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Sample records for reduce dental artifacts

  1. An opposite view data replacement approach for reducing artifacts due to metallic dental objects

    SciTech Connect

    Yazdi, Mehran; Lari, Meghdad Asadi; Bernier, Gaston; Beaulieu, Luc

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: To present a conceptually new method for metal artifact reduction (MAR) that can be used on patients with multiple objects within the scan plane that are also of small sized along the longitudinal (scanning) direction, such as dental fillings. Methods: The proposed algorithm, named opposite view replacement, achieves MAR by first detecting the projection data affected by metal objects and then replacing the affected projections by the corresponding opposite view projections, which are not affected by metal objects. The authors also applied a fading process to avoid producing any discontinuities in the boundary of the affected projection areas in the sinogram. A skull phantom with and without a variety of dental metal inserts was made to extract the performance metric of the algorithm. A head and neck case, typical of IMRT planning, was also tested. Results: The reconstructed CT images based on this new replacement scheme show a significant improvement in image quality for patients with metallic dental objects compared to the MAR algorithms based on the interpolation scheme. For the phantom, the authors showed that the artifact reduction algorithm can efficiently recover the CT numbers in the area next to the metallic objects. Conclusions: The authors presented a new and efficient method for artifact reduction due to multiple small metallic objects. The obtained results from phantoms and clinical cases fully validate the proposed approach.

  2. Automatic correction of dental artifacts in PET/MRI.

    PubMed

    Ladefoged, Claes N; Andersen, Flemming L; Keller, Sune H; Beyer, Thomas; Law, Ian; Højgaard, Liselotte; Darkner, Sune; Lauze, Francois

    2015-04-01

    A challenge when using current magnetic resonance (MR)-based attenuation correction in positron emission tomography/MR imaging (PET/MRI) is that the MRIs can have a signal void around the dental fillings that is segmented as artificial air-regions in the attenuation map. For artifacts connected to the background, we propose an extension to an existing active contour algorithm to delineate the outer contour using the nonattenuation corrected PET image and the original attenuation map. We propose a combination of two different methods for differentiating the artifacts within the body from the anatomical air-regions by first using a template of artifact regions, and second, representing the artifact regions with a combination of active shape models and k-nearest-neighbors. The accuracy of the combined method has been evaluated using 25 [Formula: see text]-fluorodeoxyglucose PET/MR patients. Results showed that the approach was able to correct an average of [Formula: see text] of the artifact areas. PMID:26158104

  3. Automatic correction of dental artifacts in PET/MRI

    PubMed Central

    Ladefoged, Claes N.; Andersen, Flemming L.; Keller, Sune. H.; Beyer, Thomas; Law, Ian; Højgaard, Liselotte; Darkner, Sune; Lauze, Francois

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. A challenge when using current magnetic resonance (MR)-based attenuation correction in positron emission tomography/MR imaging (PET/MRI) is that the MRIs can have a signal void around the dental fillings that is segmented as artificial air-regions in the attenuation map. For artifacts connected to the background, we propose an extension to an existing active contour algorithm to delineate the outer contour using the nonattenuation corrected PET image and the original attenuation map. We propose a combination of two different methods for differentiating the artifacts within the body from the anatomical air-regions by first using a template of artifact regions, and second, representing the artifact regions with a combination of active shape models and k-nearest-neighbors. The accuracy of the combined method has been evaluated using 25 F18-fluorodeoxyglucose PET/MR patients. Results showed that the approach was able to correct an average of 97±3% of the artifact areas. PMID:26158104

  4. A Wavelet Thresholding Method to Reduce Ultrasound Artifacts

    PubMed Central

    Tay, Peter C.; Acton, Scott T.; Hossack, John A.

    2010-01-01

    Artifacts due to enhancement, reverberation, and multi-path reflection are commonly encountered in medical ultrasound imaging. These artifacts can adversely affect an automated image quantification algorithm or interfere with a physician’s assessment of a radiological image. This paper proposes a soft wavelet thresholding method to replace regions adversely affected by these artifacts with the texture due to the underlying tissue(s), which were originally obscured. Our proposed method soft thresholds the wavelet coefficients of affected regions to estimate the reflectivity values caused by these artifacts. By subtracting the estimated reflectivity values of the artifacts from the original reflectivity values, estimates of artifact reduced reflectivity values are attained. The improvements of our proposed method are substantiated by an evaluation of Field II simulated, in vivo mouse and human heart B mode images. PMID:20934848

  5. A wavelet thresholding method to reduce ultrasound artifacts.

    PubMed

    Tay, Peter C; Acton, Scott T; Hossack, John A

    2011-01-01

    Artifacts due to enhancement, reverberation, and multi-path reflection are commonly encountered in medical ultrasound imaging. These artifacts can adversely affect an automated image quantification algorithm or interfere with a physician's assessment of a radiological image. This paper proposes a soft wavelet thresholding method to replace regions adversely affected by these artifacts with the texture due to the underlying tissue(s), which were originally obscured. Our proposed method soft thresholds the wavelet coefficients of affected regions to estimate the reflectivity values caused by these artifacts. By subtracting the estimated reflectivity values of the artifacts from the original reflectivity values, estimates of artifact reduced reflectivity values are attained. The improvements of our proposed method are substantiated by an evaluation of Field II simulated, in vivo mouse and human heart B mode images. PMID:20934848

  6. Three-dimensional metal artifact reduction method for dental conebeam CT scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Koji; Katsumata, Atsushi; Ito, Koichi; Aoki, Takafumi

    2009-02-01

    In dental treatments where metal is indispensable material and dental implants require precise structural measurements of teeth and bones, the ability of CT scanners to perform Metal Artifact Reduction (MAR) is a very important yet unsolved problem. The increasing need for dental implants is raising the demand for a conebeam CT. In this paper, an MAR method of the Metal Erasing Method (MEM) is extended to three dimensions. Assuming that metals are completely opaque to X-ray, MEM reconstructs metals and other materials separately, then combines them afterward. 3D-MEM is not only more efficient but performs better than the repetition of MEM, because it identifies metals more precisely by utilizing the continuity of metals in the third dimension. Another important contribution of the research is the application of advanced binarization techniques for identifying metal-corrupted areas on projection images. Differential histogram techniques are applied to find an adequate threshold value. Whereas MEM needs to identify metals on a sinogram that covers the all rotation angles with a single threshold value, identifying metals on each projection image with an individual value is an important benefit of 3D-MEM. The threshold value varies per projection angle, especially by the influence of the spine and scull, that are objects outside of the field of view. The performance of 3D-MEM is examined using a subject who has as many as 12 pieces of complex metals in his teeth. It is shown that the metals are successfully identified and the grade of metal artifact has been considerably reduced.

  7. Method for reducing windmill artifacts in multislice CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Kevin M.; Žabic, Stanislav

    2011-03-01

    Thin-slice images reconstructed from helical multi-slice CT scans typically display artifacts known as windmill artifacts, which arise from not satisfying the Nyquist sampling criteria in the patient longitudinal direction. Since these are essentially aliasing artifacts, they can be reduced or removed by trading off resolution, either globally (by reconstructing thicker slices) or locally (by local smoothing of the strong gradients). The obvious drawback to this approach is the associated loss in resolution. Another approach is to utilize an x-ray tube with the capability to modulate the focal spot in the z-direction, to effectively improve the sampling rate. This work presents a new method for windmill artifact reduction based on total variation minimization in the image domain, which is capable of removing windmill artifacts while at the same time preserving the resolution of anatomic structures within the images. This is a big improvement over previous reconstruction methods that sacrifice resolution, and it provides practically the same benefits as a z-switching x-ray tube with a much simpler impact to the overall CT system.

  8. Heparin reduces nonspecific eosinophil staining artifacts in mass cytometry experiments.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Adeeb H; Tordesillas, Leticia; Berin, M Cecilia

    2016-06-01

    The analysis of heterogeneous cell samples by mass cytometry (CyTOF) relies on the assumption that metal labeled antibodies accurately bind to their target antigens. We report a previously unappreciated experimental artifact of non-specific antibody binding by eosinophils during intracellular CyTOF analysis of human whole blood samples. We hypothesized that this non-specific binding results from a charge-based interaction between the metal-labeled antibodies and highly cationic proteins found in eosinophillic granules and found that this non-specific staining artifact could be reduced to background levels with a simple blocking protocol using heparin as a competing anionic protein. This protocol eliminates a potential source of erroneous data interpretation in all experiments involving intracellular staining of human whole blood samples, and allows accurate assessment of dynamic changes in intracellular proteins in eosinophils by CyTOF. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. PMID:27061608

  9. Glucosyltransferase inactivation reduces dental caries.

    PubMed

    Devulapalle, K S; Mooser, G

    2001-02-01

    Dental caries has been an intractable disease in spite of intense dental research. The metabolic acids produced by mutans streptococci demineralize the tooth surface and lead to dental caries. The enzyme glucosyltransferase (GTF) produced by mutans streptococci is the key factor in this process. Oral bacterial GTFs use sucrose as a substrate in synthesis of either water-soluble or insoluble glucans. In this investigation, kinetic studies with divalent metal ions revealed their strong binding affinity to GTF. The metal ions also proved to be strong inhibitors of the enzyme. Here we describe a simple method of inactivating the enzyme that actively participates in dental caries by taking advantage of a Fenton reaction which requires metal ions such as iron or copper and peroxide. The hydroxyl radical ions produced via the Fenton reaction inactivate GTF, a factor in the production of dental caries. PMID:11332534

  10. Artifacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Samantha

    2009-01-01

    NASA Headquarters sent a list of items to KSC that were deemed potential artifacts. These items played arole in the Shuttle Program's development and maintenance. Because these items are national assets, many are of interest to museums, schools, other government entities, etc. upon the Space Shuttle's retirement. The list contains over 500 items. All of these items need to be located, photographed, and catalogued with accompanying specific data that needs to be gathered. Initial research suggests that this is a time, labor, and cost intensive project. The purpose of my project was to focus on 20-60 of these 500 items, gather the necessary data, and compile them in a way that can be added to by other users when/if the project goes into full effect.

  11. Metal Artifact Reduction and Segmentation of Dental Computerized Tomography Images Using Least Square Support Vector Machine and Mean Shift Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Mortaheb, Parinaz; Rezaeian, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Segmentation and three-dimensional (3D) visualization of teeth in dental computerized tomography (CT) images are of dentists’ requirements for both abnormalities diagnosis and the treatments such as dental implant and orthodontic planning. On the other hand, dental CT image segmentation is a difficult process because of the specific characteristics of the tooth's structure. This paper presents a method for automatic segmentation of dental CT images. We present a multi-step method, which starts with a preprocessing phase to reduce the metal artifact using the least square support vector machine. Integral intensity profile is then applied to detect each tooth's region candidates. Finally, the mean shift algorithm is used to partition the region of each tooth, and all these segmented slices are then applied for 3D visualization of teeth. Examining the performance of our proposed approach, a set of reliable assessment metrics is utilized. We applied the segmentation method on 14 cone-beam CT datasets. Functionality analysis of the proposed method demonstrated precise segmentation results on different sample slices. Accuracy analysis of the proposed method indicates that we can increase the sensitivity, specificity, precision, and accuracy of the segmentation results by 83.24%, 98.35%, 72.77%, and 97.62% and decrease the error rate by 2.34%. The experimental results show that the proposed approach performs well on different types of CT images and has better performance than all existing approaches. Moreover, segmentation results can be more accurate by using the proposed algorithm of metal artifact reduction in the preprocessing phase. PMID:27014607

  12. Improved image decompression for reduced transform coding artifacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orourke, Thomas P.; Stevenson, Robert L.

    1994-01-01

    The perceived quality of images reconstructed from low bit rate compression is severely degraded by the appearance of transform coding artifacts. This paper proposes a method for producing higher quality reconstructed images based on a stochastic model for the image data. Quantization (scalar or vector) partitions the transform coefficient space and maps all points in a partition cell to a representative reconstruction point, usually taken as the centroid of the cell. The proposed image estimation technique selects the reconstruction point within the quantization partition cell which results in a reconstructed image which best fits a non-Gaussian Markov random field (MRF) image model. This approach results in a convex constrained optimization problem which can be solved iteratively. At each iteration, the gradient projection method is used to update the estimate based on the image model. In the transform domain, the resulting coefficient reconstruction points are projected to the particular quantization partition cells defined by the compressed image. Experimental results will be shown for images compressed using scalar quantization of block DCT and using vector quantization of subband wavelet transform. The proposed image decompression provides a reconstructed image with reduced visibility of transform coding artifacts and superior perceived quality.

  13. Adaptive motion artifact reducing algorithm for wrist photoplethysmography application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jingwei; Wang, Guijin; Shi, Chenbo

    2016-04-01

    Photoplethysmography (PPG) technology is widely used in wearable heart pulse rate monitoring. It might reveal the potential risks of heart condition and cardiopulmonary function by detecting the cardiac rhythms in physical exercise. However the quality of wrist photoelectric signal is very sensitive to motion artifact since the thicker tissues and the fewer amount of capillaries. Therefore, motion artifact is the major factor that impede the heart rate measurement in the high intensity exercising. One accelerometer and three channels of light with different wavelengths are used in this research to analyze the coupled form of motion artifact. A novel approach is proposed to separate the pulse signal from motion artifact by exploiting their mixing ratio in different optical paths. There are four major steps of our method: preprocessing, motion artifact estimation, adaptive filtering and heart rate calculation. Five healthy young men are participated in the experiment. The speeder in the treadmill is configured as 12km/h, and all subjects would run for 3-10 minutes by swinging the arms naturally. The final result is compared with chest strap. The average of mean square error (MSE) is less than 3 beats per minute (BPM/min). Proposed method performed well in intense physical exercise and shows the great robustness to individuals with different running style and posture.

  14. Potential hazards and artifacts of ferromagnetic and nonferromagnetic surgical and dental materials and devices in nuclear magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    New, P F; Rosen, B R; Brady, T J; Buonanno, F S; Kistler, J P; Burt, C T; Hinshaw, W S; Newhouse, J H; Pohost, G M; Taveras, J M

    1983-04-01

    The risks to patients with metal surgical implants who are undergoing nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging and the artifacts caused by such implants were studied. Twenty-one aneurysm and other hemostatic clips and a variety of other materials (e.g., dental amalgam, 14 karat gold) were used. Longitudinal forces and torques were found to be exerted upon 16 of the 21 clips. With five aneurysm clips, forces and torques sufficient to produce risk of hemorrhage from dislocation of the clip from the vessel or aneurysm, or cerebral injury by clip displacement without dislodgement were identified. The induced ferromagnetism was shown to be related to the composition of the alloys from which the clips were manufactured. Clips with 10-14% nickel are evidently without sufficient induced ferromagnetism to cause hazard. The extent of NMR imaging artifacts was greater for materials with measurable ferromagnetic properties, but metals without measurable ferromagnetism in our tests also resulted in significant artifacts. Dental amalgam and 14 karat gold produced no imaging artifacts, but stainless steels in dentures and orthodontic braces produced extensive artifacts in the facial region. PMID:6828719

  15. Potential hazards and artifacts of ferromagnetic and nonferromagnetic surgical and dental materials and devices in nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    New, P.F.J.; Rosen, B.R.; Brady, T.J.; Buonanno, F.S.; Kistler, J.P.; Burt, C.T.; Hinshaw, W.S.; Newhouse, J.H.; Pohost, G.M.; Taveras, J.M.

    1983-04-01

    The risks to patients with metal surgical implants who are undergoing nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging and the artifacts caused by such implants were studied. Twenty-one aneurysm and other hemostatic clips and a variety of other materials (e.g., dental amalgam, 14 karat gold) were used. Longitudinal forces and torques were found to be exerted upon 16 of the 21 clips. With five aneurysm clips, forces and torques sufficient to produce risk of hemorrhage from dislocation of the clip from the vessel or aneurysm, or cerebral injury by clip displacement without dislodgement were identified. The induced ferromagnetism was shown to be related to the composition of the alloys from which the clips were manufactured. Clips with 10-14% nickel are evidently without sufficient induced ferromagnetism to cause hazard. The extent of NMR imaging artifacts was greater for materials with measurable ferromagnetic properties, but metals without measurable ferromagnetism in our tests also resulted in significant artifacts. Dental amalgam and 14 karat gold produced no imaging artifacts, but stainless steels in dentures and orthodontic braces produced extensive artifacts in the facial region.

  16. Correction of dental artifacts within the anatomical surface in PET/MRI using active shape models and k-nearest-neighbors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladefoged, Claes N.; Andersen, Flemming L.; Keller, Sune H.; Beyer, Thomas; Højgaard, Liselotte; Lauze, François

    2014-03-01

    In combined PET/MR, attenuation correction (AC) is performed indirectly based on the available MR image information. Metal implant-induced susceptibility artifacts and subsequent signal voids challenge MR-based AC. Several papers acknowledge the problem in PET attenuation correction when dental artifacts are ignored, but none of them attempts to solve the problem. We propose a clinically feasible correction method which combines Active Shape Models (ASM) and k- Nearest-Neighbors (kNN) into a simple approach which finds and corrects the dental artifacts within the surface boundaries of the patient anatomy. ASM is used to locate a number of landmarks in the T1-weighted MR-image of a new patient. We calculate a vector of offsets from each voxel within a signal void to each of the landmarks. We then use kNN to classify each voxel as belonging to an artifact or an actual signal void using this offset vector, and fill the artifact voxels with a value representing soft tissue. We tested the method using fourteen patients without artifacts, and eighteen patients with dental artifacts of varying sizes within the anatomical surface of the head/neck region. Though the method wrongly filled a small volume in the bottom part of a maxillary sinus in two patients without any artifacts, due to their abnormal location, it succeeded in filling all dental artifact regions in all patients. In conclusion, we propose a method, which combines ASM and kNN into a simple approach which, as the results show, succeeds to find and correct the dental artifacts within the anatomical surface.

  17. Dual energy CT: How well can pseudo-monochromatic imaging reduce metal artifacts?

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchenbecker, Stefan Faby, Sebastian; Sawall, Stefan; Kachelrieß, Marc; Lell, Michael

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Dual Energy CT (DECT) provides so-called monoenergetic images based on a linear combination of the original polychromatic images. At certain patient-specific energy levels, corresponding to certain patient- and slice-dependent linear combination weights, e.g., E = 160 keV corresponds to α = 1.57, a significant reduction of metal artifacts may be observed. The authors aimed at analyzing the method for its artifact reduction capabilities to identify its limitations. The results are compared with raw data-based processing. Methods: Clinical DECT uses a simplified version of monochromatic imaging by linearly combining the low and the high kV images and by assigning an energy to that linear combination. Those pseudo-monochromatic images can be used by radiologists to obtain images with reduced metal artifacts. The authors analyzed the underlying physics and carried out a series expansion of the polychromatic attenuation equations. The resulting nonlinear terms are responsible for the artifacts, but they are not linearly related between the low and the high kV scan: A linear combination of both images cannot eliminate the nonlinearities, it can only reduce their impact. Scattered radiation yields additional noncanceling nonlinearities. This method is compared to raw data-based artifact correction methods. To quantify the artifact reduction potential of pseudo-monochromatic images, they simulated the FORBILD abdomen phantom with metal implants, and they assessed patient data sets of a clinical dual source CT system (100, 140 kV Sn) containing artifacts induced by a highly concentrated contrast agent bolus and by metal. In each case, they manually selected an optimal α and compared it to a raw data-based material decomposition in case of simulation, to raw data-based material decomposition of inconsistent rays in case of the patient data set containing contrast agent, and to the frequency split normalized metal artifact reduction in case of the metal

  18. Reducing metal artifacts in cone-beam CT images by preprocessing projection data

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yongbin; Zhang Lifei; Zhu, X. Ronald; Lee, Andrew K.; Chambers, Mark; Dong Lei . E-mail: ldong@mdanderson.org

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: Computed tomography (CT) streak artifacts caused by metallic implants remain a challenge for the automatic processing of image data. The impact of metal artifacts in the soft-tissue region is magnified in cone-beam CT (CBCT), because the soft-tissue contrast is usually lower in CBCT images. The goal of this study was to develop an effective offline processing technique to minimize the effect. Methods and Materials: The geometry calibration cue of the CBCT system was used to track the position of the metal object in projection views. The three-dimensional (3D) representation of the object can be established from only two user-selected viewing angles. The position of the shadowed region in other views can be tracked by projecting the 3D coordinates of the object. Automatic image segmentation was used followed by a Laplacian diffusion method to replace the pixels inside the metal object with the boundary pixels. The modified projection data were then used to reconstruct a new CBCT image. The procedure was tested in phantoms, prostate cancer patients with implanted gold markers and metal prosthesis, and a head-and-neck patient with dental amalgam in the teeth. Results: Both phantom and patient studies demonstrated that the procedure was able to minimize the metal artifacts. Soft-tissue visibility was improved near or away from the metal object. The processing time was 1-2 s per projection. Conclusion: We have implemented an effective metal artifact-suppressing algorithm to improve the quality of CBCT images.

  19. Functionalized bio-artifact fabricated via selective slurry extrusion. Part 2: Fabrication of ceramic dental crown.

    PubMed

    Zhu, D B; Liang, J P; Qu, Y X; Duan, G L

    2014-05-01

    Functionalized ceramic dental crown was successfully fabricated through selective slurry extrusion (SSE) based technique of solid freeform fabrication (also known as rapid prototyping). After sintering, the decomposed tourmaline powders were embedded in ZrO2 matrix. The far infrared emission properties of the ceramic dental crown were improved due to the increase of the numbers of infrared active bonds from tourmaline. This new dental restoration process presents potential to provide dental patients with functionalized artificial teeth, which benefits the body health by the way of emitting far infrared rays in ambient temperatures. PMID:24734617

  20. SU-E-T-365: Dosimetric Impact of Dental Amalgam CT Image Artifacts On IMRT and VMAT Head and Neck Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, N; Young, L; Parvathaneni, U; Liao, J; Richard, P; Ford, E; Sandison, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The presence of high density dental amalgam in patient CT image data sets causes dose calculation errors for head and neck (HN) treatment planning. This study assesses and compares dosimetric variations in IMRT and VMAT treatment plans due to dental artifacts. Methods: Sixteen HN patients with similar treatment sites (oropharynx), tumor volume and extensive dental artifacts were divided into two groups: IMRT (n=8, 6 to 9 beams) and VMAT (n=8, 2 arcs with 352° rotation). All cases were planned with the Pinnacle 9.2 treatment planning software using the collapsed cone convolution superposition algorithm and a range of prescription dose from 60 to 72Gy. Two different treatment plans were produced, each based on one of two image sets: (a)uncorrected; (b)dental artifacts density overridden (set to 1.0g/cm{sup 3}). Differences between the two treatment plans for each of the IMRT and VMAT techniques were quantified by the following dosimetric parameters: maximum point dose, maximum spinal cord and brainstem dose, mean left and right parotid dose, and PTV coverage (V95%Rx). Average differences generated for these dosimetric parameters were compared between IMRT and VMAT plans. Results: The average absolute dose differences (plan a minus plan b) for the VMAT and IMRT techniques, respectively, caused by dental artifacts were: 2.2±3.3cGy vs. 37.6±57.5cGy (maximum point dose, P=0.15); 1.2±0.9cGy vs. 7.9±6.7cGy (maximum spinal cord dose, P=0.026); 2.2±2.4cGy vs. 12.1±13.0cGy (maximum brainstem dose, P=0.077); 0.9±1.1cGy vs. 4.1±3.5cGy (mean left parotid dose, P=0.038); 0.9±0.8cGy vs. 7.8±11.9cGy (mean right parotid dose, P=0.136); 0.021%±0.014% vs. 0.803%±1.44% (PTV coverage, P=0.17). Conclusion: For the HN plans studied, dental artifacts demonstrated a greater dose calculation error for IMRT plans compared to VMAT plans. Rotational arcs appear on the average to compensate dose calculation errors induced by dental artifacts. Thus, compared to VMAT, density

  1. Spiral-in/out BOLD fMRI for increased SNR and reduced susceptibility artifacts.

    PubMed

    Glover, G H; Law, C S

    2001-09-01

    BOLD fMRI is hampered by dropout of signal in the orbitofrontal and parietal brain regions due to magnetic field gradients near air-tissue interfaces. This work reports the use of spiral-in trajectories that begin at the edge of k-space and end at the origin, and spiral in/out trajectories in which a spiral-in readout is followed by a conventional spiral-out trajectory. The spiral-in trajectory reduces the dropout and increases the BOLD contrast. The spiral-in and spiral-out images can be combined in several ways to simultaneously achieve increased signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and reduced dropout artifacts. Activation experiments employing an olfaction task demonstrate significantly increased activation volumes due to reduced dropout, and overall increased SNR in all regions. PMID:11550244

  2. A conventional procedure to reduce Asn deamidation artifacts during trypsin peptide mapping.

    PubMed

    Kori, Yekaterina; Patel, Rekha; Neill, Alyssa; Liu, Hongcheng

    2016-01-15

    Asn deamidation is a common post-translational modification of proteins with significant biological consequences. Asn deamidation can cause changes in structure, stability and function of proteins. LC-MS peptide mapping is the most widely used method to detect and quantify Asn deamidation. However, a significant amount of deamidation can occur during sample preparation for peptide mapping, making it challenging to accurately determine the original level of deamidation. Although several protocols to reduce procedure-induced deamidation have been reported, they either require special procedural steps or are not optimal for maintaining trypsin activity. In the current study, several commonly used buffers that are optimal for trypsin activity were evaluated. The results demonstrated that much lower levels of Asn deamidation artifacts were observed when Tris buffer was used, especially at lower concentrations. The addition of 10% acetonitrile further reduced the levels of Asn deamidation artifacts. The utility of the optimized procedure was demonstrated by the digestion of a recombinant monoclonal antibody. The proposed procedure can be readily applied to any laboratory settings as it does not require any special reagents or procedures. PMID:26720699

  3. Reconcilable differences: the use of reference material to reduce methodological artifacts in the reporting of organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls.

    PubMed

    de Solla, Shane R; Weseloh, D V Chip; Letcher, Robert J; Hebert, Craig E

    2010-01-01

    Numerous long-term monitoring programs have assessed spatial and temporal trends of organochlorine (OC) pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Changes in analytical approaches (e.g., gas chromatography coupled with electron capture detection [GC-ECD] versus mass spectrometric detection [GC-MSD]) can reveal artifacts in the reported concentrations. In-house reference material (RM) was used to determine the analytical artifacts in the measurement of OCs and PCBs in Great Lake herring gull eggs previously analyzed from 1994 to 1996 (GC-ECD) and 1997 to 1999 (GC-MSD). Approximately 19.0% of the variability of PCB congeners in gull eggs was associated with analytical artifacts, and differences among colonies were obscured. Although the discrepancy in sum PCBs (SigmaPCBs) was fairly small (2.1%), some congeners varied considerably between methods (> 60%). After statistically removing the artifacts, only 1.4% of the variability in PCBs of herring gull eggs was associated with artifacts, and differences among gull colonies became apparent. After excluding OCs near the detection limit in the RM, statistically removing the artifacts reduced some of the differences between methods for OCs. Analytical artifacts may potentially render inferences difficult, confounded, and erroneous. When combining contaminant data obtained using different methods, the methods should be assumed to give different results unless demonstrated otherwise. Assessments of the compatibility of analytical methodologies should be made using an appropriate RM. PMID:20821415

  4. Reducing the formation of image artifacts during spectroscopic micro-CT acquisitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuber, Marcus; Koenig, Thomas; Hussain, Rubaiya; Hamann, Elias; Ballabriga, Rafael; Campbell, Michael; Fauler, Alex; Fiederle, Michael; Baumbach, Tilo

    2015-03-01

    Spectroscopic micro-computed tomography using photon counting detectors is a technology that promises to deliver material-specific images in pre-clinical research. Inherent to such applications is the need for a high spatial resolution, which can only be achieved with small focal spot sizes in the micrometer range. This limits the achievable x-ray fluxes and implies long acquisitions easily exceeding one hour, during which it is paramount to maintain a constant detector response. Given that photon-counting detectors are delicate systems, with each pixel hosting advanced analog and digital circuitry, this can represent a challenging task. In this contribution, we illustrate our findings on how to reduce image artifacts in computed tomography reconstructions under these conditions, using a Medipix3RX detector featuring a cadmium telluride sensor. We find that maintaining a constant temperature is a prerequisite to guarantee energy threshold stability. More importantly, we identify varying sensor leakage currents as a significant source to artifact formation. We show that these leakage currents can render the corresponding images unusable if the ambient temperature fluctuates, as caused by an air conditioning, for example. We conclude with demonstrating the necessity of an adjustable leakage current compensation.

  5. Using data redundancy gained by patch overlaps to reduce truncation artifacts in magnetic particle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlborg, M.; Kaethner, C.; Knopp, T.; Szwargulski, P.; Buzug, T. M.

    2016-06-01

    The imaging technology magnetic particle imaging allows the detection of magnetic material, in particular superparamagnetic nanoparticles, by remagnetization of the material via magnetic fields. The application is aimed at medical imaging where the particles are applied as tracer directly into the blood stream. Medical safety considerations such as peripheral nerve stimulation limit the maximal amplitude of the magnetic fields and in turn the field of view size. To handle this constraint the concept of patches was introduced, which allows a shift of a field of view to different positions in order to enlarge the imaging area. If this is done statically an overlap of patches can be used to reduce truncation artifacts occurring at the adjacent edges. In this contribution, a differentiation of two different kinds of patch overlaps, i.e. a trajectory and a system matrix overlap, is made. Further, different concepts to combine the resulting redundant information are investigated with respect to the reduction of truncation artifacts. The methods are analyzed in detail in a simulation study and validated on experimental data.

  6. PhotoAcoustic-guided Focused UltraSound imaging (PAFUSion) for reducing reflection artifacts in photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Mithun K.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2015-07-01

    Reflection artifacts caused by acoustic reflectors is an important problem in reflection-mode photoacoustic imaging. The light absorbed by skin and superficial optical absorbers may produce high photoacoustic signals, which traverse into the tissue and get reflected from structures having different acoustic impedance. These reflected photoacoustic signals, when reconstructed may appear in the region of interest, which causes complications in interpreting the images. We propose a novel method to identify and reduce reflection artifacts in photoacoustic images by making use of PhotoAcoustic-guided Focused UltraSound [PAFUSion]. Our method ultrasonically mimics the photoacoustic image formation process and thus delivers a clinically feasible way to reduce reflection artifacts. Simulation and phantom measurement results are presented to demonstrate the validity and impact of this method. Results show that PAFUSion technique can identify and differentiate reflection signals from the signals of interest and thus foresees good potential for improving photoacoustic imaging of deep tissue.

  7. Reducing Multiplexing Artifacts in Multi-Pinhole SPECT with a Stacked Silicon-Germanium System: a Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Lindsay C.; Shokouhi, Sepideh; Peterson, Todd E

    2015-01-01

    In pinhole SPECT, multi-pinhole collimators can increase sensitivity but may lead to projection overlap, or multiplexing, which can cause image artifacts. In this work we explore whether a stacked-detector configuration with a germanium and a silicon detector, used with 123I (27–32, 159 keV), where little multiplexing occurs in the Si projections, can reduce image artifacts caused by highly-multiplexed Ge projections. Simulations are first used to determine a reconstruction method that combines the Si and Ge projections to maximize image quality. Next, simulations of different pinhole configurations (varying projection multiplexing) in conjunction with digital phantoms are used to examine whether additional Si projections mitigate artifacts from the multiplexing in the Ge projections. Reconstructed images using both Si and Ge data are compared to those using Ge data alone. Normalized mean-square error and normalized standard deviation provide a quantitative evaluation of reconstructed images’ error and noise, respectively, and are used to evaluate the impact of the additional non-multiplexed data on image quality. For a qualitative comparison, the differential point response function is used to examine multiplexing artifacts. Results show that in cases of highly-multiplexed Ge projections, the addition of low-multiplexed Si projections helps to reduce image artifacts both quantitatively and qualitatively. PMID:25055382

  8. A comb filter based signal processing method to effectively reduce motion artifacts from photoplethysmographic signals.

