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  1. Gastric Cancer: How Can We Reduce the Incidence of this Disease?

    PubMed

    den Hoed, Caroline M; Kuipers, Ernst J

    2016-07-01

    Gastric cancer remains a prevalent disease worldwide with a poor prognosis. Helicobacter pylori plays a major role in gastric carcinogenesis. H. pylori colonization leads to chronic gastritis, which predisposes to atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia, and eventually gastric cancer. Screening, treatment, and prevention of H. pylori colonization can reduce the incidence of gastric cancer. Other interventions that may yield a similar effect, although of smaller magnitude, include promotion of a healthy lifestyle including dietary measures, non-smoking, low alcohol intake, and sufficient physical activity. This chapter reviews interventions that can lead to a decline in gastric cancer incidence in high and low incidence countries. PMID:27184043

  2. Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Stomach Cancer Prevention Stomach Cancer Screening Research Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Key Points Stomach cancer is a ...

  3. Treatment of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Orditura, Michele; Galizia, Gennaro; Sforza, Vincenzo; Gambardella, Valentina; Fabozzi, Alessio; Laterza, Maria Maddalena; Andreozzi, Francesca; Ventriglia, Jole; Savastano, Beatrice; Mabilia, Andrea; Lieto, Eva; Ciardiello, Fortunato; De Vita, Ferdinando

    2014-01-01

    The authors focused on the current surgical treatment of resectable gastric cancer, and significance of peri- and post-operative chemo or chemoradiation. Gastric cancer is the 4th most commonly diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Surgery remains the only curative therapy, while perioperative and adjuvant chemotherapy, as well as chemoradiation, can improve outcome of resectable gastric cancer with extended lymph node dissection. More than half of radically resected gastric cancer patients relapse locally or with distant metastases, or receive the diagnosis of gastric cancer when tumor is disseminated; therefore, median survival rarely exceeds 12 mo, and 5-years survival is less than 10%. Cisplatin and fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy, with addition of trastuzumab in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positive patients, is the widely used treatment in stage IV patients fit for chemotherapy. Recent evidence supports the use of second-line chemotherapy after progression in patients with good performance status PMID:24587643

  4. Reduced angiogenesis in peritoneal dissemination of gastric cancer through gelatinase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Wada, Norihito; Otani, Yoshihide; Kubota, Tetsuro; Kimata, Masaru; Minagawa, Akiko; Yoshimizu, Nobunari; Kameyama, Kaori; Saikawa, Yoshiro; Yoshida, Masashi; Furukawa, Toshiharu; Fujii, Masato; Kumai, Koichiro; Okada, Yasunori; Kitajima, Masaki

    2003-01-01

    Marimastat is a broad-spectrum matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitor that inhibits almost all major MMPs, key enzymes in gastric cancer invasion and metastasis. We investigated the ability of marimastat to inhibit tumor angiogenesis in the severe combined immuno-deficient (SCID) mouse/human gastric cancer model of peritoneal dissemination. A human stomach adenocarcinoma cell line, TMK-1, was injected intraperitoneally into SCID mice. On the 7th day after tumor inoculation, the administration of marimastat (27 mg/kg/day) was initiated and the treatment was continued for 2 weeks using subcutaneously-inoculating mini-osmotic pumps. On the 21st day, the mice were killed and the disseminated nodules were evaluated. Total weights, numbers, and the microvascular density of the disseminating nodules were significantly lower in mice treated with marimastat compared to the control group. Film in situ zymography demonstrated that net gelatinolytic activity in the tissues was weaker in treated-group nodules than in control-group nodules. Thus, our results suggested that marimastat inhibited peritoneal dissemination of human gastric cancer cells through inhibition of tumor angiogenesis, possibly involving the down-regulation of gelatinases, in SCID mice injected with human gastric cancer cells. PMID:14524532

  5. Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... with the syndrome is recommended. What are the estimated cancer risks associated with HDGC? Not everyone who ... the lifetime risk for diffuse gastric cancer is estimated to be 70% to 80% for men and ...

  6. Genetics and gastric cancer susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yan; Lu, Fang; Zeng, Sha; Sun, Suqing; Lu, Li; Liu, Lifeng

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer has high morbidity and mortality in China. It is ranked first in malignant tumors of the digestive system. Its etiology and pathogenesis are still unclear, but they may be associated with a variety of factors. Genetic susceptibility genes have become a research hotspot in China. Elucidating the genetic mechanisms of gastric cancer can facilitate achieving individualized prevention and developing more effective methods to reduce clinical adverse consequences, which has important clinical significance. Genetic susceptibility results from the influence of genetic factors or specific genetic defects that endow an individual’s offspring with certain physiological and metabolic features that are prone to certain diseases. Currently, studies on the genetic susceptibility genes of gastric cancer have become a hotspot. The purpose is to screen for the etiology of gastric cancer, search for gene therapy methods, and ultimately provide a scientific basis for the prevention and control of gastric cancer. This article reviews the current progress of studies on genetic susceptibility genes for gastric cancer. PMID:26309491

  7. Occupation and gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Raj, A; Mayberry, J F; Podas, T

    2003-05-01

    Gastric cancer is a cause of significant morbidity and mortality. There are several risk factors, with occupation emerging as one of these. There is considerable evidence that occupations in coal and tin mining, metal processing, particularly steel and iron, and rubber manufacturing industries lead to an increased risk of gastric cancer. Other "dusty" occupations-for example, wood processing, or work in high temperature environments have also been implicated but the evidence is not strong. The mechanism of pathogenesis of gastric cancer is unclear and the identification of causative agents can be difficult. Dust is thought to be a contributor to the pathological process, but well known carcinogens such as N-nitroso compounds have been detected in some environments. Further research on responsible agents is necessary and screening for detection of precursor gastric cancer lesions at the workplace merits consideration. PMID:12782770

  8. Occupation and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Raj, A; Mayberry, J; Podas, T

    2003-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a cause of significant morbidity and mortality. There are several risk factors, with occupation emerging as one of these. There is considerable evidence that occupations in coal and tin mining, metal processing, particularly steel and iron, and rubber manufacturing industries lead to an increased risk of gastric cancer. Other "dusty" occupations—for example, wood processing, or work in high temperature environments have also been implicated but the evidence is not strong. The mechanism of pathogenesis of gastric cancer is unclear and the identification of causative agents can be difficult. Dust is thought to be a contributor to the pathological process, but well known carcinogens such as N-nitroso compounds have been detected in some environments. Further research on responsible agents is necessary and screening for detection of precursor gastric cancer lesions at the workplace merits consideration. PMID:12782770

  9. Statins Attenuate Helicobacter pylori CagA Translocation and Reduce Incidence of Gastric Cancer: In Vitro and Population-Based Case-Control Studies

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Yuan-Man; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chen, Yu-An; Feng, Chun-Lung; Chen, Chih-Jung; Kao, Min-Chuan; Lai, Chih-Ho; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. The correlation of Helicobacter pylori and the etiology of gastric cancer was substantially certain. Cholesterol-rich microdomains (also called lipid rafts), which provide platforms for signaling, are associated with H. pylori-induced pathogenesis leading to gastric cancer. Patients who have been prescribed statins, inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl glutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, have exhibited a reduced risk of several types of cancer. However, no studies have addressed the effect of statins on H. pylori-associated gastric cancer from the antineoplastic perspective. In this study, we showed that treatment of gastric epithelial cells with simvastatin reduced the level of cellular cholesterol and led to attenuation of translocation and phosphorylation of H. pylori cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA), which is recognized as a major determinant of gastric cancer development. Additionally, a nationwide case-control study based on data from the Taiwanese National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) was conducted. A population-based case-control study revealed that patients who used simvastatin exhibited a significantly reduced risk of gastric cancer (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 0.76, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.70–0.83). In patients exhibiting H. pylori infection who were prescribed simvastatin, the adjusted OR for gastric cancer was 0.25 (95% CI = 0.12–0.50). Our results combined an in vitro study with a nationwide population analysis reveal that statin use might be a feasible approach to prevent H. pylori-associated gastric cancer. PMID:26730715

  10. Immunotherapy in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Matsueda, Satoko; Graham, David Y

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second most common of cancer-related deaths worldwide. In the majority of cases gastric cancer is advanced at diagnosis and although medical and surgical treatments have improved, survival rates remain poor. Cancer immunotherapy has emerged as a powerful and promising clinical approach for treatment of cancer and has shown major success in breast cancer, prostate cancer and melanoma. Here, we provide an overview of concepts of modern cancer immunotherapy including the theory, current approaches, remaining hurdles to be overcome, and the future prospect of cancer immunotherapy in the treatment of gastric cancer. Adaptive cell therapies, cancer vaccines, gene therapies, monoclonal antibody therapies have all been used with some initial successes in gastric cancer. However, to date the results in gastric cancer have been disappointing as current approaches often do not stimulate immunity efficiently allowing tumors continue to grow despite the presence of a measurable immune response. Here, we discuss the identification of targets for immunotherapy and the role of biomarkers in prospectively identifying appropriate subjects or immunotherapy. We also discuss the molecular mechanisms by which tumor cells escape host immunosurveillance and produce an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. We show how advances have provided tools for overcoming the mechanisms of immunosuppression including the use of monoclonal antibodies to block negative regulators normally expressed on the surface of T cells which limit activation and proliferation of cytotoxic T cells. Immunotherapy has greatly improved and is becoming an important factor in such fields as medical care and welfare for human being. Progress has been rapid ensuring that the future of immunotherapy for gastric cancer is bright. PMID:24587645

  11. Vitamin Intake Reduce the Risk of Gastric Cancer: Meta-Analysis and Systematic Review of Randomized and Observational Studies

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Qirong; Wang, Jing; Lan, Yadong; Zhan, Youqing; Xu, Dazhi

    2014-01-01

    Aim The association between vitamin intake and gastric cancer (GC) has been widely debated due to the relatively weak evidence. In this study, a meta-analysis of prospective and well designed observational studies were performed to explore this association. Methods MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and Sciencedirect were searched for studies of vitamin consumption and gastric cancer. This produced 47 relevant studies covering 1,221,392 human subjects. Random effects models were used to estimate summary relative risk (RR). Dose-response, subgroup, sensitivity, meta-regression, and publication bias analyses were conducted. Results The RR of gastric cancer in the group with the highest vitamin intake was compared to that of the lowest intake group. Total vitamin intake was 0.78 (95% CI, 0.71−0.83). In 9 studies that individuals were given doses at least 4 times above the tolerable upper intake (UL) vitamins, the RR was 1.20 (95% CI, 0.99−1.44). However, in 17 studies that individuals received doses below the UL, the RR was 0.76 (95% CI, 0.68−0.86). Dose-response analysis was conducted on different increments in different types of vitamins (vitamin A: 1.5 mg/day, vitamin C: 100 mg/day, vitamin E: 10 mg/day) intake with a significant reduction in the risk of gastric cancer, respectively, 29% in vitamin A, 26% in vitamin C, and 24% in vitamin E. Conclusion This meta-analysis clearly demonstrated that low doses of vitamins can significantly reduce the risk of GC, especially vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin E. PMID:25549091

  12. General Information about Gastric Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Gastric Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Gastric Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  13. Clinical epidemiology of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Tiing Leong; Fock, Kwong Ming

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality and the fourth most common cancer globally. There are, however, distinct differences in incidence rates in different geographic regions. While the incidence rate of gastric cancer has been falling, that of gastric cardia cancers is reportedly on the rise in some regions. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is a major risk factor of non-cardia gastric cancer, and data has emerged concerning the role of H. pylori eradication for primary prevention of gastric cancer. Dietary, lifestyle and metabolic factors have also been implicated. Although addressing these other factors may contribute to health, the actual impact in terms of cancer prevention is unclear. Once irreversible histological changes have occurred, endoscopic surveillance would be necessary. A molecular classification system offers hope for molecularly tailored, personalised therapies for gastric cancer, which may improve the prognosis for patients. PMID:25630323

  14. Gastric cancer review

    PubMed Central

    Carcas, Lauren Peirce

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is an aggressive disease that continues to have a daunting impact on global health. Despite an overall decline in incidence over the last several decades, gastric cancer remains the fourth most common type of cancer and is the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. This review aims to discuss the global distribution of the disease and the trend of decreasing incidence of disease, delineate the different pathologic subtypes and their immunohistochemical (IHC) staining patterns and molecular signatures and mutations, explore the role of the pathogen H. pylori in tumorgenesis, discuss the increasing incidence of the disease in the young, western populations and define the role of biologic agents in the treatment of the disease. PMID:25589897

  15. Nutrition and Gastric Cancer Risk: An Update

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Data from epidemiologic, experimental, and animal studies indicate that diet plays an important role in the etiology of gastric cancer. High intake of fresh fruit and vegetable, lycopene and lycopene-containing food products, and potentially vitamin C and selenium may reduce the risk for gastric can...

  16. Drugs Approved for Stomach (Gastric) Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Stomach (Gastric) Cancer This page lists ... stomach (gastric) cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Cyramza (Ramucirumab) Docetaxel ...

  17. Not all gastric masses are gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Del Rosario, Michael; Tsai, Henry

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer metastasising to the gastrointestinal tract normally does not occur. However, as clinicians, we must be aware that lung adenocarcinoma, as in all cancers, can and will metastasise to any part of the body. We describe a case of a patient with a presumed primary gastric adenocarcinoma who presented with shortness of breath due to pleural effusion. Pathology from the pleural effusion was positive for primary lung adenocarcinoma. Further investigation revealed that the patient's gastric mass was misdiagnosed as gastric adenocarcinoma. We correctly diagnosed the mass as metastatic lung adenocarcinoma. This was very significant because the patient was transitioning to palliative care with possible tube feeding. After the correct diagnosis, her management drastically changed and her health improved. Clinical, pathological and medical management of lung cancer metastasis to the stomach are discussed. PMID:26976833

  18. Reduced expression of SET7/9, a histone mono-methyltransferase, is associated with gastric cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Yoshimitsu; Koda, Yuki; Byeon, Sun-ju; Shimada, Shu; Nishikawaji, Taketo; Sakamoto, Ayuna; Chen, Yingxuan; Kojima, Kazuyuki; Kawano, Tatsuyuki; Eishi, Yoshinobu; Deng, Dajun; Kim, Woo Ho; Zhu, Wei-Guo; Yuasa, Yasuhito; Tanaka, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    SET7/9, a histone methyltransferase, has two distinct functions for lysine methylation. SET7/9 methylates non-histone proteins, such as p53, and participates in their posttranslational modifications. Although SET7/9 transcriptionally activate the genes via H3K4 mono-methylation, its target genes are poorly understood. To clarify whether or not SET7/9 is related to carcinogenesis, we studied alterations of SET7/9 in gastric cancers (GCs). Among the 376 primary GCs, 129 cases (34.3%) showed loss or weak expression of SET7/9 protein compared to matched non-cancerous tissues by immunohistochemistry. Reduced SET7/9 expression was significantly correlated with clinical aggressiveness and worse prognosis. Knockdown of SET7/9 in GC cells markedly increased cell proliferation, migration and invasion. Expression of SREK1IP1, PGC and CCDC28B were inhibited in GC cells with SET7/9 knockdown, while matrix metalloproteinase genes (MMP1, MMP7 and MMP9) were activated. SET7/9 bound and mono-methylated H3K4 at the region of the approximately 4-6 kb upstream from the SREK1IP1 transcriptional start site and the promoters of PGC and CDC28B. Cell proliferation, migration and invasion, and expression of three MMPs were increased in GC cells with SREK1IP knockdown, which were similar to those of SET7/9 knockdown. These data suggest that SET7/9 has tumor suppressor functions, and loss of SET7/9 may contribute to gastric cancer progression. PMID:26701885

  19. Risks of Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Stomach Cancer Prevention Stomach Cancer Screening Research Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Key Points Stomach cancer is a ...

  20. Gene methylation in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yiping; Dang, Siwen; Hou, Peng

    2013-09-23

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignancies and remains the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Over 70% of new cases and deaths occur in developing countries. In the early years of the molecular biology revolution, cancer research mainly focuses on genetic alterations, including gastric cancer. Epigenetic mechanisms are essential for normal development and maintenance of tissue-specific gene expression patterns in mammals. Disruption of epigenetic processes can lead to altered gene function and malignant cellular transformation. Recent advancements in the rapidly evolving field of cancer epigenetics have shown extensive reprogramming of every component of the epigenetic machinery in cancer, including DNA methylation, histone modifications, nucleosome positioning, noncoding RNAs, and microRNAs. Aberrant DNA methylation in the promoter regions of gene, which leads to inactivation of tumor suppressor and other cancer-related genes in cancer cells, is the most well-defined epigenetic hallmark in gastric cancer. The advantages of gene methylation as a target for detection and diagnosis of cancer in biopsy specimens and non-invasive body fluids such as serum and gastric washes have led to many studies of application in gastric cancer. This review focuses on the most common and important phenomenon of epigenetics, DNA methylation, in gastric cancer and illustrates the impact epigenetics has had on this field. PMID:23669186

  1. [Molecular Subtypes of Gastric Cancer].

    PubMed

    Hatogai, Ken; Doi, Toshihiko

    2016-03-01

    Gastric cancer has been classified based on the pathological characteristics including microscopic configuration and growth pattern. Although these classifications have been used in studies investigating prognosis and recurrence pattern, they are not considered for decisions regarding the therapeutic strategy. In the ToGA study, trastuzumab, an anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody, demonstrated clinical efficacy for gastric cancer with HER2 overexpression or HER2 gene amplification. Based on these findings of the ToGA study, the definition of HER2-positive gastric cancer was established. Thereafter, several molecular targeted agents, including agents targeting other receptor tyrosine kinases, have been investigated in gastric cancer. However, to date no biomarker, except HER2, has been established. Based on the recent technological development in the field of gene analysis, a comprehensive molecular evaluation of gastric cancer was performed as part of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project, and a new molecular classification was proposed that divided gastric cancer into the following 4 subtypes: tumors positive for Epstein-Barr virus, microsatellite instability tumors, genomically stable tumors, and tumors with chromosomal instability. Each subtype has specific molecular alterations including gene mutation and amplification, DNA methylation, and protein overexpression. Additionally, some subtypes were suggested to be correlated with the clinicopathological characteristics or as targets of some molecular targeted agents that are currently under development. The new molecular classification is expected to be a roadmap for patient stratification and clinical trials on molecular targeted therapies in gastric cancer. PMID:27067842

  2. Endoscopic treatment for early gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Min, Yang Won; Min, Byung-Hoon; Lee, Jun Haeng; Kim, Jae J

    2014-04-28

    Gastric cancer remains one of the most common causes of cancer death. However the proportion of early gastric cancer (EGC) at diagnosis is increasing. Endoscopic treatment for EGC is actively performed worldwide in cases meeting specific criteria. Endoscopic mucosal resection can treat EGC with comparable results to surgery for selected cases. Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) increases the en bloc and complete resection rates and reduces the local recurrence rate. ESD has been performed with expanded indication and is expected to be more widely used in the treatment of EGC through the technological advances in the near future. This review will describe the techniques, indications and outcomes of endoscopic treatment for EGC. PMID:24782609

  3. Gastric cancer pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Berger, Hilmar; Marques, Miguel S; Zietlow, Rike; Meyer, Thomas F; Machado, Jose C; Figueiredo, Ceu

    2016-09-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) results from a multistep process that is influenced by Helicobacter pylori infection, genetic susceptibility of the host, as well as of other environmental factors. GC results from the accumulation of numerous genetic and epigenetic alterations in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, leading to dysregulation of multiple signaling pathways, which disrupt the cell cycle and the balance between cell proliferation and cell death. For this special issue, we have selected to review last year's advances related to three main topics: the cell of origin that initiates malignant growth in GC, the mechanisms of direct genotoxicity induced by H. pylori infection, and the role of aberrantly expressed long noncoding RNAs in GC transformation. The understanding of the molecular basis of GC development is of utmost importance for the identification of novel targets for GC prevention and treatment. PMID:27531537

  4. Acetaldehyde and gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Salaspuro, Mikko

    2011-04-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) gene polymorphisms associating with enhanced acetaldehyde exposure and markedly increased cancer risk in alcohol drinkers provide undisputable evidence for acetaldehyde being a local carcinogen not only in esophageal but also in gastric cancer. Accordingly, acetaldehyde associated with alcoholic beverages has recently been classified as a Group 1 carcinogen to humans. Microbes are responsible for the bulk of acetaldehyde production from ethanol both in saliva and Helicobacter pylori-infected and achlorhydric stomach. Acetaldehyde is the most abundant carcinogen in tobacco smoke and it readily dissolves into saliva during smoking. Many foodstuffs and 'non-alcoholic' beverages are important but unrecognized sources of local acetaldehyde exposure. The cumulative cancer risk associated with increasing acetaldehyde exposure suggests the need for worldwide screening of the acetaldehyde levels of alcoholic beverages and as well of the ethanol and acetaldehyde of food produced by fermentation. The generally regarded as safe status of acetaldehyde should be re-evaluated. The as low as reasonably achievable principle should be applied to the acetaldehyde of alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages and food. Risk groups with ADH-and ALDH2 gene polymorphisms, H. pylori infection or achlorhydric atrophic gastritis, or both, should be screened and educated in this health issue. L-cysteine formulations binding carcinogenic acetaldehyde locally in the stomach provide new means for intervention studies. PMID:21401890

  5. DBGC: A Database of Human Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Zhang, Jun; Cai, Mingdeng; Zhu, Zhenggang; Gu, Wenjie; Yu, Yingyan; Zhang, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    The Database of Human Gastric Cancer (DBGC) is a comprehensive database that integrates various human gastric cancer-related data resources. Human gastric cancer-related transcriptomics projects, proteomics projects, mutations, biomarkers and drug-sensitive genes from different sources were collected and unified in this database. Moreover, epidemiological statistics of gastric cancer patients in China and clinicopathological information annotated with gastric cancer cases were also integrated into the DBGC. We believe that this database will greatly facilitate research regarding human gastric cancer in many fields. DBGC is freely available at http://bminfor.tongji.edu.cn/dbgc/index.do. PMID:26566288

  6. [Gastric cancer in Lima].

    PubMed

    Pilco, Paul; Payet, Eduardo; Cáceres, Eduardo

    2006-01-01

    Gastric cancer continues to be one of the most common malignant neoplasias in the world. Despite the decreasing incidence of this disease in developed countries, Eastern Europe and Latin America show the highest incidences. It accounted for 8.6% of all new cases of cancer in 2002. In Peru it has increased between 1990 and 1997 amounting to 24.3/100000 in men and 17.6/100000 in women, during the last period studied, thus it is considered a high risk area. Mortality: it is still the leading cause of death for both sexes, in men it is 19.3/100000 and in women 14.2/100000. Incidence is directly proportional to the place of origin in Metropolitan Lima, a city of almost 8 million inhabitants, and the districts with the highest incidences are Puente Piedra and Lince followed by Villa El Salvador, El Augustino, Breña and Rimac among others. These are districts with medium-low socioeconomic levels, whereas the lowest incidences are found in districts with high socioeconomic levels, such as San Isidro and Miraflores, among others. PMID:17211488

  7. Targeted therapy in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Alexandra; Ristimäki, Ari

    2015-05-01

    Gastric cancer is often diagnosed at an advanced stage. Although chemotherapy prolongs survival and improves quality of life, the survival of gastric cancer patients with advanced disease is short. Thanks to recent insights into the molecular pathways involved in gastric carcinogenesis, new targeted treatment options have become available for gastric cancer patients. Trastuzumab, an antibody targeted to HER-2, was shown to improve survival of advanced gastric cancer patients harboring HER-2 overexpression due to gene amplification in their tumor cells, and is currently also explored in adjuvant and neoadjuvant settings. Another agent with promising results in clinical trials is ramucirumab, an antibody targeting VEGFR-2. No clear survival benefit, however, were experienced with agents targeting EGFR (cetuximab, panitumumab), VEGF-A (bevacizumab), or mTOR (everolimus). Drugs targeting c-MET/HGF are currently under investigation in biomarker-selected cohorts, with promising results in early clinical trials. This review will summarize the current status of targeted treatment options in gastric cancer. PMID:25706252

  8. Subtotal gastrectomy for gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Roberto; Ettorre, Giuseppe Maria; Santoro, Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    Although a steady decline in the incidence and mortality rates of gastric carcinoma has been observed in the last century worldwide, the absolute number of new cases/year is increasing because of the aging of the population. So far, surgical resection with curative intent has been the only treatment providing hope for cure; therefore, gastric cancer surgery has become a specialized field in digestive surgery. Gastrectomy with lymph node (LN) dissection for cancer patients remains a challenging procedure which requires skilled, well-trained surgeons who are very familiar with the fast-evolving oncological principles of gastric cancer surgery. As a matter of fact, the extent of gastric resection and LN dissection depends on the size of the disease and gastric cancer surgery has become a patient and “disease-tailored” surgery, ranging from endoscopic resection to laparoscopic assisted gastrectomy and conventional extended multivisceral resections. LN metastases are the most important prognostic factor in patients that undergo curative resection. LN dissection remains the most challenging part of the operation due to the location of LN stations around major retroperitoneal vessels and adjacent organs, which are not routinely included in the resected specimen and need to be preserved in order to avoid dangerous intra- and postoperative complications. Hence, the surgeon is the most important non-TMN prognostic factor in gastric cancer. Subtotal gastrectomy is the treatment of choice for middle and distal-third gastric cancer as it provides similar survival rates and better functional outcome compared to total gastrectomy, especially in early-stage disease with favorable prognosis. Nonetheless, the resection range for middle-third gastric cancer cases and the extent of LN dissection at early stages remains controversial. Due to the necessity of a more extended procedure at advanced stages and the trend for more conservative treatments in early gastric cancer, the

  9. Gastric metastasis from salivary duct carcinoma mimicking primary gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Kanefumi; Takeno, Shinsuke; Nimura, Satoshi; Sugiyama, Yoshikazu; Sueta, Takayuki; Maki, Kenji; Kayashima, Yoshiyuki; Shiwaku, Hironari; Kato, Daisuke; Hashimoto, Tatsuya; Sasaki, Takamitsu; Yamashita, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We present a very rare case of gastric metastasis mimicking primary gastric cancer in a patient who had undergone surgery for salivary duct carcinoma. Presentation of case A 67-year-old man had been diagnosed as having right parotid cancer and had undergone a right parotidectomy and lymph node dissection. The histological diagnosis was salivary duct carcinoma. One year after the surgery, a positron emission tomography–computed tomography scan using fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) revealed an abnormal uptake of FDG in the left cervical, mediastinal, paraaortic, and cardiac lymph nodes; stomach; and pancreas. On gastroduodenoscopy, there was a huge, easily bleeding ulcer mimicking primary gastric cancer at the upper body of the stomach. Biopsy revealed poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. Therefore, we were unable to differentiate between the primary gastric cancer and the metastatic tumor using gastroduodenoscopy and biopsy. Because of the uncontrollable bleeding from the gastric cancer, we performed an emergency palliative total gastrectomy. On histological examination, the gastric lesion was found to be metastatic carcinoma originating from the salivary duct carcinoma. Discussion In the presented case, we could not diagnose the gastric metastasis originating from the salivary duct carcinoma even by endoscopic biopsy. This is because the histological appearance of salivary duct carcinoma is similar to that of high-grade adenocarcinoma, thus, resembling primary gastric cancer. Conclusion When we perform endoscopic examination of patients with malignant neoplasias, a possibility of metastatic gastric cancer should be taken into consideration. PMID:27085106

  10. The future of gastric cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Correa, Pelayo; Piazuelo, M Blanca; Camargo, M Constanza

    2004-01-01

    Despite advances in surgical treatment and chemotherapy, gastric cancer remains a major global health burden. The most recent estimates show that it is the fourth most common cancer and the second most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Various etiologic factors have been linked with the disease. It is widely accepted that Helicobacter pylori infection and high salt intake are positively associated with this neoplastic process. Controversial associations have been found with smoking or drinking habits. In contrast, there is convincing evidence that the adequate consumption of fresh fruits and vegetables reduces the risk of gastric cancer. Prevention intervention trials involving antioxidant supplements and anti- H. pylori treatment have shown beneficial effects in preventing the progression of pathologic changes in the gastric mucosa. On the other hand, recent advances related to differences in the genotypes of the bacteria and in human cytokine polymorphisms would allow the design and implementation of large-scale screening programs to identify subjects at the highest risk of gastric cancer. Curing the infection in such subjects and supplying adequate amounts of antioxidants should prevent a neoplastic outcome, and this intervention should be monitored by endoscopic surveillance. PMID:15052434

  11. Recapitulating Human Gastric Cancer Pathogenesis: Experimental Models of Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lin; El Zaatari, Mohamad; Merchant, Juanita L

    2016-01-01

    This review focuses on the various experimental models to study gastric cancer pathogenesis, with the role of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) used as the major examples. We review differences in human stomach anatomy compared to the stomachs of the experimental models, including the mouse and invertebrate models such as Drosophila and C. elegans. The contribution of major signaling pathways, e.g., Notch, Hedgehog, AKT/PI3K is discussed in the context of their potential contribution to foregut tumorigenesis. We critically examine the rationale behind specific GEMMs, chemical carcinogens, dietary promoters, Helicobacter infection, and direct mutagenesis of relevant oncogenes and tumor suppressor that have been developed to study gastric cancer pathogenesis. Despite species differences, more efficient and effective models to test specific genes and pathways disrupted in human gastric carcinogenesis have yet to emerge. As we better understand these species differences, "humanized" versions of mouse models will more closely approximate human gastric cancer pathogenesis. Towards that end, epigenetic marks on chromatin, the gut microbiota, and ways of manipulating the immune system will likely move center stage, permitting greater overlap between rodent and human cancer phenotypes thus providing a unified progression model. PMID:27573785

  12. Pembrolizumab, Combination Chemotherapy, and Radiation Therapy Before Surgery in Treating Adult Patients With Locally Advanced Gastroesophageal Junction or Gastric Cardia Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-27

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Gastric Cardia Adenocarcinoma; Stage IB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer

  13. De Novo Gastric Cancer After Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gong, Chung-Sik; Yoo, Moon-Won; Kim, Beom-Su; Hwang, Shin; Kim, Ki-Hun; Yook, Jeong-Hwan; Kim, Byung-Sik; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND In South Korea, which has a high incidence of gastric cancer, the most common de novo malignancy associated with liver transplantation is gastric cancer. This study sought to identify clinicopathologic characteristics in gastric cancer patients after liver transplantation, and to help manage these cases. MATERIAL AND METHODS We investigated gastric cancer patients after liver transplantation at Asan Medical Center. We analyzed sex, age, cause of liver transplantation, initiating immunosuppressant, pre-transplantation gastric fibroscopy findings, time interval between transplantation and gastric cancer occurrence, follow-up period, existence of gastric cancer screening, Helicobacter pylori infection, family cancer history, gastric cancer treatment, cancer location, size of tumor, macroscopic gross type, WHO histologic type, Lauren's classification, TNM stage, and survival. RESULTS Of 2968 adult liver transplantation patients at our hospital, 19 were diagnosed with gastric cancer. The mean age at the time of gastric cancer diagnosis was 60.2±6.8 (46-71) years and mean time interval between liver transplantation and diagnosis of gastric cancer was 56.0±30.7 (3.20-113) months. Endoscopic submucosal dissection was done for 10 patients, 4 of whom underwent surgical resection. Surgical resection as an initial treatment was done in 8 patients. One patient received chemotherapy first. The standard incidence ratio of gastric cancer in these patients was 1036 per 100 000 persons (95% CI, 623.7-1,619) in men and 318.9 per 100 000 (95% CI, 4.170-1,774) in women. CONCLUSIONS For long-term survival of liver transplant patients, early detection of de novo cancer is necessary. Therefore, annual screening for gastric cancer after liver transplantation is needed, especially in areas where the incidence of gastric cancer is high, such as South Korea. PMID:27334929

  14. Ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme UbcH10 promotes gastric cancer growth and is a potential biomarker for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mengxuan; Qu, Yingying; Shi, Rongliang; Wu, Xubo; Su, Chang; Hu, Zhiqiu; Chang, Qimeng; Liu, Shaoqun; Pan, Gaofeng; Lei, Ming; Xie, Fubo; Tu, Shiwei; Tao, Weikang; Zhou, He; Hu, Gang; Zhang, Ziping

    2016-08-01

    Gastric cancer is a fatal disease and the availability of early diagnostic methods is limited. There is an urgent need to identify effective targets for early diagnosis and therapeutics. UbcH10 is a ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme with high expression in various types of cancers. In the present study, several gastric tumor cell lines with high or low expression of UbcH10 were exploited to study the role of UbcH10 in gastric cancer. Knockdown of UbcH10 expression using siRNA in gastric cancer cell lines with high expression of UbcH10 resulted in reduced proliferation, increased cisplatin-induced apoptosis and reduced serum-induced ERK, Akt and p38 phosphorylation signaling. In agreement, overexpression of UbcH10 in gastric cancer cell lines with low expression of UbcH10 led to enhanced cell proliferation and resistance to cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Most importantly, IHC analyses showed that the UbcH10 protein was expressed at a high level in most patient gastric cancer tissues, but was absent in adjacent mesenchyme tissues. These data suggest that UbcH10 may promote gastric cancer growth and can serve as a biomarker for diagnosis or as a target for novel therapeutics in gastric cancer. PMID:27349176

  15. Advances in gastric cancer prevention

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Antonio; Cito, Letizia

    2012-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a multifactorial neoplastic pathology numbering among its causes both environmental and genetic predisposing factors. It is mainly diffused in South America and South-East Asia, where it shows the highest morbility percentages and it is relatively scarcely diffused in Western countries and North America. Although molecular mechanisms leading to gastric cancer development are only partially known, three main causes are well characterized: Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection, diet rich in salted and/or smoked food and red meat, and epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin) mutations. Unhealthy diet and H. pylori infection are able to induce in stomach cancer cells genotypic and phenotypic transformation, but their effects may be crossed by a diet rich in vegetables and fresh fruits. Various authors have recently focused their attention on the importance of a well balanced diet, suggesting a necessary dietary education starting from childhood. A constant surveillance will be necessary in people carrying E-cadherin mutations, since they are highly prone in developing gastric cancer, also within the inner stomach layers. Above all in the United States, several carriers decided to undergo a gastrectomy, preferring changing their lifestyle than living with the awareness of the development of a possible gastric cancer. This kind of choice is strictly personal, hence a decision cannot be suggested within the clinical management. Here we summarize the key points of gastric cancer prevention analyzing possible strategies referred to the different predisposing factors. We will discuss about the effects of diet, H. pylori infection and E-cadherin mutations and how each of them can be handled. PMID:23061031

  16. Prevention of chemically induced urinary bladder cancers by naproxen: protocols to reduce gastric toxicity in humans do not alter preventive efficacy.

    PubMed

    Lubet, Ronald A; Scheiman, James M; Bode, Ann; White, Jonathan; Minasian, Lori; Juliana, M Margaret; Boring, Daniel L; Steele, Vernon E; Grubbs, Clinton J

    2015-04-01

    The COX inhibitors (NSAID/Coxibs) are a major focus for the chemoprevention of cancer. The COX-2-specific inhibitors have progressed to clinical trials and have shown preventive efficacy in colon and skin cancers. However, they have significant adverse cardiovascular effects. Certain NSAIDs (e.g., naproxen) have a good cardiac profile, but can cause gastric toxicity. The present study examined protocols to reduce this toxicity of naproxen. Female Fischer-344 rats were treated weekly with the urinary bladder-specific carcinogen hydroxybutyl(butyl)nitrosamine (OH-BBN) for 8 weeks. Rats were dosed daily with NPX (40 mg/kg body weight/day, gavage) or with the proton pump inhibitor omeprazole (4.0 mg/kg body weight/day) either singly or in combination beginning 2 weeks after the final OH-BBN. OH-BBN-treated rats, 96% developed urinary bladder cancers. While omeprazole alone was ineffective (97% cancers), naproxen alone or combined with omeprazole-prevented cancers, yielding 27 and 35% cancers, respectively. In a separate study, OH-BBN -: treated rats were administered naproxen: (A) daily, (B) 1 week daily naproxen/1week vehicle, (C) 3 weeks daily naproxen/3 week vehicle, or (D) daily vehicle beginning 2 weeks after last OH-BBN treatment. In the intermittent dosing study, protocol A, B, C, and D resulted in palpable cancers in 27%, 22%, 19%, and 96% of rats (P < 0.01). Short-term naproxen treatment increased apoptosis, but did not alter proliferation in the urinary bladder cancers. Two different protocols that should decrease the gastric toxicity of NSAIDs in humans did not alter chemopreventive efficacy. This should encourage the use of NSAIDs (e.g., naproxen) in clinical prevention trials. PMID:25762530

  17. Functional role of autophagy in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a highly regulated catabolic pathway responsible for the degradation of long-lived proteins and damaged intracellular organelles. Perturbations in autophagy are found in gastric cancer. In host gastric cells, autophagy can be induced by Helicobacter pylori (or H. pylori) infection, which is associated with the oncogenesis of gastric cancer. In gastric cancer cells, autophagy has both pro-survival and pro-death functions in determining cell fate. Besides, autophagy modulates gastric cancer metastasis by affecting a wide range of pathological events, including extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), tumor angiogenesis, and tumor microenvironment. In addition, some of the autophagy-related proteins, such as Beclin 1, microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (MAP1-LC3), and p62/sequestosome 1 (SQSTM1) have certain prognostic values for gastric cancer. In this article, we review the recent studies regarding the functional role of autophagy in gastric cancer. PMID:26910278

  18. Molecular classification and prediction in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xiandong; Zhao, Yongzhong; Song, Won-min; Zhang, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer, a highly heterogeneous disease, is the second leading cause of cancer death and the fourth most common cancer globally, with East Asia accounting for more than half of cases annually. Alongside TNM staging, gastric cancer clinic has two well-recognized classification systems, the Lauren classification that subdivides gastric adenocarcinoma into intestinal and diffuse types and the alternative World Health Organization system that divides gastric cancer into papillary, tubular, mucinous (colloid), and poorly cohesive carcinomas. Both classification systems enable a better understanding of the histogenesis and the biology of gastric cancer yet have a limited clinical utility in guiding patient therapy due to the molecular heterogeneity of gastric cancer. Unprecedented whole-genome-scale data have been catalyzing and advancing the molecular subtyping approach. Here we cataloged and compared those published gene expression profiling signatures in gastric cancer. We summarized recent integrated genomic characterization of gastric cancer based on additional data of somatic mutation, chromosomal instability, EBV virus infection, and DNA methylation. We identified the consensus patterns across these signatures and identified the underlying molecular pathways and biological functions. The identification of molecular subtyping of gastric adenocarcinoma and the development of integrated genomics approaches for clinical applications such as prediction of clinical intervening emerge as an essential phase toward personalized medicine in treating gastric cancer. PMID:26380657

  19. 64Cu DOTA-Trastuzumab PET/CT in Studying Patients With Gastric Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-27

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Stage IA Gastric Cancer; Stage IB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer

  20. The journey of personalizing gastric cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Yan, Li

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer ranks the fourth most prevalent malignancy yet it is the second leading cause of cancer-related death. Every year, gastric cancer adds nearly 1 million new cancer cases, and 723,000 or 10% of cancer deaths to the global cancer burden. Approximately, 405,000 or 43% of the new cases and 325,000 or 45% of the deaths are in China, making gastric cancer a particularly challenging malignancy. This thematic series discusses the molecular classifications of gastric cancer by the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and the Asian Cancer Research Group (ACRG) as well as the implications in personalized therapeutic choices; discusses the evolution of gastric surgery and presents perspectives on surgical techniques in treating gastric cancer; and reviews current and emerging targeted agents as well as immunotherapies in treating gastric cancer. With these advancements in molecular characterization, surgical intervention, and targeted and immunotherapies, gastric cancer will enter a personalized medicine era in the next 5 years. PMID:27581614

  1. Drugs Approved for Stomach (Gastric) Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for stomach (gastric) cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  2. Endoscopic resection of gastric and esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Balmadrid, Bryan; Hwang, Joo Ha

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) and endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) techniques have reduced the need for surgery in early esophageal and gastric cancers and thus has lessened morbidity and mortality in these diseases. ESD is a relatively new technique in western countries and requires rigorous training to reproduce the proficiency of Asian countries, such as Korea and Japan, which have very high complete (en bloc) resection rates and low complication rates. EMR plays a valuable role in early esophageal cancers. ESD has shown better en bloc resection rates but it is easier to master and maintain proficiency in EMR; it also requires less procedural time. For early esophageal adenocarcinoma arising from Barrett’s, ESD and EMR techniques are usually combined with other ablative modalities, the most common being radiofrequency ablation because it has the largest dataset to prove its success. The EMR techniques have been used with some success in early gastric cancers but ESD is currently preferred for most of these lesions. ESD has the added advantage of resecting into the submucosa and thus allowing for endoscopic resection of more aggressive (deeper) early gastric cancer. PMID:26510452

  3. Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... of stomach cancer. Some studies show that eating fruits and vegetables that are high in vitamin C and beta carotene may lower the risk ... take can prevent cancer. These may include eating fruits and vegetables, exercising, ... vitamins, minerals, or food supplements. New ways to prevent ...

