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Sample records for reduced brain edema

  1. Telmisartan reduced cerebral edema by inhibiting NLRP3 inflammasome in mice with cold brain injury.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xin; Hu, Chen-Chen; Zhang, Ya-Li; Yao, Shang-Long; Mao, Wei-Ke

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible beneficial role of telmisartan in cerebral edema after traumatic brain injury (TBI) and the potential mechanisms related to the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptor (NLR) pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome activation. TBI model was established by cold-induced brain injury. Male C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned into 3, 6, 12, 24, 48 and 72 h survival groups to investigate cerebral edema development with time and received 0, 5, 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg telmisartan by oral gavage, 1 h prior to TBI to determine the efficient anti-edemic dose. The therapeutic window was identified by post-treating 30 min, 1 h, 2 h and 4 h after TBI. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity, the neurological function and histological injury were assessed, at the same time, the mRNA and protein expression levels of NLRP3 inflammasome, IL-1β and IL-18 concentrations in peri-contused brain tissue were measured 24 h post TBI. The results showed that the traumatic cerebral edema occurred from 6 h, reached the peak at 24 h and recovered to the baseline 72 h after TBI. A single oral dose of 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg telmisartan could reduce cerebral edema. Post-treatment up to 2 h effectively limited the edema development. Furthermore, prophylactic administration of telmisartan markedly inhibited BBB impairment, NLRP3, apoptotic speck-containing protein (ASC) and Caspase-1 activation, as well as IL-1β and IL-18 maturation, subsequently improved the neurological outcomes. In conclusion, telmisartan can reduce traumatic cerebral edema by inhibiting the NLRP3 inflammasome-regulated IL-1β and IL-18 accumulation. PMID:27465336

  2. Hypertonic saline reduces lipopolysaccharide-induced mouse brain edema through inhibiting aquaporin 4 expression

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Three percent sodium chloride (NaCl) treatment has been shown to reduce brain edema and inhibited brain aquaporin 4 (AQP4) expression in bacterial meningitis induced by Escherichia coli. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the main pathogenic component of E. coli. We aimed to explore the effect of 3% NaCl in mouse brain edema induced by LPS, as well as to elucidate the potential mechanisms of action. Methods Three percent NaCl was used to treat cerebral edema induced by LPS in mice in vivo. Brain water content, IL-1β, TNFα, immunoglobulin G (IgG), AQP4 mRNA and protein were measured in brain tissues. IL-1β, 3% NaCl and calphostin C (a specific inhibitor of protein kinase C) were used to treat the primary astrocytes in vitro. AQP4 mRNA and protein were measured in astrocytes. Differences in various groups were determined by one-way analysis of variance. Results Three percent NaCl attenuated the increase of brain water content, IL-1β, TNFα, IgG, AQP4 mRNA and protein in brain tissues induced by LPS. Three percent NaCl inhibited the increase of AQP4 mRNA and protein in astrocytes induced by IL-1β in vitro. Calphostin C blocked the decrease of AQP4 mRNA and protein in astrocytes induced by 3% NaCl in vitro. Conclusions Osmotherapy with 3% NaCl ameliorated LPS-induced cerebral edema in vivo. In addition to its osmotic force, 3% NaCl exerted anti-edema effects possibly through down-regulating the expression of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β and TNFα) and inhibiting the expression of AQP4 induced by proinflammatory cytokines. Three percent NaCl attenuated the expression of AQP4 through activation of protein kinase C in astrocytes. PMID:23036239

  3. Arginine-Vasopressin Receptor Blocker Conivaptan Reduces Brain Edema and Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption after Experimental Stroke in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zeynalov, Emil; Jones, Susan M.; Seo, Jeong-Woo; Snell, Lawrence D.; Elliott, J. Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background Stroke is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Stroke is complicated by brain edema and blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption, and is often accompanied by increased release of arginine-vasopressin (AVP). AVP acts through V1a and V2 receptors to trigger hyponatremia, vasospasm, and platelet aggregation which can exacerbate brain edema. The AVP receptor blockers conivaptan (V1a and V2) and tolvaptan (V2) are used to correct hyponatremia, but their effect on post-ischemic brain edema and BBB disruption remains to be elucidated. Therefore, we conducted this study to investigate if these drugs can prevent brain edema and BBB disruption in mice after stroke. Methods Experimental mice underwent the filament model of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) with reperfusion. Mice were treated with conivaptan, tolvaptan, or vehicle. Treatments were initiated immediately at reperfusion and administered IV (conivaptan) or orally (tolvaptan) for 48 hours. Physiological variables, neurological deficit scores (NDS), plasma and urine sodium and osmolality were recorded. Brain water content (BWC) and Evans Blue (EB) extravasation index were evaluated at the end point. Results Both conivaptan and tolvaptan produced aquaresis as indicated by changes in plasma and urine sodium levels. However plasma and urine osmolality was changed only by conivaptan. Unlike tolvaptan, conivaptan improved NDS and reduced BWC in the ipsilateral hemisphere: from 81.66 ± 0.43% (vehicle) to 78.28 ± 0.48% (conivaptan, 0.2 mg, p < 0.05 vs vehicle). Conivaptan also attenuated the EB extravasation from 1.22 ± 0.08 (vehicle) to 1.01 ± 0.02 (conivaptan, 0.2 mg, p < 0.05). Conclusion Continuous IV infusion with conivaptan for 48 hours after experimental stroke reduces brain edema, and BBB disruption. Conivaptan but not tolvaptan may potentially be used in patients to prevent brain edema after stroke. PMID:26275173

  4. Rifaximin, but not growth factor 1, reduces brain edema in cirrhotic rats

    PubMed Central

    Òdena, Gemma; Miquel, Mireia; Serafín, Anna; Galan, Amparo; Morillas, Rosa; Planas, Ramon; Bartolí, Ramon

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To compare rifaximin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 treatment of hyperammonemia and brain edema in cirrhotic rats with portal occlusion. METHODS: Rats with CCl4-induced cirrhosis with ascites plus portal vein occlusion and controls were randomized into six groups: Cirrhosis; Cirrhosis + IGF-1; Cirrhosis + rifaximin; Controls; Controls + IGF-1; and Controls + rifaximin. An oral glutamine-challenge test was performed, and plasma and cerebral ammonia, glucose, bilirubin, transaminases, endotoxemia, brain water content and ileocecal cultures were measured and liver histology was assessed. RESULTS: Rifaximin treatment significantly reduced bacterial overgrowth and endotoxemia compared with cirrhosis groups, and improved some liver function parameters (bilirubin, alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase). These effects were associated with a significant reduction in cerebral water content. Blood and cerebral ammonia levels, and area-under-the-curve values for oral glutamine-challenge tests were similar in rifaximin-treated cirrhotic rats and control group animals. By contrast, IGF-1 administration failed to improve most alterations observed in cirrhosis. CONCLUSION: By reducing gut bacterial overgrowth, only rifaximin was capable of normalizing plasma and brain ammonia and thereby abolishing low-grade brain edema, alterations associated with hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:22563196

  5. Radiosurgery for brain metastases and cerebral edema.

    PubMed

    Gazit, Inbal; Har-Nof, Sagi; Cohen, Zvi R; Zibly, Zion; Nissim, Uzi; Spiegelmann, Roberto

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess reduction in cerebral edema following linear accelerator radiosurgery (LINAC) as first line therapy for brain metastasis. We reviewed the medical records of all patients who underwent LINAC radiosurgery for brain metastasis at our institution during 2010-2012, and who had not previously undergone either surgery or whole brain radiotherapy. Data were analyzed for 55 brain metastases from 46 patients (24 males), mean age 59.9 years. During the 2 months following LINAC radiosurgery, the mean steroid dose decreased from 4.8 to 2.6 mg/day, the mean metastasis volume decreased from 3.79±4.12 cc to 2.8±4.48 cc (p=0.001), and the mean edema volume decreased from 16.91±30.15 cc to 12.85±24.47 cc (p=0.23). The 17 patients with reductions of more than 50% in brain edema volume had single metastases. Edema volume in the nine patients with two brain metastases remained stable in five patients (volume change <10%, 0-2 cc) and increased in four patients (by >10%, 2-14 cc). In a subanalysis of eight metastases with baseline edema volume greater than 40 cc, edema volume decreased from 77.27±37.21 cc to 24.84±35.6 cc (p=0.034). Reductions in brain edema were greater in metastases for which non-small-cell lung carcinoma and breast cancers were the primary diseases. Overall, symptoms improved in most patients. No patients who were without symptoms or who had no signs of increased intracranial pressure at baseline developed signs of intracranial pressure following LINAC radiosurgery. In this series, LINAC stereotactic radiosurgery for metastatic brain lesions resulted in early reduction in brain edema volume in single metastasis patients and those with large edema volumes, and reduced the need for steroids. PMID:25533053

  6. Intravenous HOE-642 reduces brain edema and Na uptake in the rat permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion model of stroke: evidence for participation of the blood-brain barrier Na/H exchanger.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Martha E; Chen, Yi-Je; Lam, Tina I; Taylor, Kelleen C; Walton, Jeffrey H; Anderson, Steven E

    2013-02-01

    Cerebral edema forms in the early hours of ischemic stroke by processes involving increased transport of Na and Cl from blood into brain across an intact blood-brain barrier (BBB). Our previous studies provided evidence that the BBB Na-K-Cl cotransporter is stimulated by the ischemic factors hypoxia, aglycemia, and arginine vasopressin (AVP), and that inhibition of the cotransporter by intravenous bumetanide greatly reduces edema and infarct in rats subjected to permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO). More recently, we showed that BBB Na/H exchanger activity is also stimulated by hypoxia, aglycemia, and AVP. The present study was conducted to further investigate the possibility that a BBB Na/H exchanger also participates in edema formation during ischemic stroke. Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to pMCAO and then brain edema and Na content assessed by magnetic resonance imaging diffusion-weighed imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy Na spectroscopy, respectively, for up to 210 minutes. We found that intravenous administration of the specific Na/H exchange inhibitor HOE-642 significantly decreased brain Na uptake and reduced cerebral edema, brain swelling, and infarct volume. These findings support the hypothesis that edema formation and brain Na uptake during the early hours of cerebral ischemia involve BBB Na/H exchanger activity as well as Na-K-Cl cotransporter activity. PMID:23149557

  7. Brain edema in diseases of different etiology.

    PubMed

    Adeva, María M; Souto, Gema; Donapetry, Cristóbal; Portals, Manuel; Rodriguez, Alberto; Lamas, David

    2012-07-01

    Cerebral edema is a potentially life-threatening complication shared by diseases of different etiology, such as diabetic ketoacidosis, acute liver failure, high altitude exposure, dialysis disequilibrium syndrome, and salicylate intoxication. Pulmonary edema is also habitually present in these disorders, indicating that the microcirculatory disturbance causing edema is not confined to the brain. Both cerebral and pulmonary subclinical edema may be detected before it becomes clinically evident. Available evidence suggests that tissue hypoxia or intracellular acidosis is a commonality occurring in all of these disorders. Tissue ischemia induces physiological compensatory mechanisms to ensure cell oxygenation and carbon dioxide removal from tissues, including hyperventilation, elevation of red blood cell 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate content, and capillary vasodilatation. Clinical, laboratory, and necropsy findings in these diseases confirm the occurrence of low plasma carbon dioxide partial pressure, increased erythrocyte 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate concentration, and capillary vasodilatation with increased vascular permeability in all of them. Baseline tissue hypoxia or intracellular acidosis induced by the disease may further deteriorate when tissue oxygen requirement is no longer matched to oxygen delivery resulting in massive capillary vasodilatation with increased vascular permeability and plasma fluid leakage into the interstitial compartment leading to edema affecting the brain, lung, and other organs. Causative factors involved in the progression from physiological adaptation to devastating clinical edema are not well known and may include uncontrolled disease, malfunctioning adaptive responses, or unknown factors. The role of carbon monoxide and local nitric oxide production influencing tissue oxygenation is unclear. PMID:22579570

  8. Selective vasopressin-1a receptor antagonist prevents brain edema, reduces astrocytic cell swelling and GFAP, V1aR and AQP4 expression after focal traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Marmarou, Christina R; Liang, Xiuyin; Abidi, Naqeeb H; Parveen, Shanaz; Taya, Keisuke; Henderson, Scott C; Young, Harold F; Filippidis, Aristotelis S; Baumgarten, Clive M

    2014-09-18

    A secondary and often lethal consequence of traumatic brain injury is cellular edema that we posit is due to astrocytic swelling caused by transmembrane water fluxes augmented by vasopressin-regulated aquaporin-4 (AQP4). We therefore tested whether vasopressin 1a receptor (V1aR) inhibition would suppress astrocyte AQP4, reduce astrocytic edema, and thereby diminish TBI-induced edematous changes. V1aR inhibition by SR49059 significantly reduced brain edema after cortical contusion injury (CCI) in rat 5h post-injury. Injured-hemisphere brain water content (n=6 animals/group) and astrocytic area (n=3/group) were significantly higher in CCI-vehicle (80.5±0.3%; 18.0±1.4 µm(2)) versus sham groups (78.3±0.1%; 9.5±0.9 µm(2)), and SR49059 blunted CCI-induced increases in brain edema (79.0±0.2%; 9.4±0.8µm(2)). CCI significantly up-regulated GFAP, V1aR and AQP4 protein levels and SR49059 suppressed injury induced up regulation (n=6/group). In CCI-vehicle, sham and CCI-SR49059 groups, GFAP was 1.58±0.04, 0.47±0.02, and 0.81±0.03, respectively; V1aR was 1.00±0.06, 0.45±0.05, and 0.46±0.09; and AQP4 was 2.03±0.34, 0.49±0.04, and 0.92±0.22. Confocal immunohistochemistry gave analogous results. In CCI-vehicle, sham and CCI-SR49059 groups, fluorescence intensity of GFAP was 349±38, 56±5, and 244±30, respectively, V1aR was 601±71, 117.8±14, and 390±76, and AQP4 was 818±117, 158±5, and 458±55 (n=3/group). The results support that edema was predominantly cellular following CCI and documented that V1aR inhibition with SR49059 suppressed injury-induced up regulation of GFAP, V1A and AQP4, blunting edematous changes. Our findings suggest V1aR inhibitors may be potential therapeutic tools to prevent cellular swelling and provide treatment for post-traumatic brain edema. PMID:24933327

  9. Agmatine Attenuates Brain Edema and Apoptotic Cell Death after Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Young; Lee, Yong Woo; Kim, Jae Hwan; Lee, Won Taek; Park, Kyung Ah; Lee, Jong Eun

    2015-07-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with poor neurological outcome, including necrosis and brain edema. In this study, we investigated whether agmatine treatment reduces edema and apoptotic cell death after TBI. TBI was produced by cold injury to the cerebral primary motor cortex of rats. Agmatine was administered 30 min after injury and once daily until the end of the experiment. Animals were sacrificed for analysis at 1, 2, or 7 days after the injury. Various neurological analyses were performed to investigate disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and neurological dysfunction after TBI. To examine the extent of brain edema after TBI, the expression of aquaporins (AQPs), phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), and nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) were investigated. Our findings demonstrated that agmatine treatment significantly reduces brain edema after TBI by suppressing the expression of AQP1, 4, and 9. In addition, agmatine treatment significantly reduced apoptotic cell death by suppressing the phosphorylation of MAPKs and by increasing the nuclear translocation of NF-κB after TBI. These results suggest that agmatine treatment may have therapeutic potential for brain edema and neural cell death in various central nervous system diseases. PMID:26130959

  10. The novel antiepileptic agent RWJ-333369-A, but not its analog RWJ-333369, reduces regional cerebral edema without affecting neurobehavioral outcome or cell death following experimental traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Keck, Carrie A.; Thompson, Hilaire J.; Pitkänen, Asla; LeBold, David G.; Morales, Diego M.; Plevy, Jamie B.; Puri, Rishi; Zhao, Boyu; Dichter, Marc; McIntosh, Tracy K.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of two antiepileptic compounds, RWJ-333369 and RWJ-333369-A in a well-established experimental model of lateral fluid percussion (FP) traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the rat. Methods Anethestized Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 227) were subjected to lateral FP brain injury or sham-injury. Animals were randomized to receive treatment with RWJ-333369 (60 mg/kg, p.o.) or its analog RWJ-333369-A (60 mg/kg, p.o.), or vehicle (equal volume) at 15 minutes, 4, 8, and 24 hours post-injury. In Study I, animals were assessed at 48 hours for acute motor and cognitive function and then sacrificed to evaluate regional cerebral edema. In Study II, animals were evaluated post-injury for motor function at 48 hours and weekly thereafter from 1 to 4 weeks. Post-traumatic learning ability was assessed 4 weeks post-injury, followed by evaluation of hemispheric tissue loss. Results In Study I, no improvement in acute memory or motor function was observed following administration of either RWJ-333369 or RWJ-333369-A in brain-injured animals compared to vehicle-treated, brain-injured animals. However, brain-injured animals receiving treatment with RWJ-333369-A had a significant reduction in post-traumatic cerebral edema in both injured and contralateral hippocampus compared to brain-injured, vehicle-treated controls (p < 0.05). In Study II, treatment with either compound did not result in any improvement of neuromotor function, learning ability or change in lesion volume following brain injury. Conclusions These results indicate that the novel antiepileptic compound RWJ-333369-A reduces post-traumatic hippocampal edema without affecting neurobehavioral or histological outcome. It remains unclear whether this small effect on hippocampal edema is related to the ability of this compound to attenuate seizure activity. PMID:17726266

  11. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance studies on brain edema

    SciTech Connect

    Naruse, S.; Horikawa, Y.; Tanaka, C.; Hirakawa, K.; Nishikawa, H.; Yoshizaki, K.

    1982-06-01

    The water in normal and edematous brain tissues of rats was studied by the pulse nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, measuring the longitudinal relaxation time (T1) and the transverse relaxation time (T2). In the normal brain, T1 and T2 were single components, both shorter than in pure water. Prolongation and separation of T2 into two components, one fast and one slow, were the characteristic findings in brain edema induced by both cold injury and triethyl tin (TET), although some differences between the two types of edema existed in the content of the lesion and in the degree of changes in T1 and T2 values. Quantitative analysis of T1 and T2 values in their time course relating to water content demonstrated that prolongation of T1 referred to the volume of increased water in tissues examined, and that two phases of T2 reflected the distribution and the content of the edema fluid. From the analysis of the slow component of T2 versus water content during edema formation, it was demonstrated that the increase in edema fluid was steady, and its content was constant during formation of TET-induced edema. On the contrary, during the formation of cold-injury edema, water-rich edema fluid increased during the initial few hours, and protein-rich edema fluid increased thereafter. It was concluded that proton NMR relaxation time measurements may provide new understanding in the field of brain edema research.

  12. Mathematical modelling of blood-brain barrier failure and edema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, Sarah; Lang, Georgina; Vella, Dominic; Goriely, Alain

    2015-11-01

    Injuries such as traumatic brain injury and stroke can result in increased blood-brain barrier permeability. This increase may lead to water accumulation in the brain tissue resulting in vasogenic edema. Although the initial injury may be localised, the resulting edema causes mechanical damage and compression of the vasculature beyond the original injury site. We employ a biphasic mixture model to investigate the consequences of blood-brain barrier permeability changes within a region of brain tissue and the onset of vasogenic edema. We find that such localised changes can indeed result in brain tissue swelling and that the type of damage that results (stress damage or strain damage) depends on the ability of the brain to clear edema fluid.

  13. Drowning stars: reassessing the role of astrocytes in brain edema.

    PubMed

    Thrane, Alexander S; Rangroo Thrane, Vinita; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2014-11-01

    Edema formation frequently complicates brain infarction, tumors, and trauma. Despite the significant mortality of this condition, current treatment options are often ineffective or incompletely understood. Recent studies have revealed the existence of a brain-wide paravascular pathway for cerebrospinal (CSF) and interstitial fluid (ISF) exchange. The current review critically examines the contribution of this 'glymphatic' system to the main types of brain edema. We propose that in cytotoxic edema, energy depletion enhances glymphatic CSF influx, whilst suppressing ISF efflux. We also argue that paravascular inflammation or 'paravasculitis' plays a critical role in vasogenic edema. Finally, recent advances in diagnostic imaging of glymphatic function may hold the key to defining the edema profile of individual patients, and thus enable more targeted therapy. PMID:25236348

  14. Drowning stars: Reassessing the role of astrocytes in brain edema

    PubMed Central

    Thrane, Alexander S.; Thrane, Vinita Rangroo; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2014-01-01

    Edema formation frequently complicates brain infarction, tumors and trauma. Despite the significant mortality of this condition, current treatment options are often ineffective or incompletely understood. Recent studies have revealed the existence of a brain-wide paravascular pathway for cerebrospinal (CSF) and interstitial fluid (ISF) exchange. The current review critically examines the contribution of this ‘glymphatic’ system to the main types of brain edema. We propose that in cytotoxic edema, energy depletion enhances glymphatic CSF influx, whilst suppressing ISF efflux. We also argue that paravascular inflammation or ‘paravasculitis’ plays a critical role in vasogenic edema. Finally, recent advances in diagnostic imaging of glymphatic function may hold the key to defining the edema profile of individual patients and thus enable more targeted therapy. PMID:25236348

  15. Acetazolamide Mitigates Astrocyte Cellular Edema Following Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Sturdivant, Nasya M; Smith, Sean G; Ali, Syed F; Wolchok, Jeffrey C; Balachandran, Kartik

    2016-01-01

    Non-penetrating or mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is commonly experienced in accidents, the battlefield and in full-contact sports. Astrocyte cellular edema is one of the major factors that leads to high morbidity post-mTBI. Various studies have reported an upregulation of aquaporin-4 (AQP4), a water channel protein, following brain injury. AZA is an antiepileptic drug that has been shown to inhibit AQP4 expression and in this study we investigate the drug as a therapeutic to mitigate the extent of mTBI induced cellular edema. We hypothesized that mTBI-mediated astrocyte dysfunction, initiated by increased intracellular volume, could be reduced when treated with AZA. We tested our hypothesis in a three-dimensional in vitro astrocyte model of mTBI. Samples were subject to no stretch (control) or one high-speed stretch (mTBI) injury. AQP4 expression was significantly increased 24 hours after mTBI. mTBI resulted in a significant increase in the cell swelling within 30 min of mTBI, which was significantly reduced in the presence of AZA. Cell death and expression of S100B was significantly reduced when AZA was added shortly before mTBI stretch. Overall, our data point to occurrence of astrocyte swelling immediately following mTBI, and AZA as a promising treatment to mitigate downstream cellular mortality. PMID:27623738

  16. [Increased intracranial pressure and brain edema].

    PubMed

    Dietrich, W; Erbguth, F

    2013-03-01

    In primary and secondary brain diseases, increasing volumes of the three compartments of brain tissue, cerebrospinal fluid, or blood lead to a critical increase in intracranial pressure (ICP). A rising ICP is associated with typical clinical symptoms; however, during analgosedation it can only be detected by invasive ICP monitoring. Other neuromonitoring procedures are not as effective as ICP monitoring; they reflect the ICP changes and their complications by other metabolic and oxygenation parameters. The most relevant parameter for brain perfusion is cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), which is calculated as the difference between the middle arterial pressure (MAP) and the ICP. A mixed body of evidence exists for the different ICP-reducing treatment measures, such as hyperventilation, hyperosmolar substances, hypothermia, glucocorticosteroids, CSF drainage, and decompressive surgery. PMID:23503630

  17. [Increased intracranial pressure and brain edema].

    PubMed

    Dietrich, W; Erbguth, F

    2013-09-01

    In primary and secondary brain diseases, increasing volumes of the three compartments of brain tissue, cerebrospinal fluid, or blood lead to a critical increase in intracranial pressure (ICP). A rising ICP is associated with typical clinical symptoms; however, during analgosedation it can only be detected by invasive ICP monitoring. Other neuromonitoring procedures are not as effective as ICP monitoring; they reflect the ICP changes and their complications by other metabolic and oxygenation parameters. The most relevant parameter for brain perfusion is cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), which is calculated as the difference between the middle arterial pressure (MAP) and the ICP. A mixed body of evidence exists for the different ICP-reducing treatment measures, such as hyperventilation, hyperosmolar substances, hypothermia, glucocorticosteroids, CSF drainage, and decompressive surgery. PMID:24061872

  18. Evaluation of brain edema using magnetic resonance proton relaxation times

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Nishimura, S. )

    1990-01-01

    Experimental and clinical studies on the evaluation of water content in cases of brain edema were performed in vivo, using MR proton relaxation times (longitudinal relaxation time, T1; transverse relaxation time, T2). Brain edema was produced in the white matter of cats by the direct infusion method. The correlations between proton relaxation times obtained from MR images and the water content of white matter were studied both in autoserum-infused cats and in saline-infused cats. The correlations between T1 as well as T2 and the water content in human vasogenic brain edema were also examined and compared with the data obtained from the serum group. T1 and T2 showed good correlations with the water content of white matter not only in the experimental animals but also in the clinical cases. The quality of the edema fluid did not influence relaxation time and T1 seemed to represent almost solely the water content of the tissue. T2, however, was affected by the nature of existence of water and was more sensitive than T1 in detecting extravasated edema fluid. It seems feasible therefore to evaluate the water content of brain edema on the basis of T1 values.

  19. Effects of Chloride Flux Modulators in an in Vitro-model of Brain Edema Formation

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vikas; Naik, Runa S.; Hillert, Markus; Klein, Jochen

    2006-01-01

    Brain edema is a serious consequence of hemispheric stroke and traumatic brain injury and contributes significantly to patient mortality. In the present study, we measured water contents in hippocampal slices as an in vitro-model of edema formation. Excitotoxic conditions induced by N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA, 300 μM), as well as ischemia induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) caused cellular edema formation as indicated by an increase of slice water contents. In the presence of furosemide, an inhibitor of the Na,K,Cl-cotransporter, NMDA-induced edema were reduced by 64% while OGD-induced edema were unaffected. The same observation, i.e. reduction of excitotoxic edema formation but no effect on ischemia-induced edema, was made with chloride transport inhibitors such as DIDS and niflumic acid. Under ischemic conditions, modulation of GABAA receptors by bicuculline, a GABA antagonist, or by diazepam, a GABAergic agonist, did not significantly affect edema formation. Further experiments demonstrated that low chloride conditions prevented NMDA-induced, but not OGD-induced water influx. Omission of calcium ions had no effect. Our results show that NMDA-induced edema formation is highly dependent on chloride influx as it was prevented by low-chloride conditions and by various compounds that interfere with chloride influx. In contrast, OGD-induced edema observed in brain slices were not affected by modulators of chloride fluxes. The results are discussed with reference to ionic changes occurring during tissue ischemia. Section: Neurophysiology, Neuropharmacology and other forms of Intercellular Communication. PMID:17014830

  20. Edema

    MedlinePlus

    Edema means swelling caused by fluid in your body's tissues. It usually occurs in the feet, ankles ... it can involve your entire body. Causes of edema include Eating too much salt Sunburn Heart failure ...

  1. Beneficial effects of hyperbaric oxygen on edema in rat hippocampus following traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Liu, Su; Liu, Ying; Deng, Shukun; Guo, Aisong; Wang, Xiubing; Shen, Guangyu

    2015-12-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy helps alleviate secondary injury following brain trauma [traumatic brain injury (TBI)], although the mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we assessed recovery of post-TBI spatial learning and memory in rats using the Morris water maze (MWM) and measured changes in apparent diffusion coefficient in the hippocampus by diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) to evaluate possible therapeutic effects of HBO on TBI-associated brain edema. DWIs were obtained 8, 24, 48 h, 7 days, and 14 days post-TBI. Daily HBO therapy significantly improved post-TBI MWM performance and reduced edema in the ipsilateral hippocampus, suggesting that the therapeutic efficacy of HBO is mediated, at least in part, by a reduction in brain edema. PMID:26267487

  2. Brain edema in acute liver failure. Insight from experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Andres, T; Blei, M D; Judy, R; Cho, M D

    1990-07-01

    Brain edema is a leading cause of death in fulminant hepatic failure (FHP). Animal studies are needed to gain further insight into its pathogenesis. The authors describe and analyze the results of brain studies in two animal models of FHF, the rabbit with galactosamine induced hepatitis and the anhepatic model of liver desvascularization. A gravimetric technique is used to determine water content in brain samples as small as 10 mg in weight. Results showed that water content is increased and correlates with the severity of encephalopathy in both experimental models of encephalopathy. The possible pathogenic role of ammonia and octanoic acid are discussed. PMID:19256151

  3. Corticorelin, a synthetic human corticotropin-releasing factor analog, for the treatment of peritumoral brain edema.

    PubMed

    Panickar, Kiran S

    2010-12-01

    Corticorelin is a synthetic analog of the naturally occurring human peptide corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF). Several studies have indicated the ability of CRF to reduce the brain edema caused by brain tumors. Peritumoral brain edema (PBE), caused by an intracerebral tumor, manifests several features of vasogenic edema, which is a type of edema characterized by disruption of the blood-brain barrier. Traditionally, PBE has been treated using corticosteroids, primarily dexamethasone. Introduced more than four decades ago, dexamethasone revolutionized the treatment of PBE, but the side effects and withdrawal symptoms associated with corticosteroids propelled the investigation of other drugs. Clinical trials with the synthetic human CRF (hCRF) corticorelin (Xerecept, NEU-3002; Celtic Pharmaceutical Holdings) have indicated that this drug has a distinct advantage over classical corticosteroids in the treatment of PBE. Fewer and/or milder side effects have been reported for corticorelin compared with dexamethasone, although at higher doses of corticorelin several side effects, including hypotension and transient flushing, have been reported. Nevertheless, corticorelin was reasonably well tolerated in patients and healthy volunteers, and may be a good candidate for reducing PBE and associated neural damage, as well as improving neurological symptoms. PMID:21154169

  4. Acute Methamphetamine Intoxication: Brain Hyperthermia, Blood-Brain Barrier and Brain Edema

    PubMed Central

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A.; Sharma, Hari S.

    2011-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a powerful and often abused stimulant with potent addictive and neurotoxic properties. While it is generally assumed that multiple chemical substances released in the brain following METH-induced metabolic activation (or oxidative stress) are primary factors underlying damage of neural cells, in this work we will present data suggesting a role of brain hyperthermia and associated leakage of the brain-blood barrier (BBB) in acute METH-induced toxicity. First, we show that METH induces a dose-dependent brain and body hyperthermia, which is strongly potentiated by associated physiological activation and in warm environments that prevent proper heat dissipation to the external environment. Second, we demonstrate that acute METH intoxication induces robust, widespread but structure-specific leakage of the BBB, acute glial activation, and increased water content (edema), which are related to drug-induced brain hyperthermia. Third, we document widespread morphological abnormalities of brain cells, including neurons, glia, epithelial and endothelial cells developing rapidly during acute METH intoxication. These structural abnormalities are tightly related to the extent of brain hyperthermia, leakage of the BBB, and brain edema. While it is unclear whether these rapidly developed morphological abnormalities are reversible, this study demonstrates that METH induces multiple functional and structural perturbations in the brain, determining its acute toxicity and possibly contributing to neurotoxicity. PMID:19897075

  5. Increased brain edema following 5-aminolevulinic acid mediated photodynamic in normal and tumor bearing rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschberg, Henry; Angell-Petersen, Even; Spetalen, Signe; Mathews, Marlon; Madsen, Steen J.

    2007-02-01

    Introduction: Failure of treatment for high grade gliomas is usually due to local recurrence at the site of surgical resection indicating that a more aggressive form of local therapy, such as PDT, could be of benefit. PDT causes damage to both tumor cells as well as cerebral blood vessels leading to degradation of the blood brain barrier with subsequent increase of brain edema. The increase in brain edema following ALA-PDT was evaluated in terms of animal survival, histopatological changes in normal brain and tumor tissue and MRI scanning. The effect of steroid treatment, to reduce post-treatment PDT induced edema, was also examined. Methods:Tumors were established in the brains of inbred BD-IX and Fisher rats. At various times following tumor induction the animals were injected with ALA ip. and four hours later light treatment at escalating fluences and fluence rates were given. Nontumor bearing control animals were also exposed to ALA-PDT in a similar manner to evaluate damage to normal brain and degree of blood brain barrier (BBB) disruption. Results: Despite a very low level of PpIX production in normal brain, with a 200:1 tumor to normal tissue selectivity ratio measured at a distance of 2 mm from the tumor border, many animals succumbed shortly after treatment. A total radiant energy of 54 J to non-tumor bearing animals resulted in 50% mortality within 5 days of treatment. Treatment of tumor bearing animals with moderate fluence levels produced similar brain edema compared to higher fluence levels. ALA PDT in nontumor bearing animals produced edema that was light dose dependent. PDT appeared to open the BBB for a period of 24-48 hrs after which it was restored. The addition of post operative steroid treatment reduced the incident of post treatment morbidity and mortality. Conclusions: T2 and contrast enhanced T1 MRI scanning proved to be a highly effective and non-evasive modality in following the development of the edema reaction and the degree and time

  6. Proton-nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation times in brain edema

    SciTech Connect

    Kamman, R.L.; Go, K.G.; Berendsen, H.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Proton relaxation times of protein solutions, bovine brain, and edematous feline brain tissue were studied as a function of water concentration, protein concentration, and temperature. In accordance with the fast proton exchange model for relaxation, a linear relation could be established between R1 and the inverse of the weight fraction of tissue water. This relation also applied to R2 of gray matter and of protein solutions. No straightforward relation with water content was found for R2 of white matter. Temperature-dependent studies indicated that in this case, the slow exchange model for relaxation had to be applied. The effect of macromolecules in physiological relevant concentrations on the total relaxation behavior of edematous tissue was weak. Total water content changes predominantly affected the relaxation rates. The linear relation may have high clinical potential for assessment of the status of cerebral edema on the basis of T1 and T2 readings from MR images.

  7. Vascular endothelial growth factor A protein level and gene expression in intracranial meningiomas with brain edema.

    PubMed

    Nassehi, Damoun; Dyrbye, Henrik; Andresen, Morten; Thomsen, Carsten; Juhler, Marianne; Laursen, Henning; Broholm, Helle

    2011-12-01

    Meningiomas are the second most common primary intracranial tumors in adults. Although meningiomas are mostly benign, more than 50% of patients with meningioma develop peritumoral brain edema (PTBE), which may be fatal because of increased intracranial pressure. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an endothelial cell-specific mitogen and angiogen. VEGF-A protein, which is identical to vascular permeability factor, is a regulator of angiogenesis. In this study, 101 patients with meningiomas, and possible co-factors to PTBE, such as meningioma subtypes and tumor location, were examined. Forty-three patients had primary, solitary, supratentorial meningiomas with PTBE. In these, correlations in PTBE, edema index, VEGF-A protein, VEGF gene expression, capillary length, and tumor water content were investigated. DNA-branched hybridization was used for measuring VEGF gene expression in tissue homogenates prepared from frozen tissue samples. The method for VEGF-A analysis resembled an ELISA assay, but was based on chemiluminescence. The edema index was positively correlated to VEGF-A protein (p = 0.014) and VEGF gene expression (p < 0.05). The capillary length in the meningiomas was positively correlated to the PTBE (p = 0.038). If VEGF is responsible for the formation of PTBE, the edema may be treated with the anti-VEGF drug Bevacizumab (Avastin), which has been shown to reduce PTBE in patients with glioblastoma multiforme. PMID:22085359

  8. Estrogen provides neuroprotection against brain edema and blood brain barrier disruption through both estrogen receptors α and β following traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Naderi, Vida; Khaksari, Mohammad; Abbasi, Reza; Maghool, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Estrogen (E2) has neuroprotective effects on blood-brain-barrier (BBB) after traumatic brain injury (TBI). In order to investigate the roles of estrogen receptors (ERs) in these effects, ER-α antagonist (MPP) and, ER-β antagonist (PHTPP), or non-selective estrogen receptors antagonist (ICI 182780) were administered. Materials and Methods: Ovariectomized rats were divided into 10 groups, as follows: Sham, TBI, E2, oil, MPP+E2, PHTPP+E2, MPP+PHTPP+E2, ICI+E2, MPP, and DMSO. E2 (33.3 µg/Kg) or oil were administered 30 min after TBI. 1 dose (150 µg/Kg) of each of MPP, PHTPP, and (4 mg/kg) ICI182780 was injected two times, 24 hr apart, before TBI and estrogen treatment. BBB disruption (Evans blue content) and brain edema (brain water content) evaluated 5 hr and 24 hr after the TBI were evaluated, respectively. Results: The results showed that E2 reduced brain edema after TBI compared to vehicle (P<0.01). The brain edema in the MPP+E2 and PHTPP+E2 groups decreased compared to the vehicle (P<0.001). There was no significant difference in MPP+PHTPP+E2 and ICI+E2 compared to TBI. This parameter in MPP was similar to vehicle. Evans blue content in E2 group was lower than vehicle (P<0.05). The inhibitory effect of E2 on Evans blue was not reduced by MPP+E2 and PHTPP+E2 groups, but decreased by treatment with MPP+PHTPP or ICI. MPP had no effect on Evans blue content. Conclusion: A combined administration of MPP and PHTPP or ICI inhibited the E2-induced decrease in brain edema and BBB disruption; this may suggest that these effects were mediated via both receptors. PMID:25810887

  9. [Changes in epidural pulse pressure in brain edema following experimental focal ischemia].

    PubMed

    Mase, M

    1990-07-01

    It is well known that epidural pulse pressure (PP) increases with rising intracranial pressure (ICP). However, PP at the same ICP is not always identical in various intracranial pathologies. Many authors have investigated PP at increased states of ICP, but few studies related to brain edema have been done. This study was carried out in order to clarify the changes of PP in brain edema following focal ischemia. ICP and PP were measured in two groups of anesthetized dogs; 1) increased volume of CSF by cisternal saline injection (control, n = 5), 2) brain edema caused by focal ischemia (edema, n = 11). Ischemia was induced by electro-coagulation of the right anterior cerebral artery and by clipping the right middle cerebral artery and right internal carotid artery transorbitaly. The brain was recirculated for 6 hours after 2 hours of ischemia. The ischemic areas were identified by Evans blue, triphenyl tetrazolium chloride (TTC) or histological examination. Water content of the brain was measured by the wet-dry weight method. The canine focal ischemic model showed consistent ischemic damage in the caudate nucleus and produced brain edema successfully. PP increased linearly with rising ICP to 35 mmHg, and PP in the edema group was significantly smaller than that in the control group at the same ICP value. The slopes of the regression equation of ICP and PP were significantly different between the edema and control group (edema: 0.061 +/- 0.030, control: 0.107 +/- 0.015, mean +/- SD, p less than 0.01). These results suggest that PP is easily affected by ischemic brain edema.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2223260

  10. Proton relaxation in acute and subacute ischemic brain edema

    SciTech Connect

    Boisvert, D.P.; Handa, Y.; Allen, P.S. )

    1990-01-01

    The relation between regional ischemic brain edema and tissue proton relaxation rates (R1 = 1/T1; R2 = 1/T2) were studied in 16 macaque monkeys subjected to MCA occlusion. In vivo R2 measurements were obtained from multiple spin-echo (eight echoes) images taken at 2-, 3-, 4-, and 72-hr postischemia. In vitro R1 and R2 values were determined for corresponding regions after sacrifice at 4 hr (n = 8) or at 72-hr postischemia in seven surviving animals. The water content of the white and gray matter tissue samples was measured by the wet/dry method. Four animals (25%) showed ipsilateral regions of increased signal intensity as early as 2 hr after MCA occlusion. All seven animals imaged at 72 hr displayed such regions. Despite the absence of measured changes in tissue water content, significant decreases in R2, but not in R1, occurred at 4 hr. At this stage, R2 values correlated more closely than R1 with individual variations in water content. At 72 hr, marked decreases in both R1 and R2 were measured in ischemic deep gray matter and white matter. Cortical gray matter was unchanged. In edematous gray and white matter, both R1 and R2 correlated closely with tissue water content, but R2 was consistently 10 to 20 times more sensitive than R1. Biexponential R2 decay was observed at 4 and 72 hr, but only in the white matter region that became severely edematous at 72 hr.

  11. Brain Edema after Repeat Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for a Large Arteriovenous Malformation: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joo Whan; Chung, Hyun-Tai; Han, Moon Hee; Kim, Dong Gyu; Paek, Sun Ha

    2016-08-01

    Brain edema due to venous thrombosis following stereotactic radiosurgery for a cerebral arteriovenous malformation (AVM) has rarely been reported. We report a patient with a large AVM in the eloquent area, and brain edema developed in this area after repeat Gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKRS). An 18-year-old female presented with a 4-year-history of persistent headache. Magnetic resonance imaging and transfemoral carotid angiogram revealed a high-flow large AVM in the left parieto-occipital area. Brain edema developed and aggravated patient's symptoms after time-staged GKRS. The cause of edema was thought to be the failure of the surrounding venous channels to drain the venous flow from the normal brain and the drainage was hampered by the persistent shunt flow from the AVM, which was due to the thrombosis of one huge draining vein of the AVM. The microsurgical resection of the AVM nidus eliminated shunt flow and completely normalized the brain edema. Microsurgical resection of the AVM nidus completely normalized the brain edema due to thrombosis of a draining vein of an AVM develops after SRS. PMID:27574486

  12. Brain Edema after Repeat Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for a Large Arteriovenous Malformation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joo Whan; Chung, Hyun-Tai; Han, Moon Hee; Kim, Dong Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Brain edema due to venous thrombosis following stereotactic radiosurgery for a cerebral arteriovenous malformation (AVM) has rarely been reported. We report a patient with a large AVM in the eloquent area, and brain edema developed in this area after repeat Gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKRS). An 18-year-old female presented with a 4-year-history of persistent headache. Magnetic resonance imaging and transfemoral carotid angiogram revealed a high-flow large AVM in the left parieto-occipital area. Brain edema developed and aggravated patient's symptoms after time-staged GKRS. The cause of edema was thought to be the failure of the surrounding venous channels to drain the venous flow from the normal brain and the drainage was hampered by the persistent shunt flow from the AVM, which was due to the thrombosis of one huge draining vein of the AVM. The microsurgical resection of the AVM nidus eliminated shunt flow and completely normalized the brain edema. Microsurgical resection of the AVM nidus completely normalized the brain edema due to thrombosis of a draining vein of an AVM develops after SRS. PMID:27574486

  13. Correlation between subacute sensorimotor deficits and brain edema in two mouse models of intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Krafft, Paul R.; McBride, Devin W.; Lekic, Tim; Rolland, William B.; Mansell, Charles E.; Ma, Qingyi; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Formation of brain edema after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is highly associated with its poor outcome, thus it is clinically important to understand the effect brain edema has on outcome. However, the relationship between cerebral edema and behavioral deficits has not been thoroughly examined in the preclinical setting. Hence, this study aimed to evaluate the ability of common sensorimotor tests to predict the extent of brain edema in two mouse models of ICH. One hundred male CD-1 mice were subjected to sham surgery or ICH induction via intrastriatal injection of either autologous blood (30 μL) or bacterial collagenase (0.0375 U or 0.075 U). At 24 and 72 hours after surgery, animals underwent a battery of behavioral tests, including the modified Garcia neuroscore (Neuroscore), corner turn test (CTT), forelimb placing test (FPT), wire hang task (WHT) and beam walking (BW). Brain edema was evaluated via the wet weight/dry weight method. Intrastriatal injection of autologous blood or bacterial collagenase resulted in a significant increase in brain water content and associated sensorimotor deficits (p<0.05). A significant correlation between brain edema and sensorimotor deficits was observed for all behavioral tests except for WHT and BW. Based on these findings, we recommend implementing the Neuroscore, CTT and/or FPT in preclinical studies of unilateral ICH in mice. PMID:24518201

  14. Protection of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor to Brain Edema Following Intracerebral Hemorrhage and Its Involved Mechanisms: Effect of Aquaporin-4

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has protective effects on many neurological diseases. However, whether VEGF acts on brain edema following intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is largely unknown. Our previous study has shown aquaporin-4 (AQP4) plays an important role in brain edema elimination following ICH. Meanwhile, there is close relationship between VEGF and AQP4. In this study, we aimed to test effects of VEGF on brain edema following ICH and examine whether they were AQP4 dependent. Recombinant human VEGF165 (rhVEGF165) was injected intracerebroventricularly 1 d after ICH induced by microinjecting autologous whole blood into striatum. We detected perihemotomal AQP4 protein expression, then examined the effects of rhVEGF165 on perihemotomal brain edema at 1 d, 3 d, and 7 d after injection in wild type (AQP4+/+) and AQP4 knock-out (AQP4−/−) mice. Furthermore, we assessed the possible signal transduction pathways activated by VEGF to regulate AQP4 expression via astrocyte cultures. We found perihemotomal AQP4 protein expression was highly increased by rhVEGF165. RhVEGF165 alleviated perihemotomal brain edema in AQP4+/+ mice at each time point, but had no effect on AQP4−/− mice. Perihemotomal EB extravasation was increased by rhVEGF165 in AQP4−/− mice, but not AQP4+/+ mice. RhVEGF165 reduced neurological deficits and increased Nissl’s staining cells surrounding hemotoma in both types of mice and these effects were related to AQP4. RhVEGF165 up-regulated phospharylation of C-Jun amino-terminal kinase (p-JNK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK) and AQP4 protein in cultured astrocytes. The latter was inhibited by JNK and ERK inhibitors. In conclusion, VEGF reduces neurological deficits, brain edema, and neuronal death surrounding hemotoma but has no influence on BBB permeability. These effects are closely related to AQP4 up-regulation, possibly through activating JNK and ERK pathways. The current study may present new insights to

  15. Expression of Aquaporin 4 and Breakdown of the Blood-Brain Barrier after Hypoglycemia-Induced Brain Edema in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Jiangshan; Zhao, Fei; Yu, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Yuwu; Li, Dawei; Shi, Hong; Sun, Yongning

    2014-01-01

    Background Hypoglycemia-induced brain edema is a severe clinical event that often results in death. The mechanisms by which hypoglycemia induces brain edema are unclear. Methods In a hypoglycemic injury model established in adult rats, brain edema was verified by measuring brain water content and visualizing water accumulation using hematoxylin and eosin staining. Temporal expression of aquaporin 4 (AQP4) and the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) were evaluated. We assessed the distribution and expression of AQP4 following glucose deprivation in astrocyte cultures. Results Brain edema was induced immediately after severe hypoglycemia but continued to progress even after recovery from hypoglycemia. Upregulation of AQP4 expression and moderate breakdown of the BBB were observed 24 h after recovery. In vitro, significant redistribution of AQP4 to the plasma membrane was induced following 6 h glucose deprivation. Conclusion Hypoglycemia-induced brain edema is caused by cytotoxic and vasogenic factors. Changes in AQP4 location and expression may play a protective role in edema resolution. PMID:25264602

  16. Near-infrared spectroscopy technique to evaluate the effects of drugs in treating traumatic brain edema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, J.; Qian, Z.; Yang, T.; Li, W.; Hu, G.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of several drugs in treating traumatic brain edema (TBE) following traumatic brain injury (TBI) using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRs) technology. Rats with TBE models were given hypertonic saline (HS), mannitol and mannitol+HS respectively for different groups. Light scattering properties of rat's local cortex was measured by NIRs within the wavelength range from 700 to 850 nm. TBE models were built in rats' left brains. The scattering properties of the right and left target corresponding to the position of normal and TBE tissue were measured and recorded in vivo and real-time by a bifurcated needle probe. The brain water contents (BWC) were measured by the wet and dry weight method after injury and treatment hours 1, 6, 24, 72 and 120. A marked linear relationship was observed between reduced scattering coefficient (μs') and BWC. By recording μs' of rats' brains, the entire progressions of effects of several drugs were observed. The result may suggest that the NIRs techniques have a potential for assessing effects in vivo and real-time on treatment of the brain injury.

  17. Treadmill exercise ameliorates ischemia-induced brain edema while suppressing Na⁺/H⁺ exchanger 1 expression.

    PubMed

    Nishioka, Ryutaro; Sugimoto, Kana; Aono, Hitomi; Mise, Ayano; Choudhury, Mohammed E; Miyanishi, Kazuya; Islam, Afsana; Fujita, Takahiro; Takeda, Haruna; Takahashi, Hisaaki; Yano, Hajime; Tanaka, Junya

    2016-03-01

    Exercise may be one of the most effective and sound therapies for stroke; however, the mechanisms underlying the curative effects remain unclear. In this study, the effects of forced treadmill exercise with electric shock on ischemic brain edema were investigated. Wistar rats were subjected to transient (90 min) middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO). Eighty nine rats with substantially large ischemic lesions were evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and were randomly assigned to exercise and non-exercise groups. The rats were forced to run at 4-6m/s for 10 min/day on days 2, 3 and 4. Brain edema was measured on day 5 by MRI, histochemical staining of brain sections and tissue water content determination (n=7, each experiment). Motor function in some rats was examined on day 30 (n=6). Exercise reduced brain edema (P<0.05-0.001, varied by the methods) and ameliorated motor function (P<0.05). The anti-glucocorticoid mifepristone or the anti-mineralocorticoid spironolactone abolished these effects, but orally administered corticosterone mimicked the ameliorating effects of exercise. Exercise prevented the ischemia-induced expression of mRNA encoding aquaporin 4 (AQP4) and Na(+)/H(+) exchangers (NHEs) (n=5 or 7, P<0.01). Microglia and NG2 glia expressed NHE1 in the peri-ischemic region of rat brains and also in mixed glial cultures. Corticosterone at ~10nM reduced NHE1 and AQP4 expression in mixed glial and pure microglial cultures. Dexamethasone and aldosterone at 10nM did not significantly alter NHE1 and AQP4 expression. Exposure to a NHE inhibitor caused shrinkage of microglial cells. These results suggest that the stressful short-period and slow-paced treadmill exercise suppressed NHE1 and AQP4 expression resulting in the amelioration of brain edema at least partly via the moderate increase in plasma corticosterone levels. PMID:26724742

  18. Human neuronal changes in brain edema and increased intracranial pressure.

    PubMed

    Faragó, Nóra; Kocsis, Ágnes Katalin; Braskó, Csilla; Lovas, Sándor; Rózsa, Márton; Baka, Judith; Kovács, Balázs; Mikite, Katalin; Szemenyei, Viktor; Molnár, Gábor; Ozsvár, Attila; Oláh, Gáspár; Piszár, Ildikó; Zvara, Ágnes; Patócs, Attila; Barzó, Pál; Puskás, László G; Tamás, Gábor

    2016-01-01

    Functional and molecular changes associated with pathophysiological conditions are relatively easily detected based on tissue samples collected from patients. Population specific cellular responses to disease might remain undiscovered in samples taken from organs formed by a multitude of cell types. This is particularly apparent in the human cerebral cortex composed of a yet undefined number of neuron types with a potentially different involvement in disease processes. We combined cellular electrophysiology, anatomy and single cell digital PCR in human neurons identified in situ for the first time to assess mRNA expression and corresponding functional changes in response to edema and increased intracranial pressure. In single pyramidal cells, mRNA copy numbers of AQP1, AQP3, HMOX1, KCNN4, SCN3B and SOD2 increased, while CACNA1B, CRH decreased in edema. In addition, single pyramidal cells increased the copy number of AQP1, HTR5A and KCNS1 mRNAs in response to increased intracranial pressure. In contrast to pyramidal cells, AQP1, HMOX1and KCNN4 remained unchanged in single cell digital PCR performed on fast spiking cells in edema. Corroborating single cell digital PCR results, pharmacological and immunohistochemical results also suggested the presence of KCNN4 encoding the α-subunit of KCa3.1 channels in edema on pyramidal cells, but not on interneurons. We measured the frequency of spontaneous EPSPs on pyramidal cells in both pathophysiological conditions and on fast spiking interneurons in edema and found a significant decrease in each case, which was accompanied by an increase in input resistances on both cell types and by a drop in dendritic spine density on pyramidal cells consistent with a loss of excitatory synapses. Our results identify anatomical and/or physiological changes in human pyramidal and fast spiking cells in edema and increased intracranial pressure revealing cell type specific quantitative changes in gene expression. Some of the edema

  19. Influence of Age on Brain Edema Formation, Secondary Brain Damage and Inflammatory Response after Brain Trauma in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Timaru-Kast, Ralph; Luh, Clara; Gotthardt, Philipp; Huang, Changsheng; Schäfer, Michael K.; Engelhard, Kristin; Thal, Serge C.

    2012-01-01

    After traumatic brain injury (TBI) elderly patients suffer from higher mortality rate and worse functional outcome compared to young patients. However, experimental TBI research is primarily performed in young animals. Aim of the present study was to clarify whether age affects functional outcome, neuroinflammation and secondary brain damage after brain trauma in mice. Young (2 months) and old (21 months) male C57Bl6N mice were anesthetized and subjected to a controlled cortical impact injury (CCI) on the right parietal cortex. Animals of both ages were randomly assigned to 15 min, 24 h, and 72 h survival. At the end of the observation periods, contusion volume, brain water content, neurologic function, cerebral and systemic inflammation (CD3+ T cell migration, inflammatory cytokine expression in brain and lung, blood differential cell count) were determined. Old animals showed worse neurological function 72 h after CCI and a high mortality rate (19.2%) compared to young (0%). This did not correlate with histopathological damage, as contusion volumes were equal in both age groups. Although a more pronounced brain edema formation was detected in old mice 24 hours after TBI, lack of correlation between brain water content and neurological deficit indicated that brain edema formation is not solely responsible for age-dependent differences in neurological outcome. Brains of old naïve mice were about 8% smaller compared to young naïve brains, suggesting age-related brain atrophy with possible decline in plasticity. Onset of cerebral inflammation started earlier and primarily ipsilateral to damage in old mice, whereas in young mice inflammation was delayed and present in both hemispheres with a characteristic T cell migration pattern. Pulmonary interleukin 1β expression was up-regulated after cerebral injury only in young, not aged mice. The results therefore indicate that old animals are prone to functional deficits and strong ipsilateral cerebral inflammation

  20. Curcumin attenuates brain edema in mice with intracerebral hemorrhage through inhibition of AQP4 and AQP9 expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bao-feng; Cui, Zhen-wen; Zhong, Zhi-hong; Sun, Yu-hao; Sun, Qing-fang; Yang, Guo-yuan; Bian, Liu-guan

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Aquaporins (AQPs) are the water-channels that play important roles in brain water homeostasis and in cerebral edema induced by brain injury. In this study we investigated the relationship between AQPs and a neuroprotective agent curcumin that was effective in the treatment of brain edema in mice with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Methods: ICH was induced in mice by autologous blood infusion. The mice immediately received curcumin (75, 150, 300 mg/kg, ip). The Rotarod test scores, brain water content and brain expression of AQPs were measured post ICH. Cultured primary mouse astrocytes were used for in vitro experiments. The expression of AQP1, AQP4 and AQP9 and NF-κB p65 were detected using Western blotting or immunochemistry staining. Results: Curcumin administration dose-dependently reduced the cerebral edema at d 3 post ICH, and significantly attenuated the neurological deficits at d 5 post ICH. Furthermore, curcumin dose-dependently decreased the gene and protein expression of AQP4 and AQP9, but not AQP1 post ICH. Treatment of the cultured astrocytes with Fe2+ (10–100 μmol/L) dose-dependently increased the expression and nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 and the expression of AQP4 and AQP9, which were partly blocked by co-treatment with curcumin (20 μmol/L) or the NF-κB inhibitor PDTC (10 μmol/L). Conclusion: Curcumin effectively attenuates brain edema in mice with ICH through inhibition of the NF-κB pathway and subsequently the expression of AQP4 and AQP9. Curcumin may serve as a potential therapeutic agent for ICH. PMID:26119880

  1. Attenuation of Acute Phase Injury in Rat Intracranial Hemorrhage by Cerebrolysin that Inhibits Brain Edema and Inflammatory Response.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Zhaotao; Wang, Shanshan; Gao, Mou; Xu, Ruxiang; Liang, Chunyang; Zhang, Hongtian

    2016-04-01

    The outcome of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is mainly determined by the volume of the hemorrhage core and the secondary brain damage to penumbral tissues due to brain swelling, microcirculation disturbance and inflammation. The present study aims to investigate the protective effects of cerebrolysin on brain edema and inhibition of the inflammation response surrounding the hematoma core in the acute stage after ICH. The ICH model was induced by administration of type VII bacterial collagenase into the stratum of adult rats, which were then randomly divided into three groups: ICH + saline; ICH + Cerebrolysin (5 ml/kg) and sham. Cerebrolysin or saline was administered intraperitoneally 1 h post surgery. Neurological scores, extent of brain edema content and Evans blue dye extravasation were recorded. The levels of pro-inflammatory factors (IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6) were assayed by Real-time PCR and Elisa kits. Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) and tight junction proteins (TJPs; claudin-5, occludin and zonula occluden-1) expression were measured at multiple time points. The morphological and intercellular changes were characterized by Electron microscopy. It is found that cerebrolysin (5 ml/kg) improved the neurological behavior and reduced the ipsilateral brain water content and Evans blue dye extravasation. After cerebrolysin treated, the levels of pro-inflammatory factors and AQP4 in the peri-hematomal areas were markedly reduced and were accompanied with higher expression of TJPs. Electron microscopy showed the astrocytic swelling and concentrated chromatin in the ICH group and confirmed the cell junction changes. Thus, early cerebrolysin treatment ameliorates secondary injury after ICH and promotes behavioral performance during the acute phase by reducing brain edema, inflammatory response, and blood-brain barrier permeability. PMID:26498936

  2. Acupuncture and moxibustion reduces neuronal edema in Alzheimer's disease rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hua; Sun, Guojie; Kong, Lihong; Du, Yanjun; Shen, Feng; Wang, Shuju; Chen, Bangguo; Zeng, Xiaoling

    2014-01-01

    To examine the possible correlation of aberrant Wnt signaling and pathological changes in Alzheimer's disease, we established a rat model of Alzheimer's disease and measured axin and β-catenin expression in the hippocampus. Rats were pretreated with moxibustion or electroacupuncture, or both, at Baihui (GV20) and Shenshu (BL23). Axin expression was lower, β-catenin expression was greater, and neuronal cytoplasmic edema was visibly prevented in the rats that had received the pretreatments. Our results suggest that the mechanism underlying the neuroprotective effect of acupuncture and moxibustion in Alzheimer's disease is associated with axin and β-catenin expression in the Wnt signal transduction pathway. PMID:25206919

  3. MRI Reveals Edema in Larynx (But Not in Brain) During Anaphylactic Hypotension in Anesthetized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Toyota, Ichiro; Tanida, Mamoru; Wang, Mofei; Kurata, Yasutaka; Tonami, Hisao

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Anaphylactic shock is sometimes accompanied by local interstitial edema due to increased vascular permeability. We performed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to compare edema in the larynx and brain of anesthetized rats during anaphylactic hypotension versus vasodilator-induced hypotension. Methods Male Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to hypotension induced by the ovalbumin antigen (n=7) or a vasodilator sodium nitroprusside (SNP; n=7). Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and T2-relaxation time (T2RT) were quantified on MRI performed repeatedly for up to 68 min after the injection of either agent. The presence of laryngeal edema was also examined by histological examination. Separately, the occurrence of brain edema was assessed by measuring brain water content using the wet/dry method in rats with anaphylaxis (n=5) or SNP (n=5) and the non-hypotensive control rats (n=5). Mast cells in hypothalamus were morphologically examined. Results Mean arterial blood pressure similarly decreased to 35 mmHg after an injection of the antigen or SNP. Hyperintensity on T2-weighted images (as reflected by elevated T2RT) was found in the larynx as early as 13 min after an injection of the antigen, but not SNP. A postmortem histological examination revealed epiglottic edema in the rats with anaphylaxis, but not SNP. In contrast, no significant changes in T2RT or ADC were detectable in the brains of any rats studied. In separate experiments, the quantified brain water content did not increase in either anaphylaxis or SNP rats, as compared with the non-hypotensive control rats. The numbers of mast cells with metachromatic granules in the hypothalamus were not different between rats with anaphylaxis and SNP, suggesting the absence of anaphylactic reaction in hypothalamus. Conclusion Edema was detected using the MRI technique in the larynx during rat anaphylaxis, but not in the brain. PMID:24179686

  4. Blood Brain Barrier KCa3.1 Channels: Evidence for a Role in Brain Na Uptake and Edema in Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Je; Wallace, Breanna K.; Yuen, Natalie; Jenkins, David P.; Wulff, Heike; O’Donnell, Martha E.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose KCa3.1, a calcium-activated potassium channel, regulates ion and fluid secretion in the lung and gastrointestinal tract. It is also expressed on vascular endothelium where it participates in blood pressure regulation. However, the expression and physiological role of KCa3.1 in blood-brain barrier (BBB) endothelium has not been investigated. BBB endothelial cells transport Na+ and Cl− from the blood into the brain transcellularly through the cooperation of multiple co-transporters, exchangers, pumps and channels. In the early stages of cerebral ischemia, when the BBB is intact, edema formation occurs by processes involving increased BBB transcellular Na+ transport. This study evaluated whether KCa3.1 is expressed on and participates in BBB ion transport. Methods The expression of KCa3.1 on cultured cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (CMEC), isolated microvessels and brain sections was evaluated by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Activity of KCa3.1 on CMEC was examined by K+ flux assays and patch-clamp. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging were used to measure brain Na+ uptake and edema formation in rats with focal ischemic stroke following TRAM-34 treatment. Results KCa3.1 current and channel protein were identified on bovine CMEC and freshly isolated rat microvessels. In situ KCa3.1 expression on BBB endothelium was confirmed in rat and human brain sections. TRAM-34 treatment significantly reduced Na+ uptake, and cytotoxic edema in the ischemic brain. Conclusions BBB endothelial cells exhibit KCa3.1 protein and activity and pharmacological blockade of KCa3.1 appears to provide an effective therapeutic approach for reducing cerebral edema formation in the first 3 hours of ischemic stroke. PMID:25477223

  5. Dimethyl fumarate attenuates cerebral edema formation by protecting the blood-brain barrier integrity.

    PubMed

    Kunze, Reiner; Urrutia, Andrés; Hoffmann, Angelika; Liu, Hui; Helluy, Xavier; Pham, Mirko; Reischl, Stefan; Korff, Thomas; Marti, Hugo H

    2015-04-01

    Brain edema is a hallmark of various neuropathologies, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. We aim to characterize how tissue hypoxia, together with oxidative stress and inflammation, leads to capillary dysfunction and breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). In a mouse stroke model we show that systemic treatment with dimethyl fumarate (DMF), an antioxidant drug clinically used for psoriasis and multiple sclerosis, significantly prevented edema formation in vivo. Indeed, DMF stabilized the BBB by preventing disruption of interendothelial tight junctions and gap formation, and decreased matrix metalloproteinase activity in brain tissue. In vitro, DMF directly sustained endothelial tight junctions, inhibited inflammatory cytokine expression, and attenuated leukocyte transmigration. We also demonstrate that these effects are mediated via activation of the redox sensitive transcription factor NF-E2 related factor 2 (Nrf2). DMF activated the Nrf2 pathway as shown by up-regulation of several Nrf2 target genes in the brain in vivo, as well as in cerebral endothelial cells and astrocytes in vitro, where DMF also increased protein abundance of nuclear Nrf2. Finally, Nrf2 knockdown in endothelial cells aggravated subcellular delocalization of tight junction proteins during ischemic conditions, and attenuated the protective effect exerted by DMF. Overall, our data suggest that DMF protects from cerebral edema formation during ischemic stroke by targeting interendothelial junctions in an Nrf2-dependent manner, and provide the basis for a completely new approach to treat brain edema. PMID:25725349

  6. The Effects of Shilajit on Brain Edema, Intracranial Pressure and Neurologic Outcomes following the Traumatic Brain Injury in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Khaksari, Mohammad; Mahmmodi, Reza; Shahrokhi, Nader; Shabani, Mohammad; Joukar, Siavash; Aqapour, Mobin

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s): Brain edema is one of the most serious causes of death within the first few days after trauma brain injury (TBI). In this study we have investigated the role of Shilajit on brain edema, blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability, intracranial pressure (ICP) and neurologic outcomes following brain trauma. Materials and Methods: Diffuse traumatic brain trauma was induced in rats by drop of a 250 g weight from a 2 m high (Marmarou’s methods). Animals were randomly divided into 5 groups including sham, TBI, TBI-vehicle, TBI-Shi150 group and TBI-Shi250 group. Rats were undergone intraperitoneal injection of Shilajit and vehicle at 1, 24, 48 and 72 hr after trauma. Brain water content, BBB permeability, ICP and neurologic outcomes were finally measured. Results: Brain water and Evans blue dye contents showed significant decrease in Shilajit-treated groups compared to the TBI-vehicle and TBI groups. Intracranial pressure at 24, 48 and 72 hr after trauma had significant reduction in Shilajit-treated groups as compared to TBI-vehicle and TBI groups (P<0.001). The rate of neurologic outcomes improvement at 4, 24, 48 and 72 hr after trauma showed significant increase in Shilajit-treated groups in comparison to theTBI- vehicle and TBI groups (P <0.001). Conclusion: The present results indicated that Shilajit may cause in improvement of neurologic outcomes through decreasing brain edema, disrupting of BBB, and ICP after the TBI. PMID:23997917

  7. Dehydroascorbic Acid Attenuates Ischemic Brain Edema and Neurotoxicity in Cerebral Ischemia: An in vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Song, Juhyun; Park, Joohyun; Kim, Jae Hwan; Choi, Ja Yong; Kim, Jae Young; Lee, Kyoung Min

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic stroke results in the diverse phathophysiologies including blood brain barrier (BBB) disruption, brain edema, neuronal cell death, and synaptic loss in brain. Vitamin C has known as the potent anti-oxidant having multiple functions in various organs, as well as in brain. Dehydroascorbic acid (DHA) as the oxidized form of ascorbic acid (AA) acts as a cellular protector against oxidative stress and easily enters into the brain compared to AA. To determine the role of DHA on edema formation, neuronal cell death, and synaptic dysfunction following cerebral ischemia, we investigated the infarct size of ischemic brain tissue and measured the expression of aquaporin 1 (AQP-1) as the water channel protein. We also examined the expression of claudin 5 for confirming the BBB breakdown, and the expression of bcl 2 associated X protein (Bax), caspase-3, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) for checking the effect of DHA on the neurotoxicity. Finally, we examined postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95) expression to confirm the effect of DHA on synaptic dysfunction following ischemic stroke. Based on our findings, we propose that DHA might alleviate the pathogenesis of ischemic brain injury by attenuating edema, neuronal loss, and by improving synaptic connection. PMID:25792869

  8. Stereotactic Aspiration-Thrombolysis of Intracerebral Hemorrhage and its Impact on Perihematoma Brain Edema

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Ryan J.; Keyl, Penelope M.; Hanley, Daniel F.; Johnson, Robert R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Recent reports suggest that when thrombolytic agents are administered within the clot, lysis rate accelerates at the expense of increased risk of worsening edema. To test this hypothesis, we report on the volumetric analysis of (1) the intraparenchymal hematoma and, (2) perihematomal edema in a cohort of ICH patients treated with intraclot rtPA. Methods A convenience sample of highly selected ICH patients underwent frameless stereotactic aspiration and thrombolysis (FAST) of the clot. Two milligrams of rtPA were administered every 12 h until ICH volume ≤10 cc, or catheter fenestrations were no longer in continuity with the clot. ICH and perihematomal edema volumes were calculated from CT scans. Using random effects linear regression we estimated the rate of hematoma and edema volume resolution as well as their relationship during the first 8 days of lytic therapy. Results Fifteen patients were treated, mean age: 60.7 years, median time from ictus to FAST: 1 (range 0–3) day. Using a random effects model that considered volume resolution over the first 8 days following lytic therapy we found that the both percentage hematoma and percentage perihematoma edema resolution per day were quadratic with respect to time. Percentage residual hematoma volume on day K = 97.7% − [24.36%*K] + [1.89%*K2]; P < 0.001 for both terms. Percentage residual edema on day K = 97.4% − [13.94%*K] + [1.30%*K2]; P < 0.001 for K and P = 0.01 for K2. Examination of each patient’s volume data suggests that there exists a strong direct relationship between perihematoma edema volume and same day hematoma volume. Conclusions In this cohort of ICH patients treated using FAST, volumetric analysis of ICH and perihematomal edema seems to suggest that local use of rtPA does not exacerbate brain edema formation. Furthermore, there seems to be a strong association between reduction in ICH volume and reduction in edema volume, as would be expected following the concept of

  9. Antagonists of the Vasopressin V1 Receptor and of the β1-Adrenoceptor Inhibit Cytotoxic Brain Edema in Stroke by Effects on Astrocytes – but the Mechanisms Differ

    PubMed Central

    Hertz, Leif; Xu, Junnan; Chen, Ye; Gibbs, Marie E; Du, Ting; Hertz, Leif; Xu, Junnan; Chen, Ye; Gibbs, Marie E; Du, Ting

    2014-01-01

    Brain edema is a serious complication in ischemic stroke because even relatively small changes in brain volume can compromise cerebral blood flow or result in compression of vital brain structures on account of the fixed volume of the rigid skull. Literature data indicate that administration of either antagonists of the V1 vasopressin (AVP) receptor or the β1-adrenergic receptor are able to reduce edema or infarct size when administered after the onset of ischemia, a key advantage for possible clinical use. The present review discusses possible mechanisms, focusing on the role of NKCC1, an astrocytic cotransporter of Na+, K+, 2Cl- and water and its activation by highly increased extracellular K+ concentrations in the development of cytotoxic cell swelling. However, it also mentions that due to a 3/2 ratio between Na+ release and K+ uptake by the Na+,K+-ATPase driving NKCC1 brain extracellular fluid can become hypertonic, which may facilitate water entry across the blood-brain barrier, essential for development of edema. It shows that brain edema does not develop until during reperfusion, which can be explained by lack of metabolic energy during ischemia. V1 antagonists are likely to protect against cytotoxic edema formation by inhibiting AVP enhancement of NKCC1-mediated uptake of ions and water, whereas β1-adrenergic antagonists prevent edema formation because β1-adrenergic stimulation alone is responsible for stimulation of the Na+,K+-ATPase driving NKCC1, first and foremost due to decrease in extracellular Ca2+ concentration. Inhibition of NKCC1 also has adverse effects, e.g. on memory and the treatment should probably be of shortest possible duration. PMID:25342939

  10. Segmentation of tumor and edema along with healthy tissues of brain using wavelets and neural networks.

    PubMed

    Demirhan, Ayşe; Toru, Mustafa; Guler, Inan

    2015-07-01

    Robust brain magnetic resonance (MR) segmentation algorithms are critical to analyze tissues and diagnose tumor and edema in a quantitative way. In this study, we present a new tissue segmentation algorithm that segments brain MR images into tumor, edema, white matter (WM), gray matter (GM), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The detection of the healthy tissues is performed simultaneously with the diseased tissues because examining the change caused by the spread of tumor and edema on healthy tissues is very important for treatment planning. We used T1, T2, and FLAIR MR images of 20 subjects suffering from glial tumor. We developed an algorithm for stripping the skull before the segmentation process. The segmentation is performed using self-organizing map (SOM) that is trained with unsupervised learning algorithm and fine-tuned with learning vector quantization (LVQ). Unlike other studies, we developed an algorithm for clustering the SOM instead of using an additional network. Input feature vector is constructed with the features obtained from stationary wavelet transform (SWT) coefficients. The results showed that average dice similarity indexes are 91% for WM, 87% for GM, 96% for CSF, 61% for tumor, and 77% for edema. PMID:25265636

  11. Central Role of Maladapted Astrocytic Plasticity in Ischemic Brain Edema Formation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Feng; Parpura, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Brain edema formation and the ensuing brain damages are the major cause of high mortality and long term disability following the occurrence of ischemic stroke. In this process, oxygen and glucose deprivation and the resulting reperfusion injury play primary roles. In response to the ischemic insult, the neurovascular unit experiences both intracellular and extracellular edemas, associated with maladapted astrocytic plasticity. The astrocytic plasticity includes both morphological and functional plasticity. The former involves a reactive gliosis and the subsequent glial retraction. It relates to the capacity of astrocytes to buffer changes in extracellular chemical levels, particularly K(+) and glutamate, as well as the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The latter involves the expression and activity of a series of ion and water transport proteins. These molecules are grouped together around glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and water channel protein aquaporin 4 (AQP4) to form functional networks, regulate hydromineral balance across cell membranes and maintain the integrity of the BBB. Intense ischemic challenges can disrupt these capacities of astrocytes and result in their maladaptation. The maladapted astrocytic plasticity in ischemic stroke cannot only disrupt the hydromineral homeostasis across astrocyte membrane and the BBB, but also leads to disorders of the whole neurovascular unit. This review focuses on how the maladapted astrocytic plasticity in ischemic stroke plays the central role in the brain edema formation. PMID:27242440

  12. Central Role of Maladapted Astrocytic Plasticity in Ischemic Brain Edema Formation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu-Feng; Parpura, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Brain edema formation and the ensuing brain damages are the major cause of high mortality and long term disability following the occurrence of ischemic stroke. In this process, oxygen and glucose deprivation and the resulting reperfusion injury play primary roles. In response to the ischemic insult, the neurovascular unit experiences both intracellular and extracellular edemas, associated with maladapted astrocytic plasticity. The astrocytic plasticity includes both morphological and functional plasticity. The former involves a reactive gliosis and the subsequent glial retraction. It relates to the capacity of astrocytes to buffer changes in extracellular chemical levels, particularly K+ and glutamate, as well as the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The latter involves the expression and activity of a series of ion and water transport proteins. These molecules are grouped together around glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and water channel protein aquaporin 4 (AQP4) to form functional networks, regulate hydromineral balance across cell membranes and maintain the integrity of the BBB. Intense ischemic challenges can disrupt these capacities of astrocytes and result in their maladaptation. The maladapted astrocytic plasticity in ischemic stroke cannot only disrupt the hydromineral homeostasis across astrocyte membrane and the BBB, but also leads to disorders of the whole neurovascular unit. This review focuses on how the maladapted astrocytic plasticity in ischemic stroke plays the central role in the brain edema formation. PMID:27242440

  13. The role of extracellular-5'-nucleotidase/CD73 in glioma peritumoural brain edema.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Wang, Dong; Zhu, ZhiZhong; Wang, Wei; Zhang, XueBin; Tang, Fan; Zhou, Yu; Wang, HongGuang; Liu, MengYuan; Yao, Xin; Yan, XiaoLing

    2016-04-01

    During pathological conditions, extracellular-5'-nucleotidase/CD73 can protect neurons by reducing the permeability of the blood brain barrier. In recent years, it has been demonstrated that CD73 can negatively contribute to the growth of gliomas; however, the function of CD73 in glioma blood vessels is not clear. We analysed the expression of CD73 in 72 glioma patients using immunohistochemistry and correspondingly compared the results with the Edema index (EI). We established an in vitro model of the blood-tumour barrier and analysed the expression of CD73 in vascular endothelial cells. Lastly, CD73 expression was inhibited in endothelial cells, and the effects of this inhibition on tight junction structure and transendothelial resistance were observed. Compared to normal brains, the expression of CD73 in blood vessels of glioma patients was significantly decreased, and the amount was lower in the centre of the tumour than the periphery. The proportion of CD73-positive blood vessels had a positive correlation with the EI. The expression of CD73 in the in vitro endothelial cell blood-tumour barrier model was decreased. Lastly, inhibiting CD73 was found to decrease the expression of tight junction related proteins in endothelial cells and to decrease the value of transendothelial electric resistance. The expression of CD73 in glioma blood vessels was significantly decreased, which may play a multi-functional role in decreasing the expression of tight junction related proteins of brain microvascular endothelial cells and may also increase blood-tumour barrier permeability and accelerate the formation of PTBE. PMID:26884147

  14. Aquaporin-1 Deficiency Protects Against Myocardial Infarction by Reducing Both Edema and Apoptosis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lihua; Weng, Zhiyong; Yao, Chenjuan; Song, Yuanlin; Ma, Tonghui

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have determined that AQP1 plays an important role in edema formation and resolution in various tissues via water transport across the cell membrane. The aim of this research was to determine both if and how AQP1 is associated with cardiac ischemic injury, particularly the development of edema following myocardial infarction (MI). AQP1+/+ and AQP1−/− mice were used to create the MI model. Under physiological conditions, AQP1−/− mice develop normally; however, in the setting of MI, they exhibit cardioprotective properties, as shown by reduced cardiac infarct size determined via NBT staining, improved cardiac function determined via left ventricular catheter measurements, decreased AQP1-dependent myocardial edema determined via water content assays, and decreased apoptosis determined via TUNEL analysis. Cardiac ischemia caused by hypoxia secondary to AQP1 deficiency stabilized the expression of HIF-1α in endothelial cells and subsequently decreased microvascular permeability, resulting in the development of edema. The AQP1-dependent myocardial edema and apoptosis contributed to the development of MI. AQP1 deficiency protected cardiac function from ischemic injury following MI. Furthermore, AQP1 deficiency reduced microvascular permeability via the stabilization of HIF-1α levels in endothelial cells and decreased cellular apoptosis following MI. PMID:26348407

  15. Aquaporin-1 Deficiency Protects Against Myocardial Infarction by Reducing Both Edema and Apoptosis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Lihua; Weng, Zhiyong; Yao, Chenjuan; Song, Yuanlin; Ma, Tonghui

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have determined that AQP1 plays an important role in edema formation and resolution in various tissues via water transport across the cell membrane. The aim of this research was to determine both if and how AQP1 is associated with cardiac ischemic injury, particularly the development of edema following myocardial infarction (MI). AQP1+/+ and AQP1-/- mice were used to create the MI model. Under physiological conditions, AQP1-/- mice develop normally; however, in the setting of MI, they exhibit cardioprotective properties, as shown by reduced cardiac infarct size determined via NBT staining, improved cardiac function determined via left ventricular catheter measurements, decreased AQP1-dependent myocardial edema determined via water content assays, and decreased apoptosis determined via TUNEL analysis. Cardiac ischemia caused by hypoxia secondary to AQP1 deficiency stabilized the expression of HIF-1α in endothelial cells and subsequently decreased microvascular permeability, resulting in the development of edema. The AQP1-dependent myocardial edema and apoptosis contributed to the development of MI. AQP1 deficiency protected cardiac function from ischemic injury following MI. Furthermore, AQP1 deficiency reduced microvascular permeability via the stabilization of HIF-1α levels in endothelial cells and decreased cellular apoptosis following MI. PMID:26348407

  16. Ability of eugenol to reduce tongue edema induced by Dieffenbachia picta Schott in mice.

    PubMed

    Dip, Etyene Castro; Pereira, Nuno Alvarez; Fernandes, Patricia Dias

    2004-05-01

    Dieffenbachia picta Schott (Araceae), known in Brazil as "comigo-ninguém-pode" is an ornamental plant with toxic properties. Its juice, when chewed, causes a painful edema of the oral mucous membranes, buccal ulcerations and tongue hypertrophy. This acute inflammation sometimes becomes severe enough to produce glottis obstruction, respiratory compromise and death. Eugenol (4-alil-2-metoxiphenol), the essential oil extracted from Caryophyllus aromaticus (Myrtaceae) is widely used in odontology. In this study, our objective was to standardize, in mice, a measurable methodology for the tongue edema induced by the topical application of the D. picta stem juice; evaluate the effects of eugenol in this model and compare the results with emergency treatment used in hospitals. Our results show that in spite of a small increase in edema a few minutes after administration, emergency treatment reduced by 70% the overall edema. When compared with the combination of the above drugs, eugenol, even at the smallest dose of 5 microg/kg, regardless of the chosen administration route, or the moment the treatment began, presents better results in the reduction and inhibition of the tongue edema induced by the D. picta juice. PMID:15109894

  17. Treatment of tyramine-induced brain edema with anion transport inhibitor L-644,711

    SciTech Connect

    Faraj, B.A.; Cragoe, E.J. Jr.; Sarper, R.; Camp, M.; Malveaux, E.