    PubMed

    Peng, Fulai; Liu, Hongyun; Wang, Weidong

    2015-10-01

    A photoplethysmographic (PPG) signal can provide very useful information about a subject's cardiovascular status. Motion artifacts (MAs), which usually deteriorate the waveform of a PPG signal, severely obstruct its applications in the clinical diagnosis and healthcare area. To reduce the MAs from a PPG signal, in the present study we present a comb filter based signal processing method. Firstly, wavelet de-noising was implemented to preliminarily suppress a part of the MAs. Then, the PPG signal in the time domain was transformed into the frequency domain by a fast Fourier transform (FFT). Thirdly, the PPG signal period was estimated from the frequency domain by tracking the fundamental frequency peak of the PPG signal. Lastly, the MAs were removed by the comb filter which was designed based on the obtained PPG signal period. Experiments with synthetic and real-world datasets were implemented to validate the performance of the method. Results show that the proposed method can effectively restore the PPG signals from the MA corrupted signals. Also, the accuracy of blood oxygen saturation (SpO2), calculated from red and infrared PPG signals, was significantly improved after the MA reduction by the proposed method. Our study demonstrates that the comb filter can effectively reduce the MAs from a PPG signal provided that the PPG signal period is obtained. PMID:26334000

  9. Optical coherence tomography probe design for reduced artifact generation and manufacturability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staloff, Daniel; Comstock, Lovell; Miller, William; Schreiber, Horst

    2016-03-01

    Many fiber based probes used in Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) are comprised of a spacer, GRIN lens, fiber, and a microprism. This design form suffers from many material interfaces, which induce back reflections into the sample arm of the interferometer. With so many interfaces, these probes can produce artifacts in the system's imaging window. We present a design which has just two interfaces to minimize image artifacts. The two components of this design are the fiber endface and a reflective optic. With optimization, these two components can produce back reflections below -90dB which will minimize image artifacts. This will results in high fidelity imaging for medical diagnostics.

  10. Analysis of free breathing motion using artifact reduced 4D CT image data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrhardt, Jan; Werner, Rene; Frenzel, Thorsten; Lu, Wei; Low, Daniel; Handels, Heinz

    2007-03-01

    The mobility of lung tumors during the respiratory cycle is a source of error in radiotherapy treatment planning. Spatiotemporal CT data sets can be used for studying the motion of lung tumors and inner organs during the breathing cycle. We present methods for the analysis of respiratory motion using 4D CT data in high temporal resolution. An optical flow based reconstruction method was used to generate artifact-reduced 4D CT data sets of lung cancer patients. The reconstructed 4D CT data sets were segmented and the respiratory motion of tumors and inner organs was analyzed. A non-linear registration algorithm is used to calculate the velocity field between consecutive time frames of the 4D data. The resulting velocity field is used to analyze trajectories of landmarks and surface points. By this technique, the maximum displacement of any surface point is calculated, and regions with large respiratory motion are marked. To describe the tumor mobility the motion of the lung tumor center in three orthogonal directions is displayed. Estimated 3D appearance probabilities visualize the movement of the tumor during the respiratory cycle in one static image. Furthermore, correlations between trajectories of the skin surface and the trajectory of the tumor center are determined and skin regions are identified which are suitable for prediction of the internal tumor motion. The results of the motion analysis indicate that the described methods are suitable to gain insight into the spatiotemporal behavior of anatomical and pathological structures during the respiratory cycle.

  11. 21 CFR 872.5580 - Oral rinse to reduce the adhesion of dental plaque.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Oral rinse to reduce the adhesion of dental plaque... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 872.5580 Oral rinse to reduce the adhesion of dental plaque. (a) Identification. The device is assigned the generic name oral rinse to...

  12. 21 CFR 872.5580 - Oral rinse to reduce the adhesion of dental plaque.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Special Controls Guidance Document: Oral Rinse to Reduce the Adhesion of Dental Plaque.” See § 872.1(e... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Oral rinse to reduce the adhesion of dental plaque... adhesion of dental plaque. (a) Identification. The device is assigned the generic name oral rinse to...

  13. 21 CFR 872.5580 - Oral rinse to reduce the adhesion of dental plaque.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Special Controls Guidance Document: Oral Rinse to Reduce the Adhesion of Dental Plaque.” See § 872.1(e... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Oral rinse to reduce the adhesion of dental plaque... adhesion of dental plaque. (a) Identification. The device is assigned the generic name oral rinse to...

  14. 21 CFR 872.5580 - Oral rinse to reduce the adhesion of dental plaque.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Oral rinse to reduce the adhesion of dental plaque. 872.5580 Section 872.5580 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 872.5580 Oral rinse to reduce the adhesion of dental plaque....

  15. 21 CFR 872.5580 - Oral rinse to reduce the adhesion of dental plaque.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Oral rinse to reduce the adhesion of dental plaque. 872.5580 Section 872.5580 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 872.5580 Oral rinse to reduce the adhesion of dental plaque....

  16. Cell morphology classification in phase contrast microscopy image reducing halo artifact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Mi-Sun; Song, Soo-Min; Lee, Hana; Kim, Myoung-Hee

    2012-03-01

    Since the morphology of tumor cells is a good indicator of their invasiveness, we used time-lapse phase-contrast microscopy to examine the morphology of tumor cells. This technique enables long-term observation of the activity of live cells without photobleaching and phototoxicity which is common in other fluorescence-labeled microscopy. However, it does have certain drawbacks in terms of imaging. Therefore, we first corrected for non-uniform illumination artifacts and then we use intensity distribution information to detect cell boundary. In phase contrast microscopy image, cell is normally appeared as dark region surrounded by bright halo ring. Due to halo artifact is minimal around the cell body and has non-symmetric diffusion pattern, we calculate cross sectional plane which intersects center of each cell and orthogonal to first principal axis. Then, we extract dark cell region by analyzing intensity profile curve considering local bright peak as halo area. Finally, we examined cell morphology to classify tumor cells as malignant and benign.

  17. A Bayesian approach for the estimation and transmission of regularization parameters for reducing blocking artifacts.

    PubMed

    Mateos, J; Katsaggelos, A K; Molina, R

    2000-01-01

    With block-based compression approaches for both still images and sequences of images annoying blocking artifacts are exhibited, primarily at high compression ratios. They are due to the independent processing (quantization) of the block transformed values of the intensity or the displaced frame difference. We propose the application of the hierarchical Bayesian paradigm to the reconstruction of block discrete cosine transform (BDCT) compressed images and the estimation of the required parameters. We derive expressions for the iterative evaluation of these parameters applying the evidence analysis within the hierarchical Bayesian paradigm. The proposed method allows for the combination of parameters estimated at the coder and decoder. The performance of the proposed algorithms is demonstrated experimentally. PMID:18262958

  18. [The impact on costs and care of two approaches to reduce employees' dental plan expenses in a private company].

    PubMed

    Costa Filho, Luiz Cesar da; Duncan, Bruce Bartholow; Polanczyk, Carisi Anne; Sória, Marina Lara; Habekost, Ana Paula; Costa, Carolina Covolo da

    2008-05-01

    The present study evaluated the dental care plan offered to 4,000 employees of a private hospital and their respective families. The analysis covered three stages: (1) baseline (control), when dental care was provided by an outsourced company with a network of dentists paid for services, (2) a renegotiation of costs with the original dental care provider, and (3) provision of dental care by the hospital itself, through directly hired dentists on regular salaries. Monthly economic and clinical data were collected for this research. The dental plan renegotiation reduced costs by 37% in relation to baseline, and the hospital's own dental service reduced costs by 50%. Renegotiation led to a 31% reduction in clinical procedures, without altering the dental care profile; the hospital's own dental service did not reduce the total number of clinical procedures, but modified the profile of dental care, since procedures related to the causes of diseases increased and surgical/restorative procedures decreased. PMID:18461236

  19. Does atraumatic restorative treatment reduce dental anxiety in children? A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Arun K.; Bhumika, T. V.; Nair, N. Sreekumaran

    2015-01-01

    Dental anxiety is one of the major problems affecting children, which impairs the rendering of dental care, leading to impaired quality of life. It often leads to occupational stress in dental personnel and conflict between parents/caregivers. The objective of this study was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials done in children, to synthesize evidence of the effectiveness of atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) in reducing dental anxiety in children compared to conventional restorative treatments. The databases searched included PubMed, Google Scholar and The Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register. Eligible studies reporting dental anxiety by a variety of psychometric scales were tabulated. The review was conducted and reported in accordance with the guidelines provided by the Cochrane Collaboration. Among 416 studies retrieved through literature search, six studies matched the inclusion criteria. Due to lack of data, only three studies were included for meta-analysis using RevMan software (Review Manager, Version 5.3;The Cochrane Collaboration, Copenhagen, 2014). The pooled meta-analysis data, (standardized mean difference − 2.12 [95% confidence interval: −4.52, 0.27]) failed to show any difference between ART group and the conventional treatment group. In conclusion, ART was not more beneficial in reducing dental anxiety among pediatric dental patients. The findings are relevant in the field of clinical practice in dentistry in the management of the anxious pediatric dental patient. PMID:26038668

  20. Reduction of metal artifacts: beam hardening and photon starvation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadava, Girijesh K.; Pal, Debashish; Hsieh, Jiang

    2014-03-01

    The presence of metal-artifacts in CT imaging can obscure relevant anatomy and interfere with disease diagnosis. The cause and occurrence of metal-artifacts are primarily due to beam hardening, scatter, partial volume and photon starvation; however, the contribution to the artifacts from each of them depends on the type of hardware. A comparison of CT images obtained with different metallic hardware in various applications, along with acquisition and reconstruction parameters, helps understand methods for reducing or overcoming such artifacts. In this work, a metal beam hardening correction (BHC) and a projection-completion based metal artifact reduction (MAR) algorithms were developed, and applied on phantom and clinical CT scans with various metallic implants. Stainless-steel and Titanium were used to model and correct for metal beam hardening effect. In the MAR algorithm, the corrupted projection samples are replaced by the combination of original projections and in-painted data obtained by forward projecting a prior image. The data included spine fixation screws, hip-implants, dental-filling, and body extremity fixations, covering range of clinically used metal implants. Comparison of BHC and MAR on different metallic implants was used to characterize dominant source of the artifacts, and conceivable methods to overcome those. Results of the study indicate that beam hardening could be a dominant source of artifact in many spine and extremity fixations, whereas dental and hip implants could be dominant source of photon starvation. The BHC algorithm could significantly improve image quality in CT scans with metallic screws, whereas MAR algorithm could alleviate artifacts in hip-implants and dentalfillings.

  1. A study on a method to reduce the effect of the cross-talk artifact in a simultaneous, multiple-slice, plane, oblique MRI scan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sun-Yeob; Cho, Jae-Hwan; Lee, Hae-Kag; Cho, Moo-Seong; Park, Cheol-Soo; Kim, Eng-Chan; Kim, Sung-Kyu; Dong, Kyung-Rae; Chung, Woon-Kwan; Shin, Jae-Woo; Kim, Young-Jae; Cho, Young-Kuk

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to reduce the effect of cross-talk artifacts on the region of interest (ROI) and to improve the diagnostic value of an image by conducting an examination using the linear (series) method, rather than the interleave method, based on the time concept, which is a basic principle of MRI, with a focus on the T1-weighted image, which has a strong effect on the cross-talk artifact. A water phantom was placed in the center of a brain coil before using the interleave method and the linear method to obtain cross-sectional images. A sagittal oblique scan was conducted to ensure that the slice groups intersected one another. A reference image was also acquired at TR (time of repetition) = 500 msec. Subsequently, the TR was changed to 600 and 700 msec to conduct scans. The analysis method was to use the interleave method and the linear method to compare the effects of the cross-talk artifacts and the TR. As scanned images were suggested, the SNR (signal to noise ratio) for the ROI was measured. According to the study results, the effects of cross-talk artifacts were reduced more significantly in the image scanned using the linear method than in that using the interleave method. When the SNRs of the images scanned in the interleave method and the linear method were compared, the image scanned in the linear method showed higher SNRs for the anterior and the posterior parts at TR = 500, 600, and 700 msec. On the other hand, the image scanned in the interleave method showed an increase in the SNR for the middle part, where the cross-talk artifacts did not appear. This means that the cross-talk artifacts were reduced in the image scanned using the linear method, which resulted in an increase in the SNR. Overall, the SNRs of each image for the interleave method and the linear method were highest at TR = 700 msec. In conclusion, the linear method is selected to reduce the effects of cross-talk artifacts in a simultaneous and multiple slice plane oblique scan

  2. Real-time correction by optical tracking with integrated geometric distortion correction for reducing motion artifacts in functional MRI.

    PubMed

    Rotenberg, David; Chiew, Mark; Ranieri, Shawn; Tam, Fred; Chopra, Rajiv; Graham, Simon J

    2013-03-01

    Head motion artifacts are a major problem in functional MRI that limit its use in neuroscience research and clinical settings. Real-time scan-plane correction by optical tracking has been shown to correct slice misalignment and nonlinear spin-history artifacts; however, residual artifacts due to dynamic magnetic field nonuniformity may remain in the data. A recently developed correction technique, Phase Labeling for Additional Coordinate Encoding, can correct for absolute geometric distortion using only the complex image data from two echo planar images with slightly shifted k-space trajectories. An approach is presented that integrates Phase Labeling for Additional Coordinate Encoding into a real-time scan-plane update system by optical tracking, applied to a tissue-equivalent phantom undergoing complex motion and an functional MRI finger tapping experiment with overt head motion to induce dynamic field nonuniformity. Experiments suggest that such integrated volume-by-volume corrections are very effective at artifact suppression, with potential to expand functional MRI applications. PMID:22585554

  3. Efficacy of Self-Instructional Training for Reducing Children's Dental Fear.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prins, Pier J.

    1988-01-01

    Utilizes two different experiments to test the effectiveness of a variety self-instructional training methods to reduce the dental fears of groups of 8- to 12-year-old children. Results indicate that high levels of anxiety impair the effectiveness of self-instruction. (FMW)

  4. Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate Reduces Cytotoxic Effects Caused by Dental Monomers: A Hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yang; Ma, Sai; Wang, Yirong; Li, Jing; Shan, Lequn; Chen, Jihua

    2015-01-01

    Resin monomers from dental composite materials leached due to incomplete polymerization or biodegradation may cause contact allergies and damage dental pulp. The cytotoxicity of dental resin monomers is due to a disturbance of intracellular redox equilibrium, characterized by an overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and depletion of reduced glutathione (GSH). Oxidative stress caused by dental resin monomers leads to the disturbance of vital cell functions and induction of cell apoptosis in affected cells. The nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) pathway plays a key role in the cellular defense system against oxidative and electrophilic stress. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) can activate the Nrf2 pathway and induce expression of a multitude of antioxidants and phase II enzymes that can restore redox homeostasis. Therefore, here, we tested the hypothesis that EGCG-mediated protection against resin monomer cytotoxicity is mediated by activation of the Nrf2 pathway. This study will help to elucidate the mechanism of resin monomer cytotoxicity and provide information that will be helpful in improving the biocompatibility of dental resin materials. PMID:26489899

  5. Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate Reduces Cytotoxic Effects Caused by Dental Monomers: A Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Yang; Ma, Sai; Wang, Yirong; Li, Jing; Shan, Lequn; Chen, Jihua

    2015-01-01

    Resin monomers from dental composite materials leached due to incomplete polymerization or biodegradation may cause contact allergies and damage dental pulp. The cytotoxicity of dental resin monomers is due to a disturbance of intracellular redox equilibrium, characterized by an overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and depletion of reduced glutathione (GSH). Oxidative stress caused by dental resin monomers leads to the disturbance of vital cell functions and induction of cell apoptosis in affected cells. The nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) pathway plays a key role in the cellular defense system against oxidative and electrophilic stress. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) can activate the Nrf2 pathway and induce expression of a multitude of antioxidants and phase II enzymes that can restore redox homeostasis. Therefore, here, we tested the hypothesis that EGCG-mediated protection against resin monomer cytotoxicity is mediated by activation of the Nrf2 pathway. This study will help to elucidate the mechanism of resin monomer cytotoxicity and provide information that will be helpful in improving the biocompatibility of dental resin materials. PMID:26489899

  6. Collecting Artifacts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffey, Natalie

    2004-01-01

    Fresh out of college, the author had only a handful of items worthy of displaying, which included some fossils she had collected in her paleontology class. She had binders filled with great science information, but kids want to see "real" science, not paper science. Then it came to her: she could fill the shelves with science artifacts with the…

  7. Reducing System Artifacts in Hyperspectral Image Data Analysis with the Use of Estimates of the Error Covariance in the Data

    SciTech Connect

    HAALAND, DAVID M.; VAN BENTHEM, MARK H.; WEHLBURG, CHRISTINE M.; KOEHLER,IV, FREDERICK W.

    2002-01-01

    Hyperspectral Fourier transform infrared images have been obtained from a neoprene sample aged in air at elevated temperatures. The massive amount of spectra available from this heterogeneous sample provides the opportunity to perform quantitative analysis of the spectral data without the need for calibration standards. Multivariate curve resolution (MCR) methods with non-negativity constraints applied to the iterative alternating least squares analysis of the spectral data has been shown to achieve the goal of quantitative image analysis without the use of standards. However, the pure-component spectra and the relative concentration maps were heavily contaminated by the presence of system artifacts in the spectral data. We have demonstrated that the detrimental effects of these artifacts can be minimized by adding an estimate of the error covariance structure of the spectral image data to the MCR algorithm. The estimate is added by augmenting the concentration and pure-component spectra matrices with scores and eigenvectors obtained from the mean-centered repeat image differences of the sample. The implementation of augmentation is accomplished by employing efficient equality constraints on the MCR analysis. Augmentation with the scores from the repeat images is found to primarily improve the pure-component spectral estimates while augmentation with the corresponding eigenvectors primarily improves the concentration maps. Augmentation with both scores and eigenvectors yielded the best result by generating less noisy pure-component spectral estimates and relative concentration maps that were largely free from a striping artifact that is present due to system errors in the FT-IR images. The MCR methods presented are general and can also be applied productively to non-image spectral data.

  8. Reducing the artifacts in the identification of outer retinal boundary in the SD-OCT image with inherit retinal dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Min Zhang; Sekiguchi, Hiroyuki; Uji, Akihito; Yakami, Masahiro; Togashi, Kaori

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a new SD-OCT outer retinal boundary identification method based on the improved graph-theoretic approach in SD-OCT retinal image, which is robust to the image quality degradation and the pathological morphology variability. The performance of the proposed method was verified using the SD-OCT image database with inherit retinal dystrophies, which suffer from the artifacts most among different macular degeneration diseases. The experimental results of the subjective evaluation indicated that the identification results using the proposed method was substantially improved compared with the current built-in software in the SD-OCT devices. PMID:26737258

  9. Dental Procedures.

    PubMed

    Ramponi, Denise R

    2016-01-01

    Dental problems are a common complaint in emergency departments in the United States. There are a wide variety of dental issues addressed in emergency department visits such as dental caries, loose teeth, dental trauma, gingival infections, and dry socket syndrome. Review of the most common dental blocks and dental procedures will allow the practitioner the opportunity to make the patient more comfortable and reduce the amount of analgesia the patient will need upon discharge. Familiarity with the dental equipment, tooth, and mouth anatomy will help prepare the practitioner for to perform these dental procedures. PMID:27482994

  10. Aluminum-free low-modulus Ti-C composites that exhibit reduced image artifacts during MRI.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Chul; Lee, Hong-Jun; Son, Seong-Guk; Seok, Hyun-Kwang; Lee, Kang-Sik; Shin, Seung-Young; Lee, Jae-Chul

    2015-01-01

    Feasibility studies were performed to determine the suitability of a novel synthesis technique for fabricating multifunctional composite materials for orthopedic implants. By blending paramagnetic Ti powder with diamagnetic graphite and consolidating the resulting mixtures, Ti-C composites that cannot be feasibly obtained via conventional alloying techniques or ingot metallurgy were synthesized. The synthesized composite material exhibited extremely low magnetic susceptibility (χ=67.6×10(-6)), and, as a result, exhibited fewer artifacts during magnetic resonance imaging. The strength of the composite material (σ=770MPa) was such that it could support external loads to which the human body is subjected, but its Young's modulus was low (E=81.9 GPa) such that it could mitigate the stress-shielding effect. The material was also free from toxic elements such as Al and V and, thus, can be considered less harmful. PMID:25449916

  11. The Benefits of Prone SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging in Reducing Both Artifact Defects and Patient Radiation Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Stathaki, Maria; Koukouraki, Sophia; Papadaki, Emmanouela; Tsaroucha, Angeliki; Karkavitsas, Nikolaos

    2015-01-01

    Background Prone imaging has been demonstrated to minimize diaphragmatic and breast tissue attenuation. Objectives To determine the role of prone imaging on the reduction of unnecessary rest perfusion studies and coronary angiographies performed, thus decreasing investigation time and radiation exposure. Methods We examined 139 patients, 120 with an inferior wall and 19 with an anterior wall perfusion defect that might represented attenuation artifact. Post-stress images were acquired in both the supine and prone position. Coronary angiography was used as the “gold standard” for evaluating coronary artery patency. The study was terminated and rest imaging was obviated in the presence of complete improvement of the defect in the prone position. Quantitative interpretation was performed. Results were compared with clinical data and coronary angiographic findings. Results Prone acquisition correctly revealed defect improvement in 89 patients (89/120) with inferior wall and 12 patients (12/19) with anterior wall attenuation artifact. Quantitative analysis demonstrated statistically significant difference in the mean summed stress scores (SSS) of supine and mean SSS of prone studies in patients with disappearing inferior wall defect in the prone position and patent right coronary artery (true negative results). The mean difference between SSS in supine and in prone position was higher with disappearing than with remaining defects. Conclusion Technetium-99m (Tc-99m) tetrofosmin myocardial perfusion imaging with the patient in the prone position overcomes soft tissue attenuation; moreover it provides an inexpensive, accurate approach to limit the number of unnecessary rest perfusion studies and coronary angiographies performed. PMID:26559981

  12. The use of a respiratory rate biofeedback device to reduce dental anxiety: an exploratory investigation.

    PubMed

    Morarend, Quinn A; Spector, Michael L; Dawson, Deborah V; Clark, Steven H; Holmes, David C

    2011-06-01

    Anxiety experienced by individuals visiting the dental office to receive treatment is common. Evidence has shown biofeedback to be a useful modality of treatment for numerous maladies associated with anxiety. The purpose of the current pilot study was to investigate the use of a novel biofeedback device (RESPeRATE™) to reduce patients' pre-operative general anxiety levels and consequently reduce the pain associated with dental injections. Eighty-one subjects participated in this study, forty in the experimental group and forty-one in the control group. Subjects in the experimental group used the biofeedback technique, while those in the control group were not exposed to any biofeedback. All subjects filled out a pre-injection anxiety survey, then received an inferior alveolar injection of local anesthetic. Post-injection, both groups were given an anxiety survey and asked to respond to four questions regarding the injection experience using a Visual Analog Scale (VAS). With the use of the respiratory rate biofeedback device, there was a significant reduction of negative feelings regarding the overall injection experience, as measured by a VAS. Our findings demonstrate that this novel biofeedback technique may be helpful in the amelioration of dental anxiety, and may help produce a more pleasant overall experience for the patient. PMID:21365307

  13. Artifacts in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Krupa, Katarzyna; Bekiesińska-Figatowska, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Summary Artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging and foreign bodies within the patient’s body may be confused with a pathology or may reduce the quality of examinations. Radiologists are frequently not informed about the medical history of patients and face postoperative/other images they are not familiar with. A gallery of such images was presented in this manuscript. A truncation artifact in the spinal cord could be misinterpreted as a syrinx. Motion artifacts caused by breathing, cardiac movement, CSF pulsation/blood flow create a ghost artifact which can be reduced by patient immobilization, or cardiac/respiratory gating. Aliasing artifacts can be eliminated by increasing the field of view. An artificially hyperintense signal on FLAIR images can result from magnetic susceptibility artifacts, CSF/vascular pulsation, motion, but can also be found in patients undergoing MRI examinations while receiving supplemental oxygen. Metallic and other foreign bodies which may be found on and in patients’ bodies are the main group of artifacts and these are the focus of this study: e.g. make-up, tattoos, hairbands, clothes, endovascular embolization, prostheses, surgical clips, intraorbital and other medical implants, etc. Knowledge of different types of artifacts and their origin, and of possible foreign bodies is necessary to eliminate them or to reduce their negative influence on MR images by adjusting acquisition parameters. It is also necessary to take them into consideration when interpreting the images. Some proposals of reducing artifacts have been mentioned. Describing in detail the procedures to avoid or limit the artifacts would go beyond the scope of this paper but technical ways to reduce them can be found in the cited literature. PMID:25745524

  14. Clinical Use of Virtual Reality Distraction System to Reduce Anxiety and Pain in Dental Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Kenneth; Wiederhold, Brenda K.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Virtual reality (VR) has been used by clinicians to manage pain in clinical populations. This study examines the use of VR as a form of distraction for dental patients using both subjective and objective measures to determine how a VR system affects patients' reported anxiety level, pain level, and physiological factors. As predicted, results of self-evaluation questionnaires showed that patients experienced less anxiety and pain after undergoing VR treatment. Physiological data reported similar trends in decreased anxiety. Overall, the favorable subjective and objective responses suggest that VR distraction systems can reduce discomfort and pain for patients with mild to moderate fear and anxiety. PMID:24892198

  15. Clinical use of virtual reality distraction system to reduce anxiety and pain in dental procedures.

    PubMed

    Wiederhold, Mark D; Gao, Kenneth; Wiederhold, Brenda K

    2014-06-01

    Virtual reality (VR) has been used by clinicians to manage pain in clinical populations. This study examines the use of VR as a form of distraction for dental patients using both subjective and objective measures to determine how a VR system affects patients' reported anxiety level, pain level, and physiological factors. As predicted, results of self-evaluation questionnaires showed that patients experienced less anxiety and pain after undergoing VR treatment. Physiological data reported similar trends in decreased anxiety. Overall, the favorable subjective and objective responses suggest that VR distraction systems can reduce discomfort and pain for patients with mild to moderate fear and anxiety. PMID:24892198

  16. Short dental implants in reduced alveolar bone height: A review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Tutak, Marcin; Smektała, Tomasz; Schneider, Katarzyna; Gołębiewska, Edyta; Sporniak-Tutak, Katarzyna

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of short dental implants in distally reduced alveolar bone height. Material/Methods MedLine (PubMed and Ovid), ISI Web of Knowledge, and Cochrane databases were used for analysis. Searching was conducted using the search equation: ‘Dental Implants’ [Majr] AND (Short[TIAB] OR Shorter[TIAB]) AND (Implant[TIAB] OR Implants[TIAB]). Abstracts were screened by 2 independent reviewers. The articles included in the analysis were published in the English language and reported data on the use of implants with lengths below 10 mm in the posterior region with reduced alveolar bone height making the placement of longer implants impossible without additional surgical interventions. Articles concerning data on orthodontic implants and post-resection surgery reconstruction were excluded from analysis. Any disagreements between the 2 reviewers were resolved by a third reviewer. No time frame was used. Results Of the 791 articles initially found, automatic rejection of duplicates in the Endnotes X5 software resulted in 538 articles. After the selection of studies from databases, a bibliography of 32 eligible articles was searched for other publications. Through this method, 2 more studies were added. Conclusions The analysis of the results of different studies on the use of short dental implants showed that this treatment could be effective and comparable to the use of standard-length implants. This study revealed that rough-surfaced implants with lengths between 6–10 mm placed in the posterior mandible are the preferred solution. However, more detailed data will require additional prospective studies. PMID:24257121

  17. Contrast adaptive total p-norm variation minimization approach to CT reconstruction for artifact reduction in reduced-view brain perfusion CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang-Won; Kim, Jong-Hyo

    2011-03-01

    Perfusion CT (PCT) examinations are getting more frequently used for diagnosis of acute brain diseases such as hemorrhage and infarction, because the functional map images it produces such as regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV), and mean transit time (MTT) may provide critical information in the emergency work-up of patient care. However, a typical PCT scans the same slices several tens of times after injection of contrast agent, which leads to much increased radiation dose and is inevitability of growing concern for radiation-induced cancer risk. Reducing the number of views in projection in combination of TV minimization reconstruction technique is being regarded as an option for radiation reduction. However, reconstruction artifacts due to insufficient number of X-ray projections become problematic especially when high contrast enhancement signals are present or patient's motion occurred. In this study, we present a novel reconstruction technique using contrast-adaptive TpV minimization that can reduce reconstruction artifacts effectively by using different p-norms in high contrast and low contrast objects. In the proposed method, high contrast components are first reconstructed using thresholded projection data and low p-norm total variation to reflect sparseness in both projection and reconstruction spaces. Next, projection data are modified to contain only low contrast objects by creating projection data of reconstructed high contrast components and subtracting them from original projection data. Then, the low contrast projection data are reconstructed by using relatively high p-norm TV minimization technique, and are combined with the reconstructed high contrast component images to produce final reconstructed images. The proposed algorithm was applied to numerical phantom and a clinical data set of brain PCT exam, and the resultant images were compared with those using filtered back projection (FBP) and conventional TV

  18. A review of the role of solar ultraviolet-B irradiance and vitamin D in reducing risk of dental caries

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Large geographical variations in dental health and tooth loss among US adolescents and young adults have been reported since the mid-1800s. Studies in the 1920s and 1930s noted that vitamin D and ultraviolet-B (UVB) irradiance reduced caries formation, the proposed mechanism being improved calcium absorption and metabolism. This paper reviews the history of studies of dental caries with respect to vitamin D, geographical location and available solar UVB doses. In addition, data on mean dental health rank by state for US servicemen from three periods, 1918, 1934 and 1943, were used in regression analyses with respect to summertime solar UVB doses and an index for mottled enamel, a proxy for natural fluoridation of drinking water, for 1935. There was a significant inverse correlation for dental health rank with respect to solar UVB from doses of 4.0 to 6.5 kJ/m2 with little change thereafter. Adding data for mottled enamel rates for the states with UvB doses <6.6 kJ/m2 improved the adjusted R2 from 0.45 to 0.52. The mechanism whereby UVB reduces risk of dental caries is likely through production of vitamin D, followed by induction of cathelicidin and defensins, which have antimicrobial properties. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations at or above 30–40 ng/ml should significantly reduce the formation of dental caries. It is unfortunate that the UVB and vitamin D findings were not given more consideration in the 1950s as a way to reduce the risk of dental caries when water fluoridation was being proposed. PMID:22110779

  19. Brief oral health promotion intervention among parents of young children to reduce early childhood dental decay

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Severe untreated dental decay affects a child’s growth, body weight, quality of life as well as cognitive development, and the effects extend beyond the child to the family, the community and the health care system. Early health behavioural factors, including dietary practices and eating patterns, can play a major role in the initiation and development of oral diseases, particularly dental caries. The parent/caregiver, usually the mother, has a critical role in the adoption of protective health care behaviours and parental feeding practices strongly influence children’s eating behaviours. This study will test if an early oral health promotion intervention through the use of brief motivational interviewing (MI) and anticipatory guidance (AG) approaches can reduce the incidence of early childhood dental decay and obesity. Methods The study will be a randomised controlled study with parents and their new-born child/ren who are seen at 6–12 weeks of age by a child/community health nurse. Consenting parents will complete a questionnaire on oral health knowledge, behaviours, self-efficacy, oral health fatalism, parenting stress, prenatal and peri-natal health and socio-demographic factors at study commencement and at 12 and 36 months. Each child–parent pair will be allocated to an intervention or a standard care group, using a computer-generated random blocks. The standard group will be managed through the standard early oral health screening program; “lift the lip”. The intervention group will be provided with tailored oral health counselling by oral health consultants trained in MI and AG. Participating children will be examined at 24, and 36 months for the occurrence of dental decay and have their height and weight recorded. Dietary information obtained from a food frequency chart will be used to determine food and dietary patterns. Data analysis will use intention to treat and per protocol analysis and will use tests of independent

  20. Metal artifact reduction in CT using tissue-class modeling and adaptive prefiltering

    SciTech Connect

    Bal, Matthieu; Spies, Lothar

    2006-08-15

    High-density objects such as metal prostheses, surgical clips, or dental fillings generate streak-like artifacts in computed tomography images. We present a novel method for metal artifact reduction by in-painting missing information into the corrupted sinogram. The information is provided by a tissue-class model extracted from the distorted image. To this end the image is first adaptively filtered to reduce the noise content and to smooth out streak artifacts. Consecutively, the image is segmented into different material classes using a clustering algorithm. The corrupted and missing information in the original sinogram is completed using the forward projected information from the tissue-class model. The performance of the correction method is assessed on phantom images. Clinical images featuring a broad spectrum of metal artifacts are studied. Phantom and clinical studies show that metal artifacts, such as streaks, are significantly reduced and shadows in the image are eliminated. Furthermore, the novel approach improves detectability of organ contours. This can be of great relevance, for instance, in radiation therapy planning, where images affected by metal artifacts may lead to suboptimal treatment plans.

  1. Windmill artifacts analysis in MSCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amir, O.; Sabo-Napadensky, I.

    2006-03-01

    One of the most important advantages of the novel multi slice CT (MSCT) with increased number of slices is the ability to reduce the scan time. However, does the increased number of slices in the MSCT enforce us to reduce the pitch, in order to avoid windmill artifacts, hence preventing us from decreasing the scan time? In this work we address this issue along with other aspects of the windmill artifacts. We study the dependence of the windmill artifacts, their strength and frequency, on the number of slices and on the pitch. The study demonstrates, that when retaining constant bed speed while increasing the number of slices, the intensity of the windmill artifacts is reduced significantly. Images of scans performed with the same pitch, yet with various number of slices are compared. It is observed, that the intensity of the windmill artifacts is similar, independent of the number of slices. The frequency of the artifacts however, increases with the number of slices. The study concludes that updating a clinical protocol performed with a low number of slices MSCT, to a similar protocol performed with high number of slices MSCT, the same pitch can be used attaining better IQ. Scanning with the same pitch using wider coverage enables an advantageous shorter scan time in novel MSCT.

