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  1. Ventilator-induced lung injury is reduced in transgenic mice that overexpress endothelial nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Kaori; Nishimura, Yoshihiro; Nishiuma, Teruaki; Sakashita, Akihiro; Yamashita, Tomoya; Kobayashi, Kazuyuki; Satouchi, Miyako; Ishida, Tatsuro; Kawashima, Seinosuke; Yokoyama, Mitsuhiro

    2006-06-01

    Although mechanical ventilation (MV) is an important supportive strategy for patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome, MV itself can cause a type of acute lung damage termed ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Because nitric oxide (NO) has been reported to play roles in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury, the present study explores the effects on VILI of NO derived from chronically overexpressed endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Anesthetized eNOS-transgenic (Tg) and wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 mice were ventilated at high or low tidal volume (Vt; 20 or 7 ml/kg, respectively) for 4 h. After MV, lung damage, including neutrophil infiltration, water leakage, and cytokine concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and plasma, was evaluated. Some mice were given N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), a potent NOS inhibitor, via drinking water (1 mg/ml) for 1 wk before MV. Histological analysis revealed that high Vt ventilation caused severe VILI, whereas low Vt ventilation caused minimal VILI. Under high Vt conditions, neutrophil infiltration and lung water content were significantly attenuated in eNOS-Tg mice compared with WT animals. The concentrations of macrophage inflammatory protein-2 in BALF and plasma, as well as plasma tumor necrosis factor-alpha and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, also were decreased in eNOS-Tg mice. L-NAME abrogated the beneficial effect of eNOS overexpression. In conclusion, chronic eNOS overexpression may protect the lung from VILI by inhibiting the production of inflammatory chemokines and cytokines that are associated with neutrophil infiltration into the air space. PMID:16399791

  2. Protective Ventilation of Preterm Lambs Exposed to Acute Chorioamnionitis Does Not Reduce Ventilation-Induced Lung or Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Samantha K.; Moss, Timothy J. M.; Hooper, Stuart B.; Crossley, Kelly J.; Gill, Andrew W.; Kluckow, Martin; Zahra, Valerie; Wong, Flora Y.; Pichler, Gerhard; Galinsky, Robert; Miller, Suzanne L.

    2014-01-01

    Background The onset of mechanical ventilation is a critical time for the initiation of cerebral white matter (WM) injury in preterm neonates, particularly if they are inadvertently exposed to high tidal volumes (VT) in the delivery room. Protective ventilation strategies at birth reduce ventilation-induced lung and brain inflammation and injury, however its efficacy in a compromised newborn is not known. Chorioamnionitis is a common antecedent of preterm birth, and increases the risk and severity of WM injury. We investigated the effects of high VT ventilation, after chorioamnionitis, on preterm lung and WM inflammation and injury, and whether a protective ventilation strategy could mitigate the response. Methods Pregnant ewes (n = 18) received intra-amniotic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) 2 days before delivery, instrumentation and ventilation at 127±1 days gestation. Lambs were either immediately euthanased and used as unventilated controls (LPSUVC; n = 6), or were ventilated using an injurious high VT strategy (LPSINJ; n = 5) or a protective ventilation strategy (LPSPROT; n = 7) for a total of 90 min. Mean arterial pressure, heart rate and cerebral haemodynamics and oxygenation were measured continuously. Lungs and brains underwent molecular and histological assessment of inflammation and injury. Results LPSINJ lambs had poorer oxygenation than LPSPROT lambs. Ventilation requirements and cardiopulmonary and systemic haemodynamics were not different between ventilation strategies. Compared to unventilated lambs, LPSINJ and LPSPROT lambs had increases in pro-inflammatory cytokine expression within the lungs and brain, and increased astrogliosis (p<0.02) and cell death (p<0.05) in the WM, which were equivalent in magnitude between groups. Conclusions Ventilation after acute chorioamnionitis, irrespective of strategy used, increases haemodynamic instability and lung and cerebral inflammation and injury. Mechanical ventilation is a potential contributor

  3. Hydrogen inhalation reduced epithelial apoptosis in ventilator-induced lung injury via a mechanism involving nuclear factor-kappa B activation

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chien-Sheng; Kawamura, Tomohiro; Peng, Ximei; Tochigi, Naobumi; Shigemura, Norihisa; Billiar, Timothy R.; Nakao, Atsunori; Toyoda, Yoshiya

    2011-05-06

    Highlights: {yields} Hydrogen is a regulatory molecule with antiinflammatory and antiapoptotic protective effects. {yields} There is very limited information on the pathways regulated in vivo by the hydrogen. {yields} Antiapoptotic abilities of hydrogen were explained by upregulation of the antiapoptotic gene. {yields} NF{kappa}B activation during hydrogen treatment was correlated with elevated antiapoptotic protein. {yields} NF{kappa}B activation associated with increase Bcl-2 may contribute to cytoprotection of hydrogen. -- Abstract: We recently demonstrated the inhalation of hydrogen gas, a novel medical therapeutic gas, ameliorates ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI); however, the molecular mechanisms by which hydrogen ameliorates VILI remain unclear. Therefore, we investigated whether inhaled hydrogen gas modulates the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF{kappa}B) signaling pathway. VILI was generated in male C57BL6 mice by performing a tracheostomy and placing the mice on a mechanical ventilator (tidal volume of 30 ml/kg or 10 ml/kg without positive end-expiratory pressure). The ventilator delivered either 2% nitrogen or 2% hydrogen in balanced air. NF{kappa}B activation, as indicated by NF{kappa}B DNA binding, was detected by electrophoretic mobility shift assays and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Hydrogen gas inhalation increased NF{kappa}B DNA binding after 1 h of ventilation and decreased NF{kappa}B DNA binding after 2 h of ventilation, as compared with controls. The early activation of NF{kappa}B during hydrogen treatment was correlated with elevated levels of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 and decreased levels of Bax. Hydrogen inhalation increased oxygen tension, decreased lung edema, and decreased the expression of proinflammatory mediators. Chemical inhibition of early NF{kappa}B activation using SN50 reversed these protective effects. NF{kappa}B activation and an associated increase in the expression of Bcl-2 may contribute, in part, to the

  4. Ventilator-induced Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kneyber, Martin C. J.; Zhang, Haibo; Slutsky, Arthur S.

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that mechanical ventilation can injure the lung, producing an entity known as ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). There are various forms of VILI, including volutrauma (i.e., injury caused by overdistending the lung), atelectrauma (injury due to repeated opening/closing of lung units), and biotrauma (release of mediators that can induce lung injury or aggravate pre-existing injury, potentially leading to multiple organ failure). Experimental data in the pediatric context are in accord with the importance of VILI, and appear to show age-related susceptibility to VILI, although a conclusive link between use of large Vts and mortality has not been demonstrated in this population. The relevance of VILI in the pediatric intensive care unit population is thus unclear. Given the physiological and biological differences in the respiratory systems of infants, children, and adults, it is difficult to directly extrapolate clinical practice from adults to children. This Critical Care Perspective analyzes the relevance of VILI to the pediatric population, and addresses why pediatric patients might be less susceptible than adults to VILI. PMID:25003705

  5. Metformin attenuates ventilator-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Diabetic patients may develop acute lung injury less often than non-diabetics; a fact that could be partially ascribed to the usage of antidiabetic drugs, including metformin. Metformin exhibits pleiotropic properties which make it potentially beneficial against lung injury. We hypothesized that pretreatment with metformin preserves alveolar capillary permeability and, thus, prevents ventilator-induced lung injury. Methods Twenty-four rabbits were randomly assigned to pretreatment with metformin (250 mg/Kg body weight/day per os) or no medication for two days. Explanted lungs were perfused at constant flow rate (300 mL/min) and ventilated with injurious (peak airway pressure 23 cmH2O, tidal volume ≈17 mL/Kg) or protective (peak airway pressure 11 cmH2O, tidal volume ≈7 mL/Kg) settings for 1 hour. Alveolar capillary permeability was assessed by ultrafiltration coefficient, total protein concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity in BALF. Results High-pressure ventilation of the ex-vivo lung preparation resulted in increased microvascular permeability, edema formation and microhemorrhage compared to protective ventilation. Compared to no medication, pretreatment with metformin was associated with a 2.9-fold reduction in ultrafiltration coefficient, a 2.5-fold reduction in pulmonary edema formation, lower protein concentration in BALF, lower ACE activity in BALF, and fewer histological lesions upon challenge of the lung preparation with injurious ventilation. In contrast, no differences regarding pulmonary artery pressure and BALF total cell number were noted. Administration of metformin did not impact on outcomes of lungs subjected to protective ventilation. Conclusions Pretreatment with metformin preserves alveolar capillary permeability and, thus, decreases the severity of ventilator-induced lung injury in this model. PMID:22827994

  6. Ventilator-induced lung injury in preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Clarissa Gutierrez; Silveira, Rita C; Procianoy, Renato Soibelmann

    2013-01-01

    In preterm infants, the need for intubation and mechanical ventilation is associated with ventilator-induced lung injuries and subsequent bronchopulmonary dysplasia. The aim of the present review was to improve the understanding of the mechanisms of injury that involve cytokine-mediated inflammation to contribute to the development of new preventive strategies. Relevant articles were retrieved from the PubMed database using the search terms "ventilator-induced lung injury preterm", "continuous positive airway pressure", "preterm", and "bronchopulmonary dysplasia". The resulting data and other relevant information were divided into several topics to ensure a thorough, critical view of ventilation-induced lung injury and its consequences in preterm infants. The role of pro-inflammatory cytokines (particularly interleukins 6 and 8 and tumor necrosis factor alpha) as mediators of lung injury was assessed. Evidence from studies conducted with animals and human newborns is described. This evidence shows that brief periods of mechanical ventilation is sufficient to induce the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Other forms of mechanical and non-invasive ventilation were also analyzed as protective alternatives to conventional mechanical ventilation. It was concluded that non-invasive ventilation, intubation followed by early surfactant administration and quick extubation for nasal continuous positive airway pressure, and strategies that regulate tidal volume and avoid volutrauma (such as volume guarantee ventilation) protect against ventilator-induced lung injury in preterm infants. PMID:24553514

  7. Inhibition of poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase attenuates ventilator-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Vaschetto, Rosanna; Kuiper, Jan W.; Chiang, Johnson; Haitsma, Jack J.; Juco, Jonathan W.; Uhlig, Stefan; Plötz, Frans B.; Della Corte, Francesco; Zhang, Haibo; Slutsky, Arthur S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Mechanical ventilation can induce organ injury associated with overwhelming inflammatory responses. Excessive activation of poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase enzyme following massive DNA damage may aggravate inflammatory responses. We thus hypothesized that the pharmacological inhibition of poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase by PJ-34 will attenuate ventilator-induced lung injury. Methods Anesthetized rats were subjected to intratracheal instillation of lipopolysaccharide at a dose of 6 mg/kg. The animals were then randomized to receive mechanical ventilation at either low tidal volume (6 mL/kg) with 5 cmH2O positive end-expiratory pressure or high tidal volume (15 mL/kg) with zero positive end-expiratory pressure, in the presence and absence of intravenous administration of PJ-34. Results The high tidal volume ventilation resulted in an increase in poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase activity in the lung. The treatment with PJ-34 maintained a greater oxygenation and a lower airway plateau pressure than the vehicle control group. This was associated with a decreased level of interleukin-6, active plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in the lung, attenuated leukocyte lung transmigration and reduced pulmonary edema and apoptosis. The administration of PJ-34 also decreased the systemic levels of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6, and attenuated the degree of apoptosis in the kidney. Conclusion The pharmacological inhibition of poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase reduces ventilator-induced lung injury and protects kidney function. PMID:18212571

  8. Saikosaponin-d attenuates ventilator-induced lung injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong-Wei; Liu, Ming; Zhong, Tai-Di; Fang, Xiang-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Saikosaponin-d is one of the main bioactive components in the traditional Chinese medicine Bupleurum falcatum L and possesses anti-inflammatory and immune-modulatory properties. The current study aimed to investigate the protective effects of saikosaponin-d on ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) in rats. We found that saikosaponin-d treatment significantly attenuated the pathological changes of lungs induced by mechanical ventilation. Administration of saikosaponin-d reduced the pulmonary neutrophil infiltration as well as the MPO concentrations. Saikosaponin-d also decreased the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines including MIP-2, IL-6 and TNF-α. Meanwhile, the expression of anti-inflammatory mediators, such as TGF-β1 and IL-10, was obviously elevated after saikosaponin-d administration. Saikosaponin-d remarkably reduced the oxidative stress and apoptosis rate in lung tissues. On the molecular level, saikosaponin-d treatment obviously downregulated the expression of caspases-3 and the pro-apoptotic protein bax, and promoted the expression level of anti-apoptotic protein bcl-2. Collectively, our study demonstrated that saikosaponin-d may attenuate ventilator induced lung injury through inhibition of inflammatory responses, oxidative stress and apoptosis. PMID:26628997

  9. Mebendazole Reduces Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation and Neointimal Formation Following Vascular Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jintao; Wang, Hui; Guo, Chiao; Luo, Wei; Lawler, Alyssa; Reddy, Aswin; Wang, Julia; Sun, Eddy B.; Eitzman, Daniel T.

    2014-01-01

    Mebendazole is an antihelminthic drug that exerts its effects via interference with microtubule function in parasites. To determine the utility of mebendazole as a potential treatment for vascular diseases involving proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells, the effects of mebendazole on vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation were tested in vitro and in a mouse model of arterial injury. In vitro, mebendazole inhibited proliferation and migration of murine vascular smooth muscle cells and this was associated with altered intracellular microtubule organization. To determine in vivo effects of mebendazole following vascular injury, femoral arterial wire injury was induced in wild-type mice treated with either mebendazole or placebo control. Compared with placebo-treated mice, mebendazole-treated mice formed less neointima at the site of injury. Mebendazole is effective at inhibiting vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration, and neointimal formation following arterial injury in mice. PMID:24587248

  10. Ventilation-induced lung injury is not exacerbated by growth restriction in preterm lambs.

    PubMed

    Allison, Beth J; Hooper, Stuart B; Coia, Elise; Zahra, Valerie A; Jenkin, Graham; Malhotra, Atul; Sehgal, Arvind; Kluckow, Martin; Gill, Andrew W; Sozo, Foula; Miller, Suzanne L; Polglase, Graeme R

    2016-02-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and preterm birth are frequent comorbidities and, combined, increase the risk of adverse respiratory outcomes compared with that in appropriately grown (AG) infants. Potential underlying reasons for this increased respiratory morbidity in IUGR infants compared with AG infants include altered fetal lung development, fetal lung inflammation, increased respiratory requirements, and/or increased ventilation-induced lung injury. IUGR was surgically induced in preterm fetal sheep (0.7 gestation) by ligation of a single umbilical artery. Four weeks later, preterm lambs were euthanized at delivery or delivered and ventilated for 2 h before euthanasia. Ventilator requirements, lung inflammation, early markers of lung injury, and morphological changes in lung parenchymal and vascular structure and surfactant composition were analyzed. IUGR preterm lambs weighed 30% less than AG preterm lambs, with increased brain-to-body weight ratio, indicating brain sparing. IUGR did not induce lung inflammation or injury or alter lung parenchymal and vascular structure compared with AG fetuses. IUGR and AG lambs had similar oxygenation and respiratory requirements after birth and had significant, but similar, increases in proinflammatory cytokine expression, lung injury markers, gene expression, and surfactant phosphatidylcholine species compared with unventilated controls. IUGR does not induce pulmonary structural changes in our model. Furthermore, IUGR and AG preterm lambs have similar ventilator requirements in the immediate postnatal period. This study suggests that increased morbidity and mortality in IUGR infants is not due to altered lung tissue or vascular structure, or to an altered response to early ventilation. PMID:26608532

  11. Computational Models of Ventilator Induced Lung Injury and Surfactant Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Jason H.T.; Smith, Bradford J.; Allen, Gilman B.

    2014-01-01

    Managing acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) invariably involves the administration of mechanical ventilation, the challenge being to avoid the iatrogenic sequellum known as ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Devising individualized ventilation strategies in ARDS requires that patient-specific lung physiology be taken into account, and this is greatly aided by the use of computational models of lung mechanical function that can be matched to physiological measurements made in a given patient. In this review, we discuss recent models that have the potential to serve as the basis for devising minimally injurious modes of mechanical ventilation in ARDS patients. PMID:26904138

  12. Pycnogenol, a compound isolated from the bark of pinus maritime mill, attenuates ventilator-induced lung injury through inhibiting NF-κB-mediated inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Xia, YF; Zhang, JH; Xu, ZF; Deng, XM

    2015-01-01

    Background: During mechanical ventilation, high end-inspiratory lung volume results in a permeability type pulmonary oedema, called ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). The pathophysiology of ventilator-induced lung injury involves multiple mechanisms, such as excessive inflammation. And pycnogenol is a mixture of flavonoid compounds extracted from pine tree bark that have anti-inflammatory activity. Objective: We investigated the effects of pyncogenol on ventilator-induced lung injury in rats. Methods: Rats were orally administrated with pycnogenol once (30 mg/kg) 2 days before lung injury induction with mechanical ventilation, then the rats were divided into three groups: lung-protective ventilation (LV group, n = 20), injurious ventilation (HV group, n = 20), HV + pycnogenol group (HV + Pyc group, n = 20). Lung specimens and the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were isolated for histopathological examinations and biochemical analyses. Results: Pretreatment with pycnogenol could markedly decrease lung wet/dry ratio, lower myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and total protein concentration and reduce the production of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β and MIP-2 in the BALF in ventilator-induced lung injury rats. Additionally, pycnogenol improved the histology of the lung and significantly inhibited the phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 and the degradation of IκB-α. Conclusion: Pycnogenol treatment could attenuate ventilator-induced lung injury in rats, at least in part, through its ability to reduce the production of inflammatory cytokines via inhibiting the activation of NF-κB, indicating it as a potential therapeutic candidate for ventilator-induced lung injury. PMID:25932110

  13. Globular adiponectin reduces vascular calcification via inhibition of ER-stress-mediated smooth muscle cell apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yan; Bian, Yunfei; Wang, Yueru; Bai, Rui; Wang, Jiapu; Xiao, Chuanshi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to explore the mechanism of globular adiponectin inhibiting vascular calcification. Methods: We established drug-induced rat vascular calcification model, globular adiponectin was given to observe the effect of globular Adiponectin on the degree of calcification. The markers of vascular calcification and apoptosis were also investigated. Meanwhile, the in vitro effect of globular Adiponectin on vascular calcification was also evaluated using primary cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells. Results: We found that globular adiponectin could inhibit drug-induced rat vascular calcification significantly in vivo. The apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells was also reduced. The possible mechanism could be the down-regulation of endoplasmic reticulum stress by globular adiponectin. Experiments in primary cultured vascular smooth muscle cells also confirmed that globular adiponectin could reduce cell apoptosis to suppress vascular calcification via inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress. Conclusions: This study confirmed that globular adiponectin could suppress vascular calcification; one of the mechanisms could be inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress to reduce cell apoptosis. It could provide an effective method in the therapy of vascular calcification-associated diseases. PMID:26045760

  14. Intermedin Stabilized Endothelial Barrier Function and Attenuated Ventilator-induced Lung Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Müller-Redetzky, Holger Christian; Kummer, Wolfgang; Pfeil, Uwe; Hellwig, Katharina; Will, Daniel; Paddenberg, Renate; Tabeling, Christoph; Hippenstiel, Stefan; Suttorp, Norbert; Witzenrath, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Background Even protective ventilation may aggravate or induce lung failure, particularly in preinjured lungs. Thus, new adjuvant pharmacologic strategies are needed to minimize ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Intermedin/Adrenomedullin-2 (IMD) stabilized pulmonary endothelial barrier function in vitro. We hypothesized that IMD may attenuate VILI-associated lung permeability in vivo. Methodology/Principal Findings Human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cell (HPMVEC) monolayers were incubated with IMD, and transcellular electrical resistance was measured to quantify endothelial barrier function. Expression and localization of endogenous pulmonary IMD, and its receptor complexes composed of calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR) and receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs) 1–3 were analyzed by qRT-PCR and immunofluorescence in non ventilated mouse lungs and in lungs ventilated for 6 h. In untreated and IMD treated mice, lung permeability, pulmonary leukocyte recruitment and cytokine levels were assessed after mechanical ventilation. Further, the impact of IMD on pulmonary vasoconstriction was investigated in precision cut lung slices (PCLS) and in isolated perfused and ventilated mouse lungs. IMD stabilized endothelial barrier function in HPMVECs. Mechanical ventilation reduced the expression of RAMP3, but not of IMD, CRLR, and RAMP1 and 2. Mechanical ventilation induced lung hyperpermeability, which was ameliorated by IMD treatment. Oxygenation was not improved by IMD, which may be attributed to impaired hypoxic vasoconstriction due to IMD treatment. IMD had minor impact on pulmonary leukocyte recruitment and did not reduce cytokine levels in VILI. Conclusions/Significance IMD may possibly provide a new approach to attenuate VILI. PMID:22563471

  15. The physical basis of ventilator-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Plataki, Maria; Hubmayr, Rolf D

    2010-01-01

    Although mechanical ventilation (MV) is a life-saving intervention for patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), it can aggravate or cause lung injury, known as ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). The biophysical characteristics of heterogeneously injured ARDS lungs increase the parenchymal stress associated with breathing, which is further aggravated by MV. Cells, in particular those lining the capillaries, airways and alveoli, transform this strain into chemical signals (mechanotransduction). The interaction of reparative and injurious mechanotransductive pathways leads to VILI. Several attempts have been made to identify clinical surrogate measures of lung stress/strain (e.g., density changes in chest computed tomography, lower and upper inflection points of the pressure–volume curve, plateau pressure and inflammatory cytokine levels) that could be used to titrate MV. However, uncertainty about the topographical distribution of stress relative to that of the susceptibility of the cells and tissues to injury makes the existence of a single ‘global’ stress/strain injury threshold doubtful. PMID:20524920

  16. Pre-Treatment with Allopurinol or Uricase Attenuates Barrier Dysfunction but Not Inflammation during Murine Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kuipers, Maria T.; Aslami, Hamid; Vlaar, Alexander P. J.; Juffermans, Nicole P.; Tuip-de Boer, Anita M.; Hegeman, Maria A.; Jongsma, Geartsje; Roelofs, Joris J. T. H.; van der Poll, Tom; Schultz, Marcus J.; Wieland, Catharina W.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Uric acid released from injured tissue is considered a major endogenous danger signal and local instillation of uric acid crystals induces acute lung inflammation via activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. Ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) is mediated by the NLRP3 inflammasome and increased uric acid levels in lung lavage fluid are reported. We studied levels in human lung injury and the contribution of uric acid in experimental VILI. Methods Uric acid levels in lung lavage fluid of patients with acute lung injury (ALI) were determined. In a different cohort of cardiac surgery patients, uric acid levels were correlated with pulmonary leakage index. In a mouse model of VILI the effect of allopurinol (inhibits uric acid synthesis) and uricase (degrades uric acid) pre-treatment on neutrophil influx, up-regulation of adhesion molecules, pulmonary and systemic cytokine levels, lung pathology, and regulation of receptors involved in the recognition of uric acid was studied. In addition, total protein and immunoglobulin M in lung lavage fluid and pulmonary wet/dry ratios were measured as markers of alveolar barrier dysfunction. Results Uric acid levels increased in ALI patients. In cardiac surgery patients, elevated levels correlated significantly with the pulmonary leakage index. Allopurinol or uricase treatment did not reduce ventilator-induced inflammation, IκB-α degradation, or up-regulation of NLRP3, Toll-like receptor 2, and Toll-like receptor 4 gene expression in mice. Alveolar barrier dysfunction was attenuated which was most pronounced in mice pre-treated with allopurinol: both treatment strategies reduced wet/dry ratio, allopurinol also lowered total protein and immunoglobulin M levels. Conclusions Local uric acid levels increase in patients with ALI. In mice, allopurinol and uricase attenuate ventilator-induced alveolar barrier dysfunction. PMID:23226314

  17. Cervical spinal cord injury exacerbates ventilator-induced diaphragm dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Smuder, Ashley J; Gonzalez-Rothi, Elisa J; Kwon, Oh Sung; Morton, Aaron B; Sollanek, Kurt J; Powers, Scott K; Fuller, David D

    2016-01-15

    Cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) can dramatically impair diaphragm muscle function and often necessitates mechanical ventilation (MV) to maintain adequate pulmonary gas exchange. MV is a life-saving intervention. However, prolonged MV results in atrophy and impaired function of the diaphragm. Since cervical SCI can also trigger diaphragm atrophy, it may create preconditions that exacerbate ventilator-induced diaphragm dysfunction (VIDD). Currently, no drug therapy or clinical standard of care exists to prevent or minimize diaphragm dysfunction following SCI. Therefore, we first tested the hypothesis that initiating MV acutely after cervical SCI will exacerbate VIDD and enhance proteolytic activation in the diaphragm to a greater extent than either condition alone. Rats underwent controlled MV for 12 h following acute (∼24 h) cervical spinal hemisection injury at C2 (SCI). Diaphragm tissue was then harvested for comprehensive functional and molecular analyses. Second, we determined if antioxidant therapy could mitigate MV-induced diaphragm dysfunction after cervical SCI. In these experiments, SCI rats received antioxidant (Trolox, a vitamin E analog) or saline treatment prior to initiating MV. Our results demonstrate that compared with either condition alone, the combination of SCI and MV resulted in increased diaphragm atrophy, contractile dysfunction, and expression of atrophy-related genes, including MuRF1. Importantly, administration of the antioxidant Trolox attenuated proteolytic activation, fiber atrophy, and contractile dysfunction in the diaphragms of SCI + MV animals. These findings provide evidence that cervical SCI greatly exacerbates VIDD, but antioxidant therapy with Trolox can preserve diaphragm contractile function following acute SCI. PMID:26472866

  18. Inhibitor of neuronal nitric oxide synthase improves gas exchange in ventilator-induced lung injury after pneumonectomy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mechanical ventilation with high tidal volumes may cause ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) and enhanced generation of nitric oxide (NO). We demonstrated in sheep that pneumonectomy followed by injurious ventilation promotes pulmonary edema. We wished both to test the hypothesis that neuronal NOS (nNOS), which is distributed in airway epithelial and neuronal tissues, could be involved in the pathogenesis of VILI and we also aimed at investigating the influence of an inhibitor of nNOS on the course of VILI after pneumonectomy. Methods Anesthetized sheep underwent right pneumonectomy, mechanical ventilation with tidal volumes (VT) of 6 mL/kg and FiO2 0.5, and were subsequently randomized to a protectively ventilated group (PROTV; n = 8) keeping VT and FiO2 unchanged, respiratory rate (RR) 25 inflations/min and PEEP 4 cm H2O for the following 8 hrs; an injuriously ventilated group with VT of 12 mL/kg, zero end-expiratory pressure, and FiO2 and RR unchanged (INJV; n = 8) and a group, which additionally received the inhibitor of nNOS, 7-nitroindazole (NI) 1.0 mg/kg/h intravenously from 2 hours after the commencement of injurious ventilation (INJV + NI; n = 8). We assessed respiratory, hemodynamic and volumetric variables, including both the extravascular lung water index (EVLWI) and the pulmonary vascular permeability index (PVPI). We measured plasma nitrite/nitrate (NOx) levels and examined lung biopsies for lung injury score (LIS). Results Both the injuriously ventilated groups demonstrated a 2–3-fold rise in EVLWI and PVPI, with no significant effects of NI. In the INJV group, gas exchange deteriorated in parallel with emerging respiratory acidosis, but administration of NI antagonized the derangement of oxygenation and the respiratory acidosis significantly. NOx displayed no significant changes and NI exerted no significant effect on LIS in the INJV group. Conclusion Inhibition of nNOS improved gas exchange, but did not

  19. Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury (VILI) in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS): Volutrauma and Molecular Effects

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco Loza, R; Villamizar Rodríguez, G; Medel Fernández, N

    2015-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is a clinical condition secondary to a variety of insults leading to a severe acute respiratory failure and high mortality in critically ill patients. Patients with ARDS generally require mechanical ventilation, which is another important factor that may increase the ALI (acute lung injury) by a series of pathophysiological mechanisms, whose common element is the initial volutrauma in the alveolar units, and forming part of an entity known clinically as ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Injured lungs can be partially protected by optimal settings and ventilation modes, using low tidal volume (VT) values and high positive-end expiratory pressure (PEEP). The benefits in ARDS outcomes caused by these interventions have been confirmed by several prospective randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and are attributed to reduction in volutrauma. The purpose of this article is to present an approach to VILI pathophysiology focused on the effects of volutrauma that lead to lung injury and the ‘mechanotransduction’ mechanism. A more complete understanding about the molecular effects that physical forces could have, is essential for a better assessment of existing strategies as well as the development of new therapeutic strategies to reduce the damage resulting from VILI, and thereby contribute to reducing mortality in ARDS. PMID:26312103

  20. Identifying tumor vascular permeability heterogeneity using reduced encoding techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aref, Michael

    We test the hypothesis that the loss of spatial resolution to gain temporal resolution in clinical dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance mammography (MRM) causes partial volume effects that yield inaccurate permeability-surface area products (PS = Kp↔t) which results in erroneous diagnostic information and we offer a potential solution using reduced encoding techniques to solve this problem. We compared the PS obtained from DCE MRI at clinical MRI resolutions (2500 x 2500 mum resolution), to that obtained from resolutions analogous to histopathological in plane resolutions (938 x 938 mum and 469 x 469 mum resolution). Secondly, we determined the accuracy of PS obtained from Keyhole, Ṟeduced-encoding I&barbelow;maging by G&barbelow;eneralized-series Ṟeconstruction (RIGR), and Ṯwo-reference RIGR (TRIGR) using high-resolution baseline data (469 x 469 mum resolution) and clinical resolution dynamic data (2500 x 2500 mum resolution). Lastly, we statistically correlated two-compartment model fitting parameters (tumor EES volume fraction, ve, tumor plasma volume fraction, vp, and PS) obtained from DCE MRI at all three resolutions to histopathologically determined tumor diagnosis. In our model, female Sprague Dawley rats with N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) induced mammary tumors imaged with fast T1-weighted gradient echo DCE MRI following a Gd-DTPA injection, there is a window of resolutions that detects similar PS "hot spots" compared to those obtained from the clinical imager resolution. The top five PS "hot spots" obtained from 469 mum resolution FFT are statistically different from those at 938 mum resolution FFT, p = 0.0014, and 2500 mum resolution FFT, p < 0.0001. Keyhole when compared with a FFT of similar resolution does not detect PS "hot spots" of similar value, p = 0.0002. PS "hot spots" obtained from RIGR compared to those from FFT are statistically the same value, p = 0.2734, but do not statistically agree on the location of mapped values

  1. Recruitment Maneuver Does not Increase the Risk of Ventilator Induced Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Akıncı, İbrahim Özkan; Atalan, Korkut; Tuğrul, Simru; Özcan, Perihan Ergin; Yılmazbayhan, Dilek; Kıran, Bayram; Basel, Ahmet; Telci, Lutfi; Çakar, Nahit

    2013-01-01

    Background: Mechanical ventilation (MV) may induce lung injury. Aims: To assess and evaluate the role of different mechanical ventilation strategies on ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) in comparison to a strategy which includes recruitment manoeuvre (RM). Study design: Randomized animal experiment. Methods: Thirty male Sprague-Dawley rats were anaesthetised, tracheostomised and divided into 5 groups randomly according to driving pressures; these were mechanically ventilated with following peak alveolar opening (Pao) and positive end-expiratory pressures (PEEP) for 1 hour: Group 15-0: 15 cmH2O Pao and 0 cmH2O PEEP; Group 30-10: 30 cmH2O Pao and 10 cmH2O PEEP; Group 30-5: 30 cmH2O Pao and 5 cmH2O PEEP; Group 30-5&RM: 30 cmH2O Pao and 5 cmH2O PEEP with additional 45 cmH2O CPAP for 30 seconds in every 15 minutes; Group 45-0: 45 cmH2O Pao and 0 cmH2O PEEP Before rats were sacrificed, blood samples were obtained for the evaluation of cytokine and chemokine levels; then, the lungs were subsequently processed for morphologic evaluation. Results: Oxygenation results were similar in all groups; however, the groups were lined as follows according to the increasing severity of morphometric evaluation parameters: Group 15-0: (0±0.009) < Group 30-10: (0±0.14) < Group 30-5&RM: (1±0.12) < Group 30-5: (1±0.16) < Group 45-0: (2±0.16). Besides, inflammatory responses were the lowest in 30-5&RM group compared to all other groups. TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, MCP-1 levels were significantly different between group 30-5&RM and group 15-0 vs. group 45-0 in each group. Conclusion: RM with low PEEP reduces the risk of ventilator-induced lung injury with a lower release of systemic inflammatory mediators in response to mechanical ventilation. PMID:25207105

  2. The bone morphogenic protein inhibitor, noggin, reduces glycemia and vascular inflammation in db/db mice.

    PubMed

    Koga, Mitsuhisa; Engberding, Niels; Dikalova, Anna E; Chang, Kyung Hwa; Seidel-Rogol, Bonnie; Long, James S; Lassègue, Bernard; Jo, Hanjoong; Griendling, Kathy K

    2013-09-01

    Vascular diseases frequently accompany diabetes mellitus. Based on the current understanding of atherosclerosis as an inflammatory disorder of the vascular wall, it has been speculated that diabetes may accelerate atherosclerosis by inducing a proinflammatory milieu in the vasculature. ANG II and bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs) have been implicated in vascular inflammation. We evaluated the effect of angiotensin receptor blockade by valsartan and BMP inhibition by noggin on markers of vascular inflammation in a mouse model of diabetes. Noggin had no effect on blood pressure but decreased serum glucose levels, whereas valsartan significantly decreased blood pressure, but not serum glucose. Both inhibitors reduced reactive oxygen species production in the aorta. Additionally, noggin and valsartan diminish gene transcription and protein expression of various inflammatory molecules in the vascular wall. These observations indicate that although both inhibitors block superoxide production and have similar effects on inflammatory gene expression, glycemia and blood pressure may represent a secondary target differentially affected by noggin and valsartan. Our data clearly identify the BMP pathway as a potentially potent therapeutic target in diabetic inflammatory vascular disease. PMID:23812391

  3. The bone morphogenic protein inhibitor, noggin, reduces glycemia and vascular inflammation in db/db mice

    PubMed Central

    Koga, Mitsuhisa; Engberding, Niels; Dikalova, Anna E.; Chang, Kyung Hwa; Seidel-Rogol, Bonnie; Long, James S.; Lassègue, Bernard; Jo, Hanjoong

    2013-01-01

    Vascular diseases frequently accompany diabetes mellitus. Based on the current understanding of atherosclerosis as an inflammatory disorder of the vascular wall, it has been speculated that diabetes may accelerate atherosclerosis by inducing a proinflammatory milieu in the vasculature. ANG II and bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs) have been implicated in vascular inflammation. We evaluated the effect of angiotensin receptor blockade by valsartan and BMP inhibition by noggin on markers of vascular inflammation in a mouse model of diabetes. Noggin had no effect on blood pressure but decreased serum glucose levels, whereas valsartan significantly decreased blood pressure, but not serum glucose. Both inhibitors reduced reactive oxygen species production in the aorta. Additionally, noggin and valsartan diminish gene transcription and protein expression of various inflammatory molecules in the vascular wall. These observations indicate that although both inhibitors block superoxide production and have similar effects on inflammatory gene expression, glycemia and blood pressure may represent a secondary target differentially affected by noggin and valsartan. Our data clearly identify the BMP pathway as a potentially potent therapeutic target in diabetic inflammatory vascular disease. PMID:23812391

  4. Trans Fatty Acids Induce Vascular Inflammation and Reduce Vascular Nitric Oxide Production in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Naomi G.; Pham, Matilda; Rizzo, Norma O.; Cheng, Andrew M.; Maloney, Ezekiel; Kim, Francis

    2011-01-01

    Intake of trans fatty acids (TFA), which are consumed by eating foods made from partially hydrogenated vegetable oils, is associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease. This relation can be explained by many factors including TFA's negative effect on endothelial function and reduced nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. In this study we investigated the effects of three different TFA (2 common isomers of C18 found in partially hydrogenated vegetable oil and a C18 isomer found from ruminant-derived—dairy products and meat) on endothelial NF-κB activation and nitric oxide (NO) production. Human endothelial cells were treated with increasing concentrations of Elaidic (trans-C18:1 (9 trans)), Linoelaidic (trans-C18:2 (9 trans, 12 trans)), and Transvaccenic (trans-C18:1 (11 trans)) for 3 h. Both Elaidic and Linoelaidic acids were associated with increasing NF-κB activation as measured by IL-6 levels and phosphorylation of IκBα, and impairment of endothelial insulin signaling and NO production, whereas Transvaccenic acid was not associated with these responses. We also measured superoxide production, which has been hypothesized to be necessary in fatty acid-dependent activation of NF-κB. Both Elaidic acid and Linoelaidic acid are associated with increased superoxide production, whereas Transvaccenic acid (which did not induce inflammatory responses) did not increase superoxide production. We observed differential activation of endothelial superoxide production, NF-κB activation, and reduction in NO production by different C18 isomers suggesting that the location and number of trans double bonds effect endothelial NF-κB activation. PMID:22216328

  5. Transplanting normal vascular proangiogenic cells to tumor-bearing mice triggers vascular remodeling and reduced hypoxia in tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sasajima, Junpei; Mizukami, Yusuke; Sugiyama, Yoshiaki; Nakamura, Kazumasa; Kawamoto, Toru; Koizumi, Kazuya; Fujii, Rie; Motomura, Wataru; Sato, Kazuya; Suzuki, Yasuaki; Tanno, Satoshi; Fujiya, Mikihiro; Sasaki, Katsunori; Shimizu, Norihiko; Karasaki, Hidenori; Kono, Toru; Kawabe, Jun-ichi; Ii, Masaaki; Yoshiara, Hiroki; Kamiyama, Naohisa; Ashida, Toshifumi; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Chung, Daniel C.; Kohgo, Yutaka

    2011-01-01

    Blood vessels deliver oxygen and nutrients to tissues and vascular networks are spatially organized to meet metabolic needs for maintaining homeostasis. In contrast, the vasculature of tumors is immature and leaky, resulting in insufficient delivery of nutrients and oxygen. Vasculogenic processes occur normally in adult tissues to repair “injured” blood vessels, leading us to hypothesize that bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNC) may be able to restore appropriate vessel function in tumor vasculature. Culturing BMMNC with endothelial growth medium resulted in the early outgrowth of spindle-shaped attached cells expressing CD11b/Flt1/Tie2/c-Kit/CXCR4 with pro-angiogenic activity. Intravenous administration of these cultured vascular proangiogenic cells (VPC) into nude mice bearing pancreatic cancer xenografts and Pdx1-Cre;LSL-KrasG12D;p53lox/+ genetically engineered mice that develop pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma significantly reduced areas of hypoxia without enhancing tumor growth. The resulting vasculature structurally mimicked normal vessels with intensive pericyte coverage. Increases in the vascularized area within VPC-injected xenografts were visualized with the ultrasound diagnostic system during injection of a microbubble-based contrast agent (Sonazoid), indicating a functional “normalization” of the tumor vasculature. In addition, gene expression profiles on the VPC-transplanted xenografts revealed a marked reduction in major factors involved in drug resistance and “stemness” of cancer cells. Together, our findings identify a novel alternate approach to regulate abnormal tumor vessels, offering the potential to improve delivery and efficacy of anti-cancer drugs to hypoxic tumors. PMID:20631070

  6. Transplanting normal vascular proangiogenic cells to tumor-bearing mice triggers vascular remodeling and reduces hypoxia in tumors.

    PubMed

    Sasajima, Junpei; Mizukami, Yusuke; Sugiyama, Yoshiaki; Nakamura, Kazumasa; Kawamoto, Toru; Koizumi, Kazuya; Fujii, Rie; Motomura, Wataru; Sato, Kazuya; Suzuki, Yasuaki; Tanno, Satoshi; Fujiya, Mikihiro; Sasaki, Katsunori; Shimizu, Norihiko; Karasaki, Hidenori; Kono, Toru; Kawabe, Jun-ichi; Ii, Masaaki; Yoshiara, Hiroki; Kamiyama, Naohisa; Ashida, Toshifumi; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Chung, Daniel C; Kohgo, Yutaka

    2010-08-01

    Blood vessels deliver oxygen and nutrients to tissues, and vascular networks are spatially organized to meet the metabolic needs for maintaining homeostasis. In contrast, the vasculature of tumors is immature and leaky, resulting in insufficient delivery of nutrients and oxygen. Vasculogenic processes occur normally in adult tissues to repair "injured" blood vessels, leading us to hypothesize that bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNC) may be able to restore appropriate vessel function in the tumor vasculature. Culturing BMMNCs in endothelial growth medium resulted in the early outgrowth of spindle-shaped attached cells expressing CD11b/Flt1/Tie2/c-Kit/CXCR4 with proangiogenic activity. Intravenous administration of these cultured vascular proangiogenic cells (VPC) into nude mice bearing pancreatic cancer xenografts and Pdx1-Cre;LSL-Kras(G12D);p53(lox/+) genetically engineered mice that develop pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma significantly reduced areas of hypoxia without enhancing tumor growth. The resulting vasculature structurally mimicked normal vessels with intensive pericyte coverage. Increases in vascularized areas within VPC-injected xenografts were visualized with an ultrasound diagnostic system during injection of a microbubble-based contrast agent (Sonazoid), indicating a functional "normalization" of the tumor vasculature. In addition, gene expression profiles in the VPC-transplanted xenografts revealed a marked reduction in major factors involved in drug resistance and "stemness" of cancer cells. Together, our findings identify a novel alternate approach to regulate abnormal tumor vessels, offering the potential to improve the delivery and efficacy of anticancer drugs to hypoxic tumors. PMID:20631070

  7. The chaperone co-inducer BGP-15 alleviates ventilation-induced diaphragm dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Salah, Heba; Li, Meishan; Cacciani, Nicola; Gastaldello, Stefano; Ogilvie, Hannah; Akkad, Hazem; Namuduri, Arvind Venkat; Morbidoni, Valeria; Artemenko, Konstantin A; Balogh, Gabor; Martinez-Redondo, Vicente; Jannig, Paulo; Hedström, Yvette; Dworkin, Barry; Bergquist, Jonas; Ruas, Jorge; Vigh, Laszlo; Salviati, Leonardo; Larsson, Lars

    2016-08-01

    Ventilation-induced diaphragm dysfunction (VIDD) is a marked decline in diaphragm function in response to mechanical ventilation, which has negative consequences for individual patients' quality of life and for the health care system, but specific treatment strategies are still lacking. We used an experimental intensive care unit (ICU) model, allowing time-resolved studies of diaphragm structure and function in response to long-term mechanical ventilation and the effects of a pharmacological intervention (the chaperone co-inducer BGP-15). The marked loss of diaphragm muscle fiber function in response to mechanical ventilation was caused by posttranslational modifications (PTMs) of myosin. In a rat model, 10 days of BGP-15 treatment greatly improved diaphragm muscle fiber function (by about 100%), although it did not reverse diaphragm atrophy. The treatment also provided protection from myosin PTMs associated with HSP72 induction and PARP-1 inhibition, resulting in improvement of mitochondrial function and content. Thus, BGP-15 may offer an intervention strategy for reducing VIDD in mechanically ventilated ICU patients. PMID:27488897

  8. Yiqihuoxuejiedu Formula Inhibits Vascular Remodeling by Reducing Proliferation and Secretion of Adventitial Fibroblast after Balloon Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ming-Jing; Wang, Jie; Gao, Yong-Hong; Liu, Hui-Min; Lv, Xi-Ying; Lei, Huan; Sun, Qing-Qin; Xu, Ying; He, Ying-Kun; Wang, Shuo-Ren

    2014-01-01

    Vascular remodeling occurs in atherosclerosis, hypertension, and restenosis after percutaneous coronary intervention. Adventitial remodeling may be a potential therapeutic target. Yiqihuoxuejiedu formula uses therapeutic principles from Chinese medicine to supplement Qi, activate blood circulation, and resolve toxin and it has been shown to inhibit vascular stenosis. To investigate effects and mechanisms of the formula on inhibiting vascular remodeling, especially adventitial remodeling, rats with a balloon injury to their common carotid artery were used and were treated for 7 or 28 days after injury. The adventitial area and α-SMA expression increased at 7 days after injury, which indicated activation and proliferation of adventitial fibroblasts. Yiqihuoxuejiedu formula reduced the adventitial areas at 7 days, attenuated the neointima and vessel wall area, stenosis percent, and α-SMA expression in the neointima, and reduced collagen content and type I/III collagen ratio in the adventitia at 28 days. Yiqihuoxuejiedu formula had more positive effects than Captopril in reducing intimal proliferation and diminishing stenosis, although Captopril lowered neointimal α-SMA expression and reduced the collagen content at 28 days. Yiqihuoxuejiedu formula has inhibitory effects on positive and negative remodeling by reducing adventitial and neointimal proliferation, reducing content, and elevating adventitial compliance. PMID:24987435

  9. Exendin-4, a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist, reduces intimal thickening after vascular injury

    SciTech Connect

    Goto, Hiromasa; Nomiyama, Takashi; Mita, Tomoya; Yasunari, Eisuke; Azuma, Kosuke; Komiya, Koji; Arakawa, Masayuki; Jin, Wen Long; Kanazawa, Akio; Kawamori, Ryuzo; Fujitani, Yoshio; Hirose, Takahisa; Watada, Hirotaka

    2011-02-04

    Research highlights: {yields} Exendin-4 reduces neointimal formation after vascular injury in a mouse model. {yields} Exendin-4 dose not alter metabolic parameters in non-diabetic, non-obese mouse model. {yields} Exendin-4 reduces PDGF-induced cell proliferation in cultured SMCs. {yields} Exendin-4 may reduces neointimal formation after vascular injury at least in part through its direct action on SMCs. -- Abstract: Glucagon-like peptide-1 is a hormone secreted by L cells of the small intestine and stimulates glucose-dependent insulin response. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists such as exendin-4 are currently used in type 2 diabetes, and considered to have beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system. To further elucidate the effect of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists on cardiovascular diseases, we investigated the effects of exendin-4 on intimal thickening after endothelial injury. Under continuous infusion of exendin-4 at 24 nmol/kg/day, C57BL/6 mice were subjected to endothelial denudation injury of the femoral artery. Treatment of mice with exendin-4 reduced neointimal formation at 4 weeks after arterial injury without altering body weight or various metabolic parameters. In addition, in vitro studies of isolated murine, rat and human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells showed the expression of GLP-1 receptor. The addition of 10 nM exendin-4 to cultured smooth muscle cells significantly reduced their proliferation induced by platelet-derived growth factor. Our results suggested that exendin-4 reduced intimal thickening after vascular injury at least in part by the suppression of platelet-derived growth factor-induced smooth muscle cells proliferation.