    1988-01-01

    Tyramine induces coma in phenelzine-treated dogs. Development of coma in these animals is associated with brain edema, abnormal brain scans of Tc-99m-diethylene-triamine-penta-acetic acid (Tc-99m-DTPA), and elevated levels of CSF catecholamines. We found that the intravenous administration of 6-7 mg/kg of a single dose of L-644,711 given fifteen minutes after the oral administration of tyramine to phenelzine-pretreated animals followed by an infusion of normal saline containing 6-7 mg/kg of the drug given over a period of 2 hr caused reversal of brain injury. This was accompanied by full recovery within a period of 24 hr of all the animals tested. A follow-up study revealed that 24 hr after treatment with L-644,711 CSF levels of catecholamines and brain images of Tc-99m-DTPA were indistinguishable from normal controls. Animals that received no drug died from unresolved coma within 4 to 24 hr. Animals that had recovered due to therapy with L-644,711 were given 10-14 days rest followed by a repetition of the phenelzine and tyramine treatment but denied L-644,711 therapy. These animals also died of unresolved coma within 24 hr. This preliminary study suggest that the use of L-644,711 may constitute an important advance in treatment of brain edema of a wide range of neurological disorders.

  18. Multi-fractal texture features for brain tumor and edema segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reza, S.; Iftekharuddin, K. M.

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we propose a fully automatic brain tumor and edema segmentation technique in brain magnetic resonance (MR) images. Different brain tissues are characterized using the novel texture features such as piece-wise triangular prism surface area (PTPSA), multi-fractional Brownian motion (mBm) and Gabor-like textons, along with regular intensity and intensity difference features. Classical Random Forest (RF) classifier is used to formulate the segmentation task as classification of these features in multi-modal MRIs. The segmentation performance is compared with other state-of-art works using a publicly available dataset known as Brain Tumor Segmentation (BRATS) 2012 [1]. Quantitative evaluation is done using the online evaluation tool from Kitware/MIDAS website [2]. The results show that our segmentation performance is more consistent and, on the average, outperforms other state-of-the art works in both training and challenge cases in the BRATS competition.

  19. A fatal adverse effect of cefazolin administration: severe brain edema in a patient with multiple meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Tribuddharat, Sirirat; Sathitkarnmanee, Thepakorn; Kitkhuandee, Amnat; Theerapongpakdee, Sunchai; Ngamsaengsirisup, Kriangsak; Chanthawong, Sarinya

    2016-01-01

    Cefazolin is commonly administered before surgery as a prophylactic antibiotic. Hypersensitivity to cefazolin is not uncommon, and the symptoms mostly include urticaria, skin reaction, diarrhea, vomiting, and transient neutropenia, which are rarely life threatening. We present a rare case of fatal cefazolin hypersensitivity in a female who was diagnosed with multiple meningiomas and scheduled for craniotomy and tumor removal. Immediately after cefazolin IV administration, the patient developed acute hypertensive crisis, which resolved within 10 minutes after the treatment. This was followed by unexplained metabolic acidosis. The patient then developed severe brain edema 100 minutes later. The patient had facial edema when her face was exposed for the next 30 minutes. A computed tomography scan revealed global brain edema with herniation. She was admitted to the intensive care unit for symptomatic treatment and died 10 days after surgery from multiorgan failure. The serum IgE level was very high (734 IU/mL). Single-dose administration of cefazolin for surgical prophylaxis may lead to rare, fatal adverse reaction. The warning signs are sudden, unexplained metabolic acidosis, hypertensive crisis, tachycardia, and facial angioedema predominating with or without cutaneous symptoms like urticaria. PMID:26929668

  20. Relationship between apathy and tumor location, size, and brain edema in patients with intracranial meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yihua; Shao, Chunhong; Gong, Ye; Wu, Xuehai; Tang, Weijun; Shi, Shenxun

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to assess the relationship between apathy and tumor location, size, and brain edema in patients with intracranial meningioma. Methods We enrolled 65 consecutive patients with meningioma and 31 normal controls matched for age, gender, and education. The patients were divided into frontal or non-frontal (NF) meningioma groups based on magnetic resonance imaging; the frontal group was then subdivided to dorsolateral frontal (DLF), medial frontal (MF), and ventral frontal (VF) groups. Tumor size and brain edema were also recorded. Apathy was assessed by the Apathy Evaluation Scale (AES). Assessments were carried out 1 week before and 3 months after surgery, respectively. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify the predictive effect of tumor size, location, and brain edema on apathy. Analysis of variance and chi-square analysis were applied to compare apathy scores and apathy rates among the frontal, NF, and normal control groups, and all subgroups within the frontal group. Results Compared with the NF and control groups, the mean AES score was much higher in the frontal group (34.0±8.3 versus 28.63±6.0, P=0.008, and 26.8±4.2, P<0.001). Subgroup analysis showed that AES scores in the MF group (42.1±6.6) and VF group (34.7±8.0) were higher than in the DLF group (28.5±4.36), NF group, and control group (P<0.05). The apathy rate was 63.6% in the MF group and 25% in the VF group, and significantly higher than in the DLF (5.6%), NF (5.3%), and control (0%) groups (P<0.001). A moderate correlation was found between AES score and mean diameter of the meningioma in all patient groups. Further analysis demonstrated that the correlation existed in the DLF (r=0.52, P=0.032), MF (r=0.84, P<0.001), and VF (r=0.64, P=0.008) groups, but not in the NF group (r=0.19, P=0.448). The AES score was much higher in patients with brain edema than in those without brain edema (34.73±8.28 versus 28.77±4.20, t=3.545, P=0.001). In

  1. Volumetric Electromagnetic Phase-Shift Spectroscopy of Brain Edema and Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Cesar A.; Valencia, Jose A.; Mora, Alfredo; Gonzalez, Fernando; Velasco, Beatriz; Porras, Martin A.; Salgado, Javier; Polo, Salvador M.; Hevia-Montiel, Nidiyare; Cordero, Sergio; Rubinsky, Boris

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by the need of poor and rural Mexico, where the population has limited access to advanced medical technology and services, we have developed a new paradigm for medical diagnostic based on the technology of “Volumetric Electromagnetic Phase Shift Spectroscopy” (VEPS), as an inexpensive partial substitute to medical imaging. VEPS, can detect changes in tissue properties inside the body through non-contact, multi-frequency electromagnetic measurements from the exterior of the body, and thereby provide rapid and inexpensive diagnostics in a way that is amenable for use in economically disadvantaged parts of the world. We describe the technology and report results from a limited pilot study with 46 healthy volunteers and eight patients with CT radiology confirmed brain edema and brain hematoma. Data analysis with a non-parametric statistical Mann-Whitney U test, shows that in the frequency range of from 26 MHz to 39 MHz, VEPS can distinguish non-invasively and without contact, with a statistical significance of p<0.05, between healthy subjects and those with a medical conditions in the brain. In the frequency range of between 153 MHz to 166 MHz it can distinguish with a statistical significance of p<0.05 between subjects with brain edema and those with a hematoma in the brain. A classifier build from measurements in these two frequency ranges can provide instantaneous diagnostic of the medical condition of the brain of a patient, from a single set of measurements. While this is a small-scale pilot study, it illustrates the potential of VEPS to change the paradigm of medical diagnostic of brain injury through a VEPS classifier-based technology. Obviously substantially larger-scale studies are needed to verify and expand on the findings in this small pilot study. PMID:23691001

  2. Diffuse leukoencephalopathy and brain edema: unusual presentations of CNS relapse of acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Michael; Kiewe, Philipp; Hartlieb, Sissel; Neumann, Martin; Schilling, Andreas; Koch, Hans-Christian; Thiel, Eckhard; Korfel, Agnieszka

    2010-04-01

    An isolated CNS relapse is rarely seen in acute myeloid leukemia. However, it has a potentially fatal clinical outcome. We herein present the case of a 39-year-old man, who presented to our emergency room with horizontal diplopic images, vertigo, bilateral deafness, and progressing somnolence. Cerebral imaging revealed cerebral and cerebellar edema and a diffuse leukoencephalopathy. With the one-year-old history of an initially successfully treated FAB-M0 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in mind, a lumbar puncture was carried out that showed a vast number of myeloid blasts in the morphologic analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid. In conjunction with normal findings in the peripheral blood-count with differential and the bone marrow examination a diagnosis of an isolated CNS relapse of the AML was made. Cytarabine chemotherapy was initiated and the symptoms resolved rapidly. To our surprise, cerebral imaging in the course of the treatment not only showed a resolution of the brain edema but also of the leukoencephalopathy, pointing to a direct infiltration of brain parenchyma by leukemic blasts. The case highlights the relevance of the CNS as a pharmacologic "sanctuary" for tumor cells in patients that on prior treatments have not received intrathecal chemotherapy or chemotherapeutics that cross the blood-brain barrier. PMID:18826442

  3. Computer aided detection of tumor and edema in brain FLAIR magnetic resonance image using ANN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Nandita; Sinha, A. K.

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents an efficient region based segmentation technique for detecting pathological tissues (Tumor & Edema) of brain using fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) magnetic resonance (MR) images. This work segments FLAIR brain images for normal and pathological tissues based on statistical features and wavelet transform coefficients using k-means algorithm. The image is divided into small blocks of 4×4 pixels. The k-means algorithm is used to cluster the image based on the feature vectors of blocks forming different classes representing different regions in the whole image. With the knowledge of the feature vectors of different segmented regions, supervised technique is used to train Artificial Neural Network using fuzzy back propagation algorithm (FBPA). Segmentation for detecting healthy tissues and tumors has been reported by several researchers by using conventional MRI sequences like T1, T2 and PD weighted sequences. This work successfully presents segmentation of healthy and pathological tissues (both Tumors and Edema) using FLAIR images. At the end pseudo coloring of segmented and classified regions are done for better human visualization.

  4. Agonist of growth hormone-releasing hormone reduces pneumolysin-induced pulmonary permeability edema

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Rudolf; Sridhar, Supriya; Rick, Ferenc G.; Gorshkov, Boris; Umapathy, Nagavedi S.; Yang, Guang; Oseghale, Aluya; Verin, Alexander D.; Chakraborty, Trinad; Matthay, Michael A.; Zemskov, Evgeny A.; White, Richard; Block, Norman L.; Schally, Andrew V.

    2012-01-01

    Aggressive treatment with antibiotics in patients infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae induces release of the bacterial virulence factor pneumolysin (PLY). Days after lungs are sterile, this pore-forming toxin can still induce pulmonary permeability edema in patients, characterized by alveolar/capillary barrier dysfunction and impaired alveolar liquid clearance (ALC). ALC is mainly regulated through Na+ transport by the apically expressed epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) and the basolaterally expressed Na+/K+-ATPase in type II alveolar epithelial cells. Because no standard treatment is currently available to treat permeability edema, the search for novel therapeutic candidates is of high priority. We detected mRNA expression for the active receptor splice variant SV1 of the hypothalamic polypeptide growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH), as well as for GHRH itself, in human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HL-MVEC). Therefore, we have evaluated the effect of the GHRH agonist JI-34 on PLY-induced barrier and ALC dysfunction. JI-34 blunts PLY-mediated endothelial hyperpermeability in monolayers of HL-MVEC, in a cAMP-dependent manner, by means of reducing the phosphorylation of myosin light chain and vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin. In human airway epithelial H441 cells, PLY significantly impairs Na+ uptake, but JI-34 restores it to basal levels by means of increasing cAMP levels. Intratracheal instillation of PLY into C57BL6 mice causes pulmonary alveolar epithelial and endothelial hyperpermeability as well as edema formation, all of which are blunted by JI-34. These findings point toward a protective role of the GHRH signaling pathway in PLY-induced permeability edema. PMID:22308467

  5. Minocycline Attenuates Neonatal Germinal-Matrix-Hemorrhage-Induced Neuroinflammation and Brain Edema by Activating Cannabinoid Receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jun; Chen, Qianwei; Guo, Jing; Yang, Liming; Tao, Yihao; Li, Lin; Miao, Hongping; Feng, Hua; Chen, Zhi; Zhu, Gang

    2016-04-01

    Germinal matrix hemorrhage (GMH) is the most common neurological disease of premature newborns leading to detrimental neurological sequelae. Minocycline has been reported to play a key role in neurological inflammatory diseases by controlling some mechanisms that involve cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2R). The current study investigated whether minocycline reduces neuroinflammation and protects the brain from injury in a rat model of collagenase-induced GMH by regulating CB2R activity. To test this hypothesis, the effects of minocycline and a CB2R antagonist (AM630) were evaluated in male rat pups that were post-natal day 7 (P7) after GMH. We found that minocycline can lead to increased CB2R mRNA expression and protein expression in microglia. Minocycline significantly reduced GMH-induced brain edema, microglial activation, and lateral ventricular volume. Additionally, minocycline enhanced cortical thickness after injury. All of these neuroprotective effects of minocycline were prevented by AM630. A cannabinoid CB2 agonist (JWH133) was used to strengthen the hypothesis, which showed the identical neuroprotective effects of minocycline. Our study demonstrates, for the first time, that minocycline attenuates neuroinflammation and brain injury in a rat model of GMH, and activation of CBR2 was partially involved in these processes. PMID:25833102

  6. Anti-edema action of thyroid hormone in MCAO model of ischemic brain stroke: Possible association with AQP4 modulation.

    PubMed

    Sadana, Prabodh; Coughlin, Lucy; Burke, Jamie; Woods, Robert; Mdzinarishvili, Alexander

    2015-07-15

    The use of neuroprotective strategies to mitigate the fatal consequences of ischemic brain stroke is a focus of robust research activity. We have previously demonstrated that thyroid hormone (T3; 3,3',5-triiodo-l-thyronine) possesses neuroprotective and anti-edema activity in pre-stroke treatment regimens when administered as a solution or as a nanoparticle formulation. In this study we have extended our evaluation of thyroid hormone use in animal models of brain stroke. We have used both transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (t-MCAO) and permanent (p-MCAO) models of ischemic brain stroke. A significant reduction of tissue infarction and a concurrent decrease in edema were observed in the t-MCAO model of brain stroke. However, no benefit of T3 was observed in p-MCAO stroke setting. Significant improvement of neurological outcomes was observed upon T3 treatment in t-MCAO mice. Further, we tested T2 (3,5-diiodo-l-thyronine) a natural deiodination metabolite of T3 in MCAO model of brain stroke. T2 potently decreased infarct size as well as edema formation. Additionally, we report here that T3 suppresses the expression of aquaporin-4 (AQP4) water channels which could be a likely mechanism of its anti-edema activity. Our studies provide evidence to stimulate clinical development of thyroid hormones for use in ischemic brain stroke. PMID:25963308

  7. Peritumoral Brain Edema after Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Asymptomatic Intracranial Meningiomas: Risks and Pattern of Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Hoe, Yeon; Choi, Young Jae; Kim, Jeong Hoon; Kwon, Do Hoon; Kim, Chang Jin

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the risks and pattern of evolution of peritumoral brain edema (PTE) after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for asymptomatic intracranial meningiomas. Methods A retrospective study was conducted on 320 patients (median age 56 years, range 24-87 years) who underwent primary Gamma Knife radiosurgery for asymptomatic meningiomas between 1998 and 2012. The median tumor volume was 2.7 cc (range 0.2-10.5 cc) and the median follow-up was 48 months (range 24-168 months). Volumetric data sets for tumors and PTE on serial MRIs were analyzed. The edema index (EI) was defined as the ratio of the volume of PTE including tumor to the tumor volume, and the relative edema indices (rEIs) were calculated from serial EIs normalized against the baseline EI. Risk factors for PTE were analyzed using logistic regression. Results Newly developed or increased PTE was noted in 49 patients (15.3%), among whom it was symptomatic in 28 patients (8.8%). Tumor volume larger than 4.2 cc (p<0.001), hemispheric tumor location (p=0.005), and pre-treatment PTE (p<0.001) were associated with an increased risk of PTE. rEI reached its maximum value at 11 months after SRS and decreased thereafter, and symptoms resolved within 24 months in most patients (85.7%). Conclusion Caution should be exercised in decision-making on SRS for asymptomatic meningiomas of large volume (>4.2 cc), of hemispheric location, or with pre-treatment PTE. PTE usually develops within months, reaches its maximum degree until a year, and resolves within 2 years after SRS. PMID:26587194

  8. Absence of Glial α-Dystrobrevin Causes Abnormalities of the Blood-Brain Barrier and Progressive Brain Edema*

    PubMed Central

    Lien, Chun Fu; Mohanta, Sarajo Kumar; Frontczak-Baniewicz, Malgorzata; Swinny, Jerome D.; Zablocka, Barbara; Górecki, Dariusz C.

    2012-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) plays a key role in maintaining brain functionality. Although mammalian BBB is formed by endothelial cells, its function requires interactions between endotheliocytes and glia. To understand the molecular mechanisms involved in these interactions is currently a major challenge. We show here that α-dystrobrevin (α-DB), a protein contributing to dystrophin-associated protein scaffolds in astrocytic endfeet, is essential for the formation and functioning of BBB. The absence of α-DB in null brains resulted in abnormal brain capillary permeability, progressively escalating brain edema, and damage of the neurovascular unit. Analyses in situ and in two-dimensional and three-dimensional in vitro models of BBB containing α-DB-null astrocytes demonstrated these abnormalities to be associated with loss of aquaporin-4 water and Kir4.1 potassium channels from glial endfeet, formation of intracellular vacuoles in α-DB-null astrocytes, and defects of the astrocyte-endothelial interactions. These caused deregulation of tight junction proteins in the endothelia. Importantly, α-DB but not dystrophins showed continuous expression throughout development in BBB models. Thus, α-DB emerges as a central organizer of dystrophin-associated protein in glial endfeet and a rare example of a glial protein with a role in maintaining BBB function. Its abnormalities might therefore lead to BBB dysfunction. PMID:23043099

  9. The neuroprotective effect of olive leaf extract is related to improved blood-brain barrier permeability and brain edema in rat with experimental focal cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Mohagheghi, Fatemeh; Bigdeli, Mohammad Reza; Rasoulian, Bahram; Hashemi, Payman; Pour, Marzyeh Rashidi

    2011-01-15

    Recent studies suggest that olive extracts suppress inflammation and reduce stress oxidative injury. We sought to extend these observations in an in vivo study of rat cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury. Four groups, each of 18 Wister rats, were studied. One (control) group received distilled water, while three treatment groups received oral olive leaf extract (50, 75 and 100mg/kg/day respectively). After 30 days, blood lipid profiles were determined, before a 60 min period of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). After 24h reperfusion, neurological deficit scores, infarct volume, brain edema, and blood-brain barrier permeability were each assessed in subgroups of six animals drawn from each main group. Olive leaf extract reduced the LDL/HDL ratio in doses 50, 75, and 100mg/kg/day in comparison to the control group (P<0.001), and offered cerebroprotection from ischemia-reperfusion. For controls vs. doses of 50mg/kg/day vs. 75 mg/kg/day vs. 100mg/kg/day, attenuated corrected infarct volumes were 209.79 ± 33.05 mm(3) vs. 164.36 ± 13.44 mm(3) vs. 123.06 ± 28.83 mm(3) vs. 94.71 ± 33.03 mm(3); brain water content of the infarcted hemisphere 82.33 ± 0.33% vs. 81.33 ± 0.66% vs. 80.75 ± 0.6% vs. 80.16 ± 0.47%, and blood-brain barrier permeability of the infarcted hemisphere 11.22 ± 2.19 μg/g vs. 9.56 ± 1.74 μg/g vs. 6.99 ± 1.48 μg/g vs. 5.94 ± 1.73 μg/g tissue (P<0.05 and P<0.01 for measures in doses 75 and 100mg/kg/day vs. controls respectively). Oral administration of olive leaf extract reduces infarct volume, brain edema, blood-brain barrier permeability, and improves neurologic deficit scores after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats. PMID:21183324

  10. Progress in Drug Treatment of Cerebral Edema.

    PubMed

    Deng, Y Y; Shen, F C; Xie, D; Han, Q P; Fang, M; Chen, C B; Zeng, H K

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral edema causes intracranial hypertension (ICH) which leads to severe outcome of patients in the clinical setting. Effective anti-edema therapy may significantly decrease the mortality in a variety of neurological conditions. At present drug treatment is a cornerstone in the management of cerebral edema. Osmotherapy has been the mainstay of pharmacologic therapy. Mannitol and hypertonic saline (HS) are the most commonly used osmotic agents. The relative safety and efficacy of HS and mannitol in the treatment of cerebral edema and reduction of enhanced ICP have been demonstrated in the past decades. Apart from its osmotic force, HS exerts anti-edema effects partly through inhibition of Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) Cotransporter-1 (NKCC1) and aquaporin 4 (AQP4) expression in astrocytes. Melatonin may also reduce brain edema and exert neuroprotective effect on several central nervous system diseases through inhibition of inflammatory response. The inhibitors of Na/H exchanger, NKCC and AQP4 may attenuate brain edema formation through inhibition of excessive transportation of ion and water from blood into the cerebral tissue. In this review we survey some of the most recent findings in the drug treatment of brain edema focusing on the use of osmotherapy, melatonin and inhibitors of ion cotransporters and water channels. A better understanding of the molecular mechanism of these agents would help to improve in the clinical management of patients with brain edema. PMID:26948324

  11. Tissue-type transglutaminase and the effects of cystamine on intracerebral hemorrhage-induced brain edema and neurological deficits

    PubMed Central

    Okauchi, Masanobu; Xi, Guohua; Keep, Richard F.; Hua, Ya

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Neurodegeneration occurs after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and tissue-type transglutaminase (tTG) has a role in neurodegenerative disorders. The present study investigated tTG expression after ICH and the effects of a tTG inhibitor, cystamine, on ICH-induced brain edema and neurological deficits. Methods This study had two parts. In the first, male Sprague-Dawley rats received an intracaudate injection of 100 µL autologous whole blood or a needle insertion (sham). Rats were killed 3 days later and the brains used for immunohistochemistry, Western blots and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. In the second set, ICH rats were treated intraperitoneally with either a tTG inhibitor, cystamine, or vehicle. Rats underwent behavioral testing and were killed at day-3 for measurement of brain swelling. Results tTG positive cells were found in the ipsilateral basal ganglia after ICH and most of those cells were neuron-like. Western blot analysis showed a 3-fold increase in tTG in the ipsilateral basal ganglia (p<0.01 vs. sham) after ICH. tTG mRNA levels were also significantly higher (8.5-fold increase vs. sham). Cystamine treatment attenuated ICH-induced brain swelling (day 3: 14.4±3.2 vs. 21.4±4.0% in vehicle-treated rats, p<0.01), neuronal death and improved functional outcome (forelimb placing score: 47±23 vs. 17±16% in vehicle-treated rats, p<0.05). Conclusions ICH induces perihematomal tTG upregulation and cystamine, a tTG inhibitor, reduces ICH-induced brain swelling and neurological deficits. PMID:19007756

  12. Histochemical characteristic of perivascular space in the brain with an advanced edema.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Katsuji; Tanegashima, Akio; Yamamoto, Yoshio; Ushiyama, Ikuko; Yamazaki, Shigeru; Nishikawa, Yoshinari; Ohkubo, Iwao

    2003-03-01

    Amorphorous and colorless spaces, Virchow-Robin spaces (VRS), were often found by HE stain around blood vessels in the edematous brain. Histochemical characteristic of the enlarged VRS caused by an advanced edema and detected by lectin stain using Griffonia simplicifolia I agglutinin in the brain stem, the occipital lobe and/or the cerebellum was examined by means of immunohistochemical method. After pretreatment with formic acid or proteinase K, formalin fixed-paraffin embedded tissue sections were incubated with antibodies (ABs) against plasma proteins such as amyloid P component, Ig G, albumin (Al), apolipoprotein E (Apo E), and lactotransferrin (Lf), and cellular proteins such as ubiquitin (Ubt), Tau-protein (Tau), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), myelin basic protein (MBP), CD68 (KP-1) and heparansulfate proteoglycan (HSG). The tissue sections were also incubated with antibodies against alanyl aminopeptidase-S (AAP-S) and alanyl aminopeptidase-N (AAP-N) without pretreatment. The VRS showed intensive reactivity with ABs against Amy P, AAP-S and AAP-N, moderate with ABs against Apo E and HSG, weak with ABs against Ig G, Al and Lf, feeble with ABs against Ubt, Tau and CD 68, and no with ABs against GFAP and MBP, respectively. Although the substances detected in VRS might be of blood plasma origin resulting from abnormalities in the blood-brain barrier, the mechanisms whereby the serum proteins and/or other substances are enriched in VRS remain incompletely understood. PMID:12935611

  13. Brain natriuretic peptide levels in six basic underwater demolitions/SEAL recruits presenting with swimming induced pulmonary edema (SIPE).

    PubMed

    Shearer, Damon; Mahon, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Swimming induced pulmonary edema (SIPE) is associated with both SCUBA diving and strenuous surface swimming; however, the majority of reported cases and clinically observed cases tend to occur during or after aggressive surface swimming. Capillary stress failure appears to be central to the pathophysiology of this disorder. Regional pulmonary capillaries are exposed to relatively high pressures secondary to increased vascular volume, elevation of pulmonary vascular resistance, and regional differences in perfusion secondary to forces of gravity and high cardiac output. Acute pulmonary edema can be classified as either cardiogenic or noncardiogenic or both. Cardiogenic pulmonary edema occurs when the pulmonary capillary hydrostatic pressure exceeds plasma oncotic pressure. Noncardiogenic pulmonary edema occurs when pulmonary capillary permeability is increased. Given the pathophysiology noted above, SIPE can be described as a cardiogenic pulmonary edema, at least in part, since an increased transalveolar pressure gradient has been implicated in the pathogenesis of SIPE. Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is used in the clinical setting to differentiate cardiac from pulmonary sources of dyspnea, specifically to diagnose cardiogenic pulmonary edema. During clinical management, BNP levels were drawn on six BUD/S recruits simultaneously presenting with pulmonary complaints consistent with SIPE, after an extended surface bay swim. This paper analyzes that data after de-identification and reviews the pathophysiology and clinical management of SIPE. PMID:19739476

  14. Pulmonary Edema

    PubMed Central

    Tanser, Paul H.

    1980-01-01

    The physician who deals with pulmonary edema from a pathophysiologic basis will seldom make a diagnostic or therapeutic error. Recent additions to preload and afterload therapy have greatly helped in the emergency and ambulatory treatment of pulmonary edema due to left heart failure. Careful follow-up and patient self-monitoring are the most effective means of reducing hospitalization of chronic heart failure patients. PMID:21293700

  15. What predicts early volumetric edema increase following stereotactic radiosurgery for brain metastases?

    PubMed

    Hanna, Andrew; Boggs, D Hunter; Kwok, Young; Simard, Marc; Regine, William F; Mehta, Minesh

    2016-04-01

    A volumetric analysis of pre- and post-radiosurgery (PreSRS and PostSRS) edema in patients with cerebral metastases was performed to determine factors of a predictive model assessing the risk of developing increased edema relatively early after SRS. One-hundred-fourteen metastases in 55 patients were analyzed. Selection for this analysis required an MRI ≤ 30 days before SRS and an MRI ≤ 100 days after SRS. Tumor volumes were calculated on PreSRS, SRS, and PostSRS T1-weighted postgadolinium images while edema volumes were calculating using PreSRS and PostSRS fluid-attenuated inversion recovery MR images. An increase in edema was defined as an increase in measurable edema of at least 5%. We developed and evaluated a model predicting the relative risk (RR) of increased edema after SRS. Peritumoral edema increased in 18% (21/114) of the analyzed lesions. Melanoma/renal histology, recursive partitioning analysis class III, and prior WBRT carried RRs of developing postSRS edema increase of 2.45, 2.48, and 3.16, respectively (all P values <0.05). The PreSRS edema/tumor ratio predicted for a RR of 1.007/ratio unit, and steroid dose at time of SRS predicted for a RR of 0.89/mg (all P values <0.05). A predictive model for assessing the RR of increased edema after SRS was developed based from these data and may be useful in identifying patients who might benefit from prophylactic anti-edema therapies before, during, or after SRS. This model could be used as the basis of inclusion criteria for prospective trials investigating novel anti-edema therapies. PMID:26721241

  16. Effects of antiperoxidants on FeCl2-induced lipid peroxidation and focal edema in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Willmore, L J; Rubin, J J

    1984-01-01

    Head trauma with contusion or cortical laceration and hemorrhage causes focal edema with encephalomalacia and gliosis. Because cerebral hemorrhage ultimately results in deposition of heme compounds and iron into the neuropil, we injected an aqueous solution of iron salts to simulate the decompartmentalization of iron after trauma. We pretreated animals with saline or with 600 mg/kg alpha-tocopherol plus 5 ppm selenium added to the drinking water. Formation of lipid peroxidation products was significantly inhibited within the iron injection site in the antiperoxidant-pretreated rats at 30, 60, and 120 min after injection of iron into the isocortex. The antiperoxidants failed to prevent formation of focal brain edema at the injection site between 1 and 8 h after injection; however, significantly less edema was present in the alpha-tocopherol + selenium-pretreated animals 24 and 48 h after injection. The efficacy of antiperoxidants in preventing lipid peroxidation, and enhancing the resolution of ferrous-induced focal brain edema suggest that tocopherol + selenium administration caused free radical quenching and termination of lipid peroxidation, and increased membrane stabilization, an effect similar to the action of glucocorticoids. PMID:6690325

  17. Imatinib treatment reduces brain injury in a murine model of traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Su, Enming J.; Fredriksson, Linda; Kanzawa, Mia; Moore, Shannon; Folestad, Erika; Stevenson, Tamara K.; Nilsson, Ingrid; Sashindranath, Maithili; Schielke, Gerald P.; Warnock, Mark; Ragsdale, Margaret; Mann, Kris; Lawrence, Anna-Lisa E.; Medcalf, Robert L.; Eriksson, Ulf; Murphy, Geoffrey G.; Lawrence, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Current therapies for Traumatic brain injury (TBI) focus on stabilizing individuals and on preventing further damage from the secondary consequences of TBI. A major complication of TBI is cerebral edema, which can be caused by the loss of blood brain barrier (BBB) integrity. Recent studies in several CNS pathologies have shown that activation of latent platelet derived growth factor-CC (PDGF-CC) within the brain can promote BBB permeability through PDGF receptor α (PDGFRα) signaling, and that blocking this pathway improves outcomes. In this study we examine the efficacy for the treatment of TBI of an FDA approved antagonist of the PDGFRα, Imatinib. Using a murine model we show that Imatinib treatment, begun 45 min after TBI and given twice daily for 5 days, significantly reduces BBB dysfunction. This is associated with significantly reduced lesion size 24 h, 7 days, and 21 days after TBI, reduced cerebral edema, determined from apparent diffusion co-efficient (ADC) measurements, and with the preservation of cognitive function. Finally, analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from human TBI patients suggests a possible correlation between high PDGF-CC levels and increased injury severity. Thus, our data suggests a novel strategy for the treatment of TBI with an existing FDA approved antagonist of the PDGFRα. PMID:26500491

  18. YiQiFuMai powder injection ameliorates blood–brain barrier dysfunction and brain edema after focal cerebral ischemia–reperfusion injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Guosheng; Ye, Xinyi; Xu, Yingqiong; Yin, Mingzhu; Chen, Honglin; Kou, Junping; Yu, Boyang

    2016-01-01

    YiQiFuMai powder injection (YQFM) is a modern preparation derived from the traditional Chinese medicine Sheng-Mai-San. YQFM is widely used in clinical practice in the People’s Republic of China, mainly for the treatment of microcirculatory disturbance-related diseases. However, little is known about its role in animals with ischemic stroke. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of YQFM on brain edema and blood–brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction induced by cerebral ischemia–reperfusion (I/R) injury. Male C57BL/6J mice underwent right middle cerebral artery occlusion for 1 hour with a subsequent 24-hour reperfusion to produce I/R injury. YQFM (three doses: 0.336, 0.671, and 1.342 g/kg) was then given intraperitoneally (IP). The results demonstrated that YQFM significantly decreased infarct size, improved neurological deficits, reduced brain water content, and increased cerebral blood flow after I/R injury. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose micro-positron emission tomography imaging and hematoxylin and eosin staining results indicated that YQFM is able to ameliorate brain metabolism and histopathological damage after I/R. Moreover, YQFM administration reduced BBB leakage and upregulated the expression of zona occludens-1 (ZO-1) and occludin, which was confirmed by Evans Blue extravasation, Western blotting, and immunofluorescence assay. Our findings suggest that YQFM provides protection against focal cerebral I/R injury in mice, possibly by improving BBB dysfunction via upregulation of the expression of tight junction proteins. PMID:26834461

  19. PGJ2 Provides Prolonged CNS Stroke Protection by Reducing White Matter Edema

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, James D.; Puche, Adam C.; Guo, Yan; Weinreich, Daniel; Slater, Bernard J.; Bernstein, Steven L.

    2012-01-01

    Few clinically effective approaches reduce CNS-white matter injury. After early in-vivo white matter infarct, NFκB-driven pro-inflammatory signals can amplify a relatively small amount of vascular damage, resulting in progressive endothelial dysfunction to create a severe ischemic lesion. This process can be minimized by 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2 (PGJ2), an analog of the metabolically active PGD2 metabolite. We evaluated PGJ2's effects and mechanisms using rodent anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (rAION); an in vivo white matter ischemia model. PGJ2 administration systemically administered either acutely or 5 hours post-insult results in significant neuroprotection, with stereologic evaluation showing improved neuronal survival 30 days post-infarct. Quantitative capillary vascular analysis reveals that PGJ2 improves perfusion at 1 day post-infarct by reducing tissue edema. Our results suggest that PGJ2 acts by reducing NFκB signaling through preventing p65 nuclear localization and inhibiting inflammatory gene expression. Importantly, PGJ2 showed no in vivo toxicity structurally as measured by optic nerve (ON) myelin thickness, functionally by ON-compound action potentials, on a cellular basis by oligodendrocyte precursor survival or changes in ON-myelin gene expression. PGJ2 may be a clinically useful neuroprotective agent for ON and other CNS infarcts involving white matter, with mechanisms of action enabling effective treatment beyond the currently considered maximal time for intervention. PMID:23284631

  20. Reduced brain injury in CD18 deficient mice after experimental intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Titova, Elena; Ostrowski, Robert P.; Kevil, Christopher G.; Tong, Weni; Rojas, Hugo; Sowers, Lawrence C.; Zhang, John H.; Tang, Jiping

    2008-01-01

    Many studies have indicated leukocytes as one of the major contributors to brain injuries caused by intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Leukocyte-expressed CD18 is important for neutrophil-endothelial interactions in the vasculature and CD18 deficiency protects against ischemia-reperfusion injury. We investigated whether CD18 deficiency provides protection against ICH-induced brain injury. Male wild type (WT) CD18+/+ mice and CD18−/− knockout mice were used in this study. ICH was induced by a collagenase injection. Mortality, neurological function, brain edema and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity as well as tissue expression of nitrotyrosine and MPO were evaluated at 24 hours after ICH. We discovered a significantly reduced brain edema and diminished mortality with a concomitant decrease in MPO and nitrotyrosine immunoreactivities in brains of CD18 knockout mice. PMID:18615643

  1. Radiation brain injury is reduced by the polyamine inhibitor [alpha]-difluoromethylornithine

    SciTech Connect

    Fike, J.R.; Seilhan, T.M.; Gobbel, G.T. ); Marton, L.J. )

    1994-04-01

    [alpha]-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) was used to reduce [sup 125]I-induced brain injury in normal beagle dogs. Different DFMO doses and administration schedules were used to determine if the reduction in brain injury was dependent on dose and/or dependent upon when the drug was administered relative to the radiation treatment. Doses of DMFO of 75 mg/kg/day and 37.5 mg/kg/day given 2 days before, during and for 14 days after irradiation reduced levels of putrescine (PU) in the cerebrospinal fluid relative to controls. Volume of edema was significantly reduced by 75 mg/kg/day of DFMO before, during and after irradiation and by the same dose when the drug was started immediately after irradiation. A reduction in edema volume after 37.5 mg/kg/day of DFMO before, during and after irradiation was very near significance. Ultrafast CT studies performed on dogs that received a DFMO dose of 75 mg/kg/day before, during and after irradiation suggested that the reduce edema volume was associated with reduced vascular permeability. Volume of necrosis and volume of contrast enhancement (breakdown of the blood-brain barrier) were significantly lower than controls only after a DFMO dose of 75 mg/kg/day before, during and after irradiation. These latter data, coupled with the findings relative to edema, suggest that different mechanisms may be involved with respect to the effects of DFMO on brain injury, or that the extents of edema, necrosis and breakdown of the blood-brain barrier may depend upon different levels of polyamine depletion. The precise mechanisms by which DFMO exerts the effects observed here need to be determined. 41 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Effects of Different Doses of Levetiracetam on Aquaporin 4 Expression in Rats with Brain Edema Following Fluid Percussion Injury.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hongbo; Li, Wenling; Dong, Changzheng; Ma, Li; Wu, Jiang; Zhao, Wenqing

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND This study was designed to investigate the effects of different doses of levetiracetam on aquaporin 4 (AQP4) expression in rats after fluid percussion injury. MATERIAL AND METHODS Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: sham operation group, traumatic brain injury group, low-dose levetiracetam group, and high-dose levetiracetam group. Brain edema models were established by fluid percussion injury, and intervened by the administration of levetiracetam. Samples from the 4 groups were collected at 2, 6, 12, and 24 h, and at 3 and 7 days after injury. Histological observation was performed using hematoxylin-eosin staining and immunohistochemical staining. AQP4 and AQP4 mRNA expression was detected using Western blot assay and RT-PCR. Brain water content was measured by the dry-wet method. RESULTS Compared with the traumatic brain injury group, brain water content, AQP4 expression, and AQP4 mRNA expression were lower in the levetiracetam groups at each time point and the differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). The intervention effects of high-dose levetiracetam were more apparent. CONCLUSIONS Levetiracetam can lessen brain edema from fluid percussion injury by down-regulating AQP4 and AQP4 mRNA expression. There is a dose-effect relationship in the preventive effect of levetiracetam within a certain extent. PMID:26927633

  3. Effects of Different Doses of Levetiracetam on Aquaporin 4 Expression in Rats with Brain Edema Following Fluid Percussion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hongbo; Li, Wenling; Dong, Changzheng; Ma, Li; Wu, Jiang; Zhao, Wenqing

    2016-01-01

    Background This study was designed to investigate the effects of different doses of levetiracetam on aquaporin 4 (AQP4) expression in rats after fluid percussion injury. Material/Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: sham operation group, traumatic brain injury group, low-dose levetiracetam group, and high-dose levetiracetam group. Brain edema models were established by fluid percussion injury, and intervened by the administration of levetiracetam. Samples from the 4 groups were collected at 2, 6, 12, and 24 h, and at 3 and 7 days after injury. Histological observation was performed using hematoxylin-eosin staining and immunohistochemical staining. AQP4 and AQP4 mRNA expression was detected using Western blot assay and RT-PCR. Brain water content was measured by the dry-wet method. Results Compared with the traumatic brain injury group, brain water content, AQP4 expression, and AQP4 mRNA expression were lower in the levetiracetam groups at each time point and the differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). The intervention effects of high-dose levetiracetam were more apparent. Conclusions Levetiracetam can lessen brain edema from fluid percussion injury by down-regulating AQP4 and AQP4 mRNA expression. There is a dose-effect relationship in the preventive effect of levetiracetam within a certain extent. PMID:26927633

  4. Inositol-trisphosphate reduces alveolar apoptosis and pulmonary edema in neonatal lung injury.

    PubMed

    Preuss, Stefanie; Stadelmann, Sabrina; Omam, Friede D; Scheiermann, Julia; Winoto-Morbach, Supandi; von Bismarck, Philipp; Knerlich-Lukoschus, Friederike; Lex, Dennis; Adam-Klages, Sabine; Wesch, Daniela; Held-Feindt, Janka; Uhlig, Stefan; Schütze, Stefan; Krause, Martin F

    2012-08-01

    D-myo-inositol-1,2,6-trisphosphate (IP3) is an isomer of the naturally occurring second messenger D-myo-inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate, and exerts anti-inflammatory and antiedematous effects in the lung. Myo-inositol (Inos) is a component of IP3, and is thought to play an important role in the prevention of neonatal pulmonary diseases such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia and neonatal acute lung injury (nALI). Inflammatory lung diseases are characterized by augmented acid sphingomyelinase (aSMase) activity leading to ceramide production, a pathway that promotes increased vascular permeability, apoptosis, and surfactant alterations. A novel, clinically relevant triple-hit model of nALI was developed, consisting of repeated airway lavage, injurious ventilation, and lipopolysaccharide instillation into the airways, every 24 hours. Thirty-five piglets were randomized to one of four treatment protocols: control (no intervention), surfactant alone, surfactant + Inos, and surfactant + IP3. After 72 hours of mechanical ventilation, lungs were excised from the thorax for subsequent analyses. Clinically, oxygenation and ventilation improved, and extravascular lung water decreased significantly with the S + IP3 intervention. In pulmonary tissue, we observed decreased aSMase activity and ceramide concentrations, decreased caspase-8 concentrations, reduced alveolar epithelial apoptosis, the reduced expression of interleukin-6, transforming growth factor-β1, and amphiregulin (an epithelial growth factor), reduced migration of blood-borne cells and particularly of CD14(+)/18(+) cells (macrophages) into the airspaces, and lower surfactant surface tensions in S + IP3-treated but not in S + Inos-treated piglets. We conclude that the admixture of IP3 to surfactant, but not of Inos, improves gas exchange and edema in our nALI model by the suppression of the governing enzyme aSMase, and that this treatment deserves clinical evaluation. PMID:22403805

  5. Roles of changes in active glutamine transport in brain edema development during hepatic encephalopathy: an emerging concept.

    PubMed

    Zielińska, Magdalena; Popek, Mariusz; Albrecht, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Excessive glutamine (Gln) synthesis in ammonia-overloaded astrocytes contributes to astrocytic swelling and brain edema, the major complication of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). Much of the newly formed Gln is believed to enter mitochondria, where it is recycled to ammonia, which causes mitochondrial dysfunction (a "Trojan horse" mode of action). A portion of Gln may increase osmotic pressure in astrocytes and the interstitial space, directly and independently contributing to brain tissue swelling. Here we discuss the possibility that altered functioning of Gln transport proteins located in the cellular or mitochondrial membranes, modulates the effects of increased Gln synthesis. Accumulation of excess Gln in mitochondria involves a carrier-mediated transport which is activated by ammonia. Studies on the expression of the cell membrane N-system transporters SN1 (SNAT3) and SN2 (SNAT5), which mediate Gln efflux from astrocytes rendered HE model-dependent effects. HE lowered the expression of SN1 at the RNA and protein level in the cerebral cortex (cc) in the thioacetamide (TAA) model of HE and the effect paralleled induction of cerebral cortical edema. Neither SN1 nor SN2 expression was affected by simple hyperammonemia, which produces no cc edema. TAA-induced HE is also associated with decreased expression of mRNA coding for the system A carriers SAT1 and SAT2, which stimulate Gln influx to neurons. Taken together, changes in the expression of Gln transporters during HE appear to favor retention of Gln in astrocytes and/or the interstitial space of the brain. HE may also affect arginine (Arg)/Gln exchange across the astrocytic cell membrane due to changes in the expression of the hybrid Arg/Gln transporter y(+)LAT2. Gln export from brain across the blood-brain barrier may be stimulated by HE via its increased exchange with peripheral tryptophan. PMID:24072671

  6. Effects of crystalloid and colloid infusions on intracranial pressure and computerized electroencephalographic data in dogs with vasogenic brain edema.

    PubMed

    Tranmer, B I; Iacobacci, R I; Kindt, G W

    1989-08-01

    This experiment was designed to study the effects of intravascular volume expansion with crystalloid and colloid agents on intracranial pressure (ICP) and computerized electroencephalographic (EEG) data in dogs with cerebral vasogenic edema. A liquid nitrogen cold lesion was produced in the right parietal lobes of 30 anesthetized mongrel dogs. ICP data from an intraventricular catheter, hemodynamic data, and EEG power data were recorded continuously during the course of the experiment. Six hours after creation of the liquid nitrogen cold lesion, each dog was infused with one of the following treatments: 1) no treatment (control); 2) 5% dextrose in water (D5W) (30 ml/kg/h); 3) 0.9% NaCl (30 ml/kg/h); 4) hetastarch (10 ml/kg/h); and 5) hetastarch (30 ml/kg/h). The animals were treated for 2 hours, killed, and the brains examined and measured for water content. During the D5W infusion, ICP increased significantly (141%) but the EEG power data did not change. During the normal saline infusion, ICP increased significantly (91%) and the EEG power data showed marked deterioration. Both hetastarch infusions produced no change in ICP and demonstrated an improvement in the EEG power data (P less than 0.001). These data suggest that crystalloid infusions may have profound deleterious effects in the presence of brain edema, but colloids do not, and should be considered in the fluid management of patients with cerebral edema. PMID:2671780

  7. Successful treatment with hyperbaric oxygen therapy for severe brain edema characterized by radiological appearance of pseudosubarachnoid hemorrhage in a child

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Yi; Gao, Xingjuan; Ju, Xiuli; Li, Aimin

    2016-01-01

    Pseudosubarachnoid hemorrhage (PSAH) is a rare neuroradiological finding, particularly in pediatric patients. The appearance of PSAH is commonly associated with poor clinical outcome due to refractory cerebral edema. Recent clinical trials have favored hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) as a promising therapeutic strategy for adult patients with severe head injuries. The present report describes a pediatric case of diffuse brain edema characterized by the radiological appearance of PSAH successfully treated with HBOT. An adolescent boy collapsed unconscious following convulsion for 3–5 min with fever and headache for 2 days. A brain computed tomography (CT) scan provided an image compatible with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Lumbar puncture was conducted on admission to hospital and showed no evidence of SAH. The CT scan was again considered and eventually interpreted as PSAH. The patient received drug treatment including acyclovir and mannitol, but the condition deteriorated rapidly. HBOT was administered at 72 h post admission and the condition was clearly improved following the initial therapy. The patient was discharged with 20 sessions of HBOT and recovered completely after 1 year. The appearance of PSAH indicates severe cerebral edema refractory to treatment with conventional internal medicine. HBOT maybe an effective therapeutic strategy for this condition. PMID:27588084

  8. Melatonin reduces acute lung inflammation, edema, and hemorrhage in heatstroke rats

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wen-shiann; Chou, Ming-ting; Chao, Chien-ming; Chang, Chen-kuei; Lin, Mao-tsun; Chang, Ching-ping

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To assess the therapeutic effect of melatonin on heat-induced acute lung inflammation and injury in rats. Methods: Heatstroke was induced by exposing anesthetized rats to heat stress (36 °C, 100 min). Rats were treated with vehicle or melatonin (0.2, 1, 5 mg/kg) by intravenous administration 100 min after the initiatioin of heatstroke and were allowed to recover at room temperature (26 °C). The acute lung injury was quantified by morphological examination and by determination of the volume of pleural exudates, the number of polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells, and the myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. The concentrations of tumor necrosis factor, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-10 in bronchoalveolar fluid (BALF) were measured by ELISA. Nitric oxide (NO) level was determined by Griess method. The levels of glutamate and lactate-to-pyruvate ratio were analyzed by CMA600 microdialysis analyzer. The concentrations of hydroxyl radicals were measured by a procedure based on the hydroxylation of sodium salicylates leading to the production of 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBA). Results: Melatonin (1 and 5 mg/kg) significantly (i) prolonged the survival time of heartstroke rats (117 and 186 min vs 59 min); (ii) attenuated heatstroke-induced hyperthermia and hypotension; (iii) attenuated acute lung injury, including edema, neutrophil infiltration, and hemorrhage scores; (iv) down-regulated exudate volume, BALF PMN cell number, and MPO activity; (v) decreased the BALF levels of lung inflammation response cytokines like TNF-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6 but further increased the level of an anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10; (vi) reduced BALF levels of glutamate, lactate-to-pyruvate ratio, NO, 2,3-DHBA, and lactate dehydrogenase. Conclusion: Melatonin may improve the outcome of heatstroke in rats by attenuating acute lung inflammation and injury. PMID:22609835

  9. Neurological deficits and brain edema after intracerebral hemorrhage in Mongolian gerbils.

    PubMed

    Kuroiwa, T; Okauchi, M; Hua, Y; Schallert, T; Keep, R F; Xi, G

    2008-01-01

    We examined the time course of neurological deficits in gerbils after an intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) induced by autologous blood infusion and examined its correlation with the severity of perihematomal edema. Mongolian gerbils (n = 15) were subjected to stereotaxic autologous blood infusion (30 or 60 microL) into the left caudate nucleus. Corner-turn and forelimb-placing tests were performed before, and 1 and 3 days after ICH. Perihematomal water content was measured by tissue gravimetry. Gerbils developed neurological deficits and perihematomal edema at day 1 after ICH. Both neurological deficits and perihematomal edema were significantly greater in animals with 60 microL blood infusion compared to the 30 microL infusion group, and both neurological deficits and edema were also greater at 3 days compared to 1 day after ICH. The severity of neurological deficits paralleled the degree of perihematomal edema. We conclude that the Mongolian gerbil is a suitable model for studies on the behavioral effects of ICH. PMID:19066097

  10. Modeling the Presence of Myelin and Edema in the Brain Based on Multi-Parametric Quantitative MRI

    PubMed Central

    Warntjes, Marcel; Engström, Maria; Tisell, Anders; Lundberg, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present a model that uses multi-parametric quantitative MRI to estimate the presence of myelin and edema in the brain. The model relates simultaneous measurement of R1 and R2 relaxation rates and proton density to four partial volume compartments, consisting of myelin partial volume, cellular partial volume, free water partial volume, and excess parenchymal water partial volume. The model parameters were obtained using spatially normalized brain images of a group of 20 healthy controls. The pathological brain was modeled in terms of the reduction of myelin content and presence of excess parenchymal water, which indicates the degree of edema. The method was tested on spatially normalized brain images of a group of 20 age-matched multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Clear differences were observed with respect to the healthy controls: the MS group had a 79 mL smaller brain volume (1069 vs. 1148 mL), a 38 mL smaller myelin volume (119 vs. 157 mL), and a 21 mL larger excess parenchymal water volume (78 vs. 57 mL). Template regions of interest of various brain structures indicated that the myelin partial volume in the MS group was 1.6 ± 1.5% lower for gray matter (GM) structures and 2.8 ± 1.0% lower for white matter (WM) structures. The excess parenchymal water partial volume was 9 ± 10% larger for GM and 5 ± 2% larger for WM. Manually placed ROIs indicated that the results using the template ROIs may have suffered from loss of anatomical detail due to the spatial normalization process. Examples of the application of the method on high-resolution images are provided for three individual subjects: a 45-year-old healthy subject, a 72-year-old healthy subject, and a 45-year-old MS patient. The observed results agreed with the expected behavior considering both age and disease. In conclusion, the proposed model may provide clinically important parameters, such as the total brain volume, degree of myelination, and

  11. The influence of carmustine wafer implantation on tumor bed cysts and peritumoral brain edema.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Yuzo; Iuchi, Toshihiko; Sakaida, Tsukasa; Yokoi, Sana; Kawasaki, Koichiro

    2016-09-01

    The development of perifocal edema and tumor bed cyst has been reported after implantation of biodegradable carmustine wafers for the treatment of malignant gliomas. We retrospectively evaluated these changes in a series of patients; 19 consecutive patients with malignant glioma who received carmustine wafer implantation at our hospital from January 2013 through July 2013, and 28 patients who underwent surgery prior to our institution's initiation of carmustine wafer implantation, as historical controls. The volume of the tumor bed cyst and perifocal edema was calculated on MRI acquired at four time points: ⩽72hours after surgery for baseline, and at 1-4, 5-8, and 9-12weeks after surgery. The volume of the tumor bed cyst in the wafer group increased significantly relative to the control group at all time points (p=0.04). Opening of the ventricle was inversely correlated with enlargement of the tumor bed cyst in the wafer group (p=0.04). The change in the volume of perifocal edema in the wafer group was not significantly different (p=0.48), but exhibited a considerable increase in patients with anaplastic oligodendroglioma relative to glioblastoma patients in the wafer group (p=0.01). We demonstrated significant enlargement of the tumor bed cyst volume after carmustine wafer implantation, as well as the development of marked perifocal edema in patients with anaplastic oligodendroglioma. PMID:27430412

  12. Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate (EGCG) Attenuates Traumatic Brain Injury by Inhibition of Edema Formation and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bo; Wang, Bing; Cao, Shuhua

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of mortality and long-term disability, which can decrease quality of life. In spite of numerous studies suggesting that Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) has been used as a therapeutic agent for a broad range of disorders, the effect of EGCG on TBI remains unknown. In this study, a weight drop model was established to evaluate the therapeutic potential of EGCG on TBI. Rats were administered with 100 mg/kg EGCG or PBS intraperitoneally. At different times following trauma, rats were sacrificed for analysis. It was found that EGCG (100 mg/kg, i.p.) treatment significantly reduced brain water content and vascular permeability at 12, 24, 48, 72 hour after TBI. Real-time PCR results revealed that EGCG inhibited TBI-induced IL-1β and TNF-α mRNA expression. Importantly, CD68 mRNA expression decreasing in the brain suggested that EGCG inhibited microglia activation. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry results showed that administering of EGCG significantly inhibited the levels of aquaporin-4 (AQP4) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression. TBI-induced oxidative stress was remarkably impaired by EGCG treatment, which elevated the activities of SOD and GSH-PX. Conversely, EGCG significantly reduced the contents of MDA after TBI. In addition, EGCG decreased TBI-induced NADPH oxidase activation through inhibition of p47phox translocation from cytoplasm to plasma membrane. These data demonstrate that EGCG treatment may be an effective therapeutic strategy for TBI and the underlying mechanism involves inhibition of oxidative stress. PMID:26557015

  13. Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate (EGCG) Attenuates Traumatic Brain Injury by Inhibition of Edema Formation and Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Wang, Bing; Cao, Shuhua; Wang, Yongqiang

    2015-11-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of mortality and long-term disability, which can decrease quality of life. In spite of numerous studies suggesting that Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) has been used as a therapeutic agent for a broad range of disorders, the effect of EGCG on TBI remains unknown. In this study, a weight drop model was established to evaluate the therapeutic potential of EGCG on TBI. Rats were administered with 100 mg/kg EGCG or PBS intraperitoneally. At different times following trauma, rats were sacrificed for analysis. It was found that EGCG (100 mg/kg, i.p.) treatment significantly reduced brain water content and vascular permeability at 12, 24, 48, 72 hour after TBI. Real-time PCR results revealed that EGCG inhibited TBI-induced IL-1β and TNF-α mRNA expression. Importantly, CD68 mRNA expression decreasing in the brain suggested that EGCG inhibited microglia activation. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry results showed that administering of EGCG significantly inhibited the levels of aquaporin-4 (AQP4) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression. TBI-induced oxidative stress was remarkably impaired by EGCG treatment, which elevated the activities of SOD and GSH-PX. Conversely, EGCG significantly reduced the contents of MDA after TBI. In addition, EGCG decreased TBI-induced NADPH oxidase activation through inhibition of p47(phox) translocation from cytoplasm to plasma membrane. These data demonstrate that EGCG treatment may be an effective therapeutic strategy for TBI and the underlying mechanism involves inhibition of oxidative stress. PMID:26557015

  14. Pulmonary edema

    MedlinePlus

    ... congestion; Lung water; Pulmonary congestion; Heart failure - pulmonary edema ... Pulmonary edema is often caused by congestive heart failure . When the heart is not able to pump efficiently, blood ...

  15. Hyperbaric oxygen reduces edema and necrosis of skeletal muscle in compartment syndromes associated with hemorrhagic hypotension

    SciTech Connect

    Skyhar, M.J.; Hargens, A.R.; Strauss, M.B.; Gershuni, D.H.; Hart, G.B.; Akeson, W.H.

    1986-10-01

    This study examined the effect of exposures to hyperbaric oxygen on the development of the edema and necrosis of muscle that are associated with compartment syndromes that are complicated by hemorrhagic hypotension. A compartment syndrome (twenty millimeters of mercury for six hours) was induced by infusion of autologous plasma in the anterolateral compartment of the left hind limb of seven anesthetized dogs while the mean arterial blood pressure was maintained at sixty-five millimeters of mercury after 30 per cent loss of blood volume. These dogs were treated with hyperbaric oxygen (two atmospheres of pure oxygen) and were compared with six dogs that had an identical compartment syndrome and hypotensive condition but were not exposed to hyperbaric oxygen. Forty-eight hours later, edema was quantified by measuring the weights of the muscles (the pressurized muscle compared with the contralateral muscle), and necrosis of muscle was evaluated by measuring the uptake of technetium-99m stannous pyrophosphate. The ratio for edema was significantly (p = 0.01) greater in dogs that had not been exposed to hyperbaric oxygen (1.15 +/- 0.01) than in the dogs that had been treated with hyperbaric oxygen (1.01 +/- 0.03), and the ratio for necrosis of muscle was also significantly (p = 0.04) greater in dogs that had not had hyperbaric oxygen (1.96 +/- 0.41) than in those that had been treated with hyperbaric oxygen (1.05 +/- 0.11). Comparisons were also made with the muscles of four normal control dogs and separately with the muscles of six normotensive dogs that had an identical compartment syndrome and normal blood pressure and were not treated with hyperbaric oxygen.