  2. Metal artifact suppression in megavoltage computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiner, L. John; Rogers, Myron; Salomons, Greg; Kerr, Andrew

    2005-04-01

    There has been considerable interest in megavoltage CT (MVCT) imaging associated with the development of image guided radiation therapy. It is clear that MVCT can provide good image quality for patient setup verification with soft tissue contrast much better than noted in conventional megavoltage portal imaging. In addition, it has been observed that MVCT images exhibit considerably reduced artifacts surrounding metal implants (e.g., surgical clips, hip implants, dental fillings) compared to conventional diagnostic CT images (kVCT). When encountered, these artifacts greatly limit the usefulness of kVCT images, and a variety of solutions have been proposed to remove the artifacts, but these have met with only partial success. In this paper, we investigate the potential for CT imaging in regions surrounding metal implants using high-energy photons from a Cobalt-60 source and from a 4 MV linear accelerator. MVCT and kVCT images of contrast phantoms and a phantom containing a hip prosthesis are compared and analysed. We show that MVCT scans provide good fidelity for CT number quantification in the high-density regions of the images, and in the regions immediately adjacent to the metal implants. They also provide structural details within the high-density inserts and implants. Calculations will show that practical clinical MVCT imaging, able to detect 3% contrast objects, should be achievable with doses of about 2.5cGy. This suggests that MVCT not only has a role in radiotherapy treatment planning and guidance, but may also be indicated for surgical guidance and follow-up in regions where metal implants cannot be avoided.

  3. Artifacts as Conventional Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Deborah R.; Callanan, Maureen A.

    2007-01-01

    What underlies children's understanding of artifacts? Studies suggest that beginning around age 7, people reason about artifacts in terms of the inventor's purpose--termed "the design stance." Our two studies emphasize another component of artifact understanding--the cultural nature of artifacts--by demonstrating people's sensitivity to an…

  4. Postprocessing algorithms to minimize fixed-pattern artifact and reduce trigger jitter in swept source optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gangjun; Tan, Ou; Gao, Simon S.; Pechauer, Alex D.; Lee, ByungKun; Lu, Chen D.; Fujimoto, James G.; Huang, David

    2015-01-01

    We propose methods to align interferograms affected by trigger jitter to a reference interferogram based on the information (amplitude/phase) at a fixed-pattern noise location to reduce residual fixed-pattern noise and improve the phase stability of swept source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) systems. One proposed method achieved this by introducing a wavenumber shift (k-shift) in the interferograms of interest and searching for the k-shift that minimized the fixed-pattern noise amplitude. The other method calculated the relative k-shift using the phase information at the residual fixed-pattern noise location. Repeating this wavenumber alignment procedure for all A-lines of interest produced fixed-pattern noise free and phase stable OCT images. A system incorporating these correction routines was used for human retina OCT and Doppler OCT imaging. The results from the two methods were compared, and it was found that the intensity-based method provided better results. PMID:25969023

  5. PET/CT Artifacts

    PubMed Central

    Blodgett, Todd M.; Mehta, Ajeet S.; Mehta, Amar S.; Laymon, Charles M.; Carney, Jonathan; Townsend, David W.

    2014-01-01

    There are several artifacts encountered in PET/CT imaging, including attenuation correction (AC) artifacts associated with using CT for attenuation correction. Several artifacts can mimic a 2-deoxy-2-[18F] fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) avid malignant lesions and therefore recognition of these artifacts is clinically relevant. Our goal was to identify and characterize these artifacts and also discuss some protocol variables that may affect image quality in PET/CT. PMID:21237418

  6. Mesoscale hybrid calibration artifact

    DOEpatents

    Tran, Hy D.; Claudet, Andre A.; Oliver, Andrew D.

    2010-09-07

    A mesoscale calibration artifact, also called a hybrid artifact, suitable for hybrid dimensional measurement and the method for make the artifact. The hybrid artifact has structural characteristics that make it suitable for dimensional measurement in both vision-based systems and touch-probe-based systems. The hybrid artifact employs the intersection of bulk-micromachined planes to fabricate edges that are sharp to the nanometer level and intersecting planes with crystal-lattice-defined angles.

  7. PROPRANOLOL AND D-CYCLOSERINE AS ADJUNCTIVE MEDICATIONS IN REDUCING DENTAL FEAR IN SEDATION PRACTICE

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, Lisa J.; McNeil, Daniel W.; Milgrom, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Extensive research and clinical experience have demonstrated the usefulness of sedation in helping fearful patients receive dental treatment, particularly when they have urgent treatment needs. In addition, the efficacy of behavioural programmes for managing dental fears is well established. While often these two approaches are seen as oppositional, our work in Seattle, Morgantown and at King’s College London Dental Institute demonstrates the complementarity of the two approaches. Using the example of two compounds, one very familiar, propranolol, and one that has recently become of interest, D-cycloserine, we wish to illustrate the manner in which these medications can be used to enhance behavioural approaches to managing dental anxiety. PMID:20151608

  8. Effectiveness of benzocaine in reducing deep cavity restoration and post-extraction stress in dental patients

    PubMed Central

    Al-Samadani, Khalid H.; Gazal, Giath

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the effectiveness of topical anesthetic, 20% benzocaine in relieving pain and stress in patients following deep cavity restoration and extraction of teeth under local anesthesia (LA). Methods: A prospective clinical trial was conducted from October 2014 until April 2015 at Taibah University, Al Madinah Al Munawarah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Forty-five patients were included in the 20% benzocaine group, and 46 in the normal saline group. Evaluation of the dental stress was made pre-operatively and immediately post-operative treatment using the visual analogue scale (VAS). Furthermore, discomfort of the injections were recorded by the patients after each treatment on standard 100 mm VAS, tagged at the endpoints with “no pain” (0 mm) and “unbearable pain” (100 mm). Results: There were statistically significant differences between the mean stress scores for patients in the benzocaine and normal saline groups post-operatively (p=0.002). There were significant differences between the mean pain scores for patients in the post buccal injection (p=0.001), post palatal injection (p=0.01), and the post inferior alveolar nerve block groups (p=0.02). Buccal, palatal, and inferior alveolar nerve block injections were more painful for patients in the normal saline group than the benzocaine group. Conclusion: This investigation has demonstrated that post-operative stress associated with deep cavity restoration and dental extractions under LA can be reduced by the application of topical anesthetic (20% benzocaine) at the operative site for intra-oral injections. PMID:26593169

  9. Detecting reduced bone mineral density from dental radiographs using statistical shape models.

    PubMed

    Allen, P Danny; Graham, Jim; Farnell, Damian J J; Harrison, Elizabeth J; Jacobs, Reinhilde; Nicopolou-Karayianni, Kety; Lindh, Christina; van der Stelt, Paul F; Horner, Keith; Devlin, Hugh

    2007-11-01

    We describe a novel method of estimating reduced bone mineral density (BMD) from dental panoramic tomograms (DPTs), which show the entire mandible. Careful expert width measurement of the inferior mandibular cortex has been shown to be predictive of BMD in hip and spine osteopenia and osteoporosis. We have implemented a method of automatic measurement of the width by active shape model search, using as training data 132 DPTs of female subjects whose BMD has been established by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. We demonstrate that widths measured after fully automatic search are significantly correlated with BMD, and exhibit less variability than manual measurements made by different experts. The correlation is highest towards the lateral region of the mandible, in a position different from that previously employed for manual width measurement. An receiver-operator characterstic (ROC) analysis for identifying osteopenia (T < -1: BMD more than one standard deviation below that of young healthy females) gives an area under curve (AUC) value of 0.64. Using a minimal interaction to initiate active shape model (ASM) search, the measurement can be made at the optimum region of the mandible, resulting in an AUC value of 0.71. Using an independent test set, AUC for detection of osteoporosis (T < -2.5) is 0.81. PMID:18046935

  10. Root Canal Therapy Reduces Multiple Dimensions of Pain: A National Dental PBRN Study

    PubMed Central

    Law, Alan S.; Nixdorf, Donald R.; Rabinowitz, Ira; Reams, Gregory J.; Smith, James A.; Torres, Anibal V.; Harris, D. Robert

    2014-01-01

    Background Initial orthograde root canal therapy (RCT) is used to treat dentoalveolar pathosis. The affect RCT has on pain intensity has been frequently reported, but the affect on other dimensions of pain has not. Also, the lack of large prospective studies involving diverse groups of patients and practitioners that are not involved in data collection suggest that there are multiple opportunities for bias to be introduced when this data is systematically aggregated. Method This prospective observational study assessed pain intensity, duration, and its interference with daily activities among RCT patients. Sixty-two practitioners (46 general dentists, 16 endodontists) in the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network enrolled patients requiring RCT. Patient reported data were collected before, immediately following, and one week after treatment using the Graded Chronic Pain Scale. Results Enrollment of 708 patients was completed over 6 months with 655 patients (93%) providing one-week follow-up data. Prior to treatment, patients reported a mean (±standard deviation) worst pain intensity of 5.3±3.8 (0-10 scale), 50% had “severe” pain (≥7), and mean days in pain and days pain interfered with activities were 3.6±2.7 and 0.5±1.2, respectively. Following treatment, patients reported a mean worst pain intensity of 3.0±3.2, 19% had “severe” pain, and mean days in pain and days with pain interference were 2.1±2.4 and 0.4±1.1, respectively. All changes were statistically significant (p<0.0001). Conclusions RCT is an effective treatment for patients experiencing pain, significantly reducing pain intensity, duration, and related interference. Further research is needed to reduce the proportion of patients reporting “severe” post-operative pain. PMID:25190605

  11. Use of cognitive artifacts in chemistry learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yengin, Ilker

    In everyday life, we interact with cognitive artifacts to receive and/or manipulate information so as to alter our thinking processes. CHEM/TEAC 869Q is a distance course that includes extensive explicit instruction in the use of a cognitive artifact. This study investigates issues related to the design of that online artifact. In order to understand design implications and how cognitive artifacts contribute to students' thinking and learning, a qualitative research methodology was engaged that utilized think aloud sessions. Participants' described constrained and structured cognitive models while using the artifact. The study also was informed by interviews and researcher's field notes. A purposeful sampling method led to the selection of participants, four males and two females, who had no prior history of using a course from the 869 series but who had experienced the scientific content covered by the CHEM869Q course. Analysis of the results showed both that a cognitive artifact may lead users' minds in decision making, and that problem solving processes were affected by cognitive artifact's design. When there is no design flaw, users generally thought that the cognitive artifact was helpful by simplifying steps, overcoming other limitations, and reducing errors in a reliable, effective, and easy to use way. Moreover, results showed that successful implementation of cognitive artifacts into teaching --learning practices depended on user willingness to transfer a task to the artifact. While users may like the idea of benefiting from a cognitive artifact, nevertheless, they may tend to limit their usage. They sometimes think that delegating a task to a cognitive artifact makes them dependent, and that they may not learn how to perform the tasks by themselves. They appear more willing to use a cognitive artifact after they have done the task by themselves.

  12. Frequent Dental Scaling Is Associated with a Reduced Risk of Periprosthetic Infection following Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Nationwide Population-Based Nested Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Ta-Wei; Lin, Tzu-Chieh; Ho, Chia-Jung; Kao Yang, Yea-Huei; Yang, Chyun-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Oral bacteremia has been presumed to be an important risk factor for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) infection. We aimed to investigate whether dental scaling could reduce the risk of TKA infection. A nested case-control study was conducted to compare 1,291 TKA patients who underwent resection arthroplasty for infected TKA and 5,004 matched controls without infection in the TKA cohort of Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). The frequency of dental scaling was analyzed. Multiple conditional logistic regression was used to assess the frequency of dental scaling and the risk of TKA infection. The percentage of patients who received dental scaling was higher in the control group than in the TKA infection group. The risk for TKA infection was 20% lower for patients who received dental scaling at least once within a 3-year period than for patients who never received dental scaling. Moreover, the risk of TKA infection was reduced by 31% among patients who underwent more frequent dental scaling (5–6 times within 3 years). Frequent and regular dental scaling is associated with a reduced risk of TKA infection. PMID:27336912

  13. Factors associated with reduced compliance of children to dental preventive measures.

    PubMed

    Ashkenazi, Malka; Bidoosi, Mervat; Levin, Liran

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to record self-reported factors for non-compliance to 'dental home' preventive measures among pediatric patients, and to clarify whether number or frequency of recall appointments increases their long-term compliance to dental home. Children attending recall appointments in a pediatric dental clinic were interviewed regarding their compliance as well as factors for non-compliance with the previously recommended preventive measures. Files of 651 children were analyzed. A significant positive correlation was found between compliance with regular teeth brushing twice a day (p < 0.0001), using correct fluoride concentration toothpaste (p < 0.0001), drinking water between meals (p < 0.0001), using Elmex gel (p < 0.0001), flossing (p < 0.002) and number of recall appointments. The most common factor for non-compliance to 'dental home' was 'I forgot'. Not flossing was commonly justified by performance difficulty while non-compliance to Elmex gel or to mouth rinses was attributed mainly to 'bad taste'. Additional common reasons were 'it was finished', 'my parents did not purchase', 'I did not find it at home', 'I did not know I need to'. Frequency and number of recall appointments might improve compliance with dental preventive measures. Referring to the specific factors of personal non-compliance may increase compliance. PMID:21698350

  14. Ability of healthy and inflamed human dental pulp to reduce hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Paola; Varvara, Giuseppe; Murmura, Giovanna; Terlizzi, Antonio; Caputi, Sergio

    2003-10-01

    This study examined the defensive ability of human dental pulp against H2O2 in healthy and reversible and irreversible pulpitis tissues through determination of catalase activity by spectrophotometric methods. Thirty-five systemically healthy patients were donors of the pulp tissue, and pulp conditions were assessed using clinical and X-ray evaluations. Catalase activity was 1.61 +/- 0.23 U mg(-1) protein in the healthy tissues, 2.99 +/- 0.45 U mg(-1) protein in the reversible pulpitis tissues, and 2.44 +/- 467 mU mg(-1) protein in the irreversible pulpitis tissues. All differences between the groups were statistically significant. These results point to a role for catalase during dental pulp inflammation in humans, and therefore demonstrate an inherent biological defense system against reactive oxidants in human dental pulp. PMID:12974692

  15. Metal artifact reduction in tomosynthesis imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaoxia; Yan, Ming; Tao, Kun; Xuan, Xiao; Sabol, John M.; Lai, Hao

    2015-03-01

    The utility of digital tomosynthesis has been shown for many clinical scenarios including post orthopedic surgery applications. However, two kinds of metal artifacts can influence diagnosis: undershooting and ripple. In this paper, we describe a novel metal artifact reduction (MAR) algorithm to reduce both of these artifacts within the filtered backprojection framework. First, metal areas that are prone to cause artifacts are identified in the raw projection images. These areas are filled with values similar to those in the local neighborhood. During the filtering step, the filled projection is free of undershooting due to the resulting smooth transition near the metal edge. Finally, the filled area is fused with the filtered raw projection data to recover the metal. Since the metal areas are recognized during the back projection step, anatomy and metal can be distinguished - reducing ripple artifacts. Phantom and clinical experiments were designed to quantitatively and qualitatively evaluate the algorithms. Based on phantom images with and without metal implants, the Artifact Spread Function (ASF) was used to quantify image quality in the ripple artifact area. The tail of the ASF with MAR decreases from in-plane to out-of-plane, implying a good artifact reduction, while the ASF without MAR remains high over a wider range. An intensity plot was utilized to analyze the edge of undershooting areas. The results illustrate that MAR reduces undershooting while preserving the edge and size of the metal. Clinical images evaluated by physicists and technologists agree with these quantitative results to further demonstrate the algorithm's effectiveness.

  16. MADR: metal artifact detection and reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, Sunil Prasad; Ha, Sungsoo; Mueller, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    Metal in CT-imaged objects drastically reduces the quality of these images due to the severe artifacts it can cause. Most metal artifacts reduction (MAR) algorithms consider the metal-affected sinogram portions as the corrupted data and replace them via sophisticated interpolation methods. While these schemes are successful in removing the metal artifacts, they fail to recover some of the edge information. To address these problems, the frequency shift metal artifact reduction algorithm (FSMAR) was recently proposed. It exploits the information hidden in the uncorrected image and combines the high frequency (edge) components of the uncorrected image with the low frequency components of the corrected image. Although this can effectively transfer the edge information of the uncorrected image, it also introduces some unwanted artifacts. The essential problem of these algorithms is that they lack the capability of detecting the artifacts and as a result cannot discriminate between desired and undesired edges. We propose a scheme that does better in these respects. Our Metal Artifact Detection and Reduction (MADR) scheme constructs a weight map which stores whether a pixel in the uncorrected image belongs to an artifact region or a non-artifact region. This weight matrix is optimal in the Linear Minimum Mean Square Sense (LMMSE). Our results demonstrate that MADR outperforms the existing algorithms and ensures that the anatomical structures close to metal implants are better preserved.

  17. Edge-preserving metal artifact reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Esther; Raupach, Rainer; Lell, Michael; Schmidt, Bernhard; Kachelriess, Marc

    2012-03-01

    Metal implants in the field of measurement lead to strong artifacts in CT images and reduce the image quality and the diagnostic value severely. We introduce frequency split metal artifact reduction (FSMAR), a conceptually new MAR method which is designed to reduce metal artifacts and preserve details and edges of structures even close to metal implants. There are many MAR methods which simply replace unreliable parts of the projection data by inpainting. FSMAR is a combination of an inpainting-based MAR method with a frequency split approach. Normalized metal artifact reduction (NMAR) is chosen as the inpainting-based MAR method in this work. The high frequencies of the original image, where all rawdata were used for the reconstruction, are combined with an NMAR-corrected image. NMAR uses a normalization step to reduce metal artifacts without introducing severe new artifacts. Algorithms using a frequency split were already used in CT for example to reduce cone-beam artifacts. FSMAR is tested for patient datasets with different metal implants. The study includes patients with hip prostheses, a neuro coil, and a spine fixation. All datasets were scanned with modern clinical dual source CT scanners. In contrast to other MAR methods, FSMAR yields images without the usual blurring close to metal implants.

  18. Corrosion and Preservation of Bronze Artifacts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Robert

    1980-01-01

    Reviews chemical information relating to the corrosion of bronze artifacts. Properties of copper alloys are reviewed, with a thorough discussion of the specialized properties of bronze. Techniques to reduce or eliminate corrosion are listed. (CS)

  19. Artifacts in Digital Collections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Stephen G.

    This paper discusses the preservation of digital resources in research libraries. The first section addresses the preservation imperative, including the challenges of quantity, stability of media, economics, and the contingent value of artifacts. The second section describes the artifact in question (i.e., an information resource in which the…

  20. Thoracotomy reduces intrinsic brain movement caused by heartbeat and respiration: a simple method to prevent motion artifact for in vivo experiments.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Nobuyoshi; Takahara, Yuji; Matsuki, Norio; Ikegaya, Yuji

    2011-10-01

    Recent technical advances in electrophysiological recording and functional imaging from the brain of living animals have promoted our understandings of the brain function, but these in vivo experiments are still technically demanding and often suffer from spontaneous pulsation, i.e., brain movements caused by respiration and heartbeat. Here we report that thoracotomy suppresses the motion artifact to a practically negligible level. This simple method will be useful in a wide variety of in vivo experiments, such as patch-clamp physiology, and optical imaging of neurons, glial cell, and blood vessels. PMID:21787813

  1. WE-D-18A-01: Evaluation of Three Commercial Metal Artifact Reduction Methods for CT Simulations in Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J; Kerns, J; Nute, J; Liu, X; Stingo, F; Followill, D; Mirkovic, D; Howell, R; Kry, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate three commercial metal artifact reduction methods (MAR) in the context of radiation therapy treatment planning. Methods: Three MAR strategies were evaluated: Philips O-MAR, monochromatic imaging using Gemstone Spectral Imaging (GSI) dual energy CT, and monochromatic imaging with metal artifact reduction software (GSIMARs). The Gammex RMI 467 tissue characterization phantom with several metal rods and two anthropomorphic phantoms (pelvic phantom with hip prosthesis and head phantom with dental fillings), were scanned with and without (baseline) metals. Each MAR method was evaluated based on CT number accuracy, metal size accuracy, and reduction in the severity of streak artifacts. CT number difference maps between the baseline and metal scan images were calculated, and the severity of streak artifacts was quantified using the percentage of pixels with >40 HU error (“bad pixels”). Results: Philips O-MAR generally reduced HU errors in the RMI phantom. However, increased errors and induced artifacts were observed for lung materials. GSI monochromatic 70keV images generally showed similar HU errors as 120kVp imaging, while 140keV images reduced errors. GSI-MARs systematically reduced errors compared to GSI monochromatic imaging. All imaging techniques preserved the diameter of a stainless steel rod to within ±1.6mm (2 pixels). For the hip prosthesis, O-MAR reduced the average % bad pixels from 47% to 32%. For GSI 140keV imaging, the percent of bad pixels was reduced from 37% to 29% compared to 120kVp imaging, while GSI-MARs further reduced it to 12%. For the head phantom, none of the MAR methods were particularly successful. Conclusion: The three MAR methods all improve CT images for treatment planning to some degree, but none of them are globally effective for all conditions. The MAR methods were successful for large metal implants in a homogeneous environment (hip prosthesis) but were not successful for the more complicated case of dental

  2. Artifacts and essentialism

    PubMed Central

    Gelman, Susan A.

    2013-01-01

    Psychological essentialism is an intuitive folk belief positing that certain categories have a non-obvious inner “essence” that gives rise to observable features. Although this belief most commonly characterizes natural kind categories, I argue that psychological essentialism can also be extended in important ways to artifact concepts. Specifically, concepts of individual artifacts include the non-obvious feature of object history, which is evident when making judgments regarding authenticity and ownership. Classic examples include famous works of art (e.g., the Mona Lisa is authentic because of its provenance), but ordinary artifacts likewise receive value from their history (e.g., a worn and tattered blanket may have special value if it was one's childhood possession). Moreover, in some cases, object history may be thought to have causal effects on individual artifacts, much as an animal essence has causal effects. I review empirical support for these claims and consider the implications for both artifact concepts and essentialism. This perspective suggests that artifact concepts cannot be contained in a theoretical framework that focuses exclusively on similarity or even function. Furthermore, although there are significant differences between essentialism of natural kinds and essentialism of artifact individuals, the commonalities suggest that psychological essentialism may not derive from folk biology but instead may reflect more domain-general perspectives on the world. PMID:23976903

  3. An evaluation of a commercial chewing gum in combination with normal toothbrushing for reducing dental plaque and gingivitis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, N C; Galustians, J H; Qaqish, J G

    2001-07-01

    New evidence suggests a beneficial outcome to chewing a sugarless gum as an added component to a regular, twice-daily toothbrushing regimen. Results of a 4-week study performed on 78 adults with preexisting gingivitis showed a significant reduction of dental plaque and gingivitis when the test group of 39 adults chewed 2 pieces of ARM & HAMMER Dental Care The Baking Soda Gum (AHDC)--a sugar-free chewing gum containing sorbitol, malitol, xylitol, and sodium bicarbonate--for 20 minutes twice a day in conjunction with once-daily toothbrushing for 60 seconds. The control group, also comprised of 39 adults, used breath mints (the study placebo) twice a day in conjunction with the same toothbrushing regimen. There were no statistically significant differences in plaque and gingivitis scores at the baseline examination. Using the Quigley-Hein Plaque Index, the test group experienced a 17% reduction in plaque over 4 weeks, while the control group reduced their plaque amounts by approximately 9% over the same period. Lobene's Mean Gingivitis Index scores were equally significant: a nearly 10% decline for the test group compared to almost 2% for the control group. This article describes the 4-week study and its promising results. PMID:11913304

  4. Reference Artifacts for NDE

    SciTech Connect

    Bono, M; Hibbard, R; Martz, H E

    2003-02-11

    Two reference artifacts will be fabricated for this study. One of the artifacts will have a cylindrical geometry and will contain features similar to those on an SNRT target. The second artifact will have a spherical geometry and will contain features similar to those on a Double Shell target. The artifacts were designed for manufacturability and to provide a range of features that can be measured using NDE methods. The cylindrical reference artifact is illustrated in Figure 1. This artifact consists of a polystyrene body containing two steps and a machined slot, into which will fit a tracer made of doped polystyrene. The polystyrene body contains several grooves and can be fabricated entirely on a diamond turning machine. The body can be machined by turning a PS rod to a diameter slightly greater than the finished diameter of 2 mm. The part can be moved off-axis to face it off and to machine the steps, slot, and grooves. The tracer contains a drilled hole and a milled slot, which could be machined with a single setup on a milling machine. Once assembled, the artifact could be placed in a Be tube or other structure relevant to target assemblies. The assembled artifact will contain many features that could be measured using various NDE methods. Some of these features are: Diameter; Maximum height; Step height; Dimensions of upper step; Radius at the union of the bottom of step and the vertical wall; Sizes of the grooves; Distance from step to groove; Slot width; Slot height; Location of the groove beneath the tracer; Diameter and location of drilled hole in tracer; and Size and location of slot in tracer. The spherical reference artifact is illustrated in Figure 2. This artifact is intended to replicate a double shell target, which consists of concentric polymer spheres separated by aerogel. The artifact consists of an upper hemispherical shell composed of 1% BrCH, which mates via a step joint with a hemispherical component made of polystyrene. This lower component

  5. Voting strategy for artifact reduction in digital breast tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Tao; Moore, Richard H.; Kopans, Daniel B.

    2006-07-15

    Artifacts are observed in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) reconstructions due to the small number of projections and the narrow angular range that are typically employed in tomosynthesis imaging. In this work, we investigate the reconstruction artifacts that are caused by high-attenuation features in breast and develop several artifact reduction methods based on a 'voting strategy'. The voting strategy identifies the projection(s) that would introduce artifacts to a voxel and rejects the projection(s) when reconstructing the voxel. Four approaches to the voting strategy were compared, including projection segmentation, maximum contribution deduction, one-step classification, and iterative classification. The projection segmentation method, based on segmentation of high-attenuation features from the projections, effectively reduces artifacts caused by metal and large calcifications that can be reliably detected and segmented from projections. The other three methods are based on the observation that contributions from artifact-inducing projections have higher value than those from normal projections. These methods attempt to identify the projection(s) that would cause artifacts by comparing contributions from different projections. Among the three methods, the iterative classification method provides the best artifact reduction; however, it can generate many false positive classifications that degrade the image quality. The maximum contribution deduction method and one-step classification method both reduce artifacts well from small calcifications, although the performance of artifact reduction is slightly better with the one-step classification. The combination of one-step classification and projection segmentation removes artifacts from both large and small calcifications.

  6. Influence of metallic artifact filtering on MEG signals for source localization during interictal epileptiform activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliorelli, Carolina; Alonso, Joan F.; Romero, Sergio; Mañanas, Miguel A.; Nowak, Rafał; Russi, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Objective. Medical intractable epilepsy is a common condition that affects 40% of epileptic patients that generally have to undergo resective surgery. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) has been increasingly used to identify the epileptogenic foci through equivalent current dipole (ECD) modeling, one of the most accepted methods to obtain an accurate localization of interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs). Modeling requires that MEG signals are adequately preprocessed to reduce interferences, a task that has been greatly improved by the use of blind source separation (BSS) methods. MEG recordings are highly sensitive to metallic interferences originated inside the head by implanted intracranial electrodes, dental prosthesis, etc and also coming from external sources such as pacemakers or vagal stimulators. To reduce these artifacts, a BSS-based fully automatic procedure was recently developed and validated, showing an effective reduction of metallic artifacts in simulated and real signals (Migliorelli et al 2015 J. Neural Eng. 12 046001). The main objective of this study was to evaluate its effects in the detection of IEDs and ECD modeling of patients with focal epilepsy and metallic interference. Approach. A comparison between the resulting positions of ECDs was performed: without removing metallic interference; rejecting only channels with large metallic artifacts; and after BSS-based reduction. Measures of dispersion and distance of ECDs were defined to analyze the results. Main results. The relationship between the artifact-to-signal ratio and ECD fitting showed that higher values of metallic interference produced highly scattered dipoles. Results revealed a significant reduction on dispersion using the BSS-based reduction procedure, yielding feasible locations of ECDs in contrast to the other two approaches. Significance. The automatic BSS-based method can be applied to MEG datasets affected by metallic artifacts as a processing step to improve the localization of

  7. Three-dimensional dental imaging by spiral CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannier, Michael W.; Hildebolt, Charles F.; Conover, Gary; Knapp, Robert H.; Yokoyama-Crothers, Naoko; Wang, Ge

    1995-05-01

    Three-dimensional image acquisition, display, and analysis of dental structures was performed and validated using spiral computed tomography (SCT) with metal artifact suppression. Isolated extracted teeth, a dry mandible, cadaver mandible, and cadaver head were scanned and reconstructed using a spiral CT scanner (Siemens Somatom PLUS-S) with 1 mm detector collimation, 1-mm table feed, and 0.1 - 1 mm reconstruction interval using specially developed software. Algorithms for metal artifact reduction including extended attenuation range and interpolation of missing projections were applied. Volumetric rendering of voxel sum images was performed to synthesize images comparable to conventional intraoral dental radiographs. Direct comparison of voxel-based synthetic and digitized film images was made. Several isolated, extracted teeth were sectioned with a diamond saw and submitted for histomorphometric analysis to aid in direct comparison with CT slice images obtained by multiplanar reconstruction. Metal artifact reduction was successful in markedly reducing the streaks and star patterns that usually accompany metallic restorations and intraoral appliances. Individual teeth were comparable to CT slice images. Voxel sum images were comparable to dental radiographs; however, for the SCT images, the spatial resolution was higher within the plane of section than it was orthogonal to the plane of section. Serial examinations were obtained by SCT, registered by surface matching, and interval change measured by 3D subtraction. Simulated lesions and restorations were introduced and quantitatively evaluated pre- and post-interventionally to assess imaging method performance.

  8. Reduced dental calcium expression and dental mass in chronic sleep deprived rats: Combined EDS, TOF-SIMS, and micro-CT analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Yi-Jie; Huang, Yung-Kai; Chou, Hsiu-Chu; Pai, Man-Hui; Lee, Ai-Wei; Mai, Fu-Der; Chang, Hung-Ming

    2015-08-01

    Teeth are the hardest tissue in the body. The growth of teeth is closely regulated by circadian rhythmicity. Considering that sleep deprivation (SD) is a severe condition that disrupts normal circadian rhythmicity, this study was conducted to determine whether calcium expression (the major element participating in teeth constitution), and dental mass would be significantly impaired following SD. Adolescent rats subjected to 3 weeks of SD were processed for energy dispersive spectrum (EDS), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) analyses. The EDS and TOF-SIMS results indicated that high calcium intensity was detected in both the upper and lower incisors of untreated rats. Micro-CT analysis corresponded closely with spectral data in which an enhanced dental mass was calculated in intact animals. However, following SD, both calcium expression and the dental mass were remarkably decreased to nearly half those of the untreated values. Because SD plays a detrimental role in impairing dental structure, establishing satisfactory sleep behavior would therefore serve as a crucial strategy for preventing or improving prevalent dental dysfunctions.

  9. Facts in artifacts

    PubMed Central

    Bindhu, PR; Krishnapillai, Rekha; Thomas, Priya; Jayanthi, P

    2013-01-01

    Examination of microscopic sections of animal tissues reveals facts which are not always related to its normal histology or pathology. Processing of tissue specimens consists of lengthy procedures from the stage of surgical removal to the stained and mounted microscopic sections. Defects are common in tissue sections as a result of faulty procedures. These defects are referred to as artifacts. They lead to misinterpretation of histopathological diagnosis but at times they throw limelight into diagnosis. This paper attempts to put together all the facts regarding the various artifacts that are encountered in histopathology. PMID:24574659

  10. A feasibility study of digital tomosynthesis for volumetric dental imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, M. K.; Kim, H. K.; Youn, H.; Kim, S. S.

    2012-03-01

    We present a volumetric dental tomography method that compensates for insufficient projection views obtained from limited-angle scans. The reconstruction algorithm is based on the backprojection filtering method which employs apodizing filters that reduce out-of-plane blur artifacts and suppress high-frequency noise. In order to accompolish this volumetric imaging two volume-reconstructed datasets are synthesized. These individual datasets provide two different limited-angle scans performed at orthogonal angles. The obtained reconstructed images, using less than 15% of the number of projection views needed for a full skull phantom scan, demonstrate the potential use of the proposed method in dental imaging applications. This method enables a much smaller radiation dose for the patient compared to conventional dental tomography.