  10. Tributyltin contributes in reducing the vascular reactivity to phenylephrine in isolated aortic rings from female rats.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Samya Mere L; Ximenes, Carolina F; de Batista, Priscila R; Simões, Fabiana V; Coser, Pedro Henrique P; Sena, Gabriela C; Podratz, Priscila L; de Souza, Leticia N G; Vassallo, Dalton V; Graceli, Jones B; Stefanon, Ivanita

    2014-03-21

    Organotin compounds such as tributyltin (TBT) are used as antifouling paints by shipping companies. TBT inhibits the aromatase responsible for the transformation of testosterone into estrogen. Our hypothesis is that TBT modulates the vascular reactivity of female rats. Female Wistar rats were treated daily (Control; CONT) or TBT (100 ng/kg) for 15 days. Rings from thoracic aortas were incubated with phenylephrine (PHE, 10(-10)-10(-4) M) in the presence and absence of endothelium, and in the presence of N(G)-Nitro-L-Arginine Methyl Ester (L-NAME), tetraethylammonium (TEA) and apocynin. TBT decreased plasma levels of estrogen and the vascular response to PHE. In the TBT group, the vascular reactivity was increased in the absence of endothelium, L-NAME and TEA. The decrease in PHE reactivity during incubation with apocynin was more evident in the TBT group. The sensitivity to acetylcholine (ACh) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) was reduced in the TBT group. TBT increased collagen, reduced α1-smooth muscle actin. Female rats treated with TBT for 15 days showed morphology alteration of the aorta and decreased their vascular reactivity, probably due to mechanisms dependent on nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, K(+) channels and an increase in oxidative stress. PMID:24468273

  11. Jujuboside B Reduces Vascular Tension by Increasing Ca2+ Influx and Activating Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yixiu; Zhang, Xin; Li, Jiannan; Bian, Yu; Sheng, Miaomiao; Liu, Bin; Fu, Zidong; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Baofeng

    2016-01-01

    Jujuboside B has been reported to have protective effect on many cardiovascular diseases. However, the effects of Jujuboside B on vascular tension and endothelial function are unknown. The present study investigated the effects of Jujuboside B on reducing vascular tension, protecting endothelial function and the potential mechanisms. The tension of isolated rat thoracic aorta ring was measured by Wire myograph system. The concentration of nitric oxide (NO) and the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) were determined by Griess reagent method and enzyme-linked immune sorbent assay. The protein levels of eNOS and p-eNOS at Serine-1177 were determined by western blot analysis. Intracellular Ca2+ concentration in HAECs was measured by laser confocal imaging microscopy. Results showed that Jujuboside B reduced the tension of rat thoracic aorta rings with intact endothelium in a dose-dependent manner. L-NAME, KN93, EGTA, SKF96365, iberiotoxin and glibenclamide significantly attenuated Jujuboside B-induced vasodilation in endothelium-intact tissues. In contrast, indometacin and 4-DAMP had no such effects. Jujuboside B also promoted NO generation and increased eNOS activity, which were attenuated by L-NAME, EGTA and SKF96365. Moreover, Jujuboside B increased intracellular Ca2+ concentration dose-dependently, which was inhibited by EGTA and SKF96365. Besides, Jujuboside B induced a rapid Ca2+ influx instantaneously after depleting intracellular Ca2+ store, which was significantly inhibited by SKF96365. In conclusion, this study preliminarily confirmed that Jujuboside B reduced vascular tension endothelium-dependently. The underlying mechanisms involved that Jujuboside B increased extracellular Ca2+ influx through endothelial transient receptor potential cation (TRPC) channels, phosphorylated eNOS and promoted NO generation in vascular endothelial cells. In addition, Jujuboside B-induced vasodilation involved

  12. Jujuboside B Reduces Vascular Tension by Increasing Ca2+ Influx and Activating Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yixiu; Zhang, Xin; Li, Jiannan; Bian, Yu; Sheng, Miaomiao; Liu, Bin; Fu, Zidong; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Baofeng

    2016-01-01

    Jujuboside B has been reported to have protective effect on many cardiovascular diseases. However, the effects of Jujuboside B on vascular tension and endothelial function are unknown. The present study investigated the effects of Jujuboside B on reducing vascular tension, protecting endothelial function and the potential mechanisms. The tension of isolated rat thoracic aorta ring was measured by Wire myograph system. The concentration of nitric oxide (NO) and the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) were determined by Griess reagent method and enzyme-linked immune sorbent assay. The protein levels of eNOS and p-eNOS at Serine-1177 were determined by western blot analysis. Intracellular Ca2+ concentration in HAECs was measured by laser confocal imaging microscopy. Results showed that Jujuboside B reduced the tension of rat thoracic aorta rings with intact endothelium in a dose-dependent manner. L-NAME, KN93, EGTA, SKF96365, iberiotoxin and glibenclamide significantly attenuated Jujuboside B-induced vasodilation in endothelium-intact tissues. In contrast, indometacin and 4-DAMP had no such effects. Jujuboside B also promoted NO generation and increased eNOS activity, which were attenuated by L-NAME, EGTA and SKF96365. Moreover, Jujuboside B increased intracellular Ca2+ concentration dose-dependently, which was inhibited by EGTA and SKF96365. Besides, Jujuboside B induced a rapid Ca2+ influx instantaneously after depleting intracellular Ca2+ store, which was significantly inhibited by SKF96365. In conclusion, this study preliminarily confirmed that Jujuboside B reduced vascular tension endothelium-dependently. The underlying mechanisms involved that Jujuboside B increased extracellular Ca2+ influx through endothelial transient receptor potential cation (TRPC) channels, phosphorylated eNOS and promoted NO generation in vascular endothelial cells. In addition, Jujuboside B-induced vasodilation involved

  13. Passive immunotherapy targeting amyloid-β reduces cerebral amyloid angiopathy and improves vascular reactivity.

    PubMed

    Bales, Kelly R; O'Neill, Sharon M; Pozdnyakov, Nikolay; Pan, Feng; Caouette, David; Pi, YeQing; Wood, Kathleen M; Volfson, Dmitri; Cirrito, John R; Han, Byung-Hee; Johnson, Andrew W; Zipfel, Gregory J; Samad, Tarek A

    2016-02-01

    Prominent cerebral amyloid angiopathy is often observed in the brains of elderly individuals and is almost universally found in patients with Alzheimer's disease. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy is characterized by accumulation of the shorter amyloid-β isoform(s) (predominantly amyloid-β40) in the walls of leptomeningeal and cortical arterioles and is likely a contributory factor to vascular dysfunction leading to stroke and dementia in the elderly. We used transgenic mice with prominent cerebral amyloid angiopathy to investigate the ability of ponezumab, an anti-amyloid-β40 selective antibody, to attenuate amyloid-β accrual in cerebral vessels and to acutely restore vascular reactivity. Chronic administration of ponezumab to transgenic mice led to a significant reduction in amyloid and amyloid-β accumulation both in leptomeningeal and brain vessels when measured by intravital multiphoton imaging and immunohistochemistry. By enriching for cerebral vascular elements, we also measured a significant reduction in the levels of soluble amyloid-β biochemically. We hypothesized that the reduction in vascular amyloid-β40 after ponezumab administration may reflect the ability of ponezumab to mobilize an interstitial fluid pool of amyloid-β40 in brain. Acutely, ponezumab triggered a significant and transient increase in interstitial fluid amyloid-β40 levels in old plaque-bearing transgenic mice but not in young animals. We also measured a beneficial effect on vascular reactivity following acute administration of ponezumab, even in vessels where there was a severe cerebral amyloid angiopathy burden. Taken together, the beneficial effects ponezumab administration has on reducing the rate of cerebral amyloid angiopathy deposition and restoring cerebral vascular health favours a mechanism that involves rapid removal and/or neutralization of amyloid-β species that may otherwise be detrimental to normal vessel function. PMID:26493635

  14. Treatment with polyamine oxidase inhibitor reduces microglial activation and limits vascular injury in ischemic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Patel, C; Xu, Z; Shosha, E; Xing, J; Lucas, R; Caldwell, R W; Caldwell, R B; Narayanan, S P

    2016-09-01

    Retinal vascular injury is a major cause of vision impairment in ischemic retinopathies. Insults such as hyperoxia, oxidative stress and inflammation contribute to this pathology. Previously, we showed that hyperoxia-induced retinal neurodegeneration is associated with increased polyamine oxidation. Here, we are studying the involvement of polyamine oxidases in hyperoxia-induced injury and death of retinal vascular endothelial cells. New-born C57BL6/J mice were exposed to hyperoxia (70% O2) from postnatal day (P) 7 to 12 and were treated with the polyamine oxidase inhibitor MDL 72527 or vehicle starting at P6. Mice were sacrificed after different durations of hyperoxia and their retinas were analyzed to determine the effects on vascular injury, microglial cell activation, and inflammatory cytokine profiling. The results of this analysis showed that MDL 72527 treatment significantly reduced hyperoxia-induced retinal vascular injury and enhanced vascular sprouting as compared with the vehicle controls. These protective effects were correlated with significant decreases in microglial activation as well as levels of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. In order to model the effects of polyamine oxidation in causing microglial activation in vitro, studies were performed using rat brain microvascular endothelial cells treated with conditioned-medium from rat retinal microglia stimulated with hydrogen peroxide. Conditioned-medium from activated microglial cultures induced cell stress signals and cell death in microvascular endothelial cells. These studies demonstrate the involvement of polyamine oxidases in hyperoxia-induced retinal vascular injury and retinal inflammation in ischemic retinopathy, through mechanisms involving cross-talk between endothelial cells and resident retinal microglia. PMID:27239699

  15. [Reducing the risk of vascular complications during percutaneous aortic valve replacement].

    PubMed

    Stratiev, V; Guyon, P; Teiger, E; Collet, J-P

    2012-08-01

    The percutaneous aortic valve replacement (TAVI) is the most recent and promising procedure in the area of interventional cardiology with a rapidly growing number of interventions worldwide. The transfemoral approach being less invasive, it has become the predominant access for the device delivery. The prevention of vascular complications by an optimal risk stratification using appropriate imaging techniques (vascular CT scan and angiography), optimised techniques for femoral puncture (active control of the arterial punction, crossover...) and skilled teams for peripheral angioplasty and percutaneous arterial closure devices (Prostar) has become mandatory given the fragile target population for TAVI. Vascular complications remain indeed one of the most frequent complication although the trend toward reduced sheeths size led to significant reduction This is mandatory regarding the needed size of the vascular arterial access - itself with constant improvement by minimising the initial 24 French with mandatory real chirurgical closure to the actual 18-19 French and soon 16 French. The improvement of the implanted devices is due to the recent evidence of the promising future of this technique and the important technological effort realised by the industry not only on the implanted aortic prosthesis but also on their delivering catheters. PMID:22497766

  16. RNAi targeting multiple cell adhesion molecules reduces immune cell recruitment and vascular inflammation after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Sager, Hendrik B; Dutta, Partha; Dahlman, James E; Hulsmans, Maarten; Courties, Gabriel; Sun, Yuan; Heidt, Timo; Vinegoni, Claudio; Borodovsky, Anna; Fitzgerald, Kevin; Wojtkiewicz, Gregory R; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Tricot, Benoit; Khan, Omar F; Kauffman, Kevin J; Xing, Yiping; Shaw, Taylor E; Libby, Peter; Langer, Robert; Weissleder, Ralph; Swirski, Filip K; Anderson, Daniel G; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) leads to a systemic surge of vascular inflammation in mice and humans, resulting in secondary ischemic complications and high mortality. We show that, in ApoE(-/-) mice with coronary ligation, increased sympathetic tone up-regulates not only hematopoietic leukocyte production but also plaque endothelial expression of adhesion molecules. To counteract the resulting arterial leukocyte recruitment, we developed nanoparticle-based RNA interference (RNAi) that effectively silences five key adhesion molecules. Simultaneously encapsulating small interfering RNA (siRNA)-targeting intercellular cell adhesion molecules 1 and 2 (Icam1 and Icam2), vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (Vcam1), and E- and P-selectins (Sele and Selp) into polymeric endothelial-avid nanoparticles reduced post-MI neutrophil and monocyte recruitment into atherosclerotic lesions and decreased matrix-degrading plaque protease activity. Five-gene combination RNAi also curtailed leukocyte recruitment to ischemic myocardium. Therefore, targeted multigene silencing may prevent complications after acute MI. PMID:27280687

  17. Peptidylarginine Deiminase Inhibition Reduces Vascular Damage and Modulates Innate Immune Responses in Murine Models of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Jason S.; Luo, Wei; O’Dell, Alexander A.; Yalavarthi, Srilakshmi; Zhao, Wenpu; Subramanian, Venkataraman; Guo, Chiao; Grenn, Robert C.; Thompson, Paul R.; Eitzman, Daniel T.; Kaplan, Mariana J.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation promotes vascular damage, thrombosis, and activation of interferon-α-producing plasmacytoid dendritic cells in diseased arteries. Peptidylarginine deiminase inhibition is a strategy that can decrease in vivo NET formation. Objective To test whether peptidylarginine deiminase inhibition, a novel approach to targeting arterial disease, can reduce vascular damage and inhibit innate immune responses in murine models of atherosclerosis. Methods and Results Apolipoprotein-E (Apoe)−/− mice demonstrated enhanced NET formation, developed autoantibodies to NETs, and expressed high levels of interferon-α in diseased arteries. Apoe−/− mice were treated for 11 weeks with daily injections of Cl-amidine, a peptidylarginine deiminase inhibitor. Peptidylarginine deiminase inhibition blocked NET formation, reduced atherosclerotic lesion area, and delayed time to carotid artery thrombosis in a photochemical injury model. Decreases in atherosclerosis burden were accompanied by reduced recruitment of netting neutrophils and macrophages to arteries, as well as by reduced arterial interferon-α expression. Conclusions Pharmacological interventions that block NET formation can reduce atherosclerosis burden and arterial thrombosis in murine systems. These results support a role for aberrant NET formation in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis through modulation of innate immune responses. PMID:24425713

  18. EPHA4-FC TREATMENT REDUCES ISCHEMIA/REPERFUSION-INDUCED INTESTINAL INJURY BY INHIBITING VASCULAR PERMEABILITY

    PubMed Central

    Woodruff, Trent M.; Wu, Mike C.-L.; Morgan, Michael; Bain, Nathan T.; Jeanes, Angela; Lipman, Jeffrey; Ting, Michael J.; Boyd, Andrew W.; Taylor, Stephen M.; Coulthard, Mark G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The inflammatory response is characterized by increased endothelial permeability, which permits the passage of fluid and inflammatory cells into interstitial spaces. The Eph/ephrin receptor ligand system plays a role in inflammation through a signaling cascade, which modifies Rho-GTPase activity. We hypothesized that blocking Eph/ephrin signaling using an EphA4-Fc would result in decreased inflammation and tissue injury in a model of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Mice undergoing intestinal I/R pretreated with the EphA4-Fc had significantly reduced intestinal injury compared to mice injected with the control Fc. This reduction in I/R injury was accompanied by significantly reduced neutrophil infiltration, but did not affect intestinal inflammatory cytokine generation. Using microdialysis, we identified that intestinal I/R induced a marked increase in systemic vascular leakage, which was completely abrogated in EphA4-Fc-treated mice. Finally, we confirmed the direct role of Eph/ephrin signaling in endothelial leakage by demonstrating that EphA4-Fc inhibited tumor necrosis factor-α–induced vascular permeability in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. This study identifies that Eph/ephrin interaction induces proinflammatory signaling in vivo by inducing vascular leak and neutrophil infiltration, which results in tissue injury in intestinal I/R. Therefore, therapeutic targeting of Eph/ephrin interaction using inhibitors, such as EphA4-Fc, may be a novel method to prevent tissue injury in acute inflammation by influencing endothelial integrity and by controlling vascular leak. PMID:26771935

  19. Eribulin mesylate reduces tumor microenvironment abnormality by vascular remodeling in preclinical human breast cancer models

    PubMed Central

    Funahashi, Yasuhiro; Okamoto, Kiyoshi; Adachi, Yusuke; Semba, Taro; Uesugi, Mai; Ozawa, Yoichi; Tohyama, Osamu; Uehara, Taisuke; Kimura, Takayuki; Watanabe, Hideki; Asano, Makoto; Kawano, Satoshi; Tizon, Xavier; McCracken, Paul J; Matsui, Junji; Aoshima, Ken; Nomoto, Kenichi; Oda, Yoshiya

    2014-01-01

    Eribulin mesylate is a synthetic macrocyclic ketone analog of the marine sponge natural product halichondrin B and an inhibitor of microtubule dynamics. Some tubulin-binding drugs are known to have antivascular (antiangiogenesis or vascular-disrupting) activities that can target abnormal tumor vessels. Using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI analyses, here we show that eribulin induces remodeling of tumor vasculature through a novel antivascular activity in MX-1 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer xenograft models. Vascular remodeling associated with improved perfusion was shown by Hoechst 33342 staining and by increased microvessel density together with decreased mean vascular areas and fewer branched vessels in tumor tissues, as determined by immunohistochemical staining for endothelial marker CD31. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of normal host cells in the stroma of xenograft tumors showed that eribulin altered the expression of mouse (host) genes in angiogenesis signaling pathways controlling endothelial cell–pericyte interactions, and in the epithelial–mesenchymal transition pathway in the context of the tumor microenvironment. Eribulin also decreased hypoxia-associated protein expression of mouse (host) vascular endothelial growth factor by ELISA and human CA9 by immunohistochemical analysis. Prior treatment with eribulin enhanced the anti-tumor activity of capecitabine in the MDA-MB-231 xenograft model. These findings suggest that eribulin-induced remodeling of abnormal tumor vasculature leads to a more functional microenvironment that may reduce the aggressiveness of tumors due to elimination of inner tumor hypoxia. Because abnormal tumor microenvironments enhance both drug resistance and metastasis, the apparent ability of eribulin to reverse these aggressive characteristics may contribute to its clinical benefits. PMID:25060424

  20. Eribulin mesylate reduces tumor microenvironment abnormality by vascular remodeling in preclinical human breast cancer models.

    PubMed

    Funahashi, Yasuhiro; Okamoto, Kiyoshi; Adachi, Yusuke; Semba, Taro; Uesugi, Mai; Ozawa, Yoichi; Tohyama, Osamu; Uehara, Taisuke; Kimura, Takayuki; Watanabe, Hideki; Asano, Makoto; Kawano, Satoshi; Tizon, Xavier; McCracken, Paul J; Matsui, Junji; Aoshima, Ken; Nomoto, Kenichi; Oda, Yoshiya

    2014-10-01

    Eribulin mesylate is a synthetic macrocyclic ketone analog of the marine sponge natural product halichondrin B and an inhibitor of microtubule dynamics. Some tubulin-binding drugs are known to have antivascular (antiangiogenesis or vascular-disrupting) activities that can target abnormal tumor vessels. Using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI analyses, here we show that eribulin induces remodeling of tumor vasculature through a novel antivascular activity in MX-1 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer xenograft models. Vascular remodeling associated with improved perfusion was shown by Hoechst 33342 staining and by increased microvessel density together with decreased mean vascular areas and fewer branched vessels in tumor tissues, as determined by immunohistochemical staining for endothelial marker CD31. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of normal host cells in the stroma of xenograft tumors showed that eribulin altered the expression of mouse (host) genes in angiogenesis signaling pathways controlling endothelial cell-pericyte interactions, and in the epithelial-mesenchymal transition pathway in the context of the tumor microenvironment. Eribulin also decreased hypoxia-associated protein expression of mouse (host) vascular endothelial growth factor by ELISA and human CA9 by immunohistochemical analysis. Prior treatment with eribulin enhanced the anti-tumor activity of capecitabine in the MDA-MB-231 xenograft model. These findings suggest that eribulin-induced remodeling of abnormal tumor vasculature leads to a more functional microenvironment that may reduce the aggressiveness of tumors due to elimination of inner tumor hypoxia. Because abnormal tumor microenvironments enhance both drug resistance and metastasis, the apparent ability of eribulin to reverse these aggressive characteristics may contribute to its clinical benefits. PMID:25060424

  1. Association of reduced Connexin 43 expression with retinal vascular lesions in human diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Tien, Thomas; Muto, Tetsuya; Zhang, Joyce; Sohn, Elliott H; Mullins, Robert F; Roy, Sayon

    2016-05-01

    Connexin 43 (Cx43) downregulation promotes apoptosis in retinal vascular cells of diabetic animal models; however, its relevance to human diabetic retinopathy has not been established. In this study, we investigated whether diabetes alters Cx43 expression and promotes retinal vascular lesions in human retinas. Diabetic human eyes (aged 64-94 years) and non-diabetic human eyes (aged 61-90 years) were analyzed in this study. Retinal protein samples and retinal capillary networks were assessed for Cx43 level by Western blot (WB) analysis and immunostaining. In parallel, retinal capillary networks were stained with hematoxylin and periodic acid Schiff to determine the extent of pericyte loss (PL) and acellular capillaries (AC) in these retinas. Cx43 protein expression was significantly reduced in the diabetic retinas compared to non-diabetic retinas as indicated by WB analysis (81 ± 11% of control). Additionally, a significant decrease in the number of Cx43 plaques per unit length of vessel was observed in the diabetic retinas compared to those of non-diabetic retinas (62 ± 10% of control; p < 0.005). Importantly, a strong inverse relationship was noted between Cx43 expression and the relative number of AC (r = -0.89; p < 0.0005), and between Cx43 expression and number of pericyte loss (r = -0.88; p < 0.0005). Overall, these results show that Cx43 expression is reduced in the human diabetic retinas and Cx43 reduction is associated with increased vascular cell death. These findings suggest that diabetes decreases retinal Cx43 expression and that the development of PL and AC is associated with reduced Cx43 expression in human diabetic retinopathy. PMID:26738943

  2. High-Level Pressure Support Ventilation Attenuates Ventilator-Induced Diaphragm Dysfunction in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Huiqing; Xu, Peifeng; Zhu, Tao; Lu, Zhihua; Yuan, Yuehua; Zhou, Jiancang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Background: The effects of different modes of mechanical ventilation in the same ventilatory support level on ventilator-induced diaphragm dysfunction onset were assessed in healthy rabbits. Methods: Twenty New Zealand rabbits were randomly assigned to 4 groups (n = 5 in each group). Group 1: no mechanical ventilation; group 2: controlled mechanical ventilation (CMV) for 24 hours; group 3: assist/control ventilation (A/C) mode for 24 hours; group 4: high-level pressure support ventilation (PSV) mode for 24 hours. Heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure, PH, partial pressure of arterial oxygen/fraction of inspired oxygen and partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide were monitored and diaphragm electrical activity was analyzed in the 4 groups. Caspase-3 was evaluated by protein analysis and diaphragm ultra structure was assessed by electron microscopy. Results: The centroid frequency and the ratio of high frequency to low frequency were significantly reduced in the CMV, A/C and PSV groups (P < 0.001). The percent change in centroid frequency was significantly lower in the PSV group than in the CMV and A/C groups (P = 0.001 and P = 0.028, respectively). Electromyography of diaphragm integral amplitude decreased by 90% ± 1.48%, 67.8% ± 3.13% and 70.2% ± 4.72% in the CMV, A/C and PSV groups, respectively (P < 0.001). Caspase-3 protein activation was attenuated in the PSV group compared with the CMV and A/C groups (P = 0.035 and P = 0.033, respectively). Irregular swelling of mitochondria along with fractured and fuzzy cristae was observed in the CMV group, whereas mitochondrial cristae were dense and rich in the PSV group. The mitochondrial injury scores (Flameng scores) in the PSV group were the lowest among the 3 ventilatory groups (0.93 ± 0.09 in PSV versus 2.69 ± 0.05 in the CMV [P < 0.01] and PSV versus A/C groups [2.02 ± 0.08, P < 0.01]). Conclusions: The diaphragm myoelectric activity was reduced in the PSV group, although excessive oxidative

  3. Fucoidan reduces secretion and expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in the retinal pigment epithelium and reduces angiogenesis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Dithmer, Michaela; Fuchs, Sabine; Shi, Yang; Schmidt, Harald; Richert, Elisabeth; Roider, Johann; Klettner, Alexa

    2014-01-01

    Fucoidan is a polysaccharide isolated from brown algae which is of current interest for anti-tumor therapy. In this study, we investigated the effect of fucoidan on the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), looking at physiology, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion, and angiogenesis, thus investigating a potential use of fucoidan for the treatment of exudative age-related macular degeneration. For this study, human RPE cell line ARPE-19 and primary porcine RPE cells were used, as well as RPE/choroid perfusion organ cultures. The effect of fucoidan on RPE cells was investigated with methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium--assay, trypan blue exclusion assay, phagocytosis assay and a wound healing assay. VEGF expression was evaluated in immunocytochemistry and Western blot, VEGF secretion was evaluated in ELISA. The effect of fucoidan on angiogenesis was tested in a Matrigel assay using calcein-AM vital staining, evaluated by confocal laser scanning microcopy and quantitative image analysis. Fucoidan displays no toxicity and does not diminish proliferation or phagocytosis, but reduces wound healing in RPE cells. Fucoidan decreases VEGF secretion in RPE/choroid explants and RPE cells. Furthermore, it diminishes VEGF expression in RPE cells even when co-applied with bevacizumab. Furthermore, fucoidan reduces RPE-supernatant- and VEGF-induced angiogenesis of peripheral endothelial cells. In conclusion, fucoidan is a non-toxic agent that reduces VEGF expression and angiogenesis in vitro and may be of interest for further studies as a potential therapy against exudative age-related macular degeneration. PMID:24558482

  4. HABP2 is a Novel Regulator of Vascular Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Mambetsariev, N.; Mirzapoiazova, T.; Mambetsariev, B.; Sammani, S.; Lennon, F.E.; Garcia, J.G.N.; Singleton, P.A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective We evaluated the role of the extracellular serine protease, Hyaluronic Acid Binding Protein 2 (HABP2), in vascular barrier regulation. Methods and Results Using immunoblot and immunohistochemical analysis, we observed that lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induces HABP2 expression in murine lung endothelium in vivo and in human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cell (HPMVEC) in vitro. High molecular weight hyaluronan (HMW-HA, ~1 million Da) decreased HABP2 protein expression in HPMVEC and decreased purified HABP2 enzymatic activity whereas low MW HA (LMW-HA, ~2,500 Da) increased these activities. The effects of LMW-HA on HABP2 activity, but not HMW-HA, were inhibited with a peptide of the polyanion binding domain (PABD) of HABP2. Silencing (siRNA) HABP2 expression augmented HMW-HA-induced EC barrier enhancement and inhibited LPS and LMW-HA-mediated EC barrier disruption, results which were reversed with overexpression of HABP2. Silencing PAR receptors 1 and 3, RhoA or ROCK expression attenuated LPS, LMW-HA and HABP2-mediated EC barrier disruption. Utilizing murine models of acute lung injury, we observed that LPS- and ventilator-induced pulmonary vascular hyper-permeability were significantly reduced with vascular silencing (siRNA) of HABP2. Conclusions HABP2 negatively regulates vascular integrity via activation of PAR receptor/RhoA/ROCK signaling and represents a potentially useful therapeutic target for syndromes of increased vascular permeability. PMID:20042707

  5. Inhibition of Janus kinase signaling during controlled mechanical ventilation prevents ventilation-induced diaphragm dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ira J.; Godinez, Guillermo L.; Singh, Baljit K.; McCaughey, Kelly M.; Alcantara, Raniel R.; Gururaja, Tarikere; Ho, Melissa S.; Nguyen, Henry N.; Friera, Annabelle M.; White, Kathy A.; McLaughlin, John R.; Hansen, Derek; Romero, Jason M.; Baltgalvis, Kristen A.; Claypool, Mark D.; Li, Wei; Lang, Wayne; Yam, George C.; Gelman, Marina S.; Ding, Rongxian; Yung, Stephanie L.; Creger, Daniel P.; Chen, Yan; Singh, Rajinder; Smuder, Ashley J.; Wiggs, Michael P.; Kwon, Oh-Sung; Sollanek, Kurt J.; Powers, Scott K.; Masuda, Esteban S.; Taylor, Vanessa C.; Payan, Donald G.; Kinoshita, Taisei; Kinsella, Todd M.

    2014-01-01

    ., Kinoshita, T., Kinsella, T. M. Inhibition of Janus kinase signaling during controlled mechanical ventilation prevents ventilation-induced diaphragm dysfunction. PMID:24671708

  6. Breaking dogmas: the plant vascular pathogen Xanthomonas albilineans is able to invade non-vascular tissues despite its reduced genome

    PubMed Central

    Mensi, Imène; Vernerey, Marie-Stéphanie; Gargani, Daniel; Nicole, Michel; Rott, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Xanthomonas albilineans, the causal agent of sugarcane leaf scald, is missing the Hrp type III secretion system that is used by many Gram-negative bacteria to colonize their host. Until now, this pathogen was considered as strictly limited to the xylem of sugarcane. We used confocal laser scanning microscopy, immunocytochemistry and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to investigate the localization of X. albilineans in diseased sugarcane. Sugarcane plants were inoculated with strains of the pathogen labelled with a green fluorescent protein. Confocal microscopy observations of symptomatic leaves confirmed the presence of the pathogen in the protoxylem and metaxylem; however, X. albilineans was also observed in phloem, parenchyma and bulliform cells of the infected leaves. Similarly, vascular bundles of infected sugarcane stalks were invaded by X. albilineans. Surprisingly, the pathogen was also observed in apparently intact storage cells of the stalk and in intercellular spaces between these cells. Most of these observations made by confocal microscopy were confirmed by TEM. The pathogen exits the xylem following cell wall and middle lamellae degradation, thus creating openings to reach parenchyma cells. This is the first description of a plant pathogenic vascular bacterium invading apparently intact non-vascular plant tissues and multiplying in parenchyma cells. PMID:24522883

  7. Farnesoid X receptor agonist CDCA reduces blood pressure and regulates vascular tone in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Chenyu; Li, Jing; Weng, Xu; Lan, Xiaofang; Chi, Xiangbo

    2015-07-01

    The Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, which plays an essential role in lipid homeostasis and glucose metabolism. However, whether or not FXR can prevent rise in blood pressure remains unknown. Here, we investigate the possibility of using chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), a natural ligand of FXR, to attenuate elevated blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). SHR and Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY) were treated with CDCA (30 mg/kg) for 8 weeks. Compared with vehicle control, CDCA attenuated rise in blood pressure in SHR. In addition, CDCA improved vasorelaxation and diminished the contractile response to endothelin-1 (ET-1) in mesenteric arteries from SHR. CDCA also stimulated endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression, repressed ET-1 levels, and inhibited NF-κB activities in mesenteric arteries of the SHR. Overall, we showed that CDCA treatment reduces systolic blood pressure, improves vascular relaxation, and inhibits vasoconstriction activity in SHR. The repressed ET-1 level, the raised eNOS expression, and the ameliorated inflammation in mesenteric arteries could be responsible for the vasorelaxant and hypotensive effect of CDCA. These findings support a potential role for FXR as a regulator in vascular activities and in the development of treatment for hypertension. PMID:26188398

  8. NDRG1 overexpressing gliomas are characterized by reduced tumor vascularization and resistance to antiangiogenic treatment.

    PubMed

    Broggini, Thomas; Wüstner, Marie; Harms, Christoph; Stange, Lena; Blaes, Jonas; Thomé, Carina; Harms, Ulrike; Mueller, Susanne; Weiler, Markus; Wick, Wolfgang; Vajkoczy, Peter; Czabanka, Marcus

    2016-10-01

    Hypoxia-regulated molecules play an important role in vascular resistance to antiangiogenic treatment. N-myc downstream-regulated-gene 1 (NDRG1) is significantly upregulated during hypoxia in glioma. It was the aim of the present study to analyze the role of NDRG1 on glioma angiogenesis and on antiangiogenic treatment. Orthotopically implanted NDRG1 glioma showed reduced tumor growth and vessel density compared to controls. RT-PCR gene array analysis revealed a 30-fold TNFSF15 increase in NDRG1 tumors. Consequently, the supernatant from NDRG1 transfected U87MG glioma cells resulted in reduced HUVEC proliferation, migration and angiogenic response in tube formation assays in vitro. This effect was provoked by increased TNFSF15 promoter activity in NDRG1 cells. Mutations in NF-κB and AP-1 promoter response elements suppressed TNFSF15 promoter activity. Moreover, U87MG glioma NDRG1 knockdown supernatant contained multiple proangiogenic proteins and increased HUVEC spheroid sprouting. Sunitinib treatment of orhotopically implanted mice reduced tumor volume and vessel density in controls; in NDRG1 overexpressing cells no reduction of tumor volume or vessel density was observed. NDRG1 overexpression leads to reduced tumor growth and angiogenesis in experimental glioma via upregulation of TNFSF15. In NDRG1 overexpressing glioma antiangiogenic treatment does not yield a therapeutic response. PMID:26297987

  9. Increased vascular thromboxane generation impairs dilation of skeletal muscle arterioles of obese Zucker rats with reduced oxygen tension

    PubMed Central

    Goodwill, Adam G.; James, Milinda E.; Frisbee, Jefferson C.

    2008-01-01

    This study determined if altered vascular prostacyclin (PGI2) and/or thromboxane A2 (TxA2) production with reduced Po2 contributes to impaired hypoxic dilation of skeletal muscle resistance arterioles of obese Zucker rats (OZRs) versus lean Zucker rats (LZRs). Mechanical responses were assessed in isolated gracilis muscle arterioles following reductions in Po2 under control conditions and following pharmacological interventions inhibiting arachidonic acid metabolism and nitric oxide synthase and alleviating elevated vascular oxidant stress. The production of arachidonic acid metabolites was assessed using pooled arteries from OZRs and LZRs in response to reduced Po2. Hypoxic dilation, endothelium-dependent in both strains, was attenuated in OZRs versus LZRs. Nitric oxide synthase inhibition had no significant impact on hypoxic dilation in either strain. Cyclooxygenase inhibition dramatically reduced hypoxic dilation in LZRs and abolished responses in OZRs. Treatment of arterioles from OZRs with polyethylene glycol-superoxide dismutase improved hypoxic dilation, and this improvement was entirely cyclooxygenase dependent. Vascular PGI2 production with reduced Po2 was similar between strains, although TxA2 production was increased in OZRs, a difference that was attenuated by treatment of vessels from OZRs with polyethylene glycol-superoxide dismutase. Both blockade of PGH2/TxA2 receptors and inhibition of thromboxane synthase increased hypoxic dilation in OZR arterioles. These results suggest that a contributing mechanism underlying impaired hypoxic dilation of skeletal muscle arterioles of OZRs may be an increased vascular production of TxA2, which competes against the vasodilator influences of PGI2. These results also suggest that the elevated vascular oxidant stress inherent in metabolic syndrome may contribute to the increased vascular TxA2 production and may blunt vascular sensitivity to PGI2. PMID:18689495

  10. Increased vascular thromboxane generation impairs dilation of skeletal muscle arterioles of obese Zucker rats with reduced oxygen tension.

    PubMed

    Goodwill, Adam G; James, Milinda E; Frisbee, Jefferson C

    2008-10-01

    This study determined if altered vascular prostacyclin (PGI(2)) and/or thromboxane A(2) (TxA(2)) production with reduced Po(2) contributes to impaired hypoxic dilation of skeletal muscle resistance arterioles of obese Zucker rats (OZRs) versus lean Zucker rats (LZRs). Mechanical responses were assessed in isolated gracilis muscle arterioles following reductions in Po(2) under control conditions and following pharmacological interventions inhibiting arachidonic acid metabolism and nitric oxide synthase and alleviating elevated vascular oxidant stress. The production of arachidonic acid metabolites was assessed using pooled arteries from OZRs and LZRs in response to reduced Po(2). Hypoxic dilation, endothelium-dependent in both strains, was attenuated in OZRs versus LZRs. Nitric oxide synthase inhibition had no significant impact on hypoxic dilation in either strain. Cyclooxygenase inhibition dramatically reduced hypoxic dilation in LZRs and abolished responses in OZRs. Treatment of arterioles from OZRs with polyethylene glycol-superoxide dismutase improved hypoxic dilation, and this improvement was entirely cyclooxygenase dependent. Vascular PGI(2) production with reduced Po(2) was similar between strains, although TxA(2) production was increased in OZRs, a difference that was attenuated by treatment of vessels from OZRs with polyethylene glycol-superoxide dismutase. Both blockade of PGH(2)/TxA(2) receptors and inhibition of thromboxane synthase increased hypoxic dilation in OZR arterioles. These results suggest that a contributing mechanism underlying impaired hypoxic dilation of skeletal muscle arterioles of OZRs may be an increased vascular production of TxA(2), which competes against the vasodilator influences of PGI(2). These results also suggest that the elevated vascular oxidant stress inherent in metabolic syndrome may contribute to the increased vascular TxA(2) production and may blunt vascular sensitivity to PGI(2). PMID:18689495

  11. History of Mechanical Ventilation. From Vesalius to Ventilator-induced Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Slutsky, Arthur S

    2015-05-15

    Mechanical ventilation is a life-saving therapy that catalyzed the development of modern intensive care units. The origins of modern mechanical ventilation can be traced back about five centuries to the seminal work of Andreas Vesalius. This article is a short history of mechanical ventilation, tracing its origins over the centuries to the present day. One of the great advances in ventilatory support over the past few decades has been the development of lung-protective ventilatory strategies, based on our understanding of the iatrogenic consequences of mechanical ventilation such as ventilator-induced lung injury. These strategies have markedly improved clinical outcomes in patients with respiratory failure. PMID:25844759

  12. Vascular risk and Aβ interact to reduce cortical thickness in AD vulnerable brain regions

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Bruce R.; Madison, Cindee M.; Wirth, Miranka; Marchant, Natalie L.; Kriger, Stephen; Mack, Wendy J.; Sanossian, Nerses; DeCarli, Charles; Chui, Helena C.; Weiner, Michael W.; Jagust, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to define whether vascular risk factors interact with β-amyloid (Aβ) in producing changes in brain structure that could underlie the increased risk of Alzheimer disease (AD). Methods: Sixty-six cognitively normal and mildly impaired older individuals with a wide range of vascular risk factors were included in this study. The presence of Aβ was assessed using [11C]Pittsburgh compound B–PET imaging, and cortical thickness was measured using 3-tesla MRI. Vascular risk was measured with the Framingham Coronary Risk Profile Index. Results: Individuals with high levels of vascular risk factors have thinner frontotemporal cortex independent of Aβ. These frontotemporal regions are also affected in individuals with Aβ deposition, but the latter show additional thinning in parietal cortices. Aβ and vascular risk were found to interact in posterior (especially in parietal) brain regions, where Aβ has its greatest effect. In this way, the negative effect of Aβ in posterior regions is increased by the presence of vascular risk. Conclusion: Aβ and vascular risk interact to enhance cortical thinning in posterior brain regions that are particularly vulnerable to AD. These findings give insight concerning the mechanisms whereby vascular risk increases the likelihood of developing AD and supports the therapeutic intervention of controlling vascular risk for the prevention of AD. PMID:24907234

  13. Probiotic mixture VSL#3 reduce high fat diet induced vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis in ApoE(-/-) mice.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yee Kwan; El-Nezami, Hani; Chen, Yan; Kinnunen, Kristiina; Kirjavainen, Pirkka V

    2016-12-01

    Atherosclerosis results from chronic inflammation potentially caused by translocation of bacterial components from the oro-gastrointestinal tract to circulation. Specific probiotics have anti-inflammatory effects and may reduce bacterial translocation. We thereby tested whether a probiotic mixture with documented anti-inflammatory potential could reduce atherosclerosis. ApoE(-/-) mice were fed high fat diet alone or with VSL#3 or a positive control treatment, telmisartan or both for 12 weeks. All treatments reduced atherosclerotic plaques significantly compared to high fat diet alone. VSL#3 significantly reduced proinflammatory adhesion molecules and risk factors of plaque rupture, reduced vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis to a comparable extent to telmisartan; and VSL#3 treated mice had the most distinctly different intestinal microbiota composition from the control groups. Combining the VSL#3 and telmisartan brought no further benefits. Our findings showed the therapeutic potential of VSL#3 in reducing atherosclerosis and vascular inflammation. PMID:27576894

  14. Partial liquid ventilation improves lung function in ventilation-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Vazquez de Anda, G F; Lachmann, R A; Verbrugge, S J; Gommers, D; Haitsma, J J; Lachmann, B

    2001-07-01

    Disturbances in lung function and lung mechanics are present after ventilation with high peak inspiratory pressures (PIP) and low levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). Therefore, the authors investigated whether partial liquid ventilation can re-establish lung function after ventilation-induced lung injury. Adult rats were exposed to high PIP without PEEP for 20 min. Thereafter, the animals were randomly divided into five groups. The first group was killed immediately after randomization and used as an untreated control. The second group received only sham treatment and ventilation, and three groups received treatment with perfluorocarbon (10 mL x kg(-1), 20 mL x kg(-1), and 20 ml x kg(-1) plus an additional 5 mL x kg(-1) after 1 h). The four groups were maintained on mechanical ventilation for a further 2-h observation period. Blood gases, lung mechanics, total protein concentration, minimal surface tension, and small/large surfactant aggregates ratio were determined. The results show that in ventilation-induced lung injury, partial liquid ventilation with different amounts of perflubron improves gas exchange and pulmonary function, when compared to a group of animals treated with standard respiratory care. These effects have been observed despite the presence of a high intra-alveolar protein concentration, especially in those groups treated with 10 and 20 mL of perflubron. The data suggest that replacement of perfluorocarbon, lost over time, is crucial to maintain the constant effects of partial liquid ventilation. PMID:11510811

  15. Ezetimibe potently reduces vascular inflammation and arteriosclerosis in eNOS deficient ApoE ko mice

    PubMed Central

    Kuhlencordt, Peter J.; Padmapriya, P.; Rützel, S.; Schödel, J.; Hu, K.; Schäfer, A.; Huang, P.L.; Ertl, G.; Bauersachs, J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Hypercholesterolemia is associated with decreased vascular nitric oxide bioavailability and deletion of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) markedly accelerates atherosclerosis development in apolipoprotein E knockout (apoE ko) mice. The current study tests whether atheroprotection provided by a lipid lowering therapy with Ezetimibe depends on eNOS. Methods/Results ApoE ko and apoE/eNOS double ko (dko) mice received a high fat diet with or without 0.05% Ezetimibe. Ezetimibe significantly reduced plasma cholesterol concentrations and atherogenic lipoproteins in both genotypes to a similar extent. Moreover, the drug reduced vascular inflammation, as it significantly reduced Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 (VCAM-1) expression and vascular CD14 expression, a marker for mononuclear cell infiltration, in both genotypes. Neither NOS protein expression nor vascular reactivity of aortic rings were changed in apoE ko mice following Ezetimibe treatment. Significant lesion reduction was seen in Ezetimibe treated male and female apoE ko and apoE/eNOS dko animals (p≤0.05). Interestingly, the drug mediated additional atheroprotection in male apoE ko, compared to male eNOS dko mice, suggesting that lipid lowering does provide additional eNOS dependent atheroprotection in this experimental group. Conclusion Lipid lowering with Ezetimibe potently reduces atherosclerosis and vascular inflammation independent of eNOS. Moreover, Ezetimibe did not exert any effects on eNOS protein expression or enzyme activity. However, additional atheroprotection by Ezetimibe was observed in eNOS competent apoE ko mice, suggesting that some of the drug's antiatherosclerotic effects are mediated by the eNOS pathway. PMID:18479686

  16. Metabolic rate and vascular function are reduced in women with a family history of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Olive, Jennifer L; Ballard, Kevin D; Miller, James J; Milliner, Beth A

    2008-06-01

    Metabolic and vascular abnormalities have been found in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D). Family history is often associated with increased risk of the development of T2D. We sought to determine if young, sedentary, insulin-sensitive individuals with a family history of T2D (FH+) have a reduced resting energy expenditure (REE) and vascular endothelial function compared with individuals who have no family history of T2D (FH-). The REE was determined in 18 FH+ individuals and 15 FH- individuals using indirect open-circuit calorimetry. Vascular endothelial function was measured via flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery. C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 were also measured to look at vascular inflammation. Body composition was measured via bioelectrical impedance analysis to determine fat-free mass and fat mass for each individual. Insulin resistance was calculated using the homeostasis model assessment equation and fasting insulin and glucose concentrations. Subjects (n = 42) were approximately 26 years old and had normal fasting serum insulin or glucose concentrations. The REE normalized for body weight (kilocalories per day per kilogram body weight) was significantly reduced in the FH+ women compared with FH- women (P < .001) but not in the men. The FMD was significantly reduced (34.3%) in the FH+ group compared with the FH- in women (P = .002). However, no between-group difference in FMD was present in male subjects (P = .376). Young, healthy, insulin-sensitive women with a family history of T2D have reduced whole-body metabolic rate and vascular endothelial function compared with those with no family history of disease. These differences in whole-body metabolic rate and vascular endothelial function were not present in male subjects. PMID:18502267

  17. Renin-angiotensin system in ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction: Potential protective role of Angiotensin (1-7).