  4. Current Perspectives on Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Marqués-Lespier, Juan M; González-Pons, María; Cruz-Correa, Marcia

    2016-09-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is third leading cause of cancer-related death. Only 28.3% of new GC cases survive more than 5 years. Although incidence has declined in the United States, an increase is estimated for 2016. Risk factors include sex (risk is higher in men), Helicobacter pylori infection, heredity, and lifestyle. GC is usually diagnosed between the ages of 60-80 years. Prognosis of GC is largely dependent on the tumor stage at diagnosis and classification as intestinal or diffuse type; diffuse-type GC has worse prognosis. Chemoprevention has been shown to decrease risk, but is currently not used clinically. PMID:27546840

  5. What gastric cancer proteomic studies show about gastric carcinogenesis?

    PubMed

    Leal, Mariana Ferreira; Wisnieski, Fernanda; de Oliveira Gigek, Carolina; do Santos, Leonardo Caires; Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; Burbano, Rommel Rodriguez; Smith, Marilia Cardoso

    2016-08-01

    Gastric cancer is a complex, heterogeneous, and multistep disease. Over the past decades, several studies have aimed to determine the molecular factors that lead to gastric cancer development and progression. After completing the human genome sequencing, proteomic technologies have presented rapid progress. Differently from the relative static state of genome, the cell proteome is dynamic and changes in pathologic conditions. Proteomic approaches have been used to determine proteome profiles and identify differentially expressed proteins between groups of samples, such as neoplastic and nonneoplastic samples or between samples of different cancer subtypes or stages. Therefore, proteomic technologies are a useful tool toward improving the knowledge of gastric cancer molecular pathogenesis and the understanding of tumor heterogeneity. This review aimed to summarize the proteins or protein families that are frequently identified by using high-throughput screening methods and which thus may have a key role in gastric carcinogenesis. The increased knowledge of gastric carcinogenesis will clearly help in the development of new anticancer treatments. Although the studies are still in their infancy, the reviewed proteins may be useful for gastric cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and patient management. PMID:27126070

  6. Helicobacter pylori Diversity and Gastric Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gastric cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Helicobacter pylori infection is the strongest known risk factor for this malignancy. An important goal is to identify H. pylori-infected persons at high risk for gastric cancer, so that these individuals can be targeted for therapeutic intervention. H. pylori exhibits a high level of intraspecies genetic diversity, and over the past two decades, many studies have endeavored to identify strain-specific features of H. pylori that are linked to development of gastric cancer. One of the most prominent differences among H. pylori strains is the presence or absence of a 40-kb chromosomal region known as the cag pathogenicity island (PAI). Current evidence suggests that the risk of gastric cancer is very low among persons harboring H. pylori strains that lack the cag PAI. Among persons harboring strains that contain the cag PAI, the risk of gastric cancer is shaped by a complex interplay among multiple strain-specific bacterial factors as well as host factors. This review discusses the strain-specific properties of H. pylori that correlate with increased gastric cancer risk, focusing in particular on secreted proteins and surface-exposed proteins, and describes evidence from cell culture and animal models linking these factors to gastric cancer pathogenesis. Strain-specific features of H. pylori that may account for geographic variation in gastric cancer incidence are also discussed. PMID:26814181

  7. Helicobacter pylori eradication as a preventive tool against gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Hamajima, Nobuyuki; Goto, Yasuyuki; Nishio, Kazuko; Tanaka, Daisuke; Kawai, Sayo; Sakakibara, Hisataka; Kondo, Takaaki

    2004-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), which increases the risk of gastric diseases, including digestive ulcers and gastric cancer, is highly prevalent in Asian countries. There is no doubt that eradication of the bacterium is effective as a treatment of digestive ulcer, but eradication aiming to reduce the gastric cancer risk is still controversial. Observational studies in Japan demonstrated that the eradication decreased the gastric cancer risk among 132 stomach cancer patients undergoing endoscopical resection (65 treated with omeprazol and antibiotics and 67 untreated). In Columbia, 976 participants were randomized into eight groups in a three-treatment factorial design including H. pylori eradication, resulting in significant regression in the H. pylori eradication group. A recent randomized study in China also showed a significant reduction of gastric cancer risk among those without any gastric atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, and dysplasia. Efficacy of eradication may vary in extent among countries with different incidence rates of gastric cancer. Since the lifetime cumulative risk (0 to 84 years old) of gastric cancer in Japan is reported to be 12.7% for males and 4.8% for females (Inoue and Tominaga, 2003), the corresponding values for H. pylori infected Japanese can be estimated at 21.2% in males and 8.0% in females under the assumptions that the relative risk for infected relative to uninfected is 5 and the proportion of those infected is 0.5. Both the fact that not all individuals are infected among those exposed and the knowledge that only a small percentage of individuals infected with the bacterium develop gastric cancer, indicate the importance of gene-environment interactions. Studies on such interactions should provide useful information for anti-H. pylori preventive strategies. PMID:15373702

  8. Gastric cancer with pregnancy: two case reports

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Sahar; Chakravarti, Seema

    2011-01-01

    Gastric cancer with pregnancy is quite rare, and is often diagnosed at advanced stages with poor prognosis. This highlights the need to improve diagnosis by means of early endoscopy. We herein report two cases of advanced gastric cancer during pregnancy who sadly died within five weeks of diagnosis, to alert clinicians to this rare disease.

  9. [A Case of Locally Advanced Gastric Cancer after Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Tatsuya; Tanaka, Keita; Yonemitsu, Kimihiro; Munechika, Taro; Nomi, Masako; Maeno, Hiroshi; Nagao, Shuji; Kawamoto, Shunji; Sasaguri, Takakazu; Sueishi, Katsuo

    2015-11-01

    A 60s male was admitted to our hospital because of appetite loss and nausea. After examination, he was diagnosed with type 3 advanced gastric cancer in the antrum. Abdominal computed tomography showed gastric cancer invasion to the left liver lobe. We initiated neoadjuvant chemotherapy using S-1 plus CDDP after laparoscopic gastrojejunostomy. S-1 was orally administered for 3 weeks followed by a 2-week drug-free period. CDDP was administered intravenously on day 8 of each course. After 5 courses of chemotherapy, the gastric cancer was reduced in size. We therefore performed total gastrectomy with D2-affiliated left liver resection. S-1 plus CDDP is expected to improve outcomes in unresectable or locally advanced gastric cancer. PMID:26805257

  10. Targeted therapy for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Elizabeth C; Cunningham, David

    2012-09-01

    For patients with advanced gastric cancer, traditional double or triplet cytotoxic chemotherapy regimens result in a median survival of 9-11 months. As combination therapy is associated with increased survival, but also increased toxicity in a patient population whose performance status often compromised by their malignancy, development of more effective and less toxic treatment choices is mandated. Emerging data from gene expression profiling suggests that differences in pathological appearance and clinical behavior may be due the presence of unique molecular phenotypes. Characterization of the gastric cancer genomic landscape reveals the presence of multiple alterations in expression of receptor tyrosine kinases, which in conjunction with their ligands and downstream effector molecules represent potentially druggable pathways for future drug development. Treatment of HER2 positive gastric cancer with trastuzumab has led to significant gains in overall survival, and further manipulation of this pathway using the novel anti-HER2 directed agents pertuzumab and T-DM1 in addition to dual EGFR/HER2 blockade with lapatinib may yield positive results. In contrast, targeting of the EGFR pathway in combination with chemotherapy in unselected patients has not been fruitful to date, with no significant gains over standard chemotherapy yet demonstrated. Similarly, use of the anti-angiogenic monoclonal antibody bevacizumab was not successful in a large global randomized trial; however intriguing regional variations were seen with respect to efficacy of this drug, leading to calls for a second, regionally stratified study. Careful selection of patient subsets will become a key factor in future clinical trials, as novel targeted agents such as those targeting the MET/HGF and FGFR axes move forward into clinical development. It is hoped that treatment of patients in such molecularly defined groups is will lead to significant gains in survival compared to current treatment

  11. Therapeutic mechanism of ginkgo biloba exocarp polysaccharides on gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ai-Hua; Chen, Hua-Sheng; Sun, Bu-Chan; Xiang, Xiao-Ren; Chu, Yun-Fei; Zhai, Fan; Jia, Ling-Chang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study the therapeutic mechanism of Ginkgo biloba exocarp polysaccharides (GBEP) on gastric cancer. METHODS: Thirty patients with gastric cancer were treated with oral GBEP capsules. The area of tumors was measured by electron gastroscope before and after treatment, then the inhibitory and effective rates were calculated. The ultrastructures of tumor cells were examined by transmissional electron microscope. Cell culture, MTT, flow cytometry were performed to observe proliferation, apoptosis and changes of relevant gene expression of human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells. RESULTS: Compared with the statement before treatment, GBEP capsules could reduce the area of tumors, and the effective rate was 73.4%. Ultrastructural changes of the cells indicated that GBEP could induce apoptosis and differentiation in tumor cells of patients with gastric cancer. GBEP could inhibit the growth of human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells following 24-72 h treatment in vitro at 10-320 mg/L, which was dose- and time-dependent. GBEP was able to elevate the apoptosis rate and expression of c-fos gene, but reduce the expression of c-myc and bcl-2 genes also in a dose-dependent manner. CONCLUSION: The therapeutic mechanism of GBEP on human gastric cancer may relate to its effects on the expression of c-myc, bcl-2 and c-fos genes, which can inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis and differentiation of tumor cells. PMID:14606069

  12. A new approach for elimination of gastric cancer deaths in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Asaka, Masahiro

    2013-01-01

    We explore a strategy for the elimination of gastric cancer deaths in Japan. Most gastric cancer is due to H. pylori infection in Japan. The effect of H. pylori eradication therapy on gastric cancer prevention in younger people is excellent, but it declines along with advancing age. Therefore, a test-and-treat approach to H. pylori infection is recommended in younger people, while for people aged 50 years or older a combination of countermeasures for H. pylori eradication that includes primary prevention and secondary prevention by endoscopic examination will reduce gastric cancer deaths, since this method will increase early detection if the disease occurs. In this paper, I described a new strategy of elimination of gastric cancer deaths in Japan due to such a high quality of diagnosis and treatment for gastric cancer. If this strategy succeeds, the incidence of gastric cancer in Japan may decrease much longer than 10 years. PMID:23180638

  13. Isoprenaline Induces Periostin Expression in Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guo-Xiao; Xi, Hong-Qing; Sun, Xiao-Yan; Geng, Zhi-Jun; Yang, Shao-Wei; Lu, Yan-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Periostin mediates critical steps in gastric cancer and is involved in various signaling pathways. However, the roles of periostin in promoting gastric cancer metastasis are not clear. The aim of this study was to investigate the relevance between periostin expression and gastric cancer progression and the role of stress-related hormones in the regulation of cancer development and progression. Materials and Methods Normal, cancerous and metastatic gastric tissues were collected from patients diagnosed with advanced gastric cancer. The in vivo expression of periostin was evaluated by in situ hybridization and immunofluorescent staining. Meanwhile, human gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines MKN-45 and BGC-803 were used to detect the in vitro expression of periostin by using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and western blotting. Results Periostin is expressed in the stroma of the primary gastric tumors and metastases, but not in normal gastric tissue. In addition, we observed that periostin is located mainly in pericryptal fibroblasts, but not in the tumor cells, and strongly correlated to the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (SMA). Furthermore, the distribution patterns of periostin were broader as the clinical staging of tumors progressed. We also identified a role of stress-related signaling in promoting cancer development and progression, and found that isoprenaline upregulated expression levels of periostin in gastric cancer cells. Conclusion These findings suggest that the distribution pattern of periostin was broader as the clinical staging of the tumor progressed and found that isoprenaline upregulated expression levels of periostin in gastric cancer cells. PMID:26996552

  14. Gastric cancer and Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Konturek, P C; Konturek, S J; Brzozowski, T

    2006-09-01

    The Nobel prize in Physiology and Medicine in 2005 was presented to Barry Marshall and Robin Warren for their discovery of Helicobacter pylori (Hp), but only the involvement of this germ in gastritis and peptic ulcer has been mentioned in the award sentence, while numerous epidemiological, clinical and experimental studies and reports emphasized the crucial role of Hp in pathogenesis of gastric cancer (GC). This review is based on the old concept proposed by P. Correa much before the discovery of spiral bacteria in the stomach, postulating the cascade of mucosal changes from acute/chronic gastritis into the atrophic gastritis with intestinal metaplasia and finally to dysplasia and GC. It is now widely accepted view that Hp infection is the major initiator of the inflammatory and atrophic changes in gastric mucosa accompanied by an over-expression of certain growth factors such as gastrin as well as of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and anti-apoptotic proteins including survivin and B-cl(2), leading to proliferation of mutated atrophic cells, excessive angiogenesis, inhibition of apoptosis and formation of gastric tumour. All the morphological and biochemical changes associated with the transformation of mucosal cells into the cancer cells can be traced in excellent experimental model of gastric cancerogenesis induced by infection of Hp in Mongolian gerbils. Since the eradication therapy was proved in several prospective clinical trials to greatly reduce the incidence of GC and this was confirmed on the gerbil model of Hp-induced GC, it has been postulated; a) that Hp is the major causal factor in pathogenesis of GC and b) that the only rational approach in attempt to reduce the occurrence of GC is the global eradication of Hp. PMID:17033105

  15. Worldwide practice in gastric cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Brenkman, Hylke JF; Haverkamp, Leonie; Ruurda, Jelle P; van Hillegersberg, Richard

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the current status of gastric cancer surgery worldwide. METHODS: An international cross-sectional survey on gastric cancer surgery was performed amongst international upper gastro-intestinal surgeons. All surgical members of the International Gastric Cancer Association were invited by e-mail to participate. An English web-based survey had to be filled in with regard to their surgical preferences. Questions asked included hospital volume, the use of neoadjuvant treatment, preferred surgical approach, extent of the lymphadenectomy and preferred anastomotic technique. The invitations were sent in September 2013 and the survey was closed in January 2014. RESULTS: The corresponding specific response rate was 227/615 (37%). The majority of respondents: originated from Asia (54%), performed > 21 gastrectomies per year (79%) and used neoadjuvant chemotherapy (73%). An open surgical procedure was performed by the majority of surgeons for distal gastrectomy for advanced cancer (91%) and total gastrectomy for both early and advanced cancer (52% and 94%). A minimally invasive procedure was preferred for distal gastrectomy for early cancer (65%). In Asia surgeons preferred a minimally invasive procedure for total gastrectomy for early cancer also (63%). A D1+ lymphadenectomy was preferred in early gastric cancer (52% for distal, 54% for total gastrectomy) and a D2 lymphadenectomy was preferred in advanced gastric cancer (93% for distal, 92% for total gastrectomy) CONCLUSION: Surgical preferences for gastric cancer surgery vary between surgeons worldwide. Although the majority of surgeons use neoadjuvant chemotherapy, minimally invasive techniques are still not widely adapted. PMID:27099448

  16. Helicobacter pylori Update: Gastric Cancer, Reliable Therapy, and Possible Benefits

    PubMed Central

    Graham, David Y.

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection contributes to development of diverse gastric and extra-gastric diseases. The infection is necessary but not sufficient for development of gastric adenocarcinoma. Its eradication would eliminate a major worldwide cause of cancer death, so there is much interest in identifying how, if, and when this can be accomplished. There are several mechanisms by which H pylori contributes to development of gastric cancer. Gastric adenocarcinoma is one of many cancers associated with inflammation, which is induced by H pylori infection, yet the bacteria also cause genetic and epigenetic changes that lead to genetic instability in gastric epithelial cells. H pylori eradication reduces both. However, many factors must be considered in determining whether treating this bacterial infection will prevent cancer or only reduce its risk—these must be considered in designing reliable and effective eradication therapies. Furthermore, H pylori infection has been proposed to provide some benefits, such as reducing the risks of obesity or childhood asthma, although there are no convincing data to support the benefits of H pylori infections. PMID:25655557

  17. Survival Analysis of Patients with Interval Cancer Undergoing Gastric Cancer Screening by Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hamashima, Chisato; Shabana, Michiko; Okamoto, Mikizo; Osaki, Yoneatsu; Kishimoto, Takuji

    2015-01-01

    endoscopic screening in reducing mortality from gastric cancer. PMID:26023768

  18. Helicobacter pylori infection and gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Toshiro; Asaka, Masahiro

    2004-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection has an association with histological gastritis, gastric atrophy, gastric cancer, and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma in the stomach. Gastric cancer occurs in only a minority of infected individuals, however. Such clinical diversities are caused by variations of H. pylori pathogenicity, host susceptibility, environmental factors, and interactions of these factors. By three prospective epidemiological studies, the International Agency for Research on Cancer, World Health Organization (IARC/WHO) concluded in 1994 that H. pylori had a causal linkage to gastric carcinogenesis and is a definite carcinogen in humans. In addition, the Mongolian gerbil model with or without low-dose chemical carcinogens demonstrated that H. pylori infection could develop into gastric cancer. The experimental studies have elucidated that virulence factors of H. pylori have an interaction with gastric epithelial cell signaling related to carcinogenesis. The cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI) is a major virulence gene cluster and codes the type IV secretion machinery system, forming a cylinder-like structure. The CagA protein is translocated into target cells via this secretion system and induces a hummingbird morphology, growth factor-like effect. The other gene products are probably translocated into target cells and accelerate cellular proliferation and apoptosis. Understanding the molecular mechanism of the interaction between H. pylori and gastric epithelial cells will provide us with a new strategy for effective prevention of the development of gastric cancer induced by H. pylori infection. PMID:15449106

  19. Lymphadenectomy in gastric cancer: Contentious issues.

    PubMed

    Garg, Pankaj Kumar; Jakhetiya, Ashish; Sharma, Jyoti; Ray, Mukur Dipi; Pandey, Durgatosh

    2016-04-27

    The stomach is the sixth most common cause of cancer worldwide. Surgery is an important component of the multi-modality treatment of the gastric cancer. The extent of lymphadenectomy has been a controversial issue in the surgical management of gastric cancer. The East-Asian surgeons believe that quality-controlled extended lymphadenectomy resulting in better loco-regional control leads to survival benefit in the gastric cancer; contrary to that, many western surgeons believe that extended lymphadenectomy adds to only postoperative morbidity and mortality without significantly enhancing the overall survival. We present a comprehensive review of the lymphadenectomy in the gastric cancer based on the previously published randomized controlled trials. PMID:27152135

  20. Lymphadenectomy in gastric cancer: Contentious issues

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Pankaj Kumar; Jakhetiya, Ashish; Sharma, Jyoti; Ray, Mukur Dipi; Pandey, Durgatosh

    2016-01-01

    The stomach is the sixth most common cause of cancer worldwide. Surgery is an important component of the multi-modality treatment of the gastric cancer. The extent of lymphadenectomy has been a controversial issue in the surgical management of gastric cancer. The East-Asian surgeons believe that quality-controlled extended lymphadenectomy resulting in better loco-regional control leads to survival benefit in the gastric cancer; contrary to that, many western surgeons believe that extended lymphadenectomy adds to only postoperative morbidity and mortality without significantly enhancing the overall survival. We present a comprehensive review of the lymphadenectomy in the gastric cancer based on the previously published randomized controlled trials. PMID:27152135

  1. Helicobacter pylori and gastric cancer: Indian enigma

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Vatsala; Pandey, Renu; Misra, Sri Prakash; Dwivedi, Manisha

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a gram negative microaerophilic bacterium which resides in the mucous linings of the stomach. It has been implicated in the causation of various gastric disorders including gastric cancer. The geographical distribution and etiology of gastric cancer differ widely in different geographical regions and H. pylori, despite being labeled as a grade I carcinogen, has not been found to be associated with gastric cancer in many areas. Studies in Asian countries such as Thailand, India, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Iran, Saudi Arabian countries, Israel and Malaysia, have reported a high frequency of H. pylori infection co-existing with a low incidence of gastric cancer. In India, a difference in the prevalence of H. pylori infection and gastric cancer has been noted even in different regions of the country leading to a puzzle when attempting to find the causes of these variations. This puzzle of H. pylori distribution and gastric cancer epidemiology is known as the Indian enigma. In this review we have attempted to explain the Indian enigma using evidence from various Indian studies and from around the globe. This review covers aspects of epidemiology, the various biological strains present in different parts of the country and within individuals, the status of different H. pylori-related diseases and the molecular pathogenesis of the bacterium. PMID:24587625

  2. Preoperative administration of polysaccharide Kureha and reduced plasma transforming growth factor-β in patients with advanced gastric cancer: A randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    YAMASHITA, KEISHI; SAKURAMOTO, SHINICHI; MIENO, HIROAKI; NEMOTO, MASAYUKI; SHIBATA, TOMOTAKA; KATADA, NATSUYA; OHTSUKI, SHIGEAKI; SAKAMOTO, YASUTOSHI; HOSHI, KEIKA; WANG, GUOQIN; HEMMI, OSAMU; SATOH, TOSHIHIKO; KIKUCHI, SHIRO; WATANABE, MASAHIKO

    2015-01-01

    Systemic abrogation of TGF-β signaling results in tumor reduction through cytotoxic T lymphocytes activity in a mouse model. The administration of polysaccharide-Kureha (PSK) into tumor-bearing mice also showed tumor regression with reduced TGF-β. However, there have been no studies regarding the PSK administration to cancer patients and the association with plasma TGF-β. PSK (3 g/day) was administered as a neoadjuvant therapy for 2 weeks before surgery. In total, 31 advanced gastric cancer (AGC) patients were randomly assigned to group A (no neoadjuvant PSK; n=14) or B (neoadjuvant PSK therapy; n=17). Plasma TGF-β was measured pre- and postoperatively. The allocation factors were clinical stage (cStage) and gender. Plasma TGF-β ranged from 1.85–43.5 ng/ml (average, 9.50 ng/ml) in AGC, and 12 patients (38.7%) had a high value, >7.0 ng/ml. These patients were largely composed of poorly-differentiated adenocarcinoma with pathological stage III/IV. All the six elevated cases in group B showed a significant reduction of plasma TGF-β (from 21.6 to 4.5 ng/ml, on average), whereas this was not exhibited in group A. The cases within the normal limits of TGF-β remained unchanged irrespective of PSK treatment. Analysis of variance showed a statistically significant reduction in the difference of plasma TGF-β between groups A and B (P=0.019). PSK reduced the plasma TGF-β in AGC patients when the levels were initially high. The clinical advantage of PSK may, however, be restricted to specific histological types of AGC. Perioperative suppression of TGF-β by PSK may antagonize cancer immune evasion and improve patient prognosis in cases of AGC. PMID:26137253

  3. Epigenetic alterations in gastric cancer (Review)

    PubMed Central

    FU, DU-GUAN

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common types of cancer and the second most common cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. An increasing number of recent studies have confirmed that gastric cancer is a multistage pathological state that arises from environmental factors; dietary factors in particulary are considered to play an important role in the etiology of gastric cancer. Improper dietary habits are one of the primary concerns as they influence key molecular events associated with the onset of gastric carcinogenesis. In the field of genetics, anticancer research has mainly focused on the various genetic markers and genetic molecular mechanisms responsible for the development of this of this disease. Some of this research has proven to be very fruitful, providing insight into the possible mechamisms repsonsible for this disease and into possible treatment modalities. However, the mortality rate associated with gastric cancer remains relatively high. Thus, epigenetics has become a hot topic for research, whereby genetic markers are bypassed and this research is directed towards reversible epigenetic events, such as methylation and histone modifications that play a crucial role in carcinogenesis. The present review focuses on the epigenetic events which play an important role in the development and progression of this deadly disease, gastric cancer. PMID:25997695

  4. Familial Clustering of Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoon Jin; Kim, Nayoung; Jang, Woncheol; Seo, Bochang; Oh, Sooyeon; Shin, Cheol Min; Lee, Dong Ho; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This comprehensive cross-sectional study aimed to identify factors contributing to familial aggregation of gastric cancer (GC). A total of 1058 GC patients and 1268 controls were analyzed separately according to the presence or absence of a first-degree relative of GC (GC-relative). Logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, gender, residence during childhood, smoking, alcohol intake, monthly income, spicy food ingestion, Helicobacter pylori status and host cytokine polymorphisms was performed. Cytotoxin-associated gene A (cagA) positivity was a distinctive risk factor for GC in the family history (FH)-positive group (odds ratio [OR], 2.39; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.42–4.00), while current/ex-smoker, moderate to strong spicy food ingestion, and non-B blood types were more closely associated with GC in the FH-negative group. Among the FH-positive group, alcohol consumption showed a synergistic carcinogenic effect in the at least 2 GC-relatives group compared to the 1 GC-relative group (1.71 vs. 9.58, P for interaction = 0.026), and this was dose-dependent. In the subjects with ≥2 GC-relatives, TGFB1-509T/T was a risk factor for GC (OR 23.74; 95% CI 1.37–410.91), as were rural residency in childhood, alcohol consumption, spicy food ingestion, and cagA positivity. These results suggest that subjects with FH may be a heterogeneous group in terms of gastric cancer susceptibility. Especially, subjects with ≥2 GC-relatives should undergo risk stratification including TGFB1-509T/T and alcohol consumption. PMID:27196462

  5. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary diffuse gastric cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... JT, van Hillegersberg R, Dekker E, Oliveira C, Cats A, Hoogerbrugge N; Dutch Working Group on Hereditary ... JH, van Hillegersberg R, Ligtenberg M, Bleiker E, Cats A; Dutch Working Group on Hereditary Gastric Cancer. ...

  6. Hematogenous Gastric Metastasis of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sasajima, Junpei; Okamoto, Kotaro; Taniguchi, Masato

    2016-01-01

    While the gastric involvement of pancreatic cancer is occasionally observed as the result of direct invasion, hematogenous gastric metastasis is rare. A 72-year-old Japanese male presented with general fatigue, pollakiuria, and thirst. Computed tomography revealed a 4.6-cm solid mass in the pancreatic tail and a 4.2-cm multilocular cystic mass in the pancreatic head with multiple liver and lymphatic metastasis. Notably, two solid masses were detected in the gastric wall of the upper body and the antrum; both were separated from the primary pancreatic cancer and seemed to be located in the submucosal layer. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed a submucosal tumor with a normal mucosa in the posterior wall of the upper body of the stomach, suggesting the gastric hematogenous metastasis of pancreatic cancer. The suspected diagnosis was unresectable pancreatic cancer with multiple metastases that was concomitant with the intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas. PMID:27403106

  7. Hematogenous Gastric Metastasis of Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sasajima, Junpei; Okamoto, Kotaro; Taniguchi, Masato

    2016-01-01

    While the gastric involvement of pancreatic cancer is occasionally observed as the result of direct invasion, hematogenous gastric metastasis is rare. A 72-year-old Japanese male presented with general fatigue, pollakiuria, and thirst. Computed tomography revealed a 4.6-cm solid mass in the pancreatic tail and a 4.2-cm multilocular cystic mass in the pancreatic head with multiple liver and lymphatic metastasis. Notably, two solid masses were detected in the gastric wall of the upper body and the antrum; both were separated from the primary pancreatic cancer and seemed to be located in the submucosal layer. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed a submucosal tumor with a normal mucosa in the posterior wall of the upper body of the stomach, suggesting the gastric hematogenous metastasis of pancreatic cancer. The suspected diagnosis was unresectable pancreatic cancer with multiple metastases that was concomitant with the intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas. PMID:27403106

  8. Translating gastric cancer genomics into targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Ang, Yvonne L E; Yong, Wei Peng; Tan, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    Gastric cancer is a common disease with limited treatment options and a poor prognosis. Many gastric cancers harbour potentially actionable targets, including over-expression and mutations in tyrosine kinase pathways. Agents have been developed against these targets with varying success- in particular, the use of trastuzumab in HER2-overexpressing gastric cancers has resulted in overall survival benefits. Gastric cancers also have high levels of somatic mutations, making them candidates for immunotherapy; early work in this field has been promising. Recent advances in whole genome and multi-platform sequencing have driven the development of molecular classification systems, which may in turn guide the selection of patients for targeted treatment. Moving forward, challenges will include the development of appropriate biomarkers to predict responses to targeted therapy, and the application of new molecular classifications into trial development and clinical practice. PMID:26947813

  9. Helicobacter pylori, Cancer, and the Gastric Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Wroblewski, Lydia E; Peek, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide and Helicobacter pylori infection is the strongest known risk factor for this disease. Although the stomach was once thought to be a sterile environment, it is now known to house many bacterial species leading to a complex interplay between H. pylori and other residents of the gastric microbiota. In addition to the role of H. pylori virulence factors, host genetic polymorphisms, and diet, it is now becoming clear that components of the gastrointestinal microbiota may also influence H. pylori-induced pathogenesis. In this chapter, we discuss emerging data regarding the gastric microbiota in humans and animal models and alterations that occur to the composition of the gastric microbiota in the presence of H. pylori infection that may augment the risk of developing gastric cancer. PMID:27573782

  10. Molecular classification of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Chia, N-Y; Tan, P

    2016-05-01

    Gastric cancer (GC), a heterogeneous disease characterized by epidemiologic and histopathologic differences across countries, is a leading cause of cancer-related death. Treatment of GC patients is currently suboptimal due to patients being commonly treated in a uniform fashion irrespective of disease subtype. With the advent of next-generation sequencing and other genomic technologies, GCs are now being investigated in great detail at the molecular level. High-throughput technologies now allow a comprehensive study of genomic and epigenomic alterations associated with GC. Gene mutations, chromosomal aberrations, differential gene expression and epigenetic alterations are some of the genetic/epigenetic influences on GC pathogenesis. In addition, integrative analyses of molecular profiling data have led to the identification of key dysregulated pathways and importantly, the establishment of GC molecular classifiers. Recently, The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) network proposed a four subtype classification scheme for GC based on the underlying tumor molecular biology of each subtype. This landmark study, together with other studies, has expanded our understanding on the characteristics of GC at the molecular level. Such knowledge may improve the medical management of GC in the future. PMID:26861606

  11. Robot-assisted surgery for gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Procopiuc, Livia; Tudor, Ştefan; Mănuc, Mircea; Diculescu, Mircea; Vasilescu, Cătălin

    2016-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery for gastric cancer is a relatively new research field, with convincing results mostly stemming from Asian countries. The use of the robotic surgery platform, thus far assessed as a safe procedure, which is also easier to learn, sets the background for a wider spread of minimally invasive technique in the treatment of gastric cancer. This review will cover the literature published so far, analyzing the pros and cons of robotic surgery and highlighting the remaining study questions. PMID:26798433

  12. Novel CD9-targeted therapies in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Murayama, Yoko; Oritani, Kenji; Tsutsui, Shusaku

    2015-01-01

    There are 33 human tetraspanin proteins, emerging as key players in malignancy, the immune system, fertilization, cellular signaling, adhesion, morphology, motility, proliferation, and tumor invasion. CD9, a member of the tetraspanin family, associates with and influences a variety of cell-surface molecules. Through these interactions, CD9 modifies multiple cellular events, including adhesion, migration, proliferation, and survival. CD9 is therefore considered to play a role in several stages during cancer development. Reduced CD9 expression is generally related to venous vessel invasion and metastasis as well as poor prognosis. We found that treatment of mice bearing human gastric cancer cells with anti-CD9 antibody successfully inhibited tumor progression via antiproliferative, proapoptotic, and antiangiogenic effects, strongly indicating that CD9 is a possible therapeutic target in patients with gastric cancer. Here, we describe the possibility of CD9 manipulation as a novel therapeutic strategy in gastric cancer, which still shows poor prognosis. PMID:25805926

  13. Inhibition of PRL-3 gene expression in gastric cancer cell line SGC7901 via microRNA suppressed reduces peritoneal metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zhengrong; Zhan Wenhua . E-mail: wcywk@hotmail.com; Wang Zhao; Zhu Baohe; He Yulong; Peng Junsheng; Cai Shirong; Ma Jinping

    2006-09-15

    High expression of PRL-3, a protein tyrosine phosphatase, is proved to be associated with lymph node metastasis in gastric carcinoma from previous studies. In this paper, we examined the relationship between PRL-3 expression and peritoneal metastasis in gastric carcinoma. We applied the artificial miRNA (pCMV-PRL3miRNA), which is based on the murine miR-155 sequence, to efficiently silence the target gene expression of PRL-3 in SGC7901 gastric cancer cells at both mRNA and protein levels. Then we observed that, in vitro, pCMV-PRL3miRNA significantly depressed the SGC7901 cell invasion and migration independent of cellular proliferation. In vivo, PRL-3 knockdown effectively suppressed the growth of peritoneal metastases and improved the prognosis in nude mice. Therefore, we concluded that artificial miRNA can depress the expression of PRL-3, and that PRL-3 might be a potential therapeutic target for gastric cancer peritoneal metastasis.