  11. ORGANIC SPECIATION SAMPLING ARTIFACTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sampling artifacts for molecular markers from organic speciation of particulate matter were investigated by analyzing forty-one samples collected in Philadelphia as a part of the Northeast Oxidant and Particulate Study (NEOPS). Samples were collected using a high volume sampler ...

  12. Artifacts of Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frausto, Tomas Ybarra

    Artifacts from Mexico are described and illustrated (1) to assist the Mexican American child in retaining pride in his social, historical, and cultural past and (2) to promote understanding by teachers and students of the cultural background of the Mexican American. The descriptions relate both the purposes for which the objects were created and…

  13. Dental Amalgam

    MedlinePlus

    ... Products and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam Dental Amalgam Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Dental amalgam is a dental filling material which is ...

  14. Artifacts in Breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Anthony, Marina-Portia; Nguyen, Dustin; Friedlander, Lauren; Mango, Victoria; Wynn, Ralph; Ha, Richard

    2016-01-01

    As breast magnetic resonance imaging has evolved to become a routine part of clinical practice, so too has the need for radiologists to be aware of its potential pitfalls and limitations. Unique challenges arise in the identification and remedy of artifacts in breast magnetic resonance imaging, and it is important that radiologists and technicians work together to optimize protocols and monitor examinations such that these may be minimized or avoided entirely. This article presents patient-related and technical artifacts that may give rise to reduced image quality and ways to recognize and reduce them. PMID:26343534

  15. An evaluation of three commercially available metal artifact reduction methods for CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jessie Y; Kerns, James R; Nute, Jessica L; Liu, Xinming; Balter, Peter A; Stingo, Francesco C; Followill, David S; Mirkovic, Dragan; Howell, Rebecca M; Kry, Stephen F

    2015-02-01

    Three commercial metal artifact reduction methods were evaluated for use in computed tomography (CT) imaging in the presence of clinically realistic metal implants: Philips O-MAR, GE's monochromatic gemstone spectral imaging (GSI) using dual-energy CT, and GSI monochromatic imaging with metal artifact reduction software applied (MARs). Each method was evaluated according to CT number accuracy, metal size accuracy, and streak artifact severity reduction by using several phantoms, including three anthropomorphic phantoms containing metal implants (hip prosthesis, dental fillings and spinal fixation rods). All three methods showed varying degrees of success for the hip prosthesis and spinal fixation rod cases, while none were particularly beneficial for dental artifacts. Limitations of the methods were also observed. MARs underestimated the size of metal implants and introduced new artifacts in imaging planes beyond the metal implant when applied to dental artifacts, and both the O-MAR and MARs algorithms induced artifacts for spinal fixation rods in a thoracic phantom. Our findings suggest that all three artifact mitigation methods may benefit patients with metal implants, though they should be used with caution in certain scenarios. PMID:25585685

  16. An evaluation of three commercially available metal artifact reduction methods for CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jessie Y.; Kerns, James R.; Nute, Jessica L.; Liu, Xinming; Balter, Peter A.; Stingo, Francesco C.; Followill, David S.; Mirkovic, Dragan; Howell, Rebecca M.; Kry, Stephen F.

    2015-02-01

    Three commercial metal artifact reduction methods were evaluated for use in computed tomography (CT) imaging in the presence of clinically realistic metal implants: Philips O-MAR, GE’s monochromatic gemstone spectral imaging (GSI) using dual-energy CT, and GSI monochromatic imaging with metal artifact reduction software applied (MARs). Each method was evaluated according to CT number accuracy, metal size accuracy, and streak artifact severity reduction by using several phantoms, including three anthropomorphic phantoms containing metal implants (hip prosthesis, dental fillings and spinal fixation rods). All three methods showed varying degrees of success for the hip prosthesis and spinal fixation rod cases, while none were particularly beneficial for dental artifacts. Limitations of the methods were also observed. MARs underestimated the size of metal implants and introduced new artifacts in imaging planes beyond the metal implant when applied to dental artifacts, and both the O-MAR and MARs algorithms induced artifacts for spinal fixation rods in a thoracic phantom. Our findings suggest that all three artifact mitigation methods may benefit patients with metal implants, though they should be used with caution in certain scenarios.

  17. An evaluation of three commercially available metal artifact reduction methods for CT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jessie Y; Kerns, James R; Nute, Jessica L; Liu, Xinming; Balter, Peter A; Stingo, Francesco C; Followill, David S; Mirkovic, Dragan; Howell, Rebecca M; Kry, Stephen F

    2015-01-01

    Three commercial metal artifact reduction methods were evaluated for use in computed tomography (CT) imaging in the presence of clinically realistic metal implants: Philips O-MAR, GE's monochromatic Gemstone Spectral Imaging (GSI) using dual-energy CT, and GSI monochromatic imaging with metal artifact reduction software applied (MARs). Each method was evaluated according to CT number accuracy, metal size accuracy, and streak artifact severity reduction by using several phantoms, including three anthropomorphic phantoms containing metal implants (hip prosthesis, dental fillings, and spinal fixation rods). All three methods showed varying degrees of success for the hip prosthesis and spinal fixation rod cases, while none were particularly beneficial for dental artifacts. Limitations of the methods were also observed. MARs underestimated the size of metal implants and introduced new artifacts in imaging planes beyond the metal implant when applied to dental artifacts, and both the O-MAR and MARs algorithms induced artifacts for spinal fixation rods in a thoracic phantom. Our findings suggest that all three artifact mitigation methods may benefit patients with metal implants, though they should be used with caution in certain scenarios. PMID:25585685

  18. Metrological multispherical freeform artifact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blobel, Gernot; Wiegmann, Axel; Siepmann, Jens; Schulz, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Precisely known artifacts are required to characterize the accuracy of asphere and freeform measuring instruments. To this end the best knowledge of the surface characteristics in conjunction with a low measurement uncertainty are necessary. Because this is a challenging task for typical freeform surfaces used in optical systems, the concept of "metrological" artifacts is introduced. We have developed a multispherical freeform artifact for performance tests of tactile touch probe and contact-free optical measuring systems. The measurement accuracy of the complete form and the deviation from calibrated spherical sections can thus be determined. The radius calibration of multiple spherical sections is performed with an extended radius measuring procedure by interferometry. Evaluated surface forms of different measuring methods and the radii determined can be compared to each other. In this study, a multispherical freeform specimen made of copper, with two differing radii, has been measured by two optical measuring methods, a full field measuring tilted-wave interferometer and a high accuracy cylinder coordinate measuring machine with an optical probe. The surface form measurements are evaluated and compared, and the radii determined are compared to the results of a radius measurement bench.

  19. Cancellation of coherent artifacts in optical coherence tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Piao, D; Zhu, Q; Dutta, N K; Yan, S; Otis, L L

    2001-10-01

    Coherent artifacts in optical coherence tomography (OCT) images can severely degrade image quality by introducing false targets if no targets are present at the artifact locations. Coherent artifacts can also add constructively or destructively to the targets that are present at the artifact locations. This constructive or destructive interference will result in cancellation of the true targets or in display of incorrect echo amplitudes of the targets. We introduce the use of a nonlinear deconvolution algorithm, CLEAN, to cancel coherent artifacts in OCT images of extracted human teeth. The results show that CLEAN can reduce the coherent artifacts to the noise background, sharpen the air-enamel and enamel-dentin interfaces, and improve the image contrast. PMID:18364794

  20. Clinical use of an epinephrine-reduced (1/400,000) articaine solution in short-time dental routine treatments--a multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Daubländer, Monika; Kämmerer, Peer W; Willershausen, Brita; Leckel, Michael; Lauer, Hans-Christoph; Buff, Siegmar; Rösl, Benita

    2012-08-01

    The addition of epinephrine in dental local anaesthesia results in a longer and deeper anaesthesia under almost ischemic conditions. For short-time dental treatments, epinephrine-reduced anaesthetics may offer shorter and more individual anaesthesia with reduced potential side effects. The aim of this study was a clinical evaluation of anaesthetic potency and adverse effects of an epinephrine-reduced articaine formulation in dental patients undergoing short-time routine treatment. In a prospective clinical, not interventional, study between January 2008 and February 2009, 908 patients undergoing short-time dental treatment in five medical centers were anaesthetized with 4% articaine 1:400,000 epinephrine (Ubistesin, 3M/ESPE, Seefeld, Germany). Efficacy and safety in clinical use were evaluated. A follow-up after 1 day was conducted by telephone survey. A mean amount of 1.3-ml anaesthetic solution was needed to achieve a complete or sufficient anaesthesia in 97% (n = 876) of cases. A second injection had to be done in 3.7% (n = 34) before and in 11.9% (n = 108) during treatment. Here, the second injection had to be applied after a mean of 48.6 min. The mean duration of soft tissue anaesthesia after infiltration was 146.6 min, after nerve block 187.7 min. The painful treatment took a mean of 50.2 min and the total treatment time summed up to 68.8 min. In 1.7% cases (n = 15), unwanted side effects were observed. The results indicate that a lower concentration of epinephrine in combination with the 4% articaine solution leads to a high success rate of efficacy. The clinical use of a 4% articaine 1:400,000 epinephrine solution can be stated as safe and effective in short dental routine treatments. Reconsiderations concerning limitations of indication or additional contraindications are not necessary. PMID:21861074

  1. Dental pulp-derived stem cell conditioned medium reduces cardiac injury following ischemia-reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Shibata, Rei; Yamamoto, Noriyuki; Nishikawa, Masaya; Hibi, Hideharu; Tanigawa, Tohru; Ueda, Minoru; Murohara, Toyoaki; Yamamoto, Akihito

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs) can regenerate various tissues. We investigated the impact of SHED-conditioned medium (SHED-CM) on myocardial injury in a mouse model of ischemia-reperfusion (I/R). Wild-type (WT) mice were subjected to myocardial ischemia followed by reperfusion. SHED-CM was intravenously injected at 5 min after reperfusion. Administration of SHED-CM reduced myocardial infarct size as well as decreased apoptosis and inflammatory cytokine levels, such as TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-β, in the myocardium following I/R. In cultured cardiac myocytes, SHED-CM significantly suppressed apoptosis under hypoxia/serum-deprivation and reduced LPS-induced expression of pro-inflammatory genes. Furthermore, anti-apoptotic action of SHED-CM was stronger than bone marrow-derived stem cell (BMSC)-CM or adipose-derived stem cell (ADSC)-CM in cardiac myocytes. SHED-CM contains a higher concentration of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) than BMSC-CM and ADSC-CM, and neutralization of HGF attenuated the inhibitory actions of SHED-CM on apoptosis in cardiac myocytes. Finally, WT mice were intravenously treated with an HGF-depleted SHED-CM, followed by myocardial I/R. HGF depletion significantly attenuated the inhibitory actions of SHED-CM on myocardial infarct size and apoptosis after I/R. SHED-CM protects the heart from acute ischemic injury because it suppresses inflammation and apoptosis. SHED-CM could be a useful treatment option for acute myocardial infarction. PMID:26542315

  2. An Additive Manufacturing Test Artifact

    PubMed Central

    Moylan, Shawn; Slotwinski, John; Cooke, April; Jurrens, Kevin; Donmez, M Alkan

    2014-01-01

    A test artifact, intended for standardization, is proposed for the purpose of evaluating the performance of additive manufacturing (AM) systems. A thorough analysis of previously proposed AM test artifacts as well as experience with machining test artifacts have inspired the design of the proposed test artifact. This new artifact is designed to provide a characterization of the capabilities and limitations of an AM system, as well as to allow system improvement by linking specific errors measured in the test artifact to specific sources in the AM system. The proposed test artifact has been built in multiple materials using multiple AM technologies. The results of several of the builds are discussed, demonstrating how the measurement results can be used to characterize and improve a specific AM system. PMID:26601039

  3. An Additive Manufacturing Test Artifact.

    PubMed

    Moylan, Shawn; Slotwinski, John; Cooke, April; Jurrens, Kevin; Donmez, M Alkan

    2014-01-01

    A test artifact, intended for standardization, is proposed for the purpose of evaluating the performance of additive manufacturing (AM) systems. A thorough analysis of previously proposed AM test artifacts as well as experience with machining test artifacts have inspired the design of the proposed test artifact. This new artifact is designed to provide a characterization of the capabilities and limitations of an AM system, as well as to allow system improvement by linking specific errors measured in the test artifact to specific sources in the AM system. The proposed test artifact has been built in multiple materials using multiple AM technologies. The results of several of the builds are discussed, demonstrating how the measurement results can be used to characterize and improve a specific AM system. PMID:26601039

  4. Artifacts in magnetic measurements of fluid samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boekelheide, Z.; Dennis, C. L.

    2016-08-01

    Applications of magnetic fluids are ever increasing, as well as the corresponding need to be able to characterize these fluids in situ. Commercial magnetometers are accurate and well-characterized for solid and powder samples, but their use with fluid samples is more limited. Here, we describe artifacts which can occur in magnetic measurements of fluid samples and their impact. The most critical problem in the measurement of fluid samples is the dynamic nature of the sample position and size/shape. Methods to reduce these artifacts are also discussed, such as removal of air bubbles and dynamic centering.

  5. Dental Caries

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Ralph C.

    1988-01-01

    Dental caries is one of the most prevalent diseases afflicting mankind. It reached a peak in the 1950s but has been declining drastically in recent years in children and young adults. This article describes the three contributing factors in dental caries: microbial plaque, tooth susceptibility, and diet, and discusses practical preventive measures which help to reduce caries incidence. Some of these, such as vaccines and antimicrobial varnishes, are still in the research stages, while others, such as sucrose substitutes, low-calorie sweeteners, and limitation of frequency of sugar snacks are well established and can be promoted by family physicians. PMID:21253193

  6. Redox cycling compounds generate H2O2 in HTS buffers containing strong reducing reagents – real hits or promiscuous artifacts?

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Redox cycling compounds (RCCs) generate µM concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the presence of strong reducing agents, common buffer components used to maintain the catalytic activity and/or folding of target proteins for high throughput screening (HTS) assays. H2O2 generated by RCCs can indirectly inhibit the catalytic activity of proteins by oxidizing accessible cysteine, tryptophan, methionine, histidine or selenocysteine residues, and indeed several important classes of protein targets are susceptible to H2O2-mediated inactivation; protein tyrosine phosphatases, cysteine proteases, and metalloenzymes. The main sources of H2O2 in cells are the Nox enzyme/SOD systems, peroxisome metabolism, and the autoxidation of reactive chemicals by enzyme mediated redox cycling at both the microsomal and mitochondrial sites of electron transport. Given the role of H2O2 as a second messenger involved in the regulation of many signaling pathways it is hardly surprising that compounds which can generate intracellular H2O2 by enzyme mediated redox cycling would have pleiotropic effects. RCCs can therefore have serious negative consequences for the probe and/or lead generation process: primary HTS assay hit rates may be inflated by RCC false positives; critical resources will be diverted to develop and implement follow up assays to distinguish RCCs from real hits; and screening databases will become annotated with the promiscuous activity of RCCs. In an attempt to mitigate the serious impact of RCCs on probe and lead generation, two groups have independently developed assays to indentify RCCs. PMID:21075044

  7. Clinical Evaluation of Normalized Metal Artifact Reduction in kVCT Using MVCT Prior Images (MVCT-NMAR) for Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Paudel, Moti Raj; Mackenzie, Marc; Fallone, B. Gino; Rathee, Satyapal

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the metal artifacts in diagnostic kilovoltage computed tomography (kVCT) images of patients that are corrected by use of a normalized metal artifact reduction (NMAR) method with megavoltage CT (MVCT) prior images: MVCT-NMAR. Methods and Materials: MVCT-NMAR was applied to images from 5 patients: 3 with dual hip prostheses, 1 with a single hip prosthesis, and 1 with dental fillings. The corrected images were evaluated for visualization of tissue structures and their interfaces and for radiation therapy dose calculations. They were compared against the corresponding images corrected by the commercial orthopedic metal artifact reduction algorithm in a Phillips CT scanner. Results: The use of MVCT images for correcting kVCT images in the MVCT-NMAR technique greatly reduces metal artifacts, avoids secondary artifacts, and makes patient images more useful for correct dose calculation in radiation therapy. These improvements are significant, provided the MVCT and kVCT images are correctly registered. The remaining and the secondary artifacts (soft tissue blurring, eroded bones, false bones or air pockets, CT number cupping within the metal) present in orthopedic metal artifact reduction corrected images are removed in the MVCT-NMAR corrected images. A large dose reduction was possible outside the planning target volume (eg, 59.2 Gy to 52.5 Gy in pubic bone) when these MVCT-NMAR corrected images were used in TomoTherapy treatment plans without directional blocks for a prostate cancer patient. Conclusions: The use of MVCT-NMAR corrected images in radiation therapy treatment planning could improve the treatment plan quality for patients with metallic implants.

  8. WE-G-18A-07: Clinical Evaluation of Normalized Metal Artifact Reduction in KVCT Using MVCT Prior Images (MVCT-NMAR) Technique in Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Paudel, M; MacKenzie, M; Fallone, B; Rathee, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the metal artifacts in diagnostic kVCT images of patients that are corrected using a normalized metal artifact reduction method with MVCT prior images, MVCT-NMAR. Methods: An MVCTNMAR algorithm was developed and applied to five patients: three with bilateral hip prostheses, one with unilateral hip prosthesis and one with dental fillings. The corrected images were evaluated for visualization of tissue structures and their interfaces, and for radiotherapy dose calculations. They were also compared against the corresponding images corrected by a commercial metal artifact reduction technique, O-MAR, on a Phillips™ CT scanner. Results: The use of MVCT images for correcting kVCT images in the MVCT-NMAR technique greatly reduces metal artifacts, avoids secondary artifacts, and makes patient images more useful for correct dose calculation in radiotherapy. These improvements are significant over the commercial correction method, provided the MVCT and kVCT images are correctly registered. The remaining and the secondary artifacts (soft tissue blurring, eroded bones, false bones or air pockets, CT number cupping within the metal) present in O-MAR corrected images are removed in the MVCT-NMAR corrected images. Large dose reduction is possible outside the planning target volume (e.g., 59.2 Gy in comparison to 52.5 Gy in pubic bone) when these MVCT-NMAR corrected images are used in TomoTherapy™ treatment plans, as the corrected images no longer require directional blocks for prostate plans in order to avoid the image artifact regions. Conclusion: The use of MVCT-NMAR corrected images in radiotherapy treatment planning could improve the treatment plan quality for cancer patients with metallic implants. Moti Raj Paudel is supported by the Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarship, the Endowed Graduate Scholarship in Oncology and the Dissertation Fellowship at the University of Alberta. The authors acknowledge the CIHR operating grant number MOP 53254.

  9. Artifacts in digital images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorre, J. J.; Gillespie, A. R.

    1980-01-01

    Three kinds of artifacts unique to digital images are illustrated, namely aliasing caused by undersampling, interference phenomena caused by improper display of images, and harmonic overtones caused by quantization of amplitudes. Special attention is given to undersampling when the sample size and interval are the same. It is noted that this situation is important because it is typical of solid-state cameras. Quantization of image data of necessity introduces energy at harmonic overtones of the image spectrum. This energy is aliased if the frequency of the overtones is greater than 0.5 cycle/pixel. It cannot be selectively removed from the image through filtering, and the best way to suppress it is to maximize the amplification of the sensor before digital encoding.

  10. Sound as artifact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benjamin, Jeffrey L.

    A distinguishing feature of the discipline of archaeology is its reliance upon sensory dependant investigation. As perceived by all of the senses, the felt environment is a unique area of archaeological knowledge. It is generally accepted that the emergence of industrial processes in the recent past has been accompanied by unprecedented sonic extremes. The work of environmental historians has provided ample evidence that the introduction of much of this unwanted sound, or "noise" was an area of contestation. More recent research in the history of sound has called for more nuanced distinctions than the noisy/quiet dichotomy. Acoustic archaeology tends to focus upon a reconstruction of sound producing instruments and spaces with a primary goal of ascertaining intentionality. Most archaeoacoustic research is focused on learning more about the sonic world of people within prehistoric timeframes while some research has been done on historic sites. In this thesis, by way of a meditation on industrial sound and the physical remains of the Quincy Mining Company blacksmith shop (Hancock, MI) in particular, I argue for an acceptance and inclusion of sound as artifact in and of itself. I am introducing the concept of an individual sound-form, or sonifact , as a reproducible, repeatable, representable physical entity, created by tangible, perhaps even visible, host-artifacts. A sonifact is a sound that endures through time, with negligible variability. Through the piecing together of historical and archaeological evidence, in this thesis I present a plausible sonifactual assemblage at the blacksmith shop in April 1916 as it may have been experienced by an individual traversing the vicinity on foot: an 'historic soundwalk.' The sensory apprehension of abandoned industrial sites is multi-faceted. In this thesis I hope to make the case for an acceptance of sound as a primary heritage value when thinking about the industrial past, and also for an increased awareness and acceptance

  11. Effect of 0.12% chlorhexidine in reducing microorganisms found in aerosol used for dental prophylaxis of patients submitted to fixed orthodontic treatment

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Isis Rodrigues Menezes; Moreira, Ana Cristina Azevedo; Costa, Myrela Galvão Cardoso; Barbosa, Marcelo de Castellucci e

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed at assessing, in vivo, whether the prior use of 0.12% chlorhexidine as mouthwash would decrease air contamination caused by aerosolized sodium bicarbonate during dental prophylaxis. The study was conducted with 23 patients aged between 10 and 40 years old who were randomly selected and undergoing fixed orthodontic treatment. Methods The study was divided into two phases (T1 and T2) with a 30-day interval in between. In both phases, dental prophylaxis was performed with aerosolized sodium bicarbonate jetted to the upper and lower arches for 4 minutes. In T1, 10 minutes before the prophylaxis procedure, the participants used distilled water as mouthwash for one minute; whereas in T2, mouthwash was performed with 0.12% chlorhexidine. Microbial samples were collected in BHI agar plates for microbiological analysis. Two dishes were positioned on the clinician (10 cm from the mouth) and a third one at 15 cm from the patient's mouth. The samples were incubated for 48 hours at 37°C. Results were expressed in colony-forming units (CFU). Results Statistical analysis carried out by means of Student's t test, as well as Wilconxon and Kruskal-Wallis tests revealed that the prior use of 0.12% chlorhexidine as mouthwash significantly reduced CFU in the three positions studied (P < 0.001). Conclusion The prior use of 0.12% chlorhexidine as mouthwash significantly reduced contamination caused by aerosolized sodium bicarbonate during dental prophylaxis in the orthodontic clinic. PMID:25162572

  12. Prior-based artifact correction (PBAC) in computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Heußer, Thorsten Brehm, Marcus; Ritschl, Ludwig; Sawall, Stefan; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Image quality in computed tomography (CT) often suffers from artifacts which may reduce the diagnostic value of the image. In many cases, these artifacts result from missing or corrupt regions in the projection data, e.g., in the case of metal, truncation, and limited angle artifacts. The authors propose a generalized correction method for different kinds of artifacts resulting from missing or corrupt data by making use of available prior knowledge to perform data completion. Methods: The proposed prior-based artifact correction (PBAC) method requires prior knowledge in form of a planning CT of the same patient or in form of a CT scan of a different patient showing the same body region. In both cases, the prior image is registered to the patient image using a deformable transformation. The registered prior is forward projected and data completion of the patient projections is performed using smooth sinogram inpainting. The obtained projection data are used to reconstruct the corrected image. Results: The authors investigate metal and truncation artifacts in patient data sets acquired with a clinical CT and limited angle artifacts in an anthropomorphic head phantom data set acquired with a gantry-based flat detector CT device. In all cases, the corrected images obtained by PBAC are nearly artifact-free. Compared to conventional correction methods, PBAC achieves better artifact suppression while preserving the patient-specific anatomy at the same time. Further, the authors show that prominent anatomical details in the prior image seem to have only minor impact on the correction result. Conclusions: The results show that PBAC has the potential to effectively correct for metal, truncation, and limited angle artifacts if adequate prior data are available. Since the proposed method makes use of a generalized algorithm, PBAC may also be applicable to other artifacts resulting from missing or corrupt data.

  13. Reducing dental plaque formation and caries development. A review of current methods and implications for novel pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Kalesinskas, Povilas; Kačergius, Tomas; Ambrozaitis, Arvydas; Pečiulienė, Vytautė; Ericson, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Dental caries is an oral disease, which has a high worldwide prevalence despite the availability of various prophylactic means, including the daily use of fluoride toothpastes, water fluoridation, dental sealants, oral health educational programs and various antiseptic mouth-rinses. One important reason for this is uncontrolled increase in consumption of foods containing considerable sucrose concentration, especially among children. Sucrose is easily metabolized by oral bacteria (mostly streptococci) to acids and, subsequently, causing tooth decay or dental caries. In the oral ecosystem, streptococci principally reside on tooth surfaces forming biofilm. Important structural and binding materials of biofilm are glucan polymers synthesized by several isoforms of glucosyltransferase enzyme present in certain species of oral bacteria, including mutans group streptococci - Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus, which preferably colonize humans. Thus, there is a constant need to develop the methods and chemotherapeutics for improving oral health care and decreasing teeth decay through the suppression of cariogenic biofilm formation in the oral cavity. The aim of this paper was to review literature related to the pathogenesis of dental caries as well as currently existing and experimental pharmaceutical substances used for prevention of this process. PMID:25209226

  14. Artifacts in musculoskeletal MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dinesh R; Chin, Michael S M; Peh, Wilfred C G

    2014-02-01

    MR imaging has become an important diagnostic tool in the evaluation of a vast number of pathologies and is of foremost importance in the evaluation of spine, joints, and soft tissue structures of the musculoskeletal system. MR imaging is susceptible to various artifacts that may affect the image quality or even simulate pathologies. Some of these artifacts have gained special importance with the use of higher field strength magnets and with the increasing need for MR imaging in postoperative patients, especially those with previous joint replacements or metallic implants. Artifacts may arise from patient motion or could be due to periodic motion, such as vascular and cardiac pulsation. Artifacts could also arise from various protocol errors including saturation, wraparound, truncation, shading, partial volume averaging, and radiofrequency interference artifacts. Susceptibility artifact occurs at interfaces with different magnetic susceptibilities and is of special importance with increasing use of metallic joint replacement prostheses. Magic angle phenomenon is a special type of artifact that occurs in musculoskeletal MR imaging. It is essential to recognize these artifacts and to correct them because they may produce pitfalls in image interpretation. PMID:24515878

  15. Volume-of-interest reconstruction from severely truncated data in dental cone-beam CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zheng; Kusnoto, Budi; Han, Xiao; Sidky, E. Y.; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2015-03-01

    As cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has gained popularity rapidly in dental imaging applications in the past two decades, radiation dose in CBCT imaging remains a potential, health concern to the patients. It is a common practice in dental CBCT imaging that only a small volume of interest (VOI) containing the teeth of interest is illuminated, thus substantially lowering imaging radiation dose. However, this would yield data with severe truncations along both transverse and longitudinal directions. Although images within the VOI reconstructed from truncated data can be of some practical utility, they often are compromised significantly by truncation artifacts. In this work, we investigate optimization-based reconstruction algorithms for VOI image reconstruction from CBCT data of dental patients containing severe truncations. In an attempt to further reduce imaging dose, we also investigate optimization-based image reconstruction from severely truncated data collected at projection views substantially fewer than those used in clinical dental applications. Results of our study show that appropriately designed optimization-based reconstruction can yield VOI images with reduced truncation artifacts, and that, when reconstructing from only one half, or even one quarter, of clinical data, it can also produce VOI images comparable to that of clinical images.

  16. The application of metal artifact reduction (MAR) in CT scans for radiation oncology by monoenergetic extrapolation with a DECT scanner.

    PubMed

    Schwahofer, Andrea; Bär, Esther; Kuchenbecker, Stefan; Grossmann, J Günter; Kachelrieß, Marc; Sterzing, Florian

    2015-12-01

    % to 20%. Thus, the improvement is not significant for radiotherapy planning. For amalgam with a density between steel and tungsten, monoenergetic data sets of a patient do not show substantial artifact reduction. The local dose uncertainties around the metal artifact determined for a static field are of the order of 5%. Although dental fillings are smaller than the phantom inserts, metal artifacts could not be reduced effectively. In conclusion, the image based monoenergetic extrapolation method does not provide efficient reduction of the consequences of CT-generated metal artifacts for radiation therapy planning, but the suitability of other MAR methods will be subsequently studied. PMID:26144602

  17. Turquoise Artifact from Teotihuacan

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, Michael W.; Harbottle, Garman; Weigand, Phil C.

    1999-07-01

    Turquoise artifacts appeared sporadically in Mesoamerica as early as the Formative period (Merry de Morales 1987:100, Figure 8.4; Weigand 1989:43). Most occurrences, however, postdate the collapse of Teotihuacan. In the Late Classic and Postclassic periods increasing quantities are found, often in the form of elaborate mosaics, in a wide variety of contexts in central, west and northwest Mexico. Neutron activation analysis has determined that much of this turquoise derives from sources in the southwestern United States (Weigand et al. 1977; Harbottle and Weigand 1992; Weigand and Harbottle 1993). Teotihuacan played a major role in Mesoamerica during the Terminal Formative and Early-Middle Classic periods. It was the dominant power in central Mexico from about the time of Christ to its collapse at about A.D. 650 (Millon 1988, 1992; Cowgill 1996). Throughout this period goods flowed into Teotihuacan from many parts of the Mesoamerican world. Despite this widespread economic interaction, only two pieces of turquoise have been recovered in the city. In the following pages, the context and implications of one of these finds will be examined.

  18. Reduction of Metal Artifact in Single Photon-Counting Computed Tomography by Spectral-Driven Iterative Reconstruction Technique

    PubMed Central

    Nasirudin, Radin A.; Mei, Kai; Panchev, Petar; Fehringer, Andreas; Pfeiffer, Franz; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Fiebich, Martin; Noël, Peter B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The exciting prospect of Spectral CT (SCT) using photon-counting detectors (PCD) will lead to new techniques in computed tomography (CT) that take advantage of the additional spectral information provided. We introduce a method to reduce metal artifact in X-ray tomography by incorporating knowledge obtained from SCT into a statistical iterative reconstruction scheme. We call our method Spectral-driven Iterative Reconstruction (SPIR). Method The proposed algorithm consists of two main components: material decomposition and penalized maximum likelihood iterative reconstruction. In this study, the spectral data acquisitions with an energy-resolving PCD were simulated using a Monte-Carlo simulator based on EGSnrc C++ class library. A jaw phantom with a dental implant made of gold was used as an object in this study. A total of three dental implant shapes were simulated separately to test the influence of prior knowledge on the overall performance of the algorithm. The generated projection data was first decomposed into three basis functions: photoelectric absorption, Compton scattering and attenuation of gold. A pseudo-monochromatic sinogram was calculated and used as input in the reconstruction, while the spatial information of the gold implant was used as a prior. The results from the algorithm were assessed and benchmarked with state-of-the-art reconstruction methods. Results Decomposition results illustrate that gold implant of any shape can be distinguished from other components of the phantom. Additionally, the result from the penalized maximum likelihood iterative reconstruction shows that artifacts are significantly reduced in SPIR reconstructed slices in comparison to other known techniques, while at the same time details around the implant are preserved. Quantitatively, the SPIR algorithm best reflects the true attenuation value in comparison to other algorithms. Conclusion It is demonstrated that the combination of the additional information from

  19. Dental Sealants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Data & Statistics > Find Data by Topic > Dental Sealants Dental Sealants Main Content Dental sealants are thin plastic coatings that protect the chewing surfaces of children’s back teeth from tooth decay. Overall, the prevalence of sealants ...

  20. Ring artifact correction for high-resolution micro CT.

    PubMed

    Kyriakou, Yiannis; Prell, Daniel; Kalender, Willi A

    2009-09-01

    In high-resolution micro CT using flat detectors (FD), imperfect or defect detector elements may cause concentric-ring artifacts due to their continuous over- or underestimation of attenuation values, which often disturb image quality. We here present a dedicated image-based ring artifact correction method for high-resolution micro CT, based on median filtering of the reconstructed image and working on a transformed version of the reconstructed images in polar coordinates. This post-processing method reduced ring artifacts in the reconstructed images and improved image quality for phantom and in in vivo scans. Noise and artifacts were reduced both in transversal and in multi-planar reformations along the longitudinal axis. PMID:19661571

  1. Archaic artifacts resembling celestial spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrakoudis, S.; Papaspyrou, P.; Petoussis, V.; Moussas, X.

    We present several bronze artifacts from the Archaic Age in Greece (750-480 BC) that resemble celestial spheres or forms of other astronomical significance. They are studied in the context of the Dark Age transition from Mycenaean Age astronomical themes to the philosophical and practical revival of astronomy in the Classical Age with its plethora of astronomical devices. These artifacts, mostly votive in nature are spherical in shape and appear in a variety of forms their most striking characteristic being the depiction of meridians and/or an equator. Most of those artifacts come from Thessaly, and more specifically from the temple of Itonia Athena at Philia, a religious center of pan-Hellenic significance. Celestial spheres, similar in form to the small artifacts presented in this study, could be used to measure latitudes, or estimate the time at a known place, and were thus very useful in navigation.

