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Sample records for redox metalloenzyme catalysis

  1. Design Strategies for Redox Active Metalloenzymes: Applications in Hydrogen Production.

    PubMed

    Alcala-Torano, R; Sommer, D J; Bahrami Dizicheh, Z; Ghirlanda, G

    2016-01-01

    The last decades have seen an increased interest in finding alternative means to produce renewable fuels in order to satisfy the growing energy demands and to minimize environmental impact. Nature can serve as an inspiration for development of these methodologies, as enzymes are able to carry out a wide variety of redox processes at high efficiency, employing a wide array of earth-abundant transition metals to do so. While it is well recognized that the protein environment plays an important role in tuning the properties of the different metal centers, the structure/function relationships between amino acids and catalytic centers are not well resolved. One specific approach to study the role of proteins in both electron and proton transfer is the biomimetic design of redox active peptides, binding organometallic clusters in well-understood protein environments. Here we discuss different strategies for the design of peptides incorporating redox active FeS clusters, [FeFe]-hydrogenase organometallic mimics, and porphyrin centers into different peptide and protein environments in order to understand natural redox enzymes. PMID:27586342

  2. Structural Determinants for Substrate Binding and Catalysis in Triphosphate Tunnel Metalloenzymes*

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Jacobo; Truffault, Vincent; Hothorn, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Triphosphate tunnel metalloenzymes (TTMs) are present in all kingdoms of life and catalyze diverse enzymatic reactions such as mRNA capping, the cyclization of adenosine triphosphate, the hydrolysis of thiamine triphosphate, and the synthesis and breakdown of inorganic polyphosphates. TTMs have an unusual tunnel domain fold that harbors substrate- and metal co-factor binding sites. It is presently poorly understood how TTMs specifically sense different triphosphate-containing substrates and how catalysis occurs in the tunnel center. Here we describe substrate-bound structures of inorganic polyphosphatases from Arabidopsis and Escherichia coli, which reveal an unorthodox yet conserved mode of triphosphate and metal co-factor binding. We identify two metal binding sites in these enzymes, with one co-factor involved in substrate coordination and the other in catalysis. Structural comparisons with a substrate- and product-bound mammalian thiamine triphosphatase and with previously reported structures of mRNA capping enzymes, adenylate cyclases, and polyphosphate polymerases suggest that directionality of substrate binding defines TTM catalytic activity. Our work provides insight into the evolution and functional diversification of an ancient enzyme family. PMID:26221030

  3. Main group redox catalysis: reversible P(III)/P(V) redox cycling at a phosphorus platform.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Nicole L; Ha, Minji; Radosevich, Alexander T

    2012-07-18

    A planar, trivalent phosphorus compound is shown to undergo reversible two-electron redox cycling (P(III)/P(V)) enabling its use as catalyst for a transfer hydrogenation reaction. The trivalent phosphorus compound activates ammonia-borane to furnish a 10-P-5 dihydridophosphorane, which in turn is shown to transfer hydrogen cleanly to azobenzene, yielding diphenylhydrazine and regenerating the initial trivalent phosphorus species. This result constitutes a rare example of two-electron redox catalysis at a main group compound and suggests broader potential for this nonmetal platform to support bond-modifying redox catalysis of the type dominated by transition metal catalysts. PMID:22746974

  4. Production and removal of superoxide anion radical by artificial metalloenzymes and redox-active metals

    PubMed Central

    Kawano, Tomonori; Kagenishi, Tomoko; Kadono, Takashi; Bouteau, François; Hiramatsu, Takuya; Lin, Cun; Tanaka, Kenichiro; Tanaka, Licca; Mancuso, Stefano; Uezu, Kazuya; Okobira, Tadashi; Furukawa, Hiroka; Iwase, Junichiro; Inokuchi, Reina; Baluška, Frantisek; Yokawa, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Generation of reactive oxygen species is useful for various medical, engineering and agricultural purposes. These include clinical modulation of immunological mechanism, enhanced degradation of organic compounds released to the environments, removal of microorganisms for the hygienic purpose, and agricultural pest control; both directly acting against pathogenic microorganisms and indirectly via stimulation of plant defense mechanism represented by systemic acquired resistance and hypersensitive response. By aiming to develop a novel classes of artificial redox-active biocatalysts involved in production and/or removal of superoxide anion radicals, recent attempts for understanding and modification of natural catalytic proteins and functional DNA sequences of mammalian and plant origins are covered in this review article. PMID:27066179

  5. Production and removal of superoxide anion radical by artificial metalloenzymes and redox-active metals.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Tomonori; Kagenishi, Tomoko; Kadono, Takashi; Bouteau, François; Hiramatsu, Takuya; Lin, Cun; Tanaka, Kenichiro; Tanaka, Licca; Mancuso, Stefano; Uezu, Kazuya; Okobira, Tadashi; Furukawa, Hiroka; Iwase, Junichiro; Inokuchi, Reina; Baluška, Frantisek; Yokawa, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Generation of reactive oxygen species is useful for various medical, engineering and agricultural purposes. These include clinical modulation of immunological mechanism, enhanced degradation of organic compounds released to the environments, removal of microorganisms for the hygienic purpose, and agricultural pest control; both directly acting against pathogenic microorganisms and indirectly via stimulation of plant defense mechanism represented by systemic acquired resistance and hypersensitive response. By aiming to develop a novel classes of artificial redox-active biocatalysts involved in production and/or removal of superoxide anion radicals, recent attempts for understanding and modification of natural catalytic proteins and functional DNA sequences of mammalian and plant origins are covered in this review article. PMID:27066179

  6. Bioinspired design of redox-active ligands for multielectron catalysis: Effects of positioning pyrazine reservoirs on cobalt for electro- and photocatalytic generation of hydrogen from water

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jurss, Jonah W.; Khnayzer, Rony S.; Panetier, Julien A.; El Roz, Karim A.; Nichols, Eva M.; Head-Gordon, Martin; Long, Jeffrey R.; Castellano, Felix N.; Chang, Christopher J.

    2015-06-09

    Mononuclear metalloenzymes in nature can function in cooperation with precisely positioned redox-active organic cofactors in order to carry out multielectron catalysis. Inspired by the finely tuned redox management of these bioinorganic systems, we present the design, synthesis, and experimental and theoretical characterization of a homologous series of cobalt complexes bearing redox-active pyrazines. These donor moieties are locked into key positions within a pentadentate ligand scaffold in order to evaluate the effects of positioning redox non-innocent ligands on hydrogen evolution catalysis. Both metal- and ligand-centered redox features are observed in organic as well as aqueous solutions over a range of pHmore » values, and comparison with analogs bearing redox-inactive zinc(II) allows for assignments of ligand-based redox events. Varying the geometric placement of redox non-innocent pyrazine donors on isostructural pentadentate ligand platforms results in marked effects on observed cobalt-catalyzed proton reduction activity. Electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution from weak acids in acetonitrile solution, under diffusion-limited conditions, reveals that the pyrazine donor of axial isomer 1-Co behaves as an unproductive electron sink, resulting in high overpotentials for proton reduction, whereas the equatorial pyrazine isomer complex 2-Co is significantly more active for hydrogen generation at lower voltages. Addition of a second equatorial pyrazine in complex 3-Co further minimizes overpotentials required for catalysis. The equatorial derivative 2-Co is also superior to its axial 1-Co congener for electrocatalytic and visible-light photocatalytic hydrogen generation in biologically relevant, neutral pH aqueous media. Density functional theory calculations (B3LYP-D2) indicate that the first reduction of catalyst isomers 1-Co, 2-Co, and 3-Co is largely metal-centered while the second reduction occurs at pyrazine. Taken together, the data establish that proper

  7. Bioinspired design of redox-active ligands for multielectron catalysis: Effects of positioning pyrazine reservoirs on cobalt for electro- and photocatalytic generation of hydrogen from water

    SciTech Connect

    Jurss, Jonah W.; Khnayzer, Rony S.; Panetier, Julien A.; El Roz, Karim A.; Nichols, Eva M.; Head-Gordon, Martin; Long, Jeffrey R.; Castellano, Felix N.; Chang, Christopher J.

    2015-06-09

    Mononuclear metalloenzymes in nature can function in cooperation with precisely positioned redox-active organic cofactors in order to carry out multielectron catalysis. Inspired by the finely tuned redox management of these bioinorganic systems, we present the design, synthesis, and experimental and theoretical characterization of a homologous series of cobalt complexes bearing redox-active pyrazines. These donor moieties are locked into key positions within a pentadentate ligand scaffold in order to evaluate the effects of positioning redox non-innocent ligands on hydrogen evolution catalysis. Both metal- and ligand-centered redox features are observed in organic as well as aqueous solutions over a range of pH values, and comparison with analogs bearing redox-inactive zinc(II) allows for assignments of ligand-based redox events. Varying the geometric placement of redox non-innocent pyrazine donors on isostructural pentadentate ligand platforms results in marked effects on observed cobalt-catalyzed proton reduction activity. Electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution from weak acids in acetonitrile solution, under diffusion-limited conditions, reveals that the pyrazine donor of axial isomer 1-Co behaves as an unproductive electron sink, resulting in high overpotentials for proton reduction, whereas the equatorial pyrazine isomer complex 2-Co is significantly more active for hydrogen generation at lower voltages. Addition of a second equatorial pyrazine in complex 3-Co further minimizes overpotentials required for catalysis. The equatorial derivative 2-Co is also superior to its axial 1-Co congener for electrocatalytic and visible-light photocatalytic hydrogen generation in biologically relevant, neutral pH aqueous media. Density functional theory calculations (B3LYP-D2) indicate that the first reduction of catalyst isomers 1-Co, 2-Co, and 3-Co is largely metal-centered while the second reduction occurs at pyrazine. Taken together, the data establish that proper

  8. Periplasmic Screening for Artificial Metalloenzymes.

    PubMed

    Jeschek, M; Panke, S; Ward, T R

    2016-01-01

    Artificial metalloenzymes represent an attractive means of combining state-of-the-art transition metal catalysis with the benefits of natural enzymes. Despite the tremendous recent progress in this field, current efforts toward the directed evolution of these hybrid biocatalysts mainly rely on the laborious, individual purification of protein variants rendering the throughput, and hence the outcome of these campaigns feeble. We have recently developed a screening platform for the directed evolution of artificial metalloenzymes based on the streptavidin-biotin technology in the periplasm of the Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli. This periplasmic compartmentalization strategy comprises a number of compelling advantages, in particular with respect to artificial metalloenzymes, which lead to a drastic increase in the throughput of screening campaigns and additionally are of unique value for future in vivo applications. Therefore, we highlight here the benefits of this strategy and intend to propose a generalized guideline for the development of novel transition metal-based biocatalysts by directed evolution in order to extend the natural enzymatic repertoire. PMID:27586348

  9. Direct observation of two-electron Ag(I)/Ag(III) redox cycles in coupling catalysis.

    PubMed

    Font, Marc; Acuña-Parés, Ferran; Parella, Teodor; Serra, Jordi; Luis, Josep M; Lloret-Fillol, Julio; Costas, Miquel; Ribas, Xavi

    2014-01-01

    Silver is extensively used in homogeneous catalysis for organic synthesis owing to its Lewis acidity, and as a powerful one-electron oxidant. However, two-electron redox catalytic cycles, which are most common in noble metal organometallic reactivity, have never been considered. Here we show that a Ag(I)/Ag(III) catalytic cycle is operative in model C-O and C-C cross-coupling reactions. An aryl-Ag(III) species is unequivocally identified as an intermediate in the catalytic cycle and we provide direct evidence of aryl halide oxidative addition and C-N, C-O, C-S, C-C and C-halide bond-forming reductive elimination steps at monometallic silver centres. We anticipate our study as the starting point for expanding Ag(I)/Ag(III) redox chemistry into new methodologies for organic synthesis, resembling well-known copper or palladium cross-coupling catalysis. Furthermore, findings described herein provide unique fundamental mechanistic understanding on Ag-catalysed cross-coupling reactions and dismiss the generally accepted conception that silver redox chemistry can only arise from one-electron processes. PMID:25014317

  10. Mechanistic understanding of surface plasmon assisted catalysis on a single particle: cyclic redox of 4-aminothiophenol

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xu, Ping; Kang, Leilei; Mack, Nathan H.; Schanze, Kirk S.; Han, Xijiang; Wang, Hsing-Lin

    2013-10-21

    We investigate surface plasmon assisted catalysis (SPAC) reactions of 4-aminothiophenol (4ATP) to and back from 4,4'-dimercaptoazobenzene (DMAB) by single particle surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy, using a self-designed gas flow cell to control the reductive/oxidative environment over the reactions. Conversion of 4ATP into DMAB is induced by energy transfer (plasmonic heating) from surface plasmon resonance to 4ATP, where O2 (as an electron acceptor) is essential and H2O (as a base) can accelerate the reaction. In contrast, hot electron (from surface plasmon decay) induction drives the reverse reaction of DMAB to 4ATP, where H2O (or H2) acts as the hydrogen source. Moremore » interestingly, the cyclic redox between 4ATP and DMAB by SPAC approach has been demonstrated. Finally, this SPAC methodology presents a unique platform for studying chemical reactions that are not possible under standard synthetic conditions.« less

  11. Design of Heteronuclear Metalloenzymes.

    PubMed

    Bhagi-Damodaran, A; Hosseinzadeh, P; Mirts, E; Reed, J; Petrik, I D; Lu, Y

    2016-01-01

    Heteronuclear metalloenzymes catalyze some of the most fundamentally interesting and practically useful reactions in nature. However, the presence of two or more metal ions in close proximity in these enzymes makes them more difficult to prepare and study than homonuclear metalloenzymes. To meet these challenges, heteronuclear metal centers have been designed into small and stable proteins with rigid scaffolds to understand how these heteronuclear centers are constructed and the mechanism of their function. This chapter describes methods for designing heterobinuclear metal centers in a protein scaffold by giving specific examples of a few heme-nonheme bimetallic centers engineered in myoglobin and cytochrome c peroxidase. We provide step-by-step procedures on how to choose the protein scaffold, design a heterobinuclear metal center in the protein scaffold computationally, incorporate metal ions into the protein, and characterize the resulting metalloproteins, both structurally and functionally. Finally, we discuss how an initial design can be further improved by rationally tuning its secondary coordination sphere, electron/proton transfer rates, and the substrate affinity. PMID:27586347

  12. Mechanistic understanding of surface plasmon assisted catalysis on a single particle: cyclic redox of 4-aminothiophenol

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Ping; Kang, Leilei; Mack, Nathan H.; Schanze, Kirk S.; Han, Xijiang; Wang, Hsing-Lin

    2013-10-21

    We investigate surface plasmon assisted catalysis (SPAC) reactions of 4-aminothiophenol (4ATP) to and back from 4,4'-dimercaptoazobenzene (DMAB) by single particle surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy, using a self-designed gas flow cell to control the reductive/oxidative environment over the reactions. Conversion of 4ATP into DMAB is induced by energy transfer (plasmonic heating) from surface plasmon resonance to 4ATP, where O2 (as an electron acceptor) is essential and H2O (as a base) can accelerate the reaction. In contrast, hot electron (from surface plasmon decay) induction drives the reverse reaction of DMAB to 4ATP, where H2O (or H2) acts as the hydrogen source. More interestingly, the cyclic redox between 4ATP and DMAB by SPAC approach has been demonstrated. Finally, this SPAC methodology presents a unique platform for studying chemical reactions that are not possible under standard synthetic conditions.

  13. Designing Hydrolytic Zinc Metalloenzymes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Zinc is an essential element required for the function of more than 300 enzymes spanning all classes. Despite years of dedicated study, questions regarding the connections between primary and secondary metal ligands and protein structure and function remain unanswered, despite numerous mechanistic, structural, biochemical, and synthetic model studies. Protein design is a powerful strategy for reproducing native metal sites that may be applied to answering some of these questions and subsequently generating novel zinc enzymes. From examination of the earliest design studies introducing simple Zn(II)-binding sites into de novo and natural protein scaffolds to current studies involving the preparation of efficient hydrolytic zinc sites, it is increasingly likely that protein design will achieve reaction rates previously thought possible only for native enzymes. This Current Topic will review the design and redesign of Zn(II)-binding sites in de novo-designed proteins and native protein scaffolds toward the preparation of catalytic hydrolytic sites. After discussing the preparation of Zn(II)-binding sites in various scaffolds, we will describe relevant examples for reengineering existing zinc sites to generate new or altered catalytic activities. Then, we will describe our work on the preparation of a de novo-designed hydrolytic zinc site in detail and present comparisons to related designed zinc sites. Collectively, these studies demonstrate the significant progress being made toward building zinc metalloenzymes from the bottom up. PMID:24506795

  14. Structural, Spectroscopic, And Theoretical Elucidation of a Redox-Active Pincer-Type Ancillary Applied in Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Adhikari, D.; Mossin, S.; Basuli, F.; Huffman, J.C.; Szilagyi, R.K.; Meyer, K.; Mindiola, D.J.

    2009-05-11

    Pincer-type ligands are believed to be very robust scaffolds that can support multifarious functionalities as well as highly reactive metal motifs applied in organometallic chemistry, especially in the realm of catalysis. In this paper, we describe the redox and, therefore, noninnocent behavior of a PNP (PNP{sup -} = N[2-P(CHMe{sub 2}){sub 2}-4-methylphenyl]{sub 2}) pincer ancillary bound to nickel. A combination of structural, spectroscopic, and theoretical techniques suggests that this type of framework can house an electron hole when coordinated to Ni(II).

  15. Tuning the redox properties of the titanocene(III)/(IV)-couple for atom-economical catalysis in single electron steps.

    PubMed

    Gansäuer, A; Hildebrandt, S; Vogelsang, E; Flowers Ii, R A

    2016-01-14

    Radical-based transformations are an attractive target for the development of catalytic processes due to ease of radical generation, high functional group tolerance and selectivity of bond-forming reactions. In spite of these appealing features, the potential of radicals as key intermediates in catalysis remains largely untapped. Herein we present recent work that exploits the innate ability of titanocene-based catalysts to undergo both oxidative addition and reductive elimination in single electron steps. We further demonstrate that tuning the redox properties of the titanocene-based catalyst can be used to develop efficient catalytic free radical processes including tetrahydrofuran synthesis, and radical arylation. PMID:26575367

  16. Operando X-ray absorption and EPR evidence for a single electron redox process in copper catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Qingquan; Zhang, Jian; Peng, Pan; Zhang, Guanghui; Huang, Zhiliang; Yi, Hong; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Lei, Aiwen

    2015-05-26

    An unprecedented single electron redox process in copper catalysis is confirmed using operando X-ray absorption and EPR spectroscopies. The oxidation state of the copper species in the interaction between Cu(II) and a sulfinic acid at room temperature, and the accurate characterization of the formed Cu(I) are clearly shown using operando X-ray absorption and EPR evidence. Further investigation of anion effects on Cu(II) discloses that bromine ions can dramatically increase the rate of the redox process. Moreover, it is proven that the sulfinic acids are converted into sulfonyl radicals, which can be trapped by 2-arylacrylic acids and various valuable β-keto sulfones are synthesized with good to excellent yields under mild conditions.

  17. Operando X-ray absorption and EPR evidence for a single electron redox process in copper catalysis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lu, Qingquan; Zhang, Jian; Peng, Pan; Zhang, Guanghui; Huang, Zhiliang; Yi, Hong; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Lei, Aiwen

    2015-05-26

    An unprecedented single electron redox process in copper catalysis is confirmed using operando X-ray absorption and EPR spectroscopies. The oxidation state of the copper species in the interaction between Cu(II) and a sulfinic acid at room temperature, and the accurate characterization of the formed Cu(I) are clearly shown using operando X-ray absorption and EPR evidence. Further investigation of anion effects on Cu(II) discloses that bromine ions can dramatically increase the rate of the redox process. Moreover, it is proven that the sulfinic acids are converted into sulfonyl radicals, which can be trapped by 2-arylacrylic acids and various valuable β-keto sulfonesmore » are synthesized with good to excellent yields under mild conditions.« less

  18. New crystalline complex metal oxides created by unit-synthesis and their catalysis based on porous and redox properties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenxin; Ishikawa, Satoshi; Tsuboi, Yuta; Sadakane, Masahiro; Murayama, Toru; Ueda, Wataru

    2016-07-01

    The development of new complex metal oxides having structural complexity suitable for solid-state catalysis is of great importance in fundamental catalysis research and practical applications. However, examples of these materials are rare. Herein, we report two types of crystalline complex metal oxides with new structures and their catalytic properties. The first one is an all-inorganic ε-Keggin polyoxometalate-based material with intrinsic microporosity. The framework of the material is formed by the assembly of ε-Keggin polyoxomolybdate units with metal ion linkers in a diamondoid topology. The micropores of the material can be opened without change of the structures, and the material adsorbs small molecules. This material has both redox properties and acidity and can be applied to O2 adsorption, selective oxidation of methacrolein, and hydrolysis of cellobiose. The other material is a crystalline metal oxide based on molecular nanowires. The hexagonal POM units stack along the c axis to form prismatic clusters as molecular wires. The molecular wires further assemble in a hexagonal fashion to form the crystals, and NH4(+) and water are present in between the molecular wires. The material is active as an acid catalyst for cellobiose conversion. PMID:27146122

  19. Protein–Protein Interaction Regulates the Direction of Catalysis and Electron Transfer in a Redox Enzyme Complex

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Protein–protein interactions are well-known to regulate enzyme activity in cell signaling and metabolism. Here, we show that protein–protein interactions regulate the activity of a respiratory-chain enzyme, CymA, by changing the direction or bias of catalysis. CymA, a member of the widespread NapC/NirT superfamily, is a menaquinol-7 (MQ-7) dehydrogenase that donates electrons to several distinct terminal reductases in the versatile respiratory network of Shewanella oneidensis. We report the incorporation of CymA within solid-supported membranes that mimic the inner membrane architecture of S. oneidensis. Quartz-crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) resolved the formation of a stable complex between CymA and one of its native redox partners, flavocytochrome c3 (Fcc3) fumarate reductase. Cyclic voltammetry revealed that CymA alone could only reduce MQ-7, while the CymA-Fcc3 complex catalyzed the reaction required to support anaerobic respiration, the oxidation of MQ-7. We propose that MQ-7 oxidation in CymA is limited by electron transfer to the hemes and that complex formation with Fcc3 facilitates the electron-transfer rate along the heme redox chain. These results reveal a yet unexplored mechanism by which bacteria can regulate multibranched respiratory networks through protein–protein interactions. PMID:23799249

  20. Total Synthesis of (+)-SCH 351448: Efficiency via Chemoselectivity and Redox-Economy Powered by Metal Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang; Krische, Michael J

    2016-07-01

    The polyketide natural product (+)-SCH 351448, a macrodiolide ionophore bearing 14 stereogenic centers, is prepared in 14 steps (LLS). In eight prior syntheses, 22-32 steps were required. Multiple chemoselective and redox-economic functional group interconversions collectively contribute to a step-change in efficiency. PMID:27337561

  1. Artificial metalloenzymes derived from three-helix bundles

    PubMed Central

    Tebo, Alison G.; Pecoraro, Vincent L.

    2015-01-01

    Three-helix bundles and coiled-coil motifs are well-established de novo designed scaffolds that have been investigated for their metal-binding and catalytic properties. Satisfaction of the primary coordination sphere for a given metal is sufficient to introduce catalytic activity and a given structure may catalyze different reactions dependent on the identity of the incorporated metal. Here we describe recent contributions in the de novo design of metalloenzymes based on three-helix bundles and coiled-coil motifs, focusing on non-heme systems for hydrolytic and redox chemistry. PMID:25579452

  2. Redox potential tuning by redox-inactive cations in nature's water oxidizing catalyst and synthetic analogues.

    PubMed

    Krewald, Vera; Neese, Frank; Pantazis, Dimitrios A

    2016-04-20

    The redox potential of synthetic oligonuclear transition metal complexes has been shown to correlate with the Lewis acidity of a redox-inactive cation connected to the redox-active transition metals of the cluster via oxo or hydroxo bridges. Such heterometallic clusters are important cofactors in many metalloenzymes, where it is speculated that the redox-inactive constituent ion of the cluster serves to optimize its redox potential for electron transfer or catalysis. A principal example is the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II of natural photosynthesis, a Mn4CaO5 cofactor that oxidizes water into dioxygen, protons and electrons. Calcium is critical for catalytic function, but its precise role is not yet established. In analogy to synthetic complexes it has been suggested that Ca(2+) fine-tunes the redox potential of the manganese cluster. Here we evaluate this hypothesis by computing the relative redox potentials of substituted derivatives of the oxygen-evolving complex with the cations Sr(2+), Gd(3+), Cd(2+), Zn(2+), Mg(2+), Sc(3+), Na(+) and Y(3+) for two sequential transitions of its catalytic cycle. The theoretical approach is validated with a series of experimentally well-characterized Mn3AO4 cubane complexes that are structural mimics of the enzymatic cluster. Our results reproduce perfectly the experimentally observed correlation between the redox potential and the Lewis acidities of redox-inactive cations for the synthetic complexes. However, it is conclusively demonstrated that this correlation does not hold for the oxygen evolving complex. In the enzyme the redox potential of the cluster only responds to the charge of the redox-inactive cations and remains otherwise insensitive to their precise identity, precluding redox-tuning of the metal cluster as a primary role for Ca(2+) in biological water oxidation. PMID:26762578

  3. Energy conversion, redox catalysis and generation of reactive oxygen species by respiratory complex I.

    PubMed

    Hirst, Judy; Roessler, Maxie M

    2016-07-01

    Complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) is critical for respiration in mammalian mitochondria. It oxidizes NADH produced by the Krebs' tricarboxylic acid cycle and β-oxidation of fatty acids, reduces ubiquinone, and transports protons to contribute to the proton-motive force across the inner membrane. Complex I is also a significant contributor to cellular oxidative stress. In complex I, NADH oxidation by a flavin mononucleotide, followed by intramolecular electron transfer along a chain of iron-sulfur clusters, delivers electrons and energy to bound ubiquinone. Either at cluster N2 (the terminal cluster in the chain) or upon the binding/reduction/dissociation of ubiquinone/ubiquinol, energy from the redox process is captured to initiate long-range energy transfer through the complex and drive proton translocation. This review focuses on current knowledge of how the redox reaction and proton transfer are coupled, with particular emphasis on the formation and role of semiquinone intermediates in both energy transduction and reactive oxygen species production. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt. PMID:26721206

  4. Cyclometalated ruthenium(II) complexes as efficient redox mediators in peroxidase catalysis.

    PubMed

    Alpeeva, Inna S; Soukharev, Valentin S; Alexandrova, Larissa; Shilova, Nadezhda V; Bovin, Nicolai V; Csöregi, Elisabeth; Ryabov, Alexander D; Sakharov, Ivan Yu

    2003-07-01

    Cyclometalated ruthenium(II) complexes, [Ru(II)(C~N)(N~N)(2)]PF(6) [HC~N=2-phenylpyridine (Hphpy) or 2-(4'-tolyl)pyridine; N~N=2,2'-bipyridine, 1,10-phenanthroline, or 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine], are rapidly oxidized by H(2)O(2) catalyzed by plant peroxidases to the corresponding Ru(III) species. The commercial isoenzyme C of horseradish peroxidase (HRP-C) and two recently purified peroxidases from sweet potato (SPP) and royal palm tree (RPTP) have been used. The most favorable conditions for the oxidation have been evaluated by varying the pH, buffer, and H(2)O(2) concentrations and the apparent second-order rate constants ( k(app)) have been measured. All the complexes studied are oxidized by HRP-C at similar rates and the rate constants k(app) are identical to those known for the best substrates of HRP-C (10(6)-10(7) M(-1) s(-1)). Both cationic (HRP-C) and anionic (SPP and RPTP) peroxidases show similar catalytic efficiency in the oxidation of the Ru(II) complexes. The mediating capacity of the complexes has been evaluated using the SPP-catalyzed co-oxidation of [Ru(II)(phpy)(bpy)(2)]PF(6) and catechol as a poor peroxidase substrate as an example. The rate of enzyme-catalyzed oxidation of catechol increases more than 10000-fold in the presence of the ruthenium complex. A simple routine for calculating the rate constant k(c) for the oxidation of catechol by the Ru(III) complex generated enzymatically from [Ru(II)(phpy)(bpy)(2)](+) is proposed. It is based on the accepted mechanism of peroxidase catalysis and involves spectrophotometric measurements of the limiting Ru(II) concentration at different concentrations of catechol. The calculated k(c) value of 0.75 M(-1) s(-1) shows that the cyclometalated Ru(II) complexes are efficient mediators in peroxidase catalysis. PMID:12774217

  5. Insight into magnetite's redox catalysis from observing surface morphology during oxidation.

    PubMed

    Nie, Shu; Starodub, Elena; Monti, Matteo; Siegel, David A; Vergara, Lucía; El Gabaly, Farid; Bartelt, Norman C; de la Figuera, Juan; McCarty, Kevin F

    2013-07-10

    We study how the (100) surface of magnetite undergoes oxidation by monitoring its morphology during exposure to oxygen at ~650 °C. Low-energy electron microscopy reveals that magnetite's surface steps advance continuously. This growth of Fe3O4 crystal occurs by the formation of bulk Fe vacancies. Using Raman spectroscopy, we identify the sinks for these vacancies, inclusions of α-Fe2O3 (hematite). Since the surface remains magnetite during oxidation, it continues to dissociate oxygen readily. At steady state, over one-quarter of impinging oxygen molecules undergo dissociative adsorption and eventual incorporation into magnetite. From the independence of growth rate on local step density, we deduce that the first step of oxidation, dissociative oxygen adsorption, occurs uniformly over magnetite's terraces, not preferentially at its surface steps. Since we directly observe new magnetite forming when it incorporates oxygen, we suggest that catalytic redox cycles on magnetite involve growing and etching crystal. PMID:23763580

  6. Iron- and Cobalt-Catalyzed Alkene Hydrogenation: Catalysis with Both Redox-Active and Strong Field Ligands.

    PubMed

    Chirik, Paul J

    2015-06-16

    The hydrogenation of alkenes is one of the most impactful reactions catalyzed by homogeneous transition metal complexes finding application in the pharmaceutical, agrochemical, and commodity chemical industries. For decades, catalyst technology has relied on precious metal catalysts supported by strong field ligands to enable highly predictable two-electron redox chemistry that constitutes key bond breaking and forming steps during turnover. Alternative catalysts based on earth abundant transition metals such as iron and cobalt not only offer potential environmental and economic advantages but also provide an opportunity to explore catalysis in a new chemical space. The kinetically and thermodynamically accessible oxidation and spin states may enable new mechanistic pathways, unique substrate scope, or altogether new reactivity. This Account describes my group's efforts over the past decade to develop iron and cobalt catalysts for alkene hydrogenation. Particular emphasis is devoted to the interplay of the electronic structure of the base metal compounds and their catalytic performance. First generation, aryl-substituted pyridine(diimine) iron dinitrogen catalysts exhibited high turnover frequencies at low catalyst loadings and hydrogen pressures for the hydrogenation of unactivated terminal and disubstituted alkenes. Exploration of structure-reactivity relationships established smaller aryl substituents and more electron donating ligands resulted in improved performance. Second generation iron and cobalt catalysts where the imine donors were replaced by N-heterocyclic carbenes resulted in dramatically improved activity and enabled hydrogenation of more challenging unactivated, tri- and tetrasubstituted alkenes. Optimized cobalt catalysts have been discovered that are among the most active homogeneous hydrogenation catalysts known. Synthesis of enantiopure, C1 symmetric pyridine(diimine) cobalt complexes have enabled rare examples of highly enantioselective

  7. Metallopeptide Catalysts and Artificial Metalloenzymes Containing Unnatural Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Jared C.

    2014-01-01

    Metallopeptide catalysts and artificial metalloenzymes built from peptide scaffolds and catalytically active metal centers possess a number of exciting properties that could be exploited for selective catalysis. Control over metal catalyst secondary coordination spheres, compatibility with library based methods for optimization and evolution, and biocompatibility stand out in this regard. A wide range of unnatural amino acids have been incorporated into peptide and protein scaffolds using several distinct methods, and the resulting unnatural amino acid containing scaffolds can be used to create novel hybrid metal-peptide catalysts. Promising levels of selectivity have been demonstrated for several hybrid catalysts, and these provide a strong impetus and important lessons for the design of and optimization of hybrid catalysts. PMID:25545848

  8. Catalytic formal [2+2+1] synthesis of pyrroles from alkynes and diazenes via TiII/TiIV redox catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Zachary W.; Hue, Ryan J.; Tonks, Ian A.

    2016-01-01

    Pyrroles are structurally important heterocycles. However, the synthesis of polysubstituted pyrroles is often challenging. Here, we report a multicomponent, Ti-catalysed formal [2+2+1] reaction of alkynes and diazenes for the oxidative synthesis of penta- and trisubstituted pyrroles: a nitrenoid analogue to classical Pauson-Khand-type syntheses of cyclopentenones. Given the scarcity of early transition-metal redox catalysis, preliminary mechanistic studies are presented. Initial stoichiometric and kinetic studies indicate that the mechanism of this reaction proceeds through a formally TiII/TiIV redox catalytic cycle, in which an azatitanacyclobutene intermediate, resulting from [2+2] alkyne + Ti imido coupling, undergoes a second alkyne insertion followed by reductive elimination to yield pyrrole and a TiII species. The key component for catalytic turnover is the reoxidation of the TiII species to a TiIV imido via the disproportionation of an η2-diazene-TiII complex.

  9. Cooperative photoredox catalysis.

    PubMed

    Lang, Xianjun; Zhao, Jincai; Chen, Xiaodong

    2016-05-31

    Visible-light photoredox catalysis has been experiencing a renaissance in response to topical interest in renewable energy and green chemistry. The latest progress in this area indicates that cooperation between photoredox catalysis and other domains of catalysis could provide effective results. Thus, we advance the concept of cooperative photoredox catalysis for organic transformations. It is important to note that this concept can bridge the gap between visible-light photoredox catalysis and other types of redox catalysis such as transition-metal catalysis, biocatalysis or electrocatalysis. In doing so, one can take advantage of the best of both worlds in establishing organic synthesis with visible-light-induced redox reaction as a crucial step. PMID:27094803

  10. Solar-driven proton and carbon dioxide reduction to fuels—lessons from metalloenzymes.

    PubMed

    Bachmeier, Andreas; Armstrong, Fraser

    2015-04-01

    Metalloenzymes such as hydrogenases and carbon monoxide dehydrogenase can be attached to light-harvesting agents to produce informative photocatalytic systems of varying intricacy. Systematic studies yield important insight into mechanistic and design principles of artificial photosynthesis—one route to future renewable energy conversion, and the unconventional experiments reveal interesting new criteria for the catalytic performance of metals in biology. Recent advances are interpreted in terms of the importance of enzyme active centres that have evolved to perform fast and efficient catalysis using abundant elements, along with the ability of enzymes to trap photo-generated electrons by virtue of having receding, buried relay centres with low reorganisation energies. PMID:25621455

  11. Engineering a dirhodium artificial metalloenzyme for selective olefin cyclopropanation

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Poonam; Yang, Hao; Ellis-Guardiola, Ken; Lewis, Jared C.

    2015-01-01

    Artificial metalloenzymes (ArMs) formed by incorporating synthetic metal catalysts into protein scaffolds have the potential to impart to chemical reactions selectivity that would be difficult to achieve using metal catalysts alone. In this work, we covalently link an alkyne-substituted dirhodium catalyst to a prolyl oligopeptidase containing a genetically encoded L-4-azidophenylalanine residue to create an ArM that catalyses olefin cyclopropanation. Scaffold mutagenesis is then used to improve the enantioselectivity of this reaction, and cyclopropanation of a range of styrenes and donor–acceptor carbene precursors were accepted. The ArM reduces the formation of byproducts, including those resulting from the reaction of dirhodium–carbene intermediates with water. This shows that an ArM can improve the substrate specificity of a catalyst and, for the first time, the water tolerance of a metal-catalysed reaction. Given the diversity of reactions catalysed by dirhodium complexes, we anticipate that dirhodium ArMs will provide many unique opportunities for selective catalysis. PMID:26206238

  12. Toward chemistry-based design of the simplest metalloenzyme-like catalyst that works efficiently in water.

    PubMed

    Kitanosono, Taku; Kobayashi, Shū

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes exhibit overwhelmingly superior catalysis compared with artificial catalysts. Current strategies to rival enzymatic catalysis require unmodified or minimally modified structures of active sites, gigantic molecular weight, and sometimes the use of harsh conditions such as extremely low temperatures in organic solvents. Herein, we describe a design of small molecules that act as the simplest metalloenzyme-like catalysts that can function in water, without mimicking enzyme structures. These artificial catalysts efficiently promoted enantioselective direct-type aldol reactions using aqueous formaldehyde. The reactions followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics, and heat-resistant asymmetric environments were constructed in water. PMID:25349140

  13. Sunlight mediated synthesis of silver nanoparticles using redox phytoprotein and their application in catalysis and colorimetric mercury sensing.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Khan Behlol Ayaz; Senthilnathan, Rajendran; Megarajan, Sengan; Anbazhagan, Veerappan

    2015-10-01

    Owing to the benign nature, plant extracts mediated green synthesis of metal nanoparticles (NPs) is rapidly expanding. In this study, we demonstrated the successful green synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) by utilizing natural sunlight and redox protein complex composed of ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase (FNR) and ferredoxin (FD). The capping and stabilization of the AgNPs by the redox protein was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Light and redox protein is the prerequisite factor for the formation of AgNPs. The obtained result shows that the photo generated free radicals by the redox protein is responsible for the reduction of Ag(+) to Ag(0). Transmission electron microscopy revealed the formation of spherical AgNPs with size ranging from 10 to 15 nm. As-prepared AgNPs exhibit excellent catalytic activity toward the degradation of hazardous organic dyes, such as methylene blue, methyl orange and methyl red. These bio-inspired AgNPs is highly sensitive and selective in sensing hazardous mercury ions in the water at micromolar concentration. In addition, FNR/FD extract stabilized AgNPs showed good antimicrobial activity against gram positive and gram negative bacteria. PMID:26163946

  14. Use of QM/DMD as a Multiscale Approach to Modeling Metalloenzymes.

    PubMed

    Gallup, N M; Alexandrova, A N

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes are complex biomolecules capable of performing unique catalysis under physiological conditions at neutral temperature and pH. However, the architecture of enzymatic catalysis is often a combination of the quantum influence of the immediate active site, as well as the electrostatic and configurational influences of amino acids surrounding the active site. As a result of this cooperation between baseline chemical reactivity and electrostatic assistance, it has become important to model enzymes using multiscale methods that take advantage of treating the active site with quantum mechanical methods, while approximately treating the surrounding protein using cheaper, classically driven force-field molecular mechanics methods. Here we describe the use of a multiscale engine which utilizes a combination of density functional theory with discrete molecular dynamics (dubbed QM/DMD) to aid in the characterization of metalloenzymes. PMID:27498643

  15. Benzylation of Nitroalkanes Using Copper-Catalyzed Thermal Redox Catalysis: Toward the Facile C-Alkylation of Nitroalkanes

    PubMed Central

    Gildner, Peter G.; Gietter, Amber A. S.; Cui, Di; Watson, Donald A.

    2012-01-01

    The C-alkylation of nitroalkanes under mild conditions has been a significant challenge in organic synthesis for more than a century. Herein, we report a simple Cu(I) catalyst, generated in situ, that is highly effective for C-benzylation of nitroalkanes using abundant benzyl bromides and related heteroaromatic compounds. This process, which we believe proceeds via a thermal redox mechanism, allows access to a variety of complex nitroalkanes under mild reaction conditions and represents the first step towards developing a general catalytic system for the alkylation of nitroalkanes. PMID:22691127

  16. Synthetic cascades are enabled by combining biocatalysts with artificial metalloenzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, V.; Wilson, Y. M.; Dürrenberger, M.; Ghislieri, D.; Churakova, E.; Quinto, T.; Knörr, L.; Häussinger, D.; Hollmann, F.; Turner, N. J.; Ward, T. R.

    2013-02-01

    Enzymatic catalysis and homogeneous catalysis offer complementary means to address synthetic challenges, both in chemistry and in biology. Despite its attractiveness, the implementation of concurrent cascade reactions that combine an organometallic catalyst with an enzyme has proven challenging because of the mutual inactivation of both catalysts. To address this, we show that incorporation of a d6-piano stool complex within a host protein affords an artificial transfer hydrogenase (ATHase) that is fully compatible with and complementary to natural enzymes, thus enabling efficient concurrent tandem catalysis. To illustrate the generality of the approach, the ATHase was combined with various NADH-, FAD- and haem-dependent enzymes, resulting in orthogonal redox cascades. Up to three enzymes were integrated in the cascade and combined with the ATHase with a view to achieving (i) a double stereoselective amine deracemization, (ii) a horseradish peroxidase-coupled readout of the transfer hydrogenase activity towards its genetic optimization, (iii) the formation of L-pipecolic acid from L-lysine and (iv) regeneration of NADH to promote a monooxygenase-catalysed oxyfunctionalization reaction.

  17. Electrochemical evidence that pyranopterin redox chemistry controls the catalysis of YedY, a mononuclear Mo enzyme.

    PubMed

    Adamson, Hope; Simonov, Alexandr N; Kierzek, Michelina; Rothery, Richard A; Weiner, Joel H; Bond, Alan M; Parkin, Alison

    2015-11-24

    A long-standing contradiction in the field of mononuclear Mo enzyme research is that small-molecule chemistry on active-site mimic compounds predicts ligand participation in the electron transfer reactions, but biochemical measurements only suggest metal-centered catalytic electron transfer. With the simultaneous measurement of substrate turnover and reversible electron transfer that is provided by Fourier-transformed alternating-current voltammetry, we show that Escherichia coli YedY is a mononuclear Mo enzyme that reconciles this conflict. In YedY, addition of three protons and three electrons to the well-characterized "as-isolated" Mo(V) oxidation state is needed to initiate the catalytic reduction of either dimethyl sulfoxide or trimethylamine N-oxide. Based on comparison with earlier studies and our UV-vis redox titration data, we assign the reversible one-proton and one-electron reduction process centered around +174 mV vs. standard hydrogen electrode at pH 7 to a Mo(V)-to-Mo(IV) conversion but ascribe the two-proton and two-electron transition occurring at negative potential to the organic pyranopterin ligand system. We predict that a dihydro-to-tetrahydro transition is needed to generate the catalytically active state of the enzyme. This is a previously unidentified mechanism, suggested by the structural simplicity of YedY, a protein in which Mo is the only metal site. PMID:26561582

  18. Electrochemical evidence that pyranopterin redox chemistry controls the catalysis of YedY, a mononuclear Mo enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, Hope; Simonov, Alexandr N.; Kierzek, Michelina; Rothery, Richard A.; Weiner, Joel H.; Bond, Alan M.

    2015-01-01

    A long-standing contradiction in the field of mononuclear Mo enzyme research is that small-molecule chemistry on active-site mimic compounds predicts ligand participation in the electron transfer reactions, but biochemical measurements only suggest metal-centered catalytic electron transfer. With the simultaneous measurement of substrate turnover and reversible electron transfer that is provided by Fourier-transformed alternating-current voltammetry, we show that Escherichia coli YedY is a mononuclear Mo enzyme that reconciles this conflict. In YedY, addition of three protons and three electrons to the well-characterized “as-isolated” Mo(V) oxidation state is needed to initiate the catalytic reduction of either dimethyl sulfoxide or trimethylamine N-oxide. Based on comparison with earlier studies and our UV-vis redox titration data, we assign the reversible one-proton and one-electron reduction process centered around +174 mV vs. standard hydrogen electrode at pH 7 to a Mo(V)-to-Mo(IV) conversion but ascribe the two-proton and two-electron transition occurring at negative potential to the organic pyranopterin ligand system. We predict that a dihydro-to-tetrahydro transition is needed to generate the catalytically active state of the enzyme. This is a previously unidentified mechanism, suggested by the structural simplicity of YedY, a protein in which Mo is the only metal site. PMID:26561582

  19. Protein−Protein Interaction Regulates the Direction of Catalysis and Electron Transfer in a Redox Enzyme Complex

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, Duncan G.; Marritt, Sophie; Firer-Sherwood, Mackenzie A.; Shi, Liang; Richardson, David J.; Evans, Stephen D.; Elliott, Sean J.; Butt, Julea N.; Jeuken, Lars J. C.

    2013-06-25

    Protein−protein complexes are fundamental to life where they are key to processes ranging from central metabolism to cell signaling. Transient protein−protein interactions generally underpin the electron-transfer (ET) pathways of respiration.1 One of the many well-characterized examples of a transient ET complex is that between cytochrome c and cytochrome c oxidase.2−5 The interaction between these partner proteins is weak and dynamic. This ensures the frequent exchange of partner proteins as required to support electron flux in cases where the sole function of one of the proteins is to shuttle electrons between redox partners.1 While it is generally assumed that such transient protein−protein interactions are specific, for Paracoccus denitrificans it has recently been shown that seven proteins in a respiratory network interact in a seemingly ill-defined manner. This results in an intricate electron-transfer network that may be better suited to successful colonization of habitats with changing resources.

  20. Heterogeneous Catalysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vannice, M. A.

    1979-01-01

    Described is a graduate course in catalysis offered at Penn State University. A detailed course outline with 30 lecture topics is presented. A list of 42 references on catalysis used in place of a textbook is provided. (BT)

  1. QM/MM X-ray Refinement of Zinc Metalloenzymes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue; Hayik, Seth A.; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2010-01-01

    Zinc metalloenzymes play an important role in biology. However, due to the limitation of molecular force field energy restraints used in X-ray refinement at medium or low resolutions, the precise geometry of the zinc coordination environment can be difficult to distinguish from ambiguous electron density maps. Due to the difficulties involved in defining accurate force fields for metal ions, the QM/MM (Quantum-Mechanical /Molecular-Mechanical) method provides an attractive and more general alternative for the study and refinement of metalloprotein active sites. Herein we present three examples that indicate that QM/MM based refinement yields a superior description of the crystal structure based on R and Rfree values and on the inspection of the zinc coordination environment. It is concluded that QM/MM refinement is a useful general tool for the improvement of the metal coordination sphere in metalloenzyme active sites. PMID:20116858

  2. Current-potential response and concentration profiles of redox polymer-mediated enzyme catalysis in biofuel cells - Estimation of Michaelis-Menten constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saravanakumar, K.; Rajendran, L.; Sangaranarayanan, M. V.

    2015-02-01

    The current-potential response of the enzyme-catalyzed, redox polymer mediated kinetic scheme pertaining to biofuel cells is analyzed. The ping-pong reaction scheme is solved analytically using the homotopy method for estimating the current density. The validity of the approach is demonstrated using the known experimental data for a series of osmium based redox polymers, involving oxygen as the substrate with laccase being the enzyme for biocathode fuel cell reactions. The significance of the results has been demonstrated by suggesting two new graphical procedures for estimating the Michaelis-Menten constants and catalytic rate constants from the experimental current densities.

  3. Oxalates as Activating Groups for Alcohols in Visible Light Photoredox Catalysis: Formation of Quaternary Centers by Redox-Neutral Fragment Coupling

    PubMed Central

    MacMillan, David W. C.; Overman, Larry E.

    2015-01-01

    Alkyl oxalates are new bench-stable alcohol-activating groups for radical generation under visible light photoredox conditions. Using these precursors, the first net redox-neutral coupling of tertiary and secondary alcohols with electron-deficient alkenes is achieved. PMID:26322524

  4. Genetic Optimization of Metalloenzymes: Enhancing Enzymes for Non-Natural Reactions.

    PubMed

    Hyster, Todd K; Ward, Thomas R

    2016-06-20

    Artificial metalloenzymes have received increasing attention over the last decade as a possible solution to unaddressed challenges in synthetic organic chemistry. Whereas traditional transition-metal catalysts typically only take advantage of the first coordination sphere to control reactivity and selectivity, artificial metalloenzymes can modulate both the first and second coordination spheres. This difference can manifest itself in reactivity profiles that can be truly unique to artificial metalloenzymes. This Review summarizes attempts to modulate the second coordination sphere of artificial metalloenzymes by using genetic modifications of the protein sequence. In doing so, successful attempts and creative solutions to address the challenges encountered are highlighted. PMID:26971363

  5. A Designed Metalloenzyme Achieving the Catalytic Rate of a Native Enzyme.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Cui, Chang; Liu, Xiaohong; Petrik, Igor D; Wang, Jiangyun; Lu, Yi

    2015-09-16

    Terminal oxidases catalyze four-electron reduction of oxygen to water, and the energy harvested is utilized to drive the synthesis of adenosine triphosphate. While much effort has been made to design a catalyst mimicking the function of terminal oxidases, most biomimetic catalysts have much lower activity than native oxidases. Herein we report a designed oxidase in myoglobin with an O2 reduction rate (52 s(-1)) comparable to that of a native cytochrome (cyt) cbb3 oxidase (50 s(-1)) under identical conditions. We achieved this goal by engineering more favorable electrostatic interactions between a functional oxidase model designed in sperm whale myoglobin and its native redox partner, cyt b5, resulting in a 400-fold electron transfer (ET) rate enhancement. Achieving high activity equivalent to that of native enzymes in a designed metalloenzyme offers deeper insight into the roles of tunable processes such as ET in oxidase activity and enzymatic function and may extend into applications such as more efficient oxygen reduction reaction catalysts for biofuel cells. PMID:26318313

  6. Heterogeneous Catalysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miranda, R.

    1989-01-01

    Described is a heterogeneous catalysis course which has elements of materials processing embedded in the classical format of catalytic mechanisms and surface chemistry. A course outline and list of examples of recent review papers written by students are provided. (MVL)

  7. Petroleum catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lerner, B.

    1996-10-01

    Catalysis reaches almost every major industrial chemical process in place today and spans production of fine chemicals and pharmaceuticals to commodity plastics and gasoline. The catalytic upgrading of crude oil for example renders chemicals, fuels, lubricants, and even coke for steel production. The initial conversion point for all these end products is the petroleum refinery. While there are a variety of catalytic schemes in the modern refinery, four key processes make up the mainstay of refinery operations: Catalytic Cracking, Alkylation, Reforming, and Isomerization. A brief history and outline of the processes will be given followed by a more detailed discussion of the catalysis. It is intended that a knowledge of both the catalytic chemistry and catalytic materials useful in these reactions may be garnered along with a broader view of the importance of catalysis in modern industrial chemistry.

  8. On the antiquity of metalloenzymes and their substrates in bioenergetics.

    PubMed

    Nitschke, Wolfgang; McGlynn, Shawn E; Milner-White, E James; Russell, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Many metalloenzymes that inject and extract reducing equivalents at the beginning and the end of electron transport chains involved in chemiosmosis are suggested, through phylogenetic analysis, to have been present in the Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA). Their active centres are affine with the structures of minerals presumed to contribute to precipitate membranes produced on the mixing of hydrothermal solutions with the Hadean Ocean ~4 billion years ago. These mineral precipitates consist of transition element sulphides and oxides such as nickelian mackinawite ([Fe>Ni]2S2), a nickel-bearing greigite (~FeSS[Fe3NiS4]SSFe), violarite (~NiSS[Fe2Ni2S4]SSNi), a molybdenum bearing complex (~Mo(IV/VI)2Fe3S(0/2-)9) and green rust or fougerite (~[Fe(II)Fe(III)(OH)4](+)[OH](-)). They may be respectively compared with the active centres of Ni-Fe hydrogenase, carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH), acetyl coenzyme-A synthase (ACS), the complex iron-sulphur molybdoenzyme (CISM) superfamily and methane monooxygenase (MMO). With the look of good catalysts - a suggestion that gathers some support from prebiotic hydrothermal experimentation - and sequestered by short peptides, they could be thought of as the original building blocks of proto-enzyme active centres. This convergence of the makeup of the LUCA-metalloenzymes with mineral structure and composition of hydrothermal precipitates adds credence to the alkaline hydrothermal (chemiosmotic) theory for the emergence of life, specifically to the possibility that the first metabolic pathway - the acetyl CoA pathway - was initially driven from either end, reductively from CO2 to CO and oxidatively and reductively from CH4 through to a methane thiol group, the two entities assembled with the help of a further thiol on a violarite cluster sequestered by peptides. By contrast, the organic coenzymes were entirely a product of the first metabolic pathways. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Metals in Bioenergetics and

  9. Phase and redox shifted four iron/four sulfur clusters: fluorous analogs of metalloenzyme cofactors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng-Pan; Xi, Zhenxing; Mueller, Kory M; Holliday, Bradley J; Bazzi, Hassan S; Gladysz, John A

    2015-12-01

    Reactions of (1) [Q]2[Fe4S4(SC(CH3)3)4] and the fluorous thiols HS(CH2)nRf8 (n = 2, 3; Rf8 = (CF2)7CF3)), or (2) [Na]2[Fe4S4(S(CH2)nRf8)4] (n = 2, 3) and [PhCH2P((CH2)3Rf6)3][Br] or [PPN][Cl] (PPN = Ph3P[horiz bar, triple dot above]N[horiz bar, triple dot above]PPh3), give the title compounds [Q]2[Fe4S4(S(CH2)nRf8)4], comprised of a fluorous dianion and in some cases fluorous cations, with (1) Q/n = Ph4P/2 (, 67%), Ph4P/3 (, 67%), Me4N/3 (69%), and Ph3P(CH2)2Rf6/2 (73%) or (2) PhCH2P((CH2)3Rf6)3/2 (, 39%), PhCH2P((CH2)3Rf6)3/3 (, 63%), and PPN/2 (36%). The educt [Ph3P(CH2)2Rf6]2[Fe4S4(SC(CH3)3)4] is in turn prepared from FeCl3, HSC(CH3)3/CH3ONa, and [Ph3P(CH2)2Rf6][I], and the educts [Na]2[Fe4S4(S(CH2)nRf8)4] from [Na]2[Fe4S4(SC(CH3)3)4] and HS(CH2)nRf8. The SCH2(1)H and (13)C NMR signals of these paramagnetic salts appear 8.7-10.3 and 32.3-34.9 ppm downfield from those of the corresponding thiols, but the chemical shifts of other signals are nearly normal. The UV-visible spectra show bands similar to those of non-fluorous analogs (290-298 nm and 406-415 nm; ε = 25 700 and 19 200 M(-1) cm(-1) for ). The singly fluorous salts are soluble in organic solvents of moderate polarity, but not in fluorous solvents. The doubly fluorous salts , are soluble in all fluorous solvents assayed, with partition coefficients of >99.65 : <0.35 (CF3C6F11/toluene) and 93.2-93.1 : 6.9-6.8 (FC-72/THF). Cyclic voltammograms carried out using a platinum working microelectrode show that is 0.08 V thermodynamically easier to reduce than . PMID:26223369

  10. Seventh BES (Basic Energy Sciences) catalysis and surface chemistry research conference

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    Research programs on catalysis and surface chemistry are presented. A total of fifty-seven topics are included. Areas of research include heterogeneous catalysis; catalysis in hydrogenation, desulfurization, gasification, and redox reactions; studies of surface properties and surface active sites; catalyst supports; chemical activation, deactivation; selectivity, chemical preparation; molecular structure studies; sorption and dissociation. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases. (CBS)

  11. Insights into the oxidative degradation of cellulose by a copper metalloenzyme that exploits biomass components.

    PubMed

    Quinlan, R Jason; Sweeney, Matt D; Lo Leggio, Leila; Otten, Harm; Poulsen, Jens-Christian N; Johansen, Katja Salomon; Krogh, Kristian B R M; Jørgensen, Christian Isak; Tovborg, Morten; Anthonsen, Annika; Tryfona, Theodora; Walter, Clive P; Dupree, Paul; Xu, Feng; Davies, Gideon J; Walton, Paul H

    2011-09-13

    The enzymatic degradation of recalcitrant plant biomass is one of the key industrial challenges of the 21st century. Accordingly, there is a continuing drive to discover new routes to promote polysaccharide degradation. Perhaps the most promising approach involves the application of "cellulase-enhancing factors," such as those from the glycoside hydrolase (CAZy) GH61 family. Here we show that GH61 enzymes are a unique family of copper-dependent oxidases. We demonstrate that copper is needed for GH61 maximal activity and that the formation of cellodextrin and oxidized cellodextrin products by GH61 is enhanced in the presence of small molecule redox-active cofactors such as ascorbate and gallate. By using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and single-crystal X-ray diffraction, the active site of GH61 is revealed to contain a type II copper and, uniquely, a methylated histidine in the copper's coordination sphere, thus providing an innovative paradigm in bioinorganic enzymatic catalysis. PMID:21876164

  12. Processive catalysis.

    PubMed

    van Dongen, Stijn F M; Elemans, Johannes A A W; Rowan, Alan E; Nolte, Roeland J M

    2014-10-20

    Nature's enzymes are an ongoing source of inspiration for scientists. The complex processes behind their selectivity and efficiency is slowly being unraveled, and these findings have spawned many biomimetic catalysts. However, nearly all focus on the conversion of small molecular substrates. Nature itself is replete with inventive catalytic systems which modify, replicate, or decompose entire polymers, often in a processive fashion. Such processivity can, for example, enhance the rate of catalysis by clamping to the polymer substrate, which imparts a large effective molarity. Reviewed herein are the various strategies for processivity in nature's arsenal and their properties. An overview of what has been achieved by chemists aiming to mimic one of nature's greatest tricks is also included. PMID:25244684

  13. Enantioselective sulfoxidation reaction catalyzed by a G-quadruplex DNA metalloenzyme.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Mingpan; Li, Yinghao; Zhou, Jun; Jia, Guoqing; Lu, Sheng-Mei; Yang, Yan; Li, Can

    2016-07-26

    Enantioselective sulfoxidation reaction is achieved for the first time by a DNA metalloenzyme assembled with the human telomeric G-quadruplex DNA and Cu(ii)-4,4'-bimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine complex, and the mixed G-quadruplex architectures are responsible for the catalytic enantioselectivity and activity. PMID:27359255

  14. Insights into the oxidative degradation of cellulose by a copper metalloenzyme that exploits biomass components

    PubMed Central

    Quinlan, R. Jason; Sweeney, Matt D.; Lo Leggio, Leila; Otten, Harm; Poulsen, Jens-Christian N.; Johansen, Katja Salomon; Krogh, Kristian B. R. M.; Jørgensen, Christian Isak; Tovborg, Morten; Anthonsen, Annika; Tryfona, Theodora; Walter, Clive P.; Dupree, Paul; Xu, Feng; Davies, Gideon J.; Walton, Paul H.

    2011-01-01

    The enzymatic degradation of recalcitrant plant biomass is one of the key industrial challenges of the 21st century. Accordingly, there is a continuing drive to discover new routes to promote polysaccharide degradation. Perhaps the most promising approach involves the application of “cellulase-enhancing factors,” such as those from the glycoside hydrolase (CAZy) GH61 family. Here we show that GH61 enzymes are a unique family of copper-dependent oxidases. We demonstrate that copper is needed for GH61 maximal activity and that the formation of cellodextrin and oxidized cellodextrin products by GH61 is enhanced in the presence of small molecule redox-active cofactors such as ascorbate and gallate. By using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and single-crystal X-ray diffraction, the active site of GH61 is revealed to contain a type II copper and, uniquely, a methylated histidine in the copper's coordination sphere, thus providing an innovative paradigm in bioinorganic enzymatic catalysis. PMID:21876164

  15. Calorimetric studies of the interactions of metalloenzyme active site mimetics with zinc-binding inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Sophia G; Burns, Philip T; Miceli, Amanda M; Grice, Kyle A; Karver, Caitlin E; Jin, Lihua

    2016-07-19

    The binding of drugs to metalloenzymes is an intricate process that involves several interactions, including binding of the drug to the enzyme active site metal, as well as multiple interactions between the drug and the enzyme residues. In order to determine the free energy contribution of Zn(2+) binding by known metalloenzyme inhibitors without the other interactions, valid active site zinc structural mimetics must be formed and binding studies need to be performed in biologically relevant conditions. The potential of each of five ligands to form a structural mimetic with Zn(2+) was investigated in buffer using Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC). All five ligands formed strong 1 : 1 (ligand : Zn(2+)) binary complexes. The complexes were used in further ITC experiments to study their interaction with 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ) and/or acetohydroxamic acid (AHA), two bidentate anionic zinc-chelating enzyme inhibitors. It was found that tetradentate ligands were not suitable for creating zinc structural mimetics for inhibitor binding in solution due to insufficient coordination sites remaining on Zn(2+). A stable binary complex, [Zn(BPA)](2+), which was formed by a tridentate ligand, bis(2-pyridylmethyl)amine (BPA), was found to bind one AHA in buffer or a methanol : buffer mixture (60 : 40 by volume) at pH 7.25 or one 8-HQ in the methanol : buffer mixture at pH 6.80, making it an effective structural mimetic for the active site of zinc metalloenzymes. These results are consistent with the observation that metalloenzyme active site zinc ions have three residues coordinated to them, leaving one or two sites open for inhibitors to bind. Our findings indicate that Zn(BPA)X2 can be used as an active site structural mimetic for zinc metalloenzymes for estimating the free energy contribution of zinc binding to the overall inhibitor active site interactions. Such use will help aid in the rational design of inhibitors to a variety of zinc metalloenzymes

  16. Metalloenzyme-Like Zeolites as Lewis Acid Catalysts for C-C Bond Formation.

    PubMed

    Van de Vyver, Stijn; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2015-10-19

    The use of metalloenzyme-like zeolites as Lewis acid catalysts for C-C bond formation reactions has received increasing attention over the past few years. In particular, the observation of direct aldol condensation reactions enabled by hydrophobic zeolites with isolated framework metal sites has encouraged the development of catalytic approaches for producing chemicals from biomass-derived compounds. The discovery of new Diels-Alder cycloaddition/dehydration routes and experimental and computational studies of Lewis acid catalyzed carbonyl-ene reactions have given a further boost to this rapidly evolving field. PMID:26465652

  17. Kinetics and Catalysis Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falconer, John L.; Britten, Jerald A.

    1984-01-01

    Eleven videotaped kinetics and catalysis demonstrations are described. Demonstrations include the clock reaction, oscillating reaction, hydrogen oxidation in air, hydrogen-oxygen explosion, acid-base properties of solids, high- and low-temperature zeolite reactivity, copper catalysis of ammonia oxidation and sodium peroxide decomposition, ammonia…

  18. Redox Redone.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petty, John T.

    1996-01-01

    Presents an extension of the change in oxidation number method that is used for balancing skeletal redox reactions in aqueous solutions. Retains most of the simplicity of the change in oxidation number method but provides the additional step-by-step process necessary for the beginner to balance an equation. (JRH)

  19. 2-Aminoimidazole Amino Acids as Inhibitors of the Binuclear Manganese Metalloenzyme Human Arginase I

    SciTech Connect

    Ilies, M.; Di Costanzo, L; North, M; Scott, J; Christianson, D

    2010-01-01

    Arginase, a key metalloenzyme of the urea cycle that converts L-arginine into L-ornithine and urea, is presently considered a pharmaceutical target for the management of diseases associated with aberrant L-arginine homeostasis, such as asthma, cardiovascular diseases, and erectile dysfunction. We now report the design, synthesis, and evaluation of a series of 2-aminoimidazole amino acid inhibitors in which the 2-aminoimidazole moiety serves as a guanidine mimetic. These compounds represent a new class of arginase inhibitors. The most potent inhibitor identified in this study, 2-(S)-amino-5-(2-aminoimidazol-1-yl)pentanoic acid (A1P, 10), binds to human arginase I with K{sub d} = 2 {micro}M and significantly attenuates airways hyperresponsiveness in a murine model of allergic airways inflammation. These findings suggest that 2-aminoimidazole amino acids represent new leads for the development of arginase inhibitors with promising pharmacological profiles.

  20. Potential Energy Surfaces for Reaction Catalyzed by Metalloenzymes from Quantum Chemical Computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leopoldini, Monica; Marino, Tiziana; Russo, Nino; Toscano, Marirosa

    For several decades quantum mechanical (QM) computational methods have been developed and refined so that it was possible to extend their applicability field enormously. Today, they are used generally to supplement experimental techniques because the theory also affords deeper understanding of molecular processes that cannot be obtained from experiments alone. Due to their favorable scaling when compared to the ab initiomethods, density functional theory (DFT) approach allows the treatment of very large systems such as the biomolecules. Thus, now it is possible, for instance, to study the difficult and critical reactions catalyzed by enzymes in biological systems. Here, a brief account of the studies performed on different metalloenzymes is given, focusing on methods and models used to describe their reaction mechanisms.

  1. 2-Aminoimidazole Amino Acids as Inhibitors of the Binuclear Manganese Metalloenzyme Human Arginase I

    PubMed Central

    Ilies, Monica; Di Costanzo, Luigi; North, Michelle L.; Scott, Jeremy A.; Christianson, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Arginase, a key metalloenzyme of the urea cycle that converts L-arginine into L-ornithine and urea, is presently considered a pharmaceutical target for the management of diseases associated with aberrant L-arginine homeostasis, such as asthma, cardiovascular diseases, and erectile dysfunction. We now report the design, synthesis, and evaluation of a series of 2-aminoimidazole amino acids inhibitors in which the 2-aminoimidazole moiety serves as a guanidine mimetic. These compounds represent a new class of arginase inhibitors. The most potent inhibitor identified in this study, 2-(S)-amino-5-(2-aminoimidazol-1-yl)-pentanoic acid (A1P, 10), binds to human arginase I with Kd = 2 μM and significantly attenuates airways hyperresponsiveness in a murine model of allergic airways inflammation. These findings suggest that 2-aminoimidazole amino acids represent new leads for the development of arginase inhibitors with promising pharmacological profiles. PMID:20441173

  2. Crystal structure of a membrane-bound metalloenzyme that catalyses the biological oxidation of methane

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, R.L.; Rosenzweig, A.C.

    2010-03-08

    Particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) is an integral membrane metalloenzyme that catalyses the conversion of methane to methanol. Knowledge of how pMMO performs this extremely challenging chemistry may have an impact on the use of methane as an alternative energy source by facilitating the development of new synthetic catalysts. We have determined the structure of pMMO from the methanotroph Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) to a resolution of 2.8 {angstrom}. The enzyme is a trimer with an {alpha}{sub 3}{beta}{sub 3}{gamma}{sub 3} polypeptide arrangement. Two metal centres, modelled as mononuclear copper and dinuclear copper, are located in soluble regions of each pmoB subunit, which resembles cytochrome c oxidase subunit II. A third metal centre, occupied by zinc in the crystal, is located within the membrane. The structure provides new insight into the molecular details of biological methane oxidation.