  14. VEGF promotes gastric cancer development by upregulating CRMP4

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jianjun; Zhai, Ertao; He, Yulong; Wu, Hui; Chen, Chuangqi; Ma, Jinping; Wang, Zhao; Cai, Shirong

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the precise role of CRMP4 in gastric tumor growth and patient survival. The mRNA and protein expression levels of CRMP4, VEGF and VEGFR2 were validated by qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. We investigated the effects on tumor growth of overexpression and knockdown of CRMP4 both in vitro and in vivo by constructing stable gastric cell lines using lentiviral-mediated transduction and shRNA interference-mediated knockdown of CRMP4 expression. We further validated the role of the ERK/AKT signaling pathways in VEGF and CRMP4 expression using ERK and PI3K inhibitors. Increased expression of VEGF and CRMP4 were observed in gastric cancer tissues compared with tumor-adjacent tissue. We found that higher CRPM4 expression was associated with lymph node metastasis, TNM stage, tumor differentiation and poorer prognosis in gastric cancer patients. In HGC27 and SGC7901 gastric cancer cells, VEGF upregulated CRMP4 in time and dose-dependent manners. Overexpression of CRMP4 increased cell proliferation, migration and invasion, whereas knockdown of CRMP4 expression had opposite effects. VEGF activated CRMP4 expression in gastric cancer cells, and this effect was significantly inhibited by MAPK and PI3K inhibitors (PD98059 and LY294002). In mice, CRMP4 overexpression also resulted in increased tumor growth. These results suggest that increased CRMP4 expression mediated by the activation of VEGF signaling facilitates gastric tumor growth and metastasis, which may have clinical implications associated with a reduced survival rate in gastric cancer patients. PMID:26934554

  15. Helicobacter pylori update: gastric cancer, reliable therapy, and possible benefits.

    PubMed

    Graham, David Y

    2015-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection contributes to the development of diverse gastric and extragastric diseases. The infection is necessary but not sufficient for the development of gastric adenocarcinoma. Its eradication would eliminate a major worldwide cause of cancer death, therefore there is much interest in identifying how, if, and when this can be accomplished. There are several mechanisms by which H pylori contributes to the development of gastric cancer. Gastric adenocarcinoma is one of many cancers associated with inflammation, which is induced by H pylori infection, yet the bacteria also cause genetic and epigenetic changes that lead to genetic instability in gastric epithelial cells. H pylori eradication reduces both. However, many factors must be considered in determining whether treating this bacterial infection will prevent cancer or only reduce its risk-these must be considered in designing reliable and effective eradication therapies. Furthermore, H pylori infection has been proposed to provide some benefits, such as reducing the risks of obesity or childhood asthma. When tested, these hypotheses have not been confirmed and are therefore most likely false. PMID:25655557

  16. EGF-reduced Wnt5a transcription induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition via Arf6-ERK signaling in gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yujie; Du, Jun; Zheng, Jianchao; Liu, Jiaojing; Xu, Rui; Shen, Tian; Zhu, Yichao; Chang, Jun; Wang, Hong; Zhang, Zhihong; Meng, Fanqing; Wang, Yan; Chen, Yongchang; Xu, Yong; Gu, Luo

    2015-01-01

    Wnt5a, a ligand for activating the non-canonical Wnt signaling pathway, is commonly associated with Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in cancer cell metastasis. Here, we show that downregulation of Wnt5a mRNA and protein by EGF is necessary for EGF-induced EMT in gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells. To further explore the mechanisms, we investigated the effect of EGF signaling on Wnt5a expression. EGF increased Arf6 and ERK activity, while blockade of Arf6 activation repressed ERK activity, up-regulated Wnt5a expression and repressed EMT in response to EGF. We also demonstrate that EGF inactivated Wnt5a transcription by direct recruitment of ERK to the Wnt5a promoter. On the other hand, inhibition of ERK phosphorylation resulted in decreased movement of ERK from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, following rescued Wnt5a mRNA and protein expression and favored an epithelial phenotype of SGC-7901 cells. In addition, we notice that kinase-dead, nuclear-localised ERK has inhibitory effect on Wnt5a transcription. Analysis of gastric cancer specimens revealed an inverse correlation between P-ERK and Wnt5a protein levels and an association between Wnt5a expression and better prognosis. These findings indicate that Wnt5a is a potential suppressor of EMT and identify a novel Arf6/ERK signaling pathway for EGF-regulated Wnt5a expression at transcriptional level of gastric cancer cells. PMID:25779663

  17. Multidisciplinary management for esophageal and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Boniface, Megan M; Wani, Sachin B; Schefter, Tracey E; Koo, Phillip J; Meguid, Cheryl; Leong, Stephen; Kaplan, Jeffrey B; Wingrove, Lisa J; McCarter, Martin D

    2016-01-01

    The management of esophageal and gastric cancer is complex and involves multiple specialists in an effort to optimize patient outcomes. Utilizing a multidisciplinary team approach starting from the initial staging evaluation ensures that all members are in agreement with the plan of care. Treatment selection for esophageal and gastric cancer often involves a combination of chemotherapy, radiation, surgery, and palliative interventions (endoscopic and surgical), and direct communication between specialists in these fields is needed to ensure appropriate clinical decision making. At the University of Colorado, the Esophageal and Gastric Multidisciplinary Clinic was created to bring together all experts involved in treating these diseases at a weekly conference in order to provide patients with coordinated, individualized, and patient-centered care. This review details the essential elements and benefits of building a multidisciplinary program focused on treating esophageal and gastric cancer patients. PMID:27217796

  18. Quality of life in gastric cancer prior to gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Svedlund, J; Sullivan, M; Sjödin, I; Liedman, B; Lundell, L

    1996-04-01

    A growing number of surgical trials include quality of life variables in the overall assessment of outcomes. This is believed to broaden the criteria for choice of treatment and the evaluation of treatment regimens. The present study is a baseline evaluation of the health-related quality of life in patients with gastric cancer facing surgery. The quality of life in these patients was related to that of other patient groups referred for surgical interventions and general population groups. Our study included 103 consecutive patients with carcinoma of the stomach considered amenable to a curative major surgical procedure. The quality of life evaluation was based on a battery of questionnaires, covering general body symptoms, mood level and functional limitations. Patients with gastric cancer reported more neurasthenic complaints such as reduced sexual interest, insomnia and poor appetite as well as a lower mood level than the general population. The gastric cancer group also showed a markedly lower mood level in comparison with a group of cancer survivors 2-3 years after diagnosis and patients with intermittent claudication. The mental well-being of gastric cancer patients matched that of cancer survivors with one or more recurrences. Overall, 25% of the gastric cancer patients reported functional limitations regarded as clinically significant. Patients with intermittent claudication reported more and patients with small cell lung cancer markedly more limitations. We conclude that although patients with gastric cancer showed a low level of limitations on average, problems in the areas of sleep/rest, home management and, especially, eating were frequently reported. PMID:8998494

  19. Recent developments and innovations in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mihmanli, Mehmet; Ilhan, Enver; Idiz, Ufuk Oguz; Alemdar, Ali; Demir, Uygar

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer has an important place in the worldwide incidence of cancer and cancer-related deaths. It can metastasize to the lymph nodes in the early stages, and lymph node metastasis is an important prognostic factor. Surgery is a very important part of gastric cancer treatment. A D2 lymphadenectomy is the standard surgical treatment for cT1N+ and T2-T4 cancers, which are potentially curable. Recently, the TNM classification system was reorganized, and the margins for gastrectomy and lymphadenectomy were revised. Endoscopic, laparoscopic and robotic treatments of gastric cancer have progressed rapidly with development of surgical instruments and techniques, especially in Eastern countries. Different endoscopic resection techniques have been identified, and these can be divided into two main categories: endoscopic mucosal resection and endoscopic submucosal dissection. Minimally invasive surgery has been reported to be safe and effective for early gastric cancer, and it can be successfully applied to advanced gastric cancer with increasing experience. Cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermıc intraperıtoneal chemotherapy were developed as a combined treatment modality from the results of experimental and clinical studies. Also, hyperthermia increases the antitumor activity and penetration of chemotherapeutics. Trastuzumab which is a monoclonal antibody interacts with human epidermal growth factor (HER) 2 and is related to gastric carcinoma. The anti-tumor mechanism of trastuzumab is not clearly known, but mechanisms such as interruption of the HER2-mediated cell signaling pathways and cell cycle progression have been reported previously. H. pylori is involved in 90% of all gastric malignancies and Japanese guidelines strongly recommend that all H. pylori infections should be eradicated regardless of the associated disease. In this review, we present innovations discussed in recent studies. PMID:27158199

  20. Recent developments and innovations in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Mihmanli, Mehmet; Ilhan, Enver; Idiz, Ufuk Oguz; Alemdar, Ali; Demir, Uygar

    2016-05-01

    Gastric cancer has an important place in the worldwide incidence of cancer and cancer-related deaths. It can metastasize to the lymph nodes in the early stages, and lymph node metastasis is an important prognostic factor. Surgery is a very important part of gastric cancer treatment. A D2 lymphadenectomy is the standard surgical treatment for cT1N+ and T2-T4 cancers, which are potentially curable. Recently, the TNM classification system was reorganized, and the margins for gastrectomy and lymphadenectomy were revised. Endoscopic, laparoscopic and robotic treatments of gastric cancer have progressed rapidly with development of surgical instruments and techniques, especially in Eastern countries. Different endoscopic resection techniques have been identified, and these can be divided into two main categories: endoscopic mucosal resection and endoscopic submucosal dissection. Minimally invasive surgery has been reported to be safe and effective for early gastric cancer, and it can be successfully applied to advanced gastric cancer with increasing experience. Cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermıc intraperıtoneal chemotherapy were developed as a combined treatment modality from the results of experimental and clinical studies. Also, hyperthermia increases the antitumor activity and penetration of chemotherapeutics. Trastuzumab which is a monoclonal antibody interacts with human epidermal growth factor (HER) 2 and is related to gastric carcinoma. The anti-tumor mechanism of trastuzumab is not clearly known, but mechanisms such as interruption of the HER2-mediated cell signaling pathways and cell cycle progression have been reported previously. H. pylori is involved in 90% of all gastric malignancies and Japanese guidelines strongly recommend that all H. pylori infections should be eradicated regardless of the associated disease. In this review, we present innovations discussed in recent studies. PMID:27158199

  1. Molecular characterization of the stomach microbiota in patients with gastric cancer and controls

    SciTech Connect

    Dicksved, J.; Lindberg, M.; Rosenquist, M.; Enroth, H.; Jansson, J.K.; Engstrand, L.

    2009-01-15

    Persistent infection of the gastric mucosa by Helicobacter pylori, can initiate an inflammatory cascade that progresses into atrophic gastritis, a condition associated with reduced capacity for secretion of gastric acid and an increased risk in developing gastric cancer. The role of H. pylori as an initiator of inflammation is evident but the mechanism for development into gastric cancer has not yet been proven. A reduced capacity for gastric acid secretion allows survival and proliferation of other microbes that normally are killed by the acidic environment. It has been postulated that some of these species may be involved in the development of gastric cancer, however their identities are poorly defined. In this study, the gastric microbiota from ten patients with gastric cancer was characterized and compared with five dyspeptic controls using the molecular profiling approach, terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), in combination with 16S rRNA gene cloning and sequencing. T-RFLP analysis revealed a complex bacterial community in the cancer patients that was not significantly different from the controls. Sequencing of 140 clones revealed 102 phylotypes, with representatives from five bacterial phyla (Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Fusobacteria). The data revealed a relatively low abundance of H. pylori and showed that the gastric cancer microbiota was instead dominated by different species of the genera Streptococcus, Lactobacillus, Veillonella and Prevotella. The respective role of these species in development of gastric cancer remains to be determined.

  2. Effect of Eradication of Helicobacter pylori on Expression Levels of FHIT, IL-8 and P73 in Gastric Mucosa of First-Degree Relatives of Gastric Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Juan; Wen, Shichao; Cao, Lipeng; Zhou, Yunfeng; Feng, Zhisong

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection plays an important role in the carcinogenesis and development of gastric cancer. Eradication of H. pylori can effectively reduce the risk of gastric cancer, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. This study aimed to investigate the effect of eradication of H. pylori on the expression levels of FHIT, IL-8 and P73 in the gastric mucosa of first-degree relatives of gastric cancer patients. Methods One hundred and thirty-two patients with functional dyspepsia having first-degree relatives with gastric cancer were prospectively recruited in this study. Nine patients presented with H. pylori infection and family histories of gastric cancer, 61 with H. pylori infection and without family histories of gastric cancer, 6 without H. pylori infection and with family histories of gastric cancer, and 56 without H. pylori infection and family histories of gastric cancer. The protein and mRNA expression levels of FHIT, IL-8 and P73 in gastric mucosa of the subjects were detected by immunohistochemical staining and polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Results Compared with the patients without H. pylori infection and family histories of gastric cancer, both the protein and mRNA levels of FIHT significantly decreased in patients with H. pylori infection and/or family histories of gastric cancer, and both the protein and mRNA levels of IL-8 significantly increased. After eradication of H. pylori, both the protein and mRNA levels of FHIT were significantly higher, and both the protein and mRNA levels of IL-8 were significantly lower. However, H. pylori infection and family histories of gastric cancer had no major effect on P73 expression. Conclusions Down-regulation of FHIT and up-regulation of IL-8 may be involved in the pathogenesis of H. pylori infection in the first-degree relatives of gastric cancer patients. PMID:25875960

  3. Gastric partitioning gastrojejunostomy in unresectable distal gastric cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Sung Joon; Lee, Ha Gyoon

    2004-04-01

    The main purpose of bypass surgery in patients with unresectable distal gastric cancer is to improve their quality of life (QoL). However, the result of conventional gastroenterostomy is dismal including continuous bleeding due to the contact of food material on the tumor surface and early obstruction of the stoma by tumor growth. Developing more effective surgery is warranted to improve the QoL of these patients. Among the 1158 patients with gastric cancer who underwent surgery from March 1993 to July 2002 at Hanyang University Medical Center, 54 (4.7%) had unresectable cancers. Various types of gastrojejunostomy (G-Jstomy), including conventional G-Jstomy (CGJ) (n = 18), antral exclusion G-Jstomy (n = 7), and gastric partitioning G-Jstomy (GPGJ) (n = 17), as well as exploratory laparotomy only (n = 12) were performed in these unresectable cases. In this study, survival and postoperative QoL were compared for the CGJ and GPGJ groups. The median survivals were 120 and 209 days for the CGJ and GPGJ groups, respectively (p = 0.046). The rates of postoperative body weight loss compared to the preoperative weight were 9.3% and 3.1% in the CGJ and GPGJ groups, respectively; the difference showed borderline significance (p = 0.067). The volume of blood transfusion was much less during the postoperative period than during the preoperative period in the GPGJ group but not in the CGJ group. The GPGJ procedure minimized food contact on the tumor surface, which was confirmed by an upper gastrointestinal barium meal series. GPGJ can be recommended as the procedure of choice for bypass surgery in patients with unresectable distal gastric cancer considering their improved survival and postoperative QoL compared to those who underwent CGJ. PMID:14994143

  4. Challenges of deciphering gastric cancer heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Hudler, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is in decline in most developed countries; however, it still accounts for a notable fraction of global mortality and morbidity related to cancer. High-throughput methods are rapidly changing our view and understanding of the molecular basis of gastric carcinogenesis. Today, it is widely accepted that the molecular complexity and heterogeneity, both inter- and intra-tumour, of gastric adenocarcinomas present significant obstacles in elucidating specific biomarkers for early detection of the disease. Although genome-wide sequencing and gene expression studies have revealed the intricate nature of the molecular changes that occur in tumour landscapes, the collected data and results are complex and sometimes contradictory. Several aberrant molecules have already been tested in clinical trials, although their diagnostic and prognostic utilities have not been confirmed thus far. The gold standard for the detection of sporadic gastric cancer is still the gastric endoscopy, which is considered invasive. In addition, genome-wide association studies have confirmed that genetic variations are important contributors to increased cancer risk and could participate in the initiation of malignant transformation. This hypothesis could in part explain the late onset of sporadic gastric cancers. The elaborate interplay of polymorphic low penetrance genes and lifestyle and environmental risk factors requires additional research to decipher their relative impacts on tumorigenesis. The purpose of this article is to present details of the molecular heterogeneity of sporadic gastric cancers at the DNA, RNA, and proteome levels and to discuss issues relevant to the translation of basic research data to clinically valuable tools. The focus of this work is the identification of relevant molecular changes that could be detected non-invasively. PMID:26457012

  5. Challenges of deciphering gastric cancer heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Hudler, Petra

    2015-10-01

    Gastric cancer is in decline in most developed countries; however, it still accounts for a notable fraction of global mortality and morbidity related to cancer. High-throughput methods are rapidly changing our view and understanding of the molecular basis of gastric carcinogenesis. Today, it is widely accepted that the molecular complexity and heterogeneity, both inter- and intra-tumour, of gastric adenocarcinomas present significant obstacles in elucidating specific biomarkers for early detection of the disease. Although genome-wide sequencing and gene expression studies have revealed the intricate nature of the molecular changes that occur in tumour landscapes, the collected data and results are complex and sometimes contradictory. Several aberrant molecules have already been tested in clinical trials, although their diagnostic and prognostic utilities have not been confirmed thus far. The gold standard for the detection of sporadic gastric cancer is still the gastric endoscopy, which is considered invasive. In addition, genome-wide association studies have confirmed that genetic variations are important contributors to increased cancer risk and could participate in the initiation of malignant transformation. This hypothesis could in part explain the late onset of sporadic gastric cancers. The elaborate interplay of polymorphic low penetrance genes and lifestyle and environmental risk factors requires additional research to decipher their relative impacts on tumorigenesis. The purpose of this article is to present details of the molecular heterogeneity of sporadic gastric cancers at the DNA, RNA, and proteome levels and to discuss issues relevant to the translation of basic research data to clinically valuable tools. The focus of this work is the identification of relevant molecular changes that could be detected non-invasively. PMID:26457012

  6. RNA interference targeting raptor inhibits proliferation of gastric cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, William Ka Kei; Lee, Chung Wa; Cho, Chi Hin; Chan, Francis Ka Leung; Yu, Jun; Sung, Joseph Jao Yiu

    2011-06-10

    Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is dysregulated in gastric cancer. The biologic function of mTORC1 in gastric carcinogenesis is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that disruption of mTORC1 function by RNA interference-mediated downregulation of raptor substantially inhibited gastric cancer cell proliferation through induction of G{sub 0}/G{sub 1}-phase cell cycle arrest. The anti-proliferative effect was accompanied by concomitant downregulation of activator protein-1 and upregulation of Smad2/3 transcriptional activities. In addition, the expression of cyclin D{sub 3} and p21{sup Waf1}, which stabilizes cyclin D/cdk4 complex for G{sub 1}-S transition, was reduced by raptor knockdown. In conclusion, disruption of mTORC1 inhibits gastric cancer cell proliferation through multiple pathways. This discovery may have an implication in the application of mTORC1-directed therapy for the treatment of gastric cancer.

  7. New advances in targeted gastric cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lazăr, Daniela Cornelia; Tăban, Sorina; Cornianu, Marioara; Faur, Alexandra; Goldiş, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Despite a decrease in incidence over past decades, gastric cancer remains a major global health problem. In the more recent period, survival has shown only minor improvement, despite significant advances in diagnostic techniques, surgical and chemotherapeutic approaches, the development of novel therapeutic agents and treatment by multidisciplinary teams. Because multiple genetic mutations, epigenetic alterations, and aberrant molecular signalling pathways are involved in the development of gastric cancers, recent research has attempted to determine the molecular heterogeneity responsible for the processes of carcinogenesis, spread and metastasis. Currently, some novel agents targeting a part of these dysfunctional molecular signalling pathways have already been integrated into the standard treatment of gastric cancer, whereas others remain in phases of investigation within clinical trials. It is essential to identify the unique molecular patterns of tumours and specific biomarkers to develop treatments targeted to the individual tumour behaviour. This review analyses the global impact of gastric cancer, as well as the role of Helicobacter pylori infection and the efficacy of bacterial eradication in preventing gastric cancer development. Furthermore, the paper discusses the currently available targeted treatments and future directions of research using promising novel classes of molecular agents for advanced tumours. PMID:27570417

  8. New advances in targeted gastric cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Lazăr, Daniela Cornelia; Tăban, Sorina; Cornianu, Marioara; Faur, Alexandra; Goldiş, Adrian

    2016-08-14

    Despite a decrease in incidence over past decades, gastric cancer remains a major global health problem. In the more recent period, survival has shown only minor improvement, despite significant advances in diagnostic techniques, surgical and chemotherapeutic approaches, the development of novel therapeutic agents and treatment by multidisciplinary teams. Because multiple genetic mutations, epigenetic alterations, and aberrant molecular signalling pathways are involved in the development of gastric cancers, recent research has attempted to determine the molecular heterogeneity responsible for the processes of carcinogenesis, spread and metastasis. Currently, some novel agents targeting a part of these dysfunctional molecular signalling pathways have already been integrated into the standard treatment of gastric cancer, whereas others remain in phases of investigation within clinical trials. It is essential to identify the unique molecular patterns of tumours and specific biomarkers to develop treatments targeted to the individual tumour behaviour. This review analyses the global impact of gastric cancer, as well as the role of Helicobacter pylori infection and the efficacy of bacterial eradication in preventing gastric cancer development. Furthermore, the paper discusses the currently available targeted treatments and future directions of research using promising novel classes of molecular agents for advanced tumours. PMID:27570417

  9. Use of lectin microarray to differentiate gastric cancer from gastric ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei-Li; Li, Yang-Guang; Lv, Yong-Chen; Guan, Xiao-Hui; Ji, Hui-Fan; Chi, Bao-Rong

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the feasibility of lectin microarray for differentiating gastric cancer from gastric ulcer. METHODS: Twenty cases of human gastric cancer tissue and 20 cases of human gastric ulcer tissue were collected and processed. Protein was extracted from the frozen tissues and stored. The lectins were dissolved in buffer, and the sugar-binding specificities of lectins and the layout of the lectin microarray were summarized. The median of the effective data points for each lectin was globally normalized to the sum of medians of all effective data points for each lectin in one block. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded gastric cancer tissues and their corresponding gastric ulcer tissues were subjected to Ag retrieval. Biotinylated lectin was used as the primary antibody and HRP-streptavidin as the secondary antibody. The glycopatterns of glycoprotein in gastric cancer and gastric ulcer specimens were determined by lectin microarray, and then validated by lectin histochemistry. Data are presented as mean ± SD for the indicated number of independent experiments. RESULTS: The glycosylation level of gastric cancer was significantly higher than that in ulcer. In gastric cancer, most of the lectin binders showed positive signals and the intensity of the signals was stronger, whereas the opposite was the case for ulcers. Significant differences in the pathological score of the two lectins were apparent between ulcer and gastric cancer tissues using the same lectin. For MPL and VVA, all types of gastric cancer detected showed stronger staining and a higher positive rate in comparison with ulcer, especially in the case of signet ring cell carcinoma and intra-mucosal carcinoma. GalNAc bound to MPL showed a significant increase. A statistically significant association between MPL and gastric cancer was observed. As with MPL, there were significant differences in VVA staining between gastric cancer and ulcer. CONCLUSION: Lectin microarray can differentiate the different

  10. Does remnant gastric cancer really differ from primary gastric cancer? A systematic review of the literature by the Task Force of Japanese Gastric Cancer Association.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Hideaki; Fukagawa, Takeo; Haga, Yoshio; Oba, Koji

    2016-04-01

    Remnant gastric cancer, most frequently defined as cancer detected in the remnant stomach after distal gastrectomy for benign disease and those cases after surgery of gastric cancer at least 5 years after the primary surgery, is often reported as a tumor with poor prognosis. The Task Force of Japanese Gastric Cancer Association for Research Promotion evaluated the clinical impact of remnant gastric cancer by systematically reviewing publications focusing on molecular carcinogenesis, lymph node status, patient survival, and surgical complications. A systematic literature search was performed using PubMed/MEDLINE with the keywords "remnant," "stomach," and "cancer," revealing 1154 relevant reports published up to the end of December 2014. The mean interval between the initial surgery and the diagnosis of remnant gastric cancer ranged from 10 to 30 years. The incidence of lymph node metastases at the splenic hilum for remnant gastric cancer is not significantly higher than that for primary proximal gastric cancer. Lymph node involvement in the jejunal mesentery is a phenomenon peculiar to remnant gastric cancer after Billroth II reconstruction. Prognosis and postoperative morbidity and mortality rates seem to be comparable to those for primary proximal gastric cancer. The crude 5-year mortality for remnant gastric cancer was 1.08 times higher than that for primary proximal gastric cancer, but this difference was not statistically significant. In conclusion, although no prospective cohort study has yet evaluated the clinical significance of remnant gastric cancer, our literature review suggests that remnant gastric cancer does not adversely affect patient prognosis and postoperative course. PMID:26667370

  11. Helicobacter pylori and gastric cancer: current status of the Austrain-Czech-German gastric cancer prevention trial (PRISMA-Study)

    PubMed Central

    Miehlke, S.; Kirsch, C.; Dragosics, B.; Gschwantler, M.; Oberhuber, G.; Antos, D.; Dite, P.; Luter, J.; Labenz, J.; Leodolter, A.; Malfertheiner, P.; Neubauer, A.; Ehninger, G.; Stolte, M.; rffer, E. Bayerdö

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To test the hypothesis that Helicobacter pylori eradication alone can reduce the incidence of gastric cancer in a subgroup of individuals with an increased risk for this fatal disease. METHODS: It is a prospective, randomized, double blind, placebo controlled multinational multicenter trial. Men between 55 and 65 years of age with a gastric cancer phenotype of Helicobacter pylori gastritis are randomized to receive a 7 day course of omeprazole 2 × 20 mg, clarithromycin 2 × 500 mg, and amoxicillin 2 × 1 g for 7 days, or omeprazole 2 × 20 mg plus placebo. Follow-up endoscopy is scheduled 3 months after therapy, and thereafter in one-year intervals. Predefined study endpoints are gastric cancer, precancerous lesions (dysplasia, adenoma), other cancers, and death. RESULTS: Since March 1998, 1524 target patients have been screened, 279 patients (18.3%) had a corpus dominant type of H. pylori gastritis, and 167 of those were randomized (58.8%). In the active treatment group (n = 86), H. pylori infection infection was cured in 88.9% of patients. Currently, the cumulative follow-up time is 3046 months (253. 38 patient years, median follow up 16 months). So far, none of the patients developed gastric cancer or any precancerous lesion. Three (1.8%) patients reached study endpoints other than gastric cancer. CONCLUSION: Among men between 55 and 65 years of age, the gastric cancer phenotype of H. pylori gastritis appears to be more common than expected. Further follow up and continuing recruitment are necessary to fulfil the main aim of the study. PMID:11819768

  12. Epidemiological review of gastric cancer in India.

    PubMed

    Dikshit, Rajesh P; Mathur, Garima; Mhatre, Sharayu; Yeole, B B

    2011-01-01

    Stomach cancer is the one of the leading cause of cancer in southern region of India. Its incidence is decreasing worldwide yet on global scale stomach cancer remains one of the most common causes of cancer death. Etiology of gastric cancer includes Helicobacter pylori infection, diet and lifestyle, tobacco, alcohol and genetic susceptibility. In this review, we tried to find the contribution of Indian scientist in understanding the descriptive and observational epidemiology of stomach cancer. PubMed was used as a search platform using key words such as "stomach cancer, treatment, clinical characteristics, stomach cancer outcome, epidemiology, etiological factor and their corresponding Mesh terms were used in combination with Boolean operators OR, AND". Most of the reported studies on gastric cancer from India are case report or case series and few are case-control studies. Indian studies on this topic are limited and have observed H. pylori infection, salted tea, pickled food, rice intake, spicy food, soda (additive of food), tobacco and alcohol as risk factors for gastric cancer. More research is required to understand the etiology, develop suitable screening test, to demarcate high-risk population and to develop and evaluate the effect of primary prevention programs. PMID:21731209

  13. Metabolomic studies of human gastric cancer: review.

    PubMed

    Jayavelu, Naresh Doni; Bar, Nadav S

    2014-07-01

    Metabolomics is a field of study in systems biology that involves the identification and quantification of metabolites present in a biological system. Analyzing metabolic differences between unperturbed and perturbed networks, such as cancerous and non-cancerous samples, can provide insight into underlying disease pathology, disease prognosis and diagnosis. Despite the large number of review articles concerning metabolomics and its application in cancer research, biomarker and drug discovery, these reviews do not focus on a specific type of cancer. Metabolomics may provide biomarkers useful for identification of early stage gastric cancer, potentially addressing an important clinical need. Here, we present a short review on metabolomics as a tool for biomarker discovery in human gastric cancer, with a primary focus on its use as a predictor of anticancer drug chemosensitivity, diagnosis, prognosis, and metastasis. PMID:25009381

  14. Survivin inhibitor YM155 suppresses gastric cancer xenograft growth in mice without affecting normal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiao Jiao; Lin, Jia Cheng; Ding, Yan Fei; Zhu, Liming; Ye, Jing; Tu, Shui Ping

    2016-01-01

    Survivin overexpression is associated with poor prognosis of human gastric cancer, and is a target for gastric cancer therapy. YM155 is originally identified as a specific inhibitor of survivin. In this study, we investigated the antitumor effect of YM155 on human gastric cancer. Our results showed that YM155 treatment significantly inhibited cell proliferation, reduced colony formation and induced apoptosis of gastric cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. Accordingly, YM155 treatment significantly decreased survivin expression without affecting XIAP expression and increased the cleavage of apoptosis-associated proteins caspase 3, 7, 8, 9. YM155 significantly inhibited sphere formation of gastric cancer cells, suppressed expansion and growth of the formed spheres (cancer stem cell-like cells, CSCs) and downregulated the protein levels of β-catenin, c-Myc, Cyclin D1 and CD44 in gastric cancer cells. YM155 infusion at 5 mg/kg/day for 7 days markedly inhibited growth of gastric cancer xenograft in a nude mouse model. Immunohistochemistry staining and Western Blot showed that YM155 treatment inhibited expression of survivin and CD44, induced apoptosis and reduced CD44+ CSCs in xenograft tumor tissues in vivo. No obvious pathological changes were observed in organs (e.g. heart, liver, lung and kidney) in YM155-treated mice. Our results demonstrated that YM155 inhibits cell proliferation, induces cell apoptosis, reduces cancer stem cell expansion, and inhibits xenograft tumor growth in gastric cancer cells. Our results elucidate a new mechanism by which YM155 inhibits gastric cancer growth by inhibition of CSCs. YM155 may be a promising agent for gastric cancer treatment. PMID:26771139

  15. Survivin inhibitor YM155 suppresses gastric cancer xenograft growth in mice without affecting normal tissues.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiao Jiao; Lin, Jia Cheng; Ding, Yan Fei; Zhu, Liming; Ye, Jing; Tu, Shui Ping

    2016-02-01

    Survivin overexpression is associated with poor prognosis of human gastric cancer, and is a target for gastric cancer therapy. YM155 is originally identified as a specific inhibitor of survivin. In this study, we investigated the antitumor effect of YM155 on human gastric cancer. Our results showed that YM155 treatment significantly inhibited cell proliferation, reduced colony formation and induced apoptosis of gastric cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. Accordingly, YM155 treatment significantly decreased survivin expression without affecting XIAP expression and increased the cleavage of apoptosis-associated proteins caspase 3, 7, 8, 9. YM155 significantly inhibited sphere formation of gastric cancer cells, suppressed expansion and growth of the formed spheres (cancer stem cell-like cells, CSCs) and downregulated the protein levels of β-catenin, c-Myc, Cyclin D1 and CD44 in gastric cancer cells. YM155 infusion at 5 mg/kg/day for 7 days markedly inhibited growth of gastric cancer xenograft in a nude mouse model. Immunohistochemistry staining and Western Blot showed that YM155 treatment inhibited expression of survivin and CD44, induced apoptosis and reduced CD44+ CSCs in xenograft tumor tissues in vivo. No obvious pathological changes were observed in organs (e.g. heart, liver, lung and kidney) in YM155-treated mice. Our results demonstrated that YM155 inhibits cell proliferation, induces cell apoptosis, reduces cancer stem cell expansion, and inhibits xenograft tumor growth in gastric cancer cells. Our results elucidate a new mechanism by which YM155 inhibits gastric cancer growth by inhibition of CSCs. YM155 may be a promising agent for gastric cancer treatment. PMID:26771139

  16. Gastric cancer: current and evolving treatment landscape.

    PubMed

    Sun, Weijing; Yan, Li

    2016-01-01

    Gastric (including gastroesophageal junction) cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. In China, an estimated 420,000 patients were diagnosed with gastric cancer in 2011, ranking this malignancy the second most prevalent cancer type and resulting in near 300,000 deaths. The treatment landscape of gastric cancer has evolved in recent years. Although systemic chemotherapy is still the mainstay treatment of metastatic disease, the introduction of agents targeting human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 and vascular endothelial growth factor/vascular endothelia growth factor receptor has brought this disease into the molecular and personalized medicine era. The preliminary yet encouraging clinical efficacy observed with immune checkpoint inhibitors, e.g., anti-programmed cell death protein 1/programmed death-ligand 1, will further shape the treatment landscape for gastric cancer. Molecular characterization of patients will play a critical role in developing new agents, as well as in implementing new treatment options for this disease. PMID:27581465

  17. Decreased expression of TLR7 in gastric cancer tissues and the effects of TLR7 activation on gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    JIANG, JIONG; DONG, LEI; QIN, BIN; SHI, HAITAO; GUO, XIAOYAN; WANG, YAN

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine the expression of Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) in gastric cancer tissues and investigate the effects of its activation on gastric cancer cells. Patients with gastric cancer (n=30) and patients without gastric cancer (control; n=14) who underwent gastroscopy were enrolled in the study. Gastric cancer and cancer-adjacent tissues were obtained from the patients with gastric cancer, and normal gastric epithelial tissues were obtained from the control patients. The TLR7 mRNA and protein expressions in different tissues were investigated by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blotting and immunohistochemistry. The present study also determined the effects of TLR7 activation by the agonist imiquimod on TLR7 protein expression, proinflammatory cytokine secretion and viability in SGC-7901 gastric cancer cells. The mRNA and protein expression levels of TLR7 were significantly downregulated in gastric cancer tissues compared with cancer-adjacent and normal gastric epithelial tissues (P<0.01). Imiquimod significantly increased TLR7 protein expression levels, and promoted the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 in SGC-7901 cells. Furthermore, imiquimod inhibited the proliferation of SGC-7901 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Thus, the present study identified that the expression of TLR7 was decreased in gastric cancer tissues, and TLR7 activation enhanced TLR7 expression, promoted the production of proinflammatory cytokines and inhibited the growth of gastric cancer cells. PMID:27347192

  18. Clinical epidemiology of gastric cancer in Hehuang valley of China: A 10-year epidemiological study of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Su; Li, Bin; Bai, Zhen-Zhong; Wu, Jun-Qi; Xie, Da-Wei; Ma, Ying-Cai; Ma, Xu-Xiang; Zhao, Jun-Hui; Guo, Xin-Jian

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the clinical epidemiological characteristics of gastric cancer in the Hehuang valley, China, to provide a reference for treatment and prevention of regional gastric cancer. METHODS: Between February 2003 and February 2013, the records of 2419 patients with gastric cancer were included in this study. The patient’s characteristics, histological and pathological features, as well as the dietary habits of the patients, were investigated. RESULTS: The clinical data showed that adenocarcinoma was the leading histological type of gastric cancer in this area. Characteristics of gastric cancer in different ethnic groups and age showed that the 60.55-65.50 years group showed the high incidence of gastric cancer in all ethnic groups. There were more male gastric cancer patients than female. Intestinal was the most common type of gastric cancer in the Hehuang valley. There was no significant difference in the proportion of sex in terms of Helicobacter pylori infection. The impact of dietary habits on gastric cancer showed that regular consumption of fried or grilled food, consumption of high-salt, high-fat and spicy food and drinking strong Boiled brick-tea were three important factors associated with gastric cancer in males and females. CONCLUSION: Differences existed in race, sex, and age of patients according to the epidemiology of gastric cancer in the Hehuang valley. Moreover, dietary habits was also an important factor contributing to gastric cancer. PMID:25132766

  19. Prevalence of deleterious ATM germline mutations in gastric cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    He, Xu-Jun; Long, Ming; Yu, Sheng; Xia, Ying-Jie; Wei, Zhang; Xiong, Zikai; Jones, Sian; He, Yiping; Yan, Hai; Wang, Xiaoyue

    2015-01-01

    Besides CDH1, few hereditary gastric cancer predisposition genes have been previously reported. In this study, we discovered two germline ATM mutations (p.Y1203fs and p.N1223S) in a Chinese family with a history of gastric cancer by screening 83 cancer susceptibility genes. Using a published exome sequencing dataset, we found deleterious germline mutations of ATM in 2.7% of 335 gastric cancer patients of different ethnic origins. The frequency of deleterious ATM mutations in gastric cancer patients is significantly higher than that in general population (p=0.0000435), suggesting an association of ATM mutations with gastric cancer predisposition. We also observed biallelic inactivation of ATM in tumors of two gastric cancer patients. Further evaluation of ATM mutations in hereditary gastric cancer will facilitate genetic testing and risk assessment. PMID:26506520

  20. Prevalence of deleterious ATM germline mutations in gastric cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Huang, Dong-Sheng; Tao, Hou-Quan; He, Xu-Jun; Long, Ming; Yu, Sheng; Xia, Ying-Jie; Wei, Zhang; Xiong, Zikai; Jones, Sian; He, Yiping; Yan, Hai; Wang, Xiaoyue

    2015-12-01

    Besides CDH1, few hereditary gastric cancer predisposition genes have been previously reported. In this study, we discovered two germline ATM mutations (p.Y1203fs and p.N1223S) in a Chinese family with a history of gastric cancer by screening 83 cancer susceptibility genes. Using a published exome sequencing dataset, we found deleterious germline mutations of ATM in 2.7% of 335 gastric cancer patients of different ethnic origins. The frequency of deleterious ATM mutations in gastric cancer patients is significantly higher than that in general population (p=0.0000435), suggesting an association of ATM mutations with gastric cancer predisposition. We also observed biallelic inactivation of ATM in tumors of two gastric cancer patients. Further evaluation of ATM mutations in hereditary gastric cancer will facilitate genetic testing and risk assessment. PMID:26506520

  1. The Role of Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy in Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Seshadri, Ramakrishnan Ayloor; Glehen, Olivier

    2016-06-01

    Peritoneal metastasis, either synchronous or metachronous, is commonly seen in gastric cancer. It is associated with a poor prognosis, with a median survival of less than one year. The outcomes are not significantly improved by the use of systemic chemotherapy. We review the relevant literature on the role of HIPEC in gastric cancer. Cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) has been used in three situations in gastric cancer. Besides its role as a definitive treatment in patients with established peritoneal metastasis (PM), it has been used as a prophylaxis against peritoneal recurrence after curative surgery and also as a palliative treatment in advanced peritoneal metastasis with intractable ascites. While prophylactic HIPEC has been shown to reduce peritoneal recurrence and improve survival in many randomised trials, palliative HIPEC can reduce the need for frequent paracentesis. Although CRS with HIPEC has shown promise in increasing the survival of selected patients with established PM from gastric cancer, larger studies are needed before this can be accepted as a standard of care. PMID:27065710

  2. Basis of decreased risk of gastric cancer in severe atrophic gastritis with eradication of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Tari, Akira; Kitadai, Yasuhiko; Sumii, Masaharu; Sasaki, Atsunori; Tani, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Sinji; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2007-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection induces chronic gastritis and lowers gastric juice ascorbic acid concentrations. We investigated how H. pylori eradication affected multiple variables that could prevent or delay development of new or occult gastric cancer in patients with early gastric cancer treated by endoscopic mucosal resection. Gastric juice pH, nitrite concentrations, and total vitamin C concentrations, serum concentrations of vitamin C and specific H. pylori antibody, and intensity of neutrophil infiltration in gastric mucosa were determined before and after successful H. pylori eradication. Successful eradication increased acid output and ascorbic acid secretion into gastric juice, accompanied by disappearance of polymorphonuclear infiltration from the surface epithelium and decreased gastric juice nitrite concentrations. Our data suggest that H. pylori eradication decreases the nitrosation rate as the ratio of vitamin C to nitrite increases. This decreases reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide, eliminating their damaging effect on DNA and reducing cell turnover. PMID:17151803

  3. Function-preserving gastrectomy for gastric cancer in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Eiji; Okajima, Kunio

    2016-01-01

    Surgery used to be the only therapy for gastric cancer, and since its ability to cure gastric cancer was the focus of attention, less attention was paid to function-preserving surgery in gastric cancer, though it was studied for gastroduodenal ulcer. Maki et al developed pylorus-preserving gastrectomy for gastric ulcer in 1967. At the same time, the definition of early gastric cancer (EGC) was being considered, histopathological investigations of EGC were carried out, and the validity of modified surgery was sustained. After the development of H2-blockers, the number of operations for gastroduodenal ulcers decreased, and the number of EGC patients increased simultaneously. As a result, the indications for pylorus-preserving gastrectomy for EGC in the middle third of the stomach extended, and various alterations were added. Since then, many kinds of function-preserving gastrectomies have been performed and studied in other fields of gastric cancer, and proximal gastrectomy, jejunal pouch interposition, segmental gastrectomy, and local resection have been performed. On the other hand, from the overall perspective, it can be said that endoscopic resection, which was launched at almost the same time, is the ultimate function-preserving surgery under the current circumstances. The current function-preserving gastrectomies that are often performed and studied are pylorus-preserving gastrectomy and proximal gastrectomy. The reasons for this are that these procedures that can be performed with systemic lymph node dissection, and they include three important elements: (1) reduction of the extent of gastrectomy; (2) preservation of the pylorus; and (3) preservation of the vagal nerve. In addition, these operations are more likely to be performed with a laparoscopic approach as minimally invasive surgery. Of the above-mentioned three elements, reduction of the extent of gastrectomy is the most important in our view. Therefore, we should try to reduce the extent of gastrectomy

  4. Function-preserving gastrectomy for gastric cancer in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Eiji; Okajima, Kunio

    2016-07-14

    Surgery used to be the only therapy for gastric cancer, and since its ability to cure gastric cancer was the focus of attention, less attention was paid to function-preserving surgery in gastric cancer, though it was studied for gastroduodenal ulcer. Maki et al developed pylorus-preserving gastrectomy for gastric ulcer in 1967. At the same time, the definition of early gastric cancer (EGC) was being considered, histopathological investigations of EGC were carried out, and the validity of modified surgery was sustained. After the development of H2-blockers, the number of operations for gastroduodenal ulcers decreased, and the number of EGC patients increased simultaneously. As a result, the indications for pylorus-preserving gastrectomy for EGC in the middle third of the stomach extended, and various alterations were added. Since then, many kinds of function-preserving gastrectomies have been performed and studied in other fields of gastric cancer, and proximal gastrectomy, jejunal pouch interposition, segmental gastrectomy, and local resection have been performed. On the other hand, from the overall perspective, it can be said that endoscopic resection, which was launched at almost the same time, is the ultimate function-preserving surgery under the current circumstances. The current function-preserving gastrectomies that are often performed and studied are pylorus-preserving gastrectomy and proximal gastrectomy. The reasons for this are that these procedures that can be performed with systemic lymph node dissection, and they include three important elements: (1) reduction of the extent of gastrectomy; (2) preservation of the pylorus; and (3) preservation of the vagal nerve. In addition, these operations are more likely to be performed with a laparoscopic approach as minimally invasive surgery. Of the above-mentioned three elements, reduction of the extent of gastrectomy is the most important in our view. Therefore, we should try to reduce the extent of gastrectomy

  5. Glucose metabolism in gastric cancer: The cutting-edge

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Lian-Wen; Yamashita, Hiroharu; Seto, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Glucose metabolism in gastric cancer cells differs from that of normal epithelial cells. Upregulated aerobic glycolysis (Warburg effect) in gastric cancer meeting the demands of cell proliferation is associated with genetic mutations, epigenetic modification and proteomic alteration. Understanding the mechanisms of aerobic glycolysis may contribute to our knowledge of gastric carcinogenesis. Metabolomic studies offer novel, convenient and practical tools in the search for new biomarkers for early detection, diagnosis, prognosis, and chemosensitivity prediction of gastric cancer. Interfering with the process of glycolysis in cancer cells may provide a new and promising therapeutic strategy for gastric cancer. In this article, we present a brief review of recent studies of glucose metabolism in gastric cancer, with primary focus on the clinical applications of new biomarkers and their potential therapeutic role in gastric cancer. PMID:26877609

  6. Early gastric stump cancer following distal gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, K; Kondo, H; Saito, D; Shirao, K; Yamaguchi, H; Yokota, T; Yamao, G; Sano, T; Sasako, M; Yoshida, S

    1998-01-01

    Background—Gastric stump cancer (GSC) is usually diagnosed at an advanced stage, and consequently the prognosis is poor. 
Aims—To investigate the clinicopathological characteristics of GSC at an early stage to assist in its identification, and thereby improve its prognosis. 
Methods—Forty three patients with resected early GSC were compared with 156 patients with resected primary early cancer in the upper third of the stomach. 
Results—Sixty five per cent (28/43) of the early GSC patients showed the elevated type endoscopically, although the frequency of the depressed type in GSC has tended to increase in the past five years. This occurred in less than 26% (40/156) of the primary early cancers. Half of the early GSCs were located on the lesser curvature (47%), and revealed differentiated adenocarcinoma (81%) histologically. The male:female ratio of early GSC cases was about 6:1, which was much higher than that in patients with primary early cancer. The five year survival rates of patients with early GSCs and early primary cancers were 84% and 95%, respectively. GSC had a favourable prognosis, if it was detected at an early stage. 
Conclusion—To detect early GSC, our results suggest that special attention should be given to elevated as well as depressed lesions on the lesser curvature of the stomach, particularly in men, during endoscopic examinations. 

