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Sample records for reduce dental artifacts

  1. An opposite view data replacement approach for reducing artifacts due to metallic dental objects

    SciTech Connect

    Yazdi, Mehran; Lari, Meghdad Asadi; Bernier, Gaston; Beaulieu, Luc

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: To present a conceptually new method for metal artifact reduction (MAR) that can be used on patients with multiple objects within the scan plane that are also of small sized along the longitudinal (scanning) direction, such as dental fillings. Methods: The proposed algorithm, named opposite view replacement, achieves MAR by first detecting the projection data affected by metal objects and then replacing the affected projections by the corresponding opposite view projections, which are not affected by metal objects. The authors also applied a fading process to avoid producing any discontinuities in the boundary of the affected projection areas in the sinogram. A skull phantom with and without a variety of dental metal inserts was made to extract the performance metric of the algorithm. A head and neck case, typical of IMRT planning, was also tested. Results: The reconstructed CT images based on this new replacement scheme show a significant improvement in image quality for patients with metallic dental objects compared to the MAR algorithms based on the interpolation scheme. For the phantom, the authors showed that the artifact reduction algorithm can efficiently recover the CT numbers in the area next to the metallic objects. Conclusions: The authors presented a new and efficient method for artifact reduction due to multiple small metallic objects. The obtained results from phantoms and clinical cases fully validate the proposed approach.

  2. Automatic correction of dental artifacts in PET/MRI.

    PubMed

    Ladefoged, Claes N; Andersen, Flemming L; Keller, Sune H; Beyer, Thomas; Law, Ian; Højgaard, Liselotte; Darkner, Sune; Lauze, Francois

    2015-04-01

    A challenge when using current magnetic resonance (MR)-based attenuation correction in positron emission tomography/MR imaging (PET/MRI) is that the MRIs can have a signal void around the dental fillings that is segmented as artificial air-regions in the attenuation map. For artifacts connected to the background, we propose an extension to an existing active contour algorithm to delineate the outer contour using the nonattenuation corrected PET image and the original attenuation map. We propose a combination of two different methods for differentiating the artifacts within the body from the anatomical air-regions by first using a template of artifact regions, and second, representing the artifact regions with a combination of active shape models and k-nearest-neighbors. The accuracy of the combined method has been evaluated using 25 [Formula: see text]-fluorodeoxyglucose PET/MR patients. Results showed that the approach was able to correct an average of [Formula: see text] of the artifact areas. PMID:26158104

  3. Automatic correction of dental artifacts in PET/MRI

    PubMed Central

    Ladefoged, Claes N.; Andersen, Flemming L.; Keller, Sune. H.; Beyer, Thomas; Law, Ian; Højgaard, Liselotte; Darkner, Sune; Lauze, Francois

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. A challenge when using current magnetic resonance (MR)-based attenuation correction in positron emission tomography/MR imaging (PET/MRI) is that the MRIs can have a signal void around the dental fillings that is segmented as artificial air-regions in the attenuation map. For artifacts connected to the background, we propose an extension to an existing active contour algorithm to delineate the outer contour using the nonattenuation corrected PET image and the original attenuation map. We propose a combination of two different methods for differentiating the artifacts within the body from the anatomical air-regions by first using a template of artifact regions, and second, representing the artifact regions with a combination of active shape models and k-nearest-neighbors. The accuracy of the combined method has been evaluated using 25 F18-fluorodeoxyglucose PET/MR patients. Results showed that the approach was able to correct an average of 97±3% of the artifact areas. PMID:26158104

  4. A Wavelet Thresholding Method to Reduce Ultrasound Artifacts

    PubMed Central

    Tay, Peter C.; Acton, Scott T.; Hossack, John A.

    2010-01-01

    Artifacts due to enhancement, reverberation, and multi-path reflection are commonly encountered in medical ultrasound imaging. These artifacts can adversely affect an automated image quantification algorithm or interfere with a physician’s assessment of a radiological image. This paper proposes a soft wavelet thresholding method to replace regions adversely affected by these artifacts with the texture due to the underlying tissue(s), which were originally obscured. Our proposed method soft thresholds the wavelet coefficients of affected regions to estimate the reflectivity values caused by these artifacts. By subtracting the estimated reflectivity values of the artifacts from the original reflectivity values, estimates of artifact reduced reflectivity values are attained. The improvements of our proposed method are substantiated by an evaluation of Field II simulated, in vivo mouse and human heart B mode images. PMID:20934848

  5. A wavelet thresholding method to reduce ultrasound artifacts.

    PubMed

    Tay, Peter C; Acton, Scott T; Hossack, John A

    2011-01-01

    Artifacts due to enhancement, reverberation, and multi-path reflection are commonly encountered in medical ultrasound imaging. These artifacts can adversely affect an automated image quantification algorithm or interfere with a physician's assessment of a radiological image. This paper proposes a soft wavelet thresholding method to replace regions adversely affected by these artifacts with the texture due to the underlying tissue(s), which were originally obscured. Our proposed method soft thresholds the wavelet coefficients of affected regions to estimate the reflectivity values caused by these artifacts. By subtracting the estimated reflectivity values of the artifacts from the original reflectivity values, estimates of artifact reduced reflectivity values are attained. The improvements of our proposed method are substantiated by an evaluation of Field II simulated, in vivo mouse and human heart B mode images. PMID:20934848

  6. Three-dimensional metal artifact reduction method for dental conebeam CT scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Koji; Katsumata, Atsushi; Ito, Koichi; Aoki, Takafumi

    2009-02-01

    In dental treatments where metal is indispensable material and dental implants require precise structural measurements of teeth and bones, the ability of CT scanners to perform Metal Artifact Reduction (MAR) is a very important yet unsolved problem. The increasing need for dental implants is raising the demand for a conebeam CT. In this paper, an MAR method of the Metal Erasing Method (MEM) is extended to three dimensions. Assuming that metals are completely opaque to X-ray, MEM reconstructs metals and other materials separately, then combines them afterward. 3D-MEM is not only more efficient but performs better than the repetition of MEM, because it identifies metals more precisely by utilizing the continuity of metals in the third dimension. Another important contribution of the research is the application of advanced binarization techniques for identifying metal-corrupted areas on projection images. Differential histogram techniques are applied to find an adequate threshold value. Whereas MEM needs to identify metals on a sinogram that covers the all rotation angles with a single threshold value, identifying metals on each projection image with an individual value is an important benefit of 3D-MEM. The threshold value varies per projection angle, especially by the influence of the spine and scull, that are objects outside of the field of view. The performance of 3D-MEM is examined using a subject who has as many as 12 pieces of complex metals in his teeth. It is shown that the metals are successfully identified and the grade of metal artifact has been considerably reduced.

  7. Method for reducing windmill artifacts in multislice CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Kevin M.; Žabic, Stanislav

    2011-03-01

    Thin-slice images reconstructed from helical multi-slice CT scans typically display artifacts known as windmill artifacts, which arise from not satisfying the Nyquist sampling criteria in the patient longitudinal direction. Since these are essentially aliasing artifacts, they can be reduced or removed by trading off resolution, either globally (by reconstructing thicker slices) or locally (by local smoothing of the strong gradients). The obvious drawback to this approach is the associated loss in resolution. Another approach is to utilize an x-ray tube with the capability to modulate the focal spot in the z-direction, to effectively improve the sampling rate. This work presents a new method for windmill artifact reduction based on total variation minimization in the image domain, which is capable of removing windmill artifacts while at the same time preserving the resolution of anatomic structures within the images. This is a big improvement over previous reconstruction methods that sacrifice resolution, and it provides practically the same benefits as a z-switching x-ray tube with a much simpler impact to the overall CT system.

  8. Heparin reduces nonspecific eosinophil staining artifacts in mass cytometry experiments.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Adeeb H; Tordesillas, Leticia; Berin, M Cecilia

    2016-06-01

    The analysis of heterogeneous cell samples by mass cytometry (CyTOF) relies on the assumption that metal labeled antibodies accurately bind to their target antigens. We report a previously unappreciated experimental artifact of non-specific antibody binding by eosinophils during intracellular CyTOF analysis of human whole blood samples. We hypothesized that this non-specific binding results from a charge-based interaction between the metal-labeled antibodies and highly cationic proteins found in eosinophillic granules and found that this non-specific staining artifact could be reduced to background levels with a simple blocking protocol using heparin as a competing anionic protein. This protocol eliminates a potential source of erroneous data interpretation in all experiments involving intracellular staining of human whole blood samples, and allows accurate assessment of dynamic changes in intracellular proteins in eosinophils by CyTOF. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. PMID:27061608

  9. Glucosyltransferase inactivation reduces dental caries.

    PubMed

    Devulapalle, K S; Mooser, G

    2001-02-01

    Dental caries has been an intractable disease in spite of intense dental research. The metabolic acids produced by mutans streptococci demineralize the tooth surface and lead to dental caries. The enzyme glucosyltransferase (GTF) produced by mutans streptococci is the key factor in this process. Oral bacterial GTFs use sucrose as a substrate in synthesis of either water-soluble or insoluble glucans. In this investigation, kinetic studies with divalent metal ions revealed their strong binding affinity to GTF. The metal ions also proved to be strong inhibitors of the enzyme. Here we describe a simple method of inactivating the enzyme that actively participates in dental caries by taking advantage of a Fenton reaction which requires metal ions such as iron or copper and peroxide. The hydroxyl radical ions produced via the Fenton reaction inactivate GTF, a factor in the production of dental caries. PMID:11332534

  10. Artifacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Samantha

    2009-01-01

    NASA Headquarters sent a list of items to KSC that were deemed potential artifacts. These items played arole in the Shuttle Program's development and maintenance. Because these items are national assets, many are of interest to museums, schools, other government entities, etc. upon the Space Shuttle's retirement. The list contains over 500 items. All of these items need to be located, photographed, and catalogued with accompanying specific data that needs to be gathered. Initial research suggests that this is a time, labor, and cost intensive project. The purpose of my project was to focus on 20-60 of these 500 items, gather the necessary data, and compile them in a way that can be added to by other users when/if the project goes into full effect.

  11. Metal Artifact Reduction and Segmentation of Dental Computerized Tomography Images Using Least Square Support Vector Machine and Mean Shift Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Mortaheb, Parinaz; Rezaeian, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Segmentation and three-dimensional (3D) visualization of teeth in dental computerized tomography (CT) images are of dentists’ requirements for both abnormalities diagnosis and the treatments such as dental implant and orthodontic planning. On the other hand, dental CT image segmentation is a difficult process because of the specific characteristics of the tooth's structure. This paper presents a method for automatic segmentation of dental CT images. We present a multi-step method, which starts with a preprocessing phase to reduce the metal artifact using the least square support vector machine. Integral intensity profile is then applied to detect each tooth's region candidates. Finally, the mean shift algorithm is used to partition the region of each tooth, and all these segmented slices are then applied for 3D visualization of teeth. Examining the performance of our proposed approach, a set of reliable assessment metrics is utilized. We applied the segmentation method on 14 cone-beam CT datasets. Functionality analysis of the proposed method demonstrated precise segmentation results on different sample slices. Accuracy analysis of the proposed method indicates that we can increase the sensitivity, specificity, precision, and accuracy of the segmentation results by 83.24%, 98.35%, 72.77%, and 97.62% and decrease the error rate by 2.34%. The experimental results show that the proposed approach performs well on different types of CT images and has better performance than all existing approaches. Moreover, segmentation results can be more accurate by using the proposed algorithm of metal artifact reduction in the preprocessing phase. PMID:27014607

  12. Improved image decompression for reduced transform coding artifacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orourke, Thomas P.; Stevenson, Robert L.

    1994-01-01

    The perceived quality of images reconstructed from low bit rate compression is severely degraded by the appearance of transform coding artifacts. This paper proposes a method for producing higher quality reconstructed images based on a stochastic model for the image data. Quantization (scalar or vector) partitions the transform coefficient space and maps all points in a partition cell to a representative reconstruction point, usually taken as the centroid of the cell. The proposed image estimation technique selects the reconstruction point within the quantization partition cell which results in a reconstructed image which best fits a non-Gaussian Markov random field (MRF) image model. This approach results in a convex constrained optimization problem which can be solved iteratively. At each iteration, the gradient projection method is used to update the estimate based on the image model. In the transform domain, the resulting coefficient reconstruction points are projected to the particular quantization partition cells defined by the compressed image. Experimental results will be shown for images compressed using scalar quantization of block DCT and using vector quantization of subband wavelet transform. The proposed image decompression provides a reconstructed image with reduced visibility of transform coding artifacts and superior perceived quality.

  13. Adaptive motion artifact reducing algorithm for wrist photoplethysmography application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jingwei; Wang, Guijin; Shi, Chenbo

    2016-04-01

    Photoplethysmography (PPG) technology is widely used in wearable heart pulse rate monitoring. It might reveal the potential risks of heart condition and cardiopulmonary function by detecting the cardiac rhythms in physical exercise. However the quality of wrist photoelectric signal is very sensitive to motion artifact since the thicker tissues and the fewer amount of capillaries. Therefore, motion artifact is the major factor that impede the heart rate measurement in the high intensity exercising. One accelerometer and three channels of light with different wavelengths are used in this research to analyze the coupled form of motion artifact. A novel approach is proposed to separate the pulse signal from motion artifact by exploiting their mixing ratio in different optical paths. There are four major steps of our method: preprocessing, motion artifact estimation, adaptive filtering and heart rate calculation. Five healthy young men are participated in the experiment. The speeder in the treadmill is configured as 12km/h, and all subjects would run for 3-10 minutes by swinging the arms naturally. The final result is compared with chest strap. The average of mean square error (MSE) is less than 3 beats per minute (BPM/min). Proposed method performed well in intense physical exercise and shows the great robustness to individuals with different running style and posture.

  14. Potential hazards and artifacts of ferromagnetic and nonferromagnetic surgical and dental materials and devices in nuclear magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    New, P F; Rosen, B R; Brady, T J; Buonanno, F S; Kistler, J P; Burt, C T; Hinshaw, W S; Newhouse, J H; Pohost, G M; Taveras, J M

    1983-04-01

    The risks to patients with metal surgical implants who are undergoing nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging and the artifacts caused by such implants were studied. Twenty-one aneurysm and other hemostatic clips and a variety of other materials (e.g., dental amalgam, 14 karat gold) were used. Longitudinal forces and torques were found to be exerted upon 16 of the 21 clips. With five aneurysm clips, forces and torques sufficient to produce risk of hemorrhage from dislocation of the clip from the vessel or aneurysm, or cerebral injury by clip displacement without dislodgement were identified. The induced ferromagnetism was shown to be related to the composition of the alloys from which the clips were manufactured. Clips with 10-14% nickel are evidently without sufficient induced ferromagnetism to cause hazard. The extent of NMR imaging artifacts was greater for materials with measurable ferromagnetic properties, but metals without measurable ferromagnetism in our tests also resulted in significant artifacts. Dental amalgam and 14 karat gold produced no imaging artifacts, but stainless steels in dentures and orthodontic braces produced extensive artifacts in the facial region. PMID:6828719

  15. Potential hazards and artifacts of ferromagnetic and nonferromagnetic surgical and dental materials and devices in nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    New, P.F.J.; Rosen, B.R.; Brady, T.J.; Buonanno, F.S.; Kistler, J.P.; Burt, C.T.; Hinshaw, W.S.; Newhouse, J.H.; Pohost, G.M.; Taveras, J.M.

    1983-04-01

    The risks to patients with metal surgical implants who are undergoing nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging and the artifacts caused by such implants were studied. Twenty-one aneurysm and other hemostatic clips and a variety of other materials (e.g., dental amalgam, 14 karat gold) were used. Longitudinal forces and torques were found to be exerted upon 16 of the 21 clips. With five aneurysm clips, forces and torques sufficient to produce risk of hemorrhage from dislocation of the clip from the vessel or aneurysm, or cerebral injury by clip displacement without dislodgement were identified. The induced ferromagnetism was shown to be related to the composition of the alloys from which the clips were manufactured. Clips with 10-14% nickel are evidently without sufficient induced ferromagnetism to cause hazard. The extent of NMR imaging artifacts was greater for materials with measurable ferromagnetic properties, but metals without measurable ferromagnetism in our tests also resulted in significant artifacts. Dental amalgam and 14 karat gold produced no imaging artifacts, but stainless steels in dentures and orthodontic braces produced extensive artifacts in the facial region.

  16. Correction of dental artifacts within the anatomical surface in PET/MRI using active shape models and k-nearest-neighbors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladefoged, Claes N.; Andersen, Flemming L.; Keller, Sune H.; Beyer, Thomas; Højgaard, Liselotte; Lauze, François

    2014-03-01

    In combined PET/MR, attenuation correction (AC) is performed indirectly based on the available MR image information. Metal implant-induced susceptibility artifacts and subsequent signal voids challenge MR-based AC. Several papers acknowledge the problem in PET attenuation correction when dental artifacts are ignored, but none of them attempts to solve the problem. We propose a clinically feasible correction method which combines Active Shape Models (ASM) and k- Nearest-Neighbors (kNN) into a simple approach which finds and corrects the dental artifacts within the surface boundaries of the patient anatomy. ASM is used to locate a number of landmarks in the T1-weighted MR-image of a new patient. We calculate a vector of offsets from each voxel within a signal void to each of the landmarks. We then use kNN to classify each voxel as belonging to an artifact or an actual signal void using this offset vector, and fill the artifact voxels with a value representing soft tissue. We tested the method using fourteen patients without artifacts, and eighteen patients with dental artifacts of varying sizes within the anatomical surface of the head/neck region. Though the method wrongly filled a small volume in the bottom part of a maxillary sinus in two patients without any artifacts, due to their abnormal location, it succeeded in filling all dental artifact regions in all patients. In conclusion, we propose a method, which combines ASM and kNN into a simple approach which, as the results show, succeeds to find and correct the dental artifacts within the anatomical surface.

  17. Dual energy CT: How well can pseudo-monochromatic imaging reduce metal artifacts?

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchenbecker, Stefan Faby, Sebastian; Sawall, Stefan; Kachelrieß, Marc; Lell, Michael

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Dual Energy CT (DECT) provides so-called monoenergetic images based on a linear combination of the original polychromatic images. At certain patient-specific energy levels, corresponding to certain patient- and slice-dependent linear combination weights, e.g., E = 160 keV corresponds to α = 1.57, a significant reduction of metal artifacts may be observed. The authors aimed at analyzing the method for its artifact reduction capabilities to identify its limitations. The results are compared with raw data-based processing. Methods: Clinical DECT uses a simplified version of monochromatic imaging by linearly combining the low and the high kV images and by assigning an energy to that linear combination. Those pseudo-monochromatic images can be used by radiologists to obtain images with reduced metal artifacts. The authors analyzed the underlying physics and carried out a series expansion of the polychromatic attenuation equations. The resulting nonlinear terms are responsible for the artifacts, but they are not linearly related between the low and the high kV scan: A linear combination of both images cannot eliminate the nonlinearities, it can only reduce their impact. Scattered radiation yields additional noncanceling nonlinearities. This method is compared to raw data-based artifact correction methods. To quantify the artifact reduction potential of pseudo-monochromatic images, they simulated the FORBILD abdomen phantom with metal implants, and they assessed patient data sets of a clinical dual source CT system (100, 140 kV Sn) containing artifacts induced by a highly concentrated contrast agent bolus and by metal. In each case, they manually selected an optimal α and compared it to a raw data-based material decomposition in case of simulation, to raw data-based material decomposition of inconsistent rays in case of the patient data set containing contrast agent, and to the frequency split normalized metal artifact reduction in case of the metal

  18. Reducing metal artifacts in cone-beam CT images by preprocessing projection data

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yongbin; Zhang Lifei; Zhu, X. Ronald; Lee, Andrew K.; Chambers, Mark; Dong Lei . E-mail: ldong@mdanderson.org

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: Computed tomography (CT) streak artifacts caused by metallic implants remain a challenge for the automatic processing of image data. The impact of metal artifacts in the soft-tissue region is magnified in cone-beam CT (CBCT), because the soft-tissue contrast is usually lower in CBCT images. The goal of this study was to develop an effective offline processing technique to minimize the effect. Methods and Materials: The geometry calibration cue of the CBCT system was used to track the position of the metal object in projection views. The three-dimensional (3D) representation of the object can be established from only two user-selected viewing angles. The position of the shadowed region in other views can be tracked by projecting the 3D coordinates of the object. Automatic image segmentation was used followed by a Laplacian diffusion method to replace the pixels inside the metal object with the boundary pixels. The modified projection data were then used to reconstruct a new CBCT image. The procedure was tested in phantoms, prostate cancer patients with implanted gold markers and metal prosthesis, and a head-and-neck patient with dental amalgam in the teeth. Results: Both phantom and patient studies demonstrated that the procedure was able to minimize the metal artifacts. Soft-tissue visibility was improved near or away from the metal object. The processing time was 1-2 s per projection. Conclusion: We have implemented an effective metal artifact-suppressing algorithm to improve the quality of CBCT images.

  19. Functionalized bio-artifact fabricated via selective slurry extrusion. Part 2: Fabrication of ceramic dental crown.

    PubMed

    Zhu, D B; Liang, J P; Qu, Y X; Duan, G L

    2014-05-01

    Functionalized ceramic dental crown was successfully fabricated through selective slurry extrusion (SSE) based technique of solid freeform fabrication (also known as rapid prototyping). After sintering, the decomposed tourmaline powders were embedded in ZrO2 matrix. The far infrared emission properties of the ceramic dental crown were improved due to the increase of the numbers of infrared active bonds from tourmaline. This new dental restoration process presents potential to provide dental patients with functionalized artificial teeth, which benefits the body health by the way of emitting far infrared rays in ambient temperatures. PMID:24734617

  20. SU-E-T-365: Dosimetric Impact of Dental Amalgam CT Image Artifacts On IMRT and VMAT Head and Neck Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, N; Young, L; Parvathaneni, U; Liao, J; Richard, P; Ford, E; Sandison, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The presence of high density dental amalgam in patient CT image data sets causes dose calculation errors for head and neck (HN) treatment planning. This study assesses and compares dosimetric variations in IMRT and VMAT treatment plans due to dental artifacts. Methods: Sixteen HN patients with similar treatment sites (oropharynx), tumor volume and extensive dental artifacts were divided into two groups: IMRT (n=8, 6 to 9 beams) and VMAT (n=8, 2 arcs with 352° rotation). All cases were planned with the Pinnacle 9.2 treatment planning software using the collapsed cone convolution superposition algorithm and a range of prescription dose from 60 to 72Gy. Two different treatment plans were produced, each based on one of two image sets: (a)uncorrected; (b)dental artifacts density overridden (set to 1.0g/cm{sup 3}). Differences between the two treatment plans for each of the IMRT and VMAT techniques were quantified by the following dosimetric parameters: maximum point dose, maximum spinal cord and brainstem dose, mean left and right parotid dose, and PTV coverage (V95%Rx). Average differences generated for these dosimetric parameters were compared between IMRT and VMAT plans. Results: The average absolute dose differences (plan a minus plan b) for the VMAT and IMRT techniques, respectively, caused by dental artifacts were: 2.2±3.3cGy vs. 37.6±57.5cGy (maximum point dose, P=0.15); 1.2±0.9cGy vs. 7.9±6.7cGy (maximum spinal cord dose, P=0.026); 2.2±2.4cGy vs. 12.1±13.0cGy (maximum brainstem dose, P=0.077); 0.9±1.1cGy vs. 4.1±3.5cGy (mean left parotid dose, P=0.038); 0.9±0.8cGy vs. 7.8±11.9cGy (mean right parotid dose, P=0.136); 0.021%±0.014% vs. 0.803%±1.44% (PTV coverage, P=0.17). Conclusion: For the HN plans studied, dental artifacts demonstrated a greater dose calculation error for IMRT plans compared to VMAT plans. Rotational arcs appear on the average to compensate dose calculation errors induced by dental artifacts. Thus, compared to VMAT, density

  1. Spiral-in/out BOLD fMRI for increased SNR and reduced susceptibility artifacts.

    PubMed

    Glover, G H; Law, C S

    2001-09-01

    BOLD fMRI is hampered by dropout of signal in the orbitofrontal and parietal brain regions due to magnetic field gradients near air-tissue interfaces. This work reports the use of spiral-in trajectories that begin at the edge of k-space and end at the origin, and spiral in/out trajectories in which a spiral-in readout is followed by a conventional spiral-out trajectory. The spiral-in trajectory reduces the dropout and increases the BOLD contrast. The spiral-in and spiral-out images can be combined in several ways to simultaneously achieve increased signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and reduced dropout artifacts. Activation experiments employing an olfaction task demonstrate significantly increased activation volumes due to reduced dropout, and overall increased SNR in all regions. PMID:11550244

  2. A conventional procedure to reduce Asn deamidation artifacts during trypsin peptide mapping.

    PubMed

    Kori, Yekaterina; Patel, Rekha; Neill, Alyssa; Liu, Hongcheng

    2016-01-15

    Asn deamidation is a common post-translational modification of proteins with significant biological consequences. Asn deamidation can cause changes in structure, stability and function of proteins. LC-MS peptide mapping is the most widely used method to detect and quantify Asn deamidation. However, a significant amount of deamidation can occur during sample preparation for peptide mapping, making it challenging to accurately determine the original level of deamidation. Although several protocols to reduce procedure-induced deamidation have been reported, they either require special procedural steps or are not optimal for maintaining trypsin activity. In the current study, several commonly used buffers that are optimal for trypsin activity were evaluated. The results demonstrated that much lower levels of Asn deamidation artifacts were observed when Tris buffer was used, especially at lower concentrations. The addition of 10% acetonitrile further reduced the levels of Asn deamidation artifacts. The utility of the optimized procedure was demonstrated by the digestion of a recombinant monoclonal antibody. The proposed procedure can be readily applied to any laboratory settings as it does not require any special reagents or procedures. PMID:26720699

  3. Reconcilable differences: the use of reference material to reduce methodological artifacts in the reporting of organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls.

    PubMed

    de Solla, Shane R; Weseloh, D V Chip; Letcher, Robert J; Hebert, Craig E

    2010-01-01

    Numerous long-term monitoring programs have assessed spatial and temporal trends of organochlorine (OC) pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Changes in analytical approaches (e.g., gas chromatography coupled with electron capture detection [GC-ECD] versus mass spectrometric detection [GC-MSD]) can reveal artifacts in the reported concentrations. In-house reference material (RM) was used to determine the analytical artifacts in the measurement of OCs and PCBs in Great Lake herring gull eggs previously analyzed from 1994 to 1996 (GC-ECD) and 1997 to 1999 (GC-MSD). Approximately 19.0% of the variability of PCB congeners in gull eggs was associated with analytical artifacts, and differences among colonies were obscured. Although the discrepancy in sum PCBs (SigmaPCBs) was fairly small (2.1%), some congeners varied considerably between methods (> 60%). After statistically removing the artifacts, only 1.4% of the variability in PCBs of herring gull eggs was associated with artifacts, and differences among gull colonies became apparent. After excluding OCs near the detection limit in the RM, statistically removing the artifacts reduced some of the differences between methods for OCs. Analytical artifacts may potentially render inferences difficult, confounded, and erroneous. When combining contaminant data obtained using different methods, the methods should be assumed to give different results unless demonstrated otherwise. Assessments of the compatibility of analytical methodologies should be made using an appropriate RM. PMID:20821415

  4. Reducing the formation of image artifacts during spectroscopic micro-CT acquisitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuber, Marcus; Koenig, Thomas; Hussain, Rubaiya; Hamann, Elias; Ballabriga, Rafael; Campbell, Michael; Fauler, Alex; Fiederle, Michael; Baumbach, Tilo

    2015-03-01

    Spectroscopic micro-computed tomography using photon counting detectors is a technology that promises to deliver material-specific images in pre-clinical research. Inherent to such applications is the need for a high spatial resolution, which can only be achieved with small focal spot sizes in the micrometer range. This limits the achievable x-ray fluxes and implies long acquisitions easily exceeding one hour, during which it is paramount to maintain a constant detector response. Given that photon-counting detectors are delicate systems, with each pixel hosting advanced analog and digital circuitry, this can represent a challenging task. In this contribution, we illustrate our findings on how to reduce image artifacts in computed tomography reconstructions under these conditions, using a Medipix3RX detector featuring a cadmium telluride sensor. We find that maintaining a constant temperature is a prerequisite to guarantee energy threshold stability. More importantly, we identify varying sensor leakage currents as a significant source to artifact formation. We show that these leakage currents can render the corresponding images unusable if the ambient temperature fluctuates, as caused by an air conditioning, for example. We conclude with demonstrating the necessity of an adjustable leakage current compensation.

  5. Using data redundancy gained by patch overlaps to reduce truncation artifacts in magnetic particle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlborg, M.; Kaethner, C.; Knopp, T.; Szwargulski, P.; Buzug, T. M.

    2016-06-01

    The imaging technology magnetic particle imaging allows the detection of magnetic material, in particular superparamagnetic nanoparticles, by remagnetization of the material via magnetic fields. The application is aimed at medical imaging where the particles are applied as tracer directly into the blood stream. Medical safety considerations such as peripheral nerve stimulation limit the maximal amplitude of the magnetic fields and in turn the field of view size. To handle this constraint the concept of patches was introduced, which allows a shift of a field of view to different positions in order to enlarge the imaging area. If this is done statically an overlap of patches can be used to reduce truncation artifacts occurring at the adjacent edges. In this contribution, a differentiation of two different kinds of patch overlaps, i.e. a trajectory and a system matrix overlap, is made. Further, different concepts to combine the resulting redundant information are investigated with respect to the reduction of truncation artifacts. The methods are analyzed in detail in a simulation study and validated on experimental data.

  6. PhotoAcoustic-guided Focused UltraSound imaging (PAFUSion) for reducing reflection artifacts in photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Mithun K.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2015-07-01

    Reflection artifacts caused by acoustic reflectors is an important problem in reflection-mode photoacoustic imaging. The light absorbed by skin and superficial optical absorbers may produce high photoacoustic signals, which traverse into the tissue and get reflected from structures having different acoustic impedance. These reflected photoacoustic signals, when reconstructed may appear in the region of interest, which causes complications in interpreting the images. We propose a novel method to identify and reduce reflection artifacts in photoacoustic images by making use of PhotoAcoustic-guided Focused UltraSound [PAFUSion]. Our method ultrasonically mimics the photoacoustic image formation process and thus delivers a clinically feasible way to reduce reflection artifacts. Simulation and phantom measurement results are presented to demonstrate the validity and impact of this method. Results show that PAFUSion technique can identify and differentiate reflection signals from the signals of interest and thus foresees good potential for improving photoacoustic imaging of deep tissue.

  7. Reducing Multiplexing Artifacts in Multi-Pinhole SPECT with a Stacked Silicon-Germanium System: a Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Lindsay C.; Shokouhi, Sepideh; Peterson, Todd E

    2015-01-01

    In pinhole SPECT, multi-pinhole collimators can increase sensitivity but may lead to projection overlap, or multiplexing, which can cause image artifacts. In this work we explore whether a stacked-detector configuration with a germanium and a silicon detector, used with 123I (27–32, 159 keV), where little multiplexing occurs in the Si projections, can reduce image artifacts caused by highly-multiplexed Ge projections. Simulations are first used to determine a reconstruction method that combines the Si and Ge projections to maximize image quality. Next, simulations of different pinhole configurations (varying projection multiplexing) in conjunction with digital phantoms are used to examine whether additional Si projections mitigate artifacts from the multiplexing in the Ge projections. Reconstructed images using both Si and Ge data are compared to those using Ge data alone. Normalized mean-square error and normalized standard deviation provide a quantitative evaluation of reconstructed images’ error and noise, respectively, and are used to evaluate the impact of the additional non-multiplexed data on image quality. For a qualitative comparison, the differential point response function is used to examine multiplexing artifacts. Results show that in cases of highly-multiplexed Ge projections, the addition of low-multiplexed Si projections helps to reduce image artifacts both quantitatively and qualitatively. PMID:25055382

  8. A comb filter based signal processing method to effectively reduce motion artifacts from photoplethysmographic signals.

    PubMed

    Peng, Fulai; Liu, Hongyun; Wang, Weidong

    2015-10-01

    A photoplethysmographic (PPG) signal can provide very useful information about a subject's cardiovascular status. Motion artifacts (MAs), which usually deteriorate the waveform of a PPG signal, severely obstruct its applications in the clinical diagnosis and healthcare area. To reduce the MAs from a PPG signal, in the present study we present a comb filter based signal processing method. Firstly, wavelet de-noising was implemented to preliminarily suppress a part of the MAs. Then, the PPG signal in the time domain was transformed into the frequency domain by a fast Fourier transform (FFT). Thirdly, the PPG signal period was estimated from the frequency domain by tracking the fundamental frequency peak of the PPG signal. Lastly, the MAs were removed by the comb filter which was designed based on the obtained PPG signal period. Experiments with synthetic and real-world datasets were implemented to validate the performance of the method. Results show that the proposed method can effectively restore the PPG signals from the MA corrupted signals. Also, the accuracy of blood oxygen saturation (SpO2), calculated from red and infrared PPG signals, was significantly improved after the MA reduction by the proposed method. Our study demonstrates that the comb filter can effectively reduce the MAs from a PPG signal provided that the PPG signal period is obtained. PMID:26334000

  9. Optical coherence tomography probe design for reduced artifact generation and manufacturability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staloff, Daniel; Comstock, Lovell; Miller, William; Schreiber, Horst

    2016-03-01

    Many fiber based probes used in Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) are comprised of a spacer, GRIN lens, fiber, and a microprism. This design form suffers from many material interfaces, which induce back reflections into the sample arm of the interferometer. With so many interfaces, these probes can produce artifacts in the system's imaging window. We present a design which has just two interfaces to minimize image artifacts. The two components of this design are the fiber endface and a reflective optic. With optimization, these two components can produce back reflections below -90dB which will minimize image artifacts. This will results in high fidelity imaging for medical diagnostics.

  10. Analysis of free breathing motion using artifact reduced 4D CT image data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrhardt, Jan; Werner, Rene; Frenzel, Thorsten; Lu, Wei; Low, Daniel; Handels, Heinz

    2007-03-01

    The mobility of lung tumors during the respiratory cycle is a source of error in radiotherapy treatment planning. Spatiotemporal CT data sets can be used for studying the motion of lung tumors and inner organs during the breathing cycle. We present methods for the analysis of respiratory motion using 4D CT data in high temporal resolution. An optical flow based reconstruction method was used to generate artifact-reduced 4D CT data sets of lung cancer patients. The reconstructed 4D CT data sets were segmented and the respiratory motion of tumors and inner organs was analyzed. A non-linear registration algorithm is used to calculate the velocity field between consecutive time frames of the 4D data. The resulting velocity field is used to analyze trajectories of landmarks and surface points. By this technique, the maximum displacement of any surface point is calculated, and regions with large respiratory motion are marked. To describe the tumor mobility the motion of the lung tumor center in three orthogonal directions is displayed. Estimated 3D appearance probabilities visualize the movement of the tumor during the respiratory cycle in one static image. Furthermore, correlations between trajectories of the skin surface and the trajectory of the tumor center are determined and skin regions are identified which are suitable for prediction of the internal tumor motion. The results of the motion analysis indicate that the described methods are suitable to gain insight into the spatiotemporal behavior of anatomical and pathological structures during the respiratory cycle.

  11. 21 CFR 872.5580 - Oral rinse to reduce the adhesion of dental plaque.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Special Controls Guidance Document: Oral Rinse to Reduce the Adhesion of Dental Plaque.” See § 872.1(e... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Oral rinse to reduce the adhesion of dental plaque... adhesion of dental plaque. (a) Identification. The device is assigned the generic name oral rinse to...

  12. 21 CFR 872.5580 - Oral rinse to reduce the adhesion of dental plaque.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Special Controls Guidance Document: Oral Rinse to Reduce the Adhesion of Dental Plaque.” See § 872.1(e... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Oral rinse to reduce the adhesion of dental plaque... adhesion of dental plaque. (a) Identification. The device is assigned the generic name oral rinse to...

  13. 21 CFR 872.5580 - Oral rinse to reduce the adhesion of dental plaque.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Oral rinse to reduce the adhesion of dental plaque... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 872.5580 Oral rinse to reduce the adhesion of dental plaque. (a) Identification. The device is assigned the generic name oral rinse to...

  14. 21 CFR 872.5580 - Oral rinse to reduce the adhesion of dental plaque.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Oral rinse to reduce the adhesion of dental plaque. 872.5580 Section 872.5580 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 872.5580 Oral rinse to reduce the adhesion of dental plaque....

  15. 21 CFR 872.5580 - Oral rinse to reduce the adhesion of dental plaque.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Oral rinse to reduce the adhesion of dental plaque. 872.5580 Section 872.5580 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 872.5580 Oral rinse to reduce the adhesion of dental plaque....

  16. Cell morphology classification in phase contrast microscopy image reducing halo artifact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Mi-Sun; Song, Soo-Min; Lee, Hana; Kim, Myoung-Hee

    2012-03-01

    Since the morphology of tumor cells is a good indicator of their invasiveness, we used time-lapse phase-contrast microscopy to examine the morphology of tumor cells. This technique enables long-term observation of the activity of live cells without photobleaching and phototoxicity which is common in other fluorescence-labeled microscopy. However, it does have certain drawbacks in terms of imaging. Therefore, we first corrected for non-uniform illumination artifacts and then we use intensity distribution information to detect cell boundary. In phase contrast microscopy image, cell is normally appeared as dark region surrounded by bright halo ring. Due to halo artifact is minimal around the cell body and has non-symmetric diffusion pattern, we calculate cross sectional plane which intersects center of each cell and orthogonal to first principal axis. Then, we extract dark cell region by analyzing intensity profile curve considering local bright peak as halo area. Finally, we examined cell morphology to classify tumor cells as malignant and benign.

  17. A Bayesian approach for the estimation and transmission of regularization parameters for reducing blocking artifacts.

    PubMed

    Mateos, J; Katsaggelos, A K; Molina, R

    2000-01-01

    With block-based compression approaches for both still images and sequences of images annoying blocking artifacts are exhibited, primarily at high compression ratios. They are due to the independent processing (quantization) of the block transformed values of the intensity or the displaced frame difference. We propose the application of the hierarchical Bayesian paradigm to the reconstruction of block discrete cosine transform (BDCT) compressed images and the estimation of the required parameters. We derive expressions for the iterative evaluation of these parameters applying the evidence analysis within the hierarchical Bayesian paradigm. The proposed method allows for the combination of parameters estimated at the coder and decoder. The performance of the proposed algorithms is demonstrated experimentally. PMID:18262958

  18. [The impact on costs and care of two approaches to reduce employees' dental plan expenses in a private company].

    PubMed

    Costa Filho, Luiz Cesar da; Duncan, Bruce Bartholow; Polanczyk, Carisi Anne; Sória, Marina Lara; Habekost, Ana Paula; Costa, Carolina Covolo da

    2008-05-01

    The present study evaluated the dental care plan offered to 4,000 employees of a private hospital and their respective families. The analysis covered three stages: (1) baseline (control), when dental care was provided by an outsourced company with a network of dentists paid for services, (2) a renegotiation of costs with the original dental care provider, and (3) provision of dental care by the hospital itself, through directly hired dentists on regular salaries. Monthly economic and clinical data were collected for this research. The dental plan renegotiation reduced costs by 37% in relation to baseline, and the hospital's own dental service reduced costs by 50%. Renegotiation led to a 31% reduction in clinical procedures, without altering the dental care profile; the hospital's own dental service did not reduce the total number of clinical procedures, but modified the profile of dental care, since procedures related to the causes of diseases increased and surgical/restorative procedures decreased. PMID:18461236

  19. Does atraumatic restorative treatment reduce dental anxiety in children? A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Arun K.; Bhumika, T. V.; Nair, N. Sreekumaran

    2015-01-01

    Dental anxiety is one of the major problems affecting children, which impairs the rendering of dental care, leading to impaired quality of life. It often leads to occupational stress in dental personnel and conflict between parents/caregivers. The objective of this study was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials done in children, to synthesize evidence of the effectiveness of atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) in reducing dental anxiety in children compared to conventional restorative treatments. The databases searched included PubMed, Google Scholar and The Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register. Eligible studies reporting dental anxiety by a variety of psychometric scales were tabulated. The review was conducted and reported in accordance with the guidelines provided by the Cochrane Collaboration. Among 416 studies retrieved through literature search, six studies matched the inclusion criteria. Due to lack of data, only three studies were included for meta-analysis using RevMan software (Review Manager, Version 5.3;The Cochrane Collaboration, Copenhagen, 2014). The pooled meta-analysis data, (standardized mean difference − 2.12 [95% confidence interval: −4.52, 0.27]) failed to show any difference between ART group and the conventional treatment group. In conclusion, ART was not more beneficial in reducing dental anxiety among pediatric dental patients. The findings are relevant in the field of clinical practice in dentistry in the management of the anxious pediatric dental patient. PMID:26038668

  20. Reduction of metal artifacts: beam hardening and photon starvation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadava, Girijesh K.; Pal, Debashish; Hsieh, Jiang

    2014-03-01

    The presence of metal-artifacts in CT imaging can obscure relevant anatomy and interfere with disease diagnosis. The cause and occurrence of metal-artifacts are primarily due to beam hardening, scatter, partial volume and photon starvation; however, the contribution to the artifacts from each of them depends on the type of hardware. A comparison of CT images obtained with different metallic hardware in various applications, along with acquisition and reconstruction parameters, helps understand methods for reducing or overcoming such artifacts. In this work, a metal beam hardening correction (BHC) and a projection-completion based metal artifact reduction (MAR) algorithms were developed, and applied on phantom and clinical CT scans with various metallic implants. Stainless-steel and Titanium were used to model and correct for metal beam hardening effect. In the MAR algorithm, the corrupted projection samples are replaced by the combination of original projections and in-painted data obtained by forward projecting a prior image. The data included spine fixation screws, hip-implants, dental-filling, and body extremity fixations, covering range of clinically used metal implants. Comparison of BHC and MAR on different metallic implants was used to characterize dominant source of the artifacts, and conceivable methods to overcome those. Results of the study indicate that beam hardening could be a dominant source of artifact in many spine and extremity fixations, whereas dental and hip implants could be dominant source of photon starvation. The BHC algorithm could significantly improve image quality in CT scans with metallic screws, whereas MAR algorithm could alleviate artifacts in hip-implants and dentalfillings.

  1. A study on a method to reduce the effect of the cross-talk artifact in a simultaneous, multiple-slice, plane, oblique MRI scan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sun-Yeob; Cho, Jae-Hwan; Lee, Hae-Kag; Cho, Moo-Seong; Park, Cheol-Soo; Kim, Eng-Chan; Kim, Sung-Kyu; Dong, Kyung-Rae; Chung, Woon-Kwan; Shin, Jae-Woo; Kim, Young-Jae; Cho, Young-Kuk

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to reduce the effect of cross-talk artifacts on the region of interest (ROI) and to improve the diagnostic value of an image by conducting an examination using the linear (series) method, rather than the interleave method, based on the time concept, which is a basic principle of MRI, with a focus on the T1-weighted image, which has a strong effect on the cross-talk artifact. A water phantom was placed in the center of a brain coil before using the interleave method and the linear method to obtain cross-sectional images. A sagittal oblique scan was conducted to ensure that the slice groups intersected one another. A reference image was also acquired at TR (time of repetition) = 500 msec. Subsequently, the TR was changed to 600 and 700 msec to conduct scans. The analysis method was to use the interleave method and the linear method to compare the effects of the cross-talk artifacts and the TR. As scanned images were suggested, the SNR (signal to noise ratio) for the ROI was measured. According to the study results, the effects of cross-talk artifacts were reduced more significantly in the image scanned using the linear method than in that using the interleave method. When the SNRs of the images scanned in the interleave method and the linear method were compared, the image scanned in the linear method showed higher SNRs for the anterior and the posterior parts at TR = 500, 600, and 700 msec. On the other hand, the image scanned in the interleave method showed an increase in the SNR for the middle part, where the cross-talk artifacts did not appear. This means that the cross-talk artifacts were reduced in the image scanned using the linear method, which resulted in an increase in the SNR. Overall, the SNRs of each image for the interleave method and the linear method were highest at TR = 700 msec. In conclusion, the linear method is selected to reduce the effects of cross-talk artifacts in a simultaneous and multiple slice plane oblique scan

  2. Real-time correction by optical tracking with integrated geometric distortion correction for reducing motion artifacts in functional MRI.

    PubMed

    Rotenberg, David; Chiew, Mark; Ranieri, Shawn; Tam, Fred; Chopra, Rajiv; Graham, Simon J

    2013-03-01

    Head motion artifacts are a major problem in functional MRI that limit its use in neuroscience research and clinical settings. Real-time scan-plane correction by optical tracking has been shown to correct slice misalignment and nonlinear spin-history artifacts; however, residual artifacts due to dynamic magnetic field nonuniformity may remain in the data. A recently developed correction technique, Phase Labeling for Additional Coordinate Encoding, can correct for absolute geometric distortion using only the complex image data from two echo planar images with slightly shifted k-space trajectories. An approach is presented that integrates Phase Labeling for Additional Coordinate Encoding into a real-time scan-plane update system by optical tracking, applied to a tissue-equivalent phantom undergoing complex motion and an functional MRI finger tapping experiment with overt head motion to induce dynamic field nonuniformity. Experiments suggest that such integrated volume-by-volume corrections are very effective at artifact suppression, with potential to expand functional MRI applications. PMID:22585554

  3. Efficacy of Self-Instructional Training for Reducing Children's Dental Fear.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prins, Pier J.

    1988-01-01

    Utilizes two different experiments to test the effectiveness of a variety self-instructional training methods to reduce the dental fears of groups of 8- to 12-year-old children. Results indicate that high levels of anxiety impair the effectiveness of self-instruction. (FMW)

  4. Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate Reduces Cytotoxic Effects Caused by Dental Monomers: A Hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yang; Ma, Sai; Wang, Yirong; Li, Jing; Shan, Lequn; Chen, Jihua

    2015-01-01

    Resin monomers from dental composite materials leached due to incomplete polymerization or biodegradation may cause contact allergies and damage dental pulp. The cytotoxicity of dental resin monomers is due to a disturbance of intracellular redox equilibrium, characterized by an overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and depletion of reduced glutathione (GSH). Oxidative stress caused by dental resin monomers leads to the disturbance of vital cell functions and induction of cell apoptosis in affected cells. The nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) pathway plays a key role in the cellular defense system against oxidative and electrophilic stress. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) can activate the Nrf2 pathway and induce expression of a multitude of antioxidants and phase II enzymes that can restore redox homeostasis. Therefore, here, we tested the hypothesis that EGCG-mediated protection against resin monomer cytotoxicity is mediated by activation of the Nrf2 pathway. This study will help to elucidate the mechanism of resin monomer cytotoxicity and provide information that will be helpful in improving the biocompatibility of dental resin materials. PMID:26489899

  5. Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate Reduces Cytotoxic Effects Caused by Dental Monomers: A Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Yang; Ma, Sai; Wang, Yirong; Li, Jing; Shan, Lequn; Chen, Jihua

    2015-01-01

    Resin monomers from dental composite materials leached due to incomplete polymerization or biodegradation may cause contact allergies and damage dental pulp. The cytotoxicity of dental resin monomers is due to a disturbance of intracellular redox equilibrium, characterized by an overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and depletion of reduced glutathione (GSH). Oxidative stress caused by dental resin monomers leads to the disturbance of vital cell functions and induction of cell apoptosis in affected cells. The nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) pathway plays a key role in the cellular defense system against oxidative and electrophilic stress. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) can activate the Nrf2 pathway and induce expression of a multitude of antioxidants and phase II enzymes that can restore redox homeostasis. Therefore, here, we tested the hypothesis that EGCG-mediated protection against resin monomer cytotoxicity is mediated by activation of the Nrf2 pathway. This study will help to elucidate the mechanism of resin monomer cytotoxicity and provide information that will be helpful in improving the biocompatibility of dental resin materials. PMID:26489899

  6. Collecting Artifacts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffey, Natalie

    2004-01-01

    Fresh out of college, the author had only a handful of items worthy of displaying, which included some fossils she had collected in her paleontology class. She had binders filled with great science information, but kids want to see "real" science, not paper science. Then it came to her: she could fill the shelves with science artifacts with the…

  7. Reducing System Artifacts in Hyperspectral Image Data Analysis with the Use of Estimates of the Error Covariance in the Data

    SciTech Connect

    HAALAND, DAVID M.; VAN BENTHEM, MARK H.; WEHLBURG, CHRISTINE M.; KOEHLER,IV, FREDERICK W.

    2002-01-01

    Hyperspectral Fourier transform infrared images have been obtained from a neoprene sample aged in air at elevated temperatures. The massive amount of spectra available from this heterogeneous sample provides the opportunity to perform quantitative analysis of the spectral data without the need for calibration standards. Multivariate curve resolution (MCR) methods with non-negativity constraints applied to the iterative alternating least squares analysis of the spectral data has been shown to achieve the goal of quantitative image analysis without the use of standards. However, the pure-component spectra and the relative concentration maps were heavily contaminated by the presence of system artifacts in the spectral data. We have demonstrated that the detrimental effects of these artifacts can be minimized by adding an estimate of the error covariance structure of the spectral image data to the MCR algorithm. The estimate is added by augmenting the concentration and pure-component spectra matrices with scores and eigenvectors obtained from the mean-centered repeat image differences of the sample. The implementation of augmentation is accomplished by employing efficient equality constraints on the MCR analysis. Augmentation with the scores from the repeat images is found to primarily improve the pure-component spectral estimates while augmentation with the corresponding eigenvectors primarily improves the concentration maps. Augmentation with both scores and eigenvectors yielded the best result by generating less noisy pure-component spectral estimates and relative concentration maps that were largely free from a striping artifact that is present due to system errors in the FT-IR images. The MCR methods presented are general and can also be applied productively to non-image spectral data.

  8. Reducing the artifacts in the identification of outer retinal boundary in the SD-OCT image with inherit retinal dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Min Zhang; Sekiguchi, Hiroyuki; Uji, Akihito; Yakami, Masahiro; Togashi, Kaori

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a new SD-OCT outer retinal boundary identification method based on the improved graph-theoretic approach in SD-OCT retinal image, which is robust to the image quality degradation and the pathological morphology variability. The performance of the proposed method was verified using the SD-OCT image database with inherit retinal dystrophies, which suffer from the artifacts most among different macular degeneration diseases. The experimental results of the subjective evaluation indicated that the identification results using the proposed method was substantially improved compared with the current built-in software in the SD-OCT devices. PMID:26737258

  9. Dental Procedures.

    PubMed

    Ramponi, Denise R

    2016-01-01

    Dental problems are a common complaint in emergency departments in the United States. There are a wide variety of dental issues addressed in emergency department visits such as dental caries, loose teeth, dental trauma, gingival infections, and dry socket syndrome. Review of the most common dental blocks and dental procedures will allow the practitioner the opportunity to make the patient more comfortable and reduce the amount of analgesia the patient will need upon discharge. Familiarity with the dental equipment, tooth, and mouth anatomy will help prepare the practitioner for to perform these dental procedures. PMID:27482994

  10. Aluminum-free low-modulus Ti-C composites that exhibit reduced image artifacts during MRI.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Chul; Lee, Hong-Jun; Son, Seong-Guk; Seok, Hyun-Kwang; Lee, Kang-Sik; Shin, Seung-Young; Lee, Jae-Chul

    2015-01-01

    Feasibility studies were performed to determine the suitability of a novel synthesis technique for fabricating multifunctional composite materials for orthopedic implants. By blending paramagnetic Ti powder with diamagnetic graphite and consolidating the resulting mixtures, Ti-C composites that cannot be feasibly obtained via conventional alloying techniques or ingot metallurgy were synthesized. The synthesized composite material exhibited extremely low magnetic susceptibility (χ=67.6×10(-6)), and, as a result, exhibited fewer artifacts during magnetic resonance imaging. The strength of the composite material (σ=770MPa) was such that it could support external loads to which the human body is subjected, but its Young's modulus was low (E=81.9 GPa) such that it could mitigate the stress-shielding effect. The material was also free from toxic elements such as Al and V and, thus, can be considered less harmful. PMID:25449916

  11. The Benefits of Prone SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging in Reducing Both Artifact Defects and Patient Radiation Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Stathaki, Maria; Koukouraki, Sophia; Papadaki, Emmanouela; Tsaroucha, Angeliki; Karkavitsas, Nikolaos

    2015-01-01

    Background Prone imaging has been demonstrated to minimize diaphragmatic and breast tissue attenuation. Objectives To determine the role of prone imaging on the reduction of unnecessary rest perfusion studies and coronary angiographies performed, thus decreasing investigation time and radiation exposure. Methods We examined 139 patients, 120 with an inferior wall and 19 with an anterior wall perfusion defect that might represented attenuation artifact. Post-stress images were acquired in both the supine and prone position. Coronary angiography was used as the “gold standard” for evaluating coronary artery patency. The study was terminated and rest imaging was obviated in the presence of complete improvement of the defect in the prone position. Quantitative interpretation was performed. Results were compared with clinical data and coronary angiographic findings. Results Prone acquisition correctly revealed defect improvement in 89 patients (89/120) with inferior wall and 12 patients (12/19) with anterior wall attenuation artifact. Quantitative analysis demonstrated statistically significant difference in the mean summed stress scores (SSS) of supine and mean SSS of prone studies in patients with disappearing inferior wall defect in the prone position and patent right coronary artery (true negative results). The mean difference between SSS in supine and in prone position was higher with disappearing than with remaining defects. Conclusion Technetium-99m (Tc-99m) tetrofosmin myocardial perfusion imaging with the patient in the prone position overcomes soft tissue attenuation; moreover it provides an inexpensive, accurate approach to limit the number of unnecessary rest perfusion studies and coronary angiographies performed. PMID:26559981

  12. The use of a respiratory rate biofeedback device to reduce dental anxiety: an exploratory investigation.

    PubMed

    Morarend, Quinn A; Spector, Michael L; Dawson, Deborah V; Clark, Steven H; Holmes, David C

    2011-06-01

    Anxiety experienced by individuals visiting the dental office to receive treatment is common. Evidence has shown biofeedback to be a useful modality of treatment for numerous maladies associated with anxiety. The purpose of the current pilot study was to investigate the use of a novel biofeedback device (RESPeRATE™) to reduce patients' pre-operative general anxiety levels and consequently reduce the pain associated with dental injections. Eighty-one subjects participated in this study, forty in the experimental group and forty-one in the control group. Subjects in the experimental group used the biofeedback technique, while those in the control group were not exposed to any biofeedback. All subjects filled out a pre-injection anxiety survey, then received an inferior alveolar injection of local anesthetic. Post-injection, both groups were given an anxiety survey and asked to respond to four questions regarding the injection experience using a Visual Analog Scale (VAS). With the use of the respiratory rate biofeedback device, there was a significant reduction of negative feelings regarding the overall injection experience, as measured by a VAS. Our findings demonstrate that this novel biofeedback technique may be helpful in the amelioration of dental anxiety, and may help produce a more pleasant overall experience for the patient. PMID:21365307

  13. Artifacts in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Krupa, Katarzyna; Bekiesińska-Figatowska, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Summary Artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging and foreign bodies within the patient’s body may be confused with a pathology or may reduce the quality of examinations. Radiologists are frequently not informed about the medical history of patients and face postoperative/other images they are not familiar with. A gallery of such images was presented in this manuscript. A truncation artifact in the spinal cord could be misinterpreted as a syrinx. Motion artifacts caused by breathing, cardiac movement, CSF pulsation/blood flow create a ghost artifact which can be reduced by patient immobilization, or cardiac/respiratory gating. Aliasing artifacts can be eliminated by increasing the field of view. An artificially hyperintense signal on FLAIR images can result from magnetic susceptibility artifacts, CSF/vascular pulsation, motion, but can also be found in patients undergoing MRI examinations while receiving supplemental oxygen. Metallic and other foreign bodies which may be found on and in patients’ bodies are the main group of artifacts and these are the focus of this study: e.g. make-up, tattoos, hairbands, clothes, endovascular embolization, prostheses, surgical clips, intraorbital and other medical implants, etc. Knowledge of different types of artifacts and their origin, and of possible foreign bodies is necessary to eliminate them or to reduce their negative influence on MR images by adjusting acquisition parameters. It is also necessary to take them into consideration when interpreting the images. Some proposals of reducing artifacts have been mentioned. Describing in detail the procedures to avoid or limit the artifacts would go beyond the scope of this paper but technical ways to reduce them can be found in the cited literature. PMID:25745524

  14. Clinical Use of Virtual Reality Distraction System to Reduce Anxiety and Pain in Dental Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Kenneth; Wiederhold, Brenda K.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Virtual reality (VR) has been used by clinicians to manage pain in clinical populations. This study examines the use of VR as a form of distraction for dental patients using both subjective and objective measures to determine how a VR system affects patients' reported anxiety level, pain level, and physiological factors. As predicted, results of self-evaluation questionnaires showed that patients experienced less anxiety and pain after undergoing VR treatment. Physiological data reported similar trends in decreased anxiety. Overall, the favorable subjective and objective responses suggest that VR distraction systems can reduce discomfort and pain for patients with mild to moderate fear and anxiety. PMID:24892198

  15. Clinical use of virtual reality distraction system to reduce anxiety and pain in dental procedures.

    PubMed

    Wiederhold, Mark D; Gao, Kenneth; Wiederhold, Brenda K

    2014-06-01

    Virtual reality (VR) has been used by clinicians to manage pain in clinical populations. This study examines the use of VR as a form of distraction for dental patients using both subjective and objective measures to determine how a VR system affects patients' reported anxiety level, pain level, and physiological factors. As predicted, results of self-evaluation questionnaires showed that patients experienced less anxiety and pain after undergoing VR treatment. Physiological data reported similar trends in decreased anxiety. Overall, the favorable subjective and objective responses suggest that VR distraction systems can reduce discomfort and pain for patients with mild to moderate fear and anxiety. PMID:24892198

  16. Short dental implants in reduced alveolar bone height: A review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Tutak, Marcin; Smektała, Tomasz; Schneider, Katarzyna; Gołębiewska, Edyta; Sporniak-Tutak, Katarzyna

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of short dental implants in distally reduced alveolar bone height. Material/Methods MedLine (PubMed and Ovid), ISI Web of Knowledge, and Cochrane databases were used for analysis. Searching was conducted using the search equation: ‘Dental Implants’ [Majr] AND (Short[TIAB] OR Shorter[TIAB]) AND (Implant[TIAB] OR Implants[TIAB]). Abstracts were screened by 2 independent reviewers. The articles included in the analysis were published in the English language and reported data on the use of implants with lengths below 10 mm in the posterior region with reduced alveolar bone height making the placement of longer implants impossible without additional surgical interventions. Articles concerning data on orthodontic implants and post-resection surgery reconstruction were excluded from analysis. Any disagreements between the 2 reviewers were resolved by a third reviewer. No time frame was used. Results Of the 791 articles initially found, automatic rejection of duplicates in the Endnotes X5 software resulted in 538 articles. After the selection of studies from databases, a bibliography of 32 eligible articles was searched for other publications. Through this method, 2 more studies were added. Conclusions The analysis of the results of different studies on the use of short dental implants showed that this treatment could be effective and comparable to the use of standard-length implants. This study revealed that rough-surfaced implants with lengths between 6–10 mm placed in the posterior mandible are the preferred solution. However, more detailed data will require additional prospective studies. PMID:24257121

  17. Contrast adaptive total p-norm variation minimization approach to CT reconstruction for artifact reduction in reduced-view brain perfusion CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang-Won; Kim, Jong-Hyo

    2011-03-01

    Perfusion CT (PCT) examinations are getting more frequently used for diagnosis of acute brain diseases such as hemorrhage and infarction, because the functional map images it produces such as regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV), and mean transit time (MTT) may provide critical information in the emergency work-up of patient care. However, a typical PCT scans the same slices several tens of times after injection of contrast agent, which leads to much increased radiation dose and is inevitability of growing concern for radiation-induced cancer risk. Reducing the number of views in projection in combination of TV minimization reconstruction technique is being regarded as an option for radiation reduction. However, reconstruction artifacts due to insufficient number of X-ray projections become problematic especially when high contrast enhancement signals are present or patient's motion occurred. In this study, we present a novel reconstruction technique using contrast-adaptive TpV minimization that can reduce reconstruction artifacts effectively by using different p-norms in high contrast and low contrast objects. In the proposed method, high contrast components are first reconstructed using thresholded projection data and low p-norm total variation to reflect sparseness in both projection and reconstruction spaces. Next, projection data are modified to contain only low contrast objects by creating projection data of reconstructed high contrast components and subtracting them from original projection data. Then, the low contrast projection data are reconstructed by using relatively high p-norm TV minimization technique, and are combined with the reconstructed high contrast component images to produce final reconstructed images. The proposed algorithm was applied to numerical phantom and a clinical data set of brain PCT exam, and the resultant images were compared with those using filtered back projection (FBP) and conventional TV

  18. A review of the role of solar ultraviolet-B irradiance and vitamin D in reducing risk of dental caries

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Large geographical variations in dental health and tooth loss among US adolescents and young adults have been reported since the mid-1800s. Studies in the 1920s and 1930s noted that vitamin D and ultraviolet-B (UVB) irradiance reduced caries formation, the proposed mechanism being improved calcium absorption and metabolism. This paper reviews the history of studies of dental caries with respect to vitamin D, geographical location and available solar UVB doses. In addition, data on mean dental health rank by state for US servicemen from three periods, 1918, 1934 and 1943, were used in regression analyses with respect to summertime solar UVB doses and an index for mottled enamel, a proxy for natural fluoridation of drinking water, for 1935. There was a significant inverse correlation for dental health rank with respect to solar UVB from doses of 4.0 to 6.5 kJ/m2 with little change thereafter. Adding data for mottled enamel rates for the states with UvB doses <6.6 kJ/m2 improved the adjusted R2 from 0.45 to 0.52. The mechanism whereby UVB reduces risk of dental caries is likely through production of vitamin D, followed by induction of cathelicidin and defensins, which have antimicrobial properties. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations at or above 30–40 ng/ml should significantly reduce the formation of dental caries. It is unfortunate that the UVB and vitamin D findings were not given more consideration in the 1950s as a way to reduce the risk of dental caries when water fluoridation was being proposed. PMID:22110779

  19. Brief oral health promotion intervention among parents of young children to reduce early childhood dental decay

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Severe untreated dental decay affects a child’s growth, body weight, quality of life as well as cognitive development, and the effects extend beyond the child to the family, the community and the health care system. Early health behavioural factors, including dietary practices and eating patterns, can play a major role in the initiation and development of oral diseases, particularly dental caries. The parent/caregiver, usually the mother, has a critical role in the adoption of protective health care behaviours and parental feeding practices strongly influence children’s eating behaviours. This study will test if an early oral health promotion intervention through the use of brief motivational interviewing (MI) and anticipatory guidance (AG) approaches can reduce the incidence of early childhood dental decay and obesity. Methods The study will be a randomised controlled study with parents and their new-born child/ren who are seen at 6–12 weeks of age by a child/community health nurse. Consenting parents will complete a questionnaire on oral health knowledge, behaviours, self-efficacy, oral health fatalism, parenting stress, prenatal and peri-natal health and socio-demographic factors at study commencement and at 12 and 36 months. Each child–parent pair will be allocated to an intervention or a standard care group, using a computer-generated random blocks. The standard group will be managed through the standard early oral health screening program; “lift the lip”. The intervention group will be provided with tailored oral health counselling by oral health consultants trained in MI and AG. Participating children will be examined at 24, and 36 months for the occurrence of dental decay and have their height and weight recorded. Dietary information obtained from a food frequency chart will be used to determine food and dietary patterns. Data analysis will use intention to treat and per protocol analysis and will use tests of independent

  20. Metal artifact reduction in CT using tissue-class modeling and adaptive prefiltering

    SciTech Connect

    Bal, Matthieu; Spies, Lothar

    2006-08-15

    High-density objects such as metal prostheses, surgical clips, or dental fillings generate streak-like artifacts in computed tomography images. We present a novel method for metal artifact reduction by in-painting missing information into the corrupted sinogram. The information is provided by a tissue-class model extracted from the distorted image. To this end the image is first adaptively filtered to reduce the noise content and to smooth out streak artifacts. Consecutively, the image is segmented into different material classes using a clustering algorithm. The corrupted and missing information in the original sinogram is completed using the forward projected information from the tissue-class model. The performance of the correction method is assessed on phantom images. Clinical images featuring a broad spectrum of metal artifacts are studied. Phantom and clinical studies show that metal artifacts, such as streaks, are significantly reduced and shadows in the image are eliminated. Furthermore, the novel approach improves detectability of organ contours. This can be of great relevance, for instance, in radiation therapy planning, where images affected by metal artifacts may lead to suboptimal treatment plans.