  3. Abiological catalysis by artificial haem proteins containing noble metals in place of iron.

    PubMed

    Key, Hanna M; Dydio, Paweł; Clark, Douglas S; Hartwig, John F

    2016-06-23

    Enzymes that contain metal ions--that is, metalloenzymes--possess the reactivity of a transition metal centre and the potential of molecular evolution to modulate the reactivity and substrate-selectivity of the system. By exploiting substrate promiscuity and protein engineering, the scope of reactions catalysed by native metalloenzymes has been expanded recently to include abiological transformations. However, this strategy is limited by the inherent reactivity of metal centres in native metalloenzymes. To overcome this limitation, artificial metalloproteins have been created by incorporating complete, noble-metal complexes within proteins lacking native metal sites. The interactions of the substrate with the protein in these systems are, however, distinct from those with the native protein because the metal complex occupies the substrate binding site. At the intersection of these approaches lies a third strategy, in which the native metal of a metalloenzyme is replaced with an abiological metal with reactivity different from that of the metal in a native protein. This strategy could create artificial enzymes for abiological catalysis within the natural substrate binding site of an enzyme that can be subjected to directed evolution. Here we report the formal replacement of iron in Fe-porphyrin IX (Fe-PIX) proteins with abiological, noble metals to create enzymes that catalyse reactions not catalysed by native Fe-enzymes or other metalloenzymes. In particular, we prepared modified myoglobins containing an Ir(Me) site that catalyse the functionalization of C-H bonds to form C-C bonds by carbene insertion and add carbenes to both β-substituted vinylarenes and unactivated aliphatic α-olefins. We conducted directed evolution of the Ir(Me)-myoglobin and generated mutants that form either enantiomer of the products of C-H insertion and catalyse the enantio- and diastereoselective cyclopropanation of unactivated olefins. The presented method of preparing artificial haem

  4. Redox and zinc signalling pathways converging on protein tyrosine phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Bellomo, Elisa; Hogstrand, Christer; Maret, Wolfgang

    2014-10-01

    Zinc ions, though redox-inert, have either pro-antioxidant or pro-oxidant functions at critical junctures in redox metabolism and redox signalling. They are released from cells and in cells, e.g. from metallothionein, a protein that transduces redox signals into zinc signals (1). The released zinc ions inhibit enzymes such as protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), key regulatory enzymes of cellular phosphorylation signalling. The Ki(Zn) value for inhibition of receptor PTPB is 21pM (2). The binding is about as tight as the binding of zinc to zinc metalloenzymes and suggests tonic zinc inhibition. PTP1-B (PTPN1), an enzyme regulating the insulin and leptin receptors and involved in cancer and diabetes pathobiochemistry, has a Ki(Zn) value of about 5nM (3). Zinc ions bind to the enzyme in the closed conformation when additional metal-binding ligands are brought into the vicinity of the active site. In contrast, redox reactions target cysteines in the active sites of PTPs in the open conformation. This work provides a molecular basis how hydrogen peroxide and free zinc ions generated by growth factor signalling stimulate phosphorylation signalling differentially. (Supported by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council UK, grant BB/K001442/1.). PMID:26461422

  5. Engineered Proteins: Redox Properties and Their Applications

    PubMed Central

    Prabhulkar, Shradha; Tian, Hui; Wang, Xiaotang; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Oxidoreductases and metalloproteins, representing more than one third of all known proteins, serve as significant catalysts for numerous biological processes that involve electron transfers such as photosynthesis, respiration, metabolism, and molecular signaling. The functional properties of the oxidoreductases/metalloproteins are determined by the nature of their redox centers. Protein engineering is a powerful approach that is used to incorporate biological and abiological redox cofactors as well as novel enzymes and redox proteins with predictable structures and desirable functions for important biological and chemical applications. The methods of protein engineering, mainly rational design, directed evolution, protein surface modifications, and domain shuffling, have allowed the creation and study of a number of redox proteins. This review presents a selection of engineered redox proteins achieved through these methods, resulting in a manipulation in redox potentials, an increase in electron-transfer efficiency, and an expansion of native proteins by de novo design. Such engineered/modified redox proteins with desired properties have led to a broad spectrum of practical applications, ranging from biosensors, biofuel cells, to pharmaceuticals and hybrid catalysis. Glucose biosensors are one of the most successful products in enzyme electrochemistry, with reconstituted glucose oxidase achieving effective electrical communication with the sensor electrode; direct electron-transfer-type biofuel cells are developed to avoid thermodynamic loss and mediator leakage; and fusion proteins of P450s and redox partners make the biocatalytic generation of drug metabolites possible. In summary, this review includes the properties and applications of the engineered redox proteins as well as their significance and great potential in the exploration of bioelectrochemical sensing devices. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 17, 1796–1822. PMID:22435347

  6. Catalysis and biocatalysis program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The annual report presents the fiscal year (FY) 1990 research activities and accomplishments for the Catalysis and Biocatalysis Program of the Advanced Industrial Concepts Division (AICD), Office of Industrial Technologies of the Department of Energy (DOE). The mission of the AICD is to create a balanced program of high risk, long term, directed interdisciplinary research and development that will improve energy efficiency and enhance fuel flexibility in the industrial sector. The Catalysis and Biocatalysis Program's technical activities were organized into five work elements: the Molecular Modeling and Catalysis by Design element; the Applied Microbiology and Genetics element; the Bioprocess Engineering element; the Separations and Novel Chemical Processes element; and the Process Design and Analysis element.

  7. Homogeneous, Heterogeneous, and Enzymatic Catalysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oyama, S. Ted; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses three areas of catalysis: homegeneous, heterogeneous, and enzymatic. Explains fundamentals and economic impact of catalysis. Lists and discusses common industrial catalysts. Provides a list of 107 references. (MVL)

  8. Bovine serum albumin-cobalt(ii) Schiff base complex hybrid: an efficient artificial metalloenzyme for enantioselective sulfoxidation using hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jie; Huang, Fuping; Wei, Yi; Bian, Hedong; Zhang, Wei; Liang, Hong

    2016-05-10

    An artificial metalloenzyme (BSA-CoL) based on the incorporation of a cobalt(ii) Schiff base complex {CoL, H2L = 2,2'-[(1,2-ethanediyl)bis(nitrilopropylidyne)]bisphenol} with bovine serum albumin (BSA) has been synthesized and characterized. Attention is focused on the catalytic activity of this artificial metalloenzyme for enantioselective oxidation of a variety of sulfides with H2O2. The influences of parameters such as pH, temperature, and the concentration of catalyst and oxidant on thioanisole as a model are investigated. Under optimum conditions, BSA-CoL as a hybrid biocatalyst is efficient for the enantioselective oxidation of a series of sulfides, producing the corresponding sulfoxides with excellent conversion (up to 100%), chemoselectivity (up to 100%) and good enantiomeric purity (up to 87% ee) in certain cases. PMID:27075699

  9. QM/MM Analysis of Transition States and Transition State Analogues in Metalloenzymes.

    PubMed

    Roston, D; Cui, Q

    2016-01-01

    Enzymology is approaching an era where many problems can benefit from computational studies. While ample challenges remain in quantitatively predicting behavior for many enzyme systems, the insights that often come from computations are an important asset for the enzymology community. Here we provide a primer for enzymologists on the types of calculations that are most useful for mechanistic problems in enzymology. In particular, we emphasize the integration of models that range from small active-site motifs to fully solvated enzyme systems for cross-validation and dissection of specific contributions from the enzyme environment. We then use a case study of the enzyme alkaline phosphatase to illustrate specific application of the methods. The case study involves examination of the binding modes of putative transition state analogues (tungstate and vanadate) to the enzyme. The computations predict covalent binding of these ions to the enzymatic nucleophile and that they adopt the trigonal bipyramidal geometry of the expected transition state. By comparing these structures with transition states found through free energy simulations, we assess the degree to which the transition state analogues mimic the true transition states. Technical issues worth treating with care as well as several remaining challenges to quantitative analysis of metalloenzymes are also highlighted during the discussion. PMID:27498640

  10. Novel triphosphate phosphohydrolase activity of Clostridium thermocellum TTM, a member of the triphosphate tunnel metalloenzyme superfamily.

    PubMed

    Keppetipola, Niroshika; Jain, Ruchi; Shuman, Stewart

    2007-04-20

    Triphosphate tunnel metalloenzymes (TTMs) are a newly recognized superfamily of phosphotransferases defined by a unique active site residing within an eight-stranded beta barrel. The prototypical members are the eukaryal metal-dependent RNA triphosphatases, which catalyze the initial step in mRNA capping. Little is known about the activities and substrate specificities of the scores of TTM homologs present in bacterial and archaeal proteomes, nearly all of which are annotated as adenylate cyclases. Here we have conducted a biochemical and structure-function analysis of a TTM protein (CthTTM) from the bacterium Clostridium thermocellum. CthTTM is a metal-dependent tripolyphosphatase and nucleoside triphosphatase; it is not an adenylate cyclase. We have identified 11 conserved amino acids in the tunnel that are critical for tripolyphosphatase and ATPase activity. The most salient findings are that (i) CthTTM is 150-fold more active in cleaving tripolyphosphate than ATP and (ii) the substrate specificity of CthTTM can be transformed by a single mutation (K8A) that abolishes tripolyphosphatase activity while strongly stimulating ATP hydrolysis. Our results underscore the plasticity of CthTTM substrate choice and suggest how novel specificities within the TTM superfamily might evolve through changes in the residues that line the tunnel walls. PMID:17303560

  11. Artificial Metalloenzymes with the Neocarzinostatin Scaffold: Toward a Biocatalyst for the Diels-Alder Reaction.

    PubMed

    Ghattas, Wadih; Cotchico-Alonso, Lur; Maréchal, Jean-Didier; Urvoas, Agathe; Rousseau, Maëva; Mahy, Jean-Pierre; Ricoux, Rémy

    2016-03-01

    A copper(II) cofactor coupled to a testosterone anchor, copper(II)-(5-(Piperazin-1-yl)-1,10-phenanthroline)testosterone-17-hemisuccinamide (10) was synthesized and associated with a neocarzinostatin variant, NCS-3.24 (KD =3 μm), thus generating a new artificial metalloenzyme by following a "Trojan horse" strategy. Interestingly, the artificial enzyme was able to efficiently catalyze the Diels-Alder cyclization reaction of cyclopentadiene (1) with 2-azachalcone (2). In comparison with what was observed with cofactor 10 alone, the artificial enzymes favored formation of the exo products (endo/exo ratios of 84:16 and 62:38, respectively, after 12 h). Molecular modeling studies assigned the synergy between the copper complex and the testosterone (KD =13 μm) moieties in the binding of 10 to good van der Waals complementarity. Moreover, by pushing the modeling exercise to its limits, we hypothesize on the molecular grounds that are responsible for the observed selectivity. PMID:26677011

  12. Catalysis of Supramolecular Hydrogelation.

    PubMed

    Trausel, Fanny; Versluis, Frank; Maity, Chandan; Poolman, Jos M; Lovrak, Matija; van Esch, Jan H; Eelkema, Rienk

    2016-07-19

    One often thinks of catalysts as chemical tools to accelerate a reaction or to have a reaction run under more benign conditions. As such, catalysis has a role to play in the chemical industry and in lab scale synthesis that is not to be underestimated. Still, the role of catalysis in living systems (cells, organisms) is much more extensive, ranging from the formation and breakdown of small molecules and biopolymers to controlling signal transduction cascades and feedback processes, motility, and mechanical action. Such phenomena are only recently starting to receive attention in synthetic materials and chemical systems. "Smart" soft materials could find many important applications ranging from personalized therapeutics to soft robotics to name but a few. Until recently, approaches to control the properties of such materials were largely dominated by thermodynamics, for instance, looking at phase behavior and interaction strength. However, kinetics plays a large role in determining the behavior of such soft materials, for instance, in the formation of kinetically trapped (metastable) states or the dynamics of component exchange. As catalysts can change the rate of a chemical reaction, catalysis could be used to control the formation, dynamics, and fate of supramolecular structures when the molecules making up these structures contain chemical bonds whose formation or exchange are susceptible to catalysis. In this Account, we describe our efforts to use synthetic catalysts to control the properties of supramolecular hydrogels. Building on the concept of synthesizing the assembling molecule in the self-assembly medium from nonassembling precursors, we will introduce the use of catalysis to change the kinetics of assembler formation and thereby the properties of the resulting material. In particular, we will focus on the synthesis of supramolecular hydrogels where the use of a catalyst provides access to gel materials with vastly different appearance and mechanical

  13. Anion-π catalysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yingjie; Beuchat, César; Domoto, Yuya; Gajewy, Jadwiga; Wilson, Adam; Mareda, Jiri; Sakai, Naomi; Matile, Stefan

    2014-02-01

    The introduction of new noncovalent interactions to build functional systems is of fundamental importance. We here report experimental and theoretical evidence that anion-π interactions can contribute to catalysis. The Kemp elimination is used as a classical tool to discover conceptually innovative catalysts for reactions with anionic transition states. For anion-π catalysis, a carboxylate base and a solubilizer are covalently attached to the π-acidic surface of naphthalenediimides. On these π-acidic surfaces, transition-state stabilizations up to ΔΔGTS = 31.8 ± 0.4 kJ mol(-1) are found. This value corresponds to a transition-state recognition of KTS = 2.7 ± 0.5 μM and a catalytic proficiency of 3.8 × 10(5) M(-1). Significantly increasing transition-state stabilization with increasing π-acidity of the catalyst, observed for two separate series, demonstrates the existence of "anion-π catalysis." In sharp contrast, increasing π-acidity of the best naphthalenediimide catalysts does not influence the more than 12 000-times weaker substrate recognition (KM = 34.5 ± 1.6 μM). Together with the disappearance of Michaelis-Menten kinetics on the expanded π-surfaces of perylenediimides, this finding supports that contributions from π-π interactions are not very important for anion-π catalysis. The linker between the π-acidic surface and the carboxylate base strongly influences activity. Insufficient length and flexibility cause incompatibility with saturation kinetics. Moreover, preorganizing linkers do not improve catalysis much, suggesting that the ideal positioning of the carboxylate base on the π-acidic surface is achieved by intramolecular anion-π interactions rather than by an optimized structure of the linker. Computational simulations are in excellent agreement with experimental results. They confirm, inter alia, that the stabilization of the anionic transition states (but not the neutral ground states) increases with the π-acidity of the

  14. Redox and Reactive Oxygen Species Regulation of Mitochondrial Cytochrome c Oxidase Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bourens, Myriam; Fontanesi, Flavia; Soto, Iliana C.; Liu, Jingjing

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Cytochrome c oxidase (COX), the last enzyme of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, is the major oxygen consumer enzyme in the cell. COX biogenesis involves several redox-regulated steps. The process is highly regulated to prevent the formation of pro-oxidant intermediates. Recent Advances: Regulation of COX assembly involves several reactive oxygen species and redox-regulated steps. These include: (i) Intricate redox-controlled machineries coordinate the expression of COX isoenzymes depending on the environmental oxygen concentration. (ii) COX is a heme A-copper metalloenzyme. COX copper metallation involves the copper chaperone Cox17 and several other recently described cysteine-rich proteins, which are oxidatively folded in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. Copper transfer to COX subunits 1 and 2 requires concomitant transfer of redox power. (iii) To avoid the accumulation of reactive assembly intermediates, COX is regulated at the translational level to minimize synthesis of the heme A-containing Cox1 subunit when assembly is impaired. Critical Issues: An increasing number of regulatory pathways converge to facilitate efficient COX assembly, thus preventing oxidative stress. Future Directions: Here we will review on the redox-regulated COX biogenesis steps and will discuss their physiological relevance. Forthcoming insights into the precise regulation of mitochondrial COX biogenesis in normal and stress conditions will likely open future perspectives for understanding mitochondrial redox regulation and prevention of oxidative stress. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 1940–1952. PMID:22937827

  15. Proteins as templates for complex synthetic metalloclusters: towards biologically programmed heterogeneous catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Fehl, Charlie

    2016-01-01

    Despite nature’s prevalent use of metals as prosthetics to adapt or enhance the behaviour of proteins, our ability to programme such architectural organization remains underdeveloped. Multi-metal clusters buried in proteins underpin the most remarkable chemical transformations in nature, but we are not yet in a position to fully mimic or exploit such systems. With the advent of copious, relevant structural information, judicious mechanistic studies and the use of accessible computational methods in protein design coupled with new synthetic methods for building biomacromolecules, we can envisage a ‘new dawn’ that will allow us to build de novo metalloenzymes that move beyond mono-metal centres. In particular, we highlight the need for systems that approach the multi-centred clusters that have evolved to couple electron shuttling with catalysis. Such hybrids may be viewed as exciting mid-points between homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts which also exploit the primary benefits of biocatalysis. PMID:27279776

  16. On the Origin of the Catalytic power of Caboxypetidase A and Other Metalloenzymes

    PubMed Central

    Kilshtain, Alexandra Vardi; Warshel, Arieh

    2009-01-01

    Zinc metalloenzymes play a major role in key biological processes and Carboxypeptidase-A (CPA) is a major prototype of such enzymes. The present work quantifies the energetics of the catalytic reaction of CPA and its mutants using the EVB approach. The simulations allow us to quantify the origin of the catalytic power of this enzyme and to examine different mechanistic alternatives. The first step of the analysis used experimental information to determine the activation energy of each assumed mechanism of the reference reaction without the enzyme. The next step of the analysis involved EVB simulations of the reference reaction and then a calibration of the simulations by forcing them to reproduce the energetics of the reference reaction, in each assumed mechanism. The calibrated EVB was then used in systematic simulations of the catalytic reaction in the protein environment, without changing any parameter. The simulations reproduced the observed rate enhancement in two feasible general acid-general base mechanisms (GAGB-1 and GAGB-2), although the calculations with the GAGB-2 mechanism underestimated the catalytic effect in some treatments. We also reproduced the catalytic effect in the R127A mutant. The mutation calculations indicate that the GAGB-2 mechanism is significantly less likely than the GAGB-1 mechanism. It is also found, that the enzyme loses all its catalytic effect without the metal. This and earlier studies show that the catalytic effect of the metal is not some constant electrostatic effect, that can be assessed from gas phase studies, but a reflection of the dielectric effect of the specific environment. PMID:19480013

  17. On the origin of the catalytic power of carboxypeptidase A and other metalloenzymes.

    PubMed

    Kilshtain, Alexandra Vardi; Warshel, Arieh

    2009-11-15

    Zinc metalloenzymes play a major role in key biological processes and carboxypeptidase-A (CPA) is a major prototype of such enzymes. The present work quantifies the energetics of the catalytic reaction of CPA and its mutants using the empirical valence bond (EVB) approach. The simulations allow us to quantify the origin of the catalytic power of this enzyme and to examine different mechanistic alternatives. The first step of the analysis used experimental information to determine the activation energy of each assumed mechanism of the reference reaction without the enzyme. The next step of the analysis involved EVB simulations of the reference reaction and then a calibration of the simulations by forcing them to reproduce the energetics of the reference reaction, in each assumed mechanism. The calibrated EVB was then used in systematic simulations of the catalytic reaction in the protein environment, without changing any parameter. The simulations reproduced the observed rate enhancement in two feasible general acid-general base mechanisms (GAGB-1 and GAGB-2), although the calculations with the GAGB-2 mechanism underestimated the catalytic effect in some treatments. We also reproduced the catalytic effect in the R127A mutant. The mutation calculations indicate that the GAGB-2 mechanism is significantly less likely than the GAGB-1 mechanism. It is also found, that the enzyme loses all its catalytic effect without the metal. This and earlier studies show that the catalytic effect of the metal is not some constant electrostatic effect, that can be assessed from gas phase studies, but a reflection of the dielectric effect of the specific environment. PMID:19480013

  18. Clusters, surfaces, and catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Contreras, Anthony M.; Montano, Max; Rioux, Robert M.

    2006-01-01

    The surface science of heterogeneous metal catalysis uses model systems ranging from single crystals to monodispersed nanoparticles in the 1–10 nm range. Molecular studies reveal that bond activation (C–H, H–H, C–C, CO) occurs at 300 K or below as the active metal sites simultaneously restructure. The strongly adsorbed molecules must be mobile to free up these sites for continued turnover of reaction. Oxide–metal interfaces are also active for catalytic turnover. Examples using C–H and CO activation are described to demonstrate these properties. Future directions include synthesis, characterization, and reaction studies with 2D and 3D monodispersed metal nanoclusters to obtain 100% selectivity in multipath reactions. Investigations of the unique structural, dynamic, and electronic properties of nanoparticles are likely to have major impact in surface technologies. The fields of heterogeneous, enzyme, and homogeneous catalysis are likely to merge for the benefit of all three. PMID:16740668

  19. Catalysis and biocatalysis program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingham, J. D.

    1993-01-01

    This final report presents a summary of research activities and accomplishments for the Catalysis and Biocatalysis Program, which was renamed the Biological and Chemical Technologies Research (BCTR) Program, currently of the Advanced Industrial Concepts Division (AICD), Office of Industrial Technologies of the Department of Energy (DOE). The Program was formerly under the Division of Energy Conversion and Utilization Technologies (ECUT) until the DOE reorganization in April, 1990. The goals of the BCTR Program are consistent with the initial ECUT goals, but represent an increased effort toward advances in chemical and biological technology transfer. In addition, the transition reflects a need for the BCTR Program to assume a greater R&D role in chemical catalysis as well as a need to position itself for a more encompassing involvement in a broader range of biological and chemical technology research. The mission of the AICD is to create a balanced Program of high risk, long-term, directed interdisciplinary research and development that will improve energy efficiency and enhance fuel flexibility in the industrial sector. Under AICD, the DOE Catalysis and Biocatalysis Program sponsors research and development in furthering industrial biotechnology applications and promotes the integrated participation of universities, industrial companies, and government research laboratories.

  20. A flexible toolbox to study protein-assisted metalloenzyme assembly in vitro.

    PubMed

    Schiffels, Johannes; Selmer, Thorsten

    2015-11-01

    A number of metalloenzymes harbor unique cofactors, which are incorporated into the apo-enzymes via protein-assisted maturation. In the case of [NiFe]-hydrogenases, minimally seven maturation factors (HypABCDEF and a specific endopeptidase) are involved, making these enzymes an excellent example for studying metallocenter assembly in general. Here, we describe an innovative toolbox to study maturation involving multiple putative gene products. The two core elements of the system are a modular, combinatorial cloning system and a cell-free maturation system, which is based on recombinant Escherichia coli extracts and/or purified maturases. Taking maturation of the soluble, oxygen-tolerant [NiFe]-hydrogenase (SH) from Cupriavidus necator as an example, the capacities of the toolbox are illustrated. In total 18 genes from C. necator were analyzed, including four SH-structural genes, the SH-dedicated hyp-genes and a second set of hyp-genes putatively involved in maturation of the Actinobacterium-like hydrogenase (AH). The two hyp-sets were either expressed in their entirety from single vectors or split into functional modules, which enabled flexible approaches to investigate limitations, specificities and the capabilities of individual constituents to functionally substitute each other. Affinity-tagged Hyp-Proteins were used in pull-down experiments to demonstrate direct interactions between dedicated or non-related constituents. The dedicated Hyp-set from C. necator exhibited the highest maturation efficiency in vitro. Constituents of non-related maturation machineries were found to interact with and to accomplish partial activation of SH. In contrast to homologues of the Hyp-family, omission of the SH-specific endopeptidase HoxW completely abolished in vitro maturation. We detected stoichiometric imbalances inside the recombinant production system, which point to limitations by the cyanylation complex HypEF and the premature subunit HoxH. Purification of HoxW revealed

  1. Zeolite catalysis: technology

    SciTech Connect

    Heinemann, H.

    1980-07-01

    Zeolites have been used as catalysts in industry since the early nineteen sixties. The great majority of commercial applications employ one of three zeolite types: zeolite Y; Mordenite; ZSM-5. By far the largest use of zeolites is in catalytic cracking, and to a lesser extent in hydrocracking. This paper reviews the rapid development of zeolite catalysis and its application in industries such as: the production of gasoline by catalytic cracking of petroleum; isomerization of C/sub 5/ and C/sub 6/ paraffin hydrocarbons; alkylation of aromatics with olefins; xylene isomerization; and conversion of methanol to gasoline.

  2. Redox-coupled proton transfer mechanism in nitrite reductase revealed by femtosecond crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Yohta; Tse, Ka Man; Nakane, Takanori; Nakatsu, Toru; Suzuki, Mamoru; Sugahara, Michihiro; Inoue, Shigeyuki; Masuda, Tetsuya; Yumoto, Fumiaki; Matsugaki, Naohiro; Nango, Eriko; Tono, Kensuke; Joti, Yasumasa; Kameshima, Takashi; Song, Changyong; Hatsui, Takaki; Nureki, Osamu; Murphy, Michael E. P.; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Iwata, So; Mizohata, Eiichi

    2016-01-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET), a ubiquitous phenomenon in biological systems, plays an essential role in copper nitrite reductase (CuNiR), the key metalloenzyme in microbial denitrification of the global nitrogen cycle. Analyses of the nitrite reduction mechanism in CuNiR with conventional synchrotron radiation crystallography (SRX) have been faced with difficulties, because X-ray photoreduction changes the native structures of metal centers and the enzyme–substrate complex. Using serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX), we determined the intact structures of CuNiR in the resting state and the nitrite complex (NC) state at 2.03- and 1.60-Å resolution, respectively. Furthermore, the SRX NC structure representing a transient state in the catalytic cycle was determined at 1.30-Å resolution. Comparison between SRX and SFX structures revealed that photoreduction changes the coordination manner of the substrate and that catalytically important His255 can switch hydrogen bond partners between the backbone carbonyl oxygen of nearby Glu279 and the side-chain hydroxyl group of Thr280. These findings, which SRX has failed to uncover, propose a redox-coupled proton switch for PCET. This concept can explain how proton transfer to the substrate is involved in intramolecular electron transfer and why substrate binding accelerates PCET. Our study demonstrates the potential of SFX as a powerful tool to study redox processes in metalloenzymes. PMID:26929369

  3. Redox-coupled proton transfer mechanism in nitrite reductase revealed by femtosecond crystallography.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Yohta; Tse, Ka Man; Nakane, Takanori; Nakatsu, Toru; Suzuki, Mamoru; Sugahara, Michihiro; Inoue, Shigeyuki; Masuda, Tetsuya; Yumoto, Fumiaki; Matsugaki, Naohiro; Nango, Eriko; Tono, Kensuke; Joti, Yasumasa; Kameshima, Takashi; Song, Changyong; Hatsui, Takaki; Yabashi, Makina; Nureki, Osamu; Murphy, Michael E P; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Iwata, So; Mizohata, Eiichi

    2016-03-15

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET), a ubiquitous phenomenon in biological systems, plays an essential role in copper nitrite reductase (CuNiR), the key metalloenzyme in microbial denitrification of the global nitrogen cycle. Analyses of the nitrite reduction mechanism in CuNiR with conventional synchrotron radiation crystallography (SRX) have been faced with difficulties, because X-ray photoreduction changes the native structures of metal centers and the enzyme-substrate complex. Using serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX), we determined the intact structures of CuNiR in the resting state and the nitrite complex (NC) state at 2.03- and 1.60-Å resolution, respectively. Furthermore, the SRX NC structure representing a transient state in the catalytic cycle was determined at 1.30-Å resolution. Comparison between SRX and SFX structures revealed that photoreduction changes the coordination manner of the substrate and that catalytically important His255 can switch hydrogen bond partners between the backbone carbonyl oxygen of nearby Glu279 and the side-chain hydroxyl group of Thr280. These findings, which SRX has failed to uncover, propose a redox-coupled proton switch for PCET. This concept can explain how proton transfer to the substrate is involved in intramolecular electron transfer and why substrate binding accelerates PCET. Our study demonstrates the potential of SFX as a powerful tool to study redox processes in metalloenzymes. PMID:26929369

  4. Catalysis and prebiotic RNA synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferris, James P.

    1993-01-01

    The essential role of catalysis for the origins of life is discussed. The status of the prebiotic synthesis of 2',5'- and 3'5'-linked oligomers of RNA is reviewed. Examples of the role of metal ion and mineral catalysis in RNA oligomer formation are discussed.

  5. The Redox Code

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Dean P.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The redox code is a set of principles that defines the positioning of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD, NADP) and thiol/disulfide and other redox systems as well as the thiol redox proteome in space and time in biological systems. The code is richly elaborated in an oxygen-dependent life, where activation/deactivation cycles involving O2 and H2O2 contribute to spatiotemporal organization for differentiation, development, and adaptation to the environment. Disruption of this organizational structure during oxidative stress represents a fundamental mechanism in system failure and disease. Recent Advances: Methodology in assessing components of the redox code under physiological conditions has progressed, permitting insight into spatiotemporal organization and allowing for identification of redox partners in redox proteomics and redox metabolomics. Critical Issues: Complexity of redox networks and redox regulation is being revealed step by step, yet much still needs to be learned. Future Directions: Detailed knowledge of the molecular patterns generated from the principles of the redox code under defined physiological or pathological conditions in cells and organs will contribute to understanding the redox component in health and disease. Ultimately, there will be a scientific basis to a modern redox medicine. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 734–746. PMID:25891126

  6. Recent advances of lanthanum-based perovskite oxides for catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Huiyuan; Zhang, Pengfei; Dai, Sheng

    2015-09-21

    There is a need to reduce the use of noble metal elements especially in the field of catalysis, where noble metals are ubiquitously applied. To this end, perovskite oxides, an important class of mixed oxide, have been attracting increasing attention for decades as potential replacements. Benefiting from the extraordinary tunability of their compositions and structures, perovskite oxides can be rationally tailored and equipped with targeted physical and chemical properties e.g. redox behavior, oxygen mobility, and ion conductivity for enhanced catalysis. Recently, the development of highly efficient perovskite oxide catalysts has been extensively studied. This review article summarizes the recent development of lanthanum-based perovskite oxides as advanced catalysts for both energy conversion applications and traditional heterogeneous reactions.

  7. Recent advances of lanthanum-based perovskite oxides for catalysis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhu, Huiyuan; Zhang, Pengfei; Dai, Sheng

    2015-09-21

    There is a need to reduce the use of noble metal elements especially in the field of catalysis, where noble metals are ubiquitously applied. To this end, perovskite oxides, an important class of mixed oxide, have been attracting increasing attention for decades as potential replacements. Benefiting from the extraordinary tunability of their compositions and structures, perovskite oxides can be rationally tailored and equipped with targeted physical and chemical properties e.g. redox behavior, oxygen mobility, and ion conductivity for enhanced catalysis. Recently, the development of highly efficient perovskite oxide catalysts has been extensively studied. This review article summarizes the recent developmentmore » of lanthanum-based perovskite oxides as advanced catalysts for both energy conversion applications and traditional heterogeneous reactions.« less

  8. Paradigms of Sulfotransferase Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting; Cook, Ian; Falany, Charles N.; Leyh, Thomas S.

    2014-01-01

    Human cytosolic sulfotransferases (SULTs) regulate the activities of thousands of signaling small molecules via transfer of the sulfuryl moiety (-SO3) from 3′-phosphoadenosine 5′-phosphosulfate (PAPS) to the hydroxyls and primary amines of acceptors. Sulfonation controls the affinities of ligands for their targets, and thereby regulates numerous receptors, which, in turn, regulate complex cellular responses. Despite their biological and medical relevance, basic SULT mechanism issues remain unresolved. To settle these issues, and to create an in-depth model of SULT catalysis, the complete kinetic mechanism of a representative member of the human SULT family, SULT2A1, was determined. The mechanism is composed of eight enzyme forms that interconvert via 22 rate constants, each of which was determined independently. The result is a complete quantitative description of the mechanism that accurately predicts complex enzymatic behavior. This is the first description of a SULT mechanism at this resolution, and it reveals numerous principles of SULT catalysis and resolves previously ambiguous issues. The structures and catalytic behaviors SULTs are highly conserved; hence, the mechanism presented here should prove paradigmatic for the family. PMID:25056952

  9. An overview of mechanisms of redox signaling

    PubMed Central

    Forman, Henry Jay; Ursini, Fulvio; Maiorino, Matilde

    2014-01-01

    A principal characteristic of redox signaling is that it involves an oxidation-reduction reaction or covalent adduct formation between the sensor signaling protein and second messenger. Non-redox signaling may involve alteration of the second messenger as in hydrolysis of GTP by G proteins, modification of the signaling protein as in farnesylation, or simple non-covalent binding of an agonist or second messenger. The chemistry of redox signaling is reviewed here. Specifically we have described how among the so-called reactive oxygen species, only hydroperoxides clearly fit the role of a second messenger. Consideration of reaction kinetics and cellular location strongly suggests that for hydroperoxides, particular protein cysteines are the targets and that the requirements for redox signaling is that these cysteines are in microenvironments in which the cysteine is ionized to the thiolate, and a proton can be donated to form a leaving group. The chemistry described here is the same as occurs in the cysteine and selenocysteine peroxidases that are generally considered the primary defense against oxidative stress. But, these same enzymes can also act as the sensors and transducer for signaling. Conditions that would allow specific signaling by peroxynitrite and superoxide are also defined. Signaling by other electrophiles, which includes lipid peroxidation products, quinones formed from polyphenols and other metabolites also involves reaction with specific protein thiolates. Again, kinetics and location are the primary determinants that provide specificity required for physiological signaling although enzymatic catalysis is not likely involved. PMID:24512843

  10. Decarboxylative Fluorination of Aliphatic Carboxylic Acids via Photoredox Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Ventre, Sandrine; Petronijevic, Filip R.; MacMillan, David W. C.

    2016-01-01

    The direct conversion of aliphatic carboxylic acids to the corresponding alkyl fluorides has been achieved via visible light-promoted photoredox catalysis. This operationally simple, redox-neutral fluorination method is amenable to a wide variety of carboxylic acids. Photon-induced oxidation of carboxylates leads to the formation of carboxyl radicals, which upon rapid CO2-extrusion and F• transfer from a fluorinating reagent yield the desired fluoroalkanes with high efficiency. Experimental evidence indicates that an oxidative quenching pathway is operable in this broadly applicable fluorination protocol. PMID:25881929

  11. Dienamine-Catalyzed Nitrone Formation via Redox Reaction.

    PubMed

    Fraboni, Americo J; Brenner-Moyer, Stacey E

    2016-05-01

    The first catalytic method to directly introduce nitrone functionality onto aldehyde substrates is described. This reaction proceeds by an unprecedented organocatalytic redox mechanism in which an enal is oxidized to the γ-nitrone via dienamine catalysis, thereby reducing an equivalent of nitrosobenzene. This reaction is a unique example of divergent reactivity of an enal, which represents a novel strategy for rapidly accessing small libraries of N,O-heterocycles. Alternatively, divergent reactivity can be suppressed simply by changing solvents. PMID:27070296

  12. Simulations of chemical catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Gregory K.

    This dissertation contains simulations of chemical catalysis in both biological and heterogeneous contexts. A mixture of classical, quantum, and hybrid techniques are applied to explore the energy profiles and compare possible chemical mechanisms both within the context of human and bacterial enzymes, as well as exploring surface reactions on a metal catalyst. A brief summary of each project follows. Project 1 - Bacterial Enzyme SpvC The newly discovered SpvC effector protein from Salmonella typhimurium interferes with the host immune response by dephosphorylating mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) with a beta-elimination mechanism. The dynamics of the enzyme substrate complex of the SpvC effector is investigated with a 3.2 ns molecular dynamics simulation, which reveals that the phosphorylated peptide substrate is tightly held in the active site by a hydrogen bond network and the lysine general base is positioned for the abstraction of the alpha hydrogen. The catalysis is further modeled with density functional theory (DFT) in a truncated active-site model at the B3LYP/6-31 G(d,p) level of theory. The truncated model suggested the reaction proceeds via a single transition state. After including the enzyme environment in ab initio QM/MM studies, it was found to proceed via an E1cB-like pathway, in which the carbanion intermediate is stabilized by an enzyme oxyanion hole provided by Lys104 and Tyr158 of SpvC. Project 2 - Human Enzyme CDK2 Phosphorylation reactions catalyzed by kinases and phosphatases play an indispensable role in cellular signaling, and their malfunctioning is implicated in many diseases. Ab initio quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical studies are reported for the phosphoryl transfer reaction catalyzed by a cyclin-dependent kinase, CDK2. Our results suggest that an active-site Asp residue, rather than ATP as previously proposed, serves as the general base to activate the Ser nucleophile. The corresponding transition state features a

  13. Spin-modified catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhary, R.; Manchanda, P.; Enders, A.; Balamurugan, B.; Sellmyer, D. J.; Skomski, R.; Kashyap, A.; Sykes, E. C. H.

    2015-05-07

    First-principle calculations are used to explore the use of magnetic degrees of freedom in catalysis. We use the Vienna Ab-Initio Simulation Package to investigate both L1{sub 0}-ordered FePt and CoPt bulk materials and perform supercell calculations for FePt nanoclusters containing 43 atoms. As the catalytic activity of transition-metal elements and alloys involves individual d levels, magnetic alloying strongly affects the catalytic performance, because it leads to shifts in the local densities of states and to additional peaks due to magnetic-moment formation. The peak shift persists in nanoparticles but is surface-site specific and therefore depends on cluster size. Our research indicates that small modifications in stoichiometry and cluster size are a useful tool in the search for new catalysts.

  14. Catalysis-dependent selenium incorporation and migration in the nitrogenase active site iron-molybdenum cofactor

    PubMed Central

    Spatzal, Thomas; Perez, Kathryn A; Howard, James B; Rees, Douglas C

    2015-01-01

    Dinitrogen reduction in the biological nitrogen cycle is catalyzed by nitrogenase, a two-component metalloenzyme. Understanding of the transformation of the inert resting state of the active site FeMo-cofactor into an activated state capable of reducing dinitrogen remains elusive. Here we report the catalysis dependent, site-selective incorporation of selenium into the FeMo-cofactor from selenocyanate as a newly identified substrate and inhibitor. The 1.60 Å resolution structure reveals selenium occupying the S2B site of FeMo-cofactor in the Azotobacter vinelandii MoFe-protein, a position that was recently identified as the CO-binding site. The Se2B-labeled enzyme retains substrate reduction activity and marks the starting point for a crystallographic pulse-chase experiment of the active site during turnover. Through a series of crystal structures obtained at resolutions of 1.32–1.66 Å, including the CO-inhibited form of Av1-Se2B, the exchangeability of all three belt-sulfur sites is demonstrated, providing direct insights into unforeseen rearrangements of the metal center during catalysis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11620.001 PMID:26673079

  15. A Survey Course in Catalysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skaates, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    Describes a 10-week survey course in catalysis for chemical engineering and chemistry students designed to show how modern chemistry and chemical engineering interact in the ongoing development of industrial catalysts. Includes course outline and instructional strategies. (Author/JN)

  16. Tearing down to build up: Metalloenzymes in the biosynthesis lincomycin, hormaomycin and the pyrrolo [1,4]benzodiazepines.

    PubMed

    Colabroy, Keri L

    2016-06-01

    The metabolic pathways for the production of lincomycin, hormaomycin and the antitumor pyrrolo [1,4] benzodiazepines share a vinyl substituted pyrroline carboxylic acid (3-vinyl-2,3-pyrroline-5-carboxylic acid, VPCA) as a common intermediate. Biosynthesis of this vinyl substituted pyrroline carboxylic acid intermediate requires a short, three-enzyme pathway containing two metalloenzymes: a heme-dependent l-tyrosine hydroxylase and a non-heme Fe(2+) dependent l-DOPA dioxygenase. The l-tyrosine hydroxylase is an unprecedented type of peroxidase that specifically monohydroxylates tyrosine, while the l-DOPA extradiol cleaving enzyme is a single-domain vicinal-oxygen-chelate (VOC) dioxygenase. The dioxygenase product subsequently undergoes an, as yet uncharacterized, C-C bond cleavage reaction. This mini-pathway demonstrates the use of metal-dependent chemistry typically associated with natural product degradation in order to build a compact, functionalized building block for larger, bioactive molecules. PMID:26963649

  17. A superfamily of metalloenzymes unifies phosphopentomutase and cofactor-independent phosphoglycerate mutase with alkaline phosphatases and sulfatases.

    PubMed Central

    Galperin, M. Y.; Bairoch, A.; Koonin, E. V.

    1998-01-01

    Sequence analysis of the probable archaeal phosphoglycerate mutase resulted in the identification of a superfamily of metalloenzymes with similar metal-binding sites and predicted conserved structural fold. This superfamily unites alkaline phosphatase, N-acetylgalactosamine-4-sulfatase, and cerebroside sulfatase, enzymes with known three-dimensional structures, with phosphopentomutase, 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate-independent phosphoglycerate mutase, phosphoglycerol transferase, phosphonate monoesterase, streptomycin-6-phosphate phosphatase, alkaline phosphodiesterase/nucleotide pyrophosphatase PC-1, and several closely related sulfatases. In addition to the metal-binding motifs, all these enzymes contain a set of conserved amino acid residues that are likely to be required for the enzymatic activity. Mutational changes in the vicinity of these residues in several sulfatases cause mucopolysaccharidosis (Hunter, Maroteaux-Lamy, Morquio, and Sanfilippo syndromes) and metachromatic leucodystrophy. PMID:10082381

  18. Enhanced Micellar Catalysis LDRD.

    SciTech Connect

    Betty, Rita G.; Tucker, Mark David; Taggart, Gretchen; Kinnan, Mark K.; Glen, Crystal Chanea; Rivera, Danielle; Sanchez, Andres; Alam, Todd Michael

    2012-12-01

    The primary goals of the Enhanced Micellar Catalysis project were to gain an understanding of the micellar environment of DF-200, or similar liquid CBW surfactant-based decontaminants, as well as characterize the aerosolized DF-200 droplet distribution and droplet chemistry under baseline ITW rotary atomization conditions. Micellar characterization of limited surfactant solutions was performed externally through the collection and measurement of Small Angle X-Ray Scattering (SAXS) images and Cryo-Transmission Electron Microscopy (cryo-TEM) images. Micellar characterization was performed externally at the University of Minnesota's Characterization Facility Center, and at the Argonne National Laboratory Advanced Photon Source facility. A micellar diffusion study was conducted internally at Sandia to measure diffusion constants of surfactants over a concentration range, to estimate the effective micelle diameter, to determine the impact of individual components to the micellar environment in solution, and the impact of combined components to surfactant phase behavior. Aerosolized DF-200 sprays were characterized for particle size and distribution and limited chemical composition. Evaporation rates of aerosolized DF-200 sprays were estimated under a set of baseline ITW nozzle test system parameters.

  19. Redox Potential of Peroxidases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, Marcela

    Redox potential of peroxidases greatly influences the range of oxidizable substrates: in principle, peroxidases may only catalyze the oxidation of substrates with lower redox potential. There is substantial information on the factors that modulate the redox potential of heme proteins. Both theoretical and experimental evidence highlight the most significant contributions arising from the interaction of heme iron with the axial ligands, as well as the electrostatic interactions surrounding the heme group. However, for different proteins, the factors contribute to different extents. Understanding the electrochemistry of heme peroxidases is fundamental in order to design enhanced biocatalysts. In this chapter, current knowledge of the forces influencing redox potential of heme peroxidases is reviewed.

  20. A Superoxide Dismutase Maquette That Reproduces the Spectroscopic and Functional Properties of the Metalloenzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Shearer,J.; Long, L.

    2006-01-01

    Described herein is a nickel superoxide dismutase (NiSOD) maquette ([Ni(SOD{sup M1})]) based on the first 12 residues from the N-terminal sequence of Streptomyces coelicolor NiSOD. The apopeptide (SOD{sup M1}) was prepared by standard solid-phase Fmoc peptide synthesis. SOD{sup M1} will readily coordinate Ni{sup II} in a 1:1 ratio in slightly basic aqueous sodium phosphate buffer (0.1 M; pH = 7.2) forming a lightly colored beige/pink solution. Unlike NiSOD, which is isolated as a 1:1 mixture of oxidized (Ni{sup III}) and reduced (Ni{sup II}) forms, [Ni(SODM1)] can only be isolated in the NiII oxidation state. The UV/vis, X-ray absorption, and CD spectra of [Ni{sup II}(SOD{sup M1})] correspond well with those reported for the reduced form of NiSOD. Despite the fact that [Ni{sup III}(SOD{sup M1})] is not isolable, [Ni(SOD{sup M1})] has an appropriate redox potential to act as an SOD (E{sub 1/2} = 0.70(2) V vs. Ag/AgCl) and in fact will catalytically disproportionate >40 000 equiv of KO{sub 2}.

  1. Conduction and Reactivity in Heterogeneous-Molecular Catalysis: New Insights in Water Oxidation Catalysis by Phosphate Cobalt Oxide Films.

    PubMed

    Costentin, Cyrille; Porter, Thomas R; Savéant, Jean-Michel

    2016-05-01

    Cyclic voltammetry of phosphate cobalt oxide (CoPi) films catalyzing O2-evolution from water oxidation as a function of scan rate, phosphate concentration and film thickness allowed for new insights into the coupling between charge transport and catalysis. At pH = 7 and low buffer concentrations, the film is insulating below 0.8 (V vs SHE) but becomes conductive above 0.9 (V vs SHE). Between 1.0 to 1.3 (V vs SHE), the mesoporous structure of the film gives rise to a large thickness-dependent capacitance. At higher buffer concentrations, two reversible proton-coupled redox couples appear over the capacitive response with 0.94 and 1.19 (V vs SHE) pH = 7 standard potentials. The latter is, at most, very weakly catalytic and not responsible for the large catalytic current observed at higher potentials. CV-response analysis showed that the amount of redox-active cobalt-species in the film is small, less than 10% of total. The catalytic process involves a further proton-coupled-electron-transfer and is so fast that it is controlled by diffusion of phosphate, the catalyst cofactor. CV-analysis with newly derived relationships led to a combination of the catalyst standard potential with the catalytic rate constant and a lower-limit estimation of these parameters. The large currents resulting from the fast catalytic reaction result in significant potential losses related to charge transport through the film. CoPi films appear to combine molecular catalysis with semiconductor-type charge transport. This mode of heterogeneous molecular catalysis is likely to occur in many other catalytic films. PMID:26981886

  2. Photoredox Catalysis in Organic Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Megan H; Twilton, Jack; MacMillan, David W C

    2016-08-19

    In recent years, photoredox catalysis has come to the forefront in organic chemistry as a powerful strategy for the activation of small molecules. In a general sense, these approaches rely on the ability of metal complexes and organic dyes to convert visible light into chemical energy by engaging in single-electron transfer with organic substrates, thereby generating reactive intermediates. In this Perspective, we highlight the unique ability of photoredox catalysis to expedite the development of completely new reaction mechanisms, with particular emphasis placed on multicatalytic strategies that enable the construction of challenging carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom bonds. PMID:27477076

  3. Photoredox Catalysis in Organic Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, photoredox catalysis has come to the forefront in organic chemistry as a powerful strategy for the activation of small molecules. In a general sense, these approaches rely on the ability of metal complexes and organic dyes to convert visible light into chemical energy by engaging in single-electron transfer with organic substrates, thereby generating reactive intermediates. In this Perspective, we highlight the unique ability of photoredox catalysis to expedite the development of completely new reaction mechanisms, with particular emphasis placed on multicatalytic strategies that enable the construction of challenging carbon–carbon and carbon–heteroatom bonds. PMID:27477076

  4. Recent Advances in Nickel Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Tasker, Sarah Z.; Standley, Eric A.; Jamison, Timothy F.

    2015-01-01

    Preface The field of nickel catalysis has made tremendous advances in the past decade. There are several key properties of nickel that have allowed for a broad range of innovative reaction development, such as facile oxidative addition and ready access to multiple oxidation states. In recent years, these properties have been increasingly understood and leveraged to perform transformations long considered exceptionally challenging. Herein, we discuss some of the most recent and significant developments in homogeneous nickel catalysis with an emphasis on both synthetic outcome and mechanism. PMID:24828188

  5. EMSL and Institute for Integrated Catalysis (IIC) Catalysis Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Charles T.; Datye, Abhaya K.; Henkelman, Graeme A.; Lobo, Raul F.; Schneider, William F.; Spicer, Leonard D.; Tysoe, Wilfred T.; Vohs, John M.; Baer, Donald R.; Hoyt, David W.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Mueller, Karl T.; Wang, Chong M.; Washton, Nancy M.; Lyubinetsky, Igor; Teller, Raymond G.; Andersen, Amity; Govind, Niranjan; Kowalski, Karol; Kabius, Bernd C.; Wang, Hongfei; Campbell, Allison A.; Shelton, William A.; Bylaska, Eric J.; Peden, Charles HF; Wang, Yong; King, David L.; Henderson, Michael A.; Rousseau, Roger J.; Szanyi, Janos; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Mei, Donghai; Garrett, Bruce C.; Ray, Douglas; Futrell, Jean H.; Laskin, Julia; DuBois, Daniel L.; Kuprat, Laura R.; Plata, Charity

    2011-05-24

    Within the context of significantly accelerating scientific progress in research areas that address important societal problems, a workshop was held in November 2010 at EMSL to identify specific and topically important areas of research and capability needs in catalysis-related science.

  6. Methods development for diffraction and spectroscopy studies of metalloenzymes at X-ray free-electron lasers

    PubMed Central

    Kern, Jan; Hattne, Johan; Tran, Rosalie; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Laksmono, Hartawan; Gul, Sheraz; Sierra, Raymond G.; Rehanek, Jens; Erko, Alexei; Mitzner, Rolf; Wernet, Phillip; Bergmann, Uwe; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Yachandra, Vittal; Yano, Junko

    2014-01-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) open up new possibilities for X-ray crystallographic and spectroscopic studies of radiation-sensitive biological samples under close to physiological conditions. To facilitate these new X-ray sources, tailored experimental methods and data-processing protocols have to be developed. The highly radiation-sensitive photosystem II (PSII) protein complex is a prime target for XFEL experiments aiming to study the mechanism of light-induced water oxidation taking place at a Mn cluster in this complex. We developed a set of tools for the study of PSII at XFELs, including a new liquid jet based on electrofocusing, an energy dispersive von Hamos X-ray emission spectrometer for the hard X-ray range and a high-throughput soft X-ray spectrometer based on a reflection zone plate. While our immediate focus is on PSII, the methods we describe here are applicable to a wide range of metalloenzymes. These experimental developments were complemented by a new software suite, cctbx.xfel. This software suite allows for near-real-time monitoring of the experimental parameters and detector signals and the detailed analysis of the diffraction and spectroscopy data collected by us at the Linac Coherent Light Source, taking into account the specific characteristics of data measured at an XFEL. PMID:24914169

  7. Binding Energy and Enzymatic Catalysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, David E.; Raines, Ronald T.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed is the fundamental role that the favorable free energy of binding of the rate-determining transition state plays in catalysis. The principle that all of the catalytic factors discussed are realized by the use of this binding energy is reviewed. (CW)

  8. Cyclopalladated complexes in enantioselective catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunina, Valeria V.; Gorunova, Olga N.; Zykov, P. A.; Kochetkov, Konstantin A.

    2011-01-01

    The results of the use of optically active palladacycles in enantioselective catalysis of [3,3]-sigmatropic rearrangements, aldol condensation, the Michael reaction and cross-coupling are analyzed. Reactions with allylic substrates or reagents and some other transformations are considered.

  9. Beyond relationships between homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, David A.; Katz, Alexander; Arslan, Ilke; Gates, Bruce C.

    2014-08-13

    Scientists who regard catalysis as a coherent field have been striving for decades to articulate the fundamental unifying principles. But because these principles seem to be broader than chemistry, chemical engineering, and materials science combined, catalytic scientists commonly interact within the sub-domains of homogeneous, heterogeneous, and bio-catalysis, and increasingly within even narrower domains such as organocatalysis, phase-transfer catalysis, acid-base catalysis, zeolite catalysis, etc. Attempts to unify catalysis have motivated researchers to find relationships between homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis and to mimic enzymes. These themes have inspired vibrant international meetings and workshops, and we have benefited from the idea exchanges and have some thoughts about a path forward.

  10. Redox controls UPR to control redox.

    PubMed

    Eletto, Davide; Chevet, Eric; Argon, Yair; Appenzeller-Herzog, Christian

    2014-09-01

    In many physiological contexts, intracellular reduction-oxidation (redox) conditions and the unfolded protein response (UPR) are important for the control of cell life and death decisions. UPR is triggered by the disruption of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis, also known as ER stress. Depending on the duration and severity of the disruption, this leads to cell adaptation or demise. In this Commentary, we review reductive and oxidative activation mechanisms of the UPR, which include direct interactions of dedicated protein disulfide isomerases with ER stress sensors, protein S-nitrosylation and ER Ca(2+) efflux that is promoted by reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, we discuss how cellular oxidant and antioxidant capacities are extensively remodeled downstream of UPR signals. Aside from activation of NADPH oxidases, mitogen-activated protein kinases and transcriptional antioxidant responses, such remodeling prominently relies on ER-mitochondrial crosstalk. Specific redox cues therefore operate both as triggers and effectors of ER stress, thus enabling amplification loops. We propose that redox-based amplification loops critically contribute to the switch from adaptive to fatal UPR. PMID:25107370

  11. Redox Species of Redox Flow Batteries: A Review.

    PubMed

    Pan, Feng; Wang, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Due to the capricious nature of renewable energy resources, such as wind and solar, large-scale energy storage devices are increasingly required to make the best use of the renewable power. The redox flow battery is considered suitable for large-scale applications due to its modular design, good scalability and flexible operation. The biggest challenge of the redox flow battery is the low energy density. The redox active species is the most important component in redox flow batteries, and the redox potential and solubility of redox species dictate the system energy density. This review is focused on the recent development of redox species. Different categories of redox species, including simple inorganic ions, metal complexes, metal-free organic compounds, polysulfide/sulfur and lithium storage active materials, are reviewed. The future development of redox species towards higher energy density is also suggested. PMID:26593894

  12. A designed redox-controlled caspase

    PubMed Central

    Witkowski, Witold A; Hardy, Jeanne A

    2011-01-01

    Caspases are a powerful class of cysteine proteases. Introduction of activated caspases in healthy or cancerous cells results in induction of apoptotic cell death. In this study, we have designed and characterized a version of caspase-7 that can be inactivated under oxidizing extracellular conditions and then reactivated under reducing intracellular conditions. This version of caspase-7 is allosterically inactivated when two of the substrate-binding loops are locked together via an engineered disulfide. When this disulfide is reduced, the protein regains its full function. The inactive loop-locked version of caspase-7 can be readily observed by immunoblotting and mass spectrometry. The reduced and reactivated form of the enzyme observed crystallographically is the first caspase-7 structure in which the substrate-binding groove is properly ordered even in the absence of an active-site ligand. In the reactivated structure, the catalytic-dyad cysteine–histidine are positioned 3.5 Å apart in an orientation that is capable of supporting catalysis. This redox-controlled version of caspase-7 is particularly well suited for targeted cell death in concert with redox-triggered delivery vehicles. PMID:21674661

  13. A designed redox-controlled caspase

    SciTech Connect

    Witkowski, Witold A.; Hardy, Jeanne A.

    2011-09-15

    Caspases are a powerful class of cysteine proteases. Introduction of activated caspases in healthy or cancerous cells results in induction of apoptotic cell death. In this study, we have designed and characterized a version of caspase-7 that can be inactivated under oxidizing extracellular conditions and then reactivated under reducing intracellular conditions. This version of caspase-7 is allosterically inactivated when two of the substrate-binding loops are locked together via an engineered disulfide. When this disulfide is reduced, the protein regains its full function. The inactive loop-locked version of caspase-7 can be readily observed by immunoblotting and mass spectrometry. The reduced and reactivated form of the enzyme observed crystallographically is the first caspase-7 structure in which the substrate-binding groove is properly ordered even in the absence of an active-site ligand. In the reactivated structure, the catalytic-dyad cysteine-histidine are positioned 3.5 {angstrom} apart in an orientation that is capable of supporting catalysis. This redox-controlled version of caspase-7 is particularly well suited for targeted cell death in concert with redox-triggered delivery vehicles.

  14. Acridinium-Based Photocatalysts: A Sustainable Option in Photoredox Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Joshi-Pangu, Amruta; Lévesque, François; Roth, Hudson G; Oliver, Steven F; Campeau, Louis-Charles; Nicewicz, David; DiRocco, Daniel A

    2016-08-19

    The emergence of visible light photoredox catalysis has enabled the productive use of lower energy radiation, leading to highly selective reaction platforms. Polypyridyl complexes of iridium and ruthenium have served as popular photocatalysts in recent years due to their long excited state lifetimes and useful redox windows, leading to the development of diverse photoredox-catalyzed transformations. The low abundances of Ir and Ru in the earth's crust and, hence, cost make these catalysts nonsustainable and have limited their application in industrial-scale manufacturing. Herein, we report a series of novel acridinium salts as alternatives to iridium photoredox catalysts and show their comparability to the ubiquitous [Ir(dF-CF3-ppy)2(dtbpy)](PF6). PMID:27454776

  15. Asymmetric Ion-Pairing Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Brak, Katrien

    2014-01-01

    Charged intermediates and reagents are ubiquitous in organic transformations. The interaction of these ionic species with chiral neutral, anionic, or cationic small molecules has emerged as a powerful strategy for catalytic, enantioselective synthesis. This review describes developments in the burgeoning field of asymmetric ion-pairing catalysis with an emphasis on the insights that have been gleaned into the structural and mechanistic features that contribute to high asymmetric induction. PMID:23192886

  16. Reaction Selectivity in Heterogeneous Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Kliewer, Christopher J.

    2009-02-02

    The understanding of selectivity in heterogeneous catalysis is of paramount importance to our society today. In this review we outline the current state of the art in research on selectivity in heterogeneous catalysis. Current in-situ surface science techniques have revealed several important features of catalytic selectivity. Sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy has shown us the importance of understanding the reaction intermediates and mechanism of a heterogeneous reaction, and can readily yield information as to the effect of temperature, pressure, catalyst geometry, surface promoters, and catalyst composition on the reaction mechanism. DFT calculations are quickly approaching the ability to assist in the interpretation of observed surface spectra, thereby making surface spectroscopy an even more powerful tool. HP-STM has revealed three vitally important parameters in heterogeneous selectivity: adsorbate mobility, catalyst mobility, and selective site-blocking. The development of size controlled nanoparticles from 0.8 to 10 nm, of controlled shape, and of controlled bimetallic composition has revealed several important variables for catalytic selectivity. Lastly, DFT calculations may be paving the way to guiding the composition choice for multi-metallic heterogeneous catalysis for the intelligent design of catalysts incorporating the many factors of selectivity we have learned.

  17. Chiral cyclopentadienylruthenium sulfoxide catalysts for asymmetric redox bicycloisomerization

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Michael C; Rao, Meera

    2016-01-01

    Summary A full account of our efforts toward an asymmetric redox bicycloisomerization reaction is presented in this article. Cyclopentadienylruthenium (CpRu) complexes containing tethered chiral sulfoxides were synthesized via an oxidative [3 + 2] cycloaddition reaction between an alkyne and an allylruthenium complex. Sulfoxide complex 1 containing a p-anisole moiety on its sulfoxide proved to be the most efficient and selective catalyst for the asymmetric redox bicycloisomerization of 1,6- and 1,7-enynes. This complex was used to synthesize a broad array of [3.1.0] and [4.1.0] bicycles. Sulfonamide- and phosphoramidate-containing products could be deprotected under reducing conditions. Catalysis performed with enantiomerically enriched propargyl alcohols revealed a matched/mismatched effect that was strongly dependent on the nature of the solvent. PMID:27559366

  18. Chiral cyclopentadienylruthenium sulfoxide catalysts for asymmetric redox bicycloisomerization.

    PubMed

    Trost, Barry M; Ryan, Michael C; Rao, Meera

    2016-01-01

    A full account of our efforts toward an asymmetric redox bicycloisomerization reaction is presented in this article. Cyclopentadienylruthenium (CpRu) complexes containing tethered chiral sulfoxides were synthesized via an oxidative [3 + 2] cycloaddition reaction between an alkyne and an allylruthenium complex. Sulfoxide complex 1 containing a p-anisole moiety on its sulfoxide proved to be the most efficient and selective catalyst for the asymmetric redox bicycloisomerization of 1,6- and 1,7-enynes. This complex was used to synthesize a broad array of [3.1.0] and [4.1.0] bicycles. Sulfonamide- and phosphoramidate-containing products could be deprotected under reducing conditions. Catalysis performed with enantiomerically enriched propargyl alcohols revealed a matched/mismatched effect that was strongly dependent on the nature of the solvent. PMID:27559366

  19. Cosmic strings and baryon decay catalysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Ruth; Perkins, W. B.; Davis, A.-C.; Brandenberger, R. H.

    1989-01-01

    Cosmic strings, like monopoles, can catalyze proton decay. For integer charged fermions, the cross section for catalysis is not amplified, unlike in the case of monopoles. The catalysis processes are reviewed both in the free quark and skyrmion pictures and the implications for baryogenesis are discussed. A computation of the cross section for monopole catalyzed skyrmion decay is presented using classical physics. Also discussed are some effects which can screen catalysis processes.

  20. Redox control of teratogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Jason M; Harris, Craig

    2013-01-01

    A number of human teratogens elicit their deleterious effects through mechanisms involving the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress. However, classic definitions of oxidative stress do not fully coincide with basic fundamental principles of teratology. Newer definitions of oxidative stress focus on the targeted redox modification of cysteine/thiol functional groups found in the regulatory domains of critical signaling pathway proteins, suggesting that the targeted disruption of signaling through specific redox couples may account for the specificity of teratogen-induced malformations which previously could not be rationalized. Here, we review examples of teratogens that induce ROS and oxidative injury, describe oxidative stress-related teratogenic mechanisms, and provide rationale for developmental periods of sensitivity and species susceptibility. Understanding how chemicals disrupt redox status, induce oxidative stress leading to dysmorphogenesis becomes important to identify potential teratogens and develop therapeutic interventions for attenuation of harmful chemical effects in utero following exposure. PMID:23089153

  1. Relation between Enzymic Catalysis and Energy Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, Mitchell; Blondin, George A.; Green, David E.

    1980-10-01

    The principles that underlie enzyme catalysis also apply to energy coupling processes. A comparison is made between a kinase system that mediates the phosphorylation of glucose by ATP (hexokinase), as the prototype for enzymic catalysis, and the mitochondrial electron-transfer complexes, as the prototypes for energy coupling systems. Induced polarization of chemical bonds and charge separation and elimination are common component events of both enzyme catalysis and energy coupling. Thus, definite limits can be imposed on models of energy coupling; they must comply with the basic principles of enzymic catalysis.

  2. Electronegativity and redox reactions.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Quintana, Ramón Alain; Martínez González, Marco; Ayers, Paul W

    2016-08-10

    Using the maximum hardness principle, we show that the oxidation potential of a molecule increases as its electronegativity increases and also increases as its electronegativity in its oxidized state increases. This insight can be used to construct a linear free energy relation for the oxidation potential, which we train on a set of 31 organic redox couples and test on a set of 10 different redox reactions. Better results are obtained when the electronegativity of the oxidized/reduced reagents are adjusted to account for the reagents' interaction with their chemical environment. PMID:27451962

  3. Tuning the Redox Properties of a Nonheme Iron(III)-Peroxo Complex Binding Redox-Inactive Zinc Ions by Water Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Yong-Min; Bang, Suhee; Yoon, Heejung; Bae, Seong Hee; Hong, Seungwoo; Cho, Kyung-Bin; Sarangi, Ritimukta; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Nam, Wonwoo

    2015-06-19

    Here we report redox-inactive metal ions play important roles in tuning chemical properties of metal–oxygen intermediates. We describe the effect of water molecules on the redox properties of a nonheme iron(III)–peroxo complex binding redox-inactive metal ions. The coordination of two water molecules to a Zn2+ ion in (TMC)FeIII-(O2)-Zn(CF3SO3)2 (1-Zn2+) decreases the Lewis acidity of the Zn2+ ion, resulting in the decrease of the one-electron oxidation and reduction potentials of 1-Zn2+. This further changes the reactivities of 1-Zn2+ in oxidation and reduction reactions; no reaction occurred upon addition of an oxidant (e.g., cerium(IV) ammonium nitrate (CAN)) to 1-Zn2+, whereas 1-Zn2+ coordinating two water molecules, (TMC)FeIII-(O2)-Zn(CF3SO3)2-(OH2)2 [1-Zn2+-(OH2)2], releases the O2 unit in the oxidation reaction. In the reduction reactions, 1-Zn2+ was converted to its corresponding iron(IV)–oxo species upon addition of a reductant (e.g., a ferrocene derivative), whereas such a reaction occurred at a much slower rate in the case of 1-Zn2+-(OH2)2. Finally, the present results provide the first biomimetic example showing that water molecules at the active sites of metalloenzymes may participate in tuning the redox properties of metal–oxygen intermediates.

  4. Tuning the Redox Properties of a Nonheme Iron(III)-Peroxo Complex Binding Redox-Inactive Zinc Ions by Water Molecules

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lee, Yong-Min; Bang, Suhee; Yoon, Heejung; Bae, Seong Hee; Hong, Seungwoo; Cho, Kyung-Bin; Sarangi, Ritimukta; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Nam, Wonwoo

    2015-06-19

    Here we report redox-inactive metal ions play important roles in tuning chemical properties of metal–oxygen intermediates. We describe the effect of water molecules on the redox properties of a nonheme iron(III)–peroxo complex binding redox-inactive metal ions. The coordination of two water molecules to a Zn2+ ion in (TMC)FeIII-(O2)-Zn(CF3SO3)2 (1-Zn2+) decreases the Lewis acidity of the Zn2+ ion, resulting in the decrease of the one-electron oxidation and reduction potentials of 1-Zn2+. This further changes the reactivities of 1-Zn2+ in oxidation and reduction reactions; no reaction occurred upon addition of an oxidant (e.g., cerium(IV) ammonium nitrate (CAN)) to 1-Zn2+, whereas 1-Zn2+ coordinatingmore » two water molecules, (TMC)FeIII-(O2)-Zn(CF3SO3)2-(OH2)2 [1-Zn2+-(OH2)2], releases the O2 unit in the oxidation reaction. In the reduction reactions, 1-Zn2+ was converted to its corresponding iron(IV)–oxo species upon addition of a reductant (e.g., a ferrocene derivative), whereas such a reaction occurred at a much slower rate in the case of 1-Zn2+-(OH2)2. Finally, the present results provide the first biomimetic example showing that water molecules at the active sites of metalloenzymes may participate in tuning the redox properties of metal–oxygen intermediates.« less

  5. Tuning the Redox Properties of a Nonheme Iron(III)–Peroxo Complex Binding Redox-Inactive Zinc Ions by Water Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong-Min; Bang, Suhee; Yoon, Heejung; Bae, Seong Hee; Hong, Seungwoo; Cho, Kyung-Bin; Sarangi, Ritimukta; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Nam, Wonwoo

    2015-01-01

    Redox-inactive metal ions play important roles in tuning chemical properties of metal–oxygen intermediates. Herein we report the effect of water molecules on the redox properties of a nonheme iron(III)–peroxo complex binding redox-inactive metal ions. The coordination of two water molecules to a Zn2+ ion in (TMC)FeIII-(O2)-Zn(CF3SO3)2 (1-Zn2+) decreases the Lewis acidity of the Zn2+ ion, resulting in the decrease of the one-electron oxidation and reduction potentials of 1-Zn2+. This further changes the reactivities of 1-Zn2+ in oxidation and reduction reactions; no reaction occurred upon addition of an oxidant (e.g., cerium(IV) ammonium nitrate (CAN)) to 1-Zn2+, whereas 1-Zn2+ coordinating two water molecules, (TMC)FeIII-(O2)-Zn(CF3SO3)2-(OH2)2 [1-Zn2+-(OH2)2], releases the O2 unit in the oxidation reaction. In the reduction reactions, 1-Zn2+ was converted to its corresponding iron(IV)–oxo species upon addition of a reductant (e.g., a ferrocene derivative), whereas such a reaction occurred at a much slower rate in the case of 1-Zn2+-(OH2)2. The present results provide the first biomimetic example showing that water molecules at the active sites of metalloenzymes may participate in tuning the redox properties of metal–oxygen intermediates. PMID:26096281

  6. Visible-Light-Induced Photoredox Catalysis of Dye-Sensitized Titanium Dioxide: Selective Aerobic Oxidation of Organic Sulfides.