 Keywords: gastric stump cancer; early gastric cancer; prognosis; endoscopy PMID:9863478

  7. Development of gastric cancer and its prevention.

    PubMed

    Massarrat, Sadegh; Stolte, Manfred

    2014-07-01

    Gastric cancer is a heterogeneous disorder; genetic factors, H. pylori infection and various environmental factors contribute to its development. Advanced atrophic corpus-predominant gastritis provides the histological base for its genesis. Low socio-economic status and poor hygienic conditions, smoking habits, heavy alcohol consumption, high salt and low intake of vegetables and fruits are important external factors for the occurrence of gastric cancer. For its prevention, the eradication of H. pylori infection at an early age is mandatory for subjects at high risk or those living in areas with high prevalence of gastric cancer. Given that an increased serum level of Pepsinogen II is a good biomarker for the presence of gastritis, it seems reasonable to screen all infected subjects at risk of gastric cancer with increased serum pepsinogen II at an early age (at around 30 years) to eradicate H. pylori. An endoscopy should be performed for subjects at an older age (40 years and older), when increased serum pepsinogen II level is associated with decreased serum pepsinogen I and pepsinogen I to II ratio. PMID:24979566

  8. NCI International EBV-Gastric Cancer Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    A collaboration among NCI and extramural investigators, established by DCEG in 2006, that utilizes data and biospecimens from completed and ongoing case series and observational studies of gastric cancer to replicate and extend findings from previous studies hindered by small numbers of EBV-positive cases, and to stimulate multidisciplinary research in this area.

  9. Current status in remnant gastric cancer after distal gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Ohira, Masaichi; Toyokawa, Takahiro; Sakurai, Katsunobu; Kubo, Naoshi; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Muguruma, Kazuya; Yashiro, Masakazu; Onoda, Naoyoshi; Hirakawa, Kosei

    2016-02-28

    Remnant gastric cancer (RGC) and gastric stump cancer after distal gastrectomy (DG) are recognized as the same clinical entity. In this review, the current knowledges as well as the non-settled issues of RGC are presented. Duodenogastric reflux and denervation of the gastric mucosa are considered as the two main factors responsible for the development of RGC after benign disease. On the other hand, some precancerous circumstances which already have existed at the time of initial surgery, such as atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia, are the main factors associated with RGC after gastric cancer. Although eradication of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in remnant stomach is promising, it is still uncertain whether it can reduce the risk of carcinogenesis. Periodic endoscopic surveillance after DG was reported useful in detecting RGC at an early stage, which offers a chance to undergo minimally invasive endoscopic treatment or laparoscopic surgery and leads to an improved prognosis in RGC patients. Future challenges may be expected to elucidate the benefit of eradication of H. pylori in the remnant stomach if it could reduce the risk for RGC, to build an optimal endoscopic surveillance strategy after DG by stratifying the risk for development of RGC, and to develop a specific staging system for RGC for the standardization of the treatment by prospecting the prognosis. PMID:26937131

  10. Gene Expression Profiling of Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Marimuthu, Arivusudar; Jacob, Harrys K.C.; Jakharia, Aniruddha; Subbannayya, Yashwanth; Keerthikumar, Shivakumar; Kashyap, Manoj Kumar; Goel, Renu; Balakrishnan, Lavanya; Dwivedi, Sutopa; Pathare, Swapnali; Dikshit, Jyoti Bajpai; Maharudraiah, Jagadeesha; Singh, Sujay; Sameer Kumar, Ghantasala S; Vijayakumar, M.; Veerendra Kumar, Kariyanakatte Veeraiah; Premalatha, Chennagiri Shrinivasamurthy; Tata, Pramila; Hariharan, Ramesh; Roa, Juan Carlos; Prasad, T.S.K; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Kumar, Rekha Vijay; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide, both in men and women. A genomewide gene expression analysis was carried out to identify differentially expressed genes in gastric adenocarcinoma tissues as compared to adjacent normal tissues. We used Agilent’s whole human genome oligonucleotide microarray platform representing ~41,000 genes to carry out gene expression analysis. Two-color microarray analysis was employed to directly compare the expression of genes between tumor and normal tissues. Through this approach, we identified several previously known candidate genes along with a number of novel candidate genes in gastric cancer. Testican-1 (SPOCK1) was one of the novel molecules that was 10-fold upregulated in tumors. Using tissue microarrays, we validated the expression of testican-1 by immunohistochemical staining. It was overexpressed in 56% (160/282) of the cases tested. Pathway analysis led to the identification of several networks in which SPOCK1 was among the topmost networks of interacting genes. By gene enrichment analysis, we identified several genes involved in cell adhesion and cell proliferation to be significantly upregulated while those corresponding to metabolic pathways were significantly downregulated. The differentially expressed genes identified in this study are candidate biomarkers for gastric adenoacarcinoma. PMID:27030788

  11. Resveratrol: A potential challenger against gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zulueta, Aida; Caretti, Anna; Signorelli, Paola; Ghidoni, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is the fourth most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the world. Late diagnosis and classical therapeutic approaches such as surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy make this disease a still threatening tumor. Genetic asset, environmental stress, dietary habit and infections caused by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) are the major causes concurring to GC initiation. A common mechanism is induction of radicals resulting in gastric mucosal injury. A regular food intake of antioxidant and radical scavenging agents has been proposed to exert protection against tumorigenesis. Resveratrol belongs to the polyphenol flavonoids class of antioxidants produced by a restricted number of plants. Resveratrol exerts bactericidal activity against H. pylori and is a powerful antioxidant, thus acting as a tumor preventive agent. Resveratrol intracellular signaling results in growth arrest and apoptosis, so that it can be directed against tumor progression. Resveratrol therapeutic potential against GC initiation and progression are reviewed here. PMID:26457023

  12. Gastric Lgr5(+) stem cells are the cellular origin of invasive intestinal-type gastric cancer in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiu-Bin; Yang, Guan; Zhu, Liang; Tang, Yu-Ling; Zhang, Chong; Ju, Zhenyu; Yang, Xiao; Teng, Yan

    2016-07-01

    The cellular origin of gastric cancer remains elusive. Leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein-coupled receptor 5 (Lgr5) is the first identified marker of gastric stem cells. However, the role of Lgr5(+) stem cells in driving malignant gastric cancer is not fully validated. Here, we deleted Smad4 and PTEN in murine gastric Lgr5(+) stem cells by the inducible Cre-LoxP system and marked mutant Lgr5(+) stem cells and their progeny with Cre-reporter Rosa26(tdTomato). Rapid onset and progression from microadenoma and macroscopic adenoma to invasive intestinal-type gastric cancer (IGC) were found in the gastric antrum with the loss of Smad4 and PTEN. In addition, invasive IGC developed at the murine gastro-forestomach junction, where a few Lgr5(+) stem cells reside. In contrast, Smad4 and PTEN deletions in differentiated cells, including antral parietal cells, pit cells and corpus Lgr5(+) chief cells, failed to initiate tumor growth. Furthermore, mutant Lgr5(+) cells were involved in IGC growth and progression. In the TCGA (The Cancer Genome Atlas) database, an increase in LGR5 expression was manifested in the human IGC that occurred at the gastric antrum and gastro-esophageal junction. In addition, the concurrent deletion of SMAD4 and PTEN, as well as their reduced expression and deregulated downstream pathways, were associated with human IGC. Thus, we demonstrated that gastric Lgr5(+) stem cells were cancer-initiating cells and might act as cancer-propagating cells to contribute to malignant progression. PMID:27091432

  13. Molecular diagnosis for personalized target therapy in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jae Yong

    2013-09-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. In advanced and metastatic gastric cancer, the conventional chemotherapy with limited efficacy shows an overall survival period of about 10 months. Patient specific and effective treatments known as personalized cancer therapy is of significant importance. Advances in high-throughput technologies such as microarray and next generation sequencing for genes, protein expression profiles and oncogenic signaling pathways have reinforced the discovery of treatment targets and personalized treatments. However, there are numerous challenges from cancer target discoveries to practical clinical benefits. Although there is a flood of biomarkers and target agents, only a minority of patients are tested and treated accordingly. Numerous molecular target agents have been under investigation for gastric cancer. Currently, targets for gastric cancer include the epidermal growth factor receptor family, mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor axis, and the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-AKT-mammalian target of rapamycin pathways. Deeper insights of molecular characteristics for gastric cancer has enabled the molecular classification of gastric cancer, the diagnosis of gastric cancer, the prediction of prognosis, the recognition of gastric cancer driver genes, and the discovery of potential therapeutic targets. Not only have we deeper insights for the molecular diversity of gastric cancer, but we have also prospected both affirmative potentials and hurdles to molecular diagnostics. New paradigm of transdisciplinary team science, which is composed of innovative explorations and clinical investigations of oncologists, geneticists, pathologists, biologists, and bio-informaticians, is mandatory to recognize personalized target therapy. PMID:24156032

  14. Early Gastric Cancer Just above a Heterotopic Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Murabayashi, Toji; Kawaguchi, Shinya; Okuda, Naoko; Oyamada, Jun; Yabana, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    We report the first case of early gastric cancer just above a heterotopic pancreas for which the differential diagnosis was carcinoma arising from heterotopic pancreas. Routine upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in an 83-year-old man with sigmoid colon cancer revealed a gastric cancer in the lesser curvature of the antrum. Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) for evaluating the depth of tumor invasion revealed a hypoechoic mass in the submucosal layer. The depth of tumor invasion was diagnosed as muscularis propria. Distal gastrectomy and sigmoidectomy were performed. Histologically, the resected specimen of the stomach unexpectedly revealed a heterotopic pancreas just below the gastric cancer. They were not linked, and the heterotopic pancreas had no dysplasia. The gastric cancer had slightly invaded the submucosa. The hypoechoic mass on EUS was not the invasive tumor but the heterotopic pancreas. The preoperative staging of the gastric cancer on EUS was confounded by the presence of the heterotopic pancreas just below the gastric cancer. PMID:27482189

  15. Microsatellite Instability in Gastric Intestinal Metaplasia in Patients with and without Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Wai K.; Kim, Jae J.; Kim, Jong G.; Graham, David Y.; Sepulveda, Antonia R.

    2000-01-01

    The role and significance of microsatellite instability (MSI) in gastric carcinogenesis remain unknown. This study determined the chronology of MSI in gastric carcinogenesis by examining intestinal metaplasia (IM) from patients with and without gastric cancer. DNA was obtained from gastric specimens of 75 patients with gastric IM (30 cancer, 26 peptic ulcer, and 19 chronic gastritis patients) and was amplified with a set of eight microsatellite markers. Eight (26.7%) tumors and seven (9.3%) IM samples (three from cancer-free patients) displayed high-level MSI (three or more loci altered). Low-level MSI (one or two loci altered) was detected in 50% of the tumors, in 40% of IM samples coexisting with cancer, and in 38% of IM tissues of cancer-free individuals. Among the 30 cancer patients, microsatellites were more frequently altered in IM coexisting with tumors that showed MSI (P = 0.003). In addition, patients with low-level MSI in the tumor tissues were more likely to have active Helicobacter pylori infection than those with stable tumors (P = 0.02). In conclusion, this study indicates that MSI occurs not only in gastric IM of patients with gastric carcinoma, but also in IM of cancer-free individuals. These data suggest that the progressive accumulation of MSI in areas of IM may contribute to gastric cancer development, representing an important molecular event in the multistep gastric carcinogenesis cascade. PMID:10666383

  16. Helicobacter pylori infection in relation to gastric cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Venkateshwari, A; Krishnaveni, D; Venugopal, S; Shashikumar, P; Vidyasagar, A; Jyothy, A

    2011-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a major cause of cancer death worldwide, especially in developing countries. The incidence of gastric cancer varies from country to country, probably as a result of genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors. H. pylori infection is considered as a major risk factor in the development of gastric cancer. However, the scenario varies in Asian countries, exhibiting a higher rate of H. pylori infection and low incidence of gastric cancer, which could be attributed to strain-specific virulence factors and host genetic makeup. In this review, we discuss the various virulence factors expressed by this bacterium and their interaction with the host factors, to influence pathogenesis. PMID:21248438

  17. Pretreatment Gastric Lavage Reduces Postoperative Bleeding after Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection for Gastric Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Yuka; Itakura, Jun; Ueda, Ken; Suzuki, Shoko; Yasui, Yutaka; Tamaki, Nobuharu; Nakakuki, Natsuko; Takada, Hitomi; Ueda, Masako; Hayashi, Tsuguru; Kuwabara, Konomi; Takaura, Kenta; Higuchi, Mayu; Komiyama, Yasuyuki; Yoshida, Tsubasa; Izumi, Namiki

    2016-01-01

    Aim For patients receiving endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD), there is urgent need pertaining to the prevention of postoperative bleeding. We conducted a retrospective propensity score-matched study that evaluated whether pre-ESD gastric lavage prevents postoperative bleeding after ESD for gastric neoplasms. Methods From September 2002 to October 2015, the 760 consecutive patients receiving ESD for gastric neoplasm were enrolled and data regarding them were retrospectively analyzed. All patients received conventional preventive treatment against delayed bleeding after ESD, including the administration of proton pump inhibitor and preventive coagulation of visible vessels, at the end of the ESD procedure. Results Pre-ESD risk factors for postoperative bleeding included tumor size and no gastric lavage. Using multivariate analysis tumor size >2.0 cm (HR 2.90, 95% CI 1.65–5.10, p = 0.0002) and no gastric lavage (HR 3.20, 95% CI 1.13–9.11, p = 0.029) were found to be independent risk factors. Next, we evaluated the effect of gastric lavage on the prevention of post-ESD bleeding using a propensity score-matching method. A total of 284 subjects (142 per group) were selected. Adjusted odds ratio of gastric lavage for post-ESD bleeding was 0.25 (95% CI 0.071–0.886, p = 0.032). Conclusion Pretreatment gastric lavage reduced postoperative bleeding in patients receiving ESD for gastric neoplasm. PMID:26871449

  18. KDM5B is overexpressed in gastric cancer and is required for gastric cancer cell proliferation and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenran; Tang, Fang; Qi, Guangying; Yuan, Shengguang; Zhang, Guangyu; Tang, Bo; He, Songqing

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic alterations such as aberrant expression of histone-modifying enzymes have been implicated in tumorigenesis. KDM5B (also known as JARID1B) is a newly identified histone demethylase that regulates chromatin structure or gene expression by removing methyl residues from trimethylated lysine 4 on histone H3. Recent observations have shown oncogenic activity of KDM5B. However, the role of KDM5B in gastric cancer carcinogenesis remains unclear. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of KDM5B in gastric cancer. Immunohistochemical analysis, western blotting, and qRT-PCR were used to measure the levels of KDM5B in gastric cancer cell lines, 45 pairs of gastric cancer tissues and the adjacent nonneoplastic tissues. KDM5B and shKDM5B were transfected into gastric cancer cells to investigate its role on regulating cell proliferation which was measured by MTT and colony formation assay. Cell's migration and invasion were measured by Transwell and Matrigel analysis in vitro. PCNA expression was measured by immunofluorescence staining and immunohistochemical analysis. The in vivo tumorigenesis and metastasis assays were performed in SCID mice. In clinical gastric cancer samples, we found that KDM5B expression was significantly up-regulated in cancer lesions compared with paired normal gastric tissues. By silencing or overexpressing KDM5B in gastric cancer cells, we found that KDM5B could promote cell growth and metastasis in vitro. An in vivo assay showed that KDM5B not only dramatically promoted gastric cancer cell xenograft formation and growth but also promoted gastric cancer cell metastasis in a liver metastasis model. Moreover, we demonstrated that KDM5B promoted gastric cancer metastasis via regulation of the Akt pathway. Our study provided evidence that KDM5B functions as a novel tumor oncogene in gastric cancer and may be a potential therapeutic target for gastric cancer management. PMID:25628922

  19. KDM5B is overexpressed in gastric cancer and is required for gastric cancer cell proliferation and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhenran; Tang, Fang; Qi, Guangying; Yuan, Shengguang; Zhang, Guangyu; Tang, Bo; He, Songqing

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic alterations such as aberrant expression of histone-modifying enzymes have been implicated in tumorigenesis. KDM5B (also known as JARID1B) is a newly identified histone demethylase that regulates chromatin structure or gene expression by removing methyl residues from trimethylated lysine 4 on histone H3. Recent observations have shown oncogenic activity of KDM5B. However, the role of KDM5B in gastric cancer carcinogenesis remains unclear. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of KDM5B in gastric cancer. Immunohistochemical analysis, western blotting, and qRT-PCR were used to measure the levels of KDM5B in gastric cancer cell lines, 45 pairs of gastric cancer tissues and the adjacent nonneoplastic tissues. KDM5B and shKDM5B were transfected into gastric cancer cells to investigate its role on regulating cell proliferation which was measured by MTT and colony formation assay. Cell’s migration and invasion were measured by Transwell and Matrigel analysis in vitro. PCNA expression was measured by immunofluorescence staining and immunohistochemical analysis. The in vivo tumorigenesis and metastasis assays were performed in SCID mice. In clinical gastric cancer samples, we found that KDM5B expression was significantly up-regulated in cancer lesions compared with paired normal gastric tissues. By silencing or overexpressing KDM5B in gastric cancer cells, we found that KDM5B could promote cell growth and metastasis in vitro. An in vivo assay showed that KDM5B not only dramatically promoted gastric cancer cell xenograft formation and growth but also promoted gastric cancer cell metastasis in a liver metastasis model. Moreover, we demonstrated that KDM5B promoted gastric cancer metastasis via regulation of the Akt pathway. Our study provided evidence that KDM5B functions as a novel tumor oncogene in gastric cancer and may be a potential therapeutic target for gastric cancer management. PMID:25628922

  20. An epidemiologic analysis of mortality and gastric cancer in Newfoundland

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, C. J.; Fodor, J. G.; Canning, E.

    1973-01-01

    A descriptive epidemiologic study of general mortality and of deaths attributable to gastric cancer was undertaken in Newfoundland. General mortality as well as gastric cancer mortality was highest on the east coast and lowest in the northwest region. A close correspondence between general mortality and the geomorphology of the island was observed. Marked regional variations in gastric cancer mortality were observed, with consistently higher death rates being reported for the peninsula between Conception and Trinity Bays and other eastern sectors. No regular differences between rural versus urban mortality rates were observed for gastric cancer. The death rate for males was double that for females, and a slight downward trend in gastric cancer mortality from 1930 to 1971 was observed. This study reveals that gastric cancer mortality is high, by international comparisons, in Newfoundland, but is less than in the highest risk countries (Japan, Chile, Iceland). ImagesFIG. 2FIG. 4 PMID:4704906

  1. Metachronous gastric cancer after successful Helicobacter pylori eradication.

    PubMed

    Shiotani, Akiko; Haruma, Ken; Graham, David Y

    2014-09-01

    The high incidence of gastric cancer in Japan initially resulted in establishment of a country-wide gastric cancer screening program to detect early and treatable cancers. In 2013 countrywide Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication was approved coupled with endoscopy to assess for the presence of chronic gastritis. Current data support the notion that cure of the infection in those with non-atrophic gastritis will prevent development of gastric cancer. However, while progression to more severe damage is halted in those who have already developed, atrophic gastritis/gastric atrophy remain at risk for subsequent development of gastric cancer. That risk is directly related to the extent and severity of atrophic gastritis. Methods to stratify cancer risk include those based on endoscopic assessment of the atrophic border, histologic grading, and non-invasive methods based on serologic testing of pepsinogen levels. Continued surveillance is required because those with atrophic gastritis/gastric atrophy retain considerable gastric cancer risk even after H. pylori eradication. Those who have already experienced a resectable early gastric cancer are among those at highest risk as metachronous lesions are frequent even after H. pylori eradication. We review the role of H. pylori and effect of H. pylori eradication indicating the incidence and the predictive factors on development of metachronous cancer after endoscopic therapy of early gastric cancer. Studies to refine risk markers to stratify for risk, surveillance methods, intervals, and duration after successful H. pylori eradication, and whether adjuvant therapy would change risk are needed. PMID:25206262

  2. Podocalyxin as a Prognostic Marker in Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Laitinen, Alli; Böckelman, Camilla; Hagström, Jaana; Kokkola, Arto; Fermér, Christian; Nilsson, Olle; Haglund, Caj

    2015-01-01

    Background Podocalyxin-like 1 (PODXL) is a cell-adhesion glycoprotein associated with aggressive tumor phenotype and poor prognosis in several forms of cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate PODXL expression in gastric cancer by use of two different antibodies. Methods By tumor-tissue microarrays and immunohistochemistry we evaluated PODXL expression in tumor specimens from 337 patients who underwent surgery for gastric adenocarcinoma at Helsinki University Hospital. We used two different antibodies: HPA2110, which is a polyclonal antibody and an in-house monoclonal antibody called HES9, to investigate the association of PODXL expression with clinicopathologic variables and patient survival. Results PODXL staining was positive by the polyclonal antibody in 153 (57.5%) cases and by the monoclonal antibody in 212 (76%). Polyclonal antibody expression was associated with intestinal cancer type (p<0.001). Monoclonal antibody staining was associated with age over 66 (p = 0.001), with intestinal cancer (p<0.001), and with small tumor size (≤ 5 cm; p = 0.024). Both antibodies were associated with high S-phase fraction (p = 0.022; p = 0.010), and high tumor proliferation index (Ki-67; p = 0.003; p = 0.001). PODXL positivity by the polyclonal antibody indicated reduced gastric-cancer-specific 5-year survival of 24.0% (95% CI 16.9–31.1), compared to 43.3% (95% CI 33.7–52.9) for patients with PODXL negativity (p = 0.001). The result remained significant in multivariable analysis (HR = 3.17; 95% CI 1.37–7.34, p = 0.007). Conclusion In gastric cancer, PODXL expression by the polyclonal antibody HPA2110 is an independent marker of poor prognosis. PMID:26674770

  3. Gastric cancer research in Mexico: A public health priority

    PubMed Central

    Sampieri, Clara Luz; Mora, Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed review studies conducted on Mexican patients diagnosed with gastric cancer and/or diseases associated with its development, in which at least one Mexican institute has participated, and to assess their contributions to the primary and secondary prevention of this disease. A search of the Medline database was conducted using the following keywords: gastric/stomach cancer, Mexico. Studies of the Mexican population were selected in which at least one Mexican Institute had participated and where the findings could support public policy proposals directed towards the primary or secondary prevention of gastric cancer. Of the 148 studies found in the Medline database, 100 were discarded and 48 were reviewed. According to the analysis presented, these studies were classified as: epidemiology of gastric cancer (5/48); risk factors and protectors relating to gastric cancer (9/48); relationship between Helicobacter pylori and pathologies associated with gastric cancer and the development of the disease (16/48); relationship between the Epstein-Barr virus and pathologies associated with gastric cancer and the development of the disease (3/48); molecular markers for the development of diseases associated with gastric cancer and gastric cancer (15/48). Mexico requires a program for the prevention and control of gastric cancer based on national health indicators. This should be produced by a multidisciplinary committee of experts who can propose actions that are relevant in the current national context. The few studies of gastric cancer conducted on the Mexican population in national institutes highlight the poor connection that currently exists between the scientific community and the health sector in terms of resolving this health issue. Public policies for health research should support projects with findings that can be translated into benefits for the population. This review serves to identify national research groups studying gastric cancer in the Mexican

  4. Surgery for Liver Metastases From Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Martella, Luca; Bertozzi, Serena; Londero, Ambrogio P.; Steffan, Agostino; De Paoli, Paolo; Bertola, Giulio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The role of surgical therapy in patients with liver metastases from gastric cancer is still controversial. In this study, we investigated the results obtained with local treatment of hepatic metastases in patients with gastric cancer, by performing a systematic literature review and meta-analysis. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies published between 1990 and 2014. These works included multiple studies that evaluated the different survival rate among patients who underwent local treatment, such as hepatectomy or radiofrequency ablation, for hepatic metastases derived from primary gastric cancer. The collected studies were evaluated for heterogeneity, publication bias, and quality, and a pooled hazard ratio (HR) was calculated with a confidence interval estimated at 95% (95% CI). After conducting a thorough research among all published works, 2337 studies were found and after the review process 11 observational studies were included in the analysis. The total amount of patients considered in the survival analysis was 1010. An accurate analysis of all included studies reported a significantly higher survival rate in the group of patients who underwent the most aggressive local treatment for hepatic metastases (HR 0.54, 95% CI 0.46–0.95) as opposed to patients who underwent only palliation or systemic treatment. Furthermore, palliative local treatment of hepatic metastases had a higher survival rate if compared to surgical (without liver surgery) and systemic palliation (HR 0.50, 95% CI 0.26–0.96). Considering the only 3 studies where data from multivariate analyses was available, we found a higher survival rate in the local treatment groups, but the difference was not significant (HR 0.50, 95% CI 0.22–1.15). Curative and also palliative surgery of liver metastases from gastric cancer may improve patients’ survival. However, further trials are needed in order to better understand the role of surgery in this

  5. Pure intramedullary spinal cord metastasis secondary to gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Gazzeri, Roberto; Galarza, Marcelo; Faiola, Andrea; Gazzeri, Giovanni

    2006-04-01

    Pure intramedullary spinal-cord metastases (ISCM) are a rare manifestation of cancer. We report a case of ISCM from gastric cancer. A 68-year-old man, treated with total gastrectomy for a gastric cancer, presented 9 months later with paresis of the left arm, pain and dissociated sensory loss. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a pure intramedullary lesion at the C3-C5 level. After surgical resection, pathological findings revealed an undifferentiated adenocarcinoma of gastric origin. To our knowledge, this is only the second report of ISCM from gastric cancer in the literature. PMID:16465555

  6. HER2 testing in gastric cancer: An update

    PubMed Central

    Abrahao-Machado, Lucas Faria; Scapulatempo-Neto, Cristovam

    2016-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) overexpression is increasingly recognized as a frequent molecular abnormality in gastric and gastroesophageal cancer. With the recent introduction of HER2 molecular targeted therapy for patients with advanced gastric cancer, determination of HER2 status is crucial in order to select patients who may benefit from this treatment. This paper provides an update on our knowledge of HER2 in gastric and gastroesophageal cancer, including the prognostic relevance of HER2, the key differences between HER2 protein expression interpretation in breast and gastric cancer, the detection methods and the immunohistochemistry scoring system. PMID:27217694

  7. HER2 testing in gastric cancer: An update.

    PubMed

    Abrahao-Machado, Lucas Faria; Scapulatempo-Neto, Cristovam

    2016-05-21

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) overexpression is increasingly recognized as a frequent molecular abnormality in gastric and gastroesophageal cancer. With the recent introduction of HER2 molecular targeted therapy for patients with advanced gastric cancer, determination of HER2 status is crucial in order to select patients who may benefit from this treatment. This paper provides an update on our knowledge of HER2 in gastric and gastroesophageal cancer, including the prognostic relevance of HER2, the key differences between HER2 protein expression interpretation in breast and gastric cancer, the detection methods and the immunohistochemistry scoring system. PMID:27217694

  8. Reproductive factors, hormone use and gastric cancer risk: The Singapore Chinese Health Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhensheng; Butler, Lesley M; Wu, Anna H; Koh, Woon-Puay; Jin, Aizhen; Wang, Renwei; Yuan, Jian-Min

    2016-06-15

    Gastric cancer incidence varies greatly worldwide, but is consistently twice as high in men than in women. The hormone-related factors hypothesized to be associated with lower risk of gastric cancer in women have not been fully explored in populations with a high background risk of gastric cancer. The Singapore Chinese Health Study (SCHS) is a prospective cohort study in which 34,022 of the participants enrolled between 1993 and 1998 were women between 45 and 74 years of age. Information on reproductive histories, hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and oral contraceptive (OC) use was collected through in-person interviews at baseline. As of December 31, 2013, 269 incident gastric cancer cases were identified. Multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to evaluate gastric cancer risk associations. Older age at natural menopause (≥55 versus <45 years: HR = 0.50, 95% CI: 0.25-0.99), type of menopause (other versus natural: HR = 0.48, 95% CI: 0.27-0.87) and greater years of menstrual cycling (fourth versus first quartile: HR = 0.67, 95% CI: 0.46-0.96) were associated with a decreased risk of gastric cancer. Ever use of OCs and HRT was also associated with reduced risk of gastric cancer; the multivariable-adjusted HRs (95% CIs) were 0.40 (0.17-0.90) for use of HRT >3 years and 0.67 (0.47-0.94) for ever use of OCs, compared with never use. Reproductive factors associated with a longer window of fertility and the use of exogenous hormones were shown to reduce gastric cancer development in a cohort of Chinese women with a high background risk of gastric cancer. PMID:26829904

  9. Borrmann Type 4 Advanced Gastric Cancer: Focus on the Development of Scirrhous Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kyoungwon; Park, Moo In; Kim, Sung Eun; Park, Seun Ja

    2016-01-01

    Early diagnosis of Borrmann type 4 advanced gastric cancer (AGC) is very important for improving the prognosis of AGC patients. Because there is no definite mass in most cases of Borrmann type 4 AGC, its accurate diagnosis via endoscopy requires an understanding of its pathogenesis and developmental process. Moreover, many people confuse linitis plastica (LP) type gastric cancer (GC), scirrhous GC, and Borrmann type 4 AGC. To distinguish each of these cancers, knowledge of their endoscopic and pathological differences is necessary, especially for LP type GCs in the developmental stage. In conclusion, diagnosis of pre-stage or latent LP type GC before progression to typical LP type GC requires the detection of IIc-like lesions in the fundic gland area. It is also crucial to identify any abnormalities such as sclerosis of the gastric wall and hypertrophy of the mucosal folds during endoscopy. PMID:27456608

  10. Identification of Aberrantly Expressed miRNAs in Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dan; Hu, Xiaowei; Zhou, Hongfeng; Shi, Guangyue; Wu, Jin

    2014-01-01

    The noncoding components of the genome, including miRNA, can contribute to pathogenesis of gastric cancer. Their expression has been profiled in many human cancers, but there are a few published studies in gastric cancer. It is necessary to identify novel aberrantly expressed miRNAs in gastric cancer. In this study, the expression profile of 1891 miRNAs was analyzed using a miRCURY array LNA miRNA chip from three gastric cancer tissues and three normal tissues. The expression levels of 4 miRNAs were compared by real-time PCR between cancerous and normal tissues. We found that 31 miRNAs are upregulated in gastric cancer (P < 0.05) and 10 miRNAs have never been reported by other studies; 30 miRNA are downregulated (P < 0.05) in gastric cancer tissues. Gene ontology analysis revealed that those dysregulated miRNAs mainly take part in regulating cell proliferation. The levels of has-miR-105, -213∗, -514b, and -548n were tested by real-time PCR and have high levels in cancerous tissues. Here, we report a miRNA profile of gastric cancer and provide new perspective to understand this malignant disease. This novel information suggests the potential roles of these miRNAs in the diagnosis, prognosis biomarkers, or therapy targets of gastric cancer. PMID:24982669

  11. Screening for and surveillance of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Compare, Debora; Rocco, Alba; Nardone, Gerardo

    2014-10-14

    Although the prevalence of gastric cancer (GC) progressively decreased during the last decades, due to improved dietary habit, introduction of food refrigeration and recovered socio-economic level, it still accounts for 10% of the total cancer-related deaths. The best strategy to reduce the mortality for GC is to schedule appropriate screening and surveillance programs, that rises many relevant concerns taking into account its worldwide variability, natural history, diagnostic tools, therapeutic strategies, and cost-effectiveness. Intestinal-type, the most frequent GC histotype, develops through a multistep process triggered by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and progressing from gastritis to atrophy, intestinal metaplasia (IM), and dysplasia. However, the majority of patients infected with H. pylori and carrying premalignant lesions do not develop GC. Therefore, it remains unclear who should be screened, when the screening should be started and how the screening should be performed. It seems reasonable that screening programs should target the general population in eastern countries, at high prevalence of GC and the high-risk subjects in western countries, at low prevalence of GC. As far as concern surveillance, currently, we are lacking of standardized international recommendations and many features have to be defined regarding the optimal diagnostic approach, the patients at higher risk, the best timing and the cost-effectiveness. Anyway, patients with corpus atrophic gastritis, extensive incomplete IM and dysplasia should enter a surveillance program. At present, screening and surveillance programs need further studies to draw worldwide reliable recommendations and evaluate the impact on mortality for GC. PMID:25320506

  12. Downregulation of tumor suppressor QKI in gastric cancer and its implication in cancer prognosis

    SciTech Connect

    Bian, Yongqian; Wang, Li; Lu, Huanyu; Yang, Guodong; Zhang, Zhang; Fu, Haiyan; Lu, Xiaozhao; Wei, Mengying; Sun, Jianyong; Zhao, Qingchuan; Dong, Guanglong; Lu, Zifan

    2012-05-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer QKI expression is decreased in gastric cancer samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Promoter hyper methylation contributes to the downregulation of QKI. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer QKI inhibits the growth of gastric cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decreased QKI expression predicts poor survival. -- Abstract: Gastric cancer (GC) is the fourth most common cancer and second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. RNA-binding protein Quaking (QKI) is a newly identified tumor suppressor in multiple cancers, while its role in GC is largely unknown. Our study here aimed to clarify the relationship between QKI expression with the clinicopathologic characteristics and the prognosis of GC. In the 222 GC patients' specimens, QKI expression was found to be significantly decreased in most of the GC tissues, which was largely due to promoter hypermethylation. QKI overexpression reduced the proliferation ability of GC cell line in vitro study. In addition, the reduced QKI expression correlated well with poor differentiation status, depth of invasion, gastric lymph node metastasis, distant metastasis, advanced TNM stage, and poor survival. Multivariate analysis showed QKI expression was an independent prognostic factor for patient survival.

  13. Differential Proteomic Analysis of Human Saliva using Tandem Mass Tags Quantification for Gastric Cancer Detection

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Hua; Zhang, Yan; Kim, Yong; Kim, Sung; Kim, Jae Joon; Kim, Kyoung Mee; Yoshizawa, Janice; Fan, Liu-Yin; Cao, Cheng-Xi; Wong, David T. W.

