gravel even during low flows in the ablation period. The investigations are part of the DFG/FWF joint project "PROSA" (http://www.ku.de/mgf/geographie/prosa).

  16. EMERGING TECHNOLOGY BULLETIN: SPOUTED BED REACTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Spouted Bed Reactor (SBR) technology utilizes the unique attributes of the "spouting " fluidization regime, which can provide heat transfer rates comparable to traditional fluid beds, while providing robust circulation of highly heterogeneous solids, concurrent with very agg...

  17. Advanced Fluidized Bed Waste Heat Recovery Systems 

    E-print Network

    Peterson, G. R.

    1988-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Programs, has sponsored the development of a Fluidized Bed Waste Heat Recovery System (FBWHRS) and a higher temperature variant, the Ceramic Tubular Distributor Plate (CTDP) Fluidized Bed Heat...

  18. Whence the Red Panda?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John J. Flynn; Michael A. Nedbal; Jerry W. Dragoo; Rodney L. Honeycutt

    2000-01-01

    The evolutionary history of the red panda (Ailurus fulgens) plays a pivotal role in the higher-level phylogeny of the “bear-like” arctoid carnivoran mammals. Characters from morphology and molecules have provided inconsistent evidence for placement of the red panda. Whereas it certainly is an arctoid, there has been major controversy about whether it should be placed with the bears (ursids), ursids

  19. Cobb's Red Cabbage Indicator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Vicki

    1998-01-01

    Describes the use of an indicator made from the pigment in red cabbage. Cabbage is grated then soaked in water. When the water is a strong red, the cabbage is strained out. The cabbage-juice indicator is then used to test for acids and bases. Includes a list of good foods to test for acidity and alkalinity. (PVD)

  20. Experimental simulation of gravity currents in erodible bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bateman, A.; La Roca, M.; Medina, V.

    2009-04-01

    Gravity currents are commonly met in nature, when a flow of denser fluid moves into a less dense one. A typical example of a gravity current is given by the sea water which flows into the bottom of a river during the summer, in correspondence of the estuary, when the river's discharge attains low values. In this case, dangerous consequences can occur, because of the polluting of the aquifer caused by the salty water. Density currents also occurs in lakes and reservoirs, because of a change in temperature or because a flood, both can produce some environmental impacts that are of interest to the local water Agency of the different countries. Of particular relevance is also the interaction of the gravity current with the movement of the sediments from the bottom of the bed. The international state of the art is particularly concerned with experimental and numerical investigation on gravity currents on fixed and porous bed [1-2-3], while, to the authors' knowledge, the interaction of a gravity current with an erodible bed is still an open field of investigation. In this paper experiments concerning with the propagation of a gravity current over fixed and erodible bed are presented. The experiments, conducted at the laboratory of Hydraulics of the Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya (actually in the Prof. Bateman's blue room), were concerned with a transparent tank 2 m long, 0.2 m wide and 0.3 m deep, partly filled with salty water and partly with fresh water, up to a depth of 0.28 m. The salty water, whose density was in the range 1050bed. In this latter case a homogeneous sand (d50=0.3 mm) was used. The results, concerned with the visualisation of the flow and the measurement of the wave front velocity, were obtained. Also the size and the frequency of the new vortices were measured using the characteristic plane. [1] L.P.Thomas, B.M. Marino, P.F. Linden, Lock-release inertial gravity currents over a thick porous layer, The Journal of Fluid Mechanics, Vol. 503, 2004 [2] John E. Simpson. Gravity Currents [3] J.J. Monaghan, R.A.F. Cas, A.M. Kos, M. Hallworth, Gravity currents descending a ramp in a stratified tank, The Journal of Fluid Mechanics, Vol. 379, 1999