    PubMed

    Sigurta', Anna; Zambelli, Vanessa; Bellani, Giacomo

    2016-09-01

    Ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction is a feared complication of mechanical ventilation that adversely affects the outcome of intensive care patients. Human and animal studies demonstrate atrophy and ultrastructural alteration of diaphragmatic muscular fibers attributable to increased oxidative stress, depression of the anabolic pathway regulated by Insulin-like growing factor 1 and increased proteolysis. The renin-angiotensin system, through its main peptide Angiotensin II, plays a major role in skeletal muscle diseases, mainly increasing oxidative stress and inducing insulin resistance, atrophy and fibrosis. Conversely, its counter-regulatory peptide Angiotensin (1-7) has a protective role in these processes. Recent data on rodent models show that renin-angiotensin system is activated after mechanical ventilation and that infusion of Angiotensin II induces diaphragmatic skeletal muscle atrophy. Given: (A) common pathways shared by ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction and skeletal muscle pathology induced by renin-angiotensin system, (B) evidences of an involvement of renin-angiotensin system in diaphragm atrophy and dysfunction, we hypothesize that renin-angiotensin system plays an important role in ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction, while Angiotensin (1-7) can have a protective effect on this pathological process. The activation of renin-angiotensin system in ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction can be demonstrated by quantification of its main components in the diaphragm of ventilated humans or animals. The infusion of Angiotensin (1-7) in an established rodent model of ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction can be used to test its potential protective role, that can be further confirmed with the infusion of Angiotensin (1-7) antagonists like A-779. Verifying this hypothesis can help in understanding the processes involved in ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction pathophysiology and open new possibilities for its

  18. Pioglitazone treatment increases COX-2-derived prostacyclin production and reduces oxidative stress in hypertensive rats: role in vascular function

    PubMed Central

    Hernanz, Raquel; Martín, Ángela; Pérez-Girón, Jose V; Palacios, Roberto; Briones, Ana M; Miguel, Marta; Salaices, Mercedes; Alonso, María J

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE PPARγ agonists, glitazones, have cardioprotective and anti-inflammatory actions associated with gene transcription interference. In this study, we determined whether chronic treatment of adult spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) with pioglitazone alters BP and vascular structure and function, and the possible mechanisms involved. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Mesenteric resistance arteries from untreated or pioglitazone-treated (2.5 mg·kg−1·day−1, 28 days) SHR and normotensive [Wistar Kyoto (WKY)] rats were used. Vascular structure was studied by pressure myography, vascular function by wire myography, protein expression by Western blot and immunohistochemistry, mRNA levels by RT-PCR, prostanoid levels by commercial kits and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by dihydroethidium-emitted fluorescence. KEY RESULTS In SHR, pioglitazone did not modify either BP or vascular structural and mechanical alterations or phenylephrine-induced contraction, but it increased vascular COX-2 levels, prostacyclin (PGI2) production and the inhibitory effects of NS 398, SQ 29,548 and tranylcypromine on phenylephrine responses. The contractile phase of the iloprost response, which was reduced by SQ 29,548, was greater in pioglitazone-treated and pioglitazone-untreated SHR than WKY. In addition, pioglitazone abolished the increased vascular ROS production, NOX-1 levels and the inhibitory effect of apocynin and allopurinol on phenylephrine contraction, whereas it did not modify eNOS expression but restored the potentiating effect of N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester on phenylephrine responses. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Although pioglitazone did not reduce BP in SHR, it increased COX-2-derived PGI2 production, reduced oxidative stress, and increased NO bioavailability, which are all involved in vasoconstrictor responses in resistance arteries. These effects would contribute to the cardioprotective effect of glitazones reported in several pathologies. PMID

  19. Reduced contribution of endothelin to the regulation of systemic and pulmonary vascular tone in severe familial hypercholesterolaemia

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Shawn B; de Beer, Vincent J; Tharp, Darla L; van Deel, Elza D; Bowles, Douglas K; Duncker, Dirk J; Laughlin, M Harold; Merkus, Daphne

    2014-01-01

    Vascular dysfunction has been associated with familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH), a severe form of hyperlipidaemia. We recently demonstrated that swine with FH exhibit reduced exercise-induced systemic, but not pulmonary, vasodilatation involving reduced nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. Since NO normally limits endothelin (ET) action, we examined the hypothesis that reduced systemic vasodilatation during exercise in FH swine results from increased ET-mediated vasoconstriction. Systemic and pulmonary vascular responses to exercise were examined in chronically instrumented normal and FH swine in the absence and presence of the ETA/B receptor antagonist tezosentan. Intrinsic reactivity to ET was further assessed in skeletal muscle arterioles. FH swine exhibited ∼9-fold elevation in total plasma cholesterol versus normal swine. Similar to our recent findings, systemic, not pulmonary, vasodilatation during exercise was reduced in FH swine. Blockade of ET receptors caused marked systemic vasodilatation at rest and during exercise in normal swine that was significantly reduced in FH swine. The reduced role of ET in FH swine in vivo was not the result of decreased arteriolar ET responsiveness, as responsiveness was increased in isolated arterioles. Smooth muscle ET receptor protein content was unaltered by FH. However, circulating plasma ET levels were reduced in FH swine. ET receptor antagonism caused pulmonary vasodilatation at rest and during exercise in normal, but not FH, swine. Therefore, contrary to our hypothesis, FH swine exhibit a generalised reduction in the role of ET in regulating vascular tone in vivo probably resulting from reduced ET production. This may represent a unique vascular consequence of severe familial hypercholesterolaemia. PMID:24421352

  20. 3',4'-Dihydroxyflavonol reduces vascular contraction through Ca²⁺ desensitization in permeabilized rat mesenteric artery.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye Young; Seok, Young Mi; Woodman, Owen L; Williams, Spencer J; Kim, In Kyeom

    2012-02-01

    3',4'-Dihydroxyflavonol (DiOHF) exerts endothelium-independent relaxation in rat aortic rings. In this study, we hypothesized that DiOHF reduces vascular contraction through Ca²⁺ desensitization in permeabilized third-order branches of rat mesenteric arteries. The third-order branches of rat mesenteric arteries were permeabilized with β-escin and subjected to tension measurement. Cumulative addition of phenylephrine (0.3-30 μM) produced concentration-dependent vascular contraction of endothelium-intact and endothelium-denuded arterial rings, which were inhibited by pretreatment with DiOHF (10, 30, or 100 μM). In addition, DiOHF dose-dependently decreased vascular contractions induced by 3.0 μM phenylephrine. β-Escin-permeabilized third-order branches of mesenteric arteries were contracted with Ca²⁺, NaF, or guanosine-5'-(γ-thio)triphosphate (GTPγS) 30 min after pretreatment with DiOHF or vehicle. Pretreatment with DiOHF for 30 min inhibited vascular contraction induced by cumulative additions of Ca²⁺ (pCa 9.0-6.0) or NaF (4.0-16.0 mM) in permeabilized arterial rings. Cumulative addition of DiOHF also reduced vascular contraction induced by Ca²⁺-controlled solution of pCa 6.0, 16.0 mM NaF, or 100 μM GTPγS in permeabilized arterial rings. DiOHF inhibited the increase in vascular tension provoked by calyculin A, even though it did not affect vascular tension already produced by calyculin A. DiOHF accelerated the relaxation induced by rapidly lowering Ca²⁺. DiOHF reduced vascular contraction through Ca²⁺ desensitization in permeabilized third-order branches of rat mesenteric arteries. These results suggest that DiOHF may have a therapeutic potential in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:21993847

  1. Reduced Anterior Cruciate Ligament Vascularization Is Associated With Chondral Knee Lesions.

    PubMed

    Hetsroni, Iftach; Manor, Amir; Finsterbush, Alex; Lowe, Joseph; Mann, Gideon; Palmanovich, Ezequiel

    2016-07-01

    This study tested the association between periligamentous vascularization of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and the presence of chondral knee lesions via retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data from 702 consecutive knee arthroscopic procedures. In each case, the ACL periligamentous envelope was documented as follows: (1) vascular, where the ACL was covered with blood vessels along its entire length; (2) centrally avascular, where the central third of the ACL was not covered but peripheral vascularized coverage was present; and (3) avascular, where there was no blood vessel coverage of the ACL. Inclusion criteria for the study were as follows: (1) age older than 18 years and (2) normal knee ligament laxity. Univariate analysis and multiple logistic regression were used to test the association between chondral lesions and each of the variables: sex, age, meniscus tear, decreased ACL vascularity, and concomitant chondral lesion in another knee compartment. The cohort included 516 knees. In the univariate analysis, all variables were associated with a chondral lesion, but only older age and decreased ACL vascularity were associated with chondral lesions in each knee compartment. In the regression model, only decreased ACL vascularity was associated with chondral lesions in each knee compartment. For avascular knees, the odds ratio was 2.84 for medial femoral condyle lesions (95% confidence interval, 1.73-4.68; P=.000), 2.44 for lateral femoral condyle lesions (95% confidence interval, 1.19-5.03; P=.015), and 2.48 for patellofemoral lesions (95% confidence interval, 1.55-3.97; P=.000). The findings showed that decreased ACL periligamentous vascularization is associated with chondral lesions of the femoral condyles in knees with preserved ACL laxity. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(4):e737-e743.]. PMID:27111071

  2. Exposure to mechanical ventilation promotes tolerance to ventilator-induced lung injury by Ccl3 downregulation.

    PubMed

    Blázquez-Prieto, Jorge; López-Alonso, Inés; Amado-Rodríguez, Laura; Batalla-Solís, Estefanía; González-López, Adrián; Albaiceta, Guillermo M

    2015-10-15

    Inflammation plays a key role in the development of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Preconditioning with a previous exposure can damp the subsequent inflammatory response. Our objectives were to demonstrate that tolerance to VILI can be induced by previous low-pressure ventilation, and to identify the molecular mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon. Intact 8- to 12-wk-old male CD1 mice were preconditioned with 90 min of noninjurious ventilation [peak pressure 17 cmH2O, positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) 2 cmH2O] and extubated. Seven days later, preconditioned mice and intact controls were submitted to injurious ventilation (peak pressure 20 cmH2O, PEEP 0 cmH2O) for 2 h to induce VILI. Preconditioned mice showed lower histological lung injury scores, bronchoalveolar lavage albumin content, and lung neutrophilic infiltration after injurious ventilation, with no differences in Il6 or Il10 expression. Microarray analyses revealed a downregulation of Calcb, Hspa1b, and Ccl3, three genes related to tolerance phenomena, in preconditioned animals. Among the previously identified genes, only Ccl3, which encodes the macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha (MIP-1α), showed significant differences between intact and preconditioned mice after high-pressure ventilation. In separate, nonconditioned animals, treatment with BX471, a specific blocker of CCR1 (the main receptor for MIP-1α), decreased lung damage and neutrophilic infiltration caused by high-pressure ventilation. We conclude that previous exposure to noninjurious ventilation induces a state of tolerance to VILI. Downregulation of the chemokine gene Ccl3 could be the mechanism responsible for this effect. PMID:26472813

  3. Resveratrol improves cognition and reduces oxidative stress in rats with vascular dementia

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xingrong; Sun, Zhikun; Liu, Yanru; Jia, Yanjie; Zhang, Boai; Zhang, Jiewen

    2013-01-01

    Resveratrol possesses beneficial biological effects, which include anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-carcinogenic properties. Recently, resveratrol has been shown to exhibit neuroprotective effects in models of Parkinson's disease, cerebral ischemia and Alzheimer's disease. However, its effects on vascular dementia remain unclear. The present study established a rat model of vascular dementia using permanent bilateral common carotid artery occlusion. At 8–12 weeks after model induction, rats were intragastrically administered 25 mg/kg resveratrol daily. Our results found that resveratrol shortened the escape latency and escape distances in the Morris water maze, and prolonged the time spent percentage and swimming distance percentage in the target quadrant during the probe test, indicating that resveratrol improved learning and memory ability in vascular dementia rats. Further experiments found that resveratrol decreased malonyldialdehyde levels, and increased superoxide dismutase activity and glutathione levels in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex of vascular dementia rats. These results confirmed that the neuroprotective effects of resveratrol on vascular dementia were associated with its anti-oxidant properties. PMID:25206513

  4. The effect of low level laser therapy on ventilator-induced lung injury in mice (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabari, Margit V.; Miller, Alyssa J.; Hariri, Lida P.; Hamblin, Michael R.; Musch, Guido; Stroh, Helene; Suter, Melissa J.

    2016-03-01

    Although mechanical ventilation (MV) is necessary to support gas exchange in critically ill patients, it can contribute to the development of lung injury and multiple organ dysfunction. It is known that high tidal volume (Vt) MV can cause ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) in healthy lungs and increase the mortality of patients with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome. Low level laser therapy (LLLT) has demonstrated to have anti-inflammatory effects. We investigated whether LLLT could alleviate inflammation from injurious MV in mice. Adult mice were assigned to 2 groups: VILI+LLLT group (3 h of injurious MV: Vt=25-30 ml/kg, respiratory rate (RR)=50/min, positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP)=0 cmH20, followed by 3 h of protective MV: Vt=9 ml/kg, RR=140/min, PEEP=2 cmH20) and VILI+no LLLT group. LLLT was applied during the first 30 min of the MV (810 nm LED system, 5 J/cm2, 1 cm above the chest). Respiratory impedance was measured in vivo with forced oscillation technique and lung mechanics were calculated by fitting the constant phase model. At the end of the MV, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed and inflammatory cells counted. Lungs were removed en-bloc and fixed for histological evaluation. We hypothesize that LLLT can reduce lung injury and inflammation from VILI. This therapy could be translated into clinical practice, where it can potentially improve outcomes in patients requiring mechanical ventilation in the operating room or in the intensive care units.

  5. Inhibition of bone morphogenetic protein signaling reduces vascular calcification and atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Derwall, Matthias; Malhotra, Rajeev; Lai, Carol S; Beppu, Yuko; Aikawa, Elena; Seehra, Jasbir S.; Zapol, Warren M; Bloch, Kenneth D.; Yu, Paul B.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The expression of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) is enhanced in human atherosclerotic and calcific vascular lesions. While genetic gain- and loss-of-function experiments in mice have supported a causal role of BMP signaling in atherosclerosis and vascular calcification, it remains uncertain whether BMP signaling might be targeted pharmacologically to ameliorate both of these processes. Methods and Results We tested the impact of pharmacologic BMP inhibition upon atherosclerosis and calcification in low density lipoprotein receptor-deficient (LDLR−/−) mice. LDLR−/− mice fed a high-fat diet developed abundant vascular calcification within twenty weeks. Prolonged treatment of LDLR−/− mice with the small molecule BMP inhibitor LDN-193189 was well-tolerated and potently inhibited development of atheroma, as well as associated vascular inflammation, osteogenic activity, and calcification. Administration of recombinant BMP antagonist ALK3-Fc replicated the anti-atherosclerotic and anti-inflammatory effects of LDN-193189. Treatment of human aortic endothelial cells with LDN-193189 or ALK3-Fc abrogated the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by oxidized LDL, a known early event in atherogenesis. Unexpectedly, treatment of mice with LDN-193189 lowered LDL serum cholesterol by 35% and markedly decreased hepatosteatosis without inhibiting HMG-CoA reductase activity. Treatment with BMP2 increased, whereas LDN-193189 or ALK3-Fc inhibited apolipoprotein B100 secretion in HepG2 cells, suggesting that BMP signaling contributes to the regulation of cholesterol biosynthesis. Conclusions These results definitively implicate BMP signaling in atherosclerosis and calcification, while uncovering a previously unidentified role for BMP signaling in LDL cholesterol metabolism. BMP inhibition may be helpful in the treatment of atherosclerosis and associated vascular calcification. PMID:22223731

  6. Mediterranean diet polyphenols reduce inflammatory angiogenesis through MMP-9 and COX-2 inhibition in human vascular endothelial cells: a potentially protective mechanism in atherosclerotic vascular disease and cancer.

    PubMed

    Scoditti, Egeria; Calabriso, Nadia; Massaro, Marika; Pellegrino, Mariangela; Storelli, Carlo; Martines, Giuseppe; De Caterina, Raffaele; Carluccio, Maria Annunziata

    2012-11-15

    Diets with high content of antioxidant polyphenols are associated with low prevalence of cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Inflammatory angiogenesis is a key pathogenic process both in cancer and atherosclerosis, and is tightly regulated by the proinflammatory enzyme cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and the matrix degrading enzymes matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). We studied the effects of antioxidant polyphenols from virgin olive oil (oleuropein and hydroxytyrosol) and red wine (resveratrol and quercetin) on endothelial cell angiogenic response in vitro, and explored underlying mechanisms. Cultured endothelial cells were pre-incubated with 0.1-50 μmol/L polyphenols before stimulation with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). All tested polyphenols reduced endothelial cell tube formation on matrigel and migration in wound healing assays. The reduced angiogenesis was associated with the inhibition of PMA-induced COX-2 protein expression and prostanoid production, as well as MMP-9 protein release and gelatinolytic activity. These effects were accompanied by a significant reduction in the stimulated intracellular reactive oxygen species levels and in the activation of the redox-sensitive transcription factor nuclear factor (NF)-κB. Our findings reveal that olive oil and red wine polyphenols reduce inflammatory angiogenesis in cultured endothelial cells, through MMP-9 and COX-2 inhibition, supporting a potential protective role for dietary polyphenols in atherosclerotic vascular disease and cancer. PMID:22595400

  7. Membrane translocation of IL-33 receptor in ventilator induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shih-Hsing; Lin, Jau-Chen; Wu, Shu-Yu; Huang, Kun-Lun; Jung, Fang; Ma, Ming-Chieh; Wang Hsu, Guoo-Shyng; Jow, Guey-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Ventilator-induced lung injury is associated with inflammatory mechanism and causes high mortality. The objective of this study was to discover the role of IL-33 and its ST2 receptor in acute lung injury induced by mechanical ventilator (ventilator-induced lung injury; VILI). Male Wistar rats were intubated after tracheostomy and received ventilation at 10 cm H2O of inspiratory pressure (PC10) by a G5 ventilator for 4 hours. The hemodynamic and respiratory parameters were collected and analyzed. The morphological changes of lung injury were also assessed by histological H&E stain. The dynamic changes of lung injury markers such as TNF-α and IL-1β were measured in serum, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and lung tissue homogenization by ELISA assay. During VILI, the IL-33 profile change was detected in BALF, peripheral serum, and lung tissue by ELISA analysis. The Il-33 and ST2 expression were analyzed by immunohistochemistry staining and western blot analysis. The consequence of VILI by H&E stain showed inducing lung congestion and increasing the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-1β in the lung tissue homogenization, serum, and BALF, respectively. In addition, rats with VILI also exhibited high expression of IL-33 in lung tissues. Interestingly, the data showed that ST2L (membrane form) was highly accumulated in the membrane fraction of lung tissue in the PC10 group, but the ST2L in cytosol was dramatically decreased in the PC10 group. Conversely, the sST2 (soluble form) was slightly decreased both in the membrane and cytosol fractions in the PC10 group compared to the control group. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that ST2L translocation from the cytosol to the cell membranes of lung tissue and the down-expression of sST2 in both fractions can function as new biomarkers of VILI. Moreover, IL-33/ST2 signaling activated by mechanically responsive lung injury may potentially serve as a new therapy target. PMID:25815839

  8. Soluble platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1, a biomarker of ventilator-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Endothelial cell injury is an important component of acute lung injury. Platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM1) is a transmembrane protein that connects endothelial cells to one another and can be detected as a soluble, truncated protein (sPECAM1) in serum. We hypothesized that injurious mechanical ventilation (MV) leads to shedding of PECAM1 from lung endothelial cells resulting in increasing sPECAM1 levels in the systemic circulation. Methods We studied 36 Sprague–Dawley rats in two prospective, randomized, controlled studies (healthy and septic) using established animal models of ventilator-induced lung injury. Animals (n = 6 in each group) were randomized to spontaneous breathing or two MV strategies: low tidal volume (VT) (6 ml/kg) and high-VT (20 ml/kg) on 2 cmH2O of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). In low-VT septic animals, 10 cmH2O of PEEP was applied. We performed pulmonary histological and physiological evaluation and measured lung PECAM1 protein content and serum sPECAM1 levels after four hours ventilation period. Results High-VT MV caused severe lung injury in healthy and septic animals, and decreased lung PECAM1 protein content (P < 0.001). Animals on high-VT had a four- to six-fold increase of mean sPECAM1 serum levels than the unventilated counterpart (35.4 ± 10.4 versus 5.6 ± 1.7 ng/ml in healthy rats; 156.8 ± 47.6 versus 35.6 ± 12.6 ng/ml in septic rats) (P < 0.0001). Low-VT MV prevented these changes. Levels of sPECAM1 in healthy animals on high-VT MV paralleled the sPECAM1 levels of non-ventilated septic animals. Conclusions Our findings suggest that circulating sPECAM1 may represent a promising biomarker for the detection and monitoring of ventilator-induced lung injury. PMID:24588994

  9. Reduced agonist-induced endothelium-dependent vasodilation in uremia is attributable to an impairment of vascular nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Passauer, Jens; Pistrosch, Frank; Büssemaker, Eckhart; Lässig, Grit; Herbrig, Kay; Gross, Peter

    2005-04-01

    Current concepts for the explanation of endothelial dysfunction and accelerated atherosclerosis in uremia propose a reduced vascular bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO). The aim of the present study was to test the contributions of NO and NO/prostacyclin (PGI(2))-independent mechanisms to both baseline vascular tone and agonist-induced endothelium-dependent vasodilation in patients on hemodialysis (HD). In 10 HD patients and eight matched healthy control subjects, forearm blood flow (FBF) was measured at rest and during intrabrachial infusions of norepinephrine (NE; endothelium-independent vasoconstrictor, 60, 120, and 240 pmol/min) and N-monomethyl-L-arginine (blocker of NO synthases, 16 micromol/min). After inhibition of cyclo-oxygenase by ibuprofen (1200 mg orally), endothelium-dependent and -independent vasodilation was assessed by infusion of acetylcholine (ACh; 1, 5, 10, 50, 100, and 300 nmol/min) and sodium-nitroprusside (2.5, 5, and 10 microg/min). NO/PGI(2)-independent vasodilation was tested by equal infusions of ACh during NO clamp. N-monomethyl-L-arginine reduced resting FBF to a comparable degree in both groups. Vascular responses to ACh were reduced in HD (P = 0.003 versus control by ANOVA), whereas those to sodium nitroprusside were mainly at control level. Infusion of ACh during NO clamp caused a similar increment of FBF in both groups. NO-mediated vasodilation as calculated by the difference between ACh-induced responses without and with NO clamp was substantially impaired in HD (P < 0.001) compared with control. In HD patients, baseline NO-mediated arteriolar tone is at control level. This study provides first evidence that endothelial dysfunction of uremic patients as shown by reduced agonist-induced endothelium-dependent vasodilation is attributable to reduced stimulation of NO, whereas the NO/PGI(2)-resistant portion of ACh-mediated vasodilation is unaffected. PMID:15728785

  10. Genetic Targets of Hydrogen Sulfide in Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury – A Microarray Study

    PubMed Central

    Spassov, Sashko; Pfeifer, Dietmar; Strosing, Karl; Ryter, Stefan; Hummel, Matthias; Faller, Simone; Hoetzel, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we have shown that inhalation of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) protects against ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). In the present study, we aimed to determine the underlying molecular mechanisms of H2S-dependent lung protection by analyzing gene expression profiles in mice. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to spontaneous breathing or mechanical ventilation in the absence or presence of H2S (80 parts per million). Gene expression profiles were determined by microarray, sqRT-PCR and Western Blot analyses. The association of Atf3 in protection against VILI was confirmed with a Vivo-Morpholino knockout model. Mechanical ventilation caused a significant lung inflammation and damage that was prevented in the presence of H2S. Mechanical ventilation favoured the expression of genes involved in inflammation, leukocyte activation and chemotaxis. In contrast, ventilation with H2S activated genes involved in extracellular matrix remodelling, angiogenesis, inhibition of apoptosis, and inflammation. Amongst others, H2S administration induced Atf3, an anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic regulator. Morpholino mediated reduction of Atf3 resulted in elevated lung injury despite the presence of H2S. In conclusion, lung protection by H2S during mechanical ventilation is associated with down-regulation of genes related to oxidative stress and inflammation and up-regulation of anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory genes. Here we show that Atf3 is clearly involved in H2S mediated protection. PMID:25025333

  11. The JAK–STAT Pathway Is Critical in Ventilator-Induced Diaphragm Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Huibin; Smith, Ira J; Hussain, Sabah NA; Goldberg, Peter; Lee, Myung; Sugiarto, Sista; Godinez, Guillermo L; Singh, Baljit K; Payan, Donald G; Rando, Thomas A; Kinsella, Todd M; Shrager, Joseph B

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation (MV) is one of the lynchpins of modern intensive-care medicine and is life saving in many critically ill patients. Continuous ventilator support, however, results in ventilation-induced diaphragm dysfunction (VIDD) that likely prolongs patients’ need for MV and thereby leads to major associated complications and avoidable intensive care unit (ICU) deaths. Oxidative stress is a key pathogenic event in the development of VIDD, but its regulation remains largely undefined. We report here that the JAK–STAT pathway is activated in MV in the human diaphragm, as evidenced by significantly increased phosphorylation of JAK and STAT. Blockage of the JAK–STAT pathway by a JAK inhibitor in a rat MV model prevents diaphragm muscle contractile dysfunction (by ~85%, p < 0.01). We further demonstrate that activated STAT3 compromises mitochondrial function and induces oxidative stress in vivo, and, interestingly, that oxidative stress also activates JAK–STAT. Inhibition of JAK–STAT prevents oxidative stress-induced protein oxidation and polyubiquitination and recovers mitochondrial function in cultured muscle cells. Therefore, in ventilated diaphragm muscle, activation of JAK–STAT is critical in regulating oxidative stress and is thereby central to the downstream pathogenesis of clinical VIDD. These findings establish the molecular basis for the therapeutic promise of JAK–STAT inhibitors in ventilated ICU patients. PMID:25286450

  12. Predicting ventilator-induced lung injury using a lung injury cost function.

    PubMed

    Hamlington, Katharine L; Smith, Bradford J; Allen, Gilman B; Bates, Jason H T

    2016-07-01

    Managing patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) requires mechanical ventilation that balances the competing goals of sustaining life while avoiding ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). In particular, it is reasonable to suppose that for any given ARDS patient, there must exist an optimum pair of values for tidal volume (VT) and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) that together minimize the risk for VILI. To find these optimum values, and thus develop a personalized approach to mechanical ventilation in ARDS, we need to be able to predict how injurious a given ventilation regimen will be in any given patient so that the minimally injurious regimen for that patient can be determined. Our goal in the present study was therefore to develop a simple computational model of the mechanical behavior of the injured lung in order to calculate potential injury cost functions to serve as predictors of VILI. We set the model parameters to represent normal, mildly injured, and severely injured lungs and estimated the amount of volutrauma and atelectrauma caused by ventilating these lungs with a range of VT and PEEP. We estimated total VILI in two ways: 1) as the sum of the contributions from volutrauma and atelectrauma and 2) as the product of their contributions. We found the product provided estimates of VILI that are more in line with our previous experimental findings. This model may thus serve as the basis for the objective choice of mechanical ventilation parameters for the injured lung. PMID:27174922

  13. Bixin protects mice against ventilation-induced lung injury in an NRF2-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Shasha; Rojo de la Vega, Montserrat; Quijada, Hector; Wondrak, Georg T.; Wang, Ting; Garcia, Joe G. N.; Zhang, Donna D.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation (MV) is a therapeutic intervention widely used in the clinic to assist patients that have difficulty breathing due to lung edema, trauma, or general anesthesia. However, MV causes ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI), a condition characterized by increased permeability of the alveolar-capillary barrier that results in edema, hemorrhage, and neutrophil infiltration, leading to exacerbated lung inflammation and oxidative stress. This study explored the feasibility of using bixin, a canonical NRF2 inducer identified during the current study, to ameliorate lung damage in a murine VILI model. In vitro, bixin was found to activate the NRF2 signaling pathway through blockage of ubiquitylation and degradation of NRF2 in a KEAP1-C151 dependent manner; intraperitoneal (IP) injection of bixin led to pulmonary upregulation of the NRF2 response in vivo. Remarkably, IP administration of bixin restored normal lung morphology and attenuated inflammatory response and oxidative DNA damage following MV. This observed beneficial effect of bixin derived from induction of the NRF2 cytoprotective response since it was only observed in Nrf2+/+ but not in Nrf2−/− mice. This is the first study providing proof-of-concept that NRF2 activators can be developed into pharmacological agents for clinical use to prevent patients from lung injury during MV treatment. PMID:26729554

  14. Mitochondrial Targeted Endonuclease III DNA Repair Enzyme Protects against Ventilator Induced Lung Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Hashizume, Masahiro; Mouner, Marc; Chouteau, Joshua M; Gorodnya, Olena M; Ruchko, Mykhaylo V; Wilson, Glenn L; Gillespie, Mark N; Parker, James C

    2014-01-01

    The mitochondrial targeted DNA repair enzyme, 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1, was previously reported to protect against mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage and ventilator induced lung injury (VILI). In the present study we determined whether mitochondrial targeted endonuclease III (EndoIII) which cleaves oxidized pyrimidines rather than purines from damaged DNA would also protect the lung. Minimal injury from 1 h ventilation at 40 cmH2O peak inflation pressure (PIP) was reversed by EndoIII pretreatment. Moderate lung injury due to ventilation for 2 h at 40 cmH2O PIP produced a 25-fold increase in total extravascular albumin space, a 60% increase in W/D weight ratio, and marked increases in MIP-2 and IL-6. Oxidative mtDNA damage and decreases in the total tissue glutathione (GSH) and the GSH/GSSH ratio also occurred. All of these indices of injury were attenuated by mitochondrial targeted EndoIII. Massive lung injury caused by 2 h ventilation at 50 cmH2O PIP was not attenuated by EndoIII pretreatment, but all untreated mice died prior to completing the two hour ventilation protocol, whereas all EndoIII-treated mice lived for the duration of ventilation. Thus, mitochondrial targeted DNA repair enzymes were protective against mild and moderate lung damage and they enhanced survival in the most severely injured group. PMID:25153040

  15. Src inhibitor reduces permeability without disturbing vascularization and prevents bone destruction in steroid-associated osteonecrotic lesions in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    He, Yi-Xin; Liu, Jin; Guo, Baosheng; Wang, Yi-Xiang; Pan, Xiaohua; Li, Defang; Tang, Tao; Chen, Yang; Peng, Songlin; Bian, Zhaoxiang; Liang, Zicai; Zhang, Bao-Ting; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2015-01-01

    To examine the therapeutic effect of Src inhibitor on the VEGF mediating vascular hyperpermeability and bone destruction within steroid-associated osteonecrotic lesions in rabbits. Rabbits with high risk for progress to destructive repair in steroid-associated osteonecrosis were selected according to our published protocol. The selected rabbits were systemically administrated with either Anti-VEGF antibody (Anti-VEGF Group) or Src inhibitor (Src-Inhibition Group) or VEGF (VEGF-Supplement Group) or a combination of VEGF and Src inhibitor (Supplement & Inhibition Group) or control vehicle (Control Group) for 4 weeks. At 0, 2 and 4 weeks after administration, in vivo dynamic MRI, micro-CT based-angiography, histomorphometry and immunoblotting were employed to evaluate the vascular and skeletal events in different groups. The incidence of the destructive repair in the Anti-VEGF Group, Src-Inhibition Group and Supplement & Inhibition Group was all significantly lower than that in the Control Group. The angiogenesis was promoted in VEGF-Supplement Group, Src-Inhibition Group and Supplement & Inhibition Group, while the hyperpermeability was inhibited in Anti-VEGF Group, Src-Inhibition Group and Supplement & Inhibition Group. The trabecular structure was improved in Src-Inhibition Group and Supplement & Inhibition Group. Src inhibitor could reduce permeability without disturbing vascularization and prevent destructive repair in steroid-associated osteonecrosis. PMID:25748225

  16. Novel Therapeutic Targets for Preserving a Healthy Endothelium: Strategies for Reducing the Risk of Vascular and Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ramli, Joseph; CalderonArtero, Pedro; Block, Robert C.; Mousa, Shaker A.

    2012-01-01

    The endothelium lies in a strategic anatomical position between the circulating blood and vascular smooth-muscle cells as a source of vasodilators such as nitric oxide, prostacyclin, and hyperpolarizing factor as well as heparin-like substances as well as other molecules with anti-proliferative properties. These effects of endothelial cells may explain why platelets and monocytes usually do not adhere at the blood vessel wall. However, under pathological conditions, endothelial dysfunction occurs and significantly contributes to the increase of platelet-vessel wall interaction, vasoconstriction, pro-inflammation, and proliferation. Under these conditions, endothelium-dependent vasodilation is reduced and endothelium-dependent constrictor responses are augmented. Upon vessel wall injury platelets rapidly adhere to the exposed sub-endothelial matrix which is mediated by several cellular receptors present on platelets or endothelial cells and various adhesive proteins. Subsequent platelet activation results in the recruitment of additional platelets and the generation of platelet aggregates forming a stable platelet plug. Therapeutic strategies aimed at improving or preserving endothelial function therefore may be promising in the prevention and treatment of coronary artery disease. Diagnostic modalities for assessment of endothelial function should allow for the early detection of vascular endothelial dysfunction before the manifestation of serious adverse vascular disorders. PMID:21769815

  17. SN50, a Cell-Permeable Inhibitor of Nuclear Factor-κB, Attenuates Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury in an Isolated and Perfused Rat Lung Model.

    PubMed

    Chian, Chih-Feng; Chiang, Chi-Huei; Chuang, Chiao-Hui; Liu, Shiou-Ling; Tsai, Chen-Liang

    2016-08-01

    High tidal volume (VT) ventilation causes the release of various mediators and results in ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). SN50, a cell-permeable nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) inhibitory peptide, attenuates inflammation and acute respiratory distress syndrome. However, the mechanisms associated with the effects of SN50 in VILI have not been fully elucidated. We investigated the cellular and molecular mechanisms for the effects of SN50 treatment in VILI. An isolated and perfused rat lung model was exposed to low (5 mL/kg) or high (15 mL/kg) VT ventilation for 6 h. SN50 was administered in the perfusate at the onset of the high-stretch mechanical ventilation. The hemodynamics, lung histological changes, inflammatory responses, and activation of apoptotic pathways were evaluated. VILI was demonstrated by increased pulmonary vascular permeability and lung weight gain, as well as by increased levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, myeloperoxidase (MPO), hydrogen peroxide, and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. The lung tissue expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), caspase-3, and phosphorylation of serine/threonine-specific protein kinase (p-AKT) was greater in the high VT group than in the low VT group. Upregulation and activation of NF-κB was associated with increased lung injury in VILI. SN50 attenuated the inflammatory responses, including the expression of IL-1β, TNF-α, MPO, MAPKs, and NF-κB. In addition, the downregulation of apoptosis was evaluated using caspase-3 and p-AKT expression. Furthermore, SN50 mitigated the increases in the lung weights, pulmonary vascular permeability, and lung injury. In conclusion, VILI is associated with inflammatory responses and activation of NF-κB. SN50 inhibits the activation of NF-κB and attenuates VILI. PMID:26780513

  18. Batroxobin protects against spinal cord injury in rats by promoting the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor to reduce apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    YU, HUI; LIN, BIN; HE, YONGZHI; ZHANG, WENBIN; XU, YANG

    2015-01-01

    The host response to spinal cord injury (SCI) can lead to an ischemic environment that can induce cell death. Therapeutic interventions using neurotrophic factors have focused on the prevention of such reactions in order to reduce this cell death. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent angiogenic and vascular permeability factor. We hypothesized in this study that batroxobin would exhibit protective effects following SCI by promoting the expression of VEGF to reduce the levels of apoptosis in a rat model of SCI. Ninety adult female Sprague Dawley rats were divided randomly into sham injury (group I), SCI (group II) and batroxobin treatment (group III) groups. The Basso-Bettie-Bresnahan (BBB) scores, number of apoptotic cells and expression of VEGF were assessed at 1, 3, 5, 7, 14 and 28 days post-injury. The BBB scores were significantly improved in group III compared with those in group II between days 5 and 28 post-injury (P<0.05). At each time-point subsequent to the injury, the number of apoptotic cells in group III was reduced compared with that in group II. Compared with group II, treatment with batroxobin significantly increased the expression of VEGF from day 3 until 2 weeks post-SCI (P<0.05), while no significant difference was observed at day 28. These data suggest that batroxobin has multiple beneficial effects on SCI, indicating a potential clinical application. PMID:26136870

  19. Muscle-derived follistatin-like 1 functions to reduce neointimal formation after vascular injury

    PubMed Central

    Miyabe, Megumi; Ohashi, Koji; Shibata, Rei; Uemura, Yusuke; Ogura, Yasuhiro; Yuasa, Daisuke; Kambara, Takahiro; Kataoka, Yoshiyuki; Yamamoto, Takashi; Matsuo, Kazuhiro; Joki, Yusuke; Enomoto, Takashi; Hayakawa, Satoko; Hiramatsu-Ito, Mizuho; Ito, Masanori; Van Den Hoff, Maurice J.B.; Walsh, Kenneth; Murohara, Toyoaki; Ouchi, Noriyuki

    2014-01-01

    Aims It is well-established that exercise diminishes cardiovascular risk, but whether humoral factors secreted by muscle confer these benefits has not been conclusively shown. We have shown that the secreted protein follistatin-like 1 (Fstl1) has beneficial actions on cardiac and endothelial function. However, the role of muscle-derived Fstl1 in proliferative vascular disease remains largely unknown. Here, we investigated whether muscle-derived Fstl1 modulates vascular remodelling in response to injury. Methods and results The targeted ablation of Fstl1 in muscle led to an increase in neointimal formation following wire-induced arterial injury compared with control mice. Conversely, muscle-specific Fstl1 transgenic (TG) mice displayed a decrease in the neointimal thickening following arterial injury. Muscle-specific Fstl1 ablation and overexpression increased and decreased, respectively, the frequency of BrdU-positive proliferating cells in injured vessels. In cultured human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs), treatment with human FSTL1 protein decreased proliferation and migration induced by stimulation with PDGF-BB. Treatment with FSTL1 enhanced AMPK phosphorylation, and inhibition of AMPK abrogated the inhibitory actions of FSTL1 on HASMC responses to PDGF-BB. The injured arteries of Fstl1-TG mice exhibited an increase in AMPK phosphorylation, and administration of AMPK inhibitor reversed the anti-proliferative actions of Fstl1 on the vessel wall. Conclusion Our findings indicate that muscle-derived Fstl1 attenuates neointimal formation in response to arterial injury by suppressing SMC proliferation through an AMPK-dependent mechanism. Thus, the release of protein factors from muscle, such as Fstl1, may partly explain why the maintenance of muscle function can have a therapeutic effect on the cardiovascular system. PMID:24743592

  20. Role of intrinsic aerobic capacity and ventilator-induced diaphragm dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Sollanek, Kurt J.; Smuder, Ashley J.; Wiggs, Michael P.; Morton, Aaron B.; Koch, Lauren G.; Britton, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    Prolonged mechanical ventilation (MV) leads to rapid diaphragmatic atrophy and contractile dysfunction, which is collectively termed “ventilator-induced diaphragm dysfunction” (VIDD). Interestingly, endurance exercise training prior to MV has been shown to protect against VIDD. Further, recent evidence reveals that sedentary animals selectively bred to possess a high aerobic capacity possess a similar skeletal muscle phenotype to muscles from endurance trained animals. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that animals with a high intrinsic aerobic capacity would naturally be afforded protection against VIDD. To this end, animals were selectively bred over 33 generations to create two divergent strains, differing in aerobic capacity: high-capacity runners (HCR) and low-capacity runners (LCR). Both groups of animals were subjected to 12 h of MV and compared with nonventilated control animals within the same strains. As expected, contrasted to LCR animals, the diaphragm muscle from the HCR animals contained higher levels of oxidative enzymes (e.g., citrate synthase) and antioxidant enzymes (e.g., superoxide dismutase and catalase). Nonetheless, compared with nonventilated controls, prolonged MV resulted in significant diaphragmatic atrophy and impaired diaphragm contractile function in both the HCR and LCR animals, and the magnitude of VIDD did not differ between strains. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that possession of a high intrinsic aerobic capacity alone does not afford protection against VIDD. Importantly, these results suggest that endurance exercise training differentially alters the diaphragm phenotype to resist VIDD. Interestingly, levels of heat shock protein 72 did not differ between strains, thus potentially representing an important area of difference between animals with intrinsically high aerobic capacity and exercise-trained animals. PMID:25571991

  1. Lung-derived soluble mediators are pathogenic in ventilator-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Jaecklin, Thomas; Engelberts, Doreen; Otulakowski, Gail; O'Brodovich, Hugh; Post, Martin; Kavanagh, Brian P

    2011-04-01

    Ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) due to high tidal volume (V(T)) is associated with increased levels of circulating factors that may contribute to, or be markers of, injury. This study investigated if exclusively lung-derived circulating factors produced during high V(T) ventilation can cause or worsen VILI. In isolated perfused mouse lungs, recirculation of perfusate worsened injury (compliance impairment, microvascular permeability, edema) induced by high V(T). Perfusate collected from lungs ventilated with high V(T) and used to perfuse lungs ventilated with low V(T) caused similar compliance impairment and permeability and caused a dose-dependent decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) across rat distal lung epithelial monolayers. Circulating soluble factors derived from the isolated lung thus contributed to VILI and had deleterious effects on the lung epithelial barrier. These data demonstrate transferability of an injury initially caused exclusively by mechanical ventilation and provides novel evidence for the biotrauma hypothesis in VILI. Mediators of the TER decrease were heat-sensitive, transferable via Folch extraction, and (following ultrafiltration, 3 kDa) comprised both smaller and larger molecules. Although several classes of candidate mediators, including protein cytokines (e.g., tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, macrophage inflammation protein-1α) and lipids (e.g., eicosanoids, ceramides, sphingolipids), have been implicated in VILI, only prostanoids accumulated in the perfusate in a pattern consistent with a pathogenic role, yet cyclooxygenase inhibition did not protect against injury. Although no single class of factor appears solely responsible for the decrease in barrier function, the current data implicate lipid-soluble protein-bound molecules as not just markers but pathogenic mediators in VILI. PMID:21239530

  2. Attenuation of Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Lung Vascular Stiffening by Lipoxin Reduces Lung Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Fanyong; Mambetsariev, Isa; Tian, Yufeng; Beckham, Yvonne; Meliton, Angelo; Leff, Alan; Gardel, Margaret L.; Allen, Michael J.; Birukov, Konstantin G.