    2016-01-01

    Novel biomarkers and non-invasive diagnostic methods are urgently needed for the screening of gastric cancer to reduce its high mortality. We employed quantitative proteomics approach to develop discriminatory biomarker signatures from human saliva for the detection of gastric cancer. Salivary proteins were analyzed and compared between gastric cancer patients and matched control subjects by using tandem mass tags (TMT) technology. More than 500 proteins were identified with quantification, and 48 of them showed significant difference expression (p < 0.05) between normal controls and gastric cancer patients, including 7 up-regulated proteins and 41 down-regulated proteins. Five proteins were selected for initial verification by ELISA and three were successfully verified, namely cystatin B (CSTB), triosephosphate isomerase (TPI1), and deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 protein (DMBT1). All three proteins could differentiate gastric cancer patients from normal control subjects, dramatically (p < 0.05). The combination of these three biomarkers could reach 85% sensitivity and 80% specificity for the detection of gastric cancer with accuracy of 0.93. This study provides the proof of concept of salivary biomarkers for the non-invasive detection of gastric cancer. It is highly encouraging to turn these biomarkers into an applicable clinical test after large scale validation. PMID:26911362

  14. Differential Proteomic Analysis of Human Saliva using Tandem Mass Tags Quantification for Gastric Cancer Detection.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Hua; Zhang, Yan; Kim, Yong; Kim, Sung; Kim, Jae Joon; Kim, Kyoung Mee; Yoshizawa, Janice; Fan, Liu-Yin; Cao, Cheng-Xi; Wong, David T W

    2016-01-01

    Novel biomarkers and non-invasive diagnostic methods are urgently needed for the screening of gastric cancer to reduce its high mortality. We employed quantitative proteomics approach to develop discriminatory biomarker signatures from human saliva for the detection of gastric cancer. Salivary proteins were analyzed and compared between gastric cancer patients and matched control subjects by using tandem mass tags (TMT) technology. More than 500 proteins were identified with quantification, and 48 of them showed significant difference expression (p < 0.05) between normal controls and gastric cancer patients, including 7 up-regulated proteins and 41 down-regulated proteins. Five proteins were selected for initial verification by ELISA and three were successfully verified, namely cystatin B (CSTB), triosephosphate isomerase (TPI1), and deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 protein (DMBT1). All three proteins could differentiate gastric cancer patients from normal control subjects, dramatically (p < 0.05). The combination of these three biomarkers could reach 85% sensitivity and 80% specificity for the detection of gastric cancer with accuracy of 0.93. This study provides the proof of concept of salivary biomarkers for the non-invasive detection of gastric cancer. It is highly encouraging to turn these biomarkers into an applicable clinical test after large scale validation. PMID:26911362

  15. Dehydroeffusol effectively inhibits human gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry with low toxicity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenming; Meng, Mei; Zhang, Bin; Du, Longsheng; Pan, Yanyan; Yang, Ping; Gu, Zhenlun; Zhou, Quansheng; Cao, Zhifei

    2015-09-01

    Accumulated data has shown that various vasculogenic tumor cells, including gastric cancer cells, are able to directly form tumor blood vessels via vasculogenic mimicry, supplying oxygen and nutrients to tumors, and facilitating progression and metastasis of malignant tumors. Therefore, tumor vasculogenic mimicry is a rational target for developing novel anticancer therapeutics. However, effective antitumor vasculogenic mimicry-targeting drugs are not clinically available. In this study, we purified 2,7-dihydroxyl-1-methyl-5-vinyl-phenanthrene, termed dehydroeffusol, from the traditional Chinese medicinal herb Juncus effusus L., and found that dehydroeffusol effectively inhibited gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry in vitro and in vivo with very low toxicity. Dehydroeffusol significantly suppressed gastric cancer cell adhesion, migration, and invasion. Molecular mechanistic studies revealed that dehydroeffusol markedly inhibited the expression of a vasculogenic mimicry master gene VE-cadherin and reduced adherent protein exposure on the cell surface by inhibiting gene promoter activity. In addition, dehydroeffusol significantly decreased the expression of a key vasculogenic gene matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) in gastric cancer cells, and diminished MMP2 protease activity. Together, our results showed that dehydroeffusol effectively inhibited gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry with very low toxicity, suggesting that dehydroeffusol is a potential drug candidate for anti-gastric cancer neovascularization and anti-gastric cancer therapy. PMID:25982451

  16. Dehydroeffusol effectively inhibits human gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry with low toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenming; Meng, Mei; Zhang, Bin; Du, Longsheng; Pan, Yanyan; Yang, Ping; Gu, Zhenlun; Zhou, Quansheng Cao, Zhifei

    2015-09-01

    Accumulated data has shown that various vasculogenic tumor cells, including gastric cancer cells, are able to directly form tumor blood vessels via vasculogenic mimicry, supplying oxygen and nutrients to tumors, and facilitating progression and metastasis of malignant tumors. Therefore, tumor vasculogenic mimicry is a rational target for developing novel anticancer therapeutics. However, effective antitumor vasculogenic mimicry-targeting drugs are not clinically available. In this study, we purified 2,7-dihydroxyl-1-methyl-5-vinyl-phenanthrene, termed dehydroeffusol, from the traditional Chinese medicinal herb Juncus effusus L., and found that dehydroeffusol effectively inhibited gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry in vitro and in vivo with very low toxicity. Dehydroeffusol significantly suppressed gastric cancer cell adhesion, migration, and invasion. Molecular mechanistic studies revealed that dehydroeffusol markedly inhibited the expression of a vasculogenic mimicry master gene VE-cadherin and reduced adherent protein exposure on the cell surface by inhibiting gene promoter activity. In addition, dehydroeffusol significantly decreased the expression of a key vasculogenic gene matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) in gastric cancer cells, and diminished MMP2 protease activity. Together, our results showed that dehydroeffusol effectively inhibited gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry with very low toxicity, suggesting that dehydroeffusol is a potential drug candidate for anti-gastric cancer neovascularization and anti-gastric cancer therapy. - Highlights: • Dehydroeffusol markedly inhibits gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry. • Dehydroeffusol suppresses the expression of vasculogenic mimicry key gene VE-cadherin. • Dehydroeffusol decreases the MMP2 expression and activity in gastric cancer cells. • Dehydroeffusol is a potential anti-cancer drug candidate with very low toxicity.

  17. Cancer type-specific epigenetic changes: gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; de Arruda Cardoso Smith, Marília; Burbano, Rommel Rodriguez

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) remains a major cause of mortality despite declining rate in the world. Epigenetic alterations contribute significantly to the development and progression of gastric tumors. Epigenetic refers to the number of modifications of the chromatin structure that affect gene expression without altering the primary sequence of DNA, and these changes lead to transcriptional activation or silencing of the gene. Over the years, the study of epigenetic processes has increased, and novel therapeutic approaches have emerged. This chapter summarizes the main epigenomic mechanisms described recently involved in gastric carcinogenesis, focusing on the roles that aberrant DNA methylation, histone modifications (histone acetylation and methylation), and miRNAs (oncogenic and tumor suppressor function of miRNA) play in the onset and progression of gastric tumors. Clinical implications of these epigenetic alterations in GC are also discussed. PMID:25421656

  18. Pylorus-Preserving Gastrectomy for Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Seung-Young; Yang, Han-Kwang

    2016-01-01

    Pylorus-preserving gastrectomy (PPG) is a function-preserving surgery for the treatment of early gastric cancer (EGC), aiming to decrease the complication rate and improve postoperative quality of life. According to the Japanese gastric cancer treatment guidelines, PPG can be performed for cT1N0M0 gastric cancer located in the middle-third of the stomach, at least 4.0 cm away from the pylorus. Although the length of the antral cuff gradually increased, from 1.5 cm during the initial use of the procedure to 3.0 cm currently, its optimal length still remains unclear. Standard procedures for the preservation of pyloric function, infra-pyloric vessels, and hepatic branch of the vagus nerve, make PPG technically more difficult and raise concerns about incomplete lymph node dissection. The short- and long-term oncological and survival outcomes of PPG were comparable to those for distal gastrectomy, but with several advantages such as a lower incidence of dumping syndrome, bile reflux, and gallstone formation, and improved nutritional status. Gastric stasis, a typical complication of PPG, can be effectively treated by balloon dilatation and stent insertion. Robot-assisted pylorus-preserving gastrectomy is feasible for EGC in the middle-third of the stomach in terms of the short-term clinical outcome. However, any benefits over laparoscopy-assisted PPG (LAPPG) from the patient's perspective have not yet been proven. An ongoing Korean multicenter randomized controlled trial (KLASS-04), which compares LAPPG and laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy for EGC in the middle-third of the stomach, may provide more clear evidence about the advantages and oncologic safety of PPG. PMID:27433390

  19. Pylorus-Preserving Gastrectomy for Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Oh, Seung-Young; Lee, Hyuk-Joon; Yang, Han-Kwang

    2016-06-01

    Pylorus-preserving gastrectomy (PPG) is a function-preserving surgery for the treatment of early gastric cancer (EGC), aiming to decrease the complication rate and improve postoperative quality of life. According to the Japanese gastric cancer treatment guidelines, PPG can be performed for cT1N0M0 gastric cancer located in the middle-third of the stomach, at least 4.0 cm away from the pylorus. Although the length of the antral cuff gradually increased, from 1.5 cm during the initial use of the procedure to 3.0 cm currently, its optimal length still remains unclear. Standard procedures for the preservation of pyloric function, infra-pyloric vessels, and hepatic branch of the vagus nerve, make PPG technically more difficult and raise concerns about incomplete lymph node dissection. The short- and long-term oncological and survival outcomes of PPG were comparable to those for distal gastrectomy, but with several advantages such as a lower incidence of dumping syndrome, bile reflux, and gallstone formation, and improved nutritional status. Gastric stasis, a typical complication of PPG, can be effectively treated by balloon dilatation and stent insertion. Robot-assisted pylorus-preserving gastrectomy is feasible for EGC in the middle-third of the stomach in terms of the short-term clinical outcome. However, any benefits over laparoscopy-assisted PPG (LAPPG) from the patient's perspective have not yet been proven. An ongoing Korean multicenter randomized controlled trial (KLASS-04), which compares LAPPG and laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy for EGC in the middle-third of the stomach, may provide more clear evidence about the advantages and oncologic safety of PPG. PMID:27433390

  20. Role of cyclooxygenase-2 in gastric cancer development and progression

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jian; Fan, Xiao-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Although the incidence of gastric cancer has been declining in recent decades, it remains a major public health issue as the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide. In China, gastric cancer is still the main cause of death in patients with malignant tumors. Most patients are diagnosed at an advanced stage and mortality is high. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is a rate-limiting enzyme in prostanoid synthesis and plays an important role in the development and progression of gastric cancer. The expression of COX-2 in gastric cancer is upregulated and its molecular mechanisms have been investigated. Helicobacter pylori infection, tumor suppressor gene mutation and the activation of nuclear factor-kappa B may be responsible for the elevated expression of COX-2 in gastric cancer. The mechanisms of COX-2 in the development and progression of gastric cancer are probably through promoting the proliferation of gastric cancer cells, while inhibiting apoptosis, assisting angiogenesis and lymphatic metastasis, and participating in cancer invasion and immunosuppression. This review is intended to discuss, comment and summarize recent research progress on the role of COX-2 in gastric cancer development and progression, and elucidate the molecular mechanisms which might be involved in the carcinogenesis. PMID:24259966

  1. A Phase I/II Study of Oblimersen Plus Cisplatin and Fluorouracil in Gastric & Esophageal Junction Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-10

    Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Esophagus; Stage III Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  2. CEACAM6 promotes tumor angiogenesis and vasculogenic mimicry in gastric cancer via FAK signaling.

    PubMed

    Zang, Mingde; Zhang, Yunqiang; Zhang, Baogui; Hu, Lei; Li, Jianfang; Fan, Zhiyuan; Wang, Hexiao; Su, Liping; Zhu, Zhenggang; Li, Chen; Yan, Chao; Gu, Qinlong; Liu, Bingya; Yan, Min

    2015-05-01

    CEACAM6 is a member of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-linked immunoglobulin superfamily that is implicated in a variety of human cancers. In our previous study, we reported that CEACAM6 was overexpressed in gastric cancer tissues and promoted cancer metastasis. The purpose of this study is to determine the role of CEACAM6 in tumor angiogenesis and mimicry formation. We found that overexpressed CEACAM6 promoted tubule formation dependent on HUVEC cells and vasculogenic mimicry formation of gastric cancer cells; opposing results were achieved in CEACAM6-silenced groups. Moreover, we found that mosaic vessels formed by HUVEC cells and gastric cancer cells were observed in vitro by 3D-culture assay. Overexpressed CEACAM6 in gastric cancer cells promoted tumor growth, VEGF expression and vasculogenic mimicry structures formation in vivo. In accordance with these observations, we found that phosphorylation of FAK and phosphorylation of paxillin were up-regulated in CEACAM6-overexpressing gastric cancer cells, and FAK inhibitor Y15 could reduce tubule and vasculogenic mimicry formation. These findings suggest that CEACAM6 promotes tumor angiogenesis and vasculogenic mimicry formation via FAK signaling in gastric cancer and CEACAM6 may be a new target for cancer anti-vascular treatment. PMID:25703140

  3. Gastric cancer: Prevention, screening and early diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Pasechnikov, Victor; Chukov, Sergej; Fedorov, Evgeny; Kikuste, Ilze; Leja, Marcis

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer continues to be an important healthcare problem from a global perspective. Most of the cases in the Western world are diagnosed at late stages when the treatment is largely ineffective. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is a well-established carcinogen for gastric cancer. While lifestyle factors are important, the efficacy of interventions in their modification, as in the use of antioxidant supplements, is unconvincing. No organized screening programs can be found outside Asia (Japan and South Korea). Although several screening approaches have been proposed, including indirect atrophy detection by measuring pepsinogen in the circulation, none of them have so far been implemented, and more study data is required to justify any implementation. Mass eradication of H. pylori in high-risk areas tends to be cost-effective, but its adverse effects and resistance remain a concern. Searches for new screening biomarkers, including microRNA and cancer-autoantibody panels, as well as detection of volatile organic compounds in the breath, are in progress. Endoscopy with a proper biopsy follow-up remains the standard for early detection of cancer and related premalignant lesions. At the same time, new advanced high-resolution endoscopic technologies are showing promising results with respect to diagnosing mucosal lesions visually and targeting each biopsy. New histological risk stratifications (classifications), including OLGA and OLGIM, have recently been developed. This review addresses the current means for gastric cancer primary and secondary prevention, the available and emerging methods for screening, and new developments in endoscopic detection of early lesions of the stomach. PMID:25320521

  4. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lei; Wu, Ruo-Lin; Xu, A-Man

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is one of the most common malignancies worldwide with poor prognosis for lack of early detection and effective treatment modalities. The significant influence of tumor microenvironment on malignant cells has been extensively investigated in this targeted-therapy era. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a highly conserved and fundamental process that is critical for embryogenesis and some other pathophysiological processes, especially tumor genesis and progression. Aberrant gastric EMT activation could endow gastric epithelial cells with increased mesenchymal characteristics and less epithelial features, and promote cancer cell stemness, initiation, invasion, metastasis, and chemo-resistance with cellular adhesion molecules especially E-cadherin concomitantly repressed, which allows tumor cells to disseminate and spread throughout the body. Some pathogens, stress, and hypoxia could induce and aggravate GC via EMT, which is significantly correlated with prognosis. GC EMT is modulated by diverse micro-environmental, membrane, and intracellular cues, and could be triggered by various overexpressed transcription factors, which are downstream of several vital cross-talking signaling pathways including TGF-β, Wnt/β-catenin, Notch, etc. microRNAs also contribute significantly to GC EMT modulation. There are currently some agents which could suppress GC EMT, shedding light on novel anti-malignancy strategies. Investigating potential mechanisms modulating GC cell EMT and discovering novel EMT regulators will further elucidate GC biology, and may provide new biomarkers for early GC detection and potentially efficient targets for preventative and curative anti-GC intervention approaches to prevent local and distant invasions. PMID:26807164

  5. Expression of stem cell markers nanog and PSCA in gastric cancer and its significance

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, XUANZHONG; WANG, FENG; HOU, MINGXING

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine the expression of stem cell markers Nanog compared with PSCA in gastric cancer tissues and adjacent normal tissues, and to investigate the association between tumor stem cells and initiation, progression, metastasis, and prognosis of gastric cancer. One hundred chemotherapy- and radiotherapy-naive patients with pathologically confirmed gastric cancer were enrolled from the General Surgery Department and Surgical Oncology Department of the Affiliated Hospital of Inner Mongolia Medical University (Hohhot, P.R. China), between October 2011 and June 2013. Surgically resected specimens of cancer tissues and adjacent normal tissues (>5 cm from the boundary of cancerous component) were collected. The mRNA expression levels of Nanog and PSCA in those tissues was determined by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). The correlation between the expression of stem cell markers Nanog and PSCA in gastric cancer tissues and clinicopathological factors was analyzed. The qPCR results demonstrated that the relative expression of Nanog was increased in gastric cancer tissues compared with in the adjacent tissues (P<0.05); and relative expression of PSCA was reduced in gastric cancer tissues compared with adjacent tissues (P<0.05). The expression of Nanog and PSCA in gastric cancer tissues was associated with tumor differentiation. The expression of Nanog was increased in poorly-differentiated and undifferentiated tumors compared with moderately- and well-differentiated tumors (P<0.05). The expression of PSCA was reduced in poorly differentiated and undifferentiated tumors compared with moderately- and well-differentiated tumors (P<0.05). However, the expression of Nanog and PSCA was not associated with age, gender, tumor size, TNM stage, depth of invasion, or lymph node metastasis. Therefore, Nanog and PSCA may have potential as molecular markers to reflect the differentiation status of gastric cancer. PMID

  6. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition in gastric cancer (Review).

    PubMed

    Katoh, Masaru

    2005-12-01

    Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR), endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD), surgical gastrectomy, and chemotherapy are therapeutic options of gastric cancer; how-ever, prognosis of advanced gastric cancer patients is still poor. Gastric cancer cells with fibroblastoid morphological changes show increased motility and invasiveness due to decreased cell-cell adhesion, which are reminiscent of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) during embryonic development. Here, EMT signaling networks in gastric cancer were reviewed. E-cadherin at adherens junction is a key molecular target of EMT. CDH1 gene at human chromosome 16q22.1 encodes E-cadherin. Familial diffuse type gastric cancer occurs due to germ-line mutations of the CDH1 gene. Down-regulation of E-cadherin function due to mutation, deletion, CpG hyper-methylation, and SNAIL (SNAI1)- or SIP1-mediated transcriptional repression of the CDH1 gene leads to EMT in gastric cancer. Amplification of ERBB2, MET, FGFR2, PIK3CA, AKT1 genes, up-regulation of WNT2, WNT2B, WNT8B, and down-regulation of SFRP1 lead to EMT in gastric cancer through GSK3beta inhibition and following SNAIL-mediated CDH1 repression. Claudin (CLDN) and PAR3/PAR6/aPKC complex at tight junction are other key molecular targets of EMT. CLDN23 gene is down-regulated in intestinal type gastric cancer. Down-regulation of PAR3/PAR6/aPKC complex also leads to EMT. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and copy number polymorphisms (CNPs) of genes encoding EMT signaling molecules will be identified as novel risk factors of gastric cancer. In addition, antibodies, RNAi compounds, and small molecular inhibitors for EMT signaling molecules will be developed as novel therapeutic agents for gastric cancer. Personalized medicine based on the combination of genetic screening and novel therapeutic agents could dramatically improve the prognosis of gastric cancer patients in the future. PMID:16273224

  7. The enigma of Helicobacter pylori infection and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ghoshal, Uday C.; Chaturvedi, Rupesh

    2011-01-01

    Although H. pylori has been recognized as a class I carcinogen, incongruence between infection prevalence and cancer incidence has been reported. Holcombe called attention to the high prevalence of infection in the face of low cancer rates, which he called “The African Enigma”. Similar observations have now been made in other geographic areas. Gastric carcinoma should be considered an infectious disease, for which the classical epidemiologic model of causality applies. The model proposes that tissue injury inflicted by the infectious agent is modulated by its interactions with host and environmental factors. Although approximately half of the world’s population is infected, only a small proportion of people develop cancer. The African enigma is a striking example of the major contrasts in cancer risk among populations with similarly high prevalence of infection. The mechanisms involved in reducing the risk of cancer in infected individuals are explored in this article, which may lead to the design of effective prevention strategies. PMID:20585917

  8. Prognostic value of decreased expression of RBM4 in human gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Hongmei; Zhu, Huijun; Zhang, Shu; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Wei; Chen, Chen; Ding, Guipeng; Zhu, Lun; Zhu, Ziyuan; Liu, Huaidong; Zhang, Yongjie; Wen, Jinbo; Kang, Xing; Zhu, Jin; Feng, Zhenqing; Liu, Baorui

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding motif 4 (RBM4) is a multifunctional protein that participates in regulating alternative splicing and mRNA translation. Its reduced expression has been associated with poor overall survival in lung cancer, breast cancer and ovarian cancer. We assessed RBM4 protein expression levels with immunohistochemistry in tissue microarrays containing malignant gastric cancer tissues and benign tissues from 813 patients. We also examined the expression levels of RBM4 mRNA in twenty-five paired gastric cancer samples and adjacent noncancerous tissues. Both RBM4 protein and mRNA expression levels were significantly lower in gastric cancer tissues compared with the adjacent noncancerous tissues. There was a significant association between reduced RBM4 protein expression and differentiation (P < 0.001), lymph node metastasis (P = 0.026), TNM state (P = 0.014) and distant metastasis (P = 0.036). Patients with reduced RBM4 expression (P < 0.001, CI = 0.315–0.710) and TNM stage III and IV (P < 0.001, CI = 4.757–11.166) had a poor overall survival. These findings suggest that RBM4 is a new biomarker in gastric cancer, as the reduced expression of this protein is correlated with poor differentiation, lymph node status and distant metastasis. Further, lower RBM4 expression is an independent prognostic marker for gastric cancer. PMID:27324405

  9. Mouse models for gastric cancer: Matching models to biological questions.

    PubMed

    Poh, Ashleigh R; O'Donoghue, Robert J J; Ernst, Matthias; Putoczki, Tracy L

    2016-07-01

    Gastric cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. This is in part due to the asymptomatic nature of the disease, which often results in late-stage diagnosis, at which point there are limited treatment options. Even when treated successfully, gastric cancer patients have a high risk of tumor recurrence and acquired drug resistance. It is vital to gain a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying gastric cancer pathogenesis to facilitate the design of new-targeted therapies that may improve patient survival. A number of chemically and genetically engineered mouse models of gastric cancer have provided significant insight into the contribution of genetic and environmental factors to disease onset and progression. This review outlines the strengths and limitations of current mouse models of gastric cancer and their relevance to the pre-clinical development of new therapeutics. PMID:26809278

  10. Epigenetics: An emerging player in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Changwon; Song, Ji-Joon; Lee, Jaeok; Kim, Mi Young

    2014-01-01

    Cancers, like other diseases, arise from gene mutations and/or altered gene expression, which eventually cause dysregulation of numerous proteins and noncoding RNAs. Changes in gene expression, i.e., upregulation of oncogenes and/or downregulation of tumor suppressor genes, can be generated not only by genetic and environmental factors but also by epigenetic factors, which are inheritable but nongenetic modifications of cellular chromosome components. Identification of the factors that contribute to individual cancers is a prerequisite to a full understanding of cancer mechanisms and the development of customized cancer therapies. The search for genetic and environmental factors has a long history in cancer research, but epigenetic factors only recently began to be associated with cancer formation, progression, and metastasis. Epigenetic alterations of chromatin include DNA methylation and histone modifications, which can affect gene-expression profiles. Recent studies have revealed diverse mechanisms by which chromatin modifiers, including writers, erasers and readers of the aforementioned modifications, contribute to the formation and progression of cancer. Furthermore, functional RNAs, such as microRNAs and long noncoding RNAs, have also been identified as key players in these processes. This review highlights recent findings concerning the epigenetic alterations associated with cancers, especially gastric cancer. PMID:24914365

  11. Epigenetics: an emerging player in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kang, Changwon; Song, Ji-Joon; Lee, Jaeok; Kim, Mi Young

    2014-06-01

    Cancers, like other diseases, arise from gene mutations and/or altered gene expression, which eventually cause dysregulation of numerous proteins and noncoding RNAs. Changes in gene expression, i.e., upregulation of oncogenes and/or downregulation of tumor suppressor genes, can be generated not only by genetic and environmental factors but also by epigenetic factors, which are inheritable but nongenetic modifications of cellular chromosome components. Identification of the factors that contribute to individual cancers is a prerequisite to a full understanding of cancer mechanisms and the development of customized cancer therapies. The search for genetic and environmental factors has a long history in cancer research, but epigenetic factors only recently began to be associated with cancer formation, progression, and metastasis. Epigenetic alterations of chromatin include DNA methylation and histone modifications, which can affect gene-expression profiles. Recent studies have revealed diverse mechanisms by which chromatin modifiers, including writers, erasers and readers of the aforementioned modifications, contribute to the formation and progression of cancer. Furthermore, functional RNAs, such as microRNAs and long noncoding RNAs, have also been identified as key players in these processes. This review highlights recent findings concerning the epigenetic alterations associated with cancers, especially gastric cancer. PMID:24914365

  12. Specific expression and methylation of SLIT1, SLIT2, SLIT3, and miR-218 in gastric cancer subtypes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mirang; Kim, Jong-Hwan; Baek, Su-Jin; Kim, Seon-Young; Kim, Yong Sung

    2016-06-01

    SLIT has been suggested as a key regulator of cancer development and a promising therapeutic target for cancer treatment. Herein, we analyzed expression and methylation of SLIT1/SLIT2/SLIT3 in 11 gastric cancer cell lines, 96 paired gastric tumors and adjacent normal gastric tissues, and 250 gastric cancers provided by The Cancer Genome Atlas. Methylation of SLIT1/SLIT2/SLIT3 was found both in early gastric cancers, and in advanced gastric cancers. Even normal gastric tissue showed increased methylation of SLIT1 and SLIT3 that correlated with patient age. Furthermore, epigenetic inactivation of SLIT occurred in a gastric cancer subtype-dependent manner. SLIT2 and SLIT3 expression was reduced in Epstein-Barr virus-positive and microsatellite instability subtypes, but increased in the genomically stable subtype. Expression of miR‑218 correlated negatively with methylation of SLIT2 or SLIT3. These findings suggest that a molecular subtype-specific therapeutic strategy is needed for targeting SLITs and miR-218 in treatment of gastric cancer. PMID:27082735

  13. Deregulated expression of Nucleophosmin 1 in gastric cancer and its clinicopathological implications

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The process of gastric carcinogenesis still remains to be elucidated. The identification of genes related to this process may help to reduce mortality rates through early diagnosis and the development of new anticancer therapies. Nucleophosmin 1 (NPM1) acts in ribosome biogenesis, centrosome duplication, maintenance of genomic stability, and embryonic development. Recently, NPM1 has been implicated in the tumorigenesis processes. Here, we evaluated NPM1 gene and protein expression in gastric tumors and in corresponding non-neoplastic gastric samples. Methods NPM1 protein expression was determined by Western blot in 17 pairs of gastric tumors and corresponding non-neoplastic gastric tissue. The protein immunoreactivity was observed in 12 tumor samples. mRNA expression was evaluated by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) in 22 pairs of gastric tumors and in matched non-neoplastic gastric tissue. Results NPM1 protein expression was significantly reduced in gastric cancer samples compared to matched non-neoplastic gastric samples (P = 0.019). The protein level of NPM1 was reduced at least 1.5-fold in 35% of tumors compared to paired non-neoplastic gastric tissue. However, NPM1 immunoreactivity was detected in neoplastic and non-neoplastic cells, including in intestinal metaplastic, gastritis and inflammatory cells. NPM1 was mainly expressed in nucleus and nucleolus subcellular compartments. The staining intensity and the percentage of immunoreactive cells varied among the studied cases. The NPM1 mRNA level was reduced at least 1.5-fold in 45.5% of samples and increased in 27.3% of samples. An inverse correlation between protein and mRNA expression was detected (r = -0.509, P = 0.037). Intestinal-type gastric cancer presented higher mRNA levels than diffuse-type (P = 0.026). However, reduced NPM1 protein expression was associated with intestinal-type gastric cancer compared to matched non-neoplastic gastric

  14. Atractylenolide I-mediated Notch pathway inhibition attenuates gastric cancer stem cell traits

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Li; Mao, Rurong; Shen, Ke; Zheng, Yuanhong; Li, Yueqi; Liu, Jianwen; Ni, Lei

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • This paper supports the anti-tumor effects of AT-I on gastric cancer in vitro. • AT-I attenuates gastric cancer stem cell traits. • It is the systematic study regarding AT-I suppression of Notch pathway in GC and GCSLCs. - Abstract: Atractylenolide I (AT-I), one of the main naturally occurring compounds of Rhizoma Atractylodis Macrocephalae, has remarkable anti-cancer effects on various cancers. However, its effects on the treatment of gastric cancer remain unclear. Via multiple cellular and molecular approaches, we demonstrated that AT-I could potently inhibit cancer cell proliferation and induce apoptosis through inactivating Notch pathway. AT-I treatment led to the reduction of expressions of Notch1, Jagged1, and its downstream Hes1/ Hey1. Our results showed that AT-I inhibited the self-renewal capacity of gastric stem-like cells (GCSLCs) by suppression of their sphere formation capacity and cell viability. AT-I attenuated gastric cancer stem cell (GCSC) traits partly through inactivating Notch1, leading to reducing the expressions of its downstream target Hes1, Hey1 and CD44 in vitro. Collectively, our results suggest that AT-I might develop as a potential therapeutic drug for the treatment of gastric cancer.

  15. EF24 induces ROS-mediated apoptosis via targeting thioredoxin reductase 1 in gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weiqian; Chen, Xi; Ying, Shilong; Feng, Zhiguo; Chen, Tongke; Ye, Qingqing; Wang, Zhe; Qiu, Chenyu; Yang, Shulin; Liang, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is one of the leading causes of cancer mortality in the world, and finding novel agents for the treatment of advanced gastric cancer is of urgent need. Diphenyl difluoroketone (EF24), a molecule having structural similarity to curcumin, exhibits potent anti-tumor activities by arresting cell cycle and inducing apoptosis. Although EF24 demonstrates potent anticancer efficacy in numerous types of human cancer cells, the cellular targets of EF24 have not been fully defined. We report here that EF24 may interact with the thioredoxin reductase 1 (TrxR1), an important selenocysteine (Sec)-containing antioxidant enzyme, to induce reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated apoptosis in human gastric cancer cells. By inhibiting TrxR1 activity and increasing intracellular ROS levels, EF24 induces a lethal endoplasmic reticulum stress in human gastric cancer cells. Importantly, knockdown of TrxR1 sensitizes cells to EF24 treatment. In vivo, EF24 treatment markedly reduces the TrxR1 activity and tumor cell burden, and displays synergistic lethality with 5-FU against gastric cancer cells. Targeting TrxR1 with EF24 thus discloses a previously unrecognized mechanism underlying the biological activity of EF24, and reveals that TrxR1 is a good target for gastric cancer therapy. PMID:26919110

  16. EF24 induces ROS-mediated apoptosis via targeting thioredoxin reductase 1 in gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zou, Peng; Xia, Yiqun; Chen, Weiqian; Chen, Xi; Ying, Shilong; Feng, Zhiguo; Chen, Tongke; Ye, Qingqing; Wang, Zhe; Qiu, Chenyu; Yang, Shulin; Liang, Guang

    2016-04-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is one of the leading causes of cancer mortality in the world, and finding novel agents for the treatment of advanced gastric cancer is of urgent need. Diphenyl difluoroketone (EF24), a molecule having structural similarity to curcumin, exhibits potent anti-tumor activities by arresting cell cycle and inducing apoptosis. Although EF24 demonstrates potent anticancer effïcacy in numerous types of human cancer cells, the cellular targets of EF24 have not been fully defined. We report here that EF24 may interact with the thioredoxin reductase 1 (TrxR1), an important selenocysteine (Sec)-containing antioxidant enzyme, to induce reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated apoptosis in human gastric cancer cells. By inhibiting TrxR1 activity and increasing intracellular ROS levels, EF24 induces a lethal endoplasmic reticulum stress in human gastric cancer cells. Importantly, knockdown of TrxR1 sensitizes cells to EF24 treatment. In vivo, EF24 treatment markedly reduces the TrxR1 activity and tumor cell burden, and displays synergistic lethality with 5-FU against gastric cancer cells. Targeting TrxR1 with EF24 thus discloses a previously unrecognized mechanism underlying the biological activity of EF24, and reveals that TrxR1 is a good target for gastric cancer therapy. PMID:26919110

  17. KIAA1324 Suppresses Gastric Cancer Progression by Inhibiting the Oncoprotein GRP78.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jin Muk; Park, Sujin; Kim, Staci Jakyong; Kim, Hyojung; Lee, Bona; Kim, Junil; Park, Jinah; Kim, Shin Tae; Yang, Han-Kwang; Kim, Woo Ho; Kim, Seong-Jin

    2015-08-01

    Recent advances in genome and transcriptome analysis have contributed to the identification of many potential cancer-related genes. Furthermore, biological and clinical investigations of the candidate genes provide us with a better understanding of carcinogenesis and development of cancer treatment. Here, we report a novel role of KIAA1324 as a tumor suppressor in gastric cancer. We observed that KIAA1324 was downregulated in most gastric cancers from transcriptome sequencing data and found that histone deacetylase was involved in the suppression of KIAA1324. Low KIAA1324 levels were associated with poor prognosis in gastric cancer patients. In the xenograft model, KIAA1324 significantly reduced tumor formation of gastric cancer cells and decreased development of preformed tumors. KIAA1324 also suppressed proliferation, invasion, and drug resistance and induced apoptosis in gastric cancer cells. Through protein interaction analysis, we identified GRP78 (glucose-regulated protein 78 kDa) as a KIAA1324-binding partner. KIAA1324 blocked oncogenic activities of GRP78 by inhibiting GRP78-caspase-7 interaction and suppressing GRP78-mediated AKT activation, thereby inducing apoptosis. In conclusion, our study reveals a tumor suppressive role of KIAA1324 via inhibition of GRP78 oncoprotein activities and provides new insight into the diagnosis and treatment of gastric cancer. PMID:26045166

  18. 3-β-Εrythrodiol isolated from Conyza canadensis inhibits MKN‑45 human gastric cancer cell proliferation by inducing apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, DNA fragmentation, ROS generation and reduces tumor weight and volume in mouse xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Qin, Yue-Hong; Yu, Jian-Yong; Ma, Heng; Song, Xi-Lin

    2016-04-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the in vitro and in vivo anticancer and apoptotic effects of 3-β-erythrodiol, a plant-derived triterpene against MKN-45 human gastric cancer cells. In addition, effects on cellular morphology, cell cycle phase distribution, DNA fragmentation, and ROS generation were also elucidated in the current research work. Cytotoxic activity of 3-β-erythrodiol was demonstrated by MTT cell viability and LDH assay. Cellular morphological study was carried out using phase contrast, fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy. Cell cycle analysis was evaluated by flow cytometry and gel electrophoresis was used to evaluate DNA fragmentation pattern. The results of the present study revealed that 3-β-erythrodiol induced dose-dependent as well as time-dependent anticancer effects in MKN-45 gastric cancer cells. Cellular morphological changes in MKN-45 cells as indicated by fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy were induced by 3-β-erythrodiol. This triterpene induced both early and late apoptotic features in these cancer cells. 3-β-Erythrodiol treatment led to sub-G1 cell cycle arrest with a corresponding decrease in S-phase cells and an increase in G2/M phase cells. DNA fragments were evident in gel electrophoresis experiment following 3-β-erythrodiol treatment. It was observed that 0.50 and 1.0 µg/g 3-β-erythrodiol injection reduced the tumor weight from 1.4 g in PBS-treated group (control) to 0.61 and 0.22 g, respectively. Similarly, 0.50 and 1.0 µg/g 3-β-erythrodiol injection reduced the tumor volume from 1.5 cm3 in PBS-treated group (control) to 0.91 and 0.31 cm3, respectively. The present investigation indicates that 3-β-erythrodiol exerts anti-proliferative effects in human gastric cancer by inducing early and late apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, and ROS generation. It also decreased the tumor volume and tumor weight in male Balb/c nude mice. PMID:26846256

  19. E-Cadherin and Gastric Cancer: Cause, Consequence, and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin

    2014-01-01

    E-cadherin (epithelial-cadherin), encoded by the CDH1 gene, is a transmembrane glycoprotein playing a crucial role in maintaining cell-cell adhesion. E-cadherin has been reported to be a tumor suppressor and to be down regulated in gastric cancer. Besides genetic mutations in CDH1 gene to induce hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC), epigenetic factors such as DNA hypermethylation also contribute to the reduction of E-cadherin in gastric carcinogenesis. In addition, expression of E-cadherin could be mediated by infectious agents such as H. pylori (Helicobacter pylori). As E-cadherin is vitally involved in signaling pathways modulating cell proliferation, survival, invasion, and migration, dysregulation of E-cadherin leads to dysfunction of gastric epithelial cells and contributes to gastric cancer development. Moreover, changes in its expression could reflect pathological conditions of gastric mucosa, making its role in gastric cancer complicated. In this review, we summarize the functions of E-cadherin and the signaling pathways it regulates. We aim to provide comprehensive perspectives in the molecular mechanism of E-cadherin and its involvement in gastric cancer initiation and progression. We also focus on its applications for early diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy in gastric cancer in order to open new avenues in this field. PMID:25184143

  20. Coffee intake and gastric cancer risk: The Singapore Chinese Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Ainslie-Waldman, Cheryl E.; Koh, Woon-Puay; Jin, Aizhen; Yeoh, Khay Guan; Zhu, Feng; Wang, Renwei; Yuan, Jian-Min; Butler, Lesley M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite experimental evidence showing chemopreventive effects of coffee-related compounds on gastric carcinogenesis, epidemiologic studies generally do not support coffee-gastric cancer associations. Observational data are lacking among high-risk populations with sufficient regular coffee consumption. Methods We examined the association between caffeinated coffee intake and gastric cancer risk in a population-based cohort that enrolled 63,257 Chinese men and women aged 45–74 years between 1993 and 1998 in Singapore. Incident gastric cancer cases (n=647) were identified after a mean follow-up of 14.7 years. Biomarkers of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection were measured in a subset of gastric cancer cases with blood collected prior to cancer diagnosis and their matched controls. Results In the total cohort, daily versus non-daily coffee intake was associated with a statistically non-significant decrease in gastric cancer risk [hazards ratio (HR) = 0.85; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.69, 1.04). In women, the inverse association strengthened and reached statistical significance (HR=0.63; 95% CI: 0.46, 0.87). In analyses restricted to never smokers and nondrinkers of alcohol, inverse associations strengthened in the total cohort (HR=0.69; 95% CI: 0.52, 0.91) and in women (HR=0.52; 95% CI: 0.37, 0.74). There was no coffee-gastric cancer risk association among men, regardless of smoking status or alcohol consumption. Similar results were observed in the nested case-control study after adjustment for H. pylori infection. Conclusion Daily coffee consumption may reduce the risk of gastric cancer in high-risk populations, especially among women. Impact: Research aimed at identifying the compounds in coffee that may protect against gastric carcinogenesis is warranted. PMID:24608187

  1. The significance of LRPPRC overexpression in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaosa; Lv, Lifen; Zheng, Jianyong; Zhou, Jinfeng; Liu, Bing; Chen, Hui; Liang, Cong; Wang, Rui; Su, Linna; Li, Xiaohua; Fan, Daiming