  1. Windmill artifacts analysis in MSCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amir, O.; Sabo-Napadensky, I.

    2006-03-01

    One of the most important advantages of the novel multi slice CT (MSCT) with increased number of slices is the ability to reduce the scan time. However, does the increased number of slices in the MSCT enforce us to reduce the pitch, in order to avoid windmill artifacts, hence preventing us from decreasing the scan time? In this work we address this issue along with other aspects of the windmill artifacts. We study the dependence of the windmill artifacts, their strength and frequency, on the number of slices and on the pitch. The study demonstrates, that when retaining constant bed speed while increasing the number of slices, the intensity of the windmill artifacts is reduced significantly. Images of scans performed with the same pitch, yet with various number of slices are compared. It is observed, that the intensity of the windmill artifacts is similar, independent of the number of slices. The frequency of the artifacts however, increases with the number of slices. The study concludes that updating a clinical protocol performed with a low number of slices MSCT, to a similar protocol performed with high number of slices MSCT, the same pitch can be used attaining better IQ. Scanning with the same pitch using wider coverage enables an advantageous shorter scan time in novel MSCT.

  2. Metal artifact suppression in megavoltage computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiner, L. John; Rogers, Myron; Salomons, Greg; Kerr, Andrew

    2005-04-01

    There has been considerable interest in megavoltage CT (MVCT) imaging associated with the development of image guided radiation therapy. It is clear that MVCT can provide good image quality for patient setup verification with soft tissue contrast much better than noted in conventional megavoltage portal imaging. In addition, it has been observed that MVCT images exhibit considerably reduced artifacts surrounding metal implants (e.g., surgical clips, hip implants, dental fillings) compared to conventional diagnostic CT images (kVCT). When encountered, these artifacts greatly limit the usefulness of kVCT images, and a variety of solutions have been proposed to remove the artifacts, but these have met with only partial success. In this paper, we investigate the potential for CT imaging in regions surrounding metal implants using high-energy photons from a Cobalt-60 source and from a 4 MV linear accelerator. MVCT and kVCT images of contrast phantoms and a phantom containing a hip prosthesis are compared and analysed. We show that MVCT scans provide good fidelity for CT number quantification in the high-density regions of the images, and in the regions immediately adjacent to the metal implants. They also provide structural details within the high-density inserts and implants. Calculations will show that practical clinical MVCT imaging, able to detect 3% contrast objects, should be achievable with doses of about 2.5cGy. This suggests that MVCT not only has a role in radiotherapy treatment planning and guidance, but may also be indicated for surgical guidance and follow-up in regions where metal implants cannot be avoided.

  3. Artifacts as Conventional Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Deborah R.; Callanan, Maureen A.

    2007-01-01

    What underlies children's understanding of artifacts? Studies suggest that beginning around age 7, people reason about artifacts in terms of the inventor's purpose--termed "the design stance." Our two studies emphasize another component of artifact understanding--the cultural nature of artifacts--by demonstrating people's sensitivity to an…

  4. Postprocessing algorithms to minimize fixed-pattern artifact and reduce trigger jitter in swept source optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gangjun; Tan, Ou; Gao, Simon S.; Pechauer, Alex D.; Lee, ByungKun; Lu, Chen D.; Fujimoto, James G.; Huang, David

    2015-01-01

    We propose methods to align interferograms affected by trigger jitter to a reference interferogram based on the information (amplitude/phase) at a fixed-pattern noise location to reduce residual fixed-pattern noise and improve the phase stability of swept source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) systems. One proposed method achieved this by introducing a wavenumber shift (k-shift) in the interferograms of interest and searching for the k-shift that minimized the fixed-pattern noise amplitude. The other method calculated the relative k-shift using the phase information at the residual fixed-pattern noise location. Repeating this wavenumber alignment procedure for all A-lines of interest produced fixed-pattern noise free and phase stable OCT images. A system incorporating these correction routines was used for human retina OCT and Doppler OCT imaging. The results from the two methods were compared, and it was found that the intensity-based method provided better results. PMID:25969023

  5. PET/CT Artifacts

    PubMed Central

    Blodgett, Todd M.; Mehta, Ajeet S.; Mehta, Amar S.; Laymon, Charles M.; Carney, Jonathan; Townsend, David W.

    2014-01-01

    There are several artifacts encountered in PET/CT imaging, including attenuation correction (AC) artifacts associated with using CT for attenuation correction. Several artifacts can mimic a 2-deoxy-2-[18F] fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) avid malignant lesions and therefore recognition of these artifacts is clinically relevant. Our goal was to identify and characterize these artifacts and also discuss some protocol variables that may affect image quality in PET/CT. PMID:21237418

  6. Mesoscale hybrid calibration artifact

    DOEpatents

    Tran, Hy D.; Claudet, Andre A.; Oliver, Andrew D.

    2010-09-07

    A mesoscale calibration artifact, also called a hybrid artifact, suitable for hybrid dimensional measurement and the method for make the artifact. The hybrid artifact has structural characteristics that make it suitable for dimensional measurement in both vision-based systems and touch-probe-based systems. The hybrid artifact employs the intersection of bulk-micromachined planes to fabricate edges that are sharp to the nanometer level and intersecting planes with crystal-lattice-defined angles.

  7. PROPRANOLOL AND D-CYCLOSERINE AS ADJUNCTIVE MEDICATIONS IN REDUCING DENTAL FEAR IN SEDATION PRACTICE

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, Lisa J.; McNeil, Daniel W.; Milgrom, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Extensive research and clinical experience have demonstrated the usefulness of sedation in helping fearful patients receive dental treatment, particularly when they have urgent treatment needs. In addition, the efficacy of behavioural programmes for managing dental fears is well established. While often these two approaches are seen as oppositional, our work in Seattle, Morgantown and at King’s College London Dental Institute demonstrates the complementarity of the two approaches. Using the example of two compounds, one very familiar, propranolol, and one that has recently become of interest, D-cycloserine, we wish to illustrate the manner in which these medications can be used to enhance behavioural approaches to managing dental anxiety. PMID:20151608

  8. Effectiveness of benzocaine in reducing deep cavity restoration and post-extraction stress in dental patients

    PubMed Central

    Al-Samadani, Khalid H.; Gazal, Giath

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the effectiveness of topical anesthetic, 20% benzocaine in relieving pain and stress in patients following deep cavity restoration and extraction of teeth under local anesthesia (LA). Methods: A prospective clinical trial was conducted from October 2014 until April 2015 at Taibah University, Al Madinah Al Munawarah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Forty-five patients were included in the 20% benzocaine group, and 46 in the normal saline group. Evaluation of the dental stress was made pre-operatively and immediately post-operative treatment using the visual analogue scale (VAS). Furthermore, discomfort of the injections were recorded by the patients after each treatment on standard 100 mm VAS, tagged at the endpoints with “no pain” (0 mm) and “unbearable pain” (100 mm). Results: There were statistically significant differences between the mean stress scores for patients in the benzocaine and normal saline groups post-operatively (p=0.002). There were significant differences between the mean pain scores for patients in the post buccal injection (p=0.001), post palatal injection (p=0.01), and the post inferior alveolar nerve block groups (p=0.02). Buccal, palatal, and inferior alveolar nerve block injections were more painful for patients in the normal saline group than the benzocaine group. Conclusion: This investigation has demonstrated that post-operative stress associated with deep cavity restoration and dental extractions under LA can be reduced by the application of topical anesthetic (20% benzocaine) at the operative site for intra-oral injections. PMID:26593169

  9. Detecting reduced bone mineral density from dental radiographs using statistical shape models.

    PubMed

    Allen, P Danny; Graham, Jim; Farnell, Damian J J; Harrison, Elizabeth J; Jacobs, Reinhilde; Nicopolou-Karayianni, Kety; Lindh, Christina; van der Stelt, Paul F; Horner, Keith; Devlin, Hugh

    2007-11-01

    We describe a novel method of estimating reduced bone mineral density (BMD) from dental panoramic tomograms (DPTs), which show the entire mandible. Careful expert width measurement of the inferior mandibular cortex has been shown to be predictive of BMD in hip and spine osteopenia and osteoporosis. We have implemented a method of automatic measurement of the width by active shape model search, using as training data 132 DPTs of female subjects whose BMD has been established by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. We demonstrate that widths measured after fully automatic search are significantly correlated with BMD, and exhibit less variability than manual measurements made by different experts. The correlation is highest towards the lateral region of the mandible, in a position different from that previously employed for manual width measurement. An receiver-operator characterstic (ROC) analysis for identifying osteopenia (T < -1: BMD more than one standard deviation below that of young healthy females) gives an area under curve (AUC) value of 0.64. Using a minimal interaction to initiate active shape model (ASM) search, the measurement can be made at the optimum region of the mandible, resulting in an AUC value of 0.71. Using an independent test set, AUC for detection of osteoporosis (T < -2.5) is 0.81. PMID:18046935

  10. Root Canal Therapy Reduces Multiple Dimensions of Pain: A National Dental PBRN Study

    PubMed Central

    Law, Alan S.; Nixdorf, Donald R.; Rabinowitz, Ira; Reams, Gregory J.; Smith, James A.; Torres, Anibal V.; Harris, D. Robert

    2014-01-01

    Background Initial orthograde root canal therapy (RCT) is used to treat dentoalveolar pathosis. The affect RCT has on pain intensity has been frequently reported, but the affect on other dimensions of pain has not. Also, the lack of large prospective studies involving diverse groups of patients and practitioners that are not involved in data collection suggest that there are multiple opportunities for bias to be introduced when this data is systematically aggregated. Method This prospective observational study assessed pain intensity, duration, and its interference with daily activities among RCT patients. Sixty-two practitioners (46 general dentists, 16 endodontists) in the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network enrolled patients requiring RCT. Patient reported data were collected before, immediately following, and one week after treatment using the Graded Chronic Pain Scale. Results Enrollment of 708 patients was completed over 6 months with 655 patients (93%) providing one-week follow-up data. Prior to treatment, patients reported a mean (±standard deviation) worst pain intensity of 5.3±3.8 (0-10 scale), 50% had “severe” pain (≥7), and mean days in pain and days pain interfered with activities were 3.6±2.7 and 0.5±1.2, respectively. Following treatment, patients reported a mean worst pain intensity of 3.0±3.2, 19% had “severe” pain, and mean days in pain and days with pain interference were 2.1±2.4 and 0.4±1.1, respectively. All changes were statistically significant (p<0.0001). Conclusions RCT is an effective treatment for patients experiencing pain, significantly reducing pain intensity, duration, and related interference. Further research is needed to reduce the proportion of patients reporting “severe” post-operative pain. PMID:25190605

  11. Use of cognitive artifacts in chemistry learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yengin, Ilker

    In everyday life, we interact with cognitive artifacts to receive and/or manipulate information so as to alter our thinking processes. CHEM/TEAC 869Q is a distance course that includes extensive explicit instruction in the use of a cognitive artifact. This study investigates issues related to the design of that online artifact. In order to understand design implications and how cognitive artifacts contribute to students' thinking and learning, a qualitative research methodology was engaged that utilized think aloud sessions. Participants' described constrained and structured cognitive models while using the artifact. The study also was informed by interviews and researcher's field notes. A purposeful sampling method led to the selection of participants, four males and two females, who had no prior history of using a course from the 869 series but who had experienced the scientific content covered by the CHEM869Q course. Analysis of the results showed both that a cognitive artifact may lead users' minds in decision making, and that problem solving processes were affected by cognitive artifact's design. When there is no design flaw, users generally thought that the cognitive artifact was helpful by simplifying steps, overcoming other limitations, and reducing errors in a reliable, effective, and easy to use way. Moreover, results showed that successful implementation of cognitive artifacts into teaching --learning practices depended on user willingness to transfer a task to the artifact. While users may like the idea of benefiting from a cognitive artifact, nevertheless, they may tend to limit their usage. They sometimes think that delegating a task to a cognitive artifact makes them dependent, and that they may not learn how to perform the tasks by themselves. They appear more willing to use a cognitive artifact after they have done the task by themselves.

  12. Frequent Dental Scaling Is Associated with a Reduced Risk of Periprosthetic Infection following Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Nationwide Population-Based Nested Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Ta-Wei; Lin, Tzu-Chieh; Ho, Chia-Jung; Kao Yang, Yea-Huei; Yang, Chyun-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Oral bacteremia has been presumed to be an important risk factor for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) infection. We aimed to investigate whether dental scaling could reduce the risk of TKA infection. A nested case-control study was conducted to compare 1,291 TKA patients who underwent resection arthroplasty for infected TKA and 5,004 matched controls without infection in the TKA cohort of Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). The frequency of dental scaling was analyzed. Multiple conditional logistic regression was used to assess the frequency of dental scaling and the risk of TKA infection. The percentage of patients who received dental scaling was higher in the control group than in the TKA infection group. The risk for TKA infection was 20% lower for patients who received dental scaling at least once within a 3-year period than for patients who never received dental scaling. Moreover, the risk of TKA infection was reduced by 31% among patients who underwent more frequent dental scaling (5–6 times within 3 years). Frequent and regular dental scaling is associated with a reduced risk of TKA infection. PMID:27336912

  13. Factors associated with reduced compliance of children to dental preventive measures.

    PubMed

    Ashkenazi, Malka; Bidoosi, Mervat; Levin, Liran

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to record self-reported factors for non-compliance to 'dental home' preventive measures among pediatric patients, and to clarify whether number or frequency of recall appointments increases their long-term compliance to dental home. Children attending recall appointments in a pediatric dental clinic were interviewed regarding their compliance as well as factors for non-compliance with the previously recommended preventive measures. Files of 651 children were analyzed. A significant positive correlation was found between compliance with regular teeth brushing twice a day (p < 0.0001), using correct fluoride concentration toothpaste (p < 0.0001), drinking water between meals (p < 0.0001), using Elmex gel (p < 0.0001), flossing (p < 0.002) and number of recall appointments. The most common factor for non-compliance to 'dental home' was 'I forgot'. Not flossing was commonly justified by performance difficulty while non-compliance to Elmex gel or to mouth rinses was attributed mainly to 'bad taste'. Additional common reasons were 'it was finished', 'my parents did not purchase', 'I did not find it at home', 'I did not know I need to'. Frequency and number of recall appointments might improve compliance with dental preventive measures. Referring to the specific factors of personal non-compliance may increase compliance. PMID:21698350

  14. Ability of healthy and inflamed human dental pulp to reduce hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Paola; Varvara, Giuseppe; Murmura, Giovanna; Terlizzi, Antonio; Caputi, Sergio

    2003-10-01

    This study examined the defensive ability of human dental pulp against H2O2 in healthy and reversible and irreversible pulpitis tissues through determination of catalase activity by spectrophotometric methods. Thirty-five systemically healthy patients were donors of the pulp tissue, and pulp conditions were assessed using clinical and X-ray evaluations. Catalase activity was 1.61 +/- 0.23 U mg(-1) protein in the healthy tissues, 2.99 +/- 0.45 U mg(-1) protein in the reversible pulpitis tissues, and 2.44 +/- 467 mU mg(-1) protein in the irreversible pulpitis tissues. All differences between the groups were statistically significant. These results point to a role for catalase during dental pulp inflammation in humans, and therefore demonstrate an inherent biological defense system against reactive oxidants in human dental pulp. PMID:12974692

  15. Metal artifact reduction in tomosynthesis imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaoxia; Yan, Ming; Tao, Kun; Xuan, Xiao; Sabol, John M.; Lai, Hao

    2015-03-01

    The utility of digital tomosynthesis has been shown for many clinical scenarios including post orthopedic surgery applications. However, two kinds of metal artifacts can influence diagnosis: undershooting and ripple. In this paper, we describe a novel metal artifact reduction (MAR) algorithm to reduce both of these artifacts within the filtered backprojection framework. First, metal areas that are prone to cause artifacts are identified in the raw projection images. These areas are filled with values similar to those in the local neighborhood. During the filtering step, the filled projection is free of undershooting due to the resulting smooth transition near the metal edge. Finally, the filled area is fused with the filtered raw projection data to recover the metal. Since the metal areas are recognized during the back projection step, anatomy and metal can be distinguished - reducing ripple artifacts. Phantom and clinical experiments were designed to quantitatively and qualitatively evaluate the algorithms. Based on phantom images with and without metal implants, the Artifact Spread Function (ASF) was used to quantify image quality in the ripple artifact area. The tail of the ASF with MAR decreases from in-plane to out-of-plane, implying a good artifact reduction, while the ASF without MAR remains high over a wider range. An intensity plot was utilized to analyze the edge of undershooting areas. The results illustrate that MAR reduces undershooting while preserving the edge and size of the metal. Clinical images evaluated by physicists and technologists agree with these quantitative results to further demonstrate the algorithm's effectiveness.

  16. MADR: metal artifact detection and reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, Sunil Prasad; Ha, Sungsoo; Mueller, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    Metal in CT-imaged objects drastically reduces the quality of these images due to the severe artifacts it can cause. Most metal artifacts reduction (MAR) algorithms consider the metal-affected sinogram portions as the corrupted data and replace them via sophisticated interpolation methods. While these schemes are successful in removing the metal artifacts, they fail to recover some of the edge information. To address these problems, the frequency shift metal artifact reduction algorithm (FSMAR) was recently proposed. It exploits the information hidden in the uncorrected image and combines the high frequency (edge) components of the uncorrected image with the low frequency components of the corrected image. Although this can effectively transfer the edge information of the uncorrected image, it also introduces some unwanted artifacts. The essential problem of these algorithms is that they lack the capability of detecting the artifacts and as a result cannot discriminate between desired and undesired edges. We propose a scheme that does better in these respects. Our Metal Artifact Detection and Reduction (MADR) scheme constructs a weight map which stores whether a pixel in the uncorrected image belongs to an artifact region or a non-artifact region. This weight matrix is optimal in the Linear Minimum Mean Square Sense (LMMSE). Our results demonstrate that MADR outperforms the existing algorithms and ensures that the anatomical structures close to metal implants are better preserved.

  17. Edge-preserving metal artifact reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Esther; Raupach, Rainer; Lell, Michael; Schmidt, Bernhard; Kachelriess, Marc

    2012-03-01

    Metal implants in the field of measurement lead to strong artifacts in CT images and reduce the image quality and the diagnostic value severely. We introduce frequency split metal artifact reduction (FSMAR), a conceptually new MAR method which is designed to reduce metal artifacts and preserve details and edges of structures even close to metal implants. There are many MAR methods which simply replace unreliable parts of the projection data by inpainting. FSMAR is a combination of an inpainting-based MAR method with a frequency split approach. Normalized metal artifact reduction (NMAR) is chosen as the inpainting-based MAR method in this work. The high frequencies of the original image, where all rawdata were used for the reconstruction, are combined with an NMAR-corrected image. NMAR uses a normalization step to reduce metal artifacts without introducing severe new artifacts. Algorithms using a frequency split were already used in CT for example to reduce cone-beam artifacts. FSMAR is tested for patient datasets with different metal implants. The study includes patients with hip prostheses, a neuro coil, and a spine fixation. All datasets were scanned with modern clinical dual source CT scanners. In contrast to other MAR methods, FSMAR yields images without the usual blurring close to metal implants.

  18. Corrosion and Preservation of Bronze Artifacts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Robert

    1980-01-01

    Reviews chemical information relating to the corrosion of bronze artifacts. Properties of copper alloys are reviewed, with a thorough discussion of the specialized properties of bronze. Techniques to reduce or eliminate corrosion are listed. (CS)

  19. Artifacts in Digital Collections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Stephen G.

    This paper discusses the preservation of digital resources in research libraries. The first section addresses the preservation imperative, including the challenges of quantity, stability of media, economics, and the contingent value of artifacts. The second section describes the artifact in question (i.e., an information resource in which the…

  20. Thoracotomy reduces intrinsic brain movement caused by heartbeat and respiration: a simple method to prevent motion artifact for in vivo experiments.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Nobuyoshi; Takahara, Yuji; Matsuki, Norio; Ikegaya, Yuji

    2011-10-01

    Recent technical advances in electrophysiological recording and functional imaging from the brain of living animals have promoted our understandings of the brain function, but these in vivo experiments are still technically demanding and often suffer from spontaneous pulsation, i.e., brain movements caused by respiration and heartbeat. Here we report that thoracotomy suppresses the motion artifact to a practically negligible level. This simple method will be useful in a wide variety of in vivo experiments, such as patch-clamp physiology, and optical imaging of neurons, glial cell, and blood vessels. PMID:21787813

  1. WE-D-18A-01: Evaluation of Three Commercial Metal Artifact Reduction Methods for CT Simulations in Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J; Kerns, J; Nute, J; Liu, X; Stingo, F; Followill, D; Mirkovic, D; Howell, R; Kry, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate three commercial metal artifact reduction methods (MAR) in the context of radiation therapy treatment planning. Methods: Three MAR strategies were evaluated: Philips O-MAR, monochromatic imaging using Gemstone Spectral Imaging (GSI) dual energy CT, and monochromatic imaging with metal artifact reduction software (GSIMARs). The Gammex RMI 467 tissue characterization phantom with several metal rods and two anthropomorphic phantoms (pelvic phantom with hip prosthesis and head phantom with dental fillings), were scanned with and without (baseline) metals. Each MAR method was evaluated based on CT number accuracy, metal size accuracy, and reduction in the severity of streak artifacts. CT number difference maps between the baseline and metal scan images were calculated, and the severity of streak artifacts was quantified using the percentage of pixels with >40 HU error (“bad pixels”). Results: Philips O-MAR generally reduced HU errors in the RMI phantom. However, increased errors and induced artifacts were observed for lung materials. GSI monochromatic 70keV images generally showed similar HU errors as 120kVp imaging, while 140keV images reduced errors. GSI-MARs systematically reduced errors compared to GSI monochromatic imaging. All imaging techniques preserved the diameter of a stainless steel rod to within ±1.6mm (2 pixels). For the hip prosthesis, O-MAR reduced the average % bad pixels from 47% to 32%. For GSI 140keV imaging, the percent of bad pixels was reduced from 37% to 29% compared to 120kVp imaging, while GSI-MARs further reduced it to 12%. For the head phantom, none of the MAR methods were particularly successful. Conclusion: The three MAR methods all improve CT images for treatment planning to some degree, but none of them are globally effective for all conditions. The MAR methods were successful for large metal implants in a homogeneous environment (hip prosthesis) but were not successful for the more complicated case of dental

  2. Artifacts and essentialism

    PubMed Central

    Gelman, Susan A.

    2013-01-01

    Psychological essentialism is an intuitive folk belief positing that certain categories have a non-obvious inner “essence” that gives rise to observable features. Although this belief most commonly characterizes natural kind categories, I argue that psychological essentialism can also be extended in important ways to artifact concepts. Specifically, concepts of individual artifacts include the non-obvious feature of object history, which is evident when making judgments regarding authenticity and ownership. Classic examples include famous works of art (e.g., the Mona Lisa is authentic because of its provenance), but ordinary artifacts likewise receive value from their history (e.g., a worn and tattered blanket may have special value if it was one's childhood possession). Moreover, in some cases, object history may be thought to have causal effects on individual artifacts, much as an animal essence has causal effects. I review empirical support for these claims and consider the implications for both artifact concepts and essentialism. This perspective suggests that artifact concepts cannot be contained in a theoretical framework that focuses exclusively on similarity or even function. Furthermore, although there are significant differences between essentialism of natural kinds and essentialism of artifact individuals, the commonalities suggest that psychological essentialism may not derive from folk biology but instead may reflect more domain-general perspectives on the world. PMID:23976903

  3. Reference Artifacts for NDE

    SciTech Connect

    Bono, M; Hibbard, R; Martz, H E

    2003-02-11

    Two reference artifacts will be fabricated for this study. One of the artifacts will have a cylindrical geometry and will contain features similar to those on an SNRT target. The second artifact will have a spherical geometry and will contain features similar to those on a Double Shell target. The artifacts were designed for manufacturability and to provide a range of features that can be measured using NDE methods. The cylindrical reference artifact is illustrated in Figure 1. This artifact consists of a polystyrene body containing two steps and a machined slot, into which will fit a tracer made of doped polystyrene. The polystyrene body contains several grooves and can be fabricated entirely on a diamond turning machine. The body can be machined by turning a PS rod to a diameter slightly greater than the finished diameter of 2 mm. The part can be moved off-axis to face it off and to machine the steps, slot, and grooves. The tracer contains a drilled hole and a milled slot, which could be machined with a single setup on a milling machine. Once assembled, the artifact could be placed in a Be tube or other structure relevant to target assemblies. The assembled artifact will contain many features that could be measured using various NDE methods. Some of these features are: Diameter; Maximum height; Step height; Dimensions of upper step; Radius at the union of the bottom of step and the vertical wall; Sizes of the grooves; Distance from step to groove; Slot width; Slot height; Location of the groove beneath the tracer; Diameter and location of drilled hole in tracer; and Size and location of slot in tracer. The spherical reference artifact is illustrated in Figure 2. This artifact is intended to replicate a double shell target, which consists of concentric polymer spheres separated by aerogel. The artifact consists of an upper hemispherical shell composed of 1% BrCH, which mates via a step joint with a hemispherical component made of polystyrene. This lower component

  4. An evaluation of a commercial chewing gum in combination with normal toothbrushing for reducing dental plaque and gingivitis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, N C; Galustians, J H; Qaqish, J G

    2001-07-01

    New evidence suggests a beneficial outcome to chewing a sugarless gum as an added component to a regular, twice-daily toothbrushing regimen. Results of a 4-week study performed on 78 adults with preexisting gingivitis showed a significant reduction of dental plaque and gingivitis when the test group of 39 adults chewed 2 pieces of ARM & HAMMER Dental Care The Baking Soda Gum (AHDC)--a sugar-free chewing gum containing sorbitol, malitol, xylitol, and sodium bicarbonate--for 20 minutes twice a day in conjunction with once-daily toothbrushing for 60 seconds. The control group, also comprised of 39 adults, used breath mints (the study placebo) twice a day in conjunction with the same toothbrushing regimen. There were no statistically significant differences in plaque and gingivitis scores at the baseline examination. Using the Quigley-Hein Plaque Index, the test group experienced a 17% reduction in plaque over 4 weeks, while the control group reduced their plaque amounts by approximately 9% over the same period. Lobene's Mean Gingivitis Index scores were equally significant: a nearly 10% decline for the test group compared to almost 2% for the control group. This article describes the 4-week study and its promising results. PMID:11913304

  5. Voting strategy for artifact reduction in digital breast tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Tao; Moore, Richard H.; Kopans, Daniel B.

    2006-07-15

    Artifacts are observed in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) reconstructions due to the small number of projections and the narrow angular range that are typically employed in tomosynthesis imaging. In this work, we investigate the reconstruction artifacts that are caused by high-attenuation features in breast and develop several artifact reduction methods based on a 'voting strategy'. The voting strategy identifies the projection(s) that would introduce artifacts to a voxel and rejects the projection(s) when reconstructing the voxel. Four approaches to the voting strategy were compared, including projection segmentation, maximum contribution deduction, one-step classification, and iterative classification. The projection segmentation method, based on segmentation of high-attenuation features from the projections, effectively reduces artifacts caused by metal and large calcifications that can be reliably detected and segmented from projections. The other three methods are based on the observation that contributions from artifact-inducing projections have higher value than those from normal projections. These methods attempt to identify the projection(s) that would cause artifacts by comparing contributions from different projections. Among the three methods, the iterative classification method provides the best artifact reduction; however, it can generate many false positive classifications that degrade the image quality. The maximum contribution deduction method and one-step classification method both reduce artifacts well from small calcifications, although the performance of artifact reduction is slightly better with the one-step classification. The combination of one-step classification and projection segmentation removes artifacts from both large and small calcifications.

  6. Influence of metallic artifact filtering on MEG signals for source localization during interictal epileptiform activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliorelli, Carolina; Alonso, Joan F.; Romero, Sergio; Mañanas, Miguel A.; Nowak, Rafał; Russi, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Objective. Medical intractable epilepsy is a common condition that affects 40% of epileptic patients that generally have to undergo resective surgery. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) has been increasingly used to identify the epileptogenic foci through equivalent current dipole (ECD) modeling, one of the most accepted methods to obtain an accurate localization of interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs). Modeling requires that MEG signals are adequately preprocessed to reduce interferences, a task that has been greatly improved by the use of blind source separation (BSS) methods. MEG recordings are highly sensitive to metallic interferences originated inside the head by implanted intracranial electrodes, dental prosthesis, etc and also coming from external sources such as pacemakers or vagal stimulators. To reduce these artifacts, a BSS-based fully automatic procedure was recently developed and validated, showing an effective reduction of metallic artifacts in simulated and real signals (Migliorelli et al 2015 J. Neural Eng. 12 046001). The main objective of this study was to evaluate its effects in the detection of IEDs and ECD modeling of patients with focal epilepsy and metallic interference. Approach. A comparison between the resulting positions of ECDs was performed: without removing metallic interference; rejecting only channels with large metallic artifacts; and after BSS-based reduction. Measures of dispersion and distance of ECDs were defined to analyze the results. Main results. The relationship between the artifact-to-signal ratio and ECD fitting showed that higher values of metallic interference produced highly scattered dipoles. Results revealed a significant reduction on dispersion using the BSS-based reduction procedure, yielding feasible locations of ECDs in contrast to the other two approaches. Significance. The automatic BSS-based method can be applied to MEG datasets affected by metallic artifacts as a processing step to improve the localization of

  7. Three-dimensional dental imaging by spiral CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannier, Michael W.; Hildebolt, Charles F.; Conover, Gary; Knapp, Robert H.; Yokoyama-Crothers, Naoko; Wang, Ge

    1995-05-01

    Three-dimensional image acquisition, display, and analysis of dental structures was performed and validated using spiral computed tomography (SCT) with metal artifact suppression. Isolated extracted teeth, a dry mandible, cadaver mandible, and cadaver head were scanned and reconstructed using a spiral CT scanner (Siemens Somatom PLUS-S) with 1 mm detector collimation, 1-mm table feed, and 0.1 - 1 mm reconstruction interval using specially developed software. Algorithms for metal artifact reduction including extended attenuation range and interpolation of missing projections were applied. Volumetric rendering of voxel sum images was performed to synthesize images comparable to conventional intraoral dental radiographs. Direct comparison of voxel-based synthetic and digitized film images was made. Several isolated, extracted teeth were sectioned with a diamond saw and submitted for histomorphometric analysis to aid in direct comparison with CT slice images obtained by multiplanar reconstruction. Metal artifact reduction was successful in markedly reducing the streaks and star patterns that usually accompany metallic restorations and intraoral appliances. Individual teeth were comparable to CT slice images. Voxel sum images were comparable to dental radiographs; however, for the SCT images, the spatial resolution was higher within the plane of section than it was orthogonal to the plane of section. Serial examinations were obtained by SCT, registered by surface matching, and interval change measured by 3D subtraction. Simulated lesions and restorations were introduced and quantitatively evaluated pre- and post-interventionally to assess imaging method performance.

  8. Reduced dental calcium expression and dental mass in chronic sleep deprived rats: Combined EDS, TOF-SIMS, and micro-CT analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Yi-Jie; Huang, Yung-Kai; Chou, Hsiu-Chu; Pai, Man-Hui; Lee, Ai-Wei; Mai, Fu-Der; Chang, Hung-Ming

    2015-08-01

    Teeth are the hardest tissue in the body. The growth of teeth is closely regulated by circadian rhythmicity. Considering that sleep deprivation (SD) is a severe condition that disrupts normal circadian rhythmicity, this study was conducted to determine whether calcium expression (the major element participating in teeth constitution), and dental mass would be significantly impaired following SD. Adolescent rats subjected to 3 weeks of SD were processed for energy dispersive spectrum (EDS), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) analyses. The EDS and TOF-SIMS results indicated that high calcium intensity was detected in both the upper and lower incisors of untreated rats. Micro-CT analysis corresponded closely with spectral data in which an enhanced dental mass was calculated in intact animals. However, following SD, both calcium expression and the dental mass were remarkably decreased to nearly half those of the untreated values. Because SD plays a detrimental role in impairing dental structure, establishing satisfactory sleep behavior would therefore serve as a crucial strategy for preventing or improving prevalent dental dysfunctions.

  9. Facts in artifacts

    PubMed Central

    Bindhu, PR; Krishnapillai, Rekha; Thomas, Priya; Jayanthi, P

    2013-01-01

    Examination of microscopic sections of animal tissues reveals facts which are not always related to its normal histology or pathology. Processing of tissue specimens consists of lengthy procedures from the stage of surgical removal to the stained and mounted microscopic sections. Defects are common in tissue sections as a result of faulty procedures. These defects are referred to as artifacts. They lead to misinterpretation of histopathological diagnosis but at times they throw limelight into diagnosis. This paper attempts to put together all the facts regarding the various artifacts that are encountered in histopathology. PMID:24574659

  10. A feasibility study of digital tomosynthesis for volumetric dental imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, M. K.; Kim, H. K.; Youn, H.; Kim, S. S.

    2012-03-01

    We present a volumetric dental tomography method that compensates for insufficient projection views obtained from limited-angle scans. The reconstruction algorithm is based on the backprojection filtering method which employs apodizing filters that reduce out-of-plane blur artifacts and suppress high-frequency noise. In order to accompolish this volumetric imaging two volume-reconstructed datasets are synthesized. These individual datasets provide two different limited-angle scans performed at orthogonal angles. The obtained reconstructed images, using less than 15% of the number of projection views needed for a full skull phantom scan, demonstrate the potential use of the proposed method in dental imaging applications. This method enables a much smaller radiation dose for the patient compared to conventional dental tomography.

  11. Artifacts of Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frausto, Tomas Ybarra

    Artifacts from Mexico are described and illustrated (1) to assist the Mexican American child in retaining pride in his social, historical, and cultural past and (2) to promote understanding by teachers and students of the cultural background of the Mexican American. The descriptions relate both the purposes for which the objects were created and…

  12. ORGANIC SPECIATION SAMPLING ARTIFACTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sampling artifacts for molecular markers from organic speciation of particulate matter were investigated by analyzing forty-one samples collected in Philadelphia as a part of the Northeast Oxidant and Particulate Study (NEOPS). Samples were collected using a high volume sampler ...

  13. Dental Amalgam

    MedlinePlus

    ... Products and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam Dental Amalgam Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Dental amalgam is a dental filling material which is ...

  14. Artifacts in Breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Anthony, Marina-Portia; Nguyen, Dustin; Friedlander, Lauren; Mango, Victoria; Wynn, Ralph; Ha, Richard

    2016-01-01

    As breast magnetic resonance imaging has evolved to become a routine part of clinical practice, so too has the need for radiologists to be aware of its potential pitfalls and limitations. Unique challenges arise in the identification and remedy of artifacts in breast magnetic resonance imaging, and it is important that radiologists and technicians work together to optimize protocols and monitor examinations such that these may be minimized or avoided entirely. This article presents patient-related and technical artifacts that may give rise to reduced image quality and ways to recognize and reduce them. PMID:26343534

  15. An evaluation of three commercially available metal artifact reduction methods for CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jessie Y.; Kerns, James R.; Nute, Jessica L.; Liu, Xinming; Balter, Peter A.; Stingo, Francesco C.; Followill, David S.; Mirkovic, Dragan; Howell, Rebecca M.; Kry, Stephen F.

    2015-02-01

    Three commercial metal artifact reduction methods were evaluated for use in computed tomography (CT) imaging in the presence of clinically realistic metal implants: Philips O-MAR, GE’s monochromatic gemstone spectral imaging (GSI) using dual-energy CT, and GSI monochromatic imaging with metal artifact reduction software applied (MARs). Each method was evaluated according to CT number accuracy, metal size accuracy, and streak artifact severity reduction by using several phantoms, including three anthropomorphic phantoms containing metal implants (hip prosthesis, dental fillings and spinal fixation rods). All three methods showed varying degrees of success for the hip prosthesis and spinal fixation rod cases, while none were particularly beneficial for dental artifacts. Limitations of the methods were also observed. MARs underestimated the size of metal implants and introduced new artifacts in imaging planes beyond the metal implant when applied to dental artifacts, and both the O-MAR and MARs algorithms induced artifacts for spinal fixation rods in a thoracic phantom. Our findings suggest that all three artifact mitigation methods may benefit patients with metal implants, though they should be used with caution in certain scenarios.

  16. An evaluation of three commercially available metal artifact reduction methods for CT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jessie Y; Kerns, James R; Nute, Jessica L; Liu, Xinming; Balter, Peter A; Stingo, Francesco C; Followill, David S; Mirkovic, Dragan; Howell, Rebecca M; Kry, Stephen F

    2015-01-01

    Three commercial metal artifact reduction methods were evaluated for use in computed tomography (CT) imaging in the presence of clinically realistic metal implants: Philips O-MAR, GE's monochromatic Gemstone Spectral Imaging (GSI) using dual-energy CT, and GSI monochromatic imaging with metal artifact reduction software applied (MARs). Each method was evaluated according to CT number accuracy, metal size accuracy, and streak artifact severity reduction by using several phantoms, including three anthropomorphic phantoms containing metal implants (hip prosthesis, dental fillings, and spinal fixation rods). All three methods showed varying degrees of success for the hip prosthesis and spinal fixation rod cases, while none were particularly beneficial for dental artifacts. Limitations of the methods were also observed. MARs underestimated the size of metal implants and introduced new artifacts in imaging planes beyond the metal implant when applied to dental artifacts, and both the O-MAR and MARs algorithms induced artifacts for spinal fixation rods in a thoracic phantom. Our findings suggest that all three artifact mitigation methods may benefit patients with metal implants, though they should be used with caution in certain scenarios. PMID:25585685

  17. An evaluation of three commercially available metal artifact reduction methods for CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jessie Y; Kerns, James R; Nute, Jessica L; Liu, Xinming; Balter, Peter A; Stingo, Francesco C; Followill, David S; Mirkovic, Dragan; Howell, Rebecca M; Kry, Stephen F

    2015-02-01

    Three commercial metal artifact reduction methods were evaluated for use in computed tomography (CT) imaging in the presence of clinically realistic metal implants: Philips O-MAR, GE's monochromatic gemstone spectral imaging (GSI) using dual-energy CT, and GSI monochromatic imaging with metal artifact reduction software applied (MARs). Each method was evaluated according to CT number accuracy, metal size accuracy, and streak artifact severity reduction by using several phantoms, including three anthropomorphic phantoms containing metal implants (hip prosthesis, dental fillings and spinal fixation rods). All three methods showed varying degrees of success for the hip prosthesis and spinal fixation rod cases, while none were particularly beneficial for dental artifacts. Limitations of the methods were also observed. MARs underestimated the size of metal implants and introduced new artifacts in imaging planes beyond the metal implant when applied to dental artifacts, and both the O-MAR and MARs algorithms induced artifacts for spinal fixation rods in a thoracic phantom. Our findings suggest that all three artifact mitigation methods may benefit patients with metal implants, though they should be used with caution in certain scenarios. PMID:25585685

  18. Metrological multispherical freeform artifact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blobel, Gernot; Wiegmann, Axel; Siepmann, Jens; Schulz, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Precisely known artifacts are required to characterize the accuracy of asphere and freeform measuring instruments. To this end the best knowledge of the surface characteristics in conjunction with a low measurement uncertainty are necessary. Because this is a challenging task for typical freeform surfaces used in optical systems, the concept of "metrological" artifacts is introduced. We have developed a multispherical freeform artifact for performance tests of tactile touch probe and contact-free optical measuring systems. The measurement accuracy of the complete form and the deviation from calibrated spherical sections can thus be determined. The radius calibration of multiple spherical sections is performed with an extended radius measuring procedure by interferometry. Evaluated surface forms of different measuring methods and the radii determined can be compared to each other. In this study, a multispherical freeform specimen made of copper, with two differing radii, has been measured by two optical measuring methods, a full field measuring tilted-wave interferometer and a high accuracy cylinder coordinate measuring machine with an optical probe. The surface form measurements are evaluated and compared, and the radii determined are compared to the results of a radius measurement bench.

  19. Cancellation of coherent artifacts in optical coherence tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Piao, D; Zhu, Q; Dutta, N K; Yan, S; Otis, L L

    2001-10-01

    Coherent artifacts in optical coherence tomography (OCT) images can severely degrade image quality by introducing false targets if no targets are present at the artifact locations. Coherent artifacts can also add constructively or destructively to the targets that are present at the artifact locations. This constructive or destructive interference will result in cancellation of the true targets or in display of incorrect echo amplitudes of the targets. We introduce the use of a nonlinear deconvolution algorithm, CLEAN, to cancel coherent artifacts in OCT images of extracted human teeth. The results show that CLEAN can reduce the coherent artifacts to the noise background, sharpen the air-enamel and enamel-dentin interfaces, and improve the image contrast. PMID:18364794

  20. Clinical use of an epinephrine-reduced (1/400,000) articaine solution in short-time dental routine treatments--a multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Daubländer, Monika; Kämmerer, Peer W; Willershausen, Brita; Leckel, Michael; Lauer, Hans-Christoph; Buff, Siegmar; Rösl, Benita

    2012-08-01

    The addition of epinephrine in dental local anaesthesia results in a longer and deeper anaesthesia under almost ischemic conditions. For short-time dental treatments, epinephrine-reduced anaesthetics may offer shorter and more individual anaesthesia with reduced potential side effects. The aim of this study was a clinical evaluation of anaesthetic potency and adverse effects of an epinephrine-reduced articaine formulation in dental patients undergoing short-time routine treatment. In a prospective clinical, not interventional, study between January 2008 and February 2009, 908 patients undergoing short-time dental treatment in five medical centers were anaesthetized with 4% articaine 1:400,000 epinephrine (Ubistesin, 3M/ESPE, Seefeld, Germany). Efficacy and safety in clinical use were evaluated. A follow-up after 1 day was conducted by telephone survey. A mean amount of 1.3-ml anaesthetic solution was needed to achieve a complete or sufficient anaesthesia in 97% (n = 876) of cases. A second injection had to be done in 3.7% (n = 34) before and in 11.9% (n = 108) during treatment. Here, the second injection had to be applied after a mean of 48.6 min. The mean duration of soft tissue anaesthesia after infiltration was 146.6 min, after nerve block 187.7 min. The painful treatment took a mean of 50.2 min and the total treatment time summed up to 68.8 min. In 1.7% cases (n = 15), unwanted side effects were observed. The results indicate that a lower concentration of epinephrine in combination with the 4% articaine solution leads to a high success rate of efficacy. The clinical use of a 4% articaine 1:400,000 epinephrine solution can be stated as safe and effective in short dental routine treatments. Reconsiderations concerning limitations of indication or additional contraindications are not necessary. PMID:21861074

  1. An Additive Manufacturing Test Artifact

    PubMed Central

    Moylan, Shawn; Slotwinski, John; Cooke, April; Jurrens, Kevin; Donmez, M Alkan

    2014-01-01

    A test artifact, intended for standardization, is proposed for the purpose of evaluating the performance of additive manufacturing (AM) systems. A thorough analysis of previously proposed AM test artifacts as well as experience with machining test artifacts have inspired the design of the proposed test artifact. This new artifact is designed to provide a characterization of the capabilities and limitations of an AM system, as well as to allow system improvement by linking specific errors measured in the test artifact to specific sources in the AM system. The proposed test artifact has been built in multiple materials using multiple AM technologies. The results of several of the builds are discussed, demonstrating how the measurement results can be used to characterize and improve a specific AM system. PMID:26601039

  2. An Additive Manufacturing Test Artifact.

    PubMed

    Moylan, Shawn; Slotwinski, John; Cooke, April; Jurrens, Kevin; Donmez, M Alkan

    2014-01-01

    A test artifact, intended for standardization, is proposed for the purpose of evaluating the performance of additive manufacturing (AM) systems. A thorough analysis of previously proposed AM test artifacts as well as experience with machining test artifacts have inspired the design of the proposed test artifact. This new artifact is designed to provide a characterization of the capabilities and limitations of an AM system, as well as to allow system improvement by linking specific errors measured in the test artifact to specific sources in the AM system. The proposed test artifact has been built in multiple materials using multiple AM technologies. The results of several of the builds are discussed, demonstrating how the measurement results can be used to characterize and improve a specific AM system. PMID:26601039

  3. Dental pulp-derived stem cell conditioned medium reduces cardiac injury following ischemia-reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Shibata, Rei; Yamamoto, Noriyuki; Nishikawa, Masaya; Hibi, Hideharu; Tanigawa, Tohru; Ueda, Minoru; Murohara, Toyoaki; Yamamoto, Akihito

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs) can regenerate various tissues. We investigated the impact of SHED-conditioned medium (SHED-CM) on myocardial injury in a mouse model of ischemia-reperfusion (I/R). Wild-type (WT) mice were subjected to myocardial ischemia followed by reperfusion. SHED-CM was intravenously injected at 5 min after reperfusion. Administration of SHED-CM reduced myocardial infarct size as well as decreased apoptosis and inflammatory cytokine levels, such as TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-β, in the myocardium following I/R. In cultured cardiac myocytes, SHED-CM significantly suppressed apoptosis under hypoxia/serum-deprivation and reduced LPS-induced expression of pro-inflammatory genes. Furthermore, anti-apoptotic action of SHED-CM was stronger than bone marrow-derived stem cell (BMSC)-CM or adipose-derived stem cell (ADSC)-CM in cardiac myocytes. SHED-CM contains a higher concentration of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) than BMSC-CM and ADSC-CM, and neutralization of HGF attenuated the inhibitory actions of SHED-CM on apoptosis in cardiac myocytes. Finally, WT mice were intravenously treated with an HGF-depleted SHED-CM, followed by myocardial I/R. HGF depletion significantly attenuated the inhibitory actions of SHED-CM on myocardial infarct size and apoptosis after I/R. SHED-CM protects the heart from acute ischemic injury because it suppresses inflammation and apoptosis. SHED-CM could be a useful treatment option for acute myocardial infarction. PMID:26542315

  4. Artifacts in magnetic measurements of fluid samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boekelheide, Z.; Dennis, C. L.

    2016-08-01

    Applications of magnetic fluids are ever increasing, as well as the corresponding need to be able to characterize these fluids in situ. Commercial magnetometers are accurate and well-characterized for solid and powder samples, but their use with fluid samples is more limited. Here, we describe artifacts which can occur in magnetic measurements of fluid samples and their impact. The most critical problem in the measurement of fluid samples is the dynamic nature of the sample position and size/shape. Methods to reduce these artifacts are also discussed, such as removal of air bubbles and dynamic centering.

  5. Dental Caries

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Ralph C.

    1988-01-01

    Dental caries is one of the most prevalent diseases afflicting mankind. It reached a peak in the 1950s but has been declining drastically in recent years in children and young adults. This article describes the three contributing factors in dental caries: microbial plaque, tooth susceptibility, and diet, and discusses practical preventive measures which help to reduce caries incidence. Some of these, such as vaccines and antimicrobial varnishes, are still in the research stages, while others, such as sucrose substitutes, low-calorie sweeteners, and limitation of frequency of sugar snacks are well established and can be promoted by family physicians. PMID:21253193

  6. Redox cycling compounds generate H2O2 in HTS buffers containing strong reducing reagents – real hits or promiscuous artifacts?

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Redox cycling compounds (RCCs) generate µM concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the presence of strong reducing agents, common buffer components used to maintain the catalytic activity and/or folding of target proteins for high throughput screening (HTS) assays. H2O2 generated by RCCs can indirectly inhibit the catalytic activity of proteins by oxidizing accessible cysteine, tryptophan, methionine, histidine or selenocysteine residues, and indeed several important classes of protein targets are susceptible to H2O2-mediated inactivation; protein tyrosine phosphatases, cysteine proteases, and metalloenzymes. The main sources of H2O2 in cells are the Nox enzyme/SOD systems, peroxisome metabolism, and the autoxidation of reactive chemicals by enzyme mediated redox cycling at both the microsomal and mitochondrial sites of electron transport. Given the role of H2O2 as a second messenger involved in the regulation of many signaling pathways it is hardly surprising that compounds which can generate intracellular H2O2 by enzyme mediated redox cycling would have pleiotropic effects. RCCs can therefore have serious negative consequences for the probe and/or lead generation process: primary HTS assay hit rates may be inflated by RCC false positives; critical resources will be diverted to develop and implement follow up assays to distinguish RCCs from real hits; and screening databases will become annotated with the promiscuous activity of RCCs. In an attempt to mitigate the serious impact of RCCs on probe and lead generation, two groups have independently developed assays to indentify RCCs. PMID:21075044

  7. Clinical Evaluation of Normalized Metal Artifact Reduction in kVCT Using MVCT Prior Images (MVCT-NMAR) for Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Paudel, Moti Raj; Mackenzie, Marc; Fallone, B. Gino; Rathee, Satyapal

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the metal artifacts in diagnostic kilovoltage computed tomography (kVCT) images of patients that are corrected by use of a normalized metal artifact reduction (NMAR) method with megavoltage CT (MVCT) prior images: MVCT-NMAR. Methods and Materials: MVCT-NMAR was applied to images from 5 patients: 3 with dual hip prostheses, 1 with a single hip prosthesis, and 1 with dental fillings. The corrected images were evaluated for visualization of tissue structures and their interfaces and for radiation therapy dose calculations. They were compared against the corresponding images corrected by the commercial orthopedic metal artifact reduction algorithm in a Phillips CT scanner. Results: The use of MVCT images for correcting kVCT images in the MVCT-NMAR technique greatly reduces metal artifacts, avoids secondary artifacts, and makes patient images more useful for correct dose calculation in radiation therapy. These improvements are significant, provided the MVCT and kVCT images are correctly registered. The remaining and the secondary artifacts (soft tissue blurring, eroded bones, false bones or air pockets, CT number cupping within the metal) present in orthopedic metal artifact reduction corrected images are removed in the MVCT-NMAR corrected images. A large dose reduction was possible outside the planning target volume (eg, 59.2 Gy to 52.5 Gy in pubic bone) when these MVCT-NMAR corrected images were used in TomoTherapy treatment plans without directional blocks for a prostate cancer patient. Conclusions: The use of MVCT-NMAR corrected images in radiation therapy treatment planning could improve the treatment plan quality for patients with metallic implants.

  8. WE-G-18A-07: Clinical Evaluation of Normalized Metal Artifact Reduction in KVCT Using MVCT Prior Images (MVCT-NMAR) Technique in Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Paudel, M; MacKenzie, M; Fallone, B; Rathee, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the metal artifacts in diagnostic kVCT images of patients that are corrected using a normalized metal artifact reduction method with MVCT prior images, MVCT-NMAR. Methods: An MVCTNMAR algorithm was developed and applied to five patients: three with bilateral hip prostheses, one with unilateral hip prosthesis and one with dental fillings. The corrected images were evaluated for visualization of tissue structures and their interfaces, and for radiotherapy dose calculations. They were also compared against the corresponding images corrected by a commercial metal artifact reduction technique, O-MAR, on a Phillips™ CT scanner. Results: The use of MVCT images for correcting kVCT images in the MVCT-NMAR technique greatly reduces metal artifacts, avoids secondary artifacts, and makes patient images more useful for correct dose calculation in radiotherapy. These improvements are significant over the commercial correction method, provided the MVCT and kVCT images are correctly registered. The remaining and the secondary artifacts (soft tissue blurring, eroded bones, false bones or air pockets, CT number cupping within the metal) present in O-MAR corrected images are removed in the MVCT-NMAR corrected images. Large dose reduction is possible outside the planning target volume (e.g., 59.2 Gy in comparison to 52.5 Gy in pubic bone) when these MVCT-NMAR corrected images are used in TomoTherapy™ treatment plans, as the corrected images no longer require directional blocks for prostate plans in order to avoid the image artifact regions. Conclusion: The use of MVCT-NMAR corrected images in radiotherapy treatment planning could improve the treatment plan quality for cancer patients with metallic implants. Moti Raj Paudel is supported by the Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarship, the Endowed Graduate Scholarship in Oncology and the Dissertation Fellowship at the University of Alberta. The authors acknowledge the CIHR operating grant number MOP 53254.

  9. Artifacts in digital images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorre, J. J.; Gillespie, A. R.

    1980-01-01

    Three kinds of artifacts unique to digital images are illustrated, namely aliasing caused by undersampling, interference phenomena caused by improper display of images, and harmonic overtones caused by quantization of amplitudes. Special attention is given to undersampling when the sample size and interval are the same. It is noted that this situation is important because it is typical of solid-state cameras. Quantization of image data of necessity introduces energy at harmonic overtones of the image spectrum. This energy is aliased if the frequency of the overtones is greater than 0.5 cycle/pixel. It cannot be selectively removed from the image through filtering, and the best way to suppress it is to maximize the amplification of the sensor before digital encoding.

  10. Sound as artifact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benjamin, Jeffrey L.

    A distinguishing feature of the discipline of archaeology is its reliance upon sensory dependant investigation. As perceived by all of the senses, the felt environment is a unique area of archaeological knowledge. It is generally accepted that the emergence of industrial processes in the recent past has been accompanied by unprecedented sonic extremes. The work of environmental historians has provided ample evidence that the introduction of much of this unwanted sound, or "noise" was an area of contestation. More recent research in the history of sound has called for more nuanced distinctions than the noisy/quiet dichotomy. Acoustic archaeology tends to focus upon a reconstruction of sound producing instruments and spaces with a primary goal of ascertaining intentionality. Most archaeoacoustic research is focused on learning more about the sonic world of people within prehistoric timeframes while some research has been done on historic sites. In this thesis, by way of a meditation on industrial sound and the physical remains of the Quincy Mining Company blacksmith shop (Hancock, MI) in particular, I argue for an acceptance and inclusion of sound as artifact in and of itself. I am introducing the concept of an individual sound-form, or sonifact , as a reproducible, repeatable, representable physical entity, created by tangible, perhaps even visible, host-artifacts. A sonifact is a sound that endures through time, with negligible variability. Through the piecing together of historical and archaeological evidence, in this thesis I present a plausible sonifactual assemblage at the blacksmith shop in April 1916 as it may have been experienced by an individual traversing the vicinity on foot: an 'historic soundwalk.' The sensory apprehension of abandoned industrial sites is multi-faceted. In this thesis I hope to make the case for an acceptance of sound as a primary heritage value when thinking about the industrial past, and also for an increased awareness and acceptance

  11. Effect of 0.12% chlorhexidine in reducing microorganisms found in aerosol used for dental prophylaxis of patients submitted to fixed orthodontic treatment

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Isis Rodrigues Menezes; Moreira, Ana Cristina Azevedo; Costa, Myrela Galvão Cardoso; Barbosa, Marcelo de Castellucci e

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed at assessing, in vivo, whether the prior use of 0.12% chlorhexidine as mouthwash would decrease air contamination caused by aerosolized sodium bicarbonate during dental prophylaxis. The study was conducted with 23 patients aged between 10 and 40 years old who were randomly selected and undergoing fixed orthodontic treatment. Methods The study was divided into two phases (T1 and T2) with a 30-day interval in between. In both phases, dental prophylaxis was performed with aerosolized sodium bicarbonate jetted to the upper and lower arches for 4 minutes. In T1, 10 minutes before the prophylaxis procedure, the participants used distilled water as mouthwash for one minute; whereas in T2, mouthwash was performed with 0.12% chlorhexidine. Microbial samples were collected in BHI agar plates for microbiological analysis. Two dishes were positioned on the clinician (10 cm from the mouth) and a third one at 15 cm from the patient's mouth. The samples were incubated for 48 hours at 37°C. Results were expressed in colony-forming units (CFU). Results Statistical analysis carried out by means of Student's t test, as well as Wilconxon and Kruskal-Wallis tests revealed that the prior use of 0.12% chlorhexidine as mouthwash significantly reduced CFU in the three positions studied (P < 0.001). Conclusion The prior use of 0.12% chlorhexidine as mouthwash significantly reduced contamination caused by aerosolized sodium bicarbonate during dental prophylaxis in the orthodontic clinic. PMID:25162572

  12. Prior-based artifact correction (PBAC) in computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Heußer, Thorsten Brehm, Marcus; Ritschl, Ludwig; Sawall, Stefan; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Image quality in computed tomography (CT) often suffers from artifacts which may reduce the diagnostic value of the image. In many cases, these artifacts result from missing or corrupt regions in the projection data, e.g., in the case of metal, truncation, and limited angle artifacts. The authors propose a generalized correction method for different kinds of artifacts resulting from missing or corrupt data by making use of available prior knowledge to perform data completion. Methods: The proposed prior-based artifact correction (PBAC) method requires prior knowledge in form of a planning CT of the same patient or in form of a CT scan of a different patient showing the same body region. In both cases, the prior image is registered to the patient image using a deformable transformation. The registered prior is forward projected and data completion of the patient projections is performed using smooth sinogram inpainting. The obtained projection data are used to reconstruct the corrected image. Results: The authors investigate metal and truncation artifacts in patient data sets acquired with a clinical CT and limited angle artifacts in an anthropomorphic head phantom data set acquired with a gantry-based flat detector CT device. In all cases, the corrected images obtained by PBAC are nearly artifact-free. Compared to conventional correction methods, PBAC achieves better artifact suppression while preserving the patient-specific anatomy at the same time. Further, the authors show that prominent anatomical details in the prior image seem to have only minor impact on the correction result. Conclusions: The results show that PBAC has the potential to effectively correct for metal, truncation, and limited angle artifacts if adequate prior data are available. Since the proposed method makes use of a generalized algorithm, PBAC may also be applicable to other artifacts resulting from missing or corrupt data.

  13. Reducing dental plaque formation and caries development. A review of current methods and implications for novel pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Kalesinskas, Povilas; Kačergius, Tomas; Ambrozaitis, Arvydas; Pečiulienė, Vytautė; Ericson, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Dental caries is an oral disease, which has a high worldwide prevalence despite the availability of various prophylactic means, including the daily use of fluoride toothpastes, water fluoridation, dental sealants, oral health educational programs and various antiseptic mouth-rinses. One important reason for this is uncontrolled increase in consumption of foods containing considerable sucrose concentration, especially among children. Sucrose is easily metabolized by oral bacteria (mostly streptococci) to acids and, subsequently, causing tooth decay or dental caries. In the oral ecosystem, streptococci principally reside on tooth surfaces forming biofilm. Important structural and binding materials of biofilm are glucan polymers synthesized by several isoforms of glucosyltransferase enzyme present in certain species of oral bacteria, including mutans group streptococci - Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus, which preferably colonize humans. Thus, there is a constant need to develop the methods and chemotherapeutics for improving oral health care and decreasing teeth decay through the suppression of cariogenic biofilm formation in the oral cavity. The aim of this paper was to review literature related to the pathogenesis of dental caries as well as currently existing and experimental pharmaceutical substances used for prevention of this process. PMID:25209226

  14. Artifacts in musculoskeletal MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dinesh R; Chin, Michael S M; Peh, Wilfred C G

    2014-02-01

    MR imaging has become an important diagnostic tool in the evaluation of a vast number of pathologies and is of foremost importance in the evaluation of spine, joints, and soft tissue structures of the musculoskeletal system. MR imaging is susceptible to various artifacts that may affect the image quality or even simulate pathologies. Some of these artifacts have gained special importance with the use of higher field strength magnets and with the increasing need for MR imaging in postoperative patients, especially those with previous joint replacements or metallic implants. Artifacts may arise from patient motion or could be due to periodic motion, such as vascular and cardiac pulsation. Artifacts could also arise from various protocol errors including saturation, wraparound, truncation, shading, partial volume averaging, and radiofrequency interference artifacts. Susceptibility artifact occurs at interfaces with different magnetic susceptibilities and is of special importance with increasing use of metallic joint replacement prostheses. Magic angle phenomenon is a special type of artifact that occurs in musculoskeletal MR imaging. It is essential to recognize these artifacts and to correct them because they may produce pitfalls in image interpretation. PMID:24515878

  15. Volume-of-interest reconstruction from severely truncated data in dental cone-beam CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zheng; Kusnoto, Budi; Han, Xiao; Sidky, E. Y.; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2015-03-01

    As cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has gained popularity rapidly in dental imaging applications in the past two decades, radiation dose in CBCT imaging remains a potential, health concern to the patients. It is a common practice in dental CBCT imaging that only a small volume of interest (VOI) containing the teeth of interest is illuminated, thus substantially lowering imaging radiation dose. However, this would yield data with severe truncations along both transverse and longitudinal directions. Although images within the VOI reconstructed from truncated data can be of some practical utility, they often are compromised significantly by truncation artifacts. In this work, we investigate optimization-based reconstruction algorithms for VOI image reconstruction from CBCT data of dental patients containing severe truncations. In an attempt to further reduce imaging dose, we also investigate optimization-based image reconstruction from severely truncated data collected at projection views substantially fewer than those used in clinical dental applications. Results of our study show that appropriately designed optimization-based reconstruction can yield VOI images with reduced truncation artifacts, and that, when reconstructing from only one half, or even one quarter, of clinical data, it can also produce VOI images comparable to that of clinical images.