  2. Redox artifacts in electrophysiological recordings

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Jonathan M.

    2013-01-01

    Electrophysiological techniques make use of Ag/AgCl electrodes that are in direct contact with cells or bath. In the bath, electrodes are exposed to numerous experimental conditions and chemical reagents that can modify electrode voltage. We examined voltage offsets created in Ag/AgCl electrodes by exposure to redox reagents used in electrophysiological studies. Voltage offsets were measured in reference to an electrode separated from the solution by an agar bridge. The reducing reagents Tris-2-carboxyethly-phosphine, dithiothreitol (DTT), and glutathione, as well as the oxidizing agent H2O2 used at experimentally relevant concentrations reacted with Ag in the electrodes to produce voltage offsets. Chloride ions and strong acids and bases produced offsets at millimolar concentrations. Electrolytic depletion of the AgCl layer, to replicate voltage clamp and sustained use, resulted in increased sensitivity to flow and DTT. Offsets were sensitive to electrode silver purity and to the amount and method of chloride deposition. For example, exposure to 10 μM DTT produced a voltage offset between 10 and 284 mV depending on the chloride deposition method. Currents generated by these offsets are significant and dependent on membrane conductance and by extension the expression of ion channels and may therefore appear to be biological in origin. These data demonstrate a new source of artifacts in electrophysiological recordings that can affect measurements obtained from a variety of experimental techniques from patch clamp to two-electrode voltage clamp. PMID:23344161

  3. Motion artifact detection in four-dimensional computed tomography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouilhol, G.; Ayadi, M.; Pinho, R.; Rit, S.; Sarrut, D.

    2014-03-01

    Motion artifacts appear in four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) images because of suboptimal acquisition parameters or patient breathing irregularities. Frequency of motion artifacts is high and they may introduce errors in radiation therapy treatment planning. Motion artifact detection can be useful for image quality assessment and 4D reconstruction improvement but manual detection in many images is a tedious process. We propose a novel method to evaluate the quality of 4DCT images by automatic detection of motion artifacts. The method was used to evaluate the impact of the optimization of acquisition parameters on image quality at our institute. 4DCT images of 114 lung cancer patients were analyzed. Acquisitions were performed with a rotation period of 0.5 seconds and a pitch of 0.1 (74 patients) or 0.081 (40 patients). A sensitivity of 0.70 and a specificity of 0.97 were observed. End-exhale phases were less prone to motion artifacts. In phases where motion speed is high, the number of detected artifacts was systematically reduced with a pitch of 0.081 instead of 0.1 and the mean reduction was 0.79. The increase of the number of patients with no artifact detected was statistically significant for the 10%, 70% and 80% respiratory phases, indicating a substantial image quality improvement.

  4. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography--imaging protocols, artifacts, and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Bockisch, Andreas; Beyer, Thomas; Antoch, Gerald; Freudenberg, Lutz S; Kühl, Hilmar; Debatin, Jörg F; Müller, Stefan P

    2004-01-01

    There has been a longstanding interest in fused images of anatomical information, such as that provided by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems, with biological information obtainable by positron emission tomography (PET). The near-simultaneous data acquisition in a fixed combination of a PET and a CT scanner in a combined PET/CT imaging system minimizes spatial and temporal mismatches between the modalities by eliminating the need to move the patient in between exams. In addition, using the fast CT scan for PET attenuation correction, the duration of the examination is significantly reduced compared to standalone PET imaging with standard rod-transmission sources. The main source of artifacts arises from the use of the CT-data for scatter and attenuation correction of the PET images. Today, CT reconstruction algorithms cannot account for the presence of metal implants, such as dental fillings or prostheses, properly, thus resulting in streak artifacts, which are propagated into the PET image by the attenuation correction. The transformation of attenuation coefficients at X-ray energies to those at 511 keV works well for soft tissues, bone, and air, but again is insufficient for dense CT contrast agents, such as iodine or barium. Finally, mismatches, for example, due to uncoordinated respiration result in incorrect attenuation-corrected PET images. These artifacts, however, can be minimized or avoided prospectively by careful acquisition protocol considerations. In doubt, the uncorrected images almost always allow discrimination between true and artificial finding. PET/CT has to be integrated into the diagnostic workflow for harvesting the full potential of the new modality. In particular, the diagnostic power of both, the CT and the PET within the combination must not be underestimated. By combining multiple diagnostic studies within a single examination, significant logistic advantages can be expected if the combined PET

  5. An illustrative review to understand and manage metal-induced artifacts in musculoskeletal MRI: a primer and updates.

    PubMed

    Dillenseger, J P; Molière, S; Choquet, P; Goetz, C; Ehlinger, M; Bierry, G

    2016-05-01

    This article reviews and explains the basic physical principles of metal-induced MRI artifacts, describes simple ways to reduce them, and presents specific reduction solutions. Artifacts include signal loss, pile-up artifacts, geometric distortion, and failure of fat suppression. Their nature and origins are reviewed and explained though schematic representations that ease the understanding. Then, optimization of simple acquisition parameters is detailed. Lastly, dedicated sequences and options specifically developed to reduce metal artifacts (VAT, SEMAC, and MAVRIC) are explained. PMID:26837388

  6. MR-driven metal artifact reduction in PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Delso, G; Wollenweber, S; Lonn, A; Wiesinger, F; Veit-Haibach, P

    2013-04-01

    Among the proposed system architectures capable of delivering positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance (PET/MR) datasets, tri-modality systems open an interesting field in which the synergies between these modalities can be exploited to address some of the problems encountered in standalone systems. In this paper we present a feasibility study of the correction of dental streak artifacts in computed tomography (CT)-based attenuation correction images using complementary MR data. The frequency and severity of metal artifacts in oncology patients was studied by inspecting the CT scans of 152 patients examined at our hospital. A prospective correction algorithm using CT and MR information to automatically locate and edit the region affected by metal artifacts was developed and tested retrospectively on data from 15 oncology patients referred for a PET/CT scan. In datasets without malignancies, the activity in Waldeyer's ring was used to measure the maximum uptake variation when the proposed correction was applied. The measured bias ranged from 10% to 30%. In datasets with malignancies on the slices affected by artifacts, the correction led to lesion uptake variations of 6.1% for a lesion 3 cm away from the implant, 1.5% for a lesion 7 cm away and <1% for a lesion 8 cm away. PMID:23478566

  7. MR-driven metal artifact reduction in PET/CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delso, G.; Wollenweber, S.; Lonn, A.; Wiesinger, F.; Veit-Haibach, P.

    2013-04-01

    Among the proposed system architectures capable of delivering positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance (PET/MR) datasets, tri-modality systems open an interesting field in which the synergies between these modalities can be exploited to address some of the problems encountered in standalone systems. In this paper we present a feasibility study of the correction of dental streak artifacts in computed tomography (CT)-based attenuation correction images using complementary MR data. The frequency and severity of metal artifacts in oncology patients was studied by inspecting the CT scans of 152 patients examined at our hospital. A prospective correction algorithm using CT and MR information to automatically locate and edit the region affected by metal artifacts was developed and tested retrospectively on data from 15 oncology patients referred for a PET/CT scan. In datasets without malignancies, the activity in Waldeyer's ring was used to measure the maximum uptake variation when the proposed correction was applied. The measured bias ranged from 10% to 30%. In datasets with malignancies on the slices affected by artifacts, the correction led to lesion uptake variations of 6.1% for a lesion 3 cm away from the implant, 1.5% for a lesion 7 cm away and <1% for a lesion 8 cm away.

  8. Quantitative Comparison of Commercial and Non-Commercial Metal Artifact Reduction Techniques in Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wagenaar, Dirk; van der Graaf, Emiel R.; van der Schaaf, Arjen; Greuter, Marcel J. W.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Typical streak artifacts known as metal artifacts occur in the presence of strongly attenuating materials in computed tomography (CT). Recently, vendors have started offering metal artifact reduction (MAR) techniques. In addition, a MAR technique called the metal deletion technique (MDT) is freely available and able to reduce metal artifacts using reconstructed images. Although a comparison of the MDT to other MAR techniques exists, a comparison of commercially available MAR techniques is lacking. The aim of this study was therefore to quantify the difference in effectiveness of the currently available MAR techniques of different scanners and the MDT technique. Materials and Methods Three vendors were asked to use their preferential CT scanner for applying their MAR techniques. The scans were performed on a Philips Brilliance ICT 256 (S1), a GE Discovery CT 750 HD (S2) and a Siemens Somatom Definition AS Open (S3). The scans were made using an anthropomorphic head and neck phantom (Kyoto Kagaku, Japan). Three amalgam dental implants were constructed and inserted between the phantom’s teeth. The average absolute error (AAE) was calculated for all reconstructions in the proximity of the amalgam implants. Results The commercial techniques reduced the AAE by 22.0±1.6%, 16.2±2.6% and 3.3±0.7% for S1 to S3 respectively. After applying the MDT to uncorrected scans of each scanner the AAE was reduced by 26.1±2.3%, 27.9±1.0% and 28.8±0.5% respectively. The difference in efficiency between the commercial techniques and the MDT was statistically significant for S2 (p=0.004) and S3 (p<0.001), but not for S1 (p=0.63). Conclusions The effectiveness of MAR differs between vendors. S1 performed slightly better than S2 and both performed better than S3. Furthermore, for our phantom and outcome measure the MDT was more effective than the commercial MAR technique on all scanners. PMID:26030821

  9. Fast image restoration without boundary artifacts.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Stanley J

    2005-10-01

    Fast Fourier transform (FFT)-based restorations are fast, but at the expense of assuming that the blurring and deblurring are based on circular convolution. Unfortunately, when the opposite sides of the image do not match up well in intensity, this assumption can create significant artifacts across the image. If the pixels outside the measured image window are modeled as unknown values in the restored image, boundary artifacts are avoided. However, this approach destroys the structure that makes the use of the FFT directly applicable, since the unknown image is no longer the same size as the measured image. Thus, the restoration methods available for this problem no longer have the computational efficiency of the FFT. We propose a new restoration method for the unknown boundary approach that can be implemented in a fast and flexible manner. We decompose the restoration into a sum of two independent restorations. One restoration yields an image that comes directly from a modified FFT-based approach. The other restoration involves a set of unknowns whose number equals that of the unknown boundary values. By summing the two, the artifacts are canceled. Because the second restoration has a significantly reduced set of unknowns, it can be calculated very efficiently even though no circular convolution structure exists. PMID:16238051

  10. Striping artifact reduction in lunar orbiter mosaic images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mlsna, P.A.; Becker, T.

    2006-01-01

    Photographic images of the moon from the 1960s Lunar Orbiter missions are being processed into maps for visual use. The analog nature of the images has produced numerous artifacts, the chief of which causes a vertical striping pattern in mosaic images formed from a series of filmstrips. Previous methods of stripe removal tended to introduce ringing and aliasing problems in the image data. This paper describes a recently developed alternative approach that succeeds at greatly reducing the striping artifacts while avoiding the creation of ringing and aliasing artifacts. The algorithm uses a one dimensional frequency domain step to deal with the periodic component of the striping artifact and a spatial domain step to handle the aperiodic residue. Several variations of the algorithm have been explored. Results, strengths, and remaining challenges are presented. ?? 2006 IEEE.

  11. PET/CT imaging artifacts.

    PubMed

    Sureshbabu, Waheeda; Mawlawi, Osama

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce the principles of PET/CT imaging and describe the artifacts associated with it. PET/CT is a new imaging modality that integrates functional (PET) and structural (CT) information into a single scanning session, allowing excellent fusion of the PET and CT images and thus improving lesion localization and interpretation accuracy. Moreover, the CT data can also be used for attenuation correction, ultimately leading to high patient throughput. These combined advantages have rendered PET/CT a preferred imaging modality over dedicated PET. Although PET/CT imaging offers many advantages, this dual-modality imaging also poses some challenges. CT-based attenuation correction can induce artifacts and quantitative errors that can affect the PET emission images. For instance, the use of contrast medium and the presence of metallic implants can be associated with focal radiotracer uptake. Furthermore, the patient's breathing can introduce mismatches between the CT attenuation map and the PET emission data, and the discrepancy between the CT and PET fields of view can lead to truncation artifacts. After reading this article, the technologist should be able to describe the principles of PET/CT imaging, identify at least 3 types of image artifacts, and describe the differences between PET/CT artifacts of different causes: metallic implants, respiratory motion, contrast medium, and truncation. PMID:16145223

  12. A correction method for nonlinear artifacts in CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Sun, Haining; Qiu, Shaokun; Lou, Shanshan; Liu, Jinjun; Li, Changjun; Jiang, Genmiao

    2004-01-01

    This work presents a new method to reduce nonlinear artifacts in computed tomography (CT). Based on the traditional water-equivalent beam hardening correction method, a new systematic iterative algorithm has been designed to modify the original spectrum, which is under the influences of certain added filter materials and some unknown factors. By incorporating the characters of polychromatic beam hardening and the insensibility and nonuniformity of detectors into consideration, a new polynomial function curve is calculated. The curve can calibrate CT raw data and reduce the nonlinear artifacts, such as shading artifacts, dark artifacts, cupping artifacts and ring artifacts, in soft tissue. Comparing with the traditional water-equivalent correction, results show that this method can significantly improve the image quality. Meanwhile, the method is pre-processing and will not increase the normal reconstruction time. That is, all the time-consuming works can be done before scanning patients. However, it is still depending on the size of phantoms currently used, and more detailed works need to be done in the future. PMID:17271926

  13. Region-of-interest reconstruction for a cone-beam dental CT with a circular trajectory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhanli; Zou, Jing; Gui, Jianbao; Zheng, Hairong; Xia, Dan

    2013-04-01

    Dental CT is the most appropriate and accurate device for preoperative evaluation of dental implantation. It can demonstrate the quantity of bone in three dimensions (3D), the location of important adjacent anatomic structures and the quality of available bone with minimal geometric distortion. Nevertheless, with the rapid increase of dental CT examinations, we are facing the problem of dose reduction without loss of image quality. In this work, backprojection-filtration (BPF) and Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) algorithm was applied to reconstruct the 3D full image and region-of-interest (ROI) image from complete and truncated circular cone-beam data respectively by computer-simulation. In addition, the BPF algorithm was evaluated based on the 3D ROI-image reconstruction from real data, which was acquired from our developed circular cone-beam prototype dental CT system. The results demonstrated that the ROI-image quality reconstructed from truncated data using the BPF algorithm was comparable to that reconstructed from complete data. The FDK algorithm, however, created artifacts while reconstructing ROI-image. Thus it can be seen, for circular cone-beam dental CT, reducing scanning angular range of the BPF algorithm used for ROI-image reconstruction are helpful for reducing the radiation dose and scanning time. Finally, an analytical method was developed for estimation of the ROI projection area on the detector before CT scanning, which would help doctors to roughly estimate the total radiation dose before the CT examination.

  14. Comparison of cone beam artifacts reduction: two pass algorithm vs TV-based CS algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Shinkook; Baek, Jongduk

    2015-03-01

    In a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), the severity of the cone beam artifacts is increased as the cone angle increases. To reduce the cone beam artifacts, several modified FDK algorithms and compressed sensing based iterative algorithms have been proposed. In this paper, we used two pass algorithm and Gradient-Projection-Barzilai-Borwein (GPBB) algorithm to reduce the cone beam artifacts, and compared their performance using structural similarity (SSIM) index. In two pass algorithm, it is assumed that the cone beam artifacts are mainly caused by extreme-density(ED) objects, and therefore the algorithm reproduces the cone beam artifacts(i.e., error image) produced by ED objects, and then subtract it from the original image. GPBB algorithm is a compressed sensing based iterative algorithm which minimizes an energy function for calculating the gradient projection with the step size determined by the Barzilai- Borwein formulation, therefore it can estimate missing data caused by the cone beam artifacts. To evaluate the performance of two algorithms, we used testing objects consisting of 7 ellipsoids separated along the z direction and cone beam artifacts were generated using 30 degree cone angle. Even though the FDK algorithm produced severe cone beam artifacts with a large cone angle, two pass algorithm reduced the cone beam artifacts with small residual errors caused by inaccuracy of ED objects. In contrast, GPBB algorithm completely removed the cone beam artifacts and restored the original shape of the objects.

  15. Artifacts in CT: recognition and avoidance.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Julia F; Keat, Nicholas

    2004-01-01

    Artifacts can seriously degrade the quality of computed tomographic (CT) images, sometimes to the point of making them diagnostically unusable. To optimize image quality, it is necessary to understand why artifacts occur and how they can be prevented or suppressed. CT artifacts originate from a range of sources. Physics-based artifacts result from the physical processes involved in the acquisition of CT data. Patient-based artifacts are caused by such factors as patient movement or the presence of metallic materials in or on the patient. Scanner-based artifacts result from imperfections in scanner function. Helical and multisection technique artifacts are produced by the image reconstruction process. Design features incorporated into modern CT scanners minimize some types of artifacts, and some can be partially corrected by the scanner software. However, in many instances, careful patient positioning and optimum selection of scanning parameters are the most important factors in avoiding CT artifacts. PMID:15537976

  16. Filter and electrostatic samplers for semivolatile aerosols: physical artifacts.

    PubMed

    Volckens, John; Leith, David

    2002-11-01

    Adsorptive and evaporative artifacts often bias measurements of semivolatile aerosols. Adsorption occurs when the sampling method disrupts the gas-particle partitioning equilibrium. Evaporation occurs because concentrations of semivolatiles are rarely constant over time. Filtration is subject to both adsorptive and evaporative artifacts. By comparison, electrostatic precipitation reduces these artifacts by minimizing the surface area of collected particles without substantially disrupting the gas-particle equilibrium. The extent of these artifacts was determined for filter samplers and electrostatic precipitator samplers for semivolatile alkane aerosols in the laboratory. Adsorption of gas-phase semivolatiles was lower in electrostatic precipitators by factors of 5-100 compared to the filter method. Particle evaporation from the electrostatic sampler was 2.3 times lower than that from TFE-coated glass-fiber filters. Use of a backup filter to correct for compound-specific adsorption artifacts can introduce positive or negative errors to the measured particle-phase concentration due to competition among the adsorbates for available adsorption sites. Adsorption of evaporated particles from the front filter onto the backup filter increased the measured evaporative artifact by a factor of 1.5-2. PMID:12433172

  17. Dental therapists: a global perspective.

    PubMed

    Nash, David A; Friedman, Jay W; Kardos, Thomas B; Kardos, Rosemary L; Schwarz, Eli; Satur, Julie; Berg, Darren G; Nasruddin, Jaafar; Mumghamba, Elifuraha G; Davenport, Elizabeth S; Nagel, Ron

    2008-04-01

    In 1921, New Zealand began training school dental nurses, subsequently deploying them throughout the country in school-based clinics providing basic dental care for children. The concept of training dental nurses, later to be designated dental therapists, was adopted by other countries as a means of improving access to care, particularly for children. This paper profiles six countries that utilise dental therapists, with a description of the training that therapists receive in these countries, and the context in which they practice. Based on available demographic information, it also updates the number of dental therapists practising globally, as well as the countries in which they practice. In several countries, dental therapy is now being integrated with dental hygiene in training and practice to create a new type of professional complementary to a dentist. Increasingly, dental therapists are permitted to treat adults as well as children. The paper also describes the status of a current initiative to introduce dental therapy to the United States. It concludes by suggesting that dental therapists can become valued members of the dental team throughout the world, helping to improve access to care and reducing existing disparities in oral health. PMID:18478885

  18. Text Signals Influence Team Artifacts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clariana, Roy B.; Rysavy, Monica D.; Taricani, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory quasi-experimental investigation describes the influence of text signals on team visual map artifacts. In two course sections, four-member teams were given one of two print-based text passage versions on the course-related topic "Social influence in groups" downloaded from Wikipedia; this text had two paragraphs, each…

  19. Toddlers View Artifact Function Normatively

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casler, Krista; Terziyan, Treysi; Greene, Kimberly

    2009-01-01

    When children use objects like adults, are they simply tracking regularities in others' object use, or are they demonstrating a normatively defined awareness that there are right and wrong ways to act? This study provides the first evidence for the latter possibility. Young 2- and 3-year-olds (n = 32) learned functions of 6 artifacts, both…

  20. Assessment of a quantitative metric for 4D CT artifact evaluation by observer consensus.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Sarah J; Castillo, Richard; Balter, Peter; Pan, Tinsu; Ibbott, Geoffrey; Hobbs, Brian; Yuan, Ying; Guerrero, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The benefits of four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) are limited by the presence of artifacts that remain difficult to quantify. A correlation-based metric previously proposed for ciné 4D CT artifact identification was further validated as an independent artifact evaluator by using a novel qualitative assessment featuring a group of observers reaching a consensus decision on artifact location and magnitude. The consensus group evaluated ten ciné 4D CT scans for artifacts over each breathing phase of coronal lung views assuming one artifact per couch location. Each artifact was assigned a magnitude score of 1-5, 1 indicating lowest severity and 5 indicating highest severity. Consensus group results served as the ground truth for assessment of the correlation metric. The ten patients were split into two cohorts; cohort 1 generated an artifact identification threshold derived from receiver operating characteristic analysis using the Youden Index, while cohort 2 generated sensitivity and specificity values from application of the artifact threshold. The Pearson correlation coefficient was calculated between the correlation metric values and the consensus group scores for both cohorts. The average sensitivity and specificity values found with application of the artifact threshold were 0.703 and 0.476, respectively. The correlation coefficients of artifact magnitudes for cohort 1 and 2 were 0.80 and 0.61, respectively, (p < 0.001 for both); these correlation coefficients included a few scans with only two of the five possible magnitude scores. Artifact incidence was associated with breathing phase (p < 0.002), with presentation less likely near maximum exhale. Overall, the correlation metric allowed accurate and automated artifact identification. The consensus group evaluation resulted in efficient qualitative scoring, reduced interobserver variation, and provided consistent identification of artifact location and magnitudes. PMID:24892346

  1. Joint correction of Nyquist artifact and minuscule motion-induced aliasing artifact in interleaved diffusion weighted EPI data using a composite two-dimensional phase correction procedure.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hing-Chiu; Chen, Nan-Kuei

    2016-09-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) obtained with interleaved echo-planar imaging (EPI) pulse sequence has great potential of characterizing brain tissue properties at high spatial-resolution. However, interleaved EPI based DWI data may be corrupted by various types of aliasing artifacts. First, inconsistencies in k-space data obtained with opposite readout gradient polarities result in Nyquist artifact, which is usually reduced with 1D phase correction in post-processing. When there exist eddy current cross terms (e.g., in oblique-plane EPI), 2D phase correction is needed to effectively reduce Nyquist artifact. Second, minuscule motion induced phase inconsistencies in interleaved DWI scans result in image-domain aliasing artifact, which can be removed with reconstruction procedures that take shot-to-shot phase variations into consideration. In existing interleaved DWI reconstruction procedures, Nyquist artifact and minuscule motion-induced aliasing artifact are typically removed subsequently in two stages. Although the two-stage phase correction generally performs well for non-oblique plane EPI data obtained from well-calibrated system, the residual artifacts may still be pronounced in oblique-plane EPI data or when there exist eddy current cross terms. To address this challenge, here we report a new composite 2D phase correction procedure, which effective removes Nyquist artifact and minuscule motion induced aliasing artifact jointly in a single step. Our experimental results demonstrate that the new 2D phase correction method can much more effectively reduce artifacts in interleaved EPI based DWI data as compared with the existing two-stage artifact correction procedures. The new method robustly enables high-resolution DWI, and should prove highly valuable for clinical uses and research studies of DWI. PMID:27114342

  2. Dental Hygienists

    MedlinePlus

    ... anatomy, patient management, and periodontics, which is the study of gum disease. High school students interested in becoming dental hygienists should take courses in biology, chemistry, and math. Most dental hygiene programs also require applicants to have completed at ...

  3. Dental sealants

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000779.htm Dental sealants To use the sharing features on this ... case a sealant needs to be replaced. How Dental Sealants Are Applied Your dentist applies sealants on ...

  4. Application of digital tomosynthesis (DTS) of optimal deblurring filters for dental X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, J. E.; Cho, H. S.; Kim, D. S.; Choi, S. I.; Je, U. K.

    2012-04-01

    Digital tomosynthesis (DTS) is a limited-angle tomographic technique that provides some of the tomographic benefits of computed tomography (CT) but at reduced dose and cost. Thus, the potential for application of DTS to dental X-ray imaging seems promising. As a continuation of our dental radiography R&D, we developed an effective DTS reconstruction algorithm and implemented it in conjunction with a commercial dental CT system for potential use in dental implant placement. The reconstruction algorithm employed a backprojection filtering (BPF) method based upon optimal deblurring filters to suppress effectively both the blur artifacts originating from the out-focus planes and the high-frequency noise. To verify the usefulness of the reconstruction algorithm, we performed systematic simulation works and evaluated the image characteristics. We also performed experimental works in which DTS images of enhanced anatomical resolution were successfully obtained by using the algorithm and were promising to our ongoing applications to dental X-ray imaging. In this paper, our approach to the development of the DTS reconstruction algorithm and the results are described in detail.

  5. TH-C-BRD-06: A Novel MRI Based CT Artifact Correction Method for Improving Proton Range Calculation in the Presence of Severe CT Artifacts

    SciTech Connect

    Park, P; Schreibmann, E; Fox, T; Roper, J; Elder, E; Tejani, M; Crocker, I; Curran, W; Dhabaan, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Severe CT artifacts can impair our ability to accurately calculate proton range thereby resulting in a clinically unacceptable treatment plan. In this work, we investigated a novel CT artifact correction method based on a coregistered MRI and investigated its ability to estimate CT HU and proton range in the presence of severe CT artifacts. Methods: The proposed method corrects corrupted CT data using a coregistered MRI to guide the mapping of CT values from a nearby artifact-free region. First patient MRI and CT images were registered using 3D deformable image registration software based on B-spline and mutual information. The CT slice with severe artifacts was selected as well as a nearby slice free of artifacts (e.g. 1cm away from the artifact). The two sets of paired MRI and CT images at different slice locations were further registered by applying 2D deformable image registration. Based on the artifact free paired MRI and CT images, a comprehensive geospatial analysis was performed to predict the correct CT HU of the CT image with severe artifact. For a proof of concept, a known artifact was introduced that changed the ground truth CT HU value up to 30% and up to 5cm error in proton range. The ability of the proposed method to recover the ground truth was quantified using a selected head and neck case. Results: A significant improvement in image quality was observed visually. Our proof of concept study showed that 90% of area that had 30% errors in CT HU was corrected to 3% of its ground truth value. Furthermore, the maximum proton range error up to 5cm was reduced to 4mm error. Conclusion: MRI based CT artifact correction method can improve CT image quality and proton range calculation for patients with severe CT artifacts.

  6. Complications of dental surgery.

    PubMed

    Lillich, J D

    1998-08-01

    Both retrospective data and clinical experience indicate that complications of dental surgery are occasionally encountered and, to some extent, are inevitable. Many of the reported complications related to dental surgery such as incomplete removal of diseased teeth or removal of the wrong tooth can be avoided with sound preoperative planning and intraoperative technique. Diseased teeth should be properly identified prior to and during surgery. In addition, complete removal of the diseased tooth must be performed. Use of intraoperative radiographic examination to confirm the location of the diseased tooth and to document its removal cannot be overemphasized. Iatrogenic fracture of the maxillary or mandibular alveolar walls or palatine bone can be avoided by proper placement of the dental punch. The chances of developing incisional drainage or secondary sinusitis can be reduced by use of appropriate systemic antibiotics. These factors should guide the surgical approach to dental surgery to reduce the likelihood of developing common complications. PMID:9742671

  7. Allergy or Tolerance: Reduced Inflammatory Cytokine Response and Concomitant IL-10 Production of Lymphocytes and Monocytes in Symptom-Free Titanium Dental Implant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Peter; Wollenberg, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions to titanium (Ti) are very rare. Thus, we assessed the proinflammatory response and also potential tolerance favoring in vitro reactivity of human blood lymphocytes and monocytes (PBMC) to Ti in healthy individuals (14 without, 6 with complication-free dental Ti implants). The proliferation index (SI) in lymphocyte transformation test (LTT) and production of cytokines linked to innate immune response (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNFα) or immune regulation (IL-10) were assessed in response to TiO2 particles or Ti discs. In both groups, the Ti-LTT reactivity was not enhanced (e.g., SI < 3). The control antigen tetanus toxoid (TT) gave adequate reactivity (median SI individuals without/with implant: 20.6 ± 5.97/19.58 ± 2.99). Individuals without implant showed higher cytokine response to Ti materials than individuals with symptom-free implants; for example, TiO2 rutile particle induced increase of IL-1β 70.27-fold/8.49-fold versus control medium culture. PBMC of 5 of the 6 individuals with complication-free Ti implants showed an ex vivo ongoing production of IL-10 (mean 4.18 ± 2.98 pg/mL)-but none of the 14 controls showed such IL-10 production. Thus in vitro IL-1β-, IL-6-, and TNF-α production reflects “normal” unspecific immune response to Ti. This might be reduced by production of tolerogenic IL-10 in individuals with symptom-free Ti dental implants. PMID:24106709

  8. Grid artifact reduction for direct digital radiography detectors based on rotated stationary grids with homomorphic filtering

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dong Sik; Lee, Sanggyun

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: Grid artifacts are caused when using the antiscatter grid in obtaining digital x-ray images. In this paper, research on grid artifact reduction techniques is conducted especially for the direct detectors, which are based on amorphous selenium. Methods: In order to analyze and reduce the grid artifacts, the authors consider a multiplicative grid image model and propose a homomorphic filtering technique. For minimal damage due to filters, which are used to suppress the grid artifacts, rotated grids with respect to the sampling direction are employed, and min-max optimization problems for searching optimal grid frequencies and angles for given sampling frequencies are established. The authors then propose algorithms for the grid artifact reduction based on the band-stop filters as well as low-pass filters. Results: The proposed algorithms are experimentally tested for digital x-ray images, which are obtained from direct detectors with the rotated grids, and are compared with other algorithms. It is shown that the proposed algorithms can successfully reduce the grid artifacts for direct detectors. Conclusions: By employing the homomorphic filtering technique, the authors can considerably suppress the strong grid artifacts with relatively narrow-bandwidth filters compared to the normal filtering case. Using rotated grids also significantly reduces the ringing artifact. Furthermore, for specific grid frequencies and angles, the authors can use simple homomorphic low-pass filters in the spatial domain, and thus alleviate the grid artifacts with very low implementation complexity.

  9. Use of Artifacts in Teaching Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oicles, Ellen

    1983-01-01

    Artifacts can help students see the differences and similarities between cultures. Describes an artifact collection on India that includes such items as furniture, clothing, kitchen utensils, decorations, and books. Suggestions are given for collecting artifacts to use with the study of other cultures. (CS)

  10. Reflection-artifact-free photoacoustic imaging using PAFUSion (photoacoustic-guided focused ultrasound)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuniyil Ajith Singh, Mithun; Jaeger, Michael; Frenz, Martin; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2016-03-01

    Reflection artifacts caused by acoustic inhomogeneities are a main challenge to deep-tissue photoacoustic imaging. Photoacoustic transients generated by the skin surface and superficial vasculature will propagate into the tissue and reflect back from echogenic structures to generate reflection artifacts. These artifacts can cause problems in image interpretation and limit imaging depth. In its basic version, PAFUSion mimics the inward travelling wave-field from blood vessel-like PA sources by applying focused ultrasound pulses, and thus provides a way to identify reflection artifacts. In this work, we demonstrate reflection artifact correction in addition to identification, towards obtaining an artifact-free photoacoustic image. In view of clinical applications, we implemented an improved version of PAFUSion in which photoacoustic data is backpropagated to imitate the inward travelling wave-field and thus the reflection artifacts of a more arbitrary distribution of PA sources that also includes the skin melanin layer. The backpropagation is performed in a synthetic way based on the pulse-echo acquisitions after transmission on each single element of the transducer array. We present a phantom experiment and initial in vivo measurements on human volunteers where we demonstrate significant reflection artifact reduction using our technique. The results provide a direct confirmation that reflection artifacts are prominent in clinical epi-photoacoustic imaging, and that PAFUSion can reduce these artifacts significantly to improve the deep-tissue photoacoustic imaging.