  16. Expression of brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 1 is inversely correlated with pathological grade, angiogenesis and peritumoral brain edema in human astrocytomas

    PubMed Central

    WANG, WEI; DA, RONG; WANG, MAODE; WANG, TUO; QI, LEI; JIANG, HAITAO; CHEN, WEI; LI, QI

    2013-01-01

    As the most common intracranial malignant neoplasms, astrocytomas are characterized by high neovascularization and severe peritumoral brain edema (PTBE). Angiogenesis is a prerequisite for the growth of solid tumors, including astrocytoma, and brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 1 (BAI1) is a novel angiogenesis inhibitor. In the present study, the expression levels of BAI1, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) were investigated using immunohistochemical methods in 90 human brain astrocytoma specimens of various pathological grades and in 11 normal human brain tissues. Vascular endothelial cells were stained for CD105 and the microvessel density (MVD) was assessed. The volume of astrocytoma and PTBE in each case was evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The results showed that BAI1 was highly expressed in the normal brain tissues, but that the expression decreased with the rising pathological grades of astrocytoma, MVD number and PTBE, indicating that BAI1 expression was inversely correlated with these factors. Furthermore, it was observed that the expression of VEGF and bFGF were inversely correlated with BAI1 expression in the human brain astrocytomas. These results indicate that the BAI1 gene may be used as a marker of decreased tumor progression and tumoral neovascularization, as well as PTBE. PMID:23761815

  17. β-Dystroglycan cleavage by matrix metalloproteinase-2/-9 disturbs aquaporin-4 polarization and influences brain edema in acute cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Yan, W; Zhao, X; Chen, H; Zhong, D; Jin, J; Qin, Q; Zhang, H; Ma, S; Li, G

    2016-06-21

    Dystroglycan (DG) is widely expressed in various tissues, and throughout the cerebral microvasculature. It consists of two subunits, α-DG and β-DG, and the cleavage of the latter by matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9 underlies a number of physiological and pathological processes. However, the involvement of MMP-2/-9-mediated β-DG cleavage in cerebral ischemia remains uncertain. In astrocytes, DG is crucial for maintaining the polarization of aquaporin-4 (AQP4), which plays a role in the regulation of cytotoxic and vasogenic edema. The present study aimed to explore the effects of MMP-2/-9-mediated β-DG cleavage on AQP4 polarization and brain edema in acute cerebral ischemia. A model of cerebral ischemia was established via permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO) in male C57BL/6 mice. Western blotting, real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), immunohistochemical staining, immunofluorescent staining, electron microscopy, and light microscopy were used. Captopril was applied as a selective MMP-2/-9 inhibitor. Recombinant mouse MMP (rmMMP)-2 and -9 were used in an in vitro cleavage experiment. The present study demonstrated evidence of β-DG cleavage by MMP-2/-9 in pMCAO mouse brains; this cleavage was implicated in AQP4 redistribution and brain edema in cerebral ischemia. In addition, captopril exacerbated cytotoxic edema and ameliorated vasogenic edema at 24h after pMCAO, and alleviated brain edema and neurological deficit at 48h and 72h. In conclusion, this study provides novel insight into the effects of MMP-2/-9-mediated β-DG cleavage in acute cerebral ischemia. Such findings might facilitate the development of a therapeutic strategy for the optimization of MMP-2/-9 targeted treatment in cerebral ischemia. PMID:27038751

  18. Controllable permeability of blood-brain barrier and reduced brain injury through low-intensity pulsed ultrasound stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Sin-Luo; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Yang, Feng-Yi

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that the blood-brain barrier (BBB) can be locally disrupted by focused ultrasound (FUS) in the presence of microbubbles (MB) while sustaining little damage to the brain tissue. Thus, the safety issue associated with FUS-induced BBB disruption (BBBD) needs to be investigated for future clinical applications. This study demonstrated the neuroprotective effects induced by low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) against brain injury in the sonicated brain. Rats subjected to a BBB disruption injury received LIPUS exposure for 5 min after FUS/MB application. Measurements of BBB permeability, brain water content, and histological analysis were then carried out to evaluate the effects of LIPUS. The permeability and time window of FUS-induced BBBD can be effectively modulated with LIPUS. LIPUS also significantly reduced brain edema, neuronal death, and apoptosis in the sonicated brain. Our results show that brain injury in the FUS-induced BBBD model could be ameliorated by LIPUS and that LIPUS may be proposed as a novel treatment modality for controllable release of drugs into the brain. PMID:26517350

  19. Ischemic Postconditioning Decreases Cerebral Edema and Brain Blood Barrier Disruption Caused by Relief of Carotid Stenosis in a Rat Model of Cerebral Hypoperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fuwei; Zhang, Xiaojie; Sun, Ying; Wang, Boyu; Zhou, Chuibing; Luo, Yinan; Ge, Pengfei

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Complications due to brain edema and breakdown of blood brain barrier are an important factor affecting the treatment effects of patients with severe carotid stenosis. In this study, we investigated the protective effects of ischemic postconditioning on brain edema and disruption of blood brain barrier via establishing rat model of hypoperfusion due to severe carotid stenosis. Methods Wistar rat model of hypoperfusion due to severe carotid stenosis was established by binding a stainless microtube to both carotid arteries. Ischemic postconditioning procedure consisted of three cycles of 30 seconds ischemia and 30 seconds reperfusion. Brain edema was evaluated by measuring cerebral water content, and blood brain barrier permeability was assayed by examining cerebral concentration of Evans' Blue (EB) and fluorescein sodium (NaF). ELISA was used to analyze the expression of MMP-9, claudin-5 and occludin. The activity and location of MMP-9 was analyzed by gelatin zymography and in situ zymography, respectively. The distribution of tight junction proteins claudin-5 and occludin was observed by immunohistochemistry. Results The increased brain water content and cerebral concentration of EB and NaF were suppressed by administration of ischemic postconditioning prior to relief of carotid stenosis. Zymographic studies showed that MMP-9 was mainly located in the cortex and its activity was significantly improved by relief of carotid stenosis and, but the elevated MMP-9 activity was inhibited markedly by ischemic postconditioning. Immunohistochemistry revealed that ischemic postconditioning improved the discontinuous distribution of claudin-5 and occludin. ELISA detected that the expression of up-regulated MMP-9 and down-regulated claudin-5 and occludin caused by carotid relief were all attenuated by ischemic postconditioning. Conclusions Ischemic postconditioning is an effective method to prevent brain edema and improve BBB permeability and could be

  20. beta-Lapachone reduces endotoxin-induced macrophage activation and lung edema and mortality.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Huei-Ping; Ho, Feng-Ming; Chao, Kuo-Fang; Kuo, Min-Liang; Lin-Shiau, Shoei-Yn; Liu, Shing-Hwa

    2003-07-01

    beta-Lapachone, a 1,2-naphthoquinone, is a novel chemotherapeutic agent. It has been shown to be capable of suppressing inducible nitric oxide synthase expression and function in rat alveolar macrophages. The authors further performed experiments to examine the molecular mechanism of beta-lapachone on LPS-induced responses in rat alveolar macrophages and to evaluate its in vivo antiinflammatory effect. A significant increase in nitrite production and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression was elicited in macrophages treated with LPS that was inhibited by coincubation with beta-lapachone. beta-Lapachone could also inhibit the production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha induced by LPS. LPS induces protein tyrosine phosphorylation and nuclear factor-kappaB binding activity by gel mobility shift assay in macrophages. These events were significantly inhibited by beta-lapachone. Furthermore, beta-lapachone in vivo protected against the induction of lung edema, lung-inducible nitric oxide synthase protein expression and nuclear factor-kappaB activation, lethality, and increased plasma nitrite and serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha levels induced by LPS. These results indicate that beta-lapachone suppresses inducible nitric oxide synthase induction and tumor necrosis factor-alpha production mediated by the inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphorylation and nuclear factor-kappaB activation caused by LPS. This results in a beneficial effect in an animal model of sepsis. PMID:12724123

  1. Low-Power 2-MHz Pulsed-Wave Transcranial Ultrasound Reduces Ischemic Brain Damage in Rats.

    PubMed

    Alexandrov, Andrei V; Barlinn, Kristian; Strong, Roger; Alexandrov, Anne W; Aronowski, Jaroslaw

    2011-09-01

    It is largely unknown whether prolonged insonation with ultrasound impacts the ischemic brain tissue by itself. Our goal was to evaluate safety and the effect of high-frequency ultrasound on infarct volume in rats. Thirty-two Long-Evans rats with permanent middle cerebral and carotid artery occlusions received either 2-MHz ultrasound at two levels of insonation power (128 or 10 mW) or no ultrasound (controls). We measured cerebral hemorrhage, indirect and direct infarct volume as well as edema volume at 24 h. No cerebral hemorrhages were detected in all animals. Exposure to low-power (10 mW) ultrasound resulted in a significantly decreased indirect infarct volume (p = 0.0039), direct infarct volume (p = 0.0031), and brain edema volume (p = 0.01) compared with controls. High-power (128 mW) ultrasound had no significant effects. An additional experiment with India ink showed a greater intravascular penetration of dye into ischemic tissues exposed to low-power ultrasound. Insonation with high-frequency, low-power ultrasound reduces ischemic brain damage in rat. Its effect on edema reduction and possible promotion of microcirculation could be used to facilitate drug and nutrient delivery to ischemic areas. PMID:24323655

  2. Curcumin reduces brain-infiltrating T lymphocytes after intracerebral hemorrhage in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Yuan, Jichao; Zhu, Haitao; Zhang, Xuan; Li, Lan; Liao, Xiaojun; Wen, Zexian; Chen, Yaxing; Feng, Hua; Lin, Jiangkai

    2016-05-01

    T lymphocytes contribute to inflammation, thereby exacerbating neuronal injury after cerebral ischemia. An increasing amount of evidence indicates that inflammation is a key contributor to intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH)-induced secondary brain injury. Curcumin, a low-molecular-weight curry spice that is derived from the Curcuma longa plant, suppresses T lymphocyte proliferation and migration. Based on these findings, we investigated whether treatment with curcumin would reduce the number of cerebral T lymphocytes in mice with experimentally induced ICH. We found that a large number of T lymphocytes infiltrated the brain at 3days post-ICH. Curcumin significantly improved neurological scores and reduced brain edema in mice with ICH, consistent with a role in reducing neuroinflammation and neurovascular injury. Using flow cytometry, we observed significantly fewer T lymphocytes in brain samples obtained from the curcumin-treated group than in samples obtained from the vehicle-treated group. Moreover, Western blot analysis and immunostaining indicated that treatment with curcumin significantly reduced the expression of a vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), interferon-γ (INF-γ) and interleukin-17 (IL-17) in the mouse brain at 72h post-ICH. Our results suggest that administering curcumin may alleviate cerebral inflammation resulting from ICH, at least in part by reducing the infiltration of T lymphocytes into the brain. Therefore, preventing T lymphocytes from infiltrating the brain may become a new strategy for treating clinical ICH. PMID:27026486

  3. Massive cerebral edema resulting in brain death as a complication of Cryptococcus neoformans meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Orsini, Jose; Blaak, Christa; Mahmoud, Dalia; Young-Gwang, Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of highly active antiretroviral therapy, cryptococcal meningoencephalitis has emerged as the second leading cause of infectious morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected patients worldwide. It presents usually as subacute or chronic disease but occasionally may be fulminant. Common clinical presentations included headache, fever, and depressed level of consciousness. The infection affects both the subarachnoid space and brain parenchyma, and is characterized by a paucity of inflammation and a large fungal burden in the cerebrospinal fluid at the time of diagnosis. Infection is usually lethal without treatment, thus the prompt diagnosis and therapy might improve the outcome. We report a case of brain death caused by Cryptococcus neoformans meningitis that was diagnosed based on clinical neurological examinations and supported by the absence of cerebral blood flow on brain angiography. PMID:25656669

  4. Deep brain stimulation to reduce sexual drive

    PubMed Central

    Fuss, Johannes; Auer, Matthias K.; Biedermann, Sarah V.; Briken, Peer; Hacke, Werner

    2015-01-01

    To date there are few treatment options to reduce high sexual drive or sexual urges in paraphilic patients with a risk for sexual offending. Pharmacological therapy aims to reduce sexual drive by lowering testosterone at the cost of severe side effects. We hypothesize that high sexual drive could also be reduced with deep brain stimulation (DBS) of circuits that generate sexual drive. This approach would help to avoid systemic side effects of antiandrogenic drug therapies. So far the best investigated target to reduce sexual drive is the ventromedial hypothalamus, which was lesioned unilaterally and bilaterally by stereotaxic interventions in paraphilic patients in the 1970s. Here, we discuss DBS as a treatment strategy in patients with severe paraphilic disorders with a serious risk of sexual offending. There are profound ethical and practical issues associated with DBS treatment of paraphilic patients that must be solved before considering such a treatment approach. PMID:26057198

  5. [Brain edema treatment procedure using continuous controlled infusion of mannitol in neurosurgical patients].

    PubMed

    Taranova, I I; Kokhno, V N

    2010-01-01

    The paper evaluates the efficiency and safety of the developed osmotherapy protocol using controlled continuous infusion of 15% mannitol solution. Two hundred and nine patients with intracranial hypertension (ICH) syndrome of various etiologies had 15% mannitol infusion, the rate of which was determined by clinical criteria. The infusion rate was 50 ml/hr with midline brain structure dislocation of 8 mm or more and major depression of consciousness (a Glasgow coma scale (GCS) score of less than 8) and 25 ml/hr with brain dislocation of 7-mm or less and a GCS score of 8 or higher. The monitoring program was as follows: Block 1 comprised the clinical and instrumental data characterizing the adequacy of brain perfusion (GCS, the magnitude of focal neurological symptoms, ICH, mean blood pressure, computed tomographic dislocation); Block 2 involved the clinical and laboratory data identifying the extracerebral complications of osmotherapy (packed cell volume, plasma osmolarity, urine density, and renal ultrasonography); Block 3 consisted of cerebral oximetry (CO) and Neurotrend. The authors' early proposed integral indicators of OC, such as interhemispheric asymmetry coefficient and hemodynamic conformity index, were used to estimate the adequacy of brain perfusion. In cerebral vasospasm, a Neurotrend microsensor was implanted at 3-cm depth for the direct quantitative determination of pO2, pCO2, pH, and brain temperature. ICH was characterized by natural changes in the CO indicators. In vasospasm, the mean linear blood flow velocity was 245 +/- 14 cm/sec in the basilar arteries, which was attended by low pO2 and metabolic acidosis, as shown by readings. Optimization of artificial ventilation, stabilization of hemodynamics, and the use of postural exposures and osmo diuretics promoted ICH normalization and central perfusion pressure optimization, which was accompanied by the disappearance of tissue hypoxia and acidosis, as suggested by Neurotrend reading. The duration of

  6. Density of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes correlates with extent of brain edema and overall survival time in patients with brain metastases

    PubMed Central

    Berghoff, Anna S; Fuchs, Elisabeth; Ricken, Gerda; Mlecnik, Bernhard; Bindea, Gabriela; Spanberger, Thomas; Hackl, Monika; Widhalm, Georg; Dieckmann, Karin; Prayer, Daniela; Bilocq, Amelie; Heinzl, Harald; Zielinski, Christoph; Bartsch, Rupert; Birner, Peter; Galon, Jerome; Preusser, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    The immune microenvironment of the brain differs from that of other organs and the role of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in brain metastases (BM), one of the most common and devastating complication of cancer, is unclear. We investigated TIL subsets and their prognostic impact in 116 BM specimens using immunohistochemistry for CD3, CD8, CD45RO, FOXP3, PD1 and PD-L1. The Immunoscore was calculated as published previously. Overall, we found TIL infiltration in 115/116 (99.1%) BM specimens. PD-L1 expression was evident in 19/67 (28.4%) BM specimens and showed no correlation with TIL density (p > 0.05). TIL density was not associated with corticosteroid administration (p > 0.05). A significant difference in infiltration density according to TIL subtype was present (p < 0.001; Chi Square); high infiltration was most frequently observed for CD3+ TILs (95/116; 81.9%) and least frequently for PD1+ TILs (18/116; 15.5%; p < 0.001). Highest TIL density was observed in melanoma, followed by renal cell cancer and lung cancer BM (p < 0.001). The density of CD8+ TILs correlated positively with the extent of peritumoral edema seen on pre-operative magnetic resonance imaging (p = 0.031). The density of CD3+ (15 vs. 6 mo; p = 0.015), CD8+ (15 vs. 11 mo; p = 0.030) and CD45RO+ TILs (18 vs. 8 mo; p = 0.006) showed a positive correlation with favorable median OS times. Immunoscore showed significant correlation with survival prognosis (27 vs. 10 mo; p < 0.001). The prognostic impact of Immunoscore was independent from established prognostic parameters at multivariable analysis (HR 0.612, p < 0.001). In conclusion, our data indicate that dense TILs infiltrates are common in BM and correlate with the amount of peritumoral brain edema and survival prognosis, thus identifying the immune system as potential biomarker for cancer patients with CNS affection. Further studies are needed to substantiate our findings. PMID:26942067

  7. Elevated pulmonary artery pressure and brain natriuretic peptide in high altitude pulmonary edema susceptible non-mountaineers

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Rajinder K.; Himashree, G.; Singh, Krishan; Soree, Poonam; Desiraju, Koundinya; Agrawal, Anurag; Ghosh, Dishari; Dass, Deepak; Reddy, Prassana K.; Panjwani, Usha; Singh, Shashi Bala

    2016-01-01

    Exaggerated pulmonary pressor response to hypoxia is a pathgonomic feature observed in high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) susceptible mountaineers. It was investigated whether measurement of basal pulmonary artery pressure (Ppa) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) could improve identification of HAPE susceptible subjects in a non-mountaineer population. We studied BNP levels, baseline hemodynamics and the response to hypoxia (FIo2 = 0.12 for 30 min duration at sea level) in 11 HAPE resistant (no past history of HAPE, Control) and 11 HAPE susceptible (past history of HAPE, HAPE-S) subjects. Baseline Ppa (19.31 ± 3.63 vs 15.68 ± 2.79 mm Hg, p < 0.05) and plasma BNP levels (52.39 ± 32.9 vs 15.05 ± 9.6 pg/ml, p < 0.05) were high and stroke volume was less (p < 0.05) in HAPE-S subjects compared to control. Acute hypoxia produced an exaggerated increase in heart rate (p < 0.05), mean arterial pressure (p < 0.05) and Ppa (28.2 ± 5.8 vs 19.33 ± 3.74 mm Hg, p < 0.05) and fall in peripheral oxygen saturation (p < 0.05) in HAPE-S compared to control. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves showed that Ppa response to acute hypoxia was the best variable to identify HAPE susceptibility (AUC 0.92) but BNP levels provided comparable information (AUC 0.85). BNP levels are easy to determine and may represent an important marker for the determination of HAPE susceptibility. PMID:26892302

  8. Elevated pulmonary artery pressure and brain natriuretic peptide in high altitude pulmonary edema susceptible non-mountaineers.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rajinder K; Himashree, G; Singh, Krishan; Soree, Poonam; Desiraju, Koundinya; Agrawal, Anurag; Ghosh, Dishari; Dass, Deepak; Reddy, Prassana K; Panjwani, Usha; Singh, Shashi Bala

    2016-01-01

    Exaggerated pulmonary pressor response to hypoxia is a pathgonomic feature observed in high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) susceptible mountaineers. It was investigated whether measurement of basal pulmonary artery pressure (Ppa) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) could improve identification of HAPE susceptible subjects in a non-mountaineer population. We studied BNP levels, baseline hemodynamics and the response to hypoxia (FIo2 = 0.12 for 30 min duration at sea level) in 11 HAPE resistant (no past history of HAPE, Control) and 11 HAPE susceptible (past history of HAPE, HAPE-S) subjects. Baseline Ppa (19.31 ± 3.63 vs 15.68 ± 2.79 mm Hg, p < 0.05) and plasma BNP levels (52.39 ± 32.9 vs 15.05 ± 9.6 pg/ml, p < 0.05) were high and stroke volume was less (p < 0.05) in HAPE-S subjects compared to control. Acute hypoxia produced an exaggerated increase in heart rate (p < 0.05), mean arterial pressure (p < 0.05) and Ppa (28.2 ± 5.8 vs 19.33 ± 3.74 mm Hg, p < 0.05) and fall in peripheral oxygen saturation (p < 0.05) in HAPE-S compared to control. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves showed that Ppa response to acute hypoxia was the best variable to identify HAPE susceptibility (AUC 0.92) but BNP levels provided comparable information (AUC 0.85). BNP levels are easy to determine and may represent an important marker for the determination of HAPE susceptibility. PMID:26892302

  9. Clinical Outcomes of Wulingsan Subtraction Decoction Treatment of Postoperative Brain Edema and Fever as a Complication of Glioma Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Wei-rong; Zhang, Feng-e; Diao, Bao-zhong; Zhang, Yue-ying

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the efficacy of Wulingsan subtraction (五苓散加减 WLSS) decoction in the treatment of postoperative brain edema and fever as a complication of glioma neurosurgery. Methods. This retrospective study was conducted at the Department of Neurosurgery of Liaocheng People's Hospital. Patients hospitalized between March 2011 and December 2014 were divided into three groups: Group A received WLSS oral liquid (50 mL), twice a day; Group B received an intravenous infusion of mannitol; and Group C received WLSS combined with mannitol (n = 30 patients per group). All patients were treated for 10 days continuously. Therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by measuring body temperature and indicators of renal function before and 3, 5, and 10 days after treatment. Results. Compared to the other two groups, significantly greater clinical efficacy was observed in the patients treated with mannitol (Group B; P < 0.05), although marked clinical efficacy was also observed over time in patients treated with WLSS (Group A). After 5 days, the quantifiable effects of the WLSS and mannitol combination group (Group C) were substantial (P < 0.05). The renal damage in Group B was more obvious after 5 days and 10 days. Conclusion. Compared with mannitol treatment alone, WLSS combined with mannitol induced a more rapid reduction in body temperature. Our findings suggest that patients should be started on mannitol for 3 days and then switched to WLSS to achieve obvious antipyretic effects and protect renal function. This method of treatment should be considered for clinical applications. PMID:27019661

  10. Molecular pathophysiology of cerebral edema.

    PubMed

    Stokum, Jesse A; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2016-03-01

    Advancements in molecular biology have led to a greater understanding of the individual proteins responsible for generating cerebral edema. In large part, the study of cerebral edema is the study of maladaptive ion transport. Following acute CNS injury, cells of the neurovascular unit, particularly brain endothelial cells and astrocytes, undergo a program of pre- and post-transcriptional changes in the activity of ion channels and transporters. These changes can result in maladaptive ion transport and the generation of abnormal osmotic forces that, ultimately, manifest as cerebral edema. This review discusses past models and current knowledge regarding the molecular and cellular pathophysiology of cerebral edema. PMID:26661240

  11. Molecular pathophysiology of cerebral edema

    PubMed Central

    Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in molecular biology have led to a greater understanding of the individual proteins responsible for generating cerebral edema. In large part, the study of cerebral edema is the study of maladaptive ion transport. Following acute CNS injury, cells of the neurovascular unit, particularly brain endothelial cells and astrocytes, undergo a program of pre- and post-transcriptional changes in the activity of ion channels and transporters. These changes can result in maladaptive ion transport and the generation of abnormal osmotic forces that, ultimately, manifest as cerebral edema. This review discusses past models and current knowledge regarding the molecular and cellular pathophysiology of cerebral edema. PMID:26661240

  12. Beneficial effects of hydrogen gas in a rat model of traumatic brain injury via reducing oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xituan; Liu, Wenbo; Xie, Keliang; Liu, Weiping; Qu, Yan; Chao, Xiaodong; Chen, Tao; Zhou, Jun; Fei, Zhou

    2010-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of mortality and disability among the young population. It has been shown that hydrogen gas (H(2)) exerts a therapeutic antioxidant activity by selectively reducing hydroxyl radical (OH, the most cytotoxic ROS). Recently, we have found that H(2) inhalation significantly improved the survival rate and organ damage of septic mice. In the present study, we investigated the effectiveness of H(2) therapy on brain edema, blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, neurological dysfunction and injury volume in TBI-challenged rats. In addition, we investigated the effects of H(2) treatment on the changes of oxidative products and antioxidant enzymes in brain tissue of TBI-challenged rats. Hydrogen treatment was given by exposure to 2% H(2) from 5 min to 5h after sham or TBI operation, respectively. Here, we found that TBI-challenged rats showed significant brain injuries characterized by the increase of BBB permeability, brain edema and lesion volume as well as neurological dysfunction, which was significantly attenuated by 2% H(2) treatment. In addition, we found that the decrease of oxidative products and the increase of endogenous antioxidant enzymatic activities in the brain tissue may be associated with the protective effects of H(2) treatment in TBI-challenged rats. The present study supports that H(2) inhalation may be a more effective therapeutic strategy for patients with TBI. PMID:20654594

  13. Diabetes aggravates nanoparticles induced breakdown of the blood-brain barrier permeability, brain edema formation, alterations in cerebral blood flow and neuronal injury. An experimental study using physiological and morphological investigations in the rat.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Hari Shanker; Patnaik, Ranjana; Sharma, Aruna

    2010-12-01

    The possibility that diabetes aggravates nanoparticles induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, edema formation and brain pathology was examined in a rat model. Engineered nanoparticles from metals Ag and Cu (50-60 mn) were administered (50 mg/kg, i.p.) once daily for 7 days in normal and streptozotocine induced diabetic rats. On the 8th day, BBB permeability to Evans blue and radioactive iodine (131I-sodium) was examined in 16 brain regions. In these brain regions alterations in regional CBF was also evaluated using radiolabelled (125I) carbonized microspheres (o.d. 15 +/- 6 microm). Regional brain edema and Na+, K+ and Cl- ion analysis were done in 8 selected brain regions. Histopathology was used to detect neuronal damage employing Nissl staining. Nanoparticles treatment in diabetic rats showed much more profound disruption of the BBB to Evans blue albumin (EBA) and radioiodine in almost all the 16 regions examined as compared to the normal animals. In these diabetic animals reduction in regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) was more pronounced than in normal rats. Edema development as seen using water content and increase in Na+ and a decrease in K+ ion were most marked in diabetic rats as compared to normal rats after nanoparticles treatment. Cell changes in the regions of BBB disruptions were also exacerbated in diabetic rats compared to normal group after nanoparticles treatment. Taken together, these observations are the first to show that diabetic rats are more susceptible to nanoparticles induced cerebrovascular reactions in the brain and neuronal damage. The possible mechanisms and significance of the present findings are discussed. PMID:21121280

  14. Dexmedetomidine Postconditioning Reduces Brain Injury after Brain Hypoxia-Ischemia in Neonatal Rats.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiaoyan; Ma, Hong; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2016-06-01

    Perinatal asphyxia can lead to death and severe disability. Brain hypoxia-ischemia (HI) injury is the major pathophysiology contributing to death and severe disability after perinatal asphyxia. Here, seven-day old Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to left brain HI. Dexmedetomidine was given intraperitoneally after the brain HI. Yohimbine or atipamezole, two α2 adrenergic receptor antagonists, were given 10 min before the dexmedetomidine injection. Neurological outcome was evaluated 7 or 28 days after the brain HI. Frontal cerebral cortex was harvested 6 h after the brain HI. Left brain HI reduced the left cerebral hemisphere weight assessed 7 days after the brain HI. This brain tissue loss was dose-dependently attenuated by dexmedetomidine. Dexmedetomidine applied within 1 h after the brain HI produced this effect. Dexmedetomidine attenuated the brain HI-induced brain tissue and cell loss as well as neurological and cognitive dysfunction assessed from 28 days after the brain HI. Dexmedetomidine postconditioning-induced neuroprotection was abolished by yohimbine or atipamezole. Brain HI increased tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin 1β in the brain tissues. This increase was attenuated by dexmedetomidine. Atipamezole inhibited this dexmedetomidine effect. Our results suggest that dexmedetomidine postconditioning reduces HI-induced brain injury in the neonatal rats. This effect may be mediated by α2 adrenergic receptor activation that inhibits inflammation in the ischemic brain tissues. PMID:26932203

  15. Escin attenuates cerebral edema induced by acute omethoate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tian; Jiang, Na; Han, Bing; Liu, Wenbo; Liu, Tongshen; Fu, Fenghua; Zhao, Delu

    2011-06-01

    Organophosphorus exposure affects different organs such as skeletal muscles, the gastrointestinal tract, liver, lung, and brain. The present experiment aimed to evaluate the effect of escin on cerebral edema induced by acute omethoate poisoning. Sprague-Dawley rats were administered subcutaneously with omethoate at a single dose of 60 mg/kg followed by escin treatment. The results showed that escin reduced the brain water content and the amount of Evans blue in omethoate-poisoned animals. Treatment with escin decreased the levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) in the brain. Escin also alleviated the histopathological change induced by acute omethoate poisoning. The findings demonstrated that escin can attenuate cerebral edema induced by acute omethoate poisoning, and the underlying mechanism was associated with ameliorating the permeability of the blood-brain barrier. PMID:21417632

  16. Hydrogen Sulfide Offers Neuroprotection on Traumatic Brain Injury in Parallel with Reduced Apoptosis and Autophagy in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Dong, Wenwen; Chen, Xiping; Tao, Luyang

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a novel gaseous mediator, has been recognized as an important neuromodulator and neuroprotective agent in the central nervous system. The present study was undertaken to study the effects of exogenous H2S on traumatic brain injury (TBI) and the underlying mechanisms. The effects of exogenous H2S on TBI were examined by using measurement of brain edema, behavior assessment, propidium iodide (PI) staining, and Western blotting, respectively. Compared to TBI groups, H2S pretreatment had reduced brain edema, improved motor performance and ameliorated performance in Morris water maze test after TBI. Immunoblotting results showed that H2S pretreatment reversed TBI-induced cleavage of caspase-3 and decline of Bcl-2, suppressed LC3-II, Beclin-1 and Vps34 activation and maintained p62 level in injured cortex and hippocampus post TBI. The results suggest a protective effect and therapeutic potential of H2S in the treatment of brain injury and the protective effect against TBI may be associated with regulating apoptosis and autophagy. PMID:24466346

  17. Reduced GABAergic Action in the Autistic Brain.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Caroline E; Ratai, Eva-Maria; Kanwisher, Nancy

    2016-01-11

    An imbalance between excitatory/inhibitory neurotransmission has been posited as a central characteristic of the neurobiology of autism [1], inspired in part by the striking prevalence of seizures among individuals with the disorder [2]. Evidence supporting this hypothesis has specifically implicated the signaling pathway of the inhibitory neurotransmitter, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), in this putative imbalance: GABA receptor genes have been associated with autism in linkage and copy number variation studies [3-7], fewer GABA receptor subunits have been observed in the post-mortem tissue of autistic individuals [8, 9], and GABAergic signaling is disrupted across heterogeneous mouse models of autism [10]. Yet, empirical evidence supporting this hypothesis in humans is lacking, leaving a gulf between animal and human studies of the condition. Here, we present a direct link between GABA signaling and autistic perceptual symptomatology. We first demonstrate a robust, replicated autistic deficit in binocular rivalry [11], a basic visual function that is thought to rely on the balance of excitation/inhibition in visual cortex [12-15]. Then, using magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we demonstrate a tight linkage between binocular rivalry dynamics in typical participants and both GABA and glutamate levels in the visual cortex. Finally, we show that the link between GABA and binocular rivalry dynamics is completely and specifically absent in autism. These results suggest a disruption in inhibitory signaling in the autistic brain and forge a translational path between animal and human models of the condition. PMID:26711497

  18. Reducing Test Anxiety: A Right Brain Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Ruth I.

    Methods of helping students reduce test anxiety are discussed, including guided fantasy which leads students to imagine a setting in which they feel competent and relaxed. Catastrophic-anastrophic expectations teach that different expectations create different feelings and make students aware that they are in charge of their own attitudes. Anxiety…

  19. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and docosapentaenoic acid (DPAn-6) algal oils reduce inflammatory mediators in human peripheral mononuclear cells in vitro and paw edema in vivo.

    PubMed

    Nauroth, Julie M; Liu, Ying Chun; Van Elswyk, Mary; Bell, Rebecca; Hall, Eileen Bailey; Chung, Gloria; Arterburn, Linda M

    2010-05-01

    The anti-inflammatory activity associated with fish oil has been ascribed to the long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA), predominantly eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Here we examined the anti-inflammatory effects of two DHA-rich algal oils, which contain little EPA, and determined the contribution of the constituent fatty acids, particularly DHA and docosapentaenoic acid (DPAn-6). In vitro, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1beta) and Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) secretion in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was inhibited with apparent relative potencies of DPAn-6 (most potent) > DHA > EPA. In addition, DPAn-6 decreased intracellular levels of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and was a potent inhibitor of pro-inflammatory prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production. DHA/DPAn-6-rich DHA-S (DHA-S) algal oil was more effective at reducing edema in rats than DHA-rich DHA-T (DHA-T), suggesting that DPAn-6 has anti-inflammatory properties. Further in vivo analyses demonstrated that feeding DPAn-6 alone, provided as an ethyl ester, reduced paw edema to an extent approaching that of indomethacin and enhanced the anti-inflammatory activity of DHA when given in combination. Together, these results demonstrate that DPAn-6 has anti-inflammatory activity and enhances the effect of DHA in vitro and in vivo. Thus, DHA-S algal oil may have potential for use in anti-inflammatory applications. PMID:20364438

  20. Micromechanics of alveolar edema.

    PubMed

    Perlman, Carrie E; Lederer, David J; Bhattacharya, Jahar

    2011-01-01

    The decrease of lung compliance in pulmonary edema underlies ventilator-induced lung injury. However, the cause of the decrease in compliance is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that in pulmonary edema, the mechanical effects of liquid-filled alveoli increase tissue stress in adjacent air-filled alveoli. By micropuncture of isolated, perfused rat lungs, we established a single-alveolus model of pulmonary edema that we imaged using confocal microscopy. In this model, we viewed a liquid-filled alveolus together with its air-filled neighbor at different transpulmonary pressures, both before and after liquid-filling. Instilling liquid in an alveolus caused alveolar shrinkage. As a result, the interalveolar septum was stretched, causing the neighboring air-filled alveolus to bulge. Thus, the air-filled alveolus was overexpanded by virtue of its adjacency to a liquid-filled alveolus. Confocal microscopy at different depths of the liquid-filled alveolus revealed a meniscus. Lung inflation to near-total lung capacity (TLC) demonstrated decreased compliance of the air-filled but not liquid-filled alveolus. However, at near TLC, the air-filled alveolus was larger than it was in the pre-edematous control tissue. In pulmonary edema, liquid-filled alveoli induce mechanical stress on air-filled alveoli, reducing the compliance of air-filled alveoli, and hence overall lung compliance. Because of increased mechanical stress, air-filled alveoli may be susceptible to overdistension injury during mechanical ventilation of the edematous lung. PMID:20118224

  1. Dietary Docosahexaenoic Acid Improves Cognitive Function, Tissue Sparing, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Indices of Edema and White Matter Injury in the Immature Rat after Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Schober, Michelle E; Requena, Daniela F; Abdullah, Osama M; Casper, T Charles; Beachy, Joanna; Malleske, Daniel; Pauly, James R

    2016-02-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of acquired neurologic disability in children. Specific therapies to treat acute TBI are lacking. Cognitive impairment from TBI may be blunted by decreasing inflammation and oxidative damage after injury. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) decreases cognitive impairment, oxidative stress, and white matter injury in adult rats after TBI. Effects of DHA on cognitive outcome, oxidative stress, and white matter injury in the developing rat after experimental TBI are unknown. We hypothesized that DHA would decrease early inflammatory markers and oxidative stress, and improve cognitive, imaging and histologic outcomes in rat pups after controlled cortical impact (CCI). CCI or sham surgery was delivered to 17 d old male rat pups exposed to DHA or standard diet for the duration of the experiments. DHA was introduced into the dam diet the day before CCI to allow timely DHA delivery to the pre-weanling pups. Inflammatory cytokines and nitrates/nitrites were measured in the injured brains at post-injury Day (PID) 1 and PID2. Morris water maze (MWM) testing was performed at PID41-PID47. T2-weighted and diffusion tensor imaging studies were obtained at PID12 and PID28. Tissue sparing was calculated histologically at PID3 and PID50. DHA did not adversely affect rat survival or weight gain. DHA acutely decreased oxidative stress and increased anti-inflammatory interleukin 10 in CCI brains. DHA improved MWM performance and lesion volume late after injury. At PID12, DHA decreased T2-imaging measures of cerebral edema and decreased radial diffusivity, an index of white matter injury. DHA improved short- and long-term neurologic outcomes after CCI in the rat pup. Given its favorable safety profile, DHA is a promising candidate therapy for pediatric TBI. Further studies are needed to explore neuroprotective mechanisms of DHA after developmental TBI. PMID:26247583

  2. Astaxanthin reduces ischemic brain injury in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hui; Kuo, Chi-Chung; Chou, Jenny; Delvolve, Alice; Jackson, Shelley N; Post, Jeremy; Woods, Amina S; Hoffer, Barry J; Wang, Yun; Harvey, Brandon K

    2009-06-01

    Astaxanthin (ATX) is a dietary carotenoid of crustaceans and fish that contributes to their coloration. Dietary ATX is important for development and survival of salmonids and crustaceans and has been shown to reduce cardiac ischemic injury in rodents. The purpose of this study was to examine whether ATX can protect against ischemic injury in the mammalian brain. Adult rats were injected intracerebroventricularly with ATX or vehicle prior to a 60-min middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). ATX was present in the infarction area at 70-75 min after onset of MCAo. Treatment with ATX, compared to vehicle, increased locomotor activity in stroke rats and reduced cerebral infarction at 2 d after MCAo. To evaluate the protective mechanisms of ATX against stroke, brain tissues were assayed for free radical damage, apoptosis, and excitoxicity. ATX antagonized ischemia-mediated loss of aconitase activity and reduced glutamate release, lipid peroxidation, translocation of cytochrome c, and TUNEL labeling in the ischemic cortex. ATX did not alter physiological parameters, such as body temperature, brain temperature, cerebral blood flow, blood gases, blood pressure, and pH. Collectively, our data suggest that ATX can reduce ischemia-related injury in brain tissue through the inhibition of oxidative stress, reduction of glutamate release, and antiapoptosis. ATX may be clinically useful for patients vulnerable or prone to ischemic events. PMID:19218497

  3. Astaxanthin reduces ischemic brain injury in adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hui; Kuo, Chi-Chung; Chou, Jenny; Delvolve, Alice; Jackson, Shelley N.; Post, Jeremy; Woods, Amina S.; Hoffer, Barry J.; Wang, Yun; Harvey, Brandon K.

    2009-01-01

    Astaxanthin (ATX) is a dietary carotenoid of crustaceans and fish that contributes to their coloration. Dietary ATX is important for development and survival of salmonids and crustaceans and has been shown to reduce cardiac ischemic injury in rodents. The purpose of this study was to examine whether ATX can protect against ischemic injury in the mammalian brain. Adult rats were injected intracerebroventricularly with ATX or vehicle prior to a 60-min middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). ATX was present in the infarction area at 70-75 min after onset of MCAo. Treatment with ATX, compared to vehicle, increased locomotor activity in stroke rats and reduced cerebral infarction at 2 d after MCAo. To evaluate the protective mechanisms of ATX against stroke, brain tissues were assayed for free radical damage, apoptosis, and excitoxicity. ATX antagonized ischemia-mediated loss of aconitase activity and reduced glutamate release, lipid peroxidation, translocation of cytochrome c, and TUNEL labeling in the ischemic cortex. ATX did not alter physiological parameters, such as body temperature, brain temperature, cerebral blood flow, blood gases, blood pressure, and pH. Collectively, our data suggest that ATX can reduce ischemia-related injury in brain tissue through the inhibition of oxidative stress, reduction of glutamate release, and antiapoptosis. ATX may be clinically useful for patients vulnerable or prone to ischemic events.—Shen, H., Kuo, C.-C., Chou, J., Delvolve, A., Jackson, S. N., Post, J., Woods, A. S., Hoffer, B. J., Wang, Y., Harvey, B. K. Astaxanthin reduces ischemic brain injury in adult rats. PMID:19218497

  4. Reducing proactive aggression through non-invasive brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Dambacher, Franziska; Schuhmann, Teresa; Lobbestael, Jill; Arntz, Arnoud; Brugman, Suzanne; Sack, Alexander T

    2015-10-01

    Aggressive behavior poses a threat to human collaboration and social safety. It is of utmost importance to identify the functional mechanisms underlying aggression and to develop potential interventions capable of reducing dysfunctional aggressive behavior already at a brain level. We here experimentally shifted fronto-cortical asymmetry to manipulate the underlying motivational emotional states in both male and female participants while assessing the behavioral effects on proactive and reactive aggression. Thirty-two healthy volunteers received either anodal transcranial direct current stimulation to increase neural activity within right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, or sham stimulation. Aggressive behavior was measured with the Taylor Aggression Paradigm. We revealed a general gender effect, showing that men displayed more behavioral aggression than women. After the induction of right fronto-hemispheric dominance, proactive aggression was reduced in men. This study demonstrates that non-invasive brain stimulation can reduce aggression in men. This is a relevant and promising step to better understand how cortical brain states connect to impulsive actions and to examine the causal role of the prefrontal cortex in aggression. Ultimately, such findings could help to examine whether the brain can be a direct target for potential supportive interventions in clinical settings dealing with overly aggressive patients and/or violent offenders. PMID:25680991

  5. C1-Inhibitor protects from focal brain trauma in a cortical cryolesion mice model by reducing thrombo-inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Albert-Weissenberger, Christiane; Mencl, Stine; Schuhmann, Michael K.; Salur, Irmak; Göb, Eva; Langhauser, Friederike; Hopp, Sarah; Hennig, Nelli; Meuth, Sven G.; Nolte, Marc W.; Sirén, Anna-Leena; Kleinschnitz, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) induces a strong inflammatory response which includes blood-brain barrier damage, edema formation and infiltration of different immune cell subsets. More recently, microvascular thrombosis has been identified as another pathophysiological feature of TBI. The contact-kinin system represents an interface between inflammatory and thrombotic circuits and is activated in different neurological diseases. C1-Inhibitor counteracts activation of the contact-kinin system at multiple levels. We investigated the therapeutic potential of C1-Inhibitor in a model of TBI. Male and female C57BL/6 mice were subjected to cortical cryolesion and treated with C1-Inhibitor after 1 h. Lesion volumes were assessed between day 1 and day 5 and blood-brain barrier damage, thrombus formation as well as the local inflammatory response were determined post TBI. Treatment of male mice with 15.0 IU C1-Inhibitor, but not 7.5 IU, 1 h after cryolesion reduced lesion volumes by ~75% on day 1. This protective effect was preserved in female mice and at later stages of trauma. Mechanistically, C1-Inhibitor stabilized the blood-brain barrier and decreased the invasion of immune cells into the brain parenchyma. Moreover, C1-Inhibitor had strong antithrombotic effects. C1-Inhibitor represents a multifaceted anti-inflammatory and antithrombotic compound that prevents traumatic neurodegeneration in clinically meaningful settings. PMID:25249935

  6. Could Cord Blood Cell Therapy Reduce Preterm Brain Injury?

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jingang; McDonald, Courtney A.; Fahey, Michael C.; Jenkin, Graham; Miller, Suzanne L.

    2014-01-01

    Major advances in neonatal care have led to significant improvements in survival rates for preterm infants, but this occurs at a cost, with a strong causal link between preterm birth and neurological deficits, including cerebral palsy (CP). Indeed, in high-income countries, up to 50% of children with CP were born preterm. The pathways that link preterm birth and brain injury are complex and multifactorial, but it is clear that preterm birth is strongly associated with damage to the white matter of the developing brain. Nearly 90% of preterm infants who later develop spastic CP have evidence of periventricular white matter injury. There are currently no treatments targeted at protecting the immature preterm brain. Umbilical cord blood (UCB) contains a diverse mix of stem and progenitor cells, and is a particularly promising source of cells for clinical applications, due to ethical and practical advantages over other potential therapeutic cell types. Recent studies have documented the potential benefits of UCB cells in reducing brain injury, particularly in rodent models of term neonatal hypoxia–ischemia. These studies indicate that UCB cells act via anti-inflammatory and immuno-modulatory effects, and release neurotrophic growth factors to support the damaged and surrounding brain tissue. The etiology of brain injury in preterm-born infants is less well understood than in term infants, but likely results from episodes of hypoperfusion, hypoxia–ischemia, and/or inflammation over a developmental period of white matter vulnerability. This review will explore current knowledge about the neuroprotective actions of UCB cells and their potential to ameliorate preterm brain injury through neonatal cell administration. We will also discuss the characteristics of UCB-derived from preterm and term infants for use in clinical applications. PMID:25346720

  7. Effect of Decompressive Craniectomy on Perihematomal Edema in Patients with Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Klinger-Gratz, Pascal P.; Fiechter, Michael; Z’Graggen, Werner J.; Gautschi, Oliver P.; El-Koussy, Marwan; Gralla, Jan; Schaller, Karl; Zbinden, Martin; Arnold, Marcel; Fischer, Urs; Mattle, Heinrich P.; Raabe, Andreas; Beck, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Background Perihematomal edema contributes to secondary brain injury in the course of intracerebral hemorrhage. The effect of decompressive surgery on perihematomal edema after intracerebral hemorrhage is unknown. This study analyzed the course of PHE in patients who were or were not treated with decompressive craniectomy. Methods More than 100 computed tomography images from our published cohort of 25 patients were evaluated retrospectively at two university hospitals in Switzerland. Computed tomography scans covered the time from admission until day 100. Eleven patients were treated by decompressive craniectomy and 14 were treated conservatively. Absolute edema and hematoma volumes were assessed using 3-dimensional volumetric measurements. Relative edema volumes were calculated based on maximal hematoma volume. Results Absolute perihematomal edema increased from 42.9 ml to 125.6 ml (192.8%) after 21 days in the decompressive craniectomy group, versus 50.4 ml to 67.2 ml (33.3%) in the control group (Δ at day 21 = 58.4 ml, p = 0.031). Peak edema developed on days 25 and 35 in patients with decompressive craniectomy and controls respectively, and it took about 60 days for the edema to decline to baseline in both groups. Eight patients (73%) in the decompressive craniectomy group and 6 patients (43%) in the control group had a good outcome (modified Rankin Scale score 0 to 4) at 6 months (P = 0.23). Conclusions Decompressive craniectomy is associated with a significant increase in perihematomal edema compared to patients who have been treated conservatively. Perihematomal edema itself lasts about 60 days if it is not treated, but decompressive craniectomy ameliorates the mass effect exerted by the intracerebral hemorrhage plus the perihematomal edema, as reflected by the reduced midline shift. PMID:26872068

  8. Resveratrol attenuates peripheral and brain inflammation and reduces ischemic brain injury in aged female mice.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Sae Im; Shin, Jin A; Cho, Sunghee; Kim, Hye Won; Lee, Ji Yoon; Kang, Jihee Lee; Park, Eun-Mi

    2016-08-01

    Resveratrol is known to improve metabolic dysfunction associated with obesity. Visceral obesity is a sign of aging and is considered a risk factor for ischemic stroke. In this study, we investigated the effects of resveratrol on inflammation in visceral adipose tissue and the brain and its effects on ischemic brain injury in aged female mice. Mice treated with resveratrol (0.1 mg/kg, p.o.) for 10 days showed reduced levels of interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α, as well as a reduction in the size of adipocytes in visceral adipose tissue. Resveratrol also reduced interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α protein levels and immunoglobulin G extravasation in the brain. Mice treated with resveratrol demonstrated smaller infarct size, improved neurological function, and blunted peripheral inflammation at 3 days postischemic stroke. These results showed that resveratrol counteracted inflammation in visceral adipose tissue and in the brain and reduced stroke-induced brain injury and peripheral inflammation in aged female mice. Therefore, resveratrol administration can be a valuable strategy for the prevention of age-associated and disease-provoked inflammation in postmenopausal women. PMID:27318135

  9. Plasma infusions into porcine cerebral white matter induce early edema, oxidative stress, pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression and DNA fragmentation: implications for white matter injury with increased blood-brain-barrier permeability.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Kenneth R; Dean, Christopher; Beiler, Shauna; Bryan, David W; Packard, Benjamin A; Smulian, A George; Linke, Michael J; de Courten-Myers, Gabrielle M

    2005-04-01

    Plasma infused into porcine cerebral white matter induces both acute interstitial and delayed vasogenic edema. Edematous white matter contains extracellular plasma proteins and rapidly induces oxidative stress as evidenced by increased protein carbonyl formation and heme oxygenase-1 induction. We tested the hypothesis that edematous white matter would also upregulate pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression and develop DNA damage. We infused autologous plasma into the frontal hemispheric white matter of pentobarbital-anesthetized pigs. We monitored and controlled physiological variables and froze brains in situ at 1, 4 or 24 hrs. We determined edema volumes by computer-assisted morphometry. We measured white matter protein carbonyl formation by immunoblotting, cytokine gene expression by standard RT-PCR methods and DNA fragmentation by agarose gel electrophoresis. White matter edema developed acutely (1 hr) after plasma infusion and increased significantly in volume between 4 and 24 hrs. Protein carbonyl formation also occurred rapidly in edematous white matter with significant elevations (3 to 4-fold) already present at 1 hr. This increase remained through 24 hrs. Pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression was also rapidly increased at 1 hr post-infusion. Evidence for DNA fragmentation began at 2 to 4 hrs, and a pattern indicative of both ongoing necrosis and apoptosis was robust by 24 hrs. Plasma protein accumulation in white matter induces acute edema development and a cascade of patho-chemical events including oxidative stress, pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression and DNA damage. These results suggest that in diseases with increased blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability or following intracerebral hemorrhage or traumatic brain injury, interstitial plasma can rapidly damage white matter. PMID:16181107

  10. Statins are Associated With a Reduced Risk of Brain Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Brian K.; Chiu, Hui-Fen; Yang, Chun-Yuh

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to investigate whether statin utilization is associated with brain cancer risk. A population-based case–control study was conducted using nationally representative claims data from the National Health Insurance Bureau in Taiwan. Cases included all patients 50 years and older who received an index diagnosis of brain cancer between 2004 and 2011. Our controls were matched by age, sex, and index date. We estimated adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using multiple logistic regression. We examined 213 brain cancer cases and 852 controls. The unadjusted ORs for any statin prescription was 0.77 (95% CI = 0.50–1.18) and the adjusted OR was 0.59 (95% CI = 0.37–0.96). Compared with no use of statins, the adjusted ORs were 0.68 (95% CI = 0.38–1.24) for the group having been prescribed with statins with cumulative defined daily dose (DDD) below 144.67 DDDs and 0.50 (95% CI = 0.28–0.97) for the group with the cumulative statin use of 144.67 DDDs or more. The results of this study suggest that statins may reduce the risk of brain cancer. PMID:27124024

  11. Diffuse Interstitial Brain Edema in Patients With End-Stage Renal Disease Undergoing Hemodialysis: A Tract-Based Spatial Statistics Study

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiang; Wen, Ji-qiu; Qi, Rong-feng; Luo, Song; Zhong, Jian-hui; Chen, Hui-juan; Ji, Gong-jun; Lu, Guang Ming; Zhang, Long Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Abstract To investigate white matter (WM) alterations and their correlation with cognition function in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD) using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) with tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) approach. This prospective HIPAA-complaint study was approved by our institutional review board. Eighty HD ESRD patients and 80 sex- and age-matched healthy controls were included. Neuropsychological (NP) tests and laboratory tests, including serum creatinine and urea, were performed. DTI data were processed to obtain fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) maps with TBSS. FA and MD difference between the 2 groups were compared. We also explored the associations of FA values in WM regions of lower FA with ages, NP tests, disease, and dialysis durations, serum creatinine and urea levels of ESRD patients. Compared with controls, HD ESRD patients had lower FA value in the corpus callosum, bilateral corona radiate, posterior thalamic radiation, left superior longitudinal fasciculus, and right cingulum (P < 0.05, FWE corrected). Almost all WM regions had increased MD in HD ESRD patients compared with controls (P < 0.05, FWE corrected). In some regions with lower FA, FA values showed moderate correlations with ages, NP tests, and serum urea levels. There was no correlation between FA values and HD durations, disease durations, and serum creatinine levels of ESRD patients (all P > 0.05). Diffuse interstitial brain edema and moderate WM integrity disruption occurring in HD ESRD patients, which correlated with cognitive dysfunction, and serum urea levels might be a risk factor for these WM changes. PMID:25526483

  12. Downregulating hypoxia-inducible factor-1α expression with perfluorooctyl-bromide nanoparticles reduces early brain injury following experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Xu, Rui; Li, Xia; Zhang, Huan; Wang, Xin; Zhu, Ji

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of perfluorooctyl-bromide (PFOB) nanoparticles on hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) and its downstream target genes in early brain injury (EBI) after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Healthy male Sprague Dawley rats (n=100) were randomly divided into five groups: Sham, SAH, SAH + vehicle, SAH + 5 mg/kg PFOB and SAH + 10 mg/kg PFOB. A rat model of SAH was created by endovascular perforation, and PFOB treatment (5 mg/kg or 10 mg/kg injected into the caudal vein) was initiated 1 h after SAH. All rats were subsequently sacrificed 24 h after surgery. Treatment with PFOB significantly alleviated EBI (including neurological dysfunction, brain edema, blood-brain barrier disruption (BBB), and neural cell apoptosis). In addition, it also suppressed the expression of HIF-1α, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and BNIP3 in the rat hippocampus. The effects of 10 g/kg PFOB were found to be more obvious than those of 5 g/kg PFOB. Our work demonstrated that PFOB treatment alleviated EBI after SAH, potentially through downregulation of the expression of HIF-1α and its target genes, which led to reduced cell apoptosis, BBB disruption and brain edema. PMID:27347319

  13. Reduced predictable information in brain signals in autism spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Carlos; Lizier, Joseph T.; Schaum, Michael; Wollstadt, Patricia; Grützner, Christine; Uhlhaas, Peter; Freitag, Christine M.; Schlitt, Sabine; Bölte, Sven; Hornero, Roberto; Wibral, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a common developmental disorder characterized by communication difficulties and impaired social interaction. Recent results suggest altered brain dynamics as a potential cause of symptoms in ASD. Here, we aim to describe potential information-processing consequences of these alterations by measuring active information storage (AIS)—a key quantity in the theory of distributed computation in biological networks. AIS is defined as the mutual information between the past state of a process and its next measurement. It measures the amount of stored information that is used for computation of the next time step of a process. AIS is high for rich but predictable dynamics. We recorded magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals in 10 ASD patients and 14 matched control subjects in a visual task. After a beamformer source analysis, 12 task-relevant sources were obtained. For these sources, stationary baseline activity was analyzed using AIS. Our results showed a decrease of AIS values in the hippocampus of ASD patients in comparison with controls, meaning that brain signals in ASD were either less predictable, reduced in their dynamic richness or both. Our study suggests the usefulness of AIS to detect an abnormal type of dynamics in ASD. The observed changes in AIS are compatible with Bayesian theories of reduced use or precision of priors in ASD. PMID:24592235

  14. Mechanisms of Astrocyte-Mediated Cerebral Edema

    PubMed Central

    Stokum, Jesse A.; Kurland, David B.; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J. Marc

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral edema formation stems from disruption of blood brain barrier (BBB) integrity and occurs after injury to the CNS. Due to the restrictive skull, relatively small increases in brain volume can translate into impaired tissue perfusion and brain herniation. In excess, cerebral edema can be gravely harmful. Astrocytes are key participants in cerebral edema by virtue of their relationship with the cerebral vasculature, their unique compliment of solute and water transport proteins, and their general role in brain volume homeostasis. Following the discovery of aquaporins, passive conduits of water flow, aquaporin 4 (AQP4) was identified as the predominant astrocyte water channel. Normally, AQP4 is highly enriched at perivascular endfeet, the outermost layer of the BBB, whereas after injury, AQP4 expression disseminates to the entire astrocytic plasmalemma, a phenomenon termed dysregulation. Arguably, the most important role of AQP4 is to rapidly neutralize osmotic gradients generated by ionic transporters. In pathological conditions, AQP4 is believed to be intimately involved in the formation and clearance of cerebral edema. In this review, we discuss aquaporin function and localization in the BBB during health and injury, and we examine post-injury ionic events that modulate AQP4- dependent edema formation. PMID:24996934

  15. Salidroside Improves Behavioral and Histological Outcomes and Reduces Apoptosis via PI3K/Akt Signaling after Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Szu-Fu; Tsai, Hsin-Ju; Hung, Tai-Ho; Chen, Chien-Cheng; Lee, Chao Yu; Wu, Chun-Hu; Wang, Pei-Yi; Liao, Nien-Chieh

    2012-01-01

    Background Traumatic brain injury (TBI) induces a complex sequence of apopototic cascades that contribute to secondary tissue damage. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of salidroside, a phenolic glycoside with potent anti-apoptotic properties, on behavioral and histological outcomes, brain edema, and apoptosis following experimental TBI and the possible involvement of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway. Methodology/Principal Findings Mice subjected to controlled cortical impact injury received intraperitoneal salidroside (20, or 50 mg/kg) or vehicle injection 10 min after injury. Behavioral studies, histology analysis and brain water content assessment were performed. Levels of PI3K/Akt signaling-related molecules, apoptosis-related proteins, cytochrome C (CytoC), and Smac/DIABLO were also analyzed. LY294002, a PI3K inhibitor, was administered to examine the mechanism of protection. The protective effect of salidroside was also investigated in primary cultured neurons subjected to stretch injury. Treatment with 20 mg/kg salidroside_significantly improved functional recovery and reduced brain tissue damage up to post-injury day 28. Salidroside_also significantly reduced neuronal death, apoptosis, and brain edema at day 1. These changes were associated with significant decreases in cleaved caspase-3, CytoC, and Smac/DIABLO at days 1 and 3. Salidroside increased phosphorylation of Akt on Ser473 and the mitochondrial Bcl-2/Bax ratio at day 1, and enhanced phosphorylation of Akt on Thr308 at day 3. This beneficial effect was abolished by pre-injection of LY294002. Moreover, delayed administration of salidroside at 3 or 6 h post-injury reduced neuronal damage at day 1. Salidroside treatment also decreased neuronal vulnerability to stretch-induced injury in vitro. Conclusions/Significance Post-injury salidroside improved long-term behavioral and histological outcomes and reduced brain edema and apoptosis

  16. [Hyponatremic encephalopathy with non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Development following marathon run].

    PubMed

    Wellershoff, G

    2013-04-01

    This article presents the case of a 52-year-old woman who developed exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH) complicated by non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema after a marathon run. The condition of EAH is a potentially life-threatening complication of endurance exercise. The main cause seems to be inadequate intake of free water during or following exercise with enduring antidiuresis due to nonosmotic stimulation of ADH secretion. Known risk factors are female gender, slow running pace and lack of weight loss. Emergency therapy is fluid restriction and bolus infusion of 3% NaCl solution to rapidly reduce brain edema. PMID:23381723

  17. Reduced brain activation in violent adolescents during response inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Yi; Mei, Yi; Du, XiaoXia; Xie, Bin; Shao, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Deficits in inhibitory control have been linked to aggression and violent behaviour. This study aimed to observe whether violent adolescents show different brain activation patterns during response inhibition and to ascertain the roles these brain regions play. A self-report method and modified overt aggression scale (MOAS) were used to evaluate violent behaviour. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 22 violent adolescents and 17 matched healthy subjects aged 12 to 18 years. While scanning, a go/no-go task was performed. Between-group comparisons revealed that activation in the bilateral middle and superior temporal gyrus, hippocampus, and right orbitofrontal area (BA11) regions were significantly reduced in the violent group compared with the control group. Meanwhile, the violent group had more widespread activation in the prefrontal cortex than that observed in the control group. Activation of the prefrontal cortex in the violent group was widespread but lacking in focus, failing to produce intensive activation in some functionally related regions during response inhibition. PMID:26888566

  18. Sex-Steroid Hormone Manipulation Reduces Brain Response to Reward.

    PubMed

    Macoveanu, Julian; Henningsson, Susanne; Pinborg, Anja; Jensen, Peter; Knudsen, Gitte M; Frokjaer, Vibe G; Siebner, Hartwig R

    2016-03-01

    Mood disorders are twice as frequent in women than in men. Risk mechanisms for major depression include adverse responses to acute changes in sex-steroid hormone levels, eg, postpartum in women. Such adverse responses may involve an altered processing of rewards. Here, we examine how women's vulnerability for mood disorders is linked to sex-steroid dynamics by investigating the effects of a pharmacologically induced fluctuation in ovarian sex steroids on the brain response to monetary rewards. In a double-blinded placebo controlled study, healthy women were randomized to receive either placebo or the gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) goserelin, which causes a net decrease in sex-steroid levels. Fifty-eight women performed a gambling task while undergoing functional MRI at baseline, during the mid-follicular phase, and again following the intervention. The gambling task enabled us to map regional brain activity related to the magnitude of risk during choice and to monetary reward. The GnRHa intervention caused a net reduction in ovarian sex steroids (estradiol and testosterone) and increased depression symptoms. Compared with placebo, GnRHa reduced amygdala's reactivity to high monetary rewards. There was a positive association between the individual changes in testosterone and changes in bilateral insula response to monetary rewards. Our data provide evidence for the involvement of sex-steroid hormones in reward processing. A blunted amygdala response to rewarding stimuli following a rapid decline in sex-steroid hormones may reflect a reduced engagement in positive experiences. Abnormal reward processing may constitute a neurobiological mechanism by which sex-steroid fluctuations provoke mood disorders in susceptible women. PMID:26245498

  19. Kininogen deficiency protects from ischemic neurodegeneration in mice by reducing thrombosis, blood-brain barrier damage, and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Langhauser, Friederike; Göb, Eva; Kraft, Peter; Geis, Christian; Schmitt, Joachim; Brede, Marc; Göbel, Kerstin; Helluy, Xavier; Pham, Mirko; Bendszus, Martin; Jakob, Peter; Stoll, Guido; Meuth, Sven G.; Nieswandt, Bernhard; McCrae, Keith R.

    2012-01-01

    Thrombosis and inflammation are hallmarks of ischemic stroke still unamenable to therapeutic interventions. High-molecular-weight kininogen (KNG) is a central constituent of the contact-kinin system which represents an interface between thrombotic and inflammatory circuits and is critically involved in stroke development. Kng−/− mice are protected from thrombosis after artificial vessel wall injury and lack the proinflammatory mediator bradykinin. We investigated the consequences of KNG deficiency in models of ischemic stroke. Kng−/− mice of either sex subjected to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion developed dramatically smaller brain infarctions and less severe neurologic deficits without an increase in infarct-associated hemorrhage. This protective effect was preserved at later stages of infarction as well as in elderly mice. Targeting KNG reduced thrombus formation in ischemic vessels and improved cerebral blood flow, and reconstitution of KNG-deficient mice with human KNG or bradykinin restored clot deposition and infarct susceptibility. Moreover, mice deficient in KNG showed less severe blood-brain barrier damage and edema formation, and the local inflammatory response was reduced compared with controls. Because KNG appears to be instrumental in pathologic thrombus formation and inflammation but dispensable for hemostasis, KNG inhibition may offer a selective and safe strategy for combating stroke and other thromboembolic diseases. PMID:22936662

  20. Kininogen deficiency protects from ischemic neurodegeneration in mice by reducing thrombosis, blood-brain barrier damage, and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Langhauser, Friederike; Göb, Eva; Kraft, Peter; Geis, Christian; Schmitt, Joachim; Brede, Marc; Göbel, Kerstin; Helluy, Xavier; Pham, Mirko; Bendszus, Martin; Jakob, Peter; Stoll, Guido; Meuth, Sven G; Nieswandt, Bernhard; McCrae, Keith R; Kleinschnitz, Christoph

    2012-11-01

    Thrombosis and inflammation are hallmarks of ischemic stroke still unamenable to therapeutic interventions. High-molecular-weight kininogen (KNG) is a central constituent of the contact-kinin system which represents an interface between thrombotic and inflammatory circuits and is critically involved in stroke development. Kng(-/-) mice are protected from thrombosis after artificial vessel wall injury and lack the proinflammatory mediator bradykinin. We investigated the consequences of KNG deficiency in models of ischemic stroke. Kng(-/-) mice of either sex subjected to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion developed dramatically smaller brain infarctions and less severe neurologic deficits without an increase in infarct-associated hemorrhage. This protective effect was preserved at later stages of infarction as well as in elderly mice. Targeting KNG reduced thrombus formation in ischemic vessels and improved cerebral blood flow, and reconstitution of KNG-deficient mice with human KNG or bradykinin restored clot deposition and infarct susceptibility. Moreover, mice deficient in KNG showed less severe blood-brain barrier damage and edema formation, and the local inflammatory response was reduced compared with controls. Because KNG appears to be instrumental in pathologic thrombus formation and inflammation but dispensable for hemostasis, KNG inhibition may offer a selective and safe strategy for combating stroke and other thromboembolic diseases. PMID:22936662

  1. Selective Brain Cooling Reduces Water Turnover in Dehydrated Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, W. Maartin; Hetem, Robyn S.; Mitchell, Duncan; Maloney, Shane K.; Meyer, Leith C. R.; Fuller, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    In artiodactyls, arterial blood destined for the brain can be cooled through counter-current heat exchange within the cavernous sinus via a process called selective brain cooling. We test the hypothesis that selective brain cooling, which results in lowered hypothalamic temperature, contributes to water conservation in sheep. Nine Dorper sheep, instrumented to provide measurements of carotid blood and brain temperature, were dosed with deuterium oxide (D2O), exposed to heat for 8 days (40◦C for 6-h per day) and deprived of water for the last five days (days 3 to 8). Plasma osmolality increased and the body water fraction decreased over the five days of water deprivation, with the sheep losing 16.7% of their body mass. Following water deprivation, both the mean 24h carotid blood temperature and the mean 24h brain temperature increased, but carotid blood temperature increased more than did brain temperature resulting in increased selective brain cooling. There was considerable inter-individual variation in the degree to which individual sheep used selective brain cooling. In general, sheep spent more time using selective brain cooling, and it was of greater magnitude, when dehydrated compared to when they were euhydrated. We found a significant positive correlation between selective brain cooling magnitude and osmolality (an index of hydration state). Both the magnitude of selective brain cooling and the proportion of time that sheep spent selective brain cooling were negatively correlated with water turnover. Sheep that used selective brain cooling more frequently, and with greater magnitude, lost less water than did conspecifics using selective brain cooling less efficiently. Our results show that a 50kg sheep can save 2.6L of water per day (~60% of daily water intake) when it employs selective brain cooling for 50% of the day during heat exposure. We conclude that selective brain cooling has a water conservation function in artiodactyls. PMID:25675092

  2. [Hereditary angioneurotic edema in children].

    PubMed

    Farkas, H; Harmat, G; Füst, G; Varga, L; Visy, B

    2000-11-19

    Hereditary angioneurotic edema results from the deficiency of C1-esterase inhibitor. The clinical picture of this autosomal dominant disorder is characterized by recurrent attacks of edema formation in the subcutis and/or the submucosa. The clinical records of 21 children with established hereditary angioneurotic edema were reviewed. Follow-up care included laboratory check-ups and abdominal ultrasound. Clinical manifestations of the disease first occurred in 2.5 to 12 years of age. Mechanical trauma was the most common precipitating factor. Pedigree-analysis revealed 19 patients with afflicted relatives. Long-term prophylaxis was initiated with tranexamic acid and danazol in 10 cases; 2 children required short-term prophylaxis. Therapy improved serum complement parameters significantly and reduced the frequency and severity of clinical manifestations. Acute, life-threatening edematous attacks were treated by the administration of C1-inhibitor concentrate, which achieved the resolution of the edema within several hours. Abdominal ultrasonography performed during the attack invariably demonstrated transitory ascites that resolved spontaneously after treatment. Adequate prophylaxis and follow-up care can spare pediatric patients from edematous attacks. Undesirable adverse effects can be avoided and the patient's quality of life can be enhanced considerably by administering the lowest effective drug dose. PMID:11143287

  3. Changes in brain morphology in albinism reflect reduced visual acuity.

    PubMed

    Bridge, Holly; von dem Hagen, Elisabeth A H; Davies, George; Chambers, Claire; Gouws, Andre; Hoffmann, Michael; Morland, Antony B

    2014-07-01

    Albinism, in humans and many animal species, has a major impact on the visual system, leading to reduced acuity, lack of binocular function and nystagmus. In addition to the lack of a foveal pit, there is a disruption to the routing of the nerve fibers crossing at the optic chiasm, resulting in excessive crossing of fibers to the contralateral hemisphere. However, very little is known about the effect of this misrouting on the structure of the post-chiasmatic visual pathway, and the occipital lobes in particular. Whole-brain analyses of cortical thickness in a large cohort of subjects with albinism showed an increase in cortical thickness, relative to control subjects, particularly in posterior V1, corresponding to the foveal representation. Furthermore, mean cortical thickness across entire V1 was significantly greater in these subjects compared to controls and negatively correlated with visual acuity in albinism. Additionally, the group with albinism showed decreased gyrification in the left ventral occipital lobe. While the increase in cortical thickness in V1, also found in congenitally blind subjects, has been interpreted to reflect a lack of pruning, the decreased gyrification in the ventral extrastriate cortex may reflect the reduced input to the foveal regions of the ventral visual stream. PMID:23039995

  4. Substance P Mediates Reduced Pneumonia Rates After Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sung; Stepien, David; Hanseman, Dennis; Robinson, Bryce; Goodman, Michael D.; Pritts, Timothy A.; Caldwell, Charles C.; Remick, Daniel G.; Lentsch, Alex B.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Traumatic brain injury results in significant morbidity and mortality and is associated with infectious complications, particularly pneumonia. However, whether traumatic brain injury directly impacts the host response to pneumonia is unknown. The objective of this study was to determine the nature of the relationship between traumatic brain injury and the prevalence of pneumonia in trauma patients and investigate the mechanism of this relationship using a murine model of traumatic brain injury with pneumonia. Design Data from the National Trauma Data Bank and a murine model of traumatic brain injury with postinjury pneumonia. Setting Academic medical centers in Cincinnati, OH, and Boston, MA. Patients/Subjects Trauma patients in the National Trauma Data Bank with a hospital length of stay greater than 2 days, age of at least 18 years at admission, and a blunt mechanism of injury. Subjects were female ICR mice 8–10 weeks old. Interventions Administration of a substance P receptor antagonist in mice. Measurements and Main Results Pneumonia rates were measured in trauma patients before and after risk adjustment using propensity scoring. In addition, survival and pulmonary inflammation were measured in mice undergoing traumatic brain injury with or without pneumonia. After risk adjustment, we found that traumatic brain injury patients had significantly lower rates of pneumonia compared to blunt trauma patients without traumatic brain injury. A murine model of traumatic brain injury reproduced these clinical findings with mice subjected to traumatic brain injury demonstrating increased bacterial clearance and survival after induction of pneumonia. To determine the mechanisms responsible for this improvement, the substance P receptor was blocked in mice after traumatic brain injury. This treatment abrogated the traumatic brain injury–associated increases in bacterial clearance and survival. Conclusions The data demonstrate that patients with traumatic

  5. Melatonin lowers edema after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cheng; Chen, Xiao; Qiao, Suchi; Liu, Xinwei; Liu, Chang; Zhu, Degang; Su, Jiacan; Wang, Zhiwei

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin has been shown to diminish edema in rats. Melatonin can be used to treat spinal cord injury. This study presumed that melatonin could relieve spinal cord edema and examined how it might act. Our experiments found that melatonin (100 mg/kg, i.p.) could reduce the water content of the spinal cord, and suppress the expression of aquaporin-4 and glial fibrillary acidic protein after spinal cord injury. This suggests that the mechanism by which melatonin alleviates the damage to the spinal cord by edema might be related to the expression of aquaporin-4 and glial fibrillary acidic protein. PMID:25657743

  6. Acute blast injury reduces brain abeta in two rodent species.

    PubMed

    De Gasperi, Rita; Gama Sosa, Miguel A; Kim, Soong Ho; Steele, John W; Shaughness, Michael C; Maudlin-Jeronimo, Eric; Hall, Aaron A; Dekosky, Steven T; McCarron, Richard M; Nambiar, Madhusoodana P; Gandy, Sam; Ahlers, Stephen T; Elder, Gregory A

    2012-01-01

    Blast-induced traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. How the primary blast wave affects the brain is not well understood. In particular, it is unclear whether blast injures the brain through mechanisms similar to those found in non-blast closed impact injuries (nbTBI). The β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide associated with the development of Alzheimer's disease is elevated acutely following TBI in humans as well as in experimental animal models of nbTBI. We examined levels of brain Aβ following experimental blast injury using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for Aβ 40 and 42. In both rat and mouse models of blast injury, rather than being increased, endogenous rodent brain Aβ levels were decreased acutely following injury. Levels of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) were increased following blast exposure although there was no evidence of axonal pathology based on APP immunohistochemical staining. Unlike the findings in nbTBI animal models, levels of the β-secretase, β-site APP cleaving enzyme 1, and the γ-secretase component presenilin-1 were unchanged following blast exposure. These studies have implications for understanding the nature of blast injury to the brain. They also suggest that strategies aimed at lowering Aβ production may not be effective for treating acute blast injury to the brain. PMID:23267342

  7. Vitexin reduces hypoxia-ischemia neonatal brain injury by the inhibition of HIF-1alpha in a rat pup model.

    PubMed

    Min, Jia-Wei; Hu, Jiang-Jian; He, Miao; Sanchez, Russell M; Huang, Wen-Xian; Liu, Yu-Qiang; Bsoul, Najeeb Bassam; Han, Song; Yin, Jun; Liu, Wan-Hong; He, Xiao-Hua; Peng, Bi-Wen

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the early suppression of HIF-1α after hypoxia-ischemia (HI) injury provides neuroprotection. Vitexin (5, 7, 4-trihydroxyflavone-8-glucoside), an HIF-1α inhibitor, is a c-glycosylated flavone that has been identified in medicinal plants. Therefore, we hypothesized that treatment with vitexin would protect against HI brain injury. Newborn rat pups were subjected to unilateral carotid artery ligation followed by 2.5 h of hypoxia (8% O2 at 37 °C). Vitexin (30, 45 or 60 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally at 5 min or 3 h after HI. Vitexin, administered 5 min after HI, was neuroprotective as seen by decreased infarct volume evaluated at 48 h post-HI. This neuroprotection was removed when vitexin was administered 3 h after HI. Neuronal cell death, blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity, brain edema, HIF-1α and VEGF protein levels were evaluated using a combination of Nissl staining, IgG staining, brain water content, immunohistochemistry and Western blot at 24 and 48 h after HI. The long-term effects of vitexin were evaluated by brain atrophy measurement, Nissl staining and neurobehavioral tests. Vitexin (45 mg/kg) ameliorated brain edema, BBB disruption and neuronal cell death; Upregulation of HIF-1α by dimethyloxalylglycine (DMOG) increased the BBB permeability and brain edema compared to HI alone. Vitexin attenuated the increase in HIF-1α and VEGF. Vitexin also had long-term effects of protecting against the loss of ipsilateral brain and improveing neurobehavioral outcomes. In conclusion, our data indicate early HIF-1α inhibition with vitexin provides both acute and long-term neuroprotection in the developing brain after neonatal HI injury. PMID:26187393

  8. [Cardiogenic and non cardiogenic pulmonary edema: pathomechanisms and causes].