    PubMed

    Lang, Xianjun; Zhao, Jincai; Chen, Xiaodong

    2016-04-01

    TiO2 photoredox catalysis has recently attracted much interest for use in performing challenging organic transformations under mild reaction conditions. However, the reaction scheme is hampered by the fact that TiO2 can only be excited by UV light of wavelengths λ shorter than 385 nm. One promising strategy to overcome this issue is to anchor an organic, preferably metal-free dye onto the surface of TiO2 . Importantly, we observed that the introduction of a catalytic amount of the redox mediator TEMPO [(2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-yl)oxyl] ensured the stability of the anchored dye, alizarin red S, thereby resulting in the selective oxidation of organic sulfides with O2 . This result affirms the essential role of the redox mediator in enabling the organic transformations by visible-light photoredox catalysis. PMID:26969891

  7. Redox Regulation of Mitochondrial Function

    PubMed Central

    Handy, Diane E.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Redox-dependent processes influence most cellular functions, such as differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. Mitochondria are at the center of these processes, as mitochondria both generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) that drive redox-sensitive events and respond to ROS-mediated changes in the cellular redox state. In this review, we examine the regulation of cellular ROS, their modes of production and removal, and the redox-sensitive targets that are modified by their flux. In particular, we focus on the actions of redox-sensitive targets that alter mitochondrial function and the role of these redox modifications on metabolism, mitochondrial biogenesis, receptor-mediated signaling, and apoptotic pathways. We also consider the role of mitochondria in modulating these pathways, and discuss how redox-dependent events may contribute to pathobiology by altering mitochondrial function. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 16, 1323–1367. PMID:22146081

  8. Redox Flow Batteries, a Review

    SciTech Connect

    Knoxville, U. Tennessee; U. Texas Austin; U, McGill; Weber, Adam Z.; Mench, Matthew M.; Meyers, Jeremy P.; Ross, Philip N.; Gostick, Jeffrey T.; Liu, Qinghua

    2011-07-15

    Redox flow batteries are enjoying a renaissance due to their ability to store large amounts of electrical energy relatively cheaply and efficiently. In this review, we examine the components of redox flow batteries with a focus on understanding the underlying physical processes. The various transport and kinetic phenomena are discussed along with the most common redox couples.

  9. DOE Laboratory Catalysis Research Symposium - Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Dunham, T.

    1999-02-01

    The conference consisted of two sessions with the following subtopics: (1) Heterogeneous Session: Novel Catalytic Materials; Photocatalysis; Novel Processing Conditions; Metals and Sulfides; Nuclear Magnetic Resonance; Metal Oxides and Partial Oxidation; Electrocatalysis; and Automotive Catalysis. (2) Homogeneous Catalysis: H-Transfer and Alkane Functionalization; Biocatalysis; Oxidation and Photocatalysis; and Novel Medical, Methods, and Catalyzed Reactions.

  10. Electrostatic catalysis of a Diels-Alder reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragonès, Albert C.; Haworth, Naomi L.; Darwish, Nadim; Ciampi, Simone; Bloomfield, Nathaniel J.; Wallace, Gordon G.; Diez-Perez, Ismael; Coote, Michelle L.

    2016-03-01

    It is often thought that the ability to control reaction rates with an applied electrical potential gradient is unique to redox systems. However, recent theoretical studies suggest that oriented electric fields could affect the outcomes of a range of chemical reactions, regardless of whether a redox system is involved. This possibility arises because many formally covalent species can be stabilized via minor charge-separated resonance contributors. When an applied electric field is aligned in such a way as to electrostatically stabilize one of these minor forms, the degree of resonance increases, resulting in the overall stabilization of the molecule or transition state. This means that it should be possible to manipulate the kinetics and thermodynamics of non-redox processes using an external electric field, as long as the orientation of the approaching reactants with respect to the field stimulus can be controlled. Here, we provide experimental evidence that the formation of carbon-carbon bonds is accelerated by an electric field. We have designed a surface model system to probe the Diels-Alder reaction, and coupled it with a scanning tunnelling microscopy break-junction approach. This technique, performed at the single-molecule level, is perfectly suited to deliver an electric-field stimulus across approaching reactants. We find a fivefold increase in the frequency of formation of single-molecule junctions, resulting from the reaction that occurs when the electric field is present and aligned so as to favour electron flow from the dienophile to the diene. Our results are qualitatively consistent with those predicted by quantum-chemical calculations in a theoretical model of this system, and herald a new approach to chemical catalysis.

  11. Precursor of ether phospholipids is synthesized by a flavoenzyme through covalent catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Nenci, Simone; Piano, Valentina; Rosati, Sara; Aliverti, Alessandro; Pandini, Vittorio; Fraaije, Marco W.; Heck, Albert J. R.; Edmondson, Dale E.; Mattevi, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    The precursor of the essential ether phospholipids is synthesized by a peroxisomal enzyme that uses a flavin cofactor to catalyze a reaction that does not alter the redox state of the substrates. The enzyme crystal structure reveals a V-shaped active site with a narrow constriction in front of the prosthetic group. Mutations causing inborn ether phospholipid deficiency, a very severe genetic disease, target residues that are part of the catalytic center. Biochemical analysis using substrate and flavin analogs, absorbance spectroscopy, mutagenesis, and mass spectrometry provide compelling evidence supporting an unusual mechanism of covalent catalysis. The flavin functions as a chemical trap that promotes exchange of an acyl with an alkyl group, generating the characteristic ether bond. Structural comparisons show that the covalent versus noncovalent mechanistic distinction in flavoenzyme catalysis and evolution relies on subtle factors rather than on gross modifications of the cofactor environment. PMID:23112191

  12. "Nanocrystal bilayer for tandem catalysis"

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Yusuke; Tsung, Chia Kuang; Huang, Wenyu; Huo, Ziyang; E.Habas, Susan E; Soejima, Tetsuro; Aliaga, Cesar E; Samorjai, Gabor A; Yang, Peidong

    2011-01-24

    Supported catalysts are widely used in industry and can be optimized by tuning the composition and interface of the metal nanoparticles and oxide supports. Rational design of metal-metal oxide interfaces in nanostructured catalysts is critical to achieve better reaction activities and selectivities. We introduce here a new class of nanocrystal tandem catalysts that have multiple metal-metal oxide interfaces for the catalysis of sequential reactions. We utilized a nanocrystal bilayer structure formed by assembling platinum and cerium oxide nanocube monolayers of less than 10 nm on a silica substrate. The two distinct metal-metal oxide interfaces, CeO2-Pt and Pt-SiO2, can be used to catalyse two distinct sequential reactions. The CeO2-Pt interface catalysed methanol decomposition to produce CO and H2, which were subsequently used for ethylene hydroformylation catalysed by the nearby Pt-SiO2 interface. Consequently, propanal was produced selectively from methanol and ethylene on the nanocrystal bilayer tandem catalyst. This new concept of nanocrystal tandem catalysis represents a powerful approach towards designing high-performance, multifunctional nanostructured catalysts

  13. Colorimetric Strategy for Highly Sensitive and Selective Simultaneous Detection of Histidine and Cysteine Based on G-Quadruplex-Cu(II) Metalloenzyme.

    PubMed

    Wu, Changtong; Fan, Daoqing; Zhou, Chunyang; Liu, Yaqing; Wang, Erkang

    2016-03-01

    In this present work, we proposed a colorimetric strategy for simultaneous detection of histidine and cysteine based on G-quadruplex-Cu(II) metalloenzyme for the first time. Because of the adding of histidine or cysteine, the formation of G-quadruplex-Cu(II) metalloenzyme will be disturbed, thus the catalytic activity to TMB-H2O2 reaction is inversely proportional to the concentration of histidine or cysteine. With this strategy, the limit of detection in experimental measurement for histidine and cysteine is 10 nM and 5 nM, respectively, which are both lower than previous colorimetric arrays. With the help of NEM, cysteine is alkylated and the reaction between Cu(2+) is inhibited, so the selectivity can also be guaranteed. The cost is quite low since the developed array is label free and enzyme free by using low-cost DNA and Cu(2+). More importantly, the colorimetric detection operation is very simple without any further modification process. PMID:26832965

  14. Redox theory of aging

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Dean P.

    2015-01-01

    Metazoan genomes encode exposure memory systems to enhance survival and reproductive potential by providing mechanisms for an individual to adjust during lifespan to environmental resources and challenges. These systems are inherently redox networks, arising during evolution of complex systems with O2 as a major determinant of bioenergetics, metabolic and structural organization, defense, and reproduction. The network structure decreases flexibility from conception onward due to differentiation and cumulative responses to environment (exposome). The redox theory of aging is that aging is a decline in plasticity of genome–exposome interaction that occurs as a consequence of execution of differentiation and exposure memory systems. This includes compromised mitochondrial and bioenergetic flexibility, impaired food utilization and metabolic homeostasis, decreased barrier and defense capabilities and loss of reproductive fidelity and fecundity. This theory accounts for hallmarks of aging, including failure to maintain oxidative or xenobiotic defenses, mitochondrial integrity, proteostasis, barrier structures, DNA repair, telomeres, immune function, metabolic regulation and regenerative capacity. PMID:25863726

  15. Ediacaran Redox Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, S. K.; Jiang, G.; Planavsky, N. J.; Kendall, B.; Owens, J. D.; Anbar, A. D.; Lyons, T. W.

    2013-12-01

    Evidence for pervasive oxic conditions, and likely even deep ocean oxygenation has been documented at three intervals in the lower (ca. 632 Ma), middle (ca. 580 Ma) and upper (ca. 551 Ma) Ediacaran. The Doushantuo Formation in South China hosts large enrichments of redox-sensitive trace element (e.g., molybdenum, vanadium and uranium) in anoxic shales, which are indicative of a globally oxic ocean-atmosphere system. However, ocean redox conditions between these periods continue to be a topic of debate and remain elusive. We have found evidence for widespread anoxic conditions through much of the Ediacaran in the deep-water Wuhe section in South China. During most of the Ediacaran-early Cambrian in basinal sections is characterized by Fe speciation data and pyrite morphologies that indicate deposition under euxinic conditions with near-crustal enrichments of redox-sensitive element and positive pyrite-sulfur isotope values, which suggest low levels of marine sulfate and widespread euxinia. Our work reinforces an emerging view that the early Earth, including the Ediacaran, underwent numerous rises and falls in surface oxidation state, rather than a unidirectional rise as originally imagined. The Ediacaran ocean thus experienced repetitive expansion and contraction of marine chalcophilic trace-metal levels that may have had fundamental impact on the slow evolution of early animals and ecosystems. Further, this framework forces us to re-examine the relationship between Neoproterozoic oxygenation and metazoan diversification. Varying redox conditions through the Cryogenian and Ediacaran may help explain molecular clock and biomarker evidence for an early appearance and initial diversification of metazoans but with a delay in the appearance of most major metazoan crown groups until close to Ediacaran-Cambrian boundary.

  16. Redox regulated peroxisome homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Li, Shuo; Liu, Yu; Ma, Changle

    2014-01-01

    Peroxisomes are ubiquitous organelles present in nearly all eukaryotic cells. Conserved functions of peroxisomes encompass beta-oxidation of fatty acids and scavenging of reactive oxygen species generated from diverse peroxisomal metabolic pathways. Peroxisome content, number, and size can change quickly in response to environmental and/or developmental cues. To achieve efficient peroxisome homeostasis, peroxisome biogenesis and degradation must be orchestrated. We review the current knowledge on redox regulated peroxisome biogenesis and degradation with an emphasis on yeasts and plants. PMID:25545794

  17. Redox regulated peroxisome homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Li, Shuo; Liu, Yu; Ma, Changle

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisomes are ubiquitous organelles present in nearly all eukaryotic cells. Conserved functions of peroxisomes encompass beta-oxidation of fatty acids and scavenging of reactive oxygen species generated from diverse peroxisomal metabolic pathways. Peroxisome content, number, and size can change quickly in response to environmental and/or developmental cues. To achieve efficient peroxisome homeostasis, peroxisome biogenesis and degradation must be orchestrated. We review the current knowledge on redox regulated peroxisome biogenesis and degradation with an emphasis on yeasts and plants. PMID:25545794

  18. Manganese dioxide modified silicon nanowires and their excellent catalysis in the decomposition of methylene blue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Weiwei; Shao, Mingwang; Yang, Li; Zhuo, Shujuan; Ye, Shiyong; Lee, Shuit-tong

    2012-02-01

    A redox between hydrofluoric acid and ammonium fluoride-treated silicon nanowires and potassium permanganate solution was investigated. The results showed that MnO2 nanoparticles might grow on the surface of silicon nanowires, which was confirmed with the transmission electron microscope. These MnO2 modified silicon nanowires were employed as catalysts in the decomposition of methylene blue using sodium borohydride as the reducing agent, which exhibited excellent catalysis with its reaction rate 6 times larger than the unsupported MnO2.

  19. Aminomethylation of enals through carbene and acid cooperative catalysis: concise access to β(2)-amino acids.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianfeng; Chen, Xingkuan; Wang, Ming; Zheng, Pengcheng; Song, Bao-An; Chi, Yonggui Robin

    2015-04-20

    A convergent, organocatalytic asymmetric aminomethylation of α,β-unsaturated aldehydes by N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) and (in situ generated) Brønsted acid cooperative catalysis is disclosed. The catalytically generated conjugated acid from the base plays dual roles in promoting the formation of azolium enolate intermediate, formaldehyde-derived iminium ion (as an electrophilic reactant), and methanol (as a nucleophilic reactant). This redox-neutral strategy is suitable for the scalable synthesis of enantiomerically enriched β(2) -amino acids bearing various substituents. PMID:25735973

  20. Palladium catalysis for energy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pfefferle, L. D.; Datye, Abhaya

    2001-03-01

    Palladium (Pd) is an attractive catalyst for a range of new combustion applications comprising primary new technologies for future industrial energy needs, including gas turbine catalytic combustion, auto exhaust catalysts, heating and fuel cells. Pd poses particular challenges because it changes both chemical state and morphology as a function of temperature and reactant environment and those changes result in positive and negative changes in activity. Interactions with the support, additives, water, and contaminants as well as carbon formation have also been observed to affect Pd catalyst performance. This report describes the results of a 3.5 year project that resolves some of the conflicting reports in the literature about the performance of Pd-based catalysis.

  1. Industrial Catalysis: A Practical Guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrauto, Robert J.

    Every student of chemistry, material science, and chemical engineering should be schooled in catalysis and catalytic reactions. The reason is quite simple; most products produced in the chemical and petroleum industry utilize catalysts to enhance the rate of reaction and selectivity to desired products. Catalysts are also extensively used to minimize harmful byproduct pollutants in environmental applications. Enhanced reaction rates translate to higher production volumes at lower temperatures with smaller and less exotic materials of construction necessary. When a highly selective catalyst is used, large volumes of desired products are produced with virtually no undesirable byproducts. Gasoline, diesel, home heating oil, and aviation fuels owe their performance quality to catalytic processing used to upgrade crude oil.

  2. Nanocrystal assembly for tandem catalysis

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Peidong; Somorjai, Gabor; Yamada, Yusuke; Tsung, Chia-Kuang; Huang, Wenyu

    2014-10-14

    The present invention provides a nanocrystal tandem catalyst comprising at least two metal-metal oxide interfaces for the catalysis of sequential reactions. One embodiment utilizes a nanocrystal bilayer structure formed by assembling sub-10 nm platinum and cerium oxide nanocube monolayers on a silica substrate. The two distinct metal-metal oxide interfaces, CeO.sub.2--Pt and Pt--SiO.sub.2, can be used to catalyze two distinct sequential reactions. The CeO.sub.2--Pt interface catalyzed methanol decomposition to produce CO and H.sub.2, which were then subsequently used for ethylene hydroformylation catalyzed by the nearby Pt--SiO.sub.2 interface. Consequently, propanal was selectively produced on this nanocrystal bilayer tandem catalyst.

  3. Magnetic monopole catalysis of proton decay

    SciTech Connect

    Marciano, W.J.; Salvino, D.

    1986-09-01

    Catalysis of proton decay by GUT magnetic monopoles (the Rubakov-Callan effect) is discussed. Combining a short-distance cross section calculation by Bernreuther and Craigie with the long-distance velocity dependent distortion factors of Arafune and Fukugita, catalysis rate predictions which can be compared with experiment are obtained. At present, hydrogen rich detectors such as water (H/sub 2/O) and methane (CH/sub 4/) appear to be particularly well suited for observing catalysis by very slow monopoles. 17 refs., 1 fig.

  4. Mechanism of Copper/Azodicarboxylate-Catalyzed Aerobic Alcohol Oxidation: Evidence for Uncooperative Catalysis.

    PubMed

    McCann, Scott D; Stahl, Shannon S

    2016-01-13

    Cooperative catalysis between Cu(II) and redox-active organic cocatalysts is a key feature of important chemical and enzymatic aerobic oxidation reactions, such as alcohol oxidation mediated by Cu/TEMPO and galactose oxidase. Nearly 20 years ago, Markó and co-workers reported that azodicarboxylates, such as di-tert-butyl azodicarboxylate (DBAD), are effective redox-active cocatalysts in Cu-catalyzed aerobic alcohol oxidation reactions [Markó, I. E., et al. Science 1996, 274, 2044], but the nature of the cooperativity between Cu and azodicarboxylates is not well understood. Here, we report a mechanistic study of Cu/DBAD-catalyzed aerobic alcohol oxidation. In situ infrared spectroscopic studies reveal a burst of product formation prior to steady-state catalysis, and gas-uptake measurements show that no O2 is consumed during the burst. Kinetic studies reveal that the anaerobic burst and steady-state turnover have different rate laws. The steady-state rate does not depend on [O2] or [DBAD]. These results, together with other EPR and in situ IR spectroscopic and kinetic isotope effect studies, reveal that the steady-state mechanism consists of two interdependent catalytic cycles that operate in sequence: a fast Cu(II)/DBAD pathway, in which DBAD serves as the oxidant, and a slow Cu(II)-only pathway, in which Cu(II) is the oxidant. This study provides significant insight into the redox cooperativity, or lack thereof, between Cu and redox-active organic cocatalysts in aerobic oxidation reactions. PMID:26694091

  5. Label free redox capacitive biosensing.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Flávio C Bedatty; Góes, Márcio S; Davis, Jason J; Bueno, Paulo R

    2013-12-15

    A surface confined redox group contributes to an interfacial charging (quantifiable by redox capacitance) that can be sensitively probed by impedance derived capacitance spectroscopy. In generating mixed molecular films comprising such redox groups, together with specific recognition elements (here antibodies), this charging signal is able to sensitively transduce the recognition and binding of specific analytes. This novel transduction method, exemplified here with C-reactive protein, an important biomarker of cardiac status and general trauma, is equally applicable to any suitably prepared interfacial combination of redox reporter and receptor. The assays are label free, ultrasensitive, highly specific and accompanied by a good linear range. PMID:23896524

  6. Quantitative measures for redox signaling.

    PubMed

    Pillay, Ché S; Eagling, Beatrice D; Driscoll, Scott R E; Rohwer, Johann M

    2016-07-01

    Redox signaling is now recognized as an important regulatory mechanism for a number of cellular processes including the antioxidant response, phosphokinase signal transduction and redox metabolism. While there has been considerable progress in identifying the cellular machinery involved in redox signaling, quantitative measures of redox signals have been lacking, limiting efforts aimed at understanding and comparing redox signaling under normoxic and pathogenic conditions. Here we have outlined some of the accepted principles for redox signaling, including the description of hydrogen peroxide as a signaling molecule and the role of kinetics in conferring specificity to these signaling events. Based on these principles, we then develop a working definition for redox signaling and review a number of quantitative methods that have been employed to describe signaling in other systems. Using computational modeling and published data, we show how time- and concentration- dependent analyses, in particular, could be used to quantitatively describe redox signaling and therefore provide important insights into the functional organization of redox networks. Finally, we consider some of the key challenges with implementing these methods. PMID:27151506

  7. A Course in Kinetics and Catalysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartholomew, C. H.

    1981-01-01

    Describes a one-semester, three-credit hour course integrating the fundamentals of kinetics and the scientific/engineering principles of heterogeneous catalysis. Includes course outline, list of texts, background readings, and topical journal articles. (SK)

  8. Biomimetic catalysis of metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yao; Ma, Shengqian

    2016-06-14

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have attracted great attention as a new type of prospective material with various merits and functionalities. MOFs can either act as biomimetic catalysts to mimic enzymatic activities or serve as hosts to encapsulate bio-active species for biomimetic catalysis. However, in comparison with the dramatic development of MOFs in other catalytic fields, MOF-based biomimetic catalysis is still in its infancy and is yet to be systematically and comprehensively explored. Herein, the principles and strategies for the design and synthesis of MOF-based biomimetic catalysts, especially the structural features of representative MOFs that are related to biomimetic catalysis, are summarized and reviewed. In addition, recent advances in biomimetic catalysis of MOFs and the relationships between their catalytic performances and the structural specificities are discussed in detail as well. PMID:27041152

  9. Micelle Catalysis of an Aromatic Substitution Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corsaro, Gerald; Smith J. K.

    1976-01-01

    Describes an experiment in which the iodonation of aniline reaction is shown to undergo catalysis in solution of sodium lauryl sulfate which forms micelles with negatively charged pseudo surfaces. (MLH)

  10. Biomimetic catalysis: Taking on the turnover challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooley, Richard J.

    2016-03-01

    Emulating the efficiency with which enzymes catalyse reactions has often been used as inspiration to develop self-assembled cages. Now two studies present approaches to achieving catalyst turnover -- one of the biggest challenges in achieving truly biomimetic catalysis.

  11. Enzyme catalysis with small ionic liquid quantities.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Fabian; Mutschler, Julien; Zufferey, Daniel

    2011-04-01

    Enzyme catalysis with minimal ionic liquid quantities improves reaction rates, stereoselectivity and enables solvent-free processing. In particular the widely used lipases combine well with many ionic liquids. Demonstrated applications are racemate separation, esterification and glycerolysis. Minimal solvent processing is also an alternative to sluggish solvent-free catalysis. The method allows simplified down-stream processing, as only traces of ionic liquids have to be removed. PMID:21107639

  12. Improved QM/MM Linear-Interaction Energy Model for Substrate Recognition in Zinc-Containing Metalloenzymes.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Williams E; Ngo, Van A; Valiente, Pedro A; Noskov, Sergei Yu

    2016-08-18

    One of the essential challenges in the description of receptor-drug interactions in the presence of various polyvalent cations (such as zinc, magnesium, or iron) is the accurate assessment of the electronic effects due to cofactor binding. The effects can range from partial electronic polarization of the proximal atoms in a receptor and bound substrate to long-range effects related to partial charge transfer and electronic delocalization effects between the cofactor and the drug. Here, we examine the role of the explicit account for electronic effects for a panel of small-molecule inhibitors binding to the zinc-aminopeptidase PfA-M1, an essential target for antimalarial drug development. Our study on PfA-M1:inhibitor interactions at the QM level reveals that the partial charge and proton transfer due to bound zinc ion are important mechanisms in the inhibitors' recognition and catalysis. The combination of classical MD simulations with a posteriori QM/MM corrections with novel DFTB parameters for the zinc cation and the linear-interaction energy (LIE) approach offers by far the most accurate estimates for the PfA-M1:inhibitor binding affinities, opening the door for future inhibitor design. PMID:27448039

  13. Wired pyrroloquinoline quinone soluble glucose dehydrogenase enzyme electrodes operating at unprecedented low redox potential.

    PubMed

    Flexer, Victoria; Mano, Nicolas

    2014-03-01

    We report unprecedented high current densities for the enzymatic oxidation of glucose already at 0 V versus Ag/AgCl. The modified electrodes were made by assembling pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-soluble glucose dehydrogenase (PQQ-sGDH) from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus with osmium-based redox polymers and a cross-linker. Both redox mediators are made of a poly(4-vinylpyridine) (PVP) polymer with Os complexes tethered to the polymer backbone via long C chains, giving the Os complexes flexibility and mobility inside the redox hydrogels. Current densities larger than 1 mA cm(-2) were measured already below 0 V with a plateau value of 4.4 mA cm(-2). Similar hydrogel electrodes comprising the same redox polymers and glucose oxidase (GOx) showed less than half the current densities of the PQQ-sGDH electrodes. The current versus potential curve dependence showed a sigmoidal shape characteristic of mediated enzyme catalysis but with a current increase versus potential less sharp than expected. Surprisingly, the midwave redox potential was positively shifted with respect to the potential of the redox mediator. PMID:24475934

  14. Inverse magnetic/shear catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McInnes, Brett

    2016-05-01

    It is well known that very large magnetic fields are generated when the Quark-Gluon Plasma is formed during peripheral heavy-ion collisions. Lattice, holographic, and other studies strongly suggest that these fields may, for observationally relevant field values, induce "inverse magnetic catalysis", signalled by a lowering of the critical temperature for the chiral/deconfinement transition. The theoretical basis of this effect has recently attracted much attention; yet so far these investigations have not included another, equally dramatic consequence of the peripheral collision geometry: the QGP acquires a large angular momentum vector, parallel to the magnetic field. Here we use holographic techniques to argue that the angular momentum can also, independently, have an effect on transition temperatures, and we obtain a rough estimate of the relative effects of the presence of both a magnetic field and an angular momentum density. We find that the shearing angular momentum reinforces the effect of the magnetic field at low values of the baryonic chemical potential, but that it can actually decrease that effect at high chemical potentials.

  15. ISOTOPE METHODS IN HOMOGENEOUS CATALYSIS.

    SciTech Connect

    BULLOCK,R.M.; BENDER,B.R.

    2000-12-01

    The use of isotope labels has had a fundamentally important role in the determination of mechanisms of homogeneously catalyzed reactions. Mechanistic data is valuable since it can assist in the design and rational improvement of homogeneous catalysts. There are several ways to use isotopes in mechanistic chemistry. Isotopes can be introduced into controlled experiments and followed where they go or don't go; in this way, Libby, Calvin, Taube and others used isotopes to elucidate mechanistic pathways for very different, yet important chemistries. Another important isotope method is the study of kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) and equilibrium isotope effect (EIEs). Here the mere observation of where a label winds up is no longer enough - what matters is how much slower (or faster) a labeled molecule reacts than the unlabeled material. The most careti studies essentially involve the measurement of isotope fractionation between a reference ground state and the transition state. Thus kinetic isotope effects provide unique data unavailable from other methods, since information about the transition state of a reaction is obtained. Because getting an experimental glimpse of transition states is really tantamount to understanding catalysis, kinetic isotope effects are very powerful.

  16. Redox flow batteries: a review

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Adam Z.; Mench, Matthew M; Meyers, Jeremy; Ross, Philip N.; Gostick, Jeffrey T.; Liu, Qinghua

    2011-01-01

    Redox flow batteries (RFBs) are enjoying a renaissance due to their ability to store large amounts of electrical energy relatively cheaply and efficiently. In this review, we examine the components of RFBs with a focus on understanding the underlying physical processes. The various transport and kinetic phenomena are discussed along with the most common redox couples.

  17. Merging photoredox catalysis with Lewis acid catalysis: activation of carbon-carbon triple bonds.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ruiwen; Chen, Yiyong; Liu, Wangsheng; Xu, Dawen; Li, Yawei; Ding, Aishun; Guo, Hao

    2016-08-01

    Here, we demonstrate that merging photoredox catalysis with Lewis acid catalysis provides a fundamentally new activation mode of C-C triple bonds, to achieve the bond-forming reaction of alkynes with weak nucleophiles. Using a synergistic merger of Eosin Y and Cu(OTf)2, a highly efficient cyclization reaction of arene-ynes was developed. PMID:27432542

  18. Metallopeptide Based Mimics with Substituted Histidines Approximate a Key Hydrogen Bonding Network in the Metalloenzyme Nickel Superoxide Dismutase

    SciTech Connect

    Shearer, J.; Neupane, K; Callan, P

    2009-01-01

    }-N{sup imidazole} bond) versus less (along the S-Ni{sup III}-N{sup amine} bond) Lewis basic imidazole bases. This reorientation of g{sub z} along the xy plane translates into a decrease in A{sub zz} by {approx}20 MHz. A decrease in Lewis-basicity of the axial imidazole also translates into a 2 orders of magnitude increase in SOD catalysis across the metallopeptide series, with k{sub cat} ranging from 6(1) x 10{sup 6} M{sup -1} s{sup -1} for the metallopeptide with the most Lewis basic imidazole to 6(2) x 10{sup 8} M{sup -1} s{sup -1} for the metallopeptide with the least basic imidazole. This likely results from a fine-tuning of the electron transfer properties of the Ni-center, which optimize it for SOD catalysis.

  19. Thiol-based redox switches.

    PubMed

    Groitl, Bastian; Jakob, Ursula

    2014-08-01

    Regulation of protein function through thiol-based redox switches plays an important role in the response and adaptation to local and global changes in the cellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Redox regulation is used by first responder proteins, such as ROS-specific transcriptional regulators, chaperones or metabolic enzymes to protect cells against mounting levels of oxidants, repair the damage and restore redox homeostasis. Redox regulation of phosphatases and kinases is used to control the activity of select eukaryotic signaling pathways, making reactive oxygen species important second messengers that regulate growth, development and differentiation. In this review we will compare different types of reversible protein thiol modifications, elaborate on their structural and functional consequences and discuss their role in oxidative stress response and ROS adaptation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Thiol-Based Redox Processes. PMID:24657586

  20. [Radiation therapy and redox imaging].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Ken-ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy kills cancer cells in part by flood of free radicals. Radiation ionizes and/or excites water molecules to create highly reactive species, i.e. free radicals and/or reactive oxygen species. Free radical chain reactions oxidize biologically important molecules and thereby disrupt their function. Tissue oxygen and/or redox status, which can influence the course of the free radical chain reaction, can affect the efficacy of radiation therapy. Prior observation of tissue oxygen and/or redox status is helpful for planning a safe and efficient course of radiation therapy. Magnetic resonance-based redox imaging techniques, which can estimate tissue redox status non-invasively, have been developed not only for diagnostic information but also for estimating the efficacy of treatment. Redox imaging is now spotlighted to achieve radiation theranostics. PMID:25948308

  1. Advanced Resources for Catalysis Science; Recommendations for a National Catalysis Research Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Peden, Charles HF.; Ray, Douglas

    2005-10-05

    Catalysis is one of the most valuable contributors to our economy and historically an area where the United States has enjoyed, but is now losing, international leadership. While other countries are stepping up their work in this area, support for advanced catalysis research and development in the U.S. has diminished. Yet, more than ever, innovative and improved catalyst technologies are imperative for new energy production processes to ease our dependence on imported resources, for new energy-efficient and environmentally benign chemical production processes, and for new emission reduction technologies to minimize the environmental impact of an active and growing economy. Addressing growing concerns about the future direction of U.S. catalysis science, experts from the catalysis community met at a workshop to determine and recommend advanced resources needed to address the grand challenges for catalysis research and development. The workshop's primary conclusion: To recapture our position as the leader in catalysis innovation and practice, and promote crucial breakthroughs, the U.S. must establish one or more well-funded and well-equipped National Catalysis Research Institutes competitively selected, centered in the national laboratories and, by charter, networked to other national laboratories, universities, and industry. The Institute(s) will be the center of a national collaboratory that gives catalysis researchers access to the most advanced techniques available in the scientific enterprise. The importance of catalysis to our energy, economic, and environmental security cannot be overemphasized. Catalysis is a vital part of our core industrial infrastructure, as it is integral to chemical processing and petroleum refining, and is critical to proposed advances needed to secure a sustainable energy future. Advances in catalysis could reduce our need for foreign oil by making better use of domestic carbon resources, for example, allowing cost-effective and zero

  2. Redox biology of the intestine

    PubMed Central

    Circu, Magdalena L.; Aw, Tak Yee

    2011-01-01

    The intestinal tract, known for its capability for self-renew, represents the first barrier of defense between the organism and its luminal environment. The thiol/disulfide redox systems comprising the glutathione/glutathione disulfide (GSH/GSSG), cysteine/cystine (Cys/CySS) and reduced and oxidized thioredoxin (Trx/TrxSS) redox couples play important roles in preserving tissue redox homeostasis, metabolic functions, and cellular integrity. Control of the thiol-disulfide status at the luminal surface is essential for maintaining mucus fluidity and absorption of nutrients, and protection against chemical-induced oxidant injury. Within intestinal cells, these redox couples preserve an environment that supports physiological processes and orchestrates networks of enzymatic reactions against oxidative stress. In this review, we focus on the intestinal redox and antioxidant systems, their subcellular compartmentation, redox signaling and epithelial turnover, and contribution of luminal microbiota, key aspects that are relevant to understanding redox-dependent processes in gut biology with implications for degenerative digestive disorders, such as inflammation and cancer. PMID:21831010

  3. Experimental and numerical techniques to assess catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herdrich, G.; Fertig, M.; Petkow, D.; Steinbeck, A.; Fasoulas, S.

    2012-01-01

    Catalytic heating can be a significant portion of the thermal load experienced by a body during re-entry. Under the auspices of the NATO Research and Technology Organisation Applied Vehicle Technologies Panel Task Group AVT-136 an assessment of the current state-of-the-art in the experimental characterization and numerical simulation of catalysis on high-temperature material surfaces has been conducted. This paper gives an extraction of the final report for this effort, showing the facilities and capabilities worldwide to assess catalysis data. A corresponding summary for the modeling activities is referenced in this article.

  4. RNA catalysis and the origins of life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orgel, Leslie E.

    1986-01-01

    The role of RNA catalysis in the origins of life is considered in connection with the discovery of riboszymes, which are RNA molecules that catalyze sequence-specific hydrolysis and transesterification reactions of RNA substrates. Due to this discovery, theories positing protein-free replication as preceding the appearance of the genetic code are more plausible. The scope of RNA catalysis in biology and chemistry is discussed, and it is noted that the development of methods to select (or predict) RNA sequences with preassigned catalytic functions would be a major contribution to the study of life's origins.

  5. Corynebacterium diphtheriae Methionine Sulfoxide Reductase A Exploits a Unique Mycothiol Redox Relay Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Tossounian, Maria-Armineh; Pedre, Brandán; Wahni, Khadija; Erdogan, Huriye; Vertommen, Didier; Van Molle, Inge; Messens, Joris

    2015-01-01

    Methionine sulfoxide reductases are conserved enzymes that reduce oxidized methionines in proteins and play a pivotal role in cellular redox signaling. We have unraveled the redox relay mechanisms of methionine sulfoxide reductase A of the pathogen Corynebacterium diphtheriae (Cd-MsrA) and shown that this enzyme is coupled to two independent redox relay pathways. Steady-state kinetics combined with mass spectrometry of Cd-MsrA mutants give a view of the essential cysteine residues for catalysis. Cd-MsrA combines a nucleophilic cysteine sulfenylation reaction with an intramolecular disulfide bond cascade linked to the thioredoxin pathway. Within this cascade, the oxidative equivalents are transferred to the surface of the protein while releasing the reduced substrate. Alternatively, MsrA catalyzes methionine sulfoxide reduction linked to the mycothiol/mycoredoxin-1 pathway. After the nucleophilic cysteine sulfenylation reaction, MsrA forms a mixed disulfide with mycothiol, which is transferred via a thiol disulfide relay mechanism to a second cysteine for reduction by mycoredoxin-1. With x-ray crystallography, we visualize two essential intermediates of the thioredoxin relay mechanism and a cacodylate molecule mimicking the substrate interactions in the active site. The interplay of both redox pathways in redox signaling regulation forms the basis for further research into the oxidative stress response of this pathogen. PMID:25752606

  6. Redox Properties of Free Radicals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neta, P.

    1981-01-01

    Describes pulse radiolysis as a useful means in studing one-electron redox potentials. This method allows the production of radicals and the determination of their concentration and rates of reaction. (CS)

  7. Fundamentals of metal oxide catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Hari

    The properties of metal oxide catalysts and hence, catalytic activity are highly dependent on the composition and structure of these oxides. This dissertation has 3 parts -- all directed towards understanding relationships between structure, composition and activity in metal oxide catalysts. The first part of this dissertation focuses on supported metal oxide catalysts of tungsten, vanadium and molybdenum. Mechanisms are proposed for ethanol oxidative dehydrogenation which is used to probe the acidity and reducibility of these oxide catalysts. These studies are then used to develop a novel method to quantify active redox sites and determine the nature of the active site on these catalysts -- our results show that the intrinsic redox turn-over frequency is independent of the nature of the metal oxide and its loading and that the actual rate obtained over an oxide is only a function of the number of removable oxygen atoms linking the metal to the support. The extension of Ultraviolet-visible Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy (UV-vis DRS) to the study of active oxide domains in binary oxide catalysts is demonstrated for distinguishing between interacting and non-interacting domains in binary MoO x-WOx catalysts on alumina. We show also how the rigorous analysis of pre-edge features, absorption white-line intensity and the full width at half maximum of the white-line in X-ray Absorption Spectra provide determinants for metal atom coordination and domain size in supported metal oxide catalysts. The second part of this work looks at effects of structure variations on the activity of polyoxometalate catalysts that are promising for the production of Methacrylic Acid from Isobutane. The use of these catalysts is limited by structural changes that impact their performance -- an "activation" period is required before the catalysts become active for methacrylic acid production and structural changes also lead to degradation of the catalyst, which are also seen during thermal

  8. Redox Control of Cardiac Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Nitin T.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been associated with various human diseases, and considerable attention has been paid to investigate their physiological effects. Various ROS are synthesized in the mitochondria and accumulate in the cytoplasm if the cellular antioxidant defense mechanism fails. The critical balance of this ROS synthesis and antioxidant defense systems is termed the redox system of the cell. Various cardiovascular diseases have also been affected by redox to different degrees. ROS have been indicated as both detrimental and protective, via different cellular pathways, for cardiac myocyte functions, electrophysiology, and pharmacology. Mostly, the ROS functions depend on the type and amount of ROS synthesized. While the literature clearly indicates ROS effects on cardiac contractility, their effects on cardiac excitability are relatively under appreciated. Cardiac excitability depends on the functions of various cardiac sarcolemal or mitochondrial ion channels carrying various depolarizing or repolarizing currents that also maintain cellular ionic homeostasis. ROS alter the functions of these ion channels to various degrees to determine excitability by affecting the cellular resting potential and the morphology of the cardiac action potential. Thus, redox balance regulates cardiac excitability, and under pathological regulation, may alter action potential propagation to cause arrhythmia. Understanding how redox affects cellular excitability may lead to potential prophylaxis or treatment for various arrhythmias. This review will focus on the studies of redox and cardiac excitation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 432–468. PMID:22897788

  9. General Route for Preparing β-Nitrocarbonyl Compounds Using Copper Thermal Redox Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Using a simple copper catalyst, the alkylation of nitroalkanes with α-bromocarbonyls is now possible. This method provides a general, functional group tolerant route to β-nitrocarbonyl compounds, including nitro amides, esters, ketones, and aldehydes. The highly sterically dense, functional group rich products from these reactions can be readily elaborated into a range of complex nitrogen-containing molecules, including highly substituted β-amino acids. PMID:24870052

  10. Green Chemistry by Nano-Catalysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    The approach of using MW technique with nano-catalysis and benign aqueous reaction medium can offer an extraordinary synergistic effect with greater potential than these three individual components in isolation. To illustrate the ‘‘proof-of-concept’’ of this “Green and Sustainabl...

  11. Diffusion and Surface Reaction in Heterogeneous Catalysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baiker, A.; Richarz, W.

    1978-01-01

    Ethylene hydrogenation on a platinum catalyst, electrolytically applied to a tube wall, is a good system for the study of the interactions between diffusion and surface reaction in heterogeneous catalysis. Theoretical background, apparatus, procedure, and student performance of this experiment are discussed. (BB)

  12. Homogeneous Catalysis by Transition Metal Compounds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mawby, Roger

    1988-01-01

    Examines four processes involving homogeneous catalysis which highlight the contrast between the simplicity of the overall reaction and the complexity of the catalytic cycle. Describes how catalysts provide circuitous routes in which all energy barriers are relatively low rather than lowering the activation energy for a single step reaction.…

  13. Arabidopsis triphosphate tunnel metalloenzyme2 is a negative regulator of the salicylic acid-mediated feedback amplification loop for defense responses.

    PubMed

    Ung, Huoi; Moeder, Wolfgang; Yoshioka, Keiko

    2014-10-01

    The triphosphate tunnel metalloenzyme (TTM) superfamily represents a group of enzymes that is characterized by their ability to hydrolyze a range of tripolyphosphate substrates. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) encodes three TTM genes, AtTTM1, AtTTM2, and AtTTM3. Although AtTTM3 has previously been reported to have tripolyphosphatase activity, recombinantly expressed AtTTM2 unexpectedly exhibited pyrophosphatase activity. AtTTM2 knockout mutant plants exhibit an enhanced hypersensitive response, elevated pathogen resistance against both virulent and avirulent pathogens, and elevated accumulation of salicylic acid (SA) upon infection. In addition, stronger systemic acquired resistance compared with wild-type plants was observed. These enhanced defense responses are dependent on SA, PHYTOALEXIN-DEFICIENT4, and NONEXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENES1. Despite their enhanced pathogen resistance, ttm2 plants did not display constitutively active defense responses, suggesting that AtTTM2 is not a conventional negative regulator but a negative regulator of the amplification of defense responses. The transcriptional suppression of AtTTM2 by pathogen infection or treatment with SA or the systemic acquired resistance activator benzothiadiazole further supports this notion. Such transcriptional regulation is conserved among TTM2 orthologs in the crop plants soybean (Glycine max) and canola (Brassica napus), suggesting that TTM2 is involved in immunity in a wide variety of plant species. This indicates the possible usage of TTM2 knockout mutants for agricultural applications to generate pathogen-resistant crop plants. PMID:25185123

  14. The Structure of RdDddP from Roseobacter denitrificans Reveals That DMSP Lyases in the DddP-Family Are Metalloenzymes

    PubMed Central

    Hehemann, Jan-Hendrik; Law, Adrienne; Redecke, Lars; Boraston, Alisdair B.

    2014-01-01

    Marine microbes degrade dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), which is produced in large quantities by marine algae and plants, with DMSP lyases into acrylate and the gas dimethyl sulfide (DMS). Approximately 10% of the DMS vents from the sea into the atmosphere and this emission returns sulfur, which arrives in the sea through rivers and runoff, back to terrestrial systems via clouds and rain. Despite their key role in this sulfur cycle DMSP lyases are poorly understood at the molecular level. Here we report the first X-ray crystal structure of the putative DMSP lyase RdDddP from Roseobacter denitrificans, which belongs to the abundant DddP family. This structure, determined to 2.15 Å resolution, shows that RdDddP is a homodimeric metalloprotein with a binuclear center of two metal ions located 2.7 Å apart in the active site of the enzyme. Consistent with the crystallographic data, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TRXF) revealed the bound metal species to be primarily iron. A 3D structure guided analysis of environmental DddP lyase sequences elucidated the critical residues for metal binding are invariant, suggesting all proteins in the DddP family are metalloenzymes. PMID:25054772

  15. Redox biology of tuberculosis pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Abhishek; Singh, Nisha; Bhat, Shabir Ahmed; Gupta, Pawan; Kumar, Ashwani

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is one of the most successful human pathogens. Mtb is persistently exposed to numerous oxidoreductive stresses during its pathogenic cycle of infection and transmission. The distinctive ability of Mtb, not only to survive the redox stress manifested by the host but also to use it for synchronizing the metabolic pathways and expression of virulence factors, is central to its success as a pathogen. This review describes the paradigmatic redox and hypoxia sensors employed by Mtb to continuously monitor variations in the intracellular redox state and the surrounding microenvironment. Two component proteins, namely, DosS and DosT, are employed by Mtb to sense changes in oxygen, nitric oxide, and carbon monoxide levels, while WhiB3 and anti-sigma factor RsrA are used to monitor changes in intracellular redox state. Using these and other unidentified redox sensors, Mtb orchestrates its metabolic pathways to survive in nutrient-deficient, acidic, oxidative, nitrosative, and hypoxic environments inside granulomas or infectious lesions. A number of these metabolic pathways are unique to mycobacteria and thus represent potential drug targets. In addition, Mtb employs versatile machinery of the mycothiol and thioredoxin systems to ensure a reductive intracellular environment for optimal functioning of its proteins even upon exposure to oxidative stress. Mtb also utilizes a battery of protective enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (KatG), alkyl hydroperoxidase (AhpC), and peroxiredoxins, to neutralize the redox stress generated by the host immune system. This chapter reviews the current understanding of mechanisms employed by Mtb to sense and neutralize redox stress and their importance in TB pathogenesis and drug development. PMID:22633061

  16. Redox Pioneer: Professor Helmut Sies

    PubMed Central

    Radi, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Professor Helmut Sies Dr. Helmut Sies (MD, 1967) is recognized as a Redox Pioneer, because he authored five articles on oxidative stress, lycopene, and glutathione, each of which has been cited more than 1000 times, and coauthored an article on hydroperoxide metabolism in mammalian systems cited more than 5000 times (Google Scholar). He obtained preclinical education at the University of Tübingen and the University of Munich, clinical training at Munich (MD, 1967) and Paris, and completed Habilitation at Munich (Physiological Chemistry and Physical Biochemistry, 1972). In early research, he first identified hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as a normal aerobic metabolite and devised a method to quantify H2O2 concentration and turnover in cells. He quantified central redox systems for energy metabolism (NAD, NADP systems) and antioxidant GSH in subcellular compartments. He first described ebselen, a selenoorganic compound, as a glutathione peroxidase mimic. He contributed a fundamental discovery to the physiology of GSH, selenium nutrition, singlet oxygen biochemistry, and health benefits of dietary lycopene and cocoa flavonoids. He has published more than 600 articles, 134 of which are cited at least 100 times, and edited 28 books. His h-index is 115. During the last quarter of the 20th century and well into the 21st, he has served as a scout, trailblazer, and pioneer in redox biology. His formulation of the concept of oxidative stress stimulated and guided research in oxidants and antioxidants; his pioneering research on carotenoids and flavonoids informed nutritional strategies against cancer, cardiovascular disease, and aging; and his quantitative approach to redox biochemistry provides a foundation for modern redox systems biology. Helmut Sies is a true Redox Pioneer. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 2459–2468. The joy of exploring the unknown and finding something novel and noteworthy: what a privilege! —Prof. Helmut Sies PMID:25178739

  17. Practical Ni-Catalyzed Aryl–Alkyl Cross-Coupling of Secondary Redox-Active Esters

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A new transformation is presented that enables chemists to couple simple alkyl carboxylic acids with aryl zinc reagents under Ni-catalysis. The success of this reaction hinges on the unique use of redox-active esters that allow one to employ such derivatives as alkyl halides surrogates. The chemistry exhibits broad substrate scope and features a high degree of practicality. The simple procedure and extremely inexpensive nature of both the substrates and pre-catalyst (NiCl2·6H2O, ca. $9.5/mol) bode well for the immediate widespread adoption of this method. PMID:26835704

  18. Practical Ni-Catalyzed Aryl-Alkyl Cross-Coupling of Secondary Redox-Active Esters.

    PubMed

    Cornella, Josep; Edwards, Jacob T; Qin, Tian; Kawamura, Shuhei; Wang, Jie; Pan, Chung-Mao; Gianatassio, Ryan; Schmidt, Michael; Eastgate, Martin D; Baran, Phil S

    2016-02-24

    A new transformation is presented that enables chemists to couple simple alkyl carboxylic acids with aryl zinc reagents under Ni-catalysis. The success of this reaction hinges on the unique use of redox-active esters that allow one to employ such derivatives as alkyl halides surrogates. The chemistry exhibits broad substrate scope and features a high degree of practicality. The simple procedure and extremely inexpensive nature of both the substrates and pre-catalyst (NiCl2·6H2O, ca. $9.5/mol) bode well for the immediate widespread adoption of this method. PMID:26835704

  19. Precise Formation of a Hollow Carbon Nitride Structure with a Janus Surface To Promote Water Splitting by Photoredox Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Dandan; Cao, Xu-Ning; Wang, Xinchen

    2016-09-12

    The precise modification of redox species on the inner and outer surfaces of hollow nanostructures is relevant in catalysis, surface science, and nanotechnology, but has proven difficult to achieve. Herein, we develop a facile approach to specifically fabricate Pt and Co3 O4 nanoparticles (NPs) onto the interior and exterior surface of hollow carbon nitride spheres (HCNS), respectively, to promote the surface redox functions of the polymer semiconductors. The photocatalytic water splitting activities of HCNS with spatially separated oxidation and reduction centers at their nanodomains were enhanced. The origin of the enhanced activity was attributed to the spatially separated reactive sites for the evolution of H2 and O2 and also to the unidirectional migration of the electron and hole on the Janus surfaces, thereby preventing the unwanted reverse reaction of water splitting and decreasing charge recombination. PMID:27533739

  20. Redox electrode materials for supercapatteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Linpo; Chen, George Z.

    2016-09-01

    Redox electrode materials, including transition metal oxides and electronically conducting polymers, are capable of faradaic charge transfer reactions, and play important roles in most electrochemical energy storage devices, such as supercapacitor, battery and supercapattery. Batteries are often based on redox materials with low power capability and safety concerns in some cases. Supercapacitors, particularly those based on redox inactive materials, e.g. activated carbon, can offer high power output, but have relatively low energy capacity. Combining the merits of supercapacitor and battery into a hybrid, the supercapattery can possess energy as much as the battery and output a power almost as high as the supercapacitor. Redox electrode materials are essential in the supercapattery design. However, it is hard to utilise these materials easily because of their intrinsic characteristics, such as the low conductivity of metal oxides and the poor mechanical strength of conducting polymers. This article offers a brief introduction of redox electrode materials, the basics of supercapattery and its relationship with pseudocapacitors, and reviews selectively some recent progresses in the relevant research and development.

  1. Redox sorting of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Gui, Hui; Streit, Jason K; Fagan, Jeffrey A; Hight Walker, Angela R; Zhou, Chongwu; Zheng, Ming

    2015-03-11

    This work expands the redox chemistry of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by investigating its role in a number of SWCNT sorting processes. Using a polyethylene glycol (PEG)/dextran (DX) aqueous two-phase system, we show that electron-transfer between redox molecules and SWCNTs triggers reorganization of the surfactant coating layer, leading to strong modulation of nanotube partition in the two phases. While the DX phase is thermodynamically more favored by an oxidized SWCNT mixture, the mildly reducing PEG phase is able to recover SWCNTs from oxidation and extract them successively from the DX phase. Remarkably, the extraction order follows SWCNT bandgap: semiconducting nanotubes of larger bandgap first, followed by semiconducting nanotubes of smaller bandgap, then nonarmchair metallic tubes of small but nonvanishing bandgap, and finally armchair metallic nanotubes of zero bandgap. Furthermore, we show that redox-induced surfactant reorganization is a common phenomenon, affecting nanotube buoyancy in a density gradient field, affinity to polymer matrices, and solubility in organic solvents. These findings establish redox modulation of surfactant coating structures as a general mechanism for tuning a diverse range of SWCNT sorting processes and demonstrate for the first time that armchair and nonarmchair metallic SWCNTs can be separated by their differential response to redox. PMID:25719939

  2. Functionalization of Oxide-Free Silicon Surfaces with Redox-Active Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Fabre, Bruno

    2016-04-27

    This review provides a comprehensive survey of the derivatization of hydrogen-terminated, oxide-free silicon surfaces with electroactive assemblies (from molecules to polymers) attached through strong interactions (covalent, electrostatic, and chimisorption). Provided that surface modification procedures are thoroughly optimized, such an approach has appeared as a promising strategy toward high-quality functional interfaces exhibiting excellent chemical and electrochemical stabilities. The attachment of electroactive molecules exhibiting either two stable redox states (e.g., ferrocene and quinones) or more than two stable redox states (e.g., metalloporphyrins, polyoxometalates, and C60) is more particularly discussed. Attention is also paid to the immobilization of electrochemically polymerizable centers. Globally, these functional interfaces have been demonstrated to show great promise for the molecular charge storage and information processing or the elaboration of the electrochemically switchable devices. Besides, there are also some relevant examples dealing with their activity for other fields of interest, such as sensing and electrochemical catalysis. PMID:27064580

  3. Delicate conformational balance of the redox enzyme cytochrome P450cam.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Simon P; Liu, Wei-Min; Hiruma, Yoshitaka; Timmer, Monika; Blok, Anneloes; Hass, Mathias A S; Ubbink, Marcellus

    2015-07-21

    The energy landscapes of proteins are highly complex and can be influenced by changes in physical and chemical conditions under which the protein is studied. The redox enzyme cytochrome P450cam undergoes a multistep catalytic cycle wherein two electrons are transferred to the heme group and the enzyme visits several conformational states. Using paramagnetic NMR spectroscopy with a lanthanoid tag, we show that the enzyme bound to its redox partner, putidaredoxin, is in a closed state at ambient temperature in solution. This result contrasts with recent crystal structures of the complex, which suggest that the enzyme opens up when bound to its partner. The closed state supports a model of catalysis in which the substrate is locked in the active site pocket and the enzyme acts as an insulator for the reactive intermediates of the reaction. PMID:26130807

  4. Delicate conformational balance of the redox enzyme cytochrome P450cam

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Simon P.; Liu, Wei-Min; Hiruma, Yoshitaka; Timmer, Monika; Blok, Anneloes; Hass, Mathias A. S.; Ubbink, Marcellus

    2015-01-01

    The energy landscapes of proteins are highly complex and can be influenced by changes in physical and chemical conditions under which the protein is studied. The redox enzyme cytochrome P450cam undergoes a multistep catalytic cycle wherein two electrons are transferred to the heme group and the enzyme visits several conformational states. Using paramagnetic NMR spectroscopy with a lanthanoid tag, we show that the enzyme bound to its redox partner, putidaredoxin, is in a closed state at ambient temperature in solution. This result contrasts with recent crystal structures of the complex, which suggest that the enzyme opens up when bound to its partner. The closed state supports a model of catalysis in which the substrate is locked in the active site pocket and the enzyme acts as an insulator for the reactive intermediates of the reaction. PMID:26130807

  5. Chromoselective Photocatalysis: Controlled Bond Activation through Light-Color Regulation of Redox Potentials.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Indrajit; König, Burkhard

    2016-06-27

    Catalysts that can be regulated in terms of activity and selectivity by external stimuli may allow the efficient multistep synthesis of complex molecules and pharmaceuticals. Herein, we report the light-color regulation of the redox potential of a photocatalyst to control the activation of chemical bonds. Light-color control of the redox power of a photocatalyst introduces a new selectivity parameter to photoredox catalysis: Instead of changing the catalyst or ligand, alteration of the color of the visible-light irradiation adjusts the selectivity in catalytic transformations. By using this principle, the selective activation of aryl-halide bonds for C-H arylation and the sequential conversion of functional groups with different reduction potentials is possible by simply applying different colors of light for excitation of the photocatalyst. PMID:27198967

  6. NASA Redox Project status summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagedorn, N. H.

    1983-01-01

    This report is a summary of the results of the Redox Project effort during Cy 1982. It was presented at the Fifth U.S. Department of Energy Battery and Electrochemical Contractors Conference, Arlington, Va., Dec. 7-9, 1982. The major development during 1982 was the shift from Redox system operation at 25 C with unmixed reactants to operation at 65 C with mixed reactants. This change has made possible a two- or three-fold increase in operating current density, to about 65 mA/sq cm, and an increase in reactant utilization from 40% to about 90%. Both of these improvements will lead to significant system cost reductions. Contract studies have indicated that Redox reactant costs also will be moderate. A new catalyst for the chromuim electrode offers all the advantages of the conventional gold-lead catalyst while being easier to apply and more forgiving in use.

  7. Redox regulation of vascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Karimi Galougahi, Keyvan; Ashley, Euan A; Ali, Ziad A

    2016-01-01

    Vascular remodeling is a dynamic process of structural and functional changes in response to biochemical and biomechanical signals in a complex in vivo milieu. While inherently adaptive, dysregulation leads to maladaptive remodeling. Reactive oxygen species participate in homeostatic cell signaling in tightly regulated- and compartmentalized cellular circuits. It is well established that perturbations in oxidation-reduction (redox) homeostasis can lead to a state of oxidative-, and more recently, reductive stress. We provide an overview of the redox signaling in the vasculature and review the role of oxidative- and reductive stress in maladaptive vascular remodeling. Particular emphasis has been placed on essential processes that determine phenotype modulation, migration and fate of the main cell types in the vessel wall. Recent advances in systems biology and the translational opportunities they may provide to specifically target the redox pathways driving pathological vascular remodeling are discussed. PMID:26483132

  8. Redox Regulation of Plant Development

    PubMed Central

    Considine, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: We provide a conceptual framework for the interactions between the cellular redox signaling hub and the phytohormone signaling network that controls plant growth and development to maximize plant productivity under stress-free situations, while limiting growth and altering development on exposure to stress. Recent Advances: Enhanced cellular oxidation plays a key role in the regulation of plant growth and stress responses. Oxidative signals or cycles of oxidation and reduction are crucial for the alleviation of dormancy and quiescence, activating the cell cycle and triggering genetic and epigenetic control that underpin growth and differentiation responses to changing environmental conditions. Critical Issues: The redox signaling hub interfaces directly with the phytohormone network in the synergistic control of growth and its modulation in response to environmental stress, but a few components have been identified. Accumulating evidence points to a complex interplay of phytohormone and redox controls that operate at multiple levels. For simplicity, we focus here on redox-dependent processes that control root growth and development and bud burst. Future Directions: The multiple roles of reactive oxygen species in the control of plant growth and development have been identified, but increasing emphasis should now be placed on the functions of redox-regulated proteins, along with the central roles of reductants such as NAD(P)H, thioredoxins, glutathione, glutaredoxins, peroxiredoxins, ascorbate, and reduced ferredoxin in the regulation of the genetic and epigenetic factors that modulate the growth and vigor of crop plants, particularly within an agricultural context. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 1305–1326. PMID:24180689

  9. Heterogenous catalysis mediated by plasmon heating.

    PubMed

    Adleman, James R; Boyd, David A; Goodwin, David G; Psaltis, Demetri

    2009-12-01

    We introduce a new method for performing and miniaturizing many types of heterogeneous catalysis involving nanoparticles. The method makes use of the plasmon resonance present in nanoscale metal catalysts to provide the necessary heat of reaction when illuminated with a low-power laser. We demonstrate our approach by reforming a flowing, liquid mixture of ethanol and water over gold nanoparticle catalysts in a microfluidic channel. Plasmon heating of the nanoparticles provides not only the heat of reaction but the means to generate both water and ethanol vapor locally over the catalysts, which in turn allows the chip and the fluid lines to remain at room temperature. The measured products of the reaction, CO(2), CO, and H(2), are consistent with catalytic steam reforming of ethanol. The approach, which we refer to as plasmon-assisted catalysis, is general and can be used with a variety of endothermic catalytic processes involving nanoparticles. PMID:19908825

  10. Transition metal catalysis in confined spaces.

    PubMed

    Leenders, Stefan H A M; Gramage-Doria, Rafael; de Bruin, Bas; Reek, Joost N H

    2015-01-21

    Transition metal catalysis plays an important role in both industry and in academia where selectivity, activity and stability are crucial parameters to control. Next to changing the structure of the ligand, introducing a confined space as a second coordination sphere around a metal catalyst has recently been shown to be a viable method to induce new selectivity and activity in transition metal catalysis. In this review we focus on supramolecular strategies to encapsulate transition metal complexes with the aim of controlling the selectivity via the second coordination sphere. As we will discuss, catalyst confinement can result in selective processes that are impossible or difficult to achieve by traditional methods. We will describe the template-ligand approach as well as the host-guest approach to arrive at such supramolecular systems and discuss how the performance of the catalyst is enhanced by confining it in a molecular container. PMID:25340992

  11. Odyssey in Polyphasic Catalysis by Metal Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Denicourt-Nowicki, Audrey; Roucoux, Alain

    2016-08-01

    Nanometer-sized metal particles constitute an unavoidable family of catalysts, combining the advantages of molecular complexes in regards to their catalytic performances and the ones of heterogeneous systems in terms of easy recycling. As part of this research, our group aims at designing well-defined metal nanoparticles based-catalysts, in non-conventional media (ionic liquids or water), for various catalytic applications (hydrogenation, dehalogenation, carbon-carbon coupling, asymmetric catalysis) in mild reaction conditions. In the drive towards a more eco-responsible chemistry, the main focuses rely on the search of highly active and selective nanocatalysts, in association with an efficient recycling mainly under pure biphasic liquid-liquid conditions. In this Personal Account, we proposed our almost fifteen-years odyssey in the world of metal nanoparticles for a sustainable catalysis. PMID:27427501

  12. Recent advances in enantioselective gold catalysis.

    PubMed

    Zi, Weiwei; Dean Toste, F

    2016-08-01

    Interest in homogeneous gold catalysis has undergone a marked increase. As strong yet air- and moisture-tolerant π-acids, cationic gold(i) complexes have been shown to catalyze diverse transformations of alkenes, alkynes and allenes, opening new opportunities for chemical synthesis. The development of efficient asymmetric variants is required in order to take full advantage of the preparative potential of these transformations. During the last few years, the chemical community has achieved tremendous success in the area. This review highlights the updated progress (2011-2015) in enantioselective gold catalysis. The discussion is classified according to the π-bonds activated by gold(i), in an order of alkynes, allenes and alkenes. Other gold activation modes, such as σ-Lewis acid catalyzed reactions and transformations of diazo compounds are also discussed. PMID:26890605

  13. Asymmetric catalysis in complex target synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Mark S.; Jacobsen, Eric N.

    2004-01-01

    This article describes three distinct strategies by which stereochemically complex molecules are synthesized and the ways asymmetric catalysis can impact on all three. The development of general methods to prepare synthetically useful building blocks leads to an expanded “chiral pool” of potential starting materials for asymmetric synthesis. The possibility of discovering new reactions to access new types of building blocks is particularly attractive and serves to help define the frontiers of the field. Asymmetric catalysis can also be applied to diastereoselective synthesis such that the stereochemistry of the catalyst, and not that of the substrate, determines the relative configuration of the product. Finally, in reactions where multiple stereocenters are generated simultaneously or in tandem, catalyst and substrate control can operate in a complementary manner to achieve one of many possible stereochemical outcomes selectively. PMID:15020767

  14. Solvent Structure and Hammerhead Ribozyme Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Martick, Monika; Lee, Tai-Sung; York, Darrin M.; Scott, William G.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Although the hammerhead ribozyme is regarded as a prototype for understanding RNA catalysis, the mechanistic roles of associated metal ions and water molecules in the cleavage reaction remain controversial. We have investigated the catalytic potential of observed divalent metal ions and water molecules bound to a 2 Å structure of the full-length hammerhead ribozyme by using X-ray crystallography in combination with molecular dynamics simulations. A single Mn2+ is observed to bind directly to the A9 phosphate in the active site, accompanying a hydrogen-bond network involving a well-ordered water molecule spanning N1 of G12 (the general base) and 2′-O of G8 (previously implicated in general acid catalysis) that we propose, based on molecular dynamics calculations, facilitates proton transfer in the cleavage reaction. Phosphate-bridging metal interactions and other mechanistic hypotheses are also tested with this approach. PMID:18420140

  15. Approaches to Single-Nanoparticle Catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambur, Justin B.; Chen, Peng

    2014-04-01

    Nanoparticles are among the most important industrial catalysts, with applications ranging from chemical manufacturing to energy conversion and storage. Heterogeneity is a general feature among these nanoparticles, with their individual differences in size, shape, and surface sites leading to variable, particle-specific catalytic activity. Assessing the activity of individual nanoparticles, preferably with subparticle resolution, is thus desired and vital to the development of efficient catalysts. It is challenging to measure the activity of single-nanoparticle catalysts, however. Several experimental approaches have been developed to monitor catalysis on single nanoparticles, including electrochemical methods, single-molecule fluorescence microscopy, surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, X-ray microscopy, and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. This review focuses on these experimental approaches, the associated methods and strategies, and selected applications in studying single-nanoparticle catalysis with chemical selectivity, sensitivity, or subparticle spatial resolution.

  16. Spatially confined catalysis-enhanced high-temperature carbon dioxide electrolysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liming; Xue, Xingjian; Xie, Kui

    2015-05-01

    In this study, a potential ilmenite cathode material Ni0.9TiO3 is designed for efficient CO2 electrolysis in an oxide-ion-conducting solid-oxide electrolyzer. Spatially confined catalysis has been successfully achieved to substantially improve cathode activity by in situ growth of catalytically active nickel nanoparticles on a ceramic skeleton. The combined analysis of XRD, SEM, EDS, XPS, TGA and Raman results together confirm that the growth of nickel catalyst is completely reversible in redox cycles. The n-type electrical properties of cathodes are systematically investigated and correlated to electrochemical performance. Efficient CO2 electrolysis with a Faraday efficiency above 90% has been demonstrated with Ni0.9TiO3 in contrast to 60% for a TiO2 cathode at 800 °C. PMID:25864375

  17. Cosmic string catalysis of skyrmion decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Ruth; Davis, Anne-Christine; Brandenberger, Robert

    1988-01-01

    The Callan-Witten picture is developed for monopole catalyzed skyrmion decay in order to analyze the corresponding cosmic string scenario. It is discovered that cosmic strings (both ordinary and superconducting) can catalyze proton decay, but that this catalysis only occurs on the scale of the core of the string. In order to do this we have to develop a vortex model for the superconducting string. An argument is also given for the difference in the enhancement factors for monopoles and strings.