    2014-02-01

    LRPPRC is a multifunctional protein involved in mitochondrial gene expression and function, cell cycle progression, and tumorigenesis. We analyzed LRPPRC gene expression in 253 paired cases of gastric cancer and noncancerous regions and six gastric cancer cell lines to demonstrate the importance of LRPPRC expression for the prediction of prognosis of gastric cancer. Our results showed that LRPPRC expression in gastric cancer tissues is significantly higher than that in paired control tissue (P < 0.001). Patients with higher LRPPRC expression showed a poorer overall survival rate than those with lower LRPPRC expression (P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that lymph node metastasis (N), distant metastasis (M), TNM stage, and LRPPRC expression were independent prognostic factors for gastric cancer (P = 0.004, 0.002, 0.017, 0.004 respectively).Moreover, Western blotting showed that LRPPRC expression was increased in SGC7901, BGC823, MKN45, and XGC9811cells. The in vitro proliferation assay showed that LRPPRC expression is inversely associated with gastric cancer cells growth. Our results indicated that LRPPRC could be used as a predictive marker for patient prognosis of gastric cancer and may be a novel therapeutic target for gastric cancer in future. PMID:24375316

  2. Downregulated MicroRNA-133a in Gastric Juice as a Clinicopathological Biomarker for Gastric Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Shao, Juan; Fang, Peng-Hua; He, Biao; Guo, Li-Li; Shi, Ming-Yi; Zhu, Yan; Bo, Ping; Zhen-Wen, Zhen-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Circulatory miR-133a is a marker shared by several types of cancer. In this study we evaluated the feasibility of using miR-133a levels in gastric juice to screen for gastric cancer. A total of 204 samples of gastric juice and mucosa from gastric cancer, atrophic gastritis, gastric ulcer, superficial gastritis and healthy cases were collected by gastroscopy. The results showed that miR-133a levels in gastric juice and carcinoma tissues of patients with gastric cancer were significantly downregulated and positively correlated. Moreover, miR-133a in gastric juice has high operability, high reliability, high sensitivity, high specificity and relative stability, fit for clinical diagnosis of gastric cancer. PMID:27268657

  3. Current advances in targeted therapies for metastatic gastric cancer: improving patient care.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Pedro Nazareth; Muniz, Thiago Pimentel; Miranda, Raelson Rodrigues; Tadokoro, Hakaru; Forones, Nora Manoukian; Monteiro, Ines-de-Paula; Castelo-Branco, Pedro; Janjigian, Yelena Y; de Mello, Ramon Andrade

    2016-03-01

    In this article, we review the literature on the current advances in targeted therapies for metastatic gastric cancer aimed at improving patient care. We conclude that the key to guiding targeted therapy is individual biomarkers, which are not completely elucidated. HER2 overexpression is the only predictive biomarker currently in use. Furthermore, it is necessary to understand that gastric tumors are heterogeneous; therefore, is impossible to evaluate a novel biological compound without evaluating personal biomarkers. The selection of patients who are able to receive each treatment is paramount for improving advanced gastric cancer survival and reducing unnecessary costs. PMID:26838766

  4. Genomic and epigenomic heterogeneity in molecular subtypes of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Byungho; Kim, Jong-Hwan; Kim, Mirang; Kim, Seon-Young

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a complex disease that is affected by multiple genetic and environmental factors. For the precise diagnosis and effective treatment of gastric cancer, the heterogeneity of the disease must be simplified; one way to achieve this is by dividing the disease into subgroups. Toward this effort, recent advances in high-throughput sequencing technology have revealed four molecular subtypes of gastric cancer, which are classified as Epstein-Barr virus-positive, microsatellite instability, genomically stable, and chromosomal instability subtypes. We anticipate that this molecular subtyping will help to extend our knowledge for basic research purposes and will be valuable for clinical use. Here, we review the genomic and epigenomic heterogeneity of the four molecular subtypes of gastric cancer. We also describe a mutational meta-analysis and a reanalysis of DNA methylation that were performed using previously reported gastric cancer datasets. PMID:26811657

  5. Causal role of Helicobacter pylori infection in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Takafumi; Goto, Yasuyuki; Maeda, Osamu; Watanabe, Osamu; Ishiguro, Kazuhiro; Goto, Hidemi

    2006-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second most frequent cancer in the world, accounting for a large proportion of all cancer cases in Asia, Latin America, and some countries in Europe. Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) is regarded as playing a specific role in the development of atrophic gastritis, which represents the most recognized pathway in multistep intestinal-type gastric carcinogenesis. Recent studies suggest that a combination of host genetic factors, bacterial virulence factors, and environmental and lifestyle factors determine the severity of gastric damage and the eventual clinical outcome of H pylori infection. The seminal discovery of H pylori as the leading cause of gastric cancer should lead to effective eradication strategies. Prevention of gastric cancer requires better screening strategies to identify candidates for eradication. PMID:16482615

  6. Microsatellite instability of gastric cancer and precancerous lesions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bing; Liu, Hong-Yi; Guo, Shao-Hua; Sun, Peng; Gong, Fang-Ming; Jia, Bao-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether microsatellite instability (MSI) of gastric cancer and precancerous lesions were existed and its effect. Methods: Laser microdissection was used. Gastric, intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia and normal mucosa were collected respectively. Five microsatellite loci were selected and MSI was detected by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography. Results: In the five microsatellite loci REF-positive phenotype, intestinal metaplasia MSI was 20.7%. Dysplasia MSI was 22.4%. Gastric MSI was 47.9%, and there was no MSI in normal gastric mucosa. Conclusion: MSI gradually increased from precancerous lesions to gastric cancer. The early detection of MSI may be a potential early warning indicator for early diagnosis of gastric cancer. PMID:26885046

  7. Identification of Gastric Cancer Biomarkers Using 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Gokula Krishnan; Yong, Wei Peng; Yeow, Chen Hua

    2016-01-01

    Existing gastric cancer diagnosing methods were invasive, hence, a reliable non-invasive gastric cancer diagnosing method is needed. As a starting point, we used 1H NMR for identifying gastric cancer biomarkers using a panel of gastric cancer spheroids and normal gastric spheroids. We were able to identify 8 chemical shift biomarkers for gastric cancer spheroids. Our data suggests that the cancerous and non-cancerous spheroids significantly differ in the lipid composition and energy metabolism. These results encourage the translation of these biomarkers into in-vivo gastric cancer detection methodology using MRI-MS. PMID:27611679

  8. Specific food structures supress appetite through reduced gastric emptying rate

    PubMed Central

    Rafiee, Hameed; Malcolm, Paul; Salt, Louise; van Aken, George

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the extent to which gastric layering and retention of a meal could be used to reduce appetite using the same caloric load. Liquid (control) and semi-solid (active) meals were produced with the same protein, fat, carbohydrate, and mass. These were fed to 10 volunteers on separate days in a crossover study, and subjective appetite ratings, gastric contents, and plasma cholecystokinin (CCK) were assessed over a period of 3 h. The active meal showed food boluses in the stomach persisting for ∼45 min, slower emptying rates, and lower plasma CCK levels over the first hour. After the first hour, both gastric emptying rates and plasma CCK levels were similar for both systems and slightly increased compared with the unfed situation. Despite the lower plasma CCK levels for the active meal over the first hour, this meal reduced appetite more than the control meal over the 3 h of the study. For a moderately increased plasma CCK level in the fed state, appetite was correlated with the volume of gastric contents rather than gastric emptying rates or plasma CCK. This suggests that enhanced gastric retention was the key factor in decreasing appetite and was probably mediated by a combination of intestinal nutrient sensing and increased viscosity in the stomach. PMID:23578786

  9. Bacterial overgrowth and diversification of microbiota in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lili; Zhou, Jianhua; Xin, Yongning; Geng, Changxin; Tian, Zibin; Yu, Xinjuan

    2016-01-01

    Objective Microbiota is potentially linked to the development of cancer. However, the features of microbiota in gastric cancer remain unclear. The aim of this study was to characterize the gastric microbiota in cancer. Methods A total of 315 patients, including 212 patients with chronic gastritis and 103 patients with gastric cancer, were enrolled in the study. The bacterial load of gastric mucosa was determined using quantitative PCR. To analyze the biodiversity, structure, and composition of microbiota, amplicons of the 16S rRNA gene from 12 patients were pyrosequenced. The sequences were processed and subsequently analyzed. Results The amount of bacteria in gastric mucosa was estimated to be 6.9×108 per gram tissue on average. It was higher in Helicobacter pylori-infected patients (7.80±0.71) compared with those uninfected (7.59±0.57, P=0.005). An increased bacterial load up to 7.85±0.70 was detected in gastric cancer compared with chronic gastritis (P=0.001). The unweighted principal coordinate analysis showed that the structure of microbiota in gastric cancer was more diversified. Five genera of bacteria with potential cancer-promoting activities were enriched in gastric cancer. The weighted principal coordinate analysis showed that the presence of Helicobacter pylori markedly altered the structure of microbiota, but had little influence on the relative proportions of the other members in the microbiota. Conclusion Findings from this study indicated an altered microbiota in gastric cancer with increased quantity of bacteria, diversified microbial communities, and enrichment of bacteria with potential cancer-promoting activities. These alterations could contribute toward the gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:26657453

  10. Rebamipide inhibits gastric cancer growth by targeting survivin and Aurora-B

    SciTech Connect

    Tarnawski, A.; E-mail: andrzej.tarnawski@med.va.gov; Pai, R.; Chiou, S.-K.; Chai, J.; Chu, E.C.

    2005-08-19

    Rebamipide accelerates healing of gastric ulcers and gastritis but its actions on gastric cancer are not known. Survivin, an anti-apoptosis protein, is overexpressed in stem, progenitor, and cancer cells. In gastric cancer, increased and sustained survivin expression provides survival advantage and facilitates tumor progression and resistance to anti-cancer drugs. Aurora-B kinase is essential for chromosome alignment and mitosis progression but surprisingly its role in gastric cancer has not been explored. We examined in human gastric cancer AGS cells: (1) survivin expression, (2) localization of survivin and Aurora-B (3) cell proliferation, and (4) effects of specific survivin siRNA and/or rebamipide (free radical scavenging drug) on survivin and Aurora-B expression and cell proliferation. Survivin and Aurora-B are strongly expressed in human AGS gastric cancer cells and co-localize during mitosis. Survivin siRNA significantly reduces AGS cell viability. Rebamipide significantly downregulates in AGS cell survivin expression, its association with Aurora-B and cell proliferation. Rebamipide-induced downregulation of survivin is at the transcription level and does not involve ubiquitin-proteasome pathway.

  11. Sentinel lymph node navigation surgery for gastric cancer: Does it really benefit the patient?

    PubMed Central

    Tani, Tohru; Sonoda, Hiromichi; Tani, Masaji

    2016-01-01

    Sentinel lymph node (SLN) navigation surgery is accepted as a standard treatment procedure for malignant melanoma and breast cancer. However, the benefit of reduced lymphadenectomy based on SLN examination remains unclear in cases of gastric cancer. Here, we review previous studies to determine whether SLN navigation surgery is beneficial for gastric cancer patients. Recently, a large-scale prospective study from the Japanese Society of Sentinel Node Navigation Surgery reported that the endoscopic dual tracer method, using a dye and radioisotope for SLN biopsy, was safe and effective when applied to cases of superficial and relatively small gastric cancers. SLN mapping with SLN basin dissection was preferred for early gastric cancer since it is minimally invasive. However, previous studies reported that limited gastrectomy and lymphadenectomy may not improve the patient’s postoperative quality of life (QOL). As a result, the benefit of SLN navigation surgery for gastric cancer patients, in terms of their QOL, is limited. Thus, endoscopic and laparoscopic limited gastrectomy combined with SLN navigation surgery has the potential to become the standard minimally invasive surgery in early gastric cancer. PMID:26973385

  12. Piperlongumine as a direct TrxR1 inhibitor with suppressive activity against gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Zou, Peng; Xia, Yiqun; Ji, Jiansong; Chen, Weiqian; Zhang, Jinsan; Chen, Xi; Rajamanickam, Vinothkumar; Chen, Gaozhi; Wang, Zhe; Chen, Lingfeng; Wang, Yifeng; Yang, Shulin; Liang, Guang

    2016-05-28

    Piperlongumine (PL), a natural alkaloid isolated from the fruit of long pepper, is known to selectively kill tumor cells while sparing their normal counterparts. However, the cellular target and potent anticancer efficacy of PL in numerous types of human cancer cells have not been fully defined. We report here that PL may interact with the thioredoxin reductase 1 (TrxR1), an important selenocysteine (Sec)-containing antioxidant enzyme, to induce reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated apoptosis in human gastric cancer cells. By inhibiting TrxR1 activity and increasing intracellular ROS levels, PL induces a lethal endoplasmic reticulum stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in human gastric cancer cells. Importantly, knockdown of TrxR1 sensitizes cells to PL treatment, and PL displays synergistic lethality with GSH inhibitors (BSO and Erastin) against gastric cancer cells. In vivo, PL treatment markedly reduces the TrxR1 activity and tumor cell burden. Remarkably, TrxR1 was significantly overexpressed in gastric cancer cell lines and human gastric cancer tissues. Targeting TrxR1 with PL thus discloses a previously unrecognized mechanism underlying the biological activity of PL and provides an in-depth insight into the action of PL in the treatment of gastric cancer. PMID:26963494

  13. Omental milky spots in screening gastric cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Cao, L; Hu, X; Zhang, Y; Sun, X T

    2011-01-01

    The existence of cancer stem and progenitor cells in solid tumors has been widely postulated. However, neither the cancer stem cells nor the cancer progenitor cells have been definitively identified and functionally characterized. Here we propose a new strategy to identify and isolate gastric cancer stem cells -using omental milky spots to screen gastric cancer stem cells in peritoneal metastasis mouse models of gastric cancer. In this study, we used the property that the macrophages in omental milky spots are cytotoxic against tumor cells and so able to screen and collect cancer stem cells. Our findings suggest that macrophages in omental milky spots have not only cytotoxic properties against tumor cells but also provide a microenvironment within milky spots in which cancer stem cells are capable to survive and grow into micrometastasis. Omental milky spot become a cancer stem cell niche in this situation. Further we studied the omental milky spots for screening gastric cancer cells (OMSS-GCCs) and found that omental milky spot enriched the volume of gastric cancer stem cells. Tumors were consistently generated after an injection of 1×103 OMSS-GCCs. OMSS-GCCs high express CD133 and low express CD324. Omental milky spots are a highly efficient "natural filter" for screening gastric cancer stem cells. PMID:21067262

  14. Gastric cancer: The times they are a-changin’

    PubMed Central

    Satolli, Maria Antonietta; Buffoni, Lucio; Spadi, Rosella; Roato, Ilaria

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the third leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Even though during these last decades gastric cancer incidence decreased in Western countries, it remains endemic and with a high incidence in Eastern countries. The survival in advanced and metastatic stage of gastric cancer is still very poor. Recently the Cancer Genoma Atlas Research Network identified four subtypes with different molecular profiles to classify gastric cancer in order to offer the optimal targeted therapies for pre-selected patients. Indeed, the key point is still the selection of patients for the right treatment, on basis of molecular tumor characterization. Since chemotherapy reached a plateau of efficacy for gastric cancer, the combination between cytotoxic therapy and biological agents gets a better prognosis and decreases chemotherapeutic toxicity. Currently, Trastuzumab in combination with platinum and fluorouracil is the only approved targeted therapy in the first line for c-erbB2 positive patients, whereas Ramucirumab is the only approved targeted agent for patients with metastatic gastric cancer. New perspectives for an effective treatment derived from the immunotherapeutic strategies. Here, we report an overview on gastric cancer treatments, with particular attention to recent advances in targeted therapies and in immunotherapeutic approach. PMID:26600930

  15. Gastric hyperplastic polyps coexisting with early gastric cancers, adenoma and neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Karpińska-Kaczmarczyk, K; Lewandowska, M; Białek, A; Ławniczak, M; Urasińska, E

    2016-03-01

    Gastric hyperplastic polyps (GHP) constitute up to 93% of all benign epithelial polyps of the stomach. The average probability of malignant transformation in GHP is 0.6-22% in large series. The aim of the study was to present the coexistence of GHP with early gastric cancer (EGC), gastric adenoma (GA), neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia (NH) and well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumour (NET G1). Three cases were studied to reveal clinical data and morphological changes and to assess the relationship between GHP and accompanying gastric neoplastic lesions. PMID:27179272

  16. Gastric cancer - clinical and epidemiological aspects.

    PubMed

    Venerito, Marino; Link, Alexander; Rokkas, Theodoros; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) ranks fifth for cancer incidence and second for cancer deaths. Epidemiological data showed that survivors of Hodgkin's lymphoma and patients with pernicious anemia etiologically linked to autoimmune gastritis are at increased risk of GC. Screening of patients with autoimmune thyroid disease by means of pepsinogen (PG) I and PG I/II detected autoimmune gastritis with oxyntic gastric atrophy in one of four patients and may be recommended for GC prevention purposes. The International Agency for Research on Cancer reported a positive association between consumption of processed meet and increased GC risk. A new GC risk prediction model based on biological markers, age, gender, smoking status, family history of GC, and consumption of highly salted food showed good predictive performance, and might prompt individuals to modify their lifestyle habits, attend regular check-up visits or participate in screening programs. A novel GC classification based on gene expression of primary resected cancers correlated with clinicopathological features. Noncoding RNA for GC screening remains the focus of multiple studies. Patients with early GC undergoing endoscopic resection are more likely to develop metachronous lesions than patients undergoing surgery and endoscopic surveillance is warranted in this special cohort. The addition of gastrectomy to chemotherapy did not improve survival of patients with advanced GC and a single noncurable factor. Apatinib, a novel oral vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 tyrosine kinase inhibitor, improved the median overall survival of patients with advanced GC and progressive disease after two or more lines of prior chemotherapy of nearly 3 months. PMID:27531538

  17. Gastric cancer in Africa: current management and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Asombang, Akwi W; Rahman, Rubayat; Ibdah, Jamal A

    2014-04-14

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most common cancer and second most common cause of cancer death worldwide. Globally, gastric cancer poses a significant public health burden - both economically and socially. In 2008, the economic burden from premature cancer deaths and disability was $895 billion and gastric cancer was the second highest cancer responsible for healthy life lost. With the expected increase in cancer deaths and non-communicable diseases, these costs are expected to rise and impact patient care. World Health Organization, estimates a 15% increase in non-communicable disease worldwide, with more than 20% increase occurring in Africa between 2010 and 2020. Mali, West Africa, is ranked 15(th) highest incidence of gastric cancer worldwide at a rate of 20.3/100000, yet very scarce published data evaluating etiology, prevention or management exist. It is understood that risk factors of gastric cancer are multifactorial and include infectious agents (Helicobacter pylori, Epstein-Barr virus), genetic, dietary, and environmental factors (alcohol, smoking). Interestingly, African patients with gastric cancer are younger, in their 3(rd)-4(th) decade, and present at a late stage of the disease. There is sparse data regarding gastric cancer in Africa due to lack of data collection and under-reporting, which impacts incidence and mortality rates. Currently, GLOBOCAN, an International Agency for Research on Cancer resource, is the most comprehensive available resource allowing comparison between nations. In resource limited settings, with already restricted healthcare funding, data is needed to establish programs in Africa that increase gastric cancer awareness, curtail the economic burden, and improve patient management and survival outcomes. PMID:24833842

  18. Gastric cancer in Africa: Current management and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Asombang, Akwi W; Rahman, Rubayat; Ibdah, Jamal A

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most common cancer and second most common cause of cancer death worldwide. Globally, gastric cancer poses a significant public health burden - both economically and socially. In 2008, the economic burden from premature cancer deaths and disability was $895 billion and gastric cancer was the second highest cancer responsible for healthy life lost. With the expected increase in cancer deaths and non-communicable diseases, these costs are expected to rise and impact patient care. World Health Organization, estimates a 15% increase in non-communicable disease worldwide, with more than 20% increase occurring in Africa between 2010 and 2020. Mali, West Africa, is ranked 15th highest incidence of gastric cancer worldwide at a rate of 20.3/100000, yet very scarce published data evaluating etiology, prevention or management exist. It is understood that risk factors of gastric cancer are multifactorial and include infectious agents (Helicobacter pylori, Epstein-Barr virus), genetic, dietary, and environmental factors (alcohol, smoking). Interestingly, African patients with gastric cancer are younger, in their 3rd-4th decade, and present at a late stage of the disease. There is sparse data regarding gastric cancer in Africa due to lack of data collection and under-reporting, which impacts incidence and mortality rates. Currently, GLOBOCAN, an International Agency for Research on Cancer resource, is the most comprehensive available resource allowing comparison between nations. In resource limited settings, with already restricted healthcare funding, data is needed to establish programs in Africa that increase gastric cancer awareness, curtail the economic burden, and improve patient management and survival outcomes. PMID:24833842

  19. Characteristics of gastric cancer in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Rubayat; Asombang, Akwi W; Ibdah, Jamal A

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is the fourth most common cancer in the world with more than 70% of cases occur in the developing world. More than 50% of cases occur in Eastern Asia. GC is the second leading cause of cancer death in both sexes worldwide. In Asia, GC is the third most common cancer after breast and lung and is the second most common cause of cancer death after lung cancer. Although the incidence and mortality rates are slowly declining in many countries of Asia, GC still remains a significant public health problem. The incidence and mortality varies according to the geographic area in Asia. These variations are closely related to the prevalence of GC risk factors; especially Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and its molecular virulent characteristics. The gradual and consistent improvements in socioeconomic conditions in Asia have lowered the H. pylori seroprevalence rates leading to a reduction in the GC incidence. However, GC remains a significant public health and an economic burden in Asia. There has been no recent systemic review of GC incidence, mortality, and H. pylori molecular epidemiology in Asia. The aim of this report is to review the GC incidence, mortality, and linkage to H. pylori in Asia. PMID:24782601

  20. Characteristics of gastric cancer in Asia.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Rubayat; Asombang, Akwi W; Ibdah, Jamal A

    2014-04-28

    Gastric cancer (GC) is the fourth most common cancer in the world with more than 70% of cases occur in the developing world. More than 50% of cases occur in Eastern Asia. GC is the second leading cause of cancer death in both sexes worldwide. In Asia, GC is the third most common cancer after breast and lung and is the second most common cause of cancer death after lung cancer. Although the incidence and mortality rates are slowly declining in many countries of Asia, GC still remains a significant public health problem. The incidence and mortality varies according to the geographic area in Asia. These variations are closely related to the prevalence of GC risk factors; especially Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and its molecular virulent characteristics. The gradual and consistent improvements in socioeconomic conditions in Asia have lowered the H. pylori seroprevalence rates leading to a reduction in the GC incidence. However, GC remains a significant public health and an economic burden in Asia. There has been no recent systemic review of GC incidence, mortality, and H. pylori molecular epidemiology in Asia. The aim of this report is to review the GC incidence, mortality, and linkage to H. pylori in Asia. PMID:24782601

  1. The Traditional Chinese Medicine Baicalein Potently Inhibits Gastric Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Jiasheng; Liu, Tianrun; Jiang, Lin; Wu, Xiangsong; Cao, Yang; Li, Maolan; Dong, Qian; Liu, Yingbin; Xu, Haineng

    2016-01-01

    Baicalein, a traditional Chinese medicine, is a member of the flavone subclass of flavonoids. It has been reported to have anticancer activities in several human cancer cell lines in vitro. However, the therapeutic effects of baicalein on human gastric cancer and the mechanisms of action of baicalein have not been extensively studied. In the present study, we utilized a cell viability assay and an in vivo tumor growth assay to test the inhibitory effects of baicalein on gastric cancer. Analyses of the cell cycle, apoptosis and alterations in protein levels were performed to elucidate how baicalein functions in gastric cancer. We found that baicalein could potently inhibit gastric cancer cell growth and colony formation. Baicalein robustly induced arrest at the S phase in the gastric cancer cell line SGC-7901. It induced SGC-7901 cell apoptosis and disrupted the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) in a dose-dependent manner. Analysis of protein expression levels in SGC-7901 cells showed downregulation of Bcl-2 and upregulation of Bax in response to baicalein treatment. These results indicate that baicalein induces apoptosis of gastric cancer cells through the mitochondrial pathway. In an in vivo subcutaneous xenograft model, baicalein exhibited excellent tumor inhibitory effects. These results indicate that baicalein may be a potential drug for gastric cancer therapy. PMID:26918059

  2. Epigenetic silencing of GDF1 disrupts SMAD signaling to reinforce gastric cancer development.

    PubMed

    Yang, W; Mok, M T S; Li, M S M; Kang, W; Wang, H; Chan, A W; Chou, J-L; Chen, J; Ng, E K W; To, K-F; Yu, J; Chan, M W Y; Chan, F K L; Sung, J J Y; Cheng, A S L

    2016-04-21

    Accumulating evidence reveals the effectiveness of epigenetic therapy in gastric cancer. However, the molecular mechanisms and targets underlying such therapeutic responses remain elusive. Herein, we report an aberrant yet therapeutically rectifiable epigenetic signaling in gastric carcinogenesis. Administration of DNA-demethylating drug 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) reduced gastric cancer incidence by ~74% (P<0.05) in N-nitroso-N-methylurea-treated mice. Through genome-wide methylation scanning, novel promoter hypermethylation-silenced and drug-targeted genes were identified in the resected murine stomach tumors and tissues. We uncovered that growth/differentiation factor 1 (Gdf1), a member of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily, was silenced by promoter hypermethylation in control tumor-bearing mice, but became reactivated in 5-aza-dC-treated mice (P<0.05). In parallel, the downregulated SMAD2/3 phosphorylation in gastric cancer was revived by 5-aza-dC in vivo. Such hypermethylation-dependent silencing and 5-aza-dC-mediated reactivation of GDF1-SMAD2/3 activity was conserved in human gastric cancer cells (P<0.05). Subsequent functional characterization further revealed the antiproliferative activity of GDF1, which was exerted through activation of SMAD2/3/4-mediated signaling, transcriptional controls on p15, p21 and c-Myc cell-cycle regulators and phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein. Clinically, hypermethylation and loss of GDF1 was significantly associated with reduced phosphorylated-SMAD2/3 and poor survival in stomach cancer patients (P<0.05). Taken together, we demonstrated a causal relationship between DNA methylation and a tumor-suppressive pathway in gastric cancer. Epigenetic silencing of GDF1 abrogates the growth-inhibitory SMAD signaling and renders proliferation advantage to gastric epithelial cells during carcinogenesis. This study lends support to epigenetic therapy for gastric cancer chemoprevention and identifies a potential

  3. ZnRF3 Induces Apoptosis of Gastric Cancer Cells by Antagonizing Wnt and Hedgehog Signaling.

    PubMed

    Qin, Hongzhen; Cai, Aizhen; Xi, Hongqing; Yuan, Jing; Chen, Lin

    2015-11-01

    A large proportion of malignant cancers of the stomach are gastric adenocarcinoma type. In spite of many studies, the molecular basis for this cancer is still unclear. Deregulated cell proliferative signaling via Wnt/β-catenin and Hedgehog pathways is considered important in the pathogenesis of many cancers including the gastric cancer. Recent studies identified ZnRF3 protein, which is a E3-ubiquitin ligase and which is either deleted or mutated in cancers, to inhibit Wnt signaling. However, the significance of ZnRF3 in the control of gastric cancer and whether it also regulates Hedgehog signaling pathway, is not known. In the present study, we assessed the expression of ZnRF3 in gastric tumors and paracancerous tissues from 58 patients (44 male and 14 female) of different ages and related this to patient survival. We observed a clear relationship between ZnRF3 expression in paracancerous tissue and tumor size. Also, ZnRF3 expression was much higher in tumors from aged patients. Male patients showed higher mortality than the females. Mechanistic studies using normal gastric cells (GES1) and gastric cancer cells (MGC-803) infected with either AdZnRF3 or AdGFP viral vectors, revealed that ZnRF3 overexpression causes significantly more apoptosis and lowered proliferation of cancer cells. ZnRF3 overexpression led to greatly reduced levels of Lgr5, a component of Wnt signaling and also Gli1, a component of Hedgehog signaling. Thus, ZnRF3 negatively influences both the Wnt and Hedgehog proliferative pathways, and probably this way it negatively regulates cancer progression. These results suggest the importance of normal ZnRF3 function in checking the progression of cancer cell growth and indicate that a lack of this protein can lead to poorer clinical outcomes for gastric cancer patients. PMID:27352324

  4. MicroRNA-524-5p suppresses the growth and invasive abilities of gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    LIU, GUANG-HUI; LIU, YUAN-HUA; YANG, ZHEN; ZHU, A-LI; ZHAO, CHUN-LIN

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that microRNAs (miRNAs) are associated with tumor development and progression. miRNA-524-5p (miR-524-5p) has been reported to be involved in the development and progression of several types of cancer, but its role in gastric cancer has not been fully elucidated to date. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the expression levels and function of miR-524-5p in human gastric cancer. The expression levels of miR-524-5p were assessed in gastric cancer specimens and cell lines, including MKN-45, SGC-7901 and MGC-803 cell lines and gastric epithelial mucosa GES-1 cells, using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). Cell proliferation and cell apoptosis assays and invasion analysis in gastric cancer cell lines were performed to evaluate the effects of miR-524-5p on gastric cancer cells in vitro. The expression levels of matrix metallopeptidase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 were determined by RT-qPCR and western blot analysis. The expression of miR-524-5p was significantly decreased in gastric cancer tissues and cell lines. Additionally, the results of the in vitro experiments demonstrated that overexpression of miR-524-5p inhibited cell proliferation and invasion, and promoted cell apoptosis in gastric cancer cells. Human gastric cancer SGC-7901 and MGC-803 cell lines transfected with miR-524-5p exhibited reduced expression levels of MMP-2 and MMP-9. Taken together, the results of the present study indicated that miR-524-5p may function as a novel tumor suppressor gene in gastric cancer, and may serve as a biomarker and therapeutic target for the treatment of gastric cancer. PMID:26998102

  5. Gastric Cancer in Young Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dhobi, Manzoor A.; Wani, Khursheed Alam; Parray, Fazl Qadir; Wani, Rouf A.; Peer, G. Q.; Abdullah, Safiya; Wani, Imtiyaz A.; Wani, Muneer A.; Shah, Mubashir A.; Thakur, Natasha

    2013-01-01

    Aim. The aim of this study was to see the clinical, pathological, and demographic profile of young patients with stomach carcinoma besides association with p53. Patients and Methods. Prospective study of young patients with stomach carcinoma from January 2005 to December 2009. A total of 50 patients with age less than 40 years were studied. Results. Male female ratio was 1 : 1.08 in young patients and 2.5 : 1 in older patients. A positive family history of stomach cancer in the first degree relatives was present in 10% of young patients. Resection was possible only in 50% young patients. 26% young patients underwent only palliative gastrojejunostomy. The most common operation was lower partial gastrectomy in 68%. Amongst the intraoperative findings peritoneal metastasis was seen in 17.4% in young patients. 50% young patients presented in stage IV as per AJCC classification (P value .004; sig.). None of the patients presented as stage 1 disease in young group. Conclusion. Early detection of stomach carcinoma is very important in all patients but in young patients it is of paramount importance. PMID:24381753

  6. Novel therapy for advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yue; Wu, Shenhong

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is a common lethal malignancy. Gastroesophageal junction and gastric cardia tumors are the fastest rising malignancies due to increasing prevalence of obesity and acid reflex in the United States. Traditional chemotherapy remains the main treatment with trastuzumab targeting human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positive disease. The median overall survival (OS) is less than one year for advanced GC patients; thus, there is an urgent unmet need to develop novel therapy for GC. Although multiple targeted agents were studied, only the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor inhibitor ramucirumab was approved recently by the United States Food and Drug Administration because of its 1.4 mo OS benefit (5.2 mo vs 3.8 mo, P = 0.047) as a single agent; 2.2 mo improvement of survival (9.6 mo vs 7.4 mo, P = 0.017) when combined with paclitaxel in previously treated advanced GC patients. It is the first single agent approved for previously treated GC and the second biologic agent after trastuzumab. Even with limited success, targeted therapy may be improved by developing new biomarkers. Immune therapy is changing the paradigm of cancer treatment and is presently under active investigation for GC in clinical trials. More evidence supports GC stem cells existence and early stage studies are looking for its potential therapeutic possibilities. PMID:26600926

  7. Molecular Classification of Gastric Cancer: A new paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Manish A.; Khanin, Raya; Tang, Laura; Janjigian, Yelena Y.; Klimstra, David S.; Gerdes, Hans; Kelsen, David P.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Gastric cancer may be subdivided into three distinct subtypes –proximal, diffuse, and distal gastric cancer– based on histopathologic and anatomic criteria. Each subtype is associated with unique epidemiology. Our aim is to test the hypothesis that these distinct gastric cancer subtypes may also be distinguished by gene expression analysis. Experimental Design Patients with localized gastric adenocarcinoma being screened for a phase II preoperative clinical trial (NCI 5917) underwent endoscopic biopsy for fresh tumor procurement. 4–6 targeted biopsies of the primary tumor were obtained. Macrodissection was performed to ensure >80% carcinoma in the sample. HG-U133A GeneChip (Affymetrix) was used for cDNA expression analysis, and all arrays were processed and analyzed using the Bioconductor R-package. Results Between November 2003 and January 2006, 57 patients were screened to identify 36 patients with localized gastric cancer who had adequate RNA for expression analysis. Using supervised analysis, we built a classifier to distinguish the three gastric cancer subtypes, successfully classifying each into tightly grouped clusters. Leave-one-out cross validation error was 0.14, suggesting that >85% of samples were classified correctly. Gene set analysis with the False Discovery Rate set at 0.25 identified several pathways that were differentially regulated when comparing each gastric cancer subtype to adjacent normal stomach. Conclusions Subtypes of gastric cancer that have epidemiologic and histologic distinction are also distinguished by gene expression data. These preliminary data suggest a new classification of gastric cancer with implications for improving our understanding of disease biology and identification of unique molecular drivers for each gastric cancer subtype. PMID:21430069

  8. Chromosome band 16q24 is frequently deleted in human gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Mori, Y; Matsunaga, M; Abe, T; Fukushige, S; Miura, K; Sunamura, M; Shiiba, K; Sato, M; Nukiwa, T; Horii, A

    1999-05-01

    We have analysed the loss of heterozygosity (LOH) on chromosome bands 16q22-q24 in 24 primary gastric cancer tissues and found three regions of frequent allelic loss (16q22, 16q24.1-q24.3 and 16q24.3). The region for the most frequent allelic loss (63%) was in 16q24.1-q24.3. LOH of this region had no relationship with histological subtype, but a significant association between LOH and microscopic lymphangial invasion was observed. Although not significant, vascular and gastric wall invasions are also associated with LOH. The region includes the locus for the H-cadherin gene. Therefore we examined the genetic and epigenetic alterations of this gene. Markedly reduced expression was observed in gastric cancer cell lines compared with that of normal gastric mucosa. However, no mutation was found in this gene in any of the gastric cancer tissues or the gastric cancer cell lines. Furthermore, we analysed the methylation status of the 5'-flanking region of the gene, but no significant association was found. We suggest that some other tumour suppressor gene(s) in 16q24.1-q24.3 may be responsible for gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:10408866

  9. Reproducibility of histologic classification of gastric cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Palli, D.; Bianchi, S.; Cipriani, F.; Duca, P.; Amorosi, A.; Avellini, C.; Russo, A.; Saragoni, A.; Todde, P.; Valdes, E.

    1991-01-01

    A panel review of histologic specimens was carried out as part of a multi-centre case-control study of gastric cancer (GC) and diet. Comparisons of diagnoses of 100 GCs by six pathologists revealed agreement in histologic classification for about 70-80% of the cancers. Concordance was somewhat higher when using the Lauren rather than the Ming or World Health Organization classification systems. Histologic types from reading biopsy tissue agreed with those derived from surgical specimens for 65-75% of the 100 tumours. Intra-observer agreement in histologic classification, assessed by repeat readings up to 3 years apart by one pathologist, was 95%. The findings indicate that, although overall concordance was good, it is important to standardise diagnoses in multi-centre epidemiologic studies of GC by histologic type. PMID:2039701

  10. Management of gastric cancer in Asia: resource-stratified guidelines.

    PubMed

    Shen, Lin; Shan, Yan-Shen; Hu, Huang-Ming; Price, Timothy J; Sirohi, Bhawna; Yeh, Kun-Huei; Yang, Yi-Hsin; Sano, Takeshi; Yang, Han-Kwang; Zhang, Xiaotian; Park, Sook Ryun; Fujii, Masashi; Kang, Yoon-Koo; Chen, Li-Tzong

    2013-11-01

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most common cancer globally, and is the second most common cause of death from cancer worldwide. About three-quarters of newly diagnosed cases in 2008 were from Asian countries. With a high mortality-to-incidence ratio, management of gastric cancer is challenging. We discuss evidence for optimum management of gastric cancer in aspects of screening and early detection, diagnosis, and staging; endoscopic and surgical intervention; and the concepts of perioperative, postoperative, and palliative chemotherapy and use of molecularly targeted therapy. Recommendations are formulated on the basis of the framework provided by the Breast Health Global Initiative, using the categories of basic, limited, enhanced, and maximum level. We aim to provide a stepwise strategy for management of gastric cancer applicable to different levels of health-care resources in Asian countries. PMID:24176572

  11. The Mechanism in Gastric Cancer Chemoprevention by Allicin.

    PubMed

    Luo, Runlan; Fang, Dengyang; Hang, Hongdong; Tang, Zeyao

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains high prevalence and fatality rates in China even though its morbidity has been decreased drastically. Allicin, which is from an assistance food-garlic (Allium Sativum L), was found to be effective in gastric cancer treatment. It is a defensive substance with a board biological properties: inhibition of bacteria, fungus, virus, controlled hypertension, diabetes, and chemoprevention of several cancers, etc. Experiments have shown that allicin can be chemopreventive to gastric cancer by inhibiting the growth of cancer cells, arresting cell cycle at G2/M phase, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and mitochondria-mediated apoptosis, which includes the caspase-dependent/-independent pathways and death receptor pathway. Those mechanisms probably involve in modulating enzymatic activity, restraining DNA formation, scavenging free radicals, and affecting cell proliferation and even tumor growth. Therefore, this review is focus on the mechanism of allicin in gastric cancer. PMID:26555611

  12. Companion diagnostics for the targeted therapy of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Changhoon; Park, Young Soo

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most common type of cancer and represents a major cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. With recent biomedical advances in our understanding of the molecular characteristics of gastric cancer, many genetic alterations have been identified as potential targets for its treatment. Multiple novel agents are currently under development as the demand for active agents that improve the survival of gastric cancer patients constantly increases. Based on lessons from previous trials of targeted agents, it is now widely accepted that the establishment of an optimal diagnostic test to select molecularly defined patients is of equal importance to the development of active agents against targetable genetic alterations. Herein, we highlight the current status and future perspectives of companion diagnostics in the treatment of gastric cancer. PMID:26494953

  13. Endoscopic surveillance of gastric cancers after Helicobacter pylori eradication

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Masaaki; Sato, Yuichi; Terai, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    The incidence and mortality of gastric cancer remains high in East Asian countries. Current data suggest that Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication might be more effective for preventing gastric cancer in young people before they develop atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia. However, the long-term effect of H. pylori eradication on metachronous cancer prevention after endoscopic resection (ER) of early gastric cancer remains controversial, with some discordance between results published for Japanese and Korean studies. The detection ability of synchronous lesions before ER and eradication of H. pylori directly influences these results. After eradication, some gastric cancers are more difficult to diagnose by endoscopy because of morphologic changes that lead to a flat or depressed appearance. Narrow-band imaging with magnifying endoscopy (NBI-ME) is expected to be useful for identifying metachronous cancers. However, some gastric cancers after eradication show a “gastritis-like” appearance under NBI-ME. The gastritis-like appearance correlates with the histological surface differentiation of the cancer tubules and superficial non-neoplastic epithelium atop or interspersed with the cancer. Till date, it remains unclear whether H. pylori eradication could prevent progression of gastric cancer. Until we can establish more useful endoscopic examination methodologies, regular endoscopic surveillance of high-risk groups is expected to be the most beneficial approach for detection. PMID:26457015

  14. Endoscopic surveillance of gastric cancers after Helicobacter pylori eradication.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masaaki; Sato, Yuichi; Terai, Shuji

    2015-10-01

    The incidence and mortality of gastric cancer remains high in East Asian countries. Current data suggest that Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication might be more effective for preventing gastric cancer in young people before they develop atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia. However, the long-term effect of H. pylori eradication on metachronous cancer prevention after endoscopic resection (ER) of early gastric cancer remains controversial, with some discordance between results published for Japanese and Korean studies. The detection ability of synchronous lesions before ER and eradication of H. pylori directly influences these results. After eradication, some gastric cancers are more difficult to diagnose by endoscopy because of morphologic changes that lead to a flat or depressed appearance. Narrow-band imaging with magnifying endoscopy (NBI-ME) is expected to be useful for identifying metachronous cancers. However, some gastric cancers after eradication show a "gastritis-like" appearance under NBI-ME. The gastritis-like appearance correlates with the histological surface differentiation of the cancer tubules and superficial non-neoplastic epithelium atop or interspersed with the cancer. Till date, it remains unclear whether H. pylori eradication could prevent progression of gastric cancer. Until we can establish more useful endoscopic examination methodologies, regular endoscopic surveillance of high-risk groups is expected to be the most beneficial approach for detection. PMID:26457015

  15. Gastric antral injections of botulinum toxin delay gastric emptying but do not reduce body weight

    PubMed Central

    Topazian, Mark; Camilleri, Michael; Enders, Felicity T.; Clain, Jonathan E.; Gleeson, Ferga C.; Levy, Michael J.; Rajan, Elizabeth; Nehra, Vandana; Dierkhising, Ross A.; Collazo-Clavell, Maria L.; Talley, Nicholas J.; Clark, Matthew M.