  16. The application of metal artifact reduction (MAR) in CT scans for radiation oncology by monoenergetic extrapolation with a DECT scanner.

    PubMed

    Schwahofer, Andrea; Bär, Esther; Kuchenbecker, Stefan; Grossmann, J Günter; Kachelrieß, Marc; Sterzing, Florian

    2015-12-01

    % to 20%. Thus, the improvement is not significant for radiotherapy planning. For amalgam with a density between steel and tungsten, monoenergetic data sets of a patient do not show substantial artifact reduction. The local dose uncertainties around the metal artifact determined for a static field are of the order of 5%. Although dental fillings are smaller than the phantom inserts, metal artifacts could not be reduced effectively. In conclusion, the image based monoenergetic extrapolation method does not provide efficient reduction of the consequences of CT-generated metal artifacts for radiation therapy planning, but the suitability of other MAR methods will be subsequently studied. PMID:26144602

  17. Turquoise Artifact from Teotihuacan

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, Michael W.; Harbottle, Garman; Weigand, Phil C.

    1999-07-01

    Turquoise artifacts appeared sporadically in Mesoamerica as early as the Formative period (Merry de Morales 1987:100, Figure 8.4; Weigand 1989:43). Most occurrences, however, postdate the collapse of Teotihuacan. In the Late Classic and Postclassic periods increasing quantities are found, often in the form of elaborate mosaics, in a wide variety of contexts in central, west and northwest Mexico. Neutron activation analysis has determined that much of this turquoise derives from sources in the southwestern United States (Weigand et al. 1977; Harbottle and Weigand 1992; Weigand and Harbottle 1993). Teotihuacan played a major role in Mesoamerica during the Terminal Formative and Early-Middle Classic periods. It was the dominant power in central Mexico from about the time of Christ to its collapse at about A.D. 650 (Millon 1988, 1992; Cowgill 1996). Throughout this period goods flowed into Teotihuacan from many parts of the Mesoamerican world. Despite this widespread economic interaction, only two pieces of turquoise have been recovered in the city. In the following pages, the context and implications of one of these finds will be examined.

  18. Reduction of Metal Artifact in Single Photon-Counting Computed Tomography by Spectral-Driven Iterative Reconstruction Technique

    PubMed Central

    Nasirudin, Radin A.; Mei, Kai; Panchev, Petar; Fehringer, Andreas; Pfeiffer, Franz; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Fiebich, Martin; Noël, Peter B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The exciting prospect of Spectral CT (SCT) using photon-counting detectors (PCD) will lead to new techniques in computed tomography (CT) that take advantage of the additional spectral information provided. We introduce a method to reduce metal artifact in X-ray tomography by incorporating knowledge obtained from SCT into a statistical iterative reconstruction scheme. We call our method Spectral-driven Iterative Reconstruction (SPIR). Method The proposed algorithm consists of two main components: material decomposition and penalized maximum likelihood iterative reconstruction. In this study, the spectral data acquisitions with an energy-resolving PCD were simulated using a Monte-Carlo simulator based on EGSnrc C++ class library. A jaw phantom with a dental implant made of gold was used as an object in this study. A total of three dental implant shapes were simulated separately to test the influence of prior knowledge on the overall performance of the algorithm. The generated projection data was first decomposed into three basis functions: photoelectric absorption, Compton scattering and attenuation of gold. A pseudo-monochromatic sinogram was calculated and used as input in the reconstruction, while the spatial information of the gold implant was used as a prior. The results from the algorithm were assessed and benchmarked with state-of-the-art reconstruction methods. Results Decomposition results illustrate that gold implant of any shape can be distinguished from other components of the phantom. Additionally, the result from the penalized maximum likelihood iterative reconstruction shows that artifacts are significantly reduced in SPIR reconstructed slices in comparison to other known techniques, while at the same time details around the implant are preserved. Quantitatively, the SPIR algorithm best reflects the true attenuation value in comparison to other algorithms. Conclusion It is demonstrated that the combination of the additional information from

  19. Dental Sealants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Data & Statistics > Find Data by Topic > Dental Sealants Dental Sealants Main Content Dental sealants are thin plastic coatings that protect the chewing surfaces of children’s back teeth from tooth decay. Overall, the prevalence of sealants ...

  20. Archaic artifacts resembling celestial spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrakoudis, S.; Papaspyrou, P.; Petoussis, V.; Moussas, X.

    We present several bronze artifacts from the Archaic Age in Greece (750-480 BC) that resemble celestial spheres or forms of other astronomical significance. They are studied in the context of the Dark Age transition from Mycenaean Age astronomical themes to the philosophical and practical revival of astronomy in the Classical Age with its plethora of astronomical devices. These artifacts, mostly votive in nature are spherical in shape and appear in a variety of forms their most striking characteristic being the depiction of meridians and/or an equator. Most of those artifacts come from Thessaly, and more specifically from the temple of Itonia Athena at Philia, a religious center of pan-Hellenic significance. Celestial spheres, similar in form to the small artifacts presented in this study, could be used to measure latitudes, or estimate the time at a known place, and were thus very useful in navigation.

  1. Ring artifact correction for high-resolution micro CT.

    PubMed

    Kyriakou, Yiannis; Prell, Daniel; Kalender, Willi A

    2009-09-01

    In high-resolution micro CT using flat detectors (FD), imperfect or defect detector elements may cause concentric-ring artifacts due to their continuous over- or underestimation of attenuation values, which often disturb image quality. We here present a dedicated image-based ring artifact correction method for high-resolution micro CT, based on median filtering of the reconstructed image and working on a transformed version of the reconstructed images in polar coordinates. This post-processing method reduced ring artifacts in the reconstructed images and improved image quality for phantom and in in vivo scans. Noise and artifacts were reduced both in transversal and in multi-planar reformations along the longitudinal axis. PMID:19661571

  2. Redox artifacts in electrophysiological recordings

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Jonathan M.

    2013-01-01

    Electrophysiological techniques make use of Ag/AgCl electrodes that are in direct contact with cells or bath. In the bath, electrodes are exposed to numerous experimental conditions and chemical reagents that can modify electrode voltage. We examined voltage offsets created in Ag/AgCl electrodes by exposure to redox reagents used in electrophysiological studies. Voltage offsets were measured in reference to an electrode separated from the solution by an agar bridge. The reducing reagents Tris-2-carboxyethly-phosphine, dithiothreitol (DTT), and glutathione, as well as the oxidizing agent H2O2 used at experimentally relevant concentrations reacted with Ag in the electrodes to produce voltage offsets. Chloride ions and strong acids and bases produced offsets at millimolar concentrations. Electrolytic depletion of the AgCl layer, to replicate voltage clamp and sustained use, resulted in increased sensitivity to flow and DTT. Offsets were sensitive to electrode silver purity and to the amount and method of chloride deposition. For example, exposure to 10 μM DTT produced a voltage offset between 10 and 284 mV depending on the chloride deposition method. Currents generated by these offsets are significant and dependent on membrane conductance and by extension the expression of ion channels and may therefore appear to be biological in origin. These data demonstrate a new source of artifacts in electrophysiological recordings that can affect measurements obtained from a variety of experimental techniques from patch clamp to two-electrode voltage clamp. PMID:23344161

  3. Motion artifact detection in four-dimensional computed tomography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouilhol, G.; Ayadi, M.; Pinho, R.; Rit, S.; Sarrut, D.

    2014-03-01

    Motion artifacts appear in four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) images because of suboptimal acquisition parameters or patient breathing irregularities. Frequency of motion artifacts is high and they may introduce errors in radiation therapy treatment planning. Motion artifact detection can be useful for image quality assessment and 4D reconstruction improvement but manual detection in many images is a tedious process. We propose a novel method to evaluate the quality of 4DCT images by automatic detection of motion artifacts. The method was used to evaluate the impact of the optimization of acquisition parameters on image quality at our institute. 4DCT images of 114 lung cancer patients were analyzed. Acquisitions were performed with a rotation period of 0.5 seconds and a pitch of 0.1 (74 patients) or 0.081 (40 patients). A sensitivity of 0.70 and a specificity of 0.97 were observed. End-exhale phases were less prone to motion artifacts. In phases where motion speed is high, the number of detected artifacts was systematically reduced with a pitch of 0.081 instead of 0.1 and the mean reduction was 0.79. The increase of the number of patients with no artifact detected was statistically significant for the 10%, 70% and 80% respiratory phases, indicating a substantial image quality improvement.

  4. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography--imaging protocols, artifacts, and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Bockisch, Andreas; Beyer, Thomas; Antoch, Gerald; Freudenberg, Lutz S; Kühl, Hilmar; Debatin, Jörg F; Müller, Stefan P

    2004-01-01

    There has been a longstanding interest in fused images of anatomical information, such as that provided by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems, with biological information obtainable by positron emission tomography (PET). The near-simultaneous data acquisition in a fixed combination of a PET and a CT scanner in a combined PET/CT imaging system minimizes spatial and temporal mismatches between the modalities by eliminating the need to move the patient in between exams. In addition, using the fast CT scan for PET attenuation correction, the duration of the examination is significantly reduced compared to standalone PET imaging with standard rod-transmission sources. The main source of artifacts arises from the use of the CT-data for scatter and attenuation correction of the PET images. Today, CT reconstruction algorithms cannot account for the presence of metal implants, such as dental fillings or prostheses, properly, thus resulting in streak artifacts, which are propagated into the PET image by the attenuation correction. The transformation of attenuation coefficients at X-ray energies to those at 511 keV works well for soft tissues, bone, and air, but again is insufficient for dense CT contrast agents, such as iodine or barium. Finally, mismatches, for example, due to uncoordinated respiration result in incorrect attenuation-corrected PET images. These artifacts, however, can be minimized or avoided prospectively by careful acquisition protocol considerations. In doubt, the uncorrected images almost always allow discrimination between true and artificial finding. PET/CT has to be integrated into the diagnostic workflow for harvesting the full potential of the new modality. In particular, the diagnostic power of both, the CT and the PET within the combination must not be underestimated. By combining multiple diagnostic studies within a single examination, significant logistic advantages can be expected if the combined PET

  5. An illustrative review to understand and manage metal-induced artifacts in musculoskeletal MRI: a primer and updates.

    PubMed

    Dillenseger, J P; Molière, S; Choquet, P; Goetz, C; Ehlinger, M; Bierry, G

    2016-05-01

    This article reviews and explains the basic physical principles of metal-induced MRI artifacts, describes simple ways to reduce them, and presents specific reduction solutions. Artifacts include signal loss, pile-up artifacts, geometric distortion, and failure of fat suppression. Their nature and origins are reviewed and explained though schematic representations that ease the understanding. Then, optimization of simple acquisition parameters is detailed. Lastly, dedicated sequences and options specifically developed to reduce metal artifacts (VAT, SEMAC, and MAVRIC) are explained. PMID:26837388

  6. MR-driven metal artifact reduction in PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Delso, G; Wollenweber, S; Lonn, A; Wiesinger, F; Veit-Haibach, P

    2013-04-01

    Among the proposed system architectures capable of delivering positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance (PET/MR) datasets, tri-modality systems open an interesting field in which the synergies between these modalities can be exploited to address some of the problems encountered in standalone systems. In this paper we present a feasibility study of the correction of dental streak artifacts in computed tomography (CT)-based attenuation correction images using complementary MR data. The frequency and severity of metal artifacts in oncology patients was studied by inspecting the CT scans of 152 patients examined at our hospital. A prospective correction algorithm using CT and MR information to automatically locate and edit the region affected by metal artifacts was developed and tested retrospectively on data from 15 oncology patients referred for a PET/CT scan. In datasets without malignancies, the activity in Waldeyer's ring was used to measure the maximum uptake variation when the proposed correction was applied. The measured bias ranged from 10% to 30%. In datasets with malignancies on the slices affected by artifacts, the correction led to lesion uptake variations of 6.1% for a lesion 3 cm away from the implant, 1.5% for a lesion 7 cm away and <1% for a lesion 8 cm away. PMID:23478566

  7. MR-driven metal artifact reduction in PET/CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delso, G.; Wollenweber, S.; Lonn, A.; Wiesinger, F.; Veit-Haibach, P.

    2013-04-01

    Among the proposed system architectures capable of delivering positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance (PET/MR) datasets, tri-modality systems open an interesting field in which the synergies between these modalities can be exploited to address some of the problems encountered in standalone systems. In this paper we present a feasibility study of the correction of dental streak artifacts in computed tomography (CT)-based attenuation correction images using complementary MR data. The frequency and severity of metal artifacts in oncology patients was studied by inspecting the CT scans of 152 patients examined at our hospital. A prospective correction algorithm using CT and MR information to automatically locate and edit the region affected by metal artifacts was developed and tested retrospectively on data from 15 oncology patients referred for a PET/CT scan. In datasets without malignancies, the activity in Waldeyer's ring was used to measure the maximum uptake variation when the proposed correction was applied. The measured bias ranged from 10% to 30%. In datasets with malignancies on the slices affected by artifacts, the correction led to lesion uptake variations of 6.1% for a lesion 3 cm away from the implant, 1.5% for a lesion 7 cm away and <1% for a lesion 8 cm away.

  8. Quantitative Comparison of Commercial and Non-Commercial Metal Artifact Reduction Techniques in Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wagenaar, Dirk; van der Graaf, Emiel R.; van der Schaaf, Arjen; Greuter, Marcel J. W.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Typical streak artifacts known as metal artifacts occur in the presence of strongly attenuating materials in computed tomography (CT). Recently, vendors have started offering metal artifact reduction (MAR) techniques. In addition, a MAR technique called the metal deletion technique (MDT) is freely available and able to reduce metal artifacts using reconstructed images. Although a comparison of the MDT to other MAR techniques exists, a comparison of commercially available MAR techniques is lacking. The aim of this study was therefore to quantify the difference in effectiveness of the currently available MAR techniques of different scanners and the MDT technique. Materials and Methods Three vendors were asked to use their preferential CT scanner for applying their MAR techniques. The scans were performed on a Philips Brilliance ICT 256 (S1), a GE Discovery CT 750 HD (S2) and a Siemens Somatom Definition AS Open (S3). The scans were made using an anthropomorphic head and neck phantom (Kyoto Kagaku, Japan). Three amalgam dental implants were constructed and inserted between the phantom’s teeth. The average absolute error (AAE) was calculated for all reconstructions in the proximity of the amalgam implants. Results The commercial techniques reduced the AAE by 22.0±1.6%, 16.2±2.6% and 3.3±0.7% for S1 to S3 respectively. After applying the MDT to uncorrected scans of each scanner the AAE was reduced by 26.1±2.3%, 27.9±1.0% and 28.8±0.5% respectively. The difference in efficiency between the commercial techniques and the MDT was statistically significant for S2 (p=0.004) and S3 (p<0.001), but not for S1 (p=0.63). Conclusions The effectiveness of MAR differs between vendors. S1 performed slightly better than S2 and both performed better than S3. Furthermore, for our phantom and outcome measure the MDT was more effective than the commercial MAR technique on all scanners. PMID:26030821

  9. Fast image restoration without boundary artifacts.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Stanley J

    2005-10-01

    Fast Fourier transform (FFT)-based restorations are fast, but at the expense of assuming that the blurring and deblurring are based on circular convolution. Unfortunately, when the opposite sides of the image do not match up well in intensity, this assumption can create significant artifacts across the image. If the pixels outside the measured image window are modeled as unknown values in the restored image, boundary artifacts are avoided. However, this approach destroys the structure that makes the use of the FFT directly applicable, since the unknown image is no longer the same size as the measured image. Thus, the restoration methods available for this problem no longer have the computational efficiency of the FFT. We propose a new restoration method for the unknown boundary approach that can be implemented in a fast and flexible manner. We decompose the restoration into a sum of two independent restorations. One restoration yields an image that comes directly from a modified FFT-based approach. The other restoration involves a set of unknowns whose number equals that of the unknown boundary values. By summing the two, the artifacts are canceled. Because the second restoration has a significantly reduced set of unknowns, it can be calculated very efficiently even though no circular convolution structure exists. PMID:16238051

  10. Striping artifact reduction in lunar orbiter mosaic images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mlsna, P.A.; Becker, T.

    2006-01-01

    Photographic images of the moon from the 1960s Lunar Orbiter missions are being processed into maps for visual use. The analog nature of the images has produced numerous artifacts, the chief of which causes a vertical striping pattern in mosaic images formed from a series of filmstrips. Previous methods of stripe removal tended to introduce ringing and aliasing problems in the image data. This paper describes a recently developed alternative approach that succeeds at greatly reducing the striping artifacts while avoiding the creation of ringing and aliasing artifacts. The algorithm uses a one dimensional frequency domain step to deal with the periodic component of the striping artifact and a spatial domain step to handle the aperiodic residue. Several variations of the algorithm have been explored. Results, strengths, and remaining challenges are presented. ?? 2006 IEEE.

  11. PET/CT imaging artifacts.

    PubMed

    Sureshbabu, Waheeda; Mawlawi, Osama

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce the principles of PET/CT imaging and describe the artifacts associated with it. PET/CT is a new imaging modality that integrates functional (PET) and structural (CT) information into a single scanning session, allowing excellent fusion of the PET and CT images and thus improving lesion localization and interpretation accuracy. Moreover, the CT data can also be used for attenuation correction, ultimately leading to high patient throughput. These combined advantages have rendered PET/CT a preferred imaging modality over dedicated PET. Although PET/CT imaging offers many advantages, this dual-modality imaging also poses some challenges. CT-based attenuation correction can induce artifacts and quantitative errors that can affect the PET emission images. For instance, the use of contrast medium and the presence of metallic implants can be associated with focal radiotracer uptake. Furthermore, the patient's breathing can introduce mismatches between the CT attenuation map and the PET emission data, and the discrepancy between the CT and PET fields of view can lead to truncation artifacts. After reading this article, the technologist should be able to describe the principles of PET/CT imaging, identify at least 3 types of image artifacts, and describe the differences between PET/CT artifacts of different causes: metallic implants, respiratory motion, contrast medium, and truncation. PMID:16145223

  12. A correction method for nonlinear artifacts in CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Sun, Haining; Qiu, Shaokun; Lou, Shanshan; Liu, Jinjun; Li, Changjun; Jiang, Genmiao

    2004-01-01

    This work presents a new method to reduce nonlinear artifacts in computed tomography (CT). Based on the traditional water-equivalent beam hardening correction method, a new systematic iterative algorithm has been designed to modify the original spectrum, which is under the influences of certain added filter materials and some unknown factors. By incorporating the characters of polychromatic beam hardening and the insensibility and nonuniformity of detectors into consideration, a new polynomial function curve is calculated. The curve can calibrate CT raw data and reduce the nonlinear artifacts, such as shading artifacts, dark artifacts, cupping artifacts and ring artifacts, in soft tissue. Comparing with the traditional water-equivalent correction, results show that this method can significantly improve the image quality. Meanwhile, the method is pre-processing and will not increase the normal reconstruction time. That is, all the time-consuming works can be done before scanning patients. However, it is still depending on the size of phantoms currently used, and more detailed works need to be done in the future. PMID:17271926

  13. Region-of-interest reconstruction for a cone-beam dental CT with a circular trajectory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhanli; Zou, Jing; Gui, Jianbao; Zheng, Hairong; Xia, Dan

    2013-04-01

    Dental CT is the most appropriate and accurate device for preoperative evaluation of dental implantation. It can demonstrate the quantity of bone in three dimensions (3D), the location of important adjacent anatomic structures and the quality of available bone with minimal geometric distortion. Nevertheless, with the rapid increase of dental CT examinations, we are facing the problem of dose reduction without loss of image quality. In this work, backprojection-filtration (BPF) and Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) algorithm was applied to reconstruct the 3D full image and region-of-interest (ROI) image from complete and truncated circular cone-beam data respectively by computer-simulation. In addition, the BPF algorithm was evaluated based on the 3D ROI-image reconstruction from real data, which was acquired from our developed circular cone-beam prototype dental CT system. The results demonstrated that the ROI-image quality reconstructed from truncated data using the BPF algorithm was comparable to that reconstructed from complete data. The FDK algorithm, however, created artifacts while reconstructing ROI-image. Thus it can be seen, for circular cone-beam dental CT, reducing scanning angular range of the BPF algorithm used for ROI-image reconstruction are helpful for reducing the radiation dose and scanning time. Finally, an analytical method was developed for estimation of the ROI projection area on the detector before CT scanning, which would help doctors to roughly estimate the total radiation dose before the CT examination.

  14. Comparison of cone beam artifacts reduction: two pass algorithm vs TV-based CS algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Shinkook; Baek, Jongduk

    2015-03-01

    In a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), the severity of the cone beam artifacts is increased as the cone angle increases. To reduce the cone beam artifacts, several modified FDK algorithms and compressed sensing based iterative algorithms have been proposed. In this paper, we used two pass algorithm and Gradient-Projection-Barzilai-Borwein (GPBB) algorithm to reduce the cone beam artifacts, and compared their performance using structural similarity (SSIM) index. In two pass algorithm, it is assumed that the cone beam artifacts are mainly caused by extreme-density(ED) objects, and therefore the algorithm reproduces the cone beam artifacts(i.e., error image) produced by ED objects, and then subtract it from the original image. GPBB algorithm is a compressed sensing based iterative algorithm which minimizes an energy function for calculating the gradient projection with the step size determined by the Barzilai- Borwein formulation, therefore it can estimate missing data caused by the cone beam artifacts. To evaluate the performance of two algorithms, we used testing objects consisting of 7 ellipsoids separated along the z direction and cone beam artifacts were generated using 30 degree cone angle. Even though the FDK algorithm produced severe cone beam artifacts with a large cone angle, two pass algorithm reduced the cone beam artifacts with small residual errors caused by inaccuracy of ED objects. In contrast, GPBB algorithm completely removed the cone beam artifacts and restored the original shape of the objects.

  15. Artifacts in CT: recognition and avoidance.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Julia F; Keat, Nicholas

    2004-01-01

    Artifacts can seriously degrade the quality of computed tomographic (CT) images, sometimes to the point of making them diagnostically unusable. To optimize image quality, it is necessary to understand why artifacts occur and how they can be prevented or suppressed. CT artifacts originate from a range of sources. Physics-based artifacts result from the physical processes involved in the acquisition of CT data. Patient-based artifacts are caused by such factors as patient movement or the presence of metallic materials in or on the patient. Scanner-based artifacts result from imperfections in scanner function. Helical and multisection technique artifacts are produced by the image reconstruction process. Design features incorporated into modern CT scanners minimize some types of artifacts, and some can be partially corrected by the scanner software. However, in many instances, careful patient positioning and optimum selection of scanning parameters are the most important factors in avoiding CT artifacts. PMID:15537976

  16. Filter and electrostatic samplers for semivolatile aerosols: physical artifacts.

    PubMed

    Volckens, John; Leith, David

    2002-11-01

    Adsorptive and evaporative artifacts often bias measurements of semivolatile aerosols. Adsorption occurs when the sampling method disrupts the gas-particle partitioning equilibrium. Evaporation occurs because concentrations of semivolatiles are rarely constant over time. Filtration is subject to both adsorptive and evaporative artifacts. By comparison, electrostatic precipitation reduces these artifacts by minimizing the surface area of collected particles without substantially disrupting the gas-particle equilibrium. The extent of these artifacts was determined for filter samplers and electrostatic precipitator samplers for semivolatile alkane aerosols in the laboratory. Adsorption of gas-phase semivolatiles was lower in electrostatic precipitators by factors of 5-100 compared to the filter method. Particle evaporation from the electrostatic sampler was 2.3 times lower than that from TFE-coated glass-fiber filters. Use of a backup filter to correct for compound-specific adsorption artifacts can introduce positive or negative errors to the measured particle-phase concentration due to competition among the adsorbates for available adsorption sites. Adsorption of evaporated particles from the front filter onto the backup filter increased the measured evaporative artifact by a factor of 1.5-2. PMID:12433172

  17. Dental therapists: a global perspective.

    PubMed

    Nash, David A; Friedman, Jay W; Kardos, Thomas B; Kardos, Rosemary L; Schwarz, Eli; Satur, Julie; Berg, Darren G; Nasruddin, Jaafar; Mumghamba, Elifuraha G; Davenport, Elizabeth S; Nagel, Ron

    2008-04-01

    In 1921, New Zealand began training school dental nurses, subsequently deploying them throughout the country in school-based clinics providing basic dental care for children. The concept of training dental nurses, later to be designated dental therapists, was adopted by other countries as a means of improving access to care, particularly for children. This paper profiles six countries that utilise dental therapists, with a description of the training that therapists receive in these countries, and the context in which they practice. Based on available demographic information, it also updates the number of dental therapists practising globally, as well as the countries in which they practice. In several countries, dental therapy is now being integrated with dental hygiene in training and practice to create a new type of professional complementary to a dentist. Increasingly, dental therapists are permitted to treat adults as well as children. The paper also describes the status of a current initiative to introduce dental therapy to the United States. It concludes by suggesting that dental therapists can become valued members of the dental team throughout the world, helping to improve access to care and reducing existing disparities in oral health. PMID:18478885

  18. Text Signals Influence Team Artifacts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clariana, Roy B.; Rysavy, Monica D.; Taricani, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory quasi-experimental investigation describes the influence of text signals on team visual map artifacts. In two course sections, four-member teams were given one of two print-based text passage versions on the course-related topic "Social influence in groups" downloaded from Wikipedia; this text had two paragraphs, each…

  19. Toddlers View Artifact Function Normatively

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casler, Krista; Terziyan, Treysi; Greene, Kimberly

    2009-01-01

    When children use objects like adults, are they simply tracking regularities in others' object use, or are they demonstrating a normatively defined awareness that there are right and wrong ways to act? This study provides the first evidence for the latter possibility. Young 2- and 3-year-olds (n = 32) learned functions of 6 artifacts, both…

  20. Assessment of a quantitative metric for 4D CT artifact evaluation by observer consensus.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Sarah J; Castillo, Richard; Balter, Peter; Pan, Tinsu; Ibbott, Geoffrey; Hobbs, Brian; Yuan, Ying; Guerrero, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The benefits of four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) are limited by the presence of artifacts that remain difficult to quantify. A correlation-based metric previously proposed for ciné 4D CT artifact identification was further validated as an independent artifact evaluator by using a novel qualitative assessment featuring a group of observers reaching a consensus decision on artifact location and magnitude. The consensus group evaluated ten ciné 4D CT scans for artifacts over each breathing phase of coronal lung views assuming one artifact per couch location. Each artifact was assigned a magnitude score of 1-5, 1 indicating lowest severity and 5 indicating highest severity. Consensus group results served as the ground truth for assessment of the correlation metric. The ten patients were split into two cohorts; cohort 1 generated an artifact identification threshold derived from receiver operating characteristic analysis using the Youden Index, while cohort 2 generated sensitivity and specificity values from application of the artifact threshold. The Pearson correlation coefficient was calculated between the correlation metric values and the consensus group scores for both cohorts. The average sensitivity and specificity values found with application of the artifact threshold were 0.703 and 0.476, respectively. The correlation coefficients of artifact magnitudes for cohort 1 and 2 were 0.80 and 0.61, respectively, (p < 0.001 for both); these correlation coefficients included a few scans with only two of the five possible magnitude scores. Artifact incidence was associated with breathing phase (p < 0.002), with presentation less likely near maximum exhale. Overall, the correlation metric allowed accurate and automated artifact identification. The consensus group evaluation resulted in efficient qualitative scoring, reduced interobserver variation, and provided consistent identification of artifact location and magnitudes. PMID:24892346

  1. Joint correction of Nyquist artifact and minuscule motion-induced aliasing artifact in interleaved diffusion weighted EPI data using a composite two-dimensional phase correction procedure.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hing-Chiu; Chen, Nan-Kuei

    2016-09-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) obtained with interleaved echo-planar imaging (EPI) pulse sequence has great potential of characterizing brain tissue properties at high spatial-resolution. However, interleaved EPI based DWI data may be corrupted by various types of aliasing artifacts. First, inconsistencies in k-space data obtained with opposite readout gradient polarities result in Nyquist artifact, which is usually reduced with 1D phase correction in post-processing. When there exist eddy current cross terms (e.g., in oblique-plane EPI), 2D phase correction is needed to effectively reduce Nyquist artifact. Second, minuscule motion induced phase inconsistencies in interleaved DWI scans result in image-domain aliasing artifact, which can be removed with reconstruction procedures that take shot-to-shot phase variations into consideration. In existing interleaved DWI reconstruction procedures, Nyquist artifact and minuscule motion-induced aliasing artifact are typically removed subsequently in two stages. Although the two-stage phase correction generally performs well for non-oblique plane EPI data obtained from well-calibrated system, the residual artifacts may still be pronounced in oblique-plane EPI data or when there exist eddy current cross terms. To address this challenge, here we report a new composite 2D phase correction procedure, which effective removes Nyquist artifact and minuscule motion induced aliasing artifact jointly in a single step. Our experimental results demonstrate that the new 2D phase correction method can much more effectively reduce artifacts in interleaved EPI based DWI data as compared with the existing two-stage artifact correction procedures. The new method robustly enables high-resolution DWI, and should prove highly valuable for clinical uses and research studies of DWI. PMID:27114342

  2. Dental Hygienists

    MedlinePlus

    ... anatomy, patient management, and periodontics, which is the study of gum disease. High school students interested in becoming dental hygienists should take courses in biology, chemistry, and math. Most dental hygiene programs also require applicants to have completed at ...

  3. Dental sealants

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000779.htm Dental sealants To use the sharing features on this ... case a sealant needs to be replaced. How Dental Sealants Are Applied Your dentist applies sealants on ...

  4. Application of digital tomosynthesis (DTS) of optimal deblurring filters for dental X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, J. E.; Cho, H. S.; Kim, D. S.; Choi, S. I.; Je, U. K.

    2012-04-01

    Digital tomosynthesis (DTS) is a limited-angle tomographic technique that provides some of the tomographic benefits of computed tomography (CT) but at reduced dose and cost. Thus, the potential for application of DTS to dental X-ray imaging seems promising. As a continuation of our dental radiography R&D, we developed an effective DTS reconstruction algorithm and implemented it in conjunction with a commercial dental CT system for potential use in dental implant placement. The reconstruction algorithm employed a backprojection filtering (BPF) method based upon optimal deblurring filters to suppress effectively both the blur artifacts originating from the out-focus planes and the high-frequency noise. To verify the usefulness of the reconstruction algorithm, we performed systematic simulation works and evaluated the image characteristics. We also performed experimental works in which DTS images of enhanced anatomical resolution were successfully obtained by using the algorithm and were promising to our ongoing applications to dental X-ray imaging. In this paper, our approach to the development of the DTS reconstruction algorithm and the results are described in detail.

  5. TH-C-BRD-06: A Novel MRI Based CT Artifact Correction Method for Improving Proton Range Calculation in the Presence of Severe CT Artifacts

    SciTech Connect

    Park, P; Schreibmann, E; Fox, T; Roper, J; Elder, E; Tejani, M; Crocker, I; Curran, W; Dhabaan, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Severe CT artifacts can impair our ability to accurately calculate proton range thereby resulting in a clinically unacceptable treatment plan. In this work, we investigated a novel CT artifact correction method based on a coregistered MRI and investigated its ability to estimate CT HU and proton range in the presence of severe CT artifacts. Methods: The proposed method corrects corrupted CT data using a coregistered MRI to guide the mapping of CT values from a nearby artifact-free region. First patient MRI and CT images were registered using 3D deformable image registration software based on B-spline and mutual information. The CT slice with severe artifacts was selected as well as a nearby slice free of artifacts (e.g. 1cm away from the artifact). The two sets of paired MRI and CT images at different slice locations were further registered by applying 2D deformable image registration. Based on the artifact free paired MRI and CT images, a comprehensive geospatial analysis was performed to predict the correct CT HU of the CT image with severe artifact. For a proof of concept, a known artifact was introduced that changed the ground truth CT HU value up to 30% and up to 5cm error in proton range. The ability of the proposed method to recover the ground truth was quantified using a selected head and neck case. Results: A significant improvement in image quality was observed visually. Our proof of concept study showed that 90% of area that had 30% errors in CT HU was corrected to 3% of its ground truth value. Furthermore, the maximum proton range error up to 5cm was reduced to 4mm error. Conclusion: MRI based CT artifact correction method can improve CT image quality and proton range calculation for patients with severe CT artifacts.

  6. Complications of dental surgery.

    PubMed

    Lillich, J D

    1998-08-01

    Both retrospective data and clinical experience indicate that complications of dental surgery are occasionally encountered and, to some extent, are inevitable. Many of the reported complications related to dental surgery such as incomplete removal of diseased teeth or removal of the wrong tooth can be avoided with sound preoperative planning and intraoperative technique. Diseased teeth should be properly identified prior to and during surgery. In addition, complete removal of the diseased tooth must be performed. Use of intraoperative radiographic examination to confirm the location of the diseased tooth and to document its removal cannot be overemphasized. Iatrogenic fracture of the maxillary or mandibular alveolar walls or palatine bone can be avoided by proper placement of the dental punch. The chances of developing incisional drainage or secondary sinusitis can be reduced by use of appropriate systemic antibiotics. These factors should guide the surgical approach to dental surgery to reduce the likelihood of developing common complications. PMID:9742671

  7. Allergy or Tolerance: Reduced Inflammatory Cytokine Response and Concomitant IL-10 Production of Lymphocytes and Monocytes in Symptom-Free Titanium Dental Implant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Peter; Wollenberg, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions to titanium (Ti) are very rare. Thus, we assessed the proinflammatory response and also potential tolerance favoring in vitro reactivity of human blood lymphocytes and monocytes (PBMC) to Ti in healthy individuals (14 without, 6 with complication-free dental Ti implants). The proliferation index (SI) in lymphocyte transformation test (LTT) and production of cytokines linked to innate immune response (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNFα) or immune regulation (IL-10) were assessed in response to TiO2 particles or Ti discs. In both groups, the Ti-LTT reactivity was not enhanced (e.g., SI < 3). The control antigen tetanus toxoid (TT) gave adequate reactivity (median SI individuals without/with implant: 20.6 ± 5.97/19.58 ± 2.99). Individuals without implant showed higher cytokine response to Ti materials than individuals with symptom-free implants; for example, TiO2 rutile particle induced increase of IL-1β 70.27-fold/8.49-fold versus control medium culture. PBMC of 5 of the 6 individuals with complication-free Ti implants showed an ex vivo ongoing production of IL-10 (mean 4.18 ± 2.98 pg/mL)-but none of the 14 controls showed such IL-10 production. Thus in vitro IL-1β-, IL-6-, and TNF-α production reflects “normal” unspecific immune response to Ti. This might be reduced by production of tolerogenic IL-10 in individuals with symptom-free Ti dental implants. PMID:24106709

  8. Grid artifact reduction for direct digital radiography detectors based on rotated stationary grids with homomorphic filtering

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dong Sik; Lee, Sanggyun

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: Grid artifacts are caused when using the antiscatter grid in obtaining digital x-ray images. In this paper, research on grid artifact reduction techniques is conducted especially for the direct detectors, which are based on amorphous selenium. Methods: In order to analyze and reduce the grid artifacts, the authors consider a multiplicative grid image model and propose a homomorphic filtering technique. For minimal damage due to filters, which are used to suppress the grid artifacts, rotated grids with respect to the sampling direction are employed, and min-max optimization problems for searching optimal grid frequencies and angles for given sampling frequencies are established. The authors then propose algorithms for the grid artifact reduction based on the band-stop filters as well as low-pass filters. Results: The proposed algorithms are experimentally tested for digital x-ray images, which are obtained from direct detectors with the rotated grids, and are compared with other algorithms. It is shown that the proposed algorithms can successfully reduce the grid artifacts for direct detectors. Conclusions: By employing the homomorphic filtering technique, the authors can considerably suppress the strong grid artifacts with relatively narrow-bandwidth filters compared to the normal filtering case. Using rotated grids also significantly reduces the ringing artifact. Furthermore, for specific grid frequencies and angles, the authors can use simple homomorphic low-pass filters in the spatial domain, and thus alleviate the grid artifacts with very low implementation complexity.

  9. Use of Artifacts in Teaching Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oicles, Ellen

    1983-01-01

    Artifacts can help students see the differences and similarities between cultures. Describes an artifact collection on India that includes such items as furniture, clothing, kitchen utensils, decorations, and books. Suggestions are given for collecting artifacts to use with the study of other cultures. (CS)

  10. Reflection-artifact-free photoacoustic imaging using PAFUSion (photoacoustic-guided focused ultrasound)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuniyil Ajith Singh, Mithun; Jaeger, Michael; Frenz, Martin; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2016-03-01

    Reflection artifacts caused by acoustic inhomogeneities are a main challenge to deep-tissue photoacoustic imaging. Photoacoustic transients generated by the skin surface and superficial vasculature will propagate into the tissue and reflect back from echogenic structures to generate reflection artifacts. These artifacts can cause problems in image interpretation and limit imaging depth. In its basic version, PAFUSion mimics the inward travelling wave-field from blood vessel-like PA sources by applying focused ultrasound pulses, and thus provides a way to identify reflection artifacts. In this work, we demonstrate reflection artifact correction in addition to identification, towards obtaining an artifact-free photoacoustic image. In view of clinical applications, we implemented an improved version of PAFUSion in which photoacoustic data is backpropagated to imitate the inward travelling wave-field and thus the reflection artifacts of a more arbitrary distribution of PA sources that also includes the skin melanin layer. The backpropagation is performed in a synthetic way based on the pulse-echo acquisitions after transmission on each single element of the transducer array. We present a phantom experiment and initial in vivo measurements on human volunteers where we demonstrate significant reflection artifact reduction using our technique. The results provide a direct confirmation that reflection artifacts are prominent in clinical epi-photoacoustic imaging, and that PAFUSion can reduce these artifacts significantly to improve the deep-tissue photoacoustic imaging.

  11. SU-E-I-38: Improved Metal Artifact Correction Using Adaptive Dual Energy Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, X; Elder, E; Roper, J; Dhabaan, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The empirical dual energy calibration (EDEC) method corrects for beam-hardening artifacts, but shows limited performance on metal artifact correction. In this work, we propose an adaptive dual energy calibration (ADEC) method to correct for metal artifacts. Methods: The empirical dual energy calibration (EDEC) method corrects for beam-hardening artifacts, but shows limited performance on metal artifact correction. In this work, we propose an adaptive dual energy calibration (ADEC) method to correct for metal artifacts. Results: Highly attenuating copper rods cause severe streaking artifacts on standard CT images. EDEC improves the image quality, but cannot eliminate the streaking artifacts. Compared to EDEC, the proposed ADEC method further reduces the streaking resulting from metallic inserts and beam-hardening effects and obtains material decomposition images with significantly improved accuracy. Conclusion: We propose an adaptive dual energy calibration method to correct for metal artifacts. ADEC is evaluated with the Shepp-Logan phantom, and shows superior metal artifact correction performance. In the future, we will further evaluate the performance of the proposed method with phantom and patient data.

  12. Dental OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colston, Bill W.; Sathyam, Ujwal S.; Dasilva, Luiz B.; Everett, Matthew J.; Stroeve, Pieter; Otis, L. L.

    1998-09-01

    We present here the first in vivo optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of human dental tissue. A novel dental optical coherence tomography system has been developed. This system incorporates the interferometer sample arm and transverse scanning optics into a handpiece that can be used intraorally to image human dental tissues. The average imaging depth of this system varied from 3 mm in hard tissues to 1.5 mm in soft tissues. We discuss the application of this imaging system for dentistry and illustrate the potential of our dental OCT system for diagnosis of periodontal disease, detection of caries, and evaluation of dental restorations.

  13. Reduction of truncation artifacts in CT images via a discriminative dictionary representation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yang; Li, Ke; Li, Yinsheng; Hsieh, Jiang; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2016-04-01

    When the scan field of view (SFOV) of a CT system is not large enough to enclose the entire cross-section of a patient, or the patient needs to be intentionally positioned partially outside the SFOV for certain clinical CT scans, truncation artifacts are often observed in the reconstructed CT images. Conventional wisdom to reduce truncation artifacts is to complete the truncated projection data via data extrapolation with different a priori assumptions. This paper presents a novel truncation artifact reduction method that directly works in the CT image domain. Specifically, a discriminative dictionary that includes a sub-dictionary of truncation artifacts and a sub-dictionary of non-artifact image information was used to separate a truncation artifact-contaminated image into two sub-images, one with reduced truncation artifacts, and the other one containing only the truncation artifacts. Both experimental phantom and retrospective human subject studies have been performed to characterize the performance of the proposed truncation artifact reduction method.

  14. Truncation artifact and boundary artifact reduction in breast tomosynthesis reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yiheng; Chan, Heang-Ping; Wu, Yi-Ta; Sahiner, Berkman; Zhou, Chuan; Wei, Jun; Ge, Jun; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Shi, Jiazheng

    2008-03-01

    Digital Tomosynthesis Mammography (DTM) is an emerging technique that has the potential to improve breast cancer detection. DTM acquires low-dose mammograms at a number of projection angles over a limited angular range and reconstructs the 3D breast volume. Due to the limited number of projections within a limited angular range and the finite size of the detector, DTM reconstruction contains boundary and truncation artifacts that degrade the image quality of the tomosynthesized slices, especially that of the boundary and truncated regions. In this work, we developed artifact reduction methods that make use of both 2D and 3D breast boundary information and local intensity-equalization and tissue-compensation techniques. A breast phantom containing test objects and a selected DTM patient case were used to evaluate the effects of artifact reduction. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), the normalized profiles of test objects, and a non-uniformity error index were used as performance measures. A GE prototype DTM system was used to acquire 21 PVs in 3° increments over a +/-30° angular range. The Simultaneous Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (SART) was used for DTM reconstruction. Our results demonstrated that the proposed methods can improve the image quality both qualitatively and quantitatively, resulting in increased CNR value, background uniformity and an overall reconstruction quality comparable to that without truncation. For the selected DTM patient case, the obscured breast structural information near the truncated regions was essentially recovered. In addition, restricting SART reconstruction to be performed within the estimated 3D breast volume increased the computation efficiency.

  15. Adaptive view synthesis for aliasing artifact reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Jiang; Slack, Christopher L.; Dutta, Sandeep; Gordon, Clarence L., III; Li, Jay; Chao, Edward

    2001-06-01

    In recent years, the scan speed of computed tomography (CT) has increased significantly. Not long ago, the state-of-the- art CT was only capable of completing a single scan in 1.0 s per gantry rotation. Nowadays, 0.5 s per revolution is nearly an industry standard. Faster scan speeds demand faster sampling of the projections to combat aliasing artifacts, and higher x-ray tube output to ensure sufficient x-ray photon flux delivered to the scan. These demands often exceed the technological capability of these components. In this paper we performed a detailed analysis on the characteristics of the view aliasing artifact. Based on our analysis and clinical observations, we propose an adaptive view synthesis (AVS) scheme that effectively reduces the demands on the data acquisition system. Detailed performance comparison between the full view sampling and the adaptive view synthesis are performed through computer simulations and phantom experiments. Our analysis indicates that AVS is adequate for routine clinical applications.

  16. Quantification and Reduction of Ghosting Artifacts in Interleaved Echo-Planar Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Reeder, Scott B.; Atalar, Ergin; Bolster, Bradley D.; McVeigh, Elliot R.

    2007-01-01

    A mathematical analysis of ghosting artifacts often seen in interleaved echo-planar images (EPI) is presented. These artifacts result from phase and amplitude discontinuities between lines of k-space in the phase-encoding direction, and timing misregistrations from system filter delays. Phase offsets and time delays are often measured using “reference” scans, to reduce ghosting through post-processing. From the expressions describing ghosting artifacts, criteria were established for reducing ghosting to acceptable levels. Subsequently, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) requirements for estimation of time delays and phase offsets, determined from reference scans, was evaluated to establish the effect of estimation error on artifact reduction for interleaved EPI. Artifacts resulting from these effects can be reduced to very low levels when appropriate reference scan estimation is used. This has important implications for functional MRI (fMRI) and applications involving small changes in signal intensity. PMID:9339445

  17. Image Degradation in Microscopic Images: Avoidance, Artifacts, and Solutions.

    PubMed

    Roels, Joris; Aelterman, Jan; De Vylder, Jonas; Lippens, Saskia; Luong, Hiêp Q; Guérin, Christopher J; Philips, Wilfried

    2016-01-01

    The goal of modern microscopy is to acquire high-quality image based data sets. A typical microscopy workflow is set up in order to address a specific biological question and involves different steps. The first step is to precisely define the biological question, in order to properly come to an experimental design for sample preparation and image acquisition. A better object representation allows biological users to draw more reliable scientific conclusions. Image restoration can manipulate the acquired data in an effort to reduce the impact of artifacts (spurious results) due to physical and technical limitations, resulting in a better representation of the object of interest. However, precise usage of these algorithms is necessary so as to avoid further artifacts that might influence the data analysis and bias the conclusions. It is essential to understand image acquisition, and how it introduces artifacts and degradations in the acquired data, so that their effects on subsequent analysis can be minimized. This paper provides an overview of the fundamental artifacts and degradations that affect many micrographs. We describe why artifacts appear, in what sense they impact overall image quality, and how to mitigate them by first improving the acquisition parameters and then applying proper image restoration techniques. PMID:27207362

  18. Reduction of MPEG ringing artifacts using adaptive sigma filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Hao

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel computationally efficient post-processing algorithm to reduce ringing artifacts in the decoded DCT-coded video without using coding information. While the proposed algorithm is based on edge information as most filtering-based de-ringing algorithms do, this algorithm solely uses one single computationally efficient nonlinear filter, namely sigma filter, for both edge detection and smoothing. Specifically, the sigma filter, which was originally designed for nonlinear filtering, is extended to generate edge proximity information. Different from other adaptive filtering-based methods, whose filters typically use a fixed small window but flexible weights, this sigma filter adaptively switches between small and large windows. The adaptation is designed for removing ringing artifacts only, so the algorithm cannot be used for de-blocking. Overall, the proposed algorithm achieves a good balance among removing ringing artifacts, preserving edges and details, and computational complexity.

  19. Adaptive grid artifact reduction in the frequency domain with spatial properties for x-ray images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong Sik; Lee, Sanggyun

    2012-03-01

    By applying band-rejection filters (BRFs) in the frequency domain, we can efficiently reduce the grid artifacts, which are caused by using the antiscatter grid in obtaining x-ray digital images. However, if the frequency component of the grid artifact is relatively close to that of the object, then simply applying a BRF may seriously distort the object and cause the ringing artifacts. Since the ringing artifacts are quite dependent on the shape of the object to be recovered in the spatial domain, the spatial property of the x-ray image should be considered in applying BRFs. In this paper, we propose an adaptive filtering scheme, which can cooperate such different properties in the spatial domain. In the spatial domain, we compare several approaches, such as the mangnitude, edge, and frequency-modulation (FM) model-based algorithms, to detect the ringing artifact or the grid artifact component. In order to perform a robust detection whether the ringing artifact is strong or not, we employ the FM model for the extracted signal, which corresponds to a specific grid artifact. A detection of the position for the ringing artifact is then conducted based on the slope detection algorithm, which is commonly used as an FM discriminator in the communication area. However, the detected position of the ringing artifact is not accurate. Hence, in order to obtain an accurate detection result, we combine the edge-based approach with the FM model approach. Numerical result for real x-ray images shows that applying BRFs in the frequency domain in conjunction with the spatial property of the ringing artifact can successfully remove the grid artifact, distorting the object less.

  20. Cochlear implant artifact attenuation in late auditory evoked potentials: a single channel approach.

    PubMed

    Mc Laughlin, Myles; Lopez Valdes, Alejandro; Reilly, Richard B; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2013-08-01

    Recent evidence suggests that late auditory evoked potentials (LAEP) provide a useful objective metric of performance in cochlear implant (CI) subjects. However, the CI produces a large electrical artifact that contaminates LAEP recordings and confounds their interpretation. Independent component analysis (ICA) has been used in combination with multi-channel recordings to effectively remove the artifact. The applicability of the ICA approach is limited when only single channel data are needed or available, as is often the case in both clinical and research settings. Here we developed a single-channel, high sample rate (125 kHz), and high bandwidth (0-100 kHz) acquisition system to reduce the CI stimulation artifact. We identified two different artifacts in the recording: 1) a high frequency artifact reflecting the stimulation pulse rate, and 2) a direct current (DC, or pedestal) artifact that showed a non-linear time varying relationship to pulse amplitude. This relationship was well described by a bivariate polynomial. The high frequency artifact was completely attenuated by a 35 Hz low-pass filter for all subjects (n = 22). The DC artifact could be caused by an impedance mismatch. For 27% of subjects tested, no DC artifact was observed when electrode impedances were balanced to within 1 kΩ. For the remaining 73% of subjects, the pulse amplitude was used to estimate and then attenuate the DC artifact. Where measurements of pulse amplitude were not available (as with standard low sample rate systems), the DC artifact could be estimated from the stimulus envelope. The present artifact removal approach allows accurate measurement of LAEPs from CI subjects from single channel recordings, increasing their feasibility and utility as an accessible objective measure of CI function. PMID:23727626

  1. Dental injuries during general anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, R G; Lindsay, S M

    1996-04-01

    Although most anaesthetic textbooks cite dental injury as a complication of endotracheal intubation few studies have examined the extent and nature of the problem. Such damage however, formed the basis for one-third of all confirmed or potential anaesthetic claims notified to the Medical Protection Society between 1977 and 1986. This article seeks to explore the extent of the problem, outline predisposing factors, summarise current prophylactic measures and make recommendations to reduce the overall incidence. Increased awareness of the problem, by both anaesthetists and dental surgeons, coupled with appropriate prophylactic measures may result in a reduced incidence of dental injury arising from general anaesthesia. Given the high incidence of dental damage we recommend that all patients undergoing a surgical operation under endotracheal intubation should have a pre-operative dental check wherever possible. Clearly, the first dental examination would be conducted by an anaesthetist familiar with the predisposing factors. Where he/she considers there to be a higher than average risk of dental damage occurring during intubation a more specialised examination should be conducted by a dental surgeon. It may, where appropriate, be possible for remedial dental treatment to be carried out and customised mouth guards to be constructed prior to the operation. Obviously such recommendations have certain financial implications and would have to be subject to controlled cost-benefit analysis before their widespread application. PMID:8935289

  2. Ghost artifact cancellation using phased array processing.

    PubMed

    Kellman, P; McVeigh, E R

    2001-08-01

    In this article, a method for phased array combining is formulated which may be used to cancel ghosts caused by a variety of distortion mechanisms, including space variant distortions such as local flow or off-resonance. This method is based on a constrained optimization, which optimizes SNR subject to the constraint of nulling ghost artifacts at known locations. The resultant technique is similar to the method known as sensitivity encoding (SENSE) used for accelerated imaging; however, in this formulation it is applied to full field-of-view (FOV) images. The method is applied to multishot EPI with noninterleaved phase encode acquisition. A number of benefits, as compared to the conventional interleaved approach, are reduced distortion due to off-resonance, in-plane flow, and EPI delay misalignment, as well as eliminating the need for echo-shifting. Experimental results demonstrate the cancellation for both phantom as well as cardiac imaging examples. PMID:11477638

  3. Artifacts in digital coincidence timing.

    PubMed

    Moses, W W; Peng, Q

    2014-11-01

    Digital methods are becoming increasingly popular for measuring time differences, and are the de facto standard in PET cameras. These methods usually include a master system clock and a (digital) arrival time estimate for each detector that is obtained by comparing the detector output signal to some reference portion of this clock (such as the rising edge). Time differences between detector signals are then obtained by subtracting the digitized estimates from a detector pair. A number of different methods can be used to generate the digitized arrival time of the detector output, such as sending a discriminator output into a time to digital converter (TDC) or digitizing the waveform and applying a more sophisticated algorithm to extract a timing estimator.All measurement methods are subject to error, and one generally wants to minimize these errors and so optimize the timing resolution. A common method for optimizing timing methods is to measure the coincidence timing resolution between two timing signals whose time difference should be constant (such as detecting gammas from positron annihilation) and selecting the method that minimizes the width of the distribution (i.e. the timing resolution). Unfortunately, a common form of error (a nonlinear transfer function) leads to artifacts that artificially narrow this resolution, which can lead to erroneous selection of the 'optimal' method. The purpose of this note is to demonstrate the origin of this artifact and suggest that caution should be used when optimizing time digitization systems solely on timing resolution minimization. PMID:25321885

  4. Artifacts in Digital Coincidence Timing

    PubMed Central

    Moses, W. W.; Peng, Q.

    2014-01-01

    Digital methods are becoming increasingly popular for measuring time differences, and are the de facto standard in PET cameras. These methods usually include a master system clock and a (digital) arrival time estimate for each detector that is obtained by comparing the detector output signal to some reference portion of this clock (such as the rising edge). Time differences between detector signals are then obtained by subtracting the digitized estimates from a detector pair. A number of different methods can be used to generate the digitized arrival time of the detector output, such as sending a discriminator output into a time to digital converter (TDC) or digitizing the waveform and applying a more sophisticated algorithm to extract a timing estimator. All measurement methods are subject to error, and one generally wants to minimize these errors and so optimize the timing resolution. A common method for optimizing timing methods is to measure the coincidence timing resolution between two timing signals whose time difference should be constant (such as detecting gammas from positron annihilation) and selecting the method that minimizes the width of the distribution (i.e., the timing resolution). Unfortunately, a common form of error (a nonlinear transfer function) leads to artifacts that artificially narrow this resolution, which can lead to erroneous selection of the “optimal” method. The purpose of this note is to demonstrate the origin of this artifact and suggest that caution should be used when optimizing time digitization systems solely on timing resolution minimization. PMID:25321885

  5. Artifacts in digital coincidence timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, W. W.; Peng, Q.

    2014-11-01

    Digital methods are becoming increasingly popular for measuring time differences, and are the de facto standard in PET cameras. These methods usually include a master system clock and a (digital) arrival time estimate for each detector that is obtained by comparing the detector output signal to some reference portion of this clock (such as the rising edge). Time differences between detector signals are then obtained by subtracting the digitized estimates from a detector pair. A number of different methods can be used to generate the digitized arrival time of the detector output, such as sending a discriminator output into a time to digital converter (TDC) or digitizing the waveform and applying a more sophisticated algorithm to extract a timing estimator. All measurement methods are subject to error, and one generally wants to minimize these errors and so optimize the timing resolution. A common method for optimizing timing methods is to measure the coincidence timing resolution between two timing signals whose time difference should be constant (such as detecting gammas from positron annihilation) and selecting the method that minimizes the width of the distribution (i.e. the timing resolution). Unfortunately, a common form of error (a nonlinear transfer function) leads to artifacts that artificially narrow this resolution, which can lead to erroneous selection of the ‘optimal’ method. The purpose of this note is to demonstrate the origin of this artifact and suggest that caution should be used when optimizing time digitization systems solely on timing resolution minimization.

  6. Artifacts in digital coincidence timing

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, W. W.; Peng, Q.

    2014-10-16

    Digital methods are becoming increasingly popular for measuring time differences, and are the de facto standard in PET cameras. These methods usually include a master system clock and a (digital) arrival time estimate for each detector that is obtained by comparing the detector output signal to some reference portion of this clock (such as the rising edge). Time differences between detector signals are then obtained by subtracting the digitized estimates from a detector pair. A number of different methods can be used to generate the digitized arrival time of the detector output, such as sending a discriminator output into a time to digital converter (TDC) or digitizing the waveform and applying a more sophisticated algorithm to extract a timing estimator.All measurement methods are subject to error, and one generally wants to minimize these errors and so optimize the timing resolution. A common method for optimizing timing methods is to measure the coincidence timing resolution between two timing signals whose time difference should be constant (such as detecting gammas from positron annihilation) and selecting the method that minimizes the width of the distribution (i.e. the timing resolution). Unfortunately, a common form of error (a nonlinear transfer function) leads to artifacts that artificially narrow this resolution, which can lead to erroneous selection of the 'optimal' method. In conclusion, the purpose of this note is to demonstrate the origin of this artifact and suggest that caution should be used when optimizing time digitization systems solely on timing resolution minimization.

  7. Ring artifacts removal from synchrotron CT image slices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zhouping; Wiebe, Sheldon; Chapman, Dean

    2013-06-01

    Ring artifacts can occur in reconstructed images from x-ray Computerized Tomography (CT) as full or partial concentric rings superimposed on the scanned structures. Due to the data corruption by those ring artifacts in CT images, qualitative and quantitative analysis of these images are compromised. In this paper, we propose to correct the ring artifacts on the reconstructed synchrotron radiation (SR) CT image slices. The proposed correction procedure includes the following steps: (1). transform the reconstructed CT images into polar coordinates; (2) apply discrete two-dimensional (2D) wavelet transform to the polar image to decompose it into four image components: low pass band image component, as well as the components from horizontal, vertical and diagonal details bands; (3). apply 2D Fourier transform to the vertical details band image component only, since the ring artifacts become vertical lines in the polar coordinates; (4). apply Gaussian filtering in Fourier domain along the abscissa direction to suppress the vertical lines, since the information of the vertical lines in Fourier domain is completely condensed to that direction; (5). perform inverse Fourier transform to get the corrected vertical details band image component; (6). perform inverse wavelet transform to get the corrected polar image; (7). transform the corrected polar image back to Cartesian coordinates to get the CT image slice with reduced ring artifacts. This approach has been successfully used on CT data acquired from the Biomedical Imaging and Therapy (BMIT) beamline in Canadian Light Source (CLS), and the results show that the ring artifacts in original SR CT images have been effectively suppressed with all the structure information in the image preserved.

  8. Dental radiology.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Tony M

    2009-02-01

    Dental radiology is the core diagnostic modality of veterinary dentistry. Dental radiographs assist in detecting hidden painful pathology, estimating the severity of dental conditions, assessing treatment options, providing intraoperative guidance, and also serve to monitor success of prior treatments. Unfortunately, most professional veterinary training programs provide little or no training in veterinary dentistry in general or dental radiology in particular. Although a technical learning curve does exist, the techniques required for producing diagnostic films are not difficult to master. Regular use of dental x-rays will increase the amount of pathology detected, leading to healthier patients and happier clients who notice a difference in how their pet feels. This article covers equipment and materials needed to produce diagnostic intraoral dental films. A simplified guide for positioning will be presented, including a positioning "cheat sheet" to be placed next to the dental x-ray machine in the operatory. Additionally, digital dental radiograph systems will be described and trends for their future discussed. PMID:19410234

  9. Dental Hygienist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of dental hygienist, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 13 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 9 units specific to the occupation of dental hygienist. The following skill areas are covered in…

  10. Computerized Dental Injection Fear Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, L.J.; Leroux, B.G.; Ruff, P.A.; Coldwell, S.E.

    2013-01-01

    One in four adults reports a clinically significant fear of dental injections, leading many to avoid dental care. While systematic desensitization is the most common therapeutic method for treating specific phobias such as fear of dental injections, lack of access to trained therapists, as well as dentists’ lack of training and time in providing such a therapy, means that most fearful individuals are not able to receive the therapy needed to be able to receive necessary dental treatment. Computer Assisted Relaxation Learning (CARL) is a self-paced computerized treatment based on systematic desensitization for dental injection fear. This multicenter, block-randomized, dentist-blind, parallel-group study conducted in 8 sites in the United States compared CARL with an informational pamphlet in reducing fear of dental injections. Participants completing CARL reported significantly greater reduction in self-reported general and injection-specific dental anxiety measures compared with control individuals (p < .001). Twice as many CARL participants (35.3%) as controls (17.6%) opted to receive a dental injection after the intervention, although this was not statistically significant. CARL, therefore, led to significant changes in self-reported fear in study participants, but no significant differences in the proportion of participants having a dental injection (ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00609648). PMID:23690352

  11. Artifacts in digital coincidence timing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Moses, W. W.; Peng, Q.

    2014-10-16

    Digital methods are becoming increasingly popular for measuring time differences, and are the de facto standard in PET cameras. These methods usually include a master system clock and a (digital) arrival time estimate for each detector that is obtained by comparing the detector output signal to some reference portion of this clock (such as the rising edge). Time differences between detector signals are then obtained by subtracting the digitized estimates from a detector pair. A number of different methods can be used to generate the digitized arrival time of the detector output, such as sending a discriminator output into amore » time to digital converter (TDC) or digitizing the waveform and applying a more sophisticated algorithm to extract a timing estimator.All measurement methods are subject to error, and one generally wants to minimize these errors and so optimize the timing resolution. A common method for optimizing timing methods is to measure the coincidence timing resolution between two timing signals whose time difference should be constant (such as detecting gammas from positron annihilation) and selecting the method that minimizes the width of the distribution (i.e. the timing resolution). Unfortunately, a common form of error (a nonlinear transfer function) leads to artifacts that artificially narrow this resolution, which can lead to erroneous selection of the 'optimal' method. In conclusion, the purpose of this note is to demonstrate the origin of this artifact and suggest that caution should be used when optimizing time digitization systems solely on timing resolution minimization.« less

  12. Young Children's Rapid Learning about Artifacts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casler, Krista; Kelemen, Deborah

    2005-01-01

    Tool use is central to interdisciplinary debates about the evolution and distinctiveness of human intelligence, yet little is actually known about how human conceptions of artifacts develop. Results across these two studies show that even 2-year-olds approach artifacts in ways distinct from captive tool-using monkeys. Contrary to adult intuition,…

  13. Dental OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilder-Smith, Petra; Otis, Linda; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Zhongping

    This chapter describes the applications of OCT for imaging in vivo dental and oral tissue. The oral cavity is a diverse environment that includes oral mucosa, gingival tissues, teeth and their supporting structures. Because OCT can image both hard and soft tissues of the oral cavity at high resolution, it offers the unique capacity to identity dental disease before destructive changes have progressed. OCT images depict clinically important anatomical features such as the location of soft tissue attachments, morphological changes in gingival tissue, tooth decay, enamel thickness and decay, as well as the structural integrity of dental restorations. OCT imaging allows for earlier intervention than is possible with current diagnostic modalities.