    PubMed

    Glaus, T; Schellenberg, S; Lang, J

    2010-07-01

    The development of pulmonary edema is divided in cardiogenic and non-cardiogenic. Cardiogenic edema pathogenically is caused by elevated hydrostatic pressure in the pulmonary capillaries due to left sided congestive heart failure. Non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema is categorized depending on the underlying pathogenesis in low-alveolar pressure, elevated permeability or neurogenic edema. Some important examples of causes are upper airway obstruction like in laryngeal paralysis or strangulation for low alveolar pressure, leptospirosis and ARDS for elevated permeability, and epilepsy, brain trauma and electrocution for neurogenic edema. The differentiation between cardiogenic versus non-cardiogenic genesis is not always straightforward, but most relevant, because treatment markedly differs between the two. Of further importance is the identification of the specific underlying cause in non-cardiogenic edema, not only for therapeutic but particularly for prognostic reasons. Depending on the cause the prognosis ranges from very poor to good chance of complete recovery. PMID:20582896

  9. Chronic oral or intraarticular administration of docosahexaenoic acid reduces nociception and knee edema and improves functional outcomes in a mouse model of Complete Freund’s Adjuvant–induced knee arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Clinical and preclinical studies have shown that supplementation with ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs) reduce joint destruction and inflammation present in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the effects of individual ω-3 PUFAs on chronic arthritic pain have not been evaluated to date. Thus, our aim in this study was to examine whether purified docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, an ω-3 PUFA) reduces spontaneous pain-related behavior and knee edema and improves functional outcomes in a mouse model of knee arthritis. Methods Unilateral arthritis was induced by multiple injections of Complete Freund’s Adjuvant (CFA) into the right knee joints of male ICR adult mice. Mice that received CFA injections were then chronically treated from day 15 until day 25 post–initial CFA injection with oral DHA (10, 30 and 100 mg/kg daily) or intraarticular DHA (25 and 50 μg/joint twice weekly). Spontaneous flinching of the injected extremity (considered as spontaneous pain-related behavior), vertical rearing and horizontal exploratory activity (considered as functional outcomes) and knee edema were assessed. To determine whether an endogenous opioid mechanism was involved in the therapeutic effect of DHA, naloxone (NLX, an opioid receptor antagonist, 3 mg/kg subcutaneously) was administered in arthritic mice chronically treated with DHA (30 mg/kg by mouth) at day 25 post–CFA injection. Results The intraarticular CFA injections resulted in increasing spontaneous flinching and knee edema of the ipsilateral extremity as well as worsening functional outcomes as time progressed. Chronic administration of DHA, given either orally or intraarticularly, significantly improved horizontal exploratory activity and reduced flinching behavior and knee edema in a dose-dependent manner. Administration of NLX did not reverse the antinociceptive effect of DHA. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this report is the first to demonstrate DHA’s antinociceptive and

  10. [Neurogenic pulmonary edema. Report of 2 cases].

    PubMed

    Dragosavac, D; Falcão, A L; Araújo, S; Terzi, R G

    1997-06-01

    Neurogenic pulmonary edema is a rare and serious complication in patients with head injury. It also may develop after a variety of cerebral insults such as subarachnoid hemorrhage, brain tumors and after epileptic seizures. Thirty six patients with severe head injury and four patients with cerebrovascular insults treated in Intensive Care Unit of HC-UNICAMP from January to September 1995 were evaluated. In this period there were two patients with neurogenic pulmonary edema, one with head injury and other with intracerebral hemorrhage. Diagnosis was made by rapid onset of pulmonary edema, severe hypoxemia, decrease of pulmonary complacence and diffuse pulmonary infiltrations, without previous history of tracheal aspiration or any other risk factor for development of adult respiratory distress syndrome. In the first case, with severe head trauma, neurogenic pulmonary edema was diagnosed at admission one hour after trauma, associated with severe systemic inflammatory reaction, and good outcome in three days. The second case, with hemorrhagic vascular insult, developed neurogenic pulmonary edema the fourth day after drainage of intracerebral hematoma and died. PMID:9629392

  11. Targeting blood-brain barrier sphingolipid signaling reduces basal P-glycoprotein activity and improves drug delivery to the brain

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Ronald E.; Peart, John C.; Hawkins, Brian T.; Campos, Christopher R.; Miller, David S.

    2012-01-01

    P-glycoprotein, an ATP-driven drug efflux pump, is a major obstacle to the delivery of small-molecule drugs across the blood-brain barrier and into the CNS. Here we test a unique signaling-based strategy to overcome this obstacle. We used a confocal microscopy-based assay with isolated rat brain capillaries to map a signaling pathway that within minutes abolishes P-glycoprotein transport activity without altering transporter protein expression or tight junction permeability. This pathway encompasses elements of proinflammatory- (TNF-α) and sphingolipid-based signaling. Critical to this pathway was signaling through sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1PR1). In brain capillaries, S1P acted through S1PR1 to rapidly and reversibly reduce P-glycoprotein transport activity. Sphingosine reduced transport by a sphingosine kinase-dependent mechanism. Importantly, fingolimod (FTY720), a S1P analog recently approved for treatment of multiple sclerosis, also rapidly reduced P-glycoprotein activity; similar effects were found with the active, phosphorylated metabolite (FTY720P). We validated these findings in vivo using in situ brain perfusion in rats. Administration of S1P, FTY720, or FTY729P increased brain uptake of three radiolabeled P-glycoprotein substrates, 3H-verapamil (threefold increase), 3H-loperamide (fivefold increase), and 3H-paclitaxel (fivefold increase); blocking S1PR1 abolished this effect. Tight junctional permeability, measured as brain 14C-sucrose accumulation, was not altered. Therefore, targeting signaling through S1PR1 at the blood-brain barrier with the sphingolipid-based drugs, FTY720 or FTY720P, can rapidly and reversibly reduce basal P-glycoprotein activity and thus improve delivery of small-molecule therapeutics to the brain. PMID:22949658

  12. Reduced Fluorescein Angiography and Fundus Photography Use in the Management of Neovascular Macular Degeneration and Macular Edema During the Past Decade

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Eric W.; Mruthyunjaya, Prithvi; Talwar, Nidhi; Harris Nwanyanwu, Kristen; Nan, Bin; Stein, Joshua D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. We assessed recent trends in the use of diagnostic testing for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (NVAMD) and macular edema (ME). Methods. Claims data from a managed-care network were analyzed on patients with NVAMD (n = 22,954) or ME (n = 31,810) to assess the use of fluorescein angiography (FA), fundus photography (FP), and optical coherence tomography (OCT) from 2001 to 2009. Repeated-measures logistic regression was performed to compare patients' odds of undergoing these procedures in 2001, 2005, and 2009. In addition, the proportions of patients with an incident NVAMD or ME diagnosis in 2003 or 2008 who underwent FA, FP, and OCT were compared. Results. From 2001 to 2009, among patients with NVAMD, the odds of undergoing OCT increased 23-fold, whereas the odds of receiving FA and FP decreased by 68% and 79%, respectively. Similar trends were observed for ME. From 2003 to 2008, the proportion of patients undergoing OCT within 1 year of initial diagnosis increased by 315% for NVAMD and by 143% for ME; the proportion undergoing OCT without FA within 1 year increased by 463% for NVAMD and by 216% for ME. Conclusions. Use of OCT increased dramatically during the past decade, whereas use of FA and FP declined considerably, suggesting that OCT may be replacing more traditional diagnostic testing in patients with NVAMD or ME. Future studies should evaluate whether this increased reliance on OCT instead of FA and FP affects patient outcomes. PMID:24346174

  13. Quercetin as a prophylactic measure against high altitude cerebral edema.

    PubMed

    Patir, Himadri; Sarada, S K S; Singh, Saumya; Mathew, Titto; Singh, Bhagwat; Bansal, Anju

    2012-08-15

    The present study was undertaken to elucidate the intervention of quercetin against high altitude cerebral edema (HACE) using male Sprague Dawley rats as an animal model. This study was also programmed to compare and correlate the effect of both quercetin (flavonoid) and dexamethasone (steroid) against HACE. Six groups of animals were designed for this experiment, (I) normoxia, (II) hypoxia (25,000 ft, 24 h), (III) normoxia+quercetin (50 mg/kg body wt), (IV) normoxia+dexamethasone (4 mg/kg body wt), (V) hypoxia+quercetin (50 mg/kg body wt), (VI) hypoxia+dexamethasone (4 mg/kg body wt). Quercetin at 50 mg/kg body wt, orally 1h prior to hypoxia exposure, was considered as the optimum dose, due to a significant reduction in the level of brain water content and cerebral transvascular leakage (P < 0.001), as compared to control (24 h hypoxia). Dexamethasone was administered at 4 mg/kg body wt, orally, 1h prior to hypoxia exposure. Both drugs (quercetin and dexamethasone) could efficiently reduce the hypoxia-induced hematological changes. Quercetin was observed to be a more potent antioxidative and anti-inflammatory agent. It blocks nuclear factor kappa-beta (NFκB) more significantly (P < 0.05) than the dexamethasone-administered hypoxia-exposed rats. Histopathological findings demonstrate the absence of an edema and inflammation in the brain sections of quercetin-administered hypoxia-exposed rats. The present study reveals quercetin to be a potent drug against HACE, as it efficiently attenuates inflammation as well as cerebral edema formation without any side effects of steroid therapy (dexamethasone). PMID:22743108

  14. Latest advances in edema

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villavicencio, J. L.; Hargens, A. R.; Pikoulicz, E.

    1996-01-01

    Basic concepts in the physiopathology of edema are reviewed. The mechanisms of fluid exchange across the capillary endothelium are explained. Interstitial flow and lymph formation are examined. Clinical disorders of tissue and lymphatic transport, microcirculatory derangements in venous disorders, protein disorders, and lymphatic system disorders are explored. Techniques for investigational imaging of the lymphatic system are explained.

  15. The Effect of Complete Decongestive Therapy on Edema Volume Reduction and Pain in Women With Post Breast Surgery Lymph Edema

    PubMed Central

    Angooti Oshnari, Leila; Hosseini, Seyed Ali; Haghighat, Shahpar; Hossein Zadeh, Samaneh

    2016-01-01

    Background Upper extremity lymph edema is the most common side effect of breast cancer treatment that may produce significant physical and psychological morbidity. Pain is the frequent symptom of lymph edema that causes impairment of activities in daily life. Objectives The aim of this study was assessment of the effect of complex decongestive therapy (CDT) on upper extremity lymph edema and pain in women with post breast surgery lymph edema. Patients and Methods In this quasi- experimental research with before- after design, 36 women with moderate lymph edema after breast surgery participated in the program. Edema volume was measured by water displacement method; pain values were evaluated by visual analog scale (VAS). Data were recorded before intervention and 2 and 4 weeks after it. CDT included the first phase (intensive phase) and the second phase (maintenance phase). Each phase lasted 2 weeks. After use of Shapiro Wilk test for normality, analysis of variances with GEE and repeated measurements were used to analyze the data. Results After one month doing CDT program, significant decrease of edema was noticed (P < 0.0001), also pain decreased during 2 and 4 weeks after intervention (P < 0.0001). Conclusions This study indicated that CDT program is effective in reducing lymph edema volume and pain in women with moderate post breast surgery lymph edema. It seems that raising patients’ awareness and training healthcare professionals regarding lymph edema preventive strategies have an important role in earlier and better combating this complication. PMID:27482330

  16. Pertuzumab, trastuzumab and docetaxel reduced the recurrence of brain metastasis from breast cancer: a case report.

    PubMed

    Senda, Noriko; Yamaguchi, Ayane; Nishimura, Hideaki; Shiozaki, Toshiki; Tsuyuki, Shigeru

    2016-03-01

    The CLEOPATRA trial reported the survival benefit of pertuzumab with trastuzumab plus docetaxel in HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer patients. However, there are a few case reports concerning the effects of a pertuzumab-containing regimen on brain metastases. A 55-year-old woman, who underwent curative surgery for breast cancer after neoadjuvant chemotherapy 5 years previously, developed repeated solitary brain metastasis in her right occipital lobe. Whole brain radiation therapy, stereotactic radiosurgery and 3 times of surgical resection were performed. Lapatinib and capecitabine plus tamoxifen were administered. The metastasis recurred in the stump of the previous surgery. Pertuzumab with trastuzumab plus docetaxel was initiated as second-line chemotherapy. A complete response of the brain metastasis was achieved, which persisted for 5 months. Pertuzumab with trastuzumab plus docetaxel was effective in reducing the brain metastases from breast cancer. Further studies are warranted to confirm the effect of this regimen on brain metastases. PMID:26116144

  17. [The role of circulating immune complexes and the status of argyrophilic membranes of the vascular walls in the development of brain edema in patients with meningococcal meningoencephalitis].

    PubMed

    Gebesh, V V; Iarosh, O A

    1991-01-01

    Based on clinical and immunological examinations of 60 patients with MME and 30 normal persons, the dynamics of the blood CIC content was studied depending on the time and gravity of the disease. The discovered changes in argyrophilic membranes of the vascular walls are determined to a considerable measure by the pathogenic action of CIC on microvessels, which entails the derangement of blood-brain barrier function and contributes to the development of acute purulent meningitis. PMID:1647627

  18. Brain Friendly Teaching-Reducing Learner's Cognitive Load.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Petra J

    2016-07-01

    Many didactic lectures induce a cognitive load in learners out of proportion to the content that they need to learn (or can learn) during that teaching session. This is due in part to the content, and in part to the way it is displayed or presented. By reducing the cognitive load on our audience, we can increase long-term retention of information. This article briefly summarizes some of the science behind cognitive load as it relates to presentations, and identifies simple steps to reduce it, while maximizing learning. PMID:27067603

  19. Use of EPO as an adjuvant in PDT of brain tumors to reduce damage to normal brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rendon, Cesar A.; Lilge, Lothar

    2004-10-01

    In order to reduce damage to surrounding normal brain in the treatment of brain tumors with photodynamic therapy (PDT), we have investigated the use of the cytokine erythropoietin (EPO) to exploit its well-established role as a neuroprotective agent. In vitro experiments demonstrated that EPO does not confer protection from PDT to rat glioma cells. In vivo testing of the possibility of EPO protecting normal brain tissue was carried out. The normal brains of Lewis rats were treated with Photofrin mediated PDT (6.25 mg/Kg B.W. 22 hours pre irradiation) and the outcome of the treatment compared between animals that received EPO (5000 U/Kg B.W. 22 hours pre irradiation) and controls. This comparison was made based on the volume of necrosis, as measured with the viability stain 2,3,5- Triphenyl tetrazoium chloride (TTC), and incidence of apoptosis, as measured with in situ end labeling assay (ISEL). Western blotting showed that EPO reaches the normal brain and activates the anti-apoptotic protein PKB/AKT1 within the brain cortex. The comparison based on volume of necrosis showed no statistical significance between the two groups. No clear difference was observed in the ISEL staining between the groups. A possible lack of responsivity in the assays that give rise to these results is discussed and future corrections are described.

  20. Rosiglitazone, a PPAR gamma agonist, Attenuates Inflammation After Surgical Brain Injury in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Hyong, Amy; Jadhav, Vikram; Lee, Steve; Tong, Wenni; Rowe, Jamaine; Zhang, John H.; Tang, Jiping

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Surgical brain injury (SBI) is unavoidable during many neurosurgical procedures. This inevitable brain injury can result in postoperative complications including brain edema, blood-brain barrier disruption (BBB) and cell death in susceptible areas. Rosiglitazone (RSG), a PPAR-γ agonist, has been shown to reduce inflammation and provide neuroprotection in experimental models of ischemia and intracerebral hemorrhage. This study was designed to evaluate the neuroprotective effects of RSG in a rodent model of SBI. Methods 65 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into sham, vehicle and treatment groups. RSG was administered intraperitoneally in two dosages (1mg/kg/dose, 6mg/kg/dose) 30 minutes before surgery, and 30 minutes and 4 hours after surgery. Animals were euthanized 24 hrs following neurological evaluation to assess brain edema and BBB permeability by IgG staining. Inflammation was examined using myeloperoxidase (MPO) assay and double-labeling fluorescent immunohistochemical analysis of IL-1β and TNF-α. Results Localized brain edema was observed in tissue surrounding the surgical injury. This brain edema was significantly higher in rats subjected to SBI than sham animals. Increased IgG staining was present in affected brain tissue; however, RSG reduced neither IgG staining nor brain edema. RSG also did not improve neurological status observed after SBI. RSG, however, significantly attenuated MPO activity and qualitatively decreased IL-1β and TNF-α expression compared to vehicle-treated group. Conclusion SBI causes increased brain edema, BBB disruption and inflammation localized along the periphery of the site of surgical resection. RSG attenuated inflammatory changes, however, did not improve brain edema, BBB disruption and neurological outcomes after SBI. PMID:18479673

  1. Activation of Alpha 7 Cholinergic Nicotinic Receptors Reduce Blood–Brain Barrier Permeability following Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; Kobori, Nobuhide; Redell, John B.; Hylin, Michael J.; Hood, Kimberly N.; Moore, Anthony N.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major human health concern that has the greatest impact on young men and women. The breakdown of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) is an important pathological consequence of TBI that initiates secondary processes, including infiltration of inflammatory cells, which can exacerbate brain inflammation and contribute to poor outcome. While the role of inflammation within the injured brain has been examined in some detail, the contribution of peripheral/systemic inflammation to TBI pathophysiology is largely unknown. Recent studies have implicated vagus nerve regulation of splenic cholinergic nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α7 (nAChRa7) signaling in the regulation of systemic inflammation. However, it is not known whether this mechanism plays a role in TBI-triggered inflammation and BBB breakdown. Following TBI, we observed that plasma TNF-α and IL-1β levels, as well as BBB permeability, were significantly increased in nAChRa7 null mice (Chrna7−/−) relative to wild-type mice. The administration of exogenous IL-1β and TNF-α to brain-injured animals worsened Evans Blue dye extravasation, suggesting that systemic inflammation contributes to TBI-triggered BBB permeability. Systemic administration of the nAChRa7 agonist PNU-282987 or the positive allosteric modulator PNU-120596 significantly attenuated TBI-triggered BBB compromise. Supporting a role for splenic nAChRa7 receptors, we demonstrate that splenic injection of the nicotinic receptor blocker α-bungarotoxin increased BBB permeability in brain-injured rats, while PNU-282987 injection decreased such permeability. These effects were not seen when α-bungarotoxin or PNU-282987 were administered to splenectomized, brain-injured rats. Together, these findings support the short-term use of nAChRa7-activating agents as a strategy to reduce TBI-triggered BBB permeability. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Breakdown of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) in response to traumatic brain injury (TBI

  2. Caspase 1 deficiency reduces inflammation-induced brain transcription

    PubMed Central

    Mastronardi, Claudio; Whelan, Fiona; Yildiz, Ozlem A.; Hannestad, Jonas; Elashoff, David; McCann, Samuel M.; Licinio, Julio; Wong, Ma-Li

    2007-01-01

    The systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is a life-threatening medical condition characterized by a severe and generalized inflammatory state that can lead to multiple organ failure and shock. The CNS regulates many features of SIRS such as fever, cardiovascular, and neuroendocrine responses. Central and systemic manifestations of SIRS can be induced by LPS or IL-1β administration. The crucial role of IL-1β in inflammation has been further highlighted by studies of mice lacking caspase 1 (casp1, also known as IL-1β convertase), a protease that cleaves pro-IL-1β into mature IL-1β. Indeed, casp1 knockout (casp1−/−) mice survive lethal doses of LPS. The key role of IL-1β in sickness behavior and its de novo expression in the CNS during inflammation led us to test the hypothesis that IL-1β plays a major role modulating the brain transcriptome during SIRS. We show a gene–environment effect caused by LPS administration in casp1−/− mice. During SIRS, the expression of several genes, such as chemokines, GTPases, the metalloprotease ADAMTS1, IL-1RA, the inducible nitric oxide synthase, and cyclooxygenase-2, was differentially increased in casp1−/− mice. Our findings may contribute to the understanding of the molecular changes that take place within the CNS during sepsis and SIRS and the development of new therapies for these serious conditions. Our results indicate that those genes may also play a role in several neuropsychiatric conditions in which inflammation has been implicated and indicate that casp1 might be a potential therapeutic target for such disorders. PMID:17409187

  3. Sodium selenate reduces hyperphosphorylated tau and improves outcomes after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Shultz, Sandy R; Wright, David K; Zheng, Ping; Stuchbery, Ryan; Liu, Shi-Jie; Sashindranath, Maithili; Medcalf, Robert L; Johnston, Leigh A; Hovens, Christopher M; Jones, Nigel C; O'Brien, Terence J

    2015-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a common and serious neurodegenerative condition that lacks a pharmaceutical intervention to improve long-term outcome. Hyperphosphorylated tau is implicated in some of the consequences of traumatic brain injury and is a potential pharmacological target. Protein phosphatase 2A is a heterotrimeric protein that regulates key signalling pathways, and protein phosphatase 2A heterotrimers consisting of the PR55 B-subunit represent the major tau phosphatase in the brain. Here we investigated whether traumatic brain injury in rats and humans would induce changes in protein phosphatase 2A and phosphorylated tau, and whether treatment with sodium selenate-a potent PR55 activator-would reduce phosphorylated tau and improve traumatic brain injury outcomes in rats. Ninety young adult male Long-Evans rats were administered either a fluid percussion injury or sham-injury. A proportion of rats were killed at 2, 24, and 72 h post-injury to assess acute changes in protein phosphatase 2A and tau. Other rats were given either sodium selenate or saline-vehicle treatment that was continuously administered via subcutaneous osmotic pump for 12 weeks. Serial magnetic resonance imaging was acquired prior to, and at 1, 4, and 12 weeks post-injury to assess evolving structural brain damage and axonal injury. Behavioural impairments were assessed at 12 weeks post-injury. The results showed that traumatic brain injury in rats acutely reduced PR55 expression and protein phosphatase 2A activity, and increased the expression of phosphorylated tau and the ratio of phosphorylated tau to total tau. Similar findings were seen in post-mortem brain samples from acute human traumatic brain injury patients, although many did not reach statistical significance. Continuous sodium selenate treatment for 12 weeks after sham or fluid percussion injury in rats increased protein phosphatase 2A activity and PR55 expression, and reduced the ratio of phosphorylated tau to total tau

  4. Diabetic Macular Edema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo, Conceição; Pires, Isabel; Cunha-Vaz, José

    The optical coherence tomography (OCT), a noninvasive and noncontact diagnostic method, was introduced in 1995 for imaging macular diseases. In diabetic macular edema (DME), OCT scans show hyporeflectivity, due to intraretinal and/or subretinal fluid accumulation, related to inner and/or outer blood-retinal barrier breakdown. OCT tomograms may also reveal the presence of hard exudates, as hyperreflective spots with a shadow, in the outer retinal layers, among others. In conclusion, OCT is a particularly valuable diagnostic tool in DME, helpful both in the diagnosis and follow-up procedure.

  5. N-butyldeoxygalactonojirimycin reduces brain ganglioside and GM2 content in neonatal Sandhoff disease mice.

    PubMed

    Baek, Rena C; Kasperzyk, Julie L; Platt, Frances M; Seyfried, Thomas N

    2008-05-01

    Sandhoff disease involves the CNS accumulation of ganglioside GM2 and asialo-GM2 (GA2) due to inherited defects in the beta-subunit gene of beta-hexosaminidase A and B (Hexb gene). Accumulation of these glycosphingolipids (GSLs) produces progressive neurodegeneration, ultimately leading to death. Substrate reduction therapy (SRT) aims to decrease the rate of glycosphingolipid (GSL) biosynthesis to compensate for the impaired rate of catabolism. The imino sugar, N-butyldeoxygalactonojirimycin (NB-DGJ) inhibits the first committed step in GSL biosynthesis. NB-DGJ treatment, administered from postnatal day 2 (p-2) to p-5 (600 mg/kg/day)), significantly reduced total brain ganglioside and GM2 content in the Sandhoff disease (Hexb(-/-)) mice, but did not reduce the content of GA2. We also found that NB-DGJ treatment caused a slight, but significant elevation in brain sialidase activity. The drug had no adverse effects on viability, body weight, brain weight, or brain water content in the mice. No significant alterations in neutral lipids or acidic phospholipids were observed in the NB-DGJ-treated Hexb(-/-) mice. Our results show that NB-DGJ is effective in reducing total brain ganglioside and GM2 content at early neonatal ages. PMID:18207611

  6. Immunomodulation by poly-YE reduces organophosphate-induced brain damage.

    PubMed

    Finkelstein, Arseny; Kunis, Gilad; Berkutzki, Tamara; Ronen, Ayal; Krivoy, Amir; Yoles, Eti; Last, David; Mardor, Yael; Van Shura, Kerry; McFarland, Emylee; Capacio, Benedict A; Eisner, Claire; Gonzales, Mary; Gregorowicz, Danise; Eisenkraft, Arik; McDonough, John H; Schwartz, Michal

    2012-01-01

    Accidental organophosphate poisoning resulting from environmental or occupational exposure, as well as the deliberate use of nerve agents on the battlefield or by terrorists, remain major threats for multi-casualty events, with no effective therapies yet available. Even transient exposure to organophosphorous compounds may lead to brain damage associated with microglial activation and to long-lasting neurological and psychological deficits. Regulation of the microglial response by adaptive immunity was previously shown to reduce the consequences of acute insult to the central nervous system (CNS). Here, we tested whether an immunization-based treatment that affects the properties of T regulatory cells (Tregs) can reduce brain damage following organophosphate intoxication, as a supplement to the standard antidotal protocol. Rats were intoxicated by acute exposure to the nerve agent soman, or the organophosphate pesticide, paraoxon, and after 24 h were treated with the immunomodulator, poly-YE. A single injection of poly-YE resulted in a significant increase in neuronal survival and tissue preservation. The beneficial effect of poly-YE treatment was associated with specific recruitment of CD4(+) T cells into the brain, reduced microglial activation, and an increase in the levels of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the piriform cortex. These results suggest therapeutic intervention with poly-YE as an immunomodulatory supplementary approach against consequences of organophosphate-induced brain damage. PMID:21925261

  7. Bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells alleviated brain injury via down-regulation of interleukin-1β in focal cerebral ischemic rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yansong; Wang, Xiaoli; Dong, Peng; Xu, Qinyan; Ma, Ze; Mu, Qingjie; Sun, Xihe; Jiang, Zhengchen; Wang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) plays an important role in brain injury after focal ischemia, and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) are capable of reducing the expression of IL-1β, we investigated the effects of BMSCs transplantation on brain edema and cerebral infarction as well as the underlying mechanisms via IL-1β. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into five groups: Normal + phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) + PBS, Normal + BMSCs, MCAO + BMSCs and MCAO + IL-1ra (an antagonist of IL-1β). BMSCs were transplanted 24 hours after MCAO, and brain edema was evaluated by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and brain water content method after BMSCs transplantation. The expression of NeuN and AQP4 was analyzed by immunofluorescence staining. Protein level of AQP4 and IL-1β was detected by western blot analysis 48 hours after transplantation. The results showed that BMSCs transplantation reduced brain edema by measurement of brain water content and ADC Value of MRI, as well as the expression of AQP4 and IL-1β. It was also found that BMSCs transplantation could alleviate the cerebral infarction volume and neuronal damage. Both the brain edema and the cerebral infarction were associated with IL-1β expression. In conclusion, BMSCs transplantation was capable of alleviating brain edema as well as reducing cerebral infarction via down-regulation of IL-1β expression, thus repair the injured brain in focal cerebral ischemic rats.

  8. Diabetic Macular Edema

    PubMed Central

    Gundogan, Fatih C.; Yolcu, Umit; Akay, Fahrettin; Ilhan, Abdullah; Ozge, Gokhan; Uzun, Salih

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic macular edema (DME), one the most prevalent causes of visual loss in industrialized countries, may be diagnosed at any stage of diabetic retinopathy. The diagnosis, treatment, and follow up of DME have become straightforward with recent developments in fundus imaging, such as optical coherence tomography. Laser photocoagulation, intravitreal injections, and pars plana vitrectomy surgery are the current treatment modalities; however, the positive effects of currently available intravitreally injected agents are temporary. At this point, further treatment choices are needed for a permanent effect. Sources of data selection: The articles published between 1985-2015 years on major databases were searched and most appropriate 40 papers were used to write this review article. PMID:27182271

  9. Cerebral embolism: local CFBF and edema measured by CT scanning and Xe inhalation. [Baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, J.S.; Yamamoto, M.; Hayman, L.A.; Sakai, F.; Nakajima, S.; Armstrong, D.

    1980-01-01

    Serial CT scans were made in baboons after cerebral embolization during stable Xe inhalation for measuring local values for CBF and lambda (brain-blood partition or solubility coefficients), followed by iodine infusion for detecting blood-brain barrier (BBB) damage. Persistent zones of zero flow surrounded by reduced flow were measured predominantly in subcortical regions, which showed gross and microscopic evidence of infarction at necropsy. Overlying cortex was relatively spared. Reduced lambda values attributed to edema appeared within 3 to 5 minutes and progressed up to 60 minutes. Damage to BBB with visible transvascular seepage of iodine began to appear 1 to 1 1/2 hours after embolism. In chronic animals, lambda values were persistently reduced in areas showing histologic infarction. Contralateral hemispheric CBF increased for the first 15 minutes after embolism, followed by progressive reduction after 30 minutes (diaschisis).

  10. Interleukin-1 exacerbates focal cerebral ischemia and reduces ischemic brain temperature in the rat.

    PubMed

    Parry-Jones, Adrian R; Liimatainen, Timo; Kauppinen, Risto A; Gröhn, Olli H J; Rothwell, Nancy J

    2008-06-01

    The proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 (IL-1) is a key mediator of inflammation in cerebral ischemia, but its precise mechanisms of action remain elusive. Temperature is critical to outcome in brain injury and given the importance of IL-1 in pyrogenesis this has clear mechanistic implications. IL-1 exacerbates ischemia independently of core (rectal) temperature. However, it is temperature in the ischemic brain that influences outcome and rectal temperature is likely to be a poor surrogate marker. This study tested the hypothesis that IL-1 exacerbates cerebral ischemia by increasing ischemic brain temperature. Wistar rats undergoing transient middle cerebral artery occlusion received either 4 microg/kg IL-1 (n=9) or vehicle (n=10) intraperitoneally. NMR-generated maps of brain temperature, tissue perfusion, and the trace of the diffusion tensor were collected during occlusion, early reperfusion, and at 24 hr. IL-1 significantly increased ischemic damage at 24 hr by 35% but rectal temperature did not vary significantly between groups. However, ischemic brain was 1.7 degrees C cooler on reperfusion in IL-1-treated animals (vs. vehicle) and a corresponding reduction in cerebral blood flow was identified in the ischemic striatum. Contrary to the stated hypothesis, IL-1 reduced ischemic brain temperature during reperfusion and this may be due to a reduction in tissue perfusion. PMID:18421691

  11. Knockdown of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in specific brain sites precipitates behaviors associated with depression and reduces neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Taliaz, D; Stall, N; Dar, D E; Zangen, A

    2009-01-01

    Depression has been associated with reduced expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus. In addition, animal studies suggest an association between reduced hippocampal neurogenesis and depressive-like behavior. These associations were predominantly established based on responses to antidepressant drugs and alterations in BDNF levels and neurogenesis in depressive patients or animal models for depressive behavior. Nevertheless, there is no direct evidence that the actual reduction of the BDNF protein in specific brain sites can induce depressive-like behaviors or affect neurogenesis in vivo. Using BDNF knockdown by RNA interference and lentiviral vectors injected into specific subregions of the hippocampus we show that a reduction in BDNF expression in the dentate gyrus, but not the CA3, reduces neurogenesis and affects behaviors associated with depression. Moreover, we show that BDNF has a critical function in neuronal differentiation, but not proliferation in vivo. Finally, we found that a specific BDNF knockdown in the ventral subiculum induces anhedonic-like behavior. These findings provide substantial support for the neurotrophic hypothesis of depression and specify anatomical and neurochemical targets for potential antidepressant interventions. Moreover, the specific effect of BDNF reduction on neuronal differentiation has broader implications for the study of neurodevelopment and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:19621014

  12. Compliant intracortical implants reduce strains and strain rates in brain tissue in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridharan, Arati; Nguyen, Jessica K.; Capadona, Jeffrey R.; Muthuswamy, Jit

    2015-06-01

    Objective. The objective of this research is to characterize the mechanical interactions of (1) soft, compliant and (2) non-compliant implants with the surrounding brain tissue in a rodent brain. Understanding such interactions will enable the engineering of novel materials that will improve stability and reliability of brain implants. Approach. Acute force measurements were made using a load cell in n = 3 live rats, each with 4 craniotomies. Using an indentation method, brain tissue was tested for changes in force using established protocols. A total of 4 non-compliant, bare silicon microshanks, 3 non-compliant polyvinyl acetate (PVAc)-coated silicon microshanks, and 6 compliant, nanocomposite microshanks were tested. Stress values were calculated by dividing the force by surface area and strain was estimated using a linear stress-strain relationship. Micromotion effects from breathing and vascular pulsatility on tissue stress were estimated from a 5 s interval of steady-state measurements. Viscoelastic properties were estimated using a second-order Prony series expansion of stress-displacement curves for each shank. Main results. The distribution of strain values imposed on brain tissue for both compliant nanocomposite microshanks and PVAc-coated, non-compliant silicon microshanks were significantly lower compared to non-compliant bare silicon shanks. Interestingly, step-indentation experiments also showed that compliant, nanocomposite materials significantly decreased stress relaxation rates in the brain tissue at the interface (p < 0.05) compared to non-compliant silicon and PVAc-coated silicon materials. Furthermore, both PVAc-coated non-compliant silicon and compliant nanocomposite shanks showed significantly reduced (by 4-5 fold) stresses due to tissue micromotion at the interface. Significance. The results of this study showed that soft, adaptive materials reduce strains and strain rates and micromotion induced stresses in the surrounding brain tissue

  13. Compliant Intracortical Implants Reduce Strains and Strain Rates in Brain Tissue In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sridharan, Arati; Nguyen, Jessica K.; Capadona, Jeffrey R.; Muthuswamy, Jit

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this research is to characterize the mechanical interactions of (1) soft, compliant and (2) non-compliant implants with the surrounding brain tissue in a rodent brain. Understanding such interactions will enable the engineering of novel materials that will improve stability and reliability of brain implants. Approach Acute force measurements were made using a load cell in n=3 live rats, each with 4 craniotomies. Using an indentation method, brain tissue was tested for changes in force using established protocols. A total of 4 non-compliant, bare silicon microshanks, 3 non-compliant polyvinyl acetate (PVAc)-coated silicon microshanks, and 6 compliant, nanocomposite microshanks were tested. Stress values were calculated by dividing the force by surface area and strain was estimated using a linear stress-strain relationship. Micromotion effects from breathing and vascular pulsatility on tissue stress were estimated from a 5 sec interval of steady-state measurements. Viscoelastic properties were estimated using a second-order Prony series expansion of stress-displacement curves for each shank. Main results The distribution of strain values imposed on brain tissue for both compliant nanocomposite microshanks and PVAc-coated, non-compliant silicon microshanks were significantly lower compared to non-compliant bare silicon shanks. Interestingly, step-indentation experiments also showed that compliant, nanocomposite materials significantly decreased stress relaxation rates in the brain tissue at the interface (p<0.05) compared to non-compliant silicon and PVAc-coated silicon materials. Further, both PVAc-coated non-compliant silicon and compliant nanocomposite shanks showed significantly reduced (by 4–5 fold) stresses due to tissue micromotion at the interface. Significance The results of this study showed that soft, adaptive materials reduce strains and strain rates and micromotion induced stresses in the surrounding brain tissue

  14. Cystoid Macular Edema in Bietti's Crystalline Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A 27-year-old man with progressive bilateral visual decline was diagnosed to have Bietti's crystalline dystrophy (BCD). Fluorescein angiography revealed bilateral petaloid type late hyperfluorescence implicating concurrent cystoid macular edema (CME). Optical coherence tomography exhibited cystoid foveal lacunas OU. During the follow-up of six years, intraretinal crystals reduced in amount but CME persisted angiographically and tomographically. CME is among the rare macular features of BCD including subfoveal sensorial detachment, subretinal neovascular membrane, and macular hole. PMID:24949209

  15. Volatile Anesthetics Influence Blood-Brain Barrier Integrity by Modulation of Tight Junction Protein Expression in Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Schaible, Eva-Verena; Timaru-Kast, Ralph; Hedrich, Jana; Luhmann, Heiko J.; Engelhard, Kristin

    2012-01-01

    Disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) results in cerebral edema formation, which is a major cause for high mortality after traumatic brain injury (TBI). As anesthetic care is mandatory in patients suffering from severe TBI it may be important to elucidate the effect of different anesthetics on cerebral edema formation. Tight junction proteins (TJ) such as zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and claudin-5 (cl5) play a central role for BBB stability. First, the influence of the volatile anesthetics sevoflurane and isoflurane on in-vitro BBB integrity was investigated by quantification of the electrical resistance (TEER) in murine brain endothelial monolayers and neurovascular co-cultures of the BBB. Secondly brain edema and TJ expression of ZO-1 and cl5 were measured in-vivo after exposure towards volatile anesthetics in native mice and after controlled cortical impact (CCI). In in-vitro endothelial monocultures, both anesthetics significantly reduced TEER within 24 hours after exposure. In BBB co-cultures mimicking the neurovascular unit (NVU) volatile anesthetics had no impact on TEER. In healthy mice, anesthesia did not influence brain water content and TJ expression, while 24 hours after CCI brain water content increased significantly stronger with isoflurane compared to sevoflurane. In line with the brain edema data, ZO-1 expression was significantly higher in sevoflurane compared to isoflurane exposed CCI animals. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed disruption of ZO-1 at the cerebrovascular level, while cl5 was less affected in the pericontusional area. The study demonstrates that anesthetics influence brain edema formation after experimental TBI. This effect may be attributed to modulation of BBB permeability by differential TJ protein expression. Therefore, selection of anesthetics may influence the barrier function and introduce a strong bias in experimental research on pathophysiology of BBB dysfunction. Future research is required to investigate adverse or

  16. Cerebral complexity preceded enlarged brain size and reduced olfactory bulbs in Old World monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, Lauren A.; Benefit, Brenda R.; McCrossin, Monte L.; Spoor, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of the only complete early cercopithecoid (Old World monkey) endocast currently known, that of 15-million-year (Myr)-old Victoriapithecus, reveals an unexpectedly small endocranial volume (ECV) relative to body size and a large olfactory bulb volume relative to ECV, similar to extant lemurs and Oligocene anthropoids. However, the Victoriapithecus brain has principal and arcuate sulci of the frontal lobe not seen in the stem catarrhine Aegyptopithecus, as well as a distinctive cercopithecoid pattern of gyrification, indicating that cerebral complexity preceded encephalization in cercopithecoids. Since larger ECVs, expanded frontal lobes, and reduced olfactory bulbs are already present in the 17- to 18-Myr-old ape Proconsul these features evolved independently in hominoids (apes) and cercopithecoids and much earlier in the former. Moreover, the order of encephalization and brain reorganization was apparently different in hominoids and cercopithecoids, showing that brain size and cerebral organization evolve independently. PMID:26138795

  17. Propofol anesthesia reduces Lempel-Ziv complexity of spontaneous brain activity in rats.

    PubMed

    Hudetz, Anthony G; Liu, Xiping; Pillay, Siveshigan; Boly, Melanie; Tononi, Giulio

    2016-08-15

    Consciousness is thought to scale with brain complexity, and it may be diminished in anesthesia. Lempel-Ziv complexity (LZC) of field potentials has been shown to be a promising measure of the level of consciousness in anesthetized human subjects, neurological patients, and across the sleep-wake states in rats. Whether this relationship holds for intrinsic networks obtained by functional brain imaging has not been tested. To fill this gap of knowledge, we estimated LZC from large-scale dynamic analysis of functional magnetic resonance images (fMRI) in conscious sedated and unconscious anesthetized rats. Blood oxygen dependent (BOLD) signals were obtained from 30-min whole-brain resting-state scans while the anesthetic propofol was infused intravenously at constant infusion rates of 20mg/kg/h (conscious sedated) and 40mg/kg/h (unconscious). Dynamic brain networks were defined at voxel level by sliding window analysis of regional homogeneity (ReHo) of the BOLD signal. From scans performed at low to high propofol dose, the LZC was significantly reduced by 110%. The results suggest that the difference in LZC between conscious sedated and anesthetized unconscious subjects is conserved in rats and this effect is detectable in large-scale brain network obtained from fMRI. PMID:27291459

  18. High-altitude pulmonary edema: diagnosis, prevention, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Pennardt, Andre

    2013-01-01

    High-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) is a lethal, noncardiogenic form of pulmonary edema that afflicts susceptible individuals after rapid ascent to high altitude above 2,500 m. Prevention of HAPE is achieved most effectively by gradual ascent allowing time for proper acclimatization. Certain prophylactic medications may further reduce the risk of ascending to high altitude in individuals with a prior history of HAPE. The most effective and reliable treatment of HAPE is immediate descent and administration of supplemental oxygen. PMID:23478563

  19. Oxygen toxicity is reduced by acetylcholinesterase inhibition in the developing rat brain.

    PubMed

    Sifringer, Marco; Bendix, Ivo; von Haefen, Clarissa; Endesfelder, Stefanie; Kalb, Alexander; Bührer, Christoph; Felderhoff-Mueser, Ursula; Spies, Claudia D

    2013-01-01

    The cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway is a neural mechanism that suppresses the innate inflammatory response and controls inflammation employing acetylcholine as the key endogenous mediator. In this study, we investigated the effects of the cholinergic agonists, physostigmine and donepezil, on neurodegeneration, inflammation and oxidative stress during oxygen toxicity in the developing rat brain. The aim of this study was to investigate the level of neurodegeneration, expression of proinflammatory cytokines, glutathione and lipid peroxidation after hyperoxia and treatment with the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors, physostigmine and donepezil in the brain of neonatal rats. Six-day-old Wistar rats were exposed to 80% oxygen for 12-24 h and received 100 μg/kg physostigmine or 200 μg/kg donepezil intraperitoneally. Sex-matched littermates kept in room air and injected with normal saline, physostigmine or donepezil served as controls. Treatment with both inhibitors significantly reduced hyperoxia-triggered activity of AChE, neural cell death and the upregulation of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and TNF-α in the immature rat brain on the mRNA and protein level. In parallel, hyperoxia-induced oxidative stress was reduced by concomitant physostigmine and donepezil administration, as shown by an increased reduced/oxidized glutathione ratio and attenuated malondialdehyde levels, as a sign of lipid peroxidation. Our results suggest that a single treatment with AChE inhibitors at the beginning of hyperoxia attenuated the detrimental effects of oxygen toxicity in the developing brain and may pave the way for AChE inhibitors, which are currently used for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, as potential candidates for adjunctive neuroprotective therapies to the immature brain. PMID:23445753

  20. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor reduces amyloidogenic processing through control of SORLA gene expression.

    PubMed

    Rohe, Michael; Synowitz, Michael; Glass, Rainer; Paul, Steven M; Nykjaer, Anders; Willnow, Thomas E

    2009-12-01

    Sorting protein-related receptor with A-type repeats (SORLA) is a major risk factor in cellular processes leading to Alzheimer's disease (AD). It acts as sorting receptor for the amyloid precursor protein (APP) that regulates intracellular trafficking and processing into amyloidogenic-beta peptides (A beta). Overexpression of SORLA in neurons reduces while inactivation of gene expression (as in knock-out mouse models) accelerates amyloidogenic processing and senile plaque formation. The current study aimed at identifying molecular pathways that control SORLA gene transcription in vivo and that may contribute to low levels of receptor expression in the brain of patients with AD. Using screening approaches in primary neurons, we identified brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) as a major inducer of Sorla that activates receptor gene transcription through the ERK (extracellular regulated kinase) pathway. In line with a physiological role as regulator of Sorla, expression of the receptor is significantly impaired in mouse models with genetic (Bdnf(-/-)) or disease-related loss of BDNF activity in the brain (Huntington's disease). Intriguingly, exogenous application of BDNF reduced A beta production in primary neurons and in the brain of wild-type mice in vivo, but not in animals genetically deficient for Sorla. These findings demonstrate that the beneficial effects ascribed to BDNF in APP metabolism act through induction of Sorla that encodes a negative regulator of neuronal APP processing. PMID:20007471

  1. Pharmacological characterization of the rat paw edema induced by Bothrops lanceolatus (Fer de lance) venom.

    PubMed

    de Faria L; Antunes, E; Bon, C; de Araújo, A L

    2001-06-01

    The inflammatory response induced by Bothrops lanceolatus venom (BLV) in the rat hind-paw was studied measuring paw edema. Non-heated BLV (75microg/paw) caused a marked paw edema accompanied by intense haemorrhage whereas heated venom (97 degrees C, 30s; 12.5-100microg/paw) produced a dose- and time-dependent non-haemorrhagic edema. The response with heated BLV was maximal within 15min disappearing over 24h. Heated venom was then routinely used at the dose of 75microg/paw. The prostacyclin analogue iloprost (0.1microg/paw) potentiated by 125% the venom-induced edema. The histamine H(1) receptor antagonist mepyramine (6mg/kg) or the serotonin/histamine receptor antagonist cyproheptadine (6mg/kg) partially inhibited BLV-induced edema whereas the combination of both compounds virtually abolished the edema. The lipoxygenase inhibitor BWA4C (10mg/kg), but not the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin (10mg/kg), significantly inhibited the edema (35% reduction; P<0.05). Dexamethasone (1mg/kg) also markedly (P<0.001) reduced venom-induced edema. The bradykinin B(2) receptor antagonist Hoe 140 (0.6mg/kg) reduced by 30% (P<0.05) the venom induced edema, whereas the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor captopril (300microg/paw) potentiated by 42% (P<0.05) the edema. Bothrops lanceolatus antivenon (anti-BLV) reduced by 28% (P<0.05) the venom-induced edema while intravenous administration of antivenom failed to affect the edema. In conclusion, BLV-induced rat paw edema involves mast cell degranulation causing local release of histamine and serotonin, a phenomenon mediated mainly by kinins and lipoxygenase metabolites. Additionally, the use of a specific Bothrops lanceolatus antivenom, given subplantarily or intravenously, revealed to be little effective to prevent BLV-induced edema. PMID:11137542

  2. Aβ40 Reduces P-Glycoprotein at the Blood–Brain Barrier through the Ubiquitin–Proteasome Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yu; Wolf, Andrea; LeVine, Harry; Miller, David S.; Bauer, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Failure to clear amyloid-β (Aβ) from the brain is in part responsible for Aβ brain accumulation in Alzheimer's disease (AD). A critical protein for clearing Aβ across the blood–brain barrier is the efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in the luminal plasma membrane of the brain capillary endothelium. P-gp is reduced at the blood–brain barrier in AD, which has been shown to be associated with Aβ brain accumulation. However, the mechanism responsible for P-gp reduction in AD is not well understood. Here we focused on identifying critical mechanistic steps involved in reducing P-gp in AD. We exposed isolated rat brain capillaries to 100 nm Aβ40, Aβ40, aggregated Aβ40, and Aβ42. We observed that only Aβ40 triggered reduction of P-gp protein expression and transport activity levels; this occurred in a dose- and time-dependent manner. To identify the steps involved in Aβ-mediated P-gp reduction, we inhibited protein ubiquitination, protein trafficking, and the ubiquitin–proteasome system, and monitored P-gp protein expression, transport activity, and P-gp-ubiquitin levels. Thus, exposing brain capillaries to Aβ40 triggers ubiquitination, internalization, and proteasomal degradation of P-gp. These findings may provide potential therapeutic targets within the blood–brain barrier to limit P-gp degradation in AD and improve Aβ brain clearance. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The mechanism reducing blood–brain barrier P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in Alzheimer's disease is poorly understood. In the present study, we focused on defining this mechanism. We demonstrate that Aβ40 drives P-gp ubiquitination, internalization, and proteasome-dependent degradation, reducing P-gp protein expression and transport activity in isolated brain capillaries. These findings may provide potential therapeutic avenues within the blood–brain barrier to limit P-gp degradation in Alzheimer's disease and improve Aβ brain clearance. PMID:26865616

  3. Impaired myelination and reduced brain ferric iron in the mouse model of mucolipidosis IV

    PubMed Central

    Grishchuk, Yulia; Peña, Karina A.; Coblentz, Jessica; King, Victoria E.; Humphrey, Daniel M.; Wang, Shirley L.; Kiselyov, Kirill I.; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mucolipidosis type IV (MLIV) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by mutations in the MCOLN1 gene, which encodes the lysosomal transient receptor potential ion channel mucolipin-1 (TRPML1). MLIV causes impaired motor and cognitive development, progressive loss of vision and gastric achlorhydria. How loss of TRPML1 leads to severe psychomotor retardation is currently unknown, and there is no therapy for MLIV. White matter abnormalities and a hypoplastic corpus callosum are the major hallmarks of MLIV brain pathology. Here, we report that loss of TRPML1 in mice results in developmental aberrations of brain myelination as a result of deficient maturation and loss of oligodendrocytes. Defective myelination is evident in Mcoln1−/− mice at postnatal day 10, an active stage of postnatal myelination in the mouse brain. Expression of mature oligodendrocyte markers is reduced in Mcoln1−/− mice at postnatal day 10 and remains lower throughout the course of the disease. We observed reduced Perls' staining in Mcoln1−/− brain, indicating lower levels of ferric iron. Total iron content in unperfused brain is not significantly different between Mcoln1−/− and wild-type littermate mice, suggesting that the observed maturation delay or loss of oligodendrocytes might be caused by impaired iron handling, rather than by global iron deficiency. Overall, these data emphasize a developmental rather than a degenerative disease course in MLIV, and suggest that there should be a stronger focus on oligodendrocyte maturation and survival to better understand MLIV pathogenesis and aid treatment development. PMID:26398942

  4. Melatonin treatment reduces astrogliosis and apoptosis in rats with traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Babaee, Abdolreza; Eftekhar-Vaghefi, Seyed Hassan; Asadi-shekaari, Majid; Shahrokhi, Nader; Soltani, Samereh Dehghani; Malekpour-Afshar, Reza; Basiri, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Melatonin is known as an anti-inflammatory agent, and it has been proven to exert neuroprotection through inhibition of cell death (apoptosis) in several models of brain injury. Secondary injury following the primary traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in glial cells activation, especially astrocytes. In fact, astrocyte activation causes the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines that may lead to secondary injury. Since most TBI research studies have focused on injured neurons and paid little attention to glial cells, the aim of current study was to investigate the effects of melatonin against astrocytes activation (astrogliosis), as well as inhibition of apoptosis in brain tissue of male rats after TBI. Materials and Methods: The animals were randomly allocated into five groups: sham group, TBI+ vehicle group (1% ethanol in saline) and TBI+ melatonin groups (5 mg/kg, 10 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg). All rats were intubated and then exposed to diffuse TBI, except for the sham group. Immunohistochemical methods were conducted using glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) marker and TUNEL assay to evaluate astrocyte reactivity and cell death, respectively. Results: The results showed that based on the number of GFAP positive astrocytes in brain cortex, astrogliosis was reduced significantly (P<0.05) in melatonin- treated groups (no dose dependent) compared to the vehicle group. Furthermore, based on TUNEL results, melatonin treatment considerably reduced the number of apoptotic cells (P<0.05). Conclusion: In total, the present findings suggest that melatonin treatment following TBI diminishes astrocyte reactivity and neuronal cells apoptosis in brain cortex in the rat model. PMID:26523219

  5. Dynamic Repertoire of Intrinsic Brain States Is Reduced in Propofol-Induced Unconsciousness

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiping; Pillay, Siveshigan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The richness of conscious experience is thought to scale with the size of the repertoire of causal brain states, and it may be diminished in anesthesia. We estimated the state repertoire from dynamic analysis of intrinsic functional brain networks in conscious sedated and unconscious anesthetized rats. Functional resonance images were obtained from 30-min whole-brain resting-state blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signals at propofol infusion rates of 20 and 40 mg/kg/h, intravenously. Dynamic brain networks were defined at the voxel level by sliding window analysis of regional homogeneity (ReHo) or coincident threshold crossings (CTC) of the BOLD signal acquired in nine sagittal slices. The state repertoire was characterized by the temporal variance of the number of voxels with significant ReHo or positive CTC. From low to high propofol dose, the temporal variances of ReHo and CTC were reduced by 78%±20% and 76%±20%, respectively. Both baseline and propofol-induced reduction of CTC temporal variance increased from lateral to medial position. Group analysis showed a 20% reduction in the number of unique states at the higher propofol dose. Analysis of temporal variance in 12 anatomically defined regions of interest predicted that the largest changes occurred in visual cortex, parietal cortex, and caudate-putamen. The results suggest that the repertoire of large-scale brain states derived from the spatiotemporal dynamics of intrinsic networks is substantially reduced at an anesthetic dose associated with loss of consciousness. PMID:24702200

  6. Reducing Traumatic Brain Injuries in Youth Sports: Youth Sports Traumatic Brain Injury State Laws, January 2009–December 2012

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. I sought to describe current state-wide youth sports traumatic brain injury (TBI) laws and their relationship to prevailing scientific understandings of youth sports TBIs, and to facilitate further research by creating an open-source data set of current laws. Methods. I used Westlaw and LexisNexis databases to create a 50-state data set of youth sports TBI laws enacted between January 2009 and December 2012. I collected and coded the text and citations of each law and developed a protocol and codebook to facilitate future research. Results. Forty-four states and Washington, DC, passed youth sports TBI laws between 2009 and 2012. No state’s youth sports TBI law focuses on primary prevention. Instead, such laws focus on (1) increasing coaches’ and parents’ ability to identify and respond to TBIs and (2) reducing the immediate risk of multiple TBIs. Conclusions. Existing youth sports TBI laws were not designed to reduce initial TBIs. Evaluation is required to assess their effectiveness in reducing the risk and consequences of multiple TBIs. Continued research and evaluation of existing laws will be needed to develop a more comprehensive youth TBI-reduction solution. PMID:23678903

  7. Reduced brain functional reserve and altered functional connectivity in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Cader, Sarah; Cifelli, Alberto; Abu-Omar, Yasir; Palace, Jacqueline; Matthews, Paul M

    2006-02-01

    Cognitive dysfunction (affecting particularly attention and working memory) occurs early in patients with multiple sclerosis. Previous studies have focused on identifying potentially adaptive functional reorganization through recruitment of new brain regions that could limit expression of these deficits. However, lesion studies remind us that functional specializations in the brain make certain brain regions necessary for a given task. We therefore have asked whether altered functional interactions between regions normally recruited provide an alternative adaptive mechanism with multiple sclerosis pathology. We used a version of the n-back task to probe working memory in patients with early multiple sclerosis. We applied a functional connectivity analysis to test whether relationships between relative activations in different brain regions change in potentially adaptive ways with multiple sclerosis. We studied 21 patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis and 16 age- and sex-matched healthy controls with 3T functional MRI. The two groups performed equally well on the task. Task-related activations were found in similar regions for patients and controls. However, patients showed relatively reduced activation in the superior frontal and anterior cingulate gyri (P > 0.01). Patients also showed a variable, but generally substantially smaller increase in activation than healthy controls with greater task complexity, depending on the specific brain region assessed (P < 0.001). Functional connectivity analysis defined further differences not apparent from the univariate contrast of the task-associated activation patterns. Control subjects showed significantly greater correlations between right dorsolateral prefrontal and superior frontal/anterior cingulate activations (P < 0.05). Patients showed correlations between activations in the right and left prefrontal cortices, although this relationship was not significant in healthy controls (P < 0.05). We interpret

  8. Insulin improves memory and reduces chronic neuroinflammation in the hippocampus of young but not aged brains.

    PubMed

    Adzovic, Linda; Lynn, Ashley E; D'Angelo, Heather M; Crockett, Alexis M; Kaercher, Roxanne M; Royer, Sarah E; Hopp, Sarah C; Wenk, Gary L

    2015-01-01

    The role of insulin in the brain is still not completely understood. In the periphery, insulin can decrease inflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS); however, whether insulin can reduce inflammation within the brain is unknown. Experiments administrating intranasal insulin to young and aged adults have shown that insulin improves memory. In our animal model of chronic neuroinflammation, we administered insulin and/or LPS directly into the brain via the fourth ventricle for 4 weeks in young rats; we then analyzed their spatial memory and neuroinflammatory response. Additionally, we administered insulin or artificial cerebral spinal fluid (aCSF), in the same manner, to aged rats and then analyzed their spatial memory and neuroinflammatory response. Response to chronic neuroinflammation in young rats was analyzed in the presence or absence of insulin supplementation. Here, we show for the first time that insulin infused (i.c.v.) to young rats significantly attenuated the effects of LPS by decreasing the expression of neuroinflammatory markers in the hippocampus and by improving performance in the Morris water pool task. In young rats, insulin infusion alone significantly improved their performance as compared to all other groups. Unexpectedly, in aged rats, the responsiveness to insulin was completely absent, that is, spatial memory was still impaired suggesting that an age-dependent insulin resistance may contribute to the cognitive impairment observed in neurodegenerative diseases. Our data suggest a novel therapeutic effect of insulin on neuroinflammation in the young but not the aged brain. PMID:25889938

  9. Uroguanylin Action in the Brain Reduces Weight Gain in Obese Mice via Different Efferent Autonomic Pathways.

    PubMed

    Folgueira, Cintia; Beiroa, Daniel; Callon, Aurelie; Al-Massadi, Omar; Barja-Fernandez, Silvia; Senra, Ana; Fernø, Johan; López, Miguel; Dieguez, Carlos; Casanueva, Felipe F; Rohner-Jeanrenaud, Françoise; Seoane, Luisa M; Nogueiras, Ruben

    2016-02-01

    The gut-brain axis is of great importance in the control of energy homeostasis. The identification of uroguanylin (UGN), a peptide released in the intestines that is regulated by nutritional status and anorectic actions, as the endogenous ligand for the guanylyl cyclase 2C receptor has revealed a new system in the regulation of energy balance. We show that chronic central infusion of UGN reduces weight gain and adiposity in diet-induced obese mice. These effects were independent of food intake and involved specific efferent autonomic pathways. On one hand, brain UGN induces brown adipose tissue thermogenesis, as well as browning and lipid mobilization in white adipose tissue through stimulation of the sympathetic nervous system. On the other hand, brain UGN augments fecal output through the vagus nerve. These findings are of relevance as they suggest that the beneficial metabolic actions of UGN through the sympathetic nervous system do not involve nondesirable gastrointestinal adverse effects, such as diarrhea. The present work provides mechanistic insights into how UGN influences energy homeostasis and suggests that UGN action in the brain represents a feasible pharmacological target in the treatment of obesity. PMID:26566631

  10. Brain SERT Expression of Male Rats Is Reduced by Aging and Increased by Testosterone Restitution

    PubMed Central

    Herrera-Pérez, José Jaime; Fernández-Guasti, Alonso; Martínez-Mota, Lucía

    2013-01-01

    In preclinical and clinical studies aging has been associated with a deteriorated response to antidepressant treatment. We hypothesize that such impairment is explained by an age-related decrease in brain serotonin transporter (SERT) expression associated with low testosterone (T) levels. The objectives of this study were to establish (1) if brain SERT expression is reduced by aging and (2) if the SERT expression in middle-aged rats is increased by T-restitution. Intact young rats (3–5 months) and gonad-intact middle-aged rats with or without T-restitution were used. The identification of the brain SERT expression was done by immunofluorescence in prefrontal cortex, lateral septum, hippocampus, and raphe nuclei. An age-dependent reduction of SERT expression was observed in all brain regions examined, while T-restitution recovered the SERT expression only in the dorsal raphe of middle-aged rats. This last action seems relevant since dorsal raphe plays an important role in the antidepressant action of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. All data suggest that this mechanism accounts for the T-replacement usefulness to improve the response to antidepressants in the aged population. PMID:26317087

  11. Adropin reduces paracellular permeability of rat brain endothelial cells exposed to ischemia-like conditions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Changjun; DeMars, Kelly M; Hawkins, Kimberly E; Candelario-Jalil, Eduardo

    2016-07-01

    Adropin is a peptide encoded by the energy homeostasis associated gene (Enho) and plays a critical role in the regulation of lipid metabolism, insulin sensitivity, and endothelial function. Little is known of the effects of adropin in the brain and whether this peptide modulates ischemia-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) injury. Here, we used an in vitro BBB model of rat brain microvascular endothelial cells (RBE4) and hypothesized that adropin would reduce endothelial permeability during ischemic conditions. To mimic ischemic conditions in vitro, RBE4 cell monolayers were subjected to 16h hypoxia/low glucose (HLG). This resulted in a significant increase in paracellular permeability to FITC-labeled dextran (40kDa), a dramatic upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and the loss of junction proteins occludin and VE-cadherin. Notably, HLG also significantly decreased Enho expression and adropin levels. Treatment of RBE4 cells with synthetic adropin (1, 10 and 100ng/ml) concentration-dependently reduced endothelial permeability after HLG, but this was not mediated through protection to junction proteins or through reduced levels of VEGF. We found that HLG dramatically increased myosin light chain 2 (MLC2) phosphorylation in RBE4 cells, which was significantly reduced by adropin treatment. We also found that HLG significantly increased Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) activity, a critical upstream effector of MLC2 phosphorylation, and that adropin treatment attenuated that effect. These data indicate that treatment with adropin reduces endothelial cell permeability after HLG insult by inhibition of the ROCK-MLC2 signaling pathway. These promising findings suggest that adropin protects against endothelial barrier dysfunction during ischemic conditions. PMID:27020249

  12. Dosimetric Predictors of Laryngeal Edema

    SciTech Connect

    Sanguineti, Giuseppe . E-mail: gisangui@utmb.edu; Adapala, Prashanth; Endres, Eugene J. C; Brack, Collin; Fiorino, Claudio; Sormani, Maria Pia; Parker, Brent

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate dosimetric predictors of laryngeal edema after radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: A total of 66 patients were selected who had squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck with grossly uninvolved larynx at the time of RT, no prior major surgical operation except for neck dissection and tonsillectomy, treatment planning data available for analysis, and at least one fiberoptic examination of the larynx within 2 years from RT performed by a single observer. Both the biologically equivalent mean dose at 2 Gy per fraction and the cumulative biologic dose-volume histogram of the larynx were extracted for each patient. Laryngeal edema was prospectively scored after treatment. Time to endpoint, moderate or worse laryngeal edema (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 2+), was calculated with log rank test from the date of treatment end. Results: At a median follow-up of 17.1 months (range, 0.4- 50.0 months), the risk of Grade 2+ edema was 58.9% {+-} 7%. Mean dose to the larynx, V30, V40, V50, V60, and V70 were significantly correlated with Grade 2+ edema at univariate analysis. At multivariate analysis, mean laryngeal dose (continuum, hazard ratio, 1.11; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-1.15; p < 0.001), and positive neck stage at RT (N0-x vs. N +, hazard ratio, 3.66; 95% confidence interval, 1.40-9.58; p = 0.008) were the only independent predictors. Further stratification showed that, to minimize the risk of Grade 2+ edema, the mean dose to the larynx has to be kept {<=}43.5 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction. Conclusion: Laryngeal edema is strictly correlated with various dosimetric parameters; mean dose to the larynx should be kept {<=}43.5 Gy.

  13. S100B inhibition reduces behavioral and pathologic changes in experimental traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Kabadi, Shruti V; Stoica, Bogdan A; Zimmer, Danna B; Afanador, Lauriaselle; Duffy, Kara B; Loane, David J; Faden, Alan I

    2015-12-01

    Neuroinflammation following traumatic brain injury (TBI) is increasingly recognized to contribute to chronic tissue loss and neurologic dysfunction. Circulating levels of S100B increase after TBI and have been used as a biomarker. S100B is produced by activated astrocytes and can promote microglial activation; signaling by S100B through interaction with the multiligand advanced glycation end product-specific receptor (AGER) has been implicated in brain injury and microglial activation during chronic neurodegeneration. We examined the effects of S100B inhibition in a controlled cortical impact model, using S100B knockout mice or administration of neutralizing S100B antibody. Both interventions significantly reduced TBI-induced lesion volume, improved retention memory function, and attenuated microglial activation. The neutralizing antibody also significantly reduced sensorimotor deficits and improved neuronal survival in the cortex. However, S100B did not alter microglial activation in BV2 cells or primary microglial cultures stimulated by lipopolysaccharide or interferon gamma. Further, proximity ligation assays did not support direct interaction in the brain between S100B and AGER following TBI. Future studies are needed to elucidate specific pathways underlying S100B-mediated neuroinflammatory actions after TBI. Our results strongly implicate S100B in TBI-induced neuroinflammation, cell loss, and neurologic dysfunction, thereby indicating that it is a potential therapeutic target for TBI. PMID:26154869

  14. Reduced bone mass accrual in mouse model of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongrun; Wergedal, Jon E; Rundle, Charles H; Mohan, Subburaman

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can affect bone by influencing the production/actions of pituitary hormones and neuropeptides that play significant regulatory roles in bone metabolism. Previously, we demonstrated that experimental TBI exerted a negative effect on the skeleton. Since mild TBI (mTBI) accounts for the majority of TBI cases, this study was undertaken to evaluate TBI effects using a milder impact model in female mice. Repetitive mTBI caused microhemorrhaging, astrocytosis, and increased anti-inflammatory protective actions in the brain of the impacted versus control mice 2 wk after the first impact. Serum levels of growth regulating insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I) were reduced by 28.9%. Bone mass was reduced significantly in total body as well as individual skeletons. Tibial total cortical density was reduced by 7.0%, which led to weaker bones, as shown by a 31.3% decrease in femoral size adjusted peak torque. A 27.5% decrease in tibial trabecular bone volume per total volume was accompanied by a 34.3% (p = 0.07) decrease in bone formation rate (BFR) per total area. Based on our data, we conclude that repetitive mTBI exerted significant negative effects on accrual of both cortical and trabecular bone mass in mice caused by a reduced BFR. PMID:25785491

  15. Preliminary evidence of reduced brain network activation in patients with post-traumatic migraine following concussion.