  11. SU-E-I-38: Improved Metal Artifact Correction Using Adaptive Dual Energy Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, X; Elder, E; Roper, J; Dhabaan, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The empirical dual energy calibration (EDEC) method corrects for beam-hardening artifacts, but shows limited performance on metal artifact correction. In this work, we propose an adaptive dual energy calibration (ADEC) method to correct for metal artifacts. Methods: The empirical dual energy calibration (EDEC) method corrects for beam-hardening artifacts, but shows limited performance on metal artifact correction. In this work, we propose an adaptive dual energy calibration (ADEC) method to correct for metal artifacts. Results: Highly attenuating copper rods cause severe streaking artifacts on standard CT images. EDEC improves the image quality, but cannot eliminate the streaking artifacts. Compared to EDEC, the proposed ADEC method further reduces the streaking resulting from metallic inserts and beam-hardening effects and obtains material decomposition images with significantly improved accuracy. Conclusion: We propose an adaptive dual energy calibration method to correct for metal artifacts. ADEC is evaluated with the Shepp-Logan phantom, and shows superior metal artifact correction performance. In the future, we will further evaluate the performance of the proposed method with phantom and patient data.

  12. Dental OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colston, Bill W.; Sathyam, Ujwal S.; Dasilva, Luiz B.; Everett, Matthew J.; Stroeve, Pieter; Otis, L. L.

    1998-09-01

    We present here the first in vivo optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of human dental tissue. A novel dental optical coherence tomography system has been developed. This system incorporates the interferometer sample arm and transverse scanning optics into a handpiece that can be used intraorally to image human dental tissues. The average imaging depth of this system varied from 3 mm in hard tissues to 1.5 mm in soft tissues. We discuss the application of this imaging system for dentistry and illustrate the potential of our dental OCT system for diagnosis of periodontal disease, detection of caries, and evaluation of dental restorations.

  13. Reduction of truncation artifacts in CT images via a discriminative dictionary representation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yang; Li, Ke; Li, Yinsheng; Hsieh, Jiang; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2016-04-01

    When the scan field of view (SFOV) of a CT system is not large enough to enclose the entire cross-section of a patient, or the patient needs to be intentionally positioned partially outside the SFOV for certain clinical CT scans, truncation artifacts are often observed in the reconstructed CT images. Conventional wisdom to reduce truncation artifacts is to complete the truncated projection data via data extrapolation with different a priori assumptions. This paper presents a novel truncation artifact reduction method that directly works in the CT image domain. Specifically, a discriminative dictionary that includes a sub-dictionary of truncation artifacts and a sub-dictionary of non-artifact image information was used to separate a truncation artifact-contaminated image into two sub-images, one with reduced truncation artifacts, and the other one containing only the truncation artifacts. Both experimental phantom and retrospective human subject studies have been performed to characterize the performance of the proposed truncation artifact reduction method.

  14. Adaptive view synthesis for aliasing artifact reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Jiang; Slack, Christopher L.; Dutta, Sandeep; Gordon, Clarence L., III; Li, Jay; Chao, Edward

    2001-06-01

    In recent years, the scan speed of computed tomography (CT) has increased significantly. Not long ago, the state-of-the- art CT was only capable of completing a single scan in 1.0 s per gantry rotation. Nowadays, 0.5 s per revolution is nearly an industry standard. Faster scan speeds demand faster sampling of the projections to combat aliasing artifacts, and higher x-ray tube output to ensure sufficient x-ray photon flux delivered to the scan. These demands often exceed the technological capability of these components. In this paper we performed a detailed analysis on the characteristics of the view aliasing artifact. Based on our analysis and clinical observations, we propose an adaptive view synthesis (AVS) scheme that effectively reduces the demands on the data acquisition system. Detailed performance comparison between the full view sampling and the adaptive view synthesis are performed through computer simulations and phantom experiments. Our analysis indicates that AVS is adequate for routine clinical applications.

  15. Truncation artifact and boundary artifact reduction in breast tomosynthesis reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yiheng; Chan, Heang-Ping; Wu, Yi-Ta; Sahiner, Berkman; Zhou, Chuan; Wei, Jun; Ge, Jun; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Shi, Jiazheng

    2008-03-01

    Digital Tomosynthesis Mammography (DTM) is an emerging technique that has the potential to improve breast cancer detection. DTM acquires low-dose mammograms at a number of projection angles over a limited angular range and reconstructs the 3D breast volume. Due to the limited number of projections within a limited angular range and the finite size of the detector, DTM reconstruction contains boundary and truncation artifacts that degrade the image quality of the tomosynthesized slices, especially that of the boundary and truncated regions. In this work, we developed artifact reduction methods that make use of both 2D and 3D breast boundary information and local intensity-equalization and tissue-compensation techniques. A breast phantom containing test objects and a selected DTM patient case were used to evaluate the effects of artifact reduction. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), the normalized profiles of test objects, and a non-uniformity error index were used as performance measures. A GE prototype DTM system was used to acquire 21 PVs in 3° increments over a +/-30° angular range. The Simultaneous Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (SART) was used for DTM reconstruction. Our results demonstrated that the proposed methods can improve the image quality both qualitatively and quantitatively, resulting in increased CNR value, background uniformity and an overall reconstruction quality comparable to that without truncation. For the selected DTM patient case, the obscured breast structural information near the truncated regions was essentially recovered. In addition, restricting SART reconstruction to be performed within the estimated 3D breast volume increased the computation efficiency.

  16. Quantification and Reduction of Ghosting Artifacts in Interleaved Echo-Planar Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Reeder, Scott B.; Atalar, Ergin; Bolster, Bradley D.; McVeigh, Elliot R.

    2007-01-01

    A mathematical analysis of ghosting artifacts often seen in interleaved echo-planar images (EPI) is presented. These artifacts result from phase and amplitude discontinuities between lines of k-space in the phase-encoding direction, and timing misregistrations from system filter delays. Phase offsets and time delays are often measured using “reference” scans, to reduce ghosting through post-processing. From the expressions describing ghosting artifacts, criteria were established for reducing ghosting to acceptable levels. Subsequently, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) requirements for estimation of time delays and phase offsets, determined from reference scans, was evaluated to establish the effect of estimation error on artifact reduction for interleaved EPI. Artifacts resulting from these effects can be reduced to very low levels when appropriate reference scan estimation is used. This has important implications for functional MRI (fMRI) and applications involving small changes in signal intensity. PMID:9339445

  17. Image Degradation in Microscopic Images: Avoidance, Artifacts, and Solutions.

    PubMed

    Roels, Joris; Aelterman, Jan; De Vylder, Jonas; Lippens, Saskia; Luong, Hiêp Q; Guérin, Christopher J; Philips, Wilfried

    2016-01-01

    The goal of modern microscopy is to acquire high-quality image based data sets. A typical microscopy workflow is set up in order to address a specific biological question and involves different steps. The first step is to precisely define the biological question, in order to properly come to an experimental design for sample preparation and image acquisition. A better object representation allows biological users to draw more reliable scientific conclusions. Image restoration can manipulate the acquired data in an effort to reduce the impact of artifacts (spurious results) due to physical and technical limitations, resulting in a better representation of the object of interest. However, precise usage of these algorithms is necessary so as to avoid further artifacts that might influence the data analysis and bias the conclusions. It is essential to understand image acquisition, and how it introduces artifacts and degradations in the acquired data, so that their effects on subsequent analysis can be minimized. This paper provides an overview of the fundamental artifacts and degradations that affect many micrographs. We describe why artifacts appear, in what sense they impact overall image quality, and how to mitigate them by first improving the acquisition parameters and then applying proper image restoration techniques. PMID:27207362

  18. Reduction of MPEG ringing artifacts using adaptive sigma filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Hao

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel computationally efficient post-processing algorithm to reduce ringing artifacts in the decoded DCT-coded video without using coding information. While the proposed algorithm is based on edge information as most filtering-based de-ringing algorithms do, this algorithm solely uses one single computationally efficient nonlinear filter, namely sigma filter, for both edge detection and smoothing. Specifically, the sigma filter, which was originally designed for nonlinear filtering, is extended to generate edge proximity information. Different from other adaptive filtering-based methods, whose filters typically use a fixed small window but flexible weights, this sigma filter adaptively switches between small and large windows. The adaptation is designed for removing ringing artifacts only, so the algorithm cannot be used for de-blocking. Overall, the proposed algorithm achieves a good balance among removing ringing artifacts, preserving edges and details, and computational complexity.

  19. Dental injuries during general anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, R G; Lindsay, S M

    1996-04-01

    Although most anaesthetic textbooks cite dental injury as a complication of endotracheal intubation few studies have examined the extent and nature of the problem. Such damage however, formed the basis for one-third of all confirmed or potential anaesthetic claims notified to the Medical Protection Society between 1977 and 1986. This article seeks to explore the extent of the problem, outline predisposing factors, summarise current prophylactic measures and make recommendations to reduce the overall incidence. Increased awareness of the problem, by both anaesthetists and dental surgeons, coupled with appropriate prophylactic measures may result in a reduced incidence of dental injury arising from general anaesthesia. Given the high incidence of dental damage we recommend that all patients undergoing a surgical operation under endotracheal intubation should have a pre-operative dental check wherever possible. Clearly, the first dental examination would be conducted by an anaesthetist familiar with the predisposing factors. Where he/she considers there to be a higher than average risk of dental damage occurring during intubation a more specialised examination should be conducted by a dental surgeon. It may, where appropriate, be possible for remedial dental treatment to be carried out and customised mouth guards to be constructed prior to the operation. Obviously such recommendations have certain financial implications and would have to be subject to controlled cost-benefit analysis before their widespread application. PMID:8935289

  20. Adaptive grid artifact reduction in the frequency domain with spatial properties for x-ray images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong Sik; Lee, Sanggyun

    2012-03-01

    By applying band-rejection filters (BRFs) in the frequency domain, we can efficiently reduce the grid artifacts, which are caused by using the antiscatter grid in obtaining x-ray digital images. However, if the frequency component of the grid artifact is relatively close to that of the object, then simply applying a BRF may seriously distort the object and cause the ringing artifacts. Since the ringing artifacts are quite dependent on the shape of the object to be recovered in the spatial domain, the spatial property of the x-ray image should be considered in applying BRFs. In this paper, we propose an adaptive filtering scheme, which can cooperate such different properties in the spatial domain. In the spatial domain, we compare several approaches, such as the mangnitude, edge, and frequency-modulation (FM) model-based algorithms, to detect the ringing artifact or the grid artifact component. In order to perform a robust detection whether the ringing artifact is strong or not, we employ the FM model for the extracted signal, which corresponds to a specific grid artifact. A detection of the position for the ringing artifact is then conducted based on the slope detection algorithm, which is commonly used as an FM discriminator in the communication area. However, the detected position of the ringing artifact is not accurate. Hence, in order to obtain an accurate detection result, we combine the edge-based approach with the FM model approach. Numerical result for real x-ray images shows that applying BRFs in the frequency domain in conjunction with the spatial property of the ringing artifact can successfully remove the grid artifact, distorting the object less.

  1. Cochlear implant artifact attenuation in late auditory evoked potentials: a single channel approach.

    PubMed

    Mc Laughlin, Myles; Lopez Valdes, Alejandro; Reilly, Richard B; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2013-08-01

    Recent evidence suggests that late auditory evoked potentials (LAEP) provide a useful objective metric of performance in cochlear implant (CI) subjects. However, the CI produces a large electrical artifact that contaminates LAEP recordings and confounds their interpretation. Independent component analysis (ICA) has been used in combination with multi-channel recordings to effectively remove the artifact. The applicability of the ICA approach is limited when only single channel data are needed or available, as is often the case in both clinical and research settings. Here we developed a single-channel, high sample rate (125 kHz), and high bandwidth (0-100 kHz) acquisition system to reduce the CI stimulation artifact. We identified two different artifacts in the recording: 1) a high frequency artifact reflecting the stimulation pulse rate, and 2) a direct current (DC, or pedestal) artifact that showed a non-linear time varying relationship to pulse amplitude. This relationship was well described by a bivariate polynomial. The high frequency artifact was completely attenuated by a 35 Hz low-pass filter for all subjects (n = 22). The DC artifact could be caused by an impedance mismatch. For 27% of subjects tested, no DC artifact was observed when electrode impedances were balanced to within 1 kΩ. For the remaining 73% of subjects, the pulse amplitude was used to estimate and then attenuate the DC artifact. Where measurements of pulse amplitude were not available (as with standard low sample rate systems), the DC artifact could be estimated from the stimulus envelope. The present artifact removal approach allows accurate measurement of LAEPs from CI subjects from single channel recordings, increasing their feasibility and utility as an accessible objective measure of CI function. PMID:23727626

  2. Ghost artifact cancellation using phased array processing.

    PubMed

    Kellman, P; McVeigh, E R

    2001-08-01

    In this article, a method for phased array combining is formulated which may be used to cancel ghosts caused by a variety of distortion mechanisms, including space variant distortions such as local flow or off-resonance. This method is based on a constrained optimization, which optimizes SNR subject to the constraint of nulling ghost artifacts at known locations. The resultant technique is similar to the method known as sensitivity encoding (SENSE) used for accelerated imaging; however, in this formulation it is applied to full field-of-view (FOV) images. The method is applied to multishot EPI with noninterleaved phase encode acquisition. A number of benefits, as compared to the conventional interleaved approach, are reduced distortion due to off-resonance, in-plane flow, and EPI delay misalignment, as well as eliminating the need for echo-shifting. Experimental results demonstrate the cancellation for both phantom as well as cardiac imaging examples. PMID:11477638

  3. Artifacts in digital coincidence timing.

    PubMed

    Moses, W W; Peng, Q

    2014-11-01

    Digital methods are becoming increasingly popular for measuring time differences, and are the de facto standard in PET cameras. These methods usually include a master system clock and a (digital) arrival time estimate for each detector that is obtained by comparing the detector output signal to some reference portion of this clock (such as the rising edge). Time differences between detector signals are then obtained by subtracting the digitized estimates from a detector pair. A number of different methods can be used to generate the digitized arrival time of the detector output, such as sending a discriminator output into a time to digital converter (TDC) or digitizing the waveform and applying a more sophisticated algorithm to extract a timing estimator.All measurement methods are subject to error, and one generally wants to minimize these errors and so optimize the timing resolution. A common method for optimizing timing methods is to measure the coincidence timing resolution between two timing signals whose time difference should be constant (such as detecting gammas from positron annihilation) and selecting the method that minimizes the width of the distribution (i.e. the timing resolution). Unfortunately, a common form of error (a nonlinear transfer function) leads to artifacts that artificially narrow this resolution, which can lead to erroneous selection of the 'optimal' method. The purpose of this note is to demonstrate the origin of this artifact and suggest that caution should be used when optimizing time digitization systems solely on timing resolution minimization. PMID:25321885

  4. Artifacts in Digital Coincidence Timing

    PubMed Central

    Moses, W. W.; Peng, Q.

    2014-01-01

    Digital methods are becoming increasingly popular for measuring time differences, and are the de facto standard in PET cameras. These methods usually include a master system clock and a (digital) arrival time estimate for each detector that is obtained by comparing the detector output signal to some reference portion of this clock (such as the rising edge). Time differences between detector signals are then obtained by subtracting the digitized estimates from a detector pair. A number of different methods can be used to generate the digitized arrival time of the detector output, such as sending a discriminator output into a time to digital converter (TDC) or digitizing the waveform and applying a more sophisticated algorithm to extract a timing estimator. All measurement methods are subject to error, and one generally wants to minimize these errors and so optimize the timing resolution. A common method for optimizing timing methods is to measure the coincidence timing resolution between two timing signals whose time difference should be constant (such as detecting gammas from positron annihilation) and selecting the method that minimizes the width of the distribution (i.e., the timing resolution). Unfortunately, a common form of error (a nonlinear transfer function) leads to artifacts that artificially narrow this resolution, which can lead to erroneous selection of the “optimal” method. The purpose of this note is to demonstrate the origin of this artifact and suggest that caution should be used when optimizing time digitization systems solely on timing resolution minimization. PMID:25321885

  5. Artifacts in digital coincidence timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, W. W.; Peng, Q.

    2014-11-01

    Digital methods are becoming increasingly popular for measuring time differences, and are the de facto standard in PET cameras. These methods usually include a master system clock and a (digital) arrival time estimate for each detector that is obtained by comparing the detector output signal to some reference portion of this clock (such as the rising edge). Time differences between detector signals are then obtained by subtracting the digitized estimates from a detector pair. A number of different methods can be used to generate the digitized arrival time of the detector output, such as sending a discriminator output into a time to digital converter (TDC) or digitizing the waveform and applying a more sophisticated algorithm to extract a timing estimator. All measurement methods are subject to error, and one generally wants to minimize these errors and so optimize the timing resolution. A common method for optimizing timing methods is to measure the coincidence timing resolution between two timing signals whose time difference should be constant (such as detecting gammas from positron annihilation) and selecting the method that minimizes the width of the distribution (i.e. the timing resolution). Unfortunately, a common form of error (a nonlinear transfer function) leads to artifacts that artificially narrow this resolution, which can lead to erroneous selection of the ‘optimal’ method. The purpose of this note is to demonstrate the origin of this artifact and suggest that caution should be used when optimizing time digitization systems solely on timing resolution minimization.

  6. Artifacts in digital coincidence timing

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, W. W.; Peng, Q.

    2014-10-16

    Digital methods are becoming increasingly popular for measuring time differences, and are the de facto standard in PET cameras. These methods usually include a master system clock and a (digital) arrival time estimate for each detector that is obtained by comparing the detector output signal to some reference portion of this clock (such as the rising edge). Time differences between detector signals are then obtained by subtracting the digitized estimates from a detector pair. A number of different methods can be used to generate the digitized arrival time of the detector output, such as sending a discriminator output into a time to digital converter (TDC) or digitizing the waveform and applying a more sophisticated algorithm to extract a timing estimator.All measurement methods are subject to error, and one generally wants to minimize these errors and so optimize the timing resolution. A common method for optimizing timing methods is to measure the coincidence timing resolution between two timing signals whose time difference should be constant (such as detecting gammas from positron annihilation) and selecting the method that minimizes the width of the distribution (i.e. the timing resolution). Unfortunately, a common form of error (a nonlinear transfer function) leads to artifacts that artificially narrow this resolution, which can lead to erroneous selection of the 'optimal' method. In conclusion, the purpose of this note is to demonstrate the origin of this artifact and suggest that caution should be used when optimizing time digitization systems solely on timing resolution minimization.

  7. Ring artifacts removal from synchrotron CT image slices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zhouping; Wiebe, Sheldon; Chapman, Dean

    2013-06-01

    Ring artifacts can occur in reconstructed images from x-ray Computerized Tomography (CT) as full or partial concentric rings superimposed on the scanned structures. Due to the data corruption by those ring artifacts in CT images, qualitative and quantitative analysis of these images are compromised. In this paper, we propose to correct the ring artifacts on the reconstructed synchrotron radiation (SR) CT image slices. The proposed correction procedure includes the following steps: (1). transform the reconstructed CT images into polar coordinates; (2) apply discrete two-dimensional (2D) wavelet transform to the polar image to decompose it into four image components: low pass band image component, as well as the components from horizontal, vertical and diagonal details bands; (3). apply 2D Fourier transform to the vertical details band image component only, since the ring artifacts become vertical lines in the polar coordinates; (4). apply Gaussian filtering in Fourier domain along the abscissa direction to suppress the vertical lines, since the information of the vertical lines in Fourier domain is completely condensed to that direction; (5). perform inverse Fourier transform to get the corrected vertical details band image component; (6). perform inverse wavelet transform to get the corrected polar image; (7). transform the corrected polar image back to Cartesian coordinates to get the CT image slice with reduced ring artifacts. This approach has been successfully used on CT data acquired from the Biomedical Imaging and Therapy (BMIT) beamline in Canadian Light Source (CLS), and the results show that the ring artifacts in original SR CT images have been effectively suppressed with all the structure information in the image preserved.

  8. Dental Hygienist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of dental hygienist, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 13 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 9 units specific to the occupation of dental hygienist. The following skill areas are covered in…

  9. Dental radiology.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Tony M

    2009-02-01

    Dental radiology is the core diagnostic modality of veterinary dentistry. Dental radiographs assist in detecting hidden painful pathology, estimating the severity of dental conditions, assessing treatment options, providing intraoperative guidance, and also serve to monitor success of prior treatments. Unfortunately, most professional veterinary training programs provide little or no training in veterinary dentistry in general or dental radiology in particular. Although a technical learning curve does exist, the techniques required for producing diagnostic films are not difficult to master. Regular use of dental x-rays will increase the amount of pathology detected, leading to healthier patients and happier clients who notice a difference in how their pet feels. This article covers equipment and materials needed to produce diagnostic intraoral dental films. A simplified guide for positioning will be presented, including a positioning "cheat sheet" to be placed next to the dental x-ray machine in the operatory. Additionally, digital dental radiograph systems will be described and trends for their future discussed. PMID:19410234

  10. Computerized Dental Injection Fear Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, L.J.; Leroux, B.G.; Ruff, P.A.; Coldwell, S.E.

    2013-01-01

    One in four adults reports a clinically significant fear of dental injections, leading many to avoid dental care. While systematic desensitization is the most common therapeutic method for treating specific phobias such as fear of dental injections, lack of access to trained therapists, as well as dentists’ lack of training and time in providing such a therapy, means that most fearful individuals are not able to receive the therapy needed to be able to receive necessary dental treatment. Computer Assisted Relaxation Learning (CARL) is a self-paced computerized treatment based on systematic desensitization for dental injection fear. This multicenter, block-randomized, dentist-blind, parallel-group study conducted in 8 sites in the United States compared CARL with an informational pamphlet in reducing fear of dental injections. Participants completing CARL reported significantly greater reduction in self-reported general and injection-specific dental anxiety measures compared with control individuals (p < .001). Twice as many CARL participants (35.3%) as controls (17.6%) opted to receive a dental injection after the intervention, although this was not statistically significant. CARL, therefore, led to significant changes in self-reported fear in study participants, but no significant differences in the proportion of participants having a dental injection (ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00609648). PMID:23690352

  11. Artifacts in digital coincidence timing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Moses, W. W.; Peng, Q.

    2014-10-16

    Digital methods are becoming increasingly popular for measuring time differences, and are the de facto standard in PET cameras. These methods usually include a master system clock and a (digital) arrival time estimate for each detector that is obtained by comparing the detector output signal to some reference portion of this clock (such as the rising edge). Time differences between detector signals are then obtained by subtracting the digitized estimates from a detector pair. A number of different methods can be used to generate the digitized arrival time of the detector output, such as sending a discriminator output into amore » time to digital converter (TDC) or digitizing the waveform and applying a more sophisticated algorithm to extract a timing estimator.All measurement methods are subject to error, and one generally wants to minimize these errors and so optimize the timing resolution. A common method for optimizing timing methods is to measure the coincidence timing resolution between two timing signals whose time difference should be constant (such as detecting gammas from positron annihilation) and selecting the method that minimizes the width of the distribution (i.e. the timing resolution). Unfortunately, a common form of error (a nonlinear transfer function) leads to artifacts that artificially narrow this resolution, which can lead to erroneous selection of the 'optimal' method. In conclusion, the purpose of this note is to demonstrate the origin of this artifact and suggest that caution should be used when optimizing time digitization systems solely on timing resolution minimization.« less

  12. Young Children's Rapid Learning about Artifacts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casler, Krista; Kelemen, Deborah

    2005-01-01

    Tool use is central to interdisciplinary debates about the evolution and distinctiveness of human intelligence, yet little is actually known about how human conceptions of artifacts develop. Results across these two studies show that even 2-year-olds approach artifacts in ways distinct from captive tool-using monkeys. Contrary to adult intuition,…

  13. Dental OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilder-Smith, Petra; Otis, Linda; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Zhongping

    This chapter describes the applications of OCT for imaging in vivo dental and oral tissue. The oral cavity is a diverse environment that includes oral mucosa, gingival tissues, teeth and their supporting structures. Because OCT can image both hard and soft tissues of the oral cavity at high resolution, it offers the unique capacity to identity dental disease before destructive changes have progressed. OCT images depict clinically important anatomical features such as the location of soft tissue attachments, morphological changes in gingival tissue, tooth decay, enamel thickness and decay, as well as the structural integrity of dental restorations. OCT imaging allows for earlier intervention than is possible with current diagnostic modalities.

  14. Comparison of ring artifact correction methods for flat-detector CT.

    PubMed

    Prell, Daniel; Kyriakou, Yiannis; Kalender, Willi A

    2009-06-21

    In flat-detector CT, imperfect or defect detector elements may cause concentric ring artifacts due to their continuous over- or underestimation of attenuation values, which often disturb image quality. Especially due to the demand for high-spatial resolution images and the necessary pixel read-out without arbitrary pixel-binning, ring artifacts become more pronounced and the reduction of these artifacts becomes a necessity. We here present a comparison of two dedicated ring artifact correction methods for flat-detector CT, on the basis of different median and mean filterings of the reconstructed image but each working in different geometric planes. While the first method works in Cartesian coordinates, the second method performs a transformation to polar coordinates. Both post-processing methods efficiently reduce ring artifacts in the reconstructed images and improve image quality. The transformation to polar coordinates turned out to be a necessary step for efficient ring artifact correction, since correction in Cartesian coordinates suffers from newly introduced artifacts as well as insufficient correction of artifacts close to the center of rotation. PMID:19491452

  15. Comparison of ring artifact correction methods for flat-detector CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prell, Daniel; Kyriakou, Yiannis; Kalender, Willi A.

    2009-06-01

    In flat-detector CT, imperfect or defect detector elements may cause concentric ring artifacts due to their continuous over- or underestimation of attenuation values, which often disturb image quality. Especially due to the demand for high-spatial resolution images and the necessary pixel read-out without arbitrary pixel-binning, ring artifacts become more pronounced and the reduction of these artifacts becomes a necessity. We here present a comparison of two dedicated ring artifact correction methods for flat-detector CT, on the basis of different median and mean filterings of the reconstructed image but each working in different geometric planes. While the first method works in Cartesian coordinates, the second method performs a transformation to polar coordinates. Both post-processing methods efficiently reduce ring artifacts in the reconstructed images and improve image quality. The transformation to polar coordinates turned out to be a necessary step for efficient ring artifact correction, since correction in Cartesian coordinates suffers from newly introduced artifacts as well as insufficient correction of artifacts close to the center of rotation.

  16. A motion artifact generation and assessment system for the rapid testing of surface biopotential electrodes.

    PubMed

    Cömert, Alper; Hyttinen, Jari

    2015-01-01

    Dry electrodes can reduce cost while increasing the usability and comfort of wearable monitoring systems. They are, however, susceptible to motion artifacts. The present electrode testing methods lack reliability and do not separate the factors that affect the motion artifact. In this paper, we introduce a first generation motion artifact generation and assessment system that generates the speed, amplitude, and pattern-wise programmable movement of the electrode. The system simultaneously measures electrode-skin impedance, the motion artifact, and one channel of an electrocardiogram that contains the motion artifact and monitors the mounting force applied to the electrode. We demonstrate the system by comparing the applied movement and the measured signals for electrode movements up to 6 mm and movement frequencies from 0.4 Hz to 4 Hz. Results show that the impedance change and surface potential are visually clearly related to the applied motion, with average correlations of 0.89 and 0.64, respectively. The applied force, electrode location, and electrode structure all affect the motion artifact. The setup enables the motion of the electrode to be accurately controlled. The system can be used as a precursor to the testing of integrated systems because it enables thorough, repeatable, and robust motion artifact studies. The system allows a deeper insight into motion artifacts and the interplay of the various factors that affect them. PMID:25500614

  17. Effect of pressure and padding on motion artifact of textile electrodes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background With the aging population and rising healthcare costs, wearable monitoring is gaining importance. The motion artifact affecting dry electrodes is one of the main challenges preventing the widespread use of wearable monitoring systems. In this paper we investigate the motion artifact and ways of making a textile electrode more resilient against motion artifact. Our aim is to study the effects of the pressure exerted onto the electrode, and the effects of inserting padding between the applied pressure and the electrode. Method We measure real time electrode-skin interface impedance, ECG from two channels, the motion artifact related surface potential, and exerted pressure during controlled motion by a measurement setup designed to estimate the relation of motion artifact to the signals. We use different foam padding materials with various mechanical properties and apply electrode pressures between 5 and 25 mmHg to understand their effect. A QRS and noise detection algorithm based on a modified Pan-Tompkins QRS detection algorithm estimates the electrode behaviour in respect to the motion artifact from two channels; one dominated by the motion artifact and one containing both the motion artifact and the ECG. This procedure enables us to quantify a given setup’s susceptibility to the motion artifact. Results Pressure is found to strongly affect signal quality as is the use of padding. In general, the paddings reduce the motion artifact. However the shape and frequency components of the motion artifact vary for different paddings, and their material and physical properties. Electrode impedance at 100 kHz correlates in some cases with the motion artifact but it is not a good predictor of the motion artifact. Conclusion From the results of this study, guidelines for improving electrode design regarding padding and pressure can be formulated as paddings are a necessary part of the system for reducing the motion artifact, and further, their effect maximises

  18. Silicon bulk micromachined hybrid dimensional artifact.

    SciTech Connect

    Claudet, Andre A.; Tran, Hy D.; Bauer, Todd Marks; Shilling, Katherine Meghan; Oliver, Andrew David

    2010-03-01

    A mesoscale dimensional artifact based on silicon bulk micromachining fabrication has been developed and manufactured with the intention of evaluating the artifact both on a high precision coordinate measuring machine (CMM) and video-probe based measuring systems. This hybrid artifact has features that can be located by both a touch probe and a video probe system with a k=2 uncertainty of 0.4 {micro}m, more than twice as good as a glass reference artifact. We also present evidence that this uncertainty could be lowered to as little as 50 nm (k=2). While video-probe based systems are commonly used to inspect mesoscale mechanical components, a video-probe system's certified accuracy is generally much worse than its repeatability. To solve this problem, an artifact has been developed which can be calibrated using a commercially available high-accuracy tactile system and then be used to calibrate typical production vision-based measurement systems. This allows for error mapping to a higher degree of accuracy than is possible with a glass reference artifact. Details of the designed features and manufacturing process of the hybrid dimensional artifact are given and a comparison of the designed features to the measured features of the manufactured artifact is presented and discussed. Measurement results from vision and touch probe systems are compared and evaluated to determine the capability of the manufactured artifact to serve as a calibration tool for video-probe systems. An uncertainty analysis for calibration of the artifact using a CMM is presented.

  19. Dental Implants

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... facts so you can make an informed decision as to whether dental implants are right for your ... the jaw bone. It’s obviously not the same as the original connection , but functions just the same. ...

  20. Dental Fluorosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... when children regularly consume fluoride during the teeth-forming years, age 8 and younger. Most dental fluorosis ... over a long period when the teeth are forming under the gums. Only children aged 8 years ...

  1. Dental Caries (Tooth Decay)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Find Data by Topic > Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Main Content Dental caries (tooth decay) remains the most prevalent chronic ... important source of information on oral health and dental care in the United States since the early ...

  2. Dosimetric consideration for patients with dental filling materials undergoing irradiation of oral cavity using RapidArc: challenges and solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mail, Noor; Albarakati, Y.; Khan, M. Ahmad; Saeedi, F.; Safadi, N.; Al-Ghamdi, S.; Saoudi, A.

    2012-03-01

    In this study, we investigate the effect of dental filling materials (DFM) on RapidArcTM treatment plans and delivery in a patient undergoing radiotherapy treatment. The presence of DFM creates uncertainties in CT number and causes long streaking artifacts in the reconstructed images which greatly affect the dose distribution inside the oral cavity. The influence of extensive dental filling artifacts on dose distribution was performed using a geometrically well defined head and neck IMRT verification phantom (PTW, Freiburg, Germany) together with inserts from DFM (Amalgam, 11.3 g/cm3). The phantom was scanned using Siemens SOMATOM Sensation CT simulator (Siemens AG, Germany) under standard head and neck imaging protocol (120 kV, 120 mAs, voxel size 1×1×2 mm3). Three RapidArcTM plans were created in the Varian Eclipse treatment planning System (TPS) to treat oral cavity using the same CT dataset including; 1) raw CT image, 2) streaking artifacts replaced with a mask of 10 HU and 3) 2 cm thick 6000 HU virtual filter (a volume around the teeth in TPS to mimic extra attenuation). The virtual filter thickness optimization was purely based on measured PDD data acquired with DFM and the calculation in Eclipse Planning System using direct beam. The dose delivery and distribution for the three plans was verified using Gafchromic EBT2 (International Specialty Product, Wayne, NJ, USA) film measurements. The artifact mask and virtual filter around the teeth in the planning was found very useful to reduce the discrepancies between the dose plan and delivery. From clinical point of view, these results can be helpful to understand the increase of mucositis in patient having DFM, and further investigation is underway for clinical solution.

  3. Rotational artifacts in on-board cone beam computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, E. S. M.; Webb, R.; Nyiri, B. J.