  14. Comparison of ring artifact correction methods for flat-detector CT.

    PubMed

    Prell, Daniel; Kyriakou, Yiannis; Kalender, Willi A

    2009-06-21

    In flat-detector CT, imperfect or defect detector elements may cause concentric ring artifacts due to their continuous over- or underestimation of attenuation values, which often disturb image quality. Especially due to the demand for high-spatial resolution images and the necessary pixel read-out without arbitrary pixel-binning, ring artifacts become more pronounced and the reduction of these artifacts becomes a necessity. We here present a comparison of two dedicated ring artifact correction methods for flat-detector CT, on the basis of different median and mean filterings of the reconstructed image but each working in different geometric planes. While the first method works in Cartesian coordinates, the second method performs a transformation to polar coordinates. Both post-processing methods efficiently reduce ring artifacts in the reconstructed images and improve image quality. The transformation to polar coordinates turned out to be a necessary step for efficient ring artifact correction, since correction in Cartesian coordinates suffers from newly introduced artifacts as well as insufficient correction of artifacts close to the center of rotation. PMID:19491452

  15. Comparison of ring artifact correction methods for flat-detector CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prell, Daniel; Kyriakou, Yiannis; Kalender, Willi A.

    2009-06-01

    In flat-detector CT, imperfect or defect detector elements may cause concentric ring artifacts due to their continuous over- or underestimation of attenuation values, which often disturb image quality. Especially due to the demand for high-spatial resolution images and the necessary pixel read-out without arbitrary pixel-binning, ring artifacts become more pronounced and the reduction of these artifacts becomes a necessity. We here present a comparison of two dedicated ring artifact correction methods for flat-detector CT, on the basis of different median and mean filterings of the reconstructed image but each working in different geometric planes. While the first method works in Cartesian coordinates, the second method performs a transformation to polar coordinates. Both post-processing methods efficiently reduce ring artifacts in the reconstructed images and improve image quality. The transformation to polar coordinates turned out to be a necessary step for efficient ring artifact correction, since correction in Cartesian coordinates suffers from newly introduced artifacts as well as insufficient correction of artifacts close to the center of rotation.

  16. A motion artifact generation and assessment system for the rapid testing of surface biopotential electrodes.

    PubMed

    Cömert, Alper; Hyttinen, Jari

    2015-01-01

    Dry electrodes can reduce cost while increasing the usability and comfort of wearable monitoring systems. They are, however, susceptible to motion artifacts. The present electrode testing methods lack reliability and do not separate the factors that affect the motion artifact. In this paper, we introduce a first generation motion artifact generation and assessment system that generates the speed, amplitude, and pattern-wise programmable movement of the electrode. The system simultaneously measures electrode-skin impedance, the motion artifact, and one channel of an electrocardiogram that contains the motion artifact and monitors the mounting force applied to the electrode. We demonstrate the system by comparing the applied movement and the measured signals for electrode movements up to 6 mm and movement frequencies from 0.4 Hz to 4 Hz. Results show that the impedance change and surface potential are visually clearly related to the applied motion, with average correlations of 0.89 and 0.64, respectively. The applied force, electrode location, and electrode structure all affect the motion artifact. The setup enables the motion of the electrode to be accurately controlled. The system can be used as a precursor to the testing of integrated systems because it enables thorough, repeatable, and robust motion artifact studies. The system allows a deeper insight into motion artifacts and the interplay of the various factors that affect them. PMID:25500614

  17. Silicon bulk micromachined hybrid dimensional artifact.

    SciTech Connect

    Claudet, Andre A.; Tran, Hy D.; Bauer, Todd Marks; Shilling, Katherine Meghan; Oliver, Andrew David

    2010-03-01

    A mesoscale dimensional artifact based on silicon bulk micromachining fabrication has been developed and manufactured with the intention of evaluating the artifact both on a high precision coordinate measuring machine (CMM) and video-probe based measuring systems. This hybrid artifact has features that can be located by both a touch probe and a video probe system with a k=2 uncertainty of 0.4 {micro}m, more than twice as good as a glass reference artifact. We also present evidence that this uncertainty could be lowered to as little as 50 nm (k=2). While video-probe based systems are commonly used to inspect mesoscale mechanical components, a video-probe system's certified accuracy is generally much worse than its repeatability. To solve this problem, an artifact has been developed which can be calibrated using a commercially available high-accuracy tactile system and then be used to calibrate typical production vision-based measurement systems. This allows for error mapping to a higher degree of accuracy than is possible with a glass reference artifact. Details of the designed features and manufacturing process of the hybrid dimensional artifact are given and a comparison of the designed features to the measured features of the manufactured artifact is presented and discussed. Measurement results from vision and touch probe systems are compared and evaluated to determine the capability of the manufactured artifact to serve as a calibration tool for video-probe systems. An uncertainty analysis for calibration of the artifact using a CMM is presented.

  18. Effect of pressure and padding on motion artifact of textile electrodes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background With the aging population and rising healthcare costs, wearable monitoring is gaining importance. The motion artifact affecting dry electrodes is one of the main challenges preventing the widespread use of wearable monitoring systems. In this paper we investigate the motion artifact and ways of making a textile electrode more resilient against motion artifact. Our aim is to study the effects of the pressure exerted onto the electrode, and the effects of inserting padding between the applied pressure and the electrode. Method We measure real time electrode-skin interface impedance, ECG from two channels, the motion artifact related surface potential, and exerted pressure during controlled motion by a measurement setup designed to estimate the relation of motion artifact to the signals. We use different foam padding materials with various mechanical properties and apply electrode pressures between 5 and 25 mmHg to understand their effect. A QRS and noise detection algorithm based on a modified Pan-Tompkins QRS detection algorithm estimates the electrode behaviour in respect to the motion artifact from two channels; one dominated by the motion artifact and one containing both the motion artifact and the ECG. This procedure enables us to quantify a given setup’s susceptibility to the motion artifact. Results Pressure is found to strongly affect signal quality as is the use of padding. In general, the paddings reduce the motion artifact. However the shape and frequency components of the motion artifact vary for different paddings, and their material and physical properties. Electrode impedance at 100 kHz correlates in some cases with the motion artifact but it is not a good predictor of the motion artifact. Conclusion From the results of this study, guidelines for improving electrode design regarding padding and pressure can be formulated as paddings are a necessary part of the system for reducing the motion artifact, and further, their effect maximises

  19. Dental Fluorosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... when children regularly consume fluoride during the teeth-forming years, age 8 and younger. Most dental fluorosis ... over a long period when the teeth are forming under the gums. Only children aged 8 years ...

  20. Dental Implants

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... facts so you can make an informed decision as to whether dental implants are right for your ... the jaw bone. It’s obviously not the same as the original connection , but functions just the same. ...

  1. Dental Caries (Tooth Decay)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Find Data by Topic > Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Main Content Dental caries (tooth decay) remains the most prevalent chronic ... important source of information on oral health and dental care in the United States since the early ...

  2. Dosimetric consideration for patients with dental filling materials undergoing irradiation of oral cavity using RapidArc: challenges and solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mail, Noor; Albarakati, Y.; Khan, M. Ahmad; Saeedi, F.; Safadi, N.; Al-Ghamdi, S.; Saoudi, A.

    2012-03-01

    In this study, we investigate the effect of dental filling materials (DFM) on RapidArcTM treatment plans and delivery in a patient undergoing radiotherapy treatment. The presence of DFM creates uncertainties in CT number and causes long streaking artifacts in the reconstructed images which greatly affect the dose distribution inside the oral cavity. The influence of extensive dental filling artifacts on dose distribution was performed using a geometrically well defined head and neck IMRT verification phantom (PTW, Freiburg, Germany) together with inserts from DFM (Amalgam, 11.3 g/cm3). The phantom was scanned using Siemens SOMATOM Sensation CT simulator (Siemens AG, Germany) under standard head and neck imaging protocol (120 kV, 120 mAs, voxel size 1×1×2 mm3). Three RapidArcTM plans were created in the Varian Eclipse treatment planning System (TPS) to treat oral cavity using the same CT dataset including; 1) raw CT image, 2) streaking artifacts replaced with a mask of 10 HU and 3) 2 cm thick 6000 HU virtual filter (a volume around the teeth in TPS to mimic extra attenuation). The virtual filter thickness optimization was purely based on measured PDD data acquired with DFM and the calculation in Eclipse Planning System using direct beam. The dose delivery and distribution for the three plans was verified using Gafchromic EBT2 (International Specialty Product, Wayne, NJ, USA) film measurements. The artifact mask and virtual filter around the teeth in the planning was found very useful to reduce the discrepancies between the dose plan and delivery. From clinical point of view, these results can be helpful to understand the increase of mucositis in patient having DFM, and further investigation is underway for clinical solution.

  3. Rotational artifacts in on-board cone beam computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, E. S. M.; Webb, R.; Nyiri, B. J.

    2015-02-01

    Rotational artifacts in image guidance systems lead to registration errors that affect non-isocentric treatments and dose to off-axis organs-at-risk. This study investigates a rotational artifact in the images acquired with the on-board cone beam computed tomography system XVI (Elekta, Stockholm, Sweden). The goals of the study are to identify the cause of the artifact, to characterize its dependence on other quantities, and to investigate possible solutions. A 30 cm diameter cylindrical phantom is used to acquire clockwise and counterclockwise scans at five speeds (120 to 360 deg min-1) on six Elekta linear accelerators from three generations (MLCi, MLCi2 and Agility). Additional scans are acquired with different pulse widths and focal spot sizes for the same mAs. Image quality is evaluated using a common phantom with an in-house three dimensional contrast transfer function attachment. A robust, operator-independent analysis is developed which quantifies rotational artifacts with 0.02° accuracy and imaging system delays with 3 ms accuracy. Results show that the artifact is caused by mislabelling of the projections with a lagging angle due to various imaging system delays. For the most clinically used scan speed (360 deg min-1), the artifact is ˜0.5°, which corresponds to ˜0.25° error per scan direction with the standard Elekta procedure for angle calibration. This leads to a 0.5 mm registration error at 11 cm off-center. The artifact increases linearly with scan speed, indicating that the system delay is independent of scan speed. For the most commonly used pulse width of 40 ms, this delay is 34 ± 1 ms, part of which is half the pulse width. Results are consistent among the three linac generations. A software solution that corrects the angles of individual projections is shown to eliminate the rotational error for all scan speeds and directions. Until such a solution is available from the manufacturer, three clinical solutions are presented, which reduce the

  4. On geometric artifacts in cryo electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Turoňová, Beata; Marsalek, Lukas; Slusallek, Philipp

    2016-04-01

    Single-tilt scheme is nowadays the prevalent acquisition geometry in electron tomography and subtomogram averaging experiments. Being an incomplete scheme that induces ill-posedness in the sense of the X-ray or Radon transform inverse problem, it introduces a number of artifacts that directly influence the quality of tomographic reconstructions. Though individually described by different authors before, a systematic study of these acquisition geometry-related artifacts in one place and across representative set of reconstruction methods has not been, to our knowledge, performed before. Moreover, the effects of these artifacts on the reconstructed density are sometimes misinterpreted, attributing them to the wrong cause, especially if their effects accumulate. In this work, we systematically study the major artifacts of single-tilt geometry known as the missing wedge (incomplete projection set problem), the missing information and the specimen-level interior problem (long-object problem). First, we illustratively describe, using a unified terminology, how and why these artifacts arise and when they can be avoided. Next, we describe the effects of these artifacts on the reconstructions across all major classes of reconstruction methods, including newly-appeared methods like the Iterative Nonuniform fast Fourier transform based Reconstruction method (INFR) and the Progressive Stochastic Reconstruction Technique (PSRT). Finally, we draw conclusions and recommendations on numerous points, especially regarding the mutual influence of the geometric artifacts, ability of different reconstruction methods to suppress them as well as implications to the interpretation of both electron tomography and subtomogram averaging experiments. PMID:26916079

  5. Artifact reduction in industrial computed tomography via data fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Schrapp, Michael; Goldammer, Matthias; Stephan, Jürgen

    2014-02-18

    As the most stressed part of a gas turbine the first row of turbine blades is not only a challenge for the materials used. Also the testing of these parts have to meet the highest standards. Computed tomography (CT) as the technique which could reveal the most details also provides the biggest challenges [1]: A full penetration of large sized turbine blades is often only possible at high X-ray voltages causing disproportional high costs. A reduction of the X-ray voltage is able to reduce these arising costs but yields non penetration artifacts in the reconstructed CT image. In most instances, these artifacts manifests itself as blurred and smeared regions at concave edges due to a reduced signal to noise ratio. In order to complement the missing information and to increase the overall image quality of our reconstruction, we use further imaging modalities such as a 3-D Scanner and ultrasonic imaging. A 3-D scanner is easy and cost effective to implement and is able to acquire all relevant data simultaneously with the CT projections. If, however, the interior structure is of supplemental interest, an ultrasonic imaging method is additionally used. We consider this data as a priori knowledge to employ them in an iterative reconstruction. To do so, standard iterative reconstruction methods are modified to incorporate the a priori data in a regularization approach in combination with minimizing the total variation of our image. Applying this procedure on turbine blades, we are able to reduce the apparent artifacts almost completely.

  6. Artifact reduction in industrial computed tomography via data fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrapp, Michael; Goldammer, Matthias; Stephan, Jürgen

    2014-02-01

    As the most stressed part of a gas turbine the first row of turbine blades is not only a challenge for the materials used. Also the testing of these parts have to meet the highest standards. Computed tomography (CT) as the technique which could reveal the most details also provides the biggest challenges [1]: A full penetration of large sized turbine blades is often only possible at high X-ray voltages causing disproportional high costs. A reduction of the X-ray voltage is able to reduce these arising costs but yields non penetration artifacts in the reconstructed CT image. In most instances, these artifacts manifests itself as blurred and smeared regions at concave edges due to a reduced signal to noise ratio. In order to complement the missing information and to increase the overall image quality of our reconstruction, we use further imaging modalities such as a 3-D Scanner and ultrasonic imaging. A 3-D scanner is easy and cost effective to implement and is able to acquire all relevant data simultaneously with the CT projections. If, however, the interior structure is of supplemental interest, an ultrasonic imaging method is additionally used. We consider this data as a priori knowledge to employ them in an iterative reconstruction. To do so, standard iterative reconstruction methods are modified to incorporate the a priori data in a regularization approach in combination with minimizing the total variation of our image. Applying this procedure on turbine blades, we are able to reduce the apparent artifacts almost completely.

  7. WE-D-18C-01: Art of Imaging: Diagnostic Ultrasound Image Artifacts

    SciTech Connect

    Zagzebski, J; Lu, Z

    2014-06-15

    Assumptions followed during construction of B-mode and color flow images are that the pulse-echo transit time can be converted to reflector depth through uniform tissue models, echoes originate only from locations along the transmit-receive axes of pulse propagation, and first order correction schemes adequately account for acoustic wave attenuation and absorption. The latter allows the display brightness to encode tissue echogenicity. This course will challenge participants to identify imaging artifacts whose origins stem from the more complex and realistic propagating and scattering conditions common in clinical ultrasound. Speckle, a very common artifact but a clinically employed feature, originates from simultaneous echoes from diffuse scatterers and is a result of coherent detection of signals. One of the most bothersome artifacts are those due to reverberations especially that originating from superficial tissue interfaces. Methods to overcome these will be discussed. This presentation also will describe and illustrate speed of sound, refraction, enhancement, shadowing, mirroring, beam width, beam-forming, and slice thickness artifacts. All are useful examples of limitations introduced by acoustic waves propagating through complex tissue paths. New formats for physician board certification exams are demanding the inclusion of image-based examples of ultrasound physics. Instructors' knowledge of, and access to examples of ultrasound artifacts are important in this effort. The presentation will incorporate an audience response system to challenge participants in correct identification of some of these artifacts. Learning Objectives: Review basic mechanisms for producing ultrasound images. Identify the etiology of speckle, reverberation noise, beam width and slice thickness artifacts, and artifacts associated with pulse propagation. Discuss methods that reduce the impact of artifacts OR employ artifacts effectively to facilitate clinical diagnosis.

  8. Automatic Identification of Artifact-Related Independent Components for Artifact Removal in EEG Recordings.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yuan; Nathan, Viswam; Jafari, Roozbeh

    2016-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is the recording of electrical activity produced by the firing of neurons within the brain. These activities can be decoded by signal processing techniques. However, EEG recordings are always contaminated with artifacts which hinder the decoding process. Therefore, identifying and removing artifacts is an important step. Researchers often clean EEG recordings with assistance from independent component analysis (ICA), since it can decompose EEG recordings into a number of artifact-related and event-related potential (ERP)-related independent components. However, existing ICA-based artifact identification strategies mostly restrict themselves to a subset of artifacts, e.g., identifying eye movement artifacts only, and have not been shown to reliably identify artifacts caused by nonbiological origins like high-impedance electrodes. In this paper, we propose an automatic algorithm for the identification of general artifacts. The proposed algorithm consists of two parts: 1) an event-related feature-based clustering algorithm used to identify artifacts which have physiological origins; and 2) the electrode-scalp impedance information employed for identifying nonbiological artifacts. The results on EEG data collected from ten subjects show that our algorithm can effectively detect, separate, and remove both physiological and nonbiological artifacts. Qualitative evaluation of the reconstructed EEG signals demonstrates that our proposed method can effectively enhance the signal quality, especially the quality of ERPs, even for those that barely display ERPs in the raw EEG. The performance results also show that our proposed method can effectively identify artifacts and subsequently enhance the classification accuracies compared to four commonly used automatic artifact removal methods. PMID:25415992

  9. Trends in allied dental education: an analysis of the past and a look to the future.

    PubMed

    Haden, N K; Morr, K E; Valachovic, R W

    2001-05-01

    Allied dental healthcare providers have been an integral part of the dental team since the turn of the 19th century. Like dental education, allied dental education's history includes a transition from apprenticeships and proprietary school settings to dental schools and community and technical colleges. There are currently 258 dental assisting programs, 255 dental hygiene programs, and 28 dental laboratory technology programs according to the American Dental Association's Commission on Dental Accreditation. First-year enrollment increased 9.5 percent in dental hygiene education from 1994/95 to 1998/99, while enrollment in dental assisting programs declined 7 percent and declined 31 percent in dental laboratory technology programs during the same period. Program capacity exceeds enrollment in all three areas of allied dental education. Challenges facing allied dental education include addressing the dental practicing community's perception of a shortage of dental assistants and dental hygienists and increasing pressure for career tracks that do not require education in ADA Commission on Dental Accreditation accredited programs. The allied dental workforce may also be called upon for innovative approaches to improve access to oral health care and reduce oral health care disparities. In addition, allied dental education programs may face challenges in recruiting faculty with the desired academic credentials. ADEA is currently pursuing initiatives in these and other areas to address the current and emerging needs of allied dental education. PMID:11425252

  10. Artifacts: The downturn of CBCT image

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajappa, Anil Kumar; Dwivedi, Neha; Tiwari, Rana

    2015-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been accepted as a useful tool for diagnosis and treatment planning in dentistry. Despite a growing trend of CBCT in dentistry, it has some disadvantages like artifacts. Artifacts are discrepancies between the reconstructed visual image and the actual content of the subject which degrade the quality of CBCT images, making them diagnostically unusable. Additionally, structures that do not exist in the subject may appear within images. Such structures can occur because of patient motion, the image capture and reconstruction process. To optimize image quality, it is necessary to understand the types of artifacts. This article aims to throw light on the various types of artifacts associated with CBCT images. PMID:26759795

  11. DICARBOXYLIC ACID CONCENTRATION TRENDS AND SAMPLING ARTIFACTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This abstract describes a slide presentation on results of dicarboxylic acid concentration trends and sampling artifacts to be presented at the 2006 International Aerosol Conference sponsored by the American Association for Aerosol Research in St. Paul, Minnesota on September 10-...

  12. The use of dental services for children: implications of the 2010 dental reform in Israel.

    PubMed

    Shahrabani, Shosh; Benzion, Uri; Machnes, Yaffa; Gal, Assaf

    2015-02-01

    Routine dental examinations for children are important for early diagnosis and treatment of dental problems. The level of dental morbidity among Israeli children is higher than the global average. A July 2010 reform of Israel's National Health Insurance Law gradually offers free dental services for children up to age 12. The study examines the use of dental services for children and the factors affecting mothers' decision to take their children for routine checkups. In addition, the study examines the impact of the reform on dental checkups for children in various populations groups. A national representative sample comprising 618 mothers of children aged 5-18 was surveyed by telephone. The survey integrated the principles of the health beliefs model and socio-demographic characteristics. The results show that mothers' decision to take their children for dental checkups is affected by their socio-demographic status and by their health beliefs with respect to dental health. After the reform, the frequency of children's dental checkups significantly increased among vulnerable populations. Therefore, the reform has helped reduce gaps in Israeli society regarding children's dental health. Raising families' awareness of the reform and of the importance of dental health care together with expanding national distribution of approved dental clinics can increase the frequency of dental checkups among children in Israel. PMID:25465981

  13. Characterization of Scattered X-Ray Photons in Dental Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ching-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Scatter is a very important artifact causing factor in dental cone-beam CT (CBCT), which has a major influence on the detectability of details within images. This work aimed to improve the image quality of dental CBCT through scatter correction. Methods Scatter was estimated in the projection domain from the low frequency component of the difference between the raw CBCT projection and the projection obtained by extrapolating the model fitted to the raw projections acquired with 2 different sizes of axial field-of-view (FOV). The function for curve fitting was optimized by using Monte Carlo simulation. To validate the proposed method, an anthropomorphic phantom and a water-filled cylindrical phantom with rod inserts simulating different tissue materials were scanned using 120 kVp, 5 mA and 9-second scanning time covering an axial FOV of 4 cm and 13 cm. The detectability of the CT image was evaluated by calculating the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Results Beam hardening and cupping artifacts were observed in CBCT images without scatter correction, especially in those acquired with 13 cm FOV. These artifacts were reduced in CBCT images corrected by the proposed method, demonstrating its efficacy on scatter correction. After scatter correction, the image quality of CBCT was improved in terms of target detectability which was quantified as the CNR for rod inserts in the cylindrical phantom. Conclusions Hopefully the calculations performed in this work can provide a route to reach a high level of diagnostic image quality for CBCT imaging used in oral and maxillofacial structures whilst ensuring patient dose as low as reasonably achievable, which may ultimately make CBCT scan a reliable and safe tool in clinical practice. PMID:26950435

  14. Properties of Artifact Representations for Evolutionary Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornby, Gregory S.

    2004-01-01

    To achieve evolutionary design systems that scale to the levels achieved by man-made artifacts we can look to their characteristics of modularity, hierarchy and regularity to guide us. For this we focus on design representations, since they strongly determine the ability of evolutionary design systems to evolve artifacts with these characteristics. We identify three properties of design representations - combination, control-flow and abstraction - and discuss how they relate to hierarchy, modularity and regularity.

  15. Productivity in dental care for children. Factors influencing the time spent delivering dental care.

    PubMed

    Wang, N J

    1994-12-01

    The cost of dental services is related to their productivity. The purpose of the study was to identify factors influencing productivity, measured as time spent providing dental care per child under care, per year, in public dental clinics. The time was expected to vary with characteristics of the patients, the personnel and the clinics. Time spent by dentists and dental hygienists delivering dental care for children aged three to 18 years was obtained from 137 public dental clinics. The data showed substantial variation in productivity between clinics. Multiple regression analysis revealed that the time spent per child was associated with interval between examinations, proportion of male dentists, ratio of dental assistants to dentists, proportion of child treatment time given by dental hygienists and proportion of all treatment time spent on child patients. These variables explained 43 per cent of the variance in the total time spent by dentists and hygienists and 41 per cent of the variance in dentists' time. Individual dentists and hygienists may reduce the mean time spent per child by extending recall intervals. On an administrative level, dentists' time per child may be reduced by employing more dental assistants or dental hygienists and allowing dentists to treat patient groups other than children. It is concluded that productivity in dental care for children in the public dental services may be influenced in several ways, both by clinical and administrative decisions. PMID:7850642

  16. Dental Calculus Arrest of Dental Caries

    PubMed Central

    Keyes, Paul H.; Rams, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Background An inverse relationship between dental calculus mineralization and dental caries demineralization on teeth has been noted in some studies. Dental calculus may even form superficial layers over existing dental caries and arrest their progression, but this phenomenon has been only rarely documented and infrequently considered in the field of Cariology. To further assess the occurrence of dental calculus arrest of dental caries, this study evaluated a large number of extracted human teeth for the presence and location of dental caries, dental calculus, and dental plaque biofilms. Materials and methods A total of 1,200 teeth were preserved in 10% buffered formal saline, and viewed while moist by a single experienced examiner using a research stereomicroscope at 15-25× magnification. Representative teeth were sectioned and photographed, and their dental plaque biofilms subjected to gram-stain examination with light microscopy at 100× magnification. Results Dental calculus was observed on 1,140 (95%) of the extracted human teeth, and no dental carious lesions were found underlying dental calculus-covered surfaces on 1,139 of these teeth. However, dental calculus arrest of dental caries was found on one (0.54%) of 187 evaluated teeth that presented with unrestored proximal enamel caries. On the distal surface of a maxillary premolar tooth, dental calculus mineralization filled the outer surface cavitation of an incipient dental caries lesion. The dental calculus-covered carious lesion extended only slightly into enamel, and exhibited a brown pigmentation characteristic of inactive or arrested dental caries. In contrast, the tooth's mesial surface, without a superficial layer of dental calculus, had a large carious lesion going through enamel and deep into dentin. Conclusions These observations further document the potential protective effects of dental calculus mineralization against dental caries.

  17. [Removal of high signal artifact (marching metal artifact) by the magnetic substance].

    PubMed

    Tsuchihashi, Toshio; Fujita, Isao; Iwasaki, Atsushi; Mori, Katsuhiko; Suzuki, Takeshi

    2002-03-01

    During this project, we evaluated methods to prevent high-signal artifact (marching metal artifact) that are caused by magnetic substance. Marching metal artifact is caused by the resonance frequency created by magnetic substance. Phase encoding and frequency encoding are often switched to minimize the influence that marching metal artifact have on the image. However, this method will only change the position at which marching metal artifact occur. It does not have the ability to completely prevent marching metal artifact. Our research illustrated that marching metal artifact can be prevented by changing the strength of the slice selective gradient field at the 90 degree RF pulse and 180 degree RF pulse. In other words, marching metal artifact can be prevented by changing the frequency bandwidth for the 90 degree RF pulse and 180 degree RF pulse. The incorporation of the phase correct option in the device used for our research (SIGNA LX and SIGNA CV/i) results in different slice selective gradient field strengths at the 90 degree RF pulse and the 180 degree RF pulse. This indicates that the use of phase correction enables marching metal artifact to be prevented. PMID:12522349

  18. AFM and pulsed laser ablation methods for Cultural Heritage: application to archeometric analysis of stone artifacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barberio, M.; Veltri, S.; Stranges, F.; Bonanno, A.; Xu, F.; Antici, P.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we introduce the use of the atomic force microscope (AFM) and of the pulsed laser ablation as methods for morphological diagnostic with nanoscale precision of archeological artifacts and corrosive patina removal from stone artifacts. We test our methodology on stone artifacts extracted from the Church of Sotterra (located in Calabria, South Italy). The AFM microscopy was compared with different petrographic, chemical, optical and morphological analysis methods for identifying the textural characteristics, evaluating the state of preservation and formulating some hypotheses about the provenance and composition of the impurity patina located on the artifact surfaces. We demonstrate that with the nanometric precision obtained with AFM microscopy, it is possible to distinguish the different states of preservation, much better than using conventional petrographic methods. The surface's roughness is evaluated from very small artifact's fragments, reducing the coring at micrometric scale with a minimal damage to the artworks. After the diagnosis, we performed restoration tests using the pulsed laser ablation (PLA) method and compared it with the more common micro-sandblasting under dry conditions. We find that the PLA is highly effective for the removal of the surficial patina, with a control of a few hundreds of nanometers in the cleaning of surface, without introducing chemical or morphological damages to the artifacts. Moreover, PLA can be easily implemented in underwater conditions; this has the great advantage that stone and pottery artifacts for marine archeological sites do not need to be removed from the site.

  19. Developments of metal artifact reduction methods of cone-beam computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Kun-Long; Jin, Shih-Chun D.; Chen, Jyh-Cheng

    2014-09-01

    While clinical applications of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) have expanded, current CBCT technology has limitations due to the streak artifacts caused by metallic objects. The aim of this work was to develop an efficient and accurate metal data interpolation in sinogram domain to achieve artifact suppression and to improve CT image quality. In this study, we propose three interpolation methods for the metal projection data. Metal objects are segmented in raw data and replacement of the segmented regions by new values is done using three interpolation schemes, (1) replacing the raw data by the simple threshold value (thresholding method), (2) reducing the raw data to half of the value which is over threshold value (modification method), (3) using the inpainting interpolation (inpainting method). Our references are the CBCT images of the phantoms without the metal implants. The performance was evaluated by comparing the differences of root mean square error (RMSE) before and after metal artifact reduction (MAR). All the metal artifacts were reduced effectively. Metal artifacts reduction using method (1) performs the best, which improve the differences of RMSE more than 60%. This study indicates that metal artifacts can be reduced effectively by manipulating metal projection data.

  20. Demand artifact: objectively detecting biased participants in advertising research.

    PubMed

    Miller, Felicia; Schertzer, Susan

    2014-12-01

    Detecting and reducing the effect of biased participants continues to be an important task for researchers. However, the lack of objective measures to assess demand artifact has made it difficult to effectively address this issue. This paper reports two experiments that apply a theory-based post-experimental inquiry that can systematically identify biased participants in consumer research. The results demonstrate how easily and effectively researchers can incorporate this tool into experimental studies of all types and reduce the likelihood of systematic error. PMID:25486509

  1. Dental Assistant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Coll. of Agriculture and Natural Resources Education Inst.

    This curriculum guide, developed for use in dental assistant education programs in Michigan, describes a task-based curriculum that can help a teacher to develop a classroom management system where students learn by doing. It is based on task analysis and reflects the skills, knowledge, and attitudes that employers expect entry-level dental…

  2. Dental crowns

    MedlinePlus

    ... cover a tooth Replace a misshapen tooth or dental implant Correct a misaligned tooth Talk to your dentist ... the tooth pulled and replaced with a tooth implant. Your crown could chip or crack: If you grind your teeth or clench your jaw, you may need to ...

  3. Wavelet approach to artifact noise removal from Capacitive coupled Electrocardiograph.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Min; Kim, Ko Keun; Park, Kwang Suk

    2008-01-01

    Capacitive coupled Electrocardiography (ECG) is introduced as non-invasive measurement technology for ubiquitous health care and appliance are spread out widely. Although it has many merits, however, capacitive coupled ECG is very weak for motion artifacts for its non-skin-contact property. There are many studies for artifact problems which treats all artifact signals below 0.8Hz. In our capacitive coupled ECG measurement system, artifacts exist not only below 0.8Hz but also over than 10Hz. Therefore, artifact noise removal algorithm using wavelet method is tested to reject artifact-wandered signal from measured signals. It is observed that using power calculation each decimation step, artifact-wandered signal is removed as low frequency artifacts as high frequency artifacts. Although some original ECG signal is removed with artifact signal, we could level the signal quality for long term measure which shows the best quality ECG signals as we can get. PMID:19163323

  4. Automatic coil selection for streak artifact reduction in radial MRI.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yiqun; Yu, Jiangsheng; Kang, Hyun Seon; Englander, Sarah; Rosen, Mark A; Song, Hee Kwon

    2012-02-01

    In radial MR imaging, streaking artifacts contaminating the entire field of view can arise from regions at the outer edges of the prescribed field of view. This can occur even when the Nyquist criterion is satisfied within the desired field of view. These artifacts become exacerbated when parts of the object lie in the superior/inferior regions of the scanner where the gradient strengths become weakened. When multiple coil arrays are used for signal reception, coils at the outer edges can be disabled before data acquisition to reduce the artifact levels. However, as the weakened gradient strengths near the edges often distort the object, causing the signal to become highly concentrated into a small region, the streaks are often not completely removed. Data from certain coils can also be excluded during reconstruction by visually inspecting the individual coil images, but this is impractical for routine use. In this work, a postprocessing method is proposed to automatically identify those coils whose images contain high levels of streaking for subsequent exclusion during reconstruction. The proposed method was demonstrated in vivo dynamic contrast enhanced MRI datasets acquired using a three-dimensional hybrid radial sequence. The results demonstrate that the proposed strategy substantially improves the image quality and show excellent agreement with images reconstructed with manually determined coil selection. PMID:21656562

  5. Demystifying Kepler Data: A Primer for Systematic Artifact Mitigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinemuchi, K.; Barclay, T.; Fanelli, M.; Pepper, J.; Still, M.; Howell, B.

    2012-01-01

    The Kepler spacecraft has collected data of high photometric precision and cadence almost continuously since operations began on 2009 May 2. Primarily designed to detect planetary transits and asteroseismological signals from solar-like stars, Kepler has provided high quality data for many areas of investigation. Unconditioned simple aperture time-series photometry are however affected by systematic structure. Examples of these systematics are differential velocity aberration, thermal gradients across the spacecraft, and pointing variations. While exhibiting some impact on Kepler's primary science, these systematics can critically handicap potentially ground-breaking scientific gains in other astrophysical areas, especially over long timescales greater than 10 days. As the data archive grows to provide light curves for 10(exp 5) stars of many years in length, Kepler will only fulfill its broad potential for stellar astrophysics if these systematics are understood and mitigated. Post-launch developments in the Kepler archive, data reduction pipeline and open source data analysis software have occurred to remove or reduce systematic artifacts. This paper provides a conceptual primer for users of the Kepler data archive to understand and recognize systematic artifacts within light curves and some methods for their removal. Specific examples of artifact mitigation are provided using data available within the archive. Through the methods defined here, the Kepler community will find a road map to maximizing the quality and employment of the Kepler legacy archive.

  6. Ratiometric artifact reduction in low power reflective photoplethysmography.

    PubMed

    Patterson, J A C; Guang-Zhong Yang

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents effective signal-processing techniques for the compensation of motion artifacts and ambient light offsets in a reflective photoplethysmography sensor suitable for wearable applications. A ratiometric comparison of infrared (IR) and red absorption characteristics cancels out noise that is multiplicative in nature and amplitude modulation of pulsatile absorption signals enables rejection of additive noise. A low-power, discrete-time pulse-oximeter platform is used to capture IR and red photoplethysmograms so that the data used for analysis have noise levels representative of what a true body sensor network device would experience. The proposed artifact rejection algorithm is designed for real-time implementation with a low-power microcontroller while being robust enough to compensate for varying levels in ambient light as well as reducing the effects of motion-induced artifacts. The performance of the system is illustrated by its ability to extract a typical plethysmogram heart-rate waveform since the sensor is subjected to a range of physical disturbances. PMID:23851947

  7. Demystifying Kepler Data: A Primer for Systematic Artifact Mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinemuchi, K.; Barclay, T.; Fanelli, M.; Pepper, J.; Still, M.; Howell, Steve B.

    2012-09-01

    The Kepler spacecraft has collected data of high photometric precision and cadence almost continuously since operations began on 2009 May 2. Primarily designed to detect planetary transits and asteroseismological signals from solar-like stars, Kepler has provided high-quality data for many areas of investigation. Unconditioned simple aperture time-series photometry is, however, affected by systematic structure. Examples of these systematics include differential velocity aberration, thermal gradients across the spacecraft, and pointing variations. While exhibiting some impact on Kepler's primary science, these systematics can critically handicap potentially ground-breaking scientific gains in other astrophysical areas, especially over long timescales greater than 10 days. As the data archive grows to provide light curves for 105 stars of many years in length, Kepler will only fulfill its broad potential for stellar astrophysics if these systematics are understood and mitigated. Post-launch developments in the Kepler archive, data reduction pipeline and open source data analysis software have helped to remove or reduce systematic artifacts. This paper provides a conceptual primer to help users of the Kepler data archive understand and recognize systematic artifacts within light curves and some methods for their removal. Specific examples of artifact mitigation are provided using data available within the archive. Through the methods defined here, the Kepler community will find a road map to maximizing the quality and employment of the Kepler legacy archive.

  8. Periodic artifact reduction in Fourier transforms of full field atomic resolution images.

    PubMed

    Hovden, Robert; Jiang, Yi; Xin, Huolin L; Kourkoutis, Lena F

    2015-04-01

    The discrete Fourier transform is among the most routine tools used in high-resolution scanning/transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM). However, when calculating a Fourier transform, periodic boundary conditions are imposed and sharp discontinuities between the edges of an image cause a cross patterned artifact along the reciprocal space axes. This artifact can interfere with the analysis of reciprocal lattice peaks of an atomic resolution image. Here we demonstrate that the recently developed Periodic Plus Smooth Decomposition technique provides a simple, efficient method for reliable removal of artifacts caused by edge discontinuities. In this method, edge artifacts are reduced by subtracting a smooth background that solves Poisson's equation with boundary conditions set by the image's edges. Unlike the traditional windowed Fourier transforms, Periodic Plus Smooth Decomposition maintains sharp reciprocal lattice peaks from the image's entire field of view. PMID:25597865

  9. Automatic probe artifact detection in MRI-guided cryoablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinyang; Tuncali, Kemal; Wells, William M.; Zientara, Gary P.

    2013-03-01

    Probe or needle artifact detection in 3D scans gives an approximate location for the tools inserted, and is thus crucial in assisting many image-guided procedures. Conventional needle localization algorithms often start with cropped images, where unwanted parts of raw scans are cropped either manually or by applying pre-defined masks. In cryoablation, however, the number of probes used, the placement and direction of probe insertion, and the portions of abdomen scanned differs significantly from case to case, and probes are often constantly being adjusted during the Probe Placement Phase. These features greatly reduce the practicality of approaches based on image cropping. In this work, we present a fully Automatic Probe Artifact Detection method, APAD, that works directly on uncropped raw MRI images, taken during the Probe Placement Phase in 3Tesla MRI-guided cryoablation. The key idea of our method is to first locate an initial 2D line strip within a slice of the MR image which approximates the position and direction of the 3D probes bundle, noting that cryoprobes or biopsy needles create a signal void (black) artifact in MRI with a bright cylindrical border. With the initial 2D line, standard approaches to detect line structures such as the 3D Hough Transform can be applied to quickly detect each probe's axis. By comparing with manually labeled probes, the analysis of 5 patient treatment cases of kidney cryoablation with varying probe placements demonstrates that our algorithm combined with standard 3D line detection is an accurate and robust method to detect probe artifacts.

  10. MPEG recompression detection based on block artifacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Weiqi; Wu, Min; Huang, Jiwu

    2008-02-01

    With sophisticated video editing technologies, it is becoming increasingly easy to tamper digital video without leaving visual clues. One of the common tampering operations on video is to remove some frames and then re-encode the resulting video. In this paper, we propose a new method for detecting this type of tampering by exploring the temporal patterns of the block artifacts in video sequences. We show that MPEG compression introduces different block artifacts into various types of frames and that the strength of the block artifacts as a function over time has a regular pattern for a given group of pictures (GOP) structure. When some frames are removed from an MPEG video file and the file is then recompressed, the block artifacts introduced by the previous compression would remain and affect the average of block artifact strength of the recompressed one in such a way that depends on the number of deleted frames and the type of GOP used previously. We propose a feature curve to reveal the compression history of an MPEG video file with a given GOP structure, and use it as evidence to detect tampering. Experimental results evaluated on common video benchmark clips demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  11. Mediating Artifact in Teacher Professional Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svendsen, Bodil

    2015-07-01

    This article focuses on teacher professional development (TPD) in natural science through the 5E model as mediating artifact. The study was conducted in an upper secondary school, grounded in a school-based intervention research project. My contribution to the field of research on TPD is founded on the hypothesis that teachers would be best facilitated to make their practice more inquiry based if they are provided with a mediating artifact. In this study the artifact is a model 5E, which is a conceptual way of thinking, to help teachers reflect on their practice. The aim is to encourage teachers to make changes themselves, by applying extended use of inquiry into their practice. This mediated artifact could thus be used across different national contexts. The main research question is; how can the 5E model as a mediating artifact enhance TPD? The article addresses the processes of the use of the 5E model and its influence on teachers' perception of the model. This is in order for teachers to conceptualize their goals related to inquiry and scientific thinking, and to solve the problems involved in achieving those goals in their own contexts. The study concludes that, after the intervention, the teachers' approaches and strategies demonstrate greater emphasis on learning.

  12. U.S. Dental School Deans’ Perceptions of the Rising Cost of Dental Education and Borrowing Pressures on Dental Students: Report of Survey Results.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Dora Elías; Garrison, Gwen E; Feldman, Cecile A; Anderson, Eugene L; Cook, Bryan J; Valachovic, Richard W

    2015-06-01

    This report presents findings from a survey of U.S. dental school deans designed to capture their perceptions regarding the rising cost of dental education and its impact on borrowing by dental students to finance their education. The survey included questions about factors influencing the cost of dental education, concerns about dental student borrowing, and financial awareness resources for students. The survey was distributed to the deans of all 63 U.S. dental schools in January 2013; 42 deans responded, for a 67% response rate. The results indicate that, according to the responding deans, new clinical technologies, technology costs, and central university taxes are the main factors that contribute to the increasing cost of dental education. Coupled with reduced state appropriations at public dental schools and declines in private giving at all dental schools, dental school deans face a perplexing set of financial management challenges. Tuition and fees are a primary source of revenue for all dental schools; however, many deans do not have total control over the cost of attending their schools since tuition and fees are often tied to mandates and policies from the parent university and the state legislature. The findings of this study indicate that U.S. dental school deans are aware of and concerned about the impact of increases in tuition and fees on dental student debt and that they are using a variety of strategies to address the growth in dental student borrowing. PMID:26223058

  13. Mapping sources of correlation in resting state FMRI, with artifact detection and removal.

    PubMed

    Jo, Hang Joon; Saad, Ziad S; Simmons, W Kyle; Milbury, Lydia A; Cox, Robert W

    2010-08-15

    Many components of resting-state (RS) FMRI show non-random structure that has little to do with neural connectivity but can covary over multiple brain structures. Some of these signals originate in physiology and others are hardware-related. One artifact discussed herein may be caused by defects in the receive coil array or the RF amplifiers powering it. During a scan, this artifact results in small image intensity shifts in parts of the brain imaged by the affected array components. These shifts introduce artifactual correlations in RS time series on the spatial scale of the coil's sensitivity profile, and can markedly bias RS connectivity results. We show that such a transient artifact can be substantially removed from RS time series by using locally formed regressors from white matter tissue. This is particularly important in arrays with larger numbers of coils, which may generate smaller artifact zones. In such a case, brain-wide average noise estimates would fail to capture the artifact. We also examine the anatomical structure of artifactual variance in RS FMRI time series, by identifying sources that contribute to these signals and where in the brain are they manifested. We consider current methods for reducing confounding sources (or noises) and their effects on connectivity maps, and offer an improved approach (ANATICOR) that can also reduce hardware artifacts. The methods described herein are currently available with AFNI, in addition to tools for rapid, interactive generation of seed-based correlation maps at single-subject and group levels. PMID:20420926

  14. Dental Training Films.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veterans Administration Medical Center, Washington, DC.

    This dental training films catalog is organized into two sections. Section I is a category listing of the films by number and title, indexed according to generalized headings; categories are as follow: anatomy, articulator systems, complete dentures, dental assisting, dental laboratory technology, dental materials, dental office emergencies,…

  15. MRI-Based Computed Tomography Metal Artifact Correction Method for Improving Proton Range Calculation Accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Peter C.; Schreibmann, Eduard; Roper, Justin; Elder, Eric; Crocker, Ian; Fox, Tim; Zhu, X. Ronald; Dong, Lei; Dhabaan, Anees

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Computed tomography (CT) artifacts can severely degrade dose calculation accuracy in proton therapy. Prompted by the recently increased popularity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the radiation therapy clinic, we developed an MRI-based CT artifact correction method for improving the accuracy of proton range calculations. Methods and Materials: The proposed method replaces corrupted CT data by mapping CT Hounsfield units (HU number) from a nearby artifact-free slice, using a coregistered MRI. MRI and CT volumetric images were registered with use of 3-dimensional (3D) deformable image registration (DIR). The registration was fine-tuned on a slice-by-slice basis by using 2D DIR. Based on the intensity of paired MRI pixel values and HU from an artifact-free slice, we performed a comprehensive analysis to predict the correct HU for the corrupted region. For a proof-of-concept validation, metal artifacts were simulated on a reference data set. Proton range was calculated using reference, artifactual, and corrected images to quantify the reduction in proton range error. The correction method was applied to 4 unique clinical cases. Results: The correction method resulted in substantial artifact reduction, both quantitatively and qualitatively. On respective simulated brain and head and neck CT images, the mean error was reduced from 495 and 370 HU to 108 and 92 HU after correction. Correspondingly, the absolute mean proton range errors of 2.4 cm and 1.7 cm were reduced to less than 2 mm in both cases. Conclusions: Our MRI-based CT artifact correction method can improve CT image quality and proton range calculation accuracy for patients with severe CT artifacts.

  16. Dental education and dental practice.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, J R

    1984-01-01

    This paper relates recent modes of dental practice to changes that the public and government are likely to ask the health care professions to make in the future. As usual they are asking for the best of all worlds. First, that we maintain the clinical model to the highest standards of personal dental care based and tested against the best research at our disposal, whilst we ensure there is no reduction in the high technical standards for which british dentists have a reputation. Second, that the profession is required to consider ways of providing care on the medicosocial model for the whole community at an economic level the country will afford. The broad changes in dental education have been reviewed, from the technical apprenticeship to the establishment of strong university departments in teaching hospitals. The importance of a sound biomedical foundation and of research both to education and the credibility of dental practice as a primary health care profession is stressed if the profession is to retain its position as a sister to medicine and not slide down to that of a technical ancillary. PMID:6374141

  17. Windmill artifact in multislice helical CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, Michael D.; Taguchi, Katsuyuki; Hein, Ilmar A.; Chiang, BeShan; Kazama, Masahiro; Mori, Issei

    2003-05-01

    Multi-slice helical CT-systems suffer from windmill artifacts: black/white patterns that spin off of features with high longitudinal gradients. The number of black/white pairs matches the number of slices (detector rows) in the multi-slive detector. The period of spin is the same as the helical pitch. We investigate the cause of the pattern by following the traces of selected voxels through the multi-slive detector array as a function of view position. This forms an "extracted sinogram" which represents the data used to reconstruct the specific voxel. Now we can determine the cause of the artifact by correlating the windmill streak in the image with the extracted data. The investigation shows that inadequate sampling along the longitudinal direction causes the artifact.

  18. Artifacts Reduction in VIR/DAWN data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrozzo, Filippo Giacomo

    2016-07-01

    Imaging spectrometers often suffer from the common problems of different types of systematic errors. The quality of the calibration to surface reflectance is important for accurately identifying surface materials. An inappropriate calibration could distort an absorption feature, causing a misidentification. Artifact might be interpreted as representing a material that does not really exist at that location. Also VIR (Visible and Infrared Spectrometer, De Sanctis et al., 2011) imaging spectrometer is affected by systematic and non-systematic errors, such as artifacts, vertical stripes and spikes. In VIR data, they are caused by imperfect radiometric and spectral calibration, by a peculiar readout noise in the detector (Schlapfer and Richter, 2011). In this work we apply a spectral polishing technique in order to remove artifacts, and spikes from VIR data and we show how the resulting spectra of Vesta and Ceres are affected by corrections.

  19. Dental x-rays

    MedlinePlus

    ... or impacted teeth The presence and extent of dental caries (cavities) Bone damage (such as from periodontitis ) Abscessed ... Dental x-rays can reveal dental cavities (tooth decay) before they ... take yearly bitewings for the early development of cavities.

  20. Dental Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirtoft, Ingegerd

    1983-12-01

    Ten years have passed since the first articles appeared in this new field. The qualities of the laser light together with the need of contactless 3-D measurements for different dental purposes seemed to be extremely promising, but still just a few scientists have used the method and mostly for laboratory studies. For some reason there has been a preponderance for orthodontic measurements. This seems to be a bit peculiar from holographic view compared with measurements for engineering purposes, which usually are made on metals. So naturally holography can become a clinical tool for measurements in the field of fixed bridges, removable partial dentures and implants. One of the problems is that the need for holography in dental research must be fulfilled in collaboration with physicists. Only a two-way communication during an entire experiment can balance both technical and odontological demands and thus give practical and clinical important results. The need for an easy way of handling the evaluation to get all required information is another problem and of course the holographic equipment must be converted to a box easy to handle for everyone. At last the position of dental holography today is going to be carefully examined together with an attempt to look into the hopefully exciting and not to utopic future for this research field.

  1. Flexible Capacitive Electrodes for Minimizing Motion Artifacts in Ambulatory Electrocardiograms

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong Su; Heo, Jeong; Lee, Won Kyu; Lim, Yong Gyu; Kim, Youn Ho; Park, Kwang Suk

    2014-01-01

    This study proposes the use of flexible capacitive electrodes for reducing motion artifacts in a wearable electrocardiogram (ECG) device. The capacitive electrodes have conductive foam on their surface, a shield, an optimal input bias resistor, and guarding feedback. The electrodes are integrated in a chest belt, and the acquired signals are transmitted wirelessly for ambulatory heart rate monitoring. We experimentally validated the electrode performance with subjects standing and walking on a treadmill at speeds of up to 7 km/h. The results confirmed the highly accurate heart rate detection capacity of the developed system and its feasibility for daily-life ECG monitoring. PMID:25120162

  2. Flexible capacitive electrodes for minimizing motion artifacts in ambulatory electrocardiograms.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Su; Heo, Jeong; Lee, Won Kyu; Lim, Yong Gyu; Kim, Youn Ho; Park, Kwang Suk

    2014-01-01

    This study proposes the use of flexible capacitive electrodes for reducing motion artifacts in a wearable electrocardiogram (ECG) device. The capacitive electrodes have conductive foam on their surface, a shield, an optimal input bias resistor, and guarding feedback. The electrodes are integrated in a chest belt, and the acquired signals are transmitted wirelessly for ambulatory heart rate monitoring. We experimentally validated the electrode performance with subjects standing and walking on a treadmill at speeds of up to 7 km/h. The results confirmed the highly accurate heart rate detection capacity of the developed system and its feasibility for daily-life ECG monitoring. PMID:25120162

  3. Dental problems in athletes.

    PubMed

    Inouye, Jill; McGrew, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Orofacial injuries and diseases occur in athletes, and they may not always have access to dentists. Therefore team physicians should be aware of the common injuries and initial management. Treatment of dental injuries will depend on whether the teeth are primary or permanent. The most common type of fracture is crown fracture, but there are other dental injuries that can lead to future complications if not treated promptly and monitored closely. Tooth avulsions need to be handled properly, and athletes should see a dentist as soon as possible. Despite the urgency of some injuries, other orofacial injuries or diseases, such as lacerations and caries, should not be overlooked. Proper education and use of mouth guards can assist athletes in reducing their risk of orofacial injuries. PMID:25574879

  4. Effect of Perceived Stress on Student Performance in Dental School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Anne E.; Lushington, Kurt

    2002-01-01

    Examined the relationship between perceived stress and academic performance in 202 dental students at an Australian dental school. Found little support for an association between increased factor stress scores on the Dental Environmental Stress (DES) questionnaire and reduced academic performance. (EV)

  5. Reduction of EEG artifacts in simultaneous EEG-fMRI: Reference layer adaptive filtering (RLAF).

    PubMed

    Steyrl, David; Patz, Franz; Krausz, Gunther; Edlinger, Günter; Müller-Putz, Gernot R

    2015-08-01

    Although simultaneous measurement of electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is one of the most valuable methods for studying human brain activity non-invasively, it remains challenging to measure high quality EEG inside the MRI scanner. Recently, a new approach for minimizing residual MRI scanner artifacts in the EEG was presented: reference layer artifact subtraction (RLAS). Here, reference electrodes capture only the artifacts, which are subsequently subtracted from the measurement electrodes. With the present work we demonstrate that replacing the subtraction by adaptive filtering statistically significantly outperforms RLAS. Reference layer adaptive filtering (RLAF) attenuates the average artifact root-mean-square (RMS) voltage of the passive MRI scanner to 0.7 μV (-14.4 dB). RLAS achieves 0.78 μV (-13.5 dB). The combination of average artifact subtraction (AAS) and RLAF reduces the residual average gradient artifact RMS voltage to 2.3 μV (-49.2 dB). AAS alone achieves 5.7 μV (-39.0 dB). All measurements were conducted with an MRI phantom, as the reference layer cap available to us was a prototype. PMID:26737122

  6. Artifact reduction in long-term monitoring of cerebral hemodynamics using near-infrared spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Vinette, Sarah A.; Dunn, Jeff F.; Slone, Edward; Federico, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a noninvasive neuroimaging technique used to assess cerebral hemodynamics. Its portability, ease of use, and relatively low operational cost lend itself well to the long-term monitoring of hemodynamic changes, such as those in epilepsy, where events are unpredictable. Long-term monitoring is associated with challenges including alterations in behaviors and motion that can result in artifacts. Five patients with epilepsy were assessed for interictal hemodynamic changes and alterations in behavior or motion. Based on this work, visual inspection was used to identify NIRS artifacts during a period of interest, specifically prior to seizures, in four patients. A motion artifact reduction algorithm (MARA, also known as the spline interpolation method) was tested on these data. Alterations in the NIRS measurements often occurred simultaneously with changes in motion and behavior. Occasionally, sharp shift artifacts were observed in the data. When artifacts appeared as sustained baseline shifts in the data, MARA reduced the standard deviation of the data and the appearance improved. We discussed motion and artifacts as challenges associated with long-term monitoring of cerebral hemodynamics in patients with epilepsy and our group’s approach to circumvent these challenges and improve the quality of the data collected. PMID:26158008

  7. Dental Fear among Medical and Dental Undergraduates

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, H.; Razak, I. A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To assess the prevalence and level of dental fear among health related undergraduates and to identify factors causing such fear using Kleinknecht's Dental Fear Survey (DFS) questionnaire. Methods. Kleinknecht's DFS questionnaire was used to assess dental fear and anxiety among the entire enrollment of the medical and dental undergraduates' of the University of Malaya. Results. Overall response rate was 82.2%. Dental students reported higher prevalence of dental fear (96.0% versus 90.4%). However, most of the fear encountered among dental students was in the low fear category as compared to their medical counterpart (69.2 versus 51.2%). Significantly more medical students cancelled dental appointment due to fear compared to dental students (P = 0.004). “Heart beats faster” and “muscle being tensed” were the top two physiological responses experienced by the respondents. “Drill” and “anesthetic needle” were the most fear provoking objects among respondents of both faculties. Conclusion. Dental fear and anxiety are a common problem encountered among medical and dental undergraduates who represent future health care professionals. Also, high level of dental fear and anxiety leads to the avoidance of the dental services. PMID:25386615

  8. Atlas of nuclear medicine artifacts and variants

    SciTech Connect

    Ryo, U.Y.; Alavi, A.; Collier, D.

    1989-01-01

    This book is designed to aid in the interpretation of nuclear medicine scans. The authors purpose is to help practitioners recognize artifacts and variants on nuclear medicine scans and thereby avoid misdiagnoses. It contains 70 pages of cases, including sections on SPECT and PET.

  9. Smoking artifacts: factors of source evaluation.

    PubMed

    Powell, L; Hickson, M; Hill, S R; Holt, G; Flick, H

    1978-12-01

    Responses from 323 students in communication indicated that credibility factors associated with nonverbal smoking artifacts are not the same as those associated with verbal stimuli; a character factor was absent for nonverbal stimuli. Verbosity, however, may permit inferences regarding potential verbal behavior. PMID:740490

  10. "Things" that Work: The Artifacts of Industrialization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geenfield, Briann; Malone, Patrick

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on teaching industrialization through the use of industrial artifacts, such as tools and products. Suggests field trips to museums and historic sites, building models of waterwheels or bridges, visiting an operating factory, and studying landscapes shaped by industrialization. Includes a bibliography. (CMK)

  11. Law addresses question of space artifact ownership

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-10-01

    U.S. astronauts who participated in many of NASA's early space missions will receive full ownership rights to artifacts from those missions through legislation that President Barack Obama signed into law on 25 September. The legislation, which received broad bipartisan support, provides artifact ownership rights to any of NASA's Mercury, Gemini, or Apollo space programs through the completion of the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project, whose flight occurred in July 1975. The law defines artifacts as expendable, disposable, or personal use items—including personal logs and flight hardware salvaged from jettisoned lunar modules—used by astronauts that were not required to be returned to NASA; lunar rocks and other lunar material are not defined as artifacts. Bill cosponsor Rep. Ralph Hall (R-Tex.), chair of the House of Representatives' Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, said on 19 September, “A majority of these items have been in the personal possession of the astronauts for 40 years or more. Over the last decade, NASA has begun to challenge the astronauts' ownership of these mementos. This issue was first brought to my attention late last year. I was surprised to learn that NASA had, on an irregular basis, intervened several times to claim ownership.”

  12. Information Design for Visualizing History Museum Artifacts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Yulin; Lai, Tingsheng; Yasuda, Takami; Yokoi, Shigeki

    2011-01-01

    In the past few years, museum visualization systems have become a hot topic that attracts many researchers' interests. Several systems provide Web services for browsing museum collections through the Web. In this paper, we proposed an intelligent museum system for history museum artifacts, and described a study in which we enable access to China…

  13. Mediating Artifact in Teacher Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svendsen, Bodil

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on teacher professional development (TPD) in natural science through the 5E model as mediating artifact. The study was conducted in an upper secondary school, grounded in a school-based intervention research project. My contribution to the field of research on TPD is founded on the hypothesis that teachers would be best…

  14. The impact of head movements on EEG and contact impedance: an adaptive filtering solution for motion artifact reduction.

    PubMed

    Mihajlovic, Vojkan; Patki, Shrishail; Grundlehner, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Designing and developing a comfortable and convenient EEG system for daily usage that can provide reliable and robust EEG signal, encompasses a number of challenges. Among them, the most ambitious is the reduction of artifacts due to body movements. This paper studies the effect of head movement artifacts on the EEG signal and on the dry electrode-tissue impedance (ETI), monitored continuously using the imec's wireless EEG headset. We have shown that motion artifacts have huge impact on the EEG spectral content in the frequency range lower than 20 Hz. Coherence and spectral analysis revealed that ETI is not capable of describing disturbances at very low frequencies (below 2 Hz). Therefore, we devised a motion artifact reduction (MAR) method that uses a combination of a band-pass filtering and multi-channel adaptive filtering (AF), suitable for real-time MAR. This method was capable of substantially reducing artifacts produced by head movements. PMID:25571131

  15. Two-stage approach for detection and reduction of motion artifacts in photoplethysmographic data.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Rajet; Natarajan, Balasubramaniam Bala; Warren, Steve

    2010-08-01

    that is effective even in the presence of severe subject movement. The approach involves an enhanced preprocessing unit consisting of a motion detection unit (MDU, developed in this paper), period estimation unit, and Fourier series reconstruction unit. The MDU identifies clean data frames versus those corrupted with motion artifacts. The period estimation unit determines the fundamental frequency of a corrupt frame. The Fourier series reconstruction unit reconstructs the final preprocessed signal by utilizing the spectrum variability of the pulse waveform. Preprocessed data are then fed to a magnitude-based FD independent component analysis unit. This helps reduce motion artifacts present at the frequencies of the reconstruction components. Experimental results are presented to demonstrate the efficacy of the overall motion artifact reduction method. PMID:20172800

  16. A robust adaptive denoising framework for real-time artifact removal in scalp EEG measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilicarslan, Atilla; Grossman, Robert G.; Contreras-Vidal, Jose Luis

    2016-04-01

    , totaling 19 sessions, with and without {H}∞ filtering of the raw data. Significance. The proposed method allows real-time adaptive artifact removal for EEG-based closed-loop BMI applications and mobile EEG studies in general, thereby increasing the range of tasks that can be studied in action and context while reducing the need for discarding data due to artifacts. Significant increase in decoding performances also justify the effectiveness of the method to be used in real-time closed-loop BMI applications.