    PubMed

    Kontos, Anthony P; Reches, Amit; Elbin, R J; Dickman, Dalia; Laufer, Ilan; Geva, Amir B; Shacham, Galit; DeWolf, Ryan; Collins, Michael W

    2016-06-01

    Post-traumatic migraine (PTM) (i.e., headache, nausea, light and/or noise sensitivity) is an emerging risk factor for prolonged recovery following concussion. Concussions and migraine share similar pathophysiology characterized by specific ionic imbalances in the brain. Given these similarities, patients with PTM following concussion may exhibit distinct electrophysiological patterns, although researchers have yet to examine the electrophysiological brain activation in patients with PTM following concussion. A novel approach that may help differentiate brain activation in patients with and without PTM is brain network activation (BNA) analysis. BNA involves an algorithmic analysis applied to multichannel EEG-ERP data that provides a network map of cortical activity and quantitative data during specific tasks. A prospective, repeated measures design was used to evaluate BNA (during Go/NoGo task), EEG-ERP, cognitive performance, and concussion related symptoms at 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks post-injury intervals among athletes with a medically diagnosed concussion with PTM (n = 15) and without (NO-PTM) (n = 22); and age, sex, and concussion history matched controls without concussion (CONTROL) (n = 20). Participants with PTM had significantly reduced BNA compared to NO-PTM and CONTROLS for Go and NoGo components at 3 weeks and for NoGo component at 4 weeks post-injury. The PTM group also demonstrated a more prominent deviation of network activity compared to the other two groups over a longer period of time. The composite BNA algorithm may be a more sensitive measure of electrophysiological change in the brain that can augment established cognitive assessment tools for detecting impairment in individuals with PTM. PMID:26091725

  16. Accurate measurement of reduced glutathione in gamma-glutamyltransferase-rich brain microvessel fractions.

    PubMed

    Maguin Gaté, Katy; Lartaud, Isabelle; Giummelly, Philippe; Legrand, Romain; Pompella, Alfonso; Leroy, Pierre

    2011-01-19

    Investigation of the redox status in the cerebral circulation is of great importance in order to evaluate intensity of oxidative stress-related diseases and the corresponding therapeutic effects. Changes in levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) are a major indicator of oxidative stress conditions. However, an important limitation for measurement of GSH as a biomarker is the possible presence in samples of gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) activity, i.e., the enzyme catalysing GSH breakdown. An accurate assay for the measurement of GSH in rat brain microvessels was developed, taking into account the high GGT activity expressed in this tissue compartment. Based on a sensitive fluorescence-based microtiter plate method using 2,3-naphthalenedicarboxyaldehyde as GSH-selective fluorogenic probe, the assay was applied to brain microvessels isolated from individual male Wistar rats. Pooling of microvessel fractions from several animals, as required by other procedures, could thus be avoided. In order to prevent GSH consumption via GGT activity, serine-boric acid complex (SBC) was added as inhibitor all along the microvessels isolation process. In the absence of GGT inhibition GSH in isolated brain microvessels was below the limit of quantification. Addition of SBC almost completely suppressed GGT activity, thus allowing GSH quantification (4.4±1.6 nmol.mg(-1) protein, n=3). Following the administration of a GSH depletor (diethyl maleate, 1g.kg(-1), i.p.), decreased GSH levels were measured in liver, brain tissue and brain microvessels as well, thus confirming the reliability of the method for safe GSH measurements in small-sized, individual samples presenting high GGT activity. PMID:21047497

  17. Progesterone reduces brain mitochondrial dysfunction after transient focal ischemia in male and female mice.

    PubMed

    Gaignard, Pauline; Fréchou, Magalie; Schumacher, Michael; Thérond, Patrice; Mattern, Claudia; Slama, Abdelhamid; Guennoun, Rachida

    2016-03-01

    This study investigated the effect of intranasal administration of progesterone on the early brain mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction and oxidative damage after transient middle cerebral occlusion in male and female mice. We showed that progesterone (8 mg/kg at 1 h post-middle cerebral occlusion) restored the mitochondrial reduced glutathione pool and the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-linked respiration in both sexes. Progesterone also reversed the decrease of the flavin adenine dinucleotide-linked respiration, which was only observed in females. Our findings point to a sex difference in stroke effects on the brain respiratory chain and suggest that the actions of progesterone on mitochondrial function may participate in its neuroprotective properties. PMID:26661198

  18. Impaired brain development and reduced cognitive function in phospholipase D-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, Ute; Stegner, David; Hattingen, Elke; Beyer, Sandra; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Klein, Jochen

    2014-06-20

    The phospholipases D (PLD1 and 2) are signaling enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine to phosphatidic acid, a lipid second messenger involved in cell proliferation, and choline, a precursor of acetylcholine (ACh). In the present study, we investigated development and cognitive function in mice that were deficient for PLD1, or PLD2, or both. We found that PLD-deficient mice had reduced brain growth at 14-27 days post partum when compared to wild-type mice. In adult PLD-deficient mice, cognitive function was impaired in social and object recognition tasks. Using brain microdialysis, we found that wild-type mice responded with a 4-fold increase of hippocampal ACh release upon behavioral stimulation in the open field, while PLD-deficient mice released significantly less ACh. These results may be relevant for cognitive dysfunctions observed in fetal alcohol syndrome and in Alzheimer' disease. PMID:24813107

  19. Melatonin reduces traumatic brain injury-induced oxidative stress in the cerebral cortex and blood of rats

    PubMed Central

    Şenol, Nilgün; Nazıroğlu, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    Free radicals induced by traumatic brain injury have deleterious effects on the function and antioxidant vitamin levels of several organ systems including the brain. Melatonin possesses antioxidant effect on the brain by maintaining antioxidant enzyme and vitamin levels. We investigated the effects of melatonin on antioxidant ability in the cerebral cortex and blood of traumatic brain injury rats. Results showed that the cerebral cortex β-carotene, vitamin C, vitamin E, reduced glutathione, and erythrocyte reduced glutathione levels, and plasma vitamin C level were decreased by traumatic brain injury whereas they were increased following melatonin treatment. In conclusion, melatonin seems to have protective effects on traumatic brain injury-induced cerebral cortex and blood toxicity by inhibiting free radical formation and supporting antioxidant vitamin redox system. PMID:25206769

  20. Brain

    MedlinePlus

    ... will return after updating. Resources Archived Modules Updates Brain Cerebrum The cerebrum is the part of the ... the outside of the brain and spinal cord. Brain Stem The brain stem is the part of ...

  1. Pathophysiology, Evaluation, and Management of Edema in Childhood Nephrotic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Demetrius

    2016-01-01

    Generalized edema is a major presenting clinical feature of children with nephrotic syndrome (NS) exemplified by such primary conditions as minimal change disease (MCD). In these children with classical NS and marked proteinuria and hypoalbuminemia, the ensuing tendency to hypovolemia triggers compensatory physiological mechanisms, which enhance renal sodium (Na+) and water retention; this is known as the “underfill hypothesis.” Edema can also occur in secondary forms of NS and several other glomerulonephritides, in which the degree of proteinuria and hypoalbuminemia, are variable. In contrast to MCD, in these latter conditions, the predominant mechanism of edema formation is “primary” or “pathophysiological,” Na+ and water retention; this is known as the “overfill hypothesis.” A major clinical challenge in children with these disorders is to distinguish the predominant mechanism of edema formation, identify other potential contributing factors, and prevent the deleterious effects of diuretic regimens in those with unsuspected reduced effective circulatory volume (i.e., underfill). This article reviews the Starling forces that become altered in NS so as to tip the balance of fluid movement in favor of edema formation. An understanding of these pathomechanisms then serves to formulate a more rational approach to prevention, evaluation, and management of such edema. PMID:26793696

  2. Reconstruction of the arcuate fasciculus for surgical planning in the setting of peritumoral edema using two-tensor unscented Kalman filter tractography

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhenrui; Tie, Yanmei; Olubiyi, Olutayo; Rigolo, Laura; Mehrtash, Alireza; Norton, Isaiah; Pasternak, Ofer; Rathi, Yogesh; Golby, Alexandra J.; O'Donnell, Lauren J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Diffusion imaging tractography is increasingly used to trace critical fiber tracts in brain tumor patients to reduce the risk of post-operative neurological deficit. However, the effects of peritumoral edema pose a challenge to conventional tractography using the standard diffusion tensor model. The aim of this study was to present a novel technique using a two-tensor unscented Kalman filter (UKF) algorithm to track the arcuate fasciculus (AF) in brain tumor patients with peritumoral edema. Methods Ten right-handed patients with left-sided brain tumors in the vicinity of language-related cortex and evidence of significant peritumoral edema were retrospectively selected for the study. All patients underwent 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) including a diffusion-weighted dataset with 31 directions. Fiber tractography was performed using both single-tensor streamline and two-tensor UKF tractography. A two-regions-of-interest approach was applied to perform the delineation of the AF. Results from the two different tractography algorithms were compared visually and quantitatively. Results Using single-tensor streamline tractography, the AF appeared disrupted in four patients and contained few fibers in the remaining six patients. Two-tensor UKF tractography delineated an AF that traversed edematous brain areas in all patients. The volume of the AF was significantly larger on two-tensor UKF than on single-tensor streamline tractography (p < 0.01). Conclusions Two-tensor UKF tractography provides the ability to trace a larger volume AF than single-tensor streamline tractography in the setting of peritumoral edema in brain tumor patients. PMID:26082890

  3. Reducing cannabinoid abuse and preventing relapse by enhancing endogenous brain levels of kynurenic acid.

    PubMed

    Justinova, Zuzana; Mascia, Paola; Wu, Hui-Qiu; Secci, Maria E; Redhi, Godfrey H; Panlilio, Leigh V; Scherma, Maria; Barnes, Chanel; Parashos, Alexandra; Zara, Tamara; Fratta, Walter; Solinas, Marcello; Pistis, Marco; Bergman, Jack; Kangas, Brian D; Ferré, Sergi; Tanda, Gianluigi; Schwarcz, Robert; Goldberg, Steven R

    2013-11-01

    In the reward circuitry of the brain, α-7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7nAChRs) modulate effects of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), marijuana's main psychoactive ingredient. Kynurenic acid (KYNA) is an endogenous negative allosteric modulator of α7nAChRs. Here we report that the kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) inhibitor Ro 61-8048 increases brain KYNA levels and attenuates cannabinoid-induced increases in extracellular dopamine in reward-related brain areas. In the self-administration model of drug abuse, Ro 61-8048 reduced the rewarding effects of THC and the synthetic cannabinoid WIN 55,212-2 in squirrel monkeys and rats, respectively, and it also prevented relapse to drug-seeking induced by reexposure to cannabinoids or cannabinoid-associated cues. The effects of enhancing endogenous KYNA levels with Ro 61-8048 were prevented by positive allosteric modulators of α7nAChRs. Despite a clear need, there are no medications approved for treatment of marijuana dependence. Modulation of KYNA offers a pharmacological strategy for achieving abstinence from marijuana and preventing relapse. PMID:24121737

  4. Pyrazole antagonists of the CB1 receptor with reduced brain penetration.

    PubMed

    Fulp, Alan; Zhang, Yanan; Bortoff, Katherine; Seltzman, Herbert; Snyder, Rodney; Wiethe, Robert; Amato, George; Maitra, Rangan

    2016-03-01

    Type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) antagonists might be useful for treating obesity, liver disease, metabolic syndrome, and dyslipidemias. Unfortunately, inhibition of CB1 in the central nervous system (CNS) produces adverse effects, including depression, anxiety and suicidal ideation in some patients, which led to withdrawal of the pyrazole inverse agonist rimonabant (SR141716A) from European markets. Efforts are underway to produce peripherally selective CB1 antagonists to circumvent CNS-associated adverse effects. In this study, novel analogs of rimonabant (1) were explored in which the 1-aminopiperidine group was switched to a 4-aminopiperidine, attached at the 4-amino position (5). The piperidine nitrogen was functionalized with carbamates, amides, and sulfonamides, providing compounds that are potent inverse agonists of hCB1 with good selectivity for hCB1 over hCB2. Select compounds were further studied using in vitro models of brain penetration, oral absorption and metabolic stability. Several compounds were identified with predicted minimal brain penetration and good metabolic stability. In vivo pharmacokinetic testing revealed that inverse agonist 8c is orally bioavailable and has vastly reduced brain penetration compared to rimonabant. PMID:26827137

  5. The cellular mechanisms of neuronal swelling underlying cytotoxic edema.

    PubMed

    Rungta, Ravi L; Choi, Hyun B; Tyson, John R; Malik, Aqsa; Dissing-Olesen, Lasse; Lin, Paulo J C; Cain, Stuart M; Cullis, Pieter R; Snutch, Terrance P; MacVicar, Brian A

    2015-04-23

    Cytotoxic brain edema triggered by neuronal swelling is the chief cause of mortality following brain trauma and cerebral infarct. Using fluorescence lifetime imaging to analyze contributions of intracellular ionic changes in brain slices, we find that intense Na(+) entry triggers a secondary increase in intracellular Cl(-) that is required for neuronal swelling and death. Pharmacological and siRNA-mediated knockdown screening identified the ion exchanger SLC26A11 unexpectedly acting as a voltage-gated Cl(-) channel that is activated upon neuronal depolarization to membrane potentials lower than -20 mV. Blockade of SLC26A11 activity attenuates both neuronal swelling and cell death. Therefore cytotoxic neuronal edema occurs when sufficient Na(+) influx and depolarization is followed by Cl(-) entry via SLC26A11. The resultant NaCl accumulation causes subsequent neuronal swelling leading to neuronal death. These findings shed light on unique elements of volume control in excitable cells and lay the ground for the development of specific treatments for brain edema. PMID:25910210

  6. The Associative Memory Deficit in Aging Is Related to Reduced Selectivity of Brain Activity during Encoding.

    PubMed

    Saverino, Cristina; Fatima, Zainab; Sarraf, Saman; Oder, Anita; Strother, Stephen C; Grady, Cheryl L

    2016-09-01

    Human aging is characterized by reductions in the ability to remember associations between items, despite intact memory for single items. Older adults also show less selectivity in task-related brain activity, such that patterns of activation become less distinct across multiple experimental tasks. This reduced selectivity or dedifferentiation has been found for episodic memory, which is often reduced in older adults, but not for semantic memory, which is maintained with age. We used fMRI to investigate whether there is a specific reduction in selectivity of brain activity during associative encoding in older adults, but not during item encoding, and whether this reduction predicts associative memory performance. Healthy young and older adults were scanned while performing an incidental encoding task for pictures of objects and houses under item or associative instructions. An old/new recognition test was administered outside the scanner. We used agnostic canonical variates analysis and split-half resampling to detect whole-brain patterns of activation that predicted item versus associative encoding for stimuli that were later correctly recognized. Older adults had poorer memory for associations than did younger adults, whereas item memory was comparable across groups. Associative encoding trials, but not item encoding trials, were predicted less successfully in older compared with young adults, indicating less distinct patterns of associative-related activity in the older group. Importantly, higher probability of predicting associative encoding trials was related to better associative memory after accounting for age and performance on a battery of neuropsychological tests. These results provide evidence that neural distinctiveness at encoding supports associative memory and that a specific reduction of selectivity in neural recruitment underlies age differences in associative memory. PMID:27082043

  7. Quercetin stabilizes apolipoprotein E and reduces brain Aβ levels in amyloid model mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xilin; Hu, Jin; Zhong, Li; Wang, Na; Yang, Longyu; Liu, Chia-Chen; Li, Huifang; Wang, Xin; Zhou, Ying; Zhang, Yunwu; Xu, Huaxi; Bu, Guojun; Zhuang, Jiangxing

    2016-09-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE) is a major cholesterol carrier that regulates lipid homeostasis by mediating lipid transport from one tissue or cell type to another. In the central neural system (CNS), apoE is mainly produced by astrocytes, and transports cholesterol to neurons via apoE receptors, which are members of the low-density lipoprotein receptor family. The APOEε4 gene is a strong genetic risk factor for late-onset sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD), likely through its strong effect on the accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide. ApoE protein levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma are reduced in APOEε4 carriers and in patients with AD. Furthermore, altered cholesterol levels are also associated with the risk of AD. Aβ accumulation, oligomerization and deposition in the brain are central to the pathogenesis of AD. Mounting evidence demonstrates that apoE and apoE receptors play important roles in these processes. Astrocyte-derived apoE is pivotal for cerebral cholesterol metabolism and clearance of Aβ. Thus, we hypothesized that increased apoE in the brain may be an effective therapeutic strategy for AD. We report here that quercetin can significantly increase apoE levels by inhibiting apoE degradation in immortalized astrocytes. Importantly, we show that oral administration of quercetin significantly increased brain apoE and reduced insoluble Aβ levels in the cortex of 5xFAD amyloid model mice. Our results demonstrate that quercetin increases apoE levels through a novel mechanism and can be explored as a novel class of drug for AD therapy. PMID:27114256

  8. Blood-brain barrier transport of choline is reduced in the aged rat.

    PubMed

    Mooradian, A D

    1988-02-01

    An age-related impairment in choline transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) may contribute to the cholinergic mechanisms of geriatric memory dysfunction. To test this hypothesis, the brain choline uptake in male Fisher 344 rats at 2, 18 and 24 months of age was studied using the Oldendorf technique. The Vmax of choline transport in the 24-month-old rats (0.05 +/- 0.04 nmol/min/g) was significantly lower than that in the 2-month-old rat (2.5 +/- 1.0 nmol/min/g) (P less than 0.05). The Km of transport in old rats (13 +/- 35 microM) was also significantly smaller than the value in 24-month-old rats (450 +/- 195 microM), while the constant of the non-saturable component of the transport, Kd, was not significantly different in older rats (1.2 +/- 0.3 vs 0.6 +/- 0.1 microliter/min/g). These results indicate that the carrier in old rats has reduced capacity and increased affinity to choline. The reduced choline carrier capacity explains the significant decrease in BBB choline transport in aged rats. PMID:3359216

  9. β-Hydroxybutyrate supports synaptic vesicle cycling but reduces endocytosis and exocytosis in rat brain synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Hrynevich, Sviatlana V; Waseem, Tatyana V; Hébert, Audrey; Pellerin, Luc; Fedorovich, Sergei V

    2016-02-01

    The ketogenic diet is used as a prophylactic treatment for different types of brain diseases, such as epilepsy or Alzheimer's disease. In such a diet, carbohydrates are replaced by fats in everyday food, resulting in an elevation of blood-borne ketone bodies levels. Despite clinical applications of this treatment, the molecular mechanisms by which the ketogenic diet exerts its beneficial effects are still uncertain. In this study, we investigated the effect of replacing glucose by the ketone body β-hydroxybutyrate as the main energy substrate on synaptic vesicle recycling in rat brain synaptosomes. First, we observed that exposing presynaptic terminals to nonglycolytic energy substrates instead of glucose did not alter the plasma membrane potential. Next, we found that synaptosomes were able to maintain the synaptic vesicle cycle monitored with the fluorescent dye acridine orange when glucose was replaced by β-hydroxybutyrate. However, in presence of β-hydroxybutyrate, synaptic vesicle recycling was modified with reduced endocytosis. Replacing glucose by pyruvate also led to a reduced endocytosis. Addition of β-hydroxybutyrate to glucose-containing incubation medium was without effect. Reduced endocytosis in presence of β-hydroxybutyrate as sole energy substrate was confirmed using the fluorescent dye FM2-10. Also we found that replacement of glucose by ketone bodies leads to inhibition of exocytosis, monitored by FM2-10. However this reduction was smaller than the effect on endocytosis under the same conditions. Using both acridine orange in synaptosomes and the genetically encoded sensor synaptopHluorin in cortical neurons, we observed that replacing glucose by β-hydroxybutyrate did not modify the pH gradient of synaptic vesicles. In conclusion, the nonglycolytic energy substrates β-hydroxybutyrate and pyruvate are able to support synaptic vesicle recycling. However, they both reduce endocytosis. Reduction of both endocytosis and exocytosis together with

  10. Melatonin Improves Outcomes of Heatstroke in Mice by Reducing Brain Inflammation and Oxidative Damage and Multiple Organ Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Shu-Fen; Lin, Mao-Tsun

    2013-01-01

    We report here that when untreated mice underwent heat stress, they displayed thermoregulatory deficit (e.g., animals display hypothermia during room temperature exposure), brain (or hypothalamic) inflammation, ischemia, oxidative damage, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis impairment (e.g., decreased plasma levels of both adrenocorticotrophic hormone and corticosterone during heat stress), multiple organ dysfunction or failure, and lethality. Melatonin therapy significantly reduced the thermoregulatory deficit, brain inflammation, ischemia, oxidative damage, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis impairment, multiple organ dysfunction, and lethality caused by heat stroke. Our data indicate that melatonin may improve outcomes of heat stroke by reducing brain inflammation, oxidative damage, and multiple organ dysfunction. PMID:24369441

  11. Preoperative mucosal tolerance to brain antigens and a neuroprotective immune response following surgical brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Ayer, Robert E.; Jafarian, Nazanin; Chen, Wanqiu; Applegate, Richard L.; Colohan, Austin R. T.; Zhang, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Object Intracranial surgery causes cortical injury from incisions, hemorrhage, retraction, and electrocautery. The term “surgical brain injury” (SBI) has been developed to categorize this injury inherent to the procedure. Neuroinflammation plays a significant role in SBI. Traditional antiinflammatory therapies are often limited by their immunosuppressive side effects and poor CNS penetration. This study uses mucosal tolerance to develop an immune system that is tolerant to brain myelin basic protein (MBP) so that inflammation can be suppressed in a timely and site-specific manner following surgical disruption of the blood-brain barrier. Methods A standard SBI model using CD57 mice was used. Nasopharyngeal mucosa was exposed to vehicle, ovalbumin, or MBP to develop mucosal tolerance to these antigens. Immunological tolerance to MBP was confirmed in vivo through hypersensitivity testing. Neurological scores, cerebral edema, and interleukin (IL)–1β and transforming growth factor (TGF)–β1 cytokine levels were measured 48 hours postoperatively. Results Hypersensitivity testing confirmed the development of immune tolerance to MBP. Myelin basic protein– tolerant mice demonstrated reduced neurological injury, less cerebral edema, decreased levels of IL-1β, and increased levels of TGFβ1 following SBI. Conclusions Developing preoperative immunological tolerance to brain antigens through mucosal tolerance provides neuroprotection, reduces brain edema, and modulates neuroinflammation following SBI. PMID:22017304

  12. Effect of lavender oil (Lavandula angustifolia) on cerebral edema and its possible mechanisms in an experimental model of stroke.

    PubMed

    Vakili, Abedin; Sharifat, Shaghayegh; Akhavan, Maziar Mohammad; Bandegi, Ahmad Reza

    2014-02-22

    Lavender belongs to the family Labiatae and has a variety of cosmetic uses as well as therapeutic purposes in herbal medicine. The present study was conducted to evaluate the protective effect of lavender oil against brain edema and its possible mechanisms in an experimental model of stroke. Under Laser-Doppler Flowmetry, focal cerebral ischemia was induced by the transient occlusion of the middle cerebral artery for 1h in rats. Lavender oil (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg ip (and/or vehicle was injected at the onset of ischemia. Infarct size, cerebral edema, functional outcome, and oxidative stress biomarkers were evaluated using standard methods. Western blotting was used to determine the protein expression of VEGF, Bax, and Bcl-2. Treatment with lavender oil at doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg significantly diminished infarct size, brain edema, and improved functional outcome after cerebral ischemia (P<0.001). Lavender oil (200 mg/kg) also reduced the content of malondialdehyde and increased the activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and total antioxidant capacity (P<0.001). Although lavender oil enhanced VEGF expression (P=0.026), it could not decrease the Bax-to-Bcl-2 ratio (pro- to anti-apoptotic proteins) in the rat brain (P>0.05). The results indicated that lavender oil has neuroprotective activity against cerebral ischemia and alleviated neurological function in rats, and the mechanism may be related to augmentation in endogenous antioxidant defense, inhibiting oxidative stress, and increasing VEGF expression in the rat brain. However, lavender oil could not suppress the apoptosis pathway. PMID:24384140

  13. Evaluating CT Perfusion Deficits in Global Cerebral Edema after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Baradaran, H.; Fodera, V.; Mir, D.; Kesavobhotla, K.; Ivanidze, J.; Ozbek, U.; Gupta, A.; Claassen, J.; Sanelli, P.C.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Global cerebral edema is an independent predictor of mortality and poor outcomes after aneurysmal SAH. Global cerebral edema, a complex disease process, is thought to be associated with an altered cerebral autoregulatory response. We studied the association between cerebral hemodynamics and early global cerebral edema by using CTP. MATERIALS AND METHODS We retrospectively studied consecutive patients with aneurysmal SAH with admission CTP performed at days 0–3. Two neuroradiologists classified global cerebral edema and hydrocephalus on NCCT performed concurrently with CTP. Global cerebral edema was defined as diffuse effacement of the sulci and/or basal cisterns or diffuse disruption of the cerebral gray-white matter junction. CTP was postprocessed into CBF and MTT maps by using a standardized method. Quantitative analysis of CTP was performed by using standard protocol with ROI sampling of the cerebral cortex. The Fisher exact test, Mann-Whitney test, and independent-samples t test were used to determine statistical associations. RESULTS Of the 45 patients included, 42% (19/45) had global cerebral edema and 58% (26/45) did not. Patient groups with and without global cerebral edema were well-matched for demographic and clinical data. Patients with global cerebral edema were more likely to have qualitative global CTP deficits than those without global cerebral edema (P = .001) with an OR = 13.3 (95% CI, 2.09–138.63). Patients with global cerebral edema also had a very strong trend toward statistical significance, with reduced quantitative CBF compared with patients without global cerebral edema (P = .064). CONCLUSIONS Global perfusion deficits are significantly associated with global cerebral edema in the early phase after aneurysmal SAH, supporting the theory that hemodynamic disturbances occur in global cerebral edema. PMID:25977478

  14. Magnetic resonance analysis of the effects of acute ammonia intoxication on rat brain. Role of NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Cauli, Omar; López-Larrubia, Pilar; Rodrigues, Tiago B; Cerdán, Sebastián; Felipo, Vicente

    2007-11-01

    Acute ammonia intoxication leads to rapid death, which is prevented by blocking N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. The subsequent mechanisms leading to death remain unclear. Brain edema seems an important step. The aim of this work was to study the effects of acute ammonia intoxication on different cerebral parameters in vivo using magnetic resonance and to assess which effects are mediated by NMDA receptors activation. To assess edema induction, we injected rats with ammonium acetate and measured apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in 16 brain areas. We also analyzed the effects on T1, T2, and T2* maps and whether these effects are prevented by blocking NMDA receptors. The effects of acute ammonia intoxication are different in different brain areas. T1 relaxation time is reduced in eight areas. T2 relaxation time is reduced only in ventral thalamus and globus pallidus. ADC values increased in hippocampus, caudate-putamen, substantia nigra and cerebellar cortex, reflecting vasogenic edema. ADC decreased in hypothalamus, reflecting cytotoxic edema. Myo-inositol increased in cerebellum and substantia nigra, reflecting vasogenic edema. N-acetyl-aspartate decreased in cerebellum, reflecting neuronal damage. Changes in N-acetyl-aspartate, T1 and T2 are prevented by blocking NMDA receptors with MK-801 while changes in ADC or myo-inositol (induction of edema) are not. PMID:17727627

  15. Expression of aquaporin-4 and pathological characteristics of brain injury in a rat model of traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, CHENGCHENG; CHEN, JIANQIANG; LU, HONG

    2015-01-01

    Aquaporin 4 (AQP4) is a widely distributed membrane protein, which is found in glial cells, ependymocytes and capillary endothelial cells in the brain, and particularly in the choroid plexus. AQP4 is a key regulator of water metabolism, and changes in its expression following brain injury are associated with pathological changes in the damaged side of the brain; however, the effects of brain injury on AQP4 and injury-induced pathological changes in the contralateral non-damaged side of the brain remain to be fully elucidated. In the present study, male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to traumatic brain injury (TBI) and changes in brain water content, the expression of AQP4 expression and pathological characteristics in the damaged and contralateral non-damaged sides of the brain were examined. In the damaged side of the brain, vasogenic edema appeared first, followed by cellular edema. The aggravated cellular edema in the damaged side of the brain resulted in two periods of peak edema severity. Pathological changes in the contralateral non-damaged side of the brain occurred later than those in the damaged side; cellular edema appeared first, followed by vasogenic edema, which was alleviated earlier than the cellular edema. AQP4 was downregulated during vasogenic edema, and upregulated during cellular edema. Taken together, these results suggested that the downregulation of AQP4 was a result of vasogenic edema and that the upregulation of AQP4 may have induced cellular edema. PMID:26459070

  16. Evaluation of Peritumoral Edema in the Delineation of Radiotherapy Clinical Target Volumes for Glioblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Eric L. . E-mail: echang@mdanderson.org; Akyurek, Serap; Avalos, Tedde C; Rebueno, Neal C; Spicer, Chris C; Garcia, John C; Famiglietti, Robin; Allen, Pamela K.; Chao, K.S. Clifford; Mahajan, Anita; Woo, Shiao Y.; Maor, Moshe H.

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the spatial relationship between peritumoral edema and recurrence pattern in patients with glioblastoma (GBM). Methods and Materials: Forty-eight primary GBM patients received three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy that did not intentionally include peritumoral edema within the clinical target volume between July 2000 and June 2001. All 48 patients have subsequently recurred, and their original treatment planning parameters were used for this study. New theoretical radiation treatment plans were created for the same 48 patients, based on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) target delineation guidelines that specify inclusion of peritumoral edema. Target volume and recurrent tumor coverage, as well as percent volume of normal brain irradiated, were assessed for both methods of target delineation using dose-volume histograms. Results: A comparison between the location of recurrent tumor and peritumoral edema volumes from all 48 cases failed to show correlation by linear regression modeling (r {sup 2} 0.0007; p = 0.3). For patients with edema >75 cm{sup 3}, the percent volume of brain irradiated to 46 Gy was significantly greater in treatment plans that intentionally included peritumoral edema compared with those that did not (38% vs. 31%; p = 0.003). The pattern of failure was identical between the two sets of plans (40 central, 3 in-field, 3 marginal, and 2 distant recurrence). Conclusion: Clinical target volume delineation based on a 2-cm margin rather than on peritumoral edema did not seem to alter the central pattern of failure for patients with GBM. For patients with peritumoral edema >75 cm{sup 3}, using a constant 2-cm margin resulted in a smaller median percent volume of brain being irradiated to 30 Gy, 46 Gy, and 50 Gy compared with corresponding theoretical RTOG plans that deliberately included peritumoral edema.

  17. Immediate Remote Ischemic Postconditioning Reduces Brain Nitrotyrosine Formation in a Piglet Asphyxia Model

    PubMed Central

    Rocha-Ferreira, Eridan; Rudge, Brogan; Hughes, Michael P.; Rahim, Ahad A.; Hristova, Mariya; Robertson, Nicola J.

    2016-01-01

    Remote ischemic postconditioning (RIPostC) is a promising therapeutic intervention that could be administered as an alternative to cooling in cases of perinatal hypoxia-ischemia (HI). In the current study we hypothesized that RIPostC in the piglet model of birth asphyxia confers protection by reducing nitrosative stress and subsequent nitrotyrosine formation, as well as having an effect on glial immunoreactivity. Postnatal day 1 (P1) piglets underwent HI brain injury and were randomised to HI (control) or HI + RIPostC. Immunohistochemistry assessment 48 hours after HI revealed a significant decrease in brain nitrotyrosine deposits in the RIPostC-treated group (p = 0.02). This was accompanied by a significant increase in eNOS expression (p < 0.0001) and decrease in iNOS (p = 0.010), with no alteration in nNOS activity. Interestingly, RIPostC treatment was associated with a significant increase in GFAP (p = 0.002) and IBA1 (p = 0.006), markers of astroglial and microglial activity, respectively. The current study demonstrates a beneficial effect of RIPostC therapy in the preclinical piglet model of neonatal asphyxia, which appears to be mediated by modulation of nitrosative stress, despite glial activation. PMID:27379176

  18. Naloxone-induced pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, J A; Koenigsberg, M D

    1987-11-01

    We present the case of a 68-year-old woman with acute pulmonary edema secondary to the administration of naloxone to reverse an inadvertent narcotic overdose. The patient presented following a 12-hour history of increasingly bizarre behavior and confusion. A total IV dose of 1.6 mg naloxone was administered in an attempt to reverse the suspected overconsumption of a codeine-containing cough suppressant. She immediately became agitated, tachycardic, and diaphoretic; a clinical diagnosis of acute pulmonary edema was made. Following treatment with furosemide, nitroglycerin, and morphine sulfate, the patient recovered completely without further incident. Although naloxone is thought to be a safe drug with few complications, it should not be used indiscriminantly, and the smallest doses necessary to elicit the desired response should be used. PMID:3662194

  19. Post-ischemic hypothermia reduced IL-18 expression and suppressed microglial activation in the immature brain.

    PubMed

    Fukui, On; Kinugasa, Yukiko; Fukuda, Aya; Fukuda, Hirotsugu; Tskitishvili, Ekaterine; Hayashi, Shusaku; Song, Mihyon; Kanagawa, Takeshi; Hosono, Takayoshi; Shimoya, Koichiro; Murata, Yuji

    2006-11-22

    Inflammation is an important factor for hypoxia-ischemia (HI) brain injury. Interleukin (IL)-18 is a proinflammatory cytokine which may be a contributor to injury in the immature brain after HI. To investigate the effects of post-HI hypothermia on IL-18 in the developing brain, 7-day-old rats were subjected to left carotid artery ligation followed by 8% oxygen for 60 min and divided into a hypothermia group (rectal temperature 32 degrees C for 24 h) and a normothermia group (36 degrees C for 24 h). The IL-18 mRNA was analyzed with real-time RT-PCR, and the protein level was analyzed by Western blot, and the location and source of IL-18 were assessed by immunohistochemistry. The significant increase of the IL-18 mRNA was observed in the ipsilateral hemispheres of the normothermia group at 24 h and 72 h after HI compared with controls, but the level in the ipsilateral hemispheres of the hypothermia group was significantly reduced at both time points, compared with the normothermia group, respectively. The IL-18 protein level in the ipsilateral hemispheres of the normothermia group significantly increased at 72 h after HI compared with controls, however, the protein level of the hypothermia group was significantly decreased, compared with the normothermia group. IL-18-positive cells were observed throughout the entire cortex, corpus callosum (CC) and striatum in the ipsilateral hemispheres of normothermia group at 72 h after HI, however, little positive cells were observed in the hypothermia group. Double labeling immunostaining found that most of the IL-18-positive cells were colocalized with lectin, which is a marker of microglia. The number of ameboid microglia (AM) in the normothermia group was significantly increased in cortex and CC, compared with the number in controls, but there were very few ramified microglia (RM) in these areas. In contrast, the number of AM in the hypothermia group was significantly decreased in cortex and CC, compared with the number in

  20. Bacopa monnieri as an Antioxidant Therapy to Reduce Oxidative Stress in the Aging Brain

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Tamara; Pase, Matthew; Stough, Con

    2015-01-01

    The detrimental effect of neuronal cell death due to oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in age-related cognitive decline and neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. The Indian herb Bacopa monnieri is a dietary antioxidant, with animal and in vitro studies indicating several modes of action that may protect the brain against oxidative damage. In parallel, several studies using the CDRI08 extract have shown that extracts of Bacopa monnieri improve cognitive function in humans. The biological mechanisms of this cognitive enhancement are unknown. In this review we discuss the animal studies and in vivo evidence for Bacopa monnieri as a potential therapeutic antioxidant to reduce oxidative stress and improve cognitive function. We suggest that future studies incorporate neuroimaging particularly magnetic resonance spectroscopy into their randomized controlled trials to better understand whether changes in antioxidant status in vivo cause improvements in cognitive function. PMID:26413126

  1. Reduced occipital and prefrontal brain volumes in dysbindin-associated schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Donohoe, Gary; Frodl, Thomas; Morris, Derek; Spoletini, Ilaria; Cannon, Dara M; Cherubini, Andrea; Caltagirone, Carlo; Bossù, Paola; McDonald, Colm; Gill, Michael; Corvin, Aiden P; Spalletta, Gianfranco

    2010-01-01

    A three-marker C-A-T dysbindin haplotype identified by Williams et al (PMID: 15066891) is associated with increased risk for schizophrenia, decreased mRNA expression, poorer cognitive performance, and early sensory processing deficits. We investigated whether this same dysbindin risk haplotype was also associated with structural variation in the gray matter volume (GMV). Using voxel-based morphometry, whole-volume analysis revealed significantly reduced GMVs in both the right dorsolateral prefrontal and left occipital cortex, corresponding to the behavioral findings of impaired spatial working memory and EEG findings of impaired visual processing already reported. These data provide important evidence of the influence of dysbindin risk variants on brain structure, and suggest a possible mechanism by which disease risk is being increased. PMID:19794403

  2. Deep Brain Stimulation for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Reduces Symptoms of Irritable Bowel Syndrome in a Single Patient

    PubMed Central

    Langguth, Berthold; Sturm, Kornelia; Wetter, Thomas C.; Lange, Max; Gabriels, Loes; Mayer, Emeran A.; Schlaier, Juergen

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a frequent gastrointestinal disorder that is difficult to treat. We describe findings from evaluation of a woman (55 years old) with obsessive compulsive disorder, which was treated with bilateral deep brain stimulation in the anterior limb of the internal capsule, and IBS. After the brain stimulation treatment she reported substantial relief of her IBS symptoms. This reduction depended on specific stimulation parameters, was reproducible over time, and was not directly associated with improvements in obsessive compulsive disorder symptoms. These observations indicate a specific effect of deep brain stimulation on IBS. This observation confirms involvement of specific brain structures in the pathophysiology of IBS and shows that symptoms can be reduced through modulation of neuronal activity in the central nervous system. Further studies of the effects of brain stimulation on IBS are required. PMID:25638586

  3. Increased efflux of amyloid-β peptides through the blood-brain barrier by muscarinic acetylcholine receptor inhibition reduces pathological phenotypes in mouse models of brain amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Paganetti, Paolo; Antoniello, Katia; Devraj, Kavi; Toni, Nicolas; Kieran, Dairin; Madani, Rime; Pihlgren, Maria; Adolfsson, Oskar; Froestl, Wolfgang; Schrattenholz, André; Liebner, Stefan; Havas, Daniel; Windisch, Manfred; Cirrito, John R; Pfeifer, Andrea; Muhs, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The formation and accumulation of toxic amyloid-β peptides (Aβ) in the brain may drive the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Accordingly, disease-modifying therapies for Alzheimer's disease and related disorders could result from treatments regulating Aβ homeostasis. Examples are the inhibition of production, misfolding, and accumulation of Aβ or the enhancement of its clearance. Here we show that oral treatment with ACI-91 (Pirenzepine) dose-dependently reduced brain Aβ burden in AβPPPS1, hAβPPSL, and AβPP/PS1 transgenic mice. A possible mechanism of action of ACI-91 may occur through selective inhibition of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (AChR) on endothelial cells of brain microvessels and enhanced Aβ peptide clearance across the blood-brain barrier. One month treatment with ACI-91 increased the clearance of intrathecally-injected Aβ in plaque-bearing mice. ACI-91 also accelerated the clearance of brain-injected Aβ in blood and peripheral tissues by favoring its urinal excretion. A single oral dose of ACI-91 reduced the half-life of interstitial Aβ peptide in pre-plaque mhAβPP/PS1d mice. By extending our studies to an in vitro model, we showed that muscarinic AChR inhibition by ACI-91 and Darifenacin augmented the capacity of differentiated endothelial monolayers for active transport of Aβ peptide. Finally, ACI-91 was found to consistently affect, in vitro and in vivo, the expression of endothelial cell genes involved in Aβ transport across the Blood Brain Brain (BBB). Thus increased Aβ clearance through the BBB may contribute to reduced Aβ burden and associated phenotypes. Inhibition of muscarinic AChR restricted to the periphery may present a therapeutic advantage as it avoids adverse central cholinergic effects. PMID:24072071

  4. Sunitinib impedes brain tumor progression and reduces tumor-induced neurodegeneration in the microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Hatipoglu, Gökçe; Hock, Stefan W; Weiss, Ruth; Fan, Zheng; Sehm, Tina; Ghoochani, Ali; Buchfelder, Michael; Savaskan, Nicolai E; Eyüpoglu, Ilker Y

    2015-01-01

    Malignant gliomas can be counted to the most devastating tumors in humans. Novel therapies do not achieve significant prolonged survival rates. The cancer cells have an impact on the surrounding vital tissue and form tumor zones, which make up the tumor microenvironment. We investigated the effects of sunitinib, a small molecule multitargeted receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, on constituents of the tumor microenvironment such as gliomas, astrocytes, endothelial cells, and neurons. Sunitinib has a known anti-angiogenic effect. We found that sunitinib normalizes the aberrant tumor-derived vasculature and reduces tumor vessel pathologies (i.e. auto-loops). Sunitinib has only minor effects on the normal, physiological, non-proliferating vasculature. We found that neurons and astrocytes are protected by sunitinib against glutamate-induced cell death, whereas sunitinib acts as a toxin towards proliferating endothelial cells and tumor vessels. Moreover, sunitinib is effective in inducing glioma cell death. We determined the underlying pathways by which sunitinib operates as a toxin on gliomas and found vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2, KDR/Flk1) as the main target to execute gliomatoxicity. The apoptosis-inducing effect of sunitinib can be mimicked by inhibition of VEGFR2. Knockdown of VEGFR2 can, in part, foster the resistance of glioma cells to receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Furthermore, sunitinib alleviates tumor-induced neurodegeneration. Hence, we tested whether temozolomide treatment could be potentiated by sunitinib application. Here we show that sunitinib can amplify the effects of temozolomide in glioma cells. Thus, our data indicate that combined treatment with temozolomide does not abrogate the effects of sunitinib. In conclusion, we found that sunitinib acts as a gliomatoxic agent and at the same time carries out neuroprotective effects, reducing tumor-induced neurodegeneration. Thus, this report uncovered sunitinib's actions on

  5. Preventing Flow-Metabolism Uncoupling Acutely Reduces Axonal Injury after Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Mironova, Yevgeniya A.; Chen, Szu-Fu; Richards, Hugh K.; Pickard, John D.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract We have previously presented evidence that the development of secondary traumatic axonal injury is related to the degree of local cerebral blood flow (LCBF) and flow-metabolism uncoupling. We have now tested the hypothesis that augmenting LCBF in the acute stages after brain injury prevents further axonal injury. Data were acquired from rats with or without acetazolamide (ACZ) that was administered immediately following controlled cortical impact injury to increase cortical LCBF. Local cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (LCMRglc) and LCBF measurements were obtained 3 h post-trauma in the same rat via 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose and 14C-iodoantipyrine co-registered autoradiographic images, and compared to the density of damaged axonal profiles in adjacent sections, and in additional groups at 24 h used to assess different populations of injured axons stereologically. ACZ treatment significantly and globally elevated LCBF twofold above untreated-injured rats at 3 h (p<0.05), but did not significantly affect LCMRglc. As a result, ipsilateral LCMRglc:LCBF ratios were reduced by twofold to sham-control levels, and the density of β-APP-stained axons at 24 h was significantly reduced in most brain regions compared to the untreated-injured group (p<0.01). Furthermore, early LCBF augmentation prevented the injury-associated increase in the number of stained axons from 3–24 h. Additional robust stereological analysis of impaired axonal transport and neurofilament compaction in the corpus callosum and cingulum underlying the injury core confirmed the amelioration of β-APP axon density, and showed a trend, but no significant effect, on RMO14-positive axons. These data underline the importance of maintaining flow-metabolism coupling immediately after injury in order to prevent further axonal injury, in at least one population of injured axons. PMID:22321027

  6. Hyskon-induced pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Mangar, D

    1993-12-01

    Hyskon (32 percent dextran-70) (Hyskon Division, Pharmacia) is used during hysteroscopy to help visualization of the uterine surfaces. Pulmonary edema of an uncertain cause has occurred in many patients. Because this study could not be conducted in humans, we determined if Hyskon caused cardiogenic or non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema in a dog model. Dogs were randomly assigned to receive an infusion of Hyskon or whole blood to sustain left ventricular end-diastolic pressure between 20 and 23 millimeters of mercury for 60 minutes. In dogs receiving blood, there was no protein in the bronchoalveolar lavage before or after blood was given. In the Hyskon group, there was no protein in the bronchoalveolar lavage before Hyskon and 0.6 +/- 1.4 milligrams per deciliter (range of 0.1 to 3.7 milligram per deciliter) after Hyskon. The ratio of bronchoalveolar lavage protein to plasma protein after Hyskon was 8.0 +/- 18.0 percent compared with zero percent in the blood group. Hyskon altered pulmonary microvascular membrane permeability, causing alveolar flooding with plasma proteins and possibly accounting for the deterioration of oxygenation and pulmonary compliance seen in patients. These results suggest a significant noncardiogenic component of Hyskon induced pulmonary edema. PMID:7505487

  7. Pathogenesis of optic disc edema in raised intracranial pressure.

    PubMed

    Hayreh, Sohan Singh

    2016-01-01

    Optic disc edema in raised intracranial pressure was first described in 1853. Ever since, there has been a plethora of controversial hypotheses to explain its pathogenesis. I have explored the subject comprehensively by doing basic, experimental and clinical studies. My objective was to investigate the fundamentals of the subject, to test the validity of the previous theories, and finally, based on all these studies, to find a logical explanation for the pathogenesis. My studies included the following issues pertinent to the pathogenesis of optic disc edema in raised intracranial pressure: the anatomy and blood supply of the optic nerve, the roles of the sheath of the optic nerve, of the centripetal flow of fluids along the optic nerve, of compression of the central retinal vein, and of acute intracranial hypertension and its associated effects. I found that, contrary to some previous claims, an acute rise of intracranial pressure was not quickly followed by production of optic disc edema. Then, in rhesus monkeys, I produced experimentally chronic intracranial hypertension by slowly increasing in size space-occupying lesions, in different parts of the brain. Those produced raised cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFP) and optic disc edema, identical to those seen in patients with elevated CSFP. Having achieved that, I investigated various aspects of optic disc edema by ophthalmoscopy, stereoscopic color fundus photography and fluorescein fundus angiography, and light microscopic, electron microscopic, horseradish peroxidase and axoplasmic transport studies, and evaluated the effect of opening the sheath of the optic nerve on the optic disc edema. This latter study showed that opening the sheath resulted in resolution of optic disc edema on the side of the sheath fenestration, in spite of high intracranial CSFP, proving that a rise of CSFP in the sheath was the essential pre-requisite for the development of optic disc edema. I also investigated optic disc edema with

  8. Reduced cerebral glucose metabolism and increased brain capillary permeability following high-dose methotrexate chemotherapy: a positron emission tomographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, P.C.; Dhawan, V.; Strother, S.C.; Sidtis, J.J.; Evans, A.C.; Allen, J.C.; Rottenberg, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    Regional glucose metabolic rate constants and blood-to-brain transport of rubidium were estimated using positron emission tomography in an adolescent patient with a brain tumor, before and after chemotherapy with intravenous high-dose methotrexate. Widespread depression of cerebral glucose metabolism was apparent 24 hours after drug administration, which may reflect reduced glucose phosphorylation, and the influx rate constant for /sup 82/Rb was increased, indicating a drug-induced alteration in blood-brain barrier function. Associated changes in neuropsychological performance, electroencephalogram, and plasma amino acid concentration were identified in the absence of evidence of systemic methotrexate toxicity, suggesting primary methotrexate neurotoxicity.

  9. Effects of brain amyloid deposition and reduced glucose metabolism on the default mode of brain function in normal aging.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Hirosawa, Tetsu; Yokokura, Masamichi; Yagi, Shunsuke; Mori, Norio; Yoshikawa, Etsuji; Yoshihara, Yujiro; Sugihara, Genichi; Takebayashi, Kiyokazu; Iwata, Yasuhide; Suzuki, Katsuaki; Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Ueki, Takatoshi; Minabe, Yoshio; Ouchi, Yasuomi

    2011-08-01

    Brain β-amyloid (Aβ) deposition during normal aging is highlighted as an initial pathogenetic event in the development of Alzheimer's disease. Many recent brain imaging studies have focused on areas deactivated during cognitive tasks [the default mode network (DMN), i.e., medial frontal gyrus/anterior cingulate cortex and precuneus/posterior cingulate cortex], where the strength of functional coordination was more or less affected by cerebral Aβ deposits. In the present positron emission tomography study, to investigate whether regional glucose metabolic alterations and Aβ deposits seen in nondemented elderly human subjects (n = 22) are of pathophysiological importance in changes of brain hemodynamic coordination in DMN during normal aging, we measured cerebral glucose metabolism with [(18)F]FDG, Aβ deposits with [(11)C]PIB, and regional cerebral blood flow during control and working memory tasks by H(2)(15)O on the same day. Data were analyzed using both region of interest and statistical parametric mapping. Our results indicated that the amount of Aβ deposits was negatively correlated with hemodynamic similarity between medial frontal and medial posterior regions, and the lower similarity was associated with poorer working memory performance. In contrast, brain glucose metabolism was not related to this medial hemodynamic similarity. These findings suggest that traceable Aβ deposition, but not glucose hypometabolism, in the brain plays an important role in occurrence of neuronal discoordination in DMN along with poor working memory in healthy elderly people. PMID:21813680

  10. Does Electroencephalogram Phase Variability Account for Reduced P3 Brain Potential in Externalizing Disorders?

    PubMed Central

    Burwell, Scott J.; Malone, Stephen M.; Bernat, Edward M.; Iacono, William G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Amplitude deficits of the P3 event-related potential (ERP) are associated with externalizing psychopathology but little is known about the nature of underlying brain electrical activity that accounts for this amplitude reduction. We sought to understand if group differences in task-induced phase-locking in electroencephalographic (EEG) delta and theta frequencies may account for P3-externalizing associations. Methods Adult males (N = 410) completed a visual oddball task and frontal and parietal P3-related delta- and theta-band phase-invariant evoked energy and inter-trial phase-locking measures were investigated with respect to the externalizing spectrum, including substance dependence, adult antisociality, and childhood disruptive disorders. We hypothesized that P3-related phase-locking is weaker in externalizing-diagnosed individuals and this might mediate prior findings of reduced evoked P3energy. Results Reductions in both evoked energy and phase-locking, in both frequency bands, at both scalp sites, were associated with greater odds of externalizing diagnoses. Generally, adding phase-locking to evoked energy came with better prediction model fit. Moreover, reduced theta-band phase-locking partially mediated the effects of within-frequency evoked energy on externalizing prediction. Conclusions Inter-trial phase-locking underlying P3 appears to be an important distinction between externalizing and control subjects. Significance This cross-trial phase-variability for externalizing-diagnosed individuals might reflect deficient top-down “tuning” by neuromodulatory systems. PMID:24656843

  11. Reduced Cerebral Oxygen Content in the DG and SVZ In Situ Promotes Neurogenesis in the Adult Rat Brain In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Liying; Huang, Xin; Wu, Kuiwu; Xu, Lun; Li, Dahu; Liu, Shuhong; Zhao, Yongqi; Fan, Ming; Zhu, Lingling

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenesis in the adult brain occurs mainly within two neurogenic structures, the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus and the sub-ventricular zone (SVZ) of the forebrain. It has been reported that mild hypoxia promoted the proliferation of Neural Stem Cells (NSCs)in vitro. Our previous study further demonstrated that an external hypoxic environment stimulated neurogenesis in the adult rat brain in vivo. However, it remains unknown how external hypoxic environments affect the oxygen content in the brain and result in neurogenesis. Here we use an optical fiber luminescent oxygen sensor to detect the oxygen content in the adult rat brain in situ under normoxia and hypoxia. We found that the distribution of oxygen in cerebral regions is spatiotemporally heterogeneous. The Po2 values in the ventricles (45∼50 Torr) and DG (approximately 10 Torr) were much higher than those of other parts of the brain, such as the cortex and thalamus (approximately 2 Torr). Interestingly, our in vivo studies showed that an external hypoxic environment could change the intrinsic oxygen content in brain tissues, notably reducing oxygen levels in both the DG and SVZ, the major sites of adult neurogenesis. Furthermore, the hypoxic environment also increased the expression of HIF-1α and VEGF, two factors that have been reported to regulate neurogenesis, within the DG and SVZ. Thus, we have demonstrated that reducing the oxygen content of the external environment decreased Po2 levels in the DG and SVZ. This reduced oxygen level in the DG and SVZ might be the main mechanism triggering neurogenesis in the adult brain. More importantly, we speculate that varying oxygen levels may be the physiological basis of the regionally restricted neurogenesis in the adult brain. PMID:26466323

  12. Iron porphyrinate Fe(TPPS) reduces brain cell damage in rats intrastriatally lesioned by quinolinate.

    PubMed

    González-Cortés, Carolina; Salinas-Lara, Citlaltepetl; Gómez-López, Marcos Artemio; Tena-Suck, Martha Lilia; Pérez-De La Cruz, Verónica; Rembao-Bojórquez, Daniel; Pedraza-Chaverrí, José; Gómez-Ruiz, Celedonio; Galván-Arzate, Sonia; Ali, Syed F; Santamaría, Abel

    2008-01-01

    It has been recently demonstrated that the reactive nitrogen species (RNS) peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) is involved in the neurotoxic pattern produced by quinolinic acid in the rat brain [V. Pérez-De La Cruz, C. González-Cortés, S. Galván-Arzate, O.N. Medina-Campos, F. Pérez-Severiano, S.F. Ali, J. Pedraza-Chaverrí, A. Santamaría, Excitotoxic brain damage involves early peroxynitrite formation in a model of Huntington's disease in rats: protective role of iron porphyrinate 5,10,15,20-tetrakis (4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrinate iron (III), Neuroscience 135 (2005) 463-474.]. The aim of this work was to investigate whether ONOO(-) can also be responsible for morphological alterations and inflammatory events in the same paradigm. For this purpose, we evaluated the effect of a pre-treatment with the iron porphyrinate Fe(TPPS), a well-known ONOO(-) decomposition catalyst (10 mg/kg, i.p., 120 min before lesion), on the quinolinate-induced striatal cell damage and immunoreactivities to glial-fibrilar acidic protein (GFAP), interleukin 6 (IL-6) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), one and seven days after the intrastriatal infusion of quinolinate (240 nmol/microl) to rats. The striatal tissue from animals lesioned by quinolinate showed a significant degree of damage and enhanced immunoreactivities to GFAP, IL-6 and iNOS, both at 1 and 7 days post-lesion. Pre-treatment of rats with Fe(TPPS) significantly attenuated or prevented all these markers at both post-lesion times tested, except for GFAP immunoreactivity at 7 days post-lesion and iNOS immunoreactivity at 1 day post-lesion. Altogether, our results suggest that ONOO(-) is actively participating in triggering inflammatory events and morphological alterations in the toxic model produced by quinolinate, since the use of agents affecting its formation, such as Fe(TPPS), are effective experimental tools to reduce the brain lesions associated to excitotoxic and oxidative damage. PMID:18579343

  13. Transcription Factor EB Is Selectively Reduced in the Nuclear Fractions of Alzheimer's and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Brains

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongjie

    2016-01-01

    Multiple studies suggest that autophagy is strongly dysregulated in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), as evidenced by accumulation of numerous autophagosomes, lysosomes with discontinuous membranes, and aggregated proteins in the patients' brains. Transcription factor EB (TFEB) was recently discovered to be a master regulator of lysosome biogenesis and autophagy. To examine whether aberrant autophagy in AD and ALS is due to alterations in TFEB expression, we systematically quantified the levels of TFEB in these brains by immunoblotting. Interestingly, cytoplasmic fractions of AD brains showed increased levels of normalized (to tubulin) TFEB only at Braak stage IV (61%, p < 0.01). Most importantly, normalized (to lamin) TFEB levels in the nuclear fractions were consistently reduced starting from Braak stage IV (52%, p < 0.01), stage V (67%, p < 0.01), and stage VI (85%, p < 0.01) when compared to normal control (NC) brains. In the ALS brains also, nuclear TFEB levels were reduced by 62% (p < 0.001). These data suggest that nuclear TFEB is selectively lost in ALS as well as AD brains, in which TFEB reduction was Braak-stage-dependent. Taken together, the observed reductions in TFEB protein levels may be responsible for the widely reported autophagy defects in these disorders. PMID:27433468

  14. [MODELING INFLAMMATORY EDEMA: ARE THE MODELS INTERCHANGEABLE].

    PubMed

    Hanh, Cong Hong; Khaziakhmetova, V N; Ziganshina, L E

    2015-01-01

    Experimental modeling of inflammatory edema by sub-plantar injection of carrageenan and formalin in mice and rats is widely used to evaluate potential anti-inflammatory activity of new drugs. This systematic analysis of published data showed that carrageenan induced paw edema model is used for evaluating the anti-inflammatory activity mostly in rats rather than mice. Formalin induced paw edema in rats and mice is used primarily for evaluation of the analgesic activity of drugs. Taken together, the results of this systematic review of available literature on edema modeling substantiate recommendation to use carrageenan paw edema in rats and formalin paw edema in mice as complementary, but not interchangeable models of inflammation. PMID:26591204

  15. Correlation between subacute sensorimotor deficits and brain water content after surgical brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    McBride, Devin W; Wang, Yuechun; Sherchan, Prativa; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H

    2015-09-01

    Brain edema is a major contributor to poor outcome and reduced quality of life after surgical brain injury (SBI). Although SBI pathophysiology is well-known, the correlation between cerebral edema and neurological deficits has not been thoroughly examined in the rat model of SBI. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine the correlation between brain edema and deficits in standard sensorimotor neurobehavior tests for rats subjected to SBI. Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to either sham surgery or surgical brain injury via partial frontal lobectomy. All animals were tested for neurological deficits 24 post-SBI and fourteen were also tested 72 h after surgery using seven common behavior tests: modified Garcia neuroscore (Neuroscore), beam walking, corner turn test, forelimb placement test, adhesive removal test, beam balance test, and foot fault test. After assessing the functional outcome, animals were euthanized for brain water content measurement. Surgical brain injury resulted in significantly elevated frontal lobe brain water content 24 and 72 h after surgery compared to that of sham animals. In all behavior tests, significance was observed between sham and SBI animals. However, a correlation between brain water content and functional outcome was observed for all tests except Neuroscore. The selection of behavior tests is critical to determine the effectiveness of therapeutics. Based on this study's results, we recommend using beam walking, the corner turn test, the beam balance test, and the foot fault test since correlations with brain water content were observed at both 24 and 72 h post-SBI. PMID:25975171

  16. Diabetic Macular Edema: Options for Adjunct Therapy.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Pilar; Abadia, Beatriz; Ferreras, Antonio; Ruiz-Moreno, Oscar; Verdes, Guayente; Pablo, Luis E

    2015-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic disease that affects 387 million people worldwide. Diabetic retinopathy (DR), a common complication of DM, is the main cause of blindness in the active population. Diabetic macular edema (DME) may occur at any stage of DR, and is characterized by vascular hyperpermeability accompanied by hard exudates within the macula. Medical and surgical therapies have dramatically reduced the progression of DR, and timely intervention can reduce the risk of severe vision loss by more than 90 %. In 2012, intravitreal ranibizumab became the first antivascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) agent approved for DME and, since then, many reports of the use of ranibizumab for DME have been promising. Randomized, prospective, multicenter clinical trials-most notably, RESOLVE, READ-2, RISE/RIDE, RESTORE, DRCR.net protocol I, and RETAIN-reported improvements in best-corrected visual acuity and decreased central retinal thickness as measured with optical coherence tomography in patients with DME. Similar treatment benefits have also been noted in clinical trials evaluating intravitreal aflibercept and bevacizumab (DAVINCI, VISTA/VIVID, and BOLT) and more recently DRCR.net protocol T. Intravitreal steroids (dexamethasone intravitreal implant and fluocinolone acetonide), particularly in refractory cases, also play a significant role in the management of DME (MEAD/CHAMPLAIN and FAMOUS/FAME studies). In summary, over the last 5 years, blocking VEGF and inflammation has been shown to improve visual outcomes in patients with macular edema due to DM, revolutionizing the treatment of center-involved DME and establishing a new standard of care. PMID:26242766

  17. Association of reduced folate carrier-1 (RFC-1) polymorphisms with ischemic stroke and silent brain infarction.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yunkyung; Kim, Jung O; Lee, Jeong Han; Park, Hye Mi; Jeon, Young Joo; Oh, Seung Hun; Bae, Jinkun; Park, Young Seok; Kim, Ok Joon; Kim, Nam Keun

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is the second leading cause of death in the world and in South Korea. Ischemic stroke and silent brain infarction (SBI) are complex, multifactorial diseases influenced by multiple genetic and environmental factors. Moderately elevated plasma homocysteine levels are a major risk factor for vascular diseases, including stroke and SBI. Folate and vitamin B12 are important regulators of homocysteine metabolism. Reduced folate carrier (RFC), a bidirectional anion exchanger, mediates folate delivery to a variety of cells. We selected three known RFC-1 polymorphisms (-43C>T, 80A>G, 696T>C) and investigated their relationship to cerebral infarction in the Korean population. We used the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method to analyze associations between the three RFC-1 polymorphisms, disease status, and folate and homocysteine levels in 584 ischemic stroke patients, 353 SBI patients, and 505 control subjects. The frequencies of the RFC-1 -43TT, 80GG, and 696CC genotypes differed significantly between the stroke and control groups. The RFC-1 80A>G substitution was also associated with small artery occlusion and SBI. In a gene-environment analysis, the RFC-1 -43C>T, 80A>G, and 696T>C polymorphisms in the ischemic stroke group had combined effects with all environmental factors. In summary, we found that the RFC-1 -43C>T, 80A>G, and 696T>C polymorphisms may be risk factors for ischemic stroke. PMID:25659099

  18. Neutrophil Protease Inhibition Reduces Neuromyelitis Optica–Immunoglobulin G–Induced Damage in Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Saadoun, Samira; Waters, Patrick; MacDonald, Claire; Bell, B. Anthony; Vincent, Angela; Verkman, A.S.; Papadopoulos, Marios C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system associated with pathogenic autoantibodies against the astrocyte water channel protein aquaporin-4 (AQP4). The presence of neutrophils is a characteristic feature in NMO lesions in humans. Neutrophils are not generally found in multiple sclerosis lesions. We evaluated the role of neutrophils in a mouse NMO model. Methods NMO lesions were produced in mice by intracerebral injection of immunoglobulin G (IgG) isolated from NMO patient serum and human complement. We previously reported that this mouse model produces the characteristic histological features of NMO, including perivascular complement activation, inflammatory cell infiltration, and loss of myelin, AQP4, and glial fibrillary acidic protein. Lesions are absent when AQP4 null mice are used or when IgG from non-NMO patients is injected. Results We found remarkably reduced neuroinflammation, myelin loss, and AQP4 loss in brains of neutropenic mice at 24 hours and 7 days, and increased severity of NMO lesions in mice made neutrophilic by granulocyte colony stimulating factor. NMO lesions were greatly reduced by intracerebral administration of the neutrophil protease inhibitors Sivelestat and cathepsin G inhibitor I or by intraperitoneal injection of Sivelestat alone. Immunostaining of human NMO lesions for neutrophil elastase revealed many degranulating perivascular neutrophils, with no equivalent perivascular neutrophils in human multiple sclerosis lesions. Interpretation Our data implicate a central role of neutrophils in the pathogenesis of early NMO lesions and suggest the potential utility of neutrophil protease inhibitors such as Sivelestat in NMO therapy. PMID:22374891

  19. Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation May Reduce Medication Costs in Early Stage Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hacker, Mallory L.; Currie, Amanda D.; Molinari, Anna L.; Turchan, Maxim; Millan, Sarah M.; Heusinkveld, Lauren E.; Roach, Jonathon; Konrad, Peter E.; Davis, Thomas L.; Neimat, Joseph S.; Phibbs, Fenna T.; Hedera, Peter; Byrne, Daniel W.; Charles, David

    2016-01-01

    Background: Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) is well-known to reduce medication burden in advanced stage Parkinson’s disease (PD). Preliminary data from a prospective, single blind, controlled pilot trial demonstrated that early stage PD subjects treated with STN-DBS also required less medication than those treated with optimal drug therapy (ODT). Objective: The purpose of this study was to analyze medication cost and utilization from the pilot trial of DBS in early stage PD and to project 10 year medication costs. Methods: Medication data collected at each visit were used to calculate medication costs. Medications were converted to levodopa equivalent daily dose, categorized by medication class, and compared. Medication costs were projected to advanced stage PD, the time when a typical patient may be offered DBS. Results: Medication costs increased 72% in the ODT group and decreased 16% in the DBS+ODT group from baseline to 24 months. This cost difference translates into a cumulative savings for the DBS+ODT group of $7,150 over the study period. Projected medication cost savings over 10 years reach $64,590. Additionally, DBS+ODT subjects were 80% less likely to require polypharmacy compared with ODT subjects at 24 months (p <  0.05; OR = 0.2; 95% CI: 0.04–0.97). Conclusions: STN-DBS in early PD reduced medication cost over the two-year study period. DBS may offer substantial long-term reduction in medication cost by maintaining a simplified, low dose medication regimen. Further study is needed to confirm these findings, and the FDA has approved a pivotal, multicenter clinical trial evaluating STN-DBS in early PD. PMID:26967937

  20. Reexpansion pulmonary edema in children

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Antonio Lucas L.; Lopes, Carlos Eduardo; Romaneli, Mariana Tresoldi das N.; Fraga, Andrea de Melo A.; Pereira, Ricardo Mendes; Tresoldi, Antonia Teresinha

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To present a case of a patient with clinical and radiological features of reexpansion pulmonary edema, a rare and potentially fatal disease. CASE DESCRIPTION An 11-year-old boy presenting fever, clinical signs and radiological features of large pleural effusion initially treated as a parapneumonic process. Due to clinical deterioration he underwent tube thoracostomy, with evacuation of 3,000 mL of fluid; he shortly presented acute respiratory insufficiency and needed mechanical ventilation. He had an atypical evolution (extubated twice with no satisfactory response). Computerized tomography findings matched those of reexpansion edema. He recovered satisfactorily after intensive care, and pleural tuberculosis was diagnosed afterwards. COMMENTS Despite its rareness in the pediatric population (only five case reports gathered), the knowledge of this pathology and its prevention is very important, due to high mortality rates. It is recommended, among other measures, slow evacuation of the pleural effusion, not removing more than 1,500 mL of fluid at once. PMID:24142327

  1. Acetate supplementation increases brain phosphocreatine and reduces AMP levels with no effect on mitochondrial biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Dhaval P.; Houdek, Heidi M.; Watt, John A.; Rosenberger, Thad A.