  18. Spatially Assisted Schwinger Mechanism and Magnetic Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Copinger, Patrick; Fukushima, Kenji

    2016-08-19

    Using the worldline formalism we compute an effective action for fermions under a temporally modulated electric field and a spatially modulated magnetic field. It is known that the former leads to an enhanced Schwinger mechanism, while we find that the latter can also result in enhanced particle production and even cause a reorganization of the vacuum to acquire a larger dynamical mass in equilibrium which spatially assists the magnetic catalysis. PMID:27588845

  19. USD Catalysis Group for Alternative Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Hoefelmeyer, James D.; Koodali, Ranjit; Sereda, Grigoriy; Engebretson, Dan; Fong, Hao; Puszynski, Jan; Shende, Rajesh; Ahrenkiel, Phil

    2012-03-13

    The South Dakota Catalysis Group (SDCG) is a collaborative project with mission to develop advanced catalysts for energy conversion with two primary goals: (1) develop photocatalytic systems in which polyfunctionalized TiO2 are the basis for hydrogen/oxygen synthesis from water and sunlight (solar fuels group), (2) develop new materials for hydrogen utilization in fuel cells (fuel cell group). In tandem, these technologies complete a closed chemical cycle with zero emissions.

  20. Nanoscale Advances in Catalysis and Energy Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yimin; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2010-05-12

    In this perspective, we present an overview of nanoscience applications in catalysis, energy conversion, and energy conservation technologies. We discuss how novel physical and chemical properties of nanomaterials can be applied and engineered to meet the advanced material requirements in the new generation of chemical and energy conversion devices. We highlight some of the latest advances in these nanotechnologies and provide an outlook at the major challenges for further developments.

  1. Independence from the Sequence of Single-Electron Transfer of Photoredox Process in Redox-Neutral Asymmetric Bond-Forming Reaction.

    PubMed

    Kizu, Tomohito; Uraguchi, Daisuke; Ooi, Takashi

    2016-08-19

    A catalytic cycle initiated by the oxidative quenching of the excited photosensitizer (Ir*(ppy)3) is established for the enantioselective coupling between (N-arylamino)methanes and (N-methanesulfonyl)aldimines catalyzed by Ir-based photosensitizer and a chiral (arylamino)phosphonium tetrakis[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]borate under visible light irradiation. This achievement clearly demonstrates the insensitivity of this redox-neutral asymmetric reaction to the sequence of the key redox events involved in the synergistic catalysis. PMID:27176596

  2. Plasma Catalysis: Synergistic Effects at the Nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Neyts, Erik C; Ostrikov, Kostya Ken; Sunkara, Mahendra K; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2015-12-23

    Thermal-catalytic gas processing is integral to many current industrial processes. Ever-increasing demands on conversion and energy efficiencies are a strong driving force for the development of alternative approaches. Similarly, synthesis of several functional materials (such as nanowires and nanotubes) demands special processing conditions. Plasma catalysis provides such an alternative, where the catalytic process is complemented by the use of plasmas that activate the source gas. This combination is often observed to result in a synergy between plasma and catalyst. This Review introduces the current state-of-the-art in plasma catalysis, including numerous examples where plasma catalysis has demonstrated its benefits or shows future potential, including CO2 conversion, hydrocarbon reforming, synthesis of nanomaterials, ammonia production, and abatement of toxic waste gases. The underlying mechanisms governing these applications, as resulting from the interaction between the plasma and the catalyst, render the process highly complex, and little is known about the factors leading to the often-observed synergy. This Review critically examines the catalytic mechanisms relevant to each specific application. PMID:26619209

  3. Hybrid Amyloid Membranes for Continuous Flow Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Bolisetty, Sreenath; Arcari, Mario; Adamcik, Jozef; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2015-12-29

    Amyloid fibrils are promising nanomaterials for technological applications such as biosensors, tissue engineering, drug delivery, and optoelectronics. Here we show that amyloid-metal nanoparticle hybrids can be used both as efficient active materials for wet catalysis and as membranes for continuous flow catalysis applications. Initially, amyloid fibrils generated in vitro from the nontoxic β-lactoglobulin protein act as templates for the synthesis of gold and palladium metal nanoparticles from salt precursors. The resulting hybrids possess catalytic features as demonstrated by evaluating their activity in a model catalytic reaction in water, e.g., the reduction of 4-nitrophenol into 4-aminophenol, with the rate constant of the reduction increasing with the concentration of amyloid-nanoparticle hybrids. Importantly, the same nanoparticles adsorbed onto fibrils surface show improved catalytic efficiency compared to the same unattached particles, pointing at the important role played by the amyloid fibril templates. Then, filter membranes are prepared from the metal nanoparticle-decorated amyloid fibrils by vacuum filtration. The resulting membranes serve as efficient flow catalysis active materials, with a complete catalytic conversion achieved within a single flow passage of a feeding solution through the membrane. PMID:26673736

  4. Implications of phosphorus redox geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasek, Matthew

    2015-04-01

    Phosphorus is the limiting nutrient in many environments. Until recently, redox changes to phosphorus speciation have been confined to the realm of chemical laboratories as phosphorus was considered to be synonymous with phosphate in the natural environment. The few known phosphorus species with a reduced redox state, such as phosphine gas, were considered novelties. Recent work has revealed a surprising role for low redox state organophosphorus compounds -- the phosphonates -- in biogeochemistry. Additionally, phosphite and hypophosphite (the lower oxyanions of phosphorus) have been identified from natural sources, and microbial genomics suggests these compounds may be ubiquitous in nature. Recent work from our laboratory suggests that reduced phosphorus compounds such as phosphite and hypophosphite may be ubiquitous (Pasek et al. 2014). If so, then these species maybe important in the global phosphorus biogeochemical cycle, and could influence global phosphorus sustainability. Additionally, these compounds could have been relevant on the early earth environment, priming the earth with reactive phosphorus for prebiotic chemistry. Reference: Pasek, M. A., Sampson, J. M., & Atlas, Z. (2014). Redox chemistry in the phosphorus biogeochemical cycle. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 111(43), 15468-15473.

  5. A Conformational Sampling Model for Radical Catalysis in Pyridoxal Phosphate- and Cobalamin-dependent Enzymes*

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Binuraj R. K.; Fisher, Karl; Rigby, Stephen E. J.; Scrutton, Nigel S.; Leys, David

    2014-01-01

    Cobalamin-dependent enzymes enhance the rate of C–Co bond cleavage by up to ∼1012-fold to generate cob(II)alamin and a transient adenosyl radical. In the case of the pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP) and cobalamin-dependent enzymes lysine 5,6-aminomutase and ornithine 4,5 aminomutase (OAM), it has been proposed that a large scale domain reorientation of the cobalamin-binding domain is linked to radical catalysis. Here, OAM variants were designed to perturb the interface between the cobalamin-binding domain and the PLP-binding TIM barrel domain. Steady-state and single turnover kinetic studies of these variants, combined with pulsed electron-electron double resonance measurements of spin-labeled OAM were used to provide direct evidence for a dynamic interface between the cobalamin and PLP-binding domains. Our data suggest that following ligand binding-induced cleavage of the Lys629-PLP covalent bond, dynamic motion of the cobalamin-binding domain leads to conformational sampling of the available space. This supports radical catalysis through transient formation of a catalytically competent active state. Crucially, it appears that the formation of the state containing both a substrate/product radical and Co(II) does not restrict cobalamin domain motion. A similar conformational sampling mechanism has been proposed to support rapid electron transfer in a number of dynamic redox systems. PMID:25213862

  6. Neutrons for Catalysis: A Workshop on Neutron Scattering Techniques for Studies in Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Overbury, Steven {Steve} H; Coates, Leighton; Herwig, Kenneth W; Kidder, Michelle

    2011-10-01

    This report summarizes the Workshop on Neutron Scattering Techniques for Studies in Catalysis, held at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on September 16 and 17, 2010. The goal of the Workshop was to bring experts in heterogeneous catalysis and biocatalysis together with neutron scattering experimenters to identify ways to attack new problems, especially Grand Challenge problems in catalysis, using neutron scattering. The Workshop locale was motivated by the neutron capabilities at ORNL, including the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and the new and developing instrumentation at the SNS. Approximately 90 researchers met for 1 1/2 days with oral presentations and breakout sessions. Oral presentations were divided into five topical sessions aimed at a discussion of Grand Challenge problems in catalysis, dynamics studies, structure characterization, biocatalysis, and computational methods. Eleven internationally known invited experts spoke in these sessions. The Workshop was intended both to educate catalyst experts about the methods and possibilities of neutron methods and to educate the neutron community about the methods and scientific challenges in catalysis. Above all, it was intended to inspire new research ideas among the attendees. All attendees were asked to participate in one or more of three breakout sessions to share ideas and propose new experiments that could be performed using the ORNL neutron facilities. The Workshop was expected to lead to proposals for beam time at either the HFIR or the SNS; therefore, it was expected that each breakout session would identify a few experiments or proof-of-principle experiments and a leader who would pursue a proposal after the Workshop. Also, a refereed review article will be submitted to a prominent journal to present research and ideas illustrating the benefits and possibilities of neutron methods for catalysis research.

  7. Redox active motifs in selenoproteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Fei; Lutz, Patricia B; Pepelyayeva, Yuliya; Arnér, Elias S J; Bayse, Craig A; Rozovsky, Sharon

    2014-05-13

    Selenoproteins use the rare amino acid selenocysteine (Sec) to act as the first line of defense against oxidants, which are linked to aging, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases. Many selenoproteins are oxidoreductases in which the reactive Sec is connected to a neighboring Cys and able to form a ring. These Sec-containing redox motifs govern much of the reactivity of selenoproteins. To study their fundamental properties, we have used (77)Se NMR spectroscopy in concert with theoretical calculations to determine the conformational preferences and mobility of representative motifs. This use of (77)Se as a probe enables the direct recording of the properties of Sec as its environment is systematically changed. We find that all motifs have several ring conformations in their oxidized state. These ring structures are most likely stabilized by weak, nonbonding interactions between the selenium and the amide carbon. To examine how the presence of selenium and ring geometric strain governs the motifs' reactivity, we measured the redox potentials of Sec-containing motifs and their corresponding Cys-only variants. The comparisons reveal that for C-terminal motifs the redox potentials increased between 20-25 mV when the selenenylsulfide bond was changed to a disulfide bond. Changes of similar magnitude arose when we varied ring size or the motifs' flanking residues. This suggests that the presence of Sec is not tied to unusually low redox potentials. The unique roles of selenoproteins in human health and their chemical reactivities may therefore not necessarily be explained by lower redox potentials, as has often been claimed. PMID:24769567

  8. Redox active motifs in selenoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fei; Lutz, Patricia B.; Pepelyayeva, Yuliya; Arnér, Elias S. J.; Bayse, Craig A.; Rozovsky, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    Selenoproteins use the rare amino acid selenocysteine (Sec) to act as the first line of defense against oxidants, which are linked to aging, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases. Many selenoproteins are oxidoreductases in which the reactive Sec is connected to a neighboring Cys and able to form a ring. These Sec-containing redox motifs govern much of the reactivity of selenoproteins. To study their fundamental properties, we have used 77Se NMR spectroscopy in concert with theoretical calculations to determine the conformational preferences and mobility of representative motifs. This use of 77Se as a probe enables the direct recording of the properties of Sec as its environment is systematically changed. We find that all motifs have several ring conformations in their oxidized state. These ring structures are most likely stabilized by weak, nonbonding interactions between the selenium and the amide carbon. To examine how the presence of selenium and ring geometric strain governs the motifs’ reactivity, we measured the redox potentials of Sec-containing motifs and their corresponding Cys-only variants. The comparisons reveal that for C-terminal motifs the redox potentials increased between 20–25 mV when the selenenylsulfide bond was changed to a disulfide bond. Changes of similar magnitude arose when we varied ring size or the motifs’ flanking residues. This suggests that the presence of Sec is not tied to unusually low redox potentials. The unique roles of selenoproteins in human health and their chemical reactivities may therefore not necessarily be explained by lower redox potentials, as has often been claimed. PMID:24769567

  9. Amide-Substituted Titanocenes in Hydrogen-Atom Transfer Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Qiang; Jakoby, Verena; Stainer, Katharina; Schmer, Alexander; Klare, Sven; Bauer, Mirko; Grimme, Stefan; Cuerva, Juan Manuel; Gansäuer, Andreas

    2016-01-22

    Two new catalytic systems for hydrogen-atom transfer (HAT) catalysis involving the N-H bonds of titanocene(III) complexes with pendant amide ligands are reported. In a monometallic system, a bifunctional catalyst for radical generation and reduction through HAT catalysis depending on the coordination of the amide ligand is employed. The pendant amide ligand is used to activate Crabtree's catalyst to yield an efficient bimetallic system for radical generation and HAT catalysis. PMID:26636435

  10. Special Issue: Coinage Metal (Copper, Silver, and Gold) Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Carabineiro, Sónia Alexandra Correia

    2016-01-01

    The subject of catalysis by coinage metals (copper, silver, and gold) comes up increasingly day-by-day. This Special Issue aims to cover the numerous aspects of the use of these metals as catalysts for several reactions. It deals with synthesis and characterization of copper, silver and gold based catalysis, their characterization and use, both for heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis, and some of their potential applications. PMID:27338316

  11. Synergistic Catalysis: A Powerful Synthetic Strategy for New Reaction Development

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Anna E.; MacMillan, David W. C.

    2012-01-01

    Synergistic catalysis is a synthetic strategy wherein both the nucleophile and the electrophile are simultaneously activated by two separate and distinct catalysts to afford a single chemical transformation. This powerful catalysis strategy leads to several benefits, specifically synergistic catalysis can (i) introduce new, previously unattainable chemical transformations, (ii) improve the efficiency of existing transformations, and (iii) create or improve catalytic enantioselectivity where stereocontrol was previously absent or challenging. This perspective aims to highlight these benefits using many of the successful examples of synergistic catalysis found in the literature. PMID:22518271

  12. Structure and Function of Transient Encounters of Redox Proteins.

    PubMed

    Volkov, Alexander N

    2015-12-15

    Many biomolecular interactions proceed via lowly populated, transient intermediates. Believed to facilitate formation of a productive complex, these short-lived species are inaccessible to conventional biophysical and structural techniques and, until recently, could only be studied by theoretical simulations. Recent development of experimental approaches sensitive to the presence of minor species--in particular paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) NMR spectroscopy--has enabled direct visualization and detailed characterization of such lowly populated states. Collectively referred to as an encounter complex, the binding intermediates are particularly important in transient protein interactions, such as those orchestrating signaling cascades or energy-generating electron transfer (ET) chains. Here I discuss encounter complexes of redox proteins mediating biological ET reactions, which are essential for many vital cellular activities including oxidative phosphorylation and photosynthesis. In particular, this Account focuses on the complex of cytochrome c (Cc) and cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP), which is a paradigm of biomolecular ET and an attractive system for studying protein binding and enzymatic catalysis. The Cc-CcP complex formation proceeds via an encounter state, consisting of multiple protein-protein orientations sampled in the search of the dominant, functionally active bound form and exhibiting a broad spatial distribution, in striking agreement with earlier theoretical simulations. At low ionic strength, CcP binds another Cc molecule to form a weak ternary complex, initially inferred from kinetics experiments and postulated to account for the measured ET activity. Despite strenuous efforts, the ternary complex could not be observed directly and remained eagerly sought for the past two decades. Very recently, we have solved its structure in solution and shown that it consists of two binding forms: the dominant, ET-inactive geometry and an ensemble of

  13. Mitochondria: Redox Metabolism and Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jia; Pervaiz, Shazib

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria are the main intracellular location for fuel generation; however, they are not just power plants but involved in a range of other intracellular functions including regulation of redox homeostasis and cell fate. Dysfunction of mitochondria will result in oxidative stress which is one of the underlying causal factors for a variety of diseases including neurodegenerative diseases, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer. In this paper, generation of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) in the mitochondria, redox regulatory roles of certain mitochondrial proteins, and the impact on cell fate will be discussed. The current state of our understanding in mitochondrial dysfunction in pathological states and how we could target them for therapeutic purpose will also be briefly reviewed. PMID:22593827

  14. Cascade redox flow battery systems

    DOEpatents

    Horne, Craig R.; Kinoshita, Kim; Hickey, Darren B.; Sha, Jay E.; Bose, Deepak

    2014-07-22

    A reduction/oxidation ("redox") flow battery system includes a series of electrochemical cells arranged in a cascade, whereby liquid electrolyte reacts in a first electrochemical cell (or group of cells) before being directed into a second cell (or group of cells) where it reacts before being directed to subsequent cells. The cascade includes 2 to n stages, each stage having one or more electrochemical cells. During a charge reaction, electrolyte entering a first stage will have a lower state-of-charge than electrolyte entering the nth stage. In some embodiments, cell components and/or characteristics may be configured based on a state-of-charge of electrolytes expected at each cascade stage. Such engineered cascades provide redox flow battery systems with higher energy efficiency over a broader range of current density than prior art arrangements.

  15. Electronic phenomena in adsorption and catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kiselev, V.F.; Krylov, O.V.

    1987-01-01

    This book is the second of a three-volume treatment prepared by a physicist and a chemist, who took a common standpoint in considering the close relationship between the electronic processes taking place on the semiconductor-dielectric interface on the one hand, and the adsorptive and catalytic phenomena on the other. This volume brings together, and generalizes, a vast bulk of knowledge on the nature of surface and interface states, on the mechanism of surface electronic processes in semiconductors, as well as considers ways of controlling these processes. In addition, the authors discuss plausible mechanisms of elementary acts in surface charging during adsorption and catalysis.

  16. Redox signaling in acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Salvador; Pereda, Javier; Sabater, Luis; Sastre, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process of the pancreatic gland that eventually may lead to a severe systemic inflammatory response. A key event in pancreatic damage is the intracellular activation of NF-κB and zymogens, involving also calcium, cathepsins, pH disorders, autophagy, and cell death, particularly necrosis. This review focuses on the new role of redox signaling in acute pancreatitis. Oxidative stress and redox status are involved in the onset of acute pancreatitis and also in the development of the systemic inflammatory response, being glutathione depletion, xanthine oxidase activation, and thiol oxidation in proteins critical features of the disease in the pancreas. On the other hand, the release of extracellular hemoglobin into the circulation from the ascitic fluid in severe necrotizing pancreatitis enhances lipid peroxidation in plasma and the inflammatory infiltrate into the lung and up-regulates the HIF–VEGF pathway, contributing to the systemic inflammatory response. Therefore, redox signaling and oxidative stress contribute to the local and systemic inflammatory response during acute pancreatitis. PMID:25778551

  17. Redox Pioneer: Professor Irwin Fridovich

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Professor Irwin Fridovich Dr. Irwin Fridovich (Ph.D., 1955) is recognized here as a Redox Pioneer because as first/last author he has published at least 1 paper on antioxidant/redox biology that has been cited over 1000 times and has published at least 10 papers each cited over 100 times. In collaboration with his graduate student, Joe McCord, Dr. Fridovich discovered the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD). Subsequently, he and his colleagues demonstrated that the enzyme is ubiquitous among aerobic biota and comprises a critical defense against oxidative stress. With coworkers, Dr. Fridovich identified the first physiological targets of superoxide, the iron–sulfur clusters of dehydratases. They also showed that SOD is just one of several strategies by which cells fend off oxidative stress. It is now clear that organisms are chronically exposed to endogenous superoxide; further, microbes, plants, and mammals all employ superoxide as a weapon to poison their competitors. Thus, the achievement of Fridovich's laboratory was not only the seminal discovery of SOD but also the painstaking work over the subsequent decades that illuminated its place in biology. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 14, 355–340. When, by chance, you make an observation that cannot be explained in terms of current knowledge, do not hesitate to pursue it even though it may seem esoteric or unimportant. It may well lead you to discoveries of considerable importance. —Professor Irwin Fridovich PMID:20518701

  18. Redox Regulation of Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Thu H.; Carroll, Kate S.

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinases represent one of the largest families of genes found in eukaryotes. Kinases mediate distinct cellular processes ranging from proliferation, differentiation, survival, and apoptosis. Ligand-mediated activation of receptor kinases can lead to the production of endogenous H2O2 by membrane-bound NADPH oxidases. In turn, H2O2 can be utilized as a secondary messenger in signal transduction pathways. This review presents an overview of the molecular mechanisms involved in redox regulation of protein kinases and its effects on signaling cascades. In the first half, we will focus primarily on receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), whereas the latter will concentrate on downstream non-receptor kinases involved in relaying stimulant response. Select examples from the literature are used to highlight the functional role of H2O2 regarding kinase activity, as well as the components involved in H2O2 production and regulation during cellular signaling. In addition, studies demonstrating direct modulation of protein kinases by H2O2 through cysteine oxidation will be emphasized. Identification of these redox-sensitive residues may help uncover signaling mechanisms conserved within kinase subfamilies. In some cases, these residues can even be exploited as targets for the development of new therapeutics. Continued efforts in this field will further basic understanding of kinase redox regulation, and delineate the mechanisms involved in physiologic and pathological H2O2 responses. PMID:23639002

  19. Factors Affecting the Relative Efficiency of General Acid Catalysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwan, Eugene E.

    2005-01-01

    A simple framework for evaluating experimental kinetic data to provide support for Specific Acid Catalysis (SAC) and General Acid Catalysis (GAC) is described based on the factors affecting their relative efficiency. Observations reveal that increasing the SAC-to-GAC rate constant ratio reduces the effective pH range for GAC.

  20. Insights into the redox cycle of human quinone reductase 2.

    PubMed

    Reybier, Karine; Perio, Pierre; Ferry, Gilles; Bouajila, Jalloul; Delagrange, Philippe; Boutin, Jean A; Nepveu, Françoise

    2011-10-01

    NRH:quinone oxidoreductase 2 (QR2) is a cytosolic enzyme that catalyzes the reduction of quinones, such as menadione and co-enzymes Q. With the aim of understanding better the mechanisms of action of QR2, we approached this enzyme catalysis via electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements of the by-products of the QR2 redox cycle. The variation in the production of oxidative species such as H(2)O(2), and subsequent hydroxyl radical generation, was measured during the course of QR2 activity under aerobic conditions and using pure human enzyme. The effects on the activity of the following were compared: (i) synthetic (N-benzyldihydronicotinamide, BNAH) or natural (nicotinamide riboside, NRH) co-substrates; (ii) synthetic (menadione) or natural (co-enzyme Q0, Q2) substrates; (iii) QR2 modulators and inhibitors (melatonin, resveratrol and S29434); (iv) a pro-drug activated via a redox cycle [CB1954, 5-(aziridin-1-yl)-2,4-dinitrobenzamide]. The results were also compared with those obtained with human QR1. The production of hydroxyl radicals is: (i) observed whatever the substrate/co-substrate used; ii) quenched by adding catalase; (iii) not observed with the specific QR2 inhibitor S29434; (iv) observed with the pro-drug CB1954. While QR2 produced free radicals with this pro-drug, QR1 gave no EPR signal showing the strong reducing capacity of QR2. In conclusion, EPR analysis of QR2 enzyme activity through free radical production enables modulators and effective inhibitors to be distinguished. PMID:21762045

  1. Redox-inactive metal ions modulate the reactivity and oxygen release of mononuclear non-haem iron(III)–peroxo complexes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bang, Suhee; Lee, Yong -Min; Hong, Seungwoo; Cho, Kyung -Bin; Nishida, Yusuke; Seo, Mi Sook; Sarangi, Ritimukta; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Nam, Wonwoo

    2014-09-14

    Redox-inactive metal ions that function as Lewis acids play pivotal roles in modulating the reactivity of oxygen-containing metal complexes and metalloenzymes, such as the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II and its small-molecule mimics. Here we report the synthesis and characterization of non-haem iron(III)–peroxo complexes that bind redox-inactive metal ions, (TMC)FeIII–(μ,η2:η2-O2)–Mn+ (Mn+ = Sr2+, Ca2+, Zn2+, Lu3+, Y3+ and Sc3+; TMC, 1,4,8,11-tetramethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane). We demonstrate that the Ca2+ and Sr2+ complexes showed similar electrochemical properties and reactivities in one-electron oxidation or reduction reactions. However, the properties and reactivities of complexes formed with stronger Lewis acidities were found to be markedly different. Inmore » conclusion, complexes that contain Ca2+ or Sr2+ ions were oxidized by an electron acceptor to release O2, whereas the release of O2 did not occur for complexes that bind stronger Lewis acids. Furthermore, we discuss these results in the light of the functional role of the Ca2+ ion in the oxidation of water to dioxygen by the oxygen-evolving complex.« less

  2. H2 binding and splitting on a new-generation [FeFe]-hydrogenase model featuring a redox-active decamethylferrocenyl phosphine ligand: a theoretical investigation.

    PubMed

    Greco, Claudio

    2013-02-18

    [FeFe]-hydrogenases are dihydrogen-evolving metalloenzymes that are able to combine substrate binding and redox functionalities, a feature that has important bearing on their efficiency. New-generation bioinspired systems such as Fe(2)[(SCH(2))(2)NBn](CO)(3)(Cp*Fe(C(5)Me(4)CH(2)PEt(2)))(dppv) were shown to mimic H(2) oxidation and splitting processes performed by the [FeFe]-hydrogenase/ferredoxin system, and key mechanistic aspects of such reaction are theoretically investigated in the present contribution. We found that H(2) binding and heterolytic cleavage take place concomitantly on DFT models of the synthetic catalyst, due to a substrate-dependent intramolecular redox process that promotes dihydrogen activation. Therefore, formation of an iron-dihydrogen complex as a reaction intermediate is excluded in the biomimetic system, at variance with the case of the enzyme. H(2) uptake at the synthetic system also requires an energetically disfavored isomerization of the amine group acting as a base during splitting. A possible strategy to stabilize the conformation competent for H(2) binding is proposed, along with an analysis of the reactivity of a triiron complex in which di(thiomethyl)amine--the chelating group naturally occurring in [FeFe]-hydrogenases--substitutes the benzyl-containing dithiolate ligand. PMID:23374093

  3. Metal-free carbonylations by photoredox catalysis.

    PubMed

    Majek, Michal; Jacobi von Wangelin, Axel

    2015-02-01

    The synthesis of benzoates from aryl electrophiles and carbon monoxide is a prime example of a transition-metal-catalyzed carbonylation reaction which is widely applied in research and industrial processes. Such reactions proceed in the presence of Pd or Ni catalysts, suitable ligands, and stoichiometric bases. We have developed an alternative procedure that is free of any metal, ligand, and base. The method involves a redox reaction driven by visible light and catalyzed by eosin Y which affords alkyl benzoates from arene diazonium salts, carbon monoxide, and alcohols under mild conditions. Tertiary esters can also be prepared in high yields. DFT calculations and radical trapping experiments support a catalytic photoredox pathway without the requirement for sacrificial redox partners. PMID:25414135

  4. UV Catalysis, Cyanotype Photography, and Sunscreens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, Glen D.; Fishelson, Stuart

    1999-09-01

    This laboratory experiment is intended for a chemistry course for non-science majors. The experiment utilizes one of the earliest photographic processes, the cyanotype process, to demonstrate UV catalysis of chemical reactions. In addition to making photographic prints from negatives, the process can be used to test the effectiveness of sunscreens and the relative efficacy of the SPF (sun protection factor) rating of sunscreens. This is an inexpensive process, requiring solutions of ammonium ferric citrate and potassium ferricyanide, with options to use hydrogen peroxide and ammonium hydroxide solutions. Students can prepare their own UV-sensitized paper with the indicated chemicals and watch the photographic image appear as it is exposed to sunlight or fluorescent UV lamps in a light box designed for use in this experiment. The laboratory experiment should stimulate discussion of UV catalysis, photographic processes and photochemistry, sunscreens, and UV damage to biological organisms. The chemicals used are relatively nontoxic, and the procedure is simple enough to be used by groups of diverse ages and abilities.

  5. Mechanical catalysis on the centimetre scale

    PubMed Central

    Miyashita, Shuhei; Audretsch, Christof; Nagy, Zoltán; Füchslin, Rudolf M.; Pfeifer, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes play important roles in catalysing biochemical transaction paths, acting as logical machines through the morphology of the processes. A key challenge in elucidating the nature of these systems, and for engineering manufacturing methods inspired by biochemical reactions, is to attain a comprehensive understanding of the stereochemical ground rules of enzymatic reactions. Here, we present a model of catalysis that can be performed magnetically by centimetre-sized passive floating units. The designed system, which is equipped with permanent magnets only, passively obeys the local causalities imposed by magnetic interactions, albeit it shows a spatial behaviour and an energy profile analogous to those of biochemical enzymes. In this process, the enzyme units trigger physical conformation changes of the target by levelling out the magnetic potential barrier (activation potential) to a funnel type and, thus, induce cascading conformation changes of the targeted substrate units reacting in parallel. The inhibitor units, conversely, suppress such changes by increasing the potential. Because the model is purely mechanical and established on a physics basis in the absence of turbulence, each performance can be explained by the morphology of the unit, extending the definition of catalysis to systems of alternative scales. PMID:25652461

  6. Asymmetric catalysis: science and opportunities (Nobel lecture).

    PubMed

    Noyori, Ryoji

    2002-06-17

    Asymmetric catalysis, in its infancy in the 1960s, has dramatically changed the procedures of chemical synthesis, and resulted in an impressive progression to a level that technically approximates or sometimes even exceeds that of natural biological processes. The recent exceptional advances in this area attest to a range of conceptual breakthroughs in chemical sciences in general, and to the practical benefits of organic synthesis, not only in laboratories but also in industry. The growth of this core technology has given rise to enormous economic potential in the manufacture of pharmaceuticals, animal health products, agrochemicals, fungicides, pheromones, flavors, and fragrances. Practical asymmetric catalysis is of growing importance to a sustainable modern society, in which environmental protection is of increasing concern. This subject is an essential component of molecular science and technology in the 21st century. Most importantly, recent progress has spurred various interdisciplinary research efforts directed toward the creation of molecularly engineered novel functions. The origin and progress of my research in this field are discussed. PMID:19746595

  7. Mechanical catalysis on the centimetre scale.

    PubMed

    Miyashita, Shuhei; Audretsch, Christof; Nagy, Zoltán; Füchslin, Rudolf M; Pfeifer, Rolf

    2015-03-01

    Enzymes play important roles in catalysing biochemical transaction paths, acting as logical machines through the morphology of the processes. A key challenge in elucidating the nature of these systems, and for engineering manufacturing methods inspired by biochemical reactions, is to attain a comprehensive understanding of the stereochemical ground rules of enzymatic reactions. Here, we present a model of catalysis that can be performed magnetically by centimetre-sized passive floating units. The designed system, which is equipped with permanent magnets only, passively obeys the local causalities imposed by magnetic interactions, albeit it shows a spatial behaviour and an energy profile analogous to those of biochemical enzymes. In this process, the enzyme units trigger physical conformation changes of the target by levelling out the magnetic potential barrier (activation potential) to a funnel type and, thus, induce cascading conformation changes of the targeted substrate units reacting in parallel. The inhibitor units, conversely, suppress such changes by increasing the potential. Because the model is purely mechanical and established on a physics basis in the absence of turbulence, each performance can be explained by the morphology of the unit, extending the definition of catalysis to systems of alternative scales. PMID:25652461

  8. Tandem Catalysis Utilizing Olefin Metathesis Reactions.

    PubMed

    Zieliński, Grzegorz K; Grela, Karol

    2016-07-01

    Since olefin metathesis transformation has become a favored synthetic tool in organic synthesis, more and more distinct non-metathetical reactions of alkylidene ruthenium complexes have been developed. Depending on the conditions applied, the same olefin metathesis catalysts can efficiently promote isomerization reactions, hydrogenation of C=C double bonds, oxidation reactions, and many others. Importantly, these transformations can be carried out in tandem with olefin metathesis reactions. Through addition of one portion of a catalyst, a tandem process provides structurally advanced products from relatively simple substrates without the need for isolation of the intermediates. These aspects not only make tandem catalysis very attractive from a practical point of view, but also open new avenues in (retro)synthetic planning. However, in the literature, the term "tandem process" is sometimes used improperly to describe other types of multi-reaction sequences. In this Concept, a number of examples of tandem catalysis involving olefin metathesis are discussed with an emphasis on their synthetic value. PMID:27203528

  9. Laboratory Investigations of Catalysis on Grain Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, T. C.; Ferrante, R. F.; Moore, M. H.; Hallenbeck, S. L.

    1998-09-01

    We have begun a set of laboratory measurements to study the possible conversion of CO into CH_4 and other alkanes via Fischer-Tropsch catalysis in the presence of interstellar dust analogs containing iron. The dust analogs are sub-micron size iron silicate smokes made in a grain condensation chamber by reacting SiH_4 with O_2 in the presence of Fe (CO)_5 . The smokes are amorphous in phase and composition; based on our gas adsorption measurements they have a surface area of near 125 m(2) g(-1) . In the catalytic experiment, a mixture of H_2 + CO (2 : 1) is continuously circulated in a closed system through 0.1 g of iron silicate smoke. The smoke is heated to near 300 C while the gas reacts for a 3 hour period. The reacted gas is condensed onto a 10 K mirror attached to the tail of a cryostat. The infrared spectrum of the condensed gas is used to identify new species formed by catalysis. There is evidence for the conversion of CO into CH_4, C_2H_6 and C_2H_4. Similarly obtained background spectra not containing the catalyst do not show the same spectral signatures. Further experiments will quantitatively determine the efficiency of this conversion to determine if grain-catalyzed reactions such as these could play an important role in the chemistry of the solar nebula.NASA/Goddard

  10. Hydroxide catalysis bonding for astronomical instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Veggel, Anna-Maria A.; Killow, Christian J.

    2014-06-01

    Hydroxide catalysis bonding (HCB) as a jointing technique has been under development for astronomical applications since ˜1998 (patented by D.-H. Gwo). It uses an aqueous hydroxide solution to form a chemical bond between oxide or oxidisable materials (e.g., SiO2, sapphire, silicon and SiC). It forms strong, extremely thin bonds, and is suitable for room temperature bonding, precision alignment, operation in ultra-low vacuum and down to temperatures of 2.5 K. It has been applied in the NASA satellite mission Gravity Probe B and in the ground-based gravitational wave (GW) detector GEO600. It will soon fly again on the ESA LISA Pathfinder mission and is currently being implemented in the Advanced LIGO and Virgo ground-based GW detectors. This technique is also of considerable interest for use in other astronomical fields and indeed more broadly, due to its desirable, and adjustable, combination of properties. This paper gives an overview of how HCB has been and can be applied in astronomical instruments, including an overview of the current literature on the properties of hydroxide catalysis bonds.

  11. Structure and Catalysis of Acylaminoacyl Peptidase

    PubMed Central

    Harmat, Veronika; Domokos, Klarissza; Menyhárd, Dóra K.; Palló, Anna; Szeltner, Zoltán; Szamosi, Ilona; Beke-Somfai, Tamás; Náray-Szabó, Gábor; Polgár, László

    2011-01-01

    Acylaminoacyl peptidase from Aeropyrum pernix is a homodimer that belongs to the prolyl oligopeptidase family. The monomer subunit is composed of one hydrolase and one propeller domain. Previous crystal structure determinations revealed that the propeller domain obstructed the access of substrate to the active site of both subunits. Here we investigated the structure and the kinetics of two mutant enzymes in which the aspartic acid of the catalytic triad was changed to alanine or asparagine. Using different substrates, we have determined the pH dependence of specificity rate constants, the rate-limiting step of catalysis, and the binding of substrates and inhibitors. The catalysis considerably depended both on the kind of mutation and on the nature of the substrate. The results were interpreted in terms of alterations in the position of the catalytic histidine side chain as demonstrated with crystal structure determination of the native and two mutant structures (D524N and D524A). Unexpectedly, in the homodimeric structures, only one subunit displayed the closed form of the enzyme. The other subunit exhibited an open gate to the catalytic site, thus revealing the structural basis that controls the oligopeptidase activity. The open form of the native enzyme displayed the catalytic triad in a distorted, inactive state. The mutations affected the closed, active form of the enzyme, disrupting its catalytic triad. We concluded that the two forms are at equilibrium and the substrates bind by the conformational selection mechanism. PMID:21084296

  12. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics of thiol/disulfide redox systems: A perspective on redox systems biology

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, Melissa; Go, Young-Mi; Jones, Dean P.

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of redox elements in biologic systems remains a major challenge for redox signaling and oxidative stress research. Central redox elements include evolutionarily conserved subsets of cysteines and methionines of proteins which function as sulfur switches and labile reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) which function in redox signaling. The sulfur switches depend upon redox environments in which rates of oxidation are balanced with rates of reduction through the thioredoxins, glutathione/glutathione disulfide and cysteine/cystine redox couples. These central couples, which we term redox control nodes, are maintained at stable but non-equilibrium steady states, are largely independently regulated in different subcellular compartments and are quasi-independent from each other within compartments. Disruption of the redox control nodes can differentially affect sulfur switches, thereby creating a diversity of oxidative stress responses. Systems biology provides approaches to address the complexity of these responses. In the present review, we summarize thiol/disulfide pathway, redox potential and rate information as a basis for kinetic modeling of sulfur switches. The summary identifies gaps in knowledge especially related to redox communication between compartments, definition of redox pathways and discrimination between types of sulfur switches. A formulation for kinetic modeling of GSH/GSSG redox control indicates that systems biology could encourage novel therapeutic approaches to protect against oxidative stress by identifying specific redox-sensitive sites which could be targeted for intervention. PMID:18155672

  13. NASA Redox system development project status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nice, A. W.

    1981-01-01

    NASA-Redox energy storage systems developed for solar power applications and utility load leveling applications are discussed. The major objective of the project is to establish the technology readiness of Redox energy storage for transfer to industry for product development and commercialization by industry. The approach is to competitively contract to design, build, and test Redox systems progressively from preprototype to prototype multi-kW and megawatt systems and conduct supporting technology advancement tasks. The Redox electrode and membrane are fully adequate for multi-kW solar related applications and the viability of the Redox system technology as demonstrated for multi-kW solar related applications. The status of the NASA Redox Storage System Project is described along with the goals and objectives of the project elements.

  14. Redox Control of Renal Function and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Whaley-Connell, Adam; Sowers, James R.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Loss of redox homeostasis and formation of excessive free radicals play an important role in the pathogenesis of kidney disease and hypertension. Free radicals such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) are necessary in physiologic processes. However, loss of redox homeostasis contributes to proinflammatory and profibrotic pathways in the kidney, which in turn lead to reduced vascular compliance and proteinuria. The kidney is susceptible to the influence of various extracellular and intracellular cues, including the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system (RAAS), hyperglycemia, lipid peroxidation, inflammatory cytokines, and growth factors. Redox control of kidney function is a dynamic process with reversible pro– and anti-free radical processes. The imbalance of redox homeostasis within the kidney is integral in hypertension and the progression of kidney disease. An emerging paradigm exists for renal redox contribution to hypertension. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 11, 2047–2089. PMID:18821850

  15. Interplay between redox and protein homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Feleciano, Diogo R; Arnsburg, Kristin; Kirstein, Janine

    2016-01-01

    The subcellular compartments of eukaryotic cells are characterized by different redox environments. Whereas the cytosol, nucleus and mitochondria are more reducing, the endoplasmic reticulum represents a more oxidizing environment. As the redox level controls the formation of intra- and inter-molecular disulfide bonds, the folding of proteins is tightly linked to its environment. The proteostasis network of each compartment needs to be adapted to the compartmental redox properties. In addition to chaperones, also members of the thioredoxin superfamily can influence the folding of proteins by regulation of cysteine reduction/oxidation. This review will focus on thioredoxin superfamily members and chaperones of C. elegans, which play an important role at the interface between redox and protein homeostasis. Additionally, this review will highlight recent methodological developments on in vivo and in vitro assessment of the redox state and their application to provide insights into the high complexity of redox and proteostasis networks of C. elegans. PMID:27386166

  16. Redox Pioneer: Professor Vadim N. Gladyshev.

    PubMed

    Hatfield, Dolph L

    2016-07-01

    Professor Vadim N. Gladyshev is recognized here as a Redox Pioneer, because he has published an article on antioxidant/redox biology that has been cited more than 1000 times and 29 articles that have been cited more than 100 times. Gladyshev is world renowned for his characterization of the human selenoproteome encoded by 25 genes, identification of the majority of known selenoprotein genes in the three domains of life, and discoveries related to thiol oxidoreductases and mechanisms of redox control. Gladyshev's first faculty position was in the Department of Biochemistry, the University of Nebraska. There, he was a Charles Bessey Professor and Director of the Redox Biology Center. He then moved to the Department of Medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, where he is Professor of Medicine and Director of the Center for Redox Medicine. His discoveries in redox biology relate to selenoenzymes, such as methionine sulfoxide reductases and thioredoxin reductases, and various thiol oxidoreductases. He is responsible for the genome-wide identification of catalytic redox-active cysteines and for advancing our understanding of the general use of cysteines by proteins. In addition, Gladyshev has characterized hydrogen peroxide metabolism and signaling and regulation of protein function by methionine-R-sulfoxidation. He has also made important contributions in the areas of aging and lifespan control and pioneered applications of comparative genomics in redox biology, selenium biology, and aging. Gladyshev's discoveries have had a profound impact on redox biology and the role of redox control in health and disease. He is a true Redox Pioneer. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 1-9. PMID:26984707

  17. Hydrolytic catalysis and structural stabilization in a designed metalloprotein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zastrow, Melissa L.; Peacock, Anna F. A.; Stuckey, Jeanne A.; Pecoraro, Vincent L.

    2012-02-01

    Metal ions are an important part of many natural proteins, providing structural, catalytic and electron transfer functions. Reproducing these functions in a designed protein is the ultimate challenge to our understanding of them. Here, we present an artificial metallohydrolase, which has been shown by X-ray crystallography to contain two different metal ions—a Zn(II) ion, which is important for catalytic activity, and a Hg(II) ion, which provides structural stability. This metallohydrolase displays catalytic activity that compares well with several characteristic reactions of natural enzymes. It catalyses p-nitrophenyl acetate (pNPA) hydrolysis with an efficiency only ~100-fold less than that of human carbonic anhydrase (CA)II and at least 550-fold better than comparable synthetic complexes. Similarly, CO2 hydration occurs with an efficiency within ~500-fold of CAII. Although histidine residues in the absence of Zn(II) exhibit pNPA hydrolysis, miniscule apopeptide activity is observed for CO2 hydration. The kinetic and structural analysis of this first de novo designed hydrolytic metalloenzyme reveals necessary design features for future metalloenzymes containing one or more metals.

  18. Hydrolytic catalysis and structural stabilization in a designed metalloprotein.

    PubMed

    Zastrow, Melissa L; Peacock, Anna F A; Stuckey, Jeanne A; Pecoraro, Vincent L

    2012-02-01

    Metal ions are an important part of many natural proteins, providing structural, catalytic and electron transfer functions. Reproducing these functions in a designed protein is the ultimate challenge to our understanding of them. Here, we present an artificial metallohydrolase, which has been shown by X-ray crystallography to contain two different metal ions-a Zn(II) ion, which is important for catalytic activity, and a Hg(II) ion, which provides structural stability. This metallohydrolase displays catalytic activity that compares well with several characteristic reactions of natural enzymes. It catalyses p-nitrophenyl acetate (pNPA) hydrolysis with an efficiency only ~100-fold less than that of human carbonic anhydrase (CA)II and at least 550-fold better than comparable synthetic complexes. Similarly, CO(2) hydration occurs with an efficiency within ~500-fold of CAII. Although histidine residues in the absence of Zn(II) exhibit pNPA hydrolysis, miniscule apopeptide activity is observed for CO(2) hydration. The kinetic and structural analysis of this first de novo designed hydrolytic metalloenzyme reveals necessary design features for future metalloenzymes containing one or more metals. PMID:22270627

  19. Zinc and the modulation of redox homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Oteiza, Patricia I.

    2012-01-01

    Zinc, a redox inactive metal, has been long viewed as a component of the antioxidant network, and growing evidence points to its involvement in redox-regulated signaling. These actions are exerted through several mechanisms based on the unique chemical and functional properties of zinc. Overall, zinc contributes to maintain the cell redox balance through different mechanisms including: i) the regulation of oxidant production and metal-induced oxidative damage; ii) the dynamic association of zinc with sulfur in protein cysteine clusters, from which the metal can be released by nitric oxide, peroxides, oxidized glutathione and other thiol oxidant species; iii) zinc-mediated induction of the zinc-binding protein metallothionein, which releases the metal under oxidative conditions and act per se scavenging oxidants; iv) the involvement of zinc in the regulation of glutathione metabolism and of the overall protein thiol redox status; and v) a direct or indirect regulation of redox signaling. Findings of oxidative stress, altered redox signaling, and associated cell/tissue disfunction in cell and animal models of zinc deficiency, stress the relevant role of zinc in the preservation of cell redox homeostasis. However, while the participation of zinc in antioxidant protection, redox sensing, and redox-regulated signaling is accepted, the involved molecules, targets and mechanisms are still partially known and the subject of active research. PMID:22960578

  20. Redox conditions for mantle plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heister, L. E.; Lesher, C. E.

    2005-12-01

    The vanadium to scandium ratio (V/Sc) for basalts from mid-ocean ridge (MOR) and arc environments has been proposed as a proxy for fO2 conditions during partial melting (e.g. [1] and [2]). Contrary to barometric measurements of the fO2 of primitive lavas, the V/Sc ratio of the upper mantle at mid-ocean ridges and arcs is similar, leading previous authors to propose that the upper mantle has uniform redox potential and is well-buffered. We have attempted to broaden the applicability of the V/Sc parameter to plume-influenced localities (both oceanic and continental), where mantle heterogeneities associated with recycled sediments, mafic crust, and metasomatized mantle, whether of shallow or deep origin, exist. We find that primitive basalts from the North Atlantic Igneous Province (NAIP), Hawaii (both the Loa and Kea trends), Deccan, Columbia River, and Siberian Traps show a range of V/Sc ratios that are generally higher (average ~9) than those for MOR (average ~ 6.7) or arc (average ~7) lavas. Based on forward polybaric decompression modeling, we attribute these differences to polybaric melting and melt segregation within the garnet stability field rather than the presence of a more oxidized mantle in plume-influenced settings. Like MORB, the V/Sc ratios for plume-influenced basalts can be accounted for by an oxidation state approximately one log unit below the Ni-NiO buffer (NNO-1). Our analysis suggests that source heterogeneities have little, if any, resolvable influence on mantle redox conditions, although they have significant influence on the trace element and isotopic composition of mantle-derived melts. We suggest that variations in the redox of erupted lavas is largely a function of shallow lithospheric processes rather than intrinsic to the mantle source, regardless of tectonic setting. [1] Li and Lee (2004) EPSL, [2] Lee et al. (2005) J. of Petrology

  1. A Highly Active Low Voltage Redox Mediator for Enhanced Rechargeability of Lithium–Oxygen Batteries

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Owing to its high theoretical specific energy, the Li-oxygen battery is one of the fundamentally most promising energy storage systems, but also one of the most challenging. Poor rechargeability, involving the oxidation of insoluble and insulating lithium peroxide (Li2O2), has remained the “Achilles’ heel” of this electrochemical energy storage system. We report here on a new redox mediator tris[4-(diethylamino)phenyl]amine (TDPA), that—at 3.1 V—exhibits the lowest and closest potential redox couple compared to the equilibrium voltage of the Li-oxygen cell of those reported to date, with a second couple also at a low potential of 3.5 V. We show it is a soluble “catalyst” capable of lowering the Li2O2 charging potential by >0.8 V without requiring direct electrical contact of the peroxide and that it also facilitates high discharge capacities. Its chemical and electrochemical stability, fast diffusion kinetics, and two dynamic redox potentials represent a significant advance in oxygen-evolution catalysis. It enables Li–O2 cells that can be recharged more than 100 cycles with average round-trip efficiencies >80%, opening a new avenue for practical Li-oxygen batteries. PMID:27163015

  2. Reversible redox reactions in an epitaxially stabilized SrCoOx oxygen sponge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeen, Hyoungjeen; Choi, Woo Seok; Biegalski, Michael D.; Folkman, Chad M.; Tung, I.-Cheng; Fong, Dillon D.; Freeland, John W.; Shin, Dongwon; Ohta, Hiromichi; Chisholm, Matthew F.; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2013-11-01

    Fast, reversible redox reactions in solids at low temperatures without thermomechanical degradation are a promising strategy for enhancing the overall performance and lifetime of many energy materials and devices. However, the robust nature of the cation’s oxidation state and the high thermodynamic barrier have hindered the realization of fast catalysis and bulk diffusion at low temperatures. Here, we report a significant lowering of the redox temperature by epitaxial stabilization of strontium cobaltites (SrCoOx) grown directly as one of two distinct crystalline phases, either the perovskite SrCoO3-δ or the brownmillerite SrCoO2.5. Importantly, these two phases can be reversibly switched at a remarkably reduced temperature (200-300 °C) in a considerably short time (< 1 min) without destroying the parent framework. The fast, low-temperature redox activity in SrCoO3-δ is attributed to a small Gibbs free-energy difference between two topotatic phases. Our findings thus provide useful information for developing highly sensitive electrochemical sensors and low-temperature cathode materials.

  3. A Highly Active Low Voltage Redox Mediator for Enhanced Rechargeability of Lithium-Oxygen Batteries.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Dipan; Black, Robert; Adams, Brian; Nazar, Linda F

    2015-12-23

    Owing to its high theoretical specific energy, the Li-oxygen battery is one of the fundamentally most promising energy storage systems, but also one of the most challenging. Poor rechargeability, involving the oxidation of insoluble and insulating lithium peroxide (Li2O2), has remained the "Achilles' heel" of this electrochemical energy storage system. We report here on a new redox mediator tris[4-(diethylamino)phenyl]amine (TDPA), that-at 3.1 V-exhibits the lowest and closest potential redox couple compared to the equilibrium voltage of the Li-oxygen cell of those reported to date, with a second couple also at a low potential of 3.5 V. We show it is a soluble "catalyst" capable of lowering the Li2O2 charging potential by >0.8 V without requiring direct electrical contact of the peroxide and that it also facilitates high discharge capacities. Its chemical and electrochemical stability, fast diffusion kinetics, and two dynamic redox potentials represent a significant advance in oxygen-evolution catalysis. It enables Li-O2 cells that can be recharged more than 100 cycles with average round-trip efficiencies >80%, opening a new avenue for practical Li-oxygen batteries. PMID:27163015

  4. Organic photoredox catalysis for the oxidation of silicates: applications in radical synthesis and dual catalysis.

    PubMed

    Lévêque, Christophe; Chenneberg, Ludwig; Corcé, Vincent; Ollivier, Cyril; Fensterbank, Louis

    2016-08-01

    Metal free photooxidation of alkyl bis(catecholato)silicates with the organic dye 1,2,3,5-tetrakis(carbazol-9-yl)-4,6-dicyano-benzene (4CzIPN) allows the smooth formation of alkyl radicals. The latter can be efficiently engaged either with radical acceptors to provide homolytic addition products or in photoredox/nickel dual catalysis reactions to obtain cross-coupling products. PMID:27373923

  5. Novel Catalysis by Gold: A Modern Alchemy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haruta, Masatake

    Gold has long been neglected as a catalyst because of its chemical inertness. However, when gold is deposited as nanoparticles on carbon and polymer materials as well as on base metal oxides and hydroxides, it exhibits unique catalytic properties for many reactions such as CO oxidation at a temperature as low as 200 K, gas phase direct epoxidation of propylene, and aerobic oxidation of glucose to gluconic acid. The structure-catalytic activity correlations are discussed with emphasis on the contact structure, support selection, and the size control of gold particles. Gold clusters with diameters smaller than 2 nm are expected to exhibit novel properties in catalysis, optics, and electronics depending on the size (number of atoms), shape, and the electronic and chemical interaction with the support materials. The above achievements and attempts can be regarded as a modern alchemy that creates valuables by means of the noblest element with little practical use.

  6. Multifunctional Ligands in Transition Metal Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, Robert H

    2011-01-01

    Sophisticated ligands are now being designed that do far more than just fulfil their traditional spectator roles by binding to the metal and providing a sterically-defined binding pocket for the substrate in homogeneous transition metal catalysis. This Focus review emphasizes selected cases in which ligands carry additional functional groups that change the properties of the ligand as a result of an external stimulus or undergo catalytically-relevant ligand-based reactivity. These include proton responsive ligands capable of gaining or losing one or more protons, ligands having a hydrogen bonding function, electroresponsive ligands capable of gaining or losing one or more electrons, and photoresponsive ligands capable of undergoing a useful change of properties upon irradiation. Molecular recognition ligands and proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) are briefly discussed.

  7. Multiple roles of graphene in heterogeneous catalysis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaobin; Zhang, Guoliang; Zhang, Fengbao

    2015-05-21

    Scientific interest in graphene as a catalyst and as a catalyst support in heterogeneous catalytic reactions has grown dramatically over the past several years. The present critical review summarizes the multiple roles of graphene in heterogeneous catalysis and highlights the influence of defects, heteroatom-containing functionalities, and graphene's two-dimensional structure on catalytic performance. We first discuss the role and advantages of graphene as a catalyst support, with emphasis on its interactions with the catalytic phases and the influence of mass transfer processes. We then clarify the origin of the intrinsic catalytic activity of graphene in heterogeneous catalytic reactions. Finally we suggest challenges and potential practical applications for graphene in industrial processes. PMID:25777748

  8. Substrate Controlled Divergence in Polyketide Synthase Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Biochemical characterization of polyketide synthases (PKSs) has relied on synthetic substrates functionalized as electrophilic esters to acylate the enzyme and initiate the catalytic cycle. In these efforts, N-acetylcysteamine thioesters have typically been employed for in vitro studies of full PKS modules as well as excised domains. However, substrate engineering approaches to control the catalytic cycle of a full PKS module harboring multiple domains remain underexplored. This study examines a series of alternatively activated native hexaketide substrates on the catalytic outcome of PikAIV, the sixth and final module of the pikromycin (Pik) pathway. We demonstrate the ability to control product formation with greater than 10:1 selectivity for either full module catalysis, leading to a 14-membered macrolactone, or direct cyclization to a 12-membered ring. This outcome was achieved through modifying the type of hexaketide ester employed, demonstrating the utility of substrate engineering in PKS functional studies and biocatalysis. PMID:25730816

  9. A simplified electrostatic model for hydrolase catalysis.

    PubMed

    Pessoa Filho, Pedro de Alcantara; Prausnitz, John M

    2015-07-01

    Toward the development of an electrostatic model for enzyme catalysis, the active site of the enzyme is represented by a cavity whose surface (and beyond) is populated by electric charges as determined by pH and the enzyme's structure. The electric field in the cavity is obtained from electrostatics and a suitable computer program. The key chemical bond in the substrate, at its ends, has partial charges with opposite signs determined from published force-field parameters. The electric field attracts one end of the bond and repels the other, causing bond tension. If that tension exceeds the attractive force between the atoms, the bond breaks; the enzyme is then a successful catalyst. To illustrate this very simple model, based on numerous assumptions, some results are presented for three hydrolases: hen-egg white lysozyme, bovine trypsin and bovine ribonuclease. Attention is given to the effect of pH. PMID:25881958

  10. Earth abundant bimetallic nanoparticles for heterogeneous catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senn, Jonathan F., Jr.

    Polymer exchange membrane fuel cells have the potential to replace current fossil fuel-based technologies in terms of emissions and efficiency, but CO contamination of H2 fuel, which is derived from steam methane reforming, leads to system inefficiency or failure. Solutions currently under development are bimetallic nanoparticles comprised of earth-abundant metals in different architectures to reduce the concentration of CO by PROX during fuel cell operation. Chapter One introduces the Pt-Sn and Co-Ni bimetallic nanoparticle systems, and the intermetallic and core-shell architectures of interest for catalytic evaluation. Application, theory, and studies associated with the efficacy of these nanoparticles are briefly reviewed. Chapter Two describes the concepts of the synthetic and characterization methods used in this work. Chapter Three presents the synthetic, characterization, and catalytic findings of this research. Pt, PtSn, PtSn2, and Pt 3Sn nanoparticles have been synthesized and supported on gamma-Al2O3. Pt3Sn was shown to be an effective PROX catalyst in various gas feed conditions, such as the gas mixture incorporating 0.1% CO, which displayed a light-off temperatures of ˜95°C. Co and Ni monometallic and CoNi bimetallic nanoparticles have been synthesized and characterized, ultimately leading to the development of target Co Ni core-shell nanoparticles. Proposed studies of catalytic properties of these nanoparticles in preferential oxidation of CO (PROX) reactions will further elucidate the effects of different crystallographic phases, nanoparticle-support interactions, and architecture on catalysis, and provide fundamental understanding of catalysis with nanoparticles composed of earth abundant metals in different architectures.

  11. Prebiotic RNA Synthesis by Montmorillonite Catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jheeta, Sohan; Joshi, Prakash C.

    2014-08-01

    This review summarizes our recent findings on the role of mineral salts in prebiotic RNA synthesis, which is catalyzed by montmorillonite clay minerals. The clay minerals not only catalyze the synthesis of RNA but also facilitate homochiral selection. Preliminary data of these findings have been presented at the "Horizontal Gene Transfer and the Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA)" conference at the Open University, Milton Keynes, UK, 5-6 September 2013. The objective of this meeting was to recognize the significance of RNA in LUCA. We believe that the prebiotic RNA synthesis from its monomers must have been a simple process. As a first step, it may have required activation of the 5'-end of the mononucleotide with a leaving group, e.g., imidazole in our model reaction (Figure 1). Wide ranges of activating groups are produced from HCN under plausible prebiotic Earth conditions. The final step is clay mineral catalysis in the presence of mineral salts to facilitate selective production of functional RNA. Both the clay minerals and mineral salts would have been abundant on early Earth. We have demonstrated that while montmorillonite (pH 7) produced only dimers from its monomers in water, addition of sodium chloride (1 M) enhanced the chain length multifold, as detected by HPLC. The effect of monovalent cations on RNA synthesis was of the following order: Li+ > Na+ > K+. A similar effect was observed with the anions, enhancing catalysis in the following order: Cl- > Br- > I-. The montmorillonite-catalyzed RNA synthesis was not affected by hydrophobic or hydrophilic interactions. We thus show that prebiotic synthesis of RNA from its monomers was a simple process requiring only clay minerals and a small amount of salt.

  12. Prebiotic RNA Synthesis by Montmorillonite Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Jheeta, Sohan; Joshi, Prakash C.

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes our recent findings on the role of mineral salts in prebiotic RNA synthesis, which is catalyzed by montmorillonite clay minerals. The clay minerals not only catalyze the synthesis of RNA but also facilitate homochiral selection. Preliminary data of these findings have been presented at the “Horizontal Gene Transfer and the Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA)” conference at the Open University, Milton Keynes, UK, 5–6 September 2013. The objective of this meeting was to recognize the significance of RNA in LUCA. We believe that the prebiotic RNA synthesis from its monomers must have been a simple process. As a first step, it may have required activation of the 5'-end of the mononucleotide with a leaving group, e.g., imidazole in our model reaction (Figure 1). Wide ranges of activating groups are produced from HCN under plausible prebiotic Earth conditions. The final step is clay mineral catalysis in the presence of mineral salts to facilitate selective production of functional RNA. Both the clay minerals and mineral salts would have been abundant on early Earth. We have demonstrated that while montmorillonite (pH 7) produced only dimers from its monomers in water, addition of sodium chloride (1 M) enhanced the chain length multifold, as detected by HPLC. The effect of monovalent cations on RNA synthesis was of the following order: Li+ > Na+ > K+. A similar effect was observed with the anions, enhancing catalysis in the following order: Cl− > Br− > I−. The montmorillonite-catalyzed RNA synthesis was not affected by hydrophobic or hydrophilic interactions. We thus show that prebiotic synthesis of RNA from its monomers was a simple process requiring only clay minerals and a small amount of salt. PMID:25370375

  13. Chromium electrodes for REDOX cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalan, V.; Reid, M. A.; Charleston, A. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    An improved electrode having a gold coating for use in the anode compartment of a REDOX cell is described. The anode fluid utilizes a chromic/chromous couple. A carbon felt is soaked in methanol, rinsed in water, dried and then heated in KOH after which it is again washed in deionized water and dried. The felt is then moistened with a methanol water solution containing chloroauric acid and is stored in a dark place while still in contact with the gold-containing solution. After all the gold-containing solution is absorbed in the felt, the latter is dried by heat and then heat treated at a substantially greater temperature. The felt is then suitable for use as an electrode and is wetted with water or up to two molar HCl prior to installation in a REDOX cell. The novelty of the invention lies in the use of KOH for cleaning the felt and the use of alcohol as a carrier for the gold together with the heat treating procedure.

  14. Redox pioneer: professor Barry Halliwell.

    PubMed

    Pervaiz, Shazib

    2011-05-01

    Professor Barry Halliwell is recognized as a Redox Pioneer because he has published eight articles on redox biology that have been each cited more than 1000 times, and 158 articles that have been each cited more than 100 times. His contributions go back as far as 1976, when he was involved in elucidation of the Foyer-Halliwell-Asada cycle, an efficient mechanism for preventing oxidative damage to chloroplasts. His subsequent work established the important role of iron and zinc in free radical reactions and their relevance to human pathologies. Professor Halliwell is also a leader in developing novel methodology for detecting free radical intermediates in vivo, and his contributions to our knowledge of reactive nitrogen species are highly significant. His sustained excellence won him the top-cited scientist award in the United Kingdom in biomedical sciences in 1999, and in 2003 he was recognized as a highly cited scientist by Institute of Scientific Information (ISI) for work on plant antioxidants, and the same year ranked 28 out of 5494 biochemists/biologists for scientific impact. Two pieces of his scholarly work have been listed as Citation Classics by ISI, and in 2007 his laboratory was ranked number 1 worldwide based on highest citation score in research on free radicals. PMID:20969479

  15. Dual Catalysis Strategies in Photochemical Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Skubi, Kazimer L; Blum, Travis R; Yoon, Tehshik P

    2016-09-14

    The interaction between an electronically excited photocatalyst and an organic molecule can result in the genertion of a diverse array of reactive intermediates that can be manipulated in a variety of ways to result in synthetically useful bond constructions. This Review summarizes dual-catalyst strategies that have been applied to synthetic photochemistry. Mechanistically distinct modes of photocatalysis are discussed, including photoinduced electron transfer, hydrogen atom transfer, and energy transfer. We focus upon the cooperative interactions of photocatalysts with redox mediators, Lewis and Brønsted acids, organocatalysts, enzymes, and transition metal complexes. PMID:27109441

  16. Flavin Redox Switching of Protein Functions

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Weidong; Moxley, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Flavin cofactors impart remarkable catalytic diversity to enzymes, enabling them to participate in a broad array of biological processes. The properties of flavins also provide proteins with a versatile redox sensor that can be utilized for converting physiological signals such as cellular metabolism, light, and redox status into a unique functional output. The control of protein functions by the flavin redox state is important for transcriptional regulation, cell signaling pathways, and environmental adaptation. A significant number of proteins that have flavin redox switches are found in the Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain family and include flavoproteins that act as photosensors and respond to changes in cellular redox conditions. Biochemical and structural studies of PAS domain flavoproteins have revealed key insights into how flavin redox changes are propagated to the surface of the protein and translated into a new functional output such as the binding of a target protein in a signaling pathway. Mechanistic details of proteins unrelated to the PAS domain are also emerging and provide novel examples of how the flavin redox state governs protein–membrane interactions in response to appropriate stimuli. Analysis of different flavin switch proteins reveals shared mechanistic themes for the regulation of protein structure and function by flavins. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 14, 1079–1091. PMID:21028987

  17. A direct way of redox sensing.

    PubMed

    Benoit, Roger; Auer, Manfred

    2011-01-01

    The function and activity of many proteins can be regulated by changes in the intracellular redox potential. This regulation can involve posttranslational modifications mediated by redox-sensitive pathways. A more direct way to sense redox changes is through reversible covalent modification of cysteine residues of proteins by reactive oxygen species (ROS), e.g. H2O2, and reactive nitrogen species (RNS), e.g. NO. Known cysteine modifications include disulfide bonds, S-nitrosylation, S-glutathionylation, as well as sulphenic acid or sulphinic acid formation. Cysteine-based redox switches are difficult to predict because currently the knowledge of precise consensus sequences is limited. One recurrent feature of known redox switches is the close proximity of polar amino acids to the reactive cysteine, resulting in stabilization of the reactive thiolate anion form. There is growing evidence that intracellular thiol-based redox sensing and signaling mechanisms may also be involved in the regulation of RNA-binding proteins. Here, we discuss the concept of cysteine-based redox sensing and signaling, the potential importance of redox switches in RNA-binding proteins and open questions in the field. PMID:21220941

  18. The Role of Conserved Tyrosine Residues in NiSOD Catalysis: A Case of Convergent Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, Robert W.; Guce, Abigail; Bryngelson, Peter A.; Higgins, Khadine A.; Ryan, Kelly C.; Cabelli, Diane E.; Garman, Scott C.; Maroney, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Superoxide dismutases rely on protein structural elements to adjust the redox potential of the metallocenter to an optimum value near 300 mV (vs. NHE), to provide a source of protons for catalysis, and to control the access of anions to the active site. These aspects of the catalytic mechanism are examined herein for recombinant preparations of the nickel-dependent SOD (NiSOD) from Streptomyces coelicolor, and for a series of mutants that affect a key tyrosine residue, Tyr9 (Y9F-, Y62F-, Y9FY62F- and D3A-NiSOD). Structural aspects of the nickel sites are examined by a combination of EPR and x-ray absorption spectroscopies, and by single crystal x-ray diffraction at ~ 1.9 Å resolution in the case of Y9F- and D3A-NiSODs. The functional effects of the mutations are examined by kinetic studies employing pulse radiolytic generation of O2− and by redox titrations. These studies reveal that although the structure of the nickel center in NiSOD is unique, the ligand environment is designed to optimize the redox potential at 290 mV and results in the oxidation of 50% of the nickel centers in the oxidized hexamer. Kinetic investigations show that all of the mutant proteins have considerable activity. In the case of Y9F-NiSOD, the enzyme shows saturation behavior that is not observed in WT-NiSOD and suggests that release of peroxide is inhibited. The crystal structure of Y9F-NiSOD reveals an anion binding site that is occupied by either Cl− or Br− and is located close to, but not within bonding distance of the nickel center. The structure of D3A-NiSOD reveals that in addition to affecting the interaction between subunits, this mutation repositions Y9 and leads to altered chemistry with peroxide. Comparisons with Mn(SOD) and Fe(SOD) reveal that although different strategies are employed to adjust the redox potential and supply of protons, NiSOD has evolved a similar strategy to control the access of anions to the active site. PMID:19183068

  19. Novel insights into redox system and the mechanism of redox regulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Hai, Chunxu

    2016-07-01

    In view of the critical role of redox system in numerous physiological and pathophysiological processes, it is important to clearly understand the family members and regulatory mechanism of redox system. In this work, we will systematically review the current data detailing the reactive oxygen species (ROS), enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants and redox sensitive transcription factors and we give a brief description of redox-mediated epigenetic and post-translational regulation. We propose that the redox system functions as a "Redox Chain", consisting of "ROS-generating Enzyme Chain", "Combined Antioxidant Chain" and "Transcription Factor Chain". We suggest that an individualized assessment of the redox status in the body should be conducted for the redox intervention of a patient. The strategy of intervention is to maintain redox homeostasis via either facilitation of ROS signaling or enhancement of antioxidant defense. These findings provide valuable new insights into redox system and open up new paths for the control of redox-related disorders. PMID:27255468

  20. Method for characterization of the redox condition of cementitious materials

    SciTech Connect

    Almond, Philip M.; Langton, Christine A.; Stefanko, David B.