  17. Model of Image Artifacts from Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willson, Reg

    2008-01-01

    A mathematical model of image artifacts produced by dust particles on lenses has been derived. Machine-vision systems often have to work with camera lenses that become dusty during use. Dust particles on the front surface of a lens produce image artifacts that can potentially affect the performance of a machine-vision algorithm. The present model satisfies a need for a means of synthesizing dust image artifacts for testing machine-vision algorithms for robustness (or the lack thereof) in the presence of dust on lenses. A dust particle can absorb light or scatter light out of some pixels, thereby giving rise to a dark dust artifact. It can also scatter light into other pixels, thereby giving rise to a bright dust artifact. For the sake of simplicity, this model deals only with dark dust artifacts. The model effectively represents dark dust artifacts as an attenuation image consisting of an array of diffuse darkened spots centered at image locations corresponding to the locations of dust particles. The dust artifacts are computationally incorporated into a given test image by simply multiplying the brightness value of each pixel by a transmission factor that incorporates the factor of attenuation, by dust particles, of the light incident on that pixel. With respect to computation of the attenuation and transmission factors, the model is based on a first-order geometric (ray)-optics treatment of the shadows cast by dust particles on the image detector. In this model, the light collected by a pixel is deemed to be confined to a pair of cones defined by the location of the pixel s image in object space, the entrance pupil of the lens, and the location of the pixel in the image plane (see Figure 1). For simplicity, it is assumed that the size of a dust particle is somewhat less than the diameter, at the front surface of the lens, of any collection cone containing all or part of that dust particle. Under this assumption, the shape of any individual dust particle artifact

  18. Artifacts for Calibration of Submicron Width Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunthaner, Frank; Grunthaner, Paula; Bryson, Charles, III

    2003-01-01

    Artifacts that are fabricated with the help of molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) are undergoing development for use as dimensional calibration standards with submicron widths. Such standards are needed for calibrating instruments (principally, scanning electron microscopes and scanning probe microscopes) for measuring the widths of features in advanced integrated circuits. Dimensional calibration standards fabricated by an older process that involves lithography and etching of trenches in (110) surfaces of single-crystal silicon are generally reproducible to within dimensional tolerances of about 15 nm. It is anticipated that when the artifacts of the present type are fully developed, their critical dimensions will be reproducible to within 1 nm. These artifacts are expected to find increasing use in the semiconductor-device and integrated- circuit industries as the width tolerances on semiconductor devices shrink to a few nanometers during the next few years. Unlike in the older process, one does not rely on lithography and etching to define the critical dimensions. Instead, one relies on the inherent smoothness and flatness of MBE layers deposited under controlled conditions and defines the critical dimensions as the thicknesses of such layers. An artifact of the present type is fabricated in two stages (see figure): In the first stage, a multilayer epitaxial wafer is grown on a very flat substrate. In the second stage, the wafer is cleaved to expose the layers, then the exposed layers are differentially etched (taking advantage of large differences between the etch rates of the different epitaxial layer materials). The resulting structure includes narrow and well-defined trenches and a shelf with thicknesses determined by the thicknesses of the epitaxial layers from which they were etched. Eventually, it should be possible to add a third fabrication stage in which durable, electronically inert artifacts could be replicated in diamondlike carbon from a master made by

  19. In vivo demonstration of reflection artifact reduction in photoacoustic imaging using synthetic aperture photoacoustic-guided focused ultrasound (PAFUSion)

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Mithun Kuniyil Ajith; Jaeger, Michael; Frenz, Martin; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2016-01-01

    Reflection artifacts caused by acoustic inhomogeneities are a critical problem in epi-mode biomedical photoacoustic imaging. High light fluence beneath the probe results in photoacoustic transients, which propagate into the tissue and reflect back from echogenic structures. These reflection artifacts cause problems in image interpretation and significantly impact the contrast and imaging depth. We recently proposed a method called PAFUSion (Photoacoustic-guided focused ultrasound) to identify such reflection artifacts in photoacoustic imaging. In its initial version, PAFUSion mimics the inward-travelling wavefield from small blood vessel-like PA sources by applying ultrasound pulses focused towards these sources, and thus provides a way to identify the resulting reflection artifacts. In this work, we demonstrate reduction of reflection artifacts in phantoms and in vivo measurements on human volunteers. In view of the spatially distributed PA sources that are found in clinical applications, we implemented an improved version of PAFUSion where photoacoustic signals are backpropagated to imitate the inward travelling wavefield and thus the reflection artifacts. The backpropagation is performed in a synthetic way based on the pulse-echo acquisitions after transmission on each single element of the transducer array. The results provide a direct confirmation that reflection artifacts are prominent in clinical epi-photoacoustic imaging, and that PAFUSion can strongly reduce these artifacts to improve deep-tissue photoacoustic imaging. PMID:27570690

  20. An Audit and Feedback Intervention for Reducing Antibiotic Prescribing in General Dental Practice: The RAPiD Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Elouafkaoui, Paula; Young, Linda; Newlands, Rumana; Duncan, Eilidh M.; Elders, Andrew; Ramsay, Craig R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Dentists prescribe approximately 10% of antibiotics dispensed in UK community pharmacies. Despite clear clinical guidance, dentists often prescribe antibiotics inappropriately. This cluster-randomised controlled trial used routinely collected National Health Service (NHS) dental prescribing and treatment claim data to compare the impact of individualised audit and feedback (A&F) interventions on dentists’ antibiotic prescribing rates. Methods and Findings All 795 antibiotic prescribing NHS general dental practices in Scotland were included. Practices were randomised to the control (practices = 163; dentists = 567) or A&F intervention group (practices = 632; dentists = 1,999). A&F intervention practices were allocated to one of two A&F groups: (1) individualised graphical A&F comprising a line graph plotting an individual dentist’s monthly antibiotic prescribing rate (practices = 316; dentists = 1,001); or (2) individualised graphical A&F plus a written behaviour change message synthesising and reiterating national guidance recommendations for dental antibiotic prescribing (practices = 316; dentists = 998). Intervention practices were also simultaneously randomised to receive A&F: (i) with or without a health board comparator comprising the addition of a line to the graphical A&F plotting the monthly antibiotic prescribing rate of all dentists in the health board; and (ii) delivered at 0 and 6 mo or at 0, 6, and 9 mo, giving a total of eight intervention groups. The primary outcome, measured by the trial statistician who was blinded to allocation, was the total number of antibiotic items dispensed per 100 NHS treatment claims over the 12 mo post-delivery of the baseline A&F. Primary outcome data was available for 152 control practices (dentists = 438) and 609 intervention practices (dentists = 1,550). At baseline, the number of antibiotic items prescribed per 100 NHS treatment claims was 8.3 in the control group and 8.5 in the intervention group. At

  1. Infant dental care (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... child to bed with a bottle of milk, juice, or sugar water. As the child grows, establishing proper dental hygiene will promote healthy teeth and gums which are essential to overall good health. Poor dental development, dental disease, and dental trauma ...

  2. Analysis of vector models in quantification of artifacts produced by standard prosthetic inlays in Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT)--a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Różyło-Kalinowska, Ingrid; Miechowicz, Sławomir; Sarna-Boś, Katarzyna; Borowicz, Janusz; Kalinowski, Paweł

    2014-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a relatively new, but highly efficient imaging method applied first in dentistry in 1998. However, the quality of the obtained slices depends among other things on artifacts generated by dental restorations as well as orthodontic and prosthetic appliances. The aim of the study was to quantify the artifacts produced by standard prosthetic inlays in CBCT images. The material consisted of 17 standard prosthetic inlays mounted in dental roots embedded in resin. The samples were examined by means of a large field of view CBCT unit, Galileos (Sirona, Germany), at 85 kV and 14 mAs. The analysis was performed using Able 3DDoctor software for data in the CT raster space as well as by means of Materialise Magics software for generated vector models (STL). The masks generated in the raster space included the area of the inlays together with image artifacts. The region of interest (ROI) of the raster space is a set of voxels from a selected range of Hounsfield units (109-3071). Ceramic inlay with zirconium dioxide (Cera Post) as well as epoxy resin inlay including silica fibers enriched with zirconium (Easy Post) produced the most intense artifacts. The smallest image distortions were created by titanium inlays, both passive (Harald Nordin) and active (Flexi Flange). Inlays containing zirconium generated the strongest artifacts, thus leading to the greatest distortions in the CBCT images. Carbon fiber inlay did not considerably affect the image quality. PMID:25404623

  3. Dental education in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Jaramillo, Jorge A.; Pulido, Jairo H. Ternera; Núñez, Jaime A. Castro; Bird, William F.; Komabayashi, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    This article describes Colombia's development of formal dentistry, its dental school system, curriculum, and dental licensure, and current issues in oral health care. In 1969, there were only 4 dental schools in Colombia; at this writing there are 21. Five dental schools are public and the other 16 are private. Nearly all classes are conducted in Spanish. Undergraduate pre-dental coursework is not a prerequisite for dental school in Colombia. To obtain licensure, Colombian dental students must complete 5 years of study in dental school, earn a diploma, and work for the government for 1 year. There are approximately 41,400 dentists in Colombia, and the number is increasing quickly. However, the unemployment rate among dentists is very high, even though graduation from dental school is extremely difficult. Although the 1,100:1 ratio of citizens to dentists is considered satisfactory, access to dental care is limited due to the high rate of poverty. PMID:20339245

  4. Teaching and Learning the Nature of Technical Artifacts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frederik, Ineke; Sonneveld, Wim; de Vries, Marc J.

    2011-01-01

    Artifacts are probably our most obvious everyday encounter with technology. Therefore, a good understanding of the nature of technical artifacts is a relevant part of technological literacy. In this article we draw from the philosophy of technology to develop a conceptualization of technical artifacts that can be used for educational purposes.…

  5. The effects of spatial filtering and artifacts on electrocorticographic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Coon, W. G.; de Pesters, A.; Brunner, P.; Schalk, G.

    2015-10-01

    Objective. Electrocorticographic (ECoG) signals contain noise that is common to all channels and noise that is specific to individual channels. Most published ECoG studies use common average reference (CAR) spatial filters to remove common noise, but CAR filters may introduce channel-specific noise into other channels. To address this concern, scientists often remove artifactual channels prior to data analysis. However, removing these channels depends on expert-based labeling and may also discard useful data. Thus, the effects of spatial filtering and artifacts on ECoG signals have been largely unknown. This study aims to quantify these effects and thereby address this gap in knowledge. Approach. In this study, we address these issues by exploring the effects of application of two types of unsupervised spatial filters and three methods of detecting signal artifacts using a large ECoG data set (20 subjects, four task conditions in each subject). Main results. Our results confirm that spatial filtering improves performance, i.e., it reduces ECoG signal variance that is not related to the task. They also show that removing artifactual channels automatically (using quantitatively defined rejection criteria) or manually (using expert opinion) does not increase the total amount of task-related information, but does avoid potential contamination from one or more noisy channels. Finally, applying a novel ‘median average reference’ filter does not require the elimination of artifactual channels prior to spatial filtering and still mitigates the influence of channels with channel-specific noise. Thus, it allows the investigator to retain more potentially useful task-related data. Significance. In summary, our results show that appropriately designed spatial filters that account for both common noise and channel-specific noise greatly improve the quality of ECoG signal analyses, and that artifacts in only a single channel can result in profound and undesired effects on

  6. New algorithms for ring artifact removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketcham, Richard A.

    2006-08-01

    This paper describes a set of algorithms that enable virtually complete ring artifact removal from tomographic imagery with minimal to negligible contamination of the underlying data. These procedures were created specifically to deal with data as acquired at the University of Texas high-resolution X-ray CT facility, but are likely to be applicable in other settings as well. In most cases corrections are optimally applied to sinogram data before reconstruction, but a variant is developed for correcting already-reconstructed images. The algorithms make particular use of repetitive aspects of the artifact across images to improve behavior. However, fully utilizing this functionality requires processing entire data sets simultaneously, rather than one image at a time. A number of parameters may be adjusted to optimize results for particular data sets.

  7. Supporting Knowledge Transfer through Decomposable Reasoning Artifacts

    SciTech Connect

    Pike, William A.; May, Richard A.; Turner, Alan E.

    2007-01-03

    Technology to support knowledge transfer and cooperative inquiry must offer its users the ability to effectively interpret knowledge structures produced by collaborators. Communicating the reasoning processes that underlie a finding is one method for enhancing interpretation, and can result in more effective evaluation and application of shared knowledge. In knowledge management tools, interpretation is aided by creating knowledge artifacts that can expose their provenance to scrutiny and that can be transformed into diverse representations that suit their consumers’ perspectives and preferences. We outline the information management needs of inquiring communities characterized by hypothesis generation tasks, and propose a model for communication, based in theories of hermeneutics, semiotics, and abduction, in which knowledge structures can be decomposed into the lower-level reasoning artifacts that produced them. We then present a proof-of-concept implementation for an environment to support the capture and communication of analytic products, with emphasis on the domain of intelligence analysis.

  8. Atypical Forensic Dental Identifications.

    PubMed

    Cardoza, Anthony R; Wood, James D

    2015-06-01

    Forensic dental identification specialists are typically the last conventional option for postmortem identification. Forensic dental identification is most often accomplished by comparing radiographs of the decedent's teeth with the dental radiographs obtained from the dentist of the suspected victim. Unfortunately, antemortem dental radiographs are not always available. When presented with this challenge, the authors of this article have been successful in completing identifications using means other than dental radiographic comparison. PMID:26126345

  9. Dental stem cell patents.

    PubMed

    Morsczeck, Christian; Frerich, Bernhard; Driemel, Oliver

    2009-01-01

    A complex human tissue harbors stem cells that are responsible for its maintenance or repair. These stem cells have been isolated also from dental tissues such as the periodontal ligament, dental papilla or dental follicle and they may offer novel applications in dentistry. This following review summarizes patents about dental stem cells for dental tissue engineering and considers their value for regenerative dentistry. PMID:19149737

  10. Interpolation algorithms and image data artifacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, M. L.

    1977-01-01

    Interpolation, or resampling coefficients, which are generated from low pass filter Fourier transforms yield more accurate resampled values than those obtained using cubic spline techniques. This is due to the utilization of six data points rather than four as currently used in cubic spline analysis. After resampling functions are applied to image data, artifacts which are similar to ringing may become pronounced. These effects are often present in the original data and the interpolation merely enhances them.

  11. Troubleshooting and elimination of artifact in polysomnography.

    PubMed

    Beine, Bretton

    2005-12-01

    A sleep technician who runs a sleep study without understanding the basis of the signals being acquired can spend a lot of time and energy trying to improve poor signal quality without success. Poor signal quality often results in an image that cannot be interpreted or is difficult to interpret, and extensive troubleshooting often results in a very disrupted sleep study. This article addresses trouble-shooting and elimination of artifact in polysomnography. PMID:16303593

  12. Artifacts Of Spectral Analysis Of Instrument Readings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, James H.

    1995-01-01

    Report presents experimental and theoretical study of some of artifacts introduced by processing outputs of two nominally identical low-frequency-reading instruments; high-sensitivity servo-accelerometers mounted together and operating, in conjunction with signal-conditioning circuits, as seismometers. Processing involved analog-to-digital conversion with anti-aliasing filtering, followed by digital processing including frequency weighting and computation of different measures of power spectral density (PSD).

  13. Reduction of display artifacts by random sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahumada, A. J., Jr.; Nagel, D. C.; Watson, A. B.; Yellott, J. I., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The application of random-sampling techniques to remove visible artifacts (such as flicker, moire patterns, and paradoxical motion) introduced in TV-type displays by discrete sequential scanning is discussed and demonstrated. Sequential-scanning artifacts are described; the window of visibility defined in spatiotemporal frequency space by Watson and Ahumada (1982 and 1983) and Watson et al. (1983) is explained; the basic principles of random sampling are reviewed and illustrated by the case of the human retina; and it is proposed that the sampling artifacts can be replaced by random noise, which can then be shifted to frequency-space regions outside the window of visibility. Vertical sequential, single-random-sequence, and continuously renewed random-sequence plotting displays generating 128 points at update rates up to 130 Hz are applied to images of stationary and moving lines, and best results are obtained with the single random sequence for the stationary lines and with the renewed random sequence for the moving lines.

  14. Sampling Artifacts from Conductive Silicone Tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Timko, Michael T.; Yu, Zhenhong; Kroll, Jesse; Jayne, John T.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Miake-Lye, Richard C.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Liscinsky, David; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Destaillats, Hugo; Holder, Amara L.; Smith, Jared D.; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2009-05-15

    We report evidence that carbon impregnated conductive silicone tubing used in aerosol sampling systems can introduce two types of experimental artifacts: 1) silicon tubing dynamically absorbs carbon dioxide gas, requiring greater than 5 minutes to reach equilibrium and 2) silicone tubing emits organic contaminants containing siloxane that adsorb onto particles traveling through it and onto downstream quartz fiber filters. The consequence can be substantial for engine exhaust measurements as both artifacts directly impact calculations of particulate mass-based emission indices. The emission of contaminants from the silicone tubing can result in overestimation of organic particle mass concentrations based on real-time aerosol mass spectrometry and the off-line thermal analysis of quartz filters. The adsorption of siloxane contaminants can affect the surface properties of aerosol particles; we observed a marked reduction in the water-affinity of soot particles passed through conductive silicone tubing. These combined observations suggest that the silicone tubing artifacts may have wide consequence for the aerosol community and should, therefore, be used with caution. Gentle heating, physical and chemical properties of the particle carriers, exposure to solvents, and tubing age may influence siloxane uptake. The amount of contamination is expected to increase as the tubing surface area increases and as the particle surface area increases. The effect is observed at ambient temperature and enhanced by mild heating (<100 oC). Further evaluation is warranted.

  15. Correction of motion artifacts in OCT-AFI data collected in airways (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abouei, Elham; Lane, Pierre M.; Pahlevaninezhad, Hamid; Lee, Anthony; Lam, Stephen; MacAulay, Calum E.

    2016-03-01

    Abstract: Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides in vivo imaging with near-histologic resolution of tissue morphology. OCT has been successfully employed in clinical practice in non-pulmonary fields of medicine such as ophthalmology and cardiology. Studies suggest that OCT has the potential to be a powerful tool for the detection and localization of malignant and non-malignant pulmonary diseases. The combination of OCT with autofluorescence imaging (AFI) provides valuable information about the structural and metabolic state of tissues. Successful application of OCT or OCT-AFI to the field of pulmonary medicine requires overcoming several challenges. This work address those associated with motion: cardiac cycle, breathing and non-uniform rotation distortion (NURD) artifacts. Mechanically rotated endoscopic probes often suffer from image degradation due to NURD. In addition cardiac and breathing motion artifacts may be present in-vivo that are not seen ex-vivo. These motion artifacts can be problematic in OCT-AFI systems with slower acquisition rates and have been observed to generate identifiable prominent artifacts which make confident interpretation of observed structures (blood vessels, etc) difficult. Understanding and correcting motion artifact could improve the image quality and interpretation. In this work, the motion artifacts in pulmonary OCT-AFI data sets are estimated in both AFI and OCT images using a locally adaptive registration algorithm that can be used to correct/reduce such artifacts. Performance of the algorithm is evaluated on images of a NURD phantom and on in-vivo OCT-AFI datasets of peripheral lung airways.

  16. Dental anxiety and dental attendance among 25-year-olds in Norway: time trends from 1997 to 2007

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background So far, there are few studies considering the development of dental anxiety and dental attendance patterns across time in the general population of Norwegian adults. This study aimed to 1) determine the frequency of dental anxiety and regular dental attendance among 25-year-olds in Norway in 1997 and 2007, 2) to study the development (time trend) of dental anxiety and the socio-behavioral distribution of dental anxiety from 1997 to 2007. Method Random samples of 1,190 and 8,000 25-yr-olds were drawn from the populations of three counties in Western Norway in 1997 and 2007, respectively. The eligible participants received questionnaires by mail including questions on socio-demographics, dental anxiety (DAS) and dental attendance. Results In 1997, 11.5% males versus 23% females reported high dental anxiety (DAS ≥ 13). Corresponding figures in 2007 were 11.3% and 19.8%. The proportions who had attended yearly for a dental check-up during the past 5 years fell from 62% in 1997 (men 56.9% and women 66.4%) to 44.6% (men 38.1% and women 48.6%) in 2007. After controlling for potential confounding factors, the 25-year-olds were 1.4 times more likely to report dental anxiety in 1997 compared to 2007. The decrease was largely attributable to a lower mean DAS score among higher educated females in 2007 than in 1997. The discrepancy in dental anxiety between regular and non-regular dental attendees had decreased, largely attributable to a decline in dental anxiety among irregular dental attendees. Conclusion The study showed reduced dental anxiety and dental attendance among 25 year-olds in Norway from 1997 to 2007. This study points to the importance of controlling for possible changes in socio-demographic distributions when different cohorts are compared. PMID:21426538

  17. SUBSURFACE MOBILE PLUTONIUM SPECIATION: SAMPLING ARTIFACTS FOR GROUNDWATER COLLOIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.; Buesseler, K.

    2010-06-29

    A recent review found several conflicting conclusions regarding colloid-facilitated transport of radionuclides in groundwater and noted that colloids can both facilitate and retard transport. Given these contrasting conclusions and the profound implications even trace concentrations of plutonium (Pu) have on the calculated risk posed to human health, it is important that the methodology used to sample groundwater colloids be free of artifacts. The objective of this study was: (1) to conduct a field study and measure Pu speciation, ({sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu for reduced-Pu{sub aq}, oxidized-Pu{sub aq}, reduced-Pu{sub colloid}, and oxidized-Pu{sub colloid}), in a Savannah River Site (SRS) aquifer along a pH gradient in F-Area, (2) to determine the impact of pumping rate on Pu concentration, Pu speciation, and Pu isotopic ratios, (3) determine the impact of delayed sample processing (as opposed to processing directly from the well).

  18. Dental hyponatraemia.

    PubMed

    Simpson, R M

    2011-08-01

    A 14-year-old girl developed dental pain and was treated for acute infected pulpitis of her right upper lateral incisor with drilling and filling. The pain continued and was helped by analgesia, sucking ice cubes and drinking cold water. Forty-eight hours later, she became confused and disoriented. She started to vomit and complained of headache. Investigations revealed hyponatraemia with normal serum potassium levels and initially normal urinary sodium excretion. Over the next 24 hours, she passed 5.45 L of urine and her serum sodium rose from 125 to 143 mmol/L. Self-induced water intoxication has been described during drinking games and initiation ceremonies, but this would appear to an unusual cause. Conservative management proved successful in allowing this girl to recover without sequelae. PMID:21873727

  19. View-Angle Tilting and Slice-Encoding Metal Artifact Correction for Artifact Reduction in MRI: Experimental Sequence Optimization for Orthopaedic Tumor Endoprostheses and Clinical Application

    PubMed Central

    Jungmann, Pia M.; Ganter, Carl; Schaeffeler, Christoph J.; Bauer, Jan S.; Baum, Thomas; Meier, Reinhard; Nittka, Mathias; Pohlig, Florian; Rechl, Hans; von Eisenhart-Rothe, Ruediger; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Woertler, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Background MRI plays a major role in follow-up of patients with malignant bone tumors. However, after limb salvage surgery, orthopaedic tumor endoprostheses might cause significant metal-induced susceptibility artifacts. Purposes To evaluate the benefit of view-angle tilting (VAT) and slice-encoding metal artifact correction (SEMAC) for MRI of large-sized orthopaedic tumor endoprostheses in an experimental model and to demonstrate clinical benefits for assessment of periprosthetic soft tissue abnormalities. Methods In an experimental setting, tumor endoprostheses (n=4) were scanned at 1.5T with three versions of optimized high-bandwidth turbo-spin-echo pulse sequences: (i) standard, (ii) VAT and (iii) combined VAT and SEMAC (VAT&SEMAC). Pulse sequences included coronal short-tau-inversion-recovery (STIR), coronal T1-weighted (w), transverse T1-w and T2-w TSE sequences. For clinical evaluation, VAT&SEMAC was compared to conventional metal artifact-reducing MR sequences (conventional MR) in n=25 patients with metal implants and clinical suspicion of tumor recurrence or infection. Diameters of artifacts were measured quantitatively. Qualitative parameters were assessed on a five-point scale (1=best, 5=worst): “image distortion”, “artificial signal changes at the edges” and “diagnostic confidence”. Imaging findings were correlated with pathology. T-tests and Wilcoxon-signed rank tests were used for statistical analyses. Results The true size of the prostheses was overestimated on MRI (P<0.05). A significant reduction of artifacts was achieved by VAT (P<0.001) and VAT&SEMAC (P=0.003) compared to the standard group. Quantitative scores improved in the VAT and VAT&SEMAC group (P<0.05). On clinical MR images, artifact diameters were significantly reduced in the VAT&SEMAC-group as compared with the conventional-group (P<0.001). Distortion and artificial signal changes were reduced and diagnostic confidence improved (P<0.05). In two cases, tumor-recurrence, in

  20. Streak artifact reduction in cardiac cone beam CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shechter, Gilad; Naveh, Galit; Lessick, Jonathan; Altman, Ami

    2005-04-01

    Cone beam reconstructed cardiac CT images suffer from characteristic streak artifacts that affect the quality of coronary artery imaging. These artifacts arise from inhomogeneous distribution of noise. While in non-tagged reconstruction inhomogeneity of noise distribution is mainly due to anisotropy of the attenuation of the scanned object (e.g. shoulders), in cardiac imaging it is largely influenced by the non-uniform distribution of the acquired data used for reconstructing the heart at a given phase. We use a cardiac adaptive filter to reduce these streaks. In difference to previous methods of adaptive filtering that locally smooth data points on the basis of their attenuation values, our filter is applied as a function of the noise distribution of the data as it is used in the phase selective reconstruction. We have reconstructed trans-axial images without adaptive filtering, with a regular adaptive filter and with the cardiac adaptive filter. With the cardiac adaptive filter significant reduction of streaks is achieved, and thus image quality is improved. The coronary vessel is much more pronounced in the cardiac adaptive filtered images, in slab MIP the main coronary artery branches are more visible, and non-calcified plaque is better differentiated from vessel wall. This improvement is accomplished without altering significantly the border definition of calcified plaques.

  1. [Progress of studies for reduction of ghost artifact in magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunxiao; Tao, Hua; Wang, Shijie; Luo, Liming

    2007-04-01

    The popularity of magnetic resonance imaging over other imaging disciplines depends predominantly on its high spatial resolution, soft tissue contrast, no hard fake trace and no radiation injury. However, the ghost artifacts produced during a magnetic resonance imaging would degrade the image badly and affect the precise orientation to focus. This paper introduced the process of studies for reduction of ghost artifact resulting from EPI imaging theory and motion of subject. A lot of researches indicated that how to reduce the ghost effectively is still a challenging task. Researchers should persist in seeking for new method to solve the difficult problem. PMID:17591281

  2. Neural networks improve brain cancer detection with Raman spectroscopy in the presence of light artifacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jermyn, Michael; Desroches, Joannie; Mercier, Jeanne; St-Arnaud, Karl; Guiot, Marie-Christine; Petrecca, Kevin; Leblond, Frederic

    2016-03-01

    It is often difficult to identify cancer tissue during brain cancer (glioma) surgery. Gliomas invade into areas of normal brain, and this cancer invasion is frequently not detected using standard preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This results in enduring invasive cancer following surgery and leads to recurrence. A hand-held Raman spectroscopy is able to rapidly detect cancer invasion in patients with grade 2-4 gliomas. However, ambient light sources can produce spectral artifacts which inhibit the ability to distinguish between cancer and normal tissue using the spectral information available. To address this issue, we have demonstrated that artificial neural networks (ANN) can accurately classify invasive cancer versus normal brain tissue, even when including measurements with significant spectral artifacts from external light sources. The non-parametric and adaptive model used by ANN makes it suitable for detecting complex non-linear spectral characteristics associated with different tissues and the confounding presence of light artifacts. The use of ANN for brain cancer detection with Raman spectroscopy, in the presence of light artifacts, improves the robustness and clinical translation potential for intraoperative use. Integration with the neurosurgical workflow is facilitated by accounting for the effect of light artifacts which may occur, due to operating room lights, neuronavigation systems, windows, or other light sources. The ability to rapidly detect invasive brain cancer under these conditions may reduce residual cancer remaining after surgery, and thereby improve patient survival.

  3. Multidistance probe arrangement to eliminate artifacts in functional near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Toru; Umeyama, Shinji; Matsuda, Keiji

    2009-11-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy has the potential to easily detect cerebral functional hemodynamics. However, in practical fNIRS measurements, a subject's physical or systemic physiological activities often cause undesirable artifacts. Such activities can be evoked even by task execution. In this case, observed artifacts may correlate strongly with the task sequence, and it is difficult to eliminate them by conventional signal filtering techniques. We present a theoretical analysis and Monte Carlo simulations of layered media in which both scattering and absorption changes occur, and show that a multidistance probe arrangement is effective in removing artifacts and extracting functional hemodynamics. The probe arrangement is determined based on simulation results. Artifacts induced by nonfunctional tasks (body tilting, head nodding, and breath holding) are clearly observed when a conventional method is used; such artifacts are appreciably reduced by the proposed method. Signals evoked by single-sided finger movements are observed at both hemispheres when we use a conventional method. On the other hand, localized signals at the primary motor area are observed by the proposed method. A statistically significant increase in oxygenated hemoglobin and decrease in deoxygenated hemoglobin are simultaneously observed at the contralateral primary motor area.

  4. Metal artifact reduction in x-ray computed tomography (CT) by constrained optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xiaomeng; Wang Jing; Xing Lei

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: The streak artifacts caused by metal implants have long been recognized as a problem that limits various applications of CT imaging. In this work, the authors propose an iterative metal artifact reduction algorithm based on constrained optimization. Methods: After the shape and location of metal objects in the image domain is determined automatically by the binary metal identification algorithm and the segmentation of ''metal shadows'' in projection domain is done, constrained optimization is used for image reconstruction. It minimizes a predefined function that reflects a priori knowledge of the image, subject to the constraint that the estimated projection data are within a specified tolerance of the available metal-shadow-excluded projection data, with image non-negativity enforced. The minimization problem is solved through the alternation of projection-onto-convex-sets and the steepest gradient descent of the objective function. The constrained optimization algorithm is evaluated with a penalized smoothness objective. Results: The study shows that the proposed method is capable of significantly reducing metal artifacts, suppressing noise, and improving soft-tissue visibility. It outperforms the FBP-type methods and ART and EM methods and yields artifacts-free images. Conclusions: Constrained optimization is an effective way to deal with CT reconstruction with embedded metal objects. Although the method is presented in the context of metal artifacts, it is applicable to general ''missing data'' image reconstruction problems.

  5. An information artifact ontology perspective on data collections and associated representational artifacts.

    PubMed

    Ceusters, Werner

    2012-01-01

    Biomedical data collections are typically compiled on the basis of assessment instruments and associated terminologies and their data structure explained by means of data dictionaries. The Information Artifact Ontology (IAO) is an attempt to give a realism-based account of the essence of information entities and how components of such entities relate to each other and to that what they are information about. Changes in the taxonomy and the definitions of the IAO, most importantly the addition of the terms 'representational artifact' and 'representational unit', are proposed to make the IAO a useful tool to clarify formally the distinctions and commonalities between data collections and associated artifacts that are compiled independently from each other, yet cover the same domain. PMID:22874154

  6. Ring artifact correction using detector line-ratios in computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Kim, Younguk; Baek, Jongduk; Hwang, Dosik

    2014-06-01

    Ring artifacts in computed tomography (CT) images degrade image quality and obscure the true shapes of objects. While several correction methods have been developed, their performances are often task-dependent and not generally applicable. Here, we propose a novel method to reduce ring artifacts by calculating the ratio of adjacent detector elements in the projection data, termed the line-ratio. Our method estimates the sensitivity of each detector element and equalizes them in sinogram space. As a result, the stripe pattern can be effectively removed from sinogram data, thereby also removing ring artifacts from the reconstructed CT image. Numerical simulations were performed to evaluate and compare the performance of our method with that of conventional methods. We also tested our method experimentally and demonstrated that our method has superior performance to other methods. PMID:24921532

  7. Methods to eliminate stimulus transduction artifact from insert earphones during electroencephalography

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Tom; Kerlin, Jess R.; Bishop, Christopher W.; Miller, Lee M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To reduce stimulus transduction artifacts in EEG while using insert earphones. Design Reference Equivalent Threshold SPLs (RETSPLs) were assessed for Etymotic ER-4B earphones in fifteen volunteers. Auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) and middle latency responses (MLRs) – as well as long-duration complex ABRs – to click and /dɑ/ speech stimuli were recorded in a single-case design. Results Transduction artifacts occurred in raw EEG responses, but they were eliminated by shielding, counter-phasing (averaging across stimuli 180° out of phase) or re-referencing. Conclusions Clinical-grade ABRs, MLRs, and cABRs can be recorded with a standard digital EEG system and high-fidelity insert earphones, provided one or more techniques are used to remove the stimulus transduction artifact. PMID:21760513

  8. [Dental records and responsibility].

    PubMed

    Brands, W G

    2006-03-01

    Dental records are more than a small part of the bookkeeping. In most dental practises, keeping records is the task of a dental assistant. In civil court, the dentist is in most countries liable for the mistakes of his employees. In disciplinary court however there may be doubt whether the dentist is responsible for the mistakes of his assistant. Contrary to their American colleagues, Dutch dental assistants and dental hygienists cannot be summoned before a disciplinary court. As these para-medics perform more and more dental treatment, independently or after delegation, they should be assigned there own disciplinary responsibility. PMID:16566401

  9. [Ultrasound artifacts and their diagnostic significance in internal medicine and gastroenterology - Part 1: B-mode artifacts].

    PubMed

    Tuma, J; Jenssen, C; Möller, K; Cui, X W; Kinkel, H; Uebel, S; Dietrich, C F

    2016-05-01

    Artifacts in ultrasonographic diagnostics are a result of the physical properties of the ultrasound waves and are caused by interaction of the ultrasound waves with biological structures and tissues and with foreign bodies. On the one hand, they may be distracting and may lead to misdiagnosis. On the other hand, they may be diagnostically helpful. Ultrasound imaging suffers from artifacts, because in reality, parameters assumed to be constant values, such as sound speed, sound rectilinear propagation, attenuation, etc., are often different from the actual parameters. Moreover, inadequate device settings may cause artifacts. Profound knowledge of the causes, avoidance, and interpretation of artifacts is a necessary precondition for correct clinical appraisal of ultrasound images. Part 1 of this review comments on the physics of artifacts and describes the most important B-mode artifacts. Pitfalls, as well as diagnostic chances resulting from B-mode artifacts, are discussed. PMID:27171335

  10. Dental Auxiliary Occupations. Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingston, Richard D.

    As part of a dental auxiliaries project, a Dental Auxiliary National Technical Advisory Committee was established, and its major undertaking was to assist in the development of a functional inventory for each of the three dental auxiliary occupations (dental assisting, dental hygiene, and dental laboratory technology). The analysis consisted of…

  11. Metallic artifact mitigation and organ-constrained tissue assignment for Monte Carlo calculations of permanent implant lung brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, J. G. H.; Miksys, N.; Thomson, R. M.; Furutani, K. M.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: To investigate methods of generating accurate patient-specific computational phantoms for the Monte Carlo calculation of lung brachytherapy patient dose distributions. Methods: Four metallic artifact mitigation methods are applied to six lung brachytherapy patient computed tomography (CT) images: simple threshold replacement (STR) identifies high CT values in the vicinity of the seeds and replaces them with estimated true values; fan beam virtual sinogram replaces artifact-affected values in a virtual sinogram and performs a filtered back-projection to generate a corrected image; 3D median filter replaces voxel values that differ from the median value in a region of interest surrounding the voxel and then applies a second filter to reduce noise; and a combination of fan beam virtual sinogram and STR. Computational phantoms are generated from artifact-corrected and uncorrected images using several tissue assignment schemes: both lung-contour constrained and unconstrained global schemes are considered. Voxel mass densities are assigned based on voxel CT number or using the nominal tissue mass densities. Dose distributions are calculated using the EGSnrc user-code BrachyDose for{sup 125}I, {sup 103}Pd, and {sup 131}Cs seeds and are compared directly as well as through dose volume histograms and dose metrics for target volumes surrounding surgical sutures. Results: Metallic artifact mitigation techniques vary in ability to reduce artifacts while preserving tissue detail. Notably, images corrected with the fan beam virtual sinogram have reduced artifacts but residual artifacts near sources remain requiring additional use of STR; the 3D median filter removes artifacts but simultaneously removes detail in lung and bone. Doses vary considerably between computational phantoms with the largest differences arising from artifact-affected voxels assigned to bone in the vicinity of the seeds. Consequently, when metallic artifact reduction and constrained tissue

  12. Coordinate Measuring Machine Pit Artifact Inspection Procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Montano, Joshua D.

    2012-07-31

    The goal of this document is to outline a procedure for dimensional measurement of Los Alamos National Laboratory's CMM Pit Artifact. This procedure will be used by the Manufacturing Practice's Inspection Technology Subgroup of the Interagency Manufacturing Operations Group and Joint Operations Weapon Operations Group (IMOG/JOWOG 39) round robin participants. The intent is to assess the state of industry within the Nuclear Weapons Complex for measurements made on this type of part and find which current measurement strategies and techniques produce the best results.

  13. A holographic color camera for recording artifacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jith, Abhay

    2013-02-01

    Advent of 3D televisions has created a new wave of public interest in images with depth. Though these technologies create moving pictures with apparent depth, it lacks the visual appeal and a set of other positive aspects of color holographic images. The above new wave of interest in 3D will definitely help to fuel popularity of holograms. In view of this, a low cost and handy color holography camera is designed for recording color holograms of artifacts. It is believed that such cameras will help to record medium format color holograms outside conventional holography laboratories and to popularize color holography. The paper discusses the design and the results obtained.

  14. The utilization of dental hygiene students in school-based dental sealant programs.

    PubMed

    Miller, Faith Y

    2005-01-01

    Early detection of childhood caries is important to childrens' overall health. Untreated childhood caries can lead to pain, as in abscesses from prolonged neglect; altered dietary intake; and delays in the development of the permanent teeth if the primary teeth are prematurely lost. In the summer of 2000, funds were provided to various oral health care provider organizations by the Illinois Department of Public Health, Division of Oral Health, to purchase portable equipment to deliver preventive services (i.e., exams, sealants, and oral hygiene education) to second-grade and sixth-grade children who qualified for Medicaid and/or free and reduced-cost lunch programs. The Dental Sealant Grant Program at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale was a unique program that utilized dental hygiene students as the primary human resource. Within the state, the Dental Sealant Grant Program was, at the time of this report, the only grantee sponsored by a stand-alone dental hygiene program (not affiliated with a dental school). Other positive aspects of the dental hygiene-sponsored sealant program were that the supervising dentist was the primary Medicaid provider and a member of the dental hygiene faculty; dental hygiene faculty participated actively as site coordinators and clinicians; and dental hygiene students were given the opportunity to volunteer for the program as a service-learning option. PMID:16297312

  15. Quantification and elimination of windmill artifacts in multi slice CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utrup, Steven J.; Brown, Kevin M.

    2008-03-01

    In multi-slice cone beam CT imaging, there are artifacts known as windmill artifacts. These artifacts are due to not satisfying the Nyquist criteria in the patient longitudinal direction. This paper quantifies and compares these artifacts as a function of the number of rows, pitch, collimation, and image thickness of the CT scanner. Scanners with rows of 16, 64 and 128 are measured and compared with simulated data, using both Helical and Axial scanning modes. In addition three focal spot switching modes are compared: the traditional within image plane mode; diagonal mode; and quad mode. All images are compared via four criteria: artifacts, MTF, SSP and noise. Results show that the frequency of the artifact, or number of blades on the windmill and magnitude of each blade, is dependent on the rate at which the rows are crossed for an image. For example, for a given pitch, doubling the rows doubles the frequency of the artifact, with each artifact approximately the magnitude. A similar result can be obtained by keeping the number of rows constant and varying the pitch. The artifact disappears as the Nyquist criteria is satisfied by either increasing the slice thickness or incorporating one of the focal spot switching modes that switch in the patient longitudinal direction. For a given MTF and SSP, the diagonal focal spot switching mode has slightly more noise while the other two are approximately equal. The artifact varies with the quad mode being the best and traditional mode being the worse.

  16. Complementary contrast media for metal artifact reduction in dual-energy computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Jack W; Edic, Peter M; FitzGerald, Paul F; Torres, Andrew S; Yeh, Benjamin M

    2015-07-01

    Metal artifacts have been a problem associated with computed tomography (CT) since its introduction. Recent techniques to mitigate this problem have included utilization of high-energy (keV) virtual monochromatic spectral (VMS) images, produced via dual-energy CT (DECT). A problem with these high-keV images is that contrast enhancement provided by all commercially available contrast media is severely reduced. Contrast agents based on higher atomic number elements can maintain contrast at the higher energy levels where artifacts are reduced. This study evaluated three such candidate elements: bismuth, tantalum, and tungsten, as well as two conventional contrast elements: iodine and barium. A water-based phantom with vials containing these five elements in solution, as well as different artifact-producing metal structures, was scanned with a DECT scanner capable of rapid operating voltage switching. In the VMS datasets, substantial reductions in the contrast were observed for iodine and barium, which suffered from contrast reductions of 97% and 91%, respectively, at 140 versus 40 keV. In comparison under the same conditions, the candidate agents demonstrated contrast enhancement reductions of only 20%, 29%, and 32% for tungsten, tantalum, and bismuth, respectively. At 140 versus 40 keV, metal artifact severity was reduced by 57% to 85% depending on the phantom configuration. PMID:26839905

  17. A comparative quantitative analysis of magnetic susceptibility artifacts in echo planar and PROPELLER diffusion-weighted images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jae-Hwan; Lee, Hae-Kag; Yang, Han-Joon; Lee, Gui-Won; Park, Yong-Soon; Chung, Woon-Kwan

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the authors investigated whether periodically-rotated overlapping parallel lines with enhanced reconstruction (PROPELLER) diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can remove magnetic susceptibility artifacts and compared apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values for PROPELLER DWI and the common echo planar (EP) DWI. Twenty patients that underwent brain MRI with a metal dental implant were selected. A 3.0T MR scanner was then used to obtain EP DWI, PROPELLER DWI, and corresponding apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps for a b-value of 0 and 1,000 s/mm2. The frequencies of magnetic susceptibility artifacts in four parts of the brain (bilateral temporal lobes, pons, and orbit) were selected. In the ADC maps, we measured the ADC values of both sides of the temporal lobe and the pons. According to the study results, the frequency of magnetic susceptibility artifacts in PROPELLER DW images was lower than it was in EP DW images. In ADC maps, the ADC values of the bilateral temporal lobes and the pons were all higher in PROPELLER ADC maps than in EP ADC maps. Our findings show that when a high-field MRI machine is used, magnetic susceptibility artifacts can distort anatomical structures and produce high-intensity signals. Furthermore, our findings suggest that in many cases, PROPELLER DWI would be helpful in terms of achieving a correct diagnosis.

  18. Dental x-rays

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - teeth; Radiograph - dental; Bitewings; Periapical film; Panoramic film ... dentist's office. There are many types of dental x-rays. Some are: Bitewing Periapical Palatal (also called occlusal) ...

  19. Dental education in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Masuoka, David; Komabayashi, Takashi; Reyes-Vela, Enrique

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this article is to provide information about dental education in Mexico, including its history, the dental school system, curriculum and dental licensure. In 1977, there were only 59 Mexican dental schools; however, there were 83 schools registered in the last official national count in 2007. Forty-one dental schools are public, and the other 42 are private. Every year the number of private dental schools increases. Admission to dental schools in Mexico requires a high school diploma. All classes are conducted in Spanish. To obtain licensure in Mexico, dental students must complete a 3 to 5-year program plus a year of community service. No formal nationwide standard clinical/didactic curriculum exists in Mexico. There are approximately 153,000 dentists in Mexico, a number that increases each year. The dentist-patient ratio is approximately 1:700. However, the high percentage of inactive licensed dentists in Mexico points to a serious problem. PMID:24984634

  20. Dental education in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Komabayashi, Takashi; Razak, Abdul Aziz Abdul; Bird, William F

    2007-12-01

    There was only one dental school in Malaysia until 1997 but five new schools have been established since 1998. This review provides information about dental education in Malaysia including; the history of dental education, the current dental school system and curriculum, and dental licensure. There are four public and two private dental schools in Malaysia. High school graduates are required to take the nationwide matriculation entrance examination or the Higher School Certificate (HSC) to apply for a dental degree programme. A five-year dental programme leads to the BDS or the DDS degree. National or state examinations are not required to practise dentistry. Currently, there are approximately 2,500 dentists, with a ratio of 1 dentist for every 10,000 people. PMID:18265775

  1. American Dental Education Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... work hard to help your students fulfill their dreams, and play a crucial... Learn more Dental School ... Terms of Use | Website Feedback | Website Help ©2016 American Dental Education Association® (ADEA), 655 K Street, NW, ...

  2. Emerging infections - implications for dental care.

    PubMed

    Monaghan, N P

    2016-07-01

    Over the last 20 years the majority of emerging infections which have spread rapidly across the globe have been respiratory infections that are spread via droplets, a trend which is likely to continue. Aerosol spray generation in the dental surgery has the potential to spread such infections to staff or other patients. Although the diseases may differ, some common approaches can reduce the risk of transmission. Dental professionals should be aware of areas affected by emerging infections, the incubation period and the recent travel history of patients. Elective dental care for those returning from areas affected by emerging infections should be delayed until the incubation period for the infection is over. PMID:27388077

  3. Sterilization of dental instruments and devices: an update.

    PubMed

    Goodman, H S; Carpenter, R D; Cox, M R

    1994-04-01

    Dental sterilization techniques have become a focus of attention as a result of disclosure of occupational HIV transmission from an infected dentist to a cluster of patients. Although there has never been a confirmed report of a patient acquiring an infectious blood-borne disease from a dental instrument or device, recommendations for universal sterilization of dental handpieces and other devices have recently been implemented. Because of the higher rate of hepatitis B virus transmissability in the dental health care environment, an upgrade in sterilization protocols may be warranted. Stringent sterilization standards are especially necessary in higher-risk institutional dental care settings. However, a high rate of dental sterilization errors has been reported and traced to operator error. Recent institutional dental sterilization policy changes have been developed to reduce the chance of sterilization error, further diminishing the risk of cross contamination. PMID:8060010

  4. Quantification of ring artifact visibility in CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, Mats; Meyer, Bettina; Bornefalk, Hans; Danielsson, Mats

    2012-03-01

    Ring artifacts appear in computed tomography images if there are too large inhomogeneities between different detector elements. The question of how large inhomogeneities are acceptable is gaining in importance due to the development of energy discriminating photon counting CT, where detector homogeneity is an important design parameter. We propose using the systematic-to-statistical error quotient q, defined as the variance of the expected log-normalized count number between detector elements (dels) divided by the variance of log-normalized count numbers measured with the same del, as a metric of ring artifact visibility. With a simple observer study using simulated images, it is shown that rings are visible in the reconstructed image if q exceeds a threshold which lies close to 1.2 • 10-3 for 1500 detector elements and 2000 projection angles. It is also shown by visual inspection of simulated images that the threshold value is, to a good approximation, inversely proportional to the number of angle measurements and independent of the number of detector elements. The results suggest that a simple oberver study, together with these scaling relationships, is sufficient for establishing sinogram homogeneity requirements for a particular reconstruction method.

  5. Electrostatic sampler for semivolatile aerosols: chemical artifacts.

    PubMed

    Volckens, John; Leith, David

    2002-11-01

    Electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) show promise as an alternative sampling method for semivolatile aerosols because they are less susceptible to adsorptive and evaporative artifacts than filter based methods. However, the corona discharge may after the chemical composition of a sampled aerosol. Chemical artifacts associated with electrostatic precipitation of semivolatile aerosols were investigated in the laboratory. ESPs and filters sampled both particles and vapors of alkanes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and alkenes across varying concentrations. Gravimetric measurements between the two sampling methods were well correlated. Ozone generated by the ESP corona was the primary cause of alkene reactions in the gas phase. Particles collected within the corona region were vulnerable to irradiation by corona ions overtime. Particles collected outside the corona region did not react. Vapors passing through the corona reacted to a lesser extent. Vapors captured after passing through the ESP reacted with ozone that was not removed by the vapor trap. Chemical speciation of highly reactive compounds (i.e., alkenes or other compounds with relatively short half-lives outdoors) is not appropriate with ESPs. Electrostatic precipitation of these compounds is appropriate, however, when total organic carbon is of interest as the ESP does not alter the amount of mass measured gravimetrically. ESPs can make accurate measurements of more persistent semivolatile compounds, such as alkanes and PAHs. PMID:12433171

  6. Ontological System for Context Artifacts and Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, T.; Chung, N. T.; Mukherjee, R. M.

    2012-12-01

    The Adaptive Vehicle Make (AVM) program is a portfolio of programs, managed by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). It was established to revolutionize how DoD designs, verifies, and manufactures complex defense systems and vehicles. The Component, Context, and Manufacturing Model Library (C2M2L; pronounced "camel") seeks to develop domain-specific models needed to enable design, verification, and fabrication of the Fast Adaptable Next-Generation (FANG) infantry fighting vehicle using in its overall infrastructure. Terrain models are being developed to represent the surface/fluid that an amphibious infantry fighting vehicle would traverse, ranging from paved road surfaces to rocky, mountainous terrain, slope, discrete obstacles, mud, sand snow, and water fording. Context models are being developed to provide additional data for environmental factors, such as: humidity, wind speed, particulate presence and character, solar radiation, cloud cover, precipitation, and more. The Ontological System for Context Artifacts and Resources (OSCAR) designed and developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory is semantic web data system that enables context artifacts to be registered and searched according to their meaning, rather than indexed according to their syntactic structure alone (as in the case for traditional search engines). The system leverages heavily on the Semantic Web for Earth and Environmental Terminology (SWEET) ontologies to model physical terrain environment and context model characteristics. In this talk, we focus on the application of the SWEET ontologies and the design of the OSCAR system architecture.

  7. Detection of artifacts from high energy bursts in neonatal EEG.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Sourya; Biswas, Arunava; Mukherjee, Jayanta; Majumdar, Arun Kumar; Majumdar, Bandana; Mukherjee, Suchandra; Singh, Arun Kumar

    2013-11-01

    Detection of non-cerebral activities or artifacts, intermixed within the background EEG, is essential to discard them from subsequent pattern analysis. The problem is much harder in neonatal EEG, where the background EEG contains spikes, waves, and rapid fluctuations in amplitude and frequency. Existing artifact detection methods are mostly limited to detect only a subset of artifacts such as ocular, muscle or power line artifacts. Few methods integrate different modules, each for detection of one specific category of artifact. Furthermore, most of the reference approaches are implemented and tested on adult EEG recordings. Direct application of those methods on neonatal EEG causes performance deterioration, due to greater pattern variation and inherent complexity. A method for detection of a wide range of artifact categories in neonatal EEG is thus required. At the same time, the method should be specific enough to preserve the background EEG information. The current study describes a feature based classification approach to detect both repetitive (generated from ECG, EMG, pulse, respiration, etc.) and transient (generated from eye blinking, eye movement, patient movement, etc.) artifacts. It focuses on artifact detection within high energy burst patterns, instead of detecting artifacts within the complete background EEG with wide pattern variation. The objective is to find true burst patterns, which can later be used to identify the Burst-Suppression (BS) pattern, which is commonly observed during newborn seizure. Such selective artifact detection is proven to be more sensitive to artifacts and specific to bursts, compared to the existing artifact detection approaches applied on the complete background EEG. Several time domain, frequency domain, statistical features, and features generated by wavelet decomposition are analyzed to model the proposed bi-classification between burst and artifact segments. A feature selection method is also applied to select the

  8. Dental Laboratory Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of the Air Force, Washington, DC.

    The Air Force dental laboratory technology manual is designed as a basic training text as well as a reference source for dental laboratory technicians, a specialty occupation concerned with the design, fabrication, and repair of dental prostheses. Numerous instructive diagrams and photographs are included throughout the manual. The comprehensive…

  9. Perspectives from Dental Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baum, Bruce J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper responds to the Institute of Medicine's 1995 report concerning the present status and future needs of dental education in the United States. It examines whether real reform is occurring at the National Institute of Dental Research, within the academic dental community, and within the practicing profession. It concludes that very little…

  10. Dental Manpower Fact Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ake, James N.; Johnson, Donald W.

    Statistical data on many aspects of dental and allied dental personnel supply, distribution, characteristics, and education and on certain other aspects of dental services are presented and discussed. The data on dentist supply show the national trend in the supply of active dentists since 1950 and the concurrent changes in dentist-to-population…

  11. DENTAL SCHOOL PLANNING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GALAGAN, DONALD J.

    THIS DISCUSSION PRESENTS A COMPLETE PICTURE OF THE CURRENT STATE OF DENTAL EDUCATION WITH SUGGESTIONS FOR MEETING THE DEMANDS FOR DENTAL STAFF AND FACILITIES. THE AREAS INVESTIGATED ARE (1) OBJECTIVES IN DENTAL EDUCATION--COURSES, TEACHING MODES, INNOVATIONS IN CURRICULUM, COORDINATION OF BASIC AND CLINICAL INSTRUCTION, (2) FACILITY…

  12. Computerized Tool to Manage Dental Anxiety: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Tellez, M; Potter, C M; Kinner, D G; Jensen, D; Waldron, E; Heimberg, R G; Myers Virtue, S; Zhao, H; Ismail, A I

    2015-09-01

    Anxiety regarding dental and physical health is a common and potentially distressing problem, for both patients and health care providers. Anxiety has been identified as a barrier to regular dental visits and as an important target for enhancement of oral health-related quality of life. The study aimed to develop and evaluate a computerized cognitive-behavioral therapy dental anxiety intervention that could be easily implemented in dental health care settings. A cognitive-behavioral protocol based on psychoeducation, exposure to feared dental procedures, and cognitive restructuring was developed. A randomized controlled trial was conducted (N = 151) to test its efficacy. Consenting adult dental patients who met inclusion criteria (e.g., high dental anxiety) were randomized to 1 of 2 groups: immediate treatment (n = 74) or a wait-list control (n = 77). Analyses of covariance based on intention-to-treat analyses were used to compare the 2 groups on dental anxiety, fear, avoidance, and overall severity of dental phobia. Baseline scores on these outcomes were entered into the analyses as covariates. Groups were equivalent at baseline but differed at 1-mo follow-up. Both groups showed improvement in outcomes, but analyses of covariance demonstrated significant differences in dental anxiety, fear, avoidance, and overall severity of dental phobia in favor of immediate treatment at the follow-up assessment. Of the patients who met diagnostic criteria for phobia at baseline, fewer patients in the immediate treatment group continued to meet criteria for dental phobia at follow-up as compared with the wait-list group. A new computer-based tool seems to be efficacious in reducing dental anxiety and fear/avoidance of dental procedures. Examination of its effectiveness when administered in dental offices under less controlled conditions is warranted (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02081365). PMID:26202996

  13. Reduction of ring artifacts in CBCT: Detection and correction of pixel gain variations in flat panel detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Altunbas, Cem; Lai, Chao-Jen; Zhong, Yuncheng; Shaw, Chris C.

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: In using flat panel detectors (FPD) for cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), pixel gain variations may lead to structured nonuniformities in projections and ring artifacts in CBCT images. Such gain variations can be caused by change in detector entrance exposure levels or beam hardening, and they are not accounted by conventional flat field correction methods. In this work, the authors presented a method to identify isolated pixel clusters that exhibit gain variations and proposed a pixel gain correction (PGC) method to suppress both beam hardening and exposure level dependent gain variations. Methods: To modulate both beam spectrum and entrance exposure, flood field FPD projections were acquired using beam filters with varying thicknesses. “Ideal” pixel values were estimated by performing polynomial fits in both raw and flat field corrected projections. Residuals were calculated by taking the difference between measured and ideal pixel values to identify clustered image and FPD artifacts in flat field corrected and raw images, respectively. To correct clustered image artifacts, the ratio of ideal to measured pixel values in filtered images were utilized as pixel-specific gain correction factors, referred as PGC method, and they were tabulated as a function of pixel value in a look-up table. Results: 0.035% of detector pixels lead to clustered image artifacts in flat field corrected projections, where 80% of these pixels were traced back and linked to artifacts in the FPD. The performance of PGC method was tested in variety of imaging conditions and phantoms. The PGC method reduced clustered image artifacts and fixed pattern noise in projections, and ring artifacts in CBCT images. Conclusions: Clustered projection image artifacts that lead to ring artifacts in CBCT can be better identified with our artifact detection approach. When compared to the conventional flat field correction method, the proposed PGC method enables characterization of nonlinear

  14. Subchondral bone and cartilage thickness from MRI: effects of chemical-shift artifact.

    PubMed

    McGibbon, Chris A; Bencardino, Jenny; Palmer, William E

    2003-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the modality of choice for visualizing and quantifying articular cartilage thickness. However, difficulties persist in MRI of subchondral bone using spoiled gradient-echo (SPGR) and other gradient-echo sequences, primarily due to the effects of chemical-shift artifact. Fat suppression techniques are often used to reduce these artifacts, but they prevent measurement of bone thickness. In this report, we assess the magnitude of chemical-shift effects (phase-cancellation and misregistration artifacts) on subchondral bone and cartilage thickness measurements in human femoral heads using a variety of pulse sequence parameters. Phase-cancellation effects were quantified by comparing measurements from in-phase images (TE=13.5 ms) to out-of-phase images (TE=15.8 ms). We also tested the assumption of the optimal in-phase TE by comparing thickness measures at small variations on TE (13.0, 13.5 and 14.0 ms). Misregistration effects were quantified by comparing measurements from water+fat images (water-only+fat-only images) to the measurements from in-phase (TE=13.5) images. A correction algorithm was developed and applied to the in-phase measurements and then compared to measurements from water+fat images. We also compared thickness measurements at different image resolutions. Results showed that both phase-cancellation artifact and misregistration artifact were significant for bone thickness measurement, but not for cartilage thickness measurement. Using an in-phase TE and correction algorithm for misregistration artifact, the errors in bone thickness relative to water+fat images were non-significant. This information may be useful for developing pulse sequences for optimal imaging of both cartilage and subchondral bone. PMID:12695880

  15. Reference geometry-based detection of (4D-)CT motion artifacts: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, René; Gauer, Tobias

    2015-03-01

    Respiration-correlated computed tomography (4D or 3D+t CT) can be considered as standard of care in radiation therapy treatment planning for lung and liver lesions. The decision about an application of motion management devices and the estimation of patient-specific motion effects on the dose distribution relies on precise motion assessment in the planning 4D CT data { which is impeded in case of CT motion artifacts. The development of image-based/post-processing approaches to reduce motion artifacts would benefit from precise detection and localization of the artifacts. Simple slice-by-slice comparison of intensity values and threshold-based analysis of related metrics suffer from- depending on the threshold- high false-positive or -negative rates. In this work, we propose exploiting prior knowledge about `ideal' (= artifact free) reference geometries to stabilize metric-based artifact detection by transferring (multi-)atlas-based concepts to this specific task. Two variants are introduced and evaluated: (S1) analysis and comparison of warped atlas data obtained by repeated non-linear atlas-to-patient registration with different levels of regularization; (S2) direct analysis of vector field properties (divergence, curl magnitude) of the atlas-to-patient transformation. Feasibility of approaches (S1) and (S2) is evaluated by motion-phantom data and intra-subject experiments (four patients) as well as - adopting a multi-atlas strategy- inter-subject investigations (twelve patients involved). It is demonstrated that especially sorting/double structure artifacts can be precisely detected and localized by (S1). In contrast, (S2) suffers from high false positive rates.

  16. WE-G-18A-03: Cone Artifacts Correction in Iterative Cone Beam CT Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, H; Folkerts, M; Jiang, S; Jia, X; Wang, X; Bai, T; Lu, W

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: For iterative reconstruction (IR) in cone-beam CT (CBCT) imaging, data truncation along the superior-inferior (SI) direction causes severe cone artifacts in the reconstructed CBCT volume images. Not only does it reduce the effective SI coverage of the reconstructed volume, it also hinders the IR algorithm convergence. This is particular a problem for regularization based IR, where smoothing type regularization operations tend to propagate the artifacts to a large area. It is our purpose to develop a practical cone artifacts correction solution. Methods: We found it is the missing data residing in the truncated cone area that leads to inconsistency between the calculated forward projections and measured projections. We overcome this problem by using FDK type reconstruction to estimate the missing data and design weighting factors to compensate the inconsistency caused by the missing data. We validate the proposed methods in our multi-GPU low-dose CBCT reconstruction system on multiple patients' datasets. Results: Compared to the FDK reconstruction with full datasets, while IR is able to reconstruct CBCT images using a subset of projection data, the severe cone artifacts degrade overall image quality. For head-neck case under a full-fan mode, 13 out of 80 slices are contaminated. It is even more severe in pelvis case under half-fan mode, where 36 out of 80 slices are affected, leading to inferior soft-tissue delineation. By applying the proposed method, the cone artifacts are effectively corrected, with a mean intensity difference decreased from ∼497 HU to ∼39HU for those contaminated slices. Conclusion: A practical and effective solution for cone artifacts correction is proposed and validated in CBCT IR algorithm. This study is supported in part by NIH (1R01CA154747-01)

  17. Weaker dental enamel explains dental decay.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Alexandre R; Gibson, Carolyn W; Deeley, Kathleen; Xue, Hui; Li, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries continues to be the most prevalent bacteria-mediated non-contagious disease of humankind. Dental professionals assert the disease can be explained by poor oral hygiene and a diet rich in sugars but this does not account for caries free individuals exposed to the same risk factors. In order to test the hypothesis that amount of amelogenin during enamel development can influence caries susceptibility, we generated multiple strains of mice with varying levels of available amelogenin during dental development. Mechanical tests showed that dental enamel developed with less amelogenin is "weaker" while the dental enamel of animals over-expressing amelogenin appears to be more resistant to acid dissolution. PMID:25885796

  18. Hybrid ICA—Regression: Automatic Identification and Removal of Ocular Artifacts from Electroencephalographic Signals

    PubMed Central

    Mannan, Malik M. Naeem; Jeong, Myung Y.; Kamran, Muhammad A.