    2013-01-01

    Acetate supplementation in rats increases plasma acetate and brain acetyl-CoA levels. Although acetate is used as a marker to study glial energy metabolism, the effect that acetate supplementation has on normal brain energy stores has not been quantified. To determine the effect(s) that an increase in acetyl-CoA levels has on brain energy metabolism, we measured brain nucleotide, phosphagen and glycogen levels, and quantified cardiolipin content and mitochondrial number in rats subjected to acetate supplementation. Acetate supplementation was induced with glyceryl triacetate (GTA) by oral gavage (6 g/Kg body weight). Rats used for biochemical analysis were euthanized using head-focused microwave irradiation at 2, and 4 hr following treatment to immediately stop metabolism. We found that acetate did not alter brain ATP, ADP, NAD, GTP levels, or the energy charge ratio [ECR, (ATP + ½ ADP) / (ATP + ADP + AMP)] when compared to controls. However, after 4 hr of treatment brain phosphocreatine levels were significantly elevated with a concomitant reduction in AMP levels with no change in glycogen levels. In parallel studies where rats were treated with GTA for 28 days, we found that acetate did not alter brain glycogen and mitochondrial biogenesis as determined by measuring brain cardiolipin content, the fatty acid composition of cardiolipin and using quantitative ultra-structural analysis to determine mitochondrial density/unit area of cytoplasm in hippocampal CA3 neurons. Collectively, these data suggest that an increase in brain acetyl-CoA levels by acetate supplementation does increase brain energy stores however it has no effect on brain glycogen and neuronal mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:23321384

  2. A novel multi-target ligand (JM-20) protects mitochondrial integrity, inhibits brain excitatory amino acid release and reduces cerebral ischemia injury in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Nuñez-Figueredo, Yanier; Ramírez-Sánchez, Jeney; Hansel, Gisele; Simões Pires, Elisa Nicoloso; Merino, Nelson; Valdes, Odalys; Delgado-Hernández, René; Parra, Alicia Lagarto; Ochoa-Rodríguez, Estael; Verdecia-Reyes, Yamila; Salbego, Christianne; Costa, Silvia L; Souza, Diogo O; Pardo-Andreu, Gilberto L

    2014-10-01

    We previously showed that JM-20, a novel 1,5-benzodiazepine fused to a dihydropyridine moiety, possessed an anxiolytic profile similar to diazepam and strong neuroprotective activity in different cell models relevant to cerebral ischemia. Here, we investigated whether JM-20 protects against ischemic neuronal damage in vitro and in vivo. The effects of JM-20 were evaluated on hippocampal slices subjected to oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). For in vivo studies, Wistar rats were subjected 90 min of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) and oral administration of JM-20 at 2, 4 and 8 mg/kg 1 h following reperfusion. Twenty-four hours after cerebral blood flow restoration, neurological deficits were scored, and the infarct volume, histopathological changes in cortex, number of hippocampal and striatal neurons, and glutamate/aspartate concentrations in the cerebrospinal fluid were measured. Susceptibility to brain mitochondrial swelling, membrane potential dissipation, H2O2 generation, cytochrome c release, Ca2+ accumulation, and morphological changes in the organelles were assessed 24 h post-ischemia. In vitro, JM-20 (1 and 10 μM) administered during reperfusion significantly reduced cell death in hippocampal slices subjected to OGD. In vivo, JM-20 treatment (4 and 8 mg/kg) significantly decreased neurological deficit scores, edema formation, total infarct volumes and histological alterations in different brain regions. JM-20 treatment also protected brain mitochondria from ischemic damage, most likely by preventing Ca2+ accumulation in organelles. Moreover, an 8-mg/kg JM-20 dose reduced glutamate and aspartate concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid and the deleterious effects of MCAo even when delivered 8 h after blood flow restoration. These results suggest that in rats, JM-20 is a robust neuroprotective agent against ischemia/reperfusion injury with a wide therapeutic window. Our findings support the further examination of potential clinical JM-20 use to treat

  3. Normobaric hyperoxia markedly reduces brain damage and sensorimotor deficits following brief focal ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Ejaz, Sohail; Emmrich, Julius V; Sitnikov, Sergey L; Hong, Young T; Sawiak, Stephen J; Fryer, Tim D; Aigbirhio, Franklin I; Williamson, David J; Baron, Jean-Claude

    2016-03-01

    'True' transient ischaemic attacks are characterized not only clinically, but also radiologically by a lack of corresponding changes on magnetic resonance imaging. During a transient ischaemic attack it is assumed that the affected tissue is penumbral but rescued by early spontaneous reperfusion. There is, however, evidence from rodent studies that even brief focal ischaemia not resulting in tissue infarction can cause extensive selective neuronal loss associated with long-lasting sensorimotor impairment but normal magnetic resonance imaging. Selective neuronal loss might therefore contribute to the increasingly recognized cognitive impairment occurring in patients with transient ischaemic attacks. It is therefore relevant to consider treatments to reduce brain damage occurring with transient ischaemic attacks. As penumbral neurons are threatened by markedly constrained oxygen delivery, improving the latter by increasing arterial O2 content would seem logical. Despite only small increases in arterial O2 content, normobaric oxygen therapy experimentally induces significant increases in penumbral O2 pressure and by such may maintain the penumbra alive until reperfusion. Nevertheless, the effects of normobaric oxygen therapy on infarct volume in rodent models have been conflicting, although duration of occlusion appeared an important factor. Likewise, in the single randomized trial published to date, early-administered normobaric oxygen therapy had no significant effect on clinical outcome despite reduced diffusion-weighted imaging lesion growth during therapy. Here we tested the hypothesis that normobaric oxygen therapy prevents both selective neuronal loss and sensorimotor deficits in a rodent model mimicking true transient ischaemic attack. Normobaric oxygen therapy was applied from the onset and until completion of 15 min distal middle cerebral artery occlusion in spontaneously hypertensive rats, a strain representative of the transient ischaemic attack

  4. Property-based design of a glucosylceramide synthase inhibitor that reduces glucosylceramide in the brain[S

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Scott D.; Wilson, Michael W.; Abe, Akira; Shu, Liming; George, Christopher H.; Kirchhoff, Paul; Showalter, H. D. Hollis; Xiang, Jianming; Keep, Richard F.; Shayman, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Synthesis inhibition is the basis for the treatment of type 1 Gaucher disease by the glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) inhibitor eliglustat tartrate. However, the extended use of eliglustat and related compounds for the treatment of glycosphingolipid storage diseases with CNS manifestations is limited by the lack of brain penetration of this drug. Property modeling around the D-threo-1-phenyl-2-decanoylamino-3-morpholino-propanol (PDMP) pharmacophore was employed in a search for compounds of comparable activity against the GCS but lacking P-glycoprotein (MDR1) recognition. Modifications of the carboxamide N-acyl group were made to lower total polar surface area and rotatable bond number. Compounds were screened for inhibition of GCS in crude enzyme and whole cell assays and for MDR1 substrate recognition. One analog, 2-(2,3-dihydro-1H-inden-2-yl)-N-((1R,2R)-1-(2,3-dihydrobenzo[b][1,4]dioxin-6-yl)-1-hydroxy-3-(pyrrolidin-1-yl)propan-2-yl)acetamide (CCG-203586), was identified that inhibited GCS at low nanomolar concentrations with little to no apparent recognition by MDR1. Intraperitoneal administration of this compound to mice for 3 days resulted in a significant dose dependent decrease in brain glucosylceramide content, an effect not seen in mice dosed in parallel with eliglustat tartrate. PMID:22058426

  5. Mitochondrial Complex 1 Activity Measured by Spectrophotometry Is Reduced across All Brain Regions in Ageing and More Specifically in Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial function, in particular complex 1 of the electron transport chain (ETC), has been shown to decrease during normal ageing and in neurodegenerative disease. However, there is some debate concerning which area of the brain has the greatest complex 1 activity. It is important to identify the pattern of activity in order to be able to gauge the effect of age or disease related changes. We determined complex 1 activity spectrophotometrically in the cortex, brainstem and cerebellum of middle aged mice (70–71 weeks), a cerebellar ataxic neurodegeneration model (pcd5J) and young wild type controls. We share our updated protocol on the measurements of complex1 activity and find that mitochondrial fractions isolated from frozen tissues can be measured for robust activity. We show that complex 1 activity is clearly highest in the cortex when compared with brainstem and cerebellum (p<0.003). Cerebellum and brainstem mitochondria exhibit similar levels of complex 1 activity in wild type brains. In the aged brain we see similar levels of complex 1 activity in all three-brain regions. The specific activity of complex 1 measured in the aged cortex is significantly decreased when compared with controls (p<0.0001). Both the cerebellum and brainstem mitochondria also show significantly reduced activity with ageing (p<0.05). The mouse model of ataxia predictably has a lower complex 1 activity in the cerebellum, and although reductions are measured in the cortex and brain stem, the remaining activity is higher than in the aged brains. We present clear evidence that complex 1 activity decreases across the brain with age and much more specifically in the cerebellum of the pcd5j mouse. Mitochondrial impairment can be a region specific phenomenon in disease, but in ageing appears to affect the entire brain, abolishing the pattern of higher activity in cortical regions. PMID:27333203

  6. Involvement of COX2-Thromboxane Pathway in TCDD-Induced Precardiac Edema in Developing Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Teraoka, Hiroki; Okuno, Yuki; Nijoukubo, Daisuke; Yamakoshi, Ayumi; Peterson, Richard E.; Stegeman, John J.; Kitazawa, Takio; Hiraga, Takeo; Kubota, Akira

    2015-01-01

    The cardiovascular system is one of the most characteristic and important targets for developmental toxicity by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in fish larvae. However, knowledge of the mechanism of TCDD-induced edema after heterodimerization of aryl hydrocarbon receptor type 2 (AHR2) and AHR nuclear translocator type 1 (ARNT1) is still limited. In the present study, microscopic analysis with a high-speed camera revealed that TCDD increased the size of a small cavity between the heart and body wall in early eleutheroembryos, a toxic effect that we designate as precardiac edema. A concentration-response curve for precardiac edema at 2 days post fertilization (dpf) showed close similarity to that for conventional pericardial edema at 3 dpf. Precardiac edema caused by TCDD was reduced by morpholino knockdown of AHR2 and ARNT1, as well as by an antioxidant (ascorbic acid). A selective inhibitor of cyclooxygenase type 2 (COX2), NS398, also markedly inhibited TCDD-induced precardiac edema. A thromboxane receptor (TP) antagonist, ICI-192,605 almost abolished TCDD-induced precardiac edema and this effect was cancelled by U46619, a TP agonist, which was not influential in the action of TCDD by itself. Knockdown of COX2b and thromboxane A synthase 1 (TBXS), but not COX2a, strongly reduced TCDD-induced precardiac edema. Knockdown of COX2b was without effect on mesencephalic circulation failure caused by TCDD. The edema by TCDD was also inhibited by knockdown of c-mpl, a thrombopoietin receptor necessary for thromobocyte production. Finally, induction of COX2b, but not COX2a, by TCDD was seen in eleutheroembryos at 3 dpf. These results suggest a role of the COX2b-thromboxane pathway in precardiac edema formation following TCDD exposure in developing zebrafish. PMID:24858302

  7. Involvement of COX2-thromboxane pathway in TCDD-induced precardiac edema in developing zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Teraoka, Hiroki; Okuno, Yuki; Nijoukubo, Daisuke; Yamakoshi, Ayumi; Peterson, Richard E; Stegeman, John J; Kitazawa, Takio; Hiraga, Takeo; Kubota, Akira

    2014-09-01

    The cardiovascular system is one of the most characteristic and important targets for developmental toxicity by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in fish larvae. However, knowledge of the mechanism of TCDD-induced edema after heterodimerization of aryl hydrocarbon receptor type 2 (AHR2) and AHR nuclear translocator type 1 (ARNT1) is still limited. In the present study, microscopic analysis with a high-speed camera revealed that TCDD increased the size of a small cavity between the heart and body wall in early eleutheroembryos, a toxic effect that we designate as precardiac edema. A concentration-response curve for precardiac edema at 2 days post fertilization (dpf) showed close similarity to that for conventional pericardial edema at 3 dpf. Precardiac edema caused by TCDD was reduced by morpholino knockdown of AHR2 and ARNT1, as well as by an antioxidant (ascorbic acid). A selective inhibitor of cyclooxygenase type 2 (COX2), NS398, also markedly inhibited TCDD-induced precardiac edema. A thromboxane receptor (TP) antagonist, ICI-192,605 almost abolished TCDD-induced precardiac edema and this effect was canceled by U46619, a TP agonist, which was not influential in the action of TCDD by itself. Knockdown of COX2b and thromboxane A synthase 1 (TBXS), but not COX2a, strongly reduced TCDD-induced precardiac edema. Knockdown of COX2b was without effect on mesencephalic circulation failure caused by TCDD. The edema by TCDD was also inhibited by knockdown of c-mpl, a thrombopoietin receptor necessary for thromobocyte production. Finally, induction of COX2b, but not COX2a, by TCDD was seen in eleutheroembryos at 3 dpf. These results suggest a role of the COX2b-thromboxane pathway in precardiac edema formation following TCDD exposure in developing zebrafish. PMID:24858302

  8. Anandamide inhibits Theiler's virus induced VCAM-1 in brain endothelial cells and reduces leukocyte transmigration in a model of blood brain barrier by activation of CB1 receptors

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background VCAM-1 represents one of the most important adhesion molecule involved in the transmigration of blood leukocytes across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) that is an essential step in the pathogenesis of MS. Several evidences have suggested the potential therapeutic value of cannabinoids (CBs) in the treatment of MS and their experimental models. However, the effects of endocannabinoids on VCAM-1 regulation are poorly understood. In the present study we investigated the effects of anandamide (AEA) in the regulation of VCAM-1 expression induced by Theiler's virus (TMEV) infection of brain endothelial cells using in vitro and in vivo approaches. Methods i) in vitro: VCAM-1 was measured by ELISA in supernatants of brain endothelial cells infected with TMEV and subjected to AEA and/or cannabinoid receptors antagonist treatment. To evaluate the functional effect of VCAM-1 modulation we developed a blood brain barrier model based on a system of astrocytes and brain endothelial cells co-culture. ii) in vivo: CB1 receptor deficient mice (Cnr1-/-) infected with TMEV were treated with the AEA uptake inhibitor UCM-707 for three days. VCAM-1 expression and microglial reactivity were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Results Anandamide-induced inhibition of VCAM-1 expression in brain endothelial cell cultures was mediated by activation of CB1 receptors. The study of leukocyte transmigration confirmed the functional relevance of VCAM-1 inhibition by AEA. In vivo approaches also showed that the inhibition of AEA uptake reduced the expression of brain VCAM-1 in response to TMEV infection. Although a decreased expression of VCAM-1 by UCM-707 was observed in both, wild type and CB1 receptor deficient mice (Cnr1-/-), the magnitude of VCAM-1 inhibition was significantly higher in the wild type mice. Interestingly, Cnr1-/- mice showed enhanced microglial reactivity and VCAM-1 expression following TMEV infection, indicating that the lack of CB1 receptor exacerbated

  9. Targeting Kv1.3 channels to reduce white matter pathology after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Thomas M; Trimmer, Patricia A; Colley, Beverly S; Phillips, Linda L

    2016-09-01

    Axonal injury is present in essentially all clinically significant cases of traumatic brain injury (TBI). While no effective treatment has been identified to date, experimental TBI models have shown promising axonal protection using immunosuppressants FK506 and Cyclosporine-A, with treatment benefits attributed to calcineurin inhibition or protection of mitochondrial function. However, growing evidence suggests neuroprotective efficacy of these compounds may also involve direct modulation of ion channels, and in particular Kv1.3. The present study tested whether blockade of Kv1.3 channels, using Clofazimine (CFZ), would alleviate TBI-induced white matter pathology in rodents. Postinjury CFZ administration prevented suppression of compound action potential (CAP) amplitude in the corpus callosum of adult rats following midline fluid percussion TBI, with injury and treatment effects primarily expressed in unmyelinated CAPs. Kv1.3 protein levels in callosal tissue extracts were significantly reduced postinjury, but this loss was prevented by CFZ treatment. In parallel, CFZ also attenuated the injury-induced elevation in pro-inflammatory cytokine IL1-β. The effects of CFZ on glial function were further studied using mixed microglia/astrocyte cell cultures derived from P3-5 mouse corpus callosum. Cultures of callosal glia challenged with lipopolysaccharide exhibited a dramatic increase in IL1-β levels, accompanied by reactive morphological changes in microglia, both of which were attenuated by CFZ treatment. These results support a cell specific role for Kv1.3 signaling in white matter pathology after TBI, and suggest a treatment approach based on the blockade of these channels. This therapeutic strategy may be especially efficacious for normalizing neuro-glial interactions affecting unmyelinated axons after TBI. PMID:27302680

  10. THYROID HORMONE INSUFFICIENCY DURING BRAIN DEVELOPMENT REDUCES PARVALBUMIN IMMUNOREACTIVITY AND INHIBITORY FUNCTION IN THE HIPPOCAMPUS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA must evaluate the risk of exposure of the developing brain to chemicals with the potential to disrupt thyroid hormone homeostasis. The existing literature identifies morphological and neurochemical indices of severe neonatal hypothyroidism in the early postnatal period i...

  11. Reinke Edema: Watch For Vocal Fold Cysts.

    PubMed

    Tüzüner, Arzu; Demirci, Sule; Yavanoglu, Ahmet; Kurkcuoglu, Melih; Arslan, Necmi

    2015-06-01

    Reinke edema is one of the common cause of dysphonia middle-aged population, and severe thickening of vocal folds require surgical treatment. Smoking plays a major role on etiology. Vocal fold cysts are also benign lesions and vocal trauma blamed for acquired cysts. We would like to present 3 cases with vocal fold cyst related with Reinke edema. First case had a subepidermal epidermoid cyst with Reinke edema, which could be easily observed before surgery during laryngostroboscopy. Second case had a mucous retention cyst into the edematous Reinke tissue, which was detected during surgical intervention, and third case had a epidermoid cyst that occurred 2 months after before microlaryngeal operation regarding Reinke edema reduction. These 3 cases revealed that surgical management of Reinke edema needs a careful dissection and close follow-up after surgery for presence of vocal fold cysts. PMID:26080256

  12. Minocycline Transiently Reduces Microglia/Macrophage Activation but Exacerbates Cognitive Deficits Following Repetitive Traumatic Brain Injury in the Neonatal Rat.

    PubMed

    Hanlon, Lauren A; Huh, Jimmy W; Raghupathi, Ramesh

    2016-03-01

    Elevated microglial/macrophage-associated biomarkers in the cerebrospinal fluid of infant victims of abusive head trauma (AHT) suggest that these cells play a role in the pathophysiology of the injury. In a model of AHT in 11-day-old rats, 3 impacts (24 hours apart) resulted in spatial learning and memory deficits and increased brain microglial/macrophage reactivity, traumatic axonal injury, neuronal degeneration, and cortical and white-matter atrophy. The antibiotic minocycline has been effective in decreasing injury-induced microglial/macrophage activation while simultaneously attenuating cellular and functional deficits in models of neonatal hypoxic ischemia, but the potential for this compound to rescue deficits after impact-based trauma to the immature brain remains unexplored. Acute minocycline administration in this model of AHT decreased microglial/macrophage reactivity in the corpus callosum of brain-injured animals at 3 days postinjury, but this effect was lost by 7 days postinjury. Additionally, minocycline treatment had no effect on traumatic axonal injury, neurodegeneration, tissue atrophy, or spatial learning deficits. Interestingly, minocycline-treated animals demonstrated exacerbated injury-induced spatial memory deficits. These results contrast with previous findings in other models of brain injury and suggest that minocycline is ineffective in reducing microglial/macrophage activation and ameliorating injury-induced deficits following repetitive neonatal traumatic brain injury. PMID:26825312

  13. Hyaluronidase injection for the treatment of eyelid edema: a retrospective analysis of 20 patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hyaluronidase (Hylase Dessau®) is a hyaluronic acid-metabolizing enzyme, which has been shown to loosen the extracellular matrix, thereby improving the diffusion of local anesthetics. Lower eyelid edema is a common post-interventional complication of cosmetic procedures performed in the lid region, such as the injection of hyaluronic acid fillers for tear-trough augmentation. The purpose of this study was to validate the efficacy of hyaluronidase in the management of lower eyelid edema. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis with 20 patients with lower eyelid edema. Most patients (n = 14) presented with edema following hyaluronic acid injection (tear-trough augmentation), whereas the minority (n = 6) were treated due to idiopathic edema (malar edema or malar mounds). Patients were treated by local infiltration of approximately 0.2 ml to 0.5 ml of hyaluronidase (Hylase Dessau® 20 IU to 75 IU) per eyelid. Photographs were taken prior to and seven days after infiltration. Results Hyaluronidase was found to reduce effectively and rapidly or resolve eyelid edema after a single injection. No relevant adverse effects were observed. However, it must be noted that a hyaluronidase injection may also dissolve injected hyaluronic acid fillers and may therefore negatively affect tear-trough augmentations. While the effects of a treatment for edema due to tear-trough augmentation were permanent, malar edema and malar mounds reoccurred within two to three weeks. Conclusion The infiltration of hyaluronidase is rapid, safe and currently the only effective option for the management of eyelid edema. No relevant adverse effects were observed. PMID:24886711

  14. Analysis of lymphatic drainage in various forms of leg edema using two compartment lymphoscintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Bräutigam, P; Földi, E; Schaiper, I; Krause, T; Vanscheidt, W; Moser, E

    1998-06-01

    The anatomical and functional status of the epifascial and subfascial lymphatic compartments was analyzed using two compartment lymphoscintigraphy in five groups of patients (total 55) with various forms of edema of the lower extremities. Digital whole body scintigraphy enabled semiquantitative estimation of radiotracer transport with comparison of lymphatic drainage between those individuals without (normal) and those with leg edema by calculating the uptake of the radiopharmaceutical transported to regional lymph nodes. A visual assessment of the lymphatic drainage pathways of the legs was also performed. In patients with cyclic idiopathic edema, an accelerated rate of lymphatic transport was detected (high lymph volume overload or dynamic insufficiency). In those with venous (phlebo) edemas, high volume lymphatic overload (dynamic insufficiency) of the epifascial compartment was scintigraphically detected by increased tracer uptake in regional nodes. In patients with deep femoral venous occlusion (post-thrombotic syndrome). subfascial lymphatic transport was uniformly markedly reduced (safety valve lymphatic insufficiency). On the other hand, in the epifascial compartment, lymph transport was accelerated. In those patients with recurrent or extensive skin ulceration, lymph transport was reduced. Patients with lipedema (obesity) scintigraphically showed no alteration in lymphatic transport. This study demonstrates that lymphatic drainage is notably affected (except in obesity termed lipedema) in various edemas of the leg. Lymphatic drainage varied depending on the specific compartment and the pathophysiologic mechanism accounting for the edema. Two compartment lymphoscintigraphy is a valuable diagnostic tool for accurate assessment of leg edema of known and unknown origin. PMID:9664268

  15. Atrial fibrillation is associated with reduced brain volume and cognitive function independent of cerebral infarcts

    PubMed Central

    Stefansdottir, Hrafnhildur; Arnar, David O.; Aspelund, Thor; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Jonsdottir, Maria K.; Hjaltason, Haukur; Launer, Lenore J.; Gudnason, Vilmundur

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Atrial fibrillation (AF) has been associated with cognitive decline independant of stroke, suggesting additional effects of AF on the brain. We aimed to assess the association between AF and brain function and structure in a general elderly population. Methods This is a cross-sectional analysis on 4251 non-demented participants (mean age 76 ± 5 years) in the population-based AGES-Reykjavik Study. Medical record data were collected on the presence, subtype and time from first diagnosis of AF; 330 participants had AF. Brain volume measurements, adjusted for intracranial volume, and presence of cerebral infarcts were determined with MRI. Memory, speed of processing and executive function composites were calculated from a cognitive test battery. In a multivariable linear regression model, adjustments were made for demographic, cardiovascular risk factors and cerebral infarcts. Results Participants with AF had lower total brain volume compared to those without AF (p<0.001). The association was stronger with persistent/permanent than paroxysmal AF and with increased time from the first diagnosis of the disease. Of the brain tissue volumes, AF was associated with lower volume of gray and white matter (p<0.001 and p=0.008 respectively) but not of white matter hyperintesities (p=0.49). Participants with AF scored lower on tests on memory. Conclusions AF is associated with smaller brain volume and the association is stronger with increasing burden of the arrhythmia. These findings suggest that AF has a cumulative negative effect on the brain independent of cerebral infarcts. PMID:23444303

  16. Xenon improves neurological outcome and reduces secondary injury following trauma in an in vivo model of traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Luh, Clara; Gruss, Marco; Radyushkin, Konstantin; Hirnet, Tobias; Werner, Christian; Engelhard, Kristin; Franks, Nicholas P; Thal, Serge C; Dickinson, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine the neuroprotective efficacy of the inert gas xenon following traumatic brain injury, and to determine whether application of xenon has a clinically relevant therapeutic time window. Design Controlled animal study. Setting University research laboratory. Subjects Male C57BL/6N mice (n=196) Interventions 75% xenon, 50% xenon or 30% xenon, with 25% oxygen (balance nitrogen) treatment following mechanical brain lesion by controlled cortical impact. Measurements & Main Results Outcome following trauma was measured using: 1) functional neurological outcome score, 2) histological measurement of contusion volume, 3) analysis of locomotor function and gait. Our study shows that xenon-treatment improves outcome following traumatic brain injury. Neurological outcome scores were significantly (p<0.05) better in xenon-treated groups in the early phase (24 hours) and up to 4 days after injury. Contusion volume was significantly (p<0.05) reduced in the xenon-treated groups. Xenon treatment significantly (p<0.05) reduced contusion volume when xenon was given 15 minutes after injury or when treatment was delayed 1 hour or 3 hours after injury. Neurological outcome was significantly (p<0.05) improved when xenon treatment was given 15 minutes or 1 hour after injury. Improvements in locomotor function (p<0.05) were observed in the xenon-treated group, 1 month after trauma. Conclusions These results show for the first time that xenon improves neurological outcome and reduces contusion volume following traumatic brain injury in mice. In this model, xenon application has a therapeutic time window of up to at least 3 hours. These findings support the idea that xenon may be of benefit as a neuroprotective treatment in brain trauma patients. PMID:25188549

  17. Neuronal hemoglobin in mitochondria is reduced by forming a complex with α-synuclein in aging monkey brains

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Weiwei; Li, Xuran; Li, Xin; Li, Xuying; Yu, Shun

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal hemoglobin (nHb) plays a critical role in maintaining normal mitochondrial functioning in the brain. However, in aging and Parkinson's disease (PD) brains, mitochondrial nHb levels are greatly reduced in neurons that accumulate α-synuclein (α-syn), suggesting a link between the two proteins. In this study, we demonstrate that α-syn and Hb can form a complex in both brain tissue and peripheral red blood cells (RBCs) in aging cynomolgus monkeys. nHb-α-syn complex levels in the mitochondrial fraction of the striatum decreased with age; this was negatively correlated with levels in the cytoplasmic fraction and in RBCs and was accompanied by a reduction in mitochondrial free nHb. In contrast, no changes in nHb-α-syn complex formation or free nHb levels were detected in the cerebellum. In vitro studies using a cultured dopaminergic cell line showed that intracellular accumulation of α-syn caused an elevation in nHb-α-syn complex levels in both mitochondrial and cytoplasmic fractions as well as a reduction in mitochondrial free nHb. nHb overexpression increased free nHb levels in mitochondria, stabilized mitochondrial membrane potential, and reduced α-syn-induced apoptosis. The above results suggest that α-syn forms a complex with nHb in selected regions of the aging brain, thereby decreasing mitochondrial function and increasing the risk of PD. PMID:26824991

  18. Brain BDNF levels elevation induced by physical training is reduced after unilateral common carotid artery occlusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Banoujaafar, Hayat; Van Hoecke, Jacques; Mossiat, Claude M; Marie, Christine

    2014-10-01

    We investigated the contribution of blood flow elevation in the cerebrovasculature to physical training-induced brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels elevation in the brain. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor protein levels were measured in the motor cortex 24 h after the last session of a forced treadmill walking (30 minutes a day, 18 m/minute for 7 consecutive days). Unilateral common carotid artery occlusion and modulation of exercise intensity (0 versus -10% inclination of the treadmill) were used as strategies to reduce the (normal) elevation of flow in the cerebrovasculature occurring during exercise. Administration of N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 60 mg/kg before each exercise sessions) and genetic hypertension (spontaneously hypertensive rats) were used as approaches to reduce stimulation of nitric oxide production in response to shear stress elevation. Vascular occlusion totally and partially abolished the effect of physical training on BDNF levels in the hemisphere ipsilateral and contralateral to occlusion, respectively. BDNF levels were higher after high than low exercise intensity. In addition, both genetic hypertension and L-NAME treatment blunted the effects of physical training on BDNF. From these results, we propose that elevation of brain BDNF levels elicited by physical training involves changes in cerebral hemodynamics. PMID:25052557

  19. Elevated Intracranial Pressure and Cerebral Edema following Permanent MCA Occlusion in an Ovine Model

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Adam J.; Vink, Robert; Helps, Stephen C.; Knox, Steven J.; Blumbergs, Peter C.; Turner, Renée J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Malignant middle cerebral artery (MCA) stroke has a disproportionately high mortality due to the rapid development of refractory space-occupying cerebral edema. Animal models are essential in developing successful anti-edema therapies; however to date poor clinical translation has been associated with the predominately used rodent models. As such, large animal gyrencephalic models of stroke are urgently needed. The aim of the study was to characterize the intracranial pressure (ICP) response to MCA occlusion in our recently developed ovine stroke model. Materials and Methods 30 adult female Merino sheep (n = 8–12/gp) were randomized to sham surgery, temporary or permanent proximal MCA occlusion. ICP and brain tissue oxygen were monitored for 24 hours under general anesthesia. MRI, infarct volume with triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining and histology were performed. Results No increase in ICP, radiological evidence of ischemia within the MCA territory but without space-occupying edema, and TTC infarct volumes of 7.9+/-5.1% were seen with temporary MCAO. Permanent MCAO resulted in significantly elevated ICP, accompanied by 30% mortality, radiological evidence of space-occupying cerebral edema and TTC infarct volumes of 27.4+/-6.4%. Conclusions Permanent proximal MCAO in the sheep results in space-occupying cerebral edema, raised ICP and mortality similar to human malignant MCA stroke. This animal model may prove useful for pre-clinical testing of anti-edema therapies that have shown promise in rodent studies. PMID:26121036

  20. Reducing iron in the brain: a novel pharmacologic mechanism of huperzine A in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiao-Tian; Qian, Zhong-Ming; He, Xuan; Gong, Qi; Wu, Ka-Chun; Jiang, Li-Rong; Lu, Li-Na; Zhu, Zhou-Jing; Zhang, Hai-Yan; Yung, Wing-Ho; Ke, Ya

    2014-05-01

    Huperzine A (HupA), a natural inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase derived from a plant, is a licensed anti-Alzheimer's disease (AD) drug in China and a nutraceutical in the United States. In addition to acting as an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, HupA possesses neuroprotective properties. However, the relevant mechanism is unknown. Here, we showed that the neuroprotective effect of HupA was derived from a novel action on brain iron regulation. HupA treatment reduced insoluble and soluble beta amyloid levels, ameliorated amyloid plaques formation, and hyperphosphorylated tau in the cortex and hippocampus of APPswe/PS1dE9 transgenic AD mice. Also, HupA decreased beta amyloid oligomers and amyloid precursor protein levels, and increased A Disintegrin And Metalloprotease Domain 10 (ADAM10) expression in these treated AD mice. However, these beneficial effects of HupA were largely abolished by feeding the animals with a high iron diet. In parallel, we found that HupA decreased iron content in the brain and demonstrated that HupA also has a role to reduce the expression of transferrin-receptor 1 as well as the transferrin-bound iron uptake in cultured neurons. The findings implied that reducing iron in the brain is a novel mechanism of HupA in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:24332448

  1. An Online Family Intervention to Reduce Parental Distress Following Pediatric Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Shari L.; Carey, Joanne; Wolfe, Christopher R.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined whether an online problem-solving intervention could improve parental adjustment following pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI). Families of children with moderate-to-severe TBI were recruited from the trauma registry of a large children's hospital and randomly assigned to receive online family problem solving therapy (FPS; n…

  2. Walnut diet reduces accumulation of polyubiquitinated proteins and inflammation in the brain of aged rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An increase in the aggregation of misfolded/damaged polyubiquitinated proteins has been the hallmark of many age-related neurodegenerative diseases. The accumulation of these potentially toxic proteins in brain increases with age, in part due to increased oxidative and inflammatory stresses. Walnuts...

  3. Reduced N400 Semantic Priming Effects in Adult Survivors of Paediatric and Adolescent Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knuepffer, C.; Murdoch, B. E.; Lloyd, D.; Lewis, F. M.; Hinchliffe, F. J.

    2012-01-01

    The immediate and long-term neural correlates of linguistic processing deficits reported following paediatric and adolescent traumatic brain injury (TBI) are poorly understood. Therefore, the current research investigated event-related potentials (ERPs) elicited during a semantic picture-word priming experiment in two groups of highly functioning…

  4. Berry fruit and nuts: their role in reducing oxidative stress and inflammation in the aging brain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Berry fruits and nuts are nutrient dense and contain a variety of bioactive phytochemicals, specifically polyphenols. A growing body of literature describes pre-clinical research, using both in vitro and in vivo techniques, which show beneficial effects of nut and berry consumption on the brain in ...

  5. Brain imaging: Reduced sensitivity of RARE-derived techniques to susceptibility effects

    SciTech Connect

    Reimer, P.; Allkemper, T.; Schuierer, G.; Peters, P.E.

    1996-03-01

    Our goal was to evaluate the decreased sensitivity of RARE-derived pulse sequences to susceptibility effects. A variety of RARE-derived T2-weighted fast SE echo (FSE) sequences with echo trains from 6 to 16 were compared with conventional SE (CSE) sequences by means of MRI in phantoms (iron oxides), volunteers (n = 10), and patients (n = 13) with old hemorrhagic brain lesions. All experiments were performed on a 1.5 T clinical MR system (Magnetom SP 4000; Siemens AG, Erlangen, Germany) with constant imaging parameters. Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) of tubes doped with iron oxides at different concentrations and brain areas with physiological iron deposition (red nucleus, substantia nigra) were calculated for CSE and FSE pulse sequences. Areas of old brain hemorrhage were analyzed for lesion conspicuity by blinded analysis with CSE as an internal standard. CNR of iron oxide tubes (TE 90 ins, CSE 45.0 {+-} 3.5, FSE 16 echo trains 28.5 {+-} 3. 1; p {le} 0.01) and iron-containing brain areas decreased with increasing echo trains of FSE sequences. A significantly lower number of old hemorrhagic brain lesions was visible in patients scanned with FSE sequences (6 echo trains: n = 28; 16 echo trains: n = 26) than CSE (n = 40). Our results demonstrate that the sensitivity of RARE-derived techniques to susceptibility effects is significantly decreased compared with CSE. CSE sequences or GE sequences should still be preferred in patients with a history of seizures or intracranial hemorrhage. 25 refs., 3 figs., 1 tabs.

  6. Calorie restriction reduces psychological stress reactivity and its association with brain volume and microstructure in aged rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Willette, Auriel A.; Coe, Christopher L.; Colman, Ricki J.; Bendlin, Barbara B; Kastman, Erik K; Field, Aaron S.; Alexander, Andrew L.; Allison, David B.; Weindruch, Richard H.; Johnson, Sterling C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Heightened stress reactivity is associated with hippocampal atrophy, age-related cognitive deficits, and increased risk for Alzheimer s disease. This temperament predisposition may aggravate age-associated brain pathology or be reflective of it. This association may be mediated through repeated activation of the stress hormone axis over time. Dietary interventions, such as calorie restriction (CR), affect stress biology and may moderate the pathogenic relationship between stress reactivity and brain in limbic and prefrontal regions. Methods Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) aged 19–31 years consumed either a standard diet (N=18) or were maintained on 30% CR relative to baseline intake (N=26) for 13–19 years. Behavior was rated in both normative and aversive contexts. Urinary cortisol was collected. Animals underwent magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to acquire volumetric and tissue microstructure data respectively. Voxel-wise statistics regressed a global stress reactivity factor, cortisol, and their interaction on brain indices across and between dietary groups. Results CR significantly reduced stress reactivity during aversive contexts without affecting activity, orientation, or attention behavior. Stress reactivity was associated with less volume and tissue density in areas important for emotional regulation and the endocrine axis including prefrontal cortices, hippocampus, amygdala, and hypothalamus. CR reduced these relationships. A Cortisol by Stress Reactivity voxel-wise interaction indicated that only monkeys with high stress reactivity and high basal cortisol demonstrated lower brain volume and tissue density in prefrontal cortices, hippocampus, and amygdala. Conclusions High stress reactivity predicted lower volume and microstructural tissue density in regions involved in emotional processing and modulation. A CR diet reduced stress reactivity and regional associations with neural modalities. High levels of

  7. Statins are Associated With a Reduced Risk of Brain Cancer: A Population-Based Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Brian K; Chiu, Hui-Fen; Yang, Chun-Yuh

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether statin utilization is associated with brain cancer risk.A population-based case-control study was conducted using nationally representative claims data from the National Health Insurance Bureau in Taiwan. Cases included all patients 50 years and older who received an index diagnosis of brain cancer between 2004 and 2011. Our controls were matched by age, sex, and index date. We estimated adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using multiple logistic regression.We examined 213 brain cancer cases and 852 controls. The unadjusted ORs for any statin prescription was 0.77 (95% CI = 0.50-1.18) and the adjusted OR was 0.59 (95% CI = 0.37-0.96). Compared with no use of statins, the adjusted ORs were 0.68 (95% CI = 0.38-1.24) for the group having been prescribed with statins with cumulative defined daily dose (DDD) below 144.67 DDDs and 0.50 (95% CI = 0.28-0.97) for the group with the cumulative statin use of 144.67 DDDs or more.The results of this study suggest that statins may reduce the risk of brain cancer. PMID:27124024

  8. Intranasal guanosine administration presents a wide therapeutic time window to reduce brain damage induced by permanent ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Denise Barbosa; Muller, Gabriel Cardozo; Rocha, Guilherme Botter Maio; Dellavia, Gustavo Hirata; Almeida, Roberto Farina; Pettenuzzo, Leticia Ferreira; Loureiro, Samanta Oliveira; Hansel, Gisele; Horn, Ângelo Cássio Magalhães; Souza, Diogo Onofre; Ganzella, Marcelo

    2016-03-01

    In addition to its intracellular roles, the nucleoside guanosine (GUO) also has extracellular effects that identify it as a putative neuromodulator signaling molecule in the central nervous system. Indeed, GUO can modulate glutamatergic neurotransmission, and it can promote neuroprotective effects in animal models involving glutamate neurotoxicity, which is the case in brain ischemia. In the present study, we aimed to investigate a new in vivo GUO administration route (intranasal, IN) to determine putative improvement of GUO neuroprotective effects against an experimental model of permanent focal cerebral ischemia. Initially, we demonstrated that IN [(3)H] GUO administration reached the brain in a dose-dependent and saturable pattern in as few as 5 min, presenting a higher cerebrospinal GUO level compared with systemic administration. IN GUO treatment started immediately or even 3 h after ischemia onset prevented behavior impairment. The behavior recovery was not correlated to decreased brain infarct volume, but it was correlated to reduced mitochondrial dysfunction in the penumbra area. Therefore, we showed that the IN route is an efficient way to promptly deliver GUO to the CNS and that IN GUO treatment prevented behavioral and brain impairment caused by ischemia in a therapeutically wide time window. PMID:26695181

  9. Reduced resting-state brain activity in the default mode network in children with (central) auditory processing disorders

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In recent years, there has been a growing interest in Central Auditory Processing Disorder (C)APD. However, the neural correlates of (C)APD are poorly understood. Previous neuroimaging experiments have shown changes in the intrinsic activity of the brain in various cognitive deficits and brain disorders. The present study investigated the spontaneous brain activity in (C)APD subjects with resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI). Methods Thirteen children diagnosed with (C)APD and fifteen age and gender-matched controls participated in a rs-fMRI study during which they were asked to relax keeping their eyes open. Two different techniques of the rs-fMRI data analysis were used: Regional Homogeneity (ReHo) and Independent Component Analysis (ICA), which approach is rare. Results Both methods of data analysis showed comparable results in the pattern of DMN activity within groups. Additionally, ReHo analysis revealed increased co-activation of the superior frontal gyrus, the posterior cingulate cortex/the precuneus in controls, compared to the (C)APD group. ICA yielded inconsistent results across groups. Conclusions Our ReHo results suggest that (C)APD children seem to present reduced regional homogeneity in brain regions considered a part of the default mode network (DMN). These findings might contribute to a better understanding of neural mechanisms of (C)APD. PMID:25261349

  10. Perspectives on edema in childhood nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Teoh, Chia Wei; Robinson, Lisa A; Noone, Damien

    2015-10-01

    There have been two major theories surrounding the development of edema in nephrotic syndrome (NS), namely, the under- and overfill hypotheses. Edema is one of the cardinal features of NS and remains one of the principal reasons for admission of children to the hospital. Recently, the discovery that proteases in the glomerular filtrate of patients with NS are activating the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), resulting in intrarenal salt retention and thereby contributing to edema, might suggest that targeting ENaC with amiloride might be a suitable strategy to manage the edema of NS. Other potential agents, particularly urearetics and aquaretics, might also prove useful in NS. Recent evidence also suggests that there may be other areas involved in salt storage, especially the skin, and it will be intriguing to study the implications of this in NS. PMID:26290369

  11. Pedal edema associated with atypical antipsychotics

    PubMed Central

    Munshi, Santanu; Mukherjee, Shatavisa; Saha, Indranil; Sen, Sukanta

    2016-01-01

    This study describes a patient diagnosed as a case of bipolar affective disorder complaining of bothersome incidence of pedal edema 1 month after the initiation of atypical antipsychotic regimen with risperidone and quetiapine. All hematological and biochemical profiles were found to be normal. On discontinuation of risperidone, the condition remained unresolved even after 2 weeks, and the edema progressed reaching her calves. On tapering the dose of quetiapine, she started showing gradual improvement in edematous condition. Quetiapine was slowly discontinued. No further recurrence of edema occurred, and hence, no further medication changes were implemented. Pedal edema was found to be resolved within weeks of dechallenge of the regimen. Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale gave a score of 7 which denotes “probable” adverse drug reaction with quetiapine. PMID:26997731

  12. Reduced N400 semantic priming effects in adult survivors of paediatric and adolescent traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Knuepffer, C; Murdoch, B E; Lloyd, D; Lewis, F M; Hinchliffe, F J

    2012-10-01

    The immediate and long-term neural correlates of linguistic processing deficits reported following paediatric and adolescent traumatic brain injury (TBI) are poorly understood. Therefore, the current research investigated event-related potentials (ERPs) elicited during a semantic picture-word priming experiment in two groups of highly functioning individuals matched for various demographic variables and behavioural language performance. Participants in the TBI group had a recorded history of paediatric or adolescent TBI involving injury mechanisms associated with diffuse white matter pathology, while participants in the control group never sustained any insult to the brain. A comparison of N400 Mean Amplitudes elicited during three experimental conditions with varying semantic relatedness between the prime and target stimuli (congruent, semantically related, unrelated) revealed a significantly smaller N400 response in the unrelated condition in the TBI group, indicating residual linguistic processing deviations when processing demands required the quick detection of a between-category (unrelated) violation of semantic expectancy. PMID:22819620

  13. Smoothened Agonist Reduces Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Breakdown in Humanized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vir B.; Singh, Meera V.; Gorantla, Santhi; Poluektova, Larisa Y.; Maggirwar, Sanjay B.

    2016-01-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-1 (HIV)-associated neurocognitive disorder is characterized by recruitment of activated/infected leukocytes into the CNS via disrupted Blood Brain Barrier (BBB) that contributes to persistent neuro-inflammation. In this report, humanized NOD/scid-IL2Rγcnull mice were used to establish that impaired Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling is associated with loss of BBB function and neurological damage, and that modulating Shh signaling can rescue these detrimental effects. Plasma viral load, p24 levels and CD4+ T cells were measured as markers of productive HIV infection. These mice also showed impaired exclusion of Evans blue dye from the brain, increased plasma levels of S100B, an astrocytic protein, and down-regulation of tight junction proteins Occludin and Claudin5, collectively indicating BBB dysfunction. Further, brain tissue from HIV+ mice indicated reduced synaptic density, neuronal atrophy, microglial activation, and astrocytosis. Importantly, reduced expression of Shh and Gli1 was also observed in these mice, demonstrating diminished Shh signaling. Administration of Shh mimetic, smoothened agonist (SAG) restored BBB integrity and also abated the neuropathology in infected mice. Together, our results suggest a neuroprotective role for Shh signaling in the context of HIV infection, underscoring the therapeutic potential of SAG in controlling HAND pathogenesis. PMID:27241024

  14. Inhibition of JNK by a Peptide Inhibitor Reduces Traumatic Brain Injury-Induced Tauopathy in Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Hien T.; Sanchez, Laura; Brody, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major environmental risk factor for subsequent development of Alzheimer disease (AD). Pathological features that are common to AD and many tauopathies are neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) and neuropil threads composed of hyperphosphorylated tau. Axonal accumulations of total and phospho-tau have been observed within hours to weeks and intracytoplasmic NFTs have been documented years following severe TBI in humans. We previously reported that controlled cortical impact TBI accelerated tau pathology in young 3×Tg-AD mice. Here, we used this TBI mouse model to investigate mechanisms responsible for increased tau phosphorylation and accumulation following brain trauma. We found that TBI resulted in abnormal axonal accumulation of several kinases that phosphorylate tau. Notably, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) was markedly activated in injured axons and colocalized with phospho-tau. We found that moderate reduction of JNK activity (40%) by a peptide inhibitor, DJNKi1, was sufficient to reduce total and phospho-tau accumulations in axons of these mice with TBI. Longer-term studies will be required to determine whether reducing acute tau pathology proves beneficial in brain trauma. PMID:22249463

  15. Inhibition of mTOR Pathway by Rapamycin Reduces Brain Damage in Rats Subjected to Transient Forebrain Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiao; Hei, Changhun; Liu, Ping; Song, Yaozu; Thomas, Taylor; Tshimanga, Sylvie; Wang, Feng; Niu, Jianguo; Sun, Tao; Li, P. Andy

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study are to clarify the role of mTOR in mediating cerebral ischemic brain damage and the effects of rapamycin on ischemic outcomes. Ten minutes of forebrain ischemia was induced in rats, and their brains were sampled after 3 h, 16 h, and 7 days reperfusion for histology, immunohistochemistry and biochemical analysis. Our data demonstrated that cerebral ischemia resulted in both apoptotic and necrotic neuronal death; cerebral ischemia and reperfusion led to significant increases of mRNA and protein levels of p-mTOR and its downstream p-P70S6K and p-S6; elevation of LC3-II, and release of cytochrome c into the cytoplasm in both the cortex and hippocampus. Inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin markedly reduced ischemia-induced damage; suppressed p-Akt, p-mTOR, p-P70S6K and p-S6 protein levels; decreased LC3-II and Beclin-1; and prevented cytochrome c release in the two structures. All together, these data provide evidence that cerebral ischemia activates mTOR and autophagy pathways. Inhibition of mTOR deactivates the mTOR pathway, suppresses autophagy, prevents cytochrome c release and reduces ischemic brain damage. PMID:26681922

  16. Smoothened Agonist Reduces Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Breakdown in Humanized Mice.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vir B; Singh, Meera V; Gorantla, Santhi; Poluektova, Larisa Y; Maggirwar, Sanjay B

    2016-01-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-1 (HIV)-associated neurocognitive disorder is characterized by recruitment of activated/infected leukocytes into the CNS via disrupted Blood Brain Barrier (BBB) that contributes to persistent neuro-inflammation. In this report, humanized NOD/scid-IL2Rγc(null) mice were used to establish that impaired Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling is associated with loss of BBB function and neurological damage, and that modulating Shh signaling can rescue these detrimental effects. Plasma viral load, p24 levels and CD4(+) T cells were measured as markers of productive HIV infection. These mice also showed impaired exclusion of Evans blue dye from the brain, increased plasma levels of S100B, an astrocytic protein, and down-regulation of tight junction proteins Occludin and Claudin5, collectively indicating BBB dysfunction. Further, brain tissue from HIV(+) mice indicated reduced synaptic density, neuronal atrophy, microglial activation, and astrocytosis. Importantly, reduced expression of Shh and Gli1 was also observed in these mice, demonstrating diminished Shh signaling. Administration of Shh mimetic, smoothened agonist (SAG) restored BBB integrity and also abated the neuropathology in infected mice. Together, our results suggest a neuroprotective role for Shh signaling in the context of HIV infection, underscoring the therapeutic potential of SAG in controlling HAND pathogenesis. PMID:27241024

  17. Reducing dietary intake of linoleic acid of mouse dams during lactation increases offspring brain n-3 LCPUFA content.

    PubMed

    Schipper, L; Oosting, A; Scheurink, A J W; van Dijk, G; van der Beek, E M

    2016-07-01

    Omega (n-)3 and n-6 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) accumulation in the infant brain after birth is strongly driven by dietary supply of n-3 and n-6 LCPUFAs and their C18 precursors through breast milk or infant formula. n-3 LCPUFA accretion is associated with positive effects on neurodevelopmental outcome whereas high n-6 LCPUFA accumulation is considered disadvantageous. Maternal diet is crucial for breast milk fatty acid composition. Unfortunately, global increases in linoleic acid (C18:2n-6; LA) intake have dramatically increased n-6 LCPUFA and reduced n-3 LCPUFA availability for breastfed infants. We investigated the effects of reducing maternal dietary LA, or increasing n-3 LCPUFA, during lactation on milk and offspring brain fatty acids in mice. Offspring brain n-3 LCPUFA was higher following both interventions, although effects were mediated by different mechanisms. Because of competitive interactions between n-3 and n-6 fatty acids, lowering maternal LA intake may support neurodevelopment in breastfed infants. PMID:27255638

  18. THERAPEUTIC NEUTRALIZATION OF THE NLRP1 INFLAMMASOME REDUCES THE INNATE IMMUNE RESPONSE AND IMPROVES HISTOPATHOLOGY AFTER TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY

    PubMed Central

    de Rivero Vaccari, Juan Pablo; Lotocki, George; Alonso, Ofelia F.; Bramlett, Helen M.; Dietrich, W. Dalton; Keane, Robert W.

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) elicits acute inflammation that in turn exacerbates primary brain damage. A crucial part of innate immunity in the immune privileged central nervous system involves production of proinflammatory cytokines mediated by inflammasome signaling. Here we show that the nucleotide-binding, leucine-rich repeat pyrin domain containing protein 1 (NLRP1) inflammasome consisting of NLRP1, caspases-1 and -11, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain (ASC), the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) and pannexin 1 is expressed in neurons of the cerebral cortex. Moderate parasagittal fluid percussion injury (FPI) induced processing of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), activation of caspase-1, cleavage of XIAP and promoted assembly of the NLRP1 inflammasome complex. Anti-ASC neutralizing antibodies administered immediately after FPI to injured rats reduced caspase-1 activation, XIAP cleavage and processing of IL-1β resulting in a significant decrease in contusion volume. These studies show that the NLRP1 inflammasome constitutes an important component of the innate CNS inflammatory response after TBI and may be a novel therapeutic target for reducing the damaging effects of post-traumatic brain inflammation. PMID:19401709

  19. Reduced Metabolsim in Brain 'Control Networks' Following Cocaine-Cues Exposure in Female Cocaine Abusers

    SciTech Connect

    Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.; Volkow, N.D.; Tomasi, D.; Wang, G.-J.; Fowler, J.S.; Telang, F.; Goldstein, R.Z.; Alia-Klein, N.; Wong, C.T.

    2011-03-01

    Gender differences in vulnerability for cocaine addiction have been reported. Though the mechanisms are not understood, here we hypothesize that gender differences in reactivity to conditioned-cues, which contributes to relapse, are involved. To test this we compared brain metabolism (using PET and {sup 18}FDG) between female (n = 10) and male (n = 16) active cocaine abusers when they watched a neutral video (nature scenes) versus a cocaine-cues video. Self-reports of craving increased with the cocaine-cue video but responses did not differ between genders. In contrast, changes in whole brain metabolism with cocaine-cues differed by gender (p<0.05); females significantly decreased metabolism (-8.6% {+-} 10) whereas males tended to increase it (+5.5% {+-} 18). SPM analysis (Cocaine-cues vs Neutral) in females revealed decreases in frontal, cingulate and parietal cortices, thalamus and midbrain (p<0.001) whereas males showed increases in right inferior frontal gyrus (BA 44/45) (only at p<0.005). The gender-cue interaction showed greater decrements with Cocaine-cues in females than males (p<0.001) in frontal (BA 8, 9, 10), anterior cingulate (BA 24, 32), posterior cingulate (BA 23, 31), inferior parietal (BA 40) and thalamus (dorsomedial nucleus). Females showed greater brain reactivity to cocaine-cues than males but no differences in craving, suggesting that there may be gender differences in response to cues that are not linked with craving but could affect subsequent drug use. Specifically deactivation of brain regions from 'control networks' (prefrontal, cingulate, inferior parietal, thalamus) in females could increase their vulnerability to relapse since it would interfere with executive function (cognitive inhibition). This highlights the importance of gender tailored interventions for cocaine addiction.

  20. Hyperglycemia Reduces Efficiency of Brain Networks in Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae-Jin; Yu, Ji Hee; Shin, Mi-Seon

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has shown that the brain is an important target of diabetic complications. Since brain regions are interconnected to form a large-scale neural network, we investigated whether severe hyperglycemia affects the topology of the brain network in people with type 2 diabetes. Twenty middle-aged (average age: 54 years) individuals with poorly controlled diabetes (HbA1c: 8.9−14.6%, 74−136 mmol/mol) and 20 age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy volunteers were recruited. Graph theoretic network analysis was performed with axonal fiber tractography and tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) using diffusion tensor imaging. Associations between the blood glucose level and white matter network characteristics were investigated. Individuals with diabetes had lower white matter network efficiency (P<0.001) and longer white matter path length (P<0.05) compared to healthy individuals. Higher HbA1c was associated with lower network efficiency (r = −0.53, P = 0.001) and longer network path length (r = 0.40, P<0.05). A disruption in local microstructural integrity was found in the multiple white matter regions and associated with higher HbA1c and fasting plasma glucose levels (corrected P<0.05). Poorer glycemic control is associated with lower efficiency and longer connection paths of the global brain network in individuals with diabetes. Chronic hyperglycemia in people with diabetes may disrupt the brain’s topological integration, and lead to mental slowing and cognitive impairment. PMID:27336309

  1. The natural xanthone alpha-mangostin reduces oxidative damage in rat brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Márquez-Valadez, Berenice; Lugo-Huitrón, Rafael; Valdivia-Cerda, Verónica; Miranda-Ramírez, Luis Rubén; Pérez-De La Cruz, Verónica; González-Cuahutencos, Octavio; Rivero-Cruz, Isabel; Mata, Rachel; Santamaría, Abel; Pedraza-Chaverrí, José

    2009-02-01

    The antiperoxidative properties of alpha-mangostin, a xanthone isolated from mangosteen fruit, were tested for the first time in nerve tissue exposed to different toxic insults. Two reliable biological preparations (rat brain homogenates and synaptosomal P2 fractions) were exposed to the toxic actions of a free radical generator (ferrous sulfate), an excitotoxic agent (quinolinate), and a mitochondrial toxin (3-nitropropionate). alpha-Mangostin decreased the lipoperoxidative action of FeSO(4) in both preparations in a concentration-dependent manner, and completely abolished the peroxidative effects of quinolinate, 3-nitropropionate and FeSO(4) + quinolinate at all concentrations tested. Interestingly, when tested alone in brain homogenates, alpha-mangostin significantly decreased the lipoperoxidation even below basal levels. alpha-Mangostin also prevented the decreased reductant capacity of mitochondria in synaptosomal fractions. Our results suggest that alpha-mangostin exerts a robust antiperoxidative effect in brain tissue preparations probably through its properties as a free radical scavenger. In light of these findings, this antioxidant should be tested in other neurotoxic models involving oxidative stress. PMID:19178790

  2. Vascular risk and Aβ interact to reduce cortical thickness in AD vulnerable brain regions

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Bruce R.; Madison, Cindee M.; Wirth, Miranka; Marchant, Natalie L.; Kriger, Stephen; Mack, Wendy J.; Sanossian, Nerses; DeCarli, Charles; Chui, Helena C.; Weiner, Michael W.; Jagust, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to define whether vascular risk factors interact with β-amyloid (Aβ) in producing changes in brain structure that could underlie the increased risk of Alzheimer disease (AD). Methods: Sixty-six cognitively normal and mildly impaired older individuals with a wide range of vascular risk factors were included in this study. The presence of Aβ was assessed using [11C]Pittsburgh compound B–PET imaging, and cortical thickness was measured using 3-tesla MRI. Vascular risk was measured with the Framingham Coronary Risk Profile Index. Results: Individuals with high levels of vascular risk factors have thinner frontotemporal cortex independent of Aβ. These frontotemporal regions are also affected in individuals with Aβ deposition, but the latter show additional thinning in parietal cortices. Aβ and vascular risk were found to interact in posterior (especially in parietal) brain regions, where Aβ has its greatest effect. In this way, the negative effect of Aβ in posterior regions is increased by the presence of vascular risk. Conclusion: Aβ and vascular risk interact to enhance cortical thinning in posterior brain regions that are particularly vulnerable to AD. These findings give insight concerning the mechanisms whereby vascular risk increases the likelihood of developing AD and supports the therapeutic intervention of controlling vascular risk for the prevention of AD. PMID:24907234

  3. Transient Corneal Edema is a Predictive Factor for Pseudophakic Cystoid Macular Edema after Uncomplicated Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Do, Jae Rock; Oh, Jong-Hyun; Chuck, Roy S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To report transient corneal edema after phacoemulsification as a predictive factor for the development of pseudophakic cystoid macular edema (PCME). Methods A total of 150 eyes from 150 patients (59 men and 91 women; mean age, 68.0 ± 10.15 years) were analyzed using spectral domain optical coherence tomography 1 week and 5 weeks after routine phacoemulsification cataract surgery. Transient corneal edema detected 1 week after surgery was analyzed to reveal any significant relationship with the development of PCME 5 weeks after surgery. Results Transient corneal edema developed in 17 (11.3%) of 150 eyes 1 week after surgery. A history of diabetes mellitus was significantly associated with development of transient corneal edema (odds ratio [OR], 4.04; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.41 to 11.54; p = 0.011). Both diabetes mellitus and transient corneal edema were significantly associated with PCME development 5 weeks after surgery (OR, 4.58; 95% CI, 1.56 to 13.43; p = 0.007; and OR, 6.71; CI, 2.05 to 21.95; p = 0.003, respectively). In the 8 eyes with both diabetes mellitus and transient corneal edema, 4 (50%) developed PCME 5 weeks after surgery. Conclusions Transient corneal edema detected 1 week after routine cataract surgery is a predictive factor for development of PCME. Close postoperative observation and intervention is recommended in patients with transient corneal edema. PMID:25646056

  4. Novel inhibitors of Anthrax edema factor

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Deliang; Misra, Milind; Sower, Laurie; Peterson, Johnny W.; Kellogg, Glen E.; Schein, Catherine H.

    2008-01-01

    Several pathogenic bacteria produce adenylyl cyclase toxins, such as the edema factor (EF) of Bacillus anthracis. These disturb cellular metabolism by catalyzing production of excessive amounts of the regulatory molecule cAMP. Here, a structure-based method, where a 3D- pharmacophore that fit the active site of EF was constructed from fragments, was used to identify non-nucleotide inhibitors of EF. A library of small molecule fragments was docked to the EF- active site in existing crystal structures and those with the highest HINT scores were assembled into a 3D-pharmacophore. About 10,000 compounds, from over 2.7 million compounds in the ZINC database, had a similar molecular framework. These were ranked according to their docking scores, using methodology that was shown to achieve maximum accuracy (i.e., how well the docked position matched the experimentally determined site for ATP analogues in crystal structures of the complex). Finally, 19 diverse compounds with the best AutoDock binding/docking scores were assayed in a cell based assay for their ability to reduce cAMP secretion induced by EF. Four of the test compounds, from different structural groups, inhibited in the low micromolar range. One of these has a core structure common to phosphatase inhibitors previously identified by high-throughput assays of a diversity library. Thus, the fragment based pharmacophore identified a small number of diverse compounds for assay, and greatly enhanced the selection process of advanced lead compounds for combinatorial design. PMID:18620864

  5. Partially flexible MEMS neural probe composed of polyimide and sucrose gel for reducing brain damage during and after implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Myounggun; Cho, Jeiwon; Kim, Yun Kyung; Jung, Dahee; Yoon, Eui-Sung; Shin, Sehyun; Cho, Il-Joo

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents a flexible microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) neural probe that minimizes neuron damage and immune response, suitable for chronic recording applications. MEMS neural probes with various features such as high electrode densities have been actively investigated for neuron stimulation and recording to study brain functions. However, successful recording of neural signals in chronic application using rigid silicon probes still remains challenging because of cell death and macrophages accumulated around the electrodes over time from continuous brain movement. Thus, in this paper, we propose a new flexible MEMS neural probe that consists of two segments: a polyimide-based, flexible segment for connection and a rigid segment composed of thin silicon for insertion. While the flexible connection segment is designed to reduce the long-term chronic neuron damage, the thin insertion segment is designed to minimize the brain damage during the insertion process. The proposed flexible neural probe was successfully fabricated using the MEMS process on a silicon on insulator wafer. For a successful insertion, a biodegradable sucrose gel is coated on the flexible segment to temporarily increase the probe stiffness to prevent buckling. After the insertion, the sucrose gel dissolves inside the brain exposing the polyimide probe. By performing an insertion test, we confirm that the flexible probe has enough stiffness. In addition, by monitoring immune responses and brain histology, we successfully demonstrate that the proposed flexible neural probe incurs fivefold less neural damage than that incurred by a conventional silicon neural probe. Therefore, the presented flexible neural probe is a promising candidate for recording stable neural signals for long-time chronic applications.

  6. Administration of DHA Reduces Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Associated Inflammation and Alters Microglial or Macrophage Activation in Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Lloyd D; Yin, Yan; Attarwala, Insiya Y; Begum, Gulnaz; Deng, Julia; Yan, Hong Q; Dixon, C Edward; Sun, Dandan

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of the administration of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) post-traumatic brain injury (TBI) on reducing neuroinflammation. TBI was induced by cortical contusion injury in Sprague Dawley rats. Either DHA (16 mg/kg in dimethyl sulfoxide) or vehicle dimethyl sulfoxide (1 ml/kg) was administered intraperitonially at 5 min after TBI, followed by a daily dose for 3 to 21 days. TBI triggered activation of microglia or macrophages, detected by an increase of Iba1 positively stained microglia or macrophages in peri-lesion cortical tissues at 3, 7, and 21 days post-TBI. The inflammatory response was further characterized by expression of the proinflammatory marker CD16/32 and the anti-inflammatory marker CD206 in Iba1(+) microglia or macrophages. DHA-treated brains showed significantly fewer CD16/32(+) microglia or macrophages, but an increased CD206(+) phagocytic microglial or macrophage population. Additionally, DHA treatment revealed a shift in microglial or macrophage morphology from the activated, amoeboid-like state into the more permissive, surveillant state. Furthermore, activated Iba1(+) microglial or macrophages were associated with neurons expressing the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress marker CHOP at 3 days post-TBI, and the administration of DHA post-TBI concurrently reduced ER stress and the associated activation of Iba1(+) microglial or macrophages. There was a decrease in nuclear translocation of activated nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells protein at 3 days in DHA-treated tissue and reduced neuronal degeneration in DHA-treated brains at 3, 7, and 21 days after TBI. In summary, our study demonstrated that TBI mediated inflammatory responses are associated with increased neuronal ER stress and subsequent activation of microglia or macrophages. DHA administration reduced neuronal ER stress and subsequent association with microglial or macrophage polarization after TBI, demonstrating its therapeutic

  7. Administration of DHA Reduces Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Associated Inflammation and Alters Microglial or Macrophage Activation in Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Lloyd D.; Yin, Yan; Attarwala, Insiya Y.; Begum, Gulnaz; Deng, Julia; Yan, Hong Q.; Dixon, C. Edward

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of the administration of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) post-traumatic brain injury (TBI) on reducing neuroinflammation. TBI was induced by cortical contusion injury in Sprague Dawley rats. Either DHA (16 mg/kg in dimethyl sulfoxide) or vehicle dimethyl sulfoxide (1 ml/kg) was administered intraperitonially at 5 min after TBI, followed by a daily dose for 3 to 21 days. TBI triggered activation of microglia or macrophages, detected by an increase of Iba1 positively stained microglia or macrophages in peri-lesion cortical tissues at 3, 7, and 21 days post-TBI. The inflammatory response was further characterized by expression of the proinflammatory marker CD16/32 and the anti-inflammatory marker CD206 in Iba1+ microglia or macrophages. DHA-treated brains showed significantly fewer CD16/32+ microglia or macrophages, but an increased CD206+ phagocytic microglial or macrophage population. Additionally, DHA treatment revealed a shift in microglial or macrophage morphology from the activated, amoeboid-like state into the more permissive, surveillant state. Furthermore, activated Iba1+ microglial or macrophages were associated with neurons expressing the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress marker CHOP at 3 days post-TBI, and the administration of DHA post-TBI concurrently reduced ER stress and the associated activation of Iba1+ microglial or macrophages. There was a decrease in nuclear translocation of activated nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells protein at 3 days in DHA-treated tissue and reduced neuronal degeneration in DHA-treated brains at 3, 7, and 21 days after TBI. In summary, our study demonstrated that TBI mediated inflammatory responses are associated with increased neuronal ER stress and subsequent activation of microglia or macrophages. DHA administration reduced neuronal ER stress and subsequent association with microglial or macrophage polarization after TBI, demonstrating its therapeutic potential to

  8. Olanzapine-induced tender pitting pre-tibial edema.

    PubMed

    Mathan, Kaliaperumal; Muthukrishnan, Venkatesan; Menon, Vikas

    2015-01-01

    Antipsychotic-induced edema is uncommonly encountered in clinical practice. We report a case of tender pitting pre-tibial edema with olanzapine in a woman with no medical comorbidities. The peculiar distribution of edema resulted in diagnostic confusion necessitating specific investigations. Eventually, the edema resolved following complete stoppage of the drug, but caused distress to the patient and the caregiver. PMID:25969664

  9. Cross-sex hormone treatment in male-to-female transsexual persons reduces serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF).

    PubMed

    Fuss, Johannes; Hellweg, Rainer; Van Caenegem, Eva; Briken, Peer; Stalla, Günter K; T'Sjoen, Guy; Auer, Matthias K

    2015-01-01

    Serum levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are reduced in male-to-female transsexual persons (MtF) compared to male controls. It was hypothesized before that this might reflect either an involvement of BDNF in a biomechanism of transsexualism or to be the result of persistent social stress due to the condition. Here, we demonstrate that 12 month of cross-sex hormone treatment reduces serum BDNF levels in male-to-female transsexual persons independent of anthropometric measures. Participants were acquired through the European Network for the Investigation of Gender Incongruence (ENIGI). Reduced serum BDNF in MtF thus seems to be a result of hormonal treatment rather than a consequence or risk factor of transsexualism. PMID:25498415

  10. Mast cells promote blood brain barrier breakdown and neutrophil infiltration in a mouse model of focal cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    McKittrick, Craig M; Lawrence, Catherine E; Carswell, Hilary V O

    2015-01-01

    Blood brain barrier (BBB) breakdown and neuroinflammation are key events in ischemic stroke morbidity and mortality. The present study investigated the effects of mast cell deficiency and stabilization on BBB breakdown and neutrophil infiltration in mice after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAo). Adult male C57BL6/J wild type (WT) and mast cell-deficient (C57BL6/J KitWsh/Wsh (Wsh)) mice underwent tMCAo and BBB breakdown, brain edema and neutrophil infiltration were examined after 4 hours of reperfusion. Blood brain barrier breakdown, brain edema, and neutrophil infiltration were significantly reduced in Wsh versus WT mice (P<0.05). These results were reproduced pharmacologically using mast cell stabilizer, cromoglycate. Wild-type mice administered cromoglycate intraventricularly exhibited reduced BBB breakdown, brain edema, and neutrophil infiltration versus vehicle (P<0.05). There was no effect of cromoglycate versus vehicle in Wsh mice, validating specificity of cromoglycate on brain mast cells. Proteomic analysis in Wsh versus WT indicated that effects may be via expression of endoglin, endothelin-1, and matrix metalloproteinase-9. Using an in vivo model of mast cell deficiency, this is the first study showing that mast cells promote BBB breakdown in focal ischemia in mice, and opens up future opportunities for using mice to identify specific mechanisms of mast cell-related BBB injury. PMID:25564235

  11. [Acute heart failure: acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema and cardiogenic shock].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Marteles, Marta; Urrutia, Agustín

    2014-03-01

    Acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema and cardiogenic shock are two of the main forms of presentation of acute heart failure. Both entities are serious, with high mortality, and require early diagnosis and prompt and aggressive management. Acute pulmonary edema is due to the passage of fluid through the alveolarcapillary membrane and is usually the result of an acute cardiac episode. Correct evaluation and clinical identification of the process is essential in the management of acute pulmonary edema. The initial aim of treatment is to ensure hemodynamic stability and to correct hypoxemia. Other measures that can be used are vasodilators such as nitroglycerin, loop diuretics and, in specific instances, opioids. Cardiogenic shock is characterized by sustained hypoperfusion, pulmonary wedge pressure > 18 mmHg and a cardiac index < 2.2l/min/m(2). The process typically presents with hypotension (systolic blood pressure < 90 mmHg or a decrease in mean arterial pressure > 30 mmHg) and absent or reduced diuresis (< 0.5 ml/kg/h). The most common cause is left ventricular failure due to acute myocardial infarction. Treatment consists of general measures to reverse acidosis and hypoxemia, as well as the use of vasopressors and inotropic drugs. Early coronary revascularization has been demonstrated to improve survival in shock associated with ischaemic heart disease. PMID:24930078

  12. Molecular Signatures of Reduced Nerve Toxicity by CeCl3 in Phoxim-exposed Silkworm Brains

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Binbin; Li, Fanchi; Ni, Min; Zhang, Hua; Xu, Kaizun; Tian, Jianghai; Hu, Jingsheng; Shen, Weide; Li, Bing

    2015-01-01

    CeCl3 can reduce the damage caused by OP pesticides, in this study we used the brain of silkworms to investigate the mechanism of CeCl3 effects on pesticide resistance. The results showed that phoxim treatments led to brain damages, swelling and death of neurons, chromatin condensation, and mitochondrial damage. Normal nerve conduction was severely affected by phoxim treatments, as revealed by: increases in the contents of neurotransmitters Glu, NO, and ACh by 63.65%, 61.14%, and 98.54%, respectively; decreases in the contents of 5-HT and DA by 53.19% and 43.71%, respectively; reductions in the activities of Na+/K+-ATPase, Ca2+/Mg2+-ATPase, and AChE by 85.27%, 85.63%, and 85.63%, respectively; and increase in the activity of TNOS by 22.33%. CeCl3 pretreatment can significantly reduce such damages. Results of DGE and qRT-PCR indicated that CeCl3 treatments significantly upregulated the expression levels of CYP4G23, cyt-b5, GSTs-σ1, ace1, esterase-FE4, and β-esterase 2. Overall, phoxim treatments cause nerve tissue lesions, neuron death, and nerve conduction hindrance, but CeCl3 pretreatments can promote the expression of phoxim resistance-related genes in silkworm brains to reduce phoxim-induced damages. Our study provides a potential new method to improve the resistance of silkworms against OP pesticides. PMID:26227613

  13. Baifuzi reduces transient ischemic brain damage through an interaction with the STREX domain of BKCa channels

    PubMed Central

    Chi, S; Cai, W; Liu, P; Zhang, Z; Chen, X; Gao, L; Qi, J; Bi, L; Chen, L; Qi, Z

    2010-01-01

    Stroke is a long-term disability and one of the leading causes of death. However, no successful therapeutic intervention is available for the majority of stroke patients. In this study, we explored a traditional Chinese medicine Baifuzi (Typhonium giganteum Engl.). We show, at first, that the ethanol extract of Baifuzi exerts neuroprotective effects against brain damage induced by transient global or focal cerebral ischemia in rats and mice. Second, the extract activated large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel (BKCa) channels, and BKCa channel blockade suppressed the neuroprotection of the extract, suggesting that the BKCa is the molecular target of Baifuzi. Third, Baifuzi cerebroside (Baifuzi-CB), purified from its ethanol extract, activated BKCa channels in a manner similar to that of the extract. Fourth, the stress axis hormone-regulated exon (STREX) domain of the BKCa channel directly interacted with Baifuzi-CB, and its deletion suppressed channel activation by Baifuzi-CB. These results indicate that Baifuzi-CB activated the BKCa channel through its direct interaction with the STREX domain of the channel and suggests that Baifuzi-CB merits exploration as a potential therapeutic agent for treating brain ischemia. PMID:21364615

  14. Treatment with Evasin-3 reduces atherosclerotic vulnerability for ischemic stroke, but not brain injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Copin, Jean-Christophe; da Silva, Rafaela F; Fraga-Silva, Rodrigo A; Capettini, Luciano; Quintao, Silvia; Lenglet, Sébastien; Pelli, Graziano; Galan, Katia; Burger, Fabienne; Braunersreuther, Vincent; Schaller, Karl; Deruaz, Maud; Proudfoot, Amanda E; Dallegri, Franco; Stergiopulos, Nikolaos; Santos, Robson A S; Gasche, Yvan; Mach, François; Montecucco, Fabrizio

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophilic inflammation might have a pathophysiological role in both carotid plaque rupture and ischemic stroke injury. Here, we investigated the potential benefits of the CXC chemokine-binding protein Evasin-3, which potently inhibits chemokine bioactivity and related neutrophilic inflammation in two mouse models of carotid atherosclerosis and ischemic stroke, respectively. In the first model, the chronic treatment with Evasin-3 as compared with Vehicle (phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)) was investigated in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice implanted of a ‘cast' carotid device. In the second model, acute Evasin-3 treatment (5 minutes after cerebral ischemia onset) was assessed in mice subjected to transient left middle cerebral artery occlusion. Although CXCL1 and CXCL2 were upregulated in both atherosclerotic plaques and infarcted brain, only CXCL1 was detectable in serum. In carotid atherosclerosis, treatment with Evasin-3 was associated with reduction in intraplaque neutrophil and matrix metalloproteinase-9 content and weak increase in collagen as compared with Vehicle. In ischemic stroke, treatment with Evasin-3 was associated with reduction in ischemic brain neutrophil infiltration and protective oxidants. No other effects in clinical and histological outcomes were observed. We concluded that Evasin-3 treatment was associated with reduction in neutrophilic inflammation in both mouse models. However, Evasin-3 administration after cerebral ischemia onset failed to improve poststroke outcomes. PMID:23250107

  15. Reduced brain somatostatin in mood disorders: a common pathophysiological substrate and drug target?

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Li-Chun; Sibille, Etienne

    2013-01-01

    Our knowledge of the pathophysiology of affect dysregulation has progressively increased, but the pharmacological treatments remain inadequate. Here, we summarize the current literature on deficits in somatostatin, an inhibitory modulatory neuropeptide, in major depression and other neurological disorders that also include mood disturbances. We focus on direct evidence in the human postmortem brain, and review rodent genetic and pharmacological studies probing the role of the somatostatin system in relation to mood. We also briefly go over pharmacological developments targeting the somatostatin system in peripheral organs and discuss the challenges of targeting the brain somatostatin system. Finally, the fact that somatostatin deficits are frequently observed across neurological disorders suggests a selective cellular vulnerability of somatostatin-expressing neurons. Potential cell intrinsic factors mediating those changes are discussed, including nitric oxide induced oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, high inflammatory response, high demand for neurotrophic environment, and overall aging processes. Together, based on the co-localization of somatostatin with gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), its presence in dendritic-targeting GABA neuron subtypes, and its temporal-specific function, we discuss the possibility that deficits in somatostatin play a central role in cortical local inhibitory circuit deficits leading to abnormal corticolimbic network activity and clinical mood symptoms across neurological disorders. PMID:24058344

  16. Low-power hardware implementation of movement decoding for brain computer interface with reduced-resolution discrete cosine transform.