    2015-12-22

    Disclosed are methods for determining the redox condition of cementitious materials. The methods are leaching methods that utilize an in situ redox indicator that is present in the cementitious materials as formed. The in situ redox indicator leaches from cementitious material and, when the leaching process is carried out under anaerobic conditions can be utilized to determine the redox condition of the material. The in situ redox indicator can exhibit distinct characteristics in the leachate depending upon the redox condition of the indicator.

  1. Screening of redox couples and electrode materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giner, J.; Swette, L.; Cahill, K.

    1976-01-01

    Electrochemical parameters of selected redox couples that might be potentially promising for application in bulk energy storage systems were investigated. This was carried out in two phases: a broad investigation of the basic characteristics and behavior of various redox couples, followed by a more limited investigation of their electrochemical performance in a redox flow reactor configuration. In the first phase of the program, eight redox couples were evaluated under a variety of conditions in terms of their exchange current densities as measured by the rotating disk electrode procedure. The second phase of the program involved the testing of four couples in a redox reactor under flow conditions with a varity of electrode materials and structures.

  2. Redox signaling in cardiovascular health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Madamanchi, Nageswara R.; Runge, Marschall S.

    2013-01-01

    Spatiotemporal regulation of the activity of a vast array of intracellular proteins and signaling pathways by reactive oxygen species (ROS) governs normal cardiovascular function. However, data from experimental and animal studies strongly support that dysregulated redox signaling, resulting from hyper-activation of various cellular oxidases or mitochondrial dysfunction, is integral to the pathogenesis and progression of cardiovascular disease (CVD). In this review, we address how redox signaling modulates the protein function, the various sources of increased oxidative stress in CVD, and the labyrinth of redox-sensitive molecular mechanisms involved in the development of atherosclerosis, hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure, and ischemia–reperfusion injury. Advances in redox biology and pharmacology for inhibiting ROS production in specific cell types and subcellular organelles combined with the development of nanotechnology-based new in vivo imaging systems and targeted drug delivery mechanisms may enable fine-tuning of redox signaling for the treatment and prevention of CVD. PMID:23583330

  3. Serial crystallography captures enzyme catalysis in copper nitrite reductase at atomic resolution from one crystal.

    PubMed

    Horrell, Sam; Antonyuk, Svetlana V; Eady, Robert R; Hasnain, S Samar; Hough, Michael A; Strange, Richard W

    2016-07-01

    Relating individual protein crystal structures to an enzyme mechanism remains a major and challenging goal for structural biology. Serial crystallography using multiple crystals has recently been reported in both synchrotron-radiation and X-ray free-electron laser experiments. In this work, serial crystallography was used to obtain multiple structures serially from one crystal (MSOX) to study in crystallo enzyme catalysis. Rapid, shutterless X-ray detector technology on a synchrotron MX beamline was exploited to perform low-dose serial crystallography on a single copper nitrite reductase crystal, which survived long enough for 45 consecutive 100 K X-ray structures to be collected at 1.07-1.62 Å resolution, all sampled from the same crystal volume. This serial crystallography approach revealed the gradual conversion of the substrate bound at the catalytic type 2 Cu centre from nitrite to nitric oxide, following reduction of the type 1 Cu electron-transfer centre by X-ray-generated solvated electrons. Significant, well defined structural rearrangements in the active site are evident in the series as the enzyme moves through its catalytic cycle, namely nitrite reduction, which is a vital step in the global denitrification process. It is proposed that such a serial crystallography approach is widely applicable for studying any redox or electron-driven enzyme reactions from a single protein crystal. It can provide a 'catalytic reaction movie' highlighting the structural changes that occur during enzyme catalysis. The anticipated developments in the automation of data analysis and modelling are likely to allow seamless and near-real-time analysis of such data on-site at some of the powerful synchrotron crystallographic beamlines. PMID:27437114

  4. Serial crystallography captures enzyme catalysis in copper nitrite reductase at atomic resolution from one crystal

    PubMed Central

    Horrell, Sam; Antonyuk, Svetlana V.; Eady, Robert R.; Hasnain, S. Samar; Hough, Michael A.; Strange, Richard W.

    2016-01-01

    Relating individual protein crystal structures to an enzyme mechanism remains a major and challenging goal for structural biology. Serial crystallography using multiple crystals has recently been reported in both synchrotron-radiation and X-ray free-electron laser experiments. In this work, serial crystallography was used to obtain multiple structures serially from one crystal (MSOX) to study in crystallo enzyme catalysis. Rapid, shutterless X-ray detector technology on a synchrotron MX beamline was exploited to perform low-dose serial crystallography on a single copper nitrite reductase crystal, which survived long enough for 45 consecutive 100 K X-ray structures to be collected at 1.07–1.62 Å resolution, all sampled from the same crystal volume. This serial crystallography approach revealed the gradual conversion of the substrate bound at the catalytic type 2 Cu centre from nitrite to nitric oxide, following reduction of the type 1 Cu electron-transfer centre by X-ray-generated solvated electrons. Significant, well defined structural rearrangements in the active site are evident in the series as the enzyme moves through its catalytic cycle, namely nitrite reduction, which is a vital step in the global denitrification process. It is proposed that such a serial crystallography approach is widely applicable for studying any redox or electron-driven enzyme reactions from a single protein crystal. It can provide a ‘catalytic reaction movie’ highlighting the structural changes that occur during enzyme catalysis. The anticipated developments in the automation of data analysis and modelling are likely to allow seamless and near-real-time analysis of such data on-site at some of the powerful synchrotron crystallographic beamlines. PMID:27437114

  5. Kinetic Resolution in Asymmetric Epoxidation using Iminium Salt Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The first reported examples of kinetic resolution in epoxidation reactions using iminium salt catalysis are described, providing up to 99% ee in the epoxidation of racemic cis-chromenes. PMID:23862687

  6. Selective Oxidation and Ammoxidation of Olefins by Heterogeneous Catalysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grasselli, Robert K.

    1986-01-01

    Shows how the ammoxidation of olefins can be understood in terms of free radicals and surface bound organometallic intermediates. Also illustrates the close intellectual relationships between heterogeneous catalysis and organometallic chemistry. (JN)

  7. GREEN CHEMICAL SYNTHESIS THROUGH CATALYSIS AND ALTERNATE REACTION CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Green chemical synthesis through catalysis and alternate reaction conditions

    Encompassing green chemistry techniques and methodologies, we have initiated several projects at the National Risk Management Research laboratory that focus on the design and development of chemic...

  8. Nanostructured Membranes for Green Synthesis of Nanoparticles and Enzyme Catalysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Macroporous membranes functionalized with ionizable macromolecules provide promising applications in toxic metal capture at high capacity, nanoparticle synthesis, and catalysis. Our low‐pressure membrane approach is marked by reaction and separation selectivity and their tunabili...

  9. Nanostructured Membranes for Enzyme Catalysis and Green Synthesis of Nanoparticles

    EPA Science Inventory

    Macroporous membranes functionalized with ionizable macromolecules provide promising applications in toxic metal capture at high capacity, nanoparticle synthesis, and catalysis. Our low-pressure membrane approach is marked by reaction and separation selectivity and their tunabil...

  10. Redox activity of naphthalene secondary organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWhinney, R. D.; Zhou, S.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2013-04-01

    Chamber secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from low-NOx photooxidation of naphthalene by hydroxyl radical was examined with respect to its redox cycling behaviour using the dithiothreitol (DTT) assay. Naphthalene SOA was highly redox active, consuming DTT at an average rate of 118 ± 14 pmol per minute per μg of SOA material. Measured particle-phase masses of the major previously identified redox active products, 1,2- and 1,4-naphthoquinone, accounted for only 21 ± 3% of the observed redox cycling activity. The redox-active 5-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone was identified as a new minor product of naphthalene oxidation, and including this species in redox activity predictions increased the predicted DTT reactivity to 30 ± 5% of observations. Similar attempts to predict redox behaviour of oxidised two-stroke engine exhaust particles by measuring 1,2-naphthoquinone, 1,4-naphthoquinone and 9,10-phenanthrenequinone predicted DTT decay rates only 4.9 ± 2.5% of those observed. Together, these results suggest that there are substantial unidentified redox-active SOA constituents beyond the small quinones that may be important toxic components of these particles. A gas-to-SOA particle partitioning coefficient was calculated to be (7.0 ± 2.5) × 10-4 m3 μg-1 for 1,4-naphthoquinone at 25 °C. This value suggests that under typical warm conditions, 1,4-naphthoquinone is unlikely to contribute strongly to redox behaviour of ambient particles, although further work is needed to determine the potential impact under conditions such as low temperatures where partitioning to the particle is more favourable. As well, higher order oxidation products that likely account for a substantial fraction of the redox cycling capability of the naphthalene SOA are likely to partition much more strongly to the particle phase.

  11. Redox-sensitive YFP sensors for monitoring dynamic compartment-specific glutathione redox state.

    PubMed

    Banach-Latapy, Agata; He, Tiantian; Dardalhon, Michèle; Vernis, Laurence; Chanet, Roland; Huang, Meng-Er

    2013-12-01

    Intracellular redox homeostasis is crucial for many cellular functions but accurate measurements of cellular compartment-specific redox states remain technically challenging. Genetically encoded biosensors including the glutathione-specific redox-sensitive yellow fluorescent protein (rxYFP) may provide an alternative way to overcome the limitations of conventional glutathione/glutathione disulfide (GSH/GSSG) redox measurements. This study describes the use of rxYFP sensors for investigating compartment-specific steady redox state and their dynamics in response to stress in human cells. RxYFP expressed in the cytosol, nucleus, or mitochondrial matrix of HeLa cells was responsive to the intracellular redox state changes induced by reducing as well as oxidizing agents. Compartment-targeted rxYFP sensors were able to detect different steady-state redox conditions among the cytosol, nucleus, and mitochondrial matrix. These sensors expressed in human epidermal keratinocytes HEK001 responded to stress induced by ultraviolet A radiation in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, rxYFP sensors were able to sense dynamic and compartment-specific redox changes caused by 100 μM hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Mitochondrial matrix-targeted rxYFP displayed a greater dynamics of oxidation in response to a H2O2 challenge than the cytosol- and nucleus-targeted sensors, largely due to a more alkaline local pH environment. These observations support the view that mitochondrial glutathione redox state is maintained and regulated independently from that of the cytosol and nucleus. Taken together, our data show the robustness of the rxYFP sensors to measure compartmental redox changes in human cells. Complementary to existing redox sensors and conventional redox measurements, compartment-targeted rxYFP sensors provide a novel tool for examining mammalian cell redox homeostasis, permitting high-resolution readout of steady glutathione state and dynamics of redox changes. PMID:23891676

  12. New unsymmetric dinuclear Cu(II)Cu(II) complexes and their relevance to copper(II) containing metalloenzymes and DNA cleavage.

    PubMed

    Peralta, Rosely A; Neves, Ademir; Bortoluzzi, Adailton J; Dos Anjos, Ademir; Xavier, Fernando R; Szpoganicz, Bruno; Terenzi, Hernán; de Oliveira, Mauricio C B; Castellano, Eduardo; Friedermann, Geraldo R; Mangrich, Antonio S; Novak, Miguel A

    2006-05-01

    The new homodinuclear complexes, [Cu(2)(II)(HLdtb)(mu-OCH(3))](ClO(4))(2) (1) and [Cu(2)(II)(Ldtb)(mu-OCH(3))](BPh(4)) (2), with the unsymmetrical N(5)O(2) donor ligand (H(2)Ldtb) - {2-[N,N-Bis(2-pyridylmethyl)aminomethyl]-6-[N',N'-(3,5-di-tert-butylbenzyl-2-hydroxy)(2-pyridylmethyl)]aminomethyl}-4-methylphenol have been synthesized and characterized in the solid state by X-ray crystallography. In both cases the structure reveals that the complexes have a common {Cu(II)(mu-phenoxo)(mu-OCH(3))Cu(II)} structural unit. Magnetic susceptibility studies of 1 and 2 reveal J values of -38.3 cm(-1) and -2.02 cm(-1), respectively, and that the degree of antiferromagnetic coupling is strongly dependent on the coordination geometries of the copper centers within the dinuclear {Cu(II)(mu-OCH(3))(mu-phenolate)Cu(II)} structural unit. Solution studies in dichloromethane, using UV-Visible spectroscopy and electrochemistry, indicate that under these experimental conditions the first coordination spheres of the Cu(II) centers are maintained as observed in the solid state structures, and that both forms can be brought into equilibrium ([Cu(2)(HLdtb)(mu-OCH(3))](2+)=[Cu(2)(Ldtb)(mu-OCH(3))](+)+H(+)) by adjusting the pH with Et(3)N (Ldtb(2-) is the deprotonated form of the ligand). On the other hand, potentiometric titration studies of 1 in an ethanol/water mixture (70:30 V/V; I=0.1M KCl) show three titrable protons, indicating the dissociation of the bridging CH(3)O(-) group.The catecholase activity of 1 and 2 in methanol/water buffer (30:1 V/V) demonstrates that the deprotonated form is the active species in the oxidation of 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol and that the reaction follows Michaelis-Menten behavior with k(cat)=5.33 x 10(-3)s(-1) and K(M)=3.96 x 10(-3)M. Interestingly, 2 can be electrochemically oxidized with E(1/2)=0.27 V vs.Fc(+)/Fc (Fc(+)/Fc is the redox pair ferrocinium/ferrocene), a redox potential which is believed to be related to the formation of a phenoxyl radical

  13. Redox cycling compounds generate H2O2 in HTS buffers containing strong reducing reagents – real hits or promiscuous artifacts?

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Redox cycling compounds (RCCs) generate µM concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the presence of strong reducing agents, common buffer components used to maintain the catalytic activity and/or folding of target proteins for high throughput screening (HTS) assays. H2O2 generated by RCCs can indirectly inhibit the catalytic activity of proteins by oxidizing accessible cysteine, tryptophan, methionine, histidine or selenocysteine residues, and indeed several important classes of protein targets are susceptible to H2O2-mediated inactivation; protein tyrosine phosphatases, cysteine proteases, and metalloenzymes. The main sources of H2O2 in cells are the Nox enzyme/SOD systems, peroxisome metabolism, and the autoxidation of reactive chemicals by enzyme mediated redox cycling at both the microsomal and mitochondrial sites of electron transport. Given the role of H2O2 as a second messenger involved in the regulation of many signaling pathways it is hardly surprising that compounds which can generate intracellular H2O2 by enzyme mediated redox cycling would have pleiotropic effects. RCCs can therefore have serious negative consequences for the probe and/or lead generation process: primary HTS assay hit rates may be inflated by RCC false positives; critical resources will be diverted to develop and implement follow up assays to distinguish RCCs from real hits; and screening databases will become annotated with the promiscuous activity of RCCs. In an attempt to mitigate the serious impact of RCCs on probe and lead generation, two groups have independently developed assays to indentify RCCs. PMID:21075044

  14. Electrically rechargeable REDOX flow cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaller, L. H. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A bulk energy storage system is designed with an electrically rechargeable reduction-oxidation (REDOX) cell divided into two compartments by a membrane, each compartment containing an electrode. An anode fluid is directed through the first compartment at the same time that a cathode fluid is directed through the second compartment. Means are provided for circulating the anode and cathode fluids, and the electrodes are connected to an intermittent or non-continuous electrical source, which when operating, supplies current to a load as well as to the cell to recharge it. Ancillary circuitry is provided for disconnecting the intermittent source from the cell at prescribed times and for circulating the anode and cathode fluids according to desired parameters and conditions.

  15. Redox Dysregulation in Vascular Pathobiology.

    PubMed

    Loscalzo, Joseph

    2014-10-01

    Oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions comprise a subset of fundamental biochemical reactions found throughout biological systems. While redox reactions are involved in many normal cellular functions, excess oxidative potential, or oxidative stress, can lead to cellular dysfunction and injury. Multiple protective antioxidant systems have evolved to guard against the adverse consequences of oxidant stress and injury. These systems include low-molecular-weight antioxidants, such as the glutathione-glutathione disulfide redox couple; the thiol proteome, whose various oxidation states can serve as a global redox buffer; and antioxidant enzymes, such as the superoxide dismutases, catalase, peroxidredoxins, and the glutathione peroxidases. One example of an essential antioxidant enzyme whose deficiency contributes to pathobiology in the vasculature is glutathione peroxidase-3 (GPx-3), the principal antioxidant enzyme in the extracellular compartment. This enzyme catalyzes the reduction of hydrogen and lipid peroxides to water and lipid alcohols, respectively, and does so using reducing equivalents provided by glutathione. As a selenoprotein, it requires unique translational machinery for its expression, as well as adequate selenium stores; its primary site of synthesis is the renal tubule, although all nucleated cells can express low levels of the enzyme. We have previously demonstrated that a deficiency of GPx-3 leads to enhanced platelet activation, and is an independent risk factor for acute ischemic stroke in the young. We recently developed a GPx-3-deficient mouse model, and demonstrated endothelial dysfunction as well as increased platelet-dependent thrombosis in an acute ischemic stroke model. Importantly, platelet inhibitors or small-molecule superoxide and hydrogen peroxide scavengers greatly attenuated the size of the ischemic stroke and its functional consequences in this model. These data support the importance of GPx-3as a key antioxidant enzyme that

  16. Early-Late Heterobimetallic Complexes Linked by Phosphinoamide Ligands. Tuning Redox Potentials and Small Molecule Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Christine M.

    2015-08-01

    Recent attention in the chemical community has been focused on the energy efficient and environmentally benign conversion of abundant small molecules (CO2, H2O, etc.) to useful liquid fuels. This project addresses these goals by examining fundamental aspects of catalyst design to ultimately access small molecule activation processes under mild conditions. Specifically, Thomas and coworkers have targetted heterobimetallic complexes that feature metal centers with vastly different electronic properties, dictated both by their respective positions on the periodic table and their coordination environment. Unlike homobimetallic complexes featuring identical or similar metals, the bonds between metals in early/late heterobimetallics are more polarized, with the more electron-rich late metal center donating electron density to the more electron-deficient early metal center. While metal-metal bonds pose an interesting strategy for storing redox equivalents and stabilizing reactive metal fragments, the polar character of metal-metal bonds in heterobimetallic complexes renders these molecules ideally poised to react with small molecule substrates via cleavage of energy-rich single and double bonds. In addition, metal-metal interactions have been shown to dramatically affect redox potentials and promote multielectron redox activity, suggesting that metal-metal interactions may provide a mechanism to tune redox potentials and access substrate reduction/activation at mild overpotentials. This research project has provided a better fundamental understanding of how interactions between transition metals can be used as a strategy to promote and/or control chemical transformations related to the clean production of fuels. While this project focused on the study of homogeneous systems, it is anticipated that the broad conclusions drawn from these investigations will be applicable to heterogeneous catalysis as well, particularly on heterogeneous processes that occur at interfaces in

  17. The Dynamical Nature of Enzymatic Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conspectus As is well-known, enzymes are proteins designed to accelerate specific life essential chemical reactions by many orders of magnitude. A folded protein is a highly dynamical entity, best described as a hierarchy or ensemble of interconverting conformations on all time scales from femtoseconds to minutes. We are just beginning to learn what role these dynamics play in the mechanism of chemical catalysis by enzymes due to extraordinary difficulties in characterizing the conformational space, that is, the energy landscape, of a folded protein. It seems clear now that their role is crucially important. Here we discuss approaches, based on vibrational spectroscopies of various sorts, that can reveal the energy landscape of an enzyme–substrate (Michaelis) complex and decipher which part of the typically very complicated landscape is relevant to catalysis. Vibrational spectroscopy is quite sensitive to small changes in bond order and bond length, with a resolution of 0.01 Å or less. It is this sensitivity that is crucial to its ability to discern bond reactivity. Using isotope edited IR approaches, we have studied in detail the role of conformational heterogeneity and dynamics in the catalysis of hydride transfer by LDH (lactate dehydrogenase). Upon the binding of substrate, the LDH·substrate system undergoes a search through conformational space to find a range of reactive conformations over the microsecond to millisecond time scale. The ligand is shuttled to the active site via first forming a weakly bound enzyme·ligand complex, probably consisting of several heterogeneous structures. This complex undergoes numerous conformational changes spread throughout the protein that shuttle the enzyme·substrate complex to a range of conformations where the substrate is tightly bound. This ensemble of conformations all have a propensity toward chemistry, but some are much more facile for carrying out chemistry than others. The search for these tightly bound states

  18. The dynamical nature of enzymatic catalysis.

    PubMed

    Callender, Robert; Dyer, R Brian

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: As is well-known, enzymes are proteins designed to accelerate specific life essential chemical reactions by many orders of magnitude. A folded protein is a highly dynamical entity, best described as a hierarchy or ensemble of interconverting conformations on all time scales from femtoseconds to minutes. We are just beginning to learn what role these dynamics play in the mechanism of chemical catalysis by enzymes due to extraordinary difficulties in characterizing the conformational space, that is, the energy landscape, of a folded protein. It seems clear now that their role is crucially important. Here we discuss approaches, based on vibrational spectroscopies of various sorts, that can reveal the energy landscape of an enzyme-substrate (Michaelis) complex and decipher which part of the typically very complicated landscape is relevant to catalysis. Vibrational spectroscopy is quite sensitive to small changes in bond order and bond length, with a resolution of 0.01 Å or less. It is this sensitivity that is crucial to its ability to discern bond reactivity. Using isotope edited IR approaches, we have studied in detail the role of conformational heterogeneity and dynamics in the catalysis of hydride transfer by LDH (lactate dehydrogenase). Upon the binding of substrate, the LDH·substrate system undergoes a search through conformational space to find a range of reactive conformations over the microsecond to millisecond time scale. The ligand is shuttled to the active site via first forming a weakly bound enzyme·ligand complex, probably consisting of several heterogeneous structures. This complex undergoes numerous conformational changes spread throughout the protein that shuttle the enzyme·substrate complex to a range of conformations where the substrate is tightly bound. This ensemble of conformations all have a propensity toward chemistry, but some are much more facile for carrying out chemistry than others. The search for these tightly bound states

  19. Crystal Structure of 12-Lipoxygenase Catalytic-Domain-Inhibitor Complex Identifies a Substrate-Binding Channel for Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Shu; Mueser, Timothy C.; Marnett, Lawrence J.; Funk, Jr., Max O.

    2014-10-02

    Lipoxygenases are critical enzymes in the biosynthesis of families of bioactive lipids including compounds with important roles in the initiation and resolution of inflammation and in associated diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Crystals diffracting to high resolution (1.9 {angstrom}) were obtained for a complex between the catalytic domain of leukocyte 12-lipoxygenase and the isoform-specific inhibitor, 4-(2-oxapentadeca-4-yne)phenylpropanoic acid (OPP). In the three-dimensional structure of the complex, the inhibitor occupied a new U-shaped channel open at one end to the surface of the protein and extending past the redox-active iron site that is essential for catalysis. In models, the channel accommodated arachidonic acid, defining the binding site for the substrate of the catalyzed reaction. There was a void adjacent to the OPP binding site connecting to the surface of the enzyme and providing a plausible access channel for the other substrate, oxygen.

  20. Enhancement of a catalysis-based fluorometric detection method for palladium through rational fine-tuning of the palladium species.

    PubMed

    Garner, Amanda L; Song, Fengling; Koide, Kazunori

    2009-04-15

    Metal analyses in chemistry, materials science, and environmental science are currently performed using techniques such as inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and X-ray fluorescence, which require expensive instrumentation and are not high-throughput. Although fluorescent probes are known for their sensitivity and specificity and are amenable to high-throughput analyses, the robustness of such analyses are typically limited due to their binding-based nature. Herein we report an improvement of our previously reported catalysis-based fluorescent probe for palladium by rationally fine-tuning the redox and coordination chemistries of the palladium species involved in the O-deallylation reaction. This method now rivals current analytical methods with respect to sensitivity. We demonstrate palladium detection in various active pharmaceutical ingredients, spent catalytic converter materials, and a metal scavenger resin. Thus, fluorescent methods may have the potential for substituting the current instrument-intensive techniques. PMID:19317401

  1. Dedicated Beamline Facilities for Catalytic Research. Synchrotron Catalysis Consortium (SCC)

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jingguang; Frenkel, Anatoly; Rodriguez, Jose; Adzic, Radoslav; Bare, Simon R.; Hulbert, Steve L.; Karim, Ayman; Mullins, David R.; Overbury, Steve

    2015-03-04

    Synchrotron spectroscopies offer unique advantages over conventional techniques, including higher detection sensitivity and molecular specificity, faster detection rate, and more in-depth information regarding the structural, electronic and catalytic properties under in-situ reaction conditions. Despite these advantages, synchrotron techniques are often underutilized or unexplored by the catalysis community due to various perceived and real barriers, which will be addressed in the current proposal. Since its establishment in 2005, the Synchrotron Catalysis Consortium (SCC) has coordinated significant efforts to promote the utilization of cutting-edge catalytic research under in-situ conditions. The purpose of the current renewal proposal is aimed to provide assistance, and to develop new sciences/techniques, for the catalysis community through the following concerted efforts: Coordinating the implementation of a suite of beamlines for catalysis studies at the new NSLS-II synchrotron source; Providing assistance and coordination for catalysis users at an SSRL catalysis beamline during the initial period of NSLS to NSLS II transition; Designing in-situ reactors for a variety of catalytic and electrocatalytic studies; Assisting experimental set-up and data analysis by a dedicated research scientist; Offering training courses and help sessions by the PIs and co-PIs.

  2. Frustrated Lewis pairs: from concept to catalysis.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Douglas W

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: Frustrated Lewis pair (FLP) chemistry has emerged in the past decade as a strategy that enables main-group compounds to activate small molecules. This concept is based on the notion that combinations of Lewis acids and bases that are sterically prevented from forming classical Lewis acid-base adducts have Lewis acidity and basicity available for interaction with a third molecule. This concept has been applied to stoichiometric reactivity and then extended to catalysis. This Account describes three examples of such developments: hydrogenation, hydroamination, and CO2 reduction. The most dramatic finding from FLP chemistry was the discovery that FLPs can activate H2, thus countering the long-existing dogma that metals are required for such activation. This finding of stoichiometric reactivity was subsequently evolved to employ simple main-group species as catalysts in hydrogenations. While the initial studies focused on imines, subsequent studies uncovered FLP catalysts for a variety of organic substrates, including enamines, silyl enol ethers, olefins, and alkynes. Moreover, FLP reductions of aromatic anilines and N-heterocycles have been developed, while very recent extensions have uncovered the utility of FLP catalysts for ketone reductions. FLPs have also been shown to undergo stoichiometric reactivity with terminal alkynes. Typically, either deprotonation or FLP addition reaction products are observed, depending largely on the basicity of the Lewis base. While a variety of acid/base combinations have been exploited to afford a variety of zwitterionic products, this reactivity can also be extended to catalysis. When secondary aryl amines are employed, hydroamination of alkynes can be performed catalytically, providing a facile, metal-free route to enamines. In a similar fashion, initial studies of FLPs with CO2 demonstrated their ability to capture this greenhouse gas. Again, modification of the constituents of the FLP led to the discovery of reaction

  3. Structural Basis for Catalysis by Onconase

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J. Eugene; Bae, Euiyoung; Bingman, Craig A.; Phillips, George N.; Raines, Ronald T.

    2007-01-01

    Onconase (ONC) is a homolog of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease (RNase A) from the frog Rana pipiens. ONC displays antitumoral activity and is in advanced clinical trials for the treatment of cancer. Here, we report the first atomic structures of ONC·nucleic acid complexes: a T89N/E91A ONC·5′-AMP complex at 1.65 Å resolution and a wild-type ONC·d(AUGA) complex at 1.90 Å resolution. The latter structure and site-directed mutagenesis was used to reveal the atomic basis for substrate recognition and turnover by ONC. The residues in ONC that are proximal to the scissile phosphodiester bond (His10, Lys31, and His97) and uracil nucleobase (Thr35, Asp67, and Phe98) are conserved from RNase A and serve to generate a similar bell-shaped pH–kcat/KM profile for RNA cleavage. Glu91 of ONC forms two hydrogen bonds with the guanine nucleobase in d(AUGA), and Thr89 is in close proximity to that nucleobase. Installing a neutral or cationic residue at position 91 or an asparagine residue at position 89 virtually eliminated the 102-fold guanine:adenine preference of ONC. A variant that combined such substitutions, T89N/E91A ONC, actually preferred adenine over guanine. In contrast, installing an arginine residue at position 91 increased the guanine preference and afforded an ONC variant with the highest known kcat/KM value. These data indicate that ONC discriminates between guanine and adenine by using Coulombic interactions and a network of hydrogen bonds. The structure of the ONC·d(AUGA) complex was also used to probe other aspects of catalysis. For example, the T5R substitution, designed to create a favorable Coulombic interaction between ONC and a phosphoryl group in RNA, increased ribonucleolytic activity by twofold. No variant, however, was more toxic to human cancer cells than wild-type ONC. Together, these findings provide a cynosure for understanding catalysis of RNA cleavage in a system of high medicinal relevance. PMID:18001769

  4. Nanoparticles for heterogeneous catalysis: new mechanistic insights.

    PubMed

    Schauermann, Swetlana; Nilius, Niklas; Shaikhutdinov, Shamil; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2013-08-20

    Metallic nanoparticles finely dispersed over oxide supports have found use as heterogeneous catalysts in many industries including chemical manufacturing, energy-related applications and environmental remediation. The compositional and structural complexity of such nanosized systems offers many degrees of freedom for tuning their catalytic properties. However, fully rational design of heterogeneous catalysts based on an atomic-level understanding of surface processes remains an unattained goal in catalysis research. Researchers have used surface science methods and metal single crystals to explore elementary processes in heterogeneous catalysis. In this Account, we use more realistic materials that capture part of the complexity inherent to industrial catalysts. We assess the impacts on the overall catalytic performance of characteristics such as finite particle size, particle structure, particle chemical composition, flexibility of atoms in clusters, and metal-support interactions. To prepare these materials, we grew thin oxide films on metal single crystals under ultrahigh vacuum conditions and used these films as supports for metallic nanoparticles. We present four case studies on specifically designed materials with properties that expand our atomic-level understanding of surface chemistry. Specifically, we address (1) the effect of dopants in the oxide support on the growth of metal nanoclusters; (2) the effects of size and structural flexibility of metal clusters on the binding energy of gas-phase adsorbates and their catalytic activity; (3) the role of surface modifiers, such as carbon, on catalytic activity and selectivity; and (4) the structural and compositional changes of the active surface as a result of strong metal-support interaction. Using these examples, we demonstrate how studies of complex nanostructured materials can help revealing atomic processes at the solid-gas interface of heterogeneous catalysts. Among our findings is that doping of oxide

  5. Infrared Spectroscopy and Catalysis Research: Infrared spectra of adsorbed molecules provide important information in the study of catalysis.

    PubMed

    Eischens, R P

    1964-10-23

    The examples discussed here represent only a small part of the published work relating to infrared spectra of adsorbed molecules. The publications in this field indicate that infrared spectroscopy is being used for surface chemistry research in about 50 laboratories throughout the world. This effort is mainly devoted to problems related to catalysis, and in this field infrared spectroscopy is the most widely used physical tool for surface chemistry studies. The general acceptance of infrared spectroscopy is primarily due to the fact that it provides information which is pertinent to the understanding of surface reactions on an atomic scale. During the last decade significant progress has also been made in the classical chemical techniques of catalysis study and in utilization of physical tools which depend on phenomena of magnetism, conductivity, low-energy electron diffraction, and electron emission. Probably the most important progress has been in the field of inorganic chemistry, where dramatic advances have been made in knowledge of metal coordination compounds. Such knowledge is vital to the understanding of catalysis on metal surfaces. I believe this progress has produced an attitude of sophisticated optimism among catalysis researchers with regard to eventual understanding of heterogeneous catalysis. This attitude is closely related to the realization that there is no "secret of catalysis" which places catalytic action beyond the limits of ordinary chemical knowledge (22). This view implies that the chemical aspects of heterogeneous catalysis are not unique and that the use of solid catalysts merely provides a highly effective exposure of catalytic atoms and facilitates separation of the products from the catalyst. Many capable catalysis researchers believe that studies of homogeneous catalysis provide the most direct route for the study of heterogeneous catalysis. Obviously homogeneous reactions catalyzed by compounds containing only one or two metal atoms

  6. Frontiers, Opportunities, and Challenges in Biochemical and Chemical Catalysis of CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, Aaron M.; Bercaw, John E.; Bocarsly, Andrew B.; Dobbek, Holger; DuBois, Daniel L.; Dupuis, Michel; Ferry, James G.; Fujita, Etsuko; Hille, Russ; Kenis, Paul; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.; Morris, Robert H.; Peden, Charles HF; Portis, Archie; Ragsdale, Steve; Rauchfuss, Thomas B.; Reek, Joost; Seefeldt, Lance C.; Thauer, Rudolf K.; Waldrop, Grover L.

    2013-08-14

    Our central premise is that catalytic scientists can learn by studying how these important metabolic processes occur in nature. Complementarily, biochemists can learn by studying how catalytic scientists view these same chemical transformations promoted by synthetic catalysts. From these studies, hypotheses can be developed and tested through manipulation of enzyme structure and by synthesizing simple molecular catalysts to incorporate different structural features of the enzymes. It is hoped that these studies will lead to new and useful concepts in catalyst design for fuel production and utilization. This paper describes the results of a workshop held to explore these concepts in regard to the development of new and more efficient catalytic processes for the conversion of CO2 to a variety of carbon-based fuels. The organization of this overview/review is as follows: 1) The first section briefly explores how interactions between the catalysis and biological communities have been fruitful in developing new catalysts for the reduction of protons to hydrogen, the simplest fuel generation reaction. 2) The second section assesses the state of the art in both biological and chemical reduction of CO2 by two electrons to form either carbon monoxide (CO) or formate (HCOO-). It also attempts to identify common principles between biological and synthetic catalysts and productive areas for future research. 3) The third section explores both biological and chemical processes that result in the reduction of CO2 beyond the level of CO and formate, again seeking to identify common principles and productive areas of future research. 4) The fourth section explores the formation of carbon-carbon bonds in biological and chemical systems in the same vein as the other sections. 5) A fifth section addresses the role of non-redox reactions of CO2 in biological systems and their role in carbon metabolism, with a parallel discussion of chemical systems. 6) In section 6, the topics of

  7. Redox subpopulations and the risk of cancer progression: a new method for characterizing redox heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, He N.; Li, Lin Z.

    2016-02-01

    It has been shown that a malignant tumor is akin to a complex organ comprising of various cell populations including tumor cells that are genetically, metabolically and functionally different. Our redox imaging data have demonstrated intra-tumor redox heterogeneity in all mouse xenografts derived from human melanomas, breast, prostate, and colon cancers. Based on the signals of NADH and oxidized flavoproteins (Fp, including flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)) and their ratio, i.e., the redox ratio, which is an indicator of mitochondrial metabolic status, we have discovered several distinct redox subpopulations in xenografts of breast tumors potentially recapitulating functional/metabolic heterogeneity within the tumor. Furthermore, xenografts of breast tumors with higher metastatic potential tend to have a redox subpopulation whose redox ratio is significantly different from that of tumors with lower metastatic potential and usually have a bi-modal distribution of the redox ratio. The redox subpopulations from human breast cancer samples can also be very complex with multiple subpopulations as determined by fitting the redox ratio histograms with multi- Gaussian functions. In this report, we present a new method for identifying the redox subpopulations within individual breast tumor xenografts and human breast tissues, which may be used to differentiate between breast cancer and normal tissue and among breast cancer with different risks of progression.

  8. Tandem rhodium catalysis:Exploiting sulfoxides for asymmetric transition-metal catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Kou, K. G. M.

    2015-01-01

    Sulfoxides are uncommon substrates for transition-metal catalysis due to their propensity to inhibit catalyst turnover. In a collaborative effort with Ken Houk, we developed the first dynamic kinetic resolution (DKR) of allylic sulfoxides using asymmetric rhodium-catalyzed hydrogenation. Detailed mechanistic analysis of this transformation using both experimental and theoretical methods revealed rhodium to be a tandem catalyst that promoted both hydrogenation of the alkene and racemization of the allylic sulfoxide. Using a combination of deuterium labelling and DFT studies, a novel mode of allylic sulfoxide racemization via a Rh(III)-π-allyl intermediate was identified. PMID:25940066

  9. Organelle redox autonomy during environmental stress.

    PubMed

    Bratt, Avishay; Rosenwasser, Shilo; Meyer, Andreas; Fluhr, Robert

    2016-09-01

    Oxidative stress is generated in plants because of inequalities in the rate of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and scavenging. The subcellular redox state under various stress conditions was assessed using the redox reporter roGFP2 targeted to chloroplastic, mitochondrial, peroxisomal and cytosolic compartments. In parallel, the vitality of the plant was measured by ion leakage. Our results revealed that during certain physiological stress conditions the changes in roGFP2 oxidation are comparable to application of high concentrations of exogenous H2 O2 . Under each stress, particular organelles were affected. Conditions of extended dark stress, or application of elicitor, impacted chiefly on the status of peroxisomal redox state. In contrast, conditions of drought or high light altered the status of mitochondrial or chloroplast redox state, respectively. Amalgamation of the results from diverse environmental stresses shows cases of organelle autonomy as well as multi-organelle oxidative change. Importantly, organelle-specific oxidation under several stresses proceeded cell death as measured by ion leakage, suggesting early roGFP oxidation as predictive of cell death. The measurement of redox state in multiple compartments enables one to look at redox state connectivity between organelles in relation to oxidative stress as well as assign a redox fingerprint to various types of stress conditions. PMID:27037976

  10. A signal amplification strategy using the cascade catalysis of gold nanoclusters and glucose dehydrogenase for ultrasensitive detection of thrombin.

    PubMed

    Han, Jing; Zhuo, Ying; Chai, Yaqin; Gui, Guofeng; Zhao, Min; Zhu, Qiang; Yuan, Ruo

    2013-12-15

    This work reports a novel signal amplification strategy for ultrasensitive detection of thrombin by cascade catalysis of gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) and glucose dehydrogenase (GDH). Herein, the AuNCs prepared by using polyamidoamine dendrimer as template were constructed not only as nanocarriers for anchoring the large amounts of secondary thrombin aptamers but also as nanocatalysts to catalyze the oxidation of NADH efficiently. Moreover, a large amount of GDH was loaded through the immobilization technology of DNA hybridization and a large amount of toluidine blue (Tb) was intercalated into the DNA grooves via electrostatic interaction. Significantly, the electrochemical signal was greatly enhanced based on cascade catalysis: firstly, GDH catalyzed the oxidation of glucose to gluconolactone with the concomitant generation of NADH in the presence of NAD(+). Then, AuNCs as nanocatalysts could effectively catalyze NADH to produce NAD(+) with the help of Tb as redox probe. Under the optimal conditions, the proposed aptasensor exhibits a linear range of 1.0×10(-14)-5×10(-9) M with a low detection limit of 3.3×10(-15) M for thrombin detection and shows high sensitivity and good specificity. PMID:23850783

  11. The Role of Cysteine Residues in Redox Regulation and Protein Stability of Arabidopsis thaliana Starch Synthase 1

    PubMed Central

    Skryhan, Katsiaryna; Cuesta-Seijo, Jose A.; Nielsen, Morten M.; Marri, Lucia; Mellor, Silas B.; Glaring, Mikkel A.; Jensen, Poul E.; Palcic, Monica M.; Blennow, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Starch biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana is strictly regulated. In leaf extracts, starch synthase 1 (AtSS1) responds to the redox potential within a physiologically relevant range. This study presents data testing two main hypotheses: 1) that specific thiol-disulfide exchange in AtSS1 influences its catalytic function 2) that each conserved Cys residue has an impact on AtSS1 catalysis. Recombinant AtSS1 versions carrying combinations of cysteine-to-serine substitutions were generated and characterized in vitro. The results demonstrate that AtSS1 is activated and deactivated by the physiological redox transmitters thioredoxin f1 (Trxf1), thioredoxin m4 (Trxm4) and the bifunctional NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase C (NTRC). AtSS1 displayed an activity change within the physiologically relevant redox range, with a midpoint potential equal to -306 mV, suggesting that AtSS1 is in the reduced and active form during the day with active photosynthesis. Cys164 and Cys545 were the key cysteine residues involved in regulatory disulfide formation upon oxidation. A C164S_C545S double mutant had considerably decreased redox sensitivity as compared to wild type AtSS1 (30% vs 77%). Michaelis-Menten kinetics and molecular modeling suggest that both cysteines play important roles in enzyme catalysis, namely, Cys545 is involved in ADP-glucose binding and Cys164 is involved in acceptor binding. All the other single mutants had essentially complete redox sensitivity (98–99%). In addition of being part of a redox directed activity “light switch”, reactivation tests and low heterologous expression levels indicate that specific cysteine residues might play additional roles. Specifically, Cys265 in combination with Cys164 can be involved in proper protein folding or/and stabilization of translated protein prior to its transport into the plastid. Cys442 can play an important role in enzyme stability upon oxidation. The physiological and phylogenetic relevance of these findings

  12. Molecular Crowding Accelerates Ribozyme Docking and Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    All biological processes take place in highly crowded cellular environments. However, the effect that molecular crowding agents have on the folding and catalytic properties of RNA molecules remains largely unknown. Here, we have combined single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) and bulk cleavage assays to determine the effect of a molecular crowding agents on the folding and catalysis of a model RNA enzyme, the hairpin ribozyme. Our single-molecule data reveal that PEG favors the formation of the docked (active) structure by increasing the docking rate constant with increasing PEG concentrations. Furthermore, Mg2+ ion-induced folding in the presence of PEG occurs at concentrations ∼7-fold lower than in the absence of PEG, near the physiological range (∼1 mM). Lastly, bulk cleavage assays in the presence of the crowding agent show that the ribozyme’s activity increases while the heterogeneity decreases. Our data is consistent with the idea that molecular crowding plays an important role in the stabilization of ribozyme active conformations in vivo. PMID:25399908

  13. Computational Investigations on Enzymatic Catalysis and Inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simard, Daniel

    Enzymes are the bimolecular "workhorses" of the cell due to their range of functions and their requirement for cellular success. The atomistic details of how they function can provide key insights into the fundamentals of catalysis and in turn, provide a blueprint for biotechnological advances. A wide range of contemporary computational techniques has been applied with the aim to characterize recently discovered intermediates or to provide insights into enzymatic mechanisms and inhibition. More specifically, an assessment of methods was conducted to evaluate the presence of the growing number 3-- and 4--coordinated sulfur intermediates in proteins/enzymes. Furthermore, two mechanisms have been investigated, the mu-OH mechanism of the hydrolysis of dimethylphosphate in Glycerophosphodiesterase (GpdQ) using five different homonuclear metal combinations Zn(II)/Zn(II), Co(II)/Co(II), Mn(II)/Mn(II), Cd(II)/Cd(II) and Ca(II)/Ca(II) as well as a preliminary study into the effectivness of boron as an inhibitor in the serine protease reaction of class A TEM-1 beta-lactamases.

  14. Enzyme catalysis: Cleaner, safer, energy efficient

    SciTech Connect

    Lalonde, J.

    1997-09-01

    Protein catalysts, more commonly referred to as enzymes, are the driving force behind the myriad of chemical reactions occurring in living organisms. By using their ability to distinguish between similar biochemical compounds and optical isomers (enantiomers), with virtually complete discrimination, enzymes are efficient catalysts, making them an attractive alternative for synthetic ones. Tapping into the natural abilities of enzymes, the chemical process industries (CPI) are beginning to realize that enzymes are not only effective for catalyzing reactions of natural compounds within living systems, but that they can also be used to catalyze reactions of unnatural compounds. Enzymes are novel among catalysts in that they are capable of directing asymmetric transformations with complete activity under ambient conditions. As a result, bioconversions, such as the hydroxylation of unactivated hydrocarbon centers, to give alcohols in high optical purity, have few counterparts in traditional chemical catalysis. And unlike most chemical manufacturing catalysts, enzymes work in water, at ambient temperature and near neutral pH. Also, they are easy to dispose of, since they are composed of biodegradable protein. Thus, biocatalysts are the ideal green catalyst, producing less waste and consuming less energy.

  15. Some General Themes in Catalysis at LANL

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, John C.

    2012-07-19

    Some general themes in catalysis at LANL are: (1) Storage and release of energy within chemical bonds (e.g. H{sub 2} storage in and release from covalent bonds, N{sub 2} functionalization, CO{sub 2} functionalization, H{sub 2} oxidation/evolution, O{sub 2} reduction/evolution); (2) Can we control the chemistry of reactive substrates to effect energy relevant transformations in non-traditional media (e.g. can we promote C-C couplings, dehydrations, or hydrogenations in water under relatively mild conditions)? (3) Can we supplant precious metal or rare earth catalysts to effect these transformations, by using earth abundant metals/elements instead? Can we use organocatalysis and circumvent the use of metals completely? (4) Can we improve upon existing rare earth catalyst systems (e.g. in rare earth oxides pertinent to fluid cracking or polymerization) and reduce amounts required for catalytic efficacy? Carbohydrates can be accessed from non-food based biomass sources such as woody residues and switchgrass. After extracted from the plant source, our goal is to upgrade these classes of molecules into useful fuels.

  16. Constant Domain-regulated Antibody Catalysis*

    PubMed Central

    Sapparapu, Gopal; Planque, Stephanie; Mitsuda, Yukie; McLean, Gary; Nishiyama, Yasuhiro; Paul, Sudhir

    2012-01-01

    Some antibodies contain variable (V) domain catalytic sites. We report the superior amide and peptide bond-hydrolyzing activity of the same heavy and light chain V domains expressed in the IgM constant domain scaffold compared with the IgG scaffold. The superior catalytic activity of recombinant IgM was evident using two substrates, a small model peptide that is hydrolyzed without involvement of high affinity epitope binding, and HIV gp120, which is recognized specifically by noncovalent means prior to the hydrolytic reaction. The catalytic activity was inhibited by an electrophilic phosphonate diester, consistent with a nucleophilic catalytic mechanism. All 13 monoclonal IgMs tested displayed robust hydrolytic activities varying over a 91-fold range, consistent with expression of the catalytic functions at distinct levels by different V domains. The catalytic activity of polyclonal IgM was superior to polyclonal IgG from the same sera, indicating that on average IgMs express the catalytic function at levels greater than IgGs. The findings indicate a favorable effect of the remote IgM constant domain scaffold on the integrity of the V-domain catalytic site and provide a structural basis for conceiving antibody catalysis as a first line immune function expressed at high levels prior to development of mature IgG class antibodies. PMID:22948159

  17. Conformational Isomerism Can Limit Antibody Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Debler, E.W.; Muller, R.; Hilvert, D.; Wilson, I.A.

    2009-05-14

    Ligand binding to enzymes and antibodies is often accompanied by protein conformational changes. Although such structural adjustments may be conducive to enzyme catalysis, much less is known about their effect on reactions promoted by engineered catalytic antibodies. Crystallographic and pre-steady state kinetic analyses of antibody 34E4, which efficiently promotes the conversion of benzisoxazoles to salicylonitriles, show that the resting catalyst adopts two interconverting active-site conformations, only one of which is competent to bind substrate. In the predominant isomer, the indole side chain of Trp{sup L91} occupies the binding site and blocks ligand access. Slow conformational isomerization of this residue, on the same time scale as catalytic turnover, creates a deep and narrow binding site that can accommodate substrate and promote proton transfer using Glu{sup H50} as a carboxylate base. Although 34E4 is among the best catalysts for the deprotonation of benzisoxazoles, its efficiency appears to be significantly limited by this conformational plasticity of its active site. Future efforts to improve this antibody might profitably focus on stabilizing the active conformation of the catalyst. Analogous strategies may also be relevant to other engineered proteins that are limited by an unfavorable conformational pre-equilibrium.

  18. Heterogeneous Catalysis on Defect-Engineered Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Shall, M.

    2013-03-01

    Graphene has attracted great interest for a fundamental understanding of its unique structural and electronic properties and also for important potential applications in nanoelectronics and devices. The combination of thermal, chemical and mechanical stability with the high surface area offers many interesting applications in a wide range of fields including heterogeneous catalysis where metallic and bimetallic nanoparticle catalysts can be efficiently dispersed on the graphene sheets. We have developed facile and scalable chemical and laser reduction methods for the synthesis of defect-engineered graphene, as well as metal and semiconductor nanoparticles dispersed on graphene. We recently discovered a remarkable catalytic activity of metal nanoparticles supported on defect-engineered graphene in a variety of chemical transformation including carbon-carbon cross coupling reactions and Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis of long chain liquid hydrocarbons. The results demonstrate the role of the defect sites on the graphene surface in providing favorable nucleation sites for the selective deposition of the metal nanoparticles and as a result, play a major role in imparting exceptional catalytic properties. We thank the National Science Foundation CHE-0911146 Grant for the support of this work.

  19. Ferroelectric based catalysis: Switchable surface chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakekhani, Arvin; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab

    2015-03-01

    We describe a new class of catalysts that uses an epitaxial monolayer of a transition metal oxide on a ferroelectric substrate. The ferroelectric polarization switches the surface chemistry between strongly adsorptive and strongly desorptive regimes, circumventing difficulties encountered on non-switchable catalytic surfaces where the Sabatier principle dictates a moderate surface-molecule interaction strength. This method is general and can, in principle, be applied to many reactions, and for each case the choice of the transition oxide monolayer can be optimized. Here, as a specific example, we show how simultaneous NOx direct decomposition (into N2 and O2) and CO oxidation can be achieved efficiently on CrO2 terminated PbTiO3, while circumventing oxygen (and sulfur) poisoning issues. One should note that NOx direct decomposition has been an open challenge in automotive emission control industry. Our method can expand the range of catalytically active elements to those which are not conventionally considered for catalysis and which are more economical, e.g., Cr (for NOx direct decomposition and CO oxidation) instead of canonical precious metal catalysts. Primary support from Toyota Motor Engineering and Manufacturing, North America, Inc.

  20. Catalysis of Forster Resonances in Rubidium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Win, A. L.; Williams, W. D.; Sukenik, C. I.

    2016-05-01

    When two ultracold Rydberg atoms collide they may change their quantum state if the total electronic energy of the two atoms before and after the collision is about the same. This process can be made resonant by tuning the energy levels of the atoms with an electric field, via the Stark shift, so that the energy difference between incoming and outgoing channels vanishes. This condition is known as a ``Forster resonance.'' We have studied a particular Forster resonance in rubidium: 34p + 34p --> 34s + 35s, by investigating the time dependence of the state change in an ultracold environment. Furthermore, we have added 34d state atoms to the mix and observed an enhancement of 34s atom production. We attribute this enhancement to a catalysis effect whereby the 34d atoms alter the spatial distribution of 34p atoms that participate in the energy transfer interaction. We will present results from the experiment and compare them to model calculations. Present address: Department of Physics, Smith College, Northampton, MA.

  1. Mechanisms and Design in Homogeneous Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Clark R. Landis

    2010-05-26

    The major goal of this research is the determination of structure-activity relationships with respect to the elementary reactions that constitute catalytic alkene polymerization. Three classes of structure-activity relationships pertain to this work: (1) The influence of the nature of the propagating alkyl (secondary, primary, β-substituted) and alkene monomer on the rates and selectivity of propagation, termination, isomerization, hydrogenolysis, etc. Such analyses are possible by direct observation methods (2) Influence of Cp-ligand substituents on fundamental reaction steps by application of direct observation and quenched-flow methods (3) Influence of counterion and solvent polarity on rates and selectivities of elementary steps during polymerization. At this point our rate of progress is limited by a combination of inefficiencies in some data collection modes (particularly quenched-flow studies) and by a relatively narrow range of accessible rates (especially for the NMR methods). Therefore, the bulk of our work concerns the development NMR, mass spectrometric, and chromatographic methods for probing catalytic reactions in a high throughput mode. Although these methods will be applied in the context of alkene polymerization, the NMR and mass spectrometric methods are completely general and will benefit research in all areas of catalysis.

  2. Redox polymer electrodes for advanced batteries

    DOEpatents

    Gregg, Brian A.; Taylor, A. Michael

    1998-01-01

    Advanced batteries having a long cycle lifetime are provided. More specifically, the present invention relates to electrodes made from redox polymer films and batteries in which either the positive electrode, the negative electrode, or both, comprise redox polymers. Suitable redox polymers for this purpose include pyridyl or polypyridyl complexes of transition metals like iron, ruthenium, osmium, chromium, tungsten and nickel; porphyrins (either free base or metallo derivatives); phthalocyanines (either free base or metallo derivatives); metal complexes of cyclams, such as tetraazacyclotetradecane; metal complexes of crown ethers and metallocenes such as ferrocene, cobaltocene and ruthenocene.

  3. Redox polymer electrodes for advanced batteries

    DOEpatents

    Gregg, B.A.; Taylor, A.M.

    1998-11-24

    Advanced batteries having a long cycle lifetime are provided. More specifically, the present invention relates to electrodes made from redox polymer films and batteries in which either the positive electrode, the negative electrode, or both, comprise redox polymers. Suitable redox polymers for this purpose include pyridyl or polypyridyl complexes of transition metals like iron, ruthenium, osmium, chromium, tungsten and nickel; porphyrins (either free base or metallo derivatives); phthalocyanines (either free base or metallo derivatives); metal complexes of cyclams, such as tetraazacyclotetradecane; metal complexes of crown ethers and metallocenes such as ferrocene, cobaltocene and ruthenocene. 2 figs.

  4. Electrochemical cell for rebalancing REDOX flow system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaller, L. H. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    An electrically rechargeable REDOX cell or battery system including one of more rebalancing cells is described. Each rebalancing cell is divided into two chambers by an ion permeable membrane. The first chamber is fed with gaseous hydrogen and a cathode fluid which is circulated through the cathode chamber of the REDOX cell is also passed through the second chamber of the rebalancing cell. Electrochemical reactions take place on the surface of insert electrodes in the first and second chambers to rebalance the electrochemical capacity of the anode and cathode fluids of the REDOX system.

  5. Redox Regulation of Cytosolic Translation in Plants.

    PubMed

    Moore, Marten; Gossmann, Nikolaj; Dietz, Karl-Josef

    2016-05-01

    Control of protein homeostasis is crucial for environmental acclimation of plants. In this context, translational control is receiving increasing attention, particularly since post-translational modifications of the translational apparatus allow very fast and highly effective control of protein synthesis. Reduction and oxidation (redox) reactions decisively control translation by modifying initiation, elongation, and termination of translation. This opinion article compiles information on the redox sensitivity of cytosolic translation factors and the significance of redox regulation as a key modulator of translation for efficient acclimation to changing environmental conditions. PMID:26706442

  6. Redox Flow Batteries: An Engineering Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Chalamala, Babu R.; Soundappan, Thiagarajan; Fisher, Graham R.; Anstey, Mitchell A.; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Perry, Mike L.

    2014-10-01

    Redox flow batteries are well suited to provide modular and scalable energy storage systems for a wide range of energy storage applications. In this paper, we review the development of redox flow battery technology including recent advances in new redox active materials and systems. We discuss cost, performance, and reliability metrics that are critical for deployment of large flow battery systems. The technology, while relatively young, has the potential for significant improvement through reduced materials costs, improved energy and power efficiency, and significant reduction in the overall system cost.

  7. Strong correlations in actinide redox reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, S. E.; Marston, J. B.

    2011-02-01

    Reduction-oxidation (redox) reactions of the redox couples An(VI)/An(V), An(V)/An(IV), and An(IV)/An(III), where An is an element in the family of early actinides (U, Np, and Pu), as well as Am(VI)/Am(V) and Am(V)/Am(III), are modeled by combining density functional theory with a generalized Anderson impurity model that accounts for the strong correlations between the 5f electrons. Diagonalization of the Anderson impurity model yields improved estimates for the redox potentials and the propensity of the actinide complexes to disproportionate.

  8. Electrochemical immunoassay for thyroxine detection using cascade catalysis as signal amplified enhancer and multi-functionalized magnetic graphene sphere as signal tag.

    PubMed

    Han, Jing; Zhuo, Ying; Chai, Yaqin; Yu, Yanqing; Liao, Ni; Yuan, Ruo

    2013-08-01

    This paper constructed a reusable electrochemical immunosensor for the detection of thyroxine at an ultralow concentration using cascade catalysis of cytochrome c (Cyt c) and glucose oxidase (GOx) as signal amplified enhancer. It is worth pointing out that numerous Cyt c and GOx were firstly carried onto the double-stranded DNA polymers based on hybridization chain reaction (HCR), and then the amplified responses could be achieved by cascade catalysis of Cyt c and GOx recycling with the help of glucose. Moreover, multi-functionalized magnetic graphene sphere was synthesized and used as signal tag, which not only exhibited good mechanical properties, large surface area and an excellent electron transfer rate of graphene, but also possessed excellent redox activity and desirable magnetic property. With a sandwich-type immunoreaction, the proposed cascade catalysis amplification strategy could greatly enhance the sensitivity for the detection of thyroxine. Under the optimal conditions, the immunosensor showed a wide linear ranged from 0.05pg mL(-1) to 5ng mL(-1) and a low detection limit down to 15fg mL(-1). Importantly, the proposed method offers promise for reproducible and cost-effective analysis of biological samples. PMID:23870405

  9. Metabolic Control of Redox and Redox Control of Metabolism in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Fernie, Alisdair R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Reduction-oxidation (Redox) status operates as a major integrator of subcellular and extracellular metabolism and is simultaneously itself regulated by metabolic processes. Redox status not only dominates cellular metabolism due to the prominence of NAD(H) and NADP(H) couples in myriad metabolic reactions but also acts as an effective signal that informs the cell of the prevailing environmental conditions. After relay of this information, the cell is able to appropriately respond via a range of mechanisms, including directly affecting cellular functioning and reprogramming nuclear gene expression. Recent Advances: The facile accession of Arabidopsis knockout mutants alongside the adoption of broad-scale post-genomic approaches, which are able to provide transcriptomic-, proteomic-, and metabolomic-level information alongside traditional biochemical and emerging cell biological techniques, has dramatically advanced our understanding of redox status control. This review summarizes redox status control of metabolism and the metabolic control of redox status at both cellular and subcellular levels. Critical Issues: It is becoming apparent that plastid, mitochondria, and peroxisome functions influence a wide range of processes outside of the organelles themselves. While knowledge of the network of metabolic pathways and their intraorganellar redox status regulation has increased in the last years, little is known about the interorganellar redox signals coordinating these networks. A current challenge is, therefore, synthesizing our knowledge and planning experiments that tackle redox status regulation at both inter- and intracellular levels. Future Directions: Emerging tools are enabling ever-increasing spatiotemporal resolution of metabolism and imaging of redox status components. Broader application of these tools will likely greatly enhance our understanding of the interplay of redox status and metabolism as well as elucidating and

  10. Understanding of real alternative redox partner of Streptomyces peucetius DoxA: Prediction and validation using in silico and in vitro analyses.

    PubMed

    Rimal, Hemraj; Lee, Seung-Won; Lee, Joo-Ho; Oh, Tae-Jin

    2015-11-01

    Streptomyces peucetius ATCC27952 contains the cytochrome P450 monoxygenase DoxA that is responsible for the hydroxylation of daunorubicin into doxorubicin. Although S. peucetius ATCC27952 contains several potential redox partners, the most suitable endogenous electron-transport system is still unclear; therefore, we conducted a study of potential redox partners using Accelrys Discovery Studio 3.5. Recombinant DoxA along with its redox partners from S. peucetius FDX1, FDR2, and FDX3, and the putidaredoxin and putidaredoxin reductase from Pseudomonas putida that are essential equivalents of the class I type of bacterial electron-transport system were over-expressed and purified. The successful development of an efficient redox system was achieved by an in vitro enzymatic catalysis reaction with DoxA. The optimal pH for the activation of the heme was 7.6 and the optimal temperature was 30 °C. Our findings suggest a two-fold increase of DoxA activity via the NADH → FDR2 → FDX1 → DoxA pathway for the hydroxylation of the daunorubicin, and indicate that the usage of a native redox partner may increase daunorubicin-derived doxorubicin production due to the inclusion of DoxA. PMID:26334717

  11. A redox-flow electrochromic window.

    PubMed

    Jennings, James R; Lim, Wei Yang; Zakeeruddin, Shaik M; Grätzel, Michael; Wang, Qing

    2015-02-01

    A low-cost electrochromic (EC) window based on a redox-flow system that does not require expensive transparent conductive oxide (TCO) substrates is introduced and demonstrated for the first time. An aqueous I3–/I– redox electrolyte is used in place of a TCO to oxidize/reduce a molecular layer of an EC triphenylamine derivative that is anchored to a mesoporous TiO2 scaffold on the inner faces of a double-paned window. The redox electrolyte is electrochemically oxidized/reduced in an external two-compartment cell and circulated through the window cavity using an inexpensive peristaltic pump, resulting in coloration or decoloration of the window due to reaction of the redox solution with the triphenylamine derivative. The absorption characteristics, coloration/decoloration times, and cycling stability of the prototype EC window are evaluated, and prospects for further development are discussed. PMID:25584903

  12. Redox Modulations, Antioxidants, and Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Fraunberger, Erik A.; Scola, Gustavo; Laliberté, Victoria L. M.; Duong, Angela; Andreazza, Ana C.

    2016-01-01

    Although antioxidants, redox modulations, and neuropsychiatric disorders have been widely studied for many years, the field would benefit from an integrative and corroborative review. Our primary objective is to delineate the biological significance of compounds that modulate our redox status (i.e., reactive species and antioxidants) as well as outline their current role in brain health and the impact of redox modulations on the severity of illnesses. Therefore, this review will not enter into the debate regarding the perceived medical legitimacy of antioxidants but rather seek to clarify their abilities and limitations. With this in mind, antioxidants may be interpreted as natural products with significant pharmacological actions in the body. A renewed understanding of these often overlooked compounds will allow us to critically appraise the current literature and provide an informed, novel perspective on an important healthcare issue. In this review, we will introduce the complex topics of redox modulations and their role in the development of select neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:26640614

  13. Redox flow cell energy storage systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaller, L. H.

    1979-01-01

    The redox flow cell energy storage system being developed by NASA for use in remote power systems and distributed storage installations for electric utilities is presented. The system under consideration is an electrochemical storage device which utilizes the oxidation and reduction of two fully soluble redox couples (acidified chloride solutions of chromium and iron) as active electrode materials separated by a highly selective ion exchange membrane. The reactants are contained in large storage tanks and pumped through a stack of redox flow cells where the electrochemical reactions take place at porous carbon felt electrodes. Redox equipment has allowed the incorporation of state of charge readout, stack voltage control and system capacity maintenance (rebalance) devices to regulate cells in a stack jointly. A 200 W, 12 V system with a capacity of about 400 Wh has been constructed, and a 2 kW, 10kWh system is planned.

  14. Mitochondria and Redox Signaling in Steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Morris, E. Matthew; Rector, R. Scott; Thyfault, John P.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Alcoholic and nonalcoholic fatty liver diseases are potentially pathological conditions that can progress to steatohepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis. These conditions affect millions of people throughout the world in part through poor lifestyle choices of excess alcohol consumption, overnutrition, and lack of regular physical activity. Abnormal mitochondrial and cellular redox homeostasis has been documented in steatohepatitis and results in alterations of multiple redox-sensitive signaling cascades. Ultimately, these changes in signaling lead to altered enzyme function and transcriptional activities of proteins critical to mitochondrial and cellular function. In this article, we review the current hypotheses linking mitochondrial redox state to the overall pathophysiology of alcoholic and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and briefly discuss the current therapeutic options under investigation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 15, 485–504. PMID:21128703

  15. High energy density redox flow device

    DOEpatents

    Chiang, Yet-Ming; Carter, W. Craig; Ho, Bryan Y; Duduta, Mihai; Limthongkul, Pimpa

    2014-05-13

    Redox flow devices are described in which at least one of the positive electrode or negative electrode-active materials is a semi-solid or is a condensed ion-storing electroactive material, and in which at least one of the electrode-active materials is transported to and from an assembly at which the electrochemical reaction occurs, producing electrical energy. The electronic conductivity of the semi-solid is increased by the addition of conductive particles to suspensions and/or via the surface modification of the solid in semi-solids (e.g., by coating the solid with a more electron conductive coating material to increase the power of the device). High energy density and high power redox flow devices are disclosed. The redox flow devices described herein can also include one or more inventive design features. In addition, inventive chemistries for use in redox flow devices are also described.

  16. Glutathione and redox signaling in substance abuse

    PubMed Central

    Uys, Joachim D.; Mulholland, Patrick J.; Townsend, Danyelle M.

    2015-01-01

    Throughout the last couple decades, the cause and consequences of substance abuse has expanded to identify the underlying neurobiological signaling mechanisms associated with addictive behavior. Chronic use of drugs, such as cocaine, methamphetamine and alcohol leads to the formation of oxidative or nitrosative stress (ROS/RNS) and changes in glutathione and redox homeostasis. Of importance, redox-sensitive post-translational modifications on cysteine residues, such as S-glutathionylation and S-nitrosylation could impact on the structure and function of addiction related signaling proteins. In this commentary, we evaluate the role of glutathione and redox signaling in cocaine-, methamphetamine- and alcohol addiction and conclude by discussing the possibility of targeting redox pathways for the therapeutic intervention of these substance abuse disorders. PMID:25027386

  17. Glutathione and redox signaling in substance abuse.

    PubMed

    Uys, Joachim D; Mulholland, Patrick J; Townsend, Danyelle M

    2014-07-01

    Throughout the last couple decades, the cause and consequences of substance abuse has expanded to identify the underlying neurobiological signaling mechanisms associated with addictive behavior. Chronic use of drugs, such as cocaine, methamphetamine and alcohol leads to the formation of oxidative or nitrosative stress (ROS/RNS) and changes in glutathione and redox homeostasis. Of importance, redox-sensitive post-translational modifications on cysteine residues, such as S-glutathionylation and S-nitrosylation could impact on the structure and function of addiction related signaling proteins. In this commentary, we evaluate the role of glutathione and redox signaling in cocaine-, methamphetamine- and alcohol addiction and conclude by discussing the possibility of targeting redox pathways for the therapeutic intervention of these substance abuse disorders. PMID:25027386

  18. Redox artifacts in electrophysiological recordings

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Jonathan M.