    2012-01-01

    Background & Aims Gastric injections of botulinum toxin A (BTA) have been reported to delay gastric emptying, increase satiation, and reduce body weight, but there are few data from randomized, placebo-controlled studies. Methods We enrolled 60 obese participants in a 24-week, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, concealed allocation trial to compare the effects of gastric antral injections of BTA (100 U, 300 U, or 500 U) and saline placebo. The study was conducted at an outpatient clinical research unit. Participants were given one set of injections of BTA or placebo into the gastric antral muscularis propria, using endoscopic ultrasound guidance. Gastric emptying of solids (GES) was measured by scintigraphy; we also measured body weight, satiation (maximum tolerated volume in a caloric liquid drink test), calorie intake (by food frequency questionnaire), gastrointestinal symptoms, and psychologic aspects of eating behavior (by rating scale). Results Compared with baseline values, 2 weeks after injections, the mean t1/2 for GES increased by 0.8, 14, 24, and 14 minutes among subjects given placebo, 100 U, 300 U, or 500 U of BTA, respectively (P=.24 overall, P=.04 for the group given 300 U vs placebo); 16 weeks after the injections, mean body weights were reduced by 2.2, 0.2, 2.3, and 3.0 kg in these groups, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in mean body weight change, satiation volume, caloric intake, gastrointestinal symptoms, or psychological aspects of eating behavior among groups. Conclusions Gastric antral injections of BTA may delay gastric emptying at a dose of 300 U, but do not cause early satiety, altered eating behaviors, or loss of body weight. Clinicaltrials. gov identifier: NCT00976443 PMID:23063681

  16. History of Helicobacter pylori, duodenal ulcer, gastric ulcer and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Graham, David Y

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection underlies gastric ulcer disease, gastric cancer and duodenal ulcer disease. The disease expression reflects the pattern and extent of gastritis/gastric atrophy (i.e., duodenal ulcer with non-atrophic and gastric ulcer and gastric cancer with atrophic gastritis). Gastric and duodenal ulcers and gastric cancer have been known for thousands of years. Ulcers are generally non-fatal and until the 20th century were difficult to diagnose. However, the presence and pattern of gastritis in past civilizations can be deduced based on the diseases present. It has been suggested that gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer both arose or became more frequent in Europe in the 19th century. Here, we show that gastric cancer and gastric ulcer were present throughout the 17th to 19th centuries consistent with atrophic gastritis being the predominant pattern, as it proved to be when it could be examined directly in the late 19th century. The environment before the 20th century favored acquisition of H. pylori infection and atrophic gastritis (e.g., poor sanitation and standards of living, seasonal diets poor in fresh fruits and vegetables, especially in winter, vitamin deficiencies, and frequent febrile infections in childhood). The latter part of the 19th century saw improvements in standards of living, sanitation, and diets with a corresponding decrease in rate of development of atrophic gastritis allowing duodenal ulcers to become more prominent. In the early 20th century physician’s believed they could diagnose ulcers clinically and that the diagnosis required hospitalization for “surgical disease” or for “Sippy” diets. We show that while H. pylori remained common and virulent in Europe and the United States, environmental changes resulted in changes of the pattern of gastritis producing a change in the manifestations of H. pylori infections and subsequently to a rapid decline in transmission and a rapid decline in all H. pylori

  17. CMTM3 inhibits cell migration and invasion and correlates with favorable prognosis in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yu; Lin, Yi; Zhang, Lianhai; Liu, Baocai; Yuan, Wanqiong; Mo, Xiaoning; Wang, Xiaohong; Li, Henan; Xing, Xiaofang; Cheng, Xiaojing; Dong, Bin; Hu, Ying; Du, Hong; Zhu, Yubing; Ding, Ning; Li, Jiyou; Liu, Weili; Ma, Yongzhen; Qiu, Xiaoyan; Ji, Jiafu; Han, Wenling

    2014-01-01

    The CKLF-like MARVEL transmembrane domain containing 3 (CMTM3) gene is a novel tumor suppressor with frequent epigenetic inactivation. In this study, we showed the role played by CMTM3 in gastric cancer cells as a tumor suppressor gene, and examined the correlation between CMTM3 expression and clinicopathological parameters using immunohistochemistry in gastric cancer patients with different pathological stages (n = 350). We found that CMTM3 expression was reduced or silenced by epigenetic regulation in gastric cell lines, and dramatically downregulated in primary gastric cancer tissues. Restoration of CMTM3 significantly affected migration and invasion of AGS and SGC-7901 cells (P < 0.001). In vivo experiments showed that peritoneal disseminated metastases were significantly suppressed by CMTM3 (P < 0.001). We further showed that the expression of MMP2 and the phosphorylation of Erk1/2 were decreased when CMTM3 was restored. In addition, by immunohistochemical staining, we found that the expression of CMTM3 was remarkably weaker in gastric cancer tissues than in normal mucosae (P = 0.008), and was significantly correlated with gender (P = 0.033), tumor depth (P = 0.049), stage (P = 0.021), and histological grade (P = 0.022). More importantly, CMTM3 expression was associated with prognosis in gastric cancer patients (P = 0.041), and was a significant independent prognostic indicator (hazard ratio = 0.704, 95% confidence interval, 0.498–0.994; P = 0.046). Our findings indicate that CMTM3 regulates migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells. Moreover, CMTM3 is a candidate marker for prognosis of gastric cancer in the clinic. PMID:24131472

  18. Early Gastric Cancer: Current Advances of Endoscopic Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Linlin; Qin, Jinyu; Wang, Jin; Guo, Tianjiao; Wang, Zijing; Yang, Jinlin

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopy is a major method for early gastric cancer screening because of its high detection rate, but its diagnostic accuracy depends heavily on the availability of endoscopic instruments. Many novel endoscopic techniques have been shown to increase the diagnostic yield of early gastric cancer. With the improved detection rate of EGC, the endoscopic treatment has become widespread due to advances in the instruments available and endoscopist's experience. The aim of this review is to summarize frequently-used endoscopic diagnosis and treatment in early gastric cancer (EGC). PMID:26884753

  19. Early Gastric Cancer: Current Advances of Endoscopic Diagnosis and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Linlin; Qin, Jinyu; Wang, Jin; Guo, Tianjiao; Wang, Zijing; Yang, Jinlin

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopy is a major method for early gastric cancer screening because of its high detection rate, but its diagnostic accuracy depends heavily on the availability of endoscopic instruments. Many novel endoscopic techniques have been shown to increase the diagnostic yield of early gastric cancer. With the improved detection rate of EGC, the endoscopic treatment has become widespread due to advances in the instruments available and endoscopist's experience. The aim of this review is to summarize frequently-used endoscopic diagnosis and treatment in early gastric cancer (EGC). PMID:26884753

  20. Gastric Cancer with Peritoneal Tuberculosis: Challenges in Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Alshahrani, Amer Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we report a 39-year-old female patient presenting with gastric cancer and tuberculous peritonitis. The differential diagnosis between advanced gastric cancer with peritoneal carcinomatosis and early gastric cancer with peritoneal tuberculosis (TB), and the treatment of these two diseases, were challenging in this case. Physicians should have a high index of suspicion for peritoneal TB if the patient has a history of this disease, especially in areas with a high incidence of TB, such as South Korea. An early diagnosis is critical for patient management and prognosis. A surgical approach including tissue biopsy or laparoscopic exploration is recommended to confirm the diagnosis. PMID:27433397

  1. Effects of IL-10 haplotype and atomic bomb radiation exposure on gastric cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Tomonori; Ito, Reiko; Cologne, John; Maki, Mayumi; Morishita, Yukari; Nagamura, Hiroko; Sasaki, Keiko; Hayashi, Ikue; Imai, Kazue; Yoshida, Kengo; Kajimura, Junko; Kyoizumi, Seishi; Kusunoki, Yoichiro; Ohishi, Waka; Fujiwara, Saeko; Akahoshi, Masazumi; Nakachi, Kei

    2013-07-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is one of the cancers that reveal increased risk of mortality and incidence in atomic bomb survivors. The incidence of gastric cancer in the Life Span Study cohort of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) increased with radiation dose (gender-averaged excess relative risk per Gy = 0.28) and remains high more than 65 years after exposure. To assess a possible role of gene-environment interaction, we examined the dose response for gastric cancer incidence based on immunosuppression-related IL-10 genotype, in a cohort study with 200 cancer cases (93 intestinal, 96 diffuse and 11 other types) among 4,690 atomic bomb survivors participating in an immunological substudy. Using a single haplotype block composed of four haplotype-tagging SNPs (comprising the major haplotype allele IL-10-ATTA and the minor haplotype allele IL-10-GGCG, which are categorized by IL-10 polymorphisms at -819A>G and -592T>G, +1177T>C and +1589A>G), multiplicative and additive models for joint effects of radiation and this IL-10 haplotyping were examined. The IL-10 minor haplotype allele(s) was a risk factor for intestinal type gastric cancer but not for diffuse type gastric cancer. Radiation was not associated with intestinal type gastric cancer. In diffuse type gastric cancer, the haplotype-specific excess relative risk (ERR) for radiation was statistically significant only in the major homozygote category of IL-10 (ERR = 0.46/Gy, P = 0.037), whereas estimated ERR for radiation with the minor IL-10 homozygotes was close to 0 and nonsignificant. Thus, the minor IL-10 haplotype might act to reduce the radiation related risk of diffuse-type gastric cancer. The results suggest that this IL-10 haplotyping might be involved in development of radiation-associated gastric cancer of the diffuse type, and that IL-10 haplotypes may explain individual differences in the radiation-related risk of gastric cancer. PMID:23772925

  2. [Mechanisms responsible for the progression of scirrhous gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Yashiro, Masakazu; Ohira, Masaichi; Muguruma, Kazuya; Shinto, Osamu; Hirakawa, Kosei

    2012-10-01

    Scirrhous gastric carcinoma is characterized by rapid cancer cell infiltration and proliferation accompanied by extensive stromal fibrosis. The proliferative and invasive ability of scirrhous gastric cancer cells are closely associated with the growth factors, FGF7 and TGFbeta produced by organ-specific fibroblasts. Peritoneal fibroblasts morphologically change mesothelial cells, and stimulate the migratory capability of cancer cells. A FGFR2 phosphorylation inhibitor prolongs the survival of mice with peritoneal metastasis of scirrhous gastric cancer. A TGFbetaR inhibitor decreases the growth of fibroblast, and invasion-stimulating activity of fibroblasts on cancer cells. A FGFR2 phosphorylation inhibitor or TGFbetaR inhibitor appears therapeutically promising in scirrhous gastric carcinoma. PMID:23198567

  3. [Gastric cancer screening in Japan, now and tomorrow].

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Shigemi

    2012-10-01

    The screening rate of gastric cancer in the population surveyed by Japanese government was 34.3% in 2010. The rates differed by medical insurance holders: 60-70% in the big-company insurances; 32% in the national government-assisted small-company insurances; 10% in the local government-assisted non-company individual insurances and the dependents of any insurance holders. The only method of gastric cancer mass screening that Japanese government approves now is sodium bicarbonate-barium X-ray examination. The rate diagnosed as gastric cancer in the system was 0.088% in 2009. A new strategy using serum tests for pepsinogens and Helicobacter pylori-antibody has been proposed. Test and eradication may be the best method for screening high-risk subjects and primary prevention of gastric cancer, and the subsequent cancer screening. PMID:23198546

  4. Progress of Photodynamic Therapy in Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Narahara, Hiroyuki; Otani, Toru; Okuda, Shigeru

    1999-01-01

    Progress of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in gastric cancer and the clinical outcome are described in this paper. (1) We included the whole lesion and a 5 mm margin in the field for irradiation. Marking by injection of India-ink showing the irradiation field was performed beforehand. (2) We established the standard light dose to be 90 J/cm2 for an argon dye laser and 60 J/cm2 for a pulse wave laser. (3) The size of cancerous lesion curable by PDT was expanded from 3 cm in diameter, i.e. 7 cm2 in area to 4 cm in diameter, i.e. 13 cm2 by employing a new excimer dye laser model, which could emit 4mJ/pulse with 80 Hz pulse frequency. (4) The depth of cancer invasion which could be treated by PDT was increased from about 4 mm, i.e. the superficial part of the submucosal layer (SM-1) to more than 10 mm in depth, i.e. the proper muscular layer. These improvements owe much to the pulse laser, the photodynamic action induced by which permits deeper penetration than that of a continuous wave laser. (5) We employed a side-viewing fiberscope for gastric PDT to irradiate the lesion from an angle of 90°. (6) We designed a simple cut quartz fiber for photoradiation with a spiral spring thickened toward the end. (7) We developed an endoscopic device for photoradiation in PDT which achieves accurate and efficient irradiation. As a result of these improvements a higher cure rate was obtained even with a lower light dose of irradiation. PMID:18493500

  5. Lauren classification and individualized chemotherapy in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    MA, JUNLI; SHEN, HONG; KAPESA, LINDA; ZENG, SHAN

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignancies worldwide. During the last 50 years, the histological classification of gastric carcinoma has been largely based on Lauren's criteria, in which gastric cancer is classified into two major histological subtypes, namely intestinal type and diffuse type adenocarcinoma. This classification was introduced in 1965, and remains currently widely accepted and employed, since it constitutes a simple and robust classification approach. The two histological subtypes of gastric cancer proposed by the Lauren classification exhibit a number of distinct clinical and molecular characteristics, including histogenesis, cell differentiation, epidemiology, etiology, carcinogenesis, biological behaviors and prognosis. Gastric cancer exhibits varied sensitivity to chemotherapy drugs and significant heterogeneity; therefore, the disease may be a target for individualized therapy. The Lauren classification may provide the basis for individualized treatment for advanced gastric cancer, which is increasingly gaining attention in the scientific field. However, few studies have investigated individualized treatment that is guided by pathological classification. The aim of the current review is to analyze the two major histological subtypes of gastric cancer, as proposed by the Lauren classification, and to discuss the implications of this for personalized chemotherapy. PMID:27123046

  6. The distinctive gastric fluid proteome in gastric cancer reveals a multi-biomarker diagnostic profile

    PubMed Central

    Kon, Oi Lian; Yip, Tai-Tung; Ho, Meng Fatt; Chan, Weng Hoong; Wong, Wai Keong; Tan, Soo Yong; Ng, Wai Har; Kam, Siok Yuen; Eng, Alvin KH; Ho, Patrick; Viner, Rosa; Ong, Hock Soo; Kumarasinghe, M Priyanthi

    2008-01-01

    Background Overall gastric cancer survival remains poor mainly because there are no reliable methods for identifying highly curable early stage disease. Multi-protein profiling of gastric fluids, obtained from the anatomic site of pathology, could reveal diagnostic proteomic fingerprints. Methods Protein profiles were generated from gastric fluid samples of 19 gastric cancer and 36 benign gastritides patients undergoing elective, clinically-indicated gastroscopy using surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry on multiple ProteinChip arrays. Proteomic features were compared by significance analysis of microarray algorithm and two-way hierarchical clustering. A second blinded sample set (24 gastric cancers and 29 clinically benign gastritides) was used for validation. Results By significance analysyis of microarray, 60 proteomic features were up-regulated and 46 were down-regulated in gastric cancer samples (p < 0.01). Multimarker clustering showed two distinctive proteomic profiles independent of age and ethnicity. Eighteen of 19 cancer samples clustered together (sensitivity 95%) while 27/36 of non-cancer samples clustered in a second group. Nine non-cancer samples that clustered with cancer samples included 5 pre-malignant lesions (1 adenomatous polyp and 4 intestinal metaplasia). Validation using a second sample set showed the sensitivity and specificity to be 88% and 93%, respectively. Positive predictive value of the combined data was 0.80. Selected peptide sequencing identified pepsinogen C and pepsin A activation peptide as significantly down-regulated and alpha-defensin as significantly up-regulated. Conclusion This simple and reproducible multimarker proteomic assay could supplement clinical gastroscopic evaluation of symptomatic patients to enhance diagnostic accuracy for gastric cancer and pre-malignant lesions. PMID:18950519

  7. Prognostic Significance of Signet Ring Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Taghavi, Sharven; Jayarajan, Senthil N.; Davey, Adam; Willis, Alliric I.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Studies in Asia have questioned the dictum that signet ring cell carcinoma (SRC) has a worse prognosis than other forms of gastric cancer. Our study determined differences in presentation and outcomes between SRC and gastric adenocarcinoma (AC) in the United States. Patients and Methods The National Cancer Institute Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database was reviewed for SRC and AC from 2004 to 2007. Results We reviewed 10,246 cases of patients with gastric cancer, including 2,666 of SRC and 7,580 of AC. SRC presented in younger patients (61.9 v 68.7 years; P < .001) and less often in men (52.7% v 68.7%; P < .001). SRC patients were more frequently black (11.3% v 10.9%), Asian (16.4% v 13.2%), American Indian/Alaska Native (0.9% v 0.8%), or Hispanic (23.3% v 14.0%; P < .001). SRC was more likely to be stage T3-4 (45.8% v 33.3%), have lymph node spread (59.7% v 51.8%), and distant metastases (40.2% v 37.6%; P < .001). SRC was more likely to be found in the lower (30.7% v 24.2%) and middle stomach (30.6% v 20.7%; P < .001). Median survival was not different between the two (AC, 14.0 months v SRC, 13.0 months; P = .073). Multivariable analyses demonstrated SRC was not associated with mortality (hazard ratio [HR], 1.05; 95% CI, 0.96 to 1.11; P = .150). Mortality was associated with age (HR, 1.01; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.02; P < .001), black race (HR, 1.10; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.20; P = .026), and tumor grade. Variables associated with lower mortality risk included Asian race (HR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.77 to 0.91; P < .001) and surgery (HR, 0.37; 95% CI, 0.34 to 0.39; P < .001). Conclusion In the United States, SRC significantly differs from AC in extent of disease at presentation. However, when adjusted for stage, SRC does not portend a worse prognosis. PMID:22927530

  8. CD90 is upregulated in gastric cancer tissues and inhibits gastric cancer cell apoptosis by modulating the expression level of SPARC protein.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guang Chao; Gao, Lu; He, Junyu; Long, Yuehua; Liao, Shan; Wang, Haiyun; Li, Xujuan; Yi, Wei; Pei, Zhen; Wu, Minghua; Xiang, Juanjuan; Peng, Shuping; Ma, Jian; Zhou, Ming; Zeng, Zhaoyang; Xiang, Bo; Xiong, Wei; Tang, Ke; Cao, Li; Li, Xiaoling; Li, Guiyuan; Zhou, Yanhong

    2015-11-01

    Cluster of differentiation 90 (CD90) (Thy-1) plays important roles in the oncogenesis in various types of malignancies. In the present study, we investigated the expression of CD90 in gastric cancer (GC) tissues by q-PCR, immunohistochemistry (IHC), and western blot technologies. The results showed that CD90 was overexpressed in gastric cancer tissues compared with the level in the adjacent non‑cancerous tissues. To explore the possible mechanism of CD90 in GC, we elucidated the effect of CD90 on the apoptosis of AGS gastric cancer cells, and found that a considerable decrease in apoptotic cells was observed for AGS cells with CD90 overexpression. Meanwhile, the rate of apoptotic cells was increased in the AGS cells with CD90 interference (siCD90) compared with that in the AGS cells. Cell apoptosis is closely related to a reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and calcium ion (Ca2+) concentrations. Our results showed that overexpression of CD90 in the AGS gastric cancer cells led to an increase in ΔΨm and a decrease in intracellular ROS and Ca2+ concentrations. At the same time, siCD90 reduced ΔΨm and the increase in intracellular ROS and Ca2+ concentrations. Furthermore, we identified and confirmed that CD90 functions by modulating the expression level of secreted protein, acidic, cysteine‑rich (osteonectin) (SPARC) in vitro through LC‑MS/MS analyses and western blot technology. In summary, our results suggest that CD90 is upregulated in gastric cancer and inhibits gastric cancer cell apoptosis by modulating the expression level of SPARC protein. PMID:26329007

  9. Isoprenaline induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition in gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yan-Jie; Geng, Zhi-Jun; Sun, Xiao-Yan; Li, Yu-Hong; Fu, Xiao-Bing; Zhao, Xiang-Yang; Wei, Bo

    2015-10-01

    The emerging role of stress-related signaling in regulating cancer development and progression has been recognized. However, whether stress serves as a mechanism to promote gastric cancer metastasis is not clear. Here, we show that the β2-AR agonist, isoprenaline, upregulates expression levels of CD44 and CD44v8-10 in gastric cancer cells. CD44, a cancer stem cell-related marker, is expressed at high levels in gastric cancer tissues, which strongly correlates with the occurrence of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-associated phenotypes both in vivo and in vitro. Combined with experimental observations in two human gastric cancer cell lines, we found that β2-AR signaling can initiate EMT. It led to an increased expression of mesenchymal markers, such as α-SMA, vimentin, and snail at mRNA and protein levels, and conversely a decrease in epithelial markers, E-cadherin and β-catenin. Isoprenaline stimulation of β2-AR receptors activates the downstream target STAT3, which functions as a positive regulator and mediated the phenotypic switch toward a mesenchymal cell type in gastric cancer cells. Our data provide a mechanistic understanding of the complex signaling cascades involving stress-related hormones and their effects on EMT. In light of our observations, pharmacological interventions targeting β2-AR-STAT3 signaling can potentially be used to ameliorate stress-associated influences on gastric cancer development and progression. PMID:26253173

  10. Effect of Helicobacter pylori Infection on the Composition of Gastric Microbiota in the Development of Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Lei; Yu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Background Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancer types worldwide. In China, gastric cancer has become one of the major threats for public health, ranking second on incidence and third on cause of cancer death. Despite the common risk factors that promote the development of gastric cancer, the huge quantity of microorganism colonies within the gastrointestinal tract, particularly Helicobacter pylori infection, demonstrates a correlation with chronic inflammation and gastric carcinogenesis, as epidemiological studies have determined that H. pylori infection confers approximately 75% of the attributable risk for gastric cancer. Summary The current article draws an overview on the correlation between the microbiota, inflammation and gastric tumorigenesis. H. pylori infection has been identified as the main risk factor as it triggers epithelial barrier disruption, survival signaling as well as genetic/epigenetic modulation. Apart from H. pylori, the existence of a diverse and complex composition of microbiota in the stomach has been identified, which supports a role of microbiota in the development of gastric cancer. Moreover, metagenomics studies focused on the composition and function of the microbiota have associated microbiota with gastric metabolic diseases and even tumorigenesis. Apart from the gastric microbiota, inflammation is another identified contributor to cancer development as well. Key Message Though H. pylori infection and the non-H. pylori microbiota play a role in gastric cancer, the properties of gastric microbiota and mechanisms by which they participate in the genesis of gastric cancer are still not clearly depicted. Moreover, it remains to be understood how the presence of microbiota along with H. pylori infection affects the progress from gastric disease to cancer. Practical Implications This article summarized a clue of the current studies on microbiota, H. pylori infection and the progression from gastric disease to cancer. PMID

  11. Suppression of IL-8-Src signalling axis by 17β-estradiol inhibits human mesenchymal stem cells-mediated gastric cancer invasion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chung-Jung; Kuo, Fu-Chen; Wang, Chiu-Lin; Kuo, Chao-Hung; Wang, Sophie S W; Chen, Chiao-Yun; Huang, Yaw-Bin; Cheng, Kuang-Hung; Yokoyama, Kazunari K; Chen, Chun-Lin; Lu, Chien-Yu; Wu, Deng-Chyang

    2016-05-01

    Epidemiologic data show the incidence of gastric cancer in men is twofold higher than in women worldwide. Oestrogen is reported to have the capacity against gastric cancer development. Endogenous oestrogen reduces gastric cancer incidence in women. Cancer patients treated with oestrogens have a lower subsequent risk of gastric cancer. Accumulating studies report that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) might contribute to the progression of gastric cancer through paracrine effect of soluble factors. Here, we further explore the effect of oestrogen on BMMSCs-mediated human gastric cancer invasive motility. We founded that HBMMSCs notably secrete interleukin-8 (IL-8) protein. Administration of IL-8 specific neutralizing antibody significantly inhibits HBMMSCs-mediated gastric cancer motility. Treatment of recombinant IL-8 soluble protein confirmed the role of IL-8 in mediating HBMMSCs-up-regulated cell motility. IL-8 up-regulates motility activity through Src signalling pathway in human gastric cancer. We further observed that 17β -estradiol inhibit HBMMSCS-induced cell motility via suppressing activation of IL8-Src signalling in human gastric cancer cells. 17β-estradiol inhibits IL8-up-regulated Src downstream target proteins including p-Cas, p-paxillin, p-ERK1/2, p-JNK1/2, MMP9, tPA and uPA. These results suggest that 17β-estradiol significantly inhibits HBMMSCS-induced invasive motility through suppressing IL8-Src signalling axis in human gastric cancer cells. PMID:26945908

  12. Correlation between FOXP3 expression and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Guoxiao; He, Zhikuan; Shi, Zhaohui

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression and function of forkhead box protein 3 (FOXP3) in gastric cancer using a rat model. A total of 92 Wistar rats were divided into two groups: An experimental group (n=46) and a control group (n=46). In the experimental group, sarcosine ethyl ester hydrochloride and sodium nitrite carcinogens were administered for 6 months to induce gastric cancer, whereas the control group was administered saline. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, immunoblotting, immunohistochemistry and western blotting were applied to analyze FOXP3 expression in gastric cancer and normal gastric tissue in the experimental and control groups, respectively. The association between FOXP3 expression and gastric cancer pathogenesis was investigated. In the experimental group, 6/46 rats developed hyperplastic lesions (grade I), 8 rats developed precancerous lesions (grade II), 18 rats developed early stage gastric cancer (grade III) and 14 rats developed gastrointestinal invasive carcinoma (grade IV). FOXP3 transcription and expression was observed in all gastric tissues of the experimental group. FOXP3 transcription and expression levels were significantly higher in the experimental group than in the control group (P<0.05). Furthermore, in the experimental group, a higher lesion grade was associated with a higher level of FOXP3 transcription and expression (P<0.05). FOXP3 protein was predominantly distributed in the tumor nuclei of the gastric cancer tissues. In the 32 pathological slices of gastric cancer tissue obtained from the experimental group, 20 cases (62.50%) exhibited positive FOXP3 staining. In the hyperplastic (grade I) and precancerous gastric (grade II) tissues, 2 cases (33.33%) and 4 cases (50.00%) exhibited positive FOXP3 staining, respectively. However, no positive FOXP3 expression was identified in the 46 pathological gastric tissue slices obtained from the control group. In conclusion, the expression of FOXP

  13. Differential Proteomic Analysis of Noncardia Gastric Cancer from Individuals of Northern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Leal, Mariana Ferreira; Chung, Janete; Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; Assumpção, Paulo Pimentel; Demachki, Samia; da Silva, Ismael Dale Cotrim Guerreiro; Chammas, Roger; Burbano, Rommel Rodríguez; de Arruda Cardoso Smith, Marília

    2012-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. The identification of new cancer biomarkers is necessary to reduce the mortality rates through the development of new screening assays and early diagnosis, as well as new target therapies. In this study, we performed a proteomic analysis of noncardia gastric neoplasias of individuals from Northern Brazil. The proteins were analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. For the identification of differentially expressed proteins, we used statistical tests with bootstrapping resampling to control the type I error in the multiple comparison analyses. We identified 111 proteins involved in gastric carcinogenesis. The computational analysis revealed several proteins involved in the energy production processes and reinforced the Warburg effect in gastric cancer. ENO1 and HSPB1 expression were further evaluated. ENO1 was selected due to its role in aerobic glycolysis that may contribute to the Warburg effect. Although we observed two up-regulated spots of ENO1 in the proteomic analysis, the mean expression of ENO1 was reduced in gastric tumors by western blot. However, mean ENO1 expression seems to increase in more invasive tumors. This lack of correlation between proteomic and western blot analyses may be due to the presence of other ENO1 spots that present a slightly reduced expression, but with a high impact in the mean protein expression. In neoplasias, HSPB1 is induced by cellular stress to protect cells against apoptosis. In the present study, HSPB1 presented an elevated protein and mRNA expression in a subset of gastric cancer samples. However, no association was observed between HSPB1 expression and clinicopathological characteristics. Here, we identified several possible biomarkers of gastric cancer in individuals from Northern Brazil. These biomarkers may be useful for the assessment of prognosis and stratification for therapy if validated in larger clinical study

  14. Diet in the epidemiology of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Graham, S; Haughey, B; Marshall, J; Brasure, J; Zielezny, M; Freudenheim, J; West, D; Nolan, J; Wilkinson, G

    1990-01-01

    We examined the nutritional epidemiology of gastric cancer in 293 cases and neighborhood-, age-, and sex-matched controls in communities throughout the counties of Niagara, Monroe, and Erie in western New York. The interview was highly detailed, requiring two and one-half hours to complete; it attempted to provide an estimate of total calories ingested as well as of macro- and micronutrients and behaviors that could affect alimentary exposures, such as the use of refrigeration. We found that risk was enhanced by sodium, fat, and retinol. Substantial reductions in risk were associated with ingestion of carotene, especially raw vegetables (including celery, cucumbers, carrots, green peppers, tomatoes, and onions), as well as with increased use of low-temperature food storage. Both refrigeration and carotene could inhibit oxidation products that could act as carcinogens in the stomach. PMID:2300492

  15. Roadmap for elimination of gastric cancer in Korea.

    PubMed

    Graham, David Y

    2015-03-01

    Most gastric cancers are caused by infection with the common human bacterial pathogen, Helicobacter pylori. It is now accepted that gastric cancer can be prevented and virtually eliminated by H. pylori eradication and this knowledge was responsible for country-wide H. pylori eradication combined with secondary cancer prevention for those with residual risk that was introduced in Japan in 2013. Korea is a high H. pylori prevalence and high gastric cancer incidence country and a good candidate for a gastric cancer elimination program. The presence of an H. pylori infection is now considered as an indication for treatment of the infection. However, antimicrobial drug resistance is common among H. pylori in Korea making effective therapy problematic. Country-wide studies of the local and regional antimicrobial resistance patterns are needed to choose the most appropriate therapies. H. pylori and gastric cancer eradication can be both efficient and cost effective making it possible and practical to make Korea H. pylori and gastric cancer free. There is no reason to delay. PMID:25750552

  16. Changing strategies for target therapy in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Suk-young; Oh, Sang Cheul

    2016-01-01

    In spite of a worldwide decrease in the incidence of gastric cancer, this malignancy still remains one of the leading causes of cancer mortality. Great efforts have been made to improve treatment outcomes in patients with metastatic gastric cancer, and the introduction of trastuzumab has greatly improved the overall survival. The trastuzumab treatment took its first step in opening the era of molecular targeted therapy, however several issues still need to be resolved to increase the efficacy of targeted therapy. Firstly, many patients with metastatic gastric cancer who receive trastuzumab in combination with chemotherapeutic agents develop resistance to the targeted therapy. Secondly, many clinical trials testing novel molecular targeted agents with demonstrated efficacy in other malignancies have failed to show benefit in patients with metastatic gastric cancer, suggesting the importance of the selection of appropriate indications according to molecular characteristics in application of targeted agents. Herein, we review the molecular targeted agents currently approved and in use, and clinical trials in patients with metastatic gastric cancer, and demonstrate the limitations and future direction in treatment of advanced gastric cancer. PMID:26811656

  17. Dermatosis as the initial presentation of gastric cancer: two cases

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Wei; Teng, Bu-Wei; Yu, De-Cai; Zheng, Li-Ming; Ding, Yi-Tao

    2014-01-01

    Paraneoplastic dermatoses are known to be certain dermatosis related with tumor. The common paraneoplastic dermatoses are acanthosis nigricans, acquired ichthyosis, dermatomyositis, erythroderma, and so on. Here we report two cases of paraneoplastic dermatoses associated with gastric cancer. One case was a 57-year-old man with dermatomyositis and proved to be associated with gastric cancer through stomachoscopy. The other was a 66-year-old man with erythroderma and proved to be associated with gastric cancer through stomachoscopy. Both cases were treated with radical total gastrectomy with lymphadenectomy (D2) and esophagojejunostomy of Roux-en-Y. The skin symptom of both cases had improved a lot but still existed after operation. Paraneoplastic dermatoses can be seen as the early manifestation of visceral carcinomas. As a result, gastric cancers should be excluded in the patients with paraneoplastic dermatoses. PMID:25400431

  18. [Gastric cancer in the health area II of Asturias].

    PubMed

    Rubio Barbón, S; Aguirre Losada, A; Claros González, I; Viso Ciudad, S; García Fernández, M

    1990-12-01

    The gastric cancer cases diagnosed in "Asturias II" Health Area, are presented. The epidemiological features of incidence, prevalence, morbidity and diagnostic stages were analysed, as well as diagnosis methods. Comments on etiology, diagnosis and treatment are also included. PMID:2135573

  19. Treatment strategies for gastric cancer patients with peritoneal metastasis.

    PubMed

    Imano, Motohiro; Okuno, Kiyotaka

    2014-03-01

    Although the treatment of gastric cancer improves the clinical outcomes, the survival of gastric cancer patients with peritoneal metastasis is still very poor. Effective drugs against peritoneal metastasis, coupled with new therapeutic modalities, are needed to improve the prognoses of these patients. Paclitaxel and TS-1 are candidate drugs for peritoneal metastasis, and intraperitoneal chemotherapy and targeted therapy are potential new therapeutic modalities. Two phase II studies using TS-1 and intraperitoneal and systemic paclitaxel for gastric cancer patients with peritoneal metastasis showed respectable survival results. In addition, peritoneal metastatic lesions showed high levels of epithelial cellular adhesion molecule (ECAM) and very low levels of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), thus indicating that an anti-ECAM monoclonal antibody, catumaxomab, would be effective against gastric cancer-derived peritoneal metastasis. Although catumaxomab and intraperitoneally administered paclitaxel are not generally used in Japan at present, these treatment strategies might therefore be effectively used in Japan in the near future. PMID:23677598

  20. [Prevention of gastric cancer by Helicobacter pylori eradication].