    2016-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is a portable brain-imaging technique with the advantage of high-temporal resolution that can be used to record electrical activity of the brain. However, it is difficult to analyze EEG signals due to the contamination of ocular artifacts, and which potentially results in misleading conclusions. Also, it is a proven fact that the contamination of ocular artifacts cause to reduce the classification accuracy of a brain-computer interface (BCI). It is therefore very important to remove/reduce these artifacts before the analysis of EEG signals for applications like BCI. In this paper, a hybrid framework that combines independent component analysis (ICA), regression and high-order statistics has been proposed to identify and eliminate artifactual activities from EEG data. We used simulated, experimental and standard EEG signals to evaluate and analyze the effectiveness of the proposed method. Results demonstrate that the proposed method can effectively remove ocular artifacts as well as it can preserve the neuronal signals present in EEG data. A comparison with four methods from literature namely ICA, regression analysis, wavelet-ICA (wICA), and regression-ICA (REGICA) confirms the significantly enhanced performance and effectiveness of the proposed method for removal of ocular activities from EEG, in terms of lower mean square error and mean absolute error values and higher mutual information between reconstructed and original EEG. PMID:27199714

  19. Artifact reduction in short-scan CBCT by use of optimization-based reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zheng; Han, Xiao; Pearson, Erik; Pelizzari, Charles; Sidky, Emil Y.; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2016-05-01

    Increasing interest in optimization-based reconstruction in research on, and applications of, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) exists because it has been shown to have to potential to reduce artifacts observed in reconstructions obtained with the Feldkamp–Davis–Kress (FDK) algorithm (or its variants), which is used extensively for image reconstruction in current CBCT applications. In this work, we carried out a study on optimization-based reconstruction for possible reduction of artifacts in FDK reconstruction specifically from short-scan CBCT data. The investigation includes a set of optimization programs such as the image-total-variation (TV)-constrained data-divergency minimization, data-weighting matrices such as the Parker weighting matrix, and objects of practical interest for demonstrating and assessing the degree of artifact reduction. Results of investigative work reveal that appropriately designed optimization-based reconstruction, including the image-TV-constrained reconstruction, can reduce significant artifacts observed in FDK reconstruction in CBCT with a short-scan configuration.

  20. Hybrid ICA-Regression: Automatic Identification and Removal of Ocular Artifacts from Electroencephalographic Signals.

    PubMed

    Mannan, Malik M Naeem; Jeong, Myung Y; Kamran, Muhammad A

    2016-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is a portable brain-imaging technique with the advantage of high-temporal resolution that can be used to record electrical activity of the brain. However, it is difficult to analyze EEG signals due to the contamination of ocular artifacts, and which potentially results in misleading conclusions. Also, it is a proven fact that the contamination of ocular artifacts cause to reduce the classification accuracy of a brain-computer interface (BCI). It is therefore very important to remove/reduce these artifacts before the analysis of EEG signals for applications like BCI. In this paper, a hybrid framework that combines independent component analysis (ICA), regression and high-order statistics has been proposed to identify and eliminate artifactual activities from EEG data. We used simulated, experimental and standard EEG signals to evaluate and analyze the effectiveness of the proposed method. Results demonstrate that the proposed method can effectively remove ocular artifacts as well as it can preserve the neuronal signals present in EEG data. A comparison with four methods from literature namely ICA, regression analysis, wavelet-ICA (wICA), and regression-ICA (REGICA) confirms the significantly enhanced performance and effectiveness of the proposed method for removal of ocular activities from EEG, in terms of lower mean square error and mean absolute error values and higher mutual information between reconstructed and original EEG. PMID:27199714

  1. Segmentation-aided adaptive filtering for metal artifact reduction in radio-therapeutic CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saint Olive, Celine; Kaus, Michael R.; Pekar, Vladimir; Eck, Kai; Spies, Lothar

    2004-05-01

    In CT imaging, high absorbing objects such as metal bodies may cause significant artifacts, which may, for example, result in dose inaccuracies in the radiation therapy planning process. In this work, we aim at reducing the local and global image artifact, in order to improve the overall dose accuracy. The key part f this approach is the correction of the original projection data in those regions, which feature defects caused by rays traversing the high attenuating objects in the patient. The affected regions are substituted by model data derived from the original tomogram deploying a segmentation method. Phantom and climnical studies demonstrate that the proposed method significantly reduces the overall artifacts while preserving the information content of the image as much as possible. The image quality improvements were quantified by determining the signal-to-noise ratio, the artifact level and the modulation transfer function. The proposed method is computationally efficient and can easily be integrated into commercial CT scanners and radiation therapy planning software.

  2. The dosimetric impact of dental implants on head-and-neck volumetric modulated arc therapy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mu-Han; Li, Jinsheng; Price, Robert A; Wang, Lu; Lee, Chung-Chi; Ma, C-M

    2013-02-21

    This work aims to investigate the dosimetric impact of dental implants on volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for head-and-neck patients and to evaluate the effectiveness of using the material's electron-density ratio for the correction. An in-house Monte Carlo (MC) code was utilized for the dose calculation to account for the scattering and attenuation caused by the high-Z implant material. Three different dental implant materials were studied in this work: titanium, Degubond®4 and gold. The dose perturbations caused by the dental implant materials were first investigated in a water phantom with a 1 cm(3) insert. The per cent depth dose distributions of a 3 × 3 cm(2) photon field were compared with the insert material as water and the three selected dental implant materials. To evaluate the impact of the dental implant on VMAT patient dose calculation, four head-and-neck cases were selected. For each case, the VMAT plan was designed based on the artifact-corrected patient geometry using a treatment planning system (TPS) that was typically utilized for routine patient treatment. The plans were re-calculated using the MC code for five situations: uncorrected geometry, artifact-corrected geometry and artifact-corrected geometry with one of the three different implant materials. The isodose distributions and the dose-volume histograms were cross-compared with each other. To evaluate the effectiveness of using the material's electron-density ratio for dental implant correction, the implant region was set as water with the material's electron-density ratio and the calculated dose was compared with the MC simulation with the real material. The main effect of the dental implant was the severe attenuation in the downstream. The 1 cm(3) dental implant can lower the downstream dose by 10% (Ti) to 51% (Au) for a 3 × 3 cm(2) field. The TPS failed to account for the dose perturbation if the dental implant material was not precisely defined. For the VMAT

  3. The dosimetric impact of dental implants on head-and-neck volumetric modulated arc therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Mu-Han; Li, Jinsheng; Price, Robert A., Jr.; Wang, Lu; Lee, Chung-Chi; Ma, C.-M.

    2013-02-01

    This work aims to investigate the dosimetric impact of dental implants on volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for head-and-neck patients and to evaluate the effectiveness of using the material's electron-density ratio for the correction. An in-house Monte Carlo (MC) code was utilized for the dose calculation to account for the scattering and attenuation caused by the high-Z implant material. Three different dental implant materials were studied in this work: titanium, Degubond®4 and gold. The dose perturbations caused by the dental implant materials were first investigated in a water phantom with a 1 cm3 insert. The per cent depth dose distributions of a 3 × 3 cm2 photon field were compared with the insert material as water and the three selected dental implant materials. To evaluate the impact of the dental implant on VMAT patient dose calculation, four head-and-neck cases were selected. For each case, the VMAT plan was designed based on the artifact-corrected patient geometry using a treatment planning system (TPS) that was typically utilized for routine patient treatment. The plans were re-calculated using the MC code for five situations: uncorrected geometry, artifact-corrected geometry and artifact-corrected geometry with one of the three different implant materials. The isodose distributions and the dose-volume histograms were cross-compared with each other. To evaluate the effectiveness of using the material's electron-density ratio for dental implant correction, the implant region was set as water with the material's electron-density ratio and the calculated dose was compared with the MC simulation with the real material. The main effect of the dental implant was the severe attenuation in the downstream. The 1 cm3 dental implant can lower the downstream dose by 10% (Ti) to 51% (Au) for a 3 × 3 cm2 field. The TPS failed to account for the dose perturbation if the dental implant material was not precisely defined. For the VMAT patient dose calculation

  4. Facial and Dental Injuries Facial and Dental Injuries in Karate.

    PubMed

    Vidovic-Stesevic, Vesna; Verna, Carlalberta; Krastl, Gabriel; Kuhl, Sebastian; Filippi, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Karate is a martial art that carries a high trauma risk. Trauma-related Swiss and European karate data are currently unavailable. This survey seeks to increase knowledge of the incidence of traumatic facial and dental injuries, their emergency management, awareness of tooth rescue boxes, the use of mouthguards and their modifications. Interviews were conducted with 420 karate fighters from 43 European countries using a standardized questionnaire. All the participants were semi-professionals. The data were evaluated with respect to gender, kumite level (where a karate practitioner trains against an adversary), and country. Of the 420 fighters interviewed, 213 had experienced facial trauma and 44 had already had dental trauma. A total of 192 athletes had hurt their opponent by inflicting a facial or dental injury, and 290 knew about the possibility of tooth replantation following an avulsion. Only 50 interviewees knew about tooth rescue boxes. Nearly all the individuals interviewed wore a mouthguard (n = 412), and 178 of them had made their own modifications to the guard. The results of the present survey suggest that more information and education in wearing protective gear are required to reduce the incidence of dental injuries in karate. PMID:26345152

  5. CT metal artifact reduction by soft inequality constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chukalina, Marina; Nikolaev, Dmitry; Sokolov, Valerii; Ingacheva, Anastasiya; Buzmakov, Alexey; Prun, Victor

    2015-12-01

    The artifacts (known as metal-like artifacts) arising from incorrect reconstruction may obscure or simulate pathology in medical applications, hide or mimic cracks and cavities in the scanned objects in industrial tomographic scans. One of the main reasons caused such artifacts is photon starvation on the rays which go through highly absorbing regions. We indroduce a way to suppress such artifacts in the reconstructions using soft penalty mimicing linear inequalities on the photon starved rays. An efficient algorithm to use such information is provided and the effect of those inequalities on the reconstruction quality is studied.

  6. SU-E-J-58: Dosimetric Verification of Metal Artifact Effects: Comparison of Dose Distributions Affected by Patient Teeth and Implants

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M; Kang, S; Lee, S; Suh, T; Lee, J; Park, J; Park, H; Lee, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Implant-supported dentures seem particularly appropriate for the predicament of becoming edentulous and cancer patients are no exceptions. As the number of people having dental implants increased in different ages, critical dosimetric verification of metal artifact effects are required for the more accurate head and neck radiation therapy. The purpose of this study is to verify the theoretical analysis of the metal(streak and dark) artifact, and to evaluate dosimetric effect which cause by dental implants in CT images of patients with the patient teeth and implants inserted humanoid phantom. Methods: The phantom comprises cylinder which is shaped to simulate the anatomical structures of a human head and neck. Through applying various clinical cases, made phantom which is closely allied to human. Developed phantom can verify two classes: (i)closed mouth (ii)opened mouth. RapidArc plans of 4 cases were created in the Eclipse planning system. Total dose of 2000 cGy in 10 fractions is prescribed to the whole planning target volume (PTV) using 6MV photon beams. Acuros XB (AXB) advanced dose calculation algorithm, Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm (AAA) and progressive resolution optimizer were used in dose optimization and calculation. Results: In closed and opened mouth phantom, because dark artifacts formed extensively around the metal implants, dose variation was relatively higher than that of streak artifacts. As the PTV was delineated on the dark regions or large streak artifact regions, maximum 7.8% dose error and average 3.2% difference was observed. The averaged minimum dose to the PTV predicted by AAA was about 5.6% higher and OARs doses are also 5.2% higher compared to AXB. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that AXB dose calculation involving high-density materials is more accurate than AAA calculation, and AXB was superior to AAA in dose predictions beyond dark artifact/air cavity portion when compared against the measurements.

  7. [Ultrasound artifacts and their diagnostic significance in internal medicine and gastroenterology - part 2: color and spectral Doppler artifacts].

    PubMed

    Jenssen, C; Tuma, J; Möller, K; Cui, X W; Kinkel, H; Uebel, S; Dietrich, C F

    2016-06-01

    Artifacts in ultrasonographic diagnostics are a result of the physical properties of the ultrasound waves and are caused by interaction of the ultrasound waves with biological structures and tissues of the body and with foreign materials. On the one hand, they may be diagnostically helpful. On the other hand, they may be distracting and may lead to misdiagnosis. Profound knowledge of the causes, avoidance, and interpretation of artifacts is a necessary precondition for correct clinical appraisal of ultrasound images. Part 1 of this review commented on the physics of artifacts and described the most important B-mode artifacts. Part 2 focuses on the clinically relevant artifacts in Doppler and color-coded duplex sonography. Problems and pitfalls of interpretation arising from artifacts, as well as the diagnostic use of Doppler and colour-coded duplex sonography, are discussed. PMID:27284933

  8. Artifacts in single-molecule localization microscopy.

    PubMed

    Burgert, Anne; Letschert, Sebastian; Doose, Sören; Sauer, Markus

    2015-08-01

    Single-molecule localization microscopy provides subdiffraction resolution images with virtually molecular resolution. Through the availability of commercial instruments and open-source reconstruction software, achieving super resolution is now public domain. However, despite its conceptual simplicity, localization microscopy remains prone to user errors. Using direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, we investigate the impact of irradiation intensity, label density and photoswitching behavior on the distribution of membrane proteins in reconstructed super-resolution images. We demonstrate that high emitter densities in combination with inappropriate photoswitching rates give rise to the appearance of artificial membrane clusters. Especially, two-dimensional imaging of intrinsically three-dimensional membrane structures like microvilli, filopodia, overlapping membranes and vesicles with high local emitter densities is prone to generate artifacts. To judge the quality and reliability of super-resolution images, the single-molecule movies recorded to reconstruct the images have to be carefully investigated especially when investigating membrane organization and cluster analysis. PMID:26138928

  9. Differential flow: Locally Generated or Coronal Artifact?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alterman, B. L.; Kasper, J. C.; Stevens, M. L.; Szabo, A.; Koval, A.

    2015-12-01

    Alpha particles and proton beams differentially flow in the solar wind with respect to the proton core by about an Alfvén speed. Whether differential flow is an artifact of coronal physics or a signature of local acceleration as the solar wind propagates earthward is undetermined. A new analysis of Wind spacecraft observations in the solar wind combines Faraday Cup ion distribution functions with vector magnetic field measurements to characterize the bulk properties of the proton core, proton beam, and alpha particles with 92s time resolution. We utilize this data set to examine the occurrence of differential flow at 1 AU as a function of solar wind conditions and other parameters. We discuss the implications of observed trends on our understanding of differential flow's origin.

  10. Denitrification in human dental plaque

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Microbial denitrification is not considered important in human-associated microbial communities. Accordingly, metabolic investigations of the microbial biofilm communities of human dental plaque have focused on aerobic respiration and acid fermentation of carbohydrates, even though it is known that the oral habitat is constantly exposed to nitrate (NO3-) concentrations in the millimolar range and that dental plaque houses bacteria that can reduce this NO3- to nitrite (NO2-). Results We show that dental plaque mediates denitrification of NO3- to nitric oxide (NO), nitrous oxide (N2O), and dinitrogen (N2) using microsensor measurements, 15N isotopic labelling and molecular detection of denitrification genes. In vivo N2O accumulation rates in the mouth depended on the presence of dental plaque and on salivary NO3- concentrations. NO and N2O production by denitrification occurred under aerobic conditions and was regulated by plaque pH. Conclusions Increases of NO concentrations were in the range of effective concentrations for NO signalling to human host cells and, thus, may locally affect blood flow, signalling between nerves and inflammatory processes in the gum. This is specifically significant for the understanding of periodontal diseases, where NO has been shown to play a key role, but where gingival cells are believed to be the only source of NO. More generally, this study establishes denitrification by human-associated microbial communities as a significant metabolic pathway which, due to concurrent NO formation, provides a basis for symbiotic interactions. PMID:20307293

  11. Description and Documentation of the Dental School Dental Delivery System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Rosen and Wallace, Inc., Alexandria, VA.

    A study was undertaken to describe and document the dental school dental delivery system using an integrated systems approach. In late 1976 and early 1977, a team of systems analysts and dental consultants visited three dental schools to observe the delivery of dental services and patient flow and to interview administrative staff and faculty.…

  12. An extension to artifact-free projection overlaps

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jianyu

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: In multipinhole single photon emission computed tomography, the overlapping of projections has been used to increase sensitivity. Avoiding artifacts in the reconstructed image associated with projection overlaps (multiplexing) is a critical issue. In our previous report, two types of artifact-free projection overlaps, i.e., projection overlaps that do not lead to artifacts in the reconstructed image, were formally defined and proved, and were validated via simulations. In this work, a new proposition is introduced to extend the previously defined type-II artifact-free projection overlaps so that a broader range of artifact-free overlaps is accommodated. One practical purpose of the new extension is to design a baffle window multipinhole system with artifact-free projection overlaps. Methods: First, the extended type-II artifact-free overlap was theoretically defined and proved. The new proposition accommodates the situation where the extended type-II artifact-free projection overlaps can be produced with incorrectly reconstructed portions in the reconstructed image. Next, to validate the theory, the extended-type-II artifact-free overlaps were employed in designing the multiplexing multipinhole spiral orbit imaging systems with a baffle window. Numerical validations were performed via simulations, where the corresponding 1-pinhole nonmultiplexing reconstruction results were used as the benchmark for artifact-free reconstructions. The mean square error (MSE) was the metric used for comparisons of noise-free reconstructed images. Noisy reconstructions were also performed as part of the validations. Results: Simulation results show that for noise-free reconstructions, the MSEs of the reconstructed images of the artifact-free multiplexing systems are very similar to those of the corresponding 1-pinhole systems. No artifacts were observed in the reconstructed images. Therefore, the testing results for artifact-free multiplexing systems designed using the

  13. Dental Arch Wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Straightening teeth is an arduous process requiring months, often years, of applying corrective pressure by means of arch wires-better known as brace-which may have to be changed several times in the course of treatment. A new method has been developed by Dr. George Andreasen, orthodontist and dental scientist at the University of Iowa. The key is a new type of arch wire material, called Nitinol, with exceptional elasticity which helps reduce the required number of brace changes. An alloy of nickel and titanium, Nitinol was originally developed for aerospace applications by the Naval Ordnance Laboratory, now the Naval Surface Weapons Laboratory, White Oaks, Maryland. NASA subsequently conducted additional research on the properties of Nitinol and on procedures for processing the metal.

  14. Factors influencing the use of public dental services: An application of the Theory of Planned Behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Luzzi, Liana; Spencer, A John

    2008-01-01

    Background There is limited evidence of the influence of psychosocial factors and health beliefs on public dental patient's patterns of service use in Australia. The research aims were to examine associations between dental attitudes and beliefs of public dental service users and dental visiting intention and behaviour using the Theory of Planned Behaviour. Methods 517 randomly selected adult public dental patients completed a questionnaire assessing dental attitudes and beliefs which was matched with electronic records for past and future dental service use. A questionnaire measured intentions, attitudes, subjective norms and perceptions of behavioural control and self-efficacy in relation to visiting public dentists. A measure of dental attendance at public dental clinics was obtained retrospectively (over 3 1/2 years) and prospectively (over a one year period following the return of the questionnaire) by accessing electronic patient clinical records. Results Participants had positive attitudes, subjective norms and self-efficacy beliefs towards dental visiting but perceived a lack of control over visiting the dentist. Attitudes, subjective norms, self-efficacy and perceived control were significant predictors of intention (P < 0.05). Intentions, self-efficacy and past dental attendance were significant predictors of actual dental attendance (P < 0.05). Conclusion Public dental patients held favourable attitudes and beliefs but perceived a lack of control towards dental visiting. Reducing structural barriers may therefore improve access to public dental services. PMID:18445298

  15. Correction of Non-Linear Propagation Artifact in Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Imaging of Carotid Arteries: Methods and in Vitro Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Yesna O; Eckersley, Robert J; Senior, Roxy; Lim, Adrian K P; Cosgrove, David; Tang, Meng-Xing

    2015-07-01

    Non-linear propagation of ultrasound creates artifacts in contrast-enhanced ultrasound images that significantly affect both qualitative and quantitative assessments of tissue perfusion. This article describes the development and evaluation of a new algorithm to correct for this artifact. The correction is a post-processing method that estimates and removes non-linear artifact in the contrast-specific image using the simultaneously acquired B-mode image data. The method is evaluated on carotid artery flow phantoms with large and small vessels containing microbubbles of various concentrations at different acoustic pressures. The algorithm significantly reduces non-linear artifacts while maintaining the contrast signal from bubbles to increase the contrast-to-tissue ratio by up to 11 dB. Contrast signal from a small vessel 600 μm in diameter buried in tissue artifacts before correction was recovered after the correction. PMID:25935597

  16. Accelerating ring artifact correction for flat-detector CT using the CUDA framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W.; Prell, D.; Kyriakou, Y.,; Kalender, W. A.

    2010-04-01

    Ring artifacts often appear in flat-detector CT because of imperfect or defect detector elements or calibration. In high-spatial resolution CT images reducing such artifacts becomes a necessity. In this paper, we used the post-processing ring correction in polar coordinates (RCP)1 to eliminate the ring artifacts. The median filter is applied to the uncorrected images in polar coordinates and ring artifacts are extracted from the original images. The algorithm has a very high computational cost due to the time-expensive median filtering and coordinate transformation on CPUs. Graphics processing units (GPUs)ca n be seen as parallel co-processors with high computational power. All steps of the RCP algorithm were implemented with CUDA2(Compute Unified Device Architecture, NVIDIA). We introduced a new GPU-based branchless vectorized median (BVM)filter. 3, 4 This algorithm is based on minmax sorting and keeps track of a sorted array from which values are deleted and to which new values are inserted. For comparison purpose a modified pivot median filter5 on GPUs was presented, which compares a pivot element to all other values and recursively finds the median element. We evaluated the performance of the RCP method using 512 slices, each slice consisted of 512×512 pixels. This post-processing method efficiently reduces ring artifacts in the reconstructed images and improves image quality. Our CUDAbased RCP is up to 13.6 times faster than the optimized CPU-based (single core)r outine. Comparing our two GPU-based median filters showed a performance benefit by roughly 60% when switching from Pivot to BVM code. The main reason is that the BVM algorithm is branchless and makes use of data-level parallelism. The BVM method is better suited to the model of modern graphics processing. A multi-GPU solution showed that the performance scaled nearly linearly.

  17. Compensation of Motion Artifacts for Time-of-Flight Cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Marvin; Kolb, Andreas

    During the last years, Time-of-Flight sensors achieved a significant impact onto research fields in computer vision. For dynamic scenes however, most sensor’s working principles lead to significant artifacts in respect to sensor or object motion - artifacts that commonly affect distance reliability and thus affect downstream processing tasks in a negative way.

  18. Naturalistic Experience and the Early Use of Symbolic Artifacts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troseth, Georgene L.; Casey, Amy M.; Lawver, Kelly A.; Walker, Joan M. T.; Cole, David A.

    2007-01-01

    Experience with a variety of symbolic artifacts has been proposed as a mechanism underlying symbolic development. In this study, the parents of 120 2-year-old children who participated in symbolic object retrieval tasks completed a questionnaire regarding their children's naturalistic experience with symbolic artifacts and activities. In separate…

  19. Detection and removal of artifacts in astronomical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, S.; Mohr, J. J.; Bertin, E.; Kümmel, M.; Wetzstein, M.

    2016-07-01

    Astronomical images from optical photometric surveys are typically contaminated with transient artifacts such as cosmic rays, satellite trails and scattered light. We have developed and tested an algorithm that removes these artifacts using a deep, artifact free, static sky coadd image built up through the median combination of point spread function (PSF) homogenized, overlapping single epoch images. Transient artifacts are detected and masked in each single epoch image through comparison with an artifact free, PSF-matched simulated image that is constructed using the PSF-corrected, model fitting catalog from the artifact free coadd image together with the position variable PSF model of the single epoch image. This approach works well not only for cleaning single epoch images with worse seeing than the PSF homogenized coadd, but also the traditionally much more challenging problem of cleaning single epoch images with better seeing. In addition to masking transient artifacts, we have developed an interpolation approach that uses the local PSF and performs well in removing artifacts whose widths are smaller than the PSF full width at half maximum, including cosmic rays, the peaks of saturated stars and bleed trails. We have tested this algorithm on Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data and present performance metrics. More generally, our algorithm can be applied to any survey which images the same part of the sky multiple times.

  20. Electrocardiographic artifact due to a mobile phone mimicking ventricular tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xu

    2014-01-01

    A case of electrocardiographic artifact due to mobile a phone mimicking ventricular tachycardia was presented. The artifact was discriminated by close scrutiny of ECG and was attributed to a mobile phone because it was simultaneous with mobile phone game. PMID:24581928

  1. Kindergarten Children's Perceptions of "Anthropomorphic Artifacts" with Adaptive Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuperman, Asi; Mioduser, David

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, children from a kindergarten in central Israel have been exposed to learning experiences in technology as part of the implementation of a curriculum based on technological thinking, including topics related to behaving-adaptive-artifacts (e.g., robots). This study aims to unveil children's stance towards behaving artifacts:…

  2. Implementing a Smart Method to Eliminate Artifacts of Vital Signals

    PubMed Central

    Javadpour, A.; Mohammadi, A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Electroencephalography (EEG) has vital and significant applications in different medical fields and is used for the primary evaluation of neurological disorders. Hence, having easy access to suitable and useful signal is very important. Artifacts are undesirable confusions which are generally originated from inevitable human activities such as heartbeat, blinking of eyes and facial muscle activities while receiving EEG signal. It can bring about deformation in these waves though. Objective The objective of this study was to find a suitable solution to eliminate the artifacts of Vital Signals. Methods In this study, wavelet transform technique was used. This method is compared with threshold level. The threshold intensity is efficiently crucial because it should not remove the original signal instead of artifacts, and does not hold artifact signal instead of original ones. In this project, we seek to find and implement the algorithm with the ability to automatically remove the artifacts in EEG signals. For this purpose, the use of adaptive filtering methods such as wavelet analysis is appropriate. Finally, we observed that Functional Link Neural Network (FLN) performance is better than ANFIS and RBFN to remove such artifacts. Results We offer an intelligent method for removing artifacts from vital signals in neurological disorders. Conclusion The proposed method can obtain more accurate results by removing artifacts of vital signals and can be useful in the early diagnosis of neurological and cardiovascular disorders. PMID:26688799

  3. Survey of radiologic practices among dental practitioners

    SciTech Connect

    Goren, A.D.; Sciubba, J.J.; Friedman, R.; Malamud, H. )

    1989-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the factors that influence and contribute to patient exposure in radiologic procedures performed in the offices of 132 staff members within the dental department of a teaching hospital. A questionnaire was prepared in which data were requested on brands of film used, type of x-ray unit used, processing, and use of leaded apron, cervical shield, and film holder. Offices were also visited to evaluate performance of existing dental x-ray equipment. Both the Dental Radiographic Normalizing and Monitoring Device and the Dental Quality Control Test Tool were evaluated. The average exposure was equivalent to the class D film (220 mR), but only 13% of those surveyed used the faster class E film, which would reduce patient exposure in half. The survey indicates that dentists are not using the newer low-exposure class E film in their practices.

  4. Motion and ballistocardiogram artifact removal for interleaved recording of EEG and EPs during MRI.

    PubMed

    Bonmassar, Giorgio; Purdon, Patrick L; Jääskeläinen, Iiro P; Chiappa, Keith; Solo, Victor; Brown, Emery N; Belliveau, John W

    2002-08-01

    Artifacts generated by motion (e.g., ballistocardiac) of the head inside a high magnetic field corrupt recordings of EEG and EPs. This paper introduces a method for motion artifact cancellation. This method is based on adaptive filtering and takes advantage of piezoelectric motion sensor information to estimate the motion artifact noise. This filter estimates the mapping between motion sensor and EEG space, subtracting the motion-related noise from the raw EEG signal. Due to possible subject motion and changes in electrode impedance, a time-varying mapping of the motion versus EEG is required. We show that this filter is capable of removing both ballistocardiogram and gross motion artifacts, restoring EEG alpha waves (8-13 Hz), and visual evoked potentials (VEPs). This adaptive filter outperforms the simple band-pass filter for alpha detection because it is also capable of reducing noise within the frequency band of interest. In addition, this filter also removes the transient responses normally visible in the EEG window after echo planar image acquisition, observed during interleaved EEG/fMRI recordings. Our adaptive filter approach can be implemented in real-time to allow for continuous monitoring of EEG and fMRI during clinical and cognitive studies. PMID:12202099

  5. Kinect-Based Correction of Overexposure Artifacts in Knee Imaging with C-Arm CT Systems

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jang-Hwan; Hinshaw, Waldo; Haase, Sven; Wasza, Jakob; Hornegger, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To demonstrate a novel approach of compensating overexposure artifacts in CT scans of the knees without attaching any supporting appliances to the patient. C-Arm CT systems offer the opportunity to perform weight-bearing knee scans on standing patients to diagnose diseases like osteoarthritis. However, one serious issue is overexposure of the detector in regions close to the patella, which can not be tackled with common techniques. Methods. A Kinect camera is used to algorithmically remove overexposure artifacts close to the knee surface. Overexposed near-surface knee regions are corrected by extrapolating the absorption values from more reliable projection data. To achieve this, we develop a cross-calibration procedure to transform surface points from the Kinect to CT voxel coordinates. Results. Artifacts at both knee phantoms are reduced significantly in the reconstructed data and a major part of the truncated regions is restored. Conclusion. The results emphasize the feasibility of the proposed approach. The accuracy of the cross-calibration procedure can be increased to further improve correction results. Significance. The correction method can be extended to a multi-Kinect setup for use in real-world scenarios. Using depth cameras does not require prior scans and offers the possibility of a temporally synchronized correction of overexposure artifacts. To achieve this, we develop a cross-calibration procedure to transform surface points from the Kinect to CT voxel coordinates. PMID:27516772

  6. Motion artifacts in dual-energy contrast-enhanced mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allec, Nicholas; Abbaszadeh, Shiva; Lewin, John M.; Karim, Karim S.

    2012-03-01

    Several strategies have been investigated to acquire both low- and high-energy images simultaneously for contrastenhanced mammography (CEM). However, for the dual-energy technique where the existing conventional mammography infrastructure can be leveraged, low- and high-energy images are acquired using two separate exposures and the finite time between image acquisition leads to motion artifacts in the combined image. Motion artifacts lead to greater noise in the combined image and affect image quality, however the relationship between them is not clear. In this study we examine motion artifacts in dual-energy CEM and their impact on anatomical noise in the combined image and tumor detectability. To study the impact of motion artifacts, a cascaded systems model is extended to include such motion artifacts. An ideal observer model is used to quantify the performance and CEM images from a previous clinical study are used for comparison of the extended model.

  7. Eliminating pulse-induced artifacts in Urethral Pressure data.

    PubMed

    Klunder, Mario; Feuer, Ronny; Amend, Bastian; Kelp, Alexandra; Stenzl, Arnulf; Sievert, Karl-Dietrich; Sawodny, Oliver; Ederer, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Urethral Pressure Profilometry (UPP) is a tool in the diagnosis of urinary incontinence. The pressure profile along the urethra is measured by a special catheter in order to assess the contraction strength of the sphincter muscle. The use of microtip catheters with several pressure sensors and an integrated acceleration sensor enables signal reconstruction of the pressure distribution on the urethra's inside. Experimental data from minipigs exhibit artifact patterns in the pressure data. It is shown that these artifacts are caused by vascular pulsation in the sphincter structure. We therefore investigate different methods exploiting the time-correlation of the artifacts to eliminate pulse-induced artifacts in the pressure data without compromising the actual signal. Evaluation of these methods applied to experimental data conclude this work showing that both an Input-Model and Principal Component Analysis Decorrelation are effective at removing the artifacts. PMID:26736868

  8. Employment of Dental Hygienists as Dental Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fong, Cynthia; Odrich, Johanna

    1987-01-01

    A study of the use of dental hygienists to teach periodontics, preventive dentistry, community dentistry, and public health courses looked at employment patterns and practices and the qualifications of the teachers. (MSE)

  9. Meeting Dental Health Needs Through Dental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Alvin L.

    1972-01-01

    Dental health needs of the country cannot be met through education of more dentists. Rather, we must educate auxiliaries to perform many of the intraoral procedures now regarded the sole responsibility of dentists. (SB)

  10. Comparing the Performance of Popular MEG/EEG Artifact Correction Methods in an Evoked-Response Study

    PubMed Central

    Kliuchko, Marina; Vuust, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We here compared results achieved by applying popular methods for reducing artifacts in magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG) recordings of the auditory evoked Mismatch Negativity (MMN) responses in healthy adult subjects. We compared the Signal Space Separation (SSS) and temporal SSS (tSSS) methods for reducing noise from external and nearby sources. Our results showed that tSSS reduces the interference level more reliably than plain SSS, particularly for MEG gradiometers, also for healthy subjects not wearing strongly interfering magnetic material. Therefore, tSSS is recommended over SSS. Furthermore, we found that better artifact correction is achieved by applying Independent Component Analysis (ICA) in comparison to Signal Space Projection (SSP). Although SSP reduces the baseline noise level more than ICA, SSP also significantly reduces the signal—slightly more than it reduces the artifacts interfering with the signal. However, ICA also adds noise, or correction errors, to the waveform when the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the original data is relatively low—in particular to EEG and to MEG magnetometer data. In conclusion, ICA is recommended over SSP, but one should be careful when applying ICA to reduce artifacts on neurophysiological data with relatively low SNR. PMID:27524998

  11. Comparing the Performance of Popular MEG/EEG Artifact Correction Methods in an Evoked-Response Study.

    PubMed

    Haumann, Niels Trusbak; Parkkonen, Lauri; Kliuchko, Marina; Vuust, Peter; Brattico, Elvira

    2016-01-01

    We here compared results achieved by applying popular methods for reducing artifacts in magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG) recordings of the auditory evoked Mismatch Negativity (MMN) responses in healthy adult subjects. We compared the Signal Space Separation (SSS) and temporal SSS (tSSS) methods for reducing noise from external and nearby sources. Our results showed that tSSS reduces the interference level more reliably than plain SSS, particularly for MEG gradiometers, also for healthy subjects not wearing strongly interfering magnetic material. Therefore, tSSS is recommended over SSS. Furthermore, we found that better artifact correction is achieved by applying Independent Component Analysis (ICA) in comparison to Signal Space Projection (SSP). Although SSP reduces the baseline noise level more than ICA, SSP also significantly reduces the signal-slightly more than it reduces the artifacts interfering with the signal. However, ICA also adds noise, or correction errors, to the waveform when the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the original data is relatively low-in particular to EEG and to MEG magnetometer data. In conclusion, ICA is recommended over SSP, but one should be careful when applying ICA to reduce artifacts on neurophysiological data with relatively low SNR. PMID:27524998

  12. Microbial contamination of dental unit waterlines: the scientific argument.

    PubMed

    Pankhurst, C L; Johnson, N W; Woods, R G

    1998-08-01

    The quality of dental unit water is of considerable importance since patients and dental staff are regularly exposed to water and aerosols generated from the dental unit. The unique feature of dental chair water lines is the capacity for rapid development of a biofilm on the dental water supply lines combined with the generation of potentially contaminated aerosols. The biofilm, which is derived from bacteria in the incoming water and is intrinsically resistant to most biocides, then becomes the primary reservoir for continued contamination of the system. Dental water may become heavily contaminated with opportunistic respiratory pathogens such as Legionella and Mycobacterium spp. The significance of such exposure to patients and the dental team is discussed. There is at the present time, no evidence of a widespread public health problem from exposure to dental unit water. Nevertheless, the goal of infection control is to minimise the risk from exposure to potential pathogens and to create a safe working environment in which to treat patients. This paper evaluates the range of currently available infection control methods and prevention strategies which are designed to reduce the impact of the biofilm on dental water contamination, and are suitable for use in general practice. Bacterial load in dental unit water can be kept at or below recommended guidelines for drinking water (less than 200 colony forming units/ml) using a combination of readily available measures and strict adherence to maintenance protocols. Sterile water should be employed for all surgical treatments. PMID:9779119

  13. The demand for preventive and restorative dental services.

    PubMed

    Meyerhoefer, Chad D; Zuvekas, Samuel H; Manski, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Chronic tooth decay is the most common chronic condition in the United States among children ages 5-17 and also affects a large percentage of adults. Oral health conditions are preventable, but less than half of the US population uses dental services annually. We seek to examine the extent to which limited dental coverage and high out-of-pocket costs reduce dental service use by the nonelderly privately insured and uninsured. Using data from the 2001-2006 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey and an American Dental Association survey of dental procedure prices, we jointly estimate the probability of using preventive and both basic and major restorative services through a correlated random effects specification that controls for endogeneity. We found that dental coverage increased the probability of preventive care use by 19% and the use of restorative services 11% to 16%. Both conditional and unconditional on dental coverage, the use of dental services was not sensitive to out-of-pocket costs. We conclude that dental coverage is an important determinant of preventive dental service use, but other nonprice factors related to consumer preferences, especially education, are equal if not stronger determinants. PMID:23349123

  14. Behavioural and physiological effect of dental environment sensory adaptation on children's dental anxiety.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Michele; Melmed, Raphael N; Sgan-Cohen, Harold D; Eli, Ilana; Parush, Shula

    2007-12-01

    Dental anxiety is a serious obstacle in conventional oral healthcare delivery. A sensory adapted dental environment (SDE) might be effective in reducing anxiety and inducing relaxation. This study aimed to assess the efficacy of a Snoezelen SDE in reducing anxiety among children undergoing scaling and polishing by a dental hygienist. The Snoezelen environment consists of a partially dimmed room with lighting effects, vibroacoustic stimuli, and deep pressure. Nineteen children, aged 6-11 yr, participated in a cross-over intervention trial. Behavioral parameters included the mean number, duration, and magnitude of anxious behaviors, as monitored by videotaped recordings. Physiological parameters reflecting arousal were monitored by changes in dermal resistance. Results, by all measures, consistently indicated that both behavioral and psychophysiological measures of relaxation improved significantly in the SDE compared with a conventional dental environment. The findings support recommending the SDE as an effective and practical alternative in oral healthcare delivery to anxious children. PMID:18028056

  15. Method for eliminating artifacts in CCD imagers

    DOEpatents

    Turko, B.T.; Yates, G.J.

    1992-06-09

    An electronic method for eliminating artifacts in a video camera employing a charge coupled device (CCD) as an image sensor is disclosed. The method comprises the step of initializing the camera prior to normal read out and includes a first dump cycle period for transferring radiation generated charge into the horizontal register while the decaying image on the phosphor being imaged is being integrated in the photosites, and a second dump cycle period, occurring after the phosphor image has decayed, for rapidly dumping unwanted smear charge which has been generated in the vertical registers. Image charge is then transferred from the photosites and to the vertical registers and read out in conventional fashion. The inventive method allows the video camera to be used in environments having high ionizing radiation content, and to capture images of events of very short duration and occurring either within or outside the normal visual wavelength spectrum. Resultant images are free from ghost, smear and smear phenomena caused by insufficient opacity of the registers and, and are also free from random damage caused by ionization charges which exceed the charge limit capacity of the photosites. 3 figs.

  16. GUV Preparation and Imaging: Minimizing artifacts

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Penningston, Nelson F.; Wu, Jing; Farkas, Elaine R.; Goh, Shih Lin; Konyakhina, Tatyana M.; Zheng, Judy Y.; Webb, Watt W.; Feigenson, Gerald W.

    2010-01-01

    The components of biological membranes are present in a physical mixture. The nonrandom ways that the molecules of lipids and proteins mix together can strongly influence the association of proteins with each other, and the chemical reactions that occur in the membrane, or that are mediated by the membrane. A particular type of nonrandom mixing is the separation of compositionally distinct phases. Any such phase separation would result in preferential partition of some proteins and lipids between the coexisting phases, and thus would influence which proteins could be in contact, and whether a protein could find its target. Phase separation in a plasma membrane would also influence the binding of molecules from outside the cell to the membrane, including recognition proteins on viruses, bacteria, and other cells. The concept of these and other events associated with membrane phase separation are sometimes grouped together as the “raft model” of biological membranes. Several types of experiments are aimed at detecting and characterizing membrane phase separation. Visualizing phase separation has special value, both because the immiscibility is so decisively determined, and also because the type of phase can often be identified. The fluorescence microscope has proven uniquely useful for yielding images of separated phases, both in certain cell preparations, and especially in models of cell membranes. Here we discuss ways to prepare useful model membranes for image studies, and how to avoid some of the artifacts that can plague these studies. PMID:20302841

  17. Method for eliminating artifacts in CCD imagers

    DOEpatents

    Turko, Bojan T.; Yates, George J.

    1992-01-01

    An electronic method for eliminating artifacts in a video camera (10) employing a charge coupled device (CCD) (12) as an image sensor. The method comprises the step of initializing the camera (10) prior to normal read out and includes a first dump cycle period (76) for transferring radiation generated charge into the horizontal register (28) while the decaying image on the phosphor (39) being imaged is being integrated in the photosites, and a second dump cycle period (78), occurring after the phosphor (39) image has decayed, for rapidly dumping unwanted smear charge which has been generated in the vertical registers (32). Image charge is then transferred from the photosites (36) and (38) to the vertical registers (32) and read out in conventional fashion. The inventive method allows the video camera (10) to be used in environments having high ionizing radiation content, and to capture images of events of very short duration and occurring either within or outside the normal visual wavelength spectrum. Resultant images are free from ghost, smear and smear phenomena caused by insufficient opacity of the registers (28) and (32), and are also free from random damage caused by ionization charges which exceed the charge limit capacity of the photosites (36) and (37).

  18. Searching for alien artifacts on the moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, P. C. W.; Wagner, R. V.

    2013-08-01

    The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) has a low probability of success, but it would have a high impact if successful. Therefore it makes sense to widen the search as much as possible within the confines of the modest budget and limited resources currently available. To date, SETI has been dominated by the paradigm of seeking deliberately beamed radio messages. However, indirect evidence for extraterrestrial intelligence could come from any incontrovertible signatures of non-human technology. Existing searchable databases from astronomy, biology, earth and planetary sciences all offer low-cost opportunities to seek a footprint of extraterrestrial technology. In this paper we take as a case study one particular new and rapidly-expanding database: the photographic mapping of the Moon's surface by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) to 0.5 m resolution. Although there is only a tiny probability that alien technology would have left traces on the moon in the form of an artifact or surface modification of lunar features, this location has the virtue of being close, and of preserving traces for an immense duration. Systematic scrutiny of the LRO photographic images is being routinely conducted anyway for planetary science purposes, and this program could readily be expanded and outsourced at little extra cost to accommodate SETI goals, after the fashion of the SETI@home and Galaxy Zoo projects.

  19. Image Artifact Flagging in the Kepler Pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Bruce; Caldwell, Douglas; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery

    2015-08-01

    Systematic instrument noise in the raw Kepler pixel data includes time-varying crosstalk from the fine guidance sensor (FGS) clock signals, manifestations of drifting moiré pattern as locally correlated nonstationary noise and rolling band artifacts (RBA). The Kepler pipeline module Dynablack produces best fit black level estimates per pixel per cadence by modeling a combination of collateral, FFI, reverse clocked and ARP target data. A search for transit features in the fit residuals identifies spatial regions and time intervals of strong time-varying black level which we identify as RBA. Dynablack produces flags marking these these RBA regions on a per row per cadence basis for several different transit time scales. The Photometric Analysis module (PA) generates per target per cadence data quality flags based on the Dynablack RBA flags which are in turn used by the Data Validation pipeline module (DV) in producing a contamination report associated with each target processed. The Dynablack (per row) RBA flags as well as a proxy for the per target flags produced in PA will be included in the final Kepler data release scheduled to arrive at the MAST in 2016.We detail how the RBA flags are produced in Dynablack, how these are then used to produce the per target quality flags used in DV and discuss why they should be considered when searching for transit signatures in the archived Kepler light curves. Funding for the Kepler Mission has been provided by the NASA Science Mission Directorate.

  20. Automating Traceability for Generated Software Artifacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Julian; Green, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    Program synthesis automatically derives programs from specifications of their behavior. One advantage of program synthesis, as opposed to manual coding, is that there is a direct link between the specification and the derived program. This link is, however, not very fine-grained: it can be best characterized as Program is-derived- from Specification. When the generated program needs to be understood or modified, more $ne-grained linking is useful. In this paper, we present a novel technique for automatically deriving traceability relations between parts of a specification and parts of the synthesized program. The technique is very lightweight and works -- with varying degrees of success - for any process in which one artifact is automatically derived from another. We illustrate the generality of the technique by applying it to two kinds of automatic generation: synthesis of Kalman Filter programs from speci3cations using the Aut- oFilter program synthesis system, and generation of assembly language programs from C source code using the GCC C compilel: We evaluate the effectiveness of the technique in the latter application.

  1. Dental Implant Systems

    PubMed Central

    Oshida, Yoshiki; Tuna, Elif B.; Aktören, Oya; Gençay, Koray

    2010-01-01

    Among various dental materials and their successful applications, a dental implant is a good example of the integrated system of science and technology involved in multiple disciplines including surface chemistry and physics, biomechanics, from macro-scale to nano-scale manufacturing technologies and surface engineering. As many other dental materials and devices, there are crucial requirements taken upon on dental implants systems, since surface of dental implants is directly in contact with vital hard/soft tissue and is subjected to chemical as well as mechanical bio-environments. Such requirements should, at least, include biological compatibility, mechanical compatibility, and morphological compatibility to surrounding vital tissues. In this review, based on carefully selected about 500 published articles, these requirements plus MRI compatibility are firstly reviewed, followed by surface texturing methods in details. Normally dental implants are placed to lost tooth/teeth location(s) in adult patients whose skeleton and bony growth have already completed. However, there are some controversial issues for placing dental implants in growing patients. This point has been, in most of dental articles, overlooked. This review, therefore, throws a deliberate sight on this point. Concluding this review, we are proposing a novel implant system that integrates materials science and up-dated surface technology to improve dental implant systems exhibiting bio- and mechano-functionalities. PMID:20480036

  2. Dental artistry.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Ronald S

    2003-01-01

    The role of a skilled dentist is to construct and build teeth, not to destroy or tear away; the former approach reduces the possibility of permanent, irreversible damage. However, the profession's way of thinking continues to advocate the method of reduction and replacement, resting on the 100-year-old teaching of the indirect casting technique introduced by Taggart in 1907. This article explores utilizing augmentation rather than reduction, as well as natural principles for designing crowns and bridges based upon tensional integrity. PMID:15055608

  3. Loss of Alloy in Cast Restorations Fabricated by Dental Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soh, George

    1991-01-01

    A study investigated the quantity of alloy lost in the fabrication of three types of cast restoration by dental students, and identified the proportion of loss at each of the four principal stages of the fabrication process. Suggestions for reducing metal loss and related costs in dental schools are offered. (MSE)

  4. [Dental caries of the developmental age as a civilization disease].

    PubMed

    Wójcicka, Anna; Zalewska, Magdalena; Czerech, Ewa; Jabłoński, Robert; Grabowska, Stanisława Zyta; Maciorkowska, Elzbieta

    2012-01-01

    According to the definition of the World Health Organization (WHO), dental caries is a local pathological process of the extrasomatic background, leading to enamel decalcification, decomposition of dental hard tissue, and in consequence to formation of a dental cavity. Morbidity of dental caries increases with age, reaching 100% of children, aged from 6 to 7. Poland is one of few European countries where the incidence of dental caries in children did not decrease, despite recommendations of WHO for 2000 year, aimed at the decrease in the incidence of dental caries among 6-year-old children to the level of 50%. The recommendation of WHO for 2015 year is to reduce the incidence of dental caries to 30% among 6-year-olds, i.e., 70% of 6 year-old children should be free of dental caries. Apart from genetic conditioning, inappropriate health behaviors, nutritional habits and gastroesophageal reflux disease influence the development of dental caries. Consumption of 'fast food' and drinking sweetened beverages of low pH contribute markedly to the development of dental caries, decreasing simultaneously consumption of pro healthy foods, including milk and cereals. Taking into consideration perspective clinical examinations of children and adolescents, evaluating the relationship between dental caries and nutritional habits as well as environmental conditioning, the study shows current data about factors, contributing to the incidence of dental caries in children, collected from the literature. The attention was paid to the relationship between dental caries and gastroesophageal reflux disease and the necessity of its early diagnostics and proper treatment. PMID:23484402

  5. An algorithm for efficient metal artifact reductions in permanent seed implants

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Chen; Verhaegen, Frank; Laurendeau, Denis; Enger, Shirin A.; Beaulieu, Luc

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: In permanent seed implants, 60 to more than 100 small metal capsules are inserted in the prostate, creating artifacts in x-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging. The goal of this work is to develop an automatic method for metal artifact reduction (MAR) from small objects such as brachytherapy seeds for clinical applications. Methods: The approach for MAR is based on the interpolation of missing projections by directly using raw helical CT data (sinogram). First, an initial image is reconstructed from the raw CT data. Then, the metal objects segmented from the reconstructed image are reprojected back into the sinogram space to produce a metal-only sinogram. The Steger method is used to determine precisely the position and edges of the seed traces in the raw CT data. By combining the use of Steger detection and reprojections, the missing projections are detected and replaced by interpolation of non-missing neighboring projections. Results: In both phantom experiments and patient studies, the missing projections have been detected successfully and the artifacts caused by metallic objects have been substantially reduced. The performance of the algorithm has been quantified by comparing the uniformity between the uncorrected and the corrected phantom images. The results of the artifact reduction algorithm are indistinguishable from the true background value. Conclusions: An efficient algorithm for MAR in seed brachytherapy was developed. The test results obtained using raw helical CT data for both phantom and clinical cases have demonstrated that the proposed MAR method is capable of accurately detecting and correcting artifacts caused by a large number of very small metal objects (seeds) in sinogram space. This should enable a more accurate use of advanced brachytherapy dose calculations, such as Monte Carlo simulations.

  6. Dental infection simulating skin lesion.

    PubMed

    Abuabara, Allan; Schramm, Celso Alfredo; Zielak, João César; Baratto-Filho, Flares

    2012-01-01

    Orocutaneous fistulas or cutaneous sinus, a tract of dental origin, is an uncommon but well-documented condition that usually requires emergency treatment. Such condition may be misdiagnosed by physicians and dentists and may sometimes be confused with bone and skin tumor, osteomyelitis, congenital fistula, salivary gland fistula, pyogenic granuloma, infected cyst, deep mycotic infection, and other pathologies. A case of facial sinus tract that was initially misdiagnosed by a physician as a nonodontogenic lesion is presented. Nonsurgical endodontic therapy was the treatment of choice for this case. Facial cutaneous sinus tracts must be considered of dental origin. Early diagnosis and prompt treatment minimize patient discomfort and esthetic problems, reducing the possibility of further complications such as sepsis and osteomyelitis. PMID:22892779

  7. Gagging and Associations with Dental Care-Related Fear, Fear of Pain, and Beliefs about Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Randall, Cameron L.; Shulman, Grant P.; Crout, Richard J.; McNeil, Daniel W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Gagging is a behavioral response that interferes with oral health care and has been suggested to relate to dental care-related fear. Little is known, however, about the epidemiology of gagging during dental treatment. Methods To explore this phenomenon, 478 participants were recruited from the waiting area of an oral diagnosis clinic. Participants completed the Dental Fear Survey, the Short Form-Fear of Pain Questionnaire, Dental Beliefs Scale, and a demographics questionnaire that included items about problems with gagging. Results Over half of the participants reported gagging on at least one occasion during dental visits, with 7.5% almost always, or always gagging. With higher frequency of problems with gagging, patients were more likely to have greater levels of dental care-related fear, fear of pain, and more negative beliefs of dental professionals and dental treatment. Further, participants who gagged more readily had greater dental care-related fear than other gaggers. Conclusion Gagging in the dental clinic is a prevalent problem, and dental care-related fear and fear of pain are associated with more frequent gagging. Clinical Implications Given the prevalence of patients reporting problem gagging, it may be helpful for providers to assess for this barrier to treatment. By targeting dental care-related fear, fear of pain, and negative beliefs about dental care in patients who often gag in the clinic, gagging may be reduced in frequency or intensity, potentially making treatment more comfortable for patients and easier for dental care providers. PMID:24789238

  8. SU-E-I-63: Quantitative Evaluation of the Effects of Orthopedic Metal Artifact Reduction (OMAR) Software On CT Images for Radiotherapy Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Jani, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: CT simulation for patients with metal implants can often be challenging due to artifacts that obscure tumor/target delineation and normal organ definition. Our objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of Orthopedic Metal Artifact Reduction (OMAR), a commercially available software, in reducing metal-induced artifacts and its effect on computed dose during treatment planning. Methods: CT images of water surrounding metallic cylindrical rods made of aluminum, copper and iron were studied in terms of Hounsfield Units (HU) spread. Metal-induced artifacts were characterized in terms of HU/Volume Histogram (HVH) using the Pinnacle treatment planning system. Effects of OMAR on enhancing our ability to delineate organs on CT and subsequent dose computation were examined in nine (9) patients with hip implants and two (2) patients with breast tissue expanders. Results: Our study characterized water at 1000 HU with a standard deviation (SD) of about 20 HU. The HVHs allowed us to evaluate how the presence of metal changed the HU spread. For example, introducing a 2.54 cm diameter copper rod in water increased the SD in HU of the surrounding water from 20 to 209, representing an increase in artifacts. Subsequent use of OMAR brought the SD down to 78. Aluminum produced least artifacts whereas Iron showed largest amount of artifacts. In general, an increase in kVp and mA during CT scanning showed better effectiveness of OMAR in reducing artifacts. Our dose analysis showed that some isodose contours shifted by several mm with OMAR but infrequently and were nonsignificant in planning process. Computed volumes of various dose levels showed <2% change. Conclusions: In our experience, OMAR software greatly reduced the metal-induced CT artifacts for the majority of patients with implants, thereby improving our ability to delineate tumor and surrounding organs. OMAR had a clinically negligible effect on computed dose within tissues. Partially funded by unrestricted

  9. Dental Caries Vaccine – A Possible Option?

    PubMed Central

    KT, Shanmugam; KMK, Masthan; N, Balachander; Jimson, Sudha; R, Sarangarajan

    2013-01-01

    Dental caries is an irreversible microbial disease of the calcified tissues of the teeth and it has a multifactorial origin. In India, the dental caries prevalence in 35-44 year olds was reported to be 80-95% in a DCI survey. Among the elderly in the 65-74 years age group, the DCI survey reported the caries prevalence to be about 70%, while the present survey reported it to be 51- 95% in various states. Surveys which were done on school children in India showed a carie prevalence of approximately 58%.Among the U.S. population, a survey showed an incidence of 93.8% in adults with either past or present coronal caries and an incidence of 45.3% in children 23. In countries like Brazil and China, it is reaching epidemic proportions. Thus, more effective public-health measures are needed to combat dental caries. Mutans streptococci is one of the main microorganisms which are associated with the aetiology of dental caries. Preclinical studies of immunological interventions have shown that the disease can be interrupted. Clinical trials have indicated that a mucosal immune response to Streptococcus mutans crucial antigens can influence the pathogenesis of dental caries. The dental caries vaccine, when it is used in appropriate individuals at the appropriate time, can reduce the reemergence of the disease. PMID:23905153

  10. Magneto-encephalogram artifacts caused by electro-encephalogram electrodes.

    PubMed

    Murdick, R; Roth, B J

    2003-03-01

    The electro-encephalogram (EEG) and magneto-encephalogram (MEG) are often measured simultaneously. By Faraday's law of induction, the changing magnetic field of the MEG can induce eddy currents in the EEG electrodes. These eddy currents produce their own magnetic field that adds to that produced by current sources in the brain, resulting in an artifact in the MEG recording. It is shown that, under typical conditions, this artifact is less than 1%, but, during measurements of high temporal frequency and high spatial resolution, the artifact can be as large as 3%. PMID:12691441

  11. Education About Dental Hygienists' Roles in Public Dental Prevention Programs: Dental and Dental Hygiene Students' and Faculty Members' and Dental Hygienists' Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Pervez, Anushey; Kinney, Janet S; Gwozdek, Anne; Farrell, Christine M; Inglehart, Marita R

    2016-09-01

    In 2005, Public Act No. 161 (PA 161) was passed in Michigan, allowing dental hygienists to practice in approved public dental prevention programs to provide services for underserved populations while utilizing a collaborative agreement with a supervising dentist. The aims of this study were to assess how well dental and dental hygiene students and faculty members and practicing dental hygienists have been educated about PA 161, what attitudes and knowledge about the act they have, and how interested they are in additional education about it. University of Michigan dental and dental hygiene students and faculty members, students in other Michigan dental hygiene programs, and dental hygienists in the state were surveyed. Respondents (response rate) were 160 dental students (50%), 63 dental hygiene students (82%), 30 dental faculty members (26%), and 12 dental hygiene faculty members (52%) at the University of Michigan; 143 dental hygiene students in other programs (20%); and 95 members of the Michigan Dental Hygienists' Association (10%). The results showed that the dental students were less educated about PA 161 than the dental hygiene students, and the dental faculty members were less informed than the dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists. Responding dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists had more positive attitudes about PA 161 than did the students and dental faculty members. Most of the dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists knew a person providing services in a PA 161 program. Most dental hygiene students, faculty members, and dental hygienists wanted more education about PA 161. Overall, the better educated about the program the respondents were, the more positive their attitudes, and the more interested they were in learning more. PMID:27587574

  12. Analytic solutions of an unclassified artifact /

    SciTech Connect

    Trent, Bruce C.

    2012-03-01

    This report provides the technical detail for analytic solutions for the inner and outer profiles of the unclassified CMM Test Artifact (LANL Part Number 157Y-700373, 5/03/2001) in terms of radius and polar angle. Furthermore, analytic solutions are derived for the legacy Sheffield measurement hardware, also in terms of radius and polar angle, using part coordinates, i.e., relative to the analytic profile solutions obtained. The purpose of this work is to determine the exact solution for the “cosine correction” term inherent to measurement with the Sheffield hardware. The cosine correction is required in order to interpret the actual measurements taken by the hardware in terms of an actual part definition, or “knot-point spline definition,” that typically accompanies a component drawing. Specifically, there are two portions of the problem: first an analytic solution must be obtained for any point on the part, e.g., given the radii and the straight lines that define the part, it is required to find an exact solution for the inner and outer profile for any arbitrary polar angle. Next, the problem of the inspection of this part must be solved, i.e., given an arbitrary sphere (representing the inspection hardware) that comes in contact with the part (inner and outer profiles) at any arbitrary polar angle, it is required to determine the exact location of that intersection. This is trivial for the case of concentric circles. In the present case, however, the spherical portion of the profiles is offset from the defined center of the part, making the analysis nontrivial. Here, a simultaneous solution of the part profiles and the sphere was obtained.

  13. Artifact Diamond Its Allure And Significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoder, Max N.

    1989-01-01

    While the preponderance of the mechanical, optical, and electronic properties of natural diamond have been known for over a decade, only recently has artifact diamond in technologically useful form factors become an exciting possibility. The advent of sacrificial, lattice matched crystalline substrates provides the basis not only for semiconducting applications of diamond, but for optical mirrors, lenses, and windows as well. As a semiconductor, diamond has the highest resistivity, the highest saturated electron velocity, the highest thermal conductivity, the lowest dielectric constant, the highest dielectric strength, the greatest hardness, the largest bandgap and the smallest lattice constant of any material. It also has electron and hole mobilities greater than those of silicon. Its figure of merit as a microwave power amplifier is unexcelled and exceeds that of silicon by a multiplier of 8200. For integrated circuit potential, its thermal conductivity, saturated velocity, and dielectric constant also place it in the premier position (32 times that of silicon, 46 times that of GaAs). Although not verified, its radiation hardness should also be unmatched. Aside from its brilliant sparkle as a gemstone, there has been little use of diamond in the field of optics. Processing of the diamond surface now appears to be as simple as that of any other material --albeit with different techniques. In fact, it may be possible to etch diamond far more controllably (at economically viable rates) than any other material as the product of the etch is gaseous and the etched trough is self-cleaning. Other properties of diamond make it an ideal optical material. Among them are its unmatched thermal conductivity, its extremely low absorption loss above 228 nanometers, and unmatched Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, tensile strength, hardness, thermal shock, and modulus of elasticity. If the recently-found mechanisms by which erbium impurities in III-V junctions can be made to "lase

  14. Dental Pulp Defence and Repair Mechanisms in Dental Caries

    PubMed Central

    Farges, Jean-Christophe; Alliot-Licht, Brigitte; Renard, Emmanuelle; Ducret, Maxime; Gaudin, Alexis; Smith, Anthony J.; Cooper, Paul R.

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries is a chronic infectious disease resulting from the penetration of oral bacteria into the enamel and dentin. Microorganisms subsequently trigger inflammatory responses in the dental pulp. These events can lead to pulp healing if the infection is not too severe following the removal of diseased enamel and dentin tissues and clinical restoration of the tooth. However, chronic inflammation often persists in the pulp despite treatment, inducing permanent loss of normal tissue and reducing innate repair capacities. For complete tooth healing the formation of a reactionary/reparative dentin barrier to distance and protect the pulp from infectious agents and restorative materials is required. Clinical and in vitro experimental data clearly indicate that dentin barrier formation only occurs when pulp inflammation and infection are minimised, thus enabling reestablishment of tissue homeostasis and health. Therefore, promoting the resolution of pulp inflammation may provide a valuable therapeutic opportunity to ensure the sustainability of dental treatments. This paper focusses on key cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in pulp responses to bacteria and in the pulpal transition between caries-induced inflammation and dentinogenic-based repair. We report, using selected examples, different strategies potentially used by odontoblasts and specialized immune cells to combat dentin-invading bacteria in vivo. PMID:26538821

  15. Development of a new metal artifact reduction algorithm by using an edge preserving method for CBCT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Juhye; Nam, Haewon; Lee, Rena

    2015-07-01

    CT (computed tomography) images, metal materials such as tooth supplements or surgical clips can cause metal artifact and degrade image quality. In severe cases, this may lead to misdiagnosis. In this research, we developed a new MAR (metal artifact reduction) algorithm by using an edge preserving filter and the MATLAB program (Mathworks, version R2012a). The proposed algorithm consists of 6 steps: image reconstruction from projection data, metal segmentation, forward projection, interpolation, applied edge preserving smoothing filter, and new image reconstruction. For an evaluation of the proposed algorithm, we obtained both numerical simulation data and data for a Rando phantom. In the numerical simulation data, four metal regions were added into the Shepp Logan phantom for metal artifacts. The projection data of the metal-inserted Rando phantom were obtained by using a prototype CBCT scanner manufactured by medical engineering and medical physics (MEMP) laboratory research group in medical science at Ewha Womans University. After these had been adopted the proposed algorithm was performed, and the result were compared with the original image (with metal artifact without correction) and with a corrected image based on linear interpolation. Both visual and quantitative evaluations were done. Compared with the original image with metal artifacts and with the image corrected by using linear interpolation, both the numerical and the experimental phantom data demonstrated that the proposed algorithm reduced the metal artifact. In conclusion, the evaluation in this research showed that the proposed algorithm outperformed the interpolation based MAR algorithm. If an optimization and a stability evaluation of the proposed algorithm can be performed, the developed algorithm is expected to be an effective tool for eliminating metal artifacts even in commercial CT systems.