    2013-01-01

    Electrophysiological techniques make use of Ag/AgCl electrodes that are in direct contact with cells or bath. In the bath, electrodes are exposed to numerous experimental conditions and chemical reagents that can modify electrode voltage. We examined voltage offsets created in Ag/AgCl electrodes by exposure to redox reagents used in electrophysiological studies. Voltage offsets were measured in reference to an electrode separated from the solution by an agar bridge. The reducing reagents Tris-2-carboxyethly-phosphine, dithiothreitol (DTT), and glutathione, as well as the oxidizing agent H2O2 used at experimentally relevant concentrations reacted with Ag in the electrodes to produce voltage offsets. Chloride ions and strong acids and bases produced offsets at millimolar concentrations. Electrolytic depletion of the AgCl layer, to replicate voltage clamp and sustained use, resulted in increased sensitivity to flow and DTT. Offsets were sensitive to electrode silver purity and to the amount and method of chloride deposition. For example, exposure to 10 μM DTT produced a voltage offset between 10 and 284 mV depending on the chloride deposition method. Currents generated by these offsets are significant and dependent on membrane conductance and by extension the expression of ion channels and may therefore appear to be biological in origin. These data demonstrate a new source of artifacts in electrophysiological recordings that can affect measurements obtained from a variety of experimental techniques from patch clamp to two-electrode voltage clamp. PMID:23344161

  19. Redox properties of metalloporphyrin dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Collman, J.P.; Prodolliet, J.W.; Leidner, C.R.

    1986-05-28

    Cyclic and rotated disk voltammetry of two metalloporphyrin dimers, (Ru(OEP))/sub 2/ and (Os(OEP))/sub 2/, exhibit four oxidations and two reductions for each compound which are all chemically and electrochemically reversible on the voltammetric time scale. Comparison of the formal potentials of the six couples suggests that the first two oxidations are metal-centered redox processes; the remaining four couples are likely to be ligand centered. Controlled chemical oxidations using ferricinium hexafluorophosphate, silver tetrafluoroborate, and tris(4-bromophenyl)ammonium hexachloroantimonate cleanly generate the monocations (M(OEP))/sub 2//sup +/ and the dications (M(OEP))/sub 2//sup 2 +/. NMR, ESR, and electronic spectroscopy of these dimeric, cationic products support the assignment of the two oxidations as metal centered. These oxidations permit the preparation of the two series of metalloporphyrin dimers: paramagnetic (M(OEP))/sub 2/ with bond order = 2, paramagnetic (M(OEP))/sub 2//sup +/ with bond order = 2.5, and diamagnetic (M(OEP))/sub 2//sup 2 +/ with bond order = 3.

  20. Redox storage systems for solar applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagedorn, N. H.; Thaller, L. H.

    1980-01-01

    The NASA Redox energy storage system is described. The system is based on soluble aqueous iron and chromium chloride redox couples. The needed technology advances in the two elements (electrodes and membranes) that are key to its technological feasibility have been achieved and system development has begun. The design, construction, and test of a 1 kilowatt system integrated with a solar photovoltaic array is discussed.

  1. Center for Catalysis at Iowa State University

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, George A.

    2006-10-17

    The overall objective of this proposal is to enable Iowa State University to establish a Center that enjoys world-class stature and eventually enhances the economy through the transfer of innovation from the laboratory to the marketplace. The funds have been used to support experimental proposals from interdisciplinary research teams in areas related to catalysis and green chemistry. Specific focus areas included: • Catalytic conversion of renewable natural resources to industrial materials • Development of new catalysts for the oxidation or reduction of commodity chemicals • Use of enzymes and microorganisms in biocatalysis • Development of new, environmentally friendly reactions of industrial importance These focus areas intersect with barriers from the MYTP draft document. Specifically, section 2.4.3.1 Processing and Conversion has a list of bulleted items under Improved Chemical Conversions that includes new hydrogenation catalysts, milder oxidation catalysts, new catalysts for dehydration and selective bond cleavage catalysts. Specifically, the four sections are: 1. Catalyst development (7.4.12.A) 2. Conversion of glycerol (7.4.12.B) 3. Conversion of biodiesel (7.4.12.C) 4. Glucose from starch (7.4.12.D) All funded projects are part of a soybean or corn biorefinery. Two funded projects that have made significant progress toward goals of the MYTP draft document are: Catalysts to convert feedstocks with high fatty acid content to biodiesel (Kraus, Lin, Verkade) and Conversion of Glycerol into 1,3-Propanediol (Lin, Kraus). Currently, biodiesel is prepared using homogeneous base catalysis. However, as producers look for feedstocks other than soybean oil, such as waste restaurant oils and rendered animal fats, they have observed a large amount of free fatty acids contained in the feedstocks. Free fatty acids cannot be converted into biodiesel using homogeneous base-mediated processes. The CCAT catalyst system offers an integrated and cooperative catalytic

  2. Loop residues and catalysis in OMP synthase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gary P; Hansen, Michael Riis; Grubmeyer, Charles

    2012-06-01

    . The lower level of expression of the KIE by K103A suggests that in these mutant proteins the major barrier to catalysis is successful closure of the catalytic loop, which when closed, produces rapid and reversible catalysis. PMID:22531099

  3. Catalysis by unsupported skeletal gold catalysts.

    PubMed

    Wittstock, Arne; Bäumer, Marcus

    2014-03-18

    Catalysis is one of the key technologies for the 21st century for achieving the required sustainability of chemical processes. Critical improvements are based on the development of new catalysts and catalytic concepts. In this context, gold holds great promise because it is more active and selective than other precious metal catalysts at low temperatures. However, gold becomes only chemically and catalytically active when it is nanostructured. Since the 1970s and 1980s, the first type of gold catalysts that chemists studied were small nanoparticles on oxidic supports. With the later onset of nanotechnology, a variety of nanostructured materials not requiring a support or organic stabilizers became available within about the last 10 years. Among these are gold nanofoams generated by combustion of gold compounds, nanotube membranes prepared by electroless deposition of gold inside a template, and corrosion-derived nanoporous gold. Even though these materials are macroscopic in their geometric dimensions (e.g., disks, cubes, and membranes with dimensions of millimeters), they are comprised of gold nanostructures, for example, in the form of ligaments as small as 15 nm in diameter (nanoporous gold, npAu). The nanostructure brings about a high surface to volume ratio and a large fraction of low coordinated surface atoms. In this Account, we discuss how unsupported materials are active catalysts for aerobic oxidation reaction in gas phase (oxidation of CO and primary alcohols), as well as liquid phase oxidation and reduction reactions. It turns out that the bonding and activation of molecular oxygen for gas phase oxidations strongly profits from trace amounts of an ad-metal residue such as silver. It is noteworthy that these catalysts still exhibit the special gold type chemistry, characterized by activity at very low temperatures and high selectivity for partial oxidations. For example, we can oxidize CO over these unsupported catalysts (npAu, nanotubes, and powder) at

  4. High-Spin Cobalt Hydrides for Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, Patrick L.

    2013-08-29

    Organometallic chemists have traditionally used catalysts with strong-field ligands that give low-spin complexes. However, complexes with a weak ligand field have weaker bonds and lower barriers to geometric changes, suggesting that they may lead to more rapid catalytic reactions. Developing our understanding of high-spin complexes requires the use of a broader range of spectroscopic techniques, but has the promise of changing the mechanism and/or selectivity of known catalytic reactions. These changes may enable the more efficient utilization of chemical resources. A special advantage of cobalt and iron catalysts is that the metals are more abundant and cheaper than those currently used for major industrial processes that convert unsaturated organic molecules and biofeedstocks into useful chemicals. This project specifically evaluated the potential of high-spin cobalt complexes for small-molecule reactions for bond rearrangement and cleavage reactions relevant to hydrocarbon transformations. We have learned that many of these reactions proceed through crossing to different spin states: for example, high-spin complexes can flip one electron spin to access a lower-energy reaction pathway for beta-hydride elimination. This reaction enables new, selective olefin isomerization catalysis. The high-spin cobalt complexes also cleave the C-O bond of CO2 and the C-F bonds of fluoroarenes. In each case, the detailed mechanism of the reaction has been determined. Importantly, we have discovered that the cobalt catalysts described here give distinctive selectivities that are better than known catalysts. These selectivities come from a synergy between supporting ligand design and electronic control of the spin-state crossing in the reactions.

  5. Energetics of S-adenosylmethionine synthetase catalysis.

    PubMed

    McQueney, M S; Anderson, K S; Markham, G D

    2000-04-18

    S-adenosylmethionine synthetase (ATP:L-methionine S-adenosyltransferase) catalyzes the only known route of biosynthesis of the primary biological alkylating agent. The internal thermodynamics of the Escherichia coli S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) synthetase catalyzed formation of AdoMet, pyrophosphate (PP(i)), and phosphate (P(i)) from ATP, methionine, and water have been determined by a combination of pre-steady-state kinetics, solvent isotope incorporation, and equilibrium binding measurements in conjunction with computer modeling. These studies provided the rate constants for substrate binding, the two chemical interconversion steps [AdoMet formation and subsequent tripolyphosphate (PPP(i)) hydrolysis], and product release. The data demonstrate the presence of a kinetically significant isomerization of the E.AdoMet.PP(i).P(i) complex before product release. The free energy profile for the enzyme-catalyzed reaction under physiological conditions has been constructed using these experimental values and in vivo concentrations of substrates and products. The free energy profile reveals that the AdoMet formation reaction, which has an equilibrium constant of 10(4), does not have well-balanced transition state and ground state energies. In contrast, the subsequent PPP(i) hydrolytic reaction is energetically better balanced. The thermodynamic profile indicates the use of binding energies for catalysis of AdoMet formation and the necessity for subsequent PPP(i) hydrolysis to allow enzyme turnover. Crystallographic studies have shown that a mobile protein loop gates access to the active site. The present kinetic studies indicate that this loop movement is rapid with respect to k(cat) and with respect to substrate binding at physiological concentrations. The uniformly slow binding rates of 10(4)-10(5) M(-)(1) s(-)(1) for ligands with different structures suggest that loop movement may be an intrinsic property of the protein rather than being ligand induced. PMID:10757994

  6. Automotive catalysis studied by surface science.

    PubMed

    Bowker, Michael

    2008-10-01

    In this tutorial review I discuss the significant impact that surface science has had on our understanding of the catalytic phenomena associated with automobile exhaust depollution catalysis. For oxidation reactions it has generally been found that reactions are self-poisoned at low temperatures by the presence of strongly adsorbed reactants (such as molecular CO and NO), and that the rapid acceleration in rate at elevated temperatures (often called 'light-off') is due to the desorption of such adsorbates, which then frees up sites for dissociation and hence for oxidation reactions. In some circumstances such autocatalytic phenomena can then manifest themselves as oscillatory reactions which can vary in rate in both space and time. For NO reduction, the efficiency of depollution (by production of molecular nitrogen) is strongly affected by the nature of the metal used. Rh is extremely effective because it can dissociate NO much more readily than metals such as Pd and Pt, enabling oxygen removal (by reaction with CO to CO2) even at room temperature. Rh is also very selective in producing predominantly N2, rather than N2O. NOx storage and reduction (NSR) is an important recent development for removal of NOx under the highly oxidising conditions of a lean-burn engine exhaust, and the strategy involves storing NOx on BaO under oxidising conditions followed by the creation of reducing conditions to de-store and reduce it to nitrogen. By the use of STM it has been shown that this storage process is extremely facile, occurring fast even under UHV conditions, and that the storage occurs on BaO in the vicinity of Pt, with most of the oxide being converted to nitrate. PMID:18818823

  7. Catalysis-by-design impacts assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Fassbender, L L; Young, J K; Sen, R K

    1991-05-01

    Catalyst researchers have always recognized the need to develop a detailed understanding of the mechanisms of catalytic processes, and have hoped that it would lead to developing a theoretical predictive base to guide the search for new catalysts. This understanding allows one to develop a set of hierarchical models, from fundamental atomic-level ab-initio models to detailed engineering simulations of reactor systems, to direct the search for optimized, efficient catalyst systems. During the last two decades, the explosions of advanced surface analysis techniques have helped considerably to develop the building blocks for understanding various catalytic reactions. An effort to couple these theoretical and experimental advances to develop a set of hierarchical models to predict the nature of catalytic materials is a program entitled Catalysis-by-Design (CRD).'' In assessing the potential impacts of CBD on US industry, the key point to remember is that the value of the program lies in developing a novel methodology to search for new catalyst systems. Industrial researchers can then use this methodology to develop proprietary catalysts. Most companies involved in catalyst R D have two types of ongoing projects. The first type, what we call market-driven R D,'' are projects that support and improve upon a company's existing product lines. Project of the second type, technology-driven R D,'' are longer term, involve the development of totally new catalysts, and are initiated through scientists' research ideas. The CBD approach will impact both types of projects. However, this analysis indicates that the near-term impacts will be on market-driven'' projects. The conclusions and recommendations presented in this report were obtained by the authors through personal interviews with individuals involved in a variety of industrial catalyst development programs and through the three CBD workshops held in the summer of 1989. 34 refs., 7 figs., 7 tabs.

  8. Membranes for Redox Flow Battery Applications

    PubMed Central

    Prifti, Helen; Parasuraman, Aishwarya; Winardi, Suminto; Lim, Tuti Mariana; Skyllas-Kazacos, Maria

    2012-01-01

    The need for large scale energy storage has become a priority to integrate renewable energy sources into the electricity grid. Redox flow batteries are considered the best option to store electricity from medium to large scale applications. However, the current high cost of redox flow batteries impedes the wide spread adoption of this technology. The membrane is a critical component of redox flow batteries as it determines the performance as well as the economic viability of the batteries. The membrane acts as a separator to prevent cross-mixing of the positive and negative electrolytes, while still allowing the transport of ions to complete the circuit during the passage of current. An ideal membrane should have high ionic conductivity, low water intake and excellent chemical and thermal stability as well as good ionic exchange capacity. Developing a low cost, chemically stable membrane for redox flow cell batteries has been a major focus for many groups around the world in recent years. This paper reviews the research work on membranes for redox flow batteries, in particular for the all-vanadium redox flow battery which has received the most attention. PMID:24958177

  9. Redox control of apoptosis: an update.

    PubMed

    Filomeni, Giuseppe; Ciriolo, Maria R

    2006-01-01

    The redox environment of the cell is currently thought to be extremely important to control cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis as many redox-sensitive proteins characterize these networks. A recent, widely accepted theory is that free radicals are not only dangerous species but, at low concentration, they have been designed by evolution to participate in the maintenance of cellular redox (reduction/oxidation) homeostasis. This notion derives from the evidence that cells constantly generate free radicals both as waste products of aerobic metabolism and in response to a large variety of stimuli. Free radicals, once produced, provoked cellular responses (redox regulation) against oxidative stress transducing the signals to maintain the cellular redox balance. Growing evidence suggests that in many instances the production of radical species is tightly regulated and their downstream targets are very specific, indicating that reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species actively participate in several cell-signalling pathways as physiological "second messengers." In this review, we provide a general overview and novel insights into the redox-dependent pathways involved in programmed cell death. PMID:17034362

  10. Redox Regulation of Endothelial Cell Fate

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ping; Zou, Ming-Hui

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are present throughout blood vessels and have variable roles in both physiological and pathological settings. EC fate is altered and regulated by several key factors in physiological or pathological conditions. Reactive nitrogen species and reactive oxygen species derived from NAD(P)H oxidases, mitochondria, or nitric oxide-producing enzymes are not only cytotoxic but also compose a signaling network in the redox system. The formation, actions, key molecular interactions, and physiological and pathological relevance of redox signals in ECs remain unclear. We review the identities, sources, and biological actions of oxidants and reductants produced during EC function or dysfunction. Further, we discuss how ECs shape key redox sensors and examine the biological functions, transcriptional responses, and post-translational modifications evoked by the redox system in ECs. We summarize recent findings regarding the mechanisms by which redox signals regulate the fate of ECs and address the outcome of altered EC fate in health and disease. Future studies will examine if the redox biology of ECs can be targeted in pathophysiological conditions. PMID:24633153

  11. Membranes for redox flow battery applications.

    PubMed

    Prifti, Helen; Parasuraman, Aishwarya; Winardi, Suminto; Lim, Tuti Mariana; Skyllas-Kazacos, Maria

    2012-01-01

    The need for large scale energy storage has become a priority to integrate renewable energy sources into the electricity grid. Redox flow batteries are considered the best option to store electricity from medium to large scale applications. However, the current high cost of redox flow batteries impedes the wide spread adoption of this technology. The membrane is a critical component of redox flow batteries as it determines the performance as well as the economic viability of the batteries. The membrane acts as a separator to prevent cross-mixing of the positive and negative electrolytes, while still allowing the transport of ions to complete the circuit during the passage of current. An ideal membrane should have high ionic conductivity, low water intake and excellent chemical and thermal stability as well as good ionic exchange capacity. Developing a low cost, chemically stable membrane for redox flow cell batteries has been a major focus for many groups around the world in recent years. This paper reviews the research work on membranes for redox flow batteries, in particular for the all-vanadium redox flow battery which has received the most attention. PMID:24958177

  12. Dynamic Redox Regulation of IL-4 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Gaurav; Gran, Margaret A.; Bagchi, Pritha; Kemp, Melissa L.

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying the magnitude and dynamics of protein oxidation during cell signaling is technically challenging. Computational modeling provides tractable, quantitative methods to test hypotheses of redox mechanisms that may be simultaneously operative during signal transduction. The interleukin-4 (IL-4) pathway, which has previously been reported to induce reactive oxygen species and oxidation of PTP1B, may be controlled by several other putative mechanisms of redox regulation; widespread proteomic thiol oxidation observed via 2D redox differential gel electrophoresis upon IL-4 treatment suggests more than one redox-sensitive protein implicated in this pathway. Through computational modeling and a model selection strategy that relied on characteristic STAT6 phosphorylation dynamics of IL-4 signaling, we identified reversible protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) oxidation as the primary redox regulatory mechanism in the pathway. A systems-level model of IL-4 signaling was developed that integrates synchronous pan-PTP oxidation with ROS-independent mechanisms. The model quantitatively predicts the dynamics of IL-4 signaling over a broad range of new redox conditions, offers novel hypotheses about regulation of JAK/STAT signaling, and provides a framework for interrogating putative mechanisms involving receptor-initiated oxidation. PMID:26562652

  13. Nuclear thiol redox systems in plants.

    PubMed

    Delorme-Hinoux, Valérie; Bangash, Sajid A K; Meyer, Andreas J; Reichheld, Jean-Philippe

    2016-02-01

    Thiol-disulfide redox regulation is essential for many cellular functions in plants. It has major roles in defense mechanisms, maintains the redox status of the cell and plays structural, with regulatory roles for many proteins. Although thiol-based redox regulation has been extensively studied in subcellular organelles such as chloroplasts, it has been much less studied in the nucleus. Thiol-disulfide redox regulation is dependent on the conserved redox proteins, glutathione/glutaredoxin (GRX) and thioredoxin (TRX) systems. We first focus on the functions of glutathione in the nucleus and discuss recent data concerning accumulation of glutathione in the nucleus. We also provide evidence that glutathione reduction is potentially active in the nucleus. Recent data suggests that the nucleus is enriched in specific GRX and TRX isoforms. We discuss the biochemical and molecular characteristics of these isoforms and focus on genetic evidences for their potential nuclear functions. Finally, we make an overview of the different thiol-based redox regulated proteins in the nucleus. These proteins are involved in various pathways including transcriptional regulation, metabolism and signaling. PMID:26795153

  14. Dynamic Redox Regulation of IL-4 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Gaurav; Gran, Margaret A; Bagchi, Pritha; Kemp, Melissa L

    2015-11-01

    Quantifying the magnitude and dynamics of protein oxidation during cell signaling is technically challenging. Computational modeling provides tractable, quantitative methods to test hypotheses of redox mechanisms that may be simultaneously operative during signal transduction. The interleukin-4 (IL-4) pathway, which has previously been reported to induce reactive oxygen species and oxidation of PTP1B, may be controlled by several other putative mechanisms of redox regulation; widespread proteomic thiol oxidation observed via 2D redox differential gel electrophoresis upon IL-4 treatment suggests more than one redox-sensitive protein implicated in this pathway. Through computational modeling and a model selection strategy that relied on characteristic STAT6 phosphorylation dynamics of IL-4 signaling, we identified reversible protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) oxidation as the primary redox regulatory mechanism in the pathway. A systems-level model of IL-4 signaling was developed that integrates synchronous pan-PTP oxidation with ROS-independent mechanisms. The model quantitatively predicts the dynamics of IL-4 signaling over a broad range of new redox conditions, offers novel hypotheses about regulation of JAK/STAT signaling, and provides a framework for interrogating putative mechanisms involving receptor-initiated oxidation. PMID:26562652

  15. Biodiesel forming reactions using heterogeneous catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yijun

    Biodiesel synthesis from biomass provides a means for utilizing effectively renewable resources, a way to convert waste vegetable oils and animal fats to a useful product, a way to recycle carbon dioxide for a combustion fuel, and production of a fuel that is biodegradable, non-toxic, and has a lower emission profile than petroleum-diesel. Free fatty acid (FFA) esterification and triglyceride (TG) transesterification with low molecular weight alcohols constitute the synthetic routes to prepare biodiesel from lipid feedstocks. This project was aimed at developing a better understanding of important fundamental issues involved in heterogeneous catalyzed biodiesel forming reactions using mainly model compounds, representing part of on-going efforts to build up a rational base for assay, design, and performance optimization of solid acids/bases in biodiesel synthesis. As FFA esterification proceeds, water is continuously formed as a byproduct and affects reaction rates in a negative manner. Using sulfuric acid (as a catalyst) and acetic acid (as a model compound for FFA), the impact of increasing concentrations of water on acid catalysis was investigated. The order of the water effect on reaction rate was determined to be -0.83. Sulfuric acid lost up to 90% activity as the amount of water present increased. The nature of the negative effect of water on esterification was found to go beyond the scope of reverse hydrolysis and was associated with the diminished acid strength of sulfuric acid as a result of the preferential solvation by water molecules of its catalytic protons. The results indicate that as esterification progresses and byproduct water is produced, deactivation of a Bronsted acid catalyst like H2SO4 occurs. Using a solid composite acid (SAC-13) as an example of heterogeneous catalysts and sulfuric acid as a homogeneous reference, similar reaction inhibition by water was demonstrated for homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis. This similarity together with

  16. Kinetic evolutionary behavior of catalysis-select migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yuan-Gang; Lin, Zhen-Quan; Ke, Jian-Hong

    2012-06-01

    We propose a catalysis-select migration driven evolution model of two-species (A- and B-species) aggregates, where one unit of species A migrates to species B under the catalysts of species C, while under the catalysts of species D the reaction will become one unit of species B migrating to species A. Meanwhile the catalyst aggregates of species C perform self-coagulation, as do the species D aggregates. We study this catalysis-select migration driven kinetic aggregation phenomena using the generalized Smoluchowski rate equation approach with C species catalysis-select migration rate kernel K(k;i,j) = Kkij and D species catalysis-select migration rate kernel J(k;i,j)= Jkij. The kinetic evolution behaviour is found to be dominated by the competition between the catalysis-select immigration and emigration, in which the competition is between JD0 and KC0 (D0 and C0 are the initial numbers of the monomers of species D and C, respectively). When JD0 -KC0 > 0, the aggregate size distribution of species A satisfies the conventional scaling form and that of species B satisfies a modified scaling form. And in the case of JD0-KC0 < 0, species A and B exchange their aggregate size distributions as in the above JD0-KC0 > 0 case.

  17. Immobilization of polyoxometalates in crystalline solids for highly efficient heterogeneous catalysis.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ji-Jie; Wu, Chuan-De

    2016-06-21

    Polyoxometalates (POMs) are a unique class of molecular metal-oxygen clusters with attractive architecture and tunable properties. Due to their strong acidity, redox chemistry, photoactivity, charge distribution and multielectron transformation, POMs have been used as efficient catalysts in a variety of chemical reactions. To meet the requirement of sustainable chemistry, great effort has been focused on immobilization of the active POMs on different solid supports to realize heterogeneous catalysis. This short review summarizes the recent progress on immobilization of POM moieties in crystalline solids with defined crystal structures, including organic-inorganic hybrid materials, POM-based inorganic crystalline solids and POM-encapsulated metal-organic frameworks (POM@MOFs), and their catalytic properties in oxidation, hydrolysis, cyanosilylation, photocatalysis and electrocatalysis. As illustrated in the text, these crystalline solids exhibit interesting catalytic properties, such as high activity, stability and selectivity, and simple recovery and easy recycling, which are much superior to those of the corresponding constituent species in most cases. PMID:27230969

  18. Prebiotic Metabolisms: Photo catalysis of the rTCA cycle by sphalerite colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangiante, D. M.; Bowen, B.; Northen, T.; Banfield, J. F.

    2010-12-01

    Explorations of mineral catalyzed reverse tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) cycle reactions provide a window into possible mechanisms for prebiotic metabolisms and the origins of life. The excitation of nano-scale semiconducting sphalerite minerals by ultra-violate light results in reducing electrons capable of catalyzing the reduction reactions present in the rTCA cycle. Current literature has utilized ion chromatography methods to characterize catalysis of two of the five redox active rTCA cycle compounds with high yield. This technique is unable to produce the untargeted analysis required to anticipate the myriad side reactions driven by excited photoelectrons and their ensuing radicals. By employing liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC-MS) we can examine the complete range of metabolites present across a reaction time series. The three dimensional LC-MS data set allows for the qualitative determination of individual metabolite features, while the comparison of intensities yields quantitative rates. These results allow us to describe the complete set of reactions resultant from a single rTCA cycle organic acid on a photo-activated sphalerite surface and provide a possible mechanism for how metabolic pathways could operate in enzyme free environments.

  19. Cs(I) Cation Enhanced Cu(II) Catalysis of Water Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lei; Du, Jialei; Zuo, Shangshang; Chen, Zuofeng

    2016-07-18

    We report here a new catalytic water oxidation system based on Cu(II) ions and a remarkable countercation effect on the catalysis. In a concentrated fluoride solution at neutral to weakly basic pHs, simple Cu(II) salts are highly active and robust in catalyzing water oxidation homogeneously. F(-) in solution acts as a proton acceptor and an oxidatively robust ligand. F(-) coordination prevents precipitation of Cu(II) as CuF2/Cu(OH)2 and lowers potentials for accessing high-oxidation-state Cu by delocalizing the oxidative charge over F(-) ligands. Significantly, the catalytic current is greatly enhanced in a solution of CsF compared to those of KF and NaF. Although countercations are not directly involved in the catalytic redox cycle, UV-vis and (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance measurements reveal that coordination of F(-) to Cu(II) is dependent on countercations by Coulombic interaction. A less intense interaction between F(-) and well-solvated Cs(+) as compared with Na(+) and K(+) leads to a more intense coordination of F(-) to Cu(II), which accounts for the improved catalytic performance. PMID:27352033

  20. Well-Defined Dinuclear Gold Complexes for Preorganization-Induced Selective Dual Gold Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Vreeken, Vincent; Broere, Daniël L J; Jans, Anne C H; Lankelma, Marianne; Reek, Joost N H; Siegler, Maxime A; van der Vlugt, Jarl Ivar

    2016-08-16

    The synthesis, reactivity, and potential of well-defined dinuclear gold complexes as precursors for dual gold catalysis are explored. Using the preorganizing abilities of the ditopic PN(H) P(iPr) (L(H) ) ligand, dinuclear Au(I) -Au(I) complex 1 and mixed-valent Au(I) -Au(III) complex 2 provide access to structurally characterized chlorido-bridged cationic species 3 and 4 upon halide abstraction. For 2, this transformation involves unprecedented two-electron oxidation of the redox-active ligand, generating a highly rigidified environment for the Au2 core. Facile reaction with phenylacetylene affords the σ,π-activated phenylacetylide complex 5. When applied in the dual gold heterocycloaddition of a urea-functionalized alkyne, well-defined precatalyst 3 provides high regioselectivities for the anti-Markovnikov product, even at low catalyst loadings, and outperforms common mononuclear Au(I) systems. This proof-of-concept demonstrates the benefit of preorganization of two gold centers to enforce selective non-classical σ,π-activation with bifunctional substrates. PMID:27430938

  1. Amine Functionalization via Oxidative Photoredox Catalysis: Methodology Development and Complex Molecule Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Conspectus While the use of visible light to drive chemical reactivity is of high importance to the development of environmentally benign chemical transformations, the concomitant use of a stoichiometric electron donor or acceptor is often required to steer the desired redox behavior of these systems. The low-cost and ubiquity of tertiary amine bases has led to their widespread use as reductive additives in photoredox catalysis. Early use of trialkylamines in this context was focused on their role as reductive excited state quenchers of the photocatalyst, which in turn provides a more highly reducing catalytic intermediate. In this Account, we discuss some of the observations and thought processes that have led from our use of amines as reductive additives to their use as complex substrates and intermediates for natural product synthesis. Early attempts by our group to construct key carbon–carbon bonds via free-radical intermediates led to the observation that some trialkylamines readily behave as efficient hydrogen atom donors under redox-active photochemical conditions. In the wake of in-depth mechanistic studies published in the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s, this understanding has in turn allowed for a systematic approach to the design of a number of photochemical methodologies through rational tuning of the amine component. Minimization of the C–H donicity of the amine additive was found to promote desired C–C bond formation in a number of contexts, and subsequent elucidation of the amine’s redox fate has sparked a reevaluation of the amine’s role from that of reagent to that of substrate. The reactivity of tertiary amines in these photochemical systems is complex, and allows for a number of mechanistic possibilities that are not necessarily mutually exclusive. A variety of combinations of single-electron oxidation, C–H abstraction, deprotonation, and β-scission result in the formation of reactive intermediates such as α-amino radicals and iminium ions

  2. Protein S-glutathiolation: Redox-sensitive regulation of protein function

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Bradford G.; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2011-01-01

    Reversible protein S-glutathiolation has emerged as an important mechanism of post-translational modification. Under basal conditions several proteins remain adducted to glutathione, and physiological glutathiolation of proteins has been shown to regulate protein function. Enzymes that promote glutathiolation (e.g., glutathione-S-transferase-P) or those that remove glutathione from proteins (e.g., glutaredoxin) have been identified. Modification by glutathione has been shown to affect protein catalysis, ligand binding, oligomerization and protein-protein interactions. Conditions associated with oxidative or nitrosative stress, such as ischemia-reperfusion, hypertension and tachycardia increase protein glutathiolation via changes in the glutathione redox status (GSH/GSSG) or through the formation of sulfenic acid (SOH) or nitrosated (SNO) cysteine intermediates. These “activated” thiols promote reversible S-glutathiolation of key proteins involved in cell signaling, energy production, ion transport, and cell death. Hence, S-glutathiolation is ideally suited for integrating and mounting fine-tuned responses to changes in the redox state. S-glutathiolation also provides a temporary glutathione “cap” to protect protein thiols from irreversible oxidation and it could be an important mechanism of protein “encryption” to maintain proteins in a functionally silent state until they are needed during conditions of stress. Current evidence suggests that the glutathiolation-deglutathiolation cycle integrates and interacts with other post-translational mechanisms to regulate signal transduction, metabolism, inflammation, and apoptosis. PMID:21784079

  3. Cobalt and marine redox evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanner, Elizabeth D.; Planavsky, Noah J.; Lalonde, Stefan V.; Robbins, Leslie J.; Bekker, Andrey; Rouxel, Olivier J.; Saito, Mak A.; Kappler, Andreas; Mojzsis, Stephen J.; Konhauser, Kurt O.

    2014-03-01

    Cobalt (Co) is a bio-essential trace element and limiting nutrient in some regions of the modern oceans. It has been proposed that Co was more abundant in poorly ventilated Precambrian oceans based on the greater utilization of Co by anaerobic microbes relative to plants and animals. However, there are few empirical or theoretical constraints on the history of seawater Co concentrations. Herein, we present a survey of authigenic Co in marine sediments (iron formations, authigenic pyrite and bulk euxinic shales) with the goal of tracking changes in the marine Co reservoir throughout Earth's history. We further provide an overview of the modern marine Co cycle, which we use as a platform to evaluate how changes in the redox state of Earth's surface were likely to have affected marine Co concentrations. Based on sedimentary Co contents and our understanding of marine Co sources and sinks, we propose that from ca. 2.8 to 1.8 Ga the large volume of hydrothermal fluids circulating through abundant submarine ultramafic rocks along with a predominantly anoxic ocean with a low capacity for Co burial resulted in a large dissolved marine Co reservoir. We tentatively propose that there was a decrease in marine Co concentrations after ca. 1.8 Ga resulting from waning hydrothermal Co sources and the expansion of sulfide Co burial flux. Changes in the Co reservoir due to deep-water ventilation in the Neoproterozoic, if they occurred, are not resolvable with the current dataset. Rather, Co enrichments in Phanerozoic euxinic shales deposited during ocean anoxic events (OAE) indicate Co mobilization from expanded anoxic sediments and enhanced hydrothermal sources. A new record of marine Co concentrations provides a platform from which we can reevaluate the role that environmental Co concentrations played in shaping biological Co utilization throughout Earth's history.

  4. Faceted metal and metal oxide nanoparticles: design, fabrication and catalysis.

    PubMed

    Pal, Jaya; Pal, Tarasankar

    2015-09-14

    The review addresses new advances in metal, bimetallic, metal oxide, and composite particles in their nanoregime for facet-selective catalytic applications. The synthesis and growth mechanisms of the particles have been summarized in brief in this review with a view to develop critical examination of the faceted morphology of the particles for catalysis. The size, shape and composition of the particles have been found to be largely irrelevant in comparison to the nature of facets in catalysis. Thus selective high- and low-index facets have been found to selectively promote adsorption, which eventually leads to an effective catalytic reaction. As a consequence, a high density of atoms rest at the corners, steps, stages, kinks etc on the catalyst surface in order to host the adsorbate efficiently and catalyze the reaction. Again, surface atomic arrangement and bond length have been found to play a dominant role in adsorption, leading to effective catalysis. PMID:26255749

  5. Faceted metal and metal oxide nanoparticles: design, fabrication and catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Jaya; Pal, Tarasankar

    2015-08-01

    The review addresses new advances in metal, bimetallic, metal oxide, and composite particles in their nanoregime for facet-selective catalytic applications. The synthesis and growth mechanisms of the particles have been summarized in brief in this review with a view to develop critical examination of the faceted morphology of the particles for catalysis. The size, shape and composition of the particles have been found to be largely irrelevant in comparison to the nature of facets in catalysis. Thus selective high- and low-index facets have been found to selectively promote adsorption, which eventually leads to an effective catalytic reaction. As a consequence, a high density of atoms rest at the corners, steps, stages, kinks etc on the catalyst surface in order to host the adsorbate efficiently and catalyze the reaction. Again, surface atomic arrangement and bond length have been found to play a dominant role in adsorption, leading to effective catalysis.

  6. Seasonal variation of redox species and redox potentials in shallow groundwater: A comparison of measured and calculated redox potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh Kumar, A.; Riyazuddin, P.

    2012-06-01

    SummaryThe seasonal variation of redox potential (Eh) and redox species such as As(V)/As(III), Cr(VI)/Cr(III), Fe(III)/Fe(II), NO3-/NO2-, and Se(VI)/Se(IV) were studied in a shallow groundwater for a period of three years (May, 2004-January, 2007). The study area was Chrompet area of Chennai city, India. Groundwater samples from 65 wells were monitored for pH, electrical conductivity, dissolved oxygen (DO), and major ions during pre-(May) and post-monsoon (January) seasons. The objective of the study was to gain insight into the temporal variation of the redox species due to groundwater recharge and to identify the redox reactions controlling the measured Eh of the groundwater. The study revealed that the shallow groundwater was "oxic" with DO ranging between 0.25 and 5.00 mg L-1, and between 0.38 and 5.05 mg L-1 during pre-(May, 2004) and post-monsoon (January, 2005) seasons, respectively. The measured Eh (with respect to standard hydrogen electrode, SHE) ranged between 65 and 322 mV, and between 110 and 330 mV during pre- and post-monsoon seasons, respectively. During post-monsoon seasons, DO and Eh increased in most of the wells due to groundwater recharge. The calculated Eh using the redox couples As(V)/As(III), NO3-/NO2-, O2/H2O and Se(VI)/Se(IV) neither agreed among themselves nor with the measured Eh during all the seasons. It shows that in the shallow groundwater, the various redox couples are in disequilibrium among themselves and with the Pt electrode. However, 41% (n = 122) of the Eh values calculated from Fe(III)/Fe(II) couple agreed with the measured Eh within ±30 mV, the uncertainty of Pt-electrode measurement. The post-monsoon seasons showed higher values of As(V)/As(III) and Se(VI)/Se(IV) compared to the pre-monsoon seasons, whereas Fe(III)/Fe(II) behaved in the opposite manner. This pattern of variation is consistent with the increased oxidizing nature, as shown by the higher DO and Eh values observed during post-monsoon seasons. The results

  7. Electrochemical, Spectroscopic, and Density Functional Theory Characterization of Redox Activity in Nickel-Substituted Azurin: A Model for Acetyl-CoA Synthase.

    PubMed

    Manesis, Anastasia C; Shafaat, Hannah S

    2015-08-17

    Nickel-containing enzymes are key players in global hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and methane cycles. Many of these enzymes rely on Ni(I) oxidation states in critical catalytic intermediates. However, due to the highly reactive nature of these species, their isolation within metalloenzymes has often proved elusive. In this report, we describe and characterize a model biological Ni(I) species that has been generated within the electron transfer protein, azurin. Replacement of the native copper cofactor with nickel is shown to preserve the redox activity of the protein. The Ni(II/I) couple is observed at -590 mV versus NHE, with an interfacial electron transfer rate of 70 s(-1). Chemical reduction of Ni(II)Az generates a stable species with strong absorption features at 350 nm and a highly anisotropic, axial EPR signal with principal g-values of 2.56 and 2.10. Density functional theory calculations provide insight into the electronic and geometric structure of the Ni(I) species, suggesting a trigonal planar coordination environment. The predicted spectroscopic features of this low-coordinate nickel site are in good agreement with the experimental data. Molecular orbital analysis suggests potential for both metal-centered and ligand-centered reactivity, highlighting the covalency of the metal-thiolate bond. Characterization of a stable Ni(I) species within a model protein has implications for understanding the mechanisms of complex enzymes, including acetyl coenzyme A synthase, and developing scaffolds for unique reactivity. PMID:26234790

  8. Thiol-based redox switches in prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Hillion, Melanie; Antelmann, Haike

    2015-01-01

    Summary Bacteria encounter reactive oxygen species (ROS) as consequence of the aerobic life or as oxidative burst of activated neutrophils during infections. In addition, bacteria are exposed to other redox-active compounds including hypochloric acid (HOCl) and reactive electrophilic species (RES), such as quinones and aldehydes. These reactive species often target the thiol groups of cysteines in proteins and lead to thiol-disulfide switches in redox-sensing regulators to activate specific detoxification pathways and to restore the redox balance. Here, we review bacterial thiol-based redox sensors that specifically sense ROS, RES and HOCl via thiol-based mechanisms and regulate gene transcription in Gram-positive model bacteria and in human pathogens, such as Staphylococcus aureus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We also pay particular attention to emerging widely conserved HOCl-specific redox regulators that have been recently characterized in Escherichia coli. Different mechanisms are used to sense and respond to ROS, RES and HOCl by 1-Cys-type and 2-Cys-type thiol-based redox sensors that include versatile thiol-disulfide switches (OxyR, OhrR, HypR, YodB, NemR, RclR, Spx, RsrA/RshA) or alternative Cys-phosphorylations (SarZ, MgrA, SarA), thiol-S-alkylation (QsrR), His-oxidation (PerR) and methionine oxidation (HypT). In pathogenic bacteria, these redox-sensing regulators are often important virulence regulators and required for adapation to the host immune defense. PMID:25720121

  9. Redox interplay between mitochondria and peroxisomes

    PubMed Central

    Lismont, Celien; Nordgren, Marcus; Van Veldhoven, Paul P.; Fransen, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Reduction-oxidation or “redox” reactions are an integral part of a broad range of cellular processes such as gene expression, energy metabolism, protein import and folding, and autophagy. As many of these processes are intimately linked with cell fate decisions, transient or chronic changes in cellular redox equilibrium are likely to contribute to the initiation and progression of a plethora of human diseases. Since a long time, it is known that mitochondria are major players in redox regulation and signaling. More recently, it has become clear that also peroxisomes have the capacity to impact redox-linked physiological processes. To serve this function, peroxisomes cooperate with other organelles, including mitochondria. This review provides a comprehensive picture of what is currently known about the redox interplay between mitochondria and peroxisomes in mammals. We first outline the pro- and antioxidant systems of both organelles and how they may function as redox signaling nodes. Next, we critically review and discuss emerging evidence that peroxisomes and mitochondria share an intricate redox-sensitive relationship and cooperate in cell fate decisions. Key issues include possible physiological roles, messengers, and mechanisms. We also provide examples of how data mining of publicly-available datasets from “omics” technologies can be a powerful means to gain additional insights into potential redox signaling pathways between peroxisomes and mitochondria. Finally, we highlight the need for more studies that seek to clarify the mechanisms of how mitochondria may act as dynamic receivers, integrators, and transmitters of peroxisome-derived mediators of oxidative stress. The outcome of such studies may open up exciting new avenues for the community of researchers working on cellular responses to organelle-derived oxidative stress, a research field in which the role of peroxisomes is currently highly underestimated and an issue of discussion. PMID:26075204

  10. Helicenes with embedded phosphole units in enantioselective gold catalysis.

    PubMed

    Yavari, Keihann; Aillard, Paul; Zhang, Yang; Nuter, Frédérick; Retailleau, Pascal; Voituriez, Arnaud; Marinetti, Angela

    2014-01-13

    This paper discloses the first uses of phosphahelicenes as chiral ligands in transition-metal catalysis. Unlike all known helical phosphines used so far in catalysis, the phosphorus function of phosphahelicenes is embedded in the helical structure itself. This crucial structural feature originates unprecedented catalytic behaviors and efficiency. An appropriate design and fine tuning allowed both high catalytic activity and good enantiomeric excesses to be attained in the gold promoted cycloisomerizations of N-tethered 1,6-enynes and dien-ynes. PMID:24311517

  11. Highly Regioselective Indoline Synthesis under Nickel/Photoredox Dual Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Tasker, Sarah Z.; Jamison, Timothy F.

    2015-01-01

    Nickel/photoredox catalysis is used to synthesize indolines in one step from iodoacetanilides and alkenes. Very high regioselectivity for 3-substituted indoline products is obtained for both aliphatic and styrenyl olefins. Mechanistic investigations indicate that oxidation to Ni(III) is necessary to perform the difficult C–N bond-forming reductive elimination, producing a Ni(I) complex which in turn is reduced to Ni(0). This process serves to further demonstrate the utility of photoredox catalysts as controlled single electron transfer agents in multi-oxidation state nickel catalysis. PMID:26196355

  12. The Development of Visible-Light Photoredox Catalysis in Flow

    PubMed Central

    Garlets, Zachary J.; Nguyen, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Visible-light photoredox catalysis has recently emerged as a viable alternative for radical reactions otherwise carried out with tin and boron reagents. It has been recognized that by merging photoredox catalysis with flow chemistry, slow reaction times, lower yields, and safety concerns may be obviated. While flow reactors have been successfully applied to reactions carried out with UV light, only recent developments have demonstrated the same potential of flow reactors for the improvement of visible-light-mediated reactions. This review examines the initial and continuing development of visible-light-mediated photoredox flow chemistry by exemplifying the benefits of flow chemistry compared with conventional batch techniques. PMID:25484447

  13. Natural Products as Inspiration for the Development of Asymmetric Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, Justin T.; Krout, Michael R.; Stoltz, Brian M.

    2008-01-01

    Biologically active natural products often contain particularly challenging structural features and functionalities. Perhaps foremost among these difficulties are issues of stereochemistry. A useful strategy for synthesizing these molecules is to devise novel methods of bond-formation that provide new opportunities for enantioselective catalysis. In using this tactic, target structures define the problems to be solved and ultimately drive development of catalysis forward. New enantioselective methods discovered in the context of these total synthesis efforts then contribute to a greater understanding of fundamental bond construction and lead to valuable synthetic technologies useful for a variety of other applications. PMID:18800131

  14. γ-Amino alcohols via organocascade reactions involving dienamine catalysis.

    PubMed

    Appayee, Chandrakumar; Fraboni, Americo J; Brenner-Moyer, Stacey E

    2012-10-01

    Whereas cascade reactions catalyzed by secondary amines combine iminium- and/or enamine-catalyzed reactions, we introduce the feasibility of combining these modes of catalysis with dienamine-catalysis as a new general mechanism for cascade reactions. Enantioenriched β-functionalized-γ-amino alcohols were produced from simple achiral enals in one flask by combining dienamine- and iminium-catalyzed intermolecular reactions. Reaction products are precursors of γ-amino acids, γ-lactams, and pyrrolidines; one was employed in a synthesis of γ-amino acid (S)-vigabatrin, the bioactive enantiomer of Sabril. PMID:22970912

  15. A New Redox Flow Battery Using Fe/V Redox Couples in Chloride Supporting Electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Kim, Soowhan; Chen, Baowei; Nie, Zimin; Zhang, Jianlu; Xia, Guanguang; Li, Liyu; Yang, Zhenguo

    2011-08-22

    A new redox flow battery using Fe2+/Fe3+ and V2+/V3+ redox couples in chloride supporting electrolyte was proposed and investigated for potential stationary energy storage applications. The Fe/V redox flow cell using mixed reactant solutions operated within a voltage window of 0.5-1.35 V with a nearly 100% utilization ratio and demonstrated stable cycling with energy efficiency around 80% at room temperature. Compared with Fe/Cr redox flow battery operating at an elevated temperature of 65 C, the necessity of external heat management is eliminated. Similar performance was also achieved using low-cost hydrocarbon-based ion exchange membranes, which allow for further cost reduction. The improved room temperature electrochemical performance makes the Fe/V redox flow battery a promising option as stationary energy storage device to enable renewable integration and stabilization of electrical grid.

  16. The redox budget of subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, K. A.

    2012-06-01

    Elements that can occur in more than one valence state, such as Fe, C and S, play an important role in Earth's systems at all levels, and can drive planetary evolution as they cycle through the various geochemical reservoirs. Subduction introduces oxidised Fe, C and S in sediments, altered ocean crust, and partially serpentinised lithospheric mantle to the relatively reduced mantle, with short- and long-term consequences for the redox state of the mantle. The distribution of redox-sensitive elements in the mantle controls the redox state of mantle-derived material added to the lithosphere and atmosphere, such as arc volcanic gases and the magmas that form arc-related ore deposits. The extent of mantle oxidation induced by subduction zone cycling can be assessed, albeit with large uncertainties, with redox budget calculations that quantify the inputs and outputs to subduction zones. Literature data are augmented by new measurements of the chemical composition of partially serpentinised lithospheric mantle from New Caledonia and ODP 209. Results indicate that there is a net addition of Fe (55 ± 13 × 1012 mol year- 1), C (4.6 ± 4.0 × 1012 mol year- 1), S (2.4 ± 0.9 × 1012 mol year- 1), and redox budget (5-89 × 1012 mol year- 1) at subduction zones. Monte Carlo calculations of redox budget fluxes indicate that fluxes are 46 ± 12 × 1012 mol year- 1 entering subduction zones, if input and output parameters are assumed to be normally distributed, and 46-58 × 1012 mol year- 1 if input and output parameters are assumed to be log-normally distributed. Thus, inputs into subduction zones for Fe, C, S and redox budget are in excess of subduction zone outputs. If MORB and plume-related fluxes are taken into account then Fe, C and S fluxes balance, within error. However, the redox budget does not balance, unless the very lowest estimates for the extent of slab oxidation are taken. Thus it is likely that subduction continuously increases the redox budget of the mantle

  17. An unexplored role for Peroxiredoxin in exercise-induced redox signalling?

    PubMed Central

    Wadley, Alex J.; Aldred, Sarah; Coles, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    Peroxiredoxin (PRDX) is a ubiquitous oxidoreductase protein with a conserved ionised thiol that permits catalysis of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) up to a million times faster than any thiol-containing signalling protein. The increased production of H2O2 within active tissues during exercise is thought to oxidise conserved cysteine thiols, which may in turn facilitate a wide variety of physiological adaptations. The precise mechanisms linking H2O2 with the oxidation of signalling thiol proteins (phosphates, kinases and transcription factors) are unclear due to these proteins' low reactivity with H2O2 relative to abundant thiol peroxidases such as PRDX. Recent work has shown that following exposure to H2O2 in vitro, the sulfenic acid of the PRDX cysteine can form mixed disulphides with transcription factors associated with cell survival. This implicates PRDX as an ‘active’ redox relay in transmitting the oxidising equivalent of H2O2 to downstream proteins. Furthermore, under oxidative stress, PRDX can form stable oxidised dimers that can be secreted into the extracellular space, potentially acting as an extracellular ‘stress’ signal. There is extensive literature assessing non-specific markers of oxidative stress in response to exercise, however the PRDX catalytic cycle may offer a more robust approach for measuring changes in redox balance following exercise. This review discusses studies assessing PRDX-mediated cellular signalling and integrates the recent advances in redox biology with investigations that have examined the role of PRDX during exercise in humans and animals. Future studies should explore the role of PRDX as a key regulator of peroxide mediated-signal transduction during exercise in humans. PMID:26748042

  18. An unexplored role for Peroxiredoxin in exercise-induced redox signalling?

    PubMed

    Wadley, Alex J; Aldred, Sarah; Coles, Steven J

    2016-08-01

    Peroxiredoxin (PRDX) is a ubiquitous oxidoreductase protein with a conserved ionised thiol that permits catalysis of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) up to a million times faster than any thiol-containing signalling protein. The increased production of H2O2 within active tissues during exercise is thought to oxidise conserved cysteine thiols, which may in turn facilitate a wide variety of physiological adaptations. The precise mechanisms linking H2O2 with the oxidation of signalling thiol proteins (phosphates, kinases and transcription factors) are unclear due to these proteins' low reactivity with H2O2 relative to abundant thiol peroxidases such as PRDX. Recent work has shown that following exposure to H2O2 in vitro, the sulfenic acid of the PRDX cysteine can form mixed disulphides with transcription factors associated with cell survival. This implicates PRDX as an 'active' redox relay in transmitting the oxidising equivalent of H2O2 to downstream proteins. Furthermore, under oxidative stress, PRDX can form stable oxidised dimers that can be secreted into the extracellular space, potentially acting as an extracellular 'stress' signal. There is extensive literature assessing non-specific markers of oxidative stress in response to exercise, however the PRDX catalytic cycle may offer a more robust approach for measuring changes in redox balance following exercise. This review discusses studies assessing PRDX-mediated cellular signalling and integrates the recent advances in redox biology with investigations that have examined the role of PRDX during exercise in humans and animals. Future studies should explore the role of PRDX as a key regulator of peroxide mediated-signal transduction during exercise in humans. PMID:26748042

  19. Sensing of redox status by TRP channels.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Nozomi; Kurokawa, Tatsuki; Mori, Yasuo

    2016-08-01

    Cellular redox status is maintained by the balance between series of antioxidant systems and production of reactive oxygen/nitrogenous species. Cells utilize this redox balance to mediate diverse physiological functions. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are non-selective cation channels that act as biosensors for environmental and noxious stimuli, such as capsaicin and allicin, as well as changes in temperature and conditions inside the cell. TRP channels also have an emerging role as essential players in detecting cellular redox status to regulate cellular signals mediating physiological phenomena. Reactive species activate TRP channels either directly through oxidative amino acid modifications or indirectly through second messengers. For instance, TRPA1, TRPV1 and TRPC5 channels are directly activated by oxidizing agents through cysteine modification; whereas, TRPM2 channel is indirectly activated by production of ADP-ribose. One intriguing property of several TRP channels is susceptibility to both oxidizing and reducing stimuli, suggesting TRP channels could potentially act as a bidirectional sensor for detecting deviations in redox status. In this review, we discuss the unique chemical physiologies of redox sensitive TRP channels and their physiological significance in Ca(2+) signaling. PMID:26969190

  20. Redox Homeostasis in Pancreatic β Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ježek, Petr; Dlasková, Andrea; Plecitá-Hlavatá, Lydie

    2012-01-01

    We reviewed mechanisms that determine reactive oxygen species (redox) homeostasis, redox information signaling and metabolic/regulatory function of autocrine insulin signaling in pancreatic β cells, and consequences of oxidative stress and dysregulation of redox/information signaling for their dysfunction. We emphasize the role of mitochondrion in β cell molecular physiology and pathology, including the antioxidant role of mitochondrial uncoupling protein UCP2. Since in pancreatic β cells pyruvate cannot be easily diverted towards lactate dehydrogenase for lactate formation, the respiration and oxidative phosphorylation intensity are governed by the availability of glucose, leading to a certain ATP/ADP ratio, whereas in other cell types, cell demand dictates respiration/metabolism rates. Moreover, we examine the possibility that type 2 diabetes mellitus might be considered as an inevitable result of progressive self-accelerating oxidative stress and concomitantly dysregulated information signaling in peripheral tissues as well as in pancreatic β cells. It is because the redox signaling is inherent to the insulin receptor signaling mechanism and its impairment leads to the oxidative and nitrosative stress. Also emerging concepts, admiting participation of redox signaling even in glucose sensing and insulin release in pancreatic β cells, fit in this view. For example, NADPH has been firmly established to be a modulator of glucose-stimulated insulin release. PMID:23304259

  1. Redox regulation of protein damage in plasma.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Helen R; Dias, Irundika H K; Willetts, Rachel S; Devitt, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The presence and concentrations of modified proteins circulating in plasma depend on rates of protein synthesis, modification and clearance. In early studies, the proteins most frequently analysed for damage were those which were more abundant in plasma (e.g. albumin and immunoglobulins) which exist at up to 10 orders of magnitude higher concentrations than other plasma proteins e.g. cytokines. However, advances in analytical techniques using mass spectrometry and immuno-affinity purification methods, have facilitated analysis of less abundant, modified proteins and the nature of modifications at specific sites is now being characterised. The damaging reactive species that cause protein modifications in plasma principally arise from reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by NADPH oxidases (NOX), nitric oxide synthases (NOS) and oxygenase activities; reactive nitrogen species (RNS) from myeloperoxidase (MPO) and NOS activities; and hypochlorous acid from MPO. Secondary damage to proteins may be caused by oxidized lipids and glucose autooxidation. In this review, we focus on redox regulatory control of those enzymes and processes which control protein maturation during synthesis, produce reactive species, repair and remove damaged plasma proteins. We have highlighted the potential for alterations in the extracellular redox compartment to regulate intracellular redox state and, conversely, for intracellular oxidative stress to alter the cellular secretome and composition of extracellular vesicles. Through secreted, redox-active regulatory molecules, changes in redox state may be transmitted to distant sites. PMID:24624332

  2. Mitochondrial Redox Signaling and Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuxin; Zhang, Haiqing; Zhou, Huanjiao Jenny; Ji, Weidong; Min, Wang

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cell can reprogram their energy production by switching mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis. However, mitochondria play multiple roles in cancer cells, including redox regulation, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and apoptotic signaling. Moreover, these mitochondrial roles are integrated via multiple interconnected metabolic and redox sensitive pathways. Interestingly, mitochondrial redox proteins biphasically regulate tumor progression depending on cellular ROS levels. Low level of ROS functions as signaling messengers promoting cancer cell proliferation and cancer invasion. However, anti-cancer drug-initiated stress signaling could induce excessive ROS, which is detrimental to cancer cells. Mitochondrial redox proteins could scavenger basal ROS and function as “tumor suppressors” or prevent excessive ROS to act as “tumor promoter”. Paradoxically, excessive ROS often also induce DNA mutations and/or promotes tumor metastasis at various stages of cancer progression. Targeting redox-sensitive pathways and transcriptional factors in the appropriate context offers great promise for cancer prevention and therapy. However, the therapeutics should be cancer-type and stage-dependent. PMID:27023612

  3. NASA Redox Storage System Development Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagedorn, N. H.

    1984-01-01

    The Redox Storage System Technology Project was jointly supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and NASA. The objectives of the project were to develop the Redox flow battery concept and to probe its technical and economic viability. The iron and chromium redox couples were selected as the reactants. Membranes and electrodes were developed for the original mode of operating at 25 C with the reactants separated by an ion-exchange membrane. Analytical capabilities and system-level operating concepts were developed and verified in a 1-kW, 13-kWh preprototype system. A subsequent change was made in operating mode, going to 65 C and using mixed reactants. New membranes and a new electrode catalyst were developed, resulting in single cell operation as high as 80 mA/sq cm with energy efficiencies greater than 80 percent. Studies indicate a likely system cost of about $75/kWh. Standard Oil of Ohio (Sohio) has undertaken further development of the Redox system. An exclusive patent license was obtained from NASA by Sohio. Transfer of Redox technology to Sohio is supported by the NASA Technology Utilization Office.

  4. De Novo Construction of Redox Active Proteins.

    PubMed

    Moser, C C; Sheehan, M M; Ennist, N M; Kodali, G; Bialas, C; Englander, M T; Discher, B M; Dutton, P L

    2016-01-01

    Relatively simple principles can be used to plan and construct de novo proteins that bind redox cofactors and participate in a range of electron-transfer reactions analogous to those seen in natural oxidoreductase proteins. These designed redox proteins are called maquettes. Hydrophobic/hydrophilic binary patterning of heptad repeats of amino acids linked together in a single-chain self-assemble into 4-alpha-helix bundles. These bundles form a robust and adaptable frame for uncovering the default properties of protein embedded cofactors independent of the complexities introduced by generations of natural selection and allow us to better understand what factors can be exploited by man or nature to manipulate the physical chemical properties of these cofactors. Anchoring of redox cofactors such as hemes, light active tetrapyrroles, FeS clusters, and flavins by His and Cys residues allow cofactors to be placed at positions in which electron-tunneling rates between cofactors within or between proteins can be predicted in advance. The modularity of heptad repeat designs facilitates the construction of electron-transfer chains and novel combinations of redox cofactors and new redox cofactor assisted functions. Developing de novo designs that can support cofactor incorporation upon expression in a cell is needed to support a synthetic biology advance that integrates with natural bioenergetic pathways. PMID:27586341

  5. Compartmentation of Redox Metabolism in Malaria Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Rahlfs, Stefan; Przyborski, Jude M.; Becker, Katja

    2010-01-01

    Malaria, caused by the apicomplexan parasite Plasmodium, still represents a major threat to human health and welfare and leads to about one million human deaths annually. Plasmodium is a rapidly multiplying unicellular organism undergoing a complex developmental cycle in man and mosquito – a life style that requires rapid adaptation to various environments. In order to deal with high fluxes of reactive oxygen species and maintain redox regulatory processes and pathogenicity, Plasmodium depends upon an adequate redox balance. By systematically studying the subcellular localization of the major antioxidant and redox regulatory proteins, we obtained the first complete map of redox compartmentation in Plasmodium falciparum. We demonstrate the targeting of two plasmodial peroxiredoxins and a putative glyoxalase system to the apicoplast, a non-photosynthetic plastid. We furthermore obtained a complete picture of the compartmentation of thioredoxin- and glutaredoxin-like proteins. Notably, for the two major antioxidant redox-enzymes – glutathione reductase and thioredoxin reductase – Plasmodium makes use of alternative-translation-initiation (ATI) to achieve differential targeting. Dual localization of proteins effected by ATI is likely to occur also in other Apicomplexa and might open new avenues for therapeutic intervention. PMID:21203490

  6. Compartmentation of redox metabolism in malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    Kehr, Sebastian; Sturm, Nicole; Rahlfs, Stefan; Przyborski, Jude M; Becker, Katja

    2010-01-01

    Malaria, caused by the apicomplexan parasite Plasmodium, still represents a major threat to human health and welfare and leads to about one million human deaths annually. Plasmodium is a rapidly multiplying unicellular organism undergoing a complex developmental cycle in man and mosquito - a life style that requires rapid adaptation to various environments. In order to deal with high fluxes of reactive oxygen species and maintain redox regulatory processes and pathogenicity, Plasmodium depends upon an adequate redox balance. By systematically studying the subcellular localization of the major antioxidant and redox regulatory proteins, we obtained the first complete map of redox compartmentation in Plasmodium falciparum. We demonstrate the targeting of two plasmodial peroxiredoxins and a putative glyoxalase system to the apicoplast, a non-photosynthetic plastid. We furthermore obtained a complete picture of the compartmentation of thioredoxin- and glutaredoxin-like proteins. Notably, for the two major antioxidant redox-enzymes--glutathione reductase and thioredoxin reductase--Plasmodium makes use of alternative-translation-initiation (ATI) to achieve differential targeting. Dual localization of proteins effected by ATI is likely to occur also in other Apicomplexa and might open new avenues for therapeutic intervention. PMID:21203490

  7. Coordination- and Redox-Noninnocent Behavior of Ambiphilic Ligands Containing Antimony.

    PubMed

    Jones, J Stuart; Gabbaï, François P

    2016-05-17

    Stimulated by applications in catalysis, the chemistry of ambiphilic ligands featuring both donor and acceptor functionalities has experienced substantial growth in the past several years. The unique opportunities in catalysis offered by ambiphilic ligands stem from the ability of their acceptor functionalities to play key roles via metal-ligand cooperation or modulation of the reactivity of the metal center. Ligands featuring group 13 centers, most notably boranes, as their acceptor functionalities have undoubtedly spearheaded these developments, with remarkable results having been achieved in catalytic hydrogenation and hydrosilylation. Motivated by these developments as well as by our fundamental interest in the chemistry of heavy group 15 elements, we became fascinated by the possibility of employing antimony centers as Lewis acids within ambiphilic ligands. The chemistry of antimony-based ligands, most often encountered as trivalent stibines, has historically been considered to mirror that of their lighter phosphorus-based congeners. There is growing evidence, however, that antimony-based ligands may display unique coordination behavior and reactivity. Additionally, despite the diverse Lewis acid and redox chemistry that antimony exhibits, there have been only limited efforts to explore this chemistry within the coordination sphere of a transition metal. By incorporation of antimony into the framework of polydentate ligands in order to enforce the main group metal-transition metal interaction, the effect of redox and coordination events at the antimony center on the structure, electronics, and reactivity of the metal complex may be investigated. This Account describes our group's continuing efforts to probe the coordination behavior, reactivity, and application of ambiphilic ligands incorporating antimony centers. Structural and theoretical studies have established that both Sb(III) and Sb(V) centers in polydentate ligands may act as Z-type ligands toward late

  8. Redox-inactive metal ions modulate the reactivity and oxygen release of mononuclear non-haem iron(III)–peroxo complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, Suhee; Lee, Yong -Min; Hong, Seungwoo; Cho, Kyung -Bin; Nishida, Yusuke; Seo, Mi Sook; Sarangi, Ritimukta; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Nam, Wonwoo

    2014-09-14

    Redox-inactive metal ions that function as Lewis acids play pivotal roles in modulating the reactivity of oxygen-containing metal complexes and metalloenzymes, such as the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II and its small-molecule mimics. Here we report the synthesis and characterization of non-haem iron(III)–peroxo complexes that bind redox-inactive metal ions, (TMC)FeIII–(μ,η22-O2)–Mn+ (Mn+ = Sr2+, Ca2+, Zn2+, Lu3+, Y3+ and Sc3+; TMC, 1,4,8,11-tetramethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane). We demonstrate that the Ca2+ and Sr2+ complexes showed similar electrochemical properties and reactivities in one-electron oxidation or reduction reactions. However, the properties and reactivities of complexes formed with stronger Lewis acidities were found to be markedly different. In conclusion, complexes that contain Ca2+ or Sr2+ ions were oxidized by an electron acceptor to release O2, whereas the release of O2 did not occur for complexes that bind stronger Lewis acids. Furthermore, we discuss these results in the light of the functional role of the Ca2+ ion in the oxidation of water to dioxygen by the oxygen-evolving complex.

  9. Guiding Principles of Hydrogenase Catalysis Instigated and Clarified by Protein Film Electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Fraser A; Evans, Rhiannon M; Hexter, Suzannah V; Murphy, Bonnie J; Roessler, Maxie M; Wulff, Philip

    2016-05-17

    Protein film electrochemistry (PFE) is providing cutting-edge insight into the chemical principles underpinning biological hydrogen. Attached to an electrode, many enzymes exhibit "reversible" electrocatalytic behavior, meaning that a catalyzed redox reaction appears reversible or quasi-reversible when viewed by cyclic voltammetry. This efficiency is most relevant for enzymes that are inspiring advances in renewable energy, such as hydrogen-activating and CO2-reducing enzymes. Exploiting the rich repertoire of available instrumental methods, PFE experiments yield both a general snapshot and fine detail, all from tiny samples of enzyme. The dynamic electrochemical investigations blaze new trails and add exquisite detail to the information gained from structural and spectroscopic studies. This Account describes recent investigations of hydrogenases carried out in Oxford, including ideas initiated with PFE and followed through with complementary techniques, all contributing to an eventual complete picture of fast and efficient H2 activation without Pt. By immobilization of an enzyme on an electrode, catalytic electron flow and the chemistry controlling it can be addressed at the touch of a button. The buried nature of the active site means that structures that have been determined by crystallography or spectroscopy are likely to be protected, retained, and fully relevant in a PFE experiment. An electrocatalysis model formulated for the PFE of immobilized enzymes predicts interesting behavior and gives insight into why some hydrogenases are H2 producers and others are H2 oxidizers. Immobilization also allows for easy addition and removal of inhibitors along with precise potential control, one interesting outcome being that formaldehyde forms a reversible complex with reduced [FeFe]-hydrogenases, thereby providing insight into the order of electron and proton transfers. Experiments on O2-tolerant [NiFe]-hydrogenases show that O2 behaves like a reversible inhibitor: it

  10. Carbon Redox-Polymer-Gel Hybrid Supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlad, A.; Singh, N.; Melinte, S.; Gohy, J.-F.; Ajayan, P. M.