    PubMed

    Asaka, Masahiro

    2009-08-01

    Though the relationship between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and gastric cancer has been proved in epidemiological studies and animal experiments, the prophylactic effect of H. pylori eradication is controversial in human studies. A large-scale clinical study performed by the JAPANGAST Study Group has confirmed that the eradication of H. pylori undoubtedly decreases the incidence of metachronous gastric cancer after endoscopic mucosal resection as published in The Lancet (372: 392-397, 2008). This study shows gastric cancer is a kind of infectious disease, not a lifestyle-related disease, and can thus be averted by preventing or curing the infection, suggesting the eradication of H. pylori might be indicated to prevent development of gastric cancers. PMID:19692758

  1. Oct-4 is associated with gastric cancer progression and prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wen-Li; Zhang, Peng-Fei; Li, Guo-Feng; Dong, Jian-Hua; Wang, Xue-Song; Wang, Yuan-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Aim To investigate the clinical significance of Oct-4 in the development and progression of gastric cancer. Methods Immunohistochemistry was used to analyze Oct-4 expression in 412 gastric cancer cases. Oct-4 protein levels were upregulated in gastric cancer tissues compared with adjacent noncancerous tissues. Results Positive expression of Oct-4 correlated with age, depth of invasion, Lauren classification, lymph node metastasis, distant metastasis, and TNM stage. In stages I, II, and III, the 5-year survival rate of patients with high expression of Oct-4 was significantly lower than that in patients with low expression of Oct-4. In stage IV, Oct-4 expression did not correlate with the 5-year survival rate. Furthermore, multivariate analysis suggested that the depth of invasion, lymph node metastasis, distant metastasis, TNM stage, and upregulation of Oct-4 were independent prognostic factors of gastric cancer. Conclusion Oct-4 protein is a useful marker in predicting tumor progression and prognosis. PMID:26869797

  2. Radical lymphadenectomy in the management of early gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Hayes, N; Karat, D; Scott, D J; Raimes, S A; Griffin, S M

    1996-10-01

    Lymph node metastasis in patients with early gastric cancer was evaluated prospectively to determine whether radical (D2) lymphadenectomy is appropriate in such cases. Twenty-eight (18 per cent) of 156 patients having surgery for gastric cancer had early disease. Lymph node metastasis was found in 12 of the 28 patients. Metastasis was more likely in submucosal than mucosal early gastric cancer (nine of 14 versus three of 14; P = 0.024, Fisher's exact test). In two of three patients with metastasis at the N2 level, the N1 nodes were entirely clear. This study shows a higher incidence of lymph node metastasis than has been reported previously in both the UK and Japan. The high incidence of lymph node metastasis in early gastric cancer supports the continuing use of radical lymphadenectomy in patients who are fit for such major surgery. PMID:8944462

  3. Cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Seshadri, Ramakrishnan Ayloor; Glehen, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer associated peritoneal carcinomatosis (GCPC) has a poor prognosis with a median survival of less than one year. Systemic chemotherapy including targeted agents has not been found to significantly increase the survival in GCPC. Since recurrent gastric cancer remains confined to the abdominal cavity in many patients, regional therapies like aggressive cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) have been investigated for GCPC. HIPEC has been used for three indications in GC- as an adjuvant therapy after a curative surgery, HIPEC has been shown to improve survival and reduce peritoneal recurrences in many randomised trials in Asian countries; as a definitive treatment in established PC, HIPEC along with CRS is the only therapeutic modality that has resulted in long-term survival in select groups of patients; as a palliative treatment in advanced PC with intractable ascites, HIPEC has been shown to control ascites and reduce the need for frequent paracentesis. While the results of randomised trials of adjuvant HIPEC from western centres are awaited, the role of HIPEC in the treatment of GCPC is still evolving and needs larger studies before it is accepted as a standard of care. PMID:26811651

  4. Treatment of gastric outlet obstruction that results from unresectable gastric cancer: Current evidence

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Yasuhiro; Takiguchi, Shuji; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Kurokawa, Yukinori; Makino, Tomoki; Yamasaki, Makoto; Nakajima, Kiyokazu; Mori, Masaki; Doki, Yuichiro

    2016-01-01

    Malignant gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) is a common condition that results from locally advanced malignancies in the upper gastrointestinal tract, such as pancreatic, gastric, and other carcinomas. Two types of procedures for malignant GOO, namely, gastrojejunostomy (GJ) with laparotomy or a laparoscopic approach and endoscopic stenting (ES), are currently available. Although numerous previous reports have clarified the benefits and drawbacks of each procedure, whether GJ or ES should be used in patients with GOO that results from gastric cancer who may have a longer life expectancy than patients with other malignancies has not been determined. In this review, which focuses on gastric cancer-induced GOO, we analyzed the two systematic reviews and a meta-analysis that compared GJ and ES and outlined the current status of GOO treatment. We also provide an updated review that includes laparoscopic GJ. Various data from 13 studies in one review and 6 studies in another review were analyzed. Although the main results of the present review indicated that both GJ and ES were efficacious treatments in patients with GOO that resulted from gastric cancer, current evidence suggests that GJ may be the preferable procedure given its good performance status and improved prognosis in gastric cancer patients. PMID:26862366

  5. Gastric Cancer: Molecular and Clinical Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Wadhwa, Roopma; Song, Shumei; Lee, Ju-Seog; Yao, Yixin; Wei, Qingyi; Ajani, Jaffer A.

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) imposes a significant health burden around the globe despite its declining incidence. GC is often diagnosed in advanced stages and carries a poor prognosis. In depth understanding of molecular underpinnings of GC has lagged behind many other cancers of its magnitude, as a result our knowledge base for identifying germline susceptibility traits for risk and somatic drivers of progression (to identify novel therapeutic targets) is limited. A few germline (PLCE1) and somatic (ERBB2, ERBB3, PTEN, PI3K/AKT/mTOR, FGF, TP53, CDH1, and c-MET) alterations are emerging and some are being pursued in the clinic. Novel somatic gene targets, Arid1a, FAT4, and MLL/MLL3 are of interest. Clinically, variations in the therapeutic approaches for localized GC are evident by geographic regions. These are driven by preferences for the adjunctive strategies and the extent of surgery coupled with philosophical divides. However, there is a greater uniformity in approaches to metastatic cancer, an incurable condition. Having realized only modest successes, the momentum is building for carrying out more phase 3 comparative trials and some are using biomarker-based patient selection. Overall, rapid progress in biotechnology is improving our molecular understanding and can help with new drug discovery. The future prospects are excellent for defining biomarker-based subsets of patients and application of specific therapeutics. However, many challenges remain to be tackled. Here we review representative molecular and clinical dimensions of GC. PMID:24061039

  6. CO-029 is overexpressed in gastric cancer and mediates the effects of EGF on gastric cancer cell proliferation and invasion.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongyu; Wu, Yulian; Zheng, Wen; Lu, Shiliu

    2015-03-01

    Tetraspanins are cell-surface glycoproteins and have received attention recently as both suppressors and promoters of metastasis. CO-029 is a member of the tetraspanin family and is implicated to be a metastasis-promoting tetraspanin in some cancers. However, the role of CO-029 in gastric cancer remains unexplored. The present study aimed to investigate the expression of CO-029 in gastric cancer tissues and to determine whether CO-029 is involved in the effects of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on gastric cancer cell proliferation and invasion. We collected clinical samples and found that the expression of CO-029 was increased both at the mRNA level and protein level in gastric cancer tissues in comparison to normal and tumor-adjacent tissues, as demonstrated by RT-qPCR and western blot analysis, respectively. Furthermore, we performed an in vitro experiment using AGS cells and observed that EGF promoted AGS cell proliferation and enhanced the invasion ability of the AGS cells, as shown by MTT assay and cell invasion assay, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, our results reveal for the first time, that CO-029 expression was affected by EGF in a concentration- time-dependent manner. The knockdown of CO-029 attenuated the effects of EGF on gastric cancer cell proliferation and invasion. These findings suggest that CO-029 is an oncogene in human gastric cancer and that CO-029 at least partially mediates the effects of EGF on gastric cancer cell proliferation and invasion. Our data may provide a novel target for therapeutic intervention in human gastric cancer. PMID:25592989

  7. Association between ERCC5 gene polymorphisms and gastric cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Guo, B W; Yang, L; Zhao, R; Hao, S Z

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the role of ERCC5 gene polymorphisms (rs17655 and rs751402) in the development of gastric cancer in a Chinese population. A total of 142 gastric cancer patients whose diagnoses were confirmed by pathology, and 274 control subjects were recruited from Tangshan Gongren Hospital between March 2013 and March 2015. Genotyping of ERCC5 rs17655 and rs751402 polymorphisms was performed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Compared with the control subjects, we found that gastric cancer patients were more likely to be older, smoke tobacco, drink alcohol, and suffer from Helicobacter pylori infection. Using a chi-square test, a significant difference was observed in the distribution ofERCC5 rs751402 genotypes between patient and control groups (chi-square = 7.79, P = 0.02). In addition, unconditional multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that the AA genotype of rs751402 significantly increased gastric cancer risk compared to the GG genotype [odds ratio (OR) = 2.61, 95%CI = 1.23-5.49; P = 0.005]. Moreover, we found that the AA genotype correlated with elevated risk of gastric cancer when compared to the GG+AG genotype under a recessive model (OR = 2.21, 95%CI = 1.11-4.39; P = 0.01). In conclusion, we suggest that the ERCC5 rs751402 polymorphism is associated with development of gastric cancer. PMID:27323183

  8. Prevention Strategies for Gastric Cancer: A Global Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin Young; von Karsa, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    Despite the substantial burden of gastric cancer worldwide, population strategies for primary prevention have not been introduced in any country. Recognizing the causal role of Helicobacter pylori infection, there is increasing interest in population-based programs to eradicate the infection to prevent gastric cancer. Nonetheless, the paucity of available evidence on feasibility and effectiveness has prevented implementation of this approach. There are very few secondary prevention programs based on screening with endoscopy or radiography, notably in the Republic of Korea and Japan, two of the countries with the highest incidence rates of gastric cancer. In Korea, where the organized screening program is in place, survival rate of gastric cancer is as high as 67%. More research is needed to quantify the specific contribution of the screening program to observed declines in mortality rates. Gastric cancer screening is unlikely to be feasible in many Low-Middle Income Countries where the gastric cancer burden is high. Prevention strategies are still under development and the optimal approach may differ depending on local conditions and societal values. The present review gives an overview of the etiology and burden of the disease, and possible prevention strategies for countries and regions confronted with a significant burden of disease. PMID:25505712

  9. CXCR3A contributes to the invasion and metastasis of gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chenggang; Zheng, Wanlei; Du, Wenfeng

    2016-09-01

    CXCR3, belonging to CXC chemokine receptors, has been identified to be overexpressed in various kinds of tumors. There are three mRNA variants of CXCR3 (CXCR3A, CXCR3B and CXCR3alt) in human cells. The functions of major CXCR3 isoforms (CXCR3A, CXCR3B) have been reported in some tumors including prostate and breast cancer. However, the effects of CXCR3A and CXCR3B on gastric cancer cell progression remain unknown. The present investigation found that CXCR3A mRNA level was upregulated but CXCR3B mRNA level was downregulated in gastric cancer cells and tissues. In vitro growth analysis showed that CXCR3A acted as a positive mediator in regulating cell growth, whereas CXCR3B exerted the opposite effect. In vitro invasion and migration assays showed that CXCL10 promoted gastric cancer cell invasion and migration via CXCR3A, but not CXCR3B. Moreover, knockdown of CXCR3A inhibited cell growth and metastasis in vivo. Additionally, CXCR3A knockdown attenuated matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)‑13 and IL‑6 expression, and reduced ERK1/2 activation. Together, these data suggest that CXCR3A contributes to the growth, invasion and metastasis of gastric cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, and thus may be a key mediator of gastric cancer progression. PMID:27461521

  10. Prognostic value of serum tumor abnormal protein in gastric cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    LAN, FENG; ZHU, MING; QI, QIUFENG; ZHANG, YAPING; LIU, YONGPING

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant glycosylation of protein occurs in nearly all types of cancers and has been confirmed to be associated with tumor progression, metastasis and the survival rate of patients. The present study aimed to explore the prognostic value of tumor abnormal protein (TAP) in gastric cancer patients. TAP was detected in the blood of 42 gastric cancer patients and 56 healthy volunteers by using the TAP testing kit. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analysis were performed to evaluate the prognostic value of TAP. In total, 64.3% of gastric cancer patients were positive for TAP, and TAP was significantly correlated with poor prognosis [progression-free survival (PFS), 4.2 vs. 12.6 months; P=0.043]. TAP [hazard ratio (HR), 64.487; P<0.01), differentiation (HR, 17.279; P<0.01) and TNM stage (HR, 45.480; P<0.01) were found to be independent predictive factors for PFS. Furthermore, Kaplan-Meier curves indicated that TAP is associated with a reduced PFS in gastric cancer patients. The results of the present study therefore indicated that the TAP test has significant prognostic value for gastric cancer patients. PMID:27330802

  11. Reduction of gastric cancer proliferation and invasion by miR-15a mediated suppression of Bmi-1 translation

    PubMed Central

    Fesler, Andrew; Hu, Wenwei; Chen, Lujun; Xu, Bin; Wang, Qi; Tong, Anthony; Burke, Stephanie; Ju, Jingfang; Jiang, Jingting

    2016-01-01

    B-cell specific moloney leukemia virus insertion site 1 (Bmi-1) gene plays important roles in gastric cancer, but the epigenetic regulatory mechanism by microRNA (miRNA) and the functional significance of Bmi-1 inhibition in gastric cancer remains elusive. In this study, we systematically investigated the functional roles of miRNA mediated Bmi-1 suppression in gastric cancer. Our results show that the expression of miR-15a is significantly reduced in gastric cancer and the protein expression levels of Bmi-1 are inversely correlated with miR-15a (P = 0.034) in gastric cancer patient samples. Functional studies revealed that ectopic expression of miR-15a decreased Bmi-1 in gastric cancer cell lines with reduced proliferation and tumor invasion. High levels of Bmi-1 in gastric cancer patients are significantly associated with better overall survival (P = 0.024) based on the Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. PMID:26894855

  12. Development of gastric cancer associated with Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2004-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with histological gastritis, gastric atrophy, gastric cancer and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma in the stomach. However, gastric cancer only develops in a minority of infected individuals. Such clinical diversity is caused by variations in the interactions between H. pylori pathogenicity, host susceptibility, and environmental factors. Based on evidence from three prospective epidemiological studies, the International Agency for Research on Cancer and the World Health Organization (IARC/WHO) concluded in 1994 that H. pylori has a causal linkage to gastric carcinogenesis and is a definite carcinogen in humans. Two large-scale, prospective, epidemiological studies have recently been reported in Japan and have confirmed that H. pylori infection constitutes a high risk factor for the development of gastric cancer, at least in males. In order to obtain evidence that eradication of H. pylori leads to a reduction in the occurrence of gastric cancer, reversibility of precancerous lesions, gastric atrophy or intestinal metaplasia should be proven after eradication treatment. A biopsy specimen from the lesser curvature of the corpus is the most sensitive for evaluating the regression of gastric atrophy on histology, and the evaluation needs be conducted at least 13 months after treatment. In a Mongolian gerbil model with or without low-dose chemical carcinogens, it has been demonstrated that H. pylori can lead to the development of gastric cancer. Experimental studies have elucidated that virulence factors of H. pylori interact with gastric epithelial cell signaling related to carcinogenesis. The cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI) is a major virulence gene cluster; it encodes the type IV secretion machinery system forming a cylinder-like structure. The CagA protein is translocated into target cells via this secretion system and induces a hummingbird phenotype, a growth factor-like effect. The other gene products are

  13. Benefits and harms of endoscopic screening for gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hamashima, Chisato

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer has remained a serious burden worldwide, particularly in East Asian countries. However, nationwide prevention and screening programs for gastric cancer have not yet been established in most countries except in South Korea and Japan. Although evidence regarding the effectiveness of endoscopic screening for gastric cancer has been increasingly accumulated, such evidence remains weak because it is based on results from studies other than randomized controlled trials. Specifically, evidence was mostly based on the results of cohort and case-control studies mainly conducted in South Korea and Japan. However, the consistent positive results from these studies suggest promising evidence of mortality reduction from gastric cancer by endoscopic screening. The major harms of endoscopic screening include infection, adverse effects, false-positive results, and overdiagnosis. Despite the possible harms of endoscopic screening, information regarding these harms remains insufficient. To provide appropriate cancer screening, a balance of benefits and harms should always be considered when cancer screening is introduced as a public policy. Quality assurance is very important for the implementation of cancer screening to provide high-quality and safe screening and minimize harms. Endoscopic screening for gastric cancer has shown promising results, and thus deserves further evaluation to reliably establish its effectiveness and optimal use. PMID:27605874

  14. Recent patterns in gastric cancer: a global overview.

    PubMed

    Bertuccio, Paola; Chatenoud, Liliane; Levi, Fabio; Praud, Delphine; Ferlay, Jacques; Negri, Eva; Malvezzi, Matteo; La Vecchia, Carlo

    2009-08-01

    Until the mid-1990s, gastric cancer has been the first cause of cancer death worldwide, although rates had been declining for several decades and gastric cancer has become a relatively rare cancer in North America and in most Northern and Western Europe, but not in Eastern Europe, Russia and selected areas of Central and South America or East Asia. We analyzed gastric cancer mortality in Europe and other areas of the world from 1980 to 2005 using joinpoint regression analysis, and provided updated site-specific incidence rates from 51 selected registries. Over the last decade, the annual percent change (APC) in mortality rate was around -3, -4% for the major European countries. The APC were similar for the Republic of Korea (APC = -4.3%), Australia (-3.7%), the USA (-3.6%), Japan (-3.5%), Ukraine (-3%) and the Russian Federation (-2.8%). In Latin America, the decline was less marked, but constant with APC around -1.6% in Chile and Brazil, -2.3% in Argentina and Mexico and -2.6% in Colombia. Cancers in the fundus and pylorus are more common in high incidence and mortality areas and have been declining more than cardia gastric cancer. Steady downward trends persist in gastric cancer mortality worldwide even in middle aged population, and hence further appreciable declines are likely in the near future. PMID:19382179

  15. Benefits and harms of endoscopic screening for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Hamashima, Chisato

    2016-07-28

    Gastric cancer has remained a serious burden worldwide, particularly in East Asian countries. However, nationwide prevention and screening programs for gastric cancer have not yet been established in most countries except in South Korea and Japan. Although evidence regarding the effectiveness of endoscopic screening for gastric cancer has been increasingly accumulated, such evidence remains weak because it is based on results from studies other than randomized controlled trials. Specifically, evidence was mostly based on the results of cohort and case-control studies mainly conducted in South Korea and Japan. However, the consistent positive results from these studies suggest promising evidence of mortality reduction from gastric cancer by endoscopic screening. The major harms of endoscopic screening include infection, adverse effects, false-positive results, and overdiagnosis. Despite the possible harms of endoscopic screening, information regarding these harms remains insufficient. To provide appropriate cancer screening, a balance of benefits and harms should always be considered when cancer screening is introduced as a public policy. Quality assurance is very important for the implementation of cancer screening to provide high-quality and safe screening and minimize harms. Endoscopic screening for gastric cancer has shown promising results, and thus deserves further evaluation to reliably establish its effectiveness and optimal use. PMID:27605874

  16. Green tea and the risk of gastric cancer: Epidemiological evidence

    PubMed Central

    Hou, I-Chun; Amarnani, Saral; Chong, Mok T; Bishayee, Anupam

    2013-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is one of the leading causes of cancer death in the world. Numerous efforts are being made to find chemoprotective agents able to reduce its risk. Amongst these, green tea has been reported to have a protective effect against stomach cancer. This article aims to critically evaluate all epidemiological studies reporting an association between green tea consumption and GC risk. MEDLINE, EBSCOHOST and Google Scholar were used to search for clinical trials of green tea and its correlation to stomach cancer. Studies include cohort and case-control studies. Outcome of interests are inverse association, no association, and positive association. Seventeen epidemiologic studies were reviewed. Eleven studies were conducted in Japan, five in China, and one with Japanese descendent in Hawaii. Ten case-control studies and seven cohort studies were included. The relative risks or odds ratio of GC for the highest level of green tea consumption was compared. Seven studies suggested no association, eight an inverse association, and one a positive association. One study had shown a significantly lowered GC risk when tea was served warm to cold. Another study also showed a significantly risk with lukewarm tea. All studies that analyzed men and women separately have suggested a reduced risk in women than in men, albeit no significant difference. This review demonstrates that there is insufficient information to support green tea consumption reduces the risk of GC. More studies on the subject matter are warranted. PMID:23840110

  17. Endoscopic surveillance strategy after endoscopic resection for early gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Tsutomu; Tsujii, Masahiko; Kato, Motohiko; Hayashi, Yoshito; Akasaka, Tomofumi; Iijima, Hideki; Takehara, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    Early detection of early gastric cancer (EGC) is important to improve the prognosis of patients with gastric cancer. Recent advances in endoscopic modalities and treatment devices, such as image-enhanced endoscopy and high-frequency generators, may make endoscopic treatment, such as endoscopic submucosal dissection, a therapeutic option for gastric intraepithelial neoplasia. Consequently, short-term outcomes of endoscopic resection (ER) for EGC have improved. Therefore, surveillance with endoscopy after ER for EGC is becoming more important, but how to perform endoscopic surveillance after ER has not been established, even though the follow-up strategy for more advanced gastric cancer has been outlined. Therefore, a surveillance strategy for patients with EGC after ER is needed. PMID:24891981

  18. Gastric mucosa in Mongolian and Japanese patients with gastric cancer and Helicobacter pylori infection

    PubMed Central

    Matsuhisa, Takeshi; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Uchida, Tomohisa; Duger, Davaadorj; Adiyasuren, Battulga; Khasag, Oyuntsetseg; Tegshee, Tserentogtokh; Tsogt-Ochir, Byambajav

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the characteristics of gastric cancer and gastric mucosa in a Mongolian population by comparison with a Japanese population. METHODS: A total of 484 Mongolian patients with gastric cancer were enrolled to study gastric cancer characteristics in Mongolians. In addition, a total of 208 Mongolian and 3205 Japanese consecutive outpatients who underwent endoscopy, had abdominal complaints, no history of gastric operation or Helicobacter pylori eradication treatment, and no use of gastric secretion inhibitors such as histamine H2-receptor antagonists or proton pump inhibitors were enrolled. This study was conducted with the approval of the ethics committees of all hospitals. The triple-site biopsy method was used for the histologic diagnosis of gastritis and H. pylori infection in all Mongolian and Japanese cases. The infection rate of H. pylori and the status of gastric mucosa in H. pylori-infected patients were compared between Mongolian and Japanese subjects. Age (± 5 years), sex, and endoscopic diagnosis were matched between the two countries. RESULTS: Approximately 70% of Mongolian patients with gastric cancer were 50-79 years of age, and approximately half of the cancers were located in the upper part of the stomach. Histologically, 65.7% of early cancers exhibited differentiated adenocarcinoma, whereas 73.9% of advanced cancers displayed undifferentiated adenocarcinoma. The infection rate of H. pylori was higher in Mongolian than Japanese patients (75.9% vs 48.3%, P < 0.0001). When stratified by age, the prevalence was highest among young patients, and tended to decrease in patients aged 50 years or older. The anti-East-Asian CagA-specific antibody was negative in 99.4% of H. pylori-positive Mongolian patients. Chronic inflammation, neutrophil activity, glandular atrophy, and intestinal metaplasia scores were significantly lower in Mongolian compared to Japanese H. pylori-positive patients (P < 0.0001), with the exception of the intestinal

  19. MYC, FBXW7 and TP53 copy number variation and expression in Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background MYC deregulation is a common event in gastric carcinogenesis, usually as a consequence of gene amplification, chromosomal translocations, or posttranslational mechanisms. FBXW7 is a p53-controlled tumor-suppressor that plays a role in the regulation of cell cycle exit and reentry via MYC degradation. Methods We evaluated MYC, FBXW7, and TP53 copy number, mRNA levels, and protein expression in gastric cancer and paired non-neoplastic specimens from 33 patients and also in gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines. We also determined the invasion potential of the gastric cancer cell lines. Results MYC amplification was observed in 51.5% of gastric tumor samples. Deletion of one copy of FBXW7 and TP53 was observed in 45.5% and 21.2% of gastric tumors, respectively. MYC mRNA expression was significantly higher in tumors than in non-neoplastic samples. FBXW7 and TP53 mRNA expression was markedly lower in tumors than in paired non-neoplastic specimens. Moreover, deregulated MYC and FBXW7 mRNA expression was associated with the presence of lymph node metastasis and tumor stage III-IV. Additionally, MYC immunostaining was more frequently observed in intestinal-type than diffuse-type gastric cancers and was associated with MYC mRNA expression. In vitro studies showed that increased MYC and reduced FBXW7 expression is associated with a more invasive phenotype in gastric cancer cell lines. This result encouraged us to investigate the activity of the gelatinases MMP-2 and MMP-9 in both cell lines. Both gelatinases are synthesized predominantly by stromal cells rather than cancer cells, and it has been proposed that both contribute to cancer progression. We observed a significant increase in MMP-9 activity in ACP02 compared with ACP03 cells. These results confirmed that ACP02 cells have greater invasion capability than ACP03 cells. Conclusion In conclusion, FBXW7 and MYC mRNA may play a role in aggressive biologic behavior of gastric cancer cells and may be a useful

  20. Mean platelet volume predicts chemotherapy response and prognosis in patients with unresectable gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    LIAN, LIAN; XIA, YOU-YOU; ZHOU, CHONG; SHEN, XIAO-MING; LI, XIANG-LI; HAN, SHU-GUANG; ZHENG, YAN; GONG, FEI-RAN; TAO, MIN; LI, WEI

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most frequent cancer and the second cause of cancer-related mortalities worldwide. Platelets play an important and multifaceted role in cancer progression. Elevated mean platelet volume (MPV) detected in peripheral blood has been identified in various types of cancer. In the present study, we investigated the application value of MPV in the prediction of chemotherapy response and prognosis in patients with unresectable gastric cancer. A total of 128 patients with unresectable gastric cancer were included and divided according to the median values of baseline MPV (low MPV: <11.65 or high MPV: ≥11.65). A low baseline MPV level was correlated with reduced metastasis. The results showed that patients with a low baseline level of MPV improved response to chemotherapy. Changes in MPV were associated with therapeutic efficacy. Patients who remained in or were transferred into the low MPV level subgroup following first-line chemotherapy had improved response, compared to those remaining in or being transferred into the high MPV level group. The patients with a higher baseline MPV had decreased progression-free and overall survival ratios. Univariate and multivariate analyses revealed that baseline MPV was a prognostic factor affecting progression-free survival. In conclusion, the results showed that MPV measurements can provide important prognostic information for gastric cancer patients. PMID:26788144

  1. Growth inhibitory effects of three miR-129 family members on gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiuchong; Song, Haojun; Xia, Tian; Han, Shuang; Xiao, Bingxiu; Luo, Lin; Xi, Yang; Guo, Junming

    2013-12-10

    Reduced expression of microRNA-129 (miR-129) has been reported in several types of tumor cell lines as well as in primary tumor tissues. However, little is known about how miR-129 affects cell proliferation in gastric cancer. Here, we show that all miR-129 family members, miR-129-1-3p, miR-129-2-3p, and miR-129-5p, are down-regulated in gastric cancer cell lines compared with normal gastric epithelial cells. Furthermore, using the real-time cell analyzer assay to observe the growth effects of miR-129 on gastric cancer cells, we found that all three mature products of miR-129 showed tumor suppressor activities. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying down-regulation of miR-129 in gastric cancer, we analyzed the effects of miR-129 mimics on the cell cycle. We found that increased miR-129 levels in gastric cancer cells resulted in significant G0/G1 phase arrest. Interestingly, we showed that cyclin dependent kinase 6 (CDK6), a cell cycle-associated protein involved in G1-S transition, was a target of miR-129. We also found that expression of the sex determining region Y-box 4 (SOX4) was inversely associated with that of miR-129-2-3p and miR-129-5p but not of miR-129-1-3p. Together, our data indicate that all miR-129 family members, not only miR-129-5p, as previously thought, play an important role in regulating cell proliferation in gastric cancer. PMID:24055727

  2. Molecular Dimensions of Gastric Cancer: Translational and Clinical Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yoon Young; Noh, Sung Hoon; Cheong, Jae-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a global health burden and has the highest incidence in East Asia. This disease is complex in nature because it arises from multiple interactions of genetic, local environmental, and host factors, resulting in biological heterogeneity. This genetic intricacy converges on molecular characteristics reflecting the pathophysiology, tumor biology, and clinical outcome. Therefore, understanding the molecular characteristics at a genomic level is pivotal to improving the clinical care of patients with gastric cancer. A recent landmark study, The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project, showed the molecular landscape of gastric cancer through a comprehensive molecular evaluation of 295 primary gastric cancers. The proposed molecular classification divided gastric cancer into four subtypes: Epstein-Barr virus-positive, microsatellite unstable, genomic stable, and chromosomal instability. This information will be taken into account in future clinical trials and will be translated into clinical therapeutic decisions. To fully realize the clinical benefit, many challenges must be overcome. Rapid growth of high-throughput biology and functional validation of molecular targets will further deepen our knowledge of molecular dimensions of this cancer, allowing for personalized precision medicine. PMID:26498010

  3. Stromal-Based Signatures for the Classification of Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Uhlik, Mark T; Liu, Jiangang; Falcon, Beverly L; Iyer, Seema; Stewart, Julie; Celikkaya, Hilal; O'Mahony, Marguerita; Sevinsky, Christopher; Lowes, Christina; Douglass, Larry; Jeffries, Cynthia; Bodenmiller, Diane; Chintharlapalli, Sudhakar; Fischl, Anthony; Gerald, Damien; Xue, Qi; Lee, Jee-Yun; Santamaria-Pang, Alberto; Al-Kofahi, Yousef; Sui, Yunxia; Desai, Keyur; Doman, Thompson; Aggarwal, Amit; Carter, Julia H; Pytowski, Bronislaw; Jaminet, Shou-Ching; Ginty, Fiona; Nasir, Aejaz; Nagy, Janice A; Dvorak, Harold F; Benjamin, Laura E

    2016-05-01

    Treatment of metastatic gastric cancer typically involves chemotherapy and monoclonal antibodies targeting HER2 (ERBB2) and VEGFR2 (KDR). However, reliable methods to identify patients who would benefit most from a combination of treatment modalities targeting the tumor stroma, including new immunotherapy approaches, are still lacking. Therefore, we integrated a mouse model of stromal activation and gastric cancer genomic information to identify gene expression signatures that may inform treatment strategies. We generated a mouse model in which VEGF-A is expressed via adenovirus, enabling a stromal response marked by immune infiltration and angiogenesis at the injection site, and identified distinct stromal gene expression signatures. With these data, we designed multiplexed IHC assays that were applied to human primary gastric tumors and classified each tumor to a dominant stromal phenotype representative of the vascular and immune diversity found in gastric cancer. We also refined the stromal gene signatures and explored their relation to the dominant patient phenotypes identified by recent large-scale studies of gastric cancer genomics (The Cancer Genome Atlas and Asian Cancer Research Group), revealing four distinct stromal phenotypes. Collectively, these findings suggest that a genomics-based systems approach focused on the tumor stroma can be used to discover putative predictive biomarkers of treatment response, especially to antiangiogenesis agents and immunotherapy, thus offering an opportunity to improve patient stratification. Cancer Res; 76(9); 2573-86. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197264

  4. A Platform for Gastric Cancer Screening in Low- and Middle-Income Countries

    PubMed Central

    Caprara, Robert; Obstein, Keith L.; Scozzarro, Gabriel; Natali, Christian Di; Beccani, Marco; Morgan, Douglas R.; Valdastri, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide and screening programs have had a significant impact on reducing mortality. The majority of cases occur in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC), where endoscopy resources are traditionally limited. In this paper, we introduce a platform designed to enable inexpensive gastric screening to take place in remote areas of LMIC. The system consists of a swallowable endoscopic capsule connected to an external water distribution system by a multi-channel soft tether. Pressurized water is ejected from the capsule to orient the view of the endoscopic camera. After completion of a cancer screening procedure, the outer shell of the capsule and the soft tether can be disposed, while the endoscopic camera is reclaimed without needing further reprocessing. The capsule, measuring 12 mm in diameter and 28 mm in length, is able to visualize the inside of the gastric cavity by combining waterjet actuation and the adjustment of the tether length. Experimental assessment was accomplished through a set of bench trials, ex vivo analysis, and in vivo feasibility validation. During the ex vivo trials, the platform was able to visualize the main landmarks that are typically observed during a gastric cancer screening procedure in less than 8 minutes. Given the compact footprint, the minimal cost of the disposable parts, and the possibility of running on relatively available and inexpensive resources, the proposed platform can potentially widen gastric cancer screening programs in LMIC. PMID:25561586

  5. A platform for gastric cancer screening in low- and middle-income countries.

    PubMed

    Caprara, Robert; Obstein, Keith L; Scozzarro, Gabriel; Di Natali, Christian; Beccani, Marco; Morgan, Douglas R; Valdastri, Pietro

    2015-05-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide and screening programs have had a significant impact on reducing mortality. The majority of cases occur in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC), where endoscopy resources are traditionally limited. In this paper, we introduce a platform designed to enable inexpensive gastric screening to take place in remote areas of LMIC. The system consists of a swallowable endoscopic capsule connected to an external water distribution system by a multichannel soft tether. Pressurized water is ejected from the capsule to orient the view of the endoscopic camera. After completion of a cancer screening procedure, the outer shell of the capsule and the soft tether can be disposed, while the endoscopic camera is reclaimed without needing further reprocessing. The capsule, measuring 12 mm in diameter and 28 mm in length, is able to visualize the inside of the gastric cavity by combining waterjet actuation and the adjustment of the tether length. Experimental assessment was accomplished through a set of bench trials, ex vivo analysis, and in vivo feasibility validation. During the ex vivo trials, the platform was able to visualize the main landmarks that are typically observed during a gastric cancer screening procedure in less than 8 min. Given the compact footprint, the minimal cost of the disposable parts, and the possibility of running on relatively available and inexpensive resources, the proposed platform can potentially widen gastric cancer screening programs in LMIC. PMID:25561586

  6. [Palliative Care for Rectal Cancer Complicated with Gastric Cancer].

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Takeshi; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Tanaka, Kei; Muto, Takaaki

    2015-11-01

    Medical advancements have led to an increase in the number of elderly people. However, standard treatments may sometimes be difficult to use in elderly people. Here, we report the case of an elderly patient with rectal and gastric cancer who refused radical surgery. The patient was an 83-year-old man who had type-2 diabetes, hypertension, hyperuricemia, mitral valve regurgitation, and mild dementia. Furthermore, he was blind in both eyes owing to glaucoma. He first visited our hospital in 2005. In 2010, he was diagnosed with anemia, but he refused a thorough examination; however, he did consent to take iron supplements. In July 2011, he consulted our hospital for symptoms of frequent diarrhea, and agreed to an examination. After colonoscopy, he was diagnosed with rectal cancer that was becoming obstructive. There were no metastases to other organs, but he was also diagnosed with gastric cancer. As he and his family refused radical surgery, a stoma was constructed. After the operation, he received palliative care but died in September 2013. PMID:26805335

  7. Prospective randomized trial of early postoperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy as an adjuvant to resectable gastric cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, W; Whang, I; Suh, I; Averbach, A; Chang, D; Sugarbaker, P H

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Surgeons have postulated on numerous occasions that cancer resection may participate in the dissemination of a malignancy. This randomized trial sought to determine whether a large volume of chemotherapy solution used perioperatively to flood the peritoneal cavity could eliminate microscopic residual disease and thereby improve survival of patients with gastric cancer. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Surgical treatment failures in patients with gastric cancer are confined to the abdomen in most patients. Resection site and peritoneal surface spread, along with liver metastases, are the most common areas of recurrence. Survival and quality of life of patients with gastric cancer would be improved if disease progression at these anatomic sites was reduced. METHODS: In a prospective randomized trial of 248 patients, intraperitoneal mitomycin C on day 1 and intraperitoneal 5-fluorouracil on days 2 through 5 were administered after gastric cancer resection. Patients who were thought to have stage II or stage III disease were randomized after resection to surgery alone versus surgery plus early postoperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy. After final pathologic examinations, there were 39 patients with stage I, 50 with stage II 95 with stage III, and 64 with resected stage IV cancer. RESULTS: The 5-year survival of the surgery-only group was 29.3%, and the surgery-plus-intraperitoneal chemotherapy group was 38.7% (p = 0.219). In a subset analysis, the patients with stage I, stage II, and stage IV disease showed no statistically significant difference in survival. The 5-year survival rate of patients with stage III disease who underwent surgery only was 18.4% versus a survival rate of 49.1% for patients who underwent surgery plus intraperitoneal chemotherapy (p = 0.011). CONCLUSIONS: In a subset analysis, patients with stage III gastric cancer have shown a statistically significant improvement in survival when treated with perioperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy

  8. Ischemic Gastropathic Ulcer Mimics Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Daher, Saleh; Lahav, Ziv; Rmeileh, Ayman Abu; Mizrahi, Meir

    2016-01-01

    Gastric ulcer due to mesenteric ischemia is a rare clinical finding. As a result, few reports of ischemic gastric ulcers have been reported in the literature. The diagnosis of ischemic gastropathy is seldom considered in patients presenting with abdominal pain and gastric ulcers. In this case report, we describe a patient with increasing abdominal pain, weight loss, and gastric ulcers, who underwent extensive medical evaluation and whose symptoms were resistant to medical interventions. Finally he was diagnosed with chronic mesenteric ischemia, and his clinical and endoscopic abnormalities resolved after surgical revascularization of both the superior mesenteric artery and the celiac trunk. PMID:27579191

  9. Clinical significance of circulating plasma DNA in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Fang, Wen-Liang; Lan, Yuan-Tzu; Huang, Kuo-Hung; Liu, Chien-An; Hung, Yi-Ping; Lin, Chien-Hsing; Jhang, Fang-Yu; Chang, Shih-Ching; Chen, Ming-Huang; Chao, Yee; Lin, Wen-Chang; Lo, Su-Shun; Fen-Yau Li, Anna; Wu, Chew-Wun; Chiou, Shih-Hwa; Shyr, Yi-Ming

    2016-06-15

    With the progression of molecular techniques, the detection of circulating plasma DNA (cpDNA) is clinically feasible. However, the role of the cpDNA levels in gastric cancer is not well understood. This study assessed the mutational profile in primary tumors and clarified the clinical utility of quantitative and qualitative cpDNA alterations in 277 patients with advanced gastric cancer. The concentrations of cpDNA were measured by TaqMan qPCR, and 68 mutations in 8 genes were studied for cpDNA mutations. The median cpDNA concentrations in patients with stages I, II, and III gastric cancer were 3979, 3390 and 4278 copies/mL, respectively, and increased to 11,380 copies/mL in patients with Stage IV gastric cancer (p < 0.001). Among the 35 patients harboring cpDNA mutations, Stage IV patients (100%) were more likely to display high cpDNA levels than were Stage I (33.3%), II (75%) and III patients (66.7%) (p = 0.037). Patients displaying high cpDNA levels were more likely to experience peritoneal recurrence and exhibited significantly lower 5-year overall survival rates (39.2% vs. 45.8%, p = 0.039) than did patients displaying low cpDNA levels. Only for late stage (Stages III or IV) gastric cancer, patients harboring cpDNA mutations were more likely to experience vascular invasion (20% vs. 2.4%, p = 0.036) and exhibited a lower 5-year overall survival rate than did those lacking cpDNA mutations (5.6% vs. 31.5%, p = 0.028). High cpDNA levels are associated with peritoneal recurrence and poor prognosis in patients with advanced gastric cancer; harboring cpDNA mutations is associated with poor prognosis among patients with late stage gastric cancer. PMID:26815009

  10. The angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker candesartan suppresses proliferation and fibrosis in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Mitsuyoshi; Fushida, Sachio; Harada, Shinichi; Tsukada, Tomoya; Kinoshita, Jun; Oyama, Katsunobu; Tajima, Hidehiro; Ninomiya, Itasu; Fujimura, Takashi; Ohta, Tetsuo

    2014-12-01

    Gastric cancer with peritoneal dissemination has poor clinical prognosis because of the presence of rich stromal fibrosis and acquired drug resistance. Recently, Angiotensin II type I receptor blockers such as candesartan have attracted attention for their potential anti-fibrotic activity. We examined whether candesartan could attenuate tumor proliferation and fibrosis through the interaction between gastric cancer cell line (MKN45) cells and human peritoneal mesothelial cells. Candesartan significantly reduced TGF-β1 expression and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition-like change, while tumor proliferation and stromal fibrosis were impaired. Targeting the Angiotensin II signaling pathway may therefore be an efficient strategy for treatment of tumor proliferation and fibrosis. PMID:25224569