    PubMed

    Minho Won; Albalawi, Hassan; Xin Li; Thomas, Donald E

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a low-power hardware implementation for movement decoding of brain computer interface. Our proposed hardware design is facilitated by two novel ideas: (i) an efficient feature extraction method based on reduced-resolution discrete cosine transform (DCT), and (ii) a new hardware architecture of dual look-up table to perform discrete cosine transform without explicit multiplication. The proposed hardware implementation has been validated for movement decoding of electrocorticography (ECoG) signal by using a Xilinx FPGA Zynq-7000 board. It achieves more than 56× energy reduction over a reference design using band-pass filters for feature extraction. PMID:25570284

  17. Blood-brain barrier in acute liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Justin H.

    2011-01-01

    Brain edema remains a challenging obstacle in the management of acute liver failure (ALF). Cytotoxic mechanisms associated with brain edema have been well recognized, but evidence for vasogenic mechanisms in the pathogenesis of brain edema in ALF has been lacking. Recent reports have not only shown a role of matrix metalloproteinase-9 in the pathogenesis of brain edema in experimental ALF but have also found significant alterations in the tight junction elements including occludin and claudin-5, suggesting a vasogenic injury in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity. This article reviews and explores the role of the paracellular tight junction proteins in the increased selective BBB permeability that leads to brain edema in ALF. PMID:22100566

  18. Osmotic Edema Rapidly Increases Neuronal Excitability Through Activation of NMDA Receptor-Dependent Slow Inward Currents in Juvenile and Adult Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Lauderdale, Kelli; Murphy, Thomas; Tung, Tina; Davila, David; Binder, Devin K; Fiacco, Todd A

    2015-01-01

    Cellular edema (cell swelling) is a principal component of numerous brain disorders including ischemia, cortical spreading depression, hyponatremia, and epilepsy. Cellular edema increases seizure-like activity in vitro and in vivo, largely through nonsynaptic mechanisms attributable to reduction of the extracellular space. However, the types of excitability changes occurring in individual neurons during the acute phase of cell volume increase remain unclear. Using whole-cell patch clamp techniques, we report that one of the first effects of osmotic edema on excitability of CA1 pyramidal cells is the generation of slow inward currents (SICs), which initiate after approximately 1 min. Frequency of SICs increased as osmolarity decreased in a dose-dependent manner. Imaging of real-time volume changes in astrocytes revealed that neuronal SICs occurred while astrocytes were still in the process of swelling. SICs evoked by cell swelling were mainly nonsynaptic in origin and NMDA receptor-dependent. To better understand the relationship between SICs and changes in neuronal excitability, recordings were performed in increasingly physiological conditions. In the absence of any added pharmacological reagents or imposed voltage clamp, osmotic edema induced excitatory postsynaptic potentials and burst firing over the same timecourse as SICs. Like SICs, action potentials were blocked by NMDAR antagonists. Effects were more pronounced in adult (8-20 weeks old) compared with juvenile (P15-P21) mice. Together, our results indicate that cell swelling triggered by reduced osmolarity rapidly increases neuronal excitability through activation of NMDA receptors. Our findings have important implications for understanding nonsynaptic mechanisms of epilepsy in relation to cell swelling and reduction of the extracellular space. PMID:26489684

  19. Osmotic Edema Rapidly Increases Neuronal Excitability Through Activation of NMDA Receptor-Dependent Slow Inward Currents in Juvenile and Adult Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Lauderdale, Kelli; Murphy, Thomas; Tung, Tina; Davila, David; Binder, Devin K.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular edema (cell swelling) is a principal component of numerous brain disorders including ischemia, cortical spreading depression, hyponatremia, and epilepsy. Cellular edema increases seizure-like activity in vitro and in vivo, largely through nonsynaptic mechanisms attributable to reduction of the extracellular space. However, the types of excitability changes occurring in individual neurons during the acute phase of cell volume increase remain unclear. Using whole-cell patch clamp techniques, we report that one of the first effects of osmotic edema on excitability of CA1 pyramidal cells is the generation of slow inward currents (SICs), which initiate after approximately 1 min. Frequency of SICs increased as osmolarity decreased in a dose-dependent manner. Imaging of real-time volume changes in astrocytes revealed that neuronal SICs occurred while astrocytes were still in the process of swelling. SICs evoked by cell swelling were mainly nonsynaptic in origin and NMDA receptor-dependent. To better understand the relationship between SICs and changes in neuronal excitability, recordings were performed in increasingly physiological conditions. In the absence of any added pharmacological reagents or imposed voltage clamp, osmotic edema induced excitatory postsynaptic potentials and burst firing over the same timecourse as SICs. Like SICs, action potentials were blocked by NMDAR antagonists. Effects were more pronounced in adult (8–20 weeks old) compared with juvenile (P15–P21) mice. Together, our results indicate that cell swelling triggered by reduced osmolarity rapidly increases neuronal excitability through activation of NMDA receptors. Our findings have important implications for understanding nonsynaptic mechanisms of epilepsy in relation to cell swelling and reduction of the extracellular space. PMID:26489684

  20. Increasing community participation after brain injury: strategies for identifying and reducing the risks.

    PubMed

    Durgin, C J

    2000-12-01

    This article describes the complex processes involved in evaluating safety, judgment, and risk after brain injury. Starting with a review of common risk factors after onset, the article then moves to a discussion of the dilemmas faced by family members and clinicians alike when determining the individual's level of risk. Numerous suggestions are offered to identify support system concerns and to establish specific barriers to independence. The need to adopt a systematized approach to empirically verifying concerns about safety is emphasized, in addition to utilizing therapeutic interventions that are sensitive to the individual's learning capacity, psychological status, and environmental influences. The article concludes with examples of how to structure support for individuals who present with ongoing risk factors but still need to experience greater levels of personal freedom. PMID:11056403

  1. Preservation of the Blood Brain Barrier and Cortical Neuronal Tissue by Liraglutide, a Long Acting Glucagon-Like-1 Analogue, after Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hakon, Jakob; Ruscher, Karsten; Tomasevic, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral edema is a common complication following moderate and severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), and a significant risk factor for development of neuronal death and deterioration of neurological outcome. To this date, medical approaches that effectively alleviate cerebral edema and neuronal death after TBI are not available. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) has anti-inflammatory properties on cerebral endothelium and exerts neuroprotective effects. Here, we investigated the effects of GLP-1 on secondary injury after moderate and severe TBI. Male Sprague Dawley rats were subjected either to TBI by Controlled Cortical Impact (CCI) or sham surgery. After surgery, vehicle or a GLP-1 analogue, Liraglutide, were administered subcutaneously twice daily for two days. Treatment with Liraglutide (200 μg/kg) significantly reduced cerebral edema in pericontusional regions and improved sensorimotor function 48 hours after CCI. The integrity of the blood-brain barrier was markedly preserved in Liraglutide treated animals, as determined by cerebral extravasation of Evans blue conjugated albumin. Furthermore, Liraglutide reduced cortical tissue loss, but did not affect tissue loss and delayed neuronal death in the thalamus on day 7 post injury. Together, our data suggest that the GLP-1 pathway might be a promising target in the therapy of cerebral edema and cortical neuronal injury after moderate and severe TBI. PMID:25822252

  2. Hypothalamic deep brain stimulation reduces weight gain in an obesity-animal model.

    PubMed

    Melega, William P; Lacan, Goran; Gorgulho, Alessandra A; Behnke, Eric J; De Salles, Antonio A F

    2012-01-01

    Prior studies of appetite regulatory networks, primarily in rodents, have established that targeted electrical stimulation of ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) can alter food intake patterns and metabolic homeostasis. Consideration of this method for weight modulation in humans with severe overeating disorders and morbid obesity can be further advanced by modeling procedures and assessing endpoints that can provide preclinical data on efficacy and safety. In this study we adapted human deep brain stimulation (DBS) stereotactic methods and instrumentation to demonstrate in a large animal model the modulation of weight gain with VMH-DBS. Female Göttingen minipigs were used because of their dietary habits, physiologic characteristics, and brain structures that resemble those of primates. Further, these animals become obese on extra-feeding regimens. DBS electrodes were first bilaterally implanted into the VMH of the animals (n = 8) which were then maintained on a restricted food regimen for 1 mo following the surgery. The daily amount of food was then doubled for the next 2 mo in all animals to produce obesity associated with extra calorie intake, with half of the animals (n = 4) concurrently receiving continuous low frequency (50 Hz) VMH-DBS. Adverse motoric or behavioral effects were not observed subsequent to the surgical procedure or during the DBS period. Throughout this 2 mo DBS period, all animals consumed the doubled amount of daily food. However, the animals that had received VMH-DBS showed a cumulative weight gain (6.1±0.4 kg; mean ± SEM) that was lower than the nonstimulated VMH-DBS animals (9.4±1.3 kg; p<0.05), suggestive of a DBS-associated increase in metabolic rate. These results in a porcine obesity model demonstrate the efficacy and behavioral safety of a low frequency VMH-DBS application as a potential clinical strategy for modulation of body weight. PMID:22295102

  3. Hypothalamic Deep Brain Stimulation Reduces Weight Gain in an Obesity-Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Melega, William P.; Lacan, Goran; Gorgulho, Alessandra A.; Behnke, Eric J.; De Salles, Antonio A. F.

    2012-01-01

    Prior studies of appetite regulatory networks, primarily in rodents, have established that targeted electrical stimulation of ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) can alter food intake patterns and metabolic homeostasis. Consideration of this method for weight modulation in humans with severe overeating disorders and morbid obesity can be further advanced by modeling procedures and assessing endpoints that can provide preclinical data on efficacy and safety. In this study we adapted human deep brain stimulation (DBS) stereotactic methods and instrumentation to demonstrate in a large animal model the modulation of weight gain with VMH-DBS. Female Göttingen minipigs were used because of their dietary habits, physiologic characteristics, and brain structures that resemble those of primates. Further, these animals become obese on extra-feeding regimens. DBS electrodes were first bilaterally implanted into the VMH of the animals (n = 8) which were then maintained on a restricted food regimen for 1 mo following the surgery. The daily amount of food was then doubled for the next 2 mo in all animals to produce obesity associated with extra calorie intake, with half of the animals (n = 4) concurrently receiving continuous low frequency (50 Hz) VMH-DBS. Adverse motoric or behavioral effects were not observed subsequent to the surgical procedure or during the DBS period. Throughout this 2 mo DBS period, all animals consumed the doubled amount of daily food. However, the animals that had received VMH-DBS showed a cumulative weight gain (6.1±0.4 kg; mean ± SEM) that was lower than the nonstimulated VMH-DBS animals (9.4±1.3 kg; p<0.05), suggestive of a DBS-associated increase in metabolic rate. These results in a porcine obesity model demonstrate the efficacy and behavioral safety of a low frequency VMH-DBS application as a potential clinical strategy for modulation of body weight. PMID:22295102

  4. Localized delivery of fibroblast growth factor–2 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor reduces spontaneous seizures in an epilepsy model

    PubMed Central

    Paradiso, Beatrice; Marconi, Peggy; Zucchini, Silvia; Berto, Elena; Binaschi, Anna; Bozac, Aleksandra; Buzzi, Andrea; Mazzuferi, Manuela; Magri, Eros; Mora, Graciela Navarro; Rodi, Donata; Su, Tao; Volpi, Ilaria; Zanetti, Lara; Marzola, Andrea; Manservigi, Roberto; Fabene, Paolo F.; Simonato, Michele

    2009-01-01

    A loss of neurons is observed in the hippocampus of many patients with epilepsies of temporal lobe origin. It has been hypothesized that damage limitation or repair, for example using neurotrophic factors (NTFs), may prevent the transformation of a normal tissue into epileptic (epileptogenesis). Here, we used viral vectors to locally supplement two NTFs, fibroblast growth factor–2 (FGF-2) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), when epileptogenic damage was already in place. These vectors were first characterized in vitro, where they increased proliferation of neural progenitors and favored their differentiation into neurons, and they were then tested in a model of status epilepticus-induced neurodegeneration and epileptogenesis. When injected in a lesioned hippocampus, FGF-2/BDNF expressing vectors increased neuronogenesis, embanked neuronal damage, and reduced epileptogenesis. It is concluded that reduction of damage reduces epileptogenesis and that supplementing specific NTFs in lesion areas represents a new approach to the therapy of neuronal damage and of its consequences. PMID:19366663

  5. Combination of omega-3 Fatty acids, lithium, and aripiprazole reduces oxidative stress in brain of mice with mania.

    PubMed

    Arunagiri, Pandiyan; Rajeshwaran, Krishnamoorthy; Shanthakumar, Janakiraman; Tamilselvan, Thangavel; Balamurugan, Elumalai

    2014-09-01

    Manic episode in bipolar disorder (BD) was evaluated in the present study with supplementation of omega-3 fatty acids in combination with aripiprazole and lithium on methylphenidate (MPD)-induced manic mice model. Administration of MPD 5 mg/kg bw intraperitoneally (i.p.) caused increase in oxidative stress in mice brain. To retract this effect, supplementation of omega-3 fatty acids 1.5 ml/kg (p.o.), aripiprazole 1.5 mg/kg bw (i.p.), and lithium 50 mg/kg bw (p.o) were given to mice. Omega-3 fatty acids alone and in combination with aripiprazole- and lithium-treated groups significantly reduced the levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and lipid peroxidation products (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances) in the brain. MPD treatment significantly decreased the reduced glutathione (GSH) level and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, and they were restored by supplementation of omega-3 fatty acids with aripiprazole and lithium. There is no remarkable difference in the effect of creatine kinase (CK) activity between MPD-induced manic model and the treatment groups. Therefore, our results demonstrate that oxidative stress imbalance and mild insignificant CK alterations induced by administration of MPD can be restored back to normal physiological levels through omega-3 fatty acids combined with lithium and aripiprazole that attributes to effective prevention against mania in adult male Swiss albino mice. PMID:25035188

  6. A PPARdelta agonist reduces amyloid burden and brain inflammation in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kalinin, Sergey; Richardson, Jill C; Feinstein, Douglas L

    2009-10-01

    Agonists of the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) have been shown to reduce inflammatory responses in several animal models of neurological diseases and conditions and to reduce amyloid burden in transgenic mice expressing mutant forms of human amyloid precursor protein. However, the effects of activating the related receptor PPARdelta (PPARdelta), which is expressed at higher levels in the brain than PPARgamma, on inflammation and amyloid burden have not been explored. In this study we tested the effects of the selective PPARdelta agonist GW742 in 5xFAD mice which harbor 3 mutations in amyloid precursor protein and 2 mutations in presenilin 1, develop plaques by 5-6 weeks of age, and show robust inflammation and neuronal damage. Oral delivery of GW742 significantly reduced amyloid plaque burden in the subiculum region of 3-month old male and female 5xFAD mice. GW742 also significantly reduced astrocyte activation, suggesting anti-inflammatory effects on glia cells. The changes in plaque burden were accompanied by increased expression of the amyloid degrading enzymes neprilysin and insulin degrading enzyme, while in transfected HEK293 cells, GW742 activated a neprilysin promoter driving luciferase expression. These results suggest that, as found for some PPARgamma agonists, PPARdelta agonists can also reduce amyloid burden likely to be mediated by effects on amyloid clearance. PMID:19874267

  7. Diabetic macular edema: New promising therapies

    PubMed Central

    Shamsi, Hanan N Al; Masaud, Jluwi S; Ghazi, Nicola G

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of diabetic macular edema is rapidly evolving. The era of laser therapy is being quickly replaced by an era of pharmacotherapy. Several pharmacotherapies have been recently developed for the treatment of retinal vascular diseases such as diabetic macular edema. Several intravitreal injections or sustained delivery devices have undergone phase 3 testing while others are currently being evaluated. The results of clinical trials have shown the superiority of some of these agents to laser therapy. However, with the availability of several of these newer agents, it may be difficult to individualize treatment options especially those patients respond differently to various therapies. As such, more effort is still needed in order to determine the best treatment regimen for a given patient. In this article, we briefly summarize the major new therapeutic additions for the treatment of diabetic macular edema and allude to some future promising therapies. PMID:24379924

  8. Novel imaging techniques for diabetic macular edema.

    PubMed

    Lobo, C; Bernardes, R; Faria de Abreu, J R; Cunha-Vaz, J G

    1999-01-01

    Retinal edema should be defined as any increase of water of the retinal tissue resulting in an increase in its volume. It may be of cytotoxic or vasogenic origin. Development of vasogenic macular edema is dependent on a series of factors such as blood pressure, blood-retinal barrier permeability, retinal cell damage, retinal tissue osmotic pressure and retinal tissue compliance. Objective measurements of retinal thickness are now possible using the Retinal Thickness Analyser. Localised measurements of blood-retinal barrier permeability may also be obtained using the Retinal Leakage Analyser, a modified confocal scanning laser fluorometer, while obtaining simultaneously angiographic images of the choroid and retina. These new imaging techniques show that cytotoxic and vasogenic retinal edema may occur independently in the early stages of diabetic retinopathy. These findings offer new perspectives for designing novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:10896349

  9. Acute pulmonary edema caused by quinine.

    PubMed

    Everts, Richard J; Hayhurst, Michael D; Nona, Basim P

    2004-09-01

    A 57-year-old man who had been intermittently taking one 300-mg tablet of quinine sulfate orally for leg cramps experienced transient acute pulmonary edema and hypotension 30-40 minutes after ingestion on two consecutive occasions. He was not taking any concomitant drugs, and there was no alternative explanation for either event. Serial troponin T tests and electrocardiograms, obtained on admission to the hospital, followed by an outpatient echocardiogram and a coronary angiogram, were essentially normal. We compared this case with one previously published and nine previously unpublished reports of quinine-associated pulmonary edema and conclude that some cases of pulmonary edema or adult respiratory distress syndrome in patients with malaria may be caused by an adverse reaction to quinine. Although infrequent, clinicians should be aware of this potentially serious and costly adverse reaction. PMID:15460183

  10. Impact of prostate edema on cell survival and tumor control after permanent interstitial brachytherapy for early stage prostate cancers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhe (Jay); Roberts, Kenneth; Decker, Roy; Pathare, Pradip; Rockwell, Sara; Nath, Ravinder

    2011-01-01

    ) is longer than that of 131Cs (9.7 days), because the advantage of the longer 103Pd decay half-life was negated by the lower effective energy of the photons it emits (~21 keV compared to ~30.4 keV for 131Cs). In addition, the impact of edema could be reduced or enhanced by differences in the tumor characteristics (e.g. potential tumor doubling time or the α/β ratio), and the effect of these factors varied for the different radioactive sources. There is a clear need to consider the effects of prostate edema during the planning and evaluation of permanent interstitial brachytherapy treatments for prostate cancer. PMID:21772076

  11. The impact of prostate edema on cell survival and tumor control after permanent interstitial brachytherapy for early stage prostate cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    (Jay Chen, Zhe; Roberts, Kenneth; Decker, Roy; Pathare, Pradip; Rockwell, Sara; Nath, Ravinder

    2011-08-01

    that of 131Cs (9.7 days), because the advantage of the longer 103Pd decay half-life was negated by the lower effective energy of the photons it emits (~21 keV compared to ~30.4 keV for 131Cs). In addition, the impact of edema could be reduced or enhanced by differences in the tumor characteristics (e.g. potential tumor doubling time or the α/β ratio), and the effect of these factors varied for the different radioactive sources. There is a clear need to consider the effects of prostate edema during the planning and evaluation of permanent interstitial brachytherapy treatments for prostate cancer.

  12. Arginine-Restricted Therapy Resistant Bilateral Macular Edema Associated with Gyrate Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Doguizi, Sibel; Sekeroglu, Mehmet Ali; Anayol, Mustafa Alpaslan; Yilmazbas, Pelin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Gyrate atrophy is a rare genetical metabolic disorder affecting vision. Here, we report a 9-year-old boy with gyrate atrophy associated with bilateral macular edema at the time of diagnosis and the effect of long term metabolic control on macular edema. Case Presentation. A 9-year-old boy presented with a complaint of low visual acuity (best corrected visual acuity: 20/80 in both eyes, refractive error: −12.00 D). Dilated fundus examination revealed multiple bilateral, sharply defined, and scalloped chorioretinal atrophy areas in the midperipheral and peripheral zone. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography revealed bilateral cystoid macular edema in both eyes. Serum ornithine level was high (622 μmol/L). An arginine-restricted diet reduced serum ornithine level (55 μmol/L). However, visual findings including macular edema remained unchanged in 2 years of follow-up. Conclusion. Arginine-restricted diet did not improve macular edema in our patient with gyrate atrophy. A more comprehensive understanding of the underlying factors for macular edema will lead to the development of effective therapies. PMID:26770854

  13. Udder edema and association with some serum biochemical measurands and dietary factors in first calving cows

    PubMed Central

    Kojouri, G. A; Mosavi Pouryeganeh, M; Nekouei, S; Nazifi, S

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine some major biochemical alterations observed in first calving cows with udder edema during the periparturient period and to detect some associations between dietary factors and the disease. For that, the concentrations of some electrolytes (Na+, K+, Cl, Ca2+, P and Mg2+), lipid (triglycerides and cholesterol) markers and lipoproteins (HDL, LDL and VLDL) and total proteins were measured in serum samples collected from 70 first calving cows (35 with udder edema and 35 healthy ones) whereas the percentages of dry matter and crude proteins and the electrolyte (Na+, K+, Cl, Ca2+, Mg2+, P and sulphates) amounts in feed rations were determined in parallel. The total protein, the calcium and the phosphorus as well as the concentrations of lipid markers and lipoproteins (HDL and LDL) were significantly decreased in first calving cows with udder edema compared to the healthy ones and these biochemical alterations were correlated with a reduced dry matter content and an electrolyte desequilibrium mainly involving Na+ and Cl– in feed rations distributed to the cows with udder edema. To our knowledge the mechanism(s) of physiologic udder edema is uncertain and the obtained results suggest that a transient liver dysfunction (decreased total protein and LDL) probably linked to a feed ration deficient in dry matter may be involved in the aetiology of the udder edema in first calving cows. PMID:27175201

  14. The impact of dietary isoflavonoids on malignant brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Sehm, Tina; Fan, Zheng; Weiss, Ruth; Schwarz, Marc; Engelhorn, Tobias; Hore, Nirjhar; Doerfler, Arnd; Buchfelder, Michael; Eyüpoglu, Iiker Y; Savaskan, Nic E

    2014-08-01

    Poor prognosis and limited therapeutic options render malignant brain tumors one of the most devastating diseases in clinical medicine. Current treatment strategies attempt to expand the therapeutic repertoire through the use of multimodal treatment regimens. It is here that dietary fibers have been recently recognized as a supportive natural therapy in augmenting the body's response to tumor growth. Here, we investigated the impact of isoflavonoids on primary brain tumor cells. First, we treated glioma cell lines and primary astrocytes with various isoflavonoids and phytoestrogens. Cell viability in a dose-dependent manner was measured for biochanin A (BCA), genistein (GST), and secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG). Dose-response action for the different isoflavonoids showed that BCA is highly effective on glioma cells and nontoxic for normal differentiated brain tissues. We further investigated BCA in ex vivo and in vivo experimentations. Organotypic brain slice cultures were performed and treated with BCA. For in vivo experiments, BCA was intraperitoneal injected in tumor-implanted Fisher rats. Tumor size and edema were measured and quantified by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. In vascular organotypic glioma brain slice cultures (VOGIM) we found that BCA operates antiangiogenic and neuroprotective. In vivo MRI scans demonstrated that administered BCA as a monotherapy was effective in reducing significantly tumor-induced brain edema and showed a trend for prolonged survival. Our results revealed that dietary isoflavonoids, in particular BCA, execute toxicity toward glioma cells, antiangiogenic, and coevally neuroprotective properties, and therefore augment the range of state-of-the-art multimodal treatment approach. PMID:24898306

  15. Melatonin reduces membrane rigidity and oxidative damage in the brain of SAMP8 mice.

    PubMed

    García, J J; Piñol-Ripoll, G; Martínez-Ballarín, E; Fuentes-Broto, L; Miana-Mena, F J; Venegas, C; Caballero, B; Escames, G; Coto-Montes, A; Acuña-Castroviejo, D

    2011-11-01

    We evaluated the autophagy-lysosomal pathway and membrane fluidity in brain cells and mitochondrial membranes obtained from senescence-accelerated (SAMP(8)) and senescence-resistant (SAMR(1)) mice at 5 and 10 months of age. Moreover, we studied whether chronic treatment from age 1 to 10 months with melatonin stabilizes membrane fluidity. Fluidity was measured by polarization changes of 1-(4-trimethylammoniumphenyl)-6-phenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene-p-toluene sulfonate. Results showed that in untreated animals at 5 months of age, synaptosomal and mitochondrial fluidity was decreased in SAMP(8) compared to SAMR(1), as was the cathepsin D/B ratio, indicating dysfunction of the autophagy-lysosomal pathway. Moreover, we detected synaptosomal rigidity and programmed cell death capability in both groups at 10 months of age. Mitochondrial fluidity, however, did not show a significant age-dependent change but was lower in SAMP(8) than in SAMR(1) at the 5- and 10-month time points. Melatonin administration prevented rigidity in the mitochondrial membrane and seemed to decrease age-related autophagy-lysosomal alterations. These data suggest that melatonin may act to slow down the aging process because of its ability to enhance membrane fluidity and maintain structural pathways. PMID:20096480

  16. Brain injury-induced proteolysis is reduced in a novel calpastatin overexpressing transgenic mouse

    PubMed Central

    Schoch, Kathleen M.; von Reyn, Catherine R.; Bian, Jifeng; Telling, Glenn C.; Meaney, David F.; Saatman, Kathryn E.

    2013-01-01

    The calpain family of calcium-dependent proteases has been implicated in a variety of diseases and neurodegenerative pathologies. Prolonged activation of calpains results in proteolysis of numerous cellular substrates including cytoskeletal components and membrane receptors, contributing to cell demise despite coincident expression of calpastatin, the specific inhibitor of calpains. Pharmacological and gene knockout strategies have targeted calpains to determine their contribution to neurodegenerative pathology; however, limitations associated with treatment paradigms, drug specificity, and genetic disruptions have produced inconsistent results and complicated interpretation. Specific, targeted calpain inhibition achieved by enhancing endogenous calpastatin levels offers unique advantages in studying pathological calpain activation. We have characterized a novel calpastatin overexpressing transgenic mouse model, demonstrating a substantial increase in calpastatin expression within nervous system and peripheral tissues and associated reduction in protease activity. Experimental activation of calpains via traumatic brain injury resulted in cleavage of α-spectrin, collapsin response mediator protein-2, and voltage-gated sodium channel, critical proteins for the maintenance of neuronal structure and function. Calpastatin overexpression significantly attenuated calpain-mediated proteolysis of these selected substrates acutely following severe controlled cortical impact injury, but with no effect on acute hippocampal neurodegeneration. Augmenting calpastatin levels may be an effective method for calpain inhibition in TBI and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:23305291

  17. MAP training: combining meditation and aerobic exercise reduces depression and rumination while enhancing synchronized brain activity

    PubMed Central

    Alderman, B L; Olson, R L; Brush, C J; Shors, T J

    2016-01-01

    Mental and physical (MAP) training is a novel clinical intervention that combines mental training through meditation and physical training through aerobic exercise. The intervention was translated from neuroscientific studies indicating that MAP training increases neurogenesis in the adult brain. Each session consisted of 30 min of focused-attention (FA) meditation and 30 min of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise. Fifty-two participants completed the 8-week intervention, which consisted of two sessions per week. Following the intervention, individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD; n=22) reported significantly less depressive symptoms and ruminative thoughts. Typical healthy individuals (n=30) also reported less depressive symptoms at follow-up. Behavioral and event-related potential indices of cognitive control were collected at baseline and follow-up during a modified flanker task. Following MAP training, N2 and P3 component amplitudes increased relative to baseline, especially among individuals with MDD. These data indicate enhanced neural responses during the detection and resolution of conflicting stimuli. Although previous research has supported the individual beneficial effects of aerobic exercise and meditation for depression, these findings indicate that a combination of the two may be particularly effective in increasing cognitive control processes and decreasing ruminative thought patterns. PMID:26836414

  18. Luteolin Reduces Alzheimer’s Disease Pathologies Induced by Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sawmiller, Darrell; Li, Song; Shahaduzzaman, Md; Smith, Adam J.; Obregon, Demian; Giunta, Brian; Borlongan, Cesar V.; Sanberg, Paul R.; Tan, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) occurs in response to an acute insult to the head and is recognized as a major risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Indeed, recent studies have suggested a pathological overlap between TBI and AD, with both conditions exhibiting amyloid-beta (Aβ) deposits, tauopathy, and neuroinflammation. Additional studies involving animal models of AD indicate that some AD-related genotypic determinants may be critical factors enhancing temporal and phenotypic symptoms of TBI. Thus in the present study, we examined sub-acute effects of moderate TBI delivered by a gas-driven shock tube device in Aβ depositing Tg2576 mice. Three days later, significant increases in b-amyloid deposition, glycogen synthase-3 (GSK-3) activation, phospho-tau, and pro-inflammatory cytokines were observed. Importantly, peripheral treatment with the naturally occurring flavonoid, luteolin, significantly abolished these accelerated pathologies. This study lays the groundwork for a safe and natural compound that could prevent or treat TBI with minimal or no deleterious side effects in combat personnel and others at risk or who have experienced TBI. PMID:24413756

  19. MAP training: combining meditation and aerobic exercise reduces depression and rumination while enhancing synchronized brain activity.

    PubMed

    Alderman, B L; Olson, R L; Brush, C J; Shors, T J

    2016-01-01

    Mental and physical (MAP) training is a novel clinical intervention that combines mental training through meditation and physical training through aerobic exercise. The intervention was translated from neuroscientific studies indicating that MAP training increases neurogenesis in the adult brain. Each session consisted of 30 min of focused-attention (FA) meditation and 30 min of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise. Fifty-two participants completed the 8-week intervention, which consisted of two sessions per week. Following the intervention, individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD; n=22) reported significantly less depressive symptoms and ruminative thoughts. Typical healthy individuals (n=30) also reported less depressive symptoms at follow-up. Behavioral and event-related potential indices of cognitive control were collected at baseline and follow-up during a modified flanker task. Following MAP training, N2 and P3 component amplitudes increased relative to baseline, especially among individuals with MDD. These data indicate enhanced neural responses during the detection and resolution of conflicting stimuli. Although previous research has supported the individual beneficial effects of aerobic exercise and meditation for depression, these findings indicate that a combination of the two may be particularly effective in increasing cognitive control processes and decreasing ruminative thought patterns. PMID:26836414

  20. CAR T Cells Targeting Podoplanin Reduce Orthotopic Glioblastomas in Mouse Brains.

    PubMed

    Shiina, Satoshi; Ohno, Masasuke; Ohka, Fumiharu; Kuramitsu, Shunichiro; Yamamichi, Akane; Kato, Akira; Motomura, Kazuya; Tanahashi, Kuniaki; Yamamoto, Takashi; Watanabe, Reiko; Ito, Ichiro; Senga, Takeshi; Hamaguchi, Michinari; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko; Kaneko, Mika K; Kato, Yukinari; Chandramohan, Vidyalakshmi; Bigner, Darell D; Natsume, Atsushi

    2016-03-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and lethal primary malignant brain tumor in adults with a 5-year overall survival rate of less than 10%. Podoplanin (PDPN) is a type I transmembrane mucin-like glycoprotein, expressed in the lymphatic endothelium. Several solid tumors overexpress PDPN, including the mesenchymal type of GBM, which has been reported to present the worst prognosis among GBM subtypes. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-transduced T cells can recognize predefined tumor surface antigens independent of MHC restriction, which is often downregulated in gliomas. We constructed a lentiviral vector expressing a third-generation CAR comprising a PDPN-specific antibody (NZ-1-based single-chain variable fragment) with CD28, 4-1BB, and CD3ζ intracellular domains. CAR-transduced peripheral blood monocytes were immunologically evaluated by calcein-mediated cytotoxic assay, ELISA, tumor size, and overall survival. The generated CAR T cells were specific and effective against PDPN-positive GBM cells in vitro. Systemic injection of the CAR T cells into an immunodeficient mouse model inhibited the growth of intracranial glioma xenografts in vivo. CAR T-cell therapy that targets PDPN would be a promising adoptive immunotherapy to treat mesenchymal GBM. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(3); 259-68. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26822025

  1. Assessment and management of cerebral edema and intracranial hypertension in acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Mohsenin, Vahid

    2013-10-01

    Acute liver failure is uncommon but not a rare complication of liver injury. It can happen after ingestion of acetaminophen and exposure to toxins and hepatitis viruses. The defining clinical symptoms are coagulopathy and encephalopathy occurring within days or weeks of the primary insult in patients without preexisting liver injury. Acute liver failure is often complicated by multiorgan failure and sepsis. The most life-threatening complications are sepsis, multiorgan failure, and brain edema. The clinical signs of increased intracranial pressure (ICP) are nonspecific except for neurologic deficits in impending brain stem herniation. Computed tomography of the brain is not sensitive enough in gauging intracranial hypertension or ruling out brain edema. Intracranial pressure monitoring, transcranial Doppler, and jugular venous oximetry provide valuable information for monitoring ICP and guiding therapeutic measures in patients with encephalopathy grade III or IV. Osmotic therapy using hypertonic saline and mannitol, therapeutic hypothermia, and propofol sedation are shown to improve ICPs and stabilize the patient for liver transplantation. In this article, diagnosis and management of hepatic encephalopathy and cerebral edema in patients with acute liver failure are reviewed. PMID:23683564

  2. Bax inhibiting peptide reduces apoptosis in neonatal rat hypoxic-ischemic brain damage

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Meng-Ya; Cui, Kai-Jie; Yu, Mao-Min; Zhang, Hui; Peng, Xiang-Li; Jiang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) has been reported to induce apoptosis in neonates. We, therefore, analyzed the ability of Bax-inhibiting peptide (BIP) to provide neuroprotective effects during hypoxic-ischemic brain damage (HIBD). Seven-day-old wistar rat pups (n = 198) were randomly divided into a sham-operated group (Group S, n = 18), saline group (Group C, n = 90) and BIP group (Group B, n = 90). Pathological changes in the cerebral tissues of rat pups were analyzed using hematoxylin and eosin stain, TUNEL and Western blot. The expression of cytochrome c and caspase-3 was determined using western blot technique. Rat pups demonstrated neurobehavioral alteration in Groups C and B. TUNEL-positive cells in the left hippocampus were significantly increased in Group C and Group B after HIBD (P < 0.01) when compared with Group S. There was a marked reduction in TUNEL positive cells in subgroups B1 through B4 when compared with the respective subgroups C1 through C5. Compared with Group S, the expression of caspase-3 and cytochrome c was significantly increased in Groups C and B (P < 0.01). The difference in expression of caspase-3 and cytochrome c between subgroups B1 through B4 and C1 through C4 was significant (P < 0.01). In conclusions, the neuro-protective effect of BIP was due to a reduction of nerve cell apoptosis in our neonatal HIE rat model. We propose that BIP has potential as a neuro-protective drug in neonatal HIE cases. PMID:26823794

  3. Reduced glucose uptake and Aβ in brain regions with hyperintensities in connected white matter

    PubMed Central

    Rusinek, H.; Tsui, W.; Mosconi, L.; Li, Y.; Osorio, R.S.; Williams, S.; Randall, C.; Spector, N.; McHugh, P.; Murray, J.; Pirraglia, E.; Vallabhajosula, S.; Raj, A.; de Leon, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Interstitial concentration of amyloid beta (Aß) is positively related to synaptic activity in animal experiments. In humans, Aß deposition in Alzheimer's disease overlaps with cortical regions highly active earlier in life. White matter lesions (WML) disrupt connections between gray matter (GM) regions which in turn changes their activation patterns. Here, we tested if WML are related to Aß accumulation (measured with PiB-PET) and glucose uptake (measured with FDGPET) in connected GM. WML masks from 72 cognitively normal (age 61.7±9.6 years, 71% women) individuals were obtained from T2-FLAIR. MRI and PET images were normalized into common space, segmented and parcellated into gray matter (GM) regions. The effects of WML on connected GM regions were assessed using the Change in Connectivity (ChaCo) score. Defined for each GM region, ChaCo is the percentage of WM tracts connecting to that region that pass through the WML mask. The regional relationship between ChaCo, glucose uptake and Aß was explored via linear regression. Subcortical regions of the bilateral caudate, putamen, calcarine, insula, thalamus and anterior cingulum had WM connections with the most lesions, followed by frontal, occipital, temporal, parietal and cerebellar regions. Regional analysis revealed that GM with more lesions in connecting WM and thus impaired connectivity had lower FDG-PET (r=0.20, p<0.05 corrected) and lower PiB uptake (r=0.28, p<0.05 corrected). Regional regression also revealed that both ChaCo (β=0.045) and FDG-PET (β=0.089) were significant predictors of PiB. In conclusion, brain regions with more lesions in connecting WM had lower glucose metabolism and lower Aß deposition. PMID:24999038

  4. Suppressing Emotions Impairs Subsequent Stroop Performance and Reduces Prefrontal Brain Activation

    PubMed Central

    Luechinger, Roger; Boesiger, Peter; Rasch, Björn

    2013-01-01

    Abundant behavioral evidence suggests that the ability to self-control is limited, and that any exertion of self-control will increase the likelihood of subsequent self-control failures. Here we investigated the neural correlates underlying the aftereffects of self-control on future control processes using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). An initial act of self-control (suppressing emotions) impaired subsequent performance in a second task requiring control (Stroop task). On the neural level, increased activity during emotion suppression was followed by a relative decrease in activity during the Stroop task in a cluster in the right lateral prefrontal cortex (PFC) including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), an area engaged in the effortful implementation of control. There was no reliable evidence for reduced activity in the medial frontal cortex (MFC) including the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), which is involved in conflict detection processes and has previously also been implicated in self-control. Follow-up analyses showed that the detected cluster in the right lateral PFC and an area in the MFC were involved in both the emotion suppression task and the Stroop task, but only the cluster in the right lateral PFC showed reduced activation after emotion suppression during the Stroop task. Reduced activity in lateral prefrontal areas relevant for the implementation of control may be a critical consequence of prior self-control exertion if the respective areas are involved in both self-control tasks. PMID:23565239

  5. Methylene Blue Attenuates Traumatic Brain Injury-Associated Neuroinflammation and Acute Depressive-Like Behavior in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fenn, Ashley M.; Skendelas, John P.; Moussa, Daniel N.; Muccigrosso, Megan M.; Popovich, Phillip G.; Lifshitz, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with cerebral edema, blood brain barrier breakdown, and neuroinflammation that contribute to the degree of injury severity and functional recovery. Unfortunately, there are no effective proactive treatments for limiting immediate or long-term consequences of TBI. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of methylene blue (MB), an antioxidant agent, in reducing inflammation and behavioral complications associated with a diffuse brain injury. Here we show that immediate MB infusion (intravenous; 15–30 minutes after TBI) reduced cerebral edema, attenuated microglial activation and reduced neuroinflammation, and improved behavioral recovery after midline fluid percussion injury in mice. Specifically, TBI-associated edema and inflammatory gene expression in the hippocampus were significantly reduced by MB at 1 d post injury. Moreover, MB intervention attenuated TBI-induced inflammatory gene expression (interleukin [IL]-1β, tumor necrosis factor α) in enriched microglia/macrophages 1 d post injury. Cell culture experiments with lipopolysaccharide-activated BV2 microglia confirmed that MB treatment directly reduced IL-1β and increased IL-10 messenger ribonucleic acid in microglia. Last, functional recovery and depressive-like behavior were assessed up to one week after TBI. MB intervention did not prevent TBI-induced reductions in body weight or motor coordination 1–7 d post injury. Nonetheless, MB attenuated the development of acute depressive-like behavior at 7 d post injury. Taken together, immediate intervention with MB was effective in reducing neuroinflammation and improving behavioral recovery after diffuse brain injury. Thus, MB intervention may reduce life-threatening complications of TBI, including edema and neuroinflammation, and protect against the development of neuropsychiatric complications. PMID:25070744

  6. Activation of liver X receptor reduces global ischemia brain injury by reduction of nuclear factor-κB

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Oumei; Ostrowski, Robert P.; Liu, Wenwu; Zhang, John H.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have found that liver X receptors (LXRs) agonists decrease inflammation and possess neuroprotective properties. The aim of this study was to examine the mechanisms of liver X receptor agonist GW3965 on brain injury following global cerebral ischemia in the rat. The 48 male SD rats were randomly partitioned into three groups: sham, global ischemia (4-vessel occlusion for 15 minutes; 4VO) treated with vehicle and global ischemia treated with GW3965 (20mg/kg, via i.p at 10 minutes after reperfusion). The functional outcome was determined by neurological evaluation at 24 hours post ischemia and by testing rats in T maze at 3 and 7 days after reperfusion. The rats' daily body weight, incidence of seizures and 72 hours mortality were also determined. After Nissl staining and TUNEL in coronal brain sections, the numbers of intact and damaged cells were counted in the CA1 sector of the hippocampus. The expression of phosphorylated inhibitor of κB (p-IκBα), Nuclear Factor-κB (NF-κB) subunit p65, and cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) were analyzed with Western blot at 12 hours after reperfusion. GW3965 tended to reduce 72 hours mortality and the incidence of post-ischemic seizures. GW3965-treated rats showed an improved neuronal survivability in CA1 and a significant increase in the percentage of spontaneous alternations detected in T-maze on day 7 after ischemia. GW3965-induced neuroprotection was associated with a significant reduction in nuclear translocation of NF-kB p65 subunit and a decrease in the hippocampal expression of NF-kB target gene, COX-2. LXR receptor agonist protects against neuronal damage following global cerebral ischemia. The mechanism of neuroprotection may include blockade of NF-κB activation and the subsequent suppression of COX-2 in the post ischemic brain. PMID:20096333

  7. A subcutaneous cellular implant for passive immunization against amyloid-β reduces brain amyloid and tau pathologies.

    PubMed

    Lathuilière, Aurélien; Laversenne, Vanessa; Astolfo, Alberto; Kopetzki, Erhard; Jacobsen, Helmut; Stampanoni, Marco; Bohrmann, Bernd; Schneider, Bernard L; Aebischer, Patrick

    2016-05-01

    Passive immunization against misfolded toxic proteins is a promising approach to treat neurodegenerative disorders. For effective immunotherapy against Alzheimer's disease, recent clinical data indicate that monoclonal antibodies directed against the amyloid-β peptide should be administered before the onset of symptoms associated with irreversible brain damage. It is therefore critical to develop technologies for continuous antibody delivery applicable to disease prevention. Here, we addressed this question using a bioactive cellular implant to deliver recombinant anti-amyloid-β antibodies in the subcutaneous tissue. An encapsulating device permeable to macromolecules supports the long-term survival of myogenic cells over more than 10 months in immunocompetent allogeneic recipients. The encapsulated cells are genetically engineered to secrete high levels of anti-amyloid-β antibodies. Peripheral implantation leads to continuous antibody delivery to reach plasma levels that exceed 50 µg/ml. In a proof-of-concept study, we show that the recombinant antibodies produced by this system penetrate the brain and bind amyloid plaques in two mouse models of the Alzheimer's pathology. When encapsulated cells are implanted before the onset of amyloid plaque deposition in TauPS2APP mice, chronic exposure to anti-amyloid-β antibodies dramatically reduces amyloid-β40 and amyloid-β42 levels in the brain, decreases amyloid plaque burden, and most notably, prevents phospho-tau pathology in the hippocampus. These results support the use of encapsulated cell implants for passive immunotherapy against the misfolded proteins, which accumulate in Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26956423

  8. Cyclosporine Treatment Reduces Oxygen Free Radical Generation and Oxidative Stress in the Brain of Hypoxia-Reoxygenated Newborn Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiang-Qin; Chaudhary, Hetal; Brocks, Dion R.; Bigam, David L.; Cheung, Po-Yin

    2012-01-01

    Oxygen free radicals have been implicated in the pathogenesis of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. It has previously been shown in traumatic brain injury animal models that treatment with cyclosporine reduces brain injury. However, the potential neuroprotective effect of cyclosporine in asphyxiated neonates has yet to be fully studied. Using an acute newborn swine model of hypoxia-reoxygenation, we evaluated the effects of cyclosporine on the brain, focusing on hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production and markers of oxidative stress. Piglets (1–4 d, 1.4–2.5 kg) were block-randomized into three hypoxia-reoxygenation experimental groups (2 h hypoxia followed by 4 h reoxygenation)(n = 8/group). At 5 min after reoxygenation, piglets were given either i.v. saline (placebo, controls) or cyclosporine (2.5 or 10 mg/kg i.v. bolus) in a blinded-randomized fashion. An additional sham-operated group (n = 4) underwent no hypoxia-reoxygenation. Systemic hemodynamics, carotid arterial blood flow (transit-time ultrasonic probe), cerebral cortical H2O2 production (electrochemical sensor), cerebral tissue glutathione (ELISA) and cytosolic cytochrome-c (western blot) levels were examined. Hypoxic piglets had cardiogenic shock (cardiac output 40–48% of baseline), hypotension (mean arterial pressure 27–31 mmHg) and acidosis (pH 7.04) at the end of 2 h of hypoxia. Post-resuscitation cyclosporine treatment, particularly the higher dose (10 mg/kg), significantly attenuated the increase in cortical H2O2 concentration during reoxygenation, and was associated with lower cerebral oxidized glutathione levels. Furthermore, cyclosporine treatment significantly attenuated the increase in cortical cytochrome-c and lactate levels. Carotid blood arterial flow was similar among groups during reoxygenation. Conclusively, post-resuscitation administration of cyclosporine significantly attenuates H2O2 production and minimizes oxidative stress in newborn piglets following hypoxia

  9. Treatment with a Monoclonal Antibody against Methamphetamine and Amphetamine Reduces Maternal and Fetal Rat Brain Concentrations in Late Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    White, Sarah J.; Hendrickson, Howard P.; Atchley, William T.; Laurenzana, Elizabeth M.; Gentry, W. Brooks; Williams, D. Keith; Owens, S. Michael

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesized that treatment of pregnant rat dams with a dual reactive monoclonal antibody (mAb4G9) against (+)-methamphetamine [METH; equilibrium dissociation rate constant (KD) = 16 nM] and (+)-amphetamine (AMP; KD = 102 nM) could confer maternal and fetal protection from brain accumulation of both drugs of abuse. To test this hypothesis, pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats (on gestational day 21) received a 1 mg/kg i.v. METH dose, followed 30 minutes later by vehicle or mAb4G9 treatment. The mAb4G9 dose was 0.56 mole-equivalent in binding sites to the METH body burden. Pharmacokinetic analysis showed baseline METH and AMP elimination half-lives were congruent in dams and fetuses, but the METH volume of distribution in dams was nearly double the fetal values. The METH and AMP area under the serum concentration-versus-time curves from 40 minutes to 5 hours after mAb4G9 treatment increased >7000% and 2000%, respectively, in dams. Fetal METH serum did not change, but AMP decreased 23%. The increased METH and AMP concentrations in maternal serum resulted from significant increases in mAb4G9 binding. Protein binding changed from ∼15% to > 90% for METH and AMP. Fetal serum protein binding appeared to gradually increase, but the absolute fraction bound was trivial compared with the dams. mAb4G9 treatment significantly reduced METH and AMP brain values by 66% and 45% in dams and 44% and 46% in fetuses (P < 0.05), respectively. These results show anti-METH/AMP mAb4G9 therapy in dams can offer maternal and fetal brain protection from the potentially harmful effects of METH and AMP. PMID:24839971

  10. Protective Ventilation of Preterm Lambs Exposed to Acute Chorioamnionitis Does Not Reduce Ventilation-Induced Lung or Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Samantha K.; Moss, Timothy J. M.; Hooper, Stuart B.; Crossley, Kelly J.; Gill, Andrew W.; Kluckow, Martin; Zahra, Valerie; Wong, Flora Y.; Pichler, Gerhard; Galinsky, Robert; Miller, Suzanne L.

    2014-01-01

    Background The onset of mechanical ventilation is a critical time for the initiation of cerebral white matter (WM) injury in preterm neonates, particularly if they are inadvertently exposed to high tidal volumes (VT) in the delivery room. Protective ventilation strategies at birth reduce ventilation-induced lung and brain inflammation and injury, however its efficacy in a compromised newborn is not known. Chorioamnionitis is a common antecedent of preterm birth, and increases the risk and severity of WM injury. We investigated the effects of high VT ventilation, after chorioamnionitis, on preterm lung and WM inflammation and injury, and whether a protective ventilation strategy could mitigate the response. Methods Pregnant ewes (n = 18) received intra-amniotic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) 2 days before delivery, instrumentation and ventilation at 127±1 days gestation. Lambs were either immediately euthanased and used as unventilated controls (LPSUVC; n = 6), or were ventilated using an injurious high VT strategy (LPSINJ; n = 5) or a protective ventilation strategy (LPSPROT; n = 7) for a total of 90 min. Mean arterial pressure, heart rate and cerebral haemodynamics and oxygenation were measured continuously. Lungs and brains underwent molecular and histological assessment of inflammation and injury. Results LPSINJ lambs had poorer oxygenation than LPSPROT lambs. Ventilation requirements and cardiopulmonary and systemic haemodynamics were not different between ventilation strategies. Compared to unventilated lambs, LPSINJ and LPSPROT lambs had increases in pro-inflammatory cytokine expression within the lungs and brain, and increased astrogliosis (p<0.02) and cell death (p<0.05) in the WM, which were equivalent in magnitude between groups. Conclusions Ventilation after acute chorioamnionitis, irrespective of strategy used, increases haemodynamic instability and lung and cerebral inflammation and injury. Mechanical ventilation is a potential contributor

  11. INTRAVITREAL CORTICOSTEROIDS IN DIABETIC MACULAR EDEMA

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Clare; Loewenstein, Anat; Massin, Pascale

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To review the relationship between kinetics, efficacy, and safety of several corticosteroid formulations for the treatment of diabetic macular edema. Methods: Reports of corticosteroid use for the treatment of diabetic macular edema were identified by a literature search, which focused on the pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety of these agents in preclinical animal models and clinical trials. Results: Available corticosteroids for diabetic macular edema treatment include intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide, dexamethasone, and fluocinolone acetonide. Because of differences in solubility and bioavailability, various delivery mechanisms are used. Bioerodible delivery systems achieve higher maximum concentrations than nonbioerodible formulations. There is a relationship between visual gains and drug persistence in the intravitreal compartment. Safety effects were more complex; level of intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide exposure is related to development of elevated intraocular pressure and cataract; this does not seem to be the case for dexamethasone, where two different doses showed similar mean intraocular pressure and incidence of cataract surgery. With fluocinolone acetonide, rates of intraocular pressure elevations requiring surgery seem to be dose related; rates of cataract extraction were similar regardless of dose. Conclusion: Available corticosteroids for diabetic macular edema exhibit different pharmacokinetic profiles that impact efficacy and adverse events and should be taken into account when developing individualized treatment plans. PMID:26352555

  12. An uncommon cause of acute pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Nepal, Santosh; Giri, Smith; Bhusal, Mohan; Siwakoti, Krishmita; Pathak, Ranjan

    2016-09-01

    Acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema secondary to catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy is a very uncommon and fatal initial presentation of pheochromocytoma. However, with early clinical suspicion and aggressive management, the condition is reversible. This case report describes a patient who presented with hypertension, dyspnea, and cough with bloody streaks, and who recovered within 48 hours after appropriate treatment. PMID:27575897

  13. Current status in diabetic macular edema treatments.

    PubMed

    Romero-Aroca, Pedro

    2013-10-15

    Diabetes is a serious chronic condition, which increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases, kidney failure and nerve damage leading to amputation. Furthermore the ocular complications include diabetic macular edema, is the leading cause of blindness among adults in the industrialized countries. Today, blindness from diabetic macular edema is largely preventable with timely detection and appropriate interventional therapy. The treatment should include an optimized control of glycemia, arterial tension, lipids and renal status. The photocoagulation laser is currently restricted to focal macular edema in some countries, but due the high cost of intravitreal drugs, the use of laser treatment for focal and diffuse diabetic macular edema (DME), can be valid as gold standard in many countries. The intravitreal anti vascular endothelial growth factor drugs (ranibizumab and bevacizumab), are indicated in the treatment of all types of DME, but the correct protocol for administration should be defined for the different Retina Scientific Societies. The corticosteroids for diffuse DME, has a place in pseudophakic patients, but its complications restricted the use of these drugs for some patients. Finally the intravitreal interface plays an important role and its exploration is mandatory in all DME patients. PMID:24147200

  14. Cranial grafting of stem cell-derived microvesicles improves cognition and reduces neuropathology in the irradiated brain.

    PubMed

    Baulch, Janet E; Acharya, Munjal M; Allen, Barrett D; Ru, Ning; Chmielewski, Nicole N; Martirosian, Vahan; Giedzinski, Erich; Syage, Amber; Park, Audrey L; Benke, Sarah N; Parihar, Vipan K; Limoli, Charles L

    2016-04-26

    Cancer survivors face a variety of challenges as they cope with disease recurrence and a myriad of normal tissue complications brought on by radio- and chemotherapeutic treatment regimens. For patients subjected to cranial irradiation for the control of CNS malignancy, progressive and debilitating cognitive dysfunction remains a pressing unmet medical need. Although this problem has been recognized for decades, few if any satisfactory long-term solutions exist to resolve this serious unintended side effect of radiotherapy. Past work from our laboratory has demonstrated the neurocognitive benefits of human neural stem cell (hNSC) grafting in the irradiated brain, where intrahippocampal transplantation of hNSC ameliorated radiation-induced cognitive deficits. Using a similar strategy, we now provide, to our knowledge, the first evidence that cranial grafting of microvesicles secreted from hNSC affords similar neuroprotective phenotypes after head-only irradiation. Cortical- and hippocampal-based deficits found 1 mo after irradiation were completely resolved in animals cranially grafted with microvesicles. Microvesicle treatment was found to attenuate neuroinflammation and preserve host neuronal morphology in distinct regions of the brain. These data suggest that the neuroprotective properties of microvesicles act through a trophic support mechanism that reduces inflammation and preserves the structural integrity of the irradiated microenvironment. PMID:27044087

  15. Cranial grafting of stem cell-derived microvesicles improves cognition and reduces neuropathology in the irradiated brain

    PubMed Central

    Baulch, Janet E.; Acharya, Munjal M.; Allen, Barrett D.; Ru, Ning; Chmielewski, Nicole N.; Martirosian, Vahan; Giedzinski, Erich; Syage, Amber; Park, Audrey L.; Benke, Sarah N.; Parihar, Vipan K.; Limoli, Charles L.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer survivors face a variety of challenges as they cope with disease recurrence and a myriad of normal tissue complications brought on by radio- and chemotherapeutic treatment regimens. For patients subjected to cranial irradiation for the control of CNS malignancy, progressive and debilitating cognitive dysfunction remains a pressing unmet medical need. Although this problem has been recognized for decades, few if any satisfactory long-term solutions exist to resolve this serious unintended side effect of radiotherapy. Past work from our laboratory has demonstrated the neurocognitive benefits of human neural stem cell (hNSC) grafting in the irradiated brain, where intrahippocampal transplantation of hNSC ameliorated radiation-induced cognitive deficits. Using a similar strategy, we now provide, to our knowledge, the first evidence that cranial grafting of microvesicles secreted from hNSC affords similar neuroprotective phenotypes after head-only irradiation. Cortical- and hippocampal-based deficits found 1 mo after irradiation were completely resolved in animals cranially grafted with microvesicles. Microvesicle treatment was found to attenuate neuroinflammation and preserve host neuronal morphology in distinct regions of the brain. These data suggest that the neuroprotective properties of microvesicles act through a trophic support mechanism that reduces inflammation and preserves the structural integrity of the irradiated microenvironment. PMID:27044087

  16. Deficiency of prolyl oligopeptidase in mice disturbs synaptic plasticity and reduces anxiety-like behaviour, body weight, and brain volume.

    PubMed

    Höfling, Corinna; Kulesskaya, Natalia; Jaako, Külli; Peltonen, Iida; Männistö, Pekka T; Nurmi, Antti; Vartiainen, Nina; Morawski, Markus; Zharkovsky, Alexander; Võikar, Vootele; Roßner, Steffen; García-Horsman, J Arturo

    2016-06-01

    Prolyl oligopeptidase (PREP) has been implicated in neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation and has been considered a drug target to enhance memory in dementia. However, the true physiological role of PREP is not yet understood. In this paper, we report the phenotyping of a mouse line where the PREP gene has been knocked out. This work indicates that the lack of PREP in mice causes reduced anxiety but also hyperactivity. The cortical volumes of PREP knockout mice were smaller than those of wild type littermates. Additionally, we found increased expression of diazepam binding inhibitor protein in the cortex and of the somatostatin receptor-2 in the hippocampus of PREP knockout mice. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry and tail suspension test revealed lack of response of PREP knockout mice to lipopolysaccharide insult. Further analysis revealed significantly increased levels of polysialylated-neural cell adhesion molecule in PREP deficient mice. These findings might be explained as possible alteration in brain plasticity caused by PREP deficiency, which in turn affect behaviour and brain development. PMID:26996375

  17. Neurons in Vulnerable Regions of the Alzheimer’s Disease Brain Display Reduced ATM Signaling123

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xuting; Chen, Jianmin; Li, Jiali; Kofler, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a multisystemic disease caused by mutations in the ATM (A-T mutated) gene. It strikes before 5 years of age and leads to dysfunctions in many tissues, including the CNS, where it leads to neurodegeneration, primarily in cerebellum. Alzheimer’s disease (AD), by contrast, is a largely sporadic neurodegenerative disorder that rarely strikes before the 7th decade of life with primary neuronal losses in hippocampus, frontal cortex, and certain subcortical nuclei. Despite these differences, we present data supporting the hypothesis that a failure of ATM signaling is involved in the neuronal death in individuals with AD. In both, partially ATM-deficient mice and AD mouse models, neurons show evidence for a loss of ATM. In human AD, three independent indices of reduced ATM function—nuclear translocation of histone deacetylase 4, trimethylation of histone H3, and the presence of cell cycle activity—appear coordinately in neurons in regions where degeneration is prevalent. These same neurons also show reduced ATM protein levels. And though they represent only a fraction of the total neurons in each affected region, their numbers significantly correlate with disease stage. This previously unknown role for the ATM kinase in AD pathogenesis suggests that the failure of ATM function may be an important contributor to the death of neurons in AD individuals. PMID:27022623

  18. Anti-inflammatory effect of laser acupuncture in ST36 (Zusanli) acupoint in mouse paw edema.

    PubMed

    Erthal, Vanessa; Maria-Ferreira, Daniele; Werner, Maria Fernanda de Paula; Baggio, Cristiane Hatsuko; Nohama, Percy

    2016-02-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in acupuncture is a low-power laser applied to acupoints for providing luminous energy, capable to produce photobiological induction that results in biochemical, bioelectric, and bioenergetic effects. ST36 (Zusanli) is a point of acupuncture commonly used for treatment of several pathological alterations, such as inflammation, acute pain, and gastrointestinal disorders. In this study, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory effect of LLLT (830 nm, 4 J/cm(2)) in ST36 acupoint through the model of carrageenan-induced paw edema in mice and the possible mechanisms involved. Female Swiss mice were treated with LLLT in ST36 before the paw edema induction, which was measured by means of a digital micrometer and the temperature through a high-resolution digital thermograph. After this, the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), lipid hydroperoxides (LOOH), and reduced glutathione (GSH) were quantified. In another set of experiments, the paw edema was induced by bradykinin, histamine, and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). LLLT in ST36 acupoint significantly inhibited the edema formation for 4 h after the carrageenan injection and reduced the paw temperature in 10 %. Furthermore, LLLT also reduced the levels of ROS (55 %) and LOOH (50 %) but, however, did not alter the GSH levels. LLLT in ST36 reduced the paw edema induced by bradykinin (30 min, 6 %, 60 min, 7 %), histamine (30 min, 11 %), and PGE2 (90 min, 10 %, 120 min, 16 %). In conclusion, these results prove that LLLT in ST36 acupoint produces a relevant anti-inflammatory effect, reducing edema, temperature, and free radicals levels in mice paw. PMID:26738499

  19. Insufficient intake of L-histidine reduces brain histamine and causes anxiety-like behaviors in male mice.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Takeo; Nakamura, Tadaho; Shibakusa, Tetsuro; Sugita, Mayu; Naganuma, Fumito; Iida, Tomomitsu; Miura, Yamato; Mohsen, Attayeb; Harada, Ryuichi; Yanai, Kazuhiko

    2014-10-01

    L-histidine is one of the essential amino acids for humans, and it plays a critical role as a component of proteins. L-histidine is also important as a precursor of histamine. Brain histamine is synthesized from L-histidine in the presence of histidine decarboxylase, which is expressed in histamine neurons. In the present study, we aimed to elucidate the importance of dietary L-histidine as a precursor of brain histamine and the histaminergic nervous system. C57BL/6J male mice at 8 wk of age were assigned to 2 different diets for at least 2 wk: the control (Con) diet (5.08 g L-histidine/kg diet) or the low L-histidine diet (LHD) (1.28 g L-histidine/kg diet). We measured the histamine concentration in the brain areas of Con diet-fed mice (Con group) and LHD-fed mice (LHD group). The histamine concentration was significantly lower in the LHD group [Con group vs. LHD group: histamine in cortex (means ± SEs): 13.9 ± 1.25 vs. 9.36 ± 0.549 ng/g tissue; P = 0.002]. Our in vivo microdialysis assays revealed that histamine release stimulated by high K(+) from the hypothalamus in the LHD group was 60% of that in the Con group (P = 0.012). However, the concentrations of other monoamines and their metabolites were not changed by the LHD. The open-field tests showed that the LHD group spent a shorter amount of time in the central zone (87.6 ± 14.1 vs. 50.0 ± 6.03 s/10 min; P = 0.019), and the light/dark box tests demonstrated that the LHD group spent a shorter amount of time in the light box (198 ± 8.19 vs. 162 ± 14.1 s/10 min; P = 0.048), suggesting that the LHD induced anxiety-like behaviors. However, locomotor activity, memory functions, and social interaction did not differ between the 2 groups. The results of the present study demonstrated that insufficient intake of histidine reduced the brain histamine content, leading to anxiety-like behaviors in the mice. PMID:25056690

  20. Reduced neuronal cell death after experimental brain injury in mice lacking a functional alternative pathway of complement activation

    PubMed Central

    Leinhase, Iris; Holers, V Michael; Thurman, Joshua M; Harhausen, Denise; Schmidt, Oliver I; Pietzcker, Malte; Taha, Mohy E; Rittirsch, Daniel; Huber-Lang, Markus; Smith, Wade R; Ward, Peter A; Stahel, Philip F

    2006-01-01

    Background Neuroprotective strategies for prevention of the neuropathological sequelae of traumatic brain injury (TBI) have largely failed in translation to clinical treatment. Thus, there is a substantial need for further understanding the molecular mechanisms and pathways which lead to secondary neuronal cell death in the injured brain. The intracerebral activation of the complement cascade was shown to mediate inflammation and tissue destruction after TBI. However, the exact pathways of complement activation involved in the induction of posttraumatic neurodegeneration have not yet been assessed. In the present study, we investigated the role of the alternative complement activation pathway in contributing to neuronal cell death, based on a standardized TBI model in mice with targeted deletion of the factor B gene (fB-/-), a "key" component required for activation of the alternative complement pathway. Results After experimental TBI in wild-type (fB+/+) mice, there was a massive time-dependent systemic complement activation, as determined by enhanced C5a serum levels for up to 7 days. In contrast, the extent of systemic complement activation was significantly attenuated in fB-/- mice (P < 0.05,fB-/- vs. fB+/+; t = 4 h, 24 h, and 7 days after TBI). TUNEL histochemistry experiments revealed that posttraumatic neuronal cell death was clearly reduced for up to 7 days in the injured brain hemispheres of fB-/- mice, compared to fB+/+ littermates. Furthermore, a strong upregulation of the anti-apoptotic mediator Bcl-2 and downregulation of the pro-apoptotic Fas receptor was detected in brain homogenates of head-injured fB-/- vs. fB+/+ mice by Western blot analysis. Conclusion The alternative pathway of complement activation appears to play a more crucial role in the pathophysiology of TBI than previously appreciated. This notion is based on the findings of (a) the significant attenuation of overall complement activation in head-injured fB-/- mice, as determined by a

  1. Noopept reduces the postischemic functional and metabolic disorders in the brain of rats with different sensitivity to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Zarubina, I V; Shabanov, P D

    2009-03-01

    Chronic cerebral ischemia was induced by ligation of both common carotid arteries in Wistar rats, divided by sensitivity to hypoxia into highly sensitive and low-sensitive. Noopept (peptide preparation), injected (0.5 mg/kg) during 7 days after occlusion of the carotid arteries, reduced the neurological disorders in rats with high and low sensitivity to hypoxia and improved their survival during the postischemic period. Noopept normalized behavior disordered by cerebral ischemia (according to the open field and elevated plus maze tests), prevented accumulation of LPO products and inhibition of antioxidant systems in the brain of rats with high and low sensitivity to hypoxia. Hence, noopept exhibited a neuroprotective effect in cerebral ischemia. PMID:19529857

  2. Huoxue Rongluo Tablet reduces matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression in infarcted brain tissue

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Desheng; Li, Mei; Hu, Hua; Chen, Yao; Yang, Yang; Zhong, Jie; Liu, Lijuan

    2013-01-01

    Huoxue Rongluo Tablet was made of tall gastrodis tuber, dahurian angelica root, honeysuckle stem, grassleaf sweetflag rhizome, common flowering quince fruit, figwort root, red peony root and peach seed at a ratio of 3:2:6:2:3:3:3:3. Huoxue Rongluo Tablet is a well-established and common pre-scription for the treatment of cerebral infarction. In this study, a rat model of cerebral ischemia was established and the animals were intragastrically administered Huoxue Rongluo Tablet. This treat-ment reduced infarct volume, decreased matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression, and improved neurological function. Moreover, the effects of Huoxue Rongluo Tablet were better than those of buflomedil pyridoxal phosphate. These results indicate that Huoxue Rongluo Tablet is effective in treating cerebral infarction by regulating matrix metalloproteinase-9 protein expression. PMID:25206642

  3. Huoxue Rongluo Tablet reduces matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression in infarcted brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Desheng; Li, Mei; Hu, Hua; Chen, Yao; Yang, Yang; Zhong, Jie; Liu, Lijuan

    2013-12-01

    Huoxue Rongluo Tablet was made of tall gastrodis tuber, dahurian angelica root, honeysuckle stem, grassleaf sweetflag rhizome, common flowering quince fruit, figwort root, red peony root and peach seed at a ratio of 3:2:6:2:3:3:3:3. Huoxue Rongluo Tablet is a well-established and common pre-scription for the treatment of cerebral infarction. In this study, a rat model of cerebral ischemia was established and the animals were intragastrically administered Huoxue Rongluo Tablet. This treat-ment reduced infarct volume, decreased matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression, and improved neurological function. Moreover, the effects of Huoxue Rongluo Tablet were better than those of buflomedil pyridoxal phosphate. These results indicate that Huoxue Rongluo Tablet is effective in treating cerebral infarction by regulating matrix metalloproteinase-9 protein expression. PMID:25206642

  4. Protease-activated receptor 1 and 4 signal inhibition reduces preterm neonatal hemorrhagic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Lekic, Tim; Klebe, Damon; McBride, Devin W; Manaenko, Anatol; Rolland, William B.; Flores, Jerry J.; Altay, Orhan; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose This study examines the role of thrombin’s protease-activated receptors (PAR)-1,-4 in mediating cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) following germinal matrix hemorrhage (GMH). Methods GMH was induced by intraparenchymal infusion of bacterial collagenase into the right ganglionic eminence of P7 rat pups. Animals were treated with either PAR-1, -4, COX-2, or mTOR inhibitors by 1 hour, and up to five days. Results We found increased thrombin activity 6–24 hrs after GMH, and PAR-1, -4, inhibition normalized COX-2 and mTOR by 72 hrs. Early treatment with NS398 or rapamycin substantially improved long-term outcomes in juvenile animals. Conclusions Suppressing early PAR signal transduction, and postnatal NS398 or rapamycin treatment, may help reduce GMH severity in susceptible preterm infants. PMID:25931468

  5. Increased release of brain serotonin reduces vulnerability to ventricular fibrillation in the cat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehnert, Hendrik; Lombardi, Federico; Raeder, Ernst A.; Lorenzo, Antonio V.; Verrier, Richard L.; Lown, Bernard; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of administering the serotonin precursor 5-l-hydroxytryptophan, in conjunction with a monamine oxidase inhibitor phenelzine and a l-amino acid decarboxylase inhibitor carbidopa, on neurochemical changes in the concentrations of serotonin and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) in the cerebrospinal fluid of the cat were investigated. Results showed that this drug regimen led to increases of serotonin and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) concentrations in the cerebrospinal fluid by 330 and 830 percent, respectively. Concomitantly, the threshold of ventricular fibrillation was found to be elevated by 42 percent and the effective refractory period was prolonged by 7 percent; the efferent sympathetic neural activity was suppressed in the normal heart. The results indicate that the enhancement of central serotoninergic neurotransmission can reduce the susceptibility of the heart to ventricular fibrillation mediated through a decline in sympathetic neural traffic to the heart.