    2016-02-01

    Energy storage devices that provide high specific power without compromising on specific energy are highly desirable for many electric-powered applications. Here, we demonstrate that polymer organic radical gel materials support fast bulk-redox charge storage, commensurate to surface double layer ion exchange at carbon electrodes. When integrated with a carbon-based electrical double layer capacitor, nearly ideal electrode properties such as high electrical and ionic conductivity, fast bulk redox and surface charge storage as well as excellent cycling stability are attained. Such hybrid carbon redox-polymer-gel electrodes support unprecedented discharge rate of 1,000C with 50% of the nominal capacity delivered in less than 2 seconds. Devices made with such electrodes hold the potential for battery-scale energy storage while attaining supercapacitor-like power performances.

  11. Carbon Redox-Polymer-Gel Hybrid Supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Vlad, A; Singh, N; Melinte, S; Gohy, J-F; Ajayan, P M

    2016-01-01

    Energy storage devices that provide high specific power without compromising on specific energy are highly desirable for many electric-powered applications. Here, we demonstrate that polymer organic radical gel materials support fast bulk-redox charge storage, commensurate to surface double layer ion exchange at carbon electrodes. When integrated with a carbon-based electrical double layer capacitor, nearly ideal electrode properties such as high electrical and ionic conductivity, fast bulk redox and surface charge storage as well as excellent cycling stability are attained. Such hybrid carbon redox-polymer-gel electrodes support unprecedented discharge rate of 1,000C with 50% of the nominal capacity delivered in less than 2 seconds. Devices made with such electrodes hold the potential for battery-scale energy storage while attaining supercapacitor-like power performances. PMID:26917470

  12. Carbon Redox-Polymer-Gel Hybrid Supercapacitors

    PubMed Central

    Vlad, A.; Singh, N.; Melinte, S.; Gohy, J.-F.; Ajayan, P.M.

    2016-01-01

    Energy storage devices that provide high specific power without compromising on specific energy are highly desirable for many electric-powered applications. Here, we demonstrate that polymer organic radical gel materials support fast bulk-redox charge storage, commensurate to surface double layer ion exchange at carbon electrodes. When integrated with a carbon-based electrical double layer capacitor, nearly ideal electrode properties such as high electrical and ionic conductivity, fast bulk redox and surface charge storage as well as excellent cycling stability are attained. Such hybrid carbon redox-polymer-gel electrodes support unprecedented discharge rate of 1,000C with 50% of the nominal capacity delivered in less than 2 seconds. Devices made with such electrodes hold the potential for battery-scale energy storage while attaining supercapacitor-like power performances. PMID:26917470

  13. Physical applications of muon catalysis: Muon capture in hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filchenkov, V. V.

    2016-07-01

    Results of theoretical and experimental research on capture of negative muons in hydrogen are reported with an emphasis on the accompanying phenomenon of muon catalysis in hydrogen and subtleties of the experimental method. A conclusion is drawn that precise determination of the capture rate is important for refining the standard model.

  14. GREENING OF OXIDATION CATALYSIS THROUGH IMPROVED CATALYST AND PROCESS DESIGN

    EPA Science Inventory


    Greening of Oxidation Catalysis Through Improved Catalysts and Process Design
    Michael A. Gonzalez*, Thomas Becker, and Raymond Smith

    United State Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, 26 W...

  15. 2002 Gordon Research Conference on CATALYSIS. Final Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    2002-06-28

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on CATALYSIS was held at Colby-Sawyer College from 6/23/02 thru 6/28/02. The Conference was well-attended with 118 participants. The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both U.S. and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students.

  16. A Course in Heterogeneous Catalysis Involving Video-Based Seminars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Mark G.

    1984-01-01

    A video-based format was used during a graduate seminar course designed to educate students on the nature of catalysis, to help transfer information among students working on similar problems, and to improve communication skills. The mechanics of and student reaction to this seminar course are discussed. (JN)

  17. Surface Chemistry in Heterogeneous Catalysis: An Emerging Discipline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, J. M.; Campbell, Charles T.

    1980-01-01

    Provides background data on surface chemistry as an emerging discipline. Highlights the important role which surfaces play in catalysis by focusing on the catalyzed oxidation of carbon monoxide. Provides a demonstration of how surfaces exert their influences in heterogeneous phenomena and illustrates how experimental problems in this field are…

  18. Synthetic applications of eosin Y in photoredox catalysis.

    PubMed

    Hari, Durga Prasad; König, Burkhard

    2014-06-28

    Eosin Y, a long known dye molecule, has recently been widely applied as a photoredox catalyst in organic synthesis. Low cost and good availability make eosin Y an attractive alternative to typical inorganic transition metal photocatalysts. We summarize the key photophysical properties of the dye and the recent synthetic applications in photoredox catalysis. PMID:24699920

  19. Heterogeneous Catalysis: On Bathroom Mirrors and Boiling Stones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philipse, Albert P.

    2011-01-01

    Though heterogeneous nucleation of liquid droplets on a smooth surface (such as a bathroom mirror) is a classical topic in nucleation theory, it is not well-known that this topic is actually a pedagogical example of heterogeneous catalysis: the one and only effect of the surface is to lower the activation Gibbs energy of droplet formation. In…

  20. Compromised redox homeostasis, altered nitroso–redox balance, and therapeutic possibilities in atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Jillian N.; Ziberna, Klemen; Casadei, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Although the initiation, development, and maintenance of atrial fibrillation (AF) have been linked to alterations in myocyte redox state, the field lacks a complete understanding of the impact these changes may have on cellular signalling, atrial electrophysiology, and disease progression. Recent studies demonstrate spatiotemporal changes in reactive oxygen species production shortly after the induction of AF in animal models with an uncoupling of nitric oxide synthase activity ensuing in the presence of long-standing persistent AF, ultimately leading to a major shift in nitroso–redox balance. However, it remains unclear which radical or non-radical species are primarily involved in the underlying mechanisms of AF or which proteins are targeted for redox modification. In most instances, only free radical oxygen species have been assessed; yet evidence from the redox signalling field suggests that non-radical species are more likely to regulate cellular processes. A wider appreciation for the distinction of these species and how both species may be involved in the development and maintenance of AF could impact treatment strategies. In this review, we summarize how redox second-messenger systems are regulated and discuss the recent evidence for alterations in redox regulation in the atrial myocardium in the presence of AF, while identifying some critical missing links. We also examine studies looking at antioxidants for the prevention and treatment of AF and propose alternative redox targets that may serve as superior therapeutic options for the treatment of AF. PMID:26786158

  1. Redox-dependent regulation, redox control and oxidative damage in plant cells subjected to abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Karl-Josef

    2010-01-01

    Stress development intricately involves uncontrolled redox reactions and oxidative damage to functional macromolecules. Three phases characterize progressing abiotic stress and the stress strength; in the first phase redox-dependent deregulation in metabolism, in the second phase detectable development of oxidative damage and in the third phase cell death. Each phase is characterized by traceable biochemical features and specific molecular responses that reflect on the one hand cell damage but on the other hand indicate specific regulation and redox signalling aiming at compensation of stress impact. PMID:20387040

  2. Mechanistic Details and Reactivity Descriptors in Oxidation and Acid Catalysis of Methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Deshlahra, Prashant; Carr, Robert T.; Chai, Song-Hai; Iglesia, Enrique

    2015-02-06

    Acid and redox reaction rates of CH₃OH-O₂ mixtures on polyoxometalate (POM) clusters, together with isotopic, spectroscopic, and theoretical assessments of catalyst properties and reaction pathways, were used to define rigorous descriptors of reactivity and to probe the compositional effects for oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) and dehydration reactions. ³¹P-MAS NMR, transmission electron microscopy and titrations of protons with di-tert-butylpyridine during catalysis showed that POM clusters retained their Keggin structure upon dispersion on SiO₂ and after use in CH₃OH reactions. The effects of CH₃OH and O₂ pressures and of D-substitution on ODH rates show that C-H activation in molecularly adsorbed CH₃OH is the sole kinetically relevant step and leads to reduced centers as intermediates present at low coverages; their concentrations, measured from UV-vis spectra obtained during catalysis, are consistent with the effects of CH₃OH/O₂ ratios predicted from the elementary steps proposed. First-order ODH rate constants depend strongly on the addenda atoms (Mo vs W) but weakly on the central atom (P vs Si) in POM clusters, because C-H activation steps inject electrons into the lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals (LUMO) of the clusters, which are the d-orbitals at Mo⁶⁺ and W⁶⁺ centers. H-atom addition energies (HAE) at O-atoms in POM clusters represent the relevant theoretical probe of the LUMO energies and of ODH reactivity. The calculated energies of ODH transition states at each O-atom depend linearly on their HAE values with slopes near unity, as predicted for late transition states in which electron transfer and C-H cleavage are essentially complete. HAE values averaged over all accessible O-atoms in POM clusters provide the appropriate reactivity descriptor for oxides whose known structures allow accurate HAE calculations. CH₃OH dehydration proceeds via parallel pathways mediated by late carbenium-ion transition states; effects of

  3. SPECTROSCOPIC STUDY OF SURFACE REDOX REACTIONS WITH MANGANESE OXIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Redox reactions involving soil minerals and materials are important processes in environmental chemistry, but unfortunately they only have been characterized in the solution phase. he lack of a suitable method has prevented investigations of the mineral surface component of redox...

  4. Biogeochemical Barriers: Redox Behavior of Metals and Metalloids

    EPA Science Inventory

    Redox conditions and pH are arguably the most important geochemical parameters that control contaminant transport and fate in groundwater systems. Oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions mediate the chemical behavior of both inorganic and organic chemical constituents by affecting...

  5. New avenues for ligand-mediated processes--expanding metal reactivity by the use of redox-active catechol, o-aminophenol and o-phenylenediamine ligands.

    PubMed

    Broere, Daniël L J; Plessius, Raoul; van der Vlugt, Jarl Ivar

    2015-10-01

    Redox-active ligands have evolved from being considered spectroscopic curiosities - creating ambiguity about formal oxidation states in metal complexes - to versatile and useful tools to expand on the reactivity of (transition) metals or to even go beyond what is generally perceived possible. This review focusses on metal complexes containing either catechol, o-aminophenol or o-phenylenediamine type ligands. These ligands have opened up a new area of chemistry for metals across the periodic table. The portfolio of ligand-based reactivity invoked by these redox-active entities will be discussed. This ranges from facilitating oxidative additions upon d(0) metals or cross coupling reactions with cobalt(iii) without metal oxidation state changes - by functioning as an electron reservoir - to intramolecular ligand-to-substrate single-electron transfer to create a reactive substrate-centered radical on a Pd(ii) platform. Although the current state-of-art research primarily consists of stoichiometric and exploratory reactions, several notable reports of catalysis facilitated by the redox-activity of the ligand will also be discussed. In conclusion, redox-active ligands containing catechol, o-aminophenol or o-phenylenediamine moieties show great potential to be exploited as reversible electron reservoirs, donating or accepting electrons to activate substrates and metal centers and to enable new reactivity with both early and late transition as well as main group metals. PMID:26148803

  6. Complexity Generation during Natural Product Biosynthesis using Redox Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Gao, Xue; Tang, Yi

    2012-01-01

    Redox enzymes such as FAD-dependent and cytochrome P450 oxygenases play indispensible roles in generating structural complexity during natural product biosynthesis. In the pre-assembly steps, redox enzymes can convert garden variety primary metabolites into unique starter and extender building blocks. In the post-assembly tailoring steps, redox cascades can transform nascent scaffolds into structurally complex final products. In this review, we will discuss several recently characterized redox enzymes in the biosynthesis of polyketides and nonribosomal peptides. PMID:22564679

  7. Systemic Redox Biomarkers in Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    PubMed

    Pastore, Anna; Petrillo, Sara; Piermarini, Emanuela; Piemonte, Fiorella

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by a gradual and selective loss of neurons. ROS overload has been proved to occur early in this heterogeneous group of disorders, indicating oxidative stress as a primer factor underlying their pathogenesis. Given the importance of a better knowledge of the cause/effect of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis and evolution of neurodegeneration, recent efforts have been focused on the identification and determination of stable markers that may reflect systemic oxidative stress. This review provides an overview of these systemic redox biomarkers and their responsiveness to antioxidant therapies. Redox biomarkers can be classified as molecules that are modified by interactions with ROS in the microenvironment and antioxidant molecules that change in response to increased oxidative stress. DNA, lipids (including phospholipids), proteins and carbohydrates are examples of molecules that can be modified by excessive ROS in vivo. Some modifications have direct effects on molecule functions (e.g. to inhibit enzyme function), but others merely reflect the degree of oxidative stress in the local environment. Testing of redox biomarkers in neurodegenerative diseases has 3 important goals: 1) to confirm the presence or absence of systemic oxidative stress; 2) to identify possible underlying (and potentially reversible) causes of neurodegeneration; and 3) to estimate the severity of the disease and the risk of progression. Reflecting pathological processes occurring in the whole body, redox biomarkers may pinpoint novel therapeutic targets and lead to diagnose diseases before they are clinically evident. PMID:26152129

  8. Redox regulation in cancer stem cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ROS-dependent (redox regulation) signaling pathways and transcriptional activities are thought to be critical in stem cell self-renewal and differentiation during growth and organogenesis. Aberrant ROS burst and dysregulation of those ROS-dependent cellular processe...

  9. Actin cytoskeleton redox proteome oxidation by cadmium

    PubMed Central

    Go, Young-Mi; Orr, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological studies associate environmental cadmium (Cd) exposure with the risk of lung diseases. Although mechanisms are not fully elucidated, several studies demonstrate Cd effects on actin and actin-associated proteins. In a recent study of Cd at concentrations similar to environmental exposures, we found that redox-dependent inflammatory signaling by NF-κB was sensitive to the actin-disrupting agent, cytochalasin D. The goal of the present study was to use mass spectrometry-based redox proteomics to investigate Cd effects on the actin cytoskeleton proteome and related functional pathways in lung cells at low environmental concentrations. The results showed that Cd under conditions that did not alter total protein thiols or glutathione redox state caused significant oxidation of peptidyl Cys of proteins regulating actin cytoskeleton. Immunofluorescence microscopy of lung fibroblasts and pulmonary artery endothelial cells showed that low-dose Cd exposure stimulated filamentous actin formation and nuclear localization of destrin, an actin-depolymerizing factor. Taken together, the results show that redox states of peptidyl Cys in proteins associated with actin cytoskeleton pathways are selectively oxidized in lung by Cd at levels thought to occur from environmental exposure. PMID:24077948

  10. Redox flow cell energy storage systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaller, L. H.

    1979-01-01

    NASA-Redox systems are electrochemical storage devices that use two fully soluble Redox couples, anode and cathode fluids, as active electrode materials separated by a highly selective ion exchange membrane. The reactants are contained in large storage tanks and pumped through a stack of Redox flow cells where the electrochemical reactions (reduction and oxidation) take place at porous carbon felt electrodes. A string or stack of these power producing cells is connected in series in a bipolar manner. Redox energy storage systems promise to be inexpensive and possess many features that provide for flexible design, long life, high reliability and minimal operation and maintenance costs. These features include independent sizing of power and storage capacity requirements and inclusion within the cell stack of a cell that monitors the state of charge of the system as a whole, and a rebalance cell which permits continuous correction to be made for minor side reactions that would tend to result in the anode fluid and cathode fluids becoming electrochemically out of balance. These system features are described and discussed.

  11. Redox regulation of mammalian 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase.

    PubMed

    Nagahara, Noriyuki; Nagano, Masatoshi; Ito, Takaaki; Suzuki, Hidenori

    2015-01-01

    A cystine-catabolizing enzyme, 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase catalyzes the trans-sulfuration reaction of mercaptopyruvate or thiosulfate to thiol-containing compounds or cyanide. During the catalytic process, persulfide is formed at the catalytic site cysteine residue and a sulfur-acceptor substrate donates the outer sulfur of the persulfide to form a new persulfide molecule. Subsequently, the molecule can be reduced by thioredoxin to form hydrogen sulfide. The enzyme is regulated by redox changes via two redox-sensing molecular switches consisting redox-sensitive cysteine residues. One switch is the catalytic cysteine in itself, which is oxidized to form a cysteine-sulfenate resulting in inhibition of catalytic activity. The sulfenate can be reduced by thioredoxin resulting in restoration of the activity. The redox potential of sulfenate is lower than that of glutathione and greater than that of thioredoxin. The other switch involves cysteine residues positioned on the surface of the enzyme. The oxidation the intermolecular disulfide linkage at these cysteine residues, leading to dimer formation, inhibits enzyme activity. On the other hand, reduction-associated monomer formation increases catalytic activity. Thioredoxin reduces the disulfide bond more effectively than dithiothreitol, although the specificity mechanism has not been identified. Congenital defects in this enzyme result in, mercaptolactate-cysteine disulfiduria associated with or without mental retardation. However, the pathogenesis has not been identified. Because 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase serves as a cellular antioxidative protein, the other biological functions related to the inhabitant disease are being investigated. PMID:25725525

  12. Redox Transformations of Mercury in Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amyot, M.

    2007-12-01

    Wetlands are valued for their high biodiversity and for their ecosystem services. However, we still have a poor understanding of their role in the redox transformation of contaminants such as mercury. We first propose a brief overview of past studies conducted on wetlands from different latitudes. In most instances, photochemical processes are determinant in the upper portion of the water column. At the sediment/water interface, evidence is currently supporting a significant contribution of bacterial communities, as promoters of Hg(II) reduction, particularly in the presence of anoxia. A multi-year study was recently conducted on Hg redox cycling in a fluvial wetland of the St. Lawrence River, where wetland restoration could have unintended consequences. In addition to photochemistry and bacterial reduction, Hg redox cycling was affected by epiphytes living on macrophytes, through adsorption/absorption processes. Redox studies such as this one have been historically seen as having implication for water/air flux studies, since Hg(0) is volatile. We here also discuss the potential bioavailability of Hg(0) towards bacteria. An emerging axis of our wetland research effort deals with beaver dams, which are in expansion and shown to produce high levels of methylHg

  13. Methods for using redox liposome biosensors

    DOEpatents

    Cheng, Quan; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides methods and compositions for detecting the presence of biologically-important analytes by using redox liposome biosensors. In particular, the present invention provides liposome/sol-gel electrodes suitable for the detection of a wide variety of organic molecules, including but not limited to bacterial toxins.

  14. Energy storage: Redox flow batteries go organic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Sprenkle, Vince

    2016-03-01

    The use of renewable resources as providers to the electrical grid is hampered by the intermittent and irregular nature in which they generate energy. Electrical energy storage technology could provide a solution and now, by using an iterative design process, a promising anolyte for use in redox flow batteries has been developed.

  15. Redox regulation in the thylakoid lumen.

    PubMed

    Kang, Zhen-Hui; Wang, Gui-Xue

    2016-03-15

    Higher plants need to balance the efficiency of light energy absorption and dissipative photo-protection when exposed to fluctuations in light quantity and quality. This aim is partially realized through redox regulation within the chloroplast, which occurs in all chloroplast compartments except the envelope intermembrane space. In contrast to the chloroplast stroma, less attention has been paid to the thylakoid lumen, an inner, continuous space enclosed by the thylakoid membrane in which redox regulation is also essential for photosystem biogenesis and function. This sub-organelle compartment contains at least 80 lumenal proteins, more than 30 of which are known to contain disulfide bonds. Thioredoxins (Trx) in the chloroplast stroma are photo-reduced in the light, transferring reducing power to the proteins in the thylakoid membrane and ultimately the lumen through a trans-thylakoid membrane-reduced, equivalent pathway. The discovery of lumenal thiol oxidoreductase highlights the importance of the redox regulation network in the lumen for controlling disulfide bond formation, which is responsible for protein activity and folding and even plays a role in photo-protection. In addition, many lumenal members involved in photosystem assembly and non-photochemical quenching are likely required for reduction and/or oxidation to maintain their proper efficiency upon changes in light intensity. In light of recent findings, this review summarizes the multiple redox processes that occur in the thylakoid lumen in great detail, highlighting the essential auxiliary roles of lumenal proteins under fluctuating light conditions. PMID:26812087

  16. Transition-Metal-Catalyzed Redox-Neutral and Redox-Green C-H Bond Functionalization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongli; Huang, Hanmin

    2016-08-01

    Transition-metal-catalyzed C-H bond functionalization has become one of the most promising strategies to prepare complex molecules from simple precursors. However, the utilization of environmentally unfriendly oxidants in the oxidative C-H bond functionalization reactions reduces their potential applications in organic synthesis. This account describes our recent efforts in the development of a redox-neutral C-H bond functionalization strategy for direct addition of inert C-H bonds to unsaturated double bonds and a redox-green C-H bond functionalization strategy for realization of oxidative C-H functionalization with O2 as the sole oxidant, aiming to circumvent the problems posed by utilizing environmentally unfriendly oxidants. In principle, these redox-neutral and redox-green strategies pave the way for establishing new environmentally benign transition-metal-catalyzed C-H bond functionalization strategies. PMID:27258190

  17. Redox-Directed Cancer Therapeutics: Molecular Mechanisms and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Redox dysregulation originating from metabolic alterations and dependence on mitogenic and survival signaling through reactive oxygen species represents a specific vulnerability of malignant cells that can be selectively targeted by redox chemotherapeutics. This review will present an update on drug discovery, target identification, and mechanisms of action of experimental redox chemotherapeutics with a focus on pro- and antioxidant redox modulators now in advanced phases of preclinal and clinical development. Recent research indicates that numerous oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes exert their functions in part through redox mechanisms amenable to pharmacological intervention by redox chemotherapeutics. The pleiotropic action of many redox chemotherapeutics that involves simultaneous modulation of multiple redox sensitive targets can overcome cancer cell drug resistance originating from redundancy of oncogenic signaling and rapid mutation. Moreover, some redox chemotherapeutics may function according to the concept of synthetic lethality (i.e., drug cytotoxicity is confined to cancer cells that display loss of function mutations in tumor suppressor genes or upregulation of oncogene expression). The impressive number of ongoing clinical trials that examine therapeutic performance of novel redox drugs in cancer patients demonstrates that redox chemotherapy has made the crucial transition from bench to bedside. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 11, 3013–3069. PMID:19496700

  18. Redox Control of Inflammation in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Dehne, Nathalie; Grossmann, Nina; Jung, Michaela; Namgaladze, Dmitry; Schmid, Tobias; von Knethen, Andreas; Weigert, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Macrophages are present throughout the human body, constitute important immune effector cells, and have variable roles in a great number of pathological, but also physiological, settings. It is apparent that macrophages need to adjust their activation profile toward a steadily changing environment that requires altering their phenotype, a process known as macrophage polarization. Formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), derived from NADPH-oxidases, mitochondria, or NO-producing enzymes, are not necessarily toxic, but rather compose a network signaling system, known as redox regulation. Formation of redox signals in classically versus alternatively activated macrophages, their action and interaction at the level of key targets, and the resulting physiology still are insufficiently understood. We review the identity, source, and biological activities of ROS produced during macrophage activation, and discuss how they shape the key transcriptional responses evoked by hypoxia-inducible transcription factors, nuclear-erythroid 2-p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ. We summarize the mechanisms how redox signals add to the process of macrophage polarization and reprogramming, how this is controlled by the interaction of macrophages with their environment, and addresses the outcome of the polarization process in health and disease. Future studies need to tackle the option whether we can use the knowledge of redox biology in macrophages to shape their mediator profile in pathophysiology, to accelerate healing in injured tissue, to fight the invading pathogens, or to eliminate settings of altered self in tumors. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 595–637. PMID:23311665

  19. Molecular-Level Design of Heterogeneous Chiral Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Francisco Zaera

    2012-03-21

    The following is a proposal to continue our multi-institutional research on heterogeneous chiral catalysis. Our team combines the use of surface-sensitive analytical techniques for the characterization of model systems with quantum and statistical mechanical calculations to interpret experimental data and guide the design of future research. Our investigation focuses on the interrelation among the three main mechanisms by which enantioselectivity can be bestowed to heterogeneous catalysts, namely: (1) by templating chirality via the adsorption of chiral supramolecular assemblies, (2) by using chiral modifiers capable of forming chiral complexes with the reactant and force enantioselective surface reactions, and (3) by forming naturally chiral surfaces using imprinting chiral agents. Individually, the members of our team are leaders in these various aspects of chiral catalysis, but the present program provides the vehicle to generate and exploit the synergies necessary to address the problem in a comprehensive manner. Our initial work has advanced the methodology needed for these studies, including an enantioselective titration procedure to identify surface chiral sites, infrared spectroscopy in situ at the interface between gases or liquids and solids to mimic realistic catalytic conditions, and DFT and Monte Carlo algorithms to simulate and understand chirality on surfaces. The next step, to be funded by the monies requested in this proposal, is to apply those methods to specific problems in chiral catalysis, including the identification of the requirements for the formation of supramolecular surface structures with enantioselective behavior, the search for better molecules to probe the chiral nature of the modified surfaces, the exploration of the transition from supramolecular to one-to-one chiral modification, the correlation of the adsorption characteristics of one-to-one chiral modifiers with their physical properties, in particular with their configuration

  20. Redox proteomics for the assessment of redox-related posttranslational regulation in plants.

    PubMed

    Mock, Hans-Peter; Dietz, Karl-Josef

    2016-08-01

    The methodological developments of in vivo and in vitro protein labeling and subsequent detection enable sensitive and specific detection of redox modifications. Such methods are presently applied to diverse cells and tissues, subproteomes and developmental as well as environmental conditions. The chloroplast proteome is particularly suitable for such kind of studies, because redox regulation of chloroplast proteins is well established, many plastid proteins are abundant, redox network components have been inventoried in great depth, and functional consequences explored. Thus the repertoire of redox-related posttranslational modifications on the one hand side and their abundance on the other pose a challenge for the near future to understand their contribution to physiological regulation. The various posttranslational redox modifications are introduced, followed by a description of the available proteomics methods. The significance of the redox-related posttranslational modification is exemplarily worked out using established examples from photosynthesis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Proteomics - a bridge between fundamental processes and crop production, edited by Dr. Hans-Peter Mock. PMID:26784836

  1. Fundamental Understanding of the Interaction of Acid Gases with CeO2 : From Surface Science to Practical Catalysis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tumuluri, Uma; Rother, Gernot; Wu, Zili

    2016-03-21

    Acid gases including CO2, SO2, and NOx are ubiquitous in large-scale energy applications including heterogeneous catalysis. The adverse environmental and health effects of these acid gases have resulted in high interest in the research and development of technologies to remove or convert these acid gases. The main challenge for the development of these technologies is to develop catalysts that are highly efficient, stable, and cost-effective, and many catalysts have been reported in this regard. CeO2 and CeO2-based catalysts have gained prominence in the removal and conversion of CO2, SO2, and NOx because of their structural robustness and redox and acid–basemore » properties. In this article, we provide a brief overview of the application of CeO2 and CeO2-based catalysts for the removal of CO2, SO2, and NOx gases with an emphasis on the fundamental understanding of the interactions of these acid gases with CeO2. The studies summarized in this review range from surface science using single crystals and thin films with precise crystallographic planes to practical catalysis applications of nanocrystalline and polycrystalline CeO2 materials with defects and dopants. After an introduction to the properties of CeO2 surfaces, their catalytic properties for conversions of different acid gases are reviewed and discussed. Lastly, we find that the surface atomic structure, oxygen vacancies, and surface acid–base properties of CeO2 play vital roles in the surface chemistry and structure evolution during the interactions of acid gases with CeO2 and CeO2-based catalysts.« less

  2. Understanding the Kinetics and Spectroscopy of Photoredox Catalysis and Transition-Metal-Free Alternatives.

    PubMed

    Pitre, Spencer P; McTiernan, Christopher D; Scaiano, Juan C

    2016-06-21

    Over the past decade, the field of photoredox catalysis has gained increasing attention in synthetic organic chemistry because of its wide applicability in sustainable free-radical-mediated processes. Numerous examples have shown that under carefully optimized conditions, efficient and highly selective processes can be developed through excitation of a photosensitizer using inexpensive, readily available light sources. However, despite all of these recent advancements, some generalizations and/or misconceptions have become part of the photoredox culture, and often many of these discoveries lack in-depth investigations into the excited-state kinetics and underlying mechanisms. In this Account, we begin with a tutorial for understanding both the redox properties of excited states and how to measure the kinetics of excited-state processes. We discuss the generalization of direct excitation of closed-shell species to generate more potent reductive or oxidative excited states, using the helium atom as a quantitative example. We also outline how to apply redox potentials to calculate whether the proposed electron transfer events are thermodynamically feasible. In the second half of our tutorial, we discuss how to measure the kinetics of excited-state processes using techniques such as steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence and transient spectroscopy and how to apply the data using Stern-Volmer and kinetic analysis. Then we shift gears to discuss our recent contributions to the field of photoredox catalysis. Our lab focuses on developing transition-metal-free alternatives to ruthenium and iridium bipyridyl complexes for these transformations, with the goal of developing systems in which the reaction kinetics is more favorable. We have found that methylene blue, a member of the thiazine dye family, can be employed in photoredox processes such as oxidative hydroxylations of arylboronic acids to phenols. Interestingly, we were able to demonstrate that methylene blue is

  3. Catalysis by Design: Well-Defined Single-Site Heterogeneous Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, Jérémie D A; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2016-04-19

    Heterogeneous catalysis, a field important industrially and scientifically, is increasingly seeking and refining strategies to render itself more predictable. The main issue is due to the nature and the population of catalytically active sites. Their number is generally low to very low, their "acid strengths" or " redox properties" are not homogeneous, and the material may display related yet inactive sites on the same material. In many heterogeneous catalysts, the discovery of a structure-activity reationship is at best challenging. One possible solution is to generate single-site catalysts in which most, if not all, of the sites are structurally identical. Within this context and using the right tools, the catalyst structure can be designed and well-defined, to reach a molecular understanding. It is then feasible to understand the structure-activity relationship and to develop predictable heterogeneous catalysis. Single-site well-defined heterogeneous catalysts can be prepared using concepts and tools of surface organometallic chemistry (SOMC). This approach operates by reacting organometallic compounds with surfaces of highly divided oxides (or of metal nanoparticles). This strategy has a solid track record to reveal structure-activity relationship to the extent that it is becoming now quite predictable. Almost all elements of the periodical table have been grafted on surfaces of oxides (from simple oxides such as silica or alumina to more sophisticated materials regarding composition or porosity). Considering catalytic hydrocarbon transformations, heterogeneous catalysis outcome may now be predicted based on existing mechanistic proposals and the rules of molecular chemistry (organometallic, organic) associated with some concepts of surface sciences. A thorough characterization of the grafted metal centers must be carried out using tools spanning from molecular organometallic or surface chemistry. By selection of the metal, its ligand set, and the support taken

  4. Spectrophotometric assays for measuring redox biomarkers in blood.

    PubMed

    Veskoukis, Aristidis S; Kyparos, Antonios; Paschalis, Vassilis; Nikolaidis, Michalis G

    2016-05-01

    The assessment of redox status is most frequently performed by measuring redox biomarkers. The spectrophotometer is the most commonly used analytical instrument in biochemistry. There is a huge number of spectrophotometric redox biomarkers and assays, thus distinguishing the most appropriate biomarkers and protocols is overwhelming. The aim of the present review is to propose valid and reliable spectrophotometric assays for measuring redox biomarkers in blood. It is hoped that this work will help researchers to select the most suitable redox biomarkers and assays. PMID:26809994

  5. Redox Bulk Energy Storage System Study, Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciprios, G.; Erskine, W., Jr.; Grimes, P. G.

    1977-01-01

    Opportunities were found for electrochemical energy storage devices in the U.S. electric utility industry. Application requirements for these devices were defined, including techno-economic factors. A new device, the Redox storage battery was analyzed. The Redox battery features a decoupling of energy storage and power conversion functions. General computer methods were developed to simulate Redox system operations. These studies showed that the Redox system is potentially attractive if certain performance goals can be achieved. Pathways for reducing the cost of the Redox system were identified.

  6. Catalysis with two-dimensional materials and their heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Dehui; Novoselov, K. S.; Fu, Qiang; Zheng, Nanfeng; Tian, Zhongqun; Bao, Xinhe

    2016-03-01

    Graphene and other 2D atomic crystals are of considerable interest in catalysis because of their unique structural and electronic properties. Over the past decade, the materials have been used in a variety of reactions, including the oxygen reduction reaction, water splitting and CO2 activation, and have been shown to exhibit a range of catalytic mechanisms. Here, we review recent advances in the use of graphene and other 2D materials in catalytic applications, focusing in particular on the catalytic activity of heterogeneous systems such as van der Waals heterostructures (stacks of several 2D crystals). We discuss the advantages of these materials for catalysis and the different routes available to tune their electronic states and active sites. We also explore the future opportunities of these catalytic materials and the challenges they face in terms of both fundamental understanding and the development of industrial applications.

  7. Catalysis with two-dimensional materials and their heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Deng, Dehui; Novoselov, K S; Fu, Qiang; Zheng, Nanfeng; Tian, Zhongqun; Bao, Xinhe

    2016-03-01

    Graphene and other 2D atomic crystals are of considerable interest in catalysis because of their unique structural and electronic properties. Over the past decade, the materials have been used in a variety of reactions, including the oxygen reduction reaction, water splitting and CO2 activation, and have been shown to exhibit a range of catalytic mechanisms. Here, we review recent advances in the use of graphene and other 2D materials in catalytic applications, focusing in particular on the catalytic activity of heterogeneous systems such as van der Waals heterostructures (stacks of several 2D crystals). We discuss the advantages of these materials for catalysis and the different routes available to tune their electronic states and active sites. We also explore the future opportunities of these catalytic materials and the challenges they face in terms of both fundamental understanding and the development of industrial applications. PMID:26936816

  8. Polyester and polycarbonate synthesis by in vitro enzyme catalysis.

    PubMed

    Gross, R A; Kalra, B; Kumar, A

    2001-06-01

    Enzyme technology has significantly expanded in scope and impact over the past 10 years to include organic transformations in non-traditional environments. This is in part due to an increased understanding and capability of using enzyme catalysis in a wide variety of organic solvents, at interfaces, and at high temperatures and pressures. This review focuses on a relatively new but rapidly expanding research activity where in vitro enzyme catalysis is used for the synthesis of non-natural polyesters and polycarbonates. The inclination to use of enzymes for polymer synthesis has been fueled by a desire to carry out these reactions in the absence of heavy metals, at lower temperatures, and with increased selectivity. Aspects of this work that include enzyme-catalyzed step-growth condensation reactions, chain-growth ring-opening polymerizations, and corresponding transesterification of macromolecular substrates are discussed. PMID:11525611

  9. A gapless hard wall: magnetic catalysis in bulk and boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolognesi, Stefano; Laia, João N.; Tong, David; Wong, Kenny

    2012-07-01

    We study various aspects of fermions and their chiral condensates, both in the bulk of AdS4 spacetime and in the dual boundary theory. For the most part, we focus on a geometry with an infra-red hard wall. We show that, contrary to common lore, there exist boundary conditions in which the hard wall gives rise to a discrete, but gapless, fermionic spectrum. In such a setting, the presence of a magnetic field induces a bulk fermion condensate which spontaneously breaks CP invariance. We develop the holographic dictionary between composite operators and show that this bulk condensate has the interpretation of boundary magnetic catalysis involving a double-trace operator. Finally, we explain how one can replace the hard wall with bulk magnetic monopoles. In such a framework, magnetic catalysis can be viewed as a consequence of the Callan-Rubakov effect.

  10. The energy landscape of adenylate kinase during catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Kerns, S. Jordan; Agafonov, Roman V.; Cho, Young-Jin; Pontiggia, Francesco; Otten, Renee; Pachov, Dimitar V.; Kutter, Steffen; Phung, Lien A.; Murphy, Padraig N.; Thai, Vu; Alber, Tom; Hagan, Michael F.; Kern, Dorothee

    2014-01-01

    Kinases perform phosphoryl-transfer reactions in milliseconds; without enzymes, these reactions would take about 8000 years under physiological conditions. Despite extensive studies, a comprehensive understanding of kinase energy landscapes, including both chemical and conformational steps, is lacking. Here we scrutinize the microscopic steps in the catalytic cycle of adenylate kinase, through a combination of NMR measurements during catalysis, pre-steady-state kinetics, MD simulations, and crystallography of active complexes. We find that the Mg2+ cofactor activates two distinct molecular events, phosphoryl transfer (>105-fold) and lid-opening (103-fold). In contrast, mutation of an essential active-site arginine decelerates phosphoryl transfer 103-fold without substantially affecting lid-opening. Our results highlight the importance of the entire energy landscape in catalysis and suggest that adenylate kinases have evolved to activate key processes simultaneously by precise placement of a single, charged and very abundant cofactor in a pre-organized active site. PMID:25580578

  11. Metal-free transfer hydrogenation of olefins via dehydrocoupling catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Manuel; Caputo, Christopher B.; Dobrovetsky, Roman; Stephan, Douglas W.

    2014-01-01

    A major advance in main-group chemistry in recent years has been the emergence of the reactivity of main-group species that mimics that of transition metal complexes. In this report, the Lewis acidic phosphonium salt [(C6F5)3PF][B(C6F5)4] 1 is shown to catalyze the dehydrocoupling of silanes with amines, thiols, phenols, and carboxylic acids to form the Si-E bond (E = N, S, O) with the liberation of H2 (21 examples). This catalysis, when performed in the presence of a series of olefins, yields the concurrent formation of the products of dehydrocoupling and transfer hydrogenation of the olefin (30 examples). This reactivity provides a strategy for metal-free catalysis of olefin hydrogenations. The mechanisms for both catalytic reactions are proposed and supported by experiment and density functional theory calculations. PMID:25002489

  12. Flexibility, diversity, and cooperativity: pillars of enzyme catalysis.

    PubMed

    Hammes, Gordon G; Benkovic, Stephen J; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2011-12-01

    This brief review discusses our current understanding of the molecular basis of enzyme catalysis. A historical development is presented, beginning with steady state kinetics and progressing through modern fast reaction methods, nuclear magnetic resonance, and single-molecule fluorescence techniques. Experimental results are summarized for ribonuclease, aspartate aminotransferase, and especially dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). Multiple intermediates, multiple conformations, and cooperative conformational changes are shown to be an essential part of virtually all enzyme mechanisms. In the case of DHFR, theoretical investigations have provided detailed information about the movement of atoms within the enzyme-substrate complex as the reaction proceeds along the collective reaction coordinate for hydride transfer. A general mechanism is presented for enzyme catalysis that includes multiple intermediates and a complex, multidimensional standard free energy surface. Protein flexibility, diverse protein conformations, and cooperative conformational changes are important features of this model. PMID:22029278

  13. Advantages of Catalysis in Self-Assembled Molecular Capsules.

    PubMed

    Catti, Lorenzo; Zhang, Qi; Tiefenbacher, Konrad

    2016-06-27

    Control over the local chemical environment of a molecule can be achieved by encapsulation in supramolecular host systems. In supramolecular catalysis, this control is used to gain advantages over classical homogeneous catalysis in bulk solution. Two of the main advantages concern influencing reactions in terms of substrate and product selectivity. Due to size and/or shape recognition, substrate selective conversion can be realized. Additionally, noncovalent interactions with the host environment facilitate alternative reaction pathways and can yield unusual products. This Concept article discusses and highlights literature examples utilizing self-assembled molecular capsules to achieve catalytic transformations displaying a high degree of substrate and/or product selectivity. Furthermore, the advantage of supramolecular hosts in multicatalyst tandem reactions is covered. PMID:27150251

  14. Dynamics connect substrate recognition to catalysis in protein kinase A

    PubMed Central

    Masterson, Larry R.; Cheng, Cecilia; Yu, Tao; Tonelli, Marco; Kornev, Alexandr; Taylor, Susan S.; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2012-01-01

    Atomic resolution studies of protein kinases have traditionally been carried out in the inhibitory state, limiting our current knowledge on the mechanisms of substrate recognition and catalysis. Using NMR, x-ray crystallography, and thermodynamic measurements we analyzed the substrate recognition process of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), finding that entropy and protein dynamics play a prominent role. The nucleotide acts as a dynamic and allosteric activator by coupling the two lobes of apo PKA, enhancing the enzyme dynamics synchronously, and priming it for catalysis. The formation of the ternary complex is entropically driven and NMR spin relaxation data reveal that both substrate and PKA are dynamic in the closed state. Our results show that the enzyme toggles between open and closed states, which indicate that a population shift/conformational selection rather than an induced-fit mechanism governs substrate recognition. PMID:20890288

  15. Trifluoromethylation of alkenes by visible light photoredox catalysis.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Naeem; Choi, Sungkyu; Kim, Eunjin; Cho, Eun Jin

    2012-12-21

    A method for trifluoromethylation of alkenes has been developed employing visible light photoredox catalysis with CF(3)I, Ru(Phen)(3)Cl(2), and DBU. This process works especially well for terminal alkenes to give alkenyl-CF(3) products with only E-stereochemistry. The mild reaction conditions enable the trifluoromethylation of a range of alkenes that bear various functional groups. PMID:23167602

  16. Nucleophilic Aromatic Substitution Reactions in Water Enabled by Micellar Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Isley, Nicholas A; Linstadt, Roscoe T H; Kelly, Sean M; Gallou, Fabrice; Lipshutz, Bruce H

    2015-10-01

    Given the huge dependence on dipolar, aprotic solvents such as DMF, DMSO, DMAc, and NMP in nucleophilic aromatic substitution reactions (SNAr), a simple and environmentally friendly alternative is reported. Use of a "benign-by-design" nonionic surfactant, TPGS-750-M, in water enables nitrogen, oxygen, and sulfur nucleophiles to participate in SNAr reactions. Aromatic and heteroaromatic substrates readily participate in this micellar catalysis, which takes place at or near ambient temperatures. PMID:26368348

  17. Dynamically Achieved Active Site Precision in Enzyme Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conspectus The grand challenge in enzymology is to define and understand all of the parameters that contribute to enzymes’ enormous rate accelerations. The property of hydrogen tunneling in enzyme reactions has moved the focus of research away from an exclusive focus on transition state stabilization toward the importance of the motions of the heavy atoms of the protein, a role for reduced barrier width in catalysis, and the sampling of a protein conformational landscape to achieve a family of protein substates that optimize enzyme–substrate interactions and beyond. This Account focuses on a thermophilic alcohol dehydrogenase for which the chemical step of hydride transfer is rate determining across a wide range of experimental conditions. The properties of the chemical coordinate have been probed using kinetic isotope effects, indicating a transition in behavior below 30 °C that distinguishes nonoptimal from optimal C–H activation. Further, the introduction of single site mutants has the impact of either enhancing or eliminating the temperature dependent transition in catalysis. Biophysical probes, which include time dependent hydrogen/deuterium exchange and fluorescent lifetimes and Stokes shifts, have also been pursued. These studies allow the correlation of spatially resolved transitions in protein motions with catalysis. It is now possible to define a long-range network of protein motions in ht-ADH that extends from a dimer interface to the substrate binding domain across to the cofactor binding domain, over a distance of ca. 30 Å. The ongoing challenge to obtaining spatial and temporal resolution of catalysis-linked protein motions is discussed. PMID:25539048

  18. Alkyne Hydroacylation: Switching Regioselectivity by Tandem Ruthenium Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qing-An; Cruz, Faben A.; Dong, Vy M.

    2015-01-01

    By using tandem ruthenium-catalysis, internal alkynes can be coupled with aldehydes for the synthesis of β,γ-unsaturated ketones. The catalyst promotes alkyne transformations with high regioselectivity, with examples that include the differentiation of a methyl versus ethyl substituent on the alkyne. Mechanistic studies suggest that the regioselectivity results from a selective allene formation that is governed by allylic strain. PMID:25608143

  19. Asymmetric photoredox transition-metal catalysis activated by visible light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Haohua; Shen, Xiaodong; Wang, Chuanyong; Zhang, Lilu; Röse, Philipp; Chen, Liang-An; Harms, Klaus; Marsch, Michael; Hilt, Gerhard; Meggers, Eric

    2014-11-01

    Asymmetric catalysis is seen as one of the most economical strategies to satisfy the growing demand for enantiomerically pure small molecules in the fine chemical and pharmaceutical industries. And visible light has been recognized as an environmentally friendly and sustainable form of energy for triggering chemical transformations and catalytic chemical processes. For these reasons, visible-light-driven catalytic asymmetric chemistry is a subject of enormous current interest. Photoredox catalysis provides the opportunity to generate highly reactive radical ion intermediates with often unusual or unconventional reactivities under surprisingly mild reaction conditions. In such systems, photoactivated sensitizers initiate a single electron transfer from (or to) a closed-shell organic molecule to produce radical cations or radical anions whose reactivities are then exploited for interesting or unusual chemical transformations. However, the high reactivity of photoexcited substrates, intermediate radical ions or radicals, and the low activation barriers for follow-up reactions provide significant hurdles for the development of efficient catalytic photochemical processes that work under stereochemical control and provide chiral molecules in an asymmetric fashion. Here we report a highly efficient asymmetric catalyst that uses visible light for the necessary molecular activation, thereby combining asymmetric catalysis and photocatalysis. We show that a chiral iridium complex can serve as a sensitizer for photoredox catalysis and at the same time provide very effective asymmetric induction for the enantioselective alkylation of 2-acyl imidazoles. This new asymmetric photoredox catalyst, in which the metal centre simultaneously serves as the exclusive source of chirality, the catalytically active Lewis acid centre, and the photoredox centre, offers new opportunities for the `green' synthesis of non-racemic chiral molecules.

  20. Structural changes common to catalysis in the Tpx peroxiredoxin subfamily

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Andrea; Sankaran, Banumathi; Poole, Leslie B.; Karplus, P. Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Thiol peroxidases (Tpxs) are dimeric 2-Cys peroxiredoxins from bacteria that preferentially reduce alkyl hydroperoxides. Catalysis requires two conserved residues, the peroxidatic cysteine and the resolving cysteine, which are located in helix α2 and helix α3, respectively. The partial unraveling of helices α2 and α3 during catalysis allows for the formation of an intramolecular disulfide between these two residues. Here we present three structures of Escherichia coli Tpx representing the fully folded (FF, peroxide binding site intact), locally unfolded (LU, disulfide bond), and partially locally unfolded (PLU, transitional state) conformations. We also compare known Tpx crystal structures and analyze the sequence-conservation patterns among nearly 300 Tpx sequences. Twelve fully conserved Tpx-specific residues cluster at the active site and dimer interface, and an additional 37 highly conserved residues are mostly located in a cradle providing the environment for helix α2. Using the structures determined here as representative FF, transitional, and LU Tpx conformations, we describe in detail the structural changes associated with catalysis in the Tpx subfamily. Key insights include the description of a conserved hydrophobic collar around the active site, a set of conserved packing interactions between helices α2 and α3 that allow the local unfolding of α2 to trigger the partial unfolding of α3, a conserved dimer interface that anchors the ends of helices α2 and α3 to stabilize the active site during structural transitions, and a conserved set of residues constituting a cradle that stabilizes the two discrete conformations of helix α2 involved in catalysis. The involvement of the dimer interface in stabilizing active-site folding and in forming the hydrophobic collar implies that Tpx is an obligate homodimer and explains the high conservation of interface residues. PMID:19699750

  1. Observations of exoelectron emission associated with heterogeneous catalysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoenig, S. A.; Utter, M. G.

    1977-01-01

    It is suggested that the exoelectron emission from the catalyst may be used to monitor the rate of oxidation of CO and CH4 over palladium catalysts. Indirect heating of the catalyst and atmospheric pressure have no effect upon this monitoring system. Although the mechanism relating catalysis to exoelectron emission is not clear, it is considered possible that electron emission is triggered by the adsorption-desorption cycle.

  2. Selective catalysis utilizing bifunctionalized MCM-41 mesoporous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Strosahl, Kasey Jean

    2005-05-01

    Selective catalysis is a field that has been under intense investigation for the last 100 years. The most widely used method involves catalysts with stereochemical selectivity. In this type of catalysis, the catalyst controls which reactants will be transformed into the desired product. The secret to employing this type of catalysis, though, is to design the proper catalyst, which can be difficult. One may spend as much time developing the catalyst as spent separating the various products achieved. Another method of selective catalysis is now being explored. The method involves utilizing a multifunctional mesoporous silica catalyst with a gate-keeping capability. Properly functionalized mesoporous materials with well-defined pore morphology and surface properties can provide an ideal three-dimensional environment for anchoring various homogeneous catalysts. These materials can circumvent the multi-sited two-dimensional nature most heterogeneous systems have without adversely impacting the reactant diffusivity. These single-site nanostructured catalysts with ordered geometrical structure are advantageous in achieving high selectivity and reactivity. Mesoporous materials can be prepared to include pores lined homogeneously with tethered catalysts via co-condensation. Additionally, these materials can be reacted with another (RO){sub 3}Si{approx}Z group by using the traditional grafting method; this group is anchored predominantly at the entrances to the pores rather than inside the pores. Thus, if these {approx}Z groups are chosen properly, they can select certain molecules to enter the pores and be converted to products (Scheme 1). In such multifunctional catalysts, the selectivity depends on the discrimination of the gatekeeper. Gate-keeping MCM-41 materials are at the forefront of catalytic substances.

  3. Switching on Elusive Organometallic Mechanisms with Photoredox Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Terrett, Jack A.; Cuthbertson, James D.; Shurtleff, Valerie W.; MacMillan, David W. C.

    2015-01-01

    Transition metal-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions have become one of the most utilized carbon–carbon and carbon–heteroatom bond-forming reactions in chemical synthesis. More recently, nickel catalysis has been shown to participate in a wide variety of C–C bond forming reactions, most notably Negishi, Suzuki–Miyaura, Stille, Kumada, and Hiyama couplings1,2. Despite the tremendous advances in C–C fragment couplings, the ability to forge C–O bonds in a general fashion via nickel catalysis has been largely unsuccessful. The challenge for nickel-mediated alcohol couplings has been the mechanistic requirement for the critical C–O bond forming step (formally known as the reductive elimination step) to occur via a Ni(III) alkoxide intermediate. In this manuscript, we demonstrate that visible light-excited photoredox catalysts can modulate the preferred oxidation states of nickel alkoxides in an operative catalytic cycle, thereby providing transient access to Ni(III) species that readily participate in reductive elimination. Using this synergistic merger of photoredox and nickel catalysis, we have developed a highly efficient and general carbon–oxygen coupling reaction using abundant alcohols and aryl bromides. More significantly, we have developed a general strategy to “switch on” important yet elusive organometallic mechanisms via oxidation state modulations using only weak light and single-electron transfer (SET) catalysts. PMID:26266976

  4. Switching on elusive organometallic mechanisms with photoredox catalysis.

    PubMed

    Terrett, Jack A; Cuthbertson, James D; Shurtleff, Valerie W; MacMillan, David W C

    2015-08-20

    Transition-metal-catalysed cross-coupling reactions have become one of the most used carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom bond-forming reactions in chemical synthesis. Recently, nickel catalysis has been shown to participate in a wide variety of C-C bond-forming reactions, most notably Negishi, Suzuki-Miyaura, Stille, Kumada and Hiyama couplings. Despite the tremendous advances in C-C fragment couplings, the ability to forge C-O bonds in a general fashion via nickel catalysis has been largely unsuccessful. The challenge for nickel-mediated alcohol couplings has been the mechanistic requirement for the critical C-O bond-forming step (formally known as the reductive elimination step) to occur via a Ni(III) alkoxide intermediate. Here we demonstrate that visible-light-excited photoredox catalysts can modulate the preferred oxidation states of nickel alkoxides in an operative catalytic cycle, thereby providing transient access to Ni(III) species that readily participate in reductive elimination. Using this synergistic merger of photoredox and nickel catalysis, we have developed a highly efficient and general carbon-oxygen coupling reaction using abundant alcohols and aryl bromides. More notably, we have developed a general strategy to 'switch on' important yet elusive organometallic mechanisms via oxidation state modulations using only weak light and single-electron-transfer catalysts. PMID:26266976

  5. The Hammerhead Ribozyme: Structure, Catalysis and Gene Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Scott, William G.; Horan, Lucas H.; Martick, Monika

    2014-01-01

    The hammerhead ribozyme has long been considered a prototype for understanding RNA catalysis, but discrepancies between the earlier crystal structures of a minimal hammerhead self-cleaving motif and various biochemical investigations frustrated attempt to understand hammerhead ribozyme catalysis in terms of structure. With the discovery that a tertiary contact distal from the ribozyme’s active site greatly enhances its catalytic prowess, and the emergence of new corresponding crystal structures of full-length hammerhead ribozymes, a unified understanding of catalysis in terms of the structure is now possible. A mechanism in which the invariant residue G12 functions as a general base, and the 2′-OH moiety of the invariant G8, itself forming a tertiary base pair with the invariant C3, is the general acid, appears consistent with both the crystal structure and biochemical experimental results. Originally discovered in the context of plant satellite RNA viruses, the hammerhead more recently has been found embedded in the 3′-untranslated region of mature mammalian mRNAs, suggesting additional biological roles in genetic regulation. PMID:24156940

  6. Substrate-assisted catalysis: molecular basis and biological significance.

    PubMed Central

    Dall'Acqua, W.; Carter, P.

    2000-01-01

    Substrate-assisted catalysis (SAC) is the process by which a functional group in a substrate contributes to catalysis by an enzyme. SAC has been demonstrated for representatives of three major enzyme classes: serine proteases, GTPases, and type II restriction endonucleases, as well as lysozyme and hexose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase. Moreover, structure-based predictions of SAC have been made for many additional enzymes. Examples of SAC include both naturally occurring enzymes such as type II restriction endonucleases as well as engineered enzymes including serine proteases. In the latter case, a functional group from a substrate can substitute for a catalytic residue replaced by site-directed mutagenesis. From a protein engineering perspective, SAC provides a strategy for drastically changing enzyme substrate specificity or even the reaction catalyzed. From a biological viewpoint, SAC contributes significantly to the activity of some enzymes and may represent a functional intermediate in the evolution of catalysis. This review focuses on advances in engineering enzyme specificity and activity by SAC, together with the biological significance of this phenomenon. PMID:10739241

  7. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Catalysis Highlights for FY2007

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, Bruce C.

    2007-11-15

    To reduce the nation’s dependence on imported oil, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and other federal and private agencies are investing in understanding catalysis. This report focuses on catalysis research conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and its collaborators. Using sophisticated instruments in DOE’s Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility, research was conducted to answer key questions related to the nation’s use of automotive fuels. Research teams investigated how hydrogen can be safely stored and efficiently released, critical questions to use this alternative fuel. Further, they are answering key questions to design molecular catalysts to control the transfer of hydrogen atoms, hydrides, and protons important to hydrogen production. In dealing with today’s fuels, researchers examined adsorption of noxious nitrous oxides in automotive exhaust. Beyond automotive fuel, researchers worked on catalysts to harness solar power. These catalysts include the rutile and anatase forms of titanium dioxide. Basic research was conducted on designing catalysts for these and other applications. Our scientists examined how to build catalysts with the desired properties atom by atom and molecule by molecule. In addition, this report contains brief descriptions of the outstanding accomplishments of catalysis experts at PNNL.

  8. Peptide-capped nanoparticles for catalysis and assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Beverly D.

    Nature possesses methods for the formation and manipulation of inorganic materials with controlled size, shape, and compositions. Biomolecules, such as peptides, are known to be responsible for the generation of such inorganic materials on the nanoscale, where the enhanced properties can be exploited for various applications. Pd nanoparticles, capped with the Pd-specific Pd4 peptide (TSNAVHPTLRHL), were found to be active catalysts for Stille coupling, where the debated mechanism of oxidative addition was explored. Furthermore, the same Pd4-capped nanoparticles were found to be active in Suzuki coupling, another C-C coupling reaction that undergoes catalysis following a similar mechanism. Other considerations with peptide-capped metal catalysis involved the role of the reductant and the subsequent effects on morphology and reactivity, as seen by use of Au nanoparticles capped with a library of peptides. The role of the reductant was studied using varied reductants and was found to directly affect the catalytic activity. Additionally, such Au and Ag materials-binding peptides were expanded to generate multi-domain biomolecules capable of metal-specific binding and nanoparticle assembly. Such in-depth studies of peptide-capped nanomaterials and their uses in catalysis and assembly is important for optimized functionality and application.

  9. Compartmentalized Droplets for Continuous Flow Liquid-Liquid Interface Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming; Wei, Lijuan; Chen, Huan; Du, Zhiping; Binks, Bernard P; Yang, Hengquan

    2016-08-17

    To address the limitations of batch organic-aqueous biphasic catalysis, we develop a conceptually novel method termed Flow Pickering Emulsion, or FPE, to process biphasic reactions in a continuous flow fashion. This method involves the compartmentalization of bulk water into micron-sized droplets based on a water-in-oil Pickering emulsion, which are packed into a column reactor. The compartmentalized water droplets can confine water-soluble catalysts, thus "immobilizing" the catalyst in the column reactor, while the interstices between the droplets allow the organic (oil) phase to flow. Key fundamental principles underpinning this method such as the oil phase flow behavior, the stability of compartmentalized droplets and the confinement capability of these droplets toward water-soluble catalysts are experimentally and theoretically investigated. As a proof of this concept, case studies including a sulfuric acid-catalyzed addition reaction, a heteropolyacid-catalyzed ring opening reaction and an enzyme-catalyzed chiral reaction demonstrate the generality and versatility of the FPE method. Impressively, in addition to the excellent durability, the developed FPE reactions exhibit up to 10-fold reaction efficiency enhancement in comparison to the existing batch reactions, indicating a unique flow interface catalysis effect. This study opens up a new avenue to allow conventional biphasic catalysis reactions to access more sustainable and efficient flow chemistry using an innovative liquid-liquid interface protocol. PMID:27429173

  10. Switching on elusive organometallic mechanisms with photoredox catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrett, Jack A.; Cuthbertson, James D.; Shurtleff, Valerie W.; MacMillan, David W. C.

    2015-08-01

    Transition-metal-catalysed cross-coupling reactions have become one of the most used carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom bond-forming reactions in chemical synthesis. Recently, nickel catalysis has been shown to participate in a wide variety of C-C bond-forming reactions, most notably Negishi, Suzuki-Miyaura, Stille, Kumada and Hiyama couplings. Despite the tremendous advances in C-C fragment couplings, the ability to forge C-O bonds in a general fashion via nickel catalysis has been largely unsuccessful. The challenge for nickel-mediated alcohol couplings has been the mechanistic requirement for the critical C-O bond-forming step (formally known as the reductive elimination step) to occur via a Ni(III) alkoxide intermediate. Here we demonstrate that visible-light-excited photoredox catalysts can modulate the preferred oxidation states of nickel alkoxides in an operative catalytic cycle, thereby providing transient access to Ni(III) species that readily participate in reductive elimination. Using this synergistic merger of photoredox and nickel catalysis, we have developed a highly efficient and general carbon-oxygen coupling reaction using abundant alcohols and aryl bromides. More notably, we have developed a general strategy to `switch on' important yet elusive organometallic mechanisms via oxidation state modulations using only weak light and single-electron-transfer catalysts.

  11. Cost projections for Redox Energy storage systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michaels, K.; Hall, G.

    1980-01-01

    A preliminary design and system cost analysis was performed for the redox energy storage system. A conceptual design and cost estimate was prepared for each of two energy applications: (1) electric utility 100-MWh requirement (10-MW for ten hours) for energy storage for utility load leveling application, and (2) a 500-kWh requirement (10-kW for 50 hours) for use with a variety of residential or commercial applications, including stand alone solar photovoltaic systems. The conceptual designs were based on cell performance levels, system design parameters, and special material costs. These data were combined with estimated thermodynamic and hydraulic analysis to provide preliminary system designs. Results indicate that the redox cell stack to be amenable to mass production techniques with a relatively low material cost.

  12. Asymmetric Redox-Annulation of Cyclic Amines

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic amines such as 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline undergo regiodivergent annulation reactions with 4-nitrobutyraldehydes. These redox-neutral transformations enable the asymmetric synthesis of highly substituted polycyclic ring systems in just two steps from commercial materials. The utility of this process is illustrated in a rapid synthesis of (−)-protoemetinol. Computational studies provide mechanistic insights and implicate the elimination of acetic acid from an ammonium nitronate intermediate as the rate-determining step. PMID:26348653

  13. Texaphyrins: Tumor Localizing Redox Active Expanded Porphyrins

    PubMed Central

    Arambula, Jonathan F.; Preihs, Christian; Borthwick, Derric; Magda, Darren; Sessler, Jonathan L.

    2011-01-01

    Texaphyrins, a class of tumor selective expanded porphyrins capable of coordinating large metals, have been found to act as redox mediators within biological systems. This review summarizes studies involving their experimentaluse in cancer chemotherapy. Mechanistic insights involving their presumed mode of action are also described, as well as certain structure activity relationships. Finally, newer texaphyrin-based applications associated with targeted drug delivery are presented. PMID:21355841

  14. Neptunium redox speciation at the illite surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsac, Rémi; Banik, Nidhu lal; Lützenkirchen, Johannes; Marquardt, Christian Michael; Dardenne, Kathy; Schild, Dieter; Rothe, Joerg; Diascorn, Alexandre; Kupcik, Tomas; Schäfer, Thorsten; Geckeis, Horst

    2015-03-01

    Neptunium (Np(V)) sorption onto a purified illite is investigated as a function of pH (3-10) and [NpVO2+]tot(3 × 10-8-3 × 10-4 M) in 0.1 M NaCl under Ar atmosphere. After about one week reaction time, only insignificant variation of Np sorption is observed and the establishment of reaction equilibrium can be assumed. Surprisingly, solid-liquid distribution ratios (Rd) are clearly higher than those measured for Np(V) sorption onto illite under aerobic conditions. The observation that Rd increases with decreasing pe (pe = -log ae-) suggests partial reduction to Np(IV), although measured redox potentials (pe values) at a first glance suggest the predominance of Np(V). Reduction to Np(IV) at the illite surface could indeed be confirmed by X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES). Np speciation in presence of the purified Na-illite under given conditions is consistently described by applying the 2 sites protolysis non-electrostatic surface complexation and cation exchange model. Measured pe data are taken to calculate Np redox state and surface complexation constants for Np(IV) are derived by applying a data fitting procedure. Constants are very consistent with results obtained by applying an existing linear free energy relationship (LFER). Taking Np(IV) surface complexation constants into account shifts the calculated Np(V)/Np(IV) redox borderline in presence of illite surfaces by 3-5 pe units (0.2-0.3 V) towards redox neutral conditions. Our study suggests that Np(V) reduction in presence of a sorbing mineral phase is thermodynamically favored.

  15. Redox signalling and cardioprotection: translatability and mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Pagliaro, P; Penna, C

    2015-01-01

    The morbidity and mortality from coronary artery disease (CAD) remain significant worldwide. The treatment for acute myocardial infarction has improved over the past decades, including early reperfusion of culprit coronary arteries. Although it is mandatory to reperfuse the ischaemic territory as soon as possible, paradoxically this leads to additional myocardial injury, namely ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, in which redox stress plays a pivotal role and for which no effective therapy is currently available. In this review, we report evidence that the redox environment plays a pivotal role not only in I/R injury but also in cardioprotection. In fact, cardioprotective strategies, such as pre- and post-conditioning, result in a robust reduction in infarct size in animals and the role of redox signalling is of paramount importance in these conditioning strategies. Nitrosative signalling and cysteine redox modifications, such as S-nitrosation/S-nitrosylation, are also emerging as very important mechanisms in conditioning cardioprotection. The reasons for the switch from protective oxidative/nitrosative signalling to deleterious oxidative/nitrosative/nitrative stress are not fully understood. The complex regulation of this switch is, at least in part, responsible for the diminished or lack of cardioprotection induced by conditioning protocols observed in ageing animals and with co-morbidities as well as in humans. Therefore, it is important to understand at a mechanistic level the reasons for these differences before proposing a safe and useful transition of ischaemic or pharmacological conditioning. Indeed, more mechanistic novel therapeutic strategies are required to protect the heart from I/R injury and to improve clinical outcomes in patients with CAD. PMID:25303224

  16. Proteostasis and REDOX state in the heart

    PubMed Central

    Christians, Elisabeth S.

    2012-01-01

    Force-generating contractile cells of the myocardium must achieve and maintain their primary function as an efficient mechanical pump over the life span of the organism. Because only half of the cardiomyocytes can be replaced during the entire human life span, the maintenance strategy elicited by cardiac cells relies on uninterrupted renewal of their components, including proteins whose specialized functions constitute this complex and sophisticated contractile apparatus. Thus cardiac proteins are continuously synthesized and degraded to ensure proteome homeostasis, also termed “proteostasis.” Once synthesized, proteins undergo additional folding, posttranslational modifications, and trafficking and/or become involved in protein-protein or protein-DNA interactions to exert their functions. This includes key transient interactions of cardiac proteins with molecular chaperones, which assist with quality control at multiple levels to prevent misfolding or to facilitate degradation. Importantly, cardiac proteome maintenance depends on the cellular environment and, in particular, the reduction-oxidation (REDOX) state, which is significantly different among cardiac organelles (e.g., mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum). Taking into account the high metabolic activity for oxygen consumption and ATP production by mitochondria, it is a challenge for cardiac cells to maintain the REDOX state while preventing either excessive oxidative or reductive stress. A perturbed REDOX environment can affect protein handling and conformation (e.g., disulfide bonds), disrupt key structure-function relationships, and trigger a pathogenic cascade of protein aggregation, decreased cell survival, and increased organ dysfunction. This review covers current knowledge regarding the general domain of REDOX state and protein folding, specifically in cardiomyocytes under normal-healthy conditions and during disease states associated with morbidity and mortality in humans. PMID:22003057

  17. Redox response model for partly substituted cuprates

    SciTech Connect

    Oesterreicher, H. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1994-05-01

    Inhomogeneous substitutions (e.g. clustering and preferential site occupations) in compounds such as YBa[sub 2](Cu[sub 1[minus]x]M[sub x])[sub 3]O[sub y] with M = Fe, Co, Ni, etc. are an unavoidable response to the changing redox environments in these O intercalation compounds. The authors collect here experimental evidence for various types of inhomogeneous distributions predicted on a thermodynamic model which considers the preferential desorption'' of O from various local environments. The parameter organizing the redox environment is [Delta]H* (incremental enthalpy of oxygen desorption per mol O[sub 2]). Theory suggests a sequence of discernible states represented by the acronym CLUSTER. With decreasing [Delta]H*, indications for several of these states are obtained from Moessbauer and other experiments. These states are characteristically shifted in [Delta]H* for different M. Also, further substitutions according to (YX)(BaZ)[sub 2](CuM)[sub 3]O[sub y] with X = Ca, Z = Sr, La can change the relevant [Delta]H* for these states, allowing prediction of their preparation conditions. Aspects of the complex electronic phase diagram as a function of redox preparation are discussed.