    2015-01-01

    Reversible changes in lung microstructure accompany lung inflammation, although alterations in tissue micromechanics and their impact on inflammation remain unknown. This study investigated changes in extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling and tissue stiffness in a model of LPS-induced inflammation and examined the role of lipoxin analog 15-epi-lipoxin A4 (eLXA4) in the reduction of stiffness-dependent exacerbation of the inflammatory process. Atomic force microscopy measurements of live lung slices were used to directly measure local tissue stiffness changes induced by intratracheal injection of LPS. Effects of LPS on ECM properties and inflammatory response were evaluated in an animal model of LPS-induced lung injury, live lung tissue slices, and pulmonary endothelial cell (EC) culture. In vivo, LPS increased perivascular stiffness in lung slices monitored by atomic force microscopy and stimulated expression of ECM proteins fibronectin, collagen I, and ECM crosslinker enzyme, lysyl oxidase. Increased stiffness and ECM remodeling escalated LPS-induced VCAM1 and ICAM1 expression and IL-8 production by lung ECs. Stiffness-dependent exacerbation of inflammatory signaling was confirmed in pulmonary ECs grown on substrates with high and low stiffness. eLXA4 inhibited LPS-increased stiffness in lung cross sections, attenuated stiffness-dependent enhancement of EC inflammatory activation, and restored lung compliance in vivo. This study shows that increased local vascular stiffness exacerbates lung inflammation. Attenuation of local stiffening of lung vasculature represents a novel mechanism of lipoxin antiinflammatory action. PMID:24992633

  3. Alkylglycerols reduce serum complement and plasma vascular endothelial growth factor in obese individuals.

    PubMed

    Parri, A; Fitó, Montserrat; Torres, C F; Muñoz-Aguayo, D; Schröder, H; Cano, J F; Vázquez, L; Reglero, G; Covas, María-Isabel

    2016-06-01

    Alkylglycerols (AKGs), isolated or present in shark liver oil have anti-inflammatory properties. Complement 3 (C3) and 4 (C4) participate in lipid metabolism and in obesity, contributing to the metabolic syndrome and to the low-grade inflammation associated with obesity. In a randomized, controlled, crossover study, 26 non-diabetes obese individuals were assigned two preparations with low (LAC, 10 mg AKGs) and high (HAC, 20 mg AKGs) AKG content. Intervention periods were of 3 weeks preceded by 2-week washout periods in which shark liver oil was avoided. Cholesterol, C3, C4, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) decreased in a linear trend (P < 0.01) from baseline (control) to LAC and HAC. Values after HAC were significantly lower (P < 0.05) versus both baseline and after LAC. No adverse effects were observed or reported. Data from this pilot study open a promising field for the study of the beneficial effects of AKGs on cardiovascular risk factors in obese individuals. PMID:27188987

  4. Reduced diaphyseal strength associated with high intracortical vascular porosity within long bones of children with Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Jameson, John; Smith, Peter; Harris, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Osteogenesis Imperfecta is a genetic disorder resulting in bone fragility. The mechanisms behind this fragility are not well understood. In addition to characteristic bone mass deficiencies, research suggests that bone material properties are compromised in individuals with this disorder. However, little data exists regarding bone properties beyond the microstructural scale in individuals with this disorder. Specimens were obtained from long bone diaphyses of nine children with osteogenesis imperfecta during routine osteotomy procedures. Small rectangular beams, oriented longitudinally and transversely to the diaphyseal axis, were machined from these specimens and elastic modulus, yield strength, and maximum strength were measured in three-point bending. Intracortical vascular porosity, bone volume fraction, osteocyte lacuna density, and volumetric tissue mineral density were determined by synchrotron micro-computed tomography, and relationships among these mechanical properties and structural parameters were explored. Modulus and strength were on average 64–68% lower in the transverse vs. longitudinal beams (P<0.001, linear mixed model). Vascular porosity ranged between 3–42% of total bone volume. Longitudinal properties were associated negatively with porosity (P≤0.006, linear regressions). Mechanical properties, however, were not associated with osteocyte lacuna density or volumetric tissue mineral density (P≥0.167). Bone properties and structural parameters were not associated significantly with donor age (p≥0.225, linear mixed models). This study presents novel data regarding bone material strength in children with osteogenesis imperfecta. Results confirm that these properties are anisotropic. Elevated vascular porosity was observed in most specimens, and this parameter was associated with reduced bone material strength. These results offer insight towards understanding bone fragility and the role of intracortical porosity on the strength of bone

  5. Reduced diaphyseal strength associated with high intracortical vascular porosity within long bones of children with osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Albert, Carolyne; Jameson, John; Smith, Peter; Harris, Gerald

    2014-09-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta is a genetic disorder resulting in bone fragility. The mechanisms behind this fragility are not well understood. In addition to characteristic bone mass deficiencies, research suggests that bone material properties are compromised in individuals with this disorder. However, little data exists regarding bone properties beyond the microstructural scale in individuals with this disorder. Specimens were obtained from long bone diaphyses of nine children with osteogenesis imperfecta during routine osteotomy procedures. Small rectangular beams, oriented longitudinally and transversely to the diaphyseal axis, were machined from these specimens and elastic modulus, yield strength, and maximum strength were measured in three-point bending. Intracortical vascular porosity, bone volume fraction, osteocyte lacuna density, and volumetric tissue mineral density were determined by synchrotron micro-computed tomography, and relationships among these mechanical properties and structural parameters were explored. Modulus and strength were on average 64-68% lower in the transverse vs. longitudinal beams (P<0.001, linear mixed model). Vascular porosity ranged between 3 and 42% of total bone volume. Longitudinal properties were associated negatively with porosity (P≤0.006, linear regressions). Mechanical properties, however, were not associated with osteocyte lacuna density or volumetric tissue mineral density (P≥0.167). Bone properties and structural parameters were not associated significantly with donor age (P≥0.225, linear mixed models). This study presents novel data regarding bone material strength in children with osteogenesis imperfecta. Results confirm that these properties are anisotropic. Elevated vascular porosity was observed in most specimens, and this parameter was associated with reduced bone material strength. These results offer insight toward understanding bone fragility and the role of intracortical porosity on the strength of bone

  6. Continuous Taurocholic Acid Exposure Promotes Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Progression Due to Reduced Cell Loss Resulting from Enhanced Vascular Development

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Sho; Yamamoto, Hiroto; Mukaisho, Ken-ichi; Saito, Shota; Hattori, Takanori; Yamamoto, Gaku; Sugihara, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Background Refluxogenic effects of smoking and alcohol abuse may be related to the risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). The present study attempts to clarify the effects of continuous taurocholic acid (TCA) exposure, which is neither mutagenic nor genotoxic, on ESCC progression. Methods A squamous carcinoma cell line (ESCC-DR) was established from a tumor induced in a rat model of gastroduodenal reflux. ESCC-DR cells were incubated with 2 mM TCA for ≥2 months. The effects of continuous TCA exposure were evaluated in vitro on cell morphology, growth, and invasion and in vivo on xenograft tumor growth in nude mice. Moreover, the mean level of secreted transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) proteins in cell culture supernatants and mRNA synthesis of TGF-β1 and VEGF-A of ESCC cells were measured. The angiogenic potential was further examined by a migration assay using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Results Continuous TCA exposure induced marked formation of filopodia in vitro. Expression levels of angiogenic factors were significantly higher in the cells treated with TCA than in control cells. Tumor xenografts derived from cells pre-exposed to TCA were larger and more vascularized than those derived from control cells. In addition, TCA exposure increased HUVEC migration. Conclusion Continuous TCA exposure enhanced ESCC progression due to reduced cell loss in vivo. Cell loss was inhibited by TCA-induced vascular endothelial cell migration, which was mediated by TGF-β1 and VEGF-A released from ESCC cells. PMID:24551170

  7. Low-dose oral sirolimus reduces atherogenesis, vascular inflammation and modulates plaque composition in mice lacking the LDL receptor

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, L; Ding, T; Cyrus, T; Cheng, Y; Tian, H; Ma, M; Falotico, R; Praticò, D

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Chronic proliferative responses of different vascular cell types have been involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. However, their functional role remains to be established. Sirolimus reduces neointimal proliferation after balloon angioplasty and chronic graft vessel disease. These studies were undertaken to investigate the effects of this anti-proliferative drug on atherogenesis. Experimental approach: Low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient (LDL r-KO) mice on a cholesterol-rich diet were randomized to receive placebo or sirolimus (0.1; 0.3; or 1 mg·kg−1) in their diet for 8 or 16 weeks. Results: In both studies, plasma levels of the drug increased in a dose-dependent fashion, animals gained weight normally and, among groups, plasma lipids levels did not differ significantly. Compared with placebo, plasma levels of interleukin-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, interferon γ, tumour necrosis factor α and CD40, and their mRNA levels in aortic tissue were significantly reduced in sirolimus-treated mice. This effect resulted in a significant and dose-dependent reduction in atherosclerotic lesions, in both the root and aortic tree. Also these lesions contained less monocyte/macrophages and smooth muscle cells, but more collagen. Conclusions and implications: The present results demonstrated that at low doses, sirolimus was an effective and safe anti-atherogenic agent in the LDL r-KO mice. It attenuated the progression of atherosclerosis and modulated the plaque phenotype by reducing the pro-inflammatory vascular responses typical of the disease. British Journal of Pharmacology (2009) doi:10.1111/j.1476-5381.2008.00080.x PMID:19220291

  8. Mercury induces proliferation and reduces cell size in vascular smooth muscle cells through MAPK, oxidative stress and cyclooxygenase-2 pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Aguado, Andrea; Galán, María; Zhenyukh, Olha; Wiggers, Giulia A.; Roque, Fernanda R.; Redondo, Santiago; Peçanha, Franck; Martín, Angela; Fortuño, Ana; Cachofeiro, Victoria; Tejerina, Teresa; Salaices, Mercedes; and others

    2013-04-15

    Mercury exposure is known to increase cardiovascular risk but the underlying cellular mechanisms remain undetermined. We analyzed whether chronic exposure to HgCl{sub 2} affects vascular structure and the functional properties of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) through oxidative stress/cyclooxygenase-2 dependent pathways. Mesenteric resistance arteries and aortas from Wistar rats treated with HgCl{sub 2} (first dose 4.6 mg kg{sup −1}, subsequent doses 0.07 mg kg{sup −1} day{sup −1}, 30 days) and cultured aortic VSMC stimulated with HgCl{sub 2} (0.05–5 μg/ml) were used. Treatment of rats with HgCl{sub 2} decreased wall thickness of the resistance and conductance vasculature, increased the number of SMC within the media and decreased SMC nucleus size. In VSMCs, exposure to HgCl{sub 2}: 1) induced a proliferative response and a reduction in cell size; 2) increased superoxide anion production, NADPH oxidase activity, gene and/or protein levels of the NADPH oxidase subunit NOX-1, the EC- and Mn-superoxide dismutases and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2); 3) induced activation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK. Both antioxidants and COX-2 inhibitors normalized the proliferative response and the altered cell size induced by HgCl{sub 2}. Blockade of ERK1/2 and p38 signaling pathways abolished the HgCl{sub 2}-induced Nox1 and COX-2 expression and normalized the alterations induced by mercury in cell proliferation and size. In conclusion, long exposure of VSMC to low doses of mercury activates MAPK signaling pathways that result in activation of inflammatory proteins such as NADPH oxidase and COX-2 that in turn induce proliferation of VSMC and changes in cell size. These findings offer further evidence that mercury might be considered an environmental risk factor for cardiovascular disease. - Highlights: ► Chronic HgCl{sub 2} exposure induces vascular remodeling. ► HgCl{sub 2} induces proliferation and decreased cell size in vascular smooth muscle cells. ► HgCl{sub 2} induces

  9. Fenofibrate Improves Vascular Endothelial Function by Reducing Oxidative Stress While Increasing eNOS in Healthy Normolipidemic Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Ashley E; Kaplon, Rachelle E; Lucking, Sara Marian S; Russell-Nowlan, Molly J; Eckel, Robert H; Seals, Douglas R

    2013-01-01

    Vascular endothelial dysfunction develops with aging, as indicated by impaired endothelium-dependent dilation(EDD), and is related to increased cardiovascular disease risk. We hypothesized that short-term treatment with fenofibrate, a lipid-lowering agent with potential pleiotropic effects, would improve EDD in middle-aged and older normolipidemic adults by reducing oxidative stress. Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD), a measure of EDD, was assessed in 22healthy adults aged 50-77 years before and after 7days of fenofibrate (145 mg/d; n=12/7M) or placebo (n=10/5M). Brachial FMD was unchanged with placebo, but improved after 2 and 7 days of fenofibrate (5.1±0.7 vs. 2d: 6.0±0.7 and 7d: 6.4±0.6 %Δ; both P<0.005). The improvements in FMD after 7 days remained significant (P<0.05) after accounting for modest changes in plasma total and LDL-cholesterol. Endothelium-independent dilation was not affected by fenofibrate or placebo (P>0.05). Infusion (i.v.) of the antioxidant vitamin C improved brachial FMD at baseline in both groups and during placebo treatment (P<0.05), but not after 2 and 7 days of fenofibrate (P>0.05). Fenofibrate treatment also reduced plasma oxidized LDL, a systemic marker of oxidative stress, compared with placebo (P<0.05). In vascular endothelial cells sampled from peripheral veins of the subjects, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) protein expression was unchanged with placebo and after 2 days of fenofibrate, but was increased after 7 days of fenofibrate (0.54±0.03 vs. 2d: 0.52±0.04 and 7d: 0.76±0.11 intensity/HUVEC control; P<0.05 7d). Short-term treatment with fenofibrate improves vascular endothelial function in healthy normolipidemic middle-aged/older adults by reducing oxidative stress and induces increases in eNOS. PMID:23108655

  10. Reduced vascular endothelial growth factor and capillary density in the occipital cortex in dementia with Lewy bodies.

    PubMed

    Miners, Scott; Moulding, Hayley; de Silva, Rohan; Love, Seth

    2014-07-01

    In dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), blood flow tends to be reduced in the occipital cortex. We previously showed elevated activity of the endothelin and angiotensin pathways in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have measured endothelin-1 (ET-1) level and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity in the occipital cortex in DLB and control brains. We also measured vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF); factor VIII-related antigen (FVIIIRA) to indicate microvessel density; myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), a marker of ante-mortem hypoperfusion; total α-synuclein (α-syn) and α-synuclein phosphorylated at Ser129 (α-syn-p129). In contrast to findings in AD, ACE activity and ET-1 level were unchanged in DLB compared with controls. VEGF and FVIIIRA levels were, however, significantly lower in DLB. VEGF correlated positively with MAG concentration (in keeping with a relationship between reduction in VEGF and hypoperfusion), and negatively with α-syn and α-syn-p129 levels. Both α-syn and α-syn-p129 levels increased in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells after oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD), and VEGF level was reduced in SH-SY5Y cells overexpressing α-syn. Taken together, our findings suggest that reduced microvessel density rather than vasoconstriction is responsible for lower occipital blood flow in DLB, and that the loss of microvessels may result from VEGF deficiency, possible secondary to the accumulation of α-syn. PMID:24521289

  11. TGF-β receptor 1 inhibition prevents stenosis of tissue-engineered vascular grafts by reducing host mononuclear phagocyte activation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Ung; de Dios Ruiz-Rosado, Juan; Mahler, Nathan; Best, Cameron A; Tara, Shuhei; Yi, Tai; Shoji, Toshihiro; Sugiura, Tadahisa; Lee, Avione Y; Robledo-Avila, Frank; Hibino, Narutoshi; Pober, Jordan S; Shinoka, Toshiharu; Partida-Sanchez, Santiago; Breuer, Christopher K

    2016-07-01

    Stenosis is a critical problem in the long-term efficacy of tissue-engineered vascular grafts (TEVGs). We previously showed that host monocyte infiltration and activation within the graft drives stenosis and that TGF-β receptor 1 (TGF-βR1) inhibition can prevent it, but the latter effect was attributed primarily to inhibition of mesenchymal cell expansion. In this study, we assessed the effects of TGF-βR1 inhibition on the host monocytes. Biodegradable TEVGs were implanted as inferior vena cava interposition conduits in 2 groups of C57BL/6 mice (n = 25/group): unseeded grafts and unseeded grafts with TGF-βR1 inhibitor systemic treatment for the first 2 wk. The TGF-βR1 inhibitor treatment effectively improved TEVG patency at 6 mo compared to the untreated control group (91.7 vs. 48%, P < 0.001), which is associated with a reduction in classic activation of mononuclear phagocytes. Consistent with these findings, the addition of rTGF-β to LPS/IFN-γ-stimulated monocytes enhanced secretion of inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-12, and IL-6; this effect was blocked by TGF-βR1 inhibition (P < 0.0001). These findings suggest that the TGF-β signaling pathway contributes to TEVG stenosis by inducing classic activation of host monocytes. Furthermore, blocking monocyte activation by TGF-βR1 inhibition provides a viable strategy for preventing TEVG stenosis while maintaining neotissue formation.-Lee, Y.-U., de Dios Ruiz-Rosado, J., Mahler, N., Best, C. A., Tara, S., Yi, T., Shoji, T., Sugiura, T., Lee, A. Y., Robledo-Avila, F., Hibino, N., Pober, J. S., Shinoka, T., Partida-Sanchez, S., Breuer, C. K. TGF-β receptor 1 inhibition prevents stenosis of tissue-engineered vascular grafts by reducing host mononuclear phagocyte activation. PMID:27059717

  12. Antiplatelet therapy reduces aortic intimal hyperplasia distal to small diameter vascular prostheses (PTFE) in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, P O; Wang, Z G; Mikat, E M; Hackel, D B

    1982-01-01

    While the use of prosthetic grafts in small diameter arterial reconstruction is required when suitable autogenous graft material is unavailable, late occlusion of prosthetic grafts caused by proliferative lesions has been described. This study evaluated the suitability of 3-mm (ID) microporous polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) Gore-Tex grafts inserted in the abdominal aorta of eight nonhuman primates (Macaca fascicularis), and the effects of prolonged antiplatelet treatment on both graft patency and the development of intimal hyperplasia in the adjacent vasculature. Four monkeys received antiplatelet medication consisting of aspirin (163 mg twice daily) and dipyridamole (25 mg twice daily). When killed at four months following graft insertion, all four grafts in the antiplatelet medicated group were patent, while in the control group, only two of four grafts were patent. Histologic examination and quantitative photogravitometric evaluation of the degree of luminal narrowing were performed on all grafts and the adjacent vasculature. These studies revealed that while all graft and aortic segments showed varying amounts of intimal thickening, occlusions in the control animals were related to intimal hyperplasia in the host aorta at the site of the distal anastomosis. Intimal hyperplasia in all aortic segments examined distal to the graft was significantly reduced by antiplatelet therapy. Electronmicroscopy showed that smooth muscle cells were the predominant cells of the intimal thickening of the aorta (intimal hyperplasia), and that proliferation of these cells did not extend into the graft itself. The predominant cell population of the intimal thickening of the graft were of the myofibroblast type (neointimal hyperplasis). The luminal surface of the graft was lined with cells that had some but not all of the characteristics of mature endothelial cells. In vitro studies confirmed global interference with platelet function and arachidonic acid metabolism in medicated

  13. Reducing the risk of infection associated with vascular access devices through nanotechnology: a perspective

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Keogh, Samantha; Rickard, Claire M

    2013-01-01

    Intravascular catheter-related infections are still a major problem in health care and are associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and additional cost. The formation of microbial biofilm on catheters makes these infections particularly complicated, as microbial cells that detach from the biofilm can lead to infection, and because these microorganisms are highly resistant to many antimicrobial agents; thus, catheter removal is often required to successfully treat infection. To reduce the risks of catheter-related infections, many strategies have been applied, such as improvements in aseptic insertion and post-insertion care practices, implantation techniques, and antibiotic coated or impregnated materials. However, despite significant advances in using these methods, it has not been possible to completely eradicate biofilm infections. Currently, nanotechnology approaches seem to be among the most promising for preventing biofilm formation and resultant catheter-related bloodstream infection (especially with multi-resistant bacterial strains). In this review, current knowledge about catheter technology and design, the mechanisms of catheter-related bloodstream infection, and the insertion and care practices performed by medical staff, are discussed, along with novel, achievable approaches to infection prevention, based on nanotechnology. PMID:24293997

  14. FT011, a Novel Cardiorenal Protective Drug, Reduces Inflammation, Gliosis and Vascular Injury in Rats with Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Deliyanti, Devy; Zhang, Yuan; Khong, Fay; Berka, David R.; Stapleton, David I.; Kelly, Darren J.; Wilkinson-Berka, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy features inflammation as well as injury to glial cells and the microvasculature, which are influenced by hypertension and overactivity of the renin-angiotensin system. FT011 is an anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic agent that has been reported to attenuate organ damage in diabetic rats with cardiomyopathy and nephropathy. However, the potential therapeutic utility of FT011 for diabetic retinopathy has not been evaluated. We hypothesized that FT011 would attenuate retinopathy in diabetic Ren-2 rats, which exhibit hypertension due to an overactive extra-renal renin-angiotensin system. Diabetic rats were studied for 8 and 32 weeks and received intravitreal injections of FT011 (50 μM) or vehicle (0.9% NaCl). Comparisons were to age-matched controls. In the 8-week study, retinal inflammation was examined by quantitating vascular leukocyte adherence, microglial/macrophage density and the expression of inflammatory mediators. Macroglial Müller cells, which exhibit a pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic phenotype in diabetes, were evaluated in the 8-week study as well as in culture following exposure to hyperglycaemia and FT011 (10, 30, 100 μM) for 72 hours. In the 32-week study, severe retinal vasculopathy was examined by quantitating acellular capillaries and extracellular matrix proteins. In diabetic rats, FT011 reduced retinal leukostasis, microglial density and mRNA levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). In Müller cells, FT011 reduced diabetes-induced gliosis and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) immunolabeling and the hyperglycaemic-induced increase in ICAM-1, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, CCL20, cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-1, VEGF and IL-6. Late intervention with FT011 reduced acellular capillaries and the elevated mRNA levels of collagen IV and fibronectin in diabetic rats. In conclusion, the protective effects of FT011 in cardiorenal disease extend to key elements of diabetic retinopathy and

  15. The Chinese medicine formula HB01 reduces choroidal neovascularization by regulating the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) remains the leading cause of newly acquired blindness in the developed world. Currently anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) therapies are broadly used to treat neovascular ocular disorders. Here we demonstrate the effect of a traditional Chinese medicine formula, HB01, on CNV. Methods A rat model of laser-induced CNV was used to investigate the effect of HB01 in vivo. The CNV lesions in the eye were evaluated using fundus fluorescein angiography and visualized/quantified using confocal microscopy. Expression of VEGF in the choroidal and retinal tissues was measured using quantitative real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. Results We demonstrated that a traditional Chinese Medicine formula, named HB01, significantly reduced neovascularization in a rat CNV model. The effect of HB01 on CNV was comparable to the intravitreal injection of bevacizumab (Avastin). Our results also suggested that HB01 may reduce CNV partially through inhibiting the expression of VEGF. Conclusions These data support HB01 as an alternative therapy for ocular neovascular disorders. PMID:22676316

  16. Dietary fat and reduced levels of TGFbeta1 act synergistically to promote activation of the vascular endothelium and formation of lipid lesions.

    PubMed

    Grainger, D J; Mosedale, D E; Metcalfe, J C; Böttinger, E P

    2000-07-01

    Transforming growth factor-(beta) (TGF(beta)) has a wide range of activities on vascular cells and inflammatory cells, suggesting it may have different functions during various stages of atherogenesis. We report that mice heterozygous for the deletion of the tgfb1 gene (tgfb1(+/-) mice) have reduced levels of TGF(beta)1 in the artery wall until at least 8 weeks of age. On a normal mouse chow diet, the vascular endothelium of tgfb1(+/-) mice is indistinguishable from wild-type littermates, assessed by morphology and intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) expression. In contrast, levels of the smooth muscle isoforms of actin and myosin in medial smooth muscle cells of tgfb1(+/-) mice are significantly reduced. Following feeding a cholesterol-enriched diet for 12 weeks, high levels of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 were detected in the vascular endothelial cells of tgfb1(+/-) mice, but not wild-type mice. Furthermore, marked deposition of lipid into the artery wall was only observed in the tgfb1(+/-) mice on the cholesterol-enriched diet. These vascular lipid lesions were accompanied by local invasion of macrophages. We conclude that deletion of a single allele of the tgfb1 gene results in a reduced level of TGFbeta1 antigen in the aorta together with reduced smooth muscle cell differentiation, whereas the addition of a high fat dietary challenge is required to activate the vascular endothelium and to promote the formation of fatty streaks resembling early atherosclerosis in humans. PMID:10852815

  17. Identification of Risk Factors for Vascular Thrombosis May Reduce Early Renal Graft Loss: A Review of Recent Literature

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Anna Krarup; Jorgensen, Troels Munch; Jespersen, Bente

    2012-01-01

    Renal graft survival has improved over the past years, mainly owing to better immunosuppression. Vascular thrombosis, though rare, therefore accounts for up to one third of early graft loss. We assess current literature on transplantation, identify thrombosis risk factors, and discuss means of avoiding thrombotic events and saving thrombosed grafts. The incidence of arterial thrombosis was reported to 0.2–7.5% and venous thrombosis 0.1–8.2%, with the highest incidence among children and infants, and the lowest in living donor reports. The most significant risk factors for developing thrombosis were donor-age below 6 or above 60 years, or recipient-age below 5-6 years, per- or postoperative hemodynamic instability, peritoneal dialysis, diabetic nephropathy, a history of thrombosis, deceased donor, or >24 hours cold ischemia. Multiple arteries were not a risk factor, and a right kidney graft was most often reported not to be. Given the thrombosed kidney graft is diagnosed in time, salvage is possible by urgent reoperation and thrombectomy. Despite meticulous attentions to reduce thrombotic risk factors, thrombosis cannot be entirely prevented and means to an early detection of this complication is desirable in order to save the kidneys through prompt reoperation. Microdialysis may be a new tool for this. PMID:22701162

  18. Reducing the data: Analysis of the role of vascular geometry on blood flow patterns in curved vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alastruey, Jordi; Siggers, Jennifer H.; Peiffer, Véronique; Doorly, Denis J.; Sherwin, Spencer J.

    2012-03-01

    Three-dimensional simulations of blood flow usually produce such large quantities of data that they are unlikely to be of clinical use unless methods are available to simplify our understanding of the flow dynamics. We present a new method to investigate the mechanisms by which vascular curvature and torsion affect blood flow, and we apply it to the steady-state flow in single bends, helices, double bends, and a rabbit thoracic aorta based on image data. By calculating forces and accelerations in an orthogonal coordinate system following the centreline of each vessel, we obtain the inertial forces (centrifugal, Coriolis, and torsional) explicitly, which directly depend on vascular curvature and torsion. We then analyse the individual roles of the inertial, pressure gradient, and viscous forces on the patterns of primary and secondary velocities, vortical structures, and wall stresses in each cross section. We also consider cross-sectional averages of the in-plane components of these forces, which can be thought of as reducing the dynamics of secondary flows onto the vessel centreline. At Reynolds numbers between 50 and 500, secondary motions in the directions of the local normals and binormals behave as two underdamped oscillators. These oscillate around the fully developed state and are coupled by torsional forces that break the symmetry of the flow. Secondary flows are driven by the centrifugal and torsional forces, and these are counterbalanced by the in-plane pressure gradients generated by the wall reaction. The viscous force primarily opposes the pressure gradient, rather than the inertial forces. In the axial direction, and depending on the secondary motion, the curvature-dependent Coriolis force can either enhance or oppose the bulk of the axial flow, and this shapes the velocity profile. For bends with little or no torsion, the Coriolis force tends to restore flow axisymmetry. The maximum circumferential and axial wall shear stresses along the centreline

  19. Infection of vascular endothelial cells with herpes simplex virus enhances tissue factor activity and reduces thrombomodulin expression.

    PubMed Central

    Key, N S; Vercellotti, G M; Winkelmann, J C; Moldow, C F; Goodman, J L; Esmon, N L; Esmon, C T; Jacob, H S

    1990-01-01

    Latent infection of vascular cells with herpes-viruses may play a pathogenic role in the development of human atherosclerosis. In a previous study, we found that cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) infected with herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) became procoagulant, exemplified both by their enhanced assembly of the prothrombinase complex and by their inability to reduce adhesion of platelets. We now report two further procoagulant consequences of endothelial HSV infection: loss of surface thrombomodulin (TM) activity and induction of synthesis of tissue factor. Within 4 hr of infection of HUVECs, TM activity measured by thrombin-dependent protein C activation declined 21 +/- 3% (P less than 0.05) and by 18 hr, 48 +/- 5% (P less than 0.001). Similar significant TM decrements accompanied infection of bovine aortic endothelial cells. Identical TM loss was induced with HSV-2 infection but not with adenovirus infection. Decreased surface expression of TM antigen (measured by the specific binding of a polyclonal antibody to bovine TM) closely paralleled the loss of TM activity. As examined by Northern blotting, these losses apparently reflected rapid onset (within 4 hr of HSV infection) loss of mRNA for TM. In contrast, HSV infection induced a viral-dose-dependent increase in synthesis of tissue factor protein, adding to the procoagulant state. The results indicate that loss of endothelial protein-synthetic capacity is not a universal effect of HSV infection. We suggest that the procoagulant state induced by reduction in TM activity and amplified tissue factor activity accompanying HSV infection of endothelium could contribute to deposition of thrombi on atherosclerotic plaques and to the "coagulant-necrosis" state that characterizes HSV-infected mucocutaneous lesions. Images PMID:2169619

  20. Inhibition of Src and forkhead box O1 signaling by induced pluripotent stem-cell therapy attenuates hyperoxia-augmented ventilator-induced diaphragm dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Li, Li-Fu; Chang, Yuh-Lih; Chen, Ning-Hung; Wang, Chien-Ying; Chang, Gwo-Jyh; Lin, Meng-Chih; Chang, Chih-Hao; Huang, Chung-Chi; Chuang, Jen-Hua; Yang, Yi-Pin; Chiou, Shih-Hwa; Liu, Yung-Yang

    2016-07-01

    Mechanical ventilation (MV) with hyperoxia is required for providing life support to patients with acute lung injury (ALI). However, MV may cause diaphragm weakness through muscle injury and atrophy, an effect termed ventilator-induced diaphragm dysfunction (VIDD). Src protein tyrosine kinase and class O of forkhead box 1 (FoxO1) mediate acute inflammatory responses and muscle protein degradation induced by oxidative stress. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have been reported to improve hyperoxia-augmented ALI; however, the mechanisms regulating the interactions among VIDD, hyperoxia, and iPSCs are unclear. In this study, we hypothesized that iPSC therapy can ameliorate hyperoxia-augmented VIDD by suppressing the Src-FoxO1 pathway. Male C57BL/6 mice, either wild-type or Src-deficient, aged between 6 and 8 weeks were exposed to MV (6 or 10 mL/kg) with or without hyperoxia for 2-8 h after the administration of 5 × 10(7) cells/kg Oct4/Sox2/Parp1 mouse iPSCs or iPSC-derived conditioned medium (iPSC-CM). Nonventilated mice were used as controls. MV during hyperoxia aggravated VIDD, as demonstrated by the increases in Src activation, FoxO1 dephosphorylation, malondialdehyde, caspase-3, atrogin-1 and muscle ring finger-1 production, microtubule-associated protein light chain 3-II, disorganized myofibrils, disrupted mitochondria, autophagy, and myonuclear apoptosis; however, MV with hyperoxia reduced mitochondrial cytochrome C, diaphragm muscle fiber size, and contractility (P < 0.05). Hyperoxia-exacerbated VIDD was attenuated in Src-deficient mice and by iPSCs and iPSC-CM (P < 0.05). Our data indicate that iPSC therapy attenuates MV-induced diaphragmatic injury that occurs during hyperoxia-augmented VIDD by inhibiting the Src-FoxO1 signaling pathway. PMID:27055225

  1. Quantifying the roles of tidal volume and PEEP in the pathogenesis of ventilator-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Seah, Adrian S; Grant, Kara A; Aliyeva, Minara; Allen, Gilman B; Bates, Jason H T

    2011-05-01

    Management of patients with acute lung injury (ALI) rests on achieving a balance between the gas exchanging benefits of mechanical ventilation and the exacerbation of tissue damage in the form of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Optimizing this balance requires an injury cost function relating injury progression to the measurable pressures, flows, and volumes delivered during mechanical ventilation. With this in mind, we mechanically ventilated naive, anesthetized, paralyzed mice for 4 h using either a low or high tidal volume (Vt) with either moderate or zero positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). The derecruitability of the lung was assessed every 15 min in terms of the degree of increase in lung elastance occurring over 3 min following a recruitment maneuver. Mice could be safely ventilated for 4 h with either a high Vt or zero PEEP, but when both conditions were applied simultaneously the lung became increasingly unstable, demonstrating worsening injury. We were able to mimic these data using a computational model of dynamic recruitment and derecruitment that simulates the effects of progressively increasing surface tension at the air-liquid interface, suggesting that the VILI in our animal model progressed via a vicious cycle of alveolar leak, degradation of surfactant function, and increasing tissue stress. We thus propose that the task of ventilating the injured lung is usefully understood in terms of the Vt-PEEP plane. Within this plane, non-injurious combinations of Vt and PEEP lie within a "safe region", the boundaries of which shrink as VILI develops. PMID:21203845

  2. The Extent of Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury in Mice Partly Depends on Duration of Mechanical Ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Hegeman, Maria A.; Hemmes, Sabrine N. T.; Kuipers, Maria T.; Bos, Lieuwe D. J.; Jongsma, Geartsje; Roelofs, Joris J. T. H.; van der Sluijs, Koenraad F.; Juffermans, Nicole P.; Vroom, Margreeth B.; Schultz, Marcus J.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Mechanical ventilation (MV) has the potential to initiate ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). The pathogenesis of VILI has been primarily studied in animal models using more or less injurious ventilator settings. However, we speculate that duration of MV also influences severity and character of VILI. Methods. Sixty-four healthy C57Bl/6 mice were mechanically ventilated for 5 or 12 hours, using lower tidal volumes with positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) or higher tidal volumes without PEEP. Fifteen nonventilated mice served as controls. Results. All animals remained hemodynamically stable and survived MV protocols. In both MV groups, PaO2 to FiO2 ratios were lower and alveolar cell counts were higher after 12 hours of MV compared to 5 hours. Alveolar-capillary permeability was increased after 12 hours compared to 5 hours, although differences did not reach statistical significance. Lung levels of inflammatory mediators did not further increase over time. Only in mice ventilated with increased strain, lung compliance declined and wet to dry ratio increased after 12 hours of MV compared to 5 hours. Conclusions. Deleterious effects of MV are partly dependent on its duration. Even lower tidal volumes with PEEP may initiate aspects of VILI after 12 hours of MV. PMID:23691294

  3. The extent of ventilator-induced lung injury in mice partly depends on duration of mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Hegeman, Maria A; Hemmes, Sabrine N T; Kuipers, Maria T; Bos, Lieuwe D J; Jongsma, Geartsje; Roelofs, Joris J T H; van der Sluijs, Koenraad F; Juffermans, Nicole P; Vroom, Margreeth B; Schultz, Marcus J

    2013-01-01

    Background. Mechanical ventilation (MV) has the potential to initiate ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). The pathogenesis of VILI has been primarily studied in animal models using more or less injurious ventilator settings. However, we speculate that duration of MV also influences severity and character of VILI. Methods. Sixty-four healthy C57Bl/6 mice were mechanically ventilated for 5 or 12 hours, using lower tidal volumes with positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) or higher tidal volumes without PEEP. Fifteen nonventilated mice served as controls. Results. All animals remained hemodynamically stable and survived MV protocols. In both MV groups, PaO2 to FiO2 ratios were lower and alveolar cell counts were higher after 12 hours of MV compared to 5 hours. Alveolar-capillary permeability was increased after 12 hours compared to 5 hours, although differences did not reach statistical significance. Lung levels of inflammatory mediators did not further increase over time. Only in mice ventilated with increased strain, lung compliance declined and wet to dry ratio increased after 12 hours of MV compared to 5 hours. Conclusions. Deleterious effects of MV are partly dependent on its duration. Even lower tidal volumes with PEEP may initiate aspects of VILI after 12 hours of MV. PMID:23691294

  4. Development of cytotoxic antibodies following renal allograft transplantation is associated with reduced graft survival due to chronic vascular rejection.

    PubMed

    Davenport, A; Younie, M E; Parsons, J E; Klouda, P T

    1994-01-01

    We prospectively followed 64 patients who had had no cytotoxic antibodies prior to first cadaveric renal allograft transplantation for post-transplant antibodies. During a mean follow-up period of 62 months (range 45-92) cytotoxic antibodies developed in 36 patients (56%). Sixteen grafts were lost due to chronic vascular rejection in the group of patients who developed antibodies compared to two in those who remained antibody negative, P < 0.01. Renal function was worse in the antibody-positive group, median serum creatinine 215 mumol/l (131-256) (interquartile range) versus 111 mumol/l (98-127) in the antibody-negative group, P = 0.002, and creatinine clearance 39 ml/min (25-55) versus 90 ml/min (55-104), P < 0.001. There were no significant differences in immunosuppressive protocol, HLA-mismatching, blood transfusion history, the number of acute rejection episodes, mean arterial blood pressure, or proteinuria between the groups. The presence of cytotoxic antibodies predated the classical manifestations of chronic vascular rejection. This suggests that humoral mechanisms may play a role in the development of chronic vascular rejection. PMID:7816298

  5. Overexpression of Mitofusin 2 inhibited oxidized low-density lipoprotein induced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and reduced atherosclerotic lesion formation in rabbit

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Yanhong; Chen Kuanghueih; Gao Wei; Li Qian; Chen Li; Wang Guisong Tang Jian

    2007-11-16

    Our previous studies have implies that Mitofusin 2 (Mfn2), which was progressively reduced in arteries from ApoE{sup -/-} mice during the development of atherosclerosis, may take part in pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In this study, we found that overexpression of Mfn2 inhibited oxidized low-density lipoprotein or serum induced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation by down-regulation of Akt and ERK phosphorylation. Then we investigated the in vivo role of Mfn2 on the development of atherosclerosis in rabbits using adenovirus expressing Mitofusin 2 gene (AdMfn2). By morphometric analysis we found overexpression of Mfn2 inhibited atherosclerotic lesion formation and intima/media ratio by 66.7% and 74.6%, respectively, compared with control group. These results suggest that local Mfn2 treatment suppresses the development of atherosclerosis in vivo in part by attenuating the smooth muscle cell proliferation induced by lipid deposition and vascular injury.

  6. Calcitriol reduces thrombospondin-1 and increases vascular endothelial growth factor in breast cancer cells: implications for tumor angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    García-Quiroz, Janice; Rivas-Suárez, Mariana; García-Becerra, Rocío; Barrera, David; Martínez-Reza, Isela; Ordaz-Rosado, David; Santos-Martinez, Nancy; Villanueva, Octavio; Santos-Cuevas, Clara L; Avila, Euclides; Gamboa-Domínguez, Armando; Halhali, Ali; Larrea, Fernando; Díaz, Lorenza

    2014-10-01

    Calcitriol, a potent antineoplastic vitamin D metabolite, inhibits proliferation, induces apoptosis and slows the growth of tumors. Calcitriol also may exert either antiangiogenic or proangiogenic effects depending on the tissue. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and thrombospondin-1 (Tsp-1) are key factors involved in promoting and inhibiting angiogenesis, respectively. The effects of calcitriol on Tsp-1 have not been studied in the mammary gland, while VEGF regulation is not clear, since opposite outcomes have been demonstrated. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to investigate the effects of calcitriol on VEGF and Tsp-1 expression in primary breast tumor-derived cells and a panel of established breast cancer cell lines. In vivo studies in athymic mice were also performed in order to gain further insight into the biological effects of calcitriol on angiogenesis. Real time-PCR and ELISA analyses showed that calcitriol stimulated VEGF mRNA expression and protein secretion while elicited the opposite effect on Tsp-1 in 7 out of 8 cell lines studied, independently of the cell phenotype (P<0.05 in n=5). In vivo, calcitriol significantly inhibited the relative tumoral volume after 4 weeks of treatment; however, serum VEGF was higher in calcitriol-treated animals compared to controls (P<0.05). The integrated fluorescence intensity analysis of CD31, a vessel marker, showed that xenografted breast cancer cells developed tumors with similar vascular density regardless of the treatment. Nevertheless, larger necrotic areas were observed in the tumors of calcitriol-treated mice compared to controls. Since the antineoplastic activity of calcitriol has been consistently demonstrated in several studies including this one, our results suggest that the antitumoral effect of calcitriol in vivo involve different mechanisms not necessarily related to the inhibition of tumor vascularization. Overall, our findings indicate that calcitriol can impact the angiogenic

  7. Sulforaphane reduces vascular inflammation in mice and prevents TNF-α-induced monocyte adhesion to primary endothelial cells through interfering with the NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Nallasamy, Palanisamy; Si, Hongwei; Babu, Pon Velayutham Anandh; Pan, Dengke; Fu, Yu; Brooke, Elizabeth A S; Shah, Halley; Zhen, Wei; Zhu, Hong; Liu, Dongmin; Li, Yunbo; Jia, Zhenquan

    2014-08-01

    Sulforaphane, a naturally occurring isothiocyanate present in cruciferous vegetables, has received wide attention for its potential to improve vascular function in vitro. However, its effect in vivo and the molecular mechanism of sulforaphane at physiological concentrations remain unclear. Here, we report that a sulforaphane concentration as low as 0.5 μM significantly inhibited tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-induced adhesion of monocytes to human umbilical vein endothelial cells, a key event in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis both in static and under flow conditions. Such physiological concentrations of sulforaphane also significantly suppressed TNF-α-induced production of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and adhesion molecules including soluble vascular adhesion molecule-1 and soluble E-selectin, key mediators in the regulation of enhanced endothelial cell-monocyte interaction. Furthermore, sulforaphane inhibited TNF-α-induced nuclear factor (NF)-κB transcriptional activity, Inhibitor of NF-κB alpha (IκBα) degradation and subsequent NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation in endothelial cells, suggesting that sulforaphane can inhibit inflammation by suppressing NF-κB signaling. In an animal study, sulforaphane (300 ppm) in a mouse diet significantly abolished TNF-α-increased ex vivo monocyte adhesion and circulating adhesion molecules and chemokines in C57BL/6 mice. Histology showed that sulforaphane treatment significantly prevented the eruption of endothelial lining in the intima layer of the aorta and preserved elastin fibers' delicate organization, as shown by Verhoeff-van Gieson staining. Immunohistochemistry studies showed that sulforaphane treatment also reduced vascular adhesion molecule-1 and monocyte-derived F4/80-positive macrophages in the aorta of TNF-α-treated mice. In conclusion, sulforaphane at physiological concentrations protects against TNF-α-induced vascular endothelial inflammation, in both in vitro and in vivo models. This anti

  8. Vascular Lesions.

    PubMed

    Jahnke, Marla N

    2016-08-01

    Vascular lesions in childhood are comprised of vascular tumors and vascular malformations. Vascular tumors encompass neoplasms of the vascular system, of which infantile hemangiomas (IHs) are the most common. Vascular malformations, on the other hand, consist of lesions due to anomalous development of the vascular system, including the capillary, venous, arterial, and lymphatic systems. Capillary malformations represent the most frequent type of vascular malformation. IHs and vascular malformations tend to follow relatively predictable growth patterns in that IHs grow then involute during early childhood, whereas vascular malformations tend to exhibit little change. Both vascular tumors and vascular malformations can demonstrate a wide range of severity and potential associated complications necessitating specialist intervention when appropriate. Evaluation and treatment of the most common types of vascular lesions are discussed in this article. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(8):e299-e305.]. PMID:27517358

  9. ATF3 Protects Pulmonary Resident Cells from Acute and Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury by Preventing Nrf2 Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Yuexin; Akram, Ali; Amatullah, Hajera; Zhou, Dun Yuan; Gali, Patricia L.; Maron-Gutierrez, Tatiana; González-López, Adrian; Zhou, Louis; Rocco, Patricia R.M.; Hwang, David; Albaiceta, Guillermo M.; Haitsma, Jack J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) contributes to mortality in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome, the most severe form of acute lung injury (ALI). Absence of activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) confers susceptibility to ALI/VILI. To identify cell-specific ATF3-dependent mechanisms of susceptibility to ALI/VILI, we generated ATF3 chimera by adoptive bone marrow (BM) transfer and randomized to inhaled saline or lipopolysacharide (LPS) in the presence of mechanical ventilation (MV). Adenovirus vectors to silence or overexpress ATF3 were used in primary human bronchial epithelial cells and murine BM-derived macrophages from wild-type or ATF3-deficient mice. Results: Absence of ATF3 in myeloid-derived cells caused increased pulmonary cellular infiltration. In contrast, absence of ATF3 in parenchymal cells resulted in loss of alveolar-capillary membrane integrity and increased exudative edema. ATF3-deficient macrophages were unable to limit the expression of pro-inflammatory mediators. Knockdown of ATF3 in resident cells resulted in decreased junctional protein expression and increased paracellular leak. ATF3 overexpression abrogated LPS induced membrane permeability. Despite release of ATF3-dependent Nrf2 transcriptional inhibition, mice that lacked ATF3 expression in resident cells had increased Nrf2 protein degradation. Innovation: In our model, in the absence of ATF3 in parenchymal cells increased Nrf2 degradation is the result of increased Keap-1 expression and loss of DJ-1 (Parkinson disease [autosomal recessive, early onset] 7), previously not known to play a role in lung injury. Conclusion: Results suggest that ATF3 confers protection to lung injury by preventing inflammatory cell recruitment and barrier disruption in a cell-specific manner, opening novel opportunities for cell specific therapy for ALI/VILI. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 651–668. PMID:25401197

  10. Antisense versus proopiomelanocortin mRNA reduces vascular risk in a murine model of type-2 diabetes following stress exposure in early post-natal life.