    2015-02-01

    Rotational artifacts in image guidance systems lead to registration errors that affect non-isocentric treatments and dose to off-axis organs-at-risk. This study investigates a rotational artifact in the images acquired with the on-board cone beam computed tomography system XVI (Elekta, Stockholm, Sweden). The goals of the study are to identify the cause of the artifact, to characterize its dependence on other quantities, and to investigate possible solutions. A 30 cm diameter cylindrical phantom is used to acquire clockwise and counterclockwise scans at five speeds (120 to 360 deg min-1) on six Elekta linear accelerators from three generations (MLCi, MLCi2 and Agility). Additional scans are acquired with different pulse widths and focal spot sizes for the same mAs. Image quality is evaluated using a common phantom with an in-house three dimensional contrast transfer function attachment. A robust, operator-independent analysis is developed which quantifies rotational artifacts with 0.02° accuracy and imaging system delays with 3 ms accuracy. Results show that the artifact is caused by mislabelling of the projections with a lagging angle due to various imaging system delays. For the most clinically used scan speed (360 deg min-1), the artifact is ˜0.5°, which corresponds to ˜0.25° error per scan direction with the standard Elekta procedure for angle calibration. This leads to a 0.5 mm registration error at 11 cm off-center. The artifact increases linearly with scan speed, indicating that the system delay is independent of scan speed. For the most commonly used pulse width of 40 ms, this delay is 34 ± 1 ms, part of which is half the pulse width. Results are consistent among the three linac generations. A software solution that corrects the angles of individual projections is shown to eliminate the rotational error for all scan speeds and directions. Until such a solution is available from the manufacturer, three clinical solutions are presented, which reduce the

  4. On geometric artifacts in cryo electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Turoňová, Beata; Marsalek, Lukas; Slusallek, Philipp

    2016-04-01

    Single-tilt scheme is nowadays the prevalent acquisition geometry in electron tomography and subtomogram averaging experiments. Being an incomplete scheme that induces ill-posedness in the sense of the X-ray or Radon transform inverse problem, it introduces a number of artifacts that directly influence the quality of tomographic reconstructions. Though individually described by different authors before, a systematic study of these acquisition geometry-related artifacts in one place and across representative set of reconstruction methods has not been, to our knowledge, performed before. Moreover, the effects of these artifacts on the reconstructed density are sometimes misinterpreted, attributing them to the wrong cause, especially if their effects accumulate. In this work, we systematically study the major artifacts of single-tilt geometry known as the missing wedge (incomplete projection set problem), the missing information and the specimen-level interior problem (long-object problem). First, we illustratively describe, using a unified terminology, how and why these artifacts arise and when they can be avoided. Next, we describe the effects of these artifacts on the reconstructions across all major classes of reconstruction methods, including newly-appeared methods like the Iterative Nonuniform fast Fourier transform based Reconstruction method (INFR) and the Progressive Stochastic Reconstruction Technique (PSRT). Finally, we draw conclusions and recommendations on numerous points, especially regarding the mutual influence of the geometric artifacts, ability of different reconstruction methods to suppress them as well as implications to the interpretation of both electron tomography and subtomogram averaging experiments. PMID:26916079

  5. Artifact reduction in industrial computed tomography via data fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrapp, Michael; Goldammer, Matthias; Stephan, Jürgen

    2014-02-01

    As the most stressed part of a gas turbine the first row of turbine blades is not only a challenge for the materials used. Also the testing of these parts have to meet the highest standards. Computed tomography (CT) as the technique which could reveal the most details also provides the biggest challenges [1]: A full penetration of large sized turbine blades is often only possible at high X-ray voltages causing disproportional high costs. A reduction of the X-ray voltage is able to reduce these arising costs but yields non penetration artifacts in the reconstructed CT image. In most instances, these artifacts manifests itself as blurred and smeared regions at concave edges due to a reduced signal to noise ratio. In order to complement the missing information and to increase the overall image quality of our reconstruction, we use further imaging modalities such as a 3-D Scanner and ultrasonic imaging. A 3-D scanner is easy and cost effective to implement and is able to acquire all relevant data simultaneously with the CT projections. If, however, the interior structure is of supplemental interest, an ultrasonic imaging method is additionally used. We consider this data as a priori knowledge to employ them in an iterative reconstruction. To do so, standard iterative reconstruction methods are modified to incorporate the a priori data in a regularization approach in combination with minimizing the total variation of our image. Applying this procedure on turbine blades, we are able to reduce the apparent artifacts almost completely.

  6. Artifact reduction in industrial computed tomography via data fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Schrapp, Michael; Goldammer, Matthias; Stephan, Jürgen

    2014-02-18

    As the most stressed part of a gas turbine the first row of turbine blades is not only a challenge for the materials used. Also the testing of these parts have to meet the highest standards. Computed tomography (CT) as the technique which could reveal the most details also provides the biggest challenges [1]: A full penetration of large sized turbine blades is often only possible at high X-ray voltages causing disproportional high costs. A reduction of the X-ray voltage is able to reduce these arising costs but yields non penetration artifacts in the reconstructed CT image. In most instances, these artifacts manifests itself as blurred and smeared regions at concave edges due to a reduced signal to noise ratio. In order to complement the missing information and to increase the overall image quality of our reconstruction, we use further imaging modalities such as a 3-D Scanner and ultrasonic imaging. A 3-D scanner is easy and cost effective to implement and is able to acquire all relevant data simultaneously with the CT projections. If, however, the interior structure is of supplemental interest, an ultrasonic imaging method is additionally used. We consider this data as a priori knowledge to employ them in an iterative reconstruction. To do so, standard iterative reconstruction methods are modified to incorporate the a priori data in a regularization approach in combination with minimizing the total variation of our image. Applying this procedure on turbine blades, we are able to reduce the apparent artifacts almost completely.

  7. WE-D-18C-01: Art of Imaging: Diagnostic Ultrasound Image Artifacts

    SciTech Connect

    Zagzebski, J; Lu, Z

    2014-06-15

    Assumptions followed during construction of B-mode and color flow images are that the pulse-echo transit time can be converted to reflector depth through uniform tissue models, echoes originate only from locations along the transmit-receive axes of pulse propagation, and first order correction schemes adequately account for acoustic wave attenuation and absorption. The latter allows the display brightness to encode tissue echogenicity. This course will challenge participants to identify imaging artifacts whose origins stem from the more complex and realistic propagating and scattering conditions common in clinical ultrasound. Speckle, a very common artifact but a clinically employed feature, originates from simultaneous echoes from diffuse scatterers and is a result of coherent detection of signals. One of the most bothersome artifacts are those due to reverberations especially that originating from superficial tissue interfaces. Methods to overcome these will be discussed. This presentation also will describe and illustrate speed of sound, refraction, enhancement, shadowing, mirroring, beam width, beam-forming, and slice thickness artifacts. All are useful examples of limitations introduced by acoustic waves propagating through complex tissue paths. New formats for physician board certification exams are demanding the inclusion of image-based examples of ultrasound physics. Instructors' knowledge of, and access to examples of ultrasound artifacts are important in this effort. The presentation will incorporate an audience response system to challenge participants in correct identification of some of these artifacts. Learning Objectives: Review basic mechanisms for producing ultrasound images. Identify the etiology of speckle, reverberation noise, beam width and slice thickness artifacts, and artifacts associated with pulse propagation. Discuss methods that reduce the impact of artifacts OR employ artifacts effectively to facilitate clinical diagnosis.

  8. Automatic Identification of Artifact-Related Independent Components for Artifact Removal in EEG Recordings.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yuan; Nathan, Viswam; Jafari, Roozbeh

    2016-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is the recording of electrical activity produced by the firing of neurons within the brain. These activities can be decoded by signal processing techniques. However, EEG recordings are always contaminated with artifacts which hinder the decoding process. Therefore, identifying and removing artifacts is an important step. Researchers often clean EEG recordings with assistance from independent component analysis (ICA), since it can decompose EEG recordings into a number of artifact-related and event-related potential (ERP)-related independent components. However, existing ICA-based artifact identification strategies mostly restrict themselves to a subset of artifacts, e.g., identifying eye movement artifacts only, and have not been shown to reliably identify artifacts caused by nonbiological origins like high-impedance electrodes. In this paper, we propose an automatic algorithm for the identification of general artifacts. The proposed algorithm consists of two parts: 1) an event-related feature-based clustering algorithm used to identify artifacts which have physiological origins; and 2) the electrode-scalp impedance information employed for identifying nonbiological artifacts. The results on EEG data collected from ten subjects show that our algorithm can effectively detect, separate, and remove both physiological and nonbiological artifacts. Qualitative evaluation of the reconstructed EEG signals demonstrates that our proposed method can effectively enhance the signal quality, especially the quality of ERPs, even for those that barely display ERPs in the raw EEG. The performance results also show that our proposed method can effectively identify artifacts and subsequently enhance the classification accuracies compared to four commonly used automatic artifact removal methods. PMID:25415992

  9. Trends in allied dental education: an analysis of the past and a look to the future.

    PubMed

    Haden, N K; Morr, K E; Valachovic, R W

    2001-05-01

    Allied dental healthcare providers have been an integral part of the dental team since the turn of the 19th century. Like dental education, allied dental education's history includes a transition from apprenticeships and proprietary school settings to dental schools and community and technical colleges. There are currently 258 dental assisting programs, 255 dental hygiene programs, and 28 dental laboratory technology programs according to the American Dental Association's Commission on Dental Accreditation. First-year enrollment increased 9.5 percent in dental hygiene education from 1994/95 to 1998/99, while enrollment in dental assisting programs declined 7 percent and declined 31 percent in dental laboratory technology programs during the same period. Program capacity exceeds enrollment in all three areas of allied dental education. Challenges facing allied dental education include addressing the dental practicing community's perception of a shortage of dental assistants and dental hygienists and increasing pressure for career tracks that do not require education in ADA Commission on Dental Accreditation accredited programs. The allied dental workforce may also be called upon for innovative approaches to improve access to oral health care and reduce oral health care disparities. In addition, allied dental education programs may face challenges in recruiting faculty with the desired academic credentials. ADEA is currently pursuing initiatives in these and other areas to address the current and emerging needs of allied dental education. PMID:11425252

  10. The use of dental services for children: implications of the 2010 dental reform in Israel.

    PubMed

    Shahrabani, Shosh; Benzion, Uri; Machnes, Yaffa; Gal, Assaf

    2015-02-01

    Routine dental examinations for children are important for early diagnosis and treatment of dental problems. The level of dental morbidity among Israeli children is higher than the global average. A July 2010 reform of Israel's National Health Insurance Law gradually offers free dental services for children up to age 12. The study examines the use of dental services for children and the factors affecting mothers' decision to take their children for routine checkups. In addition, the study examines the impact of the reform on dental checkups for children in various populations groups. A national representative sample comprising 618 mothers of children aged 5-18 was surveyed by telephone. The survey integrated the principles of the health beliefs model and socio-demographic characteristics. The results show that mothers' decision to take their children for dental checkups is affected by their socio-demographic status and by their health beliefs with respect to dental health. After the reform, the frequency of children's dental checkups significantly increased among vulnerable populations. Therefore, the reform has helped reduce gaps in Israeli society regarding children's dental health. Raising families' awareness of the reform and of the importance of dental health care together with expanding national distribution of approved dental clinics can increase the frequency of dental checkups among children in Israel. PMID:25465981

  11. Artifacts: The downturn of CBCT image

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajappa, Anil Kumar; Dwivedi, Neha; Tiwari, Rana

    2015-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been accepted as a useful tool for diagnosis and treatment planning in dentistry. Despite a growing trend of CBCT in dentistry, it has some disadvantages like artifacts. Artifacts are discrepancies between the reconstructed visual image and the actual content of the subject which degrade the quality of CBCT images, making them diagnostically unusable. Additionally, structures that do not exist in the subject may appear within images. Such structures can occur because of patient motion, the image capture and reconstruction process. To optimize image quality, it is necessary to understand the types of artifacts. This article aims to throw light on the various types of artifacts associated with CBCT images. PMID:26759795

  12. DICARBOXYLIC ACID CONCENTRATION TRENDS AND SAMPLING ARTIFACTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This abstract describes a slide presentation on results of dicarboxylic acid concentration trends and sampling artifacts to be presented at the 2006 International Aerosol Conference sponsored by the American Association for Aerosol Research in St. Paul, Minnesota on September 10-...

  13. Characterization of Scattered X-Ray Photons in Dental Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ching-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Scatter is a very important artifact causing factor in dental cone-beam CT (CBCT), which has a major influence on the detectability of details within images. This work aimed to improve the image quality of dental CBCT through scatter correction. Methods Scatter was estimated in the projection domain from the low frequency component of the difference between the raw CBCT projection and the projection obtained by extrapolating the model fitted to the raw projections acquired with 2 different sizes of axial field-of-view (FOV). The function for curve fitting was optimized by using Monte Carlo simulation. To validate the proposed method, an anthropomorphic phantom and a water-filled cylindrical phantom with rod inserts simulating different tissue materials were scanned using 120 kVp, 5 mA and 9-second scanning time covering an axial FOV of 4 cm and 13 cm. The detectability of the CT image was evaluated by calculating the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Results Beam hardening and cupping artifacts were observed in CBCT images without scatter correction, especially in those acquired with 13 cm FOV. These artifacts were reduced in CBCT images corrected by the proposed method, demonstrating its efficacy on scatter correction. After scatter correction, the image quality of CBCT was improved in terms of target detectability which was quantified as the CNR for rod inserts in the cylindrical phantom. Conclusions Hopefully the calculations performed in this work can provide a route to reach a high level of diagnostic image quality for CBCT imaging used in oral and maxillofacial structures whilst ensuring patient dose as low as reasonably achievable, which may ultimately make CBCT scan a reliable and safe tool in clinical practice. PMID:26950435

  14. Properties of Artifact Representations for Evolutionary Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornby, Gregory S.

    2004-01-01

    To achieve evolutionary design systems that scale to the levels achieved by man-made artifacts we can look to their characteristics of modularity, hierarchy and regularity to guide us. For this we focus on design representations, since they strongly determine the ability of evolutionary design systems to evolve artifacts with these characteristics. We identify three properties of design representations - combination, control-flow and abstraction - and discuss how they relate to hierarchy, modularity and regularity.

  15. Productivity in dental care for children. Factors influencing the time spent delivering dental care.

    PubMed

    Wang, N J

    1994-12-01

    The cost of dental services is related to their productivity. The purpose of the study was to identify factors influencing productivity, measured as time spent providing dental care per child under care, per year, in public dental clinics. The time was expected to vary with characteristics of the patients, the personnel and the clinics. Time spent by dentists and dental hygienists delivering dental care for children aged three to 18 years was obtained from 137 public dental clinics. The data showed substantial variation in productivity between clinics. Multiple regression analysis revealed that the time spent per child was associated with interval between examinations, proportion of male dentists, ratio of dental assistants to dentists, proportion of child treatment time given by dental hygienists and proportion of all treatment time spent on child patients. These variables explained 43 per cent of the variance in the total time spent by dentists and hygienists and 41 per cent of the variance in dentists' time. Individual dentists and hygienists may reduce the mean time spent per child by extending recall intervals. On an administrative level, dentists' time per child may be reduced by employing more dental assistants or dental hygienists and allowing dentists to treat patient groups other than children. It is concluded that productivity in dental care for children in the public dental services may be influenced in several ways, both by clinical and administrative decisions. PMID:7850642

  16. Dental Calculus Arrest of Dental Caries

    PubMed Central

    Keyes, Paul H.; Rams, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Background An inverse relationship between dental calculus mineralization and dental caries demineralization on teeth has been noted in some studies. Dental calculus may even form superficial layers over existing dental caries and arrest their progression, but this phenomenon has been only rarely documented and infrequently considered in the field of Cariology. To further assess the occurrence of dental calculus arrest of dental caries, this study evaluated a large number of extracted human teeth for the presence and location of dental caries, dental calculus, and dental plaque biofilms. Materials and methods A total of 1,200 teeth were preserved in 10% buffered formal saline, and viewed while moist by a single experienced examiner using a research stereomicroscope at 15-25× magnification. Representative teeth were sectioned and photographed, and their dental plaque biofilms subjected to gram-stain examination with light microscopy at 100× magnification. Results Dental calculus was observed on 1,140 (95%) of the extracted human teeth, and no dental carious lesions were found underlying dental calculus-covered surfaces on 1,139 of these teeth. However, dental calculus arrest of dental caries was found on one (0.54%) of 187 evaluated teeth that presented with unrestored proximal enamel caries. On the distal surface of a maxillary premolar tooth, dental calculus mineralization filled the outer surface cavitation of an incipient dental caries lesion. The dental calculus-covered carious lesion extended only slightly into enamel, and exhibited a brown pigmentation characteristic of inactive or arrested dental caries. In contrast, the tooth's mesial surface, without a superficial layer of dental calculus, had a large carious lesion going through enamel and deep into dentin. Conclusions These observations further document the potential protective effects of dental calculus mineralization against dental caries.

  17. [Removal of high signal artifact (marching metal artifact) by the magnetic substance].

    PubMed

    Tsuchihashi, Toshio; Fujita, Isao; Iwasaki, Atsushi; Mori, Katsuhiko; Suzuki, Takeshi

    2002-03-01

    During this project, we evaluated methods to prevent high-signal artifact (marching metal artifact) that are caused by magnetic substance. Marching metal artifact is caused by the resonance frequency created by magnetic substance. Phase encoding and frequency encoding are often switched to minimize the influence that marching metal artifact have on the image. However, this method will only change the position at which marching metal artifact occur. It does not have the ability to completely prevent marching metal artifact. Our research illustrated that marching metal artifact can be prevented by changing the strength of the slice selective gradient field at the 90 degree RF pulse and 180 degree RF pulse. In other words, marching metal artifact can be prevented by changing the frequency bandwidth for the 90 degree RF pulse and 180 degree RF pulse. The incorporation of the phase correct option in the device used for our research (SIGNA LX and SIGNA CV/i) results in different slice selective gradient field strengths at the 90 degree RF pulse and the 180 degree RF pulse. This indicates that the use of phase correction enables marching metal artifact to be prevented. PMID:12522349

  18. AFM and pulsed laser ablation methods for Cultural Heritage: application to archeometric analysis of stone artifacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barberio, M.; Veltri, S.; Stranges, F.; Bonanno, A.; Xu, F.; Antici, P.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we introduce the use of the atomic force microscope (AFM) and of the pulsed laser ablation as methods for morphological diagnostic with nanoscale precision of archeological artifacts and corrosive patina removal from stone artifacts. We test our methodology on stone artifacts extracted from the Church of Sotterra (located in Calabria, South Italy). The AFM microscopy was compared with different petrographic, chemical, optical and morphological analysis methods for identifying the textural characteristics, evaluating the state of preservation and formulating some hypotheses about the provenance and composition of the impurity patina located on the artifact surfaces. We demonstrate that with the nanometric precision obtained with AFM microscopy, it is possible to distinguish the different states of preservation, much better than using conventional petrographic methods. The surface's roughness is evaluated from very small artifact's fragments, reducing the coring at micrometric scale with a minimal damage to the artworks. After the diagnosis, we performed restoration tests using the pulsed laser ablation (PLA) method and compared it with the more common micro-sandblasting under dry conditions. We find that the PLA is highly effective for the removal of the surficial patina, with a control of a few hundreds of nanometers in the cleaning of surface, without introducing chemical or morphological damages to the artifacts. Moreover, PLA can be easily implemented in underwater conditions; this has the great advantage that stone and pottery artifacts for marine archeological sites do not need to be removed from the site.

  19. Developments of metal artifact reduction methods of cone-beam computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Kun-Long; Jin, Shih-Chun D.; Chen, Jyh-Cheng

    2014-09-01

    While clinical applications of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) have expanded, current CBCT technology has limitations due to the streak artifacts caused by metallic objects. The aim of this work was to develop an efficient and accurate metal data interpolation in sinogram domain to achieve artifact suppression and to improve CT image quality. In this study, we propose three interpolation methods for the metal projection data. Metal objects are segmented in raw data and replacement of the segmented regions by new values is done using three interpolation schemes, (1) replacing the raw data by the simple threshold value (thresholding method), (2) reducing the raw data to half of the value which is over threshold value (modification method), (3) using the inpainting interpolation (inpainting method). Our references are the CBCT images of the phantoms without the metal implants. The performance was evaluated by comparing the differences of root mean square error (RMSE) before and after metal artifact reduction (MAR). All the metal artifacts were reduced effectively. Metal artifacts reduction using method (1) performs the best, which improve the differences of RMSE more than 60%. This study indicates that metal artifacts can be reduced effectively by manipulating metal projection data.

  20. Demand artifact: objectively detecting biased participants in advertising research.

    PubMed

    Miller, Felicia; Schertzer, Susan

    2014-12-01

    Detecting and reducing the effect of biased participants continues to be an important task for researchers. However, the lack of objective measures to assess demand artifact has made it difficult to effectively address this issue. This paper reports two experiments that apply a theory-based post-experimental inquiry that can systematically identify biased participants in consumer research. The results demonstrate how easily and effectively researchers can incorporate this tool into experimental studies of all types and reduce the likelihood of systematic error. PMID:25486509

  1. Dental crowns

    MedlinePlus

    ... cover a tooth Replace a misshapen tooth or dental implant Correct a misaligned tooth Talk to your dentist ... the tooth pulled and replaced with a tooth implant. Your crown could chip or crack: If you grind your teeth or clench your jaw, you may need to ...

  2. Dental Assistant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Coll. of Agriculture and Natural Resources Education Inst.

    This curriculum guide, developed for use in dental assistant education programs in Michigan, describes a task-based curriculum that can help a teacher to develop a classroom management system where students learn by doing. It is based on task analysis and reflects the skills, knowledge, and attitudes that employers expect entry-level dental…

  3. Wavelet approach to artifact noise removal from Capacitive coupled Electrocardiograph.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Min; Kim, Ko Keun; Park, Kwang Suk

    2008-01-01

    Capacitive coupled Electrocardiography (ECG) is introduced as non-invasive measurement technology for ubiquitous health care and appliance are spread out widely. Although it has many merits, however, capacitive coupled ECG is very weak for motion artifacts for its non-skin-contact property. There are many studies for artifact problems which treats all artifact signals below 0.8Hz. In our capacitive coupled ECG measurement system, artifacts exist not only below 0.8Hz but also over than 10Hz. Therefore, artifact noise removal algorithm using wavelet method is tested to reject artifact-wandered signal from measured signals. It is observed that using power calculation each decimation step, artifact-wandered signal is removed as low frequency artifacts as high frequency artifacts. Although some original ECG signal is removed with artifact signal, we could level the signal quality for long term measure which shows the best quality ECG signals as we can get. PMID:19163323

  4. Demystifying Kepler Data: A Primer for Systematic Artifact Mitigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinemuchi, K.; Barclay, T.; Fanelli, M.; Pepper, J.; Still, M.; Howell, B.

    2012-01-01

    The Kepler spacecraft has collected data of high photometric precision and cadence almost continuously since operations began on 2009 May 2. Primarily designed to detect planetary transits and asteroseismological signals from solar-like stars, Kepler has provided high quality data for many areas of investigation. Unconditioned simple aperture time-series photometry are however affected by systematic structure. Examples of these systematics are differential velocity aberration, thermal gradients across the spacecraft, and pointing variations. While exhibiting some impact on Kepler's primary science, these systematics can critically handicap potentially ground-breaking scientific gains in other astrophysical areas, especially over long timescales greater than 10 days. As the data archive grows to provide light curves for 10(exp 5) stars of many years in length, Kepler will only fulfill its broad potential for stellar astrophysics if these systematics are understood and mitigated. Post-launch developments in the Kepler archive, data reduction pipeline and open source data analysis software have occurred to remove or reduce systematic artifacts. This paper provides a conceptual primer for users of the Kepler data archive to understand and recognize systematic artifacts within light curves and some methods for their removal. Specific examples of artifact mitigation are provided using data available within the archive. Through the methods defined here, the Kepler community will find a road map to maximizing the quality and employment of the Kepler legacy archive.

  5. Ratiometric artifact reduction in low power reflective photoplethysmography.

    PubMed

    Patterson, J A C; Guang-Zhong Yang

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents effective signal-processing techniques for the compensation of motion artifacts and ambient light offsets in a reflective photoplethysmography sensor suitable for wearable applications. A ratiometric comparison of infrared (IR) and red absorption characteristics cancels out noise that is multiplicative in nature and amplitude modulation of pulsatile absorption signals enables rejection of additive noise. A low-power, discrete-time pulse-oximeter platform is used to capture IR and red photoplethysmograms so that the data used for analysis have noise levels representative of what a true body sensor network device would experience. The proposed artifact rejection algorithm is designed for real-time implementation with a low-power microcontroller while being robust enough to compensate for varying levels in ambient light as well as reducing the effects of motion-induced artifacts. The performance of the system is illustrated by its ability to extract a typical plethysmogram heart-rate waveform since the sensor is subjected to a range of physical disturbances. PMID:23851947

  6. Demystifying Kepler Data: A Primer for Systematic Artifact Mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinemuchi, K.; Barclay, T.; Fanelli, M.; Pepper, J.; Still, M.; Howell, Steve B.

    2012-09-01

    The Kepler spacecraft has collected data of high photometric precision and cadence almost continuously since operations began on 2009 May 2. Primarily designed to detect planetary transits and asteroseismological signals from solar-like stars, Kepler has provided high-quality data for many areas of investigation. Unconditioned simple aperture time-series photometry is, however, affected by systematic structure. Examples of these systematics include differential velocity aberration, thermal gradients across the spacecraft, and pointing variations. While exhibiting some impact on Kepler's primary science, these systematics can critically handicap potentially ground-breaking scientific gains in other astrophysical areas, especially over long timescales greater than 10 days. As the data archive grows to provide light curves for 105 stars of many years in length, Kepler will only fulfill its broad potential for stellar astrophysics if these systematics are understood and mitigated. Post-launch developments in the Kepler archive, data reduction pipeline and open source data analysis software have helped to remove or reduce systematic artifacts. This paper provides a conceptual primer to help users of the Kepler data archive understand and recognize systematic artifacts within light curves and some methods for their removal. Specific examples of artifact mitigation are provided using data available within the archive. Through the methods defined here, the Kepler community will find a road map to maximizing the quality and employment of the Kepler legacy archive.

  7. Automatic coil selection for streak artifact reduction in radial MRI.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yiqun; Yu, Jiangsheng; Kang, Hyun Seon; Englander, Sarah; Rosen, Mark A; Song, Hee Kwon

    2012-02-01

    In radial MR imaging, streaking artifacts contaminating the entire field of view can arise from regions at the outer edges of the prescribed field of view. This can occur even when the Nyquist criterion is satisfied within the desired field of view. These artifacts become exacerbated when parts of the object lie in the superior/inferior regions of the scanner where the gradient strengths become weakened. When multiple coil arrays are used for signal reception, coils at the outer edges can be disabled before data acquisition to reduce the artifact levels. However, as the weakened gradient strengths near the edges often distort the object, causing the signal to become highly concentrated into a small region, the streaks are often not completely removed. Data from certain coils can also be excluded during reconstruction by visually inspecting the individual coil images, but this is impractical for routine use. In this work, a postprocessing method is proposed to automatically identify those coils whose images contain high levels of streaking for subsequent exclusion during reconstruction. The proposed method was demonstrated in vivo dynamic contrast enhanced MRI datasets acquired using a three-dimensional hybrid radial sequence. The results demonstrate that the proposed strategy substantially improves the image quality and show excellent agreement with images reconstructed with manually determined coil selection. PMID:21656562

  8. Periodic artifact reduction in Fourier transforms of full field atomic resolution images.

    PubMed

    Hovden, Robert; Jiang, Yi; Xin, Huolin L; Kourkoutis, Lena F

    2015-04-01

    The discrete Fourier transform is among the most routine tools used in high-resolution scanning/transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM). However, when calculating a Fourier transform, periodic boundary conditions are imposed and sharp discontinuities between the edges of an image cause a cross patterned artifact along the reciprocal space axes. This artifact can interfere with the analysis of reciprocal lattice peaks of an atomic resolution image. Here we demonstrate that the recently developed Periodic Plus Smooth Decomposition technique provides a simple, efficient method for reliable removal of artifacts caused by edge discontinuities. In this method, edge artifacts are reduced by subtracting a smooth background that solves Poisson's equation with boundary conditions set by the image's edges. Unlike the traditional windowed Fourier transforms, Periodic Plus Smooth Decomposition maintains sharp reciprocal lattice peaks from the image's entire field of view. PMID:25597865

  9. Automatic probe artifact detection in MRI-guided cryoablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinyang; Tuncali, Kemal; Wells, William M.; Zientara, Gary P.

    2013-03-01

    Probe or needle artifact detection in 3D scans gives an approximate location for the tools inserted, and is thus crucial in assisting many image-guided procedures. Conventional needle localization algorithms often start with cropped images, where unwanted parts of raw scans are cropped either manually or by applying pre-defined masks. In cryoablation, however, the number of probes used, the placement and direction of probe insertion, and the portions of abdomen scanned differs significantly from case to case, and probes are often constantly being adjusted during the Probe Placement Phase. These features greatly reduce the practicality of approaches based on image cropping. In this work, we present a fully Automatic Probe Artifact Detection method, APAD, that works directly on uncropped raw MRI images, taken during the Probe Placement Phase in 3Tesla MRI-guided cryoablation. The key idea of our method is to first locate an initial 2D line strip within a slice of the MR image which approximates the position and direction of the 3D probes bundle, noting that cryoprobes or biopsy needles create a signal void (black) artifact in MRI with a bright cylindrical border. With the initial 2D line, standard approaches to detect line structures such as the 3D Hough Transform can be applied to quickly detect each probe's axis. By comparing with manually labeled probes, the analysis of 5 patient treatment cases of kidney cryoablation with varying probe placements demonstrates that our algorithm combined with standard 3D line detection is an accurate and robust method to detect probe artifacts.

  10. U.S. Dental School Deans’ Perceptions of the Rising Cost of Dental Education and Borrowing Pressures on Dental Students: Report of Survey Results.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Dora Elías; Garrison, Gwen E; Feldman, Cecile A; Anderson, Eugene L; Cook, Bryan J; Valachovic, Richard W

    2015-06-01

    This report presents findings from a survey of U.S. dental school deans designed to capture their perceptions regarding the rising cost of dental education and its impact on borrowing by dental students to finance their education. The survey included questions about factors influencing the cost of dental education, concerns about dental student borrowing, and financial awareness resources for students. The survey was distributed to the deans of all 63 U.S. dental schools in January 2013; 42 deans responded, for a 67% response rate. The results indicate that, according to the responding deans, new clinical technologies, technology costs, and central university taxes are the main factors that contribute to the increasing cost of dental education. Coupled with reduced state appropriations at public dental schools and declines in private giving at all dental schools, dental school deans face a perplexing set of financial management challenges. Tuition and fees are a primary source of revenue for all dental schools; however, many deans do not have total control over the cost of attending their schools since tuition and fees are often tied to mandates and policies from the parent university and the state legislature. The findings of this study indicate that U.S. dental school deans are aware of and concerned about the impact of increases in tuition and fees on dental student debt and that they are using a variety of strategies to address the growth in dental student borrowing. PMID:26223058

  11. MPEG recompression detection based on block artifacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Weiqi; Wu, Min; Huang, Jiwu

    2008-02-01

    With sophisticated video editing technologies, it is becoming increasingly easy to tamper digital video without leaving visual clues. One of the common tampering operations on video is to remove some frames and then re-encode the resulting video. In this paper, we propose a new method for detecting this type of tampering by exploring the temporal patterns of the block artifacts in video sequences. We show that MPEG compression introduces different block artifacts into various types of frames and that the strength of the block artifacts as a function over time has a regular pattern for a given group of pictures (GOP) structure. When some frames are removed from an MPEG video file and the file is then recompressed, the block artifacts introduced by the previous compression would remain and affect the average of block artifact strength of the recompressed one in such a way that depends on the number of deleted frames and the type of GOP used previously. We propose a feature curve to reveal the compression history of an MPEG video file with a given GOP structure, and use it as evidence to detect tampering. Experimental results evaluated on common video benchmark clips demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  12. Mediating Artifact in Teacher Professional Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svendsen, Bodil

    2015-07-01

    This article focuses on teacher professional development (TPD) in natural science through the 5E model as mediating artifact. The study was conducted in an upper secondary school, grounded in a school-based intervention research project. My contribution to the field of research on TPD is founded on the hypothesis that teachers would be best facilitated to make their practice more inquiry based if they are provided with a mediating artifact. In this study the artifact is a model 5E, which is a conceptual way of thinking, to help teachers reflect on their practice. The aim is to encourage teachers to make changes themselves, by applying extended use of inquiry into their practice. This mediated artifact could thus be used across different national contexts. The main research question is; how can the 5E model as a mediating artifact enhance TPD? The article addresses the processes of the use of the 5E model and its influence on teachers' perception of the model. This is in order for teachers to conceptualize their goals related to inquiry and scientific thinking, and to solve the problems involved in achieving those goals in their own contexts. The study concludes that, after the intervention, the teachers' approaches and strategies demonstrate greater emphasis on learning.