  18. Redox Modulation of HMGB1-Related Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Janko, Christina; Filipović, Milos; Munoz, Luis E.; Schorn, Christine; Schett, Georg; Ivanović-Burmazović, Ivana

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: In the cells' nuclei, high-mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB1) is a nonhistone chromatin-binding protein involved in the regulation of transcription. Extracellularly, HMGB1 acts as a danger molecule with properties of a proinflammatory cytokine. It can be actively secreted from myeloid cells or passively leak from any type of injured, necrotic cell. Increased serum levels of active HMGB1 are often found in pathogenic inflammatory conditions and correlate with worse prognoses in cancer, sepsis, and autoimmunity. By damaging cells, superoxide and peroxynitrite promote leakage of HMGB1. Recent Advances: The activity of HMGB1 strongly depends on its redox state: Inflammatory-active HMGB1 requires an intramolecular disulfide bond (Cys23 and Cys45) and a reduced Cys106. Oxidation of the latter blocks its stimulatory activity and promotes immune tolerance. Critical Issues: Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species create an oxidative environment and can be detoxified by superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and peroxidases. Modifications of the oxidative environment influence HMGB1 activity. Future Directions: In this review, we hypothesize that manipulations of an oxidative environment by SOD mimics or by hydrogen sulfide are prone to decrease tissue damage. Both the concomitant decreased HMGB1 release and its redox chemical modifications ameliorate inflammation and tissue damage. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1075–1085. PMID:23373897

  19. Membrane Development for Vanadium Redox Flow Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Schwenzer, Birgit; Zhang, Jianlu; Kim, Soowhan; Li, Liyu; Liu, Jun; Yang, Zhenguo

    2011-10-17

    Large-scale energy storage has become a main bottleneck for increasing the percentage of renewable energy in our electricity grids. Redox flow batteries are considered to be among the best options for electricity storage in the megawatt range, and large demonstration systems have already been installed. Although the full technological potential of these systems has not been reached yet, currently the main problem hindering more widespread commercialization is the high cost of redox flow batteries. Nafion{reg_sign} as the preferred membrane material is responsible for {approx}11% of the overall cost of a 1 MW/8 MWh system. Therefore in recent years two main membrane-related research threads have emerged: (a) chemical and physical modification of Nafion membranes to optimize their properties with regard to vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) application; and (b) replacement of the Nafion membranes with different, less expensive materials. This review summarizes the underlying basic science issues associated with membrane use in VRFBs and presents an overview of membrane-related research approaches aimed at improving the efficiency of VRFBs and making the technology cost-competitive. Promising research strategies and materials are identified and suggestions are provided on how materials issues could be overcome.

  20. Membrane development for vanadium redox flow batteries.

    PubMed

    Schwenzer, Birgit; Zhang, Jianlu; Kim, Soowhan; Li, Liyu; Liu, Jun; Yang, Zhenguo

    2011-10-17

    Large-scale energy storage has become the main bottleneck for increasing the percentage of renewable energy in our electricity grids. Redox flow batteries are considered to be among the best options for electricity storage in the megawatt range and large demonstration systems have already been installed. Although the full technological potential of these systems has not been reached yet, currently the main problem hindering more widespread commercialization is the high cost of redox flow batteries. Nafion, as the preferred membrane material, is responsible for about 11% of the overall cost of a 1 MW/8 MWh system. Therefore, in recent years two main membrane related research threads have emerged: 1) chemical and physical modification of Nafion membranes to optimize their properties with regard to vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) application; and 2) replacement of the Nafion membranes with different, less expensive materials. This review summarizes the underlying basic scientific issues associated with membrane use in VRFBs and presents an overview of membrane-related research approaches aimed at improving the efficiency of VRFBs and making the technology cost-competitive. Promising research strategies and materials are identified and suggestions are provided on how materials issues could be overcome. PMID:22102992

  1. Measurement of redox potential in nanoecotoxicological investigations.

    PubMed

    Tantra, Ratna; Cackett, Alex; Peck, Roger; Gohil, Dipak; Snowden, Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    Redox potential has been identified by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) as one of the parameters that should be investigated for the testing of manufactured nanomaterials. There is still some ambiguity concerning this parameter, i.e., as to what and how to measure, particularly when in a nanoecotoxicological context. In this study the redox potentials of six nanomaterials (either zinc oxide (ZnO) or cerium oxide (CeO(2))) dispersions were measured using an oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) electrode probe. The particles under testing differed in terms of their particle size and dispersion stability in deionised water and in various ecotox media. The ORP values of the various dispersions and how they fluctuate relative to each other are discussed. Results show that the ORP values are mainly governed by the type of liquid media employed, with little contributions from the nanoparticles. Seawater was shown to have reduced the ORP value, which was attributed to an increase in the concentration of reducing agents such as sulphites or the reduction of dissolved oxygen concentration. The lack of redox potential value contribution from the particles themselves is thought to be due to insufficient interaction of the particles at the Pt electrode of the ORP probe. PMID:22131988

  2. Tuning of Redox Regulatory Mechanisms, Reactive Oxygen Species and Redox Homeostasis under Salinity Stress

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, M. Sazzad; Dietz, Karl-Josef

    2016-01-01

    Soil salinity is a crucial environmental constraint which limits biomass production at many sites on a global scale. Saline growth conditions cause osmotic and ionic imbalances, oxidative stress and perturb metabolism, e.g., the photosynthetic electron flow. The plant ability to tolerate salinity is determined by multiple biochemical and physiological mechanisms protecting cell functions, in particular by regulating proper water relations and maintaining ion homeostasis. Redox homeostasis is a fundamental cell property. Its regulation includes control of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, sensing deviation from and readjustment of the cellular redox state. All these redox related functions have been recognized as decisive factors in salinity acclimation and adaptation. This review focuses on the core response of plants to overcome the challenges of salinity stress through regulation of ROS generation and detoxification systems and to maintain redox homeostasis. Emphasis is given to the role of NADH oxidase (RBOH), alternative oxidase (AOX), the plastid terminal oxidase (PTOX) and the malate valve with the malate dehydrogenase isoforms under salt stress. Overwhelming evidence assigns an essential auxiliary function of ROS and redox homeostasis to salinity acclimation of plants. PMID:27242807

  3. Crossing redox boundaries--aquifer redox history and effects on iron mineralogy and arsenic availability.

    PubMed

    Banning, Andre; Rüde, Thomas R; Dölling, Bettina

    2013-11-15

    Cretaceous shallow marine sediments from northwestern Germany exhibit a distinct colour and geochemical boundary in a depth of several decametres, witnessing a terrestrial oxidative paleo redox process which resulted in cement loss and oxidation of Fe(II) phases. Sediment samples were obtained from boreholes drilled in near-coastal and further basinward paleo environments, including both reduced and oxidized redox facies, to characterize As and Fe occurrence in unaltered layers and redistributional consequences of the redox event. Geochemical and mineralogical composition and As fractionation were assessed. Arsenic resides in pyrite in the reduced section with a bulk rock maximum concentration of 39 μg g(-1), calculated Aspyrite is ~0.2 wt.%. Siderite concretions in the fine sands do not function as As sinks, neither does glauconite whose general As/Fe leaching behaviour was characterized. In the zone of redox transition, reduced and oxidized phases coexist and elevated As concentrations (up to 73 μg g(-1)) with high proportions of reactive As were detected. Arsenic behaviour changes from relatively homogeneous Fe sulphide-control in the unaltered sediments to very heterogeneous Fe hydroxide-control above the paleo redox boundary. The studied characteristics determine recent As availability in the subsurface and must be considered during groundwater extraction from this highly important aquifer. PMID:23280400

  4. Tuning of Redox Regulatory Mechanisms, Reactive Oxygen Species and Redox Homeostasis under Salinity Stress.

    PubMed

    Hossain, M Sazzad; Dietz, Karl-Josef

    2016-01-01

    Soil salinity is a crucial environmental constraint which limits biomass production at many sites on a global scale. Saline growth conditions cause osmotic and ionic imbalances, oxidative stress and perturb metabolism, e.g., the photosynthetic electron flow. The plant ability to tolerate salinity is determined by multiple biochemical and physiological mechanisms protecting cell functions, in particular by regulating proper water relations and maintaining ion homeostasis. Redox homeostasis is a fundamental cell property. Its regulation includes control of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, sensing deviation from and readjustment of the cellular redox state. All these redox related functions have been recognized as decisive factors in salinity acclimation and adaptation. This review focuses on the core response of plants to overcome the challenges of salinity stress through regulation of ROS generation and detoxification systems and to maintain redox homeostasis. Emphasis is given to the role of NADH oxidase (RBOH), alternative oxidase (AOX), the plastid terminal oxidase (PTOX) and the malate valve with the malate dehydrogenase isoforms under salt stress. Overwhelming evidence assigns an essential auxiliary function of ROS and redox homeostasis to salinity acclimation of plants. PMID:27242807

  5. Virtual special issue on catalysis at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Laboratories

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pruski, Marek; Sadow, Aaron D.; Slowing, Igor I.; Marshall, Christopher L.; Stair, Peter; Rodriguez, Jose; Harris, Alex; Somorjai, Gabor A.; Biener, Juergen; Matranga, Christopher; et al

    2016-04-21

    Here the catalysis research at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Laboratories covers a wide range of research topics in heterogeneous catalysis, homogeneous/molecular catalysis, biocatalysis, electrocatalysis, and surface science. Since much of the work at National Laboratories is funded by DOE, the research is largely focused on addressing DOE's mission to ensure America's security and prosperity by addressing its energy, environmental, and nuclear challenges through transformative science and technology solutions.

  6. Dihydrofolate reductase as a model for studies of enzyme dynamics and catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Kohen, Amnon

    2015-01-01

    Dihydrofolate reductase from Escherichia coli (ecDHFR) serves as a model system for investigating the role of protein dynamics in enzyme catalysis. We discuss calculations predicting a network of dynamic motions that is coupled to the chemical step catalyzed by this enzyme. Kinetic studies testing these predictions are presented, and their potential use in better understanding the role of these dynamics in enzyme catalysis is considered. The cumulative results implicate motions across the entire protein in catalysis. PMID:26918149

  7. Redox Indicator Mice Stably Expressing Genetically Encoded Neuronal roGFP: Versatile Tools to Decipher Subcellular Redox Dynamics in Neuropathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Wagener, Kerstin C.; Kolbrink, Benedikt; Dietrich, Katharina; Kizina, Kathrin M.; Terwitte, Lukas S.; Kempkes, Belinda; Bao, Guobin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and downstream redox alterations not only mediate physiological signaling but also neuropathology. For long, ROS/redox imaging was hampered by a lack of reliable probes. Genetically encoded redox sensors overcame this gap and revolutionized (sub)cellular redox imaging. Yet, the successful delivery of sensor-coding DNA, which demands transfection/transduction of cultured preparations or stereotaxic microinjections of each subject, remains challenging. By generating transgenic mice, we aimed to overcome limiting cultured preparations, circumvent surgical interventions, and to extend effectively redox imaging to complex and adult preparations. Results: Our redox indicator mice widely express Thy1-driven roGFP1 (reduction–oxidation-sensitive green fluorescent protein 1) in neuronal cytosol or mitochondria. Negative phenotypic effects of roGFP1 were excluded and its proper targeting and functionality confirmed. Redox mapping by ratiometric wide-field imaging reveals most oxidizing conditions in CA3 neurons. Furthermore, mitochondria are more oxidized than cytosol. Cytosolic and mitochondrial roGFP1s reliably report cell endogenous redox dynamics upon metabolic challenge or stimulation. Fluorescence lifetime imaging yields stable, but marginal, response ranges. We therefore developed automated excitation ratiometric 2-photon imaging. It offers superior sensitivity, spatial resolution, and response dynamics. Innovation and Conclusion: Redox indicator mice enable quantitative analyses of subcellular redox dynamics in a multitude of preparations and at all postnatal stages. This will uncover cell- and compartment-specific cerebral redox signals and their defined alterations during development, maturation, and aging. Cross-breeding with other disease models will reveal molecular details on compartmental redox homeostasis in neuropathology. Combined with ratiometric 2-photon imaging, this will foster our mechanistic understanding

  8. Tuning of Hemes b Equilibrium Redox Potential Is Not Required for Cross-Membrane Electron Transfer.

    PubMed

    Pintscher, Sebastian; Kuleta, Patryk; Cieluch, Ewelina; Borek, Arkadiusz; Sarewicz, Marcin; Osyczka, Artur

    2016-03-25

    In biological energy conversion, cross-membrane electron transfer often involves an assembly of two hemesb The hemes display a large difference in redox midpoint potentials (ΔEm_b), which in several proteins is assumed to facilitate cross-membrane electron transfer and overcome a barrier of membrane potential. Here we challenge this assumption reporting on hemebligand mutants of cytochromebc1in which, for the first time in transmembrane cytochrome, one natural histidine has been replaced by lysine without loss of the native low spin type of heme iron. With these mutants we show that ΔEm_b can be markedly increased, and the redox potential of one of the hemes can stay above the level of quinone pool, or ΔEm_b can be markedly decreased to the point that two hemes are almost isopotential, yet the enzyme retains catalytically competent electron transfer between quinone binding sites and remains functionalin vivo This reveals that cytochromebc1can accommodate large changes in ΔEm_b without hampering catalysis, as long as these changes do not impose overly endergonic steps on downhill electron transfer from substrate to product. We propose that hemesbin this cytochrome and in other membranous cytochromesbact as electronic connectors for the catalytic sites with no fine tuning in ΔEm_b required for efficient cross-membrane electron transfer. We link this concept with a natural flexibility in occurrence of several thermodynamic configurations of the direction of electron flow and the direction of the gradient of potential in relation to the vector of the electric membrane potential. PMID:26858251

  9. Tuning of Hemes b Equilibrium Redox Potential Is Not Required for Cross-Membrane Electron Transfer*

    PubMed Central

    Pintscher, Sebastian; Kuleta, Patryk; Cieluch, Ewelina; Borek, Arkadiusz; Sarewicz, Marcin; Osyczka, Artur

    2016-01-01

    In biological energy conversion, cross-membrane electron transfer often involves an assembly of two hemes b. The hemes display a large difference in redox midpoint potentials (ΔEm_b), which in several proteins is assumed to facilitate cross-membrane electron transfer and overcome a barrier of membrane potential. Here we challenge this assumption reporting on heme b ligand mutants of cytochrome bc1 in which, for the first time in transmembrane cytochrome, one natural histidine has been replaced by lysine without loss of the native low spin type of heme iron. With these mutants we show that ΔEm_b can be markedly increased, and the redox potential of one of the hemes can stay above the level of quinone pool, or ΔEm_b can be markedly decreased to the point that two hemes are almost isopotential, yet the enzyme retains catalytically competent electron transfer between quinone binding sites and remains functional in vivo. This reveals that cytochrome bc1 can accommodate large changes in ΔEm_b without hampering catalysis, as long as these changes do not impose overly endergonic steps on downhill electron transfer from substrate to product. We propose that hemes b in this cytochrome and in other membranous cytochromes b act as electronic connectors for the catalytic sites with no fine tuning in ΔEm_b required for efficient cross-membrane electron transfer. We link this concept with a natural flexibility in occurrence of several thermodynamic configurations of the direction of electron flow and the direction of the gradient of potential in relation to the vector of the electric membrane potential. PMID:26858251

  10. Thiol/disulfide redox states in signaling and sensing

    PubMed Central

    Go, Young-Mi; Jones, Dean P.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid advances in redox systems biology are creating new opportunities to understand complexities of human disease and contributions of environmental exposures. New understanding of thiol-disulfide systems have occurred during the past decade as a consequence of the discoveries that thiol and disulfide systems are maintained in kinetically controlled steady-states displaced from thermodynamic equilibrium, that a widely distributed family of NADPH oxidases produces oxidants that function in cell signaling, and that a family of peroxiredoxins utilize thioredoxin as a reductant to complement the well-studied glutathione antioxidant system for peroxide elimination and redox regulation. This review focuses on thiol/disulfide redox state in biologic systems and the knowledge base available to support development of integrated redox systems biology models to better understand the function and dysfunction of thiol-disulfide redox systems. In particular, central principles have emerged concerning redox compartmentalization and utility of thiol/disulfide redox measures as indicators of physiologic function. Advances in redox proteomics show that, in addition to functioning in protein active sites and cell signaling, cysteine residues also serve as redox sensors to integrate biologic functions. These advances provide a framework for translation of redox systems biology concepts to practical use in understanding and treating human disease. Biological responses to cadmium, a widespread environmental agent, are used to illustrate the utility of these advances to the understanding of complex pleiotropic toxicities. PMID:23356510

  11. Conformational changes in redox pairs of protein structures

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Samuel W; George, Richard A; Haworth, Naomi L; Feng, Lina L; Liu, Jason Y; Wouters, Merridee A

    2009-01-01

    Disulfides are conventionally viewed as structurally stabilizing elements in proteins but emerging evidence suggests two disulfide subproteomes exist. One group mediates the well known role of structural stabilization. A second redox-active group are best known for their catalytic functions but are increasingly being recognized for their roles in regulation of protein function. Redox-active disulfides are, by their very nature, more susceptible to reduction than structural disulfides; and conversely, the Cys pairs that form them are more susceptible to oxidation. In this study, we searched for potentially redox-active Cys Pairs by scanning the Protein Data Bank for structures of proteins in alternate redox states. The PDB contains over 1134 unique redox pairs of proteins, many of which exhibit conformational differences between alternate redox states. Several classes of structural changes were observed, proteins that exhibit: disulfide oxidation following expulsion of metals such as zinc; major reorganisation of the polypeptide backbone in association with disulfide redox-activity; order/disorder transitions; and changes in quaternary structure. Based on evidence gathered supporting disulfide redox activity, we propose disulfides present in alternate redox states are likely to have physiologically relevant redox activity. PMID:19598234

  12. Support for U.S. Participants at the 15th International Congress on Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wachs, Israel E.

    2013-08-05

    The grant was used to partially assist the travel expenses of U.S. academic scientists to attend the 15th International Congress on Catalysis. The conference was held in Munich, Germany from July 1-6, 2012. The importance of the International Congress was to bring together the international community of faculty members who participate in catalysis research, and to share information that would lead to further developments and directions in the field of study. Graduate students and Post Docs were invited to apply for travel assistance based on criteria established by the North American Catalysis Society (NACS) and the local Catalysis Clubs.

  13. IONIZING RADIATION INDUCED CATALYSIS ON METAL OXIDE PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This reseach investigates a novel approach for destroying organics, such as those found in a variety of DOE waste and process streams. We propose that organics can be destroyed utilizing redox chemistry resulting from electron-hole (e-/h+) pairs generated in stable, wide bandgap ...

  14. Multiple redox states of multiheme cytochromes may enable bacterial response to changing redox environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbour, T.; Wrighton, K. C.; Mullin, S. W.; Castelle, C.; Luef, B.; Gilbert, B.; Banfield, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    Multiheme c-type cytochromes (MHCs) are key components in electron-transport pathways that enable some microorganisms to transfer electron byproducts of metabolism to a variety of minerals. As a response to changes in mineral redox potential, microbial communities may shift their membership, or individual organisms may adjust protein expression. Alternatively, the ability to respond may be conferred by the innate characteristics of certain electron-transport-chain components. Here, we used potentiostat-controlled microbial fuel cells (MFCs) to measure the timescale of response to imposed changes in redox conditions, thus placing constraints on the importance of these different mechanisms. In the experiments, a solid electrode acts as an electron-accepting mineral whose redox potential can be precisely controlled. We inoculated duplicate MFCs with a sediment/groundwater mixture from an aquifer at Rifle, Colorado, supplied acetate as an electron donor, and obtained stable, mixed-species biofilms dominated by Geobacter and a novel Geobacter-related family. We poised the anode at potentials spanning the range of natural Fe(III)-reduction, then performed cyclic voltammetry (CV) to characterize the overall biofilm redox signature. The apparent biofilm midpoint potential shifted directly with anode set potential when the latter was changed within the range from about -250 to -50 mV vs. SHE. Following a jump in set potential by 200 mV, the CV-midpoint shift by ~100 mV over a timescale of ~30 minutes to a few hours, depending on the direction of the potential change. The extracellular electron transfer molecules, whose overall CV signature is very similar to those of purified MHCs, appear to span a broad redox range (~200 mV), supporting the hypothesis that MHCs confer substantial redox flexibility. This flexibility may be a principle reason for the abundance of MHCs expressed by microorganisms capable of extracellular electron transfer to minerals.

  15. A Low Glutathione Redox State Couples with a Decreased Ascorbate Redox Ratio to Accelerate Flowering in Oncidium Orchid.

    PubMed

    Chin, Dan-Chu; Hsieh, Chia-Chi; Lin, Hsin-Yi; Yeh, Kai-Wun

    2016-02-01

    Glutathione (GSH) plays multiple roles in plants, including stress defense and regulation of growth/development. Previous studies have demonstrated that the ascorbate (AsA) redox state is involved in flowering initiation in Oncidium orchid. In this study, we discovered that a significantly decreased GSH content and GSH redox ratio are correlated with a decline in the AsA redox state during flowering initiation and high ambient temperature-induced flowering. At the same time, the expression level and enzymatic activity of GSH redox-regulated genes, glutathione reductase (GR1), and the GSH biosynthesis genes γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (GSH1) and glutathione synthase (GSH2), are down-regulated. Elevating dehydroascorbate (DHA) content in Oncidium by artificial addition of DHA resulted in a decreased AsA and GSH redox ratio, and enhanced dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) activity. This demonstrated that the lower GSH redox state could be influenced by the lower AsA redox ratio. Moreover, exogenous application of buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), to inhibit GSH biosynthesis, and glutathione disulfide (GSSG), to decrease the GSH redox ratio, also caused early flowering. However, spraying plants with GSH increased the GSH redox ratio and delayed flowering. Furthermore, transgenic Arabidopsis overexpressing Oncidium GSH1, GSH2 and GR1 displayed a high GSH redox ratio as well as delayed flowering under high ambient temperature treatment, while pad2, cad2 and gr1 mutants exhibited early flowering and a low GSH redox ratio. In conclusion, our results provide evidence that the decreased GSH redox state is linked to the decline in the AsA redox ratio and mediated by down-regulated expression of GSH metabolism-related genes to affect flowering time in Oncidium orchid. PMID:26738548

  16. High-Potential Electrocatalytic O2 Reduction with Nitroxyl / NOx Mediators: Implications for Fuel Cells and Aerobic Oxidation Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gerken, James B.; Stahl, Shannon S.

    2015-07-15

    Efficient reduction of O2 to water is a central challenge in energy conversion and aerobic oxidation catalysis. In the present study, we investigate the electrochemical reduction of O2 with soluble organic nitroxyl and nitrogen oxide (NOx) mediators. When used alone, neither organic nitroxyls, such as TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyl-N-oxyl), nor NOx species, such as sodium nitrite, are effective mediators of electrochemical O2 reduction. The combination of nitroxyl/NOx species, however, mediates sustained O2 reduction at electrochemical potentials of 0.19–0.33 V (vs. Fc/Fc+) in acetonitrile containing trifluoroacetic acid. Mechanistic analysis of the coupled redox reactions supports a process in which the nitrogen oxide catalyst drives aerobic oxidation of a nitroxyl mediator to an oxoammonium species, which then is reduced back to the nitroxyl at the cathode. The electrolysis potential is dictated by the oxoammonium/nitroxyl reduction potential. The high potentials observed with this ORR system benefit from the mechanism-based specificity for four-electron reduction of oxygen to water mediated by NOx species, together with kinetically efficient reduction of oxidized NOx species by TEMPO and other organic nitroxyls. This research was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  17. Nanostructured Electrocatalysts for All-Vanadium Redox Flow Batteries.

    PubMed

    Park, Minjoon; Ryu, Jaechan; Cho, Jaephil

    2015-10-01

    Vanadium redox reactions have been considered as a key factor affecting the energy efficiency of the all-vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs). This redox reaction determines the reaction kinetics of whole cells. However, poor kinetic reversibility and catalytic activity towards the V(2+)/V(3+) and VO(2+)/VO2(+) redox couples on the commonly used carbon substrate limit broader applications of VRFBs. Consequently, modified carbon substrates have been extensively investigated to improve vanadium redox reactions. In this Focus Review, recent progress on metal- and carbon-based nanomaterials as an electrocatalyst for VRFBs is discussed in detail, without the intention to provide a comprehensive review on the whole components of the system. Instead, the focus is mainly placed on the redox chemistry of vanadium ions at a surface of various metals, different dimensional carbons, nitrogen-doped carbon nanostructures, and metal-carbon composites. PMID:25899910

  18. Organic non-aqueous cation-based redox flow batteries

    DOEpatents

    Jansen, Andrew N.; Vaughey, John T.; Chen, Zonghai; Zhang, Lu; Brushett, Fikile R.

    2016-03-29

    The present invention provides a non-aqueous redox flow battery comprising a negative electrode immersed in a non-aqueous liquid negative electrolyte, a positive electrode immersed in a non-aqueous liquid positive electrolyte, and a cation-permeable separator (e.g., a porous membrane, film, sheet, or panel) between the negative electrolyte from the positive electrolyte. During charging and discharging, the electrolytes are circulated over their respective electrodes. The electrolytes each comprise an electrolyte salt (e.g., a lithium or sodium salt), a transition-metal free redox reactant, and optionally an electrochemically stable organic solvent. Each redox reactant is selected from an organic compound comprising a conjugated unsaturated moiety, a boron cluster compound, and a combination thereof. The organic redox reactant of the positive electrolyte is selected to have a higher redox potential than the redox reactant of the negative electrolyte.

  19. The mechanism of montmorillonite catalysis in RNA synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Prakash

    The formation of complex prebiotic molecules on the early Earth is likely to have involved a component of mineral catalysis. Amongst the variety of clay minerals that have been investigated by us for their ability to catalyze the formation of RNA oligomers is montmorillonite. These are 2:1 layer silicates that have a wide range of chemical compositions [(Na,Ca)0.33(Al,Fe,Mg)2(Si,Al)4O10(OH)2.nH2O]. They are commonly produced by the weathering of silicic volcanic ashes to form Bentonite. Once formed, montmorillonites gradually transform to Illites at a modest pressure and temperature. Of the many samples of montmorillonite that we have experimentally examined, a selected subset has been observed to be catalytic for RNA synthesis (Joshi et. al., 2009; Aldersley et al., 2011). Those that have been observed to be excellent catalysts come from a restricted range of elemental compositions. The recent identification of phyllosilicates including montmorillonite on Mars (Bishop et al., 2008) raises the possibility that such processes may have taken place there too. The extent of catalysis depended not only upon the magnitude of the negative charge on the montmorillonite lattice and the number of cations associated with it, but also on the pH at which the reaction is promoted. The isotherm and catalysis studies were extended to provide binding information and catalytic outcomes over a wide pH range. When cations in raw montmorillonite are completely replaced by sodium ions, the resulting Na+-montmorillonite does not catalyze oligomer formation because the ions saturate the interlayer between the platelets of montmorillonite, which blocks the binding of the activated monomers. Acid washed montmorillonite titrated to pH 6-8 with alkali metal ions, serves as the model catalyst for this RNA synthesis (Aldersley et. al., 2011). The optimal binding occurred in the region of maximal oligomer formation. X-ray diffraction studies revealed changes in layer separations of

  20. Redox homeostasis: The Golden Mean of healthy living.

    PubMed

    Ursini, Fulvio; Maiorino, Matilde; Forman, Henry Jay

    2016-08-01

    The notion that electrophiles serve as messengers in cell signaling is now widely accepted. Nonetheless, major issues restrain acceptance of redox homeostasis and redox signaling as components of maintenance of a normal physiological steady state. The first is that redox signaling requires sudden switching on of oxidant production and bypassing of antioxidant mechanisms rather than a continuous process that, like other signaling mechanisms, can be smoothly turned up or down. The second is the misperception that reactions in redox signaling involve "reactive oxygen species" rather than reaction of specific electrophiles with specific protein thiolates. The third is that hormesis provides protection against oxidants by increasing cellular defense or repair mechanisms rather than by specifically addressing the offset of redox homeostasis. Instead, we propose that both oxidant and antioxidant signaling are main features of redox homeostasis. As the redox shift is rapidly reversed by feedback reactions, homeostasis is maintained by continuous signaling for production and elimination of electrophiles and nucleophiles. Redox homeostasis, which is the maintenance of nucleophilic tone, accounts for a healthy physiological steady state. Electrophiles and nucleophiles are not intrinsically harmful or protective, and redox homeostasis is an essential feature of both the response to challenges and subsequent feedback. While the balance between oxidants and nucleophiles is preserved in redox homeostasis, oxidative stress provokes the establishment of a new radically altered redox steady state. The popular belief that scavenging free radicals by antioxidants has a beneficial effect is wishful thinking. We propose, instead, that continuous feedback preserves nucleophilic tone and that this is supported by redox active nutritional phytochemicals. These nonessential compounds, by activating Nrf2, mimic the effect of endogenously produced electrophiles (parahormesis). In summary

  1. Involvement of Redox State in the Aging of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Radyuk, Svetlana N.; Sohal, Rajindar S.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The main objective of this review was to provide an exposition of investigations, conducted in Drosophila melanogaster, on the role of reactive oxygen species and redox state in the aging process. While early transgenic studies did not clearly support the validity of the oxidative stress hypothesis of aging, predicated on the accumulation of structural damage, they spawned a broader search for redox-related effects that might impact the aging process. Recent Advances: Initial evidence implicating the thiol redox state as a possible causative factor in aging has been obtained in Drosophila. Overexpression of genes, such as GCL, G6PD, Prx2, and Prx5, which are involved in the maintenance of thiol redox homeostasis, has strong positive effects on longevity. Further, the depletion of peroxiredoxin activity in the mitochondria through the double knockdown of Prx5 and Prx3 not only results in a redox crisis but also elicits a rapid aging phenotype. Critical Issues: Herein, we summarize the present status of knowledge about the main components of the machinery controlling thiol redox homeostasis and describe how age-related redox fluctuations might impact aging more acutely through disruption of the redox-sensitive signaling mechanisms rather than via the simple accumulation of structural damage. Future Directions: Based on these initial insights into the plausible impact of redox fluctuations on redox signaling, future studies should focus on the pathways that have been explicitly implicated in aging, such as insulin signaling, TOR, and JNK/FOXO, with particular attention to elements that are redox sensitive. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 788–803. PMID:23458359

  2. Redox homeostasis: The Golden Mean of healthy living

    PubMed Central

    Ursini, Fulvio; Maiorino, Matilde; Forman, Henry Jay

    2016-01-01

    The notion that electrophiles serve as messengers in cell signaling is now widely accepted. Nonetheless, major issues restrain acceptance of redox homeostasis and redox signaling as components of maintenance of a normal physiological steady state. The first is that redox signaling requires sudden switching on of oxidant production and bypassing of antioxidant mechanisms rather than a continuous process that, like other signaling mechanisms, can be smoothly turned up or down. The second is the misperception that reactions in redox signaling involve “reactive oxygen species” rather than reaction of specific electrophiles with specific protein thiolates. The third is that hormesis provides protection against oxidants by increasing cellular defense or repair mechanisms rather than by specifically addressing the offset of redox homeostasis. Instead, we propose that both oxidant and antioxidant signaling are main features of redox homeostasis. As the redox shift is rapidly reversed by feedback reactions, homeostasis is maintained by continuous signaling for production and elimination of electrophiles and nucleophiles. Redox homeostasis, which is the maintenance of nucleophilic tone, accounts for a healthy physiological steady state. Electrophiles and nucleophiles are not intrinsically harmful or protective, and redox homeostasis is an essential feature of both the response to challenges and subsequent feedback. While the balance between oxidants and nucleophiles is preserved in redox homeostasis, oxidative stress provokes the establishment of a new radically altered redox steady state. The popular belief that scavenging free radicals by antioxidants has a beneficial effect is wishful thinking. We propose, instead, that continuous feedback preserves nucleophilic tone and that this is supported by redox active nutritional phytochemicals. These nonessential compounds, by activating Nrf2, mimic the effect of endogenously produced electrophiles (parahormesis). In summary

  3. Superconductivity in nonclassical superconductors as a periodical (oscillating) redox reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Kostikova, G.P.; Korol`kov, D.V.; Kostikov, Yu.P.

    1995-10-20

    Comparison of the properties of high-temperature superconductors with those of chemical systems where a periodical (oscillating) redox reaction is realized suggests that the high-temperature superconducting of nonclassical superconductors (in particular, ternary oxides) results from activation of a periodical redox reaction within a single compounds containing heterovalent forms of each of two dissimilar elements. In this redox reaction, reversible converison of the corresponding heterovalent forms occur. 37 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  4. Redox shuttles for safer lithium-ion batteries.

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Z.; Qin, Y.; Amine, K.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

    2009-10-01

    Overcharge protection is not only critical for preventing the thermal runaway of lithium-ion batteries during operation, but also important for automatic capacity balancing during battery manufacturing and repair. A redox shuttle is an electrolyte additive that can be used as intrinsic overcharge protection mechanism to enhance the safety characteristics of lithium-ion batteries. The advances on stable redox shuttles are briefly reviewed. Fundamental studies for designing stable redox shuttles are also discussed.

  5. Evolutionarily Conserved Linkage between Enzyme Fold, Flexibility, and Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Arvind; Agarwal, Pratul K.

    2011-01-01

    Proteins are intrinsically flexible molecules. The role of internal motions in a protein's designated function is widely debated. The role of protein structure in enzyme catalysis is well established, and conservation of structural features provides vital clues to their role in function. Recently, it has been proposed that the protein function may involve multiple conformations: the observed deviations are not random thermodynamic fluctuations; rather, flexibility may be closely linked to protein function, including enzyme catalysis. We hypothesize that the argument of conservation of important structural features can also be extended to identification of protein flexibility in interconnection with enzyme function. Three classes of enzymes (prolyl-peptidyl isomerase, oxidoreductase, and nuclease) that catalyze diverse chemical reactions have been examined using detailed computational modeling. For each class, the identification and characterization of the internal protein motions coupled to the chemical step in enzyme mechanisms in multiple species show identical enzyme conformational fluctuations. In addition to the active-site residues, motions of protein surface loop regions (>10 Å away) are observed to be identical across species, and networks of conserved interactions/residues connect these highly flexible surface regions to the active-site residues that make direct contact with substrates. More interestingly, examination of reaction-coupled motions in non-homologous enzyme systems (with no structural or sequence similarity) that catalyze the same biochemical reaction shows motions that induce remarkably similar changes in the enzyme–substrate interactions during catalysis. The results indicate that the reaction-coupled flexibility is a conserved aspect of the enzyme molecular architecture. Protein motions in distal areas of homologous and non-homologous enzyme systems mediate similar changes in the active-site enzyme–substrate interactions, thereby

  6. Evolutionarily conserved linkage between enzyme fold, flexibility, and catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanathan, Arvind; Agarwal, Pratul K

    2011-01-01

    Proteins are intrinsically flexible molecules. The role of internal motions in a protein's designated function is widely debated. The role of protein structure in enzyme catalysis is well established, and conservation of structural features provides vital clues to their role in function. Recently, it has been proposed that the protein function may involve multiple conformations: the observed deviations are not random thermodynamic fluctuations; rather, flexibility may be closely linked to protein function, including enzyme catalysis. We hypothesize that the argument of conservation of important structural features can also be extended to identification of protein flexibility in interconnection with enzyme function. Three classes of enzymes (prolyl-peptidyl isomerase, oxidoreductase, and nuclease) that catalyze diverse chemical reactions have been examined using detailed computational modeling. For each class, the identification and characterization of the internal protein motions coupled to the chemical step in enzyme mechanisms in multiple species show identical enzyme conformational fluctuations. In addition to the active-site residues, motions of protein surface loop regions (>10 away) are observed to be identical across species, and networks of conserved interactions/residues connect these highly flexible surface regions to the active-site residues that make direct contact with substrates. More interestingly, examination of reaction-coupled motions in non-homologous enzyme systems (with no structural or sequence similarity) that catalyze the same biochemical reaction shows motions that induce remarkably similar changes in the enzyme substrate interactions during catalysis. The results indicate that the reaction-coupled flexibility is a conserved aspect of the enzyme molecular architecture. Protein motions in distal areas of homologous and non-homologous enzyme systems mediate similar changes in the active-site enzyme substrate interactions, thereby impacting

  7. Factors Controlling Redox Speciation of Plutonium and Neptunium in Extraction Separation Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Paulenova, Alena; Vandegrift, III, George F.

    2013-09-24

    The objective of the project was to examine the factors controlling redox speciation of plutonium and neptunium in UREX+ extraction in terms of redox potentials, redox mechanism, kinetics and thermodynamics. Researchers employed redox-speciation extractions schemes in parallel to the spectroscopic experiments. The resulting distribution of redox species w studied uring spectroscopic, electrochemical, and spectro-electrochemical methods. This work reulted in collection of data on redox stability and distribution of redox couples in the nitric acid/nitrate electrolyte and the development of redox buffers to stabilize the desired oxidation state of separated radionuclides. The effects of temperature and concentrations on the redox behavior of neptunium were evaluated.

  8. Characterising Redox-Related Isotope Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, J. R.; John, S.; Young, E. D.; Kavner, A.

    2008-12-01

    Redox processes have played a pivotal role in shaping Earth's interior and surface and making life possible. A record of this evolution is found within stable isotope signatures arising from chemical redox changes occurring in our continents, oceans and atmosphere over time. Experimental and theoretical studies of redox- related transition metal isotope fractionation provide a physical basis to understand how isotopes are fractionated under natural conditions, relating geochemical signatures to earth processes from which they arise. Here we present experimental evidence that charge transfer processes drive the fractionation of stable isotopes of Fe and Zn, and the magnitude of fractionation can be tuned as a function of redox potential and other physical variables. To quantitatively evaluate isotopic signatures of redox processes, we have conducted electrochemical experiments measuring the fractionation of Fe and Zn isotopes during their electrodeposition from aqueous solution: M2+ + 2e- = M(s). The electrochemical cell consisted of anodic and cathodic half- cells separated by a salt bridge, and connected to a potentiostat which applied an adjustable constant voltage (vs. Ag/AgCl). Metallic Fe and Zn plated on glassy carbon electrodes was recovered in acid for analysis of the stable isotope composition on a Thermo-Finnigan Neptune MC-ICP-MS. Results are reported as a large delta difference between the isotopic composition (56Fe/54Fe and 66Zn/64Zn) of plated metal relative to the stock solution. The results show some clear trends; fractionation is a function of applied voltage (overpotential: η = E- E0 Volts), ranging from Δ56Fe ~ -4 to -0.9 ‰, and Δ66Zn ~ - 5.5 to -4 ‰ at η = -0.5 to -1.25 V and -0.1 to -0.5 V, respectively. Temperature affects fractionation in a counter-intuitive manner, with fractionation increasing with increasing temperature (at η = -1.0 V: Δ56Fe ~ -1.25 ‰ at 0°C and -1.62 ‰ at 35°C). The results can be explained in terms of two

  9. Redox and Chemical Activities of the Hemes in the Sulfur Oxidation Pathway Enzyme SoxAX*

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Justin M.; Marritt, Sophie J.; Kihlken, Margaret A.; Haynes, Kate; Hemmings, Andrew M.; Berks, Ben C.; Cheesman, Myles R.; Butt, Julea N.

    2012-01-01

    SoxAX enzymes couple disulfide bond formation to the reduction of cytochrome c in the first step of the phylogenetically widespread Sox microbial sulfur oxidation pathway. Rhodovulum sulfidophilum SoxAX contains three hemes. An electrochemical cell compatible with magnetic circular dichroism at near infrared wavelengths has been developed to resolve redox and chemical properties of the SoxAX hemes. In combination with potentiometric titrations monitored by electronic absorbance and EPR, this method defines midpoint potentials (Em) at pH 7.0 of approximately +210, −340, and −400 mV for the His/Met, His/Cys−, and active site His/CysS−-ligated heme, respectively. Exposing SoxAX to S2O42−, a substrate analog with Em ∼−450 mV, but not Eu(II) complexed with diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (Em ∼−1140 mV), allows cyanide to displace the cysteine persulfide (CysS−) ligand to the active site heme. This provides the first evidence for the dissociation of CysS− that has been proposed as a key event in SoxAX catalysis. PMID:23060437

  10. Visualizing Redox Dynamics of a Single Ag/AgCl Heterogeneous Nanocatalyst at Atomic Resolution.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yimin A; Li, Liang; Li, Zheng; Kinaci, Alper; Chan, Maria K Y; Sun, Yugang; Guest, Jeffrey R; McNulty, Ian; Rajh, Tijana; Liu, Yuzi

    2016-03-22

    Operando characterization of gas-solid reactions at the atomic scale is of great importance for determining the mechanism of catalysis. This is especially true in the study of heterostructures because of structural correlation between the different parts. However, such experiments are challenging and have rarely been accomplished. In this work, atomic scale redox dynamics of Ag/AgCl heterostructures have been studied using in situ environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) in combination with density function theory (DFT) calculations. The reduction of Ag/AgCl to Ag is likely a result of the formation of Cl vacancies while Ag(+) ions accept electrons. The oxidation process of Ag/AgCl has been observed: rather than direct replacement of Cl by O, the Ag/AgCl nanocatalyst was first reduced to Ag, and then Ag was oxidized to different phases of silver oxide under different O2 partial pressures. Ag2O formed at low O2 partial pressure, whereas AgO formed at atmospheric pressure. By combining in situ ETEM observation and DFT calculations, this structural evolution is characterized in a distinct nanoscale environment. PMID:26937679

  11. USD Catalysis Group for Alternative Energy - Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hoefelmeyer, James

    2014-10-03

    I. Project Summary Catalytic processes are a major technological underpinning of modern society, and are essential to the energy sector in the processing of chemical fuels from natural resources, fine chemicals synthesis, and energy conversion. Advances in catalyst technology are enormously valuable since these lead to reduced chemical waste, reduced energy loss, and reduced costs. New energy technologies, which are critical to future economic growth, are also heavily reliant on catalysts, including fuel cells and photo-electrochemical cells. Currently, the state of South Dakota is underdeveloped in terms of research infrastructure related to catalysis. If South Dakota intends to participate in significant economic growth opportunities that result from advances in catalyst technology, then this area of research needs to be made a high priority for investment. To this end, a focused research effort is proposed in which investigators from The University of South Dakota (USD) and The South Dakota School of Mines and Technology (SDSMT) will contribute to form the South Dakota Catalysis Group (SDCG). The multidisciplinary team of the (SDCG) include: (USD) Dan Engebretson, James Hoefelmeyer, Ranjit Koodali, and Grigoriy Sereda; (SDSMT) Phil Scott Ahrenkiel, Hao Fong, Jan Puszynski, Rajesh Shende, and Jacek Swiatkiewicz. The group is well suited to engage in a collaborative project due to the resources available within the existing programs. Activities within the SDCG will be monitored through an external committee consisting of three distinguished professors in chemistry. The committee will provide expert advice and recommendations to the SDCG. Advisory meetings in which committee members interact with South Dakota investigators will be accompanied by individual oral and poster presentations in a materials and catalysis symposium. The symposium will attract prominent scientists, and will enhance the visibility of research in the state of South Dakota. The SDCG requests

  12. Inorganic Chemistry in Hydrogen Storage and Biomass Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Thorn, David

    2012-06-13

    Making or breaking C-H, B-H, C-C bonds has been at the core of catalysis for many years. Making or breaking these bonds to store or recover energy presents us with fresh challenges, including how to catalyze these transformations in molecular systems that are 'tuned' to minimize energy loss and in molecular and material systems present in biomass. This talk will discuss some challenging transformations in chemical hydrogen storage, and some aspects of the inorganic chemistry we are studying in the development of catalysts for biomass utilization.

  13. High-Valent Organometallic Copper and Palladium in Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Hickman, Amanda J.; Sanford, Melanie S.

    2015-01-01

    Preface Copper and palladium catalysts are critically important for numerous commercial chemical processes. Improvements in the activity, selectivity, and scope of these catalysts have the potential to dramatically reduce the environmental impact and increase the sustainability of chemical reactions. One rapidly emerging strategy to achieve these goals is to exploit “high-valent” copper and palladium intermediates in catalysis. This review describes exciting recent advances involving both the fundamental chemistry and the applications of these high-valent metal complexes in numerous synthetically useful catalytic transformations. PMID:22498623

  14. Computational Catalysis Using the Artificial Force Induced Reaction Method.

    PubMed

    Sameera, W M C; Maeda, Satoshi; Morokuma, Keiji

    2016-04-19

    The artificial force induced reaction (AFIR) method in the global reaction route mapping (GRRM) strategy is an automatic approach to explore all important reaction paths of complex reactions. Most traditional methods in computational catalysis require guess reaction paths. On the other hand, the AFIR approach locates local minima (LMs) and transition states (TSs) of reaction paths without a guess, and therefore finds unanticipated as well as anticipated reaction paths. The AFIR method has been applied for multicomponent organic reactions, such as the aldol reaction, Passerini reaction, Biginelli reaction, and phase-transfer catalysis. In the presence of several reactants, many equilibrium structures are possible, leading to a number of reaction pathways. The AFIR method in the GRRM strategy determines all of the important equilibrium structures and subsequent reaction paths systematically. As the AFIR search is fully automatic, exhaustive trial-and-error and guess-and-check processes by the user can be eliminated. At the same time, the AFIR search is systematic, and therefore a more accurate and comprehensive description of the reaction mechanism can be determined. The AFIR method has been used for the study of full catalytic cycles and reaction steps in transition metal catalysis, such as cobalt-catalyzed hydroformylation and iron-catalyzed carbon-carbon bond formation reactions in aqueous media. Some AFIR applications have targeted the selectivity-determining step of transition-metal-catalyzed asymmetric reactions, including stereoselective water-tolerant lanthanide Lewis acid-catalyzed Mukaiyama aldol reactions. In terms of establishing the selectivity of a reaction, systematic sampling of the transition states is critical. In this direction, AFIR is very useful for performing a systematic and automatic determination of TSs. In the presence of a comprehensive description of the transition states, the selectivity of the reaction can be calculated more accurately

  15. High-valent organometallic copper and palladium in catalysis.

    PubMed

    Hickman, Amanda J; Sanford, Melanie S

    2012-04-12

    Copper and palladium catalysts are critically important in numerous commercial chemical processes. Improvements in the activity, selectivity and scope of these catalysts could drastically reduce the environmental impact, and increase the sustainability, of chemical reactions. One rapidly developing strategy for achieving these goals is to use 'high-valent' organometallic copper and palladium intermediates in catalysis. Here we describe recent advances involving both the fundamental chemistry and the applications of these high-valent metal complexes in numerous synthetically useful catalytic transformations. PMID:22498623

  16. Catalysis by dust grains in the solar nebula.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kress, M. E.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    1996-10-01

    In order to determine whether grain-catalyzed reactions played an important role in the chemistry of the solar nebula, the authors applied their time-dependent model of methane formation via Fischer-Tropsch catalysis to pressures from 10-5 to 1 bar and temperatures from 450 to 650K. Results indicate that under certain nebular conditions, conversion of CO to methane could be extremely efficient in the presence of iron-nickel dust grains over timescales very short compared to the lifetime of the solar nebula.

  17. Fuels and energy for the future: The role of catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rostrup-Nielsen, J.R.; Nielsen, R.

    2004-07-01

    There are many reasons to decrease the dependency on oil and to increase the use of other energy sources than fossil fuels. The wish for energy security is balanced by a wish for sustainable growth. Catalysis plays an important role in creating new routes and flexibility in the network of energy sources, energy carriers, and energy conversion. The process technologies resemble those applied in the large scale manufacture of commodities. This is illustrated by examples from refinery fuels, synfuels, and hydrogen and the future role of fossil fuels is discussed.

  18. Application of microflow conditions to visible light photoredox catalysis.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Matthias; Zeitler, Kirsten

    2012-06-01

    Applications of microflow conditions for visible light photoredox catalysis have successfully been developed. Operationally simple microreactor and FEP (fluorinated ethylene propylene copolymer) tube reactor systems enable significant improvement of several photoredox reactions using different photocatalysts such as [Ru(bpy)(3)](2+) and Eosin Y. Apart from rate acceleration, this approach facilitates previously challenging transformations of nonstabilized intermediates. Additionally, the productivity of the synergistic, catalytic enantioselective photoredox α-alkylation of aldehydes was demonstrated to be increased by 2 orders of magnitude. PMID:22587670

  19. Hydrogen catalysis and scavenging action of Pd-POSS nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, A; Gee, R H; Maxwell, R; Saab, A

    2007-02-01

    Prompted by the need for a self-supported, chemically stable, and functionally flexible catalytic nanoparticle system, we explore a system involving Pd clusters coated with a monolayer of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) cages. With an initial theoretical focus on hydrogen catalysis and sequestration in the Pd-POSS system, we report Density Functional Theory (DFT) results on POSS binding energies to the Pd(110) surface, hydrogen storing ability of POSS, and possible pathways of hydrogen radicals from the catalyst surface to unsaturated bonds away from the surface.

  20. Charge Transfer and Catalysis at the Metal Support Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Lawrence Robert

    2012-07-31

    Kinetic, electronic, and spectroscopic characterization of model Pt–support systems are used to demonstrate the relationship between charge transfer and catalytic activity and selectivity. The results show that charge flow controls the activity and selectivity of supported metal catalysts. This dissertation builds on extensive existing knowledge of metal–support interactions in heterogeneous catalysis. The results show the prominent role of charge transfer at catalytic interfaces to determine catalytic activity and selectivity. Further, this research demonstrates the possibility of selectively driving catalytic chemistry by controlling charge flow and presents solid-state devices and doped supports as novel methods for obtaining electronic control over catalytic reaction kinetics.

  1. Selenium nanomaterials: applications in electronics, catalysis and sensors.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Savita; Mehta, S K

    2014-02-01

    This review provides insights into the synthesis, functionalization, and applications of selenium nanoparticles in electronics, optics, catalysis and sensors. The variation of physicochemical properties such as particle size, surface area, and shape of the selenium nanoparticles and the effect of experimental conditions has also been discussed. An overview has also been provided on the fundamental electrical and optical properties of selenium nanomaterials as well as their utilization in different research fields. The work presents an insight on selenium nanoparticles with interesting properties and their future applications. PMID:24749448

  2. Redox proteomics of tomato in response to Pseudomonas syringae infection

    PubMed Central

    Balmant, Kelly Mayrink; Parker, Jennifer; Yoo, Mi-Jeong; Zhu, Ning; Dufresne, Craig; Chen, Sixue

    2015-01-01

    Unlike mammals with adaptive immunity, plants rely on their innate immunity based on pattern-triggered immunity (PTI) and effector-triggered immunity (ETI) for pathogen defense. Reactive oxygen species, known to play crucial roles in PTI and ETI, can perturb cellular redox homeostasis and lead to changes of redox-sensitive proteins through modification of cysteine sulfhydryl groups. Although redox regulation of protein functions has emerged as an important mechanism in several biological processes, little is known about redox proteins and how they function in PTI and ETI. In this study, cysTMT proteomics technology was used to identify similarities and differences of protein redox modifications in tomato resistant (PtoR) and susceptible (prf3) genotypes in response to Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (Pst) infection. In addition, the results of the redox changes were compared and corrected with the protein level changes. A total of 90 potential redox-regulated proteins were identified with functions in carbohydrate and energy metabolism, biosynthesis of cysteine, sucrose and brassinosteroid, cell wall biogenesis, polysaccharide/starch biosynthesis, cuticle development, lipid metabolism, proteolysis, tricarboxylic acid cycle, protein targeting to vacuole, and oxidation–reduction. This inventory of previously unknown protein redox switches in tomato pathogen defense lays a foundation for future research toward understanding the biological significance of protein redox modifications in plant defense responses. PMID:26504582

  3. Redox pioneer: Professor Stuart A. Lipton.

    PubMed

    Stamler, Jonathan S

    2013-09-10

    [Figure: see text] Stuart A. Lipton, M.D., Ph.D. is recognized here as a Redox Pioneer because of his publication of four articles that have been cited more than 1000 times, and 96 reports which have been cited more than 100 times. In the redox field, Dr. Lipton is best known for his work on the regulation by S-nitrosylation of the NMDA-subtype of neuronal glutamate receptor, which provided early evidence for in situ regulation of protein activity by S-nitrosylation and a prototypic model of allosteric control by this post-translational modification. Over the past several years, Lipton's group has pioneered the discovery of aberrant protein nitrosylation that may contribute to a number of neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig's disease). In particular, the phenotypic effects of rare genetic mutations may be understood to be enhanced or mimicked by nitrosative (and oxidative) modifications of cysteines and thereby help explain common sporadic forms of disease. Thus, Lipton has contributed in a major way to the understanding that nitrosative stress may result from modifications of specific proteins and may operate in conjunction with genetic mutation to create disease phenotype. Lipton (collaborating with Jonathan S. Stamler) has also employed the concept of targeted S-nitrosylation to produce novel neuroprotective drugs that act at allosteric sites in the NMDA receptor. Lipton has won a number of awards, including the Ernst Jung Prize in Medicine, and is an elected fellow of the AAAS. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 757-764. PMID:23815466

  4. Redox Pioneer: Professor Stuart A. Lipton

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Professor Stuart A. Lipton Stuart A. Lipton, M.D., Ph.D. is recognized here as a Redox Pioneer because of his publication of four articles that have been cited more than 1000 times, and 96 reports which have been cited more than 100 times. In the redox field, Dr. Lipton is best known for his work on the regulation by S-nitrosylation of the NMDA-subtype of neuronal glutamate receptor, which provided early evidence for in situ regulation of protein activity by S-nitrosylation and a prototypic model of allosteric control by this post-translational modification. Over the past several years, Lipton's group has pioneered the discovery of aberrant protein nitrosylation that may contribute to a number of neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig's disease). In particular, the phenotypic effects of rare genetic mutations may be understood to be enhanced or mimicked by nitrosative (and oxidative) modifications of cysteines and thereby help explain common sporadic forms of disease. Thus, Lipton has contributed in a major way to the understanding that nitrosative stress may result from modifications of specific proteins and may operate in conjunction with genetic mutation to create disease phenotype. Lipton (collaborating with Jonathan S. Stamler) has also employed the concept of targeted S-nitrosylation to produce novel neuroprotective drugs that act at allosteric sites in the NMDA receptor. Lipton has won a number of awards, including the Ernst Jung Prize in Medicine, and is an elected fellow of the AAAS. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 757–764. PMID:23815466

  5. Chiral Redox-Active Isosceles Triangles.

    PubMed

    Nalluri, Siva Krishna Mohan; Liu, Zhichang; Wu, Yilei; Hermann, Keith R; Samanta, Avik; Kim, Dong Jun; Krzyaniak, Matthew D; Wasielewski, Michael R; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2016-05-11

    Designing small-molecule organic redox-active materials, with potential applications in energy storage, has received considerable interest of late. Herein, we report on the synthesis, characterization, and application of two rigid chiral triangles, each of which consist of non-identical pyromellitic diimide (PMDI) and naphthalene diimide (NDI)-based redox-active units. (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopic investigations in solution confirm the lower symmetry (C2 point group) associated with these two isosceles triangles. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses reveal their rigid triangular prism-like geometries. Unlike previously investigated equilateral triangle containing three identical NDI subunits, both isosceles triangles do not choose to form one-dimensional supramolecular nanotubes by dint of [C-H···O] interaction-driven columnar stacking. The rigid isosceles triangle, composed of one NDI and two PMDI subunits, forms-in the presence of N,N-dimethylformamide-two different types of intermolecular NDI-NDI and NDI-PMDI π-π stacked dimers with opposite helicities in the solid state. Cyclic voltammetry reveals that both isosceles triangles can accept reversibly up to six electrons. Continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance and electron-nuclear double-resonance spectroscopic investigations, supported by density functional theory calculations, on the single-electron reduced radical anions of the isosceles triangles confirm the selective sharing of unpaired electrons among adjacent redox-active NDI subunit(s) within both molecules. The isosceles triangles have been employed as electrode-active materials in organic rechargeable lithium-ion batteries. The evaluation of the structure-performance relationships of this series of diimide-based triangles reveals that the increase in the number of NDI subunits, replacing PMDI ones, within the molecules improves the electrochemical cell performance of the batteries. PMID:27070768

  6. Electronic Tongue Containing Redox and Conductivity Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, Martin

    2007-01-01

    The Electronic Tongue (E-tongue 2) is an assembly of sensors for measuring concentrations of metal ions and possibly other contaminants in water. Potential uses for electronic tongues include monitoring the chemical quality of water in a variety of natural, industrial, and laboratory settings, and detecting micro-organisms indirectly by measuring microbially influenced corrosion. The device includes a heater, a temperature sensor, an oxidation/reduction (redox) sensor pair, an electrical sensor, an array of eight galvanic cells, and eight ion-specific electrodes.

  7. Methane oxidation over dual redox catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives of this research were to achieve and understand the partial oxidation of methane to oxygenates and C{sub 2} hydrocarbons over dual redox catalysts. The catalysts were based on oxidic materials that will exhibit structural and thermal stability for long reactor lifetimes. A continuous flow reactor system with oxygen or air as the oxidizing gas, rather than nitrous oxide, was utilized over a wide range of temperatures ({le}1000{degrees}C), with variable gas hourly space velocity, in order to maximize the space time yields of the desired products. All of the investigated processes are catalytic and are aimed at minimizing gas phase reactions.

  8. Methane oxidation over dual redox catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.

    1992-06-01

    The objectives of this research were to achieve and understand the partial oxidation of methane to oxygenates and C{sub 2} hydrocarbons over dual redox catalysts. The catalysts were based on oxidic materials that will exhibit structural and thermal stability for long reactor lifetimes. A continuous flow reactor system with oxygen or air as the oxidizing gas, rather than nitrous oxide, was utilized over a wide range of temperatures ({le}1000{degrees}C), with variable gas hourly space velocity, in order to maximize the space time yields of the desired products. All of the investigated processes are catalytic and are aimed at minimizing gas phase reactions.

  9. Fe-V redox flow batteries

    DOEpatents

    Li, Liyu; Kim, Soowhan; Yang, Zhenguo; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Jianlu; Chen, Baowei; Nie, Zimin; Xia, Guanguang

    2014-07-08

    A redox flow battery having a supporting solution that includes Cl.sup.- anions is characterized by an anolyte having V.sup.2+ and V.sup.3+ in the supporting solution, a catholyte having Fe.sup.2+ and Fe.sup.3+ in the supporting solution, and a membrane separating the anolyte and the catholyte. The anolyte and catholyte can have V cations and Fe cations, respectively, or the anolyte and catholyte can each contain both V and Fe cations in a mixture. Furthermore, the supporting solution can contain a mixture of SO.sub.4.sup.2- and Cl.sup.- anions.

  10. Redox shuttles for lithium ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, Wei; Zhang, Zhengcheng; Amine, Khalil

    2014-11-04

    Compounds may have general Formula IVA or IVB. ##STR00001## where, R.sup.8, R.sup.9, R.sup.10, and R.sup.11 are each independently selected from H, F, Cl, Br, CN, NO.sub.2, alkyl, haloalkyl, and alkoxy groups; X and Y are each independently O, S, N, or P; and Z' is a linkage between X and Y. Such compounds may be used as redox shuttles in electrolytes for use in electrochemical cells, batteries and electronic devices.

  11. Redox polymer mediation for enzymatic biofuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallaway, Joshua

    Mediated biocatalytic cathodes prepared from the oxygen-reducing enzyme laccase and redox-conducting osmium hydrogels were characterized for use as cathodes in enzymatic biofuel cells. A series of osmium-based redox polymers was synthesized with redox potentials spanning the range from 0.11 V to 0.85 V (SHE), and the resulting biocatalytic electrodes were modeled to determine reaction kinetic constants using the current response, measured osmium concentration, and measured apparent electron diffusion. As in solution-phase systems, the bimolecular rate constant for mediation was found to vary greatly with mediator potential---from 250 s-1M-1 when mediator and enzyme were close in potential to 9.4 x 10 4 s-1M-1 when this overpotential was large. Optimum mediator potential for a cell operating with a non-limiting platinum anode and having no mass transport limitation from bulk solution was found to be 0.66 V (SHE). Redox polymers were synthesized under different concentrations, producing osmium variation. An increase from 6.6% to 7.2% osmium increased current response from 1.2 to 2.1 mA/cm2 for a planar film in 40°C oxygen-saturated pH 4 buffer, rotating at 900 rpm. These results translated to high surface area electrodes, nearly doubling current density to 13 mA/cm2, the highest to date for such an electrode. The typical fungal laccase from Trametes versicolor was replaced by a bacterially-expressed small laccase from Streptomyces coelicolor, resulting in biocatalytic films that reduced oxygen at increased pH, with full functionality at pH 7, producing 1.5 mA/cm 2 in planar configuration. Current response was biphasic with pH, matching the activity profile of the free enzyme in solution. The mediated enzyme electrode system was modeled with respect to apparent electron diffusion, mediator concentration, and transport of oxygen from bulk solution, all of which are to some extent controlled by design. Each factor was found to limit performance in certain circumstances

  12. Rebalancing electrolytes in redox flow battery systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, On Kok; Pham, Ai Quoc

    2014-12-23

    Embodiments of redox flow battery rebalancing systems include a system for reacting an unbalanced flow battery electrolyte with a rebalance electrolyte in a first reaction cell. In some embodiments, the rebalance electrolyte may contain ferrous iron (Fe.sup.2+) which may be oxidized to ferric iron (Fe.sup.3+) in the first reaction cell. The reducing ability of the rebalance reactant may be restored in a second rebalance cell that is configured to reduce the ferric iron in the rebalance electrolyte back into ferrous iron through a reaction with metallic iron.

  13. Performance Mapping Studies in Redox Flow Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoberecht, M. A.; Thaller, L. H.

    1981-01-01

    Pumping power requirements in any flow battery system constitute a direct parasitic energy loss. It is therefore useful to determine the practical lower limit for reactant flow rates. Through the use of a theoretical framework based on electrochemical first principles, two different experimental flow mapping techniques were developed to evaluate and compare electrodes as a function of flow rate. For the carbon felt electrodes presently used in NASA-Lewis Redox cells, a flow rate 1.5 times greater than the stoichiometric rate seems to be the required minimum.

  14. 11th International congress on catalysis - 40th anniversary. Part A and B

    SciTech Connect

    Hightower, J.W.; Delgass, W.N.; Iglesia, E.; Bell, A.T.

    1996-12-31

    Reports are presented from the 11th International Congress On Catalysis. Topics are concerned with surface properties, processing and conversion of hydrocarbons, photocatalytic activity, pollution control, oxidation, environmental catalysis, characterization methods, and deactivation. Individual papers have processed separately for the United states Department of Energy databases.

  15. PREDICTION OF BUFFER CATALYSIS IN FIELD AND LABORATORY STUDIES OF POLLUTANT HYDROLYSIS REACTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A mathematical model, based on application of the Bronsted equations for general acid-base catalysis, has been developed for use in forecasting the maximum contribution of buffer catalysis in pollutant hydrolysis reactions. The predictive capacity of the model is utilized to exam...

  16. Final technical report, Symposium on New Theoretical Concepts and Directions in Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Metiu, Horia

    2014-08-22

    We organized in August 2013 a “Symposium on New Theoretical Concepts and Directions in Catalysis” with the participation of 20 invited distinguished quantum chemists and other researchers who use computations to study catalysis. Symposium website; http://catalysis.cnsi.ucsb.edu/

  17. BIFUNCTIONAL CYCLODEXTRIN METALLOENZYME MIMICS. (R826653)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  18. Plasma–catalysis: the known knowns, the known unknowns and the unknown unknowns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehead, J. Christopher

    2016-06-01

    This review describes the history and development of plasma-assisted catalysis focussing mainly on the use of atmospheric pressure, non-thermal plasma. It identifies the various interactions between the plasma and the catalyst that can modify and activate the catalytic surface and also describes how the catalyst affects the properties of the discharge. Techniques for in situ diagnostics of species adsorbed onto the surface and present in the gas-phase over a range of timescales are described. The effect of temperature on plasma–catalysis can assist in determining differences between thermal catalysis and plasma-activated catalysis and focuses on the meaning of temperature in a system involving non-equilibrium plasma. It can also help to develop an understanding of the gas-phase and surface mechanism of the plasma–catalysis at a molecular level. Our current state of knowledge and ignorance is highlighted and future directions suggested.

  19. Salt Stress Affects the Redox Status of Arabidopsis Root Meristems

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Keni; Moe-Lange, Jacob; Hennet, Lauriane; Feldman, Lewis J.

    2016-01-01

    We report the redox status (profiles) for specific populations of cells that comprise the Arabidopsis root tip. For recently germinated, 3–5-day-old seedlings we show that the region of the root tip with the most reduced redox status includes the root cap initials, the quiescent center and the most distal portion of the proximal meristem, and coincides with (overlays) the region of the auxin maximum. As one moves basally, further into the proximal meristem, and depending on the growth conditions, the redox status becomes more oxidized, with a 5–10 mV difference in redox potential between the two borders delimiting the proximal meristem. At the point on the root axis at which cells of the proximal meristem cease division and enter the transition zone, the redox potential levels off, and remains more or less unchanged throughout the transition zone. As cells leave the transition zone and enter the zone of elongation the redox potentials become more oxidized. Treating roots with salt (50, 100, and 150 mM NaCl) results in marked changes in root meristem structure and development, and is preceded by changes in the redox profile, which flattens, and initially becomes more oxidized, with pronounced changes in the redox potentials of the root cap, the root cap initials and the quiescent center. Roots exposed to relatively mild levels of salt (<100 mM) are able to re-establish a normal, pre-salt treatment redox profile 3–6 days after exposure to salt. Coincident with the salt-associated changes in redox profiles are changes in the distribution of auxin transporters (AUX1, PIN1/2), which become more diffuse in their localization. We conclude that salt stress affects root meristem maintenance, in part, through changes in redox and auxin transport. PMID:26904053

  20. Trends in catalysis research to meet future refining needs

    SciTech Connect

    Absi-Halabi, M.; Stanislaus, A.; Qabazard, H.

    1997-02-01

    The main emphasis of petroleum refining during the `70s and early `80s was to maximize conversion of heavy oils to gasoline and middle distillate products. While this objective is still important, the current focus that began in the late `80s is to develop cleaner products. This is a result of strict environmental constraints to reduce emissions from both the products and refineries. Developing catalysts with improved activity, selectivity and stability for use in processes producing such environmentally acceptable fuels is the most economical and effective route for refiners. Novel technologies such as biocatalysis and catalytic membranes are examples of current successful laboratory-scale attempts to resolve anticipated future industry problems. Since catalysts play a key role in refining processes, it is important to examine the challenges facing catalysis research to meet future refining developments. The paper discusses the factors influencing refining, advancements in refining technology and catalysis, short-term future trends in refining catalysts research, and long-term trends in refining catalysts. 56 refs.