  16. Dental Laboratory Technician.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of dental laboratory technician, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 13 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 8 units to the occupation of dental laboratory technician. The following skill areas…

  17. Dental Charting. Student's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Trudy Karlene; Apfel, Maura

    This manual is part of a series dealing with skills and information needed by students in dental assisting. The individualized student materials are suitable for classroom, laboratory, or cooperative training programs. This student manual contains four units covering the following topics: dental anatomical terminology; tooth numbering systems;…

  18. Dental Assisting Program Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This program guide contains the standard dental assisting curriculum for technical institutes in Georgia. The curriculum encompasses the minimum competencies required for entry-level dental assistants, and includes job skills in the technical areas of preventive dentistry; four-handed dentistry; chairside assisting with emphasis in diagnostics,…

  19. Dental Fear Among University Employees: Implications for Dental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaakko, Tarja; Milgrom, Peter; Coldwell, Susan E.; Getz, Tracy; Weinstein, Philip; Ramsay, Douglas S.

    1998-01-01

    A survey of 270 University of Washington permanent employees who were potential candidates for teaching clinics, found dental anxiety prevalent, correlating with poorer perceived dental health, longer intervals between dental appointments, higher frequency of past fear behaviors, more physical symptoms during last dental injection, and more…

  20. The future dental workforce?

    PubMed

    Gallagher, J E; Wilson, N H F

    2009-02-28

    The Editor-in-Chief of the BDJ has previously raised important questions about dental workforce planning and the implications for dental graduates of recent changes and pressures. It is now time to revisit this issue. Much has changed since the last workforce review in England and Wales, and the rate of change is in all probability set to increase. First, at the time of writing this paper the momentous step of including dental care professionals (DCPs) on General Dental Council (GDC) registers in the United Kingdom has recently been completed. Second, the Scope of Practice of all dental professionals has been under consultation by the General Dental Council, and research evidence suggests that greater use should be made of skill-mix in the dental team. Third, within England, Lord Darzi has just published the 'Final Report of the NHS Next Stage Review', which emphasises 'quality care' and 'team-working' as key features of healthcare; this report was accompanied by an important document entitled 'A High Quality Workforce', in which plans for local workforce planning within the NHS are outlined, placing responsibilities at national, local and regional levels. Fourth, policy makers across the UK are wrestling with addressing oral health needs, promoting health and facilitating access to dental care, all of which have implications for the nature and shape of the dental workforce. Fifth, with the impact of globalisation and European policies we are net gainers of dentists as well as having more in training. Sixth, although there have been reviews and policy initiatives by regulatory, professional and other bodies in support of shaping the dental workforce, there has been little serious consideration of skill-mix and funding mechanisms to encourage team-working. Together, these events demand that we enter a fresh debate on the future dental workforce which should extend beyond professional and national boundaries and inform workforce planning. This debate is of great

  1. Investigating the effect of modifying the EEG cap lead configuration on the gradient artifact in simultaneous EEG-fMRI.

    PubMed

    Mullinger, Karen J; Chowdhury, Muhammad E H; Bowtell, Richard

    2014-01-01

    EEG data recorded during simultaneous fMRI are contaminated by large voltages generated by time-varying magnetic field gradients. Correction of the resulting gradient artifact (GA) generally involves low-pass filtering to attenuate the high-frequency voltage fluctuations of the GA, followed by subtraction of a GA template produced by averaging over repeats of the artifact waveforms. This average artifact subtraction (AAS) process relies on the EEG amplifier having a large enough dynamic range to characterize the artifact voltages and on invariance of the artifact waveform over repeated image acquisitions. Saturation of the amplifiers and changes in subject position can leave unwanted residual GA after AAS. Previous modeling work suggested that modifying the lead layout and the exit position of the cable bundle on the EEG cap could reduce the GA amplitude. Here, we used simulations and experiments to evaluate the effect of modifying the lead paths on the magnitude of the GA and on the residual artifact after AAS. The modeling work showed that for wire paths following great circles, the smallest overall GA occurs when the leads converge at electrode Cz. The performance of this new cap design was compared with a standard cap in experiments on a spherical agar phantom and human subjects. Using gradient pulses applied separately along the three Cartesian axes, we found that the GA due to the foot-head gradient was most significantly reduced relative to a standard cap for the phantom, whereas the anterior-posterior GA was most attenuated for human subjects. In addition, there was an overall 37% reduction in the RMS GA amplitude produced by a standard EPI sequence when comparing the two caps on the phantom. In contrast, the subjects showed an 11% increase in the average RMS of the GA. This work shows that the optimal design reduces the GA on a spherical phantom however; these gains are not translated to human subjects, probably due to the differences in geometry. PMID

  2. Investigating the effect of modifying the EEG cap lead configuration on the gradient artifact in simultaneous EEG-fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Mullinger, Karen J.; Chowdhury, Muhammad E. H.; Bowtell, Richard

    2014-01-01

    EEG data recorded during simultaneous fMRI are contaminated by large voltages generated by time-varying magnetic field gradients. Correction of the resulting gradient artifact (GA) generally involves low-pass filtering to attenuate the high-frequency voltage fluctuations of the GA, followed by subtraction of a GA template produced by averaging over repeats of the artifact waveforms. This average artifact subtraction (AAS) process relies on the EEG amplifier having a large enough dynamic range to characterize the artifact voltages and on invariance of the artifact waveform over repeated image acquisitions. Saturation of the amplifiers and changes in subject position can leave unwanted residual GA after AAS. Previous modeling work suggested that modifying the lead layout and the exit position of the cable bundle on the EEG cap could reduce the GA amplitude. Here, we used simulations and experiments to evaluate the effect of modifying the lead paths on the magnitude of the GA and on the residual artifact after AAS. The modeling work showed that for wire paths following great circles, the smallest overall GA occurs when the leads converge at electrode Cz. The performance of this new cap design was compared with a standard cap in experiments on a spherical agar phantom and human subjects. Using gradient pulses applied separately along the three Cartesian axes, we found that the GA due to the foot-head gradient was most significantly reduced relative to a standard cap for the phantom, whereas the anterior-posterior GA was most attenuated for human subjects. In addition, there was an overall 37% reduction in the RMS GA amplitude produced by a standard EPI sequence when comparing the two caps on the phantom. In contrast, the subjects showed an 11% increase in the average RMS of the GA. This work shows that the optimal design reduces the GA on a spherical phantom however; these gains are not translated to human subjects, probably due to the differences in geometry. PMID

  3. Neutron-activation analysis applied to copper ores and artifacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linder, N. F.

    1970-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis is used for quantitative identification of trace metals in copper. Establishing a unique fingerprint of impurities in Michigan copper would enable identification of artifacts made from this copper.

  4. Artifact peroxides produced during cryogenic sampling of ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staffelbach, Thomas; Neftel, Albrecht; Dasgupta, Purnendu K.

    Peroxides were found to be produced as artifacts during cryogenic sampling with Horibe traps. Cryogenic trap sampling was compared to collection with a wet effluent diffusion denuder and a Nafion membrane diffusion denuder. Hydrogen peroxide and hydroxymethyl hydroperoxide measured in the cryogenic trap samples were significantly higher. In comparison, no evidence of artifact methyl hydroperoxide production was found. The amount of artifact H2O2 and HMHP produced increased with decreasing trap temperature. Spiking ambient air with ethene or isoprene showed that these hydrocarbons, in the presence of ozone, can be responsible for the artifact production of peroxides. Our results clearly suggest that the peroxide data obtained by cryogenic sampling and reported in the literature should be interpreted with caution.

  5. Chemical Principles Revisited: Artifacts and the Electromotive Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mickey, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews chemical information relevant to the study of archeology and specifically to the history of man's use of metals. Gives reasons why most significant artifacts found by archeologists are made of gold instead of iron. (CS)

  6. Pulse transducer with artifact signal attenuator. [heart rate sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cash, W. H., Jr.; Polhemus, J. T. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An artifact signal attenuator for a pulse rate sensor is described. The circuit for attenuating background noise signals is connected with a pulse rate transducer which has a light source and a detector for light reflected from blood vessels of a living body. The heart signal provided consists of a modulated dc signal voltage indicative of pulse rate. The artifact signal resulting from light reflected from the skin of the body comprises both a constant dc signal voltage and a modulated dc signal voltage. The amplitude of the artifact signal is greater and the frequency less than that of the heart signal. The signal attenuator circuit includes an operational amplifier for canceling the artifact signal from the output signal of the transducer and has the capability of meeting packaging requirements for wrist-watch-size packages.

  7. Miscellaneous artifacts relating to experiments with talking motion pictures about ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Miscellaneous artifacts relating to experiments with talking motion pictures about 1912 and to loudspeaking phonographs in the 1920s, third floor. - Thomas A. Edison Laboratories, Building No. 5, Main Street & Lakeside Avenue, West Orange, Essex County, NJ

  8. Dental amalgam--environmental aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Arenholt-Bindslev, D. )

    1992-09-01

    Increasing knowledge about the risk of toxic effects caused by anthropogenic mercury accumulation in ecosystems has resulted in a growing pressure for reduction of the discharge of mercury waste. Consequently, the mercury waste problems of dental clinics have been given increased attention, and restrictions on handling and discharge of contaminated waste have been established in several countries. Major amalgam particles from trituration surplus of those produced during the carving and burnishing of new amalgam restorations are generally collected in coarse filters and sold for refinement. Minor amalgam particles released by production of new fillings or by removal of old restorations partly sediment in tubes and drains. The remaining particles are carried with the waste water stream to the local purifying plant. In Scandinavia, the industrial discharge of mercury-contaminated waste water has been reduced to a minimum. According to recent investigations, dental clinics appear to be responsible for the major amount of mercury collected in the sludge generated in purifying plants. If threshold values for heavy metal content, including mercury, are exceeded, the sludge is not allowed to be recycled as fertilizer. Installation of an approved amalgam-separating apparatus in dental clinics is now mandatory in several countries--for example, Switzerland, Germany, Sweden, and Denmark. Approval of amalgam separators is based on national testing programs, including clinical or laboratory tests demanding 95-99% separating efficiency. 18 refs.

  9. Myocardial imaging artifacts caused by mitral valve annulus calcification

    SciTech Connect

    Wagoner, L.E.; Movahed, A.; Reeves, W.C. )

    1991-02-01

    Knowledge of imaging artifact of myocardial perfusion studies with thallium-201 is critical for improving the diagnostic accuracy of coronary artery disease. Three patients are described who underwent exercise or pharmacologic stress thallium-201 imaging studies and had a moderate, fixed myocardial perfusion defect (scar) involving the posterolateral and inferoposterior walls of the left ventricle. This was an imaging artifact caused by a heavily calcified mitral valve annulus.

  10. Optimization-based reconstruction for reduction of CBCT artifact in IGRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Dan; Zhang, Zheng; Paysan, Pascal; Seghers, Dieter; Brehm, Marcus; Munro, Peter; Sidky, Emil Y.; Pelizzari, Charles; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2016-04-01

    Kilo-voltage cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) plays an important role in image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) by providing 3D spatial information of tumor potentially useful for optimizing treatment planning. In current IGRT CBCT system, reconstructed images obtained with analytic algorithms, such as FDK algorithm and its variants, may contain artifacts. In an attempt to compensate for the artifacts, we investigate optimization-based reconstruction algorithms such as the ASD-POCS algorithm for potentially reducing arti- facts in IGRT CBCT images. In this study, using data acquired with a physical phantom and a patient subject, we demonstrate that the ASD-POCS reconstruction can significantly reduce artifacts observed in clinical re- constructions. Moreover, patient images reconstructed by use of the ASD-POCS algorithm indicate a contrast level of soft-tissue improved over that of the clinical reconstruction. We have also performed reconstructions from sparse-view data, and observe that, for current clinical imaging conditions, ASD-POCS reconstructions from data collected at one half of the current clinical projection views appear to show image quality, in terms of spatial and soft-tissue-contrast resolution, higher than that of the corresponding clinical reconstructions.

  11. Removing movement artifacts from equine ECG recordings acquired with textile electrodes.

    PubMed

    Lanata, Antonio; Guidi, Andrea; Baragli, Paolo; Paradiso, Rita; Valenza, Gaetano; Scilingo, Enzo Pasquale

    2015-08-01

    This study reports on the implementation of a novel system to detect and reduce movement artifact (MA) contribution in electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings acquired from horses in free movement conditions. The system comprises both integrated textile electrodes for ECG acquisition and one triaxial accelerometer for movement monitoring. Here, ECG and physical activity are continuously acquired from seven horses through the wearable system and a model that integrates cardiovascular and movement information to estimate the MA contribution is implemented. Moreover, in this study we propose a new algorithm where the Stationary Wavelet Transform (SWT) decomposition algorithm is employed to identify and remove movement artifacts from ECG recodigns. Achieved results showed a reduction of MA percentage greater than 40% between before- and after- the application of the proposed algorithm to seven hours of recordings. PMID:26736667

  12. Use of Multiscale Entropy to Facilitate Artifact Detection in Electroencephalographic Signals

    PubMed Central

    Mariani, Sara; Borges, Ana F. T.; Henriques, Teresa; Goldberger, Ary L.; Costa, Madalena D.

    2016-01-01

    Electroencephalographic (EEG) signals present a myriad of challenges to analysis, beginning with the detection of artifacts. Prior approaches to noise detection have utilized multiple techniques, including visual methods, independent component analysis and wavelets. However, no single method is broadly accepted, inviting alternative ways to address this problem. Here, we introduce a novel approach based on a statistical physics method, multiscale entropy (MSE) analysis, which quantifies the complexity of a signal. We postulate that noise corrupted EEG signals have lower information content, and, therefore, reduced complexity compared with their noise free counterparts. We test the new method on an open-access database of EEG signals with and without added artifacts due to electrode motion. PMID:26738116

  13. Two-level optical coherence tomography scheme for suppressing spectral saturation artifacts.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chiung-Ting; Tsai, Meng-Tsan; Lee, Cheng-Kuang

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel method for reducing saturation artifacts in spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) systems. This method is based on a two-level SD-OCT system with a dual-line charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. We compensate the saturated signal detected by the first line using the unsaturated signal detected by the second line. The Fourier transform of the compensated spectrum shows effective suppression of saturation artifacts. This method was also successfully performed on phantom material and skin on a human finger. Our method causes neither back-scattering power loss nor signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) degradation. The only difference between the traditional system and our two-level system is our utilization of the dual-line CCD camera; no additional devices or complex designs are needed. PMID:25068864

  14. Use of multiscale entropy to facilitate artifact detection in electroencephalographic signals.

    PubMed

    Mariani, Sara; Borges, Ana F T; Henriques, Teresa; Goldberger, Ary L; Costa, Madalena D

    2015-01-01

    Electroencephalographic (EEG) signals present a myriad of challenges to analysis, beginning with the detection of artifacts. Prior approaches to noise detection have utilized multiple techniques, including visual methods, independent component analysis and wavelets. However, no single method is broadly accepted, inviting alternative ways to address this problem. Here, we introduce a novel approach based on a statistical physics method, multiscale entropy (MSE) analysis, which quantifies the complexity of a signal. We postulate that noise corrupted EEG signals have lower information content, and, therefore, reduced complexity compared with their noise free counterparts. We test the new method on an open-access database of EEG signals with and without added artifacts due to electrode motion. PMID:26738116

  15. Interactions between magnetic resonance imaging and dental material

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Chalakuzhiyl Abraham; Maller, Sudhakara; Maheshwaran

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become a common and important life-saving diagnostic tool in recent times, for diseases of the head and neck region. Dentists should be aware of the interactions of various restorative dental materials and different technical factors put to use by an MRI scanning machine. Specific knowledge about these impacts, at the dentist level and at the level of the personnel at the MRI centers can save valuable time for the patient and prevent errors in MRI images. Artifacts from metal restorations are a major hindrance at such times, as they result in disappearance or distortion of the image and loss of important information. PMID:23946562

  16. Computerized dental injection fear treatment: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Heaton, L J; Leroux, B G; Ruff, P A; Coldwell, S E

    2013-07-01

    One in four adults reports a clinically significant fear of dental injections, leading many to avoid dental care. While systematic desensitization is the most common therapeutic method for treating specific phobias such as fear of dental injections, lack of access to trained therapists, as well as dentists' lack of training and time in providing such a therapy, means that most fearful individuals are not able to receive the therapy needed to be able to receive necessary dental treatment. Computer Assisted Relaxation Learning (CARL) is a self-paced computerized treatment based on systematic desensitization for dental injection fear. This multicenter, block-randomized, dentist-blind, parallel-group study conducted in 8 sites in the United States compared CARL with an informational pamphlet in reducing fear of dental injections. Participants completing CARL reported significantly greater reduction in self-reported general and injection-specific dental anxiety measures compared with control individuals (p < .001). Twice as many CARL participants (35.3%) as controls (17.6%) opted to receive a dental injection after the intervention, although this was not statistically significant. CARL, therefore, led to significant changes in self-reported fear in study participants, but no significant differences in the proportion of participants having a dental injection. PMID:23690352

  17. Sampling artifact in volume weighted velocity measurement. I. Theoretical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pengjie; Zheng, Yi; Jing, Yipeng

    2015-02-01

    Cosmology based on large scale peculiar velocity prefers volume weighted velocity statistics. However, measuring the volume weighted velocity statistics from inhomogeneously distributed galaxies (simulation particles/halos) suffers from an inevitable and significant sampling artifact. We study this sampling artifact in the velocity power spectrum measured by the nearest particle velocity assignment method by Zheng et al., [Phys. Rev. D 88, 103510 (2013).]. We derive the analytical expression of leading and higher order terms. We find that the sampling artifact suppresses the z =0 E -mode velocity power spectrum by ˜10 % at k =0.1 h /Mpc , for samples with number density 10-3 (Mpc /h )-3 . This suppression becomes larger for larger k and for sparser samples. We argue that this source of systematic errors in peculiar velocity cosmology, albeit severe, can be self-calibrated in the framework of our theoretical modelling. We also work out the sampling artifact in the density-velocity cross power spectrum measurement. A more robust evaluation of related statistics through simulations will be presented in a companion paper by Zheng et al., [Sampling artifact in volume weighted velocity measurement. II. Detection in simulations and comparison with theoretical modelling, arXiv:1409.6809.]. We also argue that similar sampling artifact exists in other velocity assignment methods and hence must be carefully corrected to avoid systematic bias in peculiar velocity cosmology.

  18. Detection of eye blink artifacts from single prefrontal channel electroencephalogram.

    PubMed

    Chang, Won-Du; Cha, Ho-Seung; Kim, Kiwoong; Im, Chang-Hwan

    2016-02-01

    Eye blinks are one of the most influential artifact sources in electroencephalogram (EEG) recorded from frontal channels, and thereby detecting and rejecting eye blink artifacts is regarded as an essential procedure for improving the quality of EEG data. In this paper, a novel method to detect eye blink artifacts from a single-channel frontal EEG signal was proposed by combining digital filters with a rule-based decision system, and its performance was validated using an EEG dataset recorded from 24 healthy participants. The proposed method has two main advantages over the conventional methods. First, it uses single-channel EEG data without the need for electrooculogram references. Therefore, this method could be particularly useful in brain-computer interface applications using headband-type wearable EEG devices with a few frontal EEG channels. Second, this method could estimate the ranges of eye blink artifacts accurately. Our experimental results demonstrated that the artifact range estimated using our method was more accurate than that from the conventional methods, and thus, the overall accuracy of detecting epochs contaminated by eye blink artifacts was markedly increased as compared to conventional methods. The MATLAB package of our library source codes and sample data, named Eyeblink Master, is open for free download. PMID:26560852

  19. Health Instruction Packages: Permanent Teeth, Dental Deposits, and Dental Instruments. Dientes Permanentes, Depositos Dentales y Instrumentos Dentales.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lind, Patricia; Germano, Catherine

    These five learning modules use text interspersed with illustrations and reinforcement exercises to instruct dental aide and dental hygiene students about jaw bones and gums, dental deposits, and dental instruments. The first four modules were prepared by Patricia Lind in both Spanish and English. "The Gum and Bone of Permanent Teeth" ("La Encia y…

  20. Evaluation of a motion artifacts removal approach on breath-hold cine-magnetic resonance images of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betancur, Julián.; Simon, Antoine; Schnell, Frédéric; Donal, Erwan; Hernández, Alfredo; Garreau, Mireille

    2013-11-01

    The acquisition of ECG-gated cine magnetic resonance images of the heart is routinely performed in apnea in order to suppress the motion artifacts caused by breathing. However, many factors including the 2D nature of the acquisition and the use of di erent beats to acquire the multiple-view cine images, cause this kind of artifacts to appear. This paper presents the qualitative evaluation of a method aiming to remove motion artifacts in multipleview cine images acquired on patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy diagnosis. The approach uses iconic registration to reduce for in-plane artifacts in long-axis-view image stacks and in-plane and out-of-plane motion artifacts in sort-axis-view image stack. Four similarity measures were evaluated: the normalized correlation, the normalized mutual information, the sum of absolute voxel di erences and the Slomka metric proposed by Slomka et al. The qualitative evaluation assessed the misalignment of di erent anatomical structures of the left ventricle as follows: the misalignment of the interventricular septum and the lateral wall for short-axis-view acquisitions and the misalignment between the short-axis-view image and long-axis-view images. Results showed the correction using the normalized correlation as the most appropriated with an 80% of success.

  1. Suppression of high-density artifacts in x-ray CT images using temporal digital subtraction with application to cryotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baissalov, Roustem; Sandison, George A.; Donnelly, Bryan J.; Saliken, John C.; Muldrew, Ken; Rewcastle, John C.

    2000-06-01

    Image guidance of cryotherapy is usually performed using ultrasound or x-ray CT. Despite the ability of CT to display the full 3D structure of the iceball, including frozen and unfrozen regions, the quality of the images is compromised by the presence of high density streak artifacts. To suppress these artifacts we applied Temporal Digital Subtraction (TDS). This TDS method has the added advantage of improving the gray scale contrast between frozen and unfrozen tissue in the CT images. Two sets of CT images were taken of a phantom material, cryoprobes and a urethral warmer (UW) before and during the cryoprobe freeze cycle. The high density artifacts persisted in both image sets. TDS was performed on these two image sets using the corresponding mask image of unfrozen material and the same geometrical configuration of the cryoprobes and the UW. The resultant difference image had a significantly reduced content of the artifacts. This TDS can be used in x-ray CT assisted cryotherapy to significantly suppress or eliminate high density x-ray CT streak artifacts by digitally processing x-ray CT images. Applying TDS in cryotherapy will facilitate estimation of the amount and location of all frozen and unfrozen regions, potentially making cryotherapy safer and less operator dependent.

  2. Study of Artifact-Resistive Technology Based on a Novel Dual Photoplethysmography Method for Wearable Pulse Rate Monitors.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Congcong; Feng, Jingjie; Hu, Jun; Ye, Xuesong

    2016-03-01

    Pulse rate is one of the major physiological parameters for monitoring of cardiovascular conditions or excise states during daily life. However it is difficult to precisely measure the exact pulse rates as photoplethysmography (PPG) is easy to be affected by motion artifacts. Instead of using accelerometers followed by algorithms such as least mean square (LMS), recursive least square (RLS) and independent component analysis (ICA) or other equipment such as complex laser systems to measure displacement directly, a novel motion artifact estimation method which had lower computational complexity and higher signal dynamic range was studied and implemented, where a differential channel following green and red light PPG channels was applied to reduce the motion artifact caused by displacement of light emitting diode (LED), photo diode (PD) and tissue deformation before the analog signal was converted to digital form. A miniaturized, battery powered wrist worn artifact-resistive pulse rates monitoring system (PRMS) was presented to verify the proposed method. Four kinds of motions were performed and the results showed that the differential channel improved the morphology of the PPG signal and appeared to be artifact resistive during motions through light intensity control and high gain-phase consistency circuit design here. PMID:26645320

  3. A diffusion-based truncated projection artifact reduction method for iterative digital breast tomosynthesis reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yao; Chan, Heang-Ping; Wei, Jun; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.

    2013-02-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has strong promise to improve sensitivity for detecting breast cancer. DBT reconstruction estimates the breast tissue attenuation using projection views (PVs) acquired in a limited angular range. Because of the limited field of view (FOV) of the detector, the PVs may not completely cover the breast in the x-ray source motion direction at large projection angles. The voxels in the imaged volume cannot be updated when they are outside the FOV, thus causing a discontinuity in intensity across the FOV boundaries in the reconstructed slices, which we refer to as the truncated projection artifact (TPA). Most existing TPA reduction methods were developed for the filtered backprojection method in the context of computed tomography. In this study, we developed a new diffusion-based method to reduce TPAs during DBT reconstruction using the simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART). Our TPA reduction method compensates for the discontinuity in background intensity outside the FOV of the current PV after each PV updating in SART. The difference in voxel values across the FOV boundary is smoothly diffused to the region beyond the FOV of the current PV. Diffusion-based background intensity estimation is performed iteratively to avoid structured artifacts. The method is applicable to TPA in both the forward and backward directions of the PVs and for any number of iterations during reconstruction. The effectiveness of the new method was evaluated by comparing the visual quality of the reconstructed slices and the measured discontinuities across the TPA with and without artifact correction at various iterations. The results demonstrated that the diffusion-based intensity compensation method reduced the TPA while preserving the detailed tissue structures. The visibility of breast lesions obscured by the TPA was improved after artifact reduction.

  4. A diffusion-based truncated projection artifact reduction method for iterative digital breast tomosynthesis reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yao; Chan, Heang-Ping; Wei, Jun; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M

    2013-02-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has strong promise to improve sensitivity for detecting breast cancer. DBT reconstruction estimates the breast tissue attenuation using projection views (PVs) acquired in a limited angular range. Because of the limited field of view (FOV) of the detector, the PVs may not completely cover the breast in the x-ray source motion direction at large projection angles. The voxels in the imaged volume cannot be updated when they are outside the FOV, thus causing a discontinuity in intensity across the FOV boundaries in the reconstructed slices, which we refer to as the truncated projection artifact (TPA). Most existing TPA reduction methods were developed for the filtered backprojection method in the context of computed tomography. In this study, we developed a new diffusion-based method to reduce TPAs during DBT reconstruction using the simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART). Our TPA reduction method compensates for the discontinuity in background intensity outside the FOV of the current PV after each PV updating in SART. The difference in voxel values across the FOV boundary is smoothly diffused to the region beyond the FOV of the current PV. Diffusion-based background intensity estimation is performed iteratively to avoid structured artifacts. The method is applicable to TPA in both the forward and backward directions of the PVs and for any number of iterations during reconstruction. The effectiveness of the new method was evaluated by comparing the visual quality of the reconstructed slices and the measured discontinuities across the TPA with and without artifact correction at various iterations. The results demonstrated that the diffusion-based intensity compensation method reduced the TPA while preserving the detailed tissue structures. The visibility of breast lesions obscured by the TPA was improved after artifact reduction. PMID:23318346

  5. Mediators between education and dental pain: a cross-sectional study to assess the role of dental services utilization.

    PubMed

    Constante, Helena M; Peres, Marco A; Schroeder, Fernanda C; Bastos, João L

    2016-02-01

    This study tested whether the pattern of dental services utilization and the reason for the last dental visit mediate the association between educational attainment and dental pain. This is a cross-sectional analysis (n = 1099) based on data from a prospective cohort study in adults, southern Brazil. The mediating effects were assessed by including interaction terms in logistic regression models and by the KHB method, which estimated the direct, mediated, and total effects of education on dental pain. The prevalence of dental pain was 17.5%. Individuals with less than 12 yr of study who visited the dentist to solve dental problems had a 20% higher odds of reporting dental pain than those with 12 or more years of study, who sought the dentist for preventive reasons. Dental services should also focus on preventive measures, especially if less-educated individuals visit the dentist only to treat problems; this may help reduce the frequency of negative oral health outcomes, including dental pain. PMID:26718615

  6. Functionalized bio-artifact fabricated via selective slurry extrusion. Part 1: Preparation of slurry containing tourmaline superfine powders.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dongbin; Xu, Anping; Qu, Yunxia; Liu, Yushan

    2011-12-01

    The far infrared dental porcelain slurry for fabricating artificial tooth via selective slurry extrusion (SSE) of solid freeform fabrication (also known as rapid prototyping) techniques was prepared by using tourmaline as additive and employing ball-milling approach. After characterization by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, it was found that the far infrared emission properties of the dental porcelain were apparently improved in the ranges of 2000-1201 cm(-1) and 881-600 cm(-1). This is due to the increase of the number of infrared active bonds that are from the tourmaline superfine powders. Moreover, it was also found that the tourmaline superfine powders can improve the pseudo-plastic properties of dental porcelain slurries, which results from the increase of the absolute value of zeta potential of the suspensions. Slurries with pseudo-plastic behavior are highly desirable in controlling the shape of the extrudate during solid freeform fabrication. With the functionalized material, a variety of bio-artifacts beneficial to body health can be built by using selective slurry extrusion machine. PMID:22409019

  7. A 3D metal artifact correction method in cone-beam CT bone imaging by using an implant image library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Ning, Ruola; Conover, David

    2008-03-01

    Cone-beam CT (CBCT) technique has been used by orthopedists to monitor bone graft growth after orthopedic surgery. In order to correct severe metal artifacts in reconstructed images caused by metal implants used in bone grafting, a three-dimensional metal artifact correction method has been previously proposed. The implants' mathematic boundaries were generated to help to segment metal from reconstructed images. The segmented metal implants were forward-projected onto the detector to create metal-only projections to compensate for beam-hardening effect. This method was proved effective with the metal implants of regular shape which can be simulated by simple 3D primitives, such as cuboid, cylinder and cone. But for metal implants of arbitrary shape, their boundaries are difficult to define mathematically. To solve this problem, this paper proposed a method by setting up an implant image library and using the implants' a priori shape information from the library during the artifact correction. The implants were acquired and scanned before the surgery and their a priori information were stored in a library. During the artifact correction, the library was called to provide the shape information of the implants to help to do the implant segmentation. The segmented implants were forward-projected onto the detector to generate implant-only projections by a cone-beam forward-projection technique. Beam-hardening effect in the original projections was then compensated by high polynomial orders of implant projections. Finally, the corrected projections were back-projected to produce artifacts-reduced images. Both phantom studies and patient studies were conducted to test this correction method. Results from both studies show the artifacts have been greatly reduced and the accuracy of bone volume measurement has been increased.

  8. Auditory steady-state responses in cochlear implant users: Effect of modulation frequency and stimulation artifacts.

    PubMed

    Gransier, Robin; Deprez, Hanne; Hofmann, Michael; Moonen, Marc; van Wieringen, Astrid; Wouters, Jan

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that objective measures based on stimulation with low-rate pulse trains fail to predict the threshold levels of cochlear implant (CI) users for high-rate pulse trains, as used in clinical devices. Electrically evoked auditory steady-state responses (EASSRs) can be elicited by modulated high-rate pulse trains, and can potentially be used to objectively determine threshold levels of CI users. The responsiveness of the auditory pathway of profoundly hearing-impaired CI users to modulation frequencies is, however, not known. In the present study we investigated the responsiveness of the auditory pathway of CI users to a monopolar 500 pulses per second (pps) pulse train modulated between 1 and 100 Hz. EASSRs to forty-three modulation frequencies, elicited at the subject's maximum comfort level, were recorded by means of electroencephalography. Stimulation artifacts were removed by a linear interpolation between a pre- and post-stimulus sample (i.e., blanking). The phase delay across modulation frequencies was used to differentiate between the neural response and a possible residual stimulation artifact after blanking. Stimulation artifacts were longer than the inter-pulse interval of the 500pps pulse train for recording electrodes ipsilateral to the CI. As a result the stimulation artifacts could not be removed by artifact removal on the bases of linear interpolation for recording electrodes ipsilateral to the CI. However, artifact-free responses could be obtained in all subjects from recording electrodes contralateral to the CI, when subject specific reference electrodes (Cz or Fpz) were used. EASSRs to modulation frequencies within the 30-50 Hz range resulted in significant responses in all subjects. Only a small number of significant responses could be obtained, during a measurement period of 5 min, that originate from the brain stem (i.e., modulation frequencies in the 80-100 Hz range). This reduced synchronized activity of brain stem

  9. Advances in dental materials.

    PubMed

    Vaderhobli, Ram M

    2011-07-01

    The use of materials to rehabilitate tooth structures is constantly changing. Over the past decade, newer material processing techniques and technologies have significantly improved the dependability and predictability of dental material for clinicians. The greatest obstacle, however, is in choosing the right combination for continued success. Finding predictable approaches for successful restorative procedures has been the goal of clinical and material scientists. This article provides a broad perspective on the advances made in various classes of dental restorative materials in terms of their functionality with respect to pit and fissure sealants, glass ionomers, and dental composites. PMID:21726695

  10. Silver Nanoparticles in Dental Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Corrêa, Juliana Mattos; Mori, Matsuyoshi; Sanches, Heloísa Lajas; da Cruz, Adriana Dibo; Poiate, Isis Andréa Venturini Pola

    2015-01-01

    Silver has been used in medicine for centuries because of its antimicrobial properties. More recently, silver nanoparticles have been synthesized and incorporated into several biomaterials, since their small size provides great antimicrobial effect, at low filler level. Hence, these nanoparticles have been applied in dentistry, in order to prevent or reduce biofilm formation over dental materials surfaces. This review aims to discuss the current progress in this field, highlighting aspects regarding silver nanoparticles incorporation, such as antimicrobial potential, mechanical properties, cytotoxicity, and long-term effectiveness. We also emphasize the need for more studies to determine the optimal concentration of silver nanoparticle and its release over time. PMID:25667594

  11. Optical coherence tomography guided dental drill

    DOEpatents

    DaSilva, Luiz B.; Colston, Jr., Bill W.; James, Dale L.

    2002-01-01

    A dental drill that has one or multiple single mode fibers that can be used to image in the vicinity of the drill tip. It is valuable to image below the surface being drilled to minimize damage to vital or normal tissue. Identifying the boundary between decayed and normal enamel (or dentine) would reduce the removal of viable tissue, and identifying the nerve before getting too close with the drill could prevent nerve damage. By surrounding a drill with several optical fibers that can be used by an optical coherence domain reflectometry (OCDR) to image several millimeters ahead of the ablation surface will lead to a new and improved dental treatment device.

  12. Mouthrinses and dental caries.

    PubMed

    2002-10-01

    Mouthrinsing for the prevention of dental caries in children and adolescents was established as a mass prophylactic method in the 1960s and has shown average efficacy of caries reduction between 20-50%. Commonly, weekly or twice monthly rinsing procedures using neutral 0.2% NaF solutions have been used in schools or institutions in areas with low fluoride concentrations in the drinking water. Today, when dental caries has declined substantially in the western countries, and relatively few individuals are suffering from caries, the efficiency of large scale mouthrinsing is questioned and more individual approaches of caries prevention strategies are needed. For this reason individual caries risk assessments are necessary, utilising diagnostic tools with the aim of explaining the main causes of the caries disease. Therefore in high risk patients, daily mouthrinses using 0.05% NaF can be recommended combined with other selective preventive measures such as sugar restriction, improved oral hygiene, antibacterial treatments, and so forth. Mouthrinsing solutions have therefore been combined with antiplaque agents like chlorhexidine and other agents which can improve the caries preventive effect not only in high caries risk patients, including those with dry mouth problems and root caries. Other agents than sodium fluoride have been used, such as stannous and amine fluoride with proven clinical effects. However, although a series of new formulas of mouthrinses containing fluoride combined with different antiplaque agents have shown promising antibacterial and antiplaque efficacy, their long-term clinical effects are sparsely documented. Acute and chronic side effects from established and recommended mouthrinsing routines are extremely rare but ethanol containing products should not be recommended to children for long-term use or to individuals with alcohol problems. Patients with dry mouth problems should avoid mouthrinses containing high concentration of detergent

  13. Recall compliance and incidence of dental caries among underserved children.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ulysses; Hui, Brian K; Pourat, Nadereh

    2015-02-01

    Regular dental recall intervals are widely recommended by dentists in the U.S. to prevent caries and improve periodontal health. However, there is some debate on whether or not compliance with six-month or more frequent recall intervals results in reduced incidence of dental caries. This study examines whether compliance with regular recall and receipt of cleanings, exams and patient education reduces rates of new decay in underserved children and finds a positive impact. PMID:25868221

  14. Characterization of ultrasound elevation beamwidth artifacts for prostate brachytherapy needle insertion

    SciTech Connect

    Peikari, Mohammad; Chen, Thomas Kuriran; Lasso, Anras; Heffter, Tamas; Fichtinger, Gabor; Burdette, Everette C.

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: Ultrasound elevation beamwidth leads to image artifacts and uncertainties in localizing objects (such as a surgical needle) in ultrasound images. The authors examined the clinical significance of errors caused by elevation beamwidth artifacts and imaging parameters in needle insertion procedures. Methods: Beveled prostate brachytherapy needles were inserted through all holes of a grid template under real-time transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guidance. The needle tip position as indicated by the TRUS image was compared to their observed physical location. A new device was developed to measure the ultrasound elevation beamwidth. Results: Imaging parameters of the TRUS scanner have direct impact on the localization error ranging from 0.5 up to 4 mm. The smallest localization error was observed laterally close to the center of the grid template and axially within the beam's focal zone. Largest localization error occurs laterally around both sides of the grid template and axially within the beam's far field. The authors also found that the localization errors vary with both lateral and elevation offsets. Conclusions: The authors found properly adjusting the TRUS imaging settings to lower the ultrasound gain and power effectively minimized the appearance of elevation beamwidth artifacts and in turn reduced the localization errors of the needle tip.

  15. Empirical mode decomposition-based motion artifact correction method for functional near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yue; Han, Junxia; Liang, Zhenhu; Yan, Jiaqing; Li, Zheng; Li, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a promising technique for monitoring brain activity. However, it is sensitive to motion artifacts. Many methods have been developed for motion correction, such as spline interpolation, wavelet filtering, and kurtosis-based wavelet filtering. We propose a motion correction method based on empirical mode decomposition (EMD), which is applied to segments of data identified as having motion artifacts. The EMD method is adaptive, data-driven, and well suited for nonstationary data. To test the performance of the proposed EMD method and to compare it with other motion correction methods, we used simulated hemodynamic responses added to real resting-state fNIRS data. The EMD method reduced mean squared error in 79% of channels and increased signal-to-noise ratio in 78% of channels. Moreover, it produced the highest Pearson's correlation coefficient between the recovered signal and the original signal, significantly better than the comparison methods (p<0.01, paired t-test). These results indicate that the proposed EMD method is a first choice method for motion artifact correction in fNIRS.

  16. Dental mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Paul T

    2016-07-01

    Mammalian teeth harbour mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which contribute to tooth growth and repair. These dental MSCs possess many in vitro features of bone marrow-derived MSCs, including clonogenicity, expression of certain markers, and following stimulation, differentiation into cells that have the characteristics of osteoblasts, chondrocytes and adipocytes. Teeth and their support tissues provide not only an easily accessible source of MSCs but also a tractable model system to study their function and properties in vivo In addition, the accessibility of teeth together with their clinical relevance provides a valuable opportunity to test stem cell-based treatments for dental disorders. This Review outlines some recent discoveries in dental MSC function and behaviour and discusses how these and other advances are paving the way for the development of new biologically based dental therapies. PMID:27381225

  17. Glossary of Dental Terms

    MedlinePlus

    ... geta poker friv Home InfoBites Find an AGD Dentist Your Family's Oral Health About the AGD Dental ... and shape of teeth performed by a general dentist | More Edentulous having lost most or all of ...

  18. American Dental Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Oral Health Topics ADVERTISEMENT Advocacy Advocacy Advocacy Issues Health Care Reform ADA Positions, Policies and Statements Legal Advocacy and ... Children's Dental Health Month ADA Seal of Acceptance Fluoride in Water Advocating for the Public Prevention Summit ...

  19. Dental care - child

    MedlinePlus

    ... dental exams, and getting necessary treatments such as fluoride, extractions, fillings, or braces and other orthodontics. ... provider if your infant needs to take oral fluoride . THE FIRST TRIP TO THE DENTIST Your child's ...

  20. Infant dental care (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Even though newborns and infants do not have teeth, care of the mouth and gums is important. ... sugar water. As the child grows, establishing proper dental hygiene will promote healthy teeth and gums which ...

  1. Dental care - child

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cantor A, Zakher B, et al. Preventing dental caries in children <5 years: systematic review updating USPSTF ... nih.gov/pubmed/15606059 . Ng MW. Early childhood caries: risk-based disease prevention and management. Dent Clin ...

  2. Dental Care in Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... for you and your baby and contain less sugar that can damage your teeth. Water or low-fat milk hydrates you and contains little or no sugar. For More Information American Dental Association: Pregnancy http : / / ...

  3. Assessment of dental plaque by optoelectronic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negrutiu, Meda-Lavinia; Sinescu, Cosmin; Bortun, Cristina Maria; Levai, Mihaela-Codrina; Topala, Florin Ionel; Crǎciunescu, Emanuela Lidia; Cojocariu, Andreea Codruta; Duma, Virgil Florin; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2016-03-01

    The formation of dental biofilm follows specific mechanisms of initial colonization on the surface, microcolony formation, development of organized three dimensional community structures, and detachment from the surface. The structure of the plaque biofilm might restrict the penetration of antimicrobial agents, while bacteria on a surface grow slowly and display a novel phenotype; the consequence of the latter is a reduced sensitivity to inhibitors. The aim of this study was to evaluate with different optoelectronic methods the morphological characteristics of the dental biofilm. The study was performed on samples from 25 patients aged between 18 and 35 years. The methods used in this study were Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) working at 870 nm for in vivo evaluations and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) for validations. For each patient a sample of dental biofilm was obtained directly from the vestibular surface of the teeth's. SD-OCT produced C- and B-scans that were used to generate three dimensional (3D) reconstructions of the sample. The results were compared with SEM evaluations. The biofilm network was dramatically destroyed after the professional dental cleaning. OCT noninvasive methods can act as a valuable tool for the 3D characterization of dental biofilms.

  4. Referrals for Dental Care During Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Kloetzel, Megan K.; Huebner, Colleen E.; Milgrom, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Oral health is essential to overall health in the prenatal period. Pregnancy is not a time to delay dental care. Several studies have shown an association between periodontal disease and poor pregnancy outcomes including preterm birth. Interventions to provide periodontal treatment to pregnant women yield inconsistent results regarding preterm birth but have established the safety of periodontal therapy during pregnancy. Postpartum, women in poor dental health readily transmit the tooth decay pathogen Streptococcus mutans from their saliva to their infants resulting in increased risk of early childhood caries. Preventive services and treatment for acute problems should be recommended, fears allayed, and women referred. Dental x-rays may be performed safely with the use of appropriate shielding. Non-emergent interventions are best provided between 14 and 20 weeks of gestation for comfort and optimal fetal safety. Most gravid women do not seek dental care. Increased interprofessional communication to encourage dentists to treat pregnant women will reduce the number of women without care. In states where it is available, Medicaid coverage of dental services for pregnant women is typically allowed during pregnancy and for two months postpartum. Women’s health providers should understand the importance of protecting oral health during pregnancy and educate their patients accordingly. PMID:21429074

  5. Elevated T cell subpopulations in dental students

    SciTech Connect

    Eedy, D.J.; Burrows, D.; Clifford, T.; Fay, A. )

    1990-05-01

    The absolute numbers of circulating white cells and lymphocyte subpopulations were studied in 25 final-year dental students and compared with a control group of 28 medical students. The total lymphocyte count, total T cell numbers (CD3), T helper/inducer (CD4), and T suppressor/cytotoxic (CD8) numbers were significantly elevated in the dental students as compared with the control group. There was no significant difference in the T helper/inducer to T suppressor/cytotoxic cell ratios or the circulating B cell (CD21) and natural killer cell (CD16) numbers between the study and control groups. Patch testing to mercury and mercuric compounds in both the study and control groups showed no evidence of cutaneous hypersensitivity to mercury. The reason for the observed elevations in T cell subpopulations in dental students is not clear. However, one possible explanation is the dental student's occupational exposure to mercury. Further work is underway to examine this possible relationship and it is suggested that dental personnel take adequate measures to reduce their exposure to mercury until the results of these studies are available.

  6. Referrals for dental care during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kloetzel, Megan K; Huebner, Colleen E; Milgrom, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Oral health is essential to overall health in the prenatal period. Pregnancy is not a time to delay dental care. Several studies have shown an association between periodontal disease and poor pregnancy outcomes including preterm birth. Interventions to provide periodontal treatment to pregnant women yield inconsistent results regarding preterm birth but have established the safety of periodontal therapy during pregnancy. Postpartum women in poor dental health readily transmit the tooth decay pathogen Streptococcus mutans from their saliva to their infants, resulting in increased risk of early childhood caries. Preventive services and treatment for acute problems should be recommended, fears allayed, and women referred. Dental radiographs may be performed safely with the use of appropriate shielding. Nonemergent interventions are best provided between 14 and 20 weeks' gestation for comfort and optimal fetal safety. Most gravid women do not seek dental care. Increased interprofessional communication to encourage dentists to treat pregnant women will reduce the number of women without care. In states where it is available, Medicaid coverage of dental services for pregnant women is typically allowed during pregnancy and for 2 months postpartum. Women's health providers should understand the importance of protecting oral health during pregnancy and educate their patients accordingly. PMID:21429074

  7. A new method for the removal of refraction artifacts in multibeam echosounder systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammerer, Edouard Louis Laurent Marie

    Refraction artifacts are often present in shallow water multibeam surveys and can degrade the quality of the final product if they are not adequately addressed. This thesis consists of the implementation of a systematic analysis and correction software package that addresses refraction artifacts in a post-processing context. The methodology consists of the estimation of the variation in the water sound speed distribution, by using the information given by the multibeam dataset itself. This is done by the evaluation of the appropriately modeled Sound Speed Profiles (SSP), which is applied either in addition to an already existing SSP, or applied directly to the raw data. Refraction errors are most developed in the outer parts of the survey line coverage. The software developed takes advantage of this observation by utilising the nadir data because they are almost unaffected by refraction errors. Two methods of analysis are considered in this study. The first method uses two neighbouring parallel lines to generate corrections. The second uses the crossing check lines. Both methods are used to evaluate the refraction coefficients of a two-layer SSP model, which, when applied, should bring the outer parts of the survey line as close as possible to the real seafloor (as observed at nadir). The software developed is tested on an actual multibeam dataset. This data has been acquired off Saint John Harbor (N.B.) with a SIMRAD EM1000 sonar. The application of the new post-processing tool reduces refraction artifacts. The reduction of such artifacts improves the extraction of useful information contained in the multibeam data. The method used allows as well the computation of correction SSPs that provide characteristics of an equivalent water mass.

  8. Metal artifact reduction in CT via ray profile correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Sungsoo; Mueller, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    In computed tomography (CT), metal implants increase the inconsistencies between the measured data and the linear assumption made by the analytical CT reconstruction algorithm. The inconsistencies appear in the form of dark and bright bands and streaks in the reconstructed image, collectively called metal artifacts. The standard method for metal artifact reduction (MAR) replaces the inconsistent data with the interpolated data. However, sinogram interpolation not only introduces new artifacts but it also suffers from the loss of detail near the implanted metals. With the help of a prior image that is usually estimated from the metal artifact-degraded image via computer vision techniques, improvements are feasible but still no MAR method exists that is widely accepted and utilized. We propose a technique that utilizes a prior image from a CT scan taken of the patient before implanting the metal objects. Hence there is a sufficient amount of structural similarity to cover the loss of detail around the metal implants. Using the prior scan and a segmentation or model of the metal implant our method then replaces sinogram interpolation with ray profile matching and estimation which yields much more reliable data estimates for the affected sinogram regions. As preliminary work, we built a new MAR framework on fan-beam geometry and tested it to remove simulated metal artifacts on a thorax phantom. The comparison with two representative sinogram correction based MAR methods shows very promising results.

  9. Search for continuous gravitational waves: Improving robustness versus instrumental artifacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keitel, David; Prix, Reinhard; Papa, Maria Alessandra; Leaci, Paola; Siddiqi, Maham

    2014-03-01

    The standard multidetector F-statistic for continuous gravitational waves is susceptible to false alarms from instrumental artifacts, for example monochromatic sinusoidal disturbances ("lines"). This vulnerability to line artifacts arises because the F-statistic compares the signal hypothesis to a Gaussian-noise hypothesis, and hence is triggered by anything that resembles the signal hypothesis more than Gaussian noise. Various ad-hoc veto methods to deal with such line artifacts have been proposed and used in the past. Here we develop a Bayesian framework that includes an explicit alternative hypothesis to model disturbed data. We introduce a simple line model that defines lines as signal candidates appearing only in one detector. This allows us to explicitly compute the odds between the signal hypothesis and an extended noise hypothesis, resulting in a new detection statistic that is more robust to instrumental artifacts. We present and discuss results from Monte-Carlo tests on both simulated data and on detector data from the fifth LIGO science run. We find that the line-robust statistic retains the detection power of the standard F-statistic in Gaussian noise. In the presence of line artifacts it is more sensitive, even compared to the popular F-statistic consistency veto, over which it improves by as much as a factor of two in detectable signal strength.

  10. Portable Dental System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Portable dental system provides dental care in isolated communities. System includes a patient's chair and a dentist's stool, an X-ray machine and a power unit, all of which fold into compact packages. A large yellow "pumpkin" is a collapsible compressed air tank. Portable system has been used successfully in South America in out of the way communities with this back-packable system, and in American nursing homes. This product is no longer manufactured.

  11. Dental (Odontogenic) Pain

    PubMed Central

    Renton, Tara

    2011-01-01

    This article provides a simple overview of acute trigeminal pain for the non dentist. This article does not cover oral mucosal diseases (vesiculobullous disorders) that may cause acute pain. Dental pain is the most common in this group and it can present in several different ways. Of particular interest for is that dental pain can mimic both trigeminal neuralgia and other chronic trigeminal pain disorders. It is crucial to exclude these disorders whilst managing patients with chronic trigeminal pain. PMID:26527224

  12. Survey of radiographic requirements and techniques in United States dental assisting programs, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Farman, A.G.; Grammer, S.; Hunter, N.; Baker, C.

    1983-10-01

    A survey of dental assisting programs revealed little standardization of student requirements for dental radiography in the United States. Areas for concern were: the high proportion of programs in which classmates exposed one another to ionizing radiation for training purposes; and the continued use of closed cones in some cases. Preclinical laboratories in radiography were, on average, of considerably longer duration than those previously reported for dental students. Conversely, clinical requirements in intraoral techniques were less for dental assisting students than is the case for dental students. Available methods of reducing patient exposure to ionizing radiation are not being fully implemented.

  13. The impacts of dental filling materials on RapidArc treatment planning and dose delivery: Challenges and solution

    SciTech Connect

    Mail, Noor; Al-Ghamdi, S.; Saoudi, A.; Albarakati, Y.; Ahmad Khan, M.; Saeedi, F.; Safadi, N.

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: The presence of high-density material in the oral cavity creates dose perturbation in both downstream and upstream directions at the surfaces of dental filling materials (DFM). In this study, the authors have investigated the effect of DFM on head and neck RapidArc treatment plans and delivery. Solutions are proposed to address (1) the issue of downstream dose perturbation, which might cause target under dosage, and (2) to reduce the upstream dose from DFM which may be the primary source of mucositis. In addition, an investigation of the clinical role of a custom-made plastic dental mold/gutter (PDM) in sparing the oral mucosa and tongue reaction is outlined.Methods: The influence of the dental filling artifacts on dose distribution was investigated using a geometrically well-defined head and neck intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) verification phantom (PTW, Freiberg, Germany) with DFM inserts called amalgam, which contained 50% mercury, 25% silver, 14% tin, 8% copper, and 3% other trace metals. Three RapidArc plans were generated in the Varian Eclipse System to treat the oral cavity using the same computer tomography (CT) dataset, including (1) a raw CT image, (2) a streaking artifacts region, which was replaced with a mask of 10 HU, and (3) a 2 cm-thick 6000 HU virtual filter [a volume created in treatment planning system to compensate for beam attenuation, where the thickness of this virtual filter is based on the measured percent depth dose (PDD) data and Eclipse calculation]. The dose delivery for the three plans was verified using Gafchromic-EBT2 film measurements. The custom-made PDM technique to reduce backscatter dose was clinically tested on four head and neck cancer patients (T3, N1, M0) with DFM, two patients with PDM and the other two patients without PDM. The thickness calculation of the PDM toward the mucosa and tongue was purely based on the measured upstream dose. Patients’ with oral mucosal reaction was clinically examined

  14. Synchronized multiartifact reduction with tomographic reconstruction (SMART-RECON): A statistical model based iterative image reconstruction method to eliminate limited-view artifacts and to mitigate the temporal-average artifacts in time-resolved CT

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guang-Hong; Li, Yinsheng

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In x-ray computed tomography (CT), a violation of the Tuy data sufficiency condition leads to limited-view artifacts. In some applications, it is desirable to use data corresponding to a narrow temporal window to reconstruct images with reduced temporal-average artifacts. However, the need to reduce temporal-average artifacts in practice may result in a violation of the Tuy condition and thus undesirable limited-view artifacts. In this paper, the authors present a new iterative reconstruction method, synchronized multiartifact reduction with tomographic reconstruction (SMART-RECON), to eliminate limited-view artifacts using data acquired within an ultranarrow temporal window that severely violates the Tuy condition. Methods: In time-resolved contrast enhanced CT acquisitions, image contrast dynamically changes during data acquisition. Each image reconstructed from data acquired in a given temporal window represents one time frame and can be denoted as an image vector. Conventionally, each individual time frame is reconstructed independently. In this paper, all image frames are grouped into a spatial–temporal image matrix and are reconstructed together. Rather than the spatial and/or temporal smoothing regularizers commonly used in iterative image reconstruction, the nuclear norm of the spatial–temporal image matrix is used in SMART-RECON to regularize the reconstruction of all image time frames. This regularizer exploits the low-dimensional structure of the spatial–temporal image matrix to mitigate limited-view artifacts when an ultranarrow temporal window is desired in some applications to reduce temporal-average artifacts. Both numerical simulations in two dimensional image slices with known ground truth and in vivo human subject data acquired in a contrast enhanced cone beam CT exam have been used to validate the proposed SMART-RECON algorithm and to demonstrate the initial performance of the algorithm. Reconstruction errors and temporal fidelity

  15. Saliva and dental erosion

    PubMed Central

    BUZALAF, Marília Afonso Rabelo; HANNAS, Angélicas Reis; KATO, Melissa Thiemi

    2012-01-01

    Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition. The consideration of chemical, biological and behavioral factors is fundamental for its prevention and therapy. Among the biological factors, saliva is one of the most important parameters in the protection against erosive wear. Objective This review discusses the role of salivary factors on the development of dental erosion. Material and Methods A search was undertaken on MEDLINE website for papers from 1969 to 2010. The keywords used in the research were "saliva", "acquired pellicle", "salivary flow", "salivary buffering capacity" and "dental erosion". Inclusion of studies, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken independently and in duplicate by two members of the review team. Disagreements were solved by discussion and consensus or by a third party. Results Several characteristics and properties of saliva play an important role in dental erosion. Salivary clearance gradually eliminates the acids through swallowing and saliva presents buffering capacity causing neutralization and buffering of dietary acids. Salivary flow allows dilution of the acids. In addition, saliva is supersaturated with respect to tooth mineral, providing calcium, phosphate and fluoride necessary for remineralization after an erosive challenge. Furthermore, many proteins present in saliva and acquired pellicle play an important role in dental erosion. Conclusions Saliva is the most important biological factor affecting the progression of dental erosion. Knowledge of its components and properties involved in this protective role can drive the development of preventive measures targeting to enhance its known beneficial effects. PMID:23138733

  16. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...—Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography The following...

  17. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...—Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography The following...

  18. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...—Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography The following...

  19. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...—Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography The following...

  20. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...—Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography The following...

  1. Dental fitness classification in the Canadian forces.

    PubMed

    Groves, Richard R

    2008-01-01

    The Canadian Forces Dental Services utilizes a dental classification system to identify those military members dentally fit for an overseas deployment where dental resources may be limited. Although the Canadian Forces Dental Services dental classification system is based on NATO standards, it differs slightly from the dental classification systems of other NATO country dental services. Data collected by dental teams on overseas deployments indicate a low rate of emergency dental visits by Canadian Forces members who were screened as dentally fit to deploy. PMID:18277717

  2. Artifact Reduction in X-Ray CT Images of Al-Steel-Perspex Specimens Mimicking a Hip Prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhogarhia, Manish; Munshi, P.; Lukose, Sijo; Subramanian, M. P.; Muralidhar, C.

    2008-09-01

    X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is a relatively new technique developed in the late 1970's, which enables the nondestructive visualization of the internal structure of objects. Beam hardening caused by the polychromatic spectrum is an important problem in X-ray computed tomography (X-CT). It leads to various artifacts in reconstruction images and reduces image quality. In the present work we are considering the Artifact Reduction in Total Hip Prosthesis CT Scan which is a problem of medical imaging. We are trying to reduce the cupping artifact induced by beam hardening as well as metal artifact as they exist in the CT scan of a human hip after the femur is replaced by a metal implant. The correction method for beam hardening used here is based on a previous work. Simulation study for the present problem includes a phantom consisting of mild steel, aluminium and perspex mimicking the photon attenuation properties of a hum hip cross section with metal implant.

  3. Motion artifacts reduction from PPG using cyclic moving average filter.

    PubMed

    Lee, Junyeon

    2014-01-01

    The photoplethysmogram (PPG) is an extremely useful medical diagnostic tool. However, PPG signals are highly susceptible to motion artifacts. In this paper, we propose a cyclic moving average filter that use similarity of Photoplethysmogram. This filtering method has the average value of each samples through separating the cycle of PPG signal. If there are some motion artifacts in continuous PPG signal, disjoin the signal based on cycle. And then, we made these signals to have same cycle by coordinating the number of sample. After arrange these cycles in 2 dimension, we put the average value of each samples from starting till now. So, we can eliminate the motion artifacts without damaged PPG signal. PMID:24704660

  4. Ring artifacts correction in compressed sensing tomographic reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Paleo, Pierre; Mirone, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Ring artifacts are a very common problem in tomographic reconstruction, and numerous methods exist to either pre-process the sinogram or correct the reconstructed slice. A novel approach to perform the correction as part of the reconstruction process is presented. It is shown that for iterative techniques, which amount to optimizing an objective function, the ring artifacts correction can be easily integrated in the formalism, enabling simultaneous slice reconstruction and ring artifacts correction. This method is tested and compared with mainstream correction techniques for both simulated and experimental data. Results show that the correction is efficient, especially for undersampled datasets. This technique is included in the PyHST2 code which is used at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility for tomographic reconstruction. PMID:26289279

  5. Incidence and consequences of breast artifacts in radionuclide cardiac studies

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer-Pavel, C.; Clark, J.K.; Pavel, D.G.

    1982-02-01

    A retrospective evaluation was done on 426 radionuclide cardiac studies performed on female patients at our institution from January through September, 1980. These procedures included pyrophosphate (PYP) myocardial scans, resting and exercise Tl-201 studies, and gated equilibrium studies. The purpose of this evaluation was to document the incidence and possible consequences of breast artifacts in various cardiac procedures. We found the incidence to range from 30 to 50% of the studies performed, and both the incidence and type of artifact encountered varied with the type of procedure performed. Furthermore, 13 to 35% of patients had artifacts directly overlying the myocardium. The possible consequences, including potential misdiagnosis, interference with computer derived quantitative parameters, and the technical maneuvers necessary to avoid or alleviate these problems are discussed.

  6. Influence of dental materials on dental MRI

    PubMed Central

    Tymofiyeva, O; Vaegler, S; Rottner, K; Boldt, J; Hopfgartner, AJ; Proff, PC; Richter, E-J; Jakob, PM

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the potential influence of standard dental materials on dental MRI (dMRI) by estimating the magnetic susceptibility with the help of the MRI-based geometric distortion method and to classify the materials from the standpoint of dMRI. Methods: A series of standard dental materials was studied on a 1.5 T MRI system using spin echo and gradient echo pulse sequences and their magnetic susceptibility was estimated using the geometric method. Measurements on samples of dental materials were supported by in vivo examples obtained in dedicated dMRI procedures. Results: The tested materials showed a range of distortion degrees. The following materials were classified as fully compatible materials that can be present even in the tooth of interest: the resin-based sealer AH Plus® (Dentsply, Maillefer, Germany), glass ionomer cement, gutta-percha, zirconium dioxide and composites from one of the tested manufacturers. Interestingly, composites provided by the other manufacturer caused relatively strong distortions and were therefore classified as compatible I, along with amalgam, gold alloy, gold–ceramic crowns, titanium alloy and NiTi orthodontic wires. Materials, the magnetic susceptibility of which differed from that of water by more than 200 ppm, were classified as non-compatible materials that should not be present in the patient’s mouth for any dMRI applications. They included stainless steel orthodontic appliances and CoCr. Conclusions: A classification of the materials that complies with the standard grouping of materials according to their magnetic susceptibility was proposed and adopted for the purposes of dMRI. The proposed classification can serve as a guideline in future dMRI research. PMID:23610088

  7. EEG artifact removal—state-of-the-art and guidelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urigüen, Jose Antonio; Garcia-Zapirain, Begoña

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents an extensive review on the artifact removal algorithms used to remove the main sources of interference encountered in the electroencephalogram (EEG), specifically ocular, muscular and cardiac artifacts. We first introduce background knowledge on the characteristics of EEG activity, of the artifacts and of the EEG measurement model. Then, we present algorithms commonly employed in the literature and describe their key features. Lastly, principally on the basis of the results provided by various researchers, but also supported by our own experience, we compare the state-of-the-art methods in terms of reported performance, and provide guidelines on how to choose a suitable artifact removal algorithm for a given scenario. With this review we have concluded that, without prior knowledge of the recorded EEG signal or the contaminants, the safest approach is to correct the measured EEG using independent component analysis—to be precise, an algorithm based on second-order statistics such as second-order blind identification (SOBI). Other effective alternatives include extended information maximization (InfoMax) and an adaptive mixture of independent component analyzers (AMICA), based on higher order statistics. All of these algorithms have proved particularly effective with simulations and, more importantly, with data collected in controlled recording conditions. Moreover, whenever prior knowledge is available, then a constrained form of the chosen method should be used in order to incorporate such additional information. Finally, since which algorithm is the best performing is highly dependent on the type of the EEG signal, the artifacts and the signal to contaminant ratio, we believe that the optimal method for removing artifacts from the EEG consists in combining more than one algorithm to correct the signal using multiple processing stages, even though this is an option largely unexplored by researchers in the area.