    PubMed

    Loizzo, Alberto; Spampinato, Santi M; Fortuna, Andrea; Vella, Stefano; Fabi, Fulvia; Del Basso, Paola; Campana, Gabriele; Loizzo, Stefano

    2015-02-01

    Mechanisms of vascular complications in type-2 diabetes patients and animal models are matter of debate. We previously demonstrated that a double-stress model applied to male mice during nursing period produces enduring hyperfunction of endogenous opioid and adrenocorticotropin (ACTH)-corticosteroid systems, accompanied by type-2 diabetes-like alterations in adult animals. Administration of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone, or of an antisense oligodeoxynucleotide versus proopiomelanocortin mRNA, capable to block the pro-opiomelanocortin-derived peptides β-endorphin and ACTH, selectively prevent these alterations. Here, we investigated alterations produced by our stress model on aorta endothelium-dependent relaxation and contractile responses. Mice, stressed during nursing period, showed in the adulthood hormonal and metabolic type-2 diabetes-like alterations, including hyperglycemia, increased body weight and increased plasma ACTH and corticosterone levels. Ex vivo isolated aorta rings, gathered from stressed mice, were less sensitive to noradrenaline-induced contractions versus controls. This effect was blocked by nitric-oxide synthase-inhibitor l-N(G)-nitroarginine added to bath organ solution. Aorta rings relaxation caused by acetylcholine was enhanced in stressed mice versus controls, but following treatment with the nitric-oxide donor sodium nitroprusside, concentration-relaxation curves in aorta from stressed groups were similar to controls. Therefore, vascular response alterations to physiologic-pharmacologic stimuli were apparently due to nitric-oxide hyperfunction-dependent mechanisms. Aorta functional alterations, and plasma stress hormones enhancement, were prevented in mice stressed and treated with antisense oligodeoxinucleotide, addressed to reduce ACTH- and corticosteroid-mediated hyperfunction. This study demonstrates the key role of ACTH-corticosteroid axis hyperfunction for the triggering of vascular conditions in male adult rodents

  11. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Therapy Ameliorates Hyperoxia-Augmented Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury through Suppressing the Src Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yung-Yang; Fu, Jui-Ying; Kao, Kuo-Chin; Huang, Chung-Chi; Chien, Yueh; Liao, Yi-Wen; Chiou, Shih-Hwa

    2014-01-01

    Background High tidal volume (VT) mechanical ventilation (MV) can induce the recruitment of neutrophils, release of inflammatory cytokines and free radicals, and disruption of alveolar epithelial and endothelial barriers. It is proposed to be the triggering factor that initiates ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) and concomitant hyperoxia further aggravates the progression of VILI. The Src protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) family is one of the most critical families to intracellular signal transduction related to acute inflammatory responses. The anti-inflammatory abilities of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have been shown to improve acute lung injuries (ALIs); however, the mechanisms regulating the interactions between MV, hyperoxia, and iPSCs have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we hypothesize that Src PTK plays a critical role in the regulation of oxidants and inflammation-induced VILI during hyperoxia. iPSC therapy can ameliorate acute hyperoxic VILI by suppressing the Src pathway. Methods Male C57BL/6 mice, either wild-type or Src-deficient, aged between 2 and 3 months were exposed to high VT (30 mL/kg) ventilation with or without hyperoxia for 1 to 4 h after the administration of Oct4/Sox2/Parp1 iPSCs at a dose of 5×107 cells/kg of mouse. Nonventilated mice were used for the control groups. Results High VT ventilation during hyperoxia further aggravated VILI, as demonstrated by the increases in microvascular permeability, neutrophil infiltration, macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) production, Src activation, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase activity, and malaldehyde (MDA) level. Administering iPSCs attenuated ALI induced by MV during hyperoxia, which benefited from the suppression of Src activation, oxidative stress, acute inflammation, and apoptosis, as indicated by the Src-deficient mice. Conclusion The data suggest that iPSC-based therapy is capable of

  12. Common Phenolic Metabolites of Flavonoids, but Not Their Unmetabolized Precursors, Reduce the Secretion of Vascular Cellular Adhesion Molecules by Human Endothelial Cells123

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Emily F; Zhang, Qingzhi; Raheem, K Saki; O’Hagan, David; O’Connell, Maria A; Kay, Colin D

    2016-01-01

    Background: Flavonoids have been implicated in the prevention of cardiovascular disease; however, their mechanisms of action have yet to be elucidated, possibly because most previous in vitro studies have used supraphysiological concentrations of unmetabolized flavonoids, overlooking their more bioavailable phenolic metabolites. Objective: We aimed to explore the effects of phenolic metabolites and their precursor flavonoids at physiologically achievable concentrations, in isolation and combination, on soluble vascular cellular adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1). Method: Fourteen phenolic acid metabolites and 6 flavonoids were screened at 1 μM for their relative effects on sVCAM-1 secretion by human umbilical vein endothelial cells stimulated with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). The active metabolites were further studied for their response at different concentrations (0.01 μM–100 μM), structure-activity relationships, and effect on vascular cellular adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 mRNA expression. In addition, the additive activity of the metabolites and flavonoids was investigated by screening 25 unique mixtures at cumulative equimolar concentrations of 1 μM. Results: Of the 20 compounds screened at 1 μM, inhibition of sVCAM-1 secretion was elicited by 4 phenolic metabolites, of which protocatechuic acid (PCA) was the most active (−17.2%, P = 0.05). Investigations into their responses at different concentrations showed that PCA significantly reduced sVCAM-1 15.2–36.5% between 1 and 100 μM, protocatechuic acid-3-sulfate and isovanillic acid reduced sVCAM-1 levels 12.2–54.7% between 10 and 100 μM, and protocatechuic acid-4-sulfate and isovanillic acid-3-glucuronide reduced sVCAM-1 secretion 27.6% and 42.8%, respectively, only at 100 μM. PCA demonstrated the strongest protein response and was therefore explored for its effect on VCAM-1 mRNA, where 78.4% inhibition was observed only after treatment with 100 μM PCA. Mixtures of the metabolites showed no

  13. Inhibition of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway does not protect against ventilator-induced accelerated proteolysis or atrophy in the diaphragm

    PubMed Central

    Smuder, Ashley J.; Nelson, W. Bradley; Hudson, Matthew B.; Kavazis, Andreas N.; Powers, Scott K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Mechanical ventilation (MV) is a life-saving intervention in patients with acute respiratory failure. However, prolonged MV results in ventilator-induced diaphragm dysfunction (VIDD), a condition characterized by both diaphragm fiber atrophy and contractile dysfunction. Previous work has shown calpain, caspase-3 and the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) are all activated in the diaphragm during prolonged MV. However, while it is established that both calpain and caspase-3 are important contributors to VIDD, the role that the UPP plays in VIDD remains unknown. These experiments tested the hypothesis that inhibition of the UPP will protect the diaphragm against VIDD. Methods We tested this prediction in an established animal model of MV using a highly specific UPP inhibitor, epoxomicin, to prevent MV-induced activation of the proteasome in the diaphragm (n = 8/group). Results Our results reveal that inhibition of the UPP did not prevent ventilator-induced diaphragm muscle fiber atrophy and contractile dysfunction during 12 hours of MV. Also, inhibition of the UPP does not impact MV-induced increases in calpain and caspase-3 activity in the diaphragm. Finally, administration of the proteasome inhibitor did not protect against the MV-induced increases in the expression of the E3 ligases, MuRF1 and atrogin-1/MaFbx. Conclusions Collectively, these results indicate that proteasome activation does not play a required role in VIDD during the first 12 hours of MV. PMID:24681580

  14. Airway Pressure Release Ventilation and High-Frequency Oscillatory Ventilation: Potential Strategies to Treat Severe Hypoxemia and Prevent Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Facchin, Francesca; Fan, Eddy

    2015-10-01

    Although lifesaving, mechanical ventilation can itself be responsible for damage to lung parenchyma. This ventilator-induced lung injury is especially observed in already injured lungs of patients with ARDS. New ventilatory approaches are needed to safely treat patients with ARDS, and recent studies have suggested the potential utility of open-lung strategies. Airway pressure release ventilation (APRV) and high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) are 2 different open-lung strategies that have been proposed to treat refractory hypoxemic respiratory failure while preventing ventilator-induced lung injury. APRV provides increased airway pressure as a potential recruitment mechanism and allows spontaneous breathing, with the potential benefits of decreased sedation, shorter duration of mechanical ventilation, and improvement in cardiac performance. HFOV delivers very small tidal volumes, to prevent volutrauma, at a constant (relatively high) mean airway pressure, thus avoiding atelectrauma. Despite their theoretical benefits, the utility of APRV and HFOV remains unproven and controversial for the routine treatment of ARDS in adult patients. This review is focused on the theoretical and practical aspects of APRV and HFOV, provides an overview of the current evidence, and addresses their possible use in the treatment of ARDS. PMID:26405188

  15. Ventilator-induced lung injury upregulates and activates gelatinases and EMMPRIN: attenuation by the synthetic matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor, Prinomastat (AG3340).

    PubMed

    Foda, H D; Rollo, E E; Drews, M; Conner, C; Appelt, K; Shalinsky, D R; Zucker, S

    2001-12-01

    Mechanical ventilation has become an indispensable therapeutic modality for patients with respiratory failure. However, a serious potential complication of MV is the newly recognized ventilator-induced acute lung injury. There is strong evidence suggesting that matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play an important role in the development of acute lung injury. Another factor to be considered is extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN). EMMPRIN is responsible for inducing fibroblasts to produce/secrete MMPs. In this report we sought to determine: (1) the role played by MMPs and EMMPRIN in the development of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) in an in vivo rat model of high volume ventilation; and (2) whether the synthetic MMP inhibitor Prinomastat (AG3340) could prevent this type of lung injury. We have demonstrated that high volume ventilation caused acute lung injury. This was accompanied by an upregulation of gelatinase A, gelatinase B, MT1-MMP, and EMMPRIN mRNA demonstrated by in situ hybridization. Pretreatment with the MMP inhibitor Prinomastat attenuated the lung injury caused by high volume ventilation. Our results suggest that MMPs play an important role in the development of VILI in rat lungs and that the MMP-inhibitor Prinomastat is effective in attenuating this type of lung injury. PMID:11726397

  16. Angiotensin II (AT(1)) receptor blockade reduces vascular tissue factor in angiotensin II-induced cardiac vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Müller, D N; Mervaala, E M; Dechend, R; Fiebeler, A; Park, J K; Schmidt, F; Theuer, J; Breu, V; Mackman, N; Luther, T; Schneider, W; Gulba, D; Ganten, D; Haller, H; Luft, F C

    2000-07-01

    Tissue factor (TF), a main initiator of clotting, is up-regulated in vasculopathy. We tested the hypothesis that chronic in vivo angiotensin (ANG) II receptor AT(1) receptor blockade inhibits TF expression in a model of ANG II-induced cardiac vasculopathy. Furthermore, we explored the mechanisms by examining transcription factor activation and analyzing the TF promoter. Untreated transgenic rats overexpressing the human renin and angiotensinogen genes (dTGR) feature hypertension and severe left ventricular hypertrophy with focal areas of necrosis, and die at age 7 weeks. Plasma and cardiac ANG II was three- to fivefold increased compared to Sprague-Dawley rats. Chronic treatment with valsartan normalized blood pressure and coronary resistance completely, and ameliorated cardiac hypertrophy (P < 0.001). Valsartan prevented monocyte/macrophage infiltration, nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) and activator protein-1 (AP-1) activation, and c-fos expression in dTGR hearts. NF-kappaB subunit p65 and TF expression was increased in the endothelium and media of cardiac vessels and markedly reduced by valsartan treatment. To analyze the mechanism of TF transcription, we then transfected human coronary artery smooth muscle cells and Chinese hamster ovary cells overexpressing the AT(1) receptor with plasmids containing the human TF promoter and the luciferase reporter gene. ANG II induced the full-length TF promoter in both transfected cell lines. TF transcription was abolished by AT(1) receptor blockade. Deletion of both AP-1 and NF-kappaB sites reduced ANG II-induced TF gene transcription completely, whereas the deletion of AP-1 sites reduced transcription. Thus, the present study clearly shows an aberrant TF expression in the endothelium and media in rats with ANG II-induced vasculopathy. The beneficial effects of AT(1) receptor blockade in this model are mediated via the inhibition of NF-kappaB and AP-1 activation, thereby preventing TF expression, cardiac vasculopathy, and

  17. Angiotensin II (AT1) Receptor Blockade Reduces Vascular Tissue Factor in Angiotensin II-Induced Cardiac Vasculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Dominik N.; Mervaala, Eero M. A.; Dechend, Ralf; Fiebeler, Anette; Park, Joon-Keun; Schmidt, Folke; Theuer, Jürgen; Breu, Volker; Mackman, Nigel; Luther, Thomas; Schneider, Wolfgang; Gulba, Dietrich; Ganten, Detlev; Haller, Hermann; Luft, Friedrich C.

    2000-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF), a main initiator of clotting, is up-regulated in vasculopathy. We tested the hypothesis that chronic in vivo angiotensin (ANG) II receptor AT1 receptor blockade inhibits TF expression in a model of ANG II-induced cardiac vasculopathy. Furthermore, we explored the mechanisms by examining transcription factor activation and analyzing the TF promoter. Untreated transgenic rats overexpressing the human renin and angiotensinogen genes (dTGR) feature hypertension and severe left ventricular hypertrophy with focal areas of necrosis, and die at age 7 weeks. Plasma and cardiac ANG II was three- to fivefold increased compared to Sprague-Dawley rats. Chronic treatment with valsartan normalized blood pressure and coronary resistance completely, and ameliorated cardiac hypertrophy (P < 0.001). Valsartan prevented monocyte/macrophage infiltration, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and activator protein-1 (AP-1) activation, and c-fos expression in dTGR hearts. NF-κB subunit p65 and TF expression was increased in the endothelium and media of cardiac vessels and markedly reduced by valsartan treatment. To analyze the mechanism of TF transcription, we then transfected human coronary artery smooth muscle cells and Chinese hamster ovary cells overexpressing the AT1 receptor with plasmids containing the human TF promoter and the luciferase reporter gene. ANG II induced the full-length TF promoter in both transfected cell lines. TF transcription was abolished by AT1 receptor blockade. Deletion of both AP-1 and NF-κB sites reduced ANG II-induced TF gene transcription completely, whereas the deletion of AP-1 sites reduced transcription. Thus, the present study clearly shows an aberrant TF expression in the endothelium and media in rats with ANG II-induced vasculopathy. The beneficial effects of AT1 receptor blockade in this model are mediated via the inhibition of NF-κB and AP-1 activation, thereby preventing TF expression, cardiac vasculopathy, and microinfarctions. PMID

  18. Cardiac Usage of Reducible Poly(oligo-D-arginine) As a Gene Carrier for Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Expression.

    PubMed

    Woo, Jongsu; Bae, Seong-Ho; Kim, Bokyoung; Park, Jin Sil; Jung, Subin; Lee, Minhyung; Kim, Yong-Hee; Choi, Donghoon

    2015-01-01

    Developments of non-viral carriers have headed toward reducing cytotoxicity, which results from the use of conventional gene carriers, and enhancing gene delivery efficiency. Cys-(d-R9)-Cys repeated reducible poly(oligo-D-arginine) (rPOA) is one of the most efficient non-viral carriers for gene therapy; however, while its efficiency has been verified in the lung and brain, it is necessary to confirm its activity in each organ or tissue since there are differences of gene carrier susceptibility to among tissue types. We therefore tested the compatibility of rPOA in cardiac tissue by in vitro or in vivo experiments and confirmed its high transfection efficiency and low cytotoxicity. Moreover, substantial regenerative effects were observed following transfection with rPOA/pVEGF expression vector complexes (79% decreased infarct size) compared to polyethyleneimine (PEI) (34% decreased infarct size) in a rat myocardial infarction (MI) model. These findings suggest that rPOA efficiently enables DNA transfection in cardiac tissue and can be used as a useful non-viral therapeutic gene carrier for gene therapy in ischemic heart disease. PMID:26649571

  19. Cardiac Usage of Reducible Poly(oligo-D-arginine) As a Gene Carrier for Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Expression

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Jongsu; Bae, Seong-Ho; Kim, Bokyoung; Park, Jin Sil; Jung, Subin; Lee, Minhyung; Kim, Yong-Hee; Choi, Donghoon

    2015-01-01

    Developments of non-viral carriers have headed toward reducing cytotoxicity, which results from the use of conventional gene carriers, and enhancing gene delivery efficiency. Cys-(d-R9)-Cys repeated reducible poly(oligo-D-arginine) (rPOA) is one of the most efficient non-viral carriers for gene therapy; however, while its efficiency has been verified in the lung and brain, it is necessary to confirm its activity in each organ or tissue since there are differences of gene carrier susceptibility to among tissue types. We therefore tested the compatibility of rPOA in cardiac tissue by in vitro or in vivo experiments and confirmed its high transfection efficiency and low cytotoxicity. Moreover, substantial regenerative effects were observed following transfection with rPOA/pVEGF expression vector complexes (79% decreased infarct size) compared to polyethyleneimine (PEI) (34% decreased infarct size) in a rat myocardial infarction (MI) model. These findings suggest that rPOA efficiently enables DNA transfection in cardiac tissue and can be used as a useful non-viral therapeutic gene carrier for gene therapy in ischemic heart disease. PMID:26649571

  20. Cytosolic calcium concentration is reduced by photolysis of a nitrosyl ruthenium complex in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Lunardi, C N; Cacciari, A L; Silva, R S; Bendhack, L M

    2006-11-01

    The effect of the NO donors cis-[RuCl(bpy)(2)(NO)](PF(6)) (RUNOCL) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) on the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](c)) was studied in cells isolated from the rat aorta smooth muscle of cells isolated from the rat aorta smooth muscle. SNP is a metal nitrosyl complex made up of iron, cyanide groups, and a nitro moiety; the RUNOCL complex is made up of ruthenium and bipyridine ligands, with chloride and nitrosyl groups in the ruthenium axial positions. Rat aorta smooth muscle cells were loaded with fluo-3 acetoxymethyl ester (Fluo-3 AM) and imaged by a confocal scanning laser microscope excited with the 488 nm line of the argon ion laser. Fluorescence emission was measured at 510 nm. One of the NO donors, RUNOCL (100 micromol/L) or SNP (100 micromol/L), was then added to the cell chamber and the fluorescent intensity percentage (%IF) was measured after 240 s. RUNOCL reduced the %IF to 60.0+/-10.0% of the initial value. After treatment with the soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazole[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ) (10 micromol/L), the measurement of %IF was 81.0+/-5.0% (n=4). In the presence of tetraethylammonium (TEA) (1 mmol/L) the %IF was 79.0+/-6.4% (n=4). A combination of ODQ and TEA increased the %IF to 97.0+/-3.5% (n=4). As for SNP, it reduced the %IF to 81.4+/-4.7% (n=4), but this effect was inhibited by ODQ (%IF 94.0+/-3.6%; n=4) and TEA (%IF 88.0+/-2.1%; n=4). The combination of ODQ and TEA increased (%IF 92.0+/-2.8%; n=4). Taken together, these results indicate that both the new NO donor RUNOCL and SNP reduce [Ca(2+)](c). Our data also give evidence that soluble guanylyl cyclase and K(+) channels sensitive to TEA are involved in the mechanisms responsible for the reduction in [Ca(2+)](c) of the rat aorta smooth muscle cells. PMID:16564714

  1. Vascular ring

    MedlinePlus

    ... with aberrant subclavian and left ligamentum ateriosus; Congenital heart defect - vascular ring; Birth defect heart - vascular ring ... accounts for less than 1% of all congenital heart problems. The condition occurs as often in males ...

  2. Sulforaphane reduces vascular inflammation in mice and prevents TNF-α-induced monocyte adhesion to primary endothelial cells through interfering with the NF-κB pathway

    PubMed Central

    Nallasamy, Palanisamy; Si, Hongwei; Babu, Pon Velayutham Anandh; Pan, Dengke; Fu, Yu; Brooke, Elizabeth A.S.; Shah, Halley; Zhen, Wei; Zhu, Hong; Liu, Dongmin; Li, Yunbo; Jia, Zhenquan

    2014-01-01

    Sulforaphane, a naturally-occurring isothiocyanate present in cruciferous vegetables, has received wide attention for its potential to improve vascular function in vitro. However, its effect in vivo and the molecular mechanism of sulforaphane at physiological concentrations remain unclear. Here, we report that a sulforaphane concentration as low as 0.5 μM significantly inhibited TNF-α-induced adhesion of monocytes to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), a key event in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis both in static and under flow conditions. Such physiological concentrations of sulforaphane also significantly suppressed TNF-α-induced production of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), adhesion molecule sVCAM-1 and sE-Selectin, key mediators in the regulation of enhanced endothelial cell-monocyte interaction. Furthermore, sulforaphane inhibited TNF-α-induced NF-κB transcriptional activity, IκBα degradation and subsequent NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation in endothelial cells, suggesting that sulforaphane can inhibit inflammation by suppressing NF-κB signaling. In an animal study, sulforaphane (300 ppm) in a mouse diet significantly abolished TNF-α-increased ex vivo monocyte adhesion and circulating adhesion molecules and chemokines in C57BL/6 mice. Histology showed that sulforaphane treatment significantly prevented the eruption of endothelial lining in the intima layer of the aorta and preserved elastin fibers’ delicate organization as shown by Verhoeff-van Gieson staining. Immunohistochemistry studies showed that sulforaphane treatment also reduced VCAM-1 and monocytes-derived F4/80-positive macrophages in the aorta of TNF-α-treated mice. In conclusion, sulforaphane at physiological concentrations protects against TNF-α-induced vascular endothelial inflammation, in both in vitro and in vivo models. This anti-inflammatory effect of sulforaphane may be, at least in part, associated with interfering with the NF-κB pathway. PMID:24880493

  3. Intratracheal budesonide-poly(lactide-co-glycolide) microparticles reduce oxidative stress, VEGF expression, and vascular leakage in a benzo(a)pyrene-fed mouse model.

    PubMed

    Bandi, Nagesh; Ayalasomayajula, Surya P; Dhanda, Devender S; Iwakawa, Jun; Cheng, Pi-Wan; Kompella, Uday B

    2005-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether intratracheally instilled polymeric budesonide microparticles could sustain lung budesonide levels for one week and inhibit early biochemical changes associated with benzo(a)pyrene (B[a]P) feeding in a mouse model for lung tumours. Polymeric microparticles of budesonide-poly (DL-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA 50:50) were prepared using a solvent evaporation technique and characterized for their size, morphology, encapsulation efficiency, and in-vitro release. The microparticles were administered intratracheally (i.t.) to B[a]P-fed A/J mice. At the end of one week drug levels in the lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) were estimated using HPLC and compared with systemic (intramuscular) administration. In addition, in-vivo end points including malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), total protein levels and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in BAL, and VEGF and c-myc mRNA levels in the lung tissue were assessed at the end of one week following intratracheal administration of budesonide microparticles. Budesonide-PLGA microparticles (1-2 microm), with a budesonide loading efficiency of 69-94%, sustained in-vitro budesonide release for over 21 days. Compared with the intramuscular route, intratracheally administered budesonide-PLGA microparticles resulted in higher budesonide levels in the BAL and lung tissue. In-vivo, B[a]P-feeding increased BAL MDA, lung VEGF mRNA, lung c-myc mRNA, BAL total protein, and BAL VEGF levels by 60, 112, 71, 154, and 78%, respectively, and decreased BAL GSH by 62%. Interestingly, intratracheally administered budesonide-PLGA particles inhibited these biochemical changes. Thus, biodegradable budesonide microparticles sustained budesonide release and reduced MDA accumulation, GSH depletion, vascular leakage, and VEGF and c-myc expression in B[a]P-fed mice, indicating the potential of locally delivered sustained-release particles for inhibiting angiogenic factors in lung cancer

  4. Small molecule agonists of integrin CD11b/CD18 do not induce global conformational changes and are significantly better than activating antibodies in reducing vascular injury

    PubMed Central

    Faridi, Mohd Hafeez; Altintas, Mehmet M.; Gomez, Camilo; Duque, Juan Camilo; Vazquez-Padron, Roberto I.; Gupta, Vineet

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND CD11b/CD18 is a key adhesion receptor that mediates leukocyte adhesion, migration and immune functions. We recently identified novel compounds, leukadherins, that allosterically enhance CD11b/CD18-dependent cell adhesion and reduce inflammation in vivo, suggesting integrin activation to be a novel mechanism of action for the development of anti-inflammatory therapeutics. Since a number of well-characterized anti-CD11b/CD18 activating antibodies are currently available, we wondered if such biological agonists could also become therapeutic leads following this mechanism of action. METHODS We compared the two types of agonists using in vitro cell adhesion and wound-healing assays and using animal model systems. We also studied effects of the two types of agonists on outside-in signaling in treated cells. RESULTS Both types of agonists similarly enhanced integrin-mediated cell adhesion and decreased cell migration. However, unlike leukadherins, the activating antibodies produced significant CD11b/CD18 macro clustering and induced phosphorylation of key proteins involved in outside-in signaling. Studies using conformation reporter antibodies showed that leukadherins did not induce global conformational changes in CD11b/CD18 explaining the reason behind their lack of ligand-mimetic outside-in signaling. In vivo, leukadherins reduced vascular injury in a dose-dependent fashion, but, surprisingly, the anti-CD11b activating antibody ED7 was ineffective. CONCLUSIONS Our results suggest that small molecule allosteric agonists of CD11b/CD18 have clear advantages over the biologic activating antibodies and provide a mechanistic basis for the difference. GENERAL SIGNIFICANCE CD11b/CD18 activation represents a novel strategy for reducing inflammatory injury. Our study establishes small molecule leukadherins as preferred agonists over activating antibodies for future development as novel anti-inflammatory therapeutics. PMID:23454649

  5. Defect in insulin-like growth factor-1 survival mechanism in atherosclerotic plaque-derived vascular smooth muscle cells is mediated by reduced surface binding and signaling.

    PubMed

    Patel, V A; Zhang, Q J; Siddle, K; Soos, M A; Goddard, M; Weissberg, P L; Bennett, M R

    2001-05-11

    Apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) is increased in atherosclerosis compared with normal vessels, where it may contribute to plaque rupture. We have previously found that human plaque-derived VSMCs (pVSMCs) are intrinsically sensitive to apoptosis and not responsive to the protective effects of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). We therefore examined the mechanism underlying this defect. Human pVSMCs showed <25% (125)I-IGF-1 surface binding, <20% IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) expression than that of normal medial VSMCs, and <40% Akt kinase activity in response to IGF-1. pVSMCs expressed and secreted high levels of IGF-1 binding proteins (IGFBPs), and the IGF-1 analogues, long R3 and Des 1,3 IGF-1, which do not bind to IGFBPs, were able to increase pVSMC survival to normal medial VSMC levels. The long R3 survival effect was phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-mediated, but it was not dependent on Akt activity alone. Intimal pVSMCs in vivo showed reduced IGF-1R expression compared with medial VSMCs, in particular at the shoulder regions of plaques. We conclude that human pVSMCs show an intrinsic sensitivity to apoptosis caused in part by defective expression of IGF-1R, impaired IGF-1-mediated survival signaling and increased IGFBP secretion. This impaired IGF-1 protection against apoptosis may promote VSMC loss and plaque instability in atherosclerosis. PMID:11348998

  6. Atorvastatin reduces vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in human non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLCs) via inhibition of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Liu, Bing; Yuan, Jiayi; Yang, Jie; Zhang, Jingjie; An, Yu; Tie, Lu; Pan, Yan; Li, Xuejun

    2012-02-01

    The high metastatic potential of non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) is closely correlated with the elevated expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and resultant tumor angiogenesis. However, no effective strategies against VEGF expression have been available in NSCLCs therapy. This study demonstrated that elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels derived from both mitochondria and NADPH oxidase were required for VEGF expression in NSCLC cells. Atorvastatin administration could significantly inhibit VEGF expression both in vitro and in vivo via inhibition of ROS production. Atorvastatin inhibited ROS generation partly through suppression of Rac1/NADPH oxidase activity. Specifically, atorvastatin could upregulate the activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and catalase, which are responsible for elimination of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) in the mitochondria and peroxisomes, respectively. Thus, inhibition of ROS production by concomitant suppression of Rac1/NADPH oxidase activity and upregulation of the activity of GPx and catalase contributes critically to atorvastatin-reduced VEGF expression in NSCLCs. Atorvastatin may be a potential alternative against VEGF expression and angiogenesis in NSCLCs therapy. PMID:22153388

  7. Pretreatment with recombinant human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) reduces virus replication and inflammation in a perinatal lamb model of RSV infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is increasingly recognized as a perinatal regulator of lung maturation and surfactant protein expression. Innate immune components including surfactant proteins A and D, and beta defensins have putative antimicrobial activity against pulmonary pathogens incl...

  8. Pretreatment with recombinant human vascular endothelial growth factor reduces virus replication and inflammation in a peri-natal lamb model of RSV infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is increasingly recognized as a perinatal regulator of lung maturation and surfactant protein expression. Innate immune components including surfactant proteins A and D, and beta defensins have putative antimicrobial activity against pulmonary pathogens incl...

  9. Arginase inhibition reduces interleukin-1β-stimulated vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation by increasing nitric oxide synthase-dependent nitric oxide production

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Jeongyeon; Ryoo, Sungwoo

    2013-06-07

    Highlights: •Arginase inhibition suppressed proliferation of IL-1β-stimulated VSMCs in dose-dependent manner. •NO production from IL-1β-induced iNOS expression was augmented by arginase inhibition, reducing VSMC proliferation. •Incubation with cGMP analogues abolished IL-1β-dependent proliferation of VSMCs. -- Abstract: We investigated whether arginase inhibition suppressed interleukin (IL)-1β-stimulated proliferation in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and the possible mechanisms involved. IL-1β stimulation increased VSMC proliferation, while the arginase inhibitor BEC and transfection of the antisense (AS) oligonucleotide against arginase I decreased VSMC proliferation and was associated with increased protein content of the cell cycle regulator p21Waf1/Cip1. IL-1β incubation induced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA expression and protein levels in a dose-dependent manner, but did not affect arginase I and II expression. Consistent with this data, IL-1β stimulation resulted in increase in NO production that was significantly augmented by arginase inhibition. The specific iNOS inhibitor 1400W abolished IL-1β-mediated NO production and further accentuated IL-1β-stimulated cell proliferation. Incubation with NO donors GSNO and DETA/NO in the presence of IL-1β abolished VSMCs proliferation and increased p21Waf1/Cip1 protein content. Furthermore, incubation with the cGMP analogue 8-Br-cGMP prevented IL-1β-induced VSMCs proliferation. In conclusion, arginase inhibition augmented iNOS-dependent NO production that resulted in suppression of IL-1β-induced VSMCs proliferation in a cGMP-dependent manner.

  10. Vascular rings.

    PubMed

    Backer, Carl L; Mongé, Michael C; Popescu, Andrada R; Eltayeb, Osama M; Rastatter, Jeffrey C; Rigsby, Cynthia K

    2016-06-01

    The term vascular ring refers to congenital vascular anomalies of the aortic arch system that compress the esophagus and trachea, causing symptoms related to those two structures. The most common vascular rings are double aortic arch and right aortic arch with left ligamentum. Pulmonary artery sling is rare and these patients need to be carefully evaluated for frequently associated tracheal stenosis. Another cause of tracheal compression occurring only in infants is the innominate artery compression syndrome. In the current era, the diagnosis of a vascular ring is best established by CT imaging that can accurately delineate the anatomy of the vascular ring and associated tracheal pathology. For patients with a right aortic arch there recently has been an increased recognition of a structure called a Kommerell diverticulum which may require resection and transfer of the left subclavian artery to the left carotid artery. A very rare vascular ring is the circumflex aorta that is now treated with the aortic uncrossing operation. Patients with vascular rings should all have an echocardiogram because of the incidence of associated congenital heart disease. We also recommend bronchoscopy to assess for additional tracheal pathology and provide an assessment of the degree of tracheomalacia and bronchomalacia. The outcomes of surgical intervention are excellent and most patients have complete resolution of symptoms over a period of time. PMID:27301603

  11. Vascular Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sepulveda, Abel; Buchanan, Edward P.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are divided into two main groups: tumors and malformations. Vascular tumors are a large and complex group of lesions, especially for clinicians with none or little experience in this field. In the past, these lesions caused a great deal of confusion because many appear analogous to the naked eye. Thankfully, recent advances in diagnostic techniques have helped the medical community to enhance our comprehension, accurately label, diagnose, and treat these lesions. In this article, we will review the most frequent vascular tumors and provide the reader with the tools to properly label, diagnose, and manage these complex lesions. PMID:25045329

  12. Early Detection of Ventilation-Induced Brain Injury Using Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Diffusion Tensor Imaging: An In Vivo Study in Preterm Lambs

    PubMed Central

    Skiöld, Béatrice; Wu, Qizhu; Hooper, Stuart B.; Davis, Peter G.; McIntyre, Richard; Tolcos, Mary; Pearson, James; Vreys, Ruth; Egan, Gary F.; Barton, Samantha K.; Cheong, Jeanie L. Y.; Polglase, Graeme R.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim High tidal volume (VT) ventilation during resuscitation of preterm lambs results in brain injury evident histologically within hours after birth. We aimed to investigate whether magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and/or diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can be used for early in vivo detection of ventilation-induced brain injury in preterm lambs. Methods Newborn lambs (0.85 gestation) were stabilized with a “protective ventilation” strategy (PROT, n = 7: prophylactic Curosurf, sustained inflation, VT 7 mL/kg, positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) 5 cmH2O) or an initial 15 minutes of “injurious ventilation” (INJ, n = 10: VT 12 mL/kg, no PEEP, late Curosurf) followed by PROT ventilation for the remainder of the experiment. At 1 hour, lambs underwent structural magnetic resonance imaging (Siemens, 3 Tesla). For measures of mean/axial/radial diffusivity (MD, AD, RD) and fractional anisotropy (FA), 30 direction DTI was performed. Regions of interests encompassed the thalamus, internal capsule, periventricular white matter and the cerebellar vermis. MRS was performed using a localized single-voxel (15×15×20 mm3, echo time 270 ms) encompassing suptratentorial deep nuclear grey matter and central white matter. Peak-area ratios for lactate (Lac) relative to N-acetylaspartate (NAA), choline (Cho) and creatine (Cr) were calculated. Groups were compared using 2-way RM-ANOVA, Mann-Whitney U-test and Spearman's correlations. Results No cerebral injury was seen on structural MR images. Lambs in the INJ group had higher mean FA and lower mean RD in the thalamus compared to PROT lambs, but not in the other regions of interest. Peak-area lactate ratios >1.0 was only seen in INJ lambs. A trend of higher mean peak-area ratios for Lac/Cr and Lac/Cho was seen, which correlated with lower pH in both groups. Conclusion Acute changes in brain diffusion measures and metabolite peak-area ratios were observed after injurious ventilation. Early MRS/DTI is

  13. Vascular Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart and blood vessels, such as diabetes or high cholesterol Smoking Obesity Losing weight, eating healthy foods, being active and not smoking can help vascular disease. Other treatments include medicines and surgery.

  14. Metabolic acidosis may be as protective as hypercapnic acidosis in an ex-vivo model of severe ventilator-induced lung injury: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is mounting experimental evidence that hypercapnic acidosis protects against lung injury. However, it is unclear if acidosis per se rather than hypercapnia is responsible for this beneficial effect. Therefore, we sought to evaluate the effects of hypercapnic (respiratory) versus normocapnic (metabolic) acidosis in an ex vivo model of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Methods Sixty New Zealand white rabbit ventilated and perfused heart-lung preparations were used. Six study groups were evaluated. Respiratory acidosis (RA), metabolic acidosis (MA) and normocapnic-normoxic (Control - C) groups were randomized into high and low peak inspiratory pressures, respectively. Each preparation was ventilated for 1 hour according to a standardized ventilation protocol. Lung injury was evaluated by means of pulmonary edema formation (weight gain), changes in ultrafiltration coefficient, mean pulmonary artery pressure changes as well as histological alterations. Results HPC group gained significantly greater weight than HPMA, HPRA and all three LP groups (P = 0.024), while no difference was observed between HPMA and HPRA groups regarding weight gain. Neither group differ on ultrafiltration coefficient. HPMA group experienced greater increase in the mean pulmonary artery pressure at 20 min (P = 0.0276) and 40 min (P = 0.0012) compared with all other groups. Histology scores were significantly greater in HP vs. LP groups (p < 0.001). Conclusions In our experimental VILI model both metabolic acidosis and hypercapnic acidosis attenuated VILI-induced pulmonary edema implying a mechanism other than possible synergistic effects of acidosis with CO2 for VILI attenuation. PMID:21486492

  15. Antioxidants and vascular health.

    PubMed

    Bielli, Alessandra; Scioli, Maria Giovanna; Mazzaglia, Donatella; Doldo, Elena; Orlandi, Augusto

    2015-12-15

    Oxygen free radicals and other reactive oxygen species (ROS) are common products of normal aerobic cellular metabolism, but high levels of ROS lead to oxidative stress and cellular damage. Increased production of ROS favors vascular dysfunction, inducing altered vascular permeability and inflammation, accompanied by the loss of vascular modulatory function, the imbalance between vasorelaxation and vasoconstriction, and the aberrant expression of inflammatory adhesion molecules. Inflammatory stimuli promote oxidative stress generated from the increased activity of mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, particularly of the Nox4 isoform, with the consequent impairment of mitochondrial β-oxidation. Vascular dysfunction due to the increase in Nox4 activity and ROS overproduction leads to the progression of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease, and neurological disorders. Considerable research into the development of effective antioxidant therapies using natural derivatives or new synthetic molecules has been conducted. Antioxidants may prevent cellular damage by reducing ROS overproduction or interfering in reactions that involve ROS. Vitamin E and ascorbic acid are well known as natural antioxidants that counteract lipid peroxidative damage by scavenging oxygen-derived free radicals, thus restoring vascular function. Recently, preliminary studies on natural antioxidants such as goji berries, thymus, rosemary, green tea ginseng, and garlic have been conducted for their efficacy in preventing vascular damage. N-acetyl-cysteine and propionyl-L-carnitine are synthetic compounds that regulate ROS production by replacing endogenous antioxidants in both endothelial and smooth muscle cells. In this review, we consider the molecular mechanisms underlying the generation of oxidative stress-induced vascular dysfunction as well as the beneficial effects of antioxidant therapies. PMID:26585821

  16. Lung stress, strain, and energy load: engineering concepts to understand the mechanism of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI).

    PubMed

    Nieman, Gary F; Satalin, Joshua; Andrews, Penny; Habashi, Nader M; Gatto, Louis A

    2016-12-01

    It was recently shown that acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) mortality has not been reduced in over 15 years and remains ~40 %, even with protective low tidal volume (LVt) ventilation. Thus, there is a critical need to develop novel ventilation strategies that will protect the lung and reduce ARDS mortality. Protti et al. have begun to analyze the impact of mechanical ventilation on lung tissue using engineering methods in normal pigs ventilated for 54 h. They used these methods to assess the impact of a mechanical breath on dynamic and static global lung strain and energy load. Strain is the change in lung volume in response to an applied stress (i.e., Tidal Volume-Vt). This study has yielded a number of exciting new concepts including the following: (1) Individual mechanical breath parameters (e.g., Vt or Plateau Pressure) are not directly correlated with VILI but rather any combination of parameters that subject the lung to excessive dynamic strain and energy/power load will cause VILI; (2) all strain is not equal; dynamic strain resulting in a dynamic energy load (i.e., kinetic energy) is more damaging to lung tissue than static strain and energy load (i.e., potential energy); and (3) a critical consideration is not just the size of the Vt but the size of the lung that is being ventilated by this Vt. This key concept merits attention since our current protective ventilation strategies are fixated on the priority of keeping the Vt low. If the lung is fully inflated, a large Vt is not necessarily injurious. In conclusion, using engineering concepts to analyze the impact of the mechanical breath on the lung is a novel new approach to investigate VILI mechanisms and to help design the optimally protective breath. Data generated using these methods have challenged some of the current dogma surrounding the mechanisms of VILI and of the components in the mechanical breath necessary for lung protection. PMID:27316442

  17. Mitochondrial-targeted DNA repair enzyme 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 protects against ventilator-induced lung injury in intact mice

    PubMed Central

    Hashizume, Masahiro; Mouner, Marc; Chouteau, Joshua M.; Gorodnya, Olena M.; Ruchko, Mykhaylo V.; Potter, Barry J.; Wilson, Glenn L.; Gillespie, Mark N.

    2013-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that oxidative mitochondrial-targeted DNA (mtDNA) damage triggered ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Control mice and mice infused with a fusion protein targeting the DNA repair enzyme, 8-oxoguanine-DNA glycosylase 1 (OGG1) to mitochondria were mechanically ventilated with a range of peak inflation pressures (PIP) for specified durations. In minimal VILI (1 h at 40 cmH2O PIP), lung total extravascular albumin space increased 2.8-fold even though neither lung wet/dry (W/D) weight ratios nor bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2 or IL-6 failed to differ from nonventilated or low PIP controls. This increase in albumin space was attenuated by OGG1. Moderately severe VILI (2 h at 40 cmH2O PIP) produced a 25-fold increase in total extravascular albumin space, a 60% increase in W/D weight ratio and marked increases in BAL MIP-2 and IL-6, accompanied by oxidative mitochondrial DNA damage, as well as decreases in the total tissue glutathione (GSH) and GSH/GSSH ratio compared with nonventilated lungs. All of these injury indices were attenuated in OGG1-treated mice. At the highest level of VILI (2 h at 50 cmH2O PIP), OGG1 failed to protect against massive lung edema and BAL cytokines or against depletion of the tissue GSH pool. Interestingly, whereas untreated mice died before completing the 2-h protocol, OGG1-treated mice lived for the duration of observation. Thus mitochondrially targeted OGG1 prevented VILI over a range of ventilation times and pressures and enhanced survival in the most severely injured group. These findings support the concept that oxidative mtDNA damage caused by high PIP triggers induction of acute lung inflammation and injury. PMID:23241530

  18. Heliox Allows for Lower Minute Volume Ventilation in an Animal Model of Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Beurskens, Charlotte J.; Aslami, Hamid; de Beer, Friso M.; Vroom, Margreeth B.; Preckel, Benedikt; Horn, Janneke; Juffermans, Nicole P.

    2013-01-01

    Background Helium is a noble gas with a low density, allowing for lower driving pressures and increased carbon dioxide (CO2) diffusion. Since application of protective ventilation can be limited by the development of hypoxemia or acidosis, we hypothesized that therefore heliox facilitates ventilation in an animal model of ventilator–induced lung injury. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats (N=8 per group) were mechanically ventilated with heliox (50% oxygen; 50% helium). Controls received a standard gas mixture (50% oxygen; 50% air). VILI was induced by application of tidal volumes of 15 mL kg-1; lung protective ventilated animals were ventilated with 6 mL kg-1. Respiratory parameters were monitored with a pneumotach system. Respiratory rate was adjusted to maintain arterial pCO2 within 4.5-5.5 kPa, according to hourly drawn arterial blood gases. After 4 hours, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was obtained. Data are mean (SD). Results VILI resulted in an increase in BALF protein compared to low tidal ventilation (629 (324) vs. 290 (181) μg mL-1; p<0.05) and IL-6 levels (640 (8.7) vs. 206 (8.7) pg mL-1; p<0.05), whereas cell counts did not differ between groups after this short course of mechanical ventilation. Ventilation with heliox resulted in a decrease in mean respiratory minute volume ventilation compared to control (123±0.6 vs. 146±8.9 mL min-1, P<0.001), due to a decrease in respiratory rate (22 (0.4) vs. 25 (2.1) breaths per minute; p<0.05), while pCO2 levels and tidal volumes remained unchanged, according to protocol. There was no effect of heliox on inspiratory pressure, while compliance was reduced. In this mild lung injury model, heliox did not exert anti-inflammatory effects. Conclusions Heliox allowed for a reduction in respiratory rate and respiratory minute volume during VILI, while maintaining normal acid-base balance. Use of heliox may be a useful approach when protective tidal volume ventilation is limited by the development of severe acidosis

  19. Risk-reducing Apolipoprotein E and Clusterin genotypes protect against the consequences of poor vascular health on executive function performance and change in nondemented older adults.

    PubMed

    McFall, G Peggy; Sapkota, Shraddha; McDermott, Kirstie L; Dixon, Roger A

    2016-06-01

    We examined independent and cumulative effects of 2 Alzheimer's-related genetic polymorphisms, Apolipoprotein E (APOE) and Clusterin (CLU), in relation to the deleterious effects of poor vascular health (pulse pressure [PP]) on executive function (EF) performance and change in nondemented older adults. Using a sample (n = 593; age range = 53-95 years) from the Victoria Longitudinal Study, we applied latent growth modeling to test the effect of PP, as moderated by APOE and CLU, on an EF latent variable. EF was affected by higher levels of PP but differentially less so for carriers of low-risk alleles (APOE ɛ2+; CLU TT) than for moderate- or high-risk alleles (APOE ɛ2-; CLU C+). The cumulative genetic risk of APOE plus CLU provided similar moderation of PP level effects on EF. Future research may focus on how APOE and CLU might provide different but complementary contributions to predicting EF level and change. Vascular health risk in synergistic association with risk-related polymorphisms can elucidate the neurobiological underpinnings of cognitive trajectories in nondemented aging. PMID:27143425

  20. [Vascular parkinsonism].

    PubMed

    Yamanouchi, H

    1997-01-01

    Critchley speculated that multiple vascular lesions of the basal ganglia must have an etiological connection to the symptoms of so-called vascular parkinsonism (VP), but without neuropathological confirmation. Some had doubts about its existence because of the lack of the pathologically confirmed case with adequate clinical correlation. At present, VP is characterized clinically by the short-stepped or frozen gait, lead-pipe rigidity, the symmetry of findings, absence of resting tremor, and negative response to levodopa in elderly patients with cerebrovascular lesions on CT/MRI. Pseudobulbar palsies, pyramidal tract findings, and/or multi-infarct dementia coexist in some of the cases. Most of clinically suspected VP patients have cerebral white matter lesions as well as basal ganglia lesions. PMID:9014431

  1. Progressive vascular remodeling and reduced neointimal formation after placement of a thermoelastic self-expanding nitinol stent in an experimental model.