  13. Dental Training Films.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veterans Administration Medical Center, Washington, DC.

    This dental training films catalog is organized into two sections. Section I is a category listing of the films by number and title, indexed according to generalized headings; categories are as follow: anatomy, articulator systems, complete dentures, dental assisting, dental laboratory technology, dental materials, dental office emergencies,…

  14. Mapping sources of correlation in resting state FMRI, with artifact detection and removal.

    PubMed

    Jo, Hang Joon; Saad, Ziad S; Simmons, W Kyle; Milbury, Lydia A; Cox, Robert W

    2010-08-15

    Many components of resting-state (RS) FMRI show non-random structure that has little to do with neural connectivity but can covary over multiple brain structures. Some of these signals originate in physiology and others are hardware-related. One artifact discussed herein may be caused by defects in the receive coil array or the RF amplifiers powering it. During a scan, this artifact results in small image intensity shifts in parts of the brain imaged by the affected array components. These shifts introduce artifactual correlations in RS time series on the spatial scale of the coil's sensitivity profile, and can markedly bias RS connectivity results. We show that such a transient artifact can be substantially removed from RS time series by using locally formed regressors from white matter tissue. This is particularly important in arrays with larger numbers of coils, which may generate smaller artifact zones. In such a case, brain-wide average noise estimates would fail to capture the artifact. We also examine the anatomical structure of artifactual variance in RS FMRI time series, by identifying sources that contribute to these signals and where in the brain are they manifested. We consider current methods for reducing confounding sources (or noises) and their effects on connectivity maps, and offer an improved approach (ANATICOR) that can also reduce hardware artifacts. The methods described herein are currently available with AFNI, in addition to tools for rapid, interactive generation of seed-based correlation maps at single-subject and group levels. PMID:20420926

  15. MRI-Based Computed Tomography Metal Artifact Correction Method for Improving Proton Range Calculation Accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Peter C.; Schreibmann, Eduard; Roper, Justin; Elder, Eric; Crocker, Ian; Fox, Tim; Zhu, X. Ronald; Dong, Lei; Dhabaan, Anees

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Computed tomography (CT) artifacts can severely degrade dose calculation accuracy in proton therapy. Prompted by the recently increased popularity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the radiation therapy clinic, we developed an MRI-based CT artifact correction method for improving the accuracy of proton range calculations. Methods and Materials: The proposed method replaces corrupted CT data by mapping CT Hounsfield units (HU number) from a nearby artifact-free slice, using a coregistered MRI. MRI and CT volumetric images were registered with use of 3-dimensional (3D) deformable image registration (DIR). The registration was fine-tuned on a slice-by-slice basis by using 2D DIR. Based on the intensity of paired MRI pixel values and HU from an artifact-free slice, we performed a comprehensive analysis to predict the correct HU for the corrupted region. For a proof-of-concept validation, metal artifacts were simulated on a reference data set. Proton range was calculated using reference, artifactual, and corrected images to quantify the reduction in proton range error. The correction method was applied to 4 unique clinical cases. Results: The correction method resulted in substantial artifact reduction, both quantitatively and qualitatively. On respective simulated brain and head and neck CT images, the mean error was reduced from 495 and 370 HU to 108 and 92 HU after correction. Correspondingly, the absolute mean proton range errors of 2.4 cm and 1.7 cm were reduced to less than 2 mm in both cases. Conclusions: Our MRI-based CT artifact correction method can improve CT image quality and proton range calculation accuracy for patients with severe CT artifacts.

  16. Dental education and dental practice.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, J R

    1984-01-01

    This paper relates recent modes of dental practice to changes that the public and government are likely to ask the health care professions to make in the future. As usual they are asking for the best of all worlds. First, that we maintain the clinical model to the highest standards of personal dental care based and tested against the best research at our disposal, whilst we ensure there is no reduction in the high technical standards for which british dentists have a reputation. Second, that the profession is required to consider ways of providing care on the medicosocial model for the whole community at an economic level the country will afford. The broad changes in dental education have been reviewed, from the technical apprenticeship to the establishment of strong university departments in teaching hospitals. The importance of a sound biomedical foundation and of research both to education and the credibility of dental practice as a primary health care profession is stressed if the profession is to retain its position as a sister to medicine and not slide down to that of a technical ancillary. PMID:6374141

  17. Windmill artifact in multislice helical CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, Michael D.; Taguchi, Katsuyuki; Hein, Ilmar A.; Chiang, BeShan; Kazama, Masahiro; Mori, Issei

    2003-05-01

    Multi-slice helical CT-systems suffer from windmill artifacts: black/white patterns that spin off of features with high longitudinal gradients. The number of black/white pairs matches the number of slices (detector rows) in the multi-slive detector. The period of spin is the same as the helical pitch. We investigate the cause of the pattern by following the traces of selected voxels through the multi-slive detector array as a function of view position. This forms an "extracted sinogram" which represents the data used to reconstruct the specific voxel. Now we can determine the cause of the artifact by correlating the windmill streak in the image with the extracted data. The investigation shows that inadequate sampling along the longitudinal direction causes the artifact.

  18. Artifacts Reduction in VIR/DAWN data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrozzo, Filippo Giacomo

    2016-07-01

    Imaging spectrometers often suffer from the common problems of different types of systematic errors. The quality of the calibration to surface reflectance is important for accurately identifying surface materials. An inappropriate calibration could distort an absorption feature, causing a misidentification. Artifact might be interpreted as representing a material that does not really exist at that location. Also VIR (Visible and Infrared Spectrometer, De Sanctis et al., 2011) imaging spectrometer is affected by systematic and non-systematic errors, such as artifacts, vertical stripes and spikes. In VIR data, they are caused by imperfect radiometric and spectral calibration, by a peculiar readout noise in the detector (Schlapfer and Richter, 2011). In this work we apply a spectral polishing technique in order to remove artifacts, and spikes from VIR data and we show how the resulting spectra of Vesta and Ceres are affected by corrections.

  19. Dental x-rays

    MedlinePlus

    ... or impacted teeth The presence and extent of dental caries (cavities) Bone damage (such as from periodontitis ) Abscessed ... Dental x-rays can reveal dental cavities (tooth decay) before they ... take yearly bitewings for the early development of cavities.

  20. Dental Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirtoft, Ingegerd

    1983-12-01

    Ten years have passed since the first articles appeared in this new field. The qualities of the laser light together with the need of contactless 3-D measurements for different dental purposes seemed to be extremely promising, but still just a few scientists have used the method and mostly for laboratory studies. For some reason there has been a preponderance for orthodontic measurements. This seems to be a bit peculiar from holographic view compared with measurements for engineering purposes, which usually are made on metals. So naturally holography can become a clinical tool for measurements in the field of fixed bridges, removable partial dentures and implants. One of the problems is that the need for holography in dental research must be fulfilled in collaboration with physicists. Only a two-way communication during an entire experiment can balance both technical and odontological demands and thus give practical and clinical important results. The need for an easy way of handling the evaluation to get all required information is another problem and of course the holographic equipment must be converted to a box easy to handle for everyone. At last the position of dental holography today is going to be carefully examined together with an attempt to look into the hopefully exciting and not to utopic future for this research field.

  1. Dental problems in athletes.

    PubMed

    Inouye, Jill; McGrew, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Orofacial injuries and diseases occur in athletes, and they may not always have access to dentists. Therefore team physicians should be aware of the common injuries and initial management. Treatment of dental injuries will depend on whether the teeth are primary or permanent. The most common type of fracture is crown fracture, but there are other dental injuries that can lead to future complications if not treated promptly and monitored closely. Tooth avulsions need to be handled properly, and athletes should see a dentist as soon as possible. Despite the urgency of some injuries, other orofacial injuries or diseases, such as lacerations and caries, should not be overlooked. Proper education and use of mouth guards can assist athletes in reducing their risk of orofacial injuries. PMID:25574879

  2. Flexible capacitive electrodes for minimizing motion artifacts in ambulatory electrocardiograms.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Su; Heo, Jeong; Lee, Won Kyu; Lim, Yong Gyu; Kim, Youn Ho; Park, Kwang Suk

    2014-01-01

    This study proposes the use of flexible capacitive electrodes for reducing motion artifacts in a wearable electrocardiogram (ECG) device. The capacitive electrodes have conductive foam on their surface, a shield, an optimal input bias resistor, and guarding feedback. The electrodes are integrated in a chest belt, and the acquired signals are transmitted wirelessly for ambulatory heart rate monitoring. We experimentally validated the electrode performance with subjects standing and walking on a treadmill at speeds of up to 7 km/h. The results confirmed the highly accurate heart rate detection capacity of the developed system and its feasibility for daily-life ECG monitoring. PMID:25120162

  3. Flexible Capacitive Electrodes for Minimizing Motion Artifacts in Ambulatory Electrocardiograms

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong Su; Heo, Jeong; Lee, Won Kyu; Lim, Yong Gyu; Kim, Youn Ho; Park, Kwang Suk

    2014-01-01

    This study proposes the use of flexible capacitive electrodes for reducing motion artifacts in a wearable electrocardiogram (ECG) device. The capacitive electrodes have conductive foam on their surface, a shield, an optimal input bias resistor, and guarding feedback. The electrodes are integrated in a chest belt, and the acquired signals are transmitted wirelessly for ambulatory heart rate monitoring. We experimentally validated the electrode performance with subjects standing and walking on a treadmill at speeds of up to 7 km/h. The results confirmed the highly accurate heart rate detection capacity of the developed system and its feasibility for daily-life ECG monitoring. PMID:25120162

  4. Effect of Perceived Stress on Student Performance in Dental School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Anne E.; Lushington, Kurt

    2002-01-01

    Examined the relationship between perceived stress and academic performance in 202 dental students at an Australian dental school. Found little support for an association between increased factor stress scores on the Dental Environmental Stress (DES) questionnaire and reduced academic performance. (EV)

  5. Artifact reduction in long-term monitoring of cerebral hemodynamics using near-infrared spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Vinette, Sarah A.; Dunn, Jeff F.; Slone, Edward; Federico, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a noninvasive neuroimaging technique used to assess cerebral hemodynamics. Its portability, ease of use, and relatively low operational cost lend itself well to the long-term monitoring of hemodynamic changes, such as those in epilepsy, where events are unpredictable. Long-term monitoring is associated with challenges including alterations in behaviors and motion that can result in artifacts. Five patients with epilepsy were assessed for interictal hemodynamic changes and alterations in behavior or motion. Based on this work, visual inspection was used to identify NIRS artifacts during a period of interest, specifically prior to seizures, in four patients. A motion artifact reduction algorithm (MARA, also known as the spline interpolation method) was tested on these data. Alterations in the NIRS measurements often occurred simultaneously with changes in motion and behavior. Occasionally, sharp shift artifacts were observed in the data. When artifacts appeared as sustained baseline shifts in the data, MARA reduced the standard deviation of the data and the appearance improved. We discussed motion and artifacts as challenges associated with long-term monitoring of cerebral hemodynamics in patients with epilepsy and our group’s approach to circumvent these challenges and improve the quality of the data collected. PMID:26158008

  6. Reduction of EEG artifacts in simultaneous EEG-fMRI: Reference layer adaptive filtering (RLAF).

    PubMed

    Steyrl, David; Patz, Franz; Krausz, Gunther; Edlinger, Günter; Müller-Putz, Gernot R

    2015-08-01

    Although simultaneous measurement of electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is one of the most valuable methods for studying human brain activity non-invasively, it remains challenging to measure high quality EEG inside the MRI scanner. Recently, a new approach for minimizing residual MRI scanner artifacts in the EEG was presented: reference layer artifact subtraction (RLAS). Here, reference electrodes capture only the artifacts, which are subsequently subtracted from the measurement electrodes. With the present work we demonstrate that replacing the subtraction by adaptive filtering statistically significantly outperforms RLAS. Reference layer adaptive filtering (RLAF) attenuates the average artifact root-mean-square (RMS) voltage of the passive MRI scanner to 0.7 μV (-14.4 dB). RLAS achieves 0.78 μV (-13.5 dB). The combination of average artifact subtraction (AAS) and RLAF reduces the residual average gradient artifact RMS voltage to 2.3 μV (-49.2 dB). AAS alone achieves 5.7 μV (-39.0 dB). All measurements were conducted with an MRI phantom, as the reference layer cap available to us was a prototype. PMID:26737122

  7. Dental Fear among Medical and Dental Undergraduates

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, H.; Razak, I. A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To assess the prevalence and level of dental fear among health related undergraduates and to identify factors causing such fear using Kleinknecht's Dental Fear Survey (DFS) questionnaire. Methods. Kleinknecht's DFS questionnaire was used to assess dental fear and anxiety among the entire enrollment of the medical and dental undergraduates' of the University of Malaya. Results. Overall response rate was 82.2%. Dental students reported higher prevalence of dental fear (96.0% versus 90.4%). However, most of the fear encountered among dental students was in the low fear category as compared to their medical counterpart (69.2 versus 51.2%). Significantly more medical students cancelled dental appointment due to fear compared to dental students (P = 0.004). “Heart beats faster” and “muscle being tensed” were the top two physiological responses experienced by the respondents. “Drill” and “anesthetic needle” were the most fear provoking objects among respondents of both faculties. Conclusion. Dental fear and anxiety are a common problem encountered among medical and dental undergraduates who represent future health care professionals. Also, high level of dental fear and anxiety leads to the avoidance of the dental services. PMID:25386615

  8. Information Design for Visualizing History Museum Artifacts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Yulin; Lai, Tingsheng; Yasuda, Takami; Yokoi, Shigeki

    2011-01-01

    In the past few years, museum visualization systems have become a hot topic that attracts many researchers' interests. Several systems provide Web services for browsing museum collections through the Web. In this paper, we proposed an intelligent museum system for history museum artifacts, and described a study in which we enable access to China…

  9. Mediating Artifact in Teacher Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svendsen, Bodil

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on teacher professional development (TPD) in natural science through the 5E model as mediating artifact. The study was conducted in an upper secondary school, grounded in a school-based intervention research project. My contribution to the field of research on TPD is founded on the hypothesis that teachers would be best…

  10. Atlas of nuclear medicine artifacts and variants

    SciTech Connect

    Ryo, U.Y.; Alavi, A.; Collier, D.

    1989-01-01

    This book is designed to aid in the interpretation of nuclear medicine scans. The authors purpose is to help practitioners recognize artifacts and variants on nuclear medicine scans and thereby avoid misdiagnoses. It contains 70 pages of cases, including sections on SPECT and PET.

  11. Smoking artifacts: factors of source evaluation.

    PubMed

    Powell, L; Hickson, M; Hill, S R; Holt, G; Flick, H

    1978-12-01

    Responses from 323 students in communication indicated that credibility factors associated with nonverbal smoking artifacts are not the same as those associated with verbal stimuli; a character factor was absent for nonverbal stimuli. Verbosity, however, may permit inferences regarding potential verbal behavior. PMID:740490

  12. "Things" that Work: The Artifacts of Industrialization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geenfield, Briann; Malone, Patrick

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on teaching industrialization through the use of industrial artifacts, such as tools and products. Suggests field trips to museums and historic sites, building models of waterwheels or bridges, visiting an operating factory, and studying landscapes shaped by industrialization. Includes a bibliography. (CMK)

  13. Law addresses question of space artifact ownership

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-10-01

    U.S. astronauts who participated in many of NASA's early space missions will receive full ownership rights to artifacts from those missions through legislation that President Barack Obama signed into law on 25 September. The legislation, which received broad bipartisan support, provides artifact ownership rights to any of NASA's Mercury, Gemini, or Apollo space programs through the completion of the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project, whose flight occurred in July 1975. The law defines artifacts as expendable, disposable, or personal use items—including personal logs and flight hardware salvaged from jettisoned lunar modules—used by astronauts that were not required to be returned to NASA; lunar rocks and other lunar material are not defined as artifacts. Bill cosponsor Rep. Ralph Hall (R-Tex.), chair of the House of Representatives' Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, said on 19 September, “A majority of these items have been in the personal possession of the astronauts for 40 years or more. Over the last decade, NASA has begun to challenge the astronauts' ownership of these mementos. This issue was first brought to my attention late last year. I was surprised to learn that NASA had, on an irregular basis, intervened several times to claim ownership.”

  14. The impact of head movements on EEG and contact impedance: an adaptive filtering solution for motion artifact reduction.

    PubMed

    Mihajlovic, Vojkan; Patki, Shrishail; Grundlehner, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Designing and developing a comfortable and convenient EEG system for daily usage that can provide reliable and robust EEG signal, encompasses a number of challenges. Among them, the most ambitious is the reduction of artifacts due to body movements. This paper studies the effect of head movement artifacts on the EEG signal and on the dry electrode-tissue impedance (ETI), monitored continuously using the imec's wireless EEG headset. We have shown that motion artifacts have huge impact on the EEG spectral content in the frequency range lower than 20 Hz. Coherence and spectral analysis revealed that ETI is not capable of describing disturbances at very low frequencies (below 2 Hz). Therefore, we devised a motion artifact reduction (MAR) method that uses a combination of a band-pass filtering and multi-channel adaptive filtering (AF), suitable for real-time MAR. This method was capable of substantially reducing artifacts produced by head movements. PMID:25571131

  15. A robust adaptive denoising framework for real-time artifact removal in scalp EEG measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilicarslan, Atilla; Grossman, Robert G.; Contreras-Vidal, Jose Luis

    2016-04-01

    , totaling 19 sessions, with and without {H}∞ filtering of the raw data. Significance. The proposed method allows real-time adaptive artifact removal for EEG-based closed-loop BMI applications and mobile EEG studies in general, thereby increasing the range of tasks that can be studied in action and context while reducing the need for discarding data due to artifacts. Significant increase in decoding performances also justify the effectiveness of the method to be used in real-time closed-loop BMI applications.

  16. Two-stage approach for detection and reduction of motion artifacts in photoplethysmographic data.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Rajet; Natarajan, Balasubramaniam Bala; Warren, Steve

    2010-08-01

    that is effective even in the presence of severe subject movement. The approach involves an enhanced preprocessing unit consisting of a motion detection unit (MDU, developed in this paper), period estimation unit, and Fourier series reconstruction unit. The MDU identifies clean data frames versus those corrupted with motion artifacts. The period estimation unit determines the fundamental frequency of a corrupt frame. The Fourier series reconstruction unit reconstructs the final preprocessed signal by utilizing the spectrum variability of the pulse waveform. Preprocessed data are then fed to a magnitude-based FD independent component analysis unit. This helps reduce motion artifacts present at the frequencies of the reconstruction components. Experimental results are presented to demonstrate the efficacy of the overall motion artifact reduction method. PMID:20172800

  17. Model of Image Artifacts from Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willson, Reg

    2008-01-01

    A mathematical model of image artifacts produced by dust particles on lenses has been derived. Machine-vision systems often have to work with camera lenses that become dusty during use. Dust particles on the front surface of a lens produce image artifacts that can potentially affect the performance of a machine-vision algorithm. The present model satisfies a need for a means of synthesizing dust image artifacts for testing machine-vision algorithms for robustness (or the lack thereof) in the presence of dust on lenses. A dust particle can absorb light or scatter light out of some pixels, thereby giving rise to a dark dust artifact. It can also scatter light into other pixels, thereby giving rise to a bright dust artifact. For the sake of simplicity, this model deals only with dark dust artifacts. The model effectively represents dark dust artifacts as an attenuation image consisting of an array of diffuse darkened spots centered at image locations corresponding to the locations of dust particles. The dust artifacts are computationally incorporated into a given test image by simply multiplying the brightness value of each pixel by a transmission factor that incorporates the factor of attenuation, by dust particles, of the light incident on that pixel. With respect to computation of the attenuation and transmission factors, the model is based on a first-order geometric (ray)-optics treatment of the shadows cast by dust particles on the image detector. In this model, the light collected by a pixel is deemed to be confined to a pair of cones defined by the location of the pixel s image in object space, the entrance pupil of the lens, and the location of the pixel in the image plane (see Figure 1). For simplicity, it is assumed that the size of a dust particle is somewhat less than the diameter, at the front surface of the lens, of any collection cone containing all or part of that dust particle. Under this assumption, the shape of any individual dust particle artifact

  18. Artifacts for Calibration of Submicron Width Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunthaner, Frank; Grunthaner, Paula; Bryson, Charles, III

    2003-01-01

    Artifacts that are fabricated with the help of molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) are undergoing development for use as dimensional calibration standards with submicron widths. Such standards are needed for calibrating instruments (principally, scanning electron microscopes and scanning probe microscopes) for measuring the widths of features in advanced integrated circuits. Dimensional calibration standards fabricated by an older process that involves lithography and etching of trenches in (110) surfaces of single-crystal silicon are generally reproducible to within dimensional tolerances of about 15 nm. It is anticipated that when the artifacts of the present type are fully developed, their critical dimensions will be reproducible to within 1 nm. These artifacts are expected to find increasing use in the semiconductor-device and integrated- circuit industries as the width tolerances on semiconductor devices shrink to a few nanometers during the next few years. Unlike in the older process, one does not rely on lithography and etching to define the critical dimensions. Instead, one relies on the inherent smoothness and flatness of MBE layers deposited under controlled conditions and defines the critical dimensions as the thicknesses of such layers. An artifact of the present type is fabricated in two stages (see figure): In the first stage, a multilayer epitaxial wafer is grown on a very flat substrate. In the second stage, the wafer is cleaved to expose the layers, then the exposed layers are differentially etched (taking advantage of large differences between the etch rates of the different epitaxial layer materials). The resulting structure includes narrow and well-defined trenches and a shelf with thicknesses determined by the thicknesses of the epitaxial layers from which they were etched. Eventually, it should be possible to add a third fabrication stage in which durable, electronically inert artifacts could be replicated in diamondlike carbon from a master made by

  19. In vivo demonstration of reflection artifact reduction in photoacoustic imaging using synthetic aperture photoacoustic-guided focused ultrasound (PAFUSion)

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Mithun Kuniyil Ajith; Jaeger, Michael; Frenz, Martin; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2016-01-01

    Reflection artifacts caused by acoustic inhomogeneities are a critical problem in epi-mode biomedical photoacoustic imaging. High light fluence beneath the probe results in photoacoustic transients, which propagate into the tissue and reflect back from echogenic structures. These reflection artifacts cause problems in image interpretation and significantly impact the contrast and imaging depth. We recently proposed a method called PAFUSion (Photoacoustic-guided focused ultrasound) to identify such reflection artifacts in photoacoustic imaging. In its initial version, PAFUSion mimics the inward-travelling wavefield from small blood vessel-like PA sources by applying ultrasound pulses focused towards these sources, and thus provides a way to identify the resulting reflection artifacts. In this work, we demonstrate reduction of reflection artifacts in phantoms and in vivo measurements on human volunteers. In view of the spatially distributed PA sources that are found in clinical applications, we implemented an improved version of PAFUSion where photoacoustic signals are backpropagated to imitate the inward travelling wavefield and thus the reflection artifacts. The backpropagation is performed in a synthetic way based on the pulse-echo acquisitions after transmission on each single element of the transducer array. The results provide a direct confirmation that reflection artifacts are prominent in clinical epi-photoacoustic imaging, and that PAFUSion can strongly reduce these artifacts to improve deep-tissue photoacoustic imaging. PMID:27570690

  20. An Audit and Feedback Intervention for Reducing Antibiotic Prescribing in General Dental Practice: The RAPiD Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Elouafkaoui, Paula; Young, Linda; Newlands, Rumana; Duncan, Eilidh M.; Elders, Andrew; Ramsay, Craig R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Dentists prescribe approximately 10% of antibiotics dispensed in UK community pharmacies. Despite clear clinical guidance, dentists often prescribe antibiotics inappropriately. This cluster-randomised controlled trial used routinely collected National Health Service (NHS) dental prescribing and treatment claim data to compare the impact of individualised audit and feedback (A&F) interventions on dentists’ antibiotic prescribing rates. Methods and Findings All 795 antibiotic prescribing NHS general dental practices in Scotland were included. Practices were randomised to the control (practices = 163; dentists = 567) or A&F intervention group (practices = 632; dentists = 1,999). A&F intervention practices were allocated to one of two A&F groups: (1) individualised graphical A&F comprising a line graph plotting an individual dentist’s monthly antibiotic prescribing rate (practices = 316; dentists = 1,001); or (2) individualised graphical A&F plus a written behaviour change message synthesising and reiterating national guidance recommendations for dental antibiotic prescribing (practices = 316; dentists = 998). Intervention practices were also simultaneously randomised to receive A&F: (i) with or without a health board comparator comprising the addition of a line to the graphical A&F plotting the monthly antibiotic prescribing rate of all dentists in the health board; and (ii) delivered at 0 and 6 mo or at 0, 6, and 9 mo, giving a total of eight intervention groups. The primary outcome, measured by the trial statistician who was blinded to allocation, was the total number of antibiotic items dispensed per 100 NHS treatment claims over the 12 mo post-delivery of the baseline A&F. Primary outcome data was available for 152 control practices (dentists = 438) and 609 intervention practices (dentists = 1,550). At baseline, the number of antibiotic items prescribed per 100 NHS treatment claims was 8.3 in the control group and 8.5 in the intervention group. At

  1. Infant dental care (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... child to bed with a bottle of milk, juice, or sugar water. As the child grows, establishing proper dental hygiene will promote healthy teeth and gums which are essential to overall good health. Poor dental development, dental disease, and dental trauma ...

  2. Analysis of vector models in quantification of artifacts produced by standard prosthetic inlays in Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT)--a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Różyło-Kalinowska, Ingrid; Miechowicz, Sławomir; Sarna-Boś, Katarzyna; Borowicz, Janusz; Kalinowski, Paweł

    2014-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a relatively new, but highly efficient imaging method applied first in dentistry in 1998. However, the quality of the obtained slices depends among other things on artifacts generated by dental restorations as well as orthodontic and prosthetic appliances. The aim of the study was to quantify the artifacts produced by standard prosthetic inlays in CBCT images. The material consisted of 17 standard prosthetic inlays mounted in dental roots embedded in resin. The samples were examined by means of a large field of view CBCT unit, Galileos (Sirona, Germany), at 85 kV and 14 mAs. The analysis was performed using Able 3DDoctor software for data in the CT raster space as well as by means of Materialise Magics software for generated vector models (STL). The masks generated in the raster space included the area of the inlays together with image artifacts. The region of interest (ROI) of the raster space is a set of voxels from a selected range of Hounsfield units (109-3071). Ceramic inlay with zirconium dioxide (Cera Post) as well as epoxy resin inlay including silica fibers enriched with zirconium (Easy Post) produced the most intense artifacts. The smallest image distortions were created by titanium inlays, both passive (Harald Nordin) and active (Flexi Flange). Inlays containing zirconium generated the strongest artifacts, thus leading to the greatest distortions in the CBCT images. Carbon fiber inlay did not considerably affect the image quality. PMID:25404623

  3. Dental education in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Jaramillo, Jorge A.; Pulido, Jairo H. Ternera; Núñez, Jaime A. Castro; Bird, William F.; Komabayashi, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    This article describes Colombia's development of formal dentistry, its dental school system, curriculum, and dental licensure, and current issues in oral health care. In 1969, there were only 4 dental schools in Colombia; at this writing there are 21. Five dental schools are public and the other 16 are private. Nearly all classes are conducted in Spanish. Undergraduate pre-dental coursework is not a prerequisite for dental school in Colombia. To obtain licensure, Colombian dental students must complete 5 years of study in dental school, earn a diploma, and work for the government for 1 year. There are approximately 41,400 dentists in Colombia, and the number is increasing quickly. However, the unemployment rate among dentists is very high, even though graduation from dental school is extremely difficult. Although the 1,100:1 ratio of citizens to dentists is considered satisfactory, access to dental care is limited due to the high rate of poverty. PMID:20339245

  4. Teaching and Learning the Nature of Technical Artifacts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frederik, Ineke; Sonneveld, Wim; de Vries, Marc J.

    2011-01-01

    Artifacts are probably our most obvious everyday encounter with technology. Therefore, a good understanding of the nature of technical artifacts is a relevant part of technological literacy. In this article we draw from the philosophy of technology to develop a conceptualization of technical artifacts that can be used for educational purposes.…

  5. The effects of spatial filtering and artifacts on electrocorticographic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Coon, W. G.; de Pesters, A.; Brunner, P.; Schalk, G.

    2015-10-01

    Objective. Electrocorticographic (ECoG) signals contain noise that is common to all channels and noise that is specific to individual channels. Most published ECoG studies use common average reference (CAR) spatial filters to remove common noise, but CAR filters may introduce channel-specific noise into other channels. To address this concern, scientists often remove artifactual channels prior to data analysis. However, removing these channels depends on expert-based labeling and may also discard useful data. Thus, the effects of spatial filtering and artifacts on ECoG signals have been largely unknown. This study aims to quantify these effects and thereby address this gap in knowledge. Approach. In this study, we address these issues by exploring the effects of application of two types of unsupervised spatial filters and three methods of detecting signal artifacts using a large ECoG data set (20 subjects, four task conditions in each subject). Main results. Our results confirm that spatial filtering improves performance, i.e., it reduces ECoG signal variance that is not related to the task. They also show that removing artifactual channels automatically (using quantitatively defined rejection criteria) or manually (using expert opinion) does not increase the total amount of task-related information, but does avoid potential contamination from one or more noisy channels. Finally, applying a novel ‘median average reference’ filter does not require the elimination of artifactual channels prior to spatial filtering and still mitigates the influence of channels with channel-specific noise. Thus, it allows the investigator to retain more potentially useful task-related data. Significance. In summary, our results show that appropriately designed spatial filters that account for both common noise and channel-specific noise greatly improve the quality of ECoG signal analyses, and that artifacts in only a single channel can result in profound and undesired effects on

  6. New algorithms for ring artifact removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketcham, Richard A.

    2006-08-01

    This paper describes a set of algorithms that enable virtually complete ring artifact removal from tomographic imagery with minimal to negligible contamination of the underlying data. These procedures were created specifically to deal with data as acquired at the University of Texas high-resolution X-ray CT facility, but are likely to be applicable in other settings as well. In most cases corrections are optimally applied to sinogram data before reconstruction, but a variant is developed for correcting already-reconstructed images. The algorithms make particular use of repetitive aspects of the artifact across images to improve behavior. However, fully utilizing this functionality requires processing entire data sets simultaneously, rather than one image at a time. A number of parameters may be adjusted to optimize results for particular data sets.

  7. Supporting Knowledge Transfer through Decomposable Reasoning Artifacts

    SciTech Connect

    Pike, William A.; May, Richard A.; Turner, Alan E.

    2007-01-03

    Technology to support knowledge transfer and cooperative inquiry must offer its users the ability to effectively interpret knowledge structures produced by collaborators. Communicating the reasoning processes that underlie a finding is one method for enhancing interpretation, and can result in more effective evaluation and application of shared knowledge. In knowledge management tools, interpretation is aided by creating knowledge artifacts that can expose their provenance to scrutiny and that can be transformed into diverse representations that suit their consumers’ perspectives and preferences. We outline the information management needs of inquiring communities characterized by hypothesis generation tasks, and propose a model for communication, based in theories of hermeneutics, semiotics, and abduction, in which knowledge structures can be decomposed into the lower-level reasoning artifacts that produced them. We then present a proof-of-concept implementation for an environment to support the capture and communication of analytic products, with emphasis on the domain of intelligence analysis.

  8. Dental stem cell patents.

    PubMed

    Morsczeck, Christian; Frerich, Bernhard; Driemel, Oliver

    2009-01-01

    A complex human tissue harbors stem cells that are responsible for its maintenance or repair. These stem cells have been isolated also from dental tissues such as the periodontal ligament, dental papilla or dental follicle and they may offer novel applications in dentistry. This following review summarizes patents about dental stem cells for dental tissue engineering and considers their value for regenerative dentistry. PMID:19149737

  9. Atypical Forensic Dental Identifications.

    PubMed

    Cardoza, Anthony R; Wood, James D

    2015-06-01

    Forensic dental identification specialists are typically the last conventional option for postmortem identification. Forensic dental identification is most often accomplished by comparing radiographs of the decedent's teeth with the dental radiographs obtained from the dentist of the suspected victim. Unfortunately, antemortem dental radiographs are not always available. When presented with this challenge, the authors of this article have been successful in completing identifications using means other than dental radiographic comparison. PMID:26126345

  10. Troubleshooting and elimination of artifact in polysomnography.

    PubMed

    Beine, Bretton

    2005-12-01

    A sleep technician who runs a sleep study without understanding the basis of the signals being acquired can spend a lot of time and energy trying to improve poor signal quality without success. Poor signal quality often results in an image that cannot be interpreted or is difficult to interpret, and extensive troubleshooting often results in a very disrupted sleep study. This article addresses trouble-shooting and elimination of artifact in polysomnography. PMID:16303593