  8. Depolarization artifacts in dual rotating-compensator Mueller matrix ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weiqi; Zhang, Chuanwei; Jiang, Hao; Chen, Xiuguo; Liu, Shiyuan

    2016-05-01

    Noticeable depolarization effects are observed in the measurement of the air using an in-house developed dual rotating-compensator Mueller matrix ellipsometer. We demonstrate that these depolarization effects are essentially artifacts and mainly induced when the compensator with wavelength-dependent optical properties is integrated with the finite bandwidth detector. We define a general formula to represent the actual Mueller matrix of the compensator by taking into account the depolarization artifacts. After incorporating this formula into the system model, a correction method is further proposed, and consequently, improved accuracy can be achieved in the Mueller matrix measurement.

  9. [Laboratory diagnosis of pseudoparasites, artifacts and parasitic delusions].

    PubMed

    Podhorský, Martin

    2011-06-01

    Common practice in a diagnostic parasitology laboratory involves distinguishing parasitic organisms from various artifacts. Artifacts mean pseudoparasites, supposed parasites and parasitic delusions. Pseudoparasites include undigested leftovers or coincidentally or purposely ingested nonparasitic organisms or their parts. Supposed parasites are wild organisms which were incorrectly identified as the components of faeces. In parasitic delusions, it is impossible to find any kind of parasites while patients describe imaginary parasites in detail. All the above categories of nonparasitic findings including case reports are described and discussed in the article. PMID:21780030

  10. EEG Artifact Removal Using a Wavelet Neural Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hoang-Anh T.; Musson, John; Li, Jiang; McKenzie, Frederick; Zhang, Guangfan; Xu, Roger; Richey, Carl; Schnell, Tom

    2011-01-01

    !n this paper we developed a wavelet neural network. (WNN) algorithm for Electroencephalogram (EEG) artifact removal without electrooculographic (EOG) recordings. The algorithm combines the universal approximation characteristics of neural network and the time/frequency property of wavelet. We. compared the WNN algorithm with .the ICA technique ,and a wavelet thresholding method, which was realized by using the Stein's unbiased risk estimate (SURE) with an adaptive gradient-based optimal threshold. Experimental results on a driving test data set show that WNN can remove EEG artifacts effectively without diminishing useful EEG information even for very noisy data.

  11. "Diabetes and literacy: negotiating control through artifacts of medicalization".

    PubMed

    Martins, David S

    2009-06-01

    My experience with the California Department of Motor Vehicles offers a case to explore how bureaucratic institutions monitor, classify, and control individuals. By examining artifacts created for and used by the DMV through the lens of literacy studies, I discuss the variety of rhetorical strategies used in each document and the effects and implications of those strategies, for example on subjectivity or identity, and move beyond the language of the artifacts themselves to attend to how they are invested with power in the management and control of populations. PMID:19165582

  12. 21 CFR 872.3100 - Dental amalgamator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dental amalgamator. 872.3100 Section 872.3100 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3100 Dental amalgamator. (a) Identification. A dental... and dental alloy particles, such as silver, tin, zinc, and copper. The mixed dental amalgam...

  13. 21 CFR 872.3100 - Dental amalgamator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental amalgamator. 872.3100 Section 872.3100 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3100 Dental amalgamator. (a) Identification. A dental... and dental alloy particles, such as silver, tin, zinc, and copper. The mixed dental amalgam...

  14. 21 CFR 872.3100 - Dental amalgamator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dental amalgamator. 872.3100 Section 872.3100 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3100 Dental amalgamator. (a) Identification. A dental... and dental alloy particles, such as silver, tin, zinc, and copper. The mixed dental amalgam...

  15. 21 CFR 872.3100 - Dental amalgamator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dental amalgamator. 872.3100 Section 872.3100 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3100 Dental amalgamator. (a) Identification. A dental... and dental alloy particles, such as silver, tin, zinc, and copper. The mixed dental amalgam...

  16. 21 CFR 872.3100 - Dental amalgamator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dental amalgamator. 872.3100 Section 872.3100 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3100 Dental amalgamator. (a) Identification. A dental... and dental alloy particles, such as silver, tin, zinc, and copper. The mixed dental amalgam...

  17. Socioeconomic and family influences on dental treatment needs among Brazilian underprivileged schoolchildren participating in a dental health program

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to compare the socioeconomic and family characteristics of underprivileged schoolchildren with and without curative dental needs participating in a dental health program. Methods A random sample of 1411 of 8-to-10 year-old Brazilian schoolchildren was examined and two sample groups were included in the cross-sectional study: 544 presented curative dental needs and the other 867 schoolchildren were without curative dental needs. The schoolchildren were examined for the presence of caries lesions using the DMFT index and their parents were asked to answer questions about socioenvironmental characteristics of their families. Logistic regression models were adjusted estimating the Odds Ratios (OR), their 95% confidence intervals (CI), and significance levels. Results After adjusting for potential confounders, it was found that families earning more than one Brazilian minimum wage, having fewer than four residents in the house, families living in homes owned by them, and children living with both biological parents were protective factors for the presence of dental caries, and consequently, curative dental needs. Conclusions Socioeconomic status and family structure influences the curative dental needs of children from underprivileged communities. In this sense, dental health programs should plan and implement strategic efforts to reduce inequities in oral health status and access to oral health services of vulnerable schoolchildren and their families. PMID:24138683

  18. Compressed-sensing (CS)-based 3D image reconstruction in cone-beam CT (CBCT) for low-dose, high-quality dental X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M. S.; Kim, H. J.; Cho, H. S.; Hong, D. K.; Je, U. K.; Oh, J. E.; Park, Y. O.; Lee, S. H.; Cho, H. M.; Choi, S. I.; Koo, Y. S.

    2013-09-01

    The most popular reconstruction algorithm for cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is based on the computationally-inexpensive filtered-backprojection (FBP) method. However, that method usually requires dense projections over the Nyquist samplings, which imposes severe restrictions on the imaging doses. Moreover, the algorithm tends to produce cone-beam artifacts as the cone angle is increased. Several variants of the FBP-based algorithm have been developed to overcome these difficulties, but problems with the cone-beam reconstruction still remain. In this study, we considered a compressed-sensing (CS)-based reconstruction algorithm for low-dose, high-quality dental CBCT images that exploited the sparsity of images with substantially high accuracy. We implemented the algorithm and performed systematic simulation works to investigate the imaging characteristics. CBCT images of high quality were successfully reconstructed by using the built-in CS-based algorithm, and the image qualities were evaluated quantitatively in terms of the universal-quality index (UQI) and the slice-profile quality index (SPQI).We expect the reconstruction algorithm developed in the work to be applicable to current dental CBCT systems, to reduce imaging doses, and to improve the image quality further.

  19. Improved method using a bubble-free adhesion technique for the preparation of semi-serial undecalcified histologic sections containing dental implants.

    PubMed

    Kihara, A; Morimoto, K; Suetsugu, T

    1989-01-01

    The preparation technique, with the minimum of artifacts for the semi-serial undecalcified histologic sections containing dental implants, is presented in this study. The sections enabled finer light-microscopic observations to be made. A formalin-fixed tissue block containing a dental implant was dehydrated in ethanol and acetone, and then embedded in polyester resin under 76 cm Hg reduced pressure. The embedded block was trimmed by a cutter and ground by abrasive paper. In a 1.5 Kg f/cm2 pressurized chamber, its polished surface was bonded to a methacrylate slide by means of ethylcyanoacrylate used in an adhesion loading device. This meant that no bubbles could arise in the interface between the slide and the block. The slide-block was then attached to an adsorptive specimen-holder of a hard-tissue cutting machine and cut to a thickness of approximately 50 microns, with use of a diamond blade. The slide-section was ground to 15-40 microns with wet-type abrasive paper and film on a polishing table. Etching with weak acid and surface staining with toluidine blue and methylene blue/basic fuchsin/light green were performed on the section. PMID:2701107

  20. Dental Implantology in U.S. Dental Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bavitz, J. Bruce

    1990-01-01

    The results of a survey of 44 dental schools corroborate the belief that dental implantology is gaining widespread acceptance in U.S. dental schools. Currently, predoctoral students have limited clinical participation. Most programs have taken the position that clinical techniques are best taught within the existing specialties at a graduate…

  1. Bulimia and Anorexia Nervosa in Dental and Dental Hygiene Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Karen B. W.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Dentists and dental hygienists are in a unique position to identify an eating disorder patient from observed oral manifestations and to refer the patient for psychological therapy. The inclusion of information on general and oral complications of bulimia and anorexia nervosa in dental and dental hygiene curriculum was examined. (MLW)

  2. Dental practice network of U.S. dental schools.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Monica A; Beeson, Dennis C; Hans, Mark G

    2009-12-01

    As dental schools incorporate training in evidence-based dentistry (EBD) into their curricula, students must learn how to critically evaluate systematic reviews and meta-analyses. It is important that dental education in the United States support the American Dental Association's position statement on EBD, which defines "best evidence" as data obtained from all study designs. Given that much evidence is missing when EBD is derived from Cochrane Systematic Reviews' randomized clinical trials, we propose the creation of a dental practice network of U.S. dental schools. We developed an electronic clinical dentistry research database for EBD using Epi-Info (available at www.cdc.gov/epiinfo/downloads.htm). As a free, public use software, Epi-Info provides the foundation for the development of clinical research databases that can increase the research capacity through multisite studies designed to generate outcomes data on the effectiveness of dental treatment. The creation of a dental practice network of dental schools with their large number of patients would expand the research capacity for EBD practice and advance the EBD science regarding the effectiveness of dental treatment. The next step is to link clinical dental researchers/educators at multiple dental schools through a collaborative clinical research network, so that the findings can be applied to the EBD component of problem-based learning curricula of dental education. PMID:20007494

  3. Nutrition and dental caries.

    PubMed

    Mobley, Connie C

    2003-04-01

    Promotion of sound dietary practices is an essential component of caries management, along with fluoride exposure and oral hygiene practices. Scientific discoveries have lead to better understanding of the caries process, the ever-expanding food supply, and the interaction between the two. Fermentable carbohydrates interact dynamically with oral bacteria and saliva, and these foods will continue to be a major part of a healthful diet. Dental health professionals can serve their patients and the public by providing comprehensive oral health care and by promoting lifestyle behaviors to improve oral and general health within the time constraints of their practice. Dietary advice given should not contradict general health principles when providing practical guidance to reduce caries risk. The following principles should guide messages: * Encourage balanced diets based on moderation and variety as depicted by the Food Guide Pyramid and the Dietary Guidelines for Americans to provide a sound approach. Avoid references to "bad" foods and focus on "good" diets that include a variety of foods. * Give examples of how combining and sequencing foods can enhance mastication, saliva production, and oral clearance at each eating occasion. Combining dairy foods with sugary foods, raw foods with cooked, and protein-rich foods with acidogenic foods are all good examples. Suggest that eating and drinking be followed by cariostatic foods such as xylitol chewing gum. * Drink water to satisfy thirst and hydration needs as often as possible. Restrict consumption of sweetened beverages to meal and snack times when they can be combined with other cariostatic foods. * When a patient reports excessive dietary intake of a fermentable carbohydrate to the point of displacing other important foods in the diet, identify alternatives that will help the patient maintain or achieve a healthy body weight, oral health status, and a nutrient-dense intake. PMID:12699234

  4. Dental Health and Orthodontic Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... Text Size Email Print Share Dental Health and Orthodontic Problems Page Content Article Body Dental Health Twin ... color can be tinted to match the teeth. Orthodontic Problems Crooked teeth, overbites and underbites are best ...

  5. Infection Control in Dental Settings

    MedlinePlus

    ... Based Dental Sealant Programs Dental Sealant FAQs Sealant Efficiency Assessment for Locals and States ... of infection control remain unchanged, new technologies, materials, equipment, and data require continuous evaluation of current ...

  6. High-fidelity artifact correction for cone-beam CT imaging of the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sisniega, A.; Zbijewski, W.; Xu, J.; Dang, H.; Stayman, J. W.; Yorkston, J.; Aygun, N.; Koliatsos, V.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2015-02-01

    CT is the frontline imaging modality for diagnosis of acute traumatic brain injury (TBI), involving the detection of fresh blood in the brain (contrast of 30-50 HU, detail size down to 1 mm) in a non-contrast-enhanced exam. A dedicated point-of-care imaging system based on cone-beam CT (CBCT) could benefit early detection of TBI and improve direction to appropriate therapy. However, flat-panel detector (FPD) CBCT is challenged by artifacts that degrade contrast resolution and limit application in soft-tissue imaging. We present and evaluate a fairly comprehensive framework for artifact correction to enable soft-tissue brain imaging with FPD CBCT. The framework includes a fast Monte Carlo (MC)-based scatter estimation method complemented by corrections for detector lag, veiling glare, and beam hardening. The fast MC scatter estimation combines GPU acceleration, variance reduction, and simulation with a low number of photon histories and reduced number of projection angles (sparse MC) augmented by kernel de-noising to yield a runtime of ~4 min per scan. Scatter correction is combined with two-pass beam hardening correction. Detector lag correction is based on temporal deconvolution of the measured lag response function. The effects of detector veiling glare are reduced by deconvolution of the glare response function representing the long range tails of the detector point-spread function. The performance of the correction framework is quantified in experiments using a realistic head phantom on a testbench for FPD CBCT. Uncorrected reconstructions were non-diagnostic for soft-tissue imaging tasks in the brain. After processing with the artifact correction framework, image uniformity was substantially improved, and artifacts were reduced to a level that enabled visualization of ~3 mm simulated bleeds throughout the brain. Non-uniformity (cupping) was reduced by a factor of 5, and contrast of simulated bleeds was improved from ~7 to 49.7 HU, in good agreement

  7. Spatiotemporal filtering of MR-temperature artifacts arising from bowel motion during transurethral MR-HIFU

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, Alain; Mougenot, Charles; Chopra, Rajiv

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Transurethral MR-HIFU is a minimally invasive image-guided treatment for localized prostate cancer that enables precise targeting of tissue within the gland. The treatment is performed within a clinical MRI to obtain real-time MR thermometry used as an active feedback to control the spatial heating pattern in the prostate and to monitor for potential damage to surrounding tissues. This requires that the MR thermometry measurements are an accurate representation of the true tissue temperature. The proton resonance frequency shift thermometry method used is sensitive to tissue motion and changes in the local magnetic susceptibility that can be caused by the motion of air bubbles in the rectum, which can impact the performance of transurethral MR-HIFU in these regions of the gland. Methods: A method is proposed for filtering of temperature artifacts based on the temporal variance of the temperature, using empirical and dynamic positional knowledge of the ultrasonic heating beam, and an estimation of the measurement noise. A two-step correction strategy is introduced which eliminates artifact-detected temperature variations while keeping the noise level low through spatial averaging. Results: The filter has been evaluated by postprocessing data from five human transurethral ultrasound treatments. The two-step correction process led to reduced final temperature standard deviation in the prostate and rectum areas where the artifact was located, without negatively affecting areas distal to the artifact. The performance of the filter was also found to be consistent across all six of the data sets evaluated. The evaluation of the detection criterion parameter M determined that a value of M = 3 achieves a conservative filter with minimal loss of spatial resolution during the process. Conclusions: The filter was able to remove most artifacts due to the presence of moving air bubbles in the rectum during transurethral MR-HIFU. A quantitative estimation of the filter

  8. True Pathologic Abnormality versus Artifact Foot Position and Magic Angle Artifact in the Peroneal Tendons with 3T Imaging.

    PubMed

    Horn, Deena B; Meyers, Steven; Astor, William

    2015-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is a commonly ordered examination by many foot and ankle surgeons for ankle pain and suspected peroneal tendon pathologic abnormalities. Magic angle artifact is one of the complexities associated with this imaging modality. Magic angle refers to the increased signal on magnetic resonance images associated with the highly organized collagen fibers in tendons and ligaments when they are orientated at a 55° angle to the main magnetic field. We present several examples from a clinical practice setting using 3T imaging illustrating a substantial reduction in magic angle artifact of the peroneal tendon in the prone plantarflexed position compared with the standard neutral (right angle) position. PMID:26429616

  9. DENTAL PULP TISSUE ENGINEERING

    PubMed Central

    Demarco, FF; Conde, MCM; Cavalcanti, B; Casagrande, L; Sakai, V; Nör, JE

    2013-01-01

    Dental pulp is a highly specialized mesenchymal tissue, which have a restrict regeneration capacity due to anatomical arrangement and post-mitotic nature of odontoblastic cells. Entire pulp amputation followed by pulp-space disinfection and filling with an artificial material cause loss of a significant amount of dentin leaving as life-lasting sequelae a non-vital and weakened tooth. However, regenerative endodontics is an emerging field of modern tissue engineering that demonstrated promising results using stem cells associated with scaffolds and responsive molecules. Thereby, this article will review the most recent endeavors to regenerate pulp tissue based on tissue engineering principles and providing insightful information to readers about the different aspects enrolled in tissue engineering. Here, we speculate that the search for the ideal combination of cells, scaffolds, and morphogenic factors for dental pulp tissue engineering may be extended over future years and result in significant advances in other areas of dental and craniofacial research. The finds collected in our review showed that we are now at a stage in which engineering a complex tissue, such as the dental pulp, is no longer an unachievable and the next decade will certainly be an exciting time for dental and craniofacial research. PMID:21519641

  10. Maintaining proper dental records.

    PubMed

    Leeuw, Wilhemina

    2014-01-01

    Referred to as Standard of Care, the legal duty of a dentist requires exercising the degree of skill and care that would be exhibited by other prudent dentists faced with the same patient-care situation. Primarily, the goal of keeping good dental records is to maintain continuity of care. Diligent and complete documentation and charting procedures are essential to fulfilling the Standard of Care. Secondly, because dental records are considered legal documents they help protect the interest of the dentist and/or the patient by establishing the details of the services rendered. Patients today are better educated and more assertive than ever before and dentists must be equipped to protect themselves against malpractice claims. Every record component must be handled as if it could be summoned to a court room and scrutinized by an attorney, judge or jury. Complete, accurate, objective and honest entries in a patient record are the only way to defend against any clinical and/or legal problems that might arise. Most medical and dental malpractice claims arise from an unfavorable interaction with the dentist and not from a poor treatment outcome. By implementing the suggestions mentioned in this course, dental health care professionals can minimize the legal risks associated with the delivery of dental care to promote greater understanding for patients of their rights and privileges to their complete record. PMID:24834675

  11. Multiresolution local tomography in dental radiology using wavelets.

    PubMed

    Niinimäki, K; Siltanen, S; Kolehmainen, V

    2007-01-01

    A Bayesian multiresolution model for local tomography in dental radiology is proposed. In this model a wavelet basis is used to present dental structures and the prior information is modeled in terms of Besov norm penalty. The proposed wavelet-based multiresolution method is used to reduce the number of unknowns in the reconstruction problem by abandoning fine-scale wavelets outside the region of interest (ROI). This multiresolution model allows significant reduction in the number of unknowns without the loss of reconstruction accuracy inside the ROI. The feasibility of the proposed method is tested with two-dimensional (2D) examples using simulated and experimental projection data from dental specimens. PMID:18002604

  12. Five practices of efficient factories applied to dental education.

    PubMed

    Nalliah, Romesh P

    2015-05-01

    Efficient factories, such as dental school clinics (DSC), are trying to improve the quality of their product by reducing inefficiencies, error rates, and wastage. Dental education is an expensive business for the student and the institution. Dental materials and equipment are costly, and students are novice providers who work slowly and inefficiently compared to an experienced dentist; this is not a good business model. The objective of this article was to present and apply five practices of efficient factories that could be applied to the DSC setting. I propose that this will lead to improved educational outcomes and improved patient outcomes in DSC. PMID:25891379

  13. Partitioning soil respiration: examining the artifacts of the trenching method.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, K. E.; Davidson, E. A.; Finzi, A.; Giasson, M. A.; Wehr, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    Soil respiration (Rs) is a combination of autotrophic (Ra) and heterotrophic respiration (Rh). Several methods have been developed to tease out the components of Rs, such as isotopic analyses, and removing Ra input through tree girdling and root exclusion experiments. Trenching involves severing the rooting system surrounding a plot to remove the Ra component within the plot. This method has some potential limitations. Reduced water uptake in trenched plots could change soil water content, which is one of the environmental controllers of Rs in many ecosystems. Eliminating root inputs could reduce heterotrophic decomposition of SOM via lack of priming. On the other hand, the severed dead roots may temporarily increase available carbon substrate for Rh. At the Harvard Forest, MA, we used the trenching method to partition Rs into its components Ra and Rh. Pre-trenched Rs was measured from spring to fall of 2012. In late fall of 2012, a trench was excavated to 1m depth around a 5x5m area, severing all roots. Plastic tarp was placed along the trench walls and then backfilled. Four automated Rs chambers were placed in the trenched plot and four in an un-trenched plot. Respiration was measured hourly for each chamber along with soil temperature and moisture from spring through fall of 2013 and 2014. Eighty root decomposition bags were placed in the organic soil horizon of the trenched (40) and un-trenched (40) plots at the time of trenching in 2012 and measured in 2013 and 2014. These data are being used to estimate the size and duration of any artifact due to root death. As expected, Rs was lower in the trenched plot (Rh only) than in the un-trenched plot (Rh + Ra) in 2013, but the reverse was unexpectedly observed during a period of low precipitation in 2014. High rates of ET combined with below-average precipitation dried the un-trenched plot to a point where Rh was inhibited, whereas less ET allowed the un-trenched plots to remain measurably wetter.

  14. Effect of different disinfection protocols on microbial and biofilm contamination of dental unit waterlines in community dental practices.

    PubMed

    Dallolio, Laura; Scuderi, Amalia; Rini, Maria S; Valente, Sabrina; Farruggia, Patrizia; Sabattini, Maria A Bucci; Pasquinelli, Gianandrea; Acacci, Anna; Roncarati, Greta; Leoni, Erica

    2014-02-01

    Output water from dental unit waterlines (DUWLs) may be a potential source of infection for both dental healthcare staff and patients. This study compared the efficacy of different disinfection methods with regard to the water quality and the presence of biofilm in DUWLs. Five dental units operating in a public dental health care setting were selected. The control dental unit had no disinfection system; two were disinfected intermittently with peracetic acid/hydrogen peroxide 0.26% and two underwent continuous disinfection with hydrogen peroxide/silver ions (0.02%) and stabilized chlorine dioxide (0.22%), respectively. After three months of applying the disinfection protocols, continuous disinfection systems were more effective than intermittent systems in reducing the microbial contamination of the water, allowing compliance with the CDC guidelines and the European Council regulatory thresholds for drinking water. P. aeruginosa, Legionella spp, sulphite-reducing Clostridium spores, S. aureus and β-haemolytic streptococci were also absent from units treated with continuous disinfection. The biofilm covering the DUWLs was more extensive, thicker and more friable in the intermittent disinfection dental units than in those with continuous disinfection. Overall, the findings showed that the products used for continuous disinfection of dental unit waterlines showed statistically better results than the intermittent treatment products under the study conditions. PMID:24552789

  15. Effect of Different Disinfection Protocols on Microbial and Biofilm Contamination of Dental Unit Waterlines in Community Dental Practices

    PubMed Central

    Dallolio, Laura; Scuderi, Amalia; Rini, Maria S.; Valente, Sabrina; Farruggia, Patrizia; Bucci Sabattini, Maria A.; Pasquinelli, Gianandrea; Acacci, Anna; Roncarati, Greta; Leoni, Erica

    2014-01-01

    Output water from dental unit waterlines (DUWLs) may be a potential source of infection for both dental healthcare staff and patients. This study compared the efficacy of different disinfection methods with regard to the water quality and the presence of biofilm in DUWLs. Five dental units operating in a public dental health care setting were selected. The control dental unit had no disinfection system; two were disinfected intermittently with peracetic acid/hydrogen peroxide 0.26% and two underwent continuous disinfection with hydrogen peroxide/silver ions (0.02%) and stabilized chlorine dioxide (0.22%), respectively. After three months of applying the disinfection protocols, continuous disinfection systems were more effective than intermittent systems in reducing the microbial contamination of the water, allowing compliance with the CDC guidelines and the European Council regulatory thresholds for drinking water. P. aeruginosa, Legionella spp, sulphite-reducing Clostridium spores, S. aureus and β-haemolytic streptococci were also absent from units treated with continuous disinfection. The biofilm covering the DUWLs was more extensive, thicker and more friable in the intermittent disinfection dental units than in those with continuous disinfection. Overall, the findings showed that the products used for continuous disinfection of dental unit waterlines showed statistically better results than the intermittent treatment products under the study conditions. PMID:24552789

  16. A dental phobia treatment within the Swedish National Health Insurance.

    PubMed

    Hägglin, Catharina; Boman, Ulla Wide

    2012-01-01

    Severe dental fear/phobia (DF) is a problem for both dental care providers and for patients who often suffer from impaired oral health and from social and emotional distress.The aim of this paper was to present the Swedish model for DF treatment within the National Health Insurance System, and to describe the dental phobia treatment and its outcome at The Dental Fear Research and Treatment Clinic (DFRTC) in Gothenburg. A literature review was made of relevant policy documents on dental phobia treatment from the National Health Insurance System and for Västra Götaland region on published outcome studies from DFRTC. The treatment manual of DFRTC was also used. In Sweden, adult patients with severe DF are able to undergo behavioral treatment within the National Health Insurance System if the patient and caregivers fulfil defined criteria that must be approved for each individual case. At DFRTC dental phobia behavioral treatment is given by psychologists and dentists in an integrated model. The goal is to refer patients for general dental care outside the DFRTC after completing treatment. The DF treatment at DFRTC has shown positive effects on dental fear, attendance and acceptance of dental treatment for 80% of patients. Follow-up after 2 and 10 years confirmed these results and showed improved oral health. In addition, positive psychosomatic and psychosocial side-effects were reported, and benefits also for society were evident in terms of reduced sick-leave. In conlusion, in Sweden a model has been developed within the National Health Insurance System helping individuals with DF. Behavioral treatment conducted at DFRTC has proven successful in helping patients cope with dental care, leading to regular attendance and better oral health. PMID:22876394

  17. Building community support for a school dental sealant program.

    PubMed

    Sanzi-Schaedel, S; Bruerd, B; Empey, G

    2001-01-01

    Children from low-income families experience more dental caries and are less likely to receive dental treatment than children from middle- and high-income families. An overwhelming amount of scientific evidence supports the effectiveness of pit and fissure sealants in deterring the development of dental caries. The authors describe a unique component of the Multnomah County, Oregon, sealant program in which local dentists volunteer to conduct dental screenings in schools. This program, which began in 1989, targets elementary schools with 40% or more of students on free or reduced-cost lunch programs. During the 1999-2000 school year, volunteer dentists screened 5,252 second- and third-grade students in 64 schools and other community programs. As a result of the screenings, dental hygienist/dental assistant teams placed a total of 11,087 dental sealants on 3,866 children (a mean of 2.87 per child). The dentists who conducted the screenings were asked to evaluate the dental sealants placed during the previous school year. The program is one example of how a school dental sealant program can be staffed to optimize the resources of a state or county public health department. An added benefit of this staffing pattern is that it builds linkages in the dental community and a foundation for collaboration between private-practice dentists and public health programs. This type of collaboration is essential to the practice of public health. Furthermore, the involvement of private dentists in a local school sealant program can contribute to the long-term oral health of low-income children. PMID:11813677

  18. Artifacts as Stories: Understanding Families, Digital Literacies, and Storied Lives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis Ellison, Tisha

    2016-01-01

    This column focuses on the interactions during family and group conversation circles that not only helped participants talk about personal, emotional, and social issues in their digital stories but also helped them make sense of artifacts and the meanings that stories carry in shared spaces and practices. This work adds to the bourgeoning…

  19. Electronic Learning Portfolios: Evaluating Artifacts in an International FCS Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keino, Leah C.

    2006-01-01

    As electronic portfolios become institutionalized in undergraduate education, it is imperative to understand the types of evidence students select to represent attainment of identified learning outcomes. This article presents an action research inquiry, which analyzes 26 completed graduation portfolios, to determine the type of artifacts selected…

  20. Junkstore Artifacts Help Invigorate J-History Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashdown, Paul G.

    1974-01-01

    Describes the results of a modern American journalism course student assignment to research and write a term paper defining and placing in the context of modern American journalism an artifact--old newspapers, crystal radios, radio logs, old magazines, type faces--provided by the instructor. (TO)

  1. SAMPLING ARTIFACT ESTIMATES FOR ALKANES, HOPANES, AND ALIPHATIC CARBOXYLIC ACIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sampling artifacts for molecular markers from organic speciation of particulate matter were investigated by analyzing forty-one samples collected in Philadelphia as a part of the Northeast Oxidant and Particulate Study (NEOPS). Samples were collected using a high volume sampler ...

  2. The Sources of Young Children's Name Innovations for Novel Artifacts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Deborah G. Kemler; Herron, Lindsay; Holt, Morghan B.

    2003-01-01

    Two studies investigated whether four-year-old children (12 in Experiment 1 with a mean age of 4;8 and 36 in Experiment 2 with a mean age of 4;7) invent names for new artifacts based on the objects' functions as opposed to their perceptual properties. Children informed about the intended functions of novel objects provided more name innovations…

  3. 77 FR 40914 - Arts and Artifacts Indemnity Panel Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-11

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Arts and Artifacts Indemnity Panel Advisory Committee AGENCY: Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: Pursuant to section 10(a)(2) of...

  4. 77 FR 64146 - Arts and Artifacts Indemnity Panel Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-18

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Arts and Artifacts Indemnity Panel Advisory Committee AGENCY: Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities, National Endowment for the Humanities. ACTION: Notice of meeting... hereby given that the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities will hold a meeting of the Arts...

  5. Bringing Music History Alive: Using Artifacts to Explore Historiography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marley, Judith L.; Price, Harry E.

    1992-01-01

    For a music history research class, the students at the University of Alabama (Tuscaloosa) must examine a musical artifact of their choice, thus learning standard and nonstandard research strategies. Utilizing both group instruction and individual tutorials, the music librarian and course professor teach cooperatively so that students use critical…

  6. Tracing the Paths of Moving Artifacts in Youth Media Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbons, Damiana

    2010-01-01

    Using a theoretical grounding in social semiotics, chronotopes, and social spaces with youth, I will discuss how identities are made possible and expressed in the interplay between the different parts of the youth video production process as youth artifacts as they move through time and space. The majority of my data is what I have come to term…

  7. 76 FR 25378 - Arts and Artifacts Indemnity Panel Advisory; Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office THE NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities Arts and Artifacts Indemnity Panel Advisory; Committee AGENCY: The National Endowment for the Humanities. ACTION: Notice...

  8. Negligible Motion Artifacts in Scalp Electroencephalography (EEG) During Treadmill Walking

    PubMed Central

    Nathan, Kevin; Contreras-Vidal, Jose L.

    2016-01-01

    Recent mobile brain/body imaging (MoBI) techniques based on active electrode scalp electroencephalogram (EEG) allow the acquisition and real-time analysis of brain dynamics during active unrestrained motor behavior involving whole body movements such as treadmill walking, over-ground walking and other locomotive and non-locomotive tasks. Unfortunately, MoBI protocols are prone to physiological and non-physiological artifacts, including motion artifacts that may contaminate the EEG recordings. A few attempts have been made to quantify these artifacts during locomotion tasks but with inconclusive results due in part to methodological pitfalls. In this paper, we investigate the potential contributions of motion artifacts in scalp EEG during treadmill walking at three different speeds (1.5, 3.0, and 4.5 km/h) using a wireless 64 channel active EEG system and a wireless inertial sensor attached to the subject’s head. The experimental setup was designed according to good measurement practices using state-of-the-art commercially available instruments, and the measurements were analyzed using Fourier analysis and wavelet coherence approaches. Contrary to prior claims, the subjects’ motion did not significantly affect their EEG during treadmill walking although precaution should be taken when gait speeds approach 4.5 km/h. Overall, these findings suggest how MoBI methods may be safely deployed in neural, cognitive, and rehabilitation engineering applications. PMID:26793089

  9. The Artifacts of Educational Reform: Explaining the Unexpected.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ascher, Gordon

    The inequality of opportunity that sometimes results from educational reform may not be an artifact or an aberration but may be the intended result of most programs. Although the ostensible goal of most educational reform is equal opportunity, very few programs achieve this goal. It is possible that the real goal of educational reform is continued…

  10. Miscellaneous artifacts stored on the third floor; from left, center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Miscellaneous artifacts stored on the third floor; from left, center is 'personal equation machine' which measures and records the reflex-response time of individuals using telegraph equipment. - Thomas A. Edison Laboratories, Building No. 5, Main Street & Lakeside Avenue, West Orange, Essex County, NJ

  11. Utility of megavoltage fan-beam CT for treatment planning in a head-and-neck cancer patient with extensive dental fillings undergoing helical tomotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Claus; Liu, Tianxiao; Jennelle, Richard L; Ryu, Janice K; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Purdy, James A; Chen, Allen M

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the potential utility of megavoltage fan-beam computed tomography (MV-FBCT) for treatment planning in a patient undergoing helical tomotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma in the presence of extensive dental artifact. A 28-year-old female with locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma presented for radiation therapy. Due to the extensiveness of the dental artifact present in the oral cavity kV-CT scan acquired at simulation, which made treatment planning impossible on tomotherapy planning system, MV-FBCT imaging was obtained using the HI-ART tomotherapy treatment machine, with the patient in the treatment position, and this information was registered with her original kV-CT scan for the purposes of structure delineation, dose calculation, and treatment planning. To validate the feasibility of the MV-FBCT-generated treatment plan, an electron density CT phantom (model 465, Gammex Inc., Middleton, WI) was scanned using MV-FBCT to obtain CT number to density table. Additionally, both a "cheese" phantom (which came with the tomotherapy treatment machine) with 2 inserted ion chambers and a generic phantom called Quasar phantom (Modus Medical Devices Inc., London, ON, Canada) with one inserted chamber were used to confirm dosimetric accuracy. The MV-FBCT could be used to clearly visualize anatomy in the region of the dental artifact and provide sufficient soft-tissue contrast to assist in the delineation of normal tissue structures and fat planes. With the elimination of the dental artifact, the MV-FBCT images allowed more accurate dose calculation by the tomotherapy system. It was confirmed that the phantom material density was determined correctly by the tomotherapy MV-FBCT number to density table. The ion chamber measurements agreed with the calculations from the MV-FBCT generated phantom plan within 2%. MV-FBCT may be useful in radiation treatment planning for nasopharyngeal cancer patients in the setting of extensive

  12. Utility of Megavoltage Fan-Beam CT for Treatment Planning in a Head-And-Neck Cancer Patient with Extensive Dental Fillings Undergoing Helical Tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Claus; Liu Tianxiao; Jennelle, Richard L.; Ryu, Janice K.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Purdy, James A.; Chen, Allen M.

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the potential utility of megavoltage fan-beam computed tomography (MV-FBCT) for treatment planning in a patient undergoing helical tomotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma in the presence of extensive dental artifact. A 28-year-old female with locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma presented for radiation therapy. Due to the extensiveness of the dental artifact present in the oral cavity kV-CT scan acquired at simulation, which made treatment planning impossible on tomotherapy planning system, MV-FBCT imaging was obtained using the HI-ART tomotherapy treatment machine, with the patient in the treatment position, and this information was registered with her original kV-CT scan for the purposes of structure delineation, dose calculation, and treatment planning. To validate the feasibility of the MV-FBCT-generated treatment plan, an electron density CT phantom (model 465, Gammex Inc., Middleton, WI) was scanned using MV-FBCT to obtain CT number to density table. Additionally, both a 'cheese' phantom (which came with the tomotherapy treatment machine) with 2 inserted ion chambers and a generic phantom called Quasar phantom (Modus Medical Devices Inc., London, ON, Canada) with one inserted chamber were used to confirm dosimetric accuracy. The MV-FBCT could be used to clearly visualize anatomy in the region of the dental artifact and provide sufficient soft-tissue contrast to assist in the delineation of normal tissue structures and fat planes. With the elimination of the dental artifact, the MV-FBCT images allowed more accurate dose calculation by the tomotherapy system. It was confirmed that the phantom material density was determined correctly by the tomotherapy MV-FBCT number to density table. The ion chamber measurements agreed with the calculations from the MV-FBCT generated phantom plan within 2%. MV-FBCT may be useful in radiation treatment planning for nasopharyngeal cancer patients in the setting of extensive

  13. Feature Guided Motion Artifact Reduction with Structure-Awareness in 4D CT Images

    PubMed Central

    Han, Dongfeng; Bayouth, John; Song, Qi; Bhatia, Sudershan; Sonka, Milan; Wu, Xiaodong

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel method to reduce the magnitude of 4D CT artifacts by stitching two images with a data-driven regularization constrain, which helps preserve the local anatomy structures. Our method first computes an interface seam for the stitching in the overlapping region of the first image, which passes through the “smoothest” region, to reduce the structure complexity along the stitching interface. Then, we compute the displacements of the seam by matching the corresponding interface seam in the second image. We use sparse 3D features as the structure cues to guide the seam matching, in which a regularization term is incorporated to keep the structure consistency. The energy function is minimized by solving a multiple-label problem in Markov Random Fields with an anatomical structure preserving regularization term. The displacements are propagated to the rest of second image and the two image are stitched along the interface seams based on the computed displacement field. The method was tested on both simulated data and clinical 4D CT images. The experiments on simulated data demonstrated that the proposed method was able to reduce the landmark distance error on average from 2.9 mm to 1.3 mm, outperforming the registration-based method by about 55%. For clinical 4D CT image data, the image quality was evaluated by three medical experts, and all identified much fewer artifacts from the resulting images by our method than from those by the compared method. PMID:22058647

  14. Dental Assistant Specialist. (AFSC 98150).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eling, David R.

    This four-volume student text is designed for use by Air Force personnel enrolled in a self-study extension course for dental assistant specialists. Covered in the individual volumes are an introduction to dental services (the mission and organization of medical/dental service, career ladder progressions, medical readiness/wartime training, and…

  15. Dental Hygiene Realpolitik Affecting Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bader, James D.

    1991-01-01

    Current conditions in dental hygiene influencing professional education are discussed. Workplace/practice issues include dental hygiene care as a component of dental practice, content, effects, and quality of care, hygienist supply and demand, and job satisfaction. Professional issues include the knowledge base, definitions of practice, and…

  16. Dental Laboratory Technology Program Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This guide contains 45 program standards for the dental laboratory technology program conducted in technical institutes in Georgia. The dental laboratory technology program, either diploma or associate degree, is designed to ensure that students gain basic competence in the job skills needed for an entry-level employee in dental laboratory…

  17. Statistical Analysis for Subjective and Objective Evaluations of Dental Drill Sounds

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Tomomi; Kuwano, Sonoko; Ebisu, Shigeyuki; Hayashi, Mikako

    2016-01-01

    The sound produced by a dental air turbine handpiece (dental drill) can markedly influence the sound environment in a dental clinic. Indeed, many patients report that the sound of a dental drill elicits an unpleasant feeling. Although several manufacturers have attempted to reduce the sound pressure levels produced by dental drills during idling based on ISO 14457, the sound emitted by such drills under active drilling conditions may negatively influence the dental clinic sound environment. The physical metrics related to the unpleasant impressions associated with dental drill sounds have not been determined. In the present study, psychological measurements of dental drill sounds were conducted with the aim of facilitating improvement of the sound environment at dental clinics. Specifically, we examined the impressions elicited by the sounds of 12 types of dental drills in idling and drilling conditions using a semantic differential. The analysis revealed that the impressions of dental drill sounds varied considerably between idling and drilling conditions and among the examined drills. This finding suggests that measuring the sound of a dental drill in idling conditions alone may be insufficient for evaluating the effects of the sound. We related the results of the psychological evaluations to those of measurements of the physical metrics of equivalent continuous A-weighted sound pressure levels (LAeq) and sharpness. Factor analysis indicated that impressions of the dental drill sounds consisted of two factors: “metallic and unpleasant” and “powerful”. LAeq had a strong relationship with “powerful impression”, calculated sharpness was positively related to “metallic impression”, and “unpleasant impression” was predicted by the combination of both LAeq and calculated sharpness. The present analyses indicate that, in addition to a reduction in sound pressure level, refining the frequency components of dental drill sounds is important for creating

  18. Statistical Analysis for Subjective and Objective Evaluations of Dental Drill Sounds.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Tomomi; Kuwano, Sonoko; Ebisu, Shigeyuki; Hayashi, Mikako

    2016-01-01

    The sound produced by a dental air turbine handpiece (dental drill) can markedly influence the sound environment in a dental clinic. Indeed, many patients report that the sound of a dental drill elicits an unpleasant feeling. Although several manufacturers have attempted to reduce the sound pressure levels produced by dental drills during idling based on ISO 14457, the sound emitted by such drills under active drilling conditions may negatively influence the dental clinic sound environment. The physical metrics related to the unpleasant impressions associated with dental drill sounds have not been determined. In the present study, psychological measurements of dental drill sounds were conducted with the aim of facilitating improvement of the sound environment at dental clinics. Specifically, we examined the impressions elicited by the sounds of 12 types of dental drills in idling and drilling conditions using a semantic differential. The analysis revealed that the impressions of dental drill sounds varied considerably between idling and drilling conditions and among the examined drills. This finding suggests that measuring the sound of a dental drill in idling conditions alone may be insufficient for evaluating the effects of the sound. We related the results of the psychological evaluations to those of measurements of the physical metrics of equivalent continuous A-weighted sound pressure levels (LAeq) and sharpness. Factor analysis indicated that impressions of the dental drill sounds consisted of two factors: "metallic and unpleasant" and "powerful". LAeq had a strong relationship with "powerful impression", calculated sharpness was positively related to "metallic impression", and "unpleasant impression" was predicted by the combination of both LAeq and calculated sharpness. The present analyses indicate that, in addition to a reduction in sound pressure level, refining the frequency components of dental drill sounds is important for creating a comfortable sound

  19. Dental pulp stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ashri, Nahid Y.; Ajlan, Sumaiah A.; Aldahmash, Abdullah M.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory periodontal disease is a major cause of loss of tooth-supporting structures. Novel approaches for regeneration of periodontal apparatus is an area of intensive research. Periodontal tissue engineering implies the use of appropriate regenerative cells, delivered through a suitable scaffold, and guided through signaling molecules. Dental pulp stem cells have been used in an increasing number of studies in dental tissue engineering. Those cells show mesenchymal (stromal) stem cell-like properties including self-renewal and multilineage differentiation potentials, aside from their relative accessibility and pleasant handling properties. The purpose of this article is to review the biological principles of periodontal tissue engineering, along with the challenges facing the development of a consistent and clinically relevant tissue regeneration platform. This article includes an updated review on dental pulp stem cells and their applications in periodontal regeneration, in combination with different scaffolds and growth factors. PMID:26620980

  20. A Novel Algorithm for Movement Artifact Removal in ECG Signals Acquired from Wearable Systems Applied to Horses.

    PubMed

    Lanata, Antonio; Guidi, Andrea; Baragli, Paolo; Valenza, Gaetano; Scilingo, Enzo Pasquale

    2015-01-01

    This study reports on a novel method to detect and reduce the contribution of movement artifact (MA) in electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings gathered from horses in free movement conditions. We propose a model that integrates cardiovascular and movement information to estimate the MA contribution. Specifically, ECG and physical activity are continuously acquired from seven horses through a wearable system. Such a system employs completely integrated textile electrodes to monitor ECG and is also equipped with a triaxial accelerometer for movement monitoring. In the literature, the most used technique to remove movement artifacts, when noise bandwidth overlaps the primary source bandwidth, is the adaptive filter. In this study we propose a new algorithm, hereinafter called Stationary Wavelet Movement Artifact Reduction (SWMAR), where the Stationary Wavelet Transform (SWT) decomposition algorithm is employed to identify and remove movement artifacts from ECG signals in horses. A comparative analysis with the Normalized Least Mean Square Adaptive Filter technique (NLMSAF) is performed as well. Results achieved on seven hours of recordings showed a reduction greater than 40% of MA percentage (between before- and after- the application of the proposed algorithm). Moreover, the comparative analysis with the NLMSAF, applied to the same ECG recordings, showed a greater reduction of MA percentage in favour of SWMAR with a statistical significant difference (p-value < 0.0.5). PMID:26484686

  1. Quantitative determination of microbial activity and community nutritional status in estuarine sediments: evidence for a disturbance artifact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Findlay, R. H.; Pollard, P. C.; Moriarty, D. J.; White, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    In estuarine sediments with a high degree of vertical heterogeneity in reduced substrate and terminal electron acceptor concentrations, the method of exposure of the microbiota to labeled substrates can introduce a "disturbance artifact" into measures of metabolic activity. The detection of this artifact is based on quantitative measurement of the relative rates of incorporation of [14C]acetate into phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) and endogenous storage lipid, poly-beta-hydroxyalkanoate (PHA). Previous studies have shown that PLFA synthesis measures cellular growth and that PHA synthesis measures carbon accumulation (unbalanced growth). The "disturbance artifact" of exposure to [14C]acetate was demonstrated by comparing injection of a core with the usual or pore-water replacement or slurry techniques. Only injection of labeled substrate allowed detection of preassay disturbance of the sediment with a garden rake. The raking increased PLFA synthesis with little effect to differences in concentration or distribution of [14C]acetate in the 10-min incubation. Bioturbation induced by sand dollar feeding in estuarine sediment could be detected in an increased PLFA/PHA ratio which was due to decreased PHA synthesis if the addition of labeled substrate was by the injection technique. Addition of labeled precursors to sediment by slurry or pore-water replacement induces greater disturbance artifacts than injection techniques.

  2. A Novel Algorithm for Movement Artifact Removal in ECG Signals Acquired from Wearable Systems Applied to Horses

    PubMed Central

    Lanata, Antonio; Guidi, Andrea; Baragli, Paolo; Valenza, Gaetano; Scilingo, Enzo Pasquale

    2015-01-01

    This study reports on a novel method to detect and reduce the contribution of movement artifact (MA) in electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings gathered from horses in free movement conditions. We propose a model that integrates cardiovascular and movement information to estimate the MA contribution. Specifically, ECG and physical activity are continuously acquired from seven horses through a wearable system. Such a system employs completely integrated textile electrodes to monitor ECG and is also equipped with a triaxial accelerometer for movement monitoring. In the literature, the most used technique to remove movement artifacts, when noise bandwidth overlaps the primary source bandwidth, is the adaptive filter. In this study we propose a new algorithm, hereinafter called Stationary Wavelet Movement Artifact Reduction (SWMAR), where the Stationary Wavelet Transform (SWT) decomposition algorithm is employed to identify and remove movement artifacts from ECG signals in horses. A comparative analysis with the Normalized Least Mean Square Adaptive Filter technique (NLMSAF) is performed as well. Results achieved on seven hours of recordings showed a reduction greater than 40% of MA percentage (between before- and after- the application of the proposed algorithm). Moreover, the comparative analysis with the NLMSAF, applied to the same ECG recordings, showed a greater reduction of MA percentage in favour of SWMAR with a statistical significant difference (p–value < 0.0.5). PMID:26484686

  3. Dental scanning in CAD/CAM technologies: laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda; Faur, Nicolae; Negru, Radu; Romînu, Mihai; Cozarov, Dalibor

    2008-02-01

    Scanning, also called digitizing, is the process of gathering the requisite data from an object. Many different technologies are used to collect three dimensional data. They range from mechanical and very slow, to radiation-based and highly-automated. Each technology has its advantages and disadvantages, and their applications and specifications overlap. The aims of this study are represented by establishing a viable method of digitally representing artifacts of dental casts, proposing a suitable scanner and post-processing software and obtaining 3D Models for the dental applications. The method is represented by the scanning procedure made by different scanners as the implicated materials. Scanners are the medium of data capture. 3D scanners aim to measure and record the relative distance between the object's surface and a known point in space. This geometric data is represented in the form of point cloud data. The contact and no contact scanners were presented. The results show that contact scanning procedures uses a touch probe to record the relative position of points on the objects' surface. This procedure is commonly used in Reverse engineering applications. Its merits are represented by efficiency for objects with low geometric surface detail. Disadvantages are represented by time consuming, this procedure being impractical for artifacts digitization. The non contact scanning procedure implies laser scanning (laser triangulation technology) and photogrammetry. As a conclusion it can be drawn that different types of dental structure needs different types of scanning procedures in order to obtain a competitive complex 3D virtual model that can be used in CAD/CAM technologies.

  4. [Hardening of dental instruments].

    PubMed

    Gerasev, G P

    1981-01-01

    The possibility of prolonging the service life of stomatological instruments by the local hardening of their working parts is discussed. Such hardening should be achieved by using hard and wear-resistant materials. The examples of hardening dental elevators and hard-alloy dental drills are given. New trends in the local hardening of instruments are the treatment of their working parts with laser beams, the application of coating on their surface by the gas-detonation method. The results of research work and trials are presented. PMID:7300627

  5. Performance of Dental Ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Rekow, E.D.; Silva, N.R.F.A.; Coelho, P.G.; Zhang, Y.; Guess, P.; Thompson, V.P.

    2011-01-01

    The clinical success of modern dental ceramics depends on an array of factors, ranging from initial physical properties of the material itself, to the fabrication and clinical procedures that inevitably damage these brittle materials, and the oral environment. Understanding the influence of these factors on clinical performance has engaged the dental, ceramics, and engineering communities alike. The objective of this review is to first summarize clinical, experimental, and analytic results reported in the recent literature. Additionally, it seeks to address how this new information adds insight into predictive test procedures and reveals challenges for future improvements. PMID:21224408

  6. Dental Support Organizations.

    PubMed

    Dufurrena, Quinn

    2015-01-01

    The Association of Dental Support Organizations is a recently formed association of 33 companies representing a range of management and support services for dental practices. These organizations do not engage in the practice of dentistry, although in some cases they operate as holding companies for practices that do, thus separating the legal responsibility of providing treatment from the management and flow of funds. This report summarizes some of the recent trends in oral health care and dentists' practice patterns that are prompting the increased prevalence of this model. The general functioning of the DSO model is described, including some common variations, and the core values of ADSO are featured. PMID:26455048

  7. Establishing dental hygiene education in Germany: current facts and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Petersilka, G J; Neuhoff, D; Flemmig, T F

    2004-05-01

    As there is a marked need to increase the number of dental hygienists (DHs) working in German dental practices, efforts are being made to establish dental hygiene education in accordance with international standards. However, as current German legislation does not envisage a perennial full-time training programme, dental hygiene education may currently be provided within a modular concept only. The basic qualification for enrollment in a modular hygienist training programme of this kind is accredited vocational training as a dental assistant (DA), followed by board-certified continuing education as an oral prophylaxis assistant. Thus, the current system of advanced training for qualification as a DH is subject to at least 6 years' work experience in the field of dentistry. A 950-h full-time advanced training course, meeting all the requirements of this concept, was established by the Westphalia-Lippe Dental Association in cooperation with the University of Münster. The curriculum underlying this programme was outlined considering the recommendations for dental hygiene education issued by the European Federation of Periodontology, although reduced in standards to comply with current German legislation. In addition, the recommendations for American Dental Hygiene education by the American Dental Association were used as a guide for programme development. The contents and implementation of the Münster Dental Hygienist Curriculum may allow the professional competence generated during practical work experience to be linked with international requirements of dental hygiene education. PMID:16451467

  8. 75 FR 16511 - Pentron Clinical Technologies, a Wholly-Owned Subsidiary of Kerr Dental/Sybron Dental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ... the Federal Register on February 16, 2010 (75 FR 7037). At the request of the State Agency, the... such as dental prosthetics, dental composites, dental impressions, dental adhesives, and other dental... prosthetics, dental composites, dental impressions, dental adhesives, and other dental materials to...

  9. Dental staff doses with handheld dental intraoral x-ray units.

    PubMed

    Gray, Joel E; Bailey, Edgar D; Ludlow, John B

    2012-02-01

    A handheld portable dental intraoral x-ray system is available in the United States and elsewhere. The system is designed to minimize the user's radiation dose. It includes specially designed shielding of the x-ray tube housing and an integral radiation shield to minimize backscatter. Personnel radiation dose records were obtained from 18 dental facilities using both the handheld system and a wall mounted dental x-ray system, providing 661 individual dose measurements. Dental staff doses were also compared for the handheld and conventional systems using both film and digital imaging for the same facilities and staff members. The results indicate that the doses for the handheld systems are significantly less than for wall-mounted systems. The average monthly dose for the handheld systems was 0.28 μSv vs. 7.86 μSv (deep dose equivalent) for the wall-mounted systems, a difference that is statistically significant at the p = 0.01 level. Consequently, there should be no concern about the use of this handheld dental intraoral x-ray system. Additional shielding efforts, (e.g., wearing a lead apron) will not provide significant benefit nor reduce staff radiation dose. PMID:22217586

  10. An efficient method to enhance the readability of historical handwritten artifacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soni, Ramakant; Shekhawat, Pradeep Singh; Jangir, Ramesh; Saini, Sanjay Kumar

    2016-03-01

    Historical handwritten letters, manuscripts, old books, paintings and similar artifacts are extremely valuable heritage and of historical importance. During a course of time these are subjected to various degradation factors which reduce their visual quality and degrade state. To preserve these for future generation their digitization is the best suitable method. Converting these into digital format will enhance their state in terms of visual quality. Using various image processing and analysis techniques their state and quality can be enhanced which will help us to restore them and preserve them and analyze them to explore valuable information of the past. This paper is based on combining different image processing techniques like de-noising the images and making them smoother, de-blurring the motion blur effects and reducing the intensity levels to reduce the memory consumption.

  11. Drugs that promote dental caries.

    PubMed

    2015-02-01

    Dental caries result from erosion of tooth enamel or cementum by acidic substances produced by bacteria found in dental plaque. Caries can lead to pulp necrosis and tooth loss. Risk factors include certain dietary habits, poor oral hygiene, and dry mouth. Diabetes and Sjogren's syndrome can also promote dental caries. Psychotropic substances such as cocaine, methamphetamine, heroin and cannabis can promote dental caries. Many medicinal drugs facilitate the formation of dental caries, through various mechanisms; they include formulations with a high sugar content; drugs that cause dry mouth (especially antimuscarinics); drugs that lower the buccal pH (inhaled powders, etc.); and drugs that cause demineralisation (tetracyclines, etc.). In practice, patients (and parents) should be informed that some drugs can increase the risk of dental caries. They should be encouraged to adapt and reinforce dental hygiene, and advised to visit a dentist regularly. PMID:25802916

  12. Review of Spaceflight Dental Emergencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Anil

    2012-01-01

    All exploration class missions--extending beyond earth's orbit--differ from existing orbital missions by being of longer duration and often not having a means of evacuation. If an exploration mission extends beyond a year, then there will be a greater lapse since the crewmembers last terrestrial dental exams, which routinely occur each year. This increased time since professional dental care could increase the chance of a dental emergency such as intractable pain, dental decay requiring a temporary filling, crown replacement, exposed pulp, abscess, tooth avulsion, or toothache. Additionally, any dental emergency will have to be treated in-flight with available resources and personnel who may not have extensive training in dental care. Thus, dental emergencies are an important risk to assess in preparation for exploration missions.

  13. Global Economic Impact of Dental Diseases.

    PubMed

    Listl, S; Galloway, J; Mossey, P A; Marcenes, W

    2015-10-01

    Reporting the economic burden of oral diseases is important to evaluate the societal relevance of preventing and addressing oral diseases. In addition to treatment costs, there are indirect costs to consider, mainly in terms of productivity losses due to absenteeism from work. The purpose of the present study was to estimate the direct and indirect costs of dental diseases worldwide to approximate the global economic impact. Estimation of direct treatment costs was based on a systematic approach. For estimation of indirect costs, an approach suggested by the World Health Organization's Commission on Macroeconomics and Health was employed, which factored in 2010 values of gross domestic product per capita as provided by the International Monetary Fund and oral burden of disease estimates from the 2010 Global Burden of Disease Study. Direct treatment costs due to dental diseases worldwide were estimated at US$298 billion yearly, corresponding to an average of 4.6% of global health expenditure. Indirect costs due to dental diseases worldwide amounted to US$144 billion yearly, corresponding to economic losses within the range of the 10 most frequent global causes of death. Within the limitations of currently available data sources and methodologies, these findings suggest that the global economic impact of dental diseases amounted to US$442 billion in 2010. Improvements in population oral health may imply substantial economic benefits not only in terms of reduced treatment costs but also because of fewer productivity losses in the labor market. PMID:26318590

  14. Children acceptance of laser dental treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazea, Andreea; Todea, Carmen

    2016-03-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the dental anxiety level and the degree of acceptance of laser assisted pedodontic treatments from the children part. Also, we want to underline the advantages of laser use in pediatric dentistry, to make this technology widely used in treating dental problems of our children patients. Methods: Thirty pediatric dental patients presented in the Department of Pedodontics, University of Medicine and Pharmacy "Victor Babeş", Timişoara were evaluated using the Wong-Baker pain rating scale, wich was administered postoperatory to all patients, to assess their level of laser therapy acceptance. Results: Wong-Baker faces pain rating scale (WBFPS) has good validity and high specificity; generally it's easy for children to use, easy to compare and has good feasibility. Laser treatment has been accepted and tolerated by pediatric patients for its ability to reduce or eliminate pain. Around 70% of the total sample showed an excellent acceptance of laser dental treatment. Conclusions: Laser technology is useful and effective in many clinical situations encountered in pediatric dentistry and a good level of pacient acceptance is reported during all laser procedures on hard and soft tissues.

  15. Identification of a unique cause of ring artifact seen in computed tomography trans-axial images.

    PubMed

    Jha, Ashish Kumar; Purandare, Nilendu C; Shah, Sneha; Agrawal, Archi; Puranik, Ameya D; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2013-10-01

    Artifacts present in computed tomography (CT) image often degrade the image quality and ultimately, the diagnostic outcome. Ring artifact in trans-axial image is caused by either miscalibrated or defective detector element of detector row, which is often categorized as scanner based artifact. A ring artifact detected on trans-axial CT image of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT), was caused by contamination of CT tube aperture by droplet of injectable contrast medium. This artifact was corrected by removal of contrast droplet from CT tube aperture. The ring artifact is a very common artifact, commonly cited in the literature. Our case puts forward an uncommon cause of this artifact and its method of correction, which also, has no mention in the existing literature. PMID:24379535

  16. Automatic Independent Component Labeling for Artifact Removal in fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Tohka, Jussi; Foerde, Karin; Aron, Adam R.; Tom, Sabrina M.; Toga, Arthur W.; Poldrack, Russell A.

    2008-01-01

    Blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signals in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) are often small compared to the level of noise in the data. The sources of noise are numerous including different kinds of motion artifacts and physiological noise with complex patterns. This complicates the statistical analysis of the fMRI data. In this study, we propose an automatic method to reduce fMRI artifacts based on independent component analysis (ICA). We trained a supervised classifier to distinguish between independent components relating to a potentially task related signal and independent components clearly relating to structured noise. After the components had been classified as either signal or noise, a denoised fMR timeseries was reconstructed based only on the independent components classified as potentially task related. The classifier was a novel global (fixed structure) decision tree trained in a Neyman-Pearson (NP) framework, which allowed the shape of the decision regions to be controlled effectively. Additionally, the conservativeness of the classifier could be tuned by modifying the NP threshold. The classifier was tested against the component classifications by an expert with the data from a category learning task. The test set as well as the expert were different from the data used for classifier training and the expert labeling the training set. The misclassification rate was between 0.2 and 0.3 for both the event related and blocked designs and it was consistent among variety of different NP thresholds. The effects of denoising on the group level statistical analyses were as expected: The denoising generally decreased Z-scores in the white matter, where extreme Z-values can be expected to reflect artifacts. A similar but weaker decrease in Z-scores was observed in the gray matter on average. These two observations suggest that denoising was likely to reduce artifacts from gray matter and could be useful to improve the detection of

  17. Smoking and dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Kasat, V.; Ladda, R.

    2012-01-01

    Smoking is a prevalent behaviour in the population. The aim of this review is to bring to light the effects of smoking on dental implants. These facts will assist dental professionals when implants are planned in tobacco users. A search of “PubMed” was made with the key words “dental implant,” “nicotine,” “smoking,” “tobacco,” and “osseointegration.” Also, publications on tobacco control by the Government of India were considered. For review, only those articles published from 1988 onward in English language were selected. Smoking has its influence on general as well as oral health of an individual. Tobacco negatively affects the outcome of almost all therapeutic procedures performed in the oral cavity. The failure rate of implant osseointegration is considerably higher among smokers, and maintenance of oral hygiene around the implants and the risk of peri-implantitis are adversely affected by smoking. To increase implant survival in smokers, various protocols have been recommended. Although osseointegrated dental implants have become the state of the art for tooth replacement, they are not without limitations or complications. In this litigious era, it is extremely important that the practitioner clearly understands and is able and willing to convey the spectrum of possible complications and their frequency to the patients. PMID:24478965

  18. Skylab Dental Examination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Skylab 2 Commander Charles Conrad is seen undergoing a dental examination by the Medical Officer, Joseph Kerwin in the Skylab Medical Facility. In the absence of an examination chair, Conrad simply rotated his body to an upside down position to facilitate the procedure.

  19. Dental Health in TSC

    MedlinePlus

    ... to occur in nearly 100% of the TSC population. Not all dental pits are cavities; they are just areas where enamel did not form, but can be an area where food can build up and start a cavity. Gums The gums may have small areas of growth called gingival fibromas , which are mostly harmless and ...

  20. Dental Issues & Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... dental school, has extra training in caring for patients with disabilities. The Special Care Dentistry Association is a resource to find a dentist ... for children who grind their teeth, because the risk of the child choking on the mouthguard if it breaks ... Academy of Pediatric Dentistry www.aapd.org Find a dentist at www. ...