    PubMed

    Carter, A J; Scott, D; Laird, J R; Bailey, L; Kovach, J A; Hoopes, T G; Pierce, K; Heath, K; Hess, K; Farb, A; Virmani, R

    1998-06-01

    Despite the improvements afforded by intracoronary stenting, restenosis remains a significant problem. The optimal physical properties of a stent have not been defined. We compared the vascular response to a thermoelastic self-expanding nitinol stent with a balloon-expandable tubular slotted stainless steel stent in normal porcine coronary arteries. Twenty-two stents (11 nitinol and 11 tubular slotted) were implanted in 11 miniature swine. The nitinol stents were deployed using the intrinsic thermal properties of the metal, without adjunctive balloon dilation. The tubular slotted stents were implanted using a noncompliant balloon with a mean inflation pressure of 12 atm. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and histology were used to evaluate the vascular response to the stents. The mean cross-sectional area (CSA) of the nitinol stents (mm2) as measured by IVUS increased from 8.13 +/- 1.09 at implant to 9.10 +/- 0.99 after 28 days (P = 0.038), while the mean CSA of the tubular slotted stents was unchanged (7.84 +/- 1.39 mm2 vs. 7.10 +/- 1.07 mm2, P = 0.25). On histology at 3 days, the tubular slotted stents had more inflammatory cells adjacent to the stent wires (5.7 +/- 1.5 cells/0.1 mm2) than the nitinol (3.9 +/- 1.3 cells/0.1 mm2, P = 0.016). The tubular slotted also had increased thrombus thickness (83 +/- 85 microm) than the nitinol stents (43 +/- 25 microm, P = 0.0014). After 28 days, the vessel injury score was similar for the nitinol (0.6 +/- 0.3) and the tubular slotted (0.5 +/- 0.1, P = 0.73) designs. The mean neointimal area (0.97 +/- 0.46 mm2 vs. 1.96 +/- 0.34 mm2, P = 0.002) and percent area stenosis (15 +/- 7 vs. 33 +/- 7, P = 0.003) were significantly lower in the nitinol than in the tubular slotted stents, respectively. We conclude that a thermoelastic nitinol stent exerts a more favorable effect on vascular remodeling, with less neointimal formation, than a balloon-expandable design. Progressive intrinsic stent expansion after implant does not appear to

  2. Reduced circulating levels of angiotensin‐(1–7) in systemic sclerosis: a new pathway in the dysregulation of endothelial‐dependent vascular tone control

    PubMed Central

    Pignone, Alberto; Del Rosso, Angela; Brosnihan, K Bridget; Perfetto, Federico; Livi, Riccardo; Fiori, Ginevra; Guiducci, Serena; Cinelli, Marina; Rogai, Veronica; Tempestini, Alessio; Bartoli, Francesca; Generini, Sergio; Ferrario, Carlos M; Cerinic, Marco Matucci

    2007-01-01

    Objective Systemic sclerosis (SSc) impairs endothelium‐dependent vasodilatation. Among angiotensin I (Ang I)‐derived compounds, vasoconstrictor angiotensin II (Ang II) and vasodilator angiotensin‐(1–7) (Ang‐(1–7)), cleaved from ACE and neutral endopeptidase (NEP) 24.11, respectively, play an important role in vascular tone regulation. Ang‐(1–7) may act independently or by activating other vasodilating molecules, such as nitric oxide (NO) or prostaglandin I2 (PGI2). Our aim was to assess, in patients with SSc, circulating levels of Ang I, Ang II and Ang‐(1–7), with their metabolising enzymes ACE and NEP, and levels of NO and PGI2, and to correlate them to the main characteristics of SSc. Methods Levels of Ang I, Ang II, Ang‐(1–7), NEP, ACE, NO and PGI2 were measured in 32 patients with SSc, who were also assessed for humoral and clinical characteristics, and 55 controls. Results Plasma Ang I, Ang II and Ang‐(1–7) levels were lower in patients with SSc than in controls (p<0.001in all cases). When Ang II and Ang‐(1–7) levels were expressed as a function of the available Ang I, lower Ang‐(1–7) levels in patients with SSc than in controls were confirmed (p<0.001), while no difference was found for Ang II levels. In patients with SSc, the Ang II/Ang‐(1–7) ratio indicated a prevalence of Ang II over Ang‐(1–7), while in controls Ang‐(1–7) was prevalent (p<0.001). Levels of ACE, NEP, NO and PGI2 were lower in patients with SSc than in controls (p<0.05 in all cases). Conclusion In patients with SSc, prevalence of the vasoconstricting Ang II over the vasodilator Ang‐(1–7) suggests a dysfunction of the angiotensin‐derived cascade that may contribute to dysregulation of vascular tone. PMID:17360781

  3. Use of an optical technique to evaluate the cerebral vascular effects of alcohol (A): Effects on deoxyhemoglobin (DH) and levels of reduced cytochrome oxidase (rCO)

    SciTech Connect

    Barbour, R.L.; Gebiewold, A.; Altura, B.M. )

    1992-02-26

    The dose-response effects of acute A infusion were studied to examine the suggestion that A can induce stroke-like events as a consequence of cerebral vasospasm. By employing a single sending and receiving fiber, an optical backscatter measurement was employed to monitor the levels in DH and rCO in a closed cranium preparation. Anesthetized rats were prepared by cannulating a branch of the internal carotid artery and subjected to either a bolus infusion (BI) or to a constant infusion (CI) of 5 or 10% A at various rates. Results showed that low BI doses of A typically produced a slight increase in the oxyhemoglobin signal indicating that vasodilation had probably occurred. Higher BI doses, however, produced a prompt and significant reduction in the hemoglobin signal with a rise in rCO suggesting a vasoconstrictor response leading to ischemia, followed by recovery within 3-5 min. CI of A produced a similar cerebral vascular response, in a dose-related manner, but of a more sustained nature. At 30-50% of the BI dose levels, a global blanching of the brain surface occurred; rCO levels increased by 50-90% with a corresponding decline in levels of oxyhemoglobin. Control experiments using identical volumes/flow rates of Ringers solution failed to produce any alterations in the optical spectrum. Overall, these data indicate that, depending on dose, (a) A can induce vasodilatory or vasoconstrictor effects in the intact brain; (b) the more pronounced effects involve vasospasm in the cortical microcirculation leading to global ischemia as determined by elevated levels of rCO and DH; (c) optical measurements permit direct noninvasive assessment of the cerebral vascular effects of substances of abuse.

  4. Portal Vein Embolization Using a Nitinol Plug (Amplatzer Vascular Plug) in Combination with Histoacryl Glue and Iodinized Oil: Adequate Hypertrophy with a Reduced Risk of Nontarget Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Bent, Clare L. Low, Deborah; Matson, Matthew B.; Renfrew, Ian; Fotheringham, Tim

    2009-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess whether portal vein embolization (PVE) using a nitinol vascular plug in combination with histoacryl glue and iodinized oil minimizes the risk of nontarget embolization while obtaining good levels of future liver remnant (FLR) hypertrophy. Between November 2005 and August 2008, 16 patients (8 females, 8 males; mean age, 63 {+-} 3.6 years), each with a small FLR, underwent right ipsilateral transhepatic PVE prior to major hepatectomy. Proximal PVE was initially performed by placement of a nitinol vascular plug, followed by distal embolization using a mixture of histoacryl glue and iodinized oil. Pre- and 6 weeks postprocedural FLR volumes were calculated using computed tomographic imaging. Selection for surgery required an FLR of 0.5% of the patient's body mass. Clinical course and outcome of surgical resection for all patients were recorded. At surgery, the ease of hepatectomy was subjectively assessed in comparison to previous experience following PVE with alternative embolic agents. PVE was successful in all patients. Mean procedure time was 30.4 {+-} 2.5 min. Mean absolute increase in FLR volume was 68.9% {+-} 12.0% (p = 0.00005). There was no evidence of nontarget embolization during the procedure or on subsequent imaging. Nine patients proceeded to extended hepatectomy. Six patients demonstrated disease progression. One patient did not achieve sufficient hypertrophy in relation to body mass to undergo hepatic resection. At surgery, the hepatobiliary surgeons observed less periportal inflammation compared to previous experience with alternative embolic agents, facilitating dissection at extended hepatectomy. In conclusion, ipsilateral transhepatic PVE using a single nitinol plug in combination with histoacryl glue and iodinized oil simplifies the procedure, offering short procedural times with minimal risk of nontarget embolization. Excellent levels of FLR hypertrophy are achieved enabling safe extended hepatectomy.

  5. Beta-3 adrenergic agonists reduce pulmonary vascular resistance and improve right ventricular performance in a porcine model of chronic pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    García-Álvarez, Ana; Pereda, Daniel; García-Lunar, Inés; Sanz-Rosa, David; Fernández-Jiménez, Rodrigo; García-Prieto, Jaime; Nuño-Ayala, Mario; Sierra, Federico; Santiago, Evelyn; Sandoval, Elena; Campelos, Paula; Agüero, Jaume; Pizarro, Gonzalo; Peinado, Víctor I; Fernández-Friera, Leticia; García-Ruiz, José M; Barberá, Joan A; Castellá, Manuel; Sabaté, Manel; Fuster, Valentín; Ibañez, Borja

    2016-07-01

    Beta-3 adrenergic receptor (β3AR) agonists have been shown to produce vasodilation and prevention of ventricular remodeling in different conditions. Given that these biological functions are critical in pulmonary hypertension (PH), we aimed to demonstrate a beneficial effect of β3AR agonists in PH. An experimental study in pigs (n = 34) with chronic PH created by pulmonary vein banding was designed to evaluate the acute hemodynamic effect and the long-term effect of β3AR agonists on hemodynamics, vascular remodeling and RV performance in chronic PH. Ex vivo human experiments were performed to explore the expression of β3AR mRNA and the vasodilator response of β3AR agonists in pulmonary arteries. Single intravenous administration of the β3AR agonist BRL37344 produced a significant acute reduction in PVR, and two-weeks treatment with two different β3AR selective agonists, intravenous BRL37344 or oral mirabegron, resulted in a significant reduction in PVR (median of -2.0 Wood units/m(2) for BRL37344 vs. +1.5 for vehicle, p = 0.04; and -1.8 Wood units/m(2) for mirabegron vs. +1.6 for vehicle, p = 0.002) associated with a significant improvement in magnetic resonance-measured RV performance. Histological markers of pulmonary vascular proliferation (p27 and Ki67) were significantly attenuated in β3AR agonists-treated pigs. β3AR was expressed in human pulmonary arteries and β3AR agonists produced vasodilatation. β3AR agonists produced a significant reduction in PVR and improved RV performance in experimental PH, emerging as a potential novel approach for treating patients with chronic PH. PMID:27328822

  6. Vascular dementia

    PubMed Central

    Korczyn, Amos D; Vakhapova, Veronika; Grinberg, Lea T

    2012-01-01

    The epidemic grow of dementia causes great concern for the society. It is customary to consider Alzheimer’s disease (AD) as the most common cause of dementia, followed by vascular dementia (VaD). This dichotomous view of a neurodegenerative disease as opposed to brain damage caused by extrinsic factors led to separate lines of research in these two entities. Indeed, accumulated data suggest that the two disorders have additive effects and probably interact; however it is still unknown to what degree. Furthermore, epidemiological studies have shown “vascular” risk factors to be associated with AD. Therefore, a clear distinction between AD and VaD cannot be made in most cases, and is furthermore unhelpful. In the absence of efficacious treatment for the neurodegenerative process, special attention must be given to vascular component, even in patients with presumed mixed pathology. Symptomatic treatment of VaD and AD are similar, although the former is less effective. For prevention of dementia it is important to treat aggressively all factors, even in stroke survivors who do not show evidence of cognitive decline,. In this review, we will give a clinical and pathological picture of the processes leading to VaD and discuss it interaction with AD. PMID:22575403

  7. Menaquinone-7 Supplementation to Reduce Vascular Calcification in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease: Rationale and Study Protocol (VitaK-CAC Trial)

    PubMed Central

    Vossen, Liv M.; Schurgers, Leon J.; van Varik, Bernard J.; Kietselaer, Bas L. J. H.; Vermeer, Cees; Meeder, Johannes G.; Rahel, Braim M.; van Cauteren, Yvonne J. M.; Hoffland, Ge A.; Rennenberg, Roger J. M. W.; Reesink, Koen D.; de Leeuw, Peter W.; Kroon, Abraham A.

    2015-01-01

    Coronary artery calcification (CAC) develops early in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and is a strong and independent predictor of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Arterial calcification is caused by an imbalance in calcification regulatory mechanisms. An important inhibitor of calcification is vitamin K-dependent matrix Gla protein (MGP). Both preclinical and clinical studies have shown that inhibition of the vitamin K-cycle by vitamin K antagonists (VKA) results in elevated uncarboxylated MGP (ucMGP) and subsequently in extensive arterial calcification. This led us to hypothesize that vitamin K supplementation may slow down the progression of calcification. To test this, we designed the VitaK-CAC trial which analyses effects of menaquinone-7 (MK-7) supplementation on progression of CAC. The trial is a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial including patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Patients with a baseline Agatston CAC-score between 50 and 400 will be randomized to an intervention-group (360 microgram MK-7) or a placebo group. Treatment duration will be 24 months. The primary endpoint is the difference in CAC-score progression between both groups. Secondary endpoints include changes in arterial structure and function, and associations with biomarkers. We hypothesize that treatment with MK-7 will slow down or arrest the progression of CAC and that this trial may lead to a treatment option for vascular calcification and subsequent CVD. PMID:26516910

  8. ACCRETA COMPLICATING COMPLETE PLACENTA PREVIA IS CHARACTERIZED BY REDUCED SYSTEMIC LEVELS OF VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH FACTOR AND EPITHELIAL-TO-MESENCHYMAL TRANSITION OF THE INVASIVE TROPHOBLAST

    PubMed Central

    Wehrum, Mark J.; Buhimschi, Irina A.; Salafia, Carolyn; Thung, Stephen; Bahtiyar, Mert O.; Werner, Erica F.; Campbell, Katherine H.; Laky, Christine; Sfakianaki, Anna K.; Zhao, Guomao; Funai, Edmund F.; Buhimschi, Catalin S.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To characterize serum angiogenic factor profile of women with complete placenta previa and determine if invasive trophoblast differentiation characteristic of accreta, increta or percreta shares features of epitehelial-mesenchymal-transition (EMT). STUDY DESIGN We analyzed gestational age matched serum samples from 90 pregnant women with either complete placenta previa (n=45) or uncomplicated pregnancies (n=45). Vascular-endothelial-growth-factor (VEGF), placental-growth-factor (PlGF) and soluble fms-like-tyrosine-kinase-1 (sFlt-1) were immunoassayed. VEGF and phosphotyrosine (P-Tyr) immunoreactivity was surveyed in histological specimens relative to expression of vimentin and cytokeratin-7. RESULTS Women with previa and invasive placentation [accreta (n=5); increta (n=6); percreta (n=2)] had lower systemic VEGF (invasive previa: median [IQR]: 0.8[0.02–3.4] vs. control: 6.5[2.7–10.5] pg/mL, P=0.02). VEGF and P-Tyr immunostaining predominated in the invasive extravillous trophoblasts (EVT) which co-expressed vimentin and cytokeratin-7, a EMT feature and tumor-like cell phenotype. CONCLUSIONS Lower systemic free VEGF and a switch of the interstitial EVT to a metastable cell phenotype characterize placenta previa with excessive myometrial invasion. PMID:21316642

  9. Long noncoding RNA HIF1A-AS1A reduces apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells: implications for the pathogenesis of thoracoabdominal aorta aneurysm.

    PubMed

    He, Qing; Tan, Jinyun; Yu, Bo; Shi, Weihao; Liang, Kun

    2015-05-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (IncRNAs) play important roles in various biological processes, such as transcriptional regulation, cell growth and tumorigenesis. However, little is known about the role of IncRNA HIF 1 alpha-antisense RNA 1 (HIF1a-AS1) in regulating the proliferation and apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and the expression of HIF1a-AS1 in serum of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA) patients. The cell viability was detected by the CCK8 assay. The cell apoptosis was assessed by annexin V-PI double-labeling staining. Expression of genes and proteins were analyzed by real-time PCR and western blotting, respectively. Cells were transfected with siRNAs as a gene silencing method. In serum of TAAA patients, the expression of HIF1a-AS1 was significantly increased (superior to 6-fold) compared to the normal control. Moreover, Palmitic acid (PA) induced cell apoptosis in VSMCs in a time- and dose-dependent manner, and the proportion of the apoptotic cells had gained as compared to untreatment group. PA also induced up-regulation expression of HIF1a-AS1. We also found that transfection of cells with HIF1a-AS1 siRNA decreased the expression of caspase-3 and caspase-8 and increased the expression of Bcl2, and protected PA-induced cell apoptosis in VSMCs. HIF1a-AS1 was overexpressed in the TAAA and the interaction between HIF1a-AS1 and apoptotic proteins plays a key role in the proliferation and apoptosis of VSMCs in vitro, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of TAAA. PMID:26062299

  10. Spiral CT: vascular applications.

    PubMed

    Rankin, S C

    1998-08-01

    Recent technical advances in CT have renewed interest in the development of CT angiography (CTA). CT angiography is a minimally invasive method of visualising the vascular system and is becoming an alternative to conventional arteriography in some situations. Spiral technology allows a volume of data to be obtained on a single breath-hold with no respiratory misregistration. Fast machines with second or subsecond acquisition times mean the images are obtained while there are high circulating levels of contrast medium giving peak vascular opacification from a peripheral intravenous injection. Accurate timing will ensure either the arterial or venous phase is imaged. Multiple overlapping axial images can be obtained from the data set with no increase in radiation dose to the patient and from these scans computer generated multiplanar and 3D images are obtained which can be viewed from numerous angles. CT angiography can be performed more quickly, less invasively and at reduced cost compared to conventional angiography. PMID:9717621

  11. Vascular permeability, vascular hyperpermeability and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Janice A.; Benjamin, Laura; Zeng, Huiyan; Dvorak, Ann M.

    2008-01-01

    The vascular system has the critical function of supplying tissues with nutrients and clearing waste products. To accomplish these goals, the vasculature must be sufficiently permeable to allow the free, bidirectional passage of small molecules and gases and, to a lesser extent, of plasma proteins. Physiologists and many vascular biologists differ as to the definition of vascular permeability and the proper methodology for its measurement. We review these conflicting views, finding that both provide useful but complementary information. Vascular permeability by any measure is dramatically increased in acute and chronic inflammation, cancer, and wound healing. This hyperpermeability is mediated by acute or chronic exposure to vascular permeabilizing agents, particularly vascular permeability factor/vascular endothelial growth factor (VPF/VEGF, VEGF-A). We demonstrate that three distinctly different types of vascular permeability can be distinguished, based on the different types of microvessels involved, the composition of the extravasate, and the anatomic pathways by which molecules of different size cross-vascular endothelium. These are the basal vascular permeability (BVP) of normal tissues, the acute vascular hyperpermeability (AVH) that occurs in response to a single, brief exposure to VEGF-A or other vascular permeabilizing agents, and the chronic vascular hyperpermeability (CVH) that characterizes pathological angiogenesis. Finally, we list the numerous (at least 25) gene products that different authors have found to affect vascular permeability in variously engineered mice and classify them with respect to their participation, as far as possible, in BVP, AVH and CVH. Further work will be required to elucidate the signaling pathways by which each of these molecules, and others likely to be discovered, mediate the different types of vascular permeability. PMID:18293091

  12. GRP78 is a novel receptor initiating a vascular barrier protective response to oxidized phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Birukova, Anna A; Singleton, Patrick A; Gawlak, Grzegorz; Tian, Xinyong; Mirzapoiazova, Tamara; Mambetsariev, Bolot; Dubrovskyi, Oleksii; Oskolkova, Olga V; Bochkov, Valery N; Birukov, Konstantin G

    2014-07-01

    Vascular integrity and the maintenance of blood vessel continuity are fundamental features of the circulatory system maintained through endothelial cell-cell junctions. Defects in the endothelial barrier become an initiating factor in several pathologies, including ischemia/reperfusion, tumor angiogenesis, pulmonary edema, sepsis, and acute lung injury. Better understanding of mechanisms stimulating endothelial barrier enhancement may provide novel therapeutic strategies. We previously reported that oxidized phospholipids (oxidized 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine [OxPAPC]) promote endothelial cell (EC) barrier enhancement both in vitro and in vivo. This study examines the initiating mechanistic events triggered by OxPAPC to increase vascular integrity. Our data demonstrate that OxPAPC directly binds the cell membrane-localized chaperone protein, GRP78, associated with its cofactor, HTJ-1. OxPAPC binding to plasma membrane-localized GRP78 leads to GRP78 trafficking to caveolin-enriched microdomains (CEMs) on the cell surface and consequent activation of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1, Src and Fyn tyrosine kinases, and Rac1 GTPase, processes essential for cytoskeletal reorganization and EC barrier enhancement. Using animal models of acute lung injury with vascular hyperpermeability, we observed that HTJ-1 knockdown blocked OxPAPC protection from interleukin-6 and ventilator-induced lung injury. Our data indicate for the first time an essential role of GRP78 and HTJ-1 in OxPAPC-mediated CEM dynamics and enhancement of vascular integrity. PMID:24829380

  13. GRP78 is a novel receptor initiating a vascular barrier protective response to oxidized phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Birukova, Anna A.; Singleton, Patrick A.; Gawlak, Grzegorz; Tian, Xinyong; Mirzapoiazova, Tamara; Mambetsariev, Bolot; Dubrovskyi, Oleksii; Oskolkova, Olga V.; Bochkov, Valery N.; Birukov, Konstantin G.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular integrity and the maintenance of blood vessel continuity are fundamental features of the circulatory system maintained through endothelial cell–cell junctions. Defects in the endothelial barrier become an initiating factor in several pathologies, including ischemia/reperfusion, tumor angiogenesis, pulmonary edema, sepsis, and acute lung injury. Better understanding of mechanisms stimulating endothelial barrier enhancement may provide novel therapeutic strategies. We previously reported that oxidized phospholipids (oxidized 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine [OxPAPC]) promote endothelial cell (EC) barrier enhancement both in vitro and in vivo. This study examines the initiating mechanistic events triggered by OxPAPC to increase vascular integrity. Our data demonstrate that OxPAPC directly binds the cell membrane–localized chaperone protein, GRP78, associated with its cofactor, HTJ-1. OxPAPC binding to plasma membrane–localized GRP78 leads to GRP78 trafficking to caveolin-enriched microdomains (CEMs) on the cell surface and consequent activation of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1, Src and Fyn tyrosine kinases, and Rac1 GTPase, processes essential for cytoskeletal reorganization and EC barrier enhancement. Using animal models of acute lung injury with vascular hyperpermeability, we observed that HTJ-1 knockdown blocked OxPAPC protection from interleukin-6 and ventilator-induced lung injury. Our data indicate for the first time an essential role of GRP78 and HTJ-1 in OxPAPC-mediated CEM dynamics and enhancement of vascular integrity. PMID:24829380

  14. Reduced Expression of the Extracellular Calcium-Sensing Receptor (CaSR) Is Associated with Activation of the Renin-Angiotensin System (RAS) to Promote Vascular Remodeling in the Pathogenesis of Essential Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Wang, La-mei; Tang, Na; Zhong, Hua; Liu, Yong-min; Li, Zhen; Feng, Qian; He, Fang

    2016-01-01

    The proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), remodeling of the vasculature, and the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) play important roles in the development of essential hypertension (EH), which is defined as high blood pressure (BP) in which secondary causes, such as renovascular disease, are absent. The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is involved in the regulation of BP. However, the underlying mechanisms by which the CaSR regulates BP are poorly understood. In the present study, the role of the CaSR in EH was investigated using male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) and rat and human plasma samples. The percentages of medial wall thickness to external diameter (WT%), total vessel wall cross-sectional area to the total area (WA%) of thoracic arteries, as well as the percentage of wall area occupied by collagen to total vessel wall area (CA%) were determined. Tissue protein expression and plasma concentrations of the CaSR, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), renin, and angiotensin II (Ang II) were additionally assessed. WT%, WA%, and CA% were found to increase with increasing BP, whereas the plasma concentration of CaSR was found to decrease. With increasing BP, the levels of smooth muscle actin and calponin decreased, whereas those of osteopontin and proliferating cell nuclear antigen increased. The CaSR level negatively correlated with the levels of cAMP and Ang II, but positively correlated with those of renin. Our data suggest that reduced expression of the CaSR is correlated with activation of the RAS, which induces increased vascular remodeling and VSMC proliferation, and thereby associated with EH in the SHR model and in the Han Chinese population. Our findings provide new insights into the pathogenesis of EH. PMID:27391973

  15. Amyloid-Peptide Vaccinations Reduce β-Amyloid Plaques but Exacerbate Vascular Deposition and Inflammation in the Retina of Alzheimer’s Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bingqian; Rasool, Suhail; Yang, Zhikuan; Glabe, Charles G.; Schreiber, Steven S.; Ge, Jian; Tan, Zhiqun

    2009-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is pathologically characterized by accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) protein deposits and/or neurofibrillary tangles in association with progressive cognitive deficits. Although numerous studies have demonstrated a relationship between brain pathology and AD progression, the Alzheimer’s pathological hallmarks have not been found in the AD retina. A recent report showed Aβ plaques in the retinas of APPswe/PS1ΔE9 transgenic mice. We now report the detection of Aβ plaques with increased retinal microvascular deposition of Aβ and neuroinflammation in Tg2576 mouse retinas. The majority of Aβ-immunoreactive plaques were detected from the ganglion cell layer to the inner plexiform layer, and some plaques were observed in the outer nuclear layer, photoreceptor outer segment, and optic nerve. Hyperphosphorylated tau was labeled in the corresponding areas of the Aβ plaques in adjacent sections. Although Aβ vaccinations reduced retinal Aβ deposits, there was a marked increase in retinal microvascular Aβ deposition as well as local neuroinflammation manifested by microglial infiltration and astrogliosis linked with disruption of the retinal organization. These results provide evidence to support further investigation of the use of retinal imaging to diagnose AD and to monitor disease activity. PMID:19834067

  16. Downregulation of Securin by the variant RNF213 R4810K (rs112735431, G>A) reduces angiogenic activity of induced pluripotent stem cell-derived vascular endothelial cells from moyamoya patients

    SciTech Connect

    Hitomi, Toshiaki; Habu, Toshiyuki; Kobayashi, Hatasu; Okuda, Hiroko; Harada, Kouji H.; Osafune, Kenji; Taura, Daisuke; Sone, Masakatsu; Asaka, Isao; Ameku, Tomonaga; Watanabe, Akira; Kasahara, Tomoko; Sudo, Tomomi; Shiota, Fumihiko; Hashikata, Hirokuni; Takagi, Yasushi; Morito, Daisuke; Miyamoto, Susumu; Nakao, Kazuwa; Koizumi, Akio

    2013-08-16

    Highlights: •Angiogenic activities were reduced in iPSECs from MMD patients. •Many mitosis-regulated genes were downregulated in iPSECs from MMD patients. •RNF213 R4810K downregulated Securin and inhibited angiogenic activity. •Securin suppression by siRNA reduced angiogenic activities of iPSECs and HUVECs. -- Abstract: Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a cerebrovascular disease characterized by occlusive lesions in the circle of Willis. The RNF213 R4810K polymorphism increases susceptibility to MMD. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were established from unaffected fibroblast donors with wild-type RNF213 alleles, and from carriers/patients with one or two RNF213 R4810K alleles. Angiogenic activities of iPSC-derived vascular endothelial cells (iPSECs) from patients and carriers were lower (49.0 ± 19.4%) than from wild-type subjects (p < 0.01). Gene expression profiles in iPSECs showed that Securin was down-regulated (p < 0.01) in carriers and patients. Overexpression of RNF213 R4810K downregulated Securin, inhibited angiogenic activity (36.0 ± 16.9%) and proliferation of humanumbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) while overexpression of RNF213 wild type did not. Securin expression was downregulated using RNA interference techniques, which reduced the level of tube formation in iPSECs and HUVECs without inhibition of proliferation. RNF213 R4810K reduced angiogenic activities of iPSECs from patients with MMD, suggesting that it is a promising in vitro model for MMD.

  17. Are MPNs vascular diseases?

    PubMed

    Finazzi, Guido; De Stefano, Valerio; Barbui, Tiziano

    2013-12-01

    A high risk of arterial and venous thrombosis is the hallmark of chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), particularly polycythemia vera (PV) and essential thrombocythemia (ET). Clinical aspects, pathogenesis and management of thrombosis in MPN resemble those of other paradigmatic vascular diseases. The occurrence of venous thrombosis in atypical sites, such as the splanchnic district, and the involvement of plasmatic prothrombotic factors, including an acquired resistance to activated protein C, both link MPN to inherited thrombophilia. Anticoagulants are the drugs of choice for these complications. The pathogenic role of leukocytes and inflammation, and the high mortality rate from arterial occlusions are common features of MPN and atherosclerosis. The efficacy and safety of aspirin in reducing deaths and major thrombosis in PV have been demonstrated in a randomized clinical trial. Finally, the Virchow's triad of impaired blood cells, endothelium and blood flow is shared both by MPN and thrombosis in solid cancer. Phlebotomy and myelosuppressive agents are the current therapeutic options for correcting these abnormalities and reducing thrombosis in this special vascular disease represented by MPN. PMID:24037420

  18. Inflammation and Vascular Injury

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Daniel I.

    2014-01-01

    The invited special lecture at the 76th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Japanese Circulation Society focused on the central role of inflammation in vascular injury and repair. Early studies pioneered the concept that mechanical injury, such as balloon angioplasty and endovascular stent deployment, elicits an inflammatory response from the vessel wall. This hypothesis was developed and substantiated at a time when the prevailing dogma viewed restenosis following angioplasty as a primarily proliferative smooth muscle cell disease. Antibody targeting of Mac-1 reduced leukocyte accumulation and limited neointimal formation following balloon injury or stent implantation. Genetic absence of Mac-1 resulted in diminished leukocyte accumulation and neointimal thickening after carotid artery injury in mice. In the course of those studies, our laboratory made fundamental discoveries regarding the mechanism of leukocyte recruitment at sites of vascular injury and identified platelet glycoprotein (GP) Ibα, a component of the GPIb-IX-V complex, as the previously unknown platelet counter-receptor for Mac-1. Follow-on studies have focused extensively on the structure, function, and signaling of the leukocyte integrin Mac-1. The binding site for GPIbα in Mac-1 has been mapped and subsequently showed that leukocyte engagement of platelet GPIbα via Mac-1 is critical not only for the biological response to vascular injury, but also for thrombosis, vasculitis, glomerulonephritis, and multiple sclerosis, thereby advancing the hypothesis that virtually all inflammation is platelet-dependent. Furthermore, ligand engagement of Mac-1 initiates a novel gene program that promotes inflammation by activating NFκB and downregulating the expression of the forkhead transcription factor Foxp1 that controls monocyte differentiation. Small molecule inhibitors of Mac-1 function have been pursued, including targeting of Mac-1-GPIbα binding or the downstream tyrosine kinase spleen tyrosine kinase

  19. Heart and vascular services

    MedlinePlus

    ... branch of medicine that focuses on the cardiovascular system. ... Circulatory system; Vascular system; Cardiovascular system ... to diagnose, monitor or treat diseases of the circulatory and vascular system include: Cardiac CT for calcium scoring Cardiac MRI ...

  20. Society for Vascular Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Annual Meeting Events Calendar Vascular Medicine Events Job Bank Professional Practice Position Statements PAD Awareness Vascular Related ... for a new job? Try the SVM Job Bank . Browse the jobs or sign up for job ...

  1. Collagen vascular disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001223.htm Collagen vascular disease To use the sharing features on ... were previously said to have "connective tissue" or "collagen vascular" disease. We now have names for many ...

  2. Heart and vascular services

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/article/007459.htm Heart and vascular services To use the sharing features on this page, ... blood vessels (arteries and veins). Heart and vascular services refers to the branch of medicine that focuses ...

  3. Pulmonary blood volume indexed to lung volume is reduced in newly diagnosed systemic sclerosis compared to normals – a prospective clinical cardiovascular magnetic resonance study addressing pulmonary vascular changes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pulmonary involvement, manifested as pulmonary arterial hypertension or pulmonary fibrosis, is the most common cause of death in systemic sclerosis (SSc). We aimed to explore the feasibility of detecting early pulmonary involvement in SSc using recently developed non-invasive quantitative measures of pulmonary physiology using cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). Methods Twenty-seven SSc patients (9 men, 57 ± 13 years) and 10 healthy controls (3 men, 54 ± 9 years) underwent CMR to determine the pulmonary blood volume (PBV) and the PBV variation (PBVV) throughout the cardiac cycle. Patients underwent Doppler echocardiography, high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT), and pulmonary function testing by spirometry. Comparisons were performed using the unpaired t-test and linear regression analysis was performed with Pearson’s correlation coefficient (r). Results Compared to healthy controls, the PBV indexed to lung volume (PBVI) was lower in patients (16 ± 4 vs 20 ± 5%, p < 0.05). There was no difference in PBV (466 ± 87 vs 471 ± 122 mL, p = 0.91) or PBVV/stroke volume (45 ± 10 vs 40 ± 6%, p = 0.09). There were no significant correlations between PBVI and pulmonary artery pressure estimated by Doppler (p = 0.08) the lung’s diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO) (p = 0.09), vital capacity (p = 0.45), or pulmonary fibrosis by HRCT (p = 0.74). Conclusions This study is the first to measure the PBV in humans using CMR. Compared to healthy controls, newly diagnosed SSc patients have a reduced amount of blood in the pulmonary vasculature (PBVI) but unchanged pulmonary vascular distensibility (PBVV/stroke volume). PBVI is unrelated to DLCO, pulmonary artery pressure, vital capacity, and the presence of pulmonary fibrosis. PBVI may be a novel parameter reflecting vascular lung involvement in early-stage SSc, and these findings may be consistent with pathophysiological changes of

  4. Vascular restoration therapy and bioresorbable vascular scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yunbing; Zhang, Xingdong

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the evolution of minimally invasive intervention technologies for vascular restoration therapy from early-stage balloon angioplasty in 1970s, metallic bare metal stent and metallic drug-eluting stent technologies in 1990s and 2000s, to bioresorbable vascular scaffold (BVS) technology in large-scale development in recent years. The history, the current stage, the challenges and the future of BVS development are discussed in detail as the best available approach for vascular restoration therapy. The criteria of materials selection, design and processing principles of BVS, and the corresponding clinical trial results are also summarized in this article. PMID:26816624

  5. Vascular Precursor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhury, Hera; Goldie, Lauren C.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that regulate the proliferation and differentiation of human stem and progenitor cells is critically important for the development and optimization of regenerative medicine strategies. For vascular regeneration studies, specifically, a true “vascular stem cell” population has not yet been identified. However, a number of cell types that exist endogenously, or can be generated or propagated ex vivo, function as vascular precursor cells and can participate in and/or promote vascular regeneration. Herein, we provide an overview of what is known about the regulation of their differentiation specifically toward a vascular endothelial cell phenotype. PMID:22866199

  6. Vascular stiffness in insulin resistance and obesity

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Guanghong; Aroor, Annayya R.; DeMarco, Vincent G.; Martinez-Lemus, Luis A.; Meininger, Gerald A.; Sowers, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes are associated with a substantially increased prevalence of vascular fibrosis and stiffness, with attendant increased risk of cardiovascular and chronic kidney disease. Although the underlying mechanisms and mediators of vascular stiffness are not well understood, accumulating evidence supports the role of metabolic and immune dysregulation related to increased adiposity, activation of the renin angiotensin aldosterone system, reduced bioavailable nitric oxide, increased vascular extracellular matrix (ECM) and ECM remodeling in the pathogenesis of vascular stiffness. This review will give a brief overview of the relationship between obesity, insulin resistance and increased vascular stiffness to provide a contemporary understanding of the proposed underlying mechanisms and potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:26321962

  7. Bioresorbable vascular scaffolds: Biodegradation, drug delivery and vascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Tesfamariam, Belay

    2016-05-01

    The metallic stents with durable polymers have been effective in reducing the need for revascularization, but the permanent presence of the metal and polymer have been associated with persistent inflammation, hypersensitivity reactions and incidence of thrombosis. Recent innovations of bioresorbable polymers are in development which could serve as temporary scaffolds that degrade into molecules and eventually resorb overtime, and leave the artery free of any permanent prosthetic constraints. The transient scaffolding has the advantages of restoring blood vessel to natural state, improve vasomotor tone and increase lumen enlargement because of expansive remodeling following completion of polymer resorption. The success of bioresorbable vascular scaffolds will depend on the degradation timeline, such that the elastic recoil of the blood vessel and negative remodeling which could potentially lead to restenosis are prevented. Bioresorbable scaffolds with bulky backbone and thick struts could lead to prolonged biodegradation, alter blood flow dynamics and increase thrombogenicity. The development of bioresorbable scaffolds is challenging because of the complexity of finding an ideal balance of polymer biodegradation and controlled drug release over time, such that the fractional drug released achieves optimal inhibitory concentration until the blood vessel remodels to a stable set point. This review discusses the various types of biodegradable materials, factors affecting biodegradation, drug release kinetics, vascular biocompatibility, adaptive vascular remodeling, and challenges in the development of bioresorbable scaffolds to treat vascular restenosis. PMID:27001225

  8. [Banks of vascular homografts].

    PubMed

    Polvani, G L; Guarino, A; Pompilio, G; Parolari, A; Piccolo, G; Sala, A; Biglioli, P

    2001-01-01

    We define as Banking of the tissues all the procedures that include the finding, preparation, conservation and distribution of the homograft. The vascular homografts are taken and put into a solution of transportation at +4 degrees C and kept at this temperature till their arrival at the Bank. The following step is the dissection of the homograft which will have to be performed as quickly as possible at most 24 hours after the taking in conditions of maximum sterility. At the Italian Homograft Bank at Centro Cardiologico, the vascular homografts are kept at +4 degrees C for 96 hours on average with antibiotics. After a phase of sterilization at +4 degrees C the tissue is frozen according to a homogeneous and controlled thermic decrease and stored at -150 degrees C/-180 degrees C in fumes of liquid nitrogen till the moment of their employment allowing a long term conservation. The aim of all these procedures of cryopreservation is to keep the structural and functional integrity of cells and tissues. The thermic decrease of the tissues must occur so that to avoid all the damages of the cellular vitality and functionality and especially of the tissue structure in toto. In order to limitate these events some cryoprotector agents are employed because they reduce the concentration of the solutes, the cellular dehydration, the formation of micro-macro crystals. Another step to establish if the homograft is proper is the study of bacteriological and viral aspects. The viral screenings are performed on the donor's blood and the bacteriological tests are performed on the tissue and on the liquids. For each phase of the banking a series of information about the donor and about the tissues are recorded and filed both on paper and database so that to grant always a right conduct of the material. PMID:11552466

  9. Imaging Pediatric Vascular Lesions.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tuyet A; Krakowski, Andrew C; Naheedy, John H; Kruk, Peter G; Friedlander, Sheila Fallon

    2015-12-01

    Vascular anomalies are commonly encountered in pediatric and dermatology practices. Most of these lesions are benign and easy to diagnose based on history and clinical exam alone. However, in some cases the diagnosis may not be clear. This may be of particular concern given that vascular anomalies may occasionally be associated with an underlying syndrome, congenital disease, or serious, life-threatening condition. Defining the type of vascular lesion early and correctly is particularly important to determine the optimal approach to management and treatment of each patient. The care of pediatric patients often requires collaboration from a multitude of specialties including pediatrics, dermatology, plastic surgery, radiology, ophthalmology, and neurology. Although early characterization of vascular lesions is important, consensus guidelines regarding the evaluation and imaging of vascular anomalies does not exist to date. Here, the authors provide an overview of pediatric vascular lesions, current classification systems for characterizing these lesions, the various imaging modalities available, and recommendations for appropriate imaging evaluation. PMID:26705446

  10. Imaging Pediatric Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tuyet A.; Krakowski, Andrew C.; Naheedy, John H.; Kruk, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are commonly encountered in pediatric and dermatology practices. Most of these lesions are benign and easy to diagnose based on history and clinical exam alone. However, in some cases the diagnosis may not be clear. This may be of particular concern given that vascular anomalies may occasionally be associated with an underlying syndrome, congenital disease, or serious, life-threatening condition. Defining the type of vascular lesion early and correctly is particularly important to determine the optimal approach to management and treatment of each patient. The care of pediatric patients often requires collaboration from a multitude of specialties including pediatrics, dermatology, plastic surgery, radiology, ophthalmology, and neurology. Although early characterization of vascular lesions is important, consensus guidelines regarding the evaluation and imaging of vascular anomalies does not exist to date. Here, the authors provide an overview of pediatric vascular lesions, current classification systems for characterizing these lesions, the various imaging modalities available, and recommendations for appropriate imaging evaluation. PMID:26705446

  11. Mechanical Ventilation as a Therapeutic Tool to Reduce ARDS Incidence.

    PubMed

    Nieman, Gary F; Gatto, Louis A; Bates, Jason H T; Habashi, Nader M

    2015-12-01

    Trauma, hemorrhagic shock, or sepsis can incite systemic inflammatory response syndrome, which can result in early acute lung injury (EALI). As EALI advances, improperly set mechanical ventilation (MV) can amplify early injury into a secondary ventilator-induced lung injury that invariably develops into overt ARDS. Once established, ARDS is refractory to most therapeutic strategies, which have not been able to lower ARDS mortality below the current unacceptably high 40%. Low tidal volume ventilation is one of the few treatments shown to have a moderate positive impact on ARDS survival, presumably by reducing ventilator-induced lung injury. Thus, there is a compelling case to be made that the focus of ARDS management should switch from treatment once this syndrome has become established to the application of preventative measures while patients are still in the EALI stage. Indeed, studies have shown that ARDS incidence is markedly reduced when conventional MV is applied preemptively using a combination of low tidal volume and positive end-expiratory pressure in both patients in the ICU and in surgical patients at high risk for developing ARDS. Furthermore, there is evidence from animal models and high-risk trauma patients that superior prevention of ARDS can be achieved using preemptive airway pressure release ventilation with a very brief duration of pressure release. Preventing rather than treating ARDS may be the way forward in dealing with this recalcitrant condition and would represent a paradigm shift in the way that MV is currently practiced. PMID:26135199

  12. Human vascular model with defined stimulation medium - a characterization study.

    PubMed

    Huttala, Outi; Vuorenpää, Hanna; Toimela, Tarja; Uotila, Jukka; Kuokkanen, Hannu; Ylikomi, Timo; Sarkanen, Jertta-Riina; Heinonen, Tuula

    2015-01-01

    The formation of blood vessels is a vital process in embryonic development and in normal physiology. Current vascular modelling is mainly based on animal biology leading to species-to-species variation when extrapolating the results to humans. Although there are a few human cell based vascular models available these assays are insufficiently characterized in terms of culture conditions and developmental stage of vascular structures. Therefore, well characterized vascular models with human relevance are needed for basic research, embryotoxicity testing, development of therapeutic strategies and for tissue engineering. We have previously shown that the in vitro vascular model based on co-culture of human adipose stromal cells (hASC) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) is able to induce an extensive vascular-like network with high reproducibility. In this work we developed a defined serum-free vascular stimulation medium (VSM) and performed further characterization in terms of cell identity, maturation and structure to obtain a thoroughly characterized in vitro vascular model to replace or reduce corresponding animal experiments. The results showed that the novel vascular stimulation medium induced intact and evenly distributed vascular-like network with morphology of mature vessels. Electron microscopic analysis assured the three-dimensional microstructure of the network containing lumen. Additionally, elevated expressions of the main human angiogenesis-related genes were detected. In conclusion, with the new defined medium the vascular model can be utilized as a characterized test system for chemical testing as well as in creating vascularized tissue models. PMID:25742497

  13. [Vascular factors in glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Mottet, B; Aptel, F; Geiser, M; Romanet, J P; Chiquet, C

    2015-12-01

    The exact pathophysiology of glaucoma is not fully understood. Understanding of the vascular pathophysiology of glaucoma requires: knowing the techniques for measuring ocular blood flow and characterizing the topography of vascular disease and the mechanisms involved in this neuropathy. A decreased mean ocular perfusion pressure and a loss of vascular autoregulation are implicated in glaucomatous disease. Early decrease in ocular blood flow has been identified in primary open-angle glaucoma and normal pressure glaucoma, contributing to the progression of optic neuropathy. The vascular damage associated with glaucoma is present in various vascular territories within the eye (from the ophthalmic artery to the retina) and is characterized by a decrease in basal blood flow associated with a dysfunction of vasoregulation. PMID:26597554

  14. Imatinib attenuates inflammation and vascular leak in a clinically relevant two-hit model of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Alicia N; Sammani, Saad; Esquinca, Adilene E; Jacobson, Jeffrey R; Garcia, Joe G N; Letsiou, Eleftheria; Dudek, Steven M

    2015-12-01

    Acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS), an illness characterized by life-threatening vascular leak, is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Recent preclinical studies and clinical observations have suggested a potential role for the chemotherapeutic agent imatinib in restoring vascular integrity. Our prior work demonstrates differential effects of imatinib in mouse models of ALI, namely attenuation of LPS-induced lung injury but exacerbation of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Because of the critical role of mechanical ventilation in the care of patients with ARDS, in the present study we pursued an assessment of the effectiveness of imatinib in a "two-hit" model of ALI caused by combined LPS and VILI. Imatinib significantly decreased bronchoalveolar lavage protein, total cells, neutrophils, and TNF-α levels in mice exposed to LPS plus VILI, indicating that it attenuates ALI in this clinically relevant model. In subsequent experiments focusing on its protective role in LPS-induced lung injury, imatinib attenuated ALI when given 4 h after LPS, suggesting potential therapeutic effectiveness when given after the onset of injury. Mechanistic studies in mouse lung tissue and human lung endothelial cells revealed that imatinib inhibits LPS-induced NF-κB expression and activation. Overall, these results further characterize the therapeutic potential of imatinib against inflammatory vascular leak. PMID:26432864

  15. Rho kinase as a target for cerebral vascular disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Lisa M; Sellers, James R; McKerracher, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    The development of novel pharmaceutical treatments for disorders of the cerebral vasculature is a serious unmet medical need. These vascular disorders are typified by a disruption in the delicate Rho signaling equilibrium within the blood vessel wall. In particular, Rho kinase overactivation in the smooth muscle and endothelial layers of the vessel wall results in cytoskeletal modifications that lead to reduced vascular integrity and abnormal vascular growth. Rho kinase is thus a promising target for the treatment of cerebral vascular disorders. Indeed, preclinical studies indicate that Rho kinase inhibition may reduce the formation/growth/rupture of both intracranial aneurysms and cerebral cavernous malformations. PMID:26062400

  16. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein prevents vascular aging and vascular smooth muscle cells senescence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meili; Fu, Yi; Gao, Cheng; Jia, Yiting; Huang, Yaqian; Liu, Limei; Wang, Xian; Wang, Wengong; Kong, Wei

    2016-09-16

    Aging-related vascular dysfunction contributes to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), a vascular extracellular matrix protein, has been described as a negative regulatory factor for the vascular aging-related processes including atherosclerosis and vascular calcification. However, whether COMP is implicated in the process of vascular aging remains unclear. Here, we identified a novel function of COMP in preventing vascular aging and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) senescence. Firstly, vascular COMP expression was decreased in three different senescence-accelerated mouse models and was also declining with age. COMP(-/-) mice displayed elevated senescence-associated markers expression, including p53, p21 and p16, in the aortas compared with their wild type (WT) littermates. In accordance, COMP deficiency induced aging-related vascular dysfunction as evidenced by the significantly reduced phenylephrine-induced contraction and increased vascular stiffness as evaluated by pulse wave velocity. The aortic wall of COMP(-/-) mice was susceptible to senescence by displaying senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA β-gal) activity induced by periadventitial application of CaCl2 to the abdominal aorta. In vitro, COMP knockdown by small interfering (si) RNA led to the elevation of p53, p21 and p16 as well as SA β-gal activity in VSMCs after H2O2 stimulation. VSMCs isolated from COMP(-/-) mice showed elevated senescence-associated markers expression and supplement of COMP adenovirus to COMP-deficient VSMCs greatly rescued cellular senescence. Taken together, these findings revealed the essential role of COMP in retarding the development of vascular aging and VSMC senescence. PMID:27498005

  17. Vascular Access in Children

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnamurthy, Ganesh Keller, Marc S.

    2011-02-15

    Establishment of stable vascular access is one of the essential and most challenging procedures in a pediatric hospital. Many clinical specialties provide vascular service in a pediatric hospital. At the top of the 'expert procedural pyramid' is the pediatric interventional radiologist, who is best suited and trained to deliver this service. Growing awareness regarding the safety and high success rate of vascular access using image guidance has led to increased demand from clinicians to provide around-the-clock vascular access service by pediatric interventional radiologists. Hence, the success of a vascular access program, with the pediatric interventional radiologist as the key provider, is challenging, and a coordinated multidisciplinary team effort is essential for success. However, there are few dedicated pediatric interventional radiologists across the globe, and also only a couple of training programs exist for pediatric interventions. This article gives an overview of the technical aspects of pediatric vascular access and provides useful tips for obtaining vascular access in children safely and successfully using image guidance.

  18. Arginase and vascular aging

    PubMed Central

    Santhanam, Lakshmi; Christianson, David W.; Nyhan, Daniel; Berkowitz, Dan E.

    2008-01-01

    Vascular and associated ventricular stiffness is one of the hallmarks of the aging cardiovascular system. Both an increase in reactive oxygen species production and a decrease in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability contribute to the endothelial dysfunction that underlies this vascular stiffness, independent of other age-related vascular pathologies such as atherosclerosis. The activation/upregulation of arginase appears to be an important contributor to age-related endothelial dysfunction by a mechanism that involves substrate (l-arginine) limitation for NO synthase (NOS) 3 and therefore NO synthesis. Not only does this lead to impaired NO production but also it contributes to the enhanced production of reactive oxygen species by NOS. Although arginase abundance is increased in vascular aging models, it appears that posttranslational modification by S-nitrosylation of the enzyme enhances its activity as well. The S-nitrosylation is mediated by the induction of NOS2 in the endothelium. Furthermore, arginase activation contributes to aging-related vascular changes by mechanisms that are not directly related to changes in NO signaling, including polyamine-dependent vascular smooth muscle proliferation and collagen synthesis. Taken together, arginase may represent an as yet elusive target for the modification of age-related vascular and ventricular stiffness contributing to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:18719233

  19. Women and Vascular Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Patient information Membership Directory (SIR login) Interventional Radiology Women and Vascular Disease Early Warning Symptom for ... major public health issue, the Society of Interventional Radiology recommends greater screening efforts by the medical community ...

  20. Diversity in vascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Woo, Karen; Kalata, Emily A; Hingorani, Anil P

    2012-12-01

    A growing body of literature in vascular surgery demonstrates disparities in the type of health care that racial/ethnic minorities receive in the United States. Numerous recommendations, including those of the Institute of Medicine, have been set forth, which identify increasing the number of minority health professionals as a key strategy to eliminating health disparities. The purpose of this study is to compare the racial/ethnic distribution of the Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) membership, the SVS leadership, vascular surgery trainees, and medical students. The results demonstrate that the racial/ethnic distribution of the SVS membership reflects a considerable lack of diversity with a paucity of diversity among the SVS leadership. An increasing rate of racial/ethnic diversity among vascular surgery trainees may indicate that the SVS will see an improvement in diversity in the future. PMID:23182481

  1. Uterine Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, Abhishek; Srinivas, Amruthashree; Chandrashekar, Babitha Moogali; Vijayakumar, Avinash

    2013-01-01

    Vascular lesions of the uterus are rare; most reported in the literature are arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Uterine AVMs can be congenital or acquired. In recent years, there has been an increasing number of reports of acquired vascular lesions of the uterus following pregnancy, abortion, cesarean delivery, and curettage. It can be seen from these reports that there is confusion concerning the terminology of uterine vascular lesions. There is also a lack of diagnostic criteria and management guidelines, which has led to an increased number of unnecessary invasive procedures (eg, angiography, uterine artery embolization, hysterectomy for abnormal vaginal bleeding). This article familiarizes readers with various vascular lesions of the uterus and their management. PMID:24340126

  2. What Is Vascular Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... or 911 immediately. @ 2016 Vascular Cures is a tax-exempt, nonprofit organization tax ID#: 94-2825216 as described in the Section ... 3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donations are tax deductible. 555 Price Ave., Suite 180, Redwood City, ...

  3. Implications of Vascular Aging

    PubMed Central

    Barodka, Viachaslau M.; Joshi, Brijen L.; Berkowitz, Dan E.; Hogue, Charles W.; Nyhan, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Chronological age is a well established risk factor for the development of cardiovascular diseases. The changes that accumulate in the vasculature with age, though, are highly variable. It is now increasingly recognized that indices of vascular health are more reliable than age per se in predicting adverse cardiovascular outcomes. The variation in the accrual of these age-related vascular changes is a function of multiple genetic and environmental factors. In this review, we highlight some of the pathophysiological mechanisms that characterize the vascular aging phenotype. Furthermore, we provide an overview of the key outcome studies that address the value of these vascular health indices in general and discuss potential effects on perioperative cardiovascular outcomes. PMID:21474663

  4. Vascular Access for Hemodialysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... short-term use. [ Top ] What is an arteriovenous fistula? An AV fistula is a connection, made by a vascular surgeon, ... vessel surgery. The surgeon usually places an AV fistula in the forearm or upper arm. An AV ...

  5. Vascular structures in dermoscopy*

    PubMed Central

    Ayhan, Erhan; Ucmak, Derya; Akkurt, ZeynepMeltem

    2015-01-01

    Dermoscopy is an aiding method in the visualization of the epidermis and dermis. It is usually used to diagnose melanocytic lesions. In recent years, dermoscopy has increasingly been used to diagnose non-melanocytic lesions. Certain vascular structures, their patterns of arrangement and additional criteria may demonstrate lesion-specific characteristics. In this review, vascular structures and their arrangements are discussed separately in the light of conflicting views and an overview of recent literature. PMID:26375224

  6. Vascular Effects of Histamine.

    PubMed

    Ebeigbe, Anthony B; Talabi, Olufunke O

    2014-01-01

    Four subtypes of receptors (H1, H2, H3 and H4) mediate the actions of histamine. In the vascular wall, the effects of histamine are mediated via H1 and H2 receptors and the actions are modulated by H3 receptor subtype located on presynaptic neurones. Alterations in vascular responses to histamine are associated with experimental as well as a human form of hypertension, suggesting a role for histanine in cardiovascular regulation. PMID:26196559

  7. [Zaidemberg's vascularized radial graft].

    PubMed

    Saint-Cast, Y

    2010-12-01

    In 1991, Carlos Zaidemberg described a new technique to repair scaphoid non-unions with a vascularized bone graft harvested from the radial styloid process. An anatomic study based on 30 dissections after colorized latex injection established the constancy of the radial styloid process's artery, while showing that its origin, course and length were subject to variations. In a retrospective series of 38 cases over a period of 10 years, the vascularized bone graft was indicated for: (1) scaphoid non-union with the presence of avascular changes of the proximal fragment (23 cases); (2) failed prior reconstruction with bone graft and internal fixation (nine cases); (3) degenerative styloid-scaphoid arthritis (three cases); (4) fracture on Preiser dystrophy (three cases). The five steps of the simplified operative technique without dissection of the vascular pedicle include: (1) longitudinal dorso-radial approach, identification of the periosteal portion of the radial styloid process artery; (2) incision of the first and second compartments, longitudinal arthrotomy under the second compartment; (3) styloidectomy and transversal resection of the scaphoid non-union and sclerotic bone; (4) elevation of the vascularized bone graft; (5) transversal and radial insertion of the vascularized bone graft, osteosynthesis by two or three K-wire touching the scaphoid's radial edge. Scaphoid union was obtained in 33 cases out of 38. The only postoperative complications were two transient radial paresthesia. The standardized surgical procedure using vascularized bone graft harvested from the radial styloid process provides an efficient scaphoid reconstruction. PMID:21087882

  8. Vascular Compromise from Soft Tissue Augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, Shannon; Carruthers, Jean D.A.; Carruthers, Alastair

    2014-01-01

    The popularity of soft tissue fillers is, in part, due to their favorable side-effect profile. However, serious complications can occur. The authors describe their extensive clinical experience with soft-tissue augmentation and the rare complication of vascular compromise, which can lead to necrosis and scarring. Over a 10-year period between January 2003 and January 2013, the authors observed a total of 12 cases of vascular compromise. Eight patients in their clinical practice showed evidence of vascular compromise out of a total of 14,355 filler injections (0.05%). In addition, four patients treated with an experimental particulate filler had vascular complications. All cases were examined for filler type, location of complication, risk factors, treatment, and outcomes. Although treatment plans differed for each patient in their series, all cases of vascular compromise resolved fully. The authors believe that an office-based protocol for both immediate and ongoing care—including a thorough individualized assessment and treatment plan for each patient—is critical to timely and effective resolution of side effects. They propose key recommendations for the prevention and management of vascular compromise to improve patient outcomes and reduce the risk of permanent complications. PMID:25276276

  9. Stroke injury, cognitive impairment and vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Kalaria, Raj N; Akinyemi, Rufus; Ihara, Masafumi

    2016-05-01

    The global burden of ischaemic strokes is almost 4-fold greater than haemorrhagic strokes. Current evidence suggests that 25-30% of ischaemic stroke survivors develop immediate or delayed vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) or vascular dementia (VaD). Dementia after stroke injury may encompass all types of cognitive disorders. States of cognitive dysfunction before the index stroke are described under the umbrella of pre-stroke dementia, which may entail vascular changes as well as insidious neurodegenerative processes. Risk factors for cognitive impairment and dementia after stroke are multifactorial including older age, family history, genetic variants, low educational status, vascular comorbidities, prior transient ischaemic attack or recurrent stroke and depressive illness. Neuroimaging determinants of dementia after stroke comprise silent brain infarcts, white matter changes, lacunar infarcts and medial temporal lobe atrophy. Until recently, the neuropathology of dementia after stroke was poorly defined. Most of post-stroke dementia is consistent with VaD involving multiple substrates. Microinfarction, microvascular changes related to blood-brain barrier damage, focal neuronal atrophy and low burden of co-existing neurodegenerative pathology appear key substrates of dementia after stroke injury. The elucidation of mechanisms of dementia after stroke injury will enable establishment of effective strategy for symptomatic relief and prevention. Controlling vascular disease risk factors is essential to reduce the burden of cognitive dysfunction after stroke. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia edited by M. Paul Murphy, Roderick A. Corriveau and Donna M. Wilcock. PMID:26806700

  10. [Vascular aging, arterial hypertension and physical activity].

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Trucksäss, A; Weisser, B

    2011-11-01

    The present review delineates the significance of intima-media-thickness, arterial stiffness and endothelial function for vascular aging. There is profound evidence for an increase in intima-media-thickness and vascular stiffness not only during healthy aging but induced also by cardiovascular risk factors. There is a central role of arterial hypertension for this progression in both structural factors. In addition, both parameters are strongly associated with cardiovascular risk. Endothelial function measured as postischemic flow-mediated vasodilatation is a functional parameter which is decreased both in healthy aging and by cardiovascular risk factors. Physical activity modifies the influence of aging and risk factors on endothelial function. A positive influence of endurance exercise on vascular stiffness and endothelial function has been demonstrated in numerous studies. In long-term studies, regular physical activity has been shown to reduce the progression of intima-media-thickness. Thus, arterial hypertension accelerates vascular aging, while physical activity has a positive influence on a variety of vascular parameters associated with vascular aging. PMID:22068448

  11. Stroke injury, cognitive impairment and vascular dementia☆

    PubMed Central

    Kalaria, Raj N.; Akinyemi, Rufus; Ihara, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    The global burden of ischaemic strokes is almost 4-fold greater than haemorrhagic strokes. Current evidence suggests that 25–30% of ischaemic stroke survivors develop immediate or delayed vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) or vascular dementia (VaD). Dementia after stroke injury may encompass all types of cognitive disorders. States of cognitive dysfunction before the index stroke are described under the umbrella of pre-stroke dementia, which may entail vascular changes as well as insidious neurodegenerative processes. Risk factors for cognitive impairment and dementia after stroke are multifactorial including older age, family history, genetic variants, low educational status, vascular comorbidities, prior transient ischaemic attack or recurrent stroke and depressive illness. Neuroimaging determinants of dementia after stroke comprise silent brain infarcts, white matter changes, lacunar infarcts and medial temporal lobe atrophy. Until recently, the neuropathology of dementia after stroke was poorly defined. Most of post-stroke dementia is consistent with VaD involving multiple substrates. Microinfarction, microvascular changes related to blood–brain barrier damage, focal neuronal atrophy and low burden of co-existing neurodegenerative pathology appear key substrates of dementia after stroke injury. The elucidation of mechanisms of dementia after stroke injury will enable establishment of effective strategy for symptomatic relief and prevention. Controlling vascular disease risk factors is essential to reduce the burden of cognitive dysfunction after stroke. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia edited by M. Paul Murphy, Roderick A. Corriveau and Donna M. Wilcock. PMID:26806700

  12. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-A and Islet Vascularization Are Necessary in Developing, but Not Adult, Pancreatic Islets

    PubMed Central

    Reinert, Rachel B.; Brissova, Marcela; Shostak, Alena; Pan, Fong Cheng; Poffenberger, Greg; Cai, Qing; Hundemer, Gregory L.; Kantz, Jeannelle; Thompson, Courtney S.; Dai, Chunhua; McGuinness, Owen P.; Powers, Alvin C.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic islets are highly vascularized mini-organs, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A is a critical factor in the development of islet vascularization. To investigate the role of VEGF-A and endothelial cells (ECs) in adult islets, we used complementary genetic approaches to temporally inactivate VEGF-A in developing mouse pancreatic and islet progenitor cells or in adult β-cells. Inactivation of VEGF-A early in development dramatically reduced pancreatic and islet vascularization, leading to reduced β-cell proliferation in both developing and adult islets and, ultimately, reduced β-cell mass and impaired glucose clearance. When VEGF-A was inactivated in adult β-cells, islet vascularization was reduced twofold. Surprisingly, even after 3 months of reduced islet vascularization, islet architecture and β-cell gene expression, mass, and function were preserved with only a minimal abnormality in glucose clearance. These data show that normal pancreatic VEGF-A expression is critical for the recruitment of ECs and the subsequent stimulation of endocrine cell proliferation during islet development. In contrast, although VEGF-A is required for maintaining the specialized vasculature observed in normal adult islets, adult β-cells can adapt and survive long-term reductions in islet vascularity. These results indicate that VEGF-A and islet vascularization have a lesser role in adult islet function and β-cell mass. PMID:23884891

  13. Role of Krev Interaction Trapped-1 in Prostacyclin-Induced Protection against Lung Vascular Permeability Induced by Excessive Mechanical Forces and Thrombin Receptor Activating Peptide 6.

    PubMed

    Meliton, Angelo; Meng, Fanyong; Tian, Yufeng; Shah, Alok A; Birukova, Anna A; Birukov, Konstantin G

    2015-12-01

    Mechanisms of vascular endothelial cell (EC) barrier regulation during acute lung injury (ALI) or other pathologies associated with increased vascular leakiness are an active area of research. Adaptor protein krev interaction trapped-1 (KRIT1) participates in angiogenesis, lumen formation, and stabilization of EC adherens junctions (AJs) in mature vasculature. We tested a role of KRIT1 in the regulation of Rho-GTPase signaling induced by mechanical stimulation and barrier dysfunction relevant to ventilator-induced lung injury and investigated KRIT1 involvement in EC barrier protection by prostacyclin (PC). PC stimulated Ras-related protein 1 (Rap1)-dependent association of KRIT1 with vascular endothelial cadherin at AJs, with KRIT1-dependent cortical cytoskeletal remodeling leading to EC barrier enhancement. KRIT1 knockdown exacerbated Rho-GTPase activation and EC barrier disruption induced by pathologic 18% cyclic stretch and thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP) 6 and attenuated the protective effects of PC. In the two-hit model of ALI caused by high tidal volume (HTV) mechanical ventilation and TRAP6 injection, KRIT1 functional deficiency in KRIT1(+/-) mice increased basal lung vascular leak and augmented vascular leak and lung injury caused by exposure to HTV and TRAP6. Down-regulation of KRIT1 also diminished the protective effects of PC against TRAP6/HTV-induced lung injury. These results demonstrate a KRIT1-dependent mechanism of vascular EC barrier control in basal conditions and in the two-hit model of ALI caused by excessive mechanical forces and TRAP6 via negative regulation of Rho activity and enhancement of cell junctions. We also conclude that the stimulation of the Rap1-KRIT1 signaling module is a major mechanism of vascular endothelial barrier protection by PC in the injured lung. PMID:25923142

  14. Vascular Integrity in the Pathogenesis of Brain Arteriovenous Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui; Zhu, Wan

    2015-01-01

    Brain arteriovenous malformation (bAVM) is an important cause of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), particularly in the young population. ICH is the first clinical symptom in about 50 % of bAVM patients. The vessels in bAVM are fragile and prone to rupture, causing bleeding into the brain. About 30 % of unruptured and non-hemorrhagic bAVMs demonstrate microscopic evidence of hemosiderin in the vascular wall. In bAVM mouse models, vascular mural cell coverage is reduced in the AVM lesion, accompanied by vascular leakage and microhemorrhage. In this review, we discuss possible signaling pathways involved in abnormal vascular development in bAVM. PMID:26463919

  15. Aging and vascular endothelial function in humans

    PubMed Central

    SEALS, Douglas R.; JABLONSKI, Kristen L.; DONATO, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    Advancing age is the major risk factor for the development of CVD (cardiovascular diseases). This is attributable, in part, to the development of vascular endothelial dysfunction, as indicated by reduced peripheral artery EDD (endothelium-dependent dilation) in response to chemical [typically ACh (acetylcholine)] or mechanical (intravascular shear) stimuli. Reduced bioavailability of the endothelium-synthesized dilating molecule NO (nitric oxide) as a result of oxidative stress is the key mechanism mediating reduced EDD with aging. Vascular oxidative stress increases with age as a consequence of greater production of reactive oxygen species (e.g. superoxide) without a compensatory increase in antioxidant defences. Sources of increased superoxide production include up-regulation of the oxidant enzyme NADPH oxidase, uncoupling of the normally NO-producing enzyme, eNOS (endothelial NO synthase) (due to reduced availability of the cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin) and increased mitochondrial synthesis during oxidative phosphorylation. Increased bioactivity of the potent endothelial-derived constricting factor ET-1 (endothelin-1), reduced endothelial production of/responsiveness to dilatory prostaglandins, the development of vascular inflammation, formation of AGEs (advanced glycation end-products), an increased rate of endothelial apoptosis and reduced expression of oestrogen receptor α (in postmenopausal females) also probably contribute to impaired EDD with aging. Several lifestyle and biological factors modulate vascular endothelial function with aging, including regular aerobic exercise, dietary factors (e.g. processed compared with non-processed foods), body weight/fatness, vitamin D status, menopause/oestrogen deficiency and a number of conventional and non-conventional risk factors for CVD. Given the number of older adults now and in the future, more information is needed on effective strategies for the prevention and treatment of vascular endothelial aging. PMID

  16. Warfarin and Vascular Calcification.

    PubMed

    Poterucha, Timothy J; Goldhaber, Samuel Z

    2016-06-01

    The vitamin K antagonist, warfarin, is the most commonly prescribed oral anticoagulant. Use of warfarin is associated with an increase in systemic calcification, including in the coronary and peripheral vasculature. This increase in vascular calcification is due to inhibition of the enzyme matrix gamma-carboxyglutamate Gla protein (MGP). MGP is a vitamin K-dependent protein that ordinarily prevents systemic calcification by scavenging calcium phosphate in the tissues. Warfarin-induced systemic calcification can result in adverse clinical effects. In this review article, we highlight some of the key translational and clinical studies that associate warfarin with vascular calcification. PMID:26714212

  17. Building Vascular Networks

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Hojae; Puranik, Amey S.; Gauvin, Robert; Edalat, Faramarz; Carrillo-Conde, Brenda; Peppas, Nicholas A.; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Only a few engineered tissues—skin, cartilage, bladder—have achieved clinical success, and biomaterials designed to replace more complex organs are still far from commercial availability. This gap exists in part because biomaterials lack a vascular network to transfer the oxygen and nutrients necessary for survival and integration after transplantation. Thus, generation of a functional vasculature is essential to the clinical success of engineered tissue constructs and remains a key challenge for regenerative medicine. In this Perspective, we discuss recent advances in vascularization of biomaterials through the use of biochemical modification, exogenous cells, or microengineering technology. PMID:23152325

  18. Estrogen, vascular estrogen receptor and hormone therapy in postmenopausal vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Raouf A

    2013-12-15

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is less common in premenopausal women than men of the same age or postmenopausal women, suggesting vascular benefits of estrogen. Estrogen activates estrogen receptors ERα, ERβ and GPR30 in endothelium and vascular smooth muscle (VSM), which trigger downstream signaling pathways and lead to genomic and non-genomic vascular effects such as vasodilation, decreased VSM contraction and growth and reduced vascular remodeling. However, randomized clinical trials (RCTs), such as the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) and Heart and Estrogen/progestin Replacement Study (HERS), have shown little vascular benefits and even adverse events with menopausal hormone therapy (MHT), likely due to factors related to the MHT used, ER profile, and RCT design. Some MHT forms, dose, combinations or route of administration may have inadequate vascular effects. Age-related changes in ER amount, distribution, integrity and post-ER signaling could alter the vascular response to MHT. The subject's age, preexisting CVD, and hormone environment could also reduce the effects of MHT. Further evaluation of natural and synthetic estrogens, phytoestrogens, and selective estrogen-receptor modulators (SERMs), and the design of appropriate MHT combinations, dose, route and 'timing' could improve the effectiveness of conventional MHT and provide alternative therapies in the peri-menopausal period. Targeting ER using specific ER agonists, localized MHT delivery, and activation of specific post-ER signaling pathways could counter age-related changes in ER. Examination of the hormone environment and conditions associated with hormone imbalance such as polycystic ovary syndrome may reveal the causes of abnormal hormone-receptor interactions. Consideration of these factors in new RCTs such as the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study (KEEPS) could enhance the vascular benefits of estrogen in postmenopausal CVD. PMID:24099797

  19. Estrogen, Vascular Estrogen Receptor and Hormone Therapy in Postmenopausal Vascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Raouf A.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is less common in premenopausal women than men of the same age or postmenopausal women, suggesting vascular benefits of estrogen. Estrogen activates estrogen receptors ERα, ERβ and GPR30 in endothelium and vascular smooth muscle (VSM), which trigger downstream signaling pathways and lead to genomic and non-genomic vascular effects such as vasodilation, decreased VSM contraction and growth and reduced vascular remodeling. However, randomized clinical trials (RCTs), such as the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) and Heart and Estrogen/progestin Replacement Study (HERS), have shown little vascular benefits and even adverse events with menopausal hormone therapy (MHT), likely due to factors related to the MHT used, ER profile, and RCT design. Some MHT forms, dose, combinations or route of administration may have inadequate vascular effects. Age-related changes in ER amount, distribution, integrity and post-ER signaling could alter the vascular response to MHT. The subject’s age, preexisting CVD, and hormone environment could also reduce the effects of MHT. Further evaluation of natural and synthetic estrogens, phytoestrogens, and selective estrogen-receptor modulators (SERMs), and the design of appropriate MHT combinations, dose, route and 'timing' could improve the effectiveness of conventional MHT and provide alternative therapies in the peri-menopausal period. Targeting ER using specific ER agonists, localized MHT delivery, and activation of specific post-ER signaling pathways could counter age-related changes in ER. Examination of the hormone environment and conditions associated with hormone imbalance such as polycystic ovary syndrome may reveal the causes of abnormal hormone-receptor interactions. Consideration of these factors in new RCTs such as the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study (KEEPS) could enhance the vascular benefits of estrogen in postmenopausal CVD. PMID:24099797

  20. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester reduces the secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor through the inhibition of the ROS, PI3K and HIF-1α signaling pathways in human retinal pigment epithelial cells under hypoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Paeng, Sung Hwa; Jung, Won-Kyo; Park, Won Sun; Lee, Dae-Sung; Kim, Gi-Young; Choi, Yung Hyun; Seo, Su-Kil; Jang, Won Hee; Choi, Jung Sik; Lee, Young-Min; Park, Saegwang; Choi, Il-Whan

    2015-05-01

    Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) can lead to progressive and severe visual loss. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) promotes the development of CNV. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), a biologically active component of the honeybee (Apis mellifera) propolis, has been demonstrated to have several interesting biological regulatory properties. The objective of this study was to determine whether treatment with CAPE results in the inhibition of the production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE cells) under hypoxic conditions and to explore the possible underlying mechanisms. An in vitro experimental model of hypoxia was used to mimic an ischemic microenvironment for the RPE cells. Human RPE cells (ARPE-19) were exposed to hypoxia with or without CAPE pre-treatment. ARPE-19 cells were used to investigate the pathway involved in the regulation of VEGF production under hypoxic conditions, based on western blot analysis, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). The amount of VEGF released from the hypoxia-exposed cells was significantly higher than that of the normoxic controls. Pre-treatment with CAPE suppressed the hypoxia-induced production of VEGF in the ARPE-19 cells, and this effect was inhibited through the attenuation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and the inhibition of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) expression. These in vitro findings suggest that CAPE may prove to be a novel anti-angiogenic agent for the treatment of diseases associated with CNV. PMID:25738890

  1. Poldip2 sustains vascular structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Sutliff, Roy L.; Hilenski, Lula L.; Amanso, Angélica M.; Parastatidis, Ioannis; Dikalova, Anna E.; Hansen, Laura; Datla, Srinivasa Raju; Long, James S.; El-Ali, Alexander M.; Joseph, Giji; Gleason, Rudolph L.; Taylor, W. Robert; Hart, C. Michael; Griendling, Kathy K.; Lassègue, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Objective Based on previous evidence that polymerase delta interacting protein 2 (Poldip2) increases NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4) activity in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC), we hypothesized that in vivo knockdown of Poldip2 would inhibit reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and alter vascular function. Approach and Results Because homozygous Poldip2 deletion is lethal, Poldip2+/− mice were employed. Poldip2 mRNA and protein levels were reduced by about 50% in Poldip2+/− aorta, with no change in p22phox, Nox1, Nox2 and Nox4 mRNAs. NADPH oxidase activity was also inhibited in Poldip2+/− tissue. Isolated aortas from Poldip2+/− mice demonstrated impaired phenylephrine and potassium chloride-induced contractions, increased stiffness and reduced compliance, associated with disruption of elastic lamellae and excessive extracellular matrix deposition. Collagen I secretion was elevated in cultured VSMC from Poldip2+/− mice and restored by H2O2 supplementation, suggesting that this novel function of Poldip2 is mediated by reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, Poldip2+/− mice were protected against aortic dilatation in a model of experimental aneurysm, an effect consistent with increased collagen secretion. Conclusions Poldip2 knockdown reduces H2O2 production in vivo, leading to increases in extracellular matrix, greater vascular stiffness and impaired agonist-mediated contraction. Thus, unaltered expression of Poldip2 is necessary for vascular integrity and function. PMID:23825363

  2. Advanced noninvasive imaging of spinal vascular malformations

    PubMed Central

    Eddleman, Christopher S.; Jeong, Hyun; Cashen, Ty A.; Walker, Matthew; Bendok, Bernard R.; Batjer, H. Hunt; Carroll, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    Spinal vascular malformations (SVMs) are an uncommon, heterogeneous group of vascular anomalies that can render devastating neurological consequences if they are not diagnosed and treated in a timely fashion. Imaging SVMs has always presented a formidable challenge because their clinical and imaging presentations resemble those of neoplasms, demyelination diseases, and infection. Advancements in noninvasive imaging modalities (MR and CT angiography) have increased during the last decade and have improved the ability to accurately diagnose spinal vascular anomalies. In addition, intraoperative imaging techniques have been developed that aid in the intraoperative assessment before, during, and after resection of these lesions with minimal and/or optimal use of spinal digital subtraction angiography. In this report, the authors review recent advancements in the imaging of SVMs that will likely lead to more timely diagnoses and treatment while reducing procedural risk exposure to the patients who harbor these uncommon spinal lesions. PMID:19119895

  3. Effects of vascularization on cancer nanochemotherapy outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paiva, L. R.; Ferreira, S. C.; Martins, M. L.

    2016-08-01

    Cancer therapy requires anticancer agents capable of efficient and uniform systemic delivery. One promising route to their development is nanotechnology. Here, a previous model for cancer chemotherapy based on a nanosized drug carrier (Paiva et al., 2011) is extended by including tissue vasculature and a three-dimensional growth. We study through computer simulations the therapy against tumors demanding either large or small nutrient supplies growing under different levels of tissue vascularization. Our results indicate that highly vascularized tumors demand more aggressive therapies (larger injected doses administrated at short intervals) than poorly vascularized ones. Furthermore, nanoparticle endocytic rate by tumor cells, not its selectivity, is the major factor that determines the therapeutic success. Finally, our finds indicate that therapies combining cytotoxic agents with antiangiogenic drugs that reduce the abnormal tumor vasculature, instead of angiogenic drugs that normalize it, can lead to successful treatments using feasible endocytic rates and administration intervals.

  4. Vascular Permeability and Drug Delivery in Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Azzi, Sandy; Hebda, Jagoda K.; Gavard, Julie

    2013-01-01

    The endothelial barrier strictly maintains vascular and tissue homeostasis, and therefore modulates many physiological processes such as angiogenesis, immune responses, and dynamic exchanges throughout organs. Consequently, alteration of this finely tuned function may have devastating consequences for the organism. This is particularly obvious in cancers, where a disorganized and leaky blood vessel network irrigates solid tumors. In this context, vascular permeability drives tumor-induced angiogenesis, blood flow disturbances, inflammatory cell infiltration, and tumor cell extravasation. This can directly restrain the efficacy of conventional therapies by limiting intravenous drug delivery. Indeed, for more effective anti-angiogenic therapies, it is now accepted that not only should excessive angiogenesis be alleviated, but also that the tumor vasculature needs to be normalized. Recovery of normal state vasculature requires diminishing hyperpermeability, increasing pericyte coverage, and restoring the basement membrane, to subsequently reduce hypoxia, and interstitial fluid pressure. In this review, we will introduce how vascular permeability accompanies tumor progression and, as a collateral damage, impacts on efficient drug delivery. The molecular mechanisms involved in tumor-driven vascular permeability will next be detailed, with a particular focus on the main factors produced by tumor cells, especially the emblematic vascular endothelial growth factor. Finally, new perspectives in cancer therapy will be presented, centered on the use of anti-permeability factors and normalization agents. PMID:23967403

  5. Vascular wall extracellular matrix proteins and vascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Junyan; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular matrix proteins form the basic structure of blood vessels. Along with providing basic structural support to blood vessels, matrix proteins interact with different sets of vascular cells via cell surface integrin or non-integrin receptors. Such interactions induce vascular cell de novo synthesis of new matrix proteins during blood vessel development or remodeling. Under pathological conditions, vascular matrix proteins undergo proteolytic processing, yielding bioactive fragments to influence vascular wall matrix remodeling. Vascular cells also produce alternatively spliced variants that induce vascular cell production of different matrix proteins to interrupt matrix homeostasis, leading to increased blood vessel stiffness; vascular cell migration, proliferation, or death; or vascular wall leakage and rupture. Destruction of vascular matrix proteins leads to vascular cell or blood-borne leukocyte accumulation, proliferation, and neointima formation within the vascular wall; blood vessels prone to uncontrolled enlargement during blood flow diastole; tortuous vein development; and neovascularization from existing pathological tissue microvessels. Here we summarize discoveries related to blood vessel matrix proteins within the past decade from basic and clinical studies in humans and animals — from expression to cross-linking, assembly, and degradation under physiological and vascular pathological conditions, including atherosclerosis, aortic aneurysms, varicose veins, and hypertension. PMID:25045854

  6. Leaf hydraulics II: vascularized tissues.

    PubMed

    Rockwell, Fulton E; Holbrook, N Michele; Stroock, Abraham D

    2014-01-01

    Current models of leaf hydration employ an Ohm's law analogy of the leaf as an ideal capacitor, neglecting the resistance to flow between cells, or treat the leaf as a plane sheet with a source of water at fixed potential filling the mid-plane, neglecting the discrete placement of veins as well as their resistance. We develop a model of leaf hydration that considers the average conductance of the vascular network to a representative areole (region bounded by the vascular network), and represent the volume of tissue within the areole as a poroelastic composite of cells and air spaces. Solutions to the 3D flow problem are found by numerical simulation, and these results are then compared to 1D models with exact solutions for a range of leaf geometries, based on a survey of temperate woody plants. We then show that the hydration times given by these solutions are well approximated by a sum of the ideal capacitor and plane sheet times, representing the time for transport through the vasculature and tissue respectively. We then develop scaling factors relating this approximate solution to the 3D model, and examine the dependence of these scaling factors on leaf geometry. Finally, we apply a similar strategy to reduce the dimensions of the steady state problem, in the context of peristomatal transpiration, and consider the relation of transpirational gradients to equilibrium leaf water potential measurements. PMID:24012489

  7. Accelerated Vascular Aging as a Paradigm for Hypertensive Vascular Disease: Prevention and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Barton, Matthias; Husmann, Marc; Meyer, Matthias R

    2016-05-01

    Aging is considered the most important nonmodifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease and death after age 28 years. Because of demographic changes the world population is expected to increase to 9 billion by the year 2050 and up to 12 billion by 2100, with several-fold increases among those 65 years of age and older. Healthy aging and prevention of aging-related diseases and associated health costs have become part of political agendas of governments around the world. Atherosclerotic vascular burden increases with age; accordingly, patients with progeria (premature aging) syndromes die from myocardial infarctions or stroke as teenagers or young adults. The incidence and prevalence of arterial hypertension also increases with age. Arterial hypertension-like diabetes and chronic renal failure-shares numerous pathologies and underlying mechanisms with the vascular aging process. In this article, we review how arterial hypertension resembles premature vascular aging, including the mechanisms by which arterial hypertension (as well as other risk factors such as diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, or chronic renal failure) accelerates the vascular aging process. We will also address the importance of cardiovascular risk factor control-including antihypertensive therapy-as a powerful intervention to interfere with premature vascular aging to reduce the age-associated prevalence of diseases such as myocardial infarction, heart failure, hypertensive nephropathy, and vascular dementia due to cerebrovascular disease. Finally, we will discuss the implementation of endothelial therapy, which aims at active patient participation to improve primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. PMID:27118295

  8. The Vascular Depression Hypothesis: Mechanisms Linking Vascular Disease with Depression

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Warren D.; Aizenstein, Howard J.; Alexopoulos, George S.

    2013-01-01

    The ‘Vascular Depression’ hypothesis posits that cerebrovascular disease may predispose, precipitate, or perpetuate some geriatric depressive syndromes. This hypothesis stimulated much research that has improved our understanding of the complex relationships between late-life depression (LLD), vascular risk factors, and cognition. Succinctly, there are well-established relationships between late-life depression, vascular risk factors, and cerebral hyperintensities, the radiological hallmark of vascular depression. Cognitive dysfunction is common in late-life depression, particularly executive dysfunction, a finding predictive of poor antidepressant response. Over time, progression of hyperintensities and cognitive deficits predicts a poor course of depression and may reflect underlying worsening of vascular disease. This work laid the foundation for examining the mechanisms by which vascular disease influences brain circuits and influences the development and course of depression. We review data testing the vascular depression hypothesis with a focus on identifying potential underlying vascular mechanisms. We propose a disconnection hypothesis, wherein focal vascular damage and white matter lesion location is a crucial factor influencing neural connectivity that contributes to clinical symptomatology. We also propose inflammatory and hypoperfusion hypotheses, concepts that link underlying vascular processes with adverse effects on brain function that influence the development of depression. Testing such hypotheses will not only inform the relationship between vascular disease and depression but also provide guidance on the potential repurposing of pharmacological agents that may improve late-life depression outcomes. PMID:23439482

  9. Vascular cognitive impairment and dementia.

    PubMed

    Gorelick, Philip B; Counts, Scott E; Nyenhuis, David

    2016-05-01

    Vascular contributions to cognitive impairment are receiving heightened attention as potentially modifiable factors for dementias of later life. These factors have now been linked not only to vascular cognitive disorders but also Alzheimer's disease. In this chapter we review 3 related topics that address vascular contributions to cognitive impairment: 1. vascular pathogenesis and mechanisms; 2. neuropsychological and neuroimaging phenotypic manifestations of cerebrovascular disease; and 3. prospects for prevention of cognitive impairment of later life based on cardiovascular and stroke risk modification. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia edited by M. Paul Murphy, Roderick A. Corriveau and Donna M. Wilcock. PMID:26704177

  10. Vascular Thoracic Outlet Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Mohamad Anas; Aljabri, Badr; Al-Omran, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Two distinct terms are used to describe vascular thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) depending on which structure is predominantly affected: venous TOS (due to subclavian vein compression) and arterial TOS (due to subclavian artery compression). Although the venous and arterial subtypes of TOS affect only 3% and <1% of all TOS patients respectively, the diagnostic and management approaches to venous and arterial TOS have undergone considerable evolution due to the recent emergence of minimally invasive endovascular techniques such as catheter-directed arterial and venous thrombolysis, and balloon angioplasty. In this review, we discuss the anatomical factors, etiology, pathogenesis and clinical presentation of vascular TOS patients. In addition, we use the most up to date observational evidence available to provide a contemporary approach to the diagnosis and management of venous TOS and arterial TOS patients. PMID:27568153

  11. Vascular trauma historical notes.

    PubMed

    Rich, Norman M

    2011-03-01

    This article provides a brief historical review of treatment of vascular trauma. Although methods for ligation came into use in the second century, this knowledge was lost during the Dark Ages and did not come back until the Renaissance. Many advances in vascular surgery occurred during the Balkan Wars, World War I, and World War II, although without antibiotics and blood banking, the philosophy of life over limb still ruled. Documenting and repairing both arteries and veins became more common during the Korean and Vietnam conflicts. Increased documentation has revealed that the current conflicts have resulted in more arterial injuries than in previous wars, likely because of improved body armor, improvised explosive device attacks, tourniquet use, and improved medical evacuation time. This brief review emphasizes the great value of mentorship and the legacy of the management of arterial and venous injuries to be passed on. PMID:21502112

  12. Plant Vascular Biology 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Biao

    2014-11-17

    This grant supported the Second International Conference on Plant Vascular Biology (PVB 2010) held July 24-28, 2010 on the campus of Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. Biao Ding (Ohio State University; OSU) and David Hannapel (Iowa State University; ISU) served as co-chairs of this conference. Biao Ding served as the local organizer. PVB is defined broadly here to include studies on the biogenesis, structure and function of transport systems in plants, under conditions of normal plant growth and development as well as of plant interactions with pathogens. The transport systems cover broadly the xylem, phloem, plasmodesmata and vascular cell membranes. The PVB concept has emerged in recent years to emphasize the integrative nature of the transport systems and approaches to investigate them.

  13. Pain management in patients with vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Seretny, M; Colvin, L A

    2016-09-01

    Vascular disease covers a wide range of conditions, including arterial, venous, and lymphatic disorders, with many of these being more common in the elderly. As the population ages, the incidence of vascular disease will increase, with a consequent increase in the requirement to manage both acute and chronic pain in this patient population. Pain management can be complex, as there are often multiple co-morbidities to be considered. An understanding of the underlying pain mechanisms is helpful in the logical direction of treatment, particularly in chronic pain states, such as phantom limb pain or complex regional pain syndrome. Acute pain management for vascular surgery presents a number of challenges, including coexisting anticoagulant medication, that may preclude the use of regional techniques. Within the limited evidence base, there is a suggestion that epidural analgesia provides better pain relief and reduced respiratory complications after major vascular surgery. For carotid endarterectomy, there is again some evidence supporting the use of local anaesthetic analgesia, either by infiltration or by superficial cervical plexus block. Chronic pain in vascular disease includes post-amputation pain, for which well-known risk factors include high pain levels before amputation and in the immediate postoperative period, emphasizing the importance of good pain control in the perioperative period. Complex regional pain syndrome is another challenging chronic pain syndrome with a wide variety of treatment options available, with the strongest evidence being for physical therapies. Further research is required to gain a better understanding of the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms in pain associated with vascular disease and the best analgesic approaches to manage it. PMID:27566812

  14. Update on Vascular Dementia.

    PubMed

    Khan, Ayesha; Kalaria, Raj N; Corbett, Anne; Ballard, Clive

    2016-09-01

    Vascular dementia (VaD) is a major contributor to the dementia syndrome and is described as having problems with reasoning, planning, judgment, and memory caused by impaired blood flow to the brain and damage to the blood vessels resulting from events such as stroke. There are a variety of etiologies that contribute to the development of vascular cognitive impairment and VaD, and these are often associated with other dementia-related pathologies such as Alzheimer disease. The diagnosis of VaD is difficult due to the number and types of lesions and their locations in the brain. Factors that increase the risk of vascular diseases such as stroke, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and smoking also raise the risk of VaD. Therefore, controlling these risk factors can help lower the chances of developing VaD. This update describes the subtypes of VaD, with details of their complex presentation, associated pathological lesions, and issues with diagnosis, prevention, and treatment. PMID:27502303

  15. Pulmonary vascular malformations.

    PubMed

    Liechty, Kenneth W; Flake, Alan W

    2008-02-01

    Pulmonary vascular malformations have historically been diagnosed in a wide range of age groups, but the extensive use of prenatal imaging studies has resulted in the majority of lesions being diagnosed in utero. Among this group of lesions, bronchopulmonary sequestrations (BPS), hybrid lesions with both congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (CCAM) and BPS, aberrant systemic vascular anastomoses, and pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVM), are the most common. The biologic behavior of these lesions and the subsequent therapy is, in large part, determined by the age of the patient at diagnosis. In the fetus, large BPS or hybrid lesions can result in fetal hydrops and in utero fetal demise. In the perinatal period, pulmonary hypoplasia from the mass effect or air trapping within the cystic component of hybrid lesions can result in life-threatening respiratory distress. In the postnatal period, communication of the lesion with the aero-digestive system can result in recurrent pneumonia. Alternatively, increased pulmonary blood flow from the systemic arterial supply can result in hemorrhage, hemoptysis, or high output cardiac failure. In addition, there have been several reports of malignant degeneration. Finally, the broad spectrum encompassed by these lesions makes classification and subsequent communication of the lesions confusing and difficult. This paper will review the components of these lesions, their associated anomalies, the diagnosis and natural history, and finally, current concepts in the management of pulmonary vascular malformations. PMID:18158137

  16. Vascular Cambium Development

    PubMed Central

    Nieminen, Kaisa; Blomster, Tiina; Helariutta, Ykä; Mähönen, Ari Pekka

    2015-01-01

    Secondary phloem and xylem tissues are produced through the activity of vascular cambium, the cylindrical secondary meristem which arises among the primary plant tissues. Most dicotyledonous species undergo secondary development, among them Arabidopsis. Despite its small size and herbaceous nature, Arabidopsis displays prominent secondary growth in several organs, including the root, hypocotyl and shoot. Together with the vast genetic resources and molecular research methods available for it, this has made Arabidopsis a versatile and accessible model organism for studying cambial development and wood formation. In this review, we discuss and compare the development and function of the vascular cambium in the Arabidopsis root, hypocotyl, and shoot. We describe the current understanding of the molecular regulation of vascular cambium and compare it to the function of primary meristems. We conclude with a look at the future prospects of cambium research, including opportunities provided by phenotyping and modelling approaches, complemented by studies of natural variation and comparative genetic studies in perennial and woody plant species. PMID:26078728

  17. Delivery of Polymeric Nanoparticles to Target Vascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Agyare, Edward; Kandimalla, Karunyna

    2015-01-01

    Current advances in nanotechnology have paved the way for the early detection, prevention and treatment of various diseases such as vascular disorders and cancer. These advances have provided novel approaches or modalities of incorporating or adsorbing therapeutic, biosensor and targeting agents into/on nanoparticles. With significant progress, nanomedicine for vascular therapy has shown significant advantages over traditional medicine because of its ability to selectively target the disease site and reduce adverse side effects. Targeted delivery of nanoparticles to vascular endothelial cells or the vascular wall provides an effective and more efficient way for early detection and/or treatment of vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis, thrombosis and Cerebrovascular Amyloid Angiopathy (CAA). Clinical applications of biocompatible and biodegradable polymers in areas such as vascular graft, implantable drug delivery, stent devices and tissue engineering scaffolds have advanced the candidature of polymers as potential nano-carriers for vascular-targeted delivery of diagnostic agents and drugs. This review focuses on the basic aspects of the vasculature and its associated diseases and relates them to polymeric nanoparticle-based strategies for targeting therapeutic agents to diseased vascular site. PMID:26069867

  18. Vinpocetine Attenuates the Osteoblastic Differentiation of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yun-Yun; Sun, Lin; Chen, Xiu-Juan; Wang, Na; Yi, Peng-Fei; Song, Min; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Yu-Zhong; Liang, Qiu-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Vascular calcification is an active process of osteoblastic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells; however, its definite mechanism remains unknown. Vinpocetine, a derivative of the alkaloid vincamine, has been demonstrated to inhibit the high glucose-induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells; however, it remains unknown whether vinpocetine can affect the osteoblastic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells. We hereby investigated the effect of vinpocetine on vascular calcification using a beta-glycerophosphate-induced cell model. Our results showed that vinpocetine significantly reduced the osteoblast-like phenotypes of vascular smooth muscle cells including ALP activity, osteocalcin, collagen type I, Runx2 and BMP-2 expression as well as the formation of mineralized nodule. Vinpocetine, binding to translocation protein, induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-related kinase and Akt and thus inhibited the translocation of nuclear factor-kappa B into the nucleus. Silencing of translocator protein significantly attenuated the inhibitory effect of vinpocetine on osteoblastic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells. Taken together, vinpocetine may be a promising candidate for the clinical therapy of vascular calcification. PMID:27589055

  19. Retinal vascular changes are a marker for cerebral vascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Heather E.

    2016-01-01

    The retinal circulation is a potential marker of cerebral vascular disease because it shares origin and drainage with the intracranial circulation and because it can be directly visualized using ophthalmoscopy. Cross sectional and cohort studies have demonstrated associations between chronic retinal and cerebral vascular disease, acute retinal and cerebral vascular disease and chronic retinal vascular disease and acute cerebral vascular disease. In particular, certain qualitative features of retinopathy, retinal artery occlusion and increased retinal vein caliber are associated with concurrent and future cerebrovascular events. These associations persist after accounting for confounding variables known to be disease-causing in both circulations, which supports the potential use of retinal vasculature findings to stratify individuals with regards to cerebral vascular disease risk. PMID:26008809

  20. Genetic Pathways of Vascular Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Marion A. Hofmann; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2012-01-01

    Vascular calcification is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Arterial calcification of the aorta, coronary, carotid and peripheral arteries becomes more prevalent with age. Genomewide association studies have identified regions of the genome linked to vascular calcification, and these same regions are linked to myocardial infarction risk. The 9p21 region linked to vascular disease and inflammation also associates with vascular calcification. In addition to these common variants, rare genetic defects can serve as primary triggers of accelerated and premature calcification. Infancy-associated calcific disorders are caused by loss of function mutations in ENPP1 an enzyme that produces extracellular pyrophosphate. Adult onset vascular calcification is linked to mutations NTE5, another enzyme that regulates extracellular phosphate metabolism. Common conditions that secondarily enhance vascular calcification include atherosclerosis, metabolic dysfunction, diabetes, and impaired renal clearance. Oxidative stress and vascular inflammation, along with biophysical properties, converge with these predisposing factors to promote soft tissue mineralization. Vascular calcification is accompanied by an osteogenic profile, and this osteogenic conversion is seen within the vascular smooth muscle itself as well as the matrix. Herein we will review the genetic causes of medial calcification in the smooth muscle layer, focusing on recent discoveries of gene mutations that regulate extracellular matrix phosphate production and the role of S100 proteins as promoters of vascular calcification. PMID:23040839

  1. [How Treatable is Vascular Dementia?].

    PubMed

    Mori, Etsuro

    2016-04-01

    Vascular dementia is an umbrella term, encompassing the pathological changes in the brain due to cerebrovascular disease that result in dementia. Vascular dementia is the second most common form of dementia, after Alzheimer's disease. In this paper, I outline the concept of vascular dementia, the key aspects of the disease that are yet to be clarified, and the current status of clinical trials. Assessing these factors, I discuss how treatable vascular dementia presently is. Use of the term'vascular dementia'is riddled with uncertainties regarding disease classification, and non-standardized diagnostic criteria. There are difficulties in determining the exact relationship between cerebrovascular pathology and cognitive impairment. The comorbid effects of Alzheimer's pathology in some individuals also present an obstacle to reliable clinical diagnosis, and hinder research into effective management approaches. Vascular dementia is preventable and treatable, as there are established primary and secondary prevention measures for the causative cerebrovascular diseases, such as vascular risk factor intervention, antiplatelet therapy, and anticoagulation, amongst others. However, unlike Alzheimer's disease, there are no established symptomatic treatments for vascular dementia. Clinical trials of cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine indicate that they produce small cognitive benefits in patients with vascular dementia, though the exact clinical significance of these is uncertain. Data are insufficient to support the widespread use of these drugs in vascular dementia. Rehabilitation and physical and cognitive exercise may be beneficial, but evidence of cognitive benefit and relief of neuropsychiatric symptoms due to exercise is lacking. PMID:27056862

  2. Serotonylation of Vascular Proteins Important to Contraction

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Stephanie W.; Priestley, Jessica R. C.; Thompson, Janice M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) was named for its source (sero-) and ability to modify smooth muscle tone (tonin). The biological effects of 5-HT are believed to be carried out by stimulation of serotonin receptors at the plasma membrane. Serotonin has recently been shown to be synthesized in vascular smooth muscle and taken up from external sources, placing 5-HT inside the cell. The enzyme transglutaminase uses primary amines such as 5-HT to covalently modify proteins on glutamine residues. We tested the hypothesis that 5-HT is a substrate for transglutaminase in arterial vascular smooth muscle, with protein serotonylation having physiological function. Methodology/Principal Findings The model was the rat aorta and cultured aortic smooth muscle cells. Western analysis demonstrated that transglutaminase II was present in vascular tissue, and transglutaminase activity was observed as a cystamine-inhibitable incorporation of the free amine pentylamine-biotin into arterial proteins. Serotonin-biotin was incorporated into α -actin, β-actin, γ-actin, myosin heavy chain and filamin A as shown through tandem mass spectrometry. Using antibodies directed against biotin or 5-HT, immunoprecipitation and immunocytochemistry confirmed serotonylation of smooth muscle α–actin. Importantly, the α-actin-dependent process of arterial isometric contraction to 5-HT was reduced by cystamine. Conclusions 5-HT covalently modifies proteins integral to contractility and the cytoskeleton. These findings suggest new mechanisms of action for 5-HT in vascular smooth muscle and consideration for intracellular effects of primary amines. PMID:19479059

  3. Nanoengineering of therapeutics for retinal vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Gahlaut, Nivriti; Suarez, Sandra; Uddin, Md Imam; Gordon, Andrew Y; Evans, Stephanie M; Jayagopal, Ashwath

    2015-09-01

    Retinal vascular diseases, including diabetic retinopathy, neovascular age related macular degeneration, and retinal vein occlusion, are leading causes of blindness in the Western world. These diseases share several common disease mechanisms, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling, hypoxia, and inflammation, which provide opportunities for common therapeutic strategies. Treatment of these diseases using laser therapy, anti-VEGF injections, and/or steroids has significantly improved clinical outcomes. However, these strategies do not address the underlying root causes of pathology, and may have deleterious side effects. Furthermore, many patients continue to progress toward legal blindness despite receiving regular therapy. Nanomedicine, the engineering of therapeutics at the 1-100 nm scale, is a promising approach for improving clinical management of retinal vascular diseases. Nanomedicine-based technologies have the potential to revolutionize the treatment of ophthalmology, through enabling sustained release of drugs over several months, reducing side effects due to specific targeting of dysfunctional cells, and interfacing with currently "undruggable" targets. We will discuss emerging nanomedicine-based applications for the treatment of complications associated with retinal vascular diseases, including angiogenesis and inflammation. PMID:26022642

  4. Mechanics of Vascular Smooth Muscle.

    PubMed

    Ratz, Paul H

    2015-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle (VSM; see Table 1 for a list of abbreviations) is a heterogeneous biomaterial comprised of cells and extracellular matrix. By surrounding tubes of endothelial cells, VSM forms a regulated network, the vasculature, through which oxygenated blood supplies specialized organs, permitting the development of large multicellular organisms. VSM cells, the engine of the vasculature, house a set of regulated nanomotors that permit rapid stress-development, sustained stress-maintenance and vessel constriction. Viscoelastic materials within, surrounding and attached to VSM cells, comprised largely of polymeric proteins with complex mechanical characteristics, assist the engine with countering loads imposed by the heart pump, and with control of relengthening after constriction. The complexity of this smart material can be reduced by classical mechanical studies combined with circuit modeling using spring and dashpot elements. Evaluation of the mechanical characteristics of VSM requires a more complete understanding of the mechanics and regulation of its biochemical parts, and ultimately, an understanding of how these parts work together to form the machinery of the vascular tree. Current molecular studies provide detailed mechanical data about single polymeric molecules, revealing viscoelasticity and plasticity at the protein domain level, the unique biological slip-catch bond, and a regulated two-step actomyosin power stroke. At the tissue level, new insight into acutely dynamic stress-strain behavior reveals smooth muscle to exhibit adaptive plasticity. At its core, physiology aims to describe the complex interactions of molecular systems, clarifying structure-function relationships and regulation of biological machines. The intent of this review is to provide a comprehensive presentation of one biomachine, VSM. PMID:26756629

  5. Abdominal Vascular Catastrophes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manpreet; Koyfman, Alex; Martinez, Joseph P

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal vascular catastrophes are among the most challenging and time sensitive for emergency practitioners to recognize. Mesenteric ischemia remains a highly lethal entity for which the history and physical examination can be misleading. Laboratory tests are often unhelpful, and appropriate imaging must be quickly obtained. A multidisciplinary approach is required to have a positive impact on mortality rates. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm likewise may present in a cryptic fashion. A specific type of ruptured aneurysm, the aortoenteric fistula, often masquerades as the more common routine gastrointestinal bleed. The astute clinician recognizes that this is a more lethal variant of gastrointestinal hemorrhage. PMID:27133247

  6. The pathobiology of vascular dementia

    PubMed Central

    Iadecola, Costantino

    2013-01-01

    Vascular cognitive impairment defines alterations in cognition, ranging from subtle deficits to full-blown dementia, attributable to cerebrovascular causes. Often coexisting with Alzheimer’s disease, mixed vascular and neurodegenerative dementia has emerged as the leading cause of age-related cognitive impairment. Central to the disease mechanism is the crucial role that cerebral blood vessels play in brain health, not only for the delivery of oxygen and nutrients, but also for the trophic signaling that links inextricably the well being of neurons and glia to that of cerebrovascular cells. This review will examine how vascular damage disrupts these vital homeostatic interactions, focusing on the hemispheric white matter, a region at heightened risk for vascular damage, and on the interplay between vascular factors and Alzheimer’s disease. Finally, preventative and therapeutic prospects will be examined, highlighting the importance of midlife vascular risk factor control in the prevention of late-life dementia. PMID:24267647

  7. Medical management of vascular anomalies.

    PubMed

    Trenor, Cameron C

    2016-03-01

    We have entered an exciting era in the care of patients with vascular anomalies. These disorders require multidisciplinary care and coordination and dedicated centers have emerged to address this need. Vascular tumors have been treated with medical therapies for many years, while malformations have been historically treated with endovascular and operative procedures. The recent serendipitous discoveries of propranolol and sirolimus for vascular anomalies have revolutionized this field. In particular, sirolimus responses are challenging the dogma that vascular malformations are not biologically active. While initially explored for lymphatic anomalies, sirolimus is now being used broadly throughout the spectrum of vascular anomalies. Whether medical therapies are reserved for refractory patients or used first line is currently dependent on the experience and availability of alternative therapies at each institution. On the horizon, we anticipate new drugs targeting genes and pathways involved in vascular anomalies to be developed. Also, combinations of medications and protocols combining medical and procedural approaches are in development for refractory patients. PMID:27607327

  8. Vascular trauma in civilian practice.

    PubMed Central

    Golledge, J.; Scriven, M. W.; Fligelstone, L. J.; Lane, I. F.

    1995-01-01

    Vascular trauma is associated with major morbidity and mortality, but little is known about its incidence or nature in Britain. A retrospective study of 36 patients requiring operative intervention for vascular trauma under one vascular surgeon over a 6-year period was undertaken. Twenty-four patients suffered iatrogenic trauma (median age 61 years); including cardiological intervention (19), radiological intervention (2), varicose vein surgery (1), umbilical vein catherisation (1) and isolated hyperthermic limb perfusion (1). There were 23 arterial and three venous injuries. Twelve patients had accidental trauma (median age 23 years). Three of the ten patients with blunt trauma were referred for vascular assessment before orthopaedic intervention, two after an on-table angiogram and five only after an initial orthopaedic procedure (range of delay 6 h to 10 days). Injuries were arterial in nine, venous in two and combined in one. Angiography was obtained in six patients, and in two patients with multiple upper limb fractures identified the site of injury when clinical localisation was difficult. A variety of vascular techniques were used to treat the injuries. Two patients died postoperatively and one underwent major limb amputation. Thirty-two (89%) remain free of vascular sequelae after a median follow-up of 48 months (range 3-72 months). Vascular trauma is uncommon in the United Kingdom. To repair the injuries a limited repertoire of vascular surgery techniques is needed. Therefore, vascular surgical assessment should be sought at an early stage to prevent major limb loss. PMID:8540659

  9. Pulmonary vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Mélot, C; Naeije, R

    2011-04-01

    Diseases of the pulmonary vasculature are a cause of increased pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) in pulmonary embolism, chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH), and pulmonary arterial hypertension or decreased PVR in pulmonary arteriovenous malformations on hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, portal hypertension, or cavopulmonary anastomosis. All these conditions are associated with a decrease in both arterial PO2 and PCO2. Gas exchange in pulmonary vascular diseases with increased PVR is characterized by a shift of ventilation and perfusion to high ventilation-perfusion ratios, a mild to moderate increase in perfusion to low ventilation-perfusion ratios, and an increased physiologic dead space. Hypoxemia in these patients is essentially explained by altered ventilation-perfusion matching amplified by a decreased mixed venous PO2 caused by a low cardiac output. Hypocapnia is accounted for by hyperventilation, which is essentially related to an increased chemosensitivity. A cardiac shunt on a patent foramen ovale may be a cause of severe hypoxemia in a proportion of patients with pulmonary hypertension and an increase in right atrial pressure. Gas exchange in pulmonary arteriovenous malformations is characterized by variable degree of pulmonary shunting and/or diffusion-perfusion imbalance. Hypocapnia is caused by an increased ventilation in relation to an increased pulmonary blood flow with direct peripheral chemoreceptor stimulation by shunted mixed venous blood flow. PMID:23737196

  10. [Vascular vertigo syndromes].

    PubMed

    Dieterich, M

    2002-12-01

    Ischemia,hemorrhages, and other vascular disorders can result in various central or peripheral vestibular syndromes with vertigo, oculomotor/balance disturbances, and nausea. The vascular vertigo syndromes listed in Table 1 can however be brought about by other causes such as demyelitizing focuses in multiple sclerosis or space-occupying lesions, so that not only localization of the damaged structure but also the various etiologies are decisive for the choice of therapy. Occasionally, combined functional disturbances of the peripheral and central vestibular system appear, such as an infarction of the inferior anterior cerebellar artery, which supplies the labyrinth and parts of the brainstem and cerebellum. In rare cases, a central lesion can have the same signs as a peripheral-vertibular disturbance: a lacunar infarct at the root entry zone of the eighth nerve can mimic a unilateral partial loss of labyrinth function as it occurs in vestibular neuritis, thus named "pseudoneuritis". Differential diagnosis between vestibular migraine, vestibular paroxysmia, transient ischemic brainstem attacks, and Meniere's disease is sometimes so difficult that only trial therapies such as prophylaxis with beta blockers, carbamazepine, thrombocyte aggregation inhibitors, antiplatelet drugs, or betahistin can clarify the issue. PMID:12486562

  11. Vascular Distribution of Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, Phoebe A.; Nurkiewicz, Timothy R.

    2014-01-01

    Once considered primarily occupational, novel nanotechnology innovation and application has led to widespread domestic use and intentional biomedical exposures. With these exciting advances, the breadth and depth of toxicological considerations must also be expanded. The vascular system interacts with every tissue in the body, striving to homeostasis. Engineered nanomaterials (ENM) have been reported to distribute in many different organs and tissues. However, these observations have tended to use approaches requiring tissue homogenization and/or gross organ analyses. These techniques, while effective in establishing presence, preclude an exact determination of where ENM are deposited within a tissue. It is necessary to identify this exact distribution and deposition of ENM throughout the cardiovascular system, with respect to vascular hemodynamics and in vivo/ in vitro ENM modifications taken into account if nanotechnology is to achieve its full potential. Distinct levels of the vasculature will first be described as individual compartments. Then the vasculature will be considered as a whole. These unique compartments and biophysical conditions will be discussed in terms of their propensity to favor ENM deposition. Understanding levels of the vasculature will also be discussed. Ultimately, future studies must verify the mechanisms speculated on and presented herein. PMID:24777845

  12. Chemerin Regulates Crosstalk Between Adipocytes and Vascular Cells Through Nox.

    PubMed

    Neves, Karla Bianca; Nguyen Dinh Cat, Aurelie; Lopes, Rheure Alves Moreira; Rios, Francisco Jose; Anagnostopoulou, Aikaterini; Lobato, Nubia Souza; de Oliveira, Ana Maria; Tostes, Rita C; Montezano, Augusto C; Touyz, Rhian M

    2015-09-01

    Adipocytes produce adipokines, including chemerin, a chemoattractant that mediates effects through its ChemR23 receptor. Chemerin has been linked to endothelial dysfunction and vascular injury in pathological conditions, such as obesity, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension. Molecular mechanisms underlying this are elusive. Here we assessed whether chemerin through redox-sensitive signaling influences molecular processes associated with vascular growth, apoptosis, and inflammation. Human microvascular endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells were stimulated with chemerin (50 ng/mL). Chemerin increased generation of reactive oxygen species and phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, effects that were inhibited by ML171, GKT137831 (Nox inhibitors), and N-acetylcysteine (reactive oxygen species scavenger). Chemerin increased mRNA expression of proinflammatory mediators in vascular cells and increased monocyte-to-endothelial cell attachment. In human vascular smooth muscle cells, chemerin induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases and stimulated proliferation (increased proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression [proliferation marker] and BrdU incorporation [proliferation assay]). Chemerin decreased phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B activation and increased TUNEL-positive human vascular smooth muscle cells. In human microvascular endothelial cells, chemerin reduced endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity and nitric oxide production. Adipocyte-conditioned medium from obese/diabetic mice (db/db), which have elevated chemerin levels, increased reactive oxygen species generation in vascular smooth muscle cells, whereas adipocyte-conditioned medium from control mice had no effect. Chemerin actions were blocked by CCX 832, a ChemR23 inhibitor. Our data demonstrate that chemerin, through Nox activation and redox-sensitive mitogen-activated protein kinases signaling, exerts proapoptotic, proinflammatory, and

  13. 219 vascular fellows' perception of the future of vascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Hingorani, Anil P; Ascher, Enrico; Marks, Natalie; Shiferson, Alexander; Puggioni, Alessandra; Tran, Victor; Patel, Nirav; Jacob, Theresa

    2009-01-01

    In an attempt to identify the fellows' concerns about the future of the field of vascular surgery, we conducted a survey consisting of 22 questions at an annual national meeting in March from 2004 to 2007. In order to obtain accurate data, all surveys were kept anonymous. The fellows were asked (1) what type of practice they anticipated they would be in, (2) what the new training paradigm for fellows should be, (3) to assess their expectation of the needed manpower with respect to the demand for vascular surgeons, (4) what were major threats to the future of vascular surgery, (5) whether they had heard of and were in favor of the American Board of Vascular Surgery (ABVS), (6) who should be able to obtain vascular privileges, and (7) about their interest in an association for vascular surgical trainees. Of 273 attendees, 219 (80%) completed the survey. Males made up 87% of those surveyed, and 60% were between the ages of 31 and 35 years. Second-year fellows made up 82% of those surveyed. Those expecting to join a private, academic, or mixed practice made up 35%, 28%, and 20% of the respondents, respectively, with 71% anticipating entering a 100% vascular practice. Forty percent felt that 5 years of general surgery with 2 years of vascular surgery should be the training paradigm, while 45% suggested 3 and 3 years, respectively. A majority, 79%, felt that future demand would exceed the available manpower, while 17% suggested that manpower would meet demand. The major challenges to the future of vascular surgery were felt to be competition from cardiology (82%) or radiology (30%) and lack of an independent board (29%). Seventeen percent were not aware of the ABVS, and only 2% were against it; 71% suggested that vascular privileges be restricted to board-certified vascular surgeons. Seventy-six percent were interested in forming an association for vascular trainees to address the issues of the future job market (67%), endovascular training during fellowship (56

  14. Interactive effects of vascular risk burden and advanced age on cerebral blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Bangen, Katherine J.; Nation, Daniel A.; Clark, Lindsay R.; Harmell, Alexandrea L.; Wierenga, Christina E.; Dev, Sheena I.; Delano-Wood, Lisa; Zlatar, Zvinka Z.; Salmon, David P.; Liu, Thomas T.; Bondi, Mark W.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular risk factors and cerebral blood flow (CBF) reduction have been linked to increased risk of cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease (AD); however the possible moderating effects of age and vascular risk burden on CBF in late life remain understudied. We examined the relationships among elevated vascular risk burden, age, CBF, and cognition. Seventy-one non-demented older adults completed an arterial spin labeling MR scan, neuropsychological assessment, and medical history interview. Relationships among vascular risk burden, age, and CBF were examined in a priori regions of interest (ROIs) previously implicated in aging and AD. Interaction effects indicated that, among older adults with elevated vascular risk burden (i.e., multiple vascular risk factors), advancing age was significantly associated with reduced cortical CBF whereas there was no such relationship for those with low vascular risk burden (i.e., no or one vascular risk factor). This pattern was observed in cortical ROIs including medial temporal (hippocampus, parahippocampal gyrus, uncus), inferior parietal (supramarginal gyrus, inferior parietal lobule, angular gyrus), and frontal (anterior cingulate, middle frontal gyrus, medial frontal gyrus) cortices. Furthermore, among those with elevated vascular risk, reduced CBF was associated with poorer cognitive performance. Such findings suggest that older adults with elevated vascular risk burden may be particularly vulnerable to cognitive change as a function of CBF reductions. Findings support the use of CBF as a potential biomarker in preclinical AD and suggest that vascular risk burden and regionally-specific CBF changes may contribute to differential age-related cognitive declines. PMID:25071567

  15. Development of a clinical prediction rule to improve peripheral intravenous cannulae first attempt success in the emergency department and reduce post insertion failure rates: the Vascular Access Decisions in the Emergency Room (VADER) study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Peter J; Rippey, James C R; Cooke, Marie L; Bharat, Chrianna; Murray, Kevin; Higgins, Niall S; Foale, Aileen; Rickard, Claire M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Peripheral intravenous cannula (PIVC) insertion is one of the most common clinical interventions performed in emergency care worldwide. However, factors associated with successful PIVC placement and maintenance are not well understood. This study seeks to determine the predictors of first time PIVC insertion success in emergency department (ED) and identify the rationale for removal of the ED inserted PIVC in patients admitted to the hospital ward. Reducing failed insertion attempts and improving peripheral intravenous cannulation practice could lead to better staff and patient experiences, as well as improving hospital efficiency. Methods and analysis We propose an observational cohort study of PIVC insertions in a patient population presenting to ED, with follow-up observation of the PIVC in subsequent admissions to the hospital ward. We will collect specific PIVC observational data such as; clinician factors, patient factors, device information and clinical practice variables. Trained researchers will gather ED PIVC insertion data to identify predictors of insertion success. In those admitted from the ED, we will determine the dwell time of the ED-inserted PIVC. Multivariate regression analyses will be used to identify factors associated with insertions success and PIVC failure and standard statistical validation techniques will be used to create and assess the effectiveness of a clinical predication rule. Ethics and dissemination The findings of our study will provide new evidence to improve insertion success rates in the ED setting and identify strategies to reduce premature device failure for patients admitted to hospital wards. Results will unravel a complexity of factors that contribute to unsuccessful PIVC attempts such as patient and clinician factors along with the products, technologies and infusates used. Trial registration number ACTRN12615000588594; Pre-results. PMID:26868942

  16. Restenosis: a challenge for vascular surgeon.

    PubMed

    Setacci, C; Castelli, P; Chiesa, R; Grego, F; Simoni, G A; Stella, A; Galzerano, G; Sirignano, P; De Donato, G; Setacci, F

    2012-12-01

    From the beginning of the cardiovascular surgery to the endovascular era restenosis represents the main problem of several spreading vascular disciplines. It can be considered as an excessive wound healing reaction of target vessel of revascularization procedures, that leads to a new narrowing of the vascular lumen. Restenosis still represents the main limiting factor of the long-term success of revascularization procedures. Prevention and strict follow-up are well established techniques in order to reduce restenosis rate and clinical impact of this condition. New drugs as cilostazol have been proven beneficial for patients with de novo lesions of peripheral arteries and cilostazol seems to avoid restenosis process in the majority of patients. PMID:23207556

  17. Caffeine's Vascular Mechanisms of Action

    PubMed Central

    Echeverri, Darío; Montes, Félix R.; Cabrera, Mariana; Galán, Angélica; Prieto, Angélica

    2010-01-01

    Caffeine is the most widely consumed stimulating substance in the world. It is found in coffee, tea, soft drinks, chocolate, and many medications. Caffeine is a xanthine with various effects and mechanisms of action in vascular tissue. In endothelial cells, it increases intracellular calcium stimulating the production of nitric oxide through the expression of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase enzyme. Nitric oxide is diffused to the vascular smooth muscle cell to produce vasodilation. In vascular smooth muscle cells its effect is predominantly a competitive inhibition of phosphodiesterase, producing an accumulation of cAMP and vasodilation. In addition, it blocks the adenosine receptors present in the vascular tissue to produce vasoconstriction. In this paper the main mechanisms of action of caffeine on the vascular tissue are described, in which it is shown that caffeine has some cardiovascular properties and effects which could be considered beneficial. PMID:21188209

  18. Neurite Mistargeting and Inverse Order of Intraretinal Vascular Plexus Formation Precede Subretinal Vascularization in Vldlr Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Verity; Xiang, Mengqing; Chen, Zhe; Junge, Harald J.

    2015-01-01

    In the retina blood vessels are required to support a high metabolic rate, however, uncontrolled vascular growth can lead to impaired vision and blindness. Subretinal vascularization (SRV), one type of pathological vessel growth, occurs in retinal angiomatous proliferation and proliferative macular telangiectasia. In these diseases SRV originates from blood vessels within the retina. We use mice with a targeted disruption in the Vldl-receptor (Vldlr) gene as a model to study SRV with retinal origin. We find that Vldlr mRNA is strongly expressed in the neuroretina, and we observe both vascular and neuronal phenotypes in Vldlr-/- mice. Unexpectedly, horizontal cell (HC) neurites are mistargeted prior to SRV in this model, and the majority of vascular lesions are associated with mistargeted neurites. In Foxn4-/- mice, which lack HCs and display reduced amacrine cell (AC) numbers, we find severe defects in intraretinal capillary development. However, SRV is not suppressed in Foxn4-/-;Vldlr-/- mice, which reveals that mistargeted HC neurites are not required for vascular lesion formation. In the absence of VLDLR, the intraretinal capillary plexuses form in an inverse order compared to normal development, and subsequent to this early defect, vascular proliferation is increased. We conclude that SRV in the Vldlr-/- model is associated with mistargeted neurites and that SRV is preceded by altered retinal vascular development. PMID:26177550

  19. Heme oxygenase-1 protects against vascular constriction and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Duckers, H J; Boehm, M; True, A L; Yet, S F; San, H; Park, J L; Clinton Webb, R; Lee, M E; Nabel, G J; Nabel, E G

    2001-06-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO-1, encoded by Hmox1) is an inducible protein activated in systemic inflammatory conditions by oxidant stress. Vascular injury is characterized by a local reparative process with inflammatory components, indicating a potential protective role for HO-1 in arterial wound repair. Here we report that HO-1 directly reduces vasoconstriction and inhibits cell proliferation during vascular injury. Expression of HO-1 in arteries stimulated vascular relaxation, mediated by guanylate cyclase and cGMP, independent of nitric oxide. The unexpected effects of HO-1 on vascular smooth muscle cell growth were mediated by cell-cycle arrest involving p21Cip1. HO-1 reduced the proliferative response to vascular injury in vivo; expression of HO-1 in pig arteries inhibited lesion formation and Hmox1-/- mice produced hyperplastic arteries compared with controls. Induction of the HO-1 pathway moderates the severity of vascular injury by at least two adaptive mechanisms independent of nitric oxide, and is a potential therapeutic target for diseases of the vasculature. PMID:11385506

  20. Influence of vascular function and pulsatile hemodynamics on cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Bell, Vanessa; Mitchell, Gary F

    2015-09-01

    Interactions between cardiac and vascular structure and function normally are optimized to ensure delivery of cardiac output with modest pulsatile hemodynamic overhead. Aortic stiffening with age or disease impairs optimal ventricular-vascular coupling, increases pulsatile load, and contributes to left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy, reduced systolic function, and impaired diastolic relaxation. Aortic pulse pressure and timing of peak systolic pressure are well-known measures of hemodynamic ventricular-vascular interaction. Recent work has elucidated the importance of direct, mechanical coupling between the aorta and the heart. LV systolic contraction results in displacement of aortic and mitral annuli, thereby producing longitudinal stretch in the ascending aorta and left atrium, respectively. Force associated with longitudinal stretch increases systolic load on the LV. However, the resulting energy stored in the elastic elements of the proximal aorta during systole facilitates early diastolic LV recoil and rapid filling. This review discusses current views on hemodynamics and mechanics of ventricular-vascular coupling. PMID:26164466

  1. Vascular inflammation and the renin-angiotensin system.

    PubMed

    Brasier, Allan R; Recinos, Adrian; Eledrisi, Mohsen S

    2002-08-01

    is by reducing vascular inflammation. Moreover, antagonizing the vascular nuclear factor-kappaB and/or hepatic JAK/STAT pathways may modulate the atherosclerotic process. PMID:12171785

  2. Vascular Inflammatory Cells in Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, David G.; Marvar, Paul J.; Titze, Jens M.

    2012-01-01

    Hypertension is a common disorder with uncertain etiology. In the last several years, it has become evident that components of both the innate and adaptive immune system play an essential role in hypertension. Macrophages and T cells accumulate in the perivascular fat, the heart and the kidney of hypertensive patients, and in animals with experimental hypertension. Various immunosuppressive agents lower blood pressure and prevent end-organ damage. Mice lacking lymphocytes are protected against hypertension, and adoptive transfer of T cells, but not B cells in the animals restores their blood pressure response to stimuli such as angiotensin II or high salt. Recent studies have shown that mice lacking macrophages have blunted hypertension in response to angiotensin II and that genetic deletion of macrophages markedly reduces experimental hypertension. Dendritic cells have also been implicated in this disease. Many hypertensive stimuli have triggering effects on the central nervous system and signals arising from the circumventricular organ seem to promote inflammation. Studies have suggested that central signals activate macrophages and T cells, which home to the kidney and vasculature and release cytokines, including IL-6 and IL-17, which in turn cause renal and vascular dysfunction and lead to blood pressure elevation. These recent discoveries provide a new understanding of hypertension and provide novel therapeutic opportunities for treatment of this serious disease. PMID:22586409

  3. Acceleration of vascularized bone tissue-engineered constructs in a large animal model combining intrinsic and extrinsic vascularization.

    PubMed

    Weigand, Annika; Beier, Justus P; Hess, Andreas; Gerber, Thomas; Arkudas, Andreas; Horch, Raymund E; Boos, Anja M

    2015-05-01

    ingrowth and remodeling processes of the bone substitute. Extrinsic vessels contribute to faster vascularization and finally anastomose with intrinsic vasculature, allowing microvascular transplantation of the bone substitute after a shorter prevascularization time than using the intrinsic method only. It can be reasonably assumed that the usage of perforated chambers can significantly reduce the time until transplantation of bone constructs. Finally, this study paves the way for further preclinical testing for proof of the concept as a basis for early clinical applicability. PMID:25760576

  4. Vinpocetine suppresses pathological vascular remodeling by inhibiting vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yujun; Knight, Walter E; Guo, Shujie; Li, Jian-Dong; Knight, Peter A; Yan, Chen

    2012-11-01

    Abnormal vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) activation is associated with various vascular disorders such as atherosclerosis, in-stent restenosis, vein graft disease, and transplantation-associated vasculopathy. Vinpocetine, a derivative of the alkaloid vincamine, has long been used as a cerebral blood flow enhancer for treating cognitive impairment. However, its role in pathological vascular remodeling remains unexplored. Herein, we show that systemic administration of vinpocetine significantly reduced neointimal formation in carotid arteries after ligation injury. Vinpocetine also markedly decreased spontaneous remodeling of human saphenous vein explants in ex vivo culture. In cultured SMCs, vinpocetine dose-dependently suppressed cell proliferation and caused G1-phase cell cycle arrest, which is associated with a decrease in cyclin D1 and an increase in p27Kip1 levels. In addition, vinpocetine dose-dependently inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-stimulated SMC migration as determined by the two-dimensional migration assays and three-dimensional aortic medial explant invasive assay. Moreover, vinpocetine significantly reduced PDGF-induced type I collagen and fibronectin expression. It is noteworthy that PDGF-stimulated phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), but not protein kinase B, was specifically inhibited by vinpocetine. Vinpocetine powerfully attenuated intracellular reactive oxidative species (ROS) production, which largely mediates the inhibitory effects of vinpocetine on ERK1/2 activation and SMC growth. Taken together, our results reveal a novel function of vinpocetine in attenuating neointimal hyperplasia and pathological vascular remodeling, at least partially through suppressing ROS production and ERK1/2 activation in SMCs. Given the safety profile of vinpocetine, this study provides insight into the therapeutic potential of vinpocetine in proliferative vascular disorders. PMID:22915768

  5. Vinpocetine Suppresses Pathological Vascular Remodeling by Inhibiting Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yujun; Knight, Walter E.; Guo, Shujie; Li, Jian-Dong; Knight, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    Abnormal vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) activation is associated with various vascular disorders such as atherosclerosis, in-stent restenosis, vein graft disease, and transplantation-associated vasculopathy. Vinpocetine, a derivative of the alkaloid vincamine, has long been used as a cerebral blood flow enhancer for treating cognitive impairment. However, its role in pathological vascular remodeling remains unexplored. Herein, we show that systemic administration of vinpocetine significantly reduced neointimal formation in carotid arteries after ligation injury. Vinpocetine also markedly decreased spontaneous remodeling of human saphenous vein explants in ex vivo culture. In cultured SMCs, vinpocetine dose-dependently suppressed cell proliferation and caused G1-phase cell cycle arrest, which is associated with a decrease in cyclin D1 and an increase in p27Kip1 levels. In addition, vinpocetine dose-dependently inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-stimulated SMC migration as determined by the two-dimensional migration assays and three-dimensional aortic medial explant invasive assay. Moreover, vinpocetine significantly reduced PDGF-induced type I collagen and fibronectin expression. It is noteworthy that PDGF-stimulated phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), but not protein kinase B, was specifically inhibited by vinpocetine. Vinpocetine powerfully attenuated intracellular reactive oxidative species (ROS) production, which largely mediates the inhibitory effects of vinpocetine on ERK1/2 activation and SMC growth. Taken together, our results reveal a novel function of vinpocetine in attenuating neointimal hyperplasia and pathological vascular remodeling, at least partially through suppressing ROS production and ERK1/2 activation in SMCs. Given the safety profile of vinpocetine, this study provides insight into the therapeutic potential of vinpocetine in proliferative vascular disorders. PMID:22915768

  6. In vivo quantitative evaluation of vascular parameters for angiogenesis based on sparse principal component analysis and aggregated boosted trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Fengjun; Liu, Junting; Qu, Xiaochao; Xu, Xianhui; Chen, Xueli; Yang, Xiang; Cao, Feng; Liang, Jimin; Tian, Jie

    2014-12-01

    To solve the multicollinearity issue and unequal contribution of vascular parameters for the quantification of angiogenesis, we developed a quantification evaluation method of vascular parameters for angiogenesis based on in vivo micro-CT imaging of hindlimb ischemic model mice. Taking vascular volume as the ground truth parameter, nine vascular parameters were first assembled into sparse principal components (PCs) to reduce the multicolinearity issue. Aggregated boosted trees (ABTs) were then employed to analyze the importance of vascular parameters for the quantification of angiogenesis via the loadings of sparse PCs. The results demonstrated that vascular volume was mainly characterized by vascular area, vascular junction, connectivity density, segment number and vascular length, which indicated they were the key vascular parameters for the quantification of angiogenesis. The proposed quantitative evaluation method was compared with both the ABTs directly using the nine vascular parameters and Pearson correlation, which were consistent. In contrast to the ABTs directly using the vascular parameters, the proposed method can select all the key vascular parameters simultaneously, because all the key vascular parameters were assembled into the sparse PCs with the highest relative importance.

  7. Vascular aspects of cognitive impairment and dementia

    PubMed Central

    Wiesmann, Maximilian; Kiliaan, Amanda J; Claassen, Jurgen AHR

    2013-01-01

    Hypertension and stroke are highly prevalent risk factors for cognitive impairment and dementia. Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD) are the most common forms of dementia, and both conditions are preceded by a stage of cognitive impairment. Stroke is a major risk factor for the development of vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) and VaD; however, stroke may also predispose to AD. Hypertension is a major risk factor for stroke, thus linking hypertension to VCI and VaD, but hypertension is also an important risk factor for AD. Reducing these two major, but modifiable, risk factors—hypertension and stroke—could be a successful strategy for reducing the public health burden of cognitive impairment and dementia. Intake of long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-n3-FA) and the manipulation of factors involved in the renin–angiotensin system (e.g. angiotensin II or angiotensin-converting enzyme) have been shown to reduce the risk of developing hypertension and stroke, thereby reducing dementia risk. This paper will review the research conducted on the relationship between hypertension, stroke, and dementia and also on the impact of LC-n3-FA or antihypertensive treatments on risk factors for VCI, VaD, and AD. PMID:24022624

  8. Vascular parkinsonism: Deconstructing a syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Vizcarra, Joaquin A.; Lang, Anthony E.; Sethi, Kapil D; Espay, Alberto J.

    2015-01-01

    Progressive ambulatory impairment and abnormal white matter signal on neuroimaging come together under the diagnostic umbrella of vascular parkinsonism. A critical appraisal of the literature, however, suggests that (1) no abnormal structural imaging pattern is specific to vascular parkinsonism; (2) there is poor correlation between brain magnetic resonance imaging hyperintensities and microangiopathic brain disease and parkinsonism from available clinicopathologic data; (3) pure parkinsonism from vascular injury (“definite” vascular parkinsonism) consistently results from ischemic or hemorrhagic strokes involving the substantia nigra and/or nigrostriatal pathway but sparing the striatum itself, the cortex, and the intervening white matter; and (4) many cases reported as vascular parkinsonism may represent pseudovascular parkinsonism (e.g., Parkinson disease or another neurodegenerative parkinsonism such as progressive supranuclear palsy with non-specific neuroimaging signal abnormalities), vascular pseudoparkinsonism (e.g., akinetic mutism due to bilateral mesial frontal strokes or apathetic depression from bilateral striatal lacunar strokes), or pseudovascular pseudoparkinsonism (e.g., higher-level gait disorders, including normal pressure hydrocephalus with transependimal exudate). These syndromic designations are preferable over vascular parkinsonism until pathology or validated biomarkers confirm the underlying nature and relevance of the leukoaraiosis. PMID:25997420

  9. Overgrowth syndromes with vascular anomalies.

    PubMed

    Blei, Francine

    2015-04-01

    Overgrowth syndromes with vascular anomalies encompass entities with a vascular anomaly as the predominant feature vs those syndromes with predominant somatic overgrowth and a vascular anomaly as a more minor component. The focus of this article is to categorize these syndromes phenotypically, including updated clinical criteria, radiologic features, evaluation, management issues, pathophysiology, and genetic information. A literature review was conducted in PubMed using key words "overgrowth syndromes and vascular anomalies" as well as specific literature reviews for each entity and supportive genetic information (e.g., somatic mosaicism). Additional searches in OMIM and Gene Reviews were conducted for each syndrome. Disease entities were categorized by predominant clinical features, known genetic information, and putative affected signaling pathway. Overgrowth syndromes with vascular anomalies are a heterogeneous group of disorders, often with variable clinical expression, due to germline or somatic mutations. Overgrowth can be focal (e.g., macrocephaly) or generalized, often asymmetrically (and/or mosaically) distributed. All germ layers may be affected, and the abnormalities may be progressive. Patients with overgrowth syndromes may be at an increased risk for malignancies. Practitioners should be attentive to patients having syndromes with overgrowth and vascular defects. These patients require proactive evaluation, referral to appropriate specialists, and in some cases, early monitoring for potential malignancies. Progress in identifying vascular anomaly-related overgrowth syndromes and their genetic etiology has been robust in the past decade and is contributing to genetically based prenatal diagnosis and new therapies targeting the putative causative genetic mutations. PMID:25937473

  10. Vascular Injuries: Trends in Management

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Mohd Lateef; Ahangar, Ab Gani; Ganie, Farooq Ahmad; Wani, Shadab Nabi; Wani, Nasir-ud-din

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Vascular injury presents a great challenge to the emergency resident because these injuries require urgent intervention to prevent loss of life or limb. Sometimes serious vascular injury presents with only subtle or occult signs or symptoms. The patient may present weeks or months after initial injury with symptoms of vascular insufficiency, embolization, pseudoaneurysm, arteriovenous fistula etc. Although the majority of vascular injuries are caused by penetrating trauma from gunshot wounds, stabbing or blast injury, the possibility of vascular injury needs to be considered in patients presenting with displaced long bone fractures, crush injury, prolonged immobilization in a fixed position by tight casts or bandages and various invasive procedures. iatrogenic vascular injuries constitute about 10% of cases in most series; however the incidence is an increasing trend because more endovascular procedures such as angioplasty and cardiac catheterization are being performed routinely. Civilian trauma is more frequently seen in young males. However, it can occur at any age due to road accidents, firearms, bomb blasts and diagnostic procedures. Most of the time, civilian trauma causes less tissue damage. There is an epidemic of vascular injuries in Kashmir valley because of problems in law and order in the past two decades. This review deals with the topic in detail. PMID:24350103