  6. Emotional graphic cigarette warning labels reduce the electrophysiological brain response to smoking cues.

    PubMed

    Wang, An-Li; Romer, Dan; Elman, Igor; Turetsky, Bruce I; Gur, Ruben C; Langleben, Daniel D

    2015-03-01

    There is an ongoing public debate about the new graphic warning labels (GWLs) that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) proposes to place on cigarette packs. Tobacco companies argued that the strongly emotional images FDA proposed to include in the GWLs encroached on their constitutional rights. The court ruled that FDA did not provide sufficient scientific evidence of compelling public interest in such encroachment. This study's objectives were to examine the effects of the GWLs on the electrophysiological and behavioral correlates of smoking addiction and to determine whether labels rated higher on the emotional reaction (ER) scale are associated with greater effects. We studied 25 non-treatment-seeking smokers. Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded while participants viewed a random sequence of paired images, in which visual smoking (Cues) or non-smoking (non-Cues) images were preceded by GWLs or neutral images. Participants reported their cigarette craving after viewing each pair. Dependent variables were magnitude of P300 ERPs and self-reported cigarette craving in response to Cues. We found that subjective craving response to Cues was significantly reduced by preceding GWLs, whereas the P300 amplitude response to Cues was reduced only by preceding GWLs rated high on the ER scale. In conclusion, our study provides experimental neuroscience evidence that weighs in on the ongoing public and legal debate about how to balance the constitutional and public health aspects of the FDA-proposed GWLs. The high toll of smoking-related illness and death adds urgency to the debate and prompts consideration of our findings while longitudinal studies of GWLs are underway. PMID:24330194

  7. Deep Brain Stimulation Reduces Neuronal Entropy in the MPTP-Primate Model of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dorval, Alan D.; Russo, Gary S.; Hashimoto, Takao; Xu, Weidong; Grill, Warren M.; Vitek, Jerrold L.

    2008-01-01

    High-frequency stimulation (HFS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) or internal segment of the globus pallidus is a clinically successful treatment for the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease. However, the mechanisms by which HFS alleviates these symptoms are not understood. Whereas initial studies focused on HFS-induced changes in neuronal firing rates, recent studies suggest that changes in patterns of neuronal activity may correlate with symptom alleviation. We hypothesized that effective STN HFS reduces the disorder of neuronal firing patterns in the basal ganglia thalamic circuit, minimizing the pathological activity associated with parkinsonism. Stimulating leads were implanted in the STN of two rhesus monkeys rendered parkinsonian by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). Action potentials were recorded from neurons of the internal and external globus pallidus and the motor thalamus (ventralis anterior, ventralis lateralis pars oralis, and ventralis posterior lateralis pars oralis) during HFS that reduced motor symptoms and during clinically ineffective low-frequency stimulation (LFS). Firing pattern entropy was calculated from the recorded spike times to quantify the disorder of the neuronal activity. The firing pattern entropy of neurons within each region of the pallidum and motor thalamus decreased in response to HFS (n ≥ 18 and P ≤ 0.02 in each region), whereas firing rate changes were specific to pallidal neurons only. In response to LFS, firing rates were unchanged, but firing pattern entropy increased throughout the circuit (n ≥ 24 and P ≤ 10−4 in each region). These data suggest that the clinical effectiveness of HFS is correlated with, and potentially mediated by, a regularization of the pattern of neuronal activity throughout the basal ganglia thalamic circuit. PMID:18784271

  8. Emotional graphic cigarette warning labels reduce the electrophysiological brain response to smoking cues

    PubMed Central

    Wang, An-Li; Romer, Dan; Elman, Igor; Turetsky, Bruce I.; Gur, Ruben C.; Langleben, Daniel D.

    2015-01-01

    There is an ongoing public debate about the new graphic warning labels (GWLs) that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) proposes to place on cigarette packs. Tobacco companies argued that the strongly emotional images FDA proposed to include in the GWLs encroached on their constitutional rights. The court ruled that FDA did not provide sufficient scientific evidence of compelling public interest in such encroachment. This study’s objectives were to examine the effects of the GWLs on the electrophysiological and behavioral correlates of smoking addiction and to determine whether labels rated higher on the emotional reaction (ER) scale are associated with greater effects. We studied 25 non-treatment-seeking smokers. Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded while participants viewed a random sequence of paired images, in which visual smoking (Cues) or non-smoking (non-Cues) images were preceded by GWLs or neutral images. Participants reported their cigarette craving after viewing each pair. Dependent variables were magnitude of P300 ERPs and self-reported cigarette craving in response to Cues. We found that subjective craving response to Cues was significantly reduced by preceding GWLs, whereas the P300 amplitude response to Cues was reduced only by preceding GWLs rated high on the ER scale. In conclusion, our study provides experimental neuroscience evidence that weighs in on the ongoing public and legal debate about how to balance the constitutional and public health aspects of the FDA-proposed GWLs. The high toll of smoking-related illness and death adds urgency to the debate and prompts consideration of our findings while longitudinal studies of GWLs are underway. PMID:24330194

  9. Intranasal IGF-1 Reduced Rat Pup Germinal Matrix Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Lekic, Tim; Flores, Jerry; Klebe, Damon; Doycheva, Desislava; Rolland, William B; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H

    2016-01-01

    Germinal matrix hemorrhage (GMH) is the most devastating neurological problem of premature infants. Current treatment strategies are ineffective and brain injury is unpreventable. Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) is an endogenous protein shown to have multiple neuroprotective properties. We therefore hypothesized that IGF-1 would reduce brain injury after GMH. Neonatal rats (P7 age) received stereotactic collagenase into the right ganglionic eminence. The following groups were studied: (1) sham, (2) GMH + vehicle, (3) GMH + intranasal IGF-1. Three days later, the animals were evaluated using the righting-reflex (early neurobehavior), Evans blue dye leakage (blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability), brain water content (edema), and hemoglobin assay (extent of bleeding). Three weeks later, juvenile rats were tested using a water maze (delayed neurobehavior), and then were sacrificed on day 28 for assessment of hydrocephalus (ventricular size). Intranasal IGF-1 treated animals had improved neurological function, and amelioration of BBB permeability, edema, and re-bleeding. IGF-1 may play a part in protective brain signaling following GMH, and our observed protective effect may offer new promise for treatment targeting this vulnerable patient population. PMID:26463950

  10. Aquaporins and Brain Tumors.

    PubMed

    Maugeri, Rosario; Schiera, Gabriella; Di Liegro, Carlo Maria; Fricano, Anna; Iacopino, Domenico Gerardo; Di Liegro, Italia

    2016-01-01

    Brain primary tumors are among the most diverse and complex human cancers, and they are normally classified on the basis of the cell-type and/or the grade of malignancy (the most malignant being glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), grade IV). Glioma cells are able to migrate throughout the brain and to stimulate angiogenesis, by inducing brain capillary endothelial cell proliferation. This in turn causes loss of tight junctions and fragility of the blood-brain barrier, which becomes leaky. As a consequence, the most serious clinical complication of glioblastoma is the vasogenic brain edema. Both glioma cell migration and edema have been correlated with modification of the expression/localization of different isoforms of aquaporins (AQPs), a family of water channels, some of which are also involved in the transport of other small molecules, such as glycerol and urea. In this review, we discuss relationships among expression/localization of AQPs and brain tumors/edema, also focusing on the possible role of these molecules as both diagnostic biomarkers of cancer progression, and therapeutic targets. Finally, we will discuss the possibility that AQPs, together with other cancer promoting factors, can be exchanged among brain cells via extracellular vesicles (EVs). PMID:27367682

  11. Aquaporins and Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Maugeri, Rosario; Schiera, Gabriella; Di Liegro, Carlo Maria; Fricano, Anna; Iacopino, Domenico Gerardo; Di Liegro, Italia

    2016-01-01

    Brain primary tumors are among the most diverse and complex human cancers, and they are normally classified on the basis of the cell-type and/or the grade of malignancy (the most malignant being glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), grade IV). Glioma cells are able to migrate throughout the brain and to stimulate angiogenesis, by inducing brain capillary endothelial cell proliferation. This in turn causes loss of tight junctions and fragility of the blood–brain barrier, which becomes leaky. As a consequence, the most serious clinical complication of glioblastoma is the vasogenic brain edema. Both glioma cell migration and edema have been correlated with modification of the expression/localization of different isoforms of aquaporins (AQPs), a family of water channels, some of which are also involved in the transport of other small molecules, such as glycerol and urea. In this review, we discuss relationships among expression/localization of AQPs and brain tumors/edema, also focusing on the possible role of these molecules as both diagnostic biomarkers of cancer progression, and therapeutic targets. Finally, we will discuss the possibility that AQPs, together with other cancer promoting factors, can be exchanged among brain cells via extracellular vesicles (EVs). PMID:27367682

  12. Interventions for the treatment of uveitic macular edema: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Karim, Rushmia; Sykakis, Evripidis; Lightman, Susan; Fraser-Bell, Samantha

    2013-01-01

    Background Uveitic macular edema is the major cause of reduced vision in eyes with uveitis. Objectives To assess the effectiveness of interventions in the treatment of uveitic macular edema. Search strategy Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Medline, and Embase. There were no language or data restrictions in the search for trials. The databases were last searched on December 1, 2011. Reference lists of included trials were searched. Archives of Ophthalmology, Ophthalmology, Retina, the British Journal of Ophthalmology, and the New England Journal of Medicine were searched for clinical trials and reviews. Selection criteria Participants of any age and sex with any type of uveitic macular edema were included. Early, chronic, refractory, or secondary uveitic macular edema were included. We included trials that compared any interventions of any dose and duration, including comparison with another treatment, sham treatment, or no treatment. Data collection and analysis Best-corrected visual acuity and central macular thickness were the primary outcome measures. Secondary outcome data including adverse effects were collected. Conclusion More results from randomized controlled trials with long follow-up periods are needed for interventions for uveitic macular edema to assist in determining the overall long-term benefit of different treatments. The only intervention with sufficiently robust randomized controlled trials for a meta-analysis was acetazolamide, which was shown to be ineffective in improving vision in eyes with uveitic macular edema, and is clinically now rarely used. Interventions showing promise in this disease include dexamethasone implants, immunomodulatory drugs and anti-vascular endothelial growth-factor agents. When macular edema has become refractory after multiple interventions, pars plana vitrectomy could be considered. The disease pathophysiology is uncertain and the course of disease unpredictable. As there are no clear guidelines from

  13. Cilostazol reduces blood brain barrier dysfunction, white matter lesion formation and motor deficits following chronic cerebral hypoperfusion.

    PubMed

    Edrissi, Hamidreza; Schock, Sarah C; Cadonic, Robert; Hakim, Antoine M; Thompson, Charlie S

    2016-09-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD) is a pathological process leading to lacunar infarcts, leukoaraiosis and cerebral microbleeds. Dysfunction of the blood brain barrier (BBB) has been proposed as a mechanism in the progression cerebral small vessel disease. A rodent model commonly used to study some aspects of CSVD is bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO) in the rat. In the present study it was determined that gait impairment, as determined by a tapered beam test, and BBB permeability increased following BCCAO. Cilostazol, a type III phosphodiesterase inhibitor, has been shown to have anti-apoptotic effects and prevent white matter vacuolation and rarefaction induced by BCCAO in rats. In this study the protective effect of cilostazol administration on the increase BBB permeability following BCCAO was determined as well as the effect on plasma levels of circulating microparticles (MPs), cerebral white matter rarefaction, glial activation and gait disturbance. The effect of cilostazol on in vitro endothelial barriers was also evaluated. Cilostazol treatment improved BBB permeability and reduced gait disturbance, visual impairment and microglial activation in optic tract following BCCAO in vivo. It also reduced the degree of cell death and the reduction in trans-endothelial electrical resistance (TEER) in artificial endothelial barriers in vitro induced by MP treatment of in vitro barriers. PMID:27350079

  14. Subthalamic deep brain stimulation reduces pathological information transmission to the thalamus in a rat model of parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Collin J.; Sheppard, Daylan T.; Huynh, Rachel; Anderson, Daria Nesterovich; Polar, Christian A.; Dorval, Alan D.

    2015-01-01

    The degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta leads to parkinsonian motor symptoms via changes in electrophysiological activity throughout the basal ganglia. High-frequency deep brain stimulation (DBS) partially treats these symptoms, but the mechanisms are unclear. We hypothesize that motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease (PD) are associated with increased information transmission from basal ganglia output neurons to motor thalamus input neurons and that therapeutic DBS of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) treats these symptoms by reducing this extraneous information transmission. We tested these hypotheses in a unilateral, 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rodent model of hemiparkinsonism. Information transfer between basal ganglia output neurons and motor thalamus input neurons increased in both the orthodromic and antidromic directions with hemiparkinsonian (hPD) onset, and these changes were reversed by behaviorally therapeutic STN-DBS. Omnidirectional information increases in the parkinsonian state underscore the detrimental nature of that pathological information and suggest a loss of information channel independence. Therapeutic STN-DBS reduced that pathological information, suggesting an effective increase in the number of independent information channels. We interpret these data with a model in which pathological information and fewer information channels diminishes the scope of possible motor activities, driving parkinsonian symptoms. In this model, STN-DBS restores information-channel independence by eliminating or masking the parkinsonism-associated information, and thus enlarges the scope of possible motor activities, alleviating parkinsonian symptoms. PMID:26217192

  15. Use of virtual reality distraction to reduce claustrophobia symptoms during a mock magnetic resonance imaging brain scan: a case report.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Palacios, Azucena; Hoffman, Hunter G; Richards, Todd R; Seibel, Eric J; Sharar, Sam R

    2007-06-01

    The present case series with two patients explored whether virtual reality (VR) distraction could reduce claustrophobia symptoms during a mock magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain scan. Two patients who met DSM-IV criteria for specific phobia, situational type (i.e., claustrophobia) reported high levels of anxiety during a mock 10-min MRI procedure with no VR, and asked to terminate the scan early. The patients were randomly assigned to receive either VR or music distraction for their second scan attempt. When immersed in an illusory three-dimensional (3D) virtual world named SnowWorld, patient 1 was able to complete a 10-min mock scan with low anxiety and reported an increase in self-efficacy afterwards. Patient 2 received "music only" distraction during her second scan but was still not able to complete a 10-min scan and asked to terminate her second scan early. These results suggest that immersive VR may prove effective at temporarily reducing claustrophobia symptoms during MRI scans and music may prove less effective. PMID:17594277

  16. Intracerebral adeno-associated virus gene delivery of apolipoprotein E2 markedly reduces brain amyloid pathology in Alzheimer's disease mouse models.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lingzhi; Gottesdiener, Andrew J; Parmar, Mayur; Li, Mingjie; Kaminsky, Stephen M; Chiuchiolo, Maria J; Sondhi, Dolan; Sullivan, Patrick M; Holtzman, David M; Crystal, Ronald G; Paul, Steven M

    2016-08-01

    The common apolipoprotein E alleles (ε4, ε3, and ε2) are important genetic risk factors for late-onset Alzheimer's disease, with the ε4 allele increasing risk and reducing the age of onset and the ε2 allele decreasing risk and markedly delaying the age of onset. Preclinical and clinical studies have shown that apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype also predicts the timing and amount of brain amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide deposition and amyloid burden (ε4 >ε3 >ε2). Using several administration protocols, we now report that direct intracerebral adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated delivery of APOE2 markedly reduces brain soluble (including oligomeric) and insoluble Aβ levels as well as amyloid burden in 2 mouse models of brain amyloidosis whose pathology is dependent on either the expression of murine Apoe or more importantly on human APOE4. The efficacy of APOE2 to reduce brain Aβ burden in either model, however, was highly dependent on brain APOE2 levels and the amount of pre-existing Aβ and amyloid deposition. We further demonstrate that a widespread reduction of brain Aβ burden can be achieved through a single injection of vector via intrathalamic delivery of AAV expressing APOE2 gene. Our results demonstrate that AAV gene delivery of APOE2 using an AAV vector rescues the detrimental effects of APOE4 on brain amyloid pathology and may represent a viable therapeutic approach for treating or preventing Alzheimer's disease especially if sufficient brain APOE2 levels can be achieved early in the course of the disease. PMID:27318144

  17. The administration of food supplemented with cocoa powder during nutritional recovery reduces damage caused by oxidative stress in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Barragán Mejía, Gerardo; Calderón Guzmán, David; Juárez Olguín, Hugo; Hernández Martínez, Nancy; García Cruz, Edna; Morales Ramírez, Aline; Labra Ruiz, Norma; Esquivel Jiménez, Gabriela; Osnaya Brizuela, Norma; García Álvarez, Raquel; Ontiveros Mendoza, Esperanza

    2011-12-01

    Malnutrition contributes to the development of oxidative damage in the central nervous system. The selective administration of nutrients tends to show positive results in individuals who have suffered from malnutrition. To determine the effect of the administration of cocoa powder on the peroxidation of lipids and glutathione level during the nutritional recovery in brain, rats of 21 days old were subjected to a protocol that resembles malnutrition (MN) by feeding them with 60% of the daily food consumption of the control group (WN) and later to nutritional recovery with regular rodent feed (RFR) or added with cocoa (10 g of cocoa powder/kg of regular rodent feed) (CCR). Animals fed with regular rodent food showed significant reduction in brain glutathione: RFR (84.18 ± 6.38 ng/mg protein) vs. CCR (210.61 ± 50.10 ng/mg protein) and WN (186.55 ± 33.18 ng/mg protein), but with similar level to that of MN (92.12 ± 15.60 ng/mg protein). On the contrary, lipid peroxidation in RFR-fed animals increased RFR (1.32 ± 0.2 μM malondialdehyde/g of tissue), CCR (0.86 ± 0.07 μM malondialdehyde/g of tissue), WN (0.89 ± 0.09 μM malondialdehyde/g of tissue), but their thiobarbituric acid reactive substances concentration is similar to that of MN group (1.50 ± 0.2 μM malondialdehyde/g of tissue). Consumption of cocoa powder as a source of antioxidants favors the restoration of the concentration of glutathione and reduces the damage caused by oxidative stress during nutritional recovery in rat brain. PMID:21826449

  18. Strength training reduces circulating interleukin-6 but not brain-derived neurotrophic factor in community-dwelling elderly individuals.

    PubMed

    Forti, Louis Nuvagah; Njemini, Rose; Beyer, Ingo; Eelbode, Elke; Meeusen, Romain; Mets, Tony; Bautmans, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Ageing is associated with a chronic low-grade inflammatory profile (CLIP). Physical exercise could circumvent the deleterious effects of CLIP by influencing circulating inflammatory mediators and neurotrophic growth factors. This study aimed at assessing whether 12 weeks of progressive strength training (PST) influences circulating brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-10 in elderly individuals. Forty community-dwelling persons aged 62-72 years participated. Twenty participants were assigned to 12-week PST (70-80 % of maximal strength, three times per week). Matched control individuals (n = 20) maintained daily activity levels. Serum was collected for BDNF, IL-6 and IL-10 assay from all participants before and after 12 weeks (for PST subjects 24-48 h after the last training). In PST, muscle strength was significantly improved (+49 % for leg extension, p = 0.039), and basal IL-6 levels significantly reduced (p = 0.001), which remained unchanged in control (p = 0.117). No significant change in BDNF was observed in PST subjects (p = 0.147) or control (p = 0.563). IL-10 was below the detection limit in most subjects. Gender and health status did not influence the results. Our results show that after 12-week PST, muscle performance improved significantly, and basal levels of IL-6 were significantly decreased in older subjects. However, serum BDNF was not altered. The lack of an observable change in BDNF might be due to a short-lived BDNF response, occurring acutely following exercise, which might have been washed out when sampling. Furthermore, blood levels of BDNF may not reflect parallel increases that occur locally in the brain and muscle. These hypotheses need confirmation by further studies. PMID:25128203

  19. Reconstituted high-density lipoproteins acutely reduce soluble brain Aβ levels in symptomatic APP/PS1 mice.

    PubMed

    Robert, Jérôme; Stukas, Sophie; Button, Emily; Cheng, Wai Hang; Lee, Michael; Fan, Jianjia; Wilkinson, Anna; Kulic, Iva; Wright, Samuel D; Wellington, Cheryl L

    2016-05-01

    Many lines of evidence suggest a protective role for high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and its major apolipoprotein (apo)A-I in Alzheimer's Disease (AD). HDL/apoA-I particles are produced by the liver and intestine and, in addition to removing excess cholesterol from the body, are increasingly recognized to have vasoprotective functions. Here we tested the ability of reconstituted HDL (rHDL) consisting of human apoA-I reconstituted with soy phosphatidylcholine for its ability to lower amyloid beta (Aβ) levels in symptomatic APP/PS1 mice, a well-characterized preclinical model of amyloidosis. Animals were treated intravenously either with four weekly doses (chronic study) or a single dose of 60mg/kg of rHDL (acute study). The major finding of our acute study is that soluble brain Aβ40 and Aβ42 levels were significantly reduced within 24h of a single dose of rHDL. By contrast, no changes were observed in our chronic study with respect to soluble or deposited Aβ levels in animals assessed 7days after the final weekly dose of rHDL, suggesting that beneficial effects diminish as rHDL is cleared from the body. Further, rHDL-treated animals showed no change in amyloid burden, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Aβ levels, neuroinflammation, or endothelial activation in the chronic study, suggesting that the pathology-modifying effects of rHDL may indeed be acute and may be specific to the soluble Aβ pool. That systemic administration of rHDL can acutely modify brain Aβ levels provides support for further investigation of the therapeutic potential of apoA-I-based agents for AD. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia edited by M. Paul Murphy, Roderick A. Corriveau and Donna M. Wilcock. PMID:26454209

  20. Influenza leaves a TRAIL to pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Brauer, Rena; Chen, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Influenza infection can cause acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), leading to poor disease outcome with high mortality. One of the driving features in the pathogenesis of ARDS is the accumulation of fluid in the alveoli, which causes severe pulmonary edema and impaired oxygen uptake. In this issue of the JCI, Peteranderl and colleagues define a paracrine communication between macrophages and type II alveolar epithelial cells during influenza infection where IFNα induces macrophage secretion of TRAIL that causes endocytosis of Na,K-ATPase by the alveolar epithelium. This reduction of Na,K-ATPase expression decreases alveolar fluid clearance, which in turn leads to pulmonary edema. Inhibition of the TRAIL signaling pathway has been shown to improve lung injury after influenza infection, and future studies will be needed to determine if blocking this pathway is a viable option in the treatment of ARDS. PMID:26999598

  1. Management of pseudophakic cystoid macular edema.

    PubMed

    Guo, Suqin; Patel, Shriji; Baumrind, Ben; Johnson, Keegan; Levinsohn, Daniel; Marcus, Edward; Tannen, Brad; Roy, Monique; Bhagat, Neelakshi; Zarbin, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Pseudophakic cystoid macular edema (PCME) is a common complication following cataract surgery. Acute PCME may resolve spontaneously, but some patients will develop chronic macular edema that affects vision and is difficult to treat. This disease was described more than 50 years ago, and there are multiple options for clinical management. We discuss mechanisms, clinical efficacy, and adverse effects of these treatment modalities. Topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents and corticosteroids are widely used and, when combined, may have a synergistic effect. Intravitreal corticosteroids and anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) agents have shown promise when topical medications either fail or have had limited effects. Randomized clinical studies evaluating anti-VEGF agents are needed to fully evaluate benefits and risks. When PCME is either refractory to medical therapy or is associated with significant vitreous involvement, pars plana vitrectomy has been shown to improve outcomes, though it is associated with additional risks. PMID:25438734

  2. The evolution of scuba divers pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, Carl

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of scuba divers pulmonary edema is described. When discovered in 1981, it was believed to be a cold-induced response in a submerged, otherwise healthy, scuba diver. The clinical features are described and discussed, as are the demographics. An alleged prevalence of 1.1% was complicated by problematic statistics and an apparent increase in reported cases. Recurrences both while diving and swimming or snorkeling were common. More recent case reports and surveys are described, identifying predisposing factors and associations, including cardiac pathology. Stress cardiomyopathies, reversible myocardial disorder or Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, may complicate the presentation, especially in older females. Relevant cardiac investigations and autopsy findings are reviewed. Disease severity and potential lethality of scuba divers pulmonary edema became more apparent early this century, and these influence our current recommendations to survivors. First aid and treatment are also discussed. PMID:27265985

  3. Emerging Pharmacotherapies for Diabetic Macular Edema

    PubMed Central

    Javey, Golnaz; Schwartz, Stephen G.; Flynn, Harry W.

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic macular edema (DME) remains an important cause of visual loss in patients with diabetes mellitus. Although photocoagulation and intensive control of systemic metabolic factors have been reported to achieve improved outcomes in large randomized clinical trials (RCTs), some patients with DME continue to lose vision despite treatment. Pharmacotherapies for DME include locally and systemically administered agents. We review several agents that have been studied for the treatment of DME. PMID:22474425

  4. An unusual cause of pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Chong, Adrian; Wahi, Sudhir; Harvey, Ryan; Finn, Chris; Shah, Pallav; Gould, Paul

    2014-03-01

    Primary cardiac tumors are rare malignancies. Patients may present with congestive cardiac failure due to intracavitary obstruction to blood flow, valvular dysfunction, embolic phenomena, local invasion resulting in arrhythmias, pericardial involvement, constitutional symptoms, or paraneoplastic syndromes. We describe the case of a previously fit 79-year-old woman who presented with acute pulmonary edema due to a large left atrial pleomorphic sarcoma causing severe functional mitral stenosis. She underwent palliative debulking surgery with good symptomatic relief. PMID:24585913

  5. Cerebral edema induced in mice by a convulsive dose of soman. Evaluation through diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and histology

    SciTech Connect

    Testylier, Guy . E-mail: guytestylier@crssa.net; Lahrech, Hana; Montigon, Olivier; Foquin, Annie; Delacour, Claire; Bernabe, Denis; Segebarth, Christoph; Dorandeu, Frederic; Carpentier, Pierre

    2007-04-15

    Purpose: In the present study, diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) and histology were used to assess cerebral edema and lesions in mice intoxicated by a convulsive dose of soman, an organophosphate compound acting as an irreversible cholinesterase inhibitor. Methods: Three hours and 24 h after the intoxication with soman (172 {mu}g/kg), the mice were anesthetized with an isoflurane/N{sub 2}O mixture and their brain examined with DW-MRI. After the imaging sessions, the mice were sacrificed for histological analysis of their brain. Results: A decrease in the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was detected as soon as 3 h after the intoxication and was found strongly enhanced at 24 h. A correlation was obtained between the ADC change and the severity of the overall brain damage (edema and cellular degeneration): the more severe the damage, the stronger the ADC drop. Anesthesia was shown to interrupt soman-induced seizures and to attenuate edema and cell change in certain sensitive brain areas. Finally, brain water content was assessed using the traditional dry/wet weight method. A significant increase of brain water was observed following the intoxication. Conclusions: The ADC decrease observed in the present study suggests that brain edema in soman poisoning is mainly intracellular and cytotoxic. Since entry of water into Brain was also evidenced, this type of edema is certainly mixed with others (vasogenic, hydrostatic, osmotic). The present study confirms the potential of DW-MRI as a non-invasive tool for monitoring the acute neuropathological consequences (edema and neurodegeneration) of soman-induced seizures.

  6. Traumatic brain injury: pathophysiology for neurocritical care.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Kosaku

    2016-01-01

    Severe cases of traumatic brain injury (TBI) require neurocritical care, the goal being to stabilize hemodynamics and systemic oxygenation to prevent secondary brain injury. It is reported that approximately 45 % of dysoxygenation episodes during critical care have both extracranial and intracranial causes, such as intracranial hypertension and brain edema. For this reason, neurocritical care is incomplete if it only focuses on prevention of increased intracranial pressure (ICP) or decreased cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP). Arterial hypotension is a major risk factor for secondary brain injury, but hypertension with a loss of autoregulation response or excess hyperventilation to reduce ICP can also result in a critical condition in the brain and is associated with a poor outcome after TBI. Moreover, brain injury itself stimulates systemic inflammation, leading to increased permeability of the blood-brain barrier, exacerbated by secondary brain injury and resulting in increased ICP. Indeed, systemic inflammatory response syndrome after TBI reflects the extent of tissue damage at onset and predicts further tissue disruption, producing a worsening clinical condition and ultimately a poor outcome. Elevation of blood catecholamine levels after severe brain damage has been reported to contribute to the regulation of the cytokine network, but this phenomenon is a systemic protective response against systemic insults. Catecholamines are directly involved in the regulation of cytokines, and elevated levels appear to influence the immune system during stress. Medical complications are the leading cause of late morbidity and mortality in many types of brain damage. Neurocritical care after severe TBI has therefore been refined to focus not only on secondary brain injury but also on systemic organ damage after excitation of sympathetic nerves following a stress reaction. PMID:27123305

  7. High altitude pulmonary edema in mountain climbers.

    PubMed

    Korzeniewski, Krzysztof; Nitsch-Osuch, Aneta; Guzek, Aneta; Juszczak, Dariusz

    2015-04-01

    Every year thousands of ski, trekking or climbing fans travel to the mountains where they stay at the altitude of more than 2500-3000m above sea level or climb mountain peaks, often exceeding 7000-8000m. High mountain climbers are at a serious risk from the effects of adverse environmental conditions prevailing at higher elevations. They may experience health problems resulting from hypotension, hypoxia or exposure to low temperatures; the severity of those conditions is largely dependent on elevation, time of exposure as well as the rate of ascent and descent. A disease which poses a direct threat to the lives of mountain climbers is high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE). It is a non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema which typically occurs in rapidly climbing unacclimatized lowlanders usually within 2-4 days of ascent above 2500-3000m. It is the most common cause of death resulting from the exposure to high altitude. The risk of HAPE rises with increased altitude and faster ascent. HAPE incidence ranges from an estimated 0.01% to 15.5%. Climbers with a previous history of HAPE, who ascent rapidly above 4500m have a 60% chance of illness recurrence. The aim of this article was to present the relevant details concerning epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical symptoms, prevention, and treatment of high altitude pulmonary edema among climbers in the mountain environment. PMID:25291181

  8. Docosahexaenoic acid reduces ER stress and abnormal protein accumulation and improves neuronal function following traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Begum, Gulnaz; Yan, Hong Q; Li, Liaoliao; Singh, Amneet; Dixon, C Edward; Sun, Dandan

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we investigated the development of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress after traumatic brain injury (TBI) and the efficacy of post-TBI administration of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in reducing ER stress. TBI was induced by cortical contusion injury in Sprague-Dawley rats. Either DHA (16 mg/kg in DMSO) or vehicle DMSO (1 ml/kg) was administered intraperitoneally at 5 min after TBI, followed by a daily dose for 3-21 d. TBI triggered sustained expression of the ER stress marker proteins including phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor-2α, activating transcription factor 4, inositol requiring kinase 1, and C/EBP homologous protein in the ipsilateral cortex at 3-21 d after TBI. The prolonged ER stress was accompanied with an accumulation of abnormal ubiquitin aggregates and increased expression of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and phosphorylated tau (p-Tau) in the frontal cortex after TBI. The ER stress marker proteins were colocalized with APP accumulation in the soma. Interestingly, administration of DHA attenuated all ER stress marker proteins and reduced the accumulation of both ubiquitinated proteins and APP/p-Tau proteins. In addition, the DHA-treated animals exhibited early recovery of their sensorimotor function after TBI. In summary, our study demonstrated that TBI induces a prolonged ER stress, which is positively correlated with abnormal APP accumulation. The sustained ER stress may play a role in chronic neuronal damage after TBI. Our findings illustrate that post-TBI administration of DHA has therapeutic potentials in reducing ER stress, abnormal protein accumulation, and neurological deficits. PMID:24599472

  9. Evidence-based review of diabetic macular edema management: Consensus statement on Indian treatment guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Das, Taraprasad; Aurora, Ajay; Chhablani, Jay; Giridhar, Anantharaman; Kumar, Atul; Raman, Rajiv; Nagpal, Manish; Narayanan, Raja; Natarajan, Sundaram; Ramasamay, Kim; Tyagi, Mudit; Verma, Lalit

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to review the current evidence and design a diabetic macular edema (DME) management guideline specific for India. The published DME guidelines from different organizations and publications were weighed against the practice trends in India. This included the recently approved drugs. DME management consisted of control of diabetes and other associated systemic conditions, such as hypertension and hyperlipidemia, and specific therapy to reduce macular edema. Quantification of macular edema is precisely made with the optical coherence tomography and treatment options include retinal laser, intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF), and implantable dexamethasone. Specific use of these modalities depends on the presenting vision and extent of macular involvement. Invariable eyes with center-involving macular edema benefit from intravitreal anti-VEGF or dexamethasone implant therapy, and eyes with macular edema not involving the macula center benefit from retinal laser. The results are illustrated with adequate case studies and frequently asked questions. This guideline prepared on the current published evidence is meant as a guideline for the treating physicians. PMID:26953019

  10. Wharton's jelly transplantation improves neurologic function in a rat model of traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Tian; Yang, Bo; Li, Dongpeng; Ma, Shanshan; Tian, Yi; Qu, Ruina; Zhang, Wenjin; Zhang, Yanting; Hu, Kai; Guan, Fangxia; Wang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI), which can lead to disability, dysfunction, and even death, is a prominent health problem worldwide. Effective therapy for this serious and debilitating condition is needed. Human umbilical cord matrix, known as Wharton's jelly (WJ), provides a natural, interface scaffold that is enriched in mesenchymal stem cells. In this study, we tested the efficacy of WJ tissue transplantation in a weight drop model of TBI in rats. WJ tissue was cultured and transplanted into the injury site 24h after TBI. The modified neurologic severity score, body weight, brain edema, and lesion volume were evaluated at various time points after TBI. Cognitive behavior was assessed by the novel object recognition test and the Morris water maze test. Expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the perilesional brain area was measured at day 14 after TBI. We found that WJ tissue transplantation lessened TBI-induced brain edema (day 3), reduced lesion volume (day 28), improved neurologic function (days 21 to 28), and promoted memory and cognitive recovery. Additionally, expression of BDNF mRNA and protein was higher in WJ tissue-treated rats than in sham-operated or vehicle-treated rats. These data suggest that WJ tissue transplantation can reduce TBI-induced brain injury and may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of TBI. PMID:25638565

  11. Long-chain n-3 PUFAs from fish oil enhance resting state brain glucose utilization and reduce anxiety in an adult nonhuman primate, the grey mouse lemur.

    PubMed

    Pifferi, Fabien; Dorieux, Olène; Castellano, Christian-Alexandre; Croteau, Etienne; Masson, Marie; Guillermier, Martine; Van Camp, Nadja; Guesnet, Philippe; Alessandri, Jean-Marc; Cunnane, Stephen; Dhenain, Marc; Aujard, Fabienne

    2015-08-01

    Decreased brain content of DHA, the most abundant long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-3 LCPUFA) in the brain, is accompanied by severe neurosensorial impairments linked to impaired neurotransmission and impaired brain glucose utilization. In the present study, we hypothesized that increasing n-3 LCPUFA intake at an early age may help to prevent or correct the glucose hypometabolism observed during aging and age-related cognitive decline. The effects of 12 months' supplementation with n-3 LCPUFA on brain glucose utilization assessed by positron emission tomography was tested in young adult mouse lemurs (Microcebus murinus). Cognitive function was tested in parallel in the same animals. Lemurs supplemented with n-3 LCPUFA had higher brain glucose uptake and cerebral metabolic rate of glucose compared with controls in all brain regions. The n-3 LCPUFA-supplemented animals also had higher exploratory activity in an open-field task and lower evidence of anxiety in the Barnes maze. Our results demonstrate for the first time in a nonhuman primate that n-3 LCPUFA supplementation increases brain glucose uptake and metabolism and concomitantly reduces anxiety. PMID:26063461

  12. Long-chain n-3 PUFAs from fish oil enhance resting state brain glucose utilization and reduce anxiety in an adult nonhuman primate, the grey mouse lemur

    PubMed Central

    Pifferi, Fabien; Dorieux, Olène; Castellano, Christian-Alexandre; Croteau, Etienne; Masson, Marie; Guillermier, Martine; Van Camp, Nadja; Guesnet, Philippe; Alessandri, Jean-Marc; Cunnane, Stephen; Dhenain, Marc; Aujard, Fabienne

    2015-01-01

    Decreased brain content of DHA, the most abundant long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-3 LCPUFA) in the brain, is accompanied by severe neurosensorial impairments linked to impaired neurotransmission and impaired brain glucose utilization. In the present study, we hypothesized that increasing n-3 LCPUFA intake at an early age may help to prevent or correct the glucose hypometabolism observed during aging and age-related cognitive decline. The effects of 12 months’ supplementation with n-3 LCPUFA on brain glucose utilization assessed by positron emission tomography was tested in young adult mouse lemurs (Microcebus murinus). Cognitive function was tested in parallel in the same animals. Lemurs supplemented with n-3 LCPUFA had higher brain glucose uptake and cerebral metabolic rate of glucose compared with controls in all brain regions. The n-3 LCPUFA-supplemented animals also had higher exploratory activity in an open-field task and lower evidence of anxiety in the Barnes maze.jlr Our results demonstrate for the first time in a nonhuman primate that n-3 LCPUFA supplementation increases brain glucose uptake and metabolism and concomitantly reduces anxiety. PMID:26063461

  13. CD11d integrin blockade reduces the systemic inflammatory response syndrome after traumatic brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Lynne C; Bao, Feng; Dekaban, Gregory A; Hryciw, Todd; Shultz, Sandy R; Cain, Donald P; Brown, Arthur

    2015-09-01

    Traumatic CNS injury triggers a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), in which circulating inflammatory cells invade body organs causing local inflammation and tissue damage. We have shown that the SIRS caused by spinal cord injury is greatly reduced by acute intravenous treatment with an antibody against the CD11d subunit of the CD11d/CD18 integrin expressed by neutrophils and monocyte/macrophages, a treatment that reduces their efflux from the circulation. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a frequently occurring injury after motor vehicle accidents, sporting and military injuries, and falls. Our studies have shown that the anti-CD11d treatment diminishes brain inflammation and oxidative injury after moderate or mild TBI, improving neurological outcomes. Accordingly, we examined the impact of this treatment on the SIRS triggered by TBI. The anti-CD11d treatment was given at 2h after a single moderate (2.5-3.0 atm) or 2 and 24h after each of three consecutive mild (1.0-1.5 atm) fluid percussion TBIs. Sham-injured, saline-treated rats served as controls. At 24h, 72 h, and 4 or 8 weeks after the single TBI and after the third of three TBIs, lungs of rats were examined histochemically, immunocytochemically and biochemically for downstream effects of SIRS including inflammation, tissue damage and expression of oxidative enzymes. Lung sections revealed that both the single moderate and repeated mild TBI caused alveolar disruption, thickening of inter-alveolar tissue, hemorrhage into the parenchyma and increased density of intra-and peri-alveolar macrophages. The anti-CD11d treatment decreased the intrapulmonary influx of neutrophils and the density of activated macrophages and the activity of myeloperoxidase after these TBIs. Moreover, Western blotting studies showed that the treatment decreased lung protein levels of oxidative enzymes gp91(phox), inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2, as well as the apoptotic pathway enzyme caspase-3 and levels

  14. CD11d integrin blockade reduces the systemic inflammatory response syndrome after traumatic brain injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Lynne C.; Bao, Feng; Dekaban, Gregory A.; Hryciw, Todd; Shultz, Sandy R.; Cain, Donald P.; Brown, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic CNS injury triggers a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), in which circulating inflammatory cells invade body organs causing local inflammation and tissue damage. We have shown that the SIRS caused by spinal cord injury is greatly reduced by acute intravenous treatment with an antibody against the CD11d subunit of the CD11d/CD18 integrin expressed by neutrophils and monocyte/macrophages, a treatment that reduces their efflux from the circulation. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a frequently occurring injury after motor vehicle accidents, sporting and military injuries, and falls. Our studies have shown that the anti-CD11d treatment diminishes brain inflammation and oxidative injury after moderate or mild TBI, improving neurological outcomes. Accordingly, we examined the impact of this treatment on the SIRS triggered by TBI. The anti-CD11d treatment was given at 2 h after a single moderate (2.5–3.0 atm) or 2 and 24 h after each of three consecutive mild (1.0–1.5 atm) fluid percussion TBIs. Sham-injured, saline-treated rats served as controls. At 24 h, 72 h, and 4 or 8 weeks after the single TBI and after the third of three TBIs, lungs of rats were examined histochemically, immunocytochemically and biochemically for downstream effects of SIRS including inflammation, tissue damage and expression of oxidative enzymes. Lung sections revealed that both the single moderate and repeated mild TBI caused alveolar disruption, thickening of inter-alveolar tissue, hemorrhage into the parenchyma and increased density of intra-and peri-alveolar macrophages. The anti-CD11d treatment decreased the intrapulmonary influx of neutrophils and the density of activated macrophages and the activity of myeloperoxidase after these TBIs. Moreover, Western blotting studies showed that the treatment decreased lung protein levels of oxidative enzymes gp91phox, inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2, as well as the apoptotic pathway enzyme caspase-3 and

  15. Inhibitory Effects of Medium Molecular Weight Heparinyl Amino Acid Derivatives on Ischemic Paw Edema in Mice.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Seiichi; Toda, Takao; Nakamura, Kazuki

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the radical-scavenging effects of heparin (HE), medium molecular weight heparinyl phenylalanine (MHF), and medium molecular weight heparinyl leucine (MHL) using ischemic paw edema in mice. We also examined the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) of mice that were administered these compounds as an index of their side-effects. HE had a preventative effect and significant reduced ischemic paw edema. However, its effect was not dose-dependent and the dose-response curve was bell-shaped. The effective dose of HE also exhibited a prolonged APTT. Pretreatment using MHF and MHL were effective against ischemic paw edema without a prolonged APTT. Remarkably, the action of MHF was not only preventively, but also therapeutically active. These results suggest that MHF and MHL are superior to HE as safe radical scavengers in vivo. PMID:27381605

  16. Intravitreal ketorolac for the treatment of chronic cystoid macular edema after cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tsilimbaris, Miltiadis K; Tsika, Chrysanthi; Kymionis, George D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To report two cases of chronic postoperative cystoid macular edema, resistant to topical therapy, treated with consecutive intravitreal injections of ketorolac tromethamine. Methods Four daily intravitreal injections of 500 μg/0.05 mL of ketorolac were given to each patient. Complete clinical examination and OCT were performed before every injection, 1, 2, 3 weeks, and 1, 3, and 6 months after the last injection. Fluorescein angiography was performed at baseline examination, 1, 3, and 6 months after the last injection. Results In both cases, the edema regressed and visual acuity increased. At 6 months after the last injection, the leakage was significantly reduced at the fluorescein angiography. Discussion Both cases responded favorably to the consecutive intravitreal administration of ketorolac tromethamine. The long-lasting remission of the macular edema in these chronic cases underlines the therapeutic potential of these agents when delivered intravitreally. PMID:26929630

  17. Increase in Central Retinal Edema after Subthreshold Diode Micropulse Laser Treatment of Chronic Central Serous Chorioretinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gawęcki, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Subthreshold diode micropulse laser (SDM) treatment is believed to be safe method of treating clinical entities involving retinal edema. We present a case of serous edematous reaction of the retina to SDM treatment. Methods. Case report. Results. A patient with chronic central serous chorioretinopathy (CSCR) was treated with SDM Yellow multispot laser. Procedure had been preceded by careful titration of the laser power, which after achieving of the threshold parameter was decreased by 50%. The follow-up visit two days after treatment revealed significant central retinal edema and subretinal fluid. Fundus autofluorescence image showed thermal reaction from the RPE in the form of small spots of hyperfluorescence corresponding to the laser multispot pattern used for treatment. Retinal edema resolved after topical bromfenac and single intravitreal bevacizumab injection. Slight pigmentary reaction from the RPE persisted. Conclusion. In the treatment of CSCR, there is a need to significantly reduce threshold SDM power parameters or simply use very low power without titration. PMID:26180649

  18. Rhodiola crenulata Extract Alleviates Hypoxic Pulmonary Edema in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Min-Hui; Shi, Li-Shian; Ho, Cheng-Wen

    2013-01-01

    Sudden exposure of nonacclimatized individuals to high altitude can easily lead to high altitude illnesses. High altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) is the most lethal form of high altitude illness. The present study was designed to investigate the ability of Rhodiola crenulata extract (RCE), an herbal medicine traditionally used as an antiacute mountain sickness remedy, to attenuate hypoxia-induced pulmonary injury. Exposure of animals to hypobaric hypoxia led to a significant increase in pathological indicators for pulmonary edema, including the lung water content, disruption of the alveolar-capillary barrier, and protein-rich fluid in the lungs. In addition, hypobaric hypoxia also increased oxidative stress markers, including (ROS) production, (MDA) level, and (MPO) activity. Furthermore, overexpression of plasma (ET-1), (VEGF) in (BALF), and (HIF-1α) in lung tissue was also found. However, pretreatment with RCE relieved the HAPE findings by curtailing all of the hypoxia-induced lung injury parameters. These findings suggest that RCE confers effective protection for maintaining the integrity of the alveolar-capillary barrier by alleviating the elevated ET-1 and VEGF levels; it does so by reducing hypoxia-induced oxidative stress. Our results offer substantial evidence to support arguments in favor of traditional applications of Rhodiola crenulata for antihigh altitude illness. PMID:23710233

  19. Brain abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... with certain heart disorders, may receive antibiotics before dental or other procedures to help reduce the risk of infection. Alternative Names Abscess - brain; Cerebral abscess; CNS abscess Images Amebic brain ...

  20. Cytokine immunopathogenesis of enterovirus 71 brain stem encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shih-Min; Lei, Huan-Yao; Liu, Ching-Chuan

    2012-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is one of the most important causes of herpangina and hand, foot, and mouth disease. It can also cause severe complications of the central nervous system (CNS). Brain stem encephalitis with pulmonary edema is the severe complication that can lead to death. EV71 replicates in leukocytes, endothelial cells, and dendritic cells resulting in the production of immune and inflammatory mediators that shape innate and acquired immune responses and the complications of disease. Cytokines, as a part of innate immunity, favor the development of antiviral and Th1 immune responses. Cytokines and chemokines play an important role in the pathogenesis EV71 brain stem encephalitis. Both the CNS and the systemic inflammatory responses to infection play important, but distinctly different, roles in the pathogenesis of EV71 pulmonary edema. Administration of intravenous immunoglobulin and milrinone, a phosphodiesterase inhibitor, has been shown to modulate inflammation, to reduce sympathetic overactivity, and to improve survival in patients with EV71 autonomic nervous system dysregulation and pulmonary edema. PMID:22956971

  1. Salubrinal reduces oxidative stress, neuroinflammation and impulsive-like behavior in a rodent model of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Logsdon, Aric F; Lucke-Wold, Brandon P; Nguyen, Linda; Matsumoto, Rae R; Turner, Ryan C; Rosen, Charles L; Huber, Jason D

    2016-07-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of trauma related morbidity in the developed world. TBI has been shown to trigger secondary injury cascades including endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, oxidative stress, and neuroinflammation. The link between secondary injury cascades and behavioral outcome following TBI is poorly understood warranting further investigation. Using our validated rodent blast TBI model, we examined the interaction of secondary injury cascades following single injury and how these interactions may contribute to impulsive-like behavior after a clinically relevant repetitive TBI paradigm. We targeted these secondary pathways acutely following single injury with the cellular stress modulator, salubrinal (SAL). We examined the neuroprotective effects of SAL administration on significantly reducing ER stress: janus-N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation and C/EBP homology protein (CHOP), oxidative stress: superoxide and carbonyls, and neuroinflammation: nuclear factor kappa beta (NFκB) activity, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) protein expression, and pro-inflammatory cytokines at 24h post-TBI. We then used the more clinically relevant repeat injury paradigm and observed elevated NFκB and iNOS activity. These injury cascades were associated with impulsive-like behavior measured on the elevated plus maze. SAL administration attenuated secondary iNOS activity at 72h following repetitive TBI, and most importantly prevented impulsive-like behavior. Overall, these results suggest a link between secondary injury cascades and impulsive-like behavior that can be modulated by SAL administration. PMID:27131989

  2. Towards reducing impact-induced brain injury: lessons from a computational study of army and football helmet pads.

    PubMed

    Moss, William C; King, Michael J; Blackman, Eric G

    2014-01-01

    We use computational simulations to compare the impact response of different football and U.S. Army helmet pad materials. We conduct experiments to characterise the material response of different helmet pads. We simulate experimental helmet impact tests performed by the U.S. Army to validate our methods. We then simulate a cylindrical impactor striking different pads. The acceleration history of the impactor is used to calculate the head injury criterion for each pad. We conduct sensitivity studies exploring the effects of pad composition, geometry and material stiffness. We find that (1) the football pad materials do not outperform the currently used military pad material in militarily relevant impact scenarios; (2) optimal material properties for a pad depend on impact energy and (3) thicker pads perform better at all velocities. Although we considered only the isolated response of pad materials, not entire helmet systems, our analysis suggests that by using larger helmet shells with correspondingly thicker pads, impact-induced traumatic brain injury may be reduced. PMID:23244512

  3. Angular Impact Mitigation system for bicycle helmets to reduce head acceleration and risk of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Kirk; Dau, Nathan; Feist, Florian; Deck, Caroline; Willinger, Rémy; Madey, Steven M; Bottlang, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Angular acceleration of the head is a known cause of traumatic brain injury (TBI), but contemporary bicycle helmets lack dedicated mechanisms to mitigate angular acceleration. A novel Angular Impact Mitigation (AIM) system for bicycle helmets has been developed that employs an elastically suspended aluminum honeycomb liner to absorb linear acceleration in normal impacts as well as angular acceleration in oblique impacts. This study tested bicycle helmets with and without AIM technology to comparatively assess impact mitigation. Normal impact tests were performed to measure linear head acceleration. Oblique impact tests were performed to measure angular head acceleration and neck loading. Furthermore, acceleration histories of oblique impacts were analyzed in a computational head model to predict the resulting risk of TBI in the form of concussion and diffuse axonal injury (DAI). Compared to standard helmets, AIM helmets resulted in a 14% reduction in peak linear acceleration (p<0.001), a 34% reduction in peak angular acceleration (p<0.001), and a 22-32% reduction in neck loading (p<0.001). Computational results predicted that AIM helmets reduced the risk of concussion and DAI by 27% and 44%, respectively. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that AIM technology could effectively improve impact mitigation compared to a contemporary expanded polystyrene-based bicycle helmet, and may enhance prevention of bicycle-related TBI. Further research is required. PMID:23770518

  4. Exogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor relieves pain symptoms of diabetic rats by reducing excitability of dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Yu, Ting; Yu, Liling; Li, Haijun; Liu, Yongjuan; Wang, Dongqin

    2016-08-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a common complication of diabetes lacking of effective treatments. Enhanced excitability of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron plays a crucial role in the progression of diabetic neuropathic hyperalgesia. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is known as a neuromodulator of nociception, but whether and how BDNF modulates the excitability of DRG neurons in the development of DPN remain to be clarified. This study investigated the role of exogenous BDNF and its high-affinity tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB) in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetic neuropathic pain. The results showed that continued intrathecal administration of BDNF to diabetic rats dramatically alleviated mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia, as well as inhibited hyperexcitability of DRG neurons. These effects were blocked by pretreatment with TrkB Fc (a synthetic fusion protein consisting of the extracellular ligand-binding domain of the TrkB receptor). The expression of BDNF and TrkB was upregulated in the DRG of diabetic rats. Intrathecal administration of BDNF did not affect this upregulation. These data provide novel information that exogenous BDNF relieved pain symptoms of diabetic rats by reducing hyperexcitability of DRG neurons and might be the potential treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy. PMID:26441011

  5. Angular Impact Mitigation System for Bicycle Helmets to Reduce Head Acceleration and Risk of Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Kirk; Dau, Nathan; Feist, Florian; Deck, Caroline; Willinger, Rémy; Madey, Steven M.; Bottlang, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Angular acceleration of the head is a known cause of traumatic brain injury (TBI), but contemporary bicycle helmets lack dedicated mechanisms to mitigate angular acceleration. A novel Angular Impact Mitigation (AIM) system for bicycle helmets has been developed that employs an elastically suspended aluminum honeycomb liner to absorb linear acceleration in normal impacts as well as angular acceleration in oblique impacts. This study tested bicycle helmets with and without AIM technology to comparatively assess impact mitigation. Normal impact tests were performed to measure linear head acceleration. Oblique impact tests were performed to measure angular head acceleration and neck loading. Furthermore, acceleration histories of oblique impacts were analyzed in a computational head model to predict the resulting risk of TBI in the form of concussion and diffuse axonal injury (DAI). Compared to standard helmets, AIM helmets resulted in a 14% reduction in peak linear acceleration (p < 0.001), a 34% reduction in peak angular acceleration (p < 0.001), and a 22% to 32% reduction in neck loading (p < 0.001). Computational results predicted that AIM helmets reduced the risk of concussion and DAI by 27% and 44%, respectively. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that AIM technology could effectively improve impact mitigation compared to a contemporary expanded polystyrene-based bicycle helmet, and may enhance prevention of bicycle-related TBI. Further research is required. PMID:23770518

  6. DKA with Severe Hypertriglyceridemia and Cerebral Edema in an Adolescent Boy: A Case Study and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Saengkaew, Tansit; Sahakitrungruang, Taninee; Wacharasindhu, Suttipong; Supornsilchai, Vichit

    2016-01-01

    A 13-year-old adolescent boy with type 1 diabetes mellitus (1b) presented with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and cerebral edema. Grossly lipemic serum and lipemia retinals due to extremely high triglyceride (TG) level were observed without evidence of xanthoma or xanthelasma. Cerebral edema was treated by appropriate ventilation and mannitol administration. Normal saline was carefully given and regular insulin was titrated according to blood sugar levels. Triglyceride levels were reduced from 9,800 mg/dL to normal range within 9 days after conventional treatment was commenced without antilipid medication. Based on our review of the literature, this is the first reported case of confirmed pediatric DKA with severe hypertriglyceridemia and cerebral edema. In patients with DKA and hypertriglyceridemia, clinicians should be mindful of the possibility of associated acute pancreatitis and cerebral edema. PMID:26904318

  7. DKA with Severe Hypertriglyceridemia and Cerebral Edema in an Adolescent Boy: A Case Study and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Saengkaew, Tansit; Sahakitrungruang, Taninee; Wacharasindhu, Suttipong; Supornsilchai, Vichit

    2016-01-01

    A 13-year-old adolescent boy with type 1 diabetes mellitus (1b) presented with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and cerebral edema. Grossly lipemic serum and lipemia retinals due to extremely high triglyceride (TG) level were observed without evidence of xanthoma or xanthelasma. Cerebral edema was treated by appropriate ventilation and mannitol administration. Normal saline was carefully given and regular insulin was titrated according to blood sugar levels. Triglyceride levels were reduced from 9,800 mg/dL to normal range within 9 days after conventional treatment was commenced without antilipid medication. Based on our review of the literature, this is the first reported case of confirmed pediatric DKA with severe hypertriglyceridemia and cerebral edema. In patients with DKA and hypertriglyceridemia, clinicians should be mindful of the possibility of associated acute pancreatitis and cerebral edema. PMID:26904318

  8. Effect of ethanol and/or reduced caloric intake during pregnancy on brain weight and synaptic membranes of mothers and their newborn

    SciTech Connect

    Breen, M.; Weinsxein, H.G.

    1986-03-05

    Pregnant female rats were divided into five groups and fed as follows: - Ad libitum (AD), 20% of calories as ethanol (ED20), pair fed to ED20 (CD20), 36% of calories as ethanol (ED36), pair to ED36( CD36). New-born rats were obtained from these groups and labelled:- AN, EN20, CN20, EN36, CN36. The brains were removed and a synaptic membrane enriched fraction isolated which was analyzed for protein, sialic acid and the marker enzymes:- acetylcholinesterase (AC) and Na/K ATPase. Caloric intake was reduced by ethanol to 85% (ED20) and 68% (ED36) of the ad libitum fed (AD). Brain wt. of the neonate was reduced by the lower caloric intake of the dam but ethanol ingestion reduced the brain weight of the neonate even more significantly, CN36 vs. ED36 (p<0.05). The amount of synaptic membranes (syn.mem), in the brain was 5 to 7 times greater in the dam than their corresponding neonates, but there was no significant difference in the sialic acid (SA) content of the syn. mem. of dams and their corresponding neonates; however, the levels of both enzyme markers were negligible in the neonate. The reduced caloric and/or ethanol ingestion by the dam increased the levels of SA in the syn. mem. of both dam and neonate, and the marker enzymes in the dam.

  9. Effect of glycerol on ischemic cerebral edema assessed by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Sakamaki, Masanori; Igarashi, Hironaka; Nishiyama, Yutaka; Hagiwara, Hiroshi; Ando, Jun; Chishiki, Tetsurou; Curran, Brian C; Katayama, Yasuo

    2003-05-15

    The aim of this study is to assess the anticerebral edema effect of glycerol on a large cerebral infarction with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Glycerol, which is widely used as an osmotic agent against cerebral edema, could exacerbate brain tissue shift, since it has been suggested that glycerol might shrink a noninfarcted hemisphere and worsen the mass effect after a large hemispheric cerebral infarction. To investigate these issues, changes in a large hemispheric infarction with cerebral edema were studied using MRI before and after glycerol administration. Infarct volumes, normal brain tissue volumes and lateral ventricle volumes, in addition to signal intensities of T(2)-weighted images, were measured in six patients before and after administration of 300 ml of glycerol. Ventricle volumes were significantly increased (p=0.0015) and the T(2) signal intensity of the post-treatment ischemic region decreased after glycerol administration. In contrast, no significant differences in either cerebral volume or T(2) signal intensity were seen in the noninfarcted hemisphere before and after administration. Our data suggest that glycerol does not exacerbate the mass effect on a large hemispheric infarction. PMID:12686405

  10. Reduced levels of dopamine and altered metabolism in brains of HPRT knock-out rats: a new rodent model of Lesch-Nyhan Disease.

    PubMed

    Meek, Stephen; Thomson, Alison J; Sutherland, Linda; Sharp, Matthew G F; Thomson, Julie; Bishop, Valerie; Meddle, Simone L; Gloaguen, Yoann; Weidt, Stefan; Singh-Dolt, Karamjit; Buehr, Mia; Brown, Helen K; Gill, Andrew C; Burdon, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND) is a severe neurological disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT), an enzyme required for efficient recycling of purine nucleotides. Although this biochemical defect reconfigures purine metabolism and leads to elevated levels of the breakdown product urea, it remains unclear exactly how loss of HPRT activity disrupts brain function. As the rat is the preferred rodent experimental model for studying neurobiology and diseases of the brain, we used genetically-modified embryonic stem cells to generate an HPRT knock-out rat. Male HPRT-deficient rats were viable, fertile and displayed normal caged behaviour. However, metabolomic analysis revealed changes in brain biochemistry consistent with disruption of purine recycling and nucleotide metabolism. Broader changes in brain biochemistry were also indicated by increased levels of the core metabolite citrate and reduced levels of lipids and fatty acids. Targeted MS/MS analysis identified reduced levels of dopamine in the brains of HPRT-deficient animals, consistent with deficits noted previously in human LND patients and HPRT knock-out mice. The HPRT-deficient rat therefore provides a new experimental platform for future investigation of how HPRT activity and disruption of purine metabolism affects neural function and behaviour. PMID:27185277

  11. Reduced levels of dopamine and altered metabolism in brains of HPRT knock-out rats: a new rodent model of Lesch-Nyhan Disease

    PubMed Central

    Meek, Stephen; Thomson, Alison J.; Sutherland, Linda; Sharp, Matthew G. F.; Thomson, Julie; Bishop, Valerie; Meddle, Simone L.; Gloaguen, Yoann; Weidt, Stefan; Singh-Dolt, Karamjit; Buehr, Mia; Brown, Helen K.; Gill, Andrew C.; Burdon, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND) is a severe neurological disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT), an enzyme required for efficient recycling of purine nucleotides. Although this biochemical defect reconfigures purine metabolism and leads to elevated levels of the breakdown product urea, it remains unclear exactly how loss of HPRT activity disrupts brain function. As the rat is the preferred rodent experimental model for studying neurobiology and diseases of the brain, we used genetically-modified embryonic stem cells to generate an HPRT knock-out rat. Male HPRT-deficient rats were viable, fertile and displayed normal caged behaviour. However, metabolomic analysis revealed changes in brain biochemistry consistent with disruption of purine recycling and nucleotide metabolism. Broader changes in brain biochemistry were also indicated by increased levels of the core metabolite citrate and reduced levels of lipids and fatty acids. Targeted MS/MS analysis identified reduced levels of dopamine in the brains of HPRT-deficient animals, consistent with deficits noted previously in human LND patients and HPRT knock-out mice. The HPRT-deficient rat therefore provides a new experimental platform for future investigation of how HPRT activity and disruption of purine metabolism affects neural function and behaviour. PMID:27185277

  12. Autoradiographic localization of a non-reducible somatostatin analog (/sup 125/I-CGP 23996) binding sites in the rat brain: comparison with membrane binding

    SciTech Connect

    Epelbaum, J.; Dussaillant, M.; Enjalbert, A.; Kordon, C.; Rostene, W.

    1985-07-01

    The regional distribution of somatostatin binding sites in the rat brain was determined by quantitative autoradiography, using /sup 125/I-CGP 23996, a non-reducible somatostatin analog. In preliminary experiments, kinetic properties of /sup 125/I-CGP 23996 binding to rat brain membranes and slide mounted frozen brain sections were compared and found similar. In addition, distribution of /sup 125/I-CGP 23996 and /sup 125/I-N-Tyr-SRIF14 binding sites on membrane prepared from 10 different rat brain structures were closely correlated (r = 0.91, 2 p less than 0.01), indicating that the non-reducible analog recognizes the same binding site as the Tyr-extended native peptide. Highest levels of /sup 125/I-CGP 23996 binding sites were found in anterior temporal, frontal and cingular cortex as well as hippocampus. Moderate levels were found in the remaining part of the limbic system including amygdala, olfactory tubercles and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. In the brain stem, nuclei involved in the auditory system such as the ventral cochlear nucleus and the superior olive nucleus, contained high levels of /sup 125/I-CGP 23996 binding sites. The distribution of /sup 125/I-CGP 23996 binding sites roughly correlated with that of the endogenous peptide in most structures, except in the mediobasal hypothalamus.

  13. Brain Volume Determination in Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Using Rats.

    PubMed

    Lekic, Tim; Hardy, Maurice; Fujii, Mutsumi; McBride, Devin W; Zhang, John H

    2016-01-01

    Brain edema is routinely measured using the wet-dry method. Volume, however, is the sum total of all cerebral tissues, including water. Therefore, volumetric change following injury may not be adequately quantified using percentage of edema. We thus tested the hypothesis that dried brains can be reconstituted with water and then re-measured to determine the actual volume. Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) was induced by endovascular perforation in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 30). Animals were euthanized at 24 and 72 h after evaluation of neurobehavior for determination of brain water content. Dried brains were thereafter reconstituted with equal parts of water (lost from brain edema) and centrifuged to remove air bubbles. The total volume was quantified using hydrostatic (underwater) physics principles that 1 ml water (mass) = 1 cm(3) (volume). The amount of additional water needed to reach a preset level marked on 2-ml test tubes was added to that lost from brain edema, and from the brain itself, to determine the final volume. SAH significantly increased both brain water and volume while worsening neurological function in affected rats. Volumetric measurements demonstrated significant brain swelling after SAH, in addition to the brain edema approach. This modification of the "wet-dry" method permits brain volume determination using valuable post hoc dried brain tissue. PMID:26463930

  14. Combined Intraperitoneal and Intrathecal Etanercept Reduce Increased Brain Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha and Asymmetric Dimethylarginine Levels and Rescues Spatial Deficits in Young Rats after Bile Duct Ligation

    PubMed Central

    Sheen, Jiunn-Ming; Chen, Yu-Chieh; Hsu, Mei-Hsin; Tain, You-Lin; Yu, Hong-Ren; Huang, Li-Tung

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rats subjected to bile duct ligation (BDL) exhibit increased systemic oxidative stress and brain dysfunction characteristic of hepatic encephalopathy (HE), including fatigue, neurotransmitter alterations, cognitive and motor impairment, and brain inflammation. The levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) are both increased in plasma and brain in encephalopathy induced by chronic liver failure. This study first determined the temporal profiles of TNF-α and ADMA in the plasma, brain cortex, and hippocampus in young BDL rats. Next, we examined whether etanercept was beneficial in preventing brain damage. Methods: Young rats underwent sham ligation or BDL at day 17 ± 1 for 4 weeks. Treatment group rats were administered etanercept (10 mg/kg) intraperitoneally (IP) three times per week with or without etanercept (100 μg) intrathecally (IT) three times in total. Results: We found increased plasma TNF-α, soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (sTNFR1), soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 (sTNFR2), and ADMA levels, increased cortical TNF-α mRNA and protein and ADMA, and hippocampal TNF-α mRNA and protein, and spatial defects in young BDL rats. The increase in cortex TNF-α mRNA and ADMA were reduced by IP etanercept or combined IP and IT etanercept. Dually IP/IT etanercept administration reduced the increased cortical and hippocampal TNF-α mRNA and protein level as well as spatial deficits. Conclusions: We conclude that combined intraperitoneal and intrathecal etanercept reduce increased brain TNF-α and ADMA levels and rescues spatial deficits in young rats after BDL. PMID:27445694

  15. Diffusion tensor-based tumor infiltration index cannot discriminate vasogenic edema from tumor-infiltrated edema.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Manabu; Goto, Tetsu; Okita, Yoshiko; Kagawa, Naoki; Kishima, Haruhiko; Hashimoto, Naoya; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2010-02-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is now used not only for delineating white matter fiber tracts, but also for assessing the histological characteristics of pathological tissues. Among these uses, predicting the extent or existence of tumor cell invasion into white matter by DTI is under extensive investigation. The previously reported tumor infiltration index (TII) holds great potential for the discrimination of pure vasogenic edema from tumor-infiltrated edema. However, conflicting data are being reported questioning the clinical value of TII. The present investigation reevaluated the utility of TII in patients with meningioma or glioma. We found that TII was unable to discriminate vasogenic from tumor-infiltrated edema. Conversely, detailed voxel-by-voxel comparison of TII and (11)C-methionie PET in the T2-hyperintense area of gliomas showed that TII and (11)C-methionie PET has a positive correlation, suggesting that, although TII is unable to discriminate the cause of edema, the extent of tumor cell invasion into white matter is depicted in gliomas by TII. These data suggest that TII involves both vasogenic and tumor-infiltrated factors, rather than only a single factor. A more intensive investigation is required to reach a complete understanding of TII. PMID:19696968

  16. Willed-movement training reduces brain damage and enhances synaptic plasticity related proteins synthesis after focal ischemia.

    PubMed

    Nie, Jingjing; Yang, Xiaosu; Tang, Qingping; Shen, Qin; Li, Simin

    2016-01-01

    It has been wildly accepted that willed movement(WM) training promotes neurological rehabilitation in patients with stroke. However, it was not clear whether the effect of WM is better than other forms of exercise. The purpose of this study is to assess different effects of WM and other forms of exercise on rats with focal ischemia. The subjects are all had right middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) surgery and randomly allocated to three groups of training and one control group with no training. Infarct volume by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) dye, expression of PICK1 and synaptophysin in cerebral cortex and striatum of injured side by western blotting and immunofluorescence performed are analyzed. Exercise has done respectively on rats in each group for 15 days and 30 days. Compared with the control group, the brain damage is reduced in other groups after 15 days exercise. The protein expressions levels of synaptophysin and PICK1 are upregulated after exercise. Concentration of PICK1 protein in WM is greater than other exercise groups, and the expression of synaptophysin in WM and SM groups are higher than EM groups. The number of PICK1 positive cells, synaptophysin and PICK1 co-positive cells are increased by exercise. Synaptophysin is widely distributed in cortex surrounding the injury area in WM and EM. It is indicated in our result that willed-movement training is the most effective intervention in enhancing the PICK1-mediated synaptic plasticity in the area adjacent to the damage region of ischemic rats. PMID:26556240

  17. Co-administration of morphine and oxycodone vaccines reduces the distribution of 6-monoacetylmorphine and oxycodone to brain in rats

    PubMed Central

    Pravetoni, M; Raleigh, MD; Le Naour, M; Tucker, AM; Harmon, TM; Jones, JM; Birnbaum, AK; Portoghese, PS; Pentel, PR

    2012-01-01

    Opioid conjugate vaccines have shown promise in animal models as a potential treatment for opioid addiction. Individual vaccines are quite specific and each targets only a limited number of structurally similar opioids. Since opioid users can switch or transition between opioids, we studied a bivalent immunization strategy of combining 2 vaccines that could target several of the most commonly abused opioids; heroin, oxycodone and their active metabolites. Morphine (M) and oxycodone (OXY) haptens were conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) through tetraglycine (Gly)4 linkers at the C6 position. Immunization of rats with M-KLH alone produced high titers of antibodies directed against heroin, 6-monoacetylmorphine (6-MAM) and morphine. Immunization with OXY-KLH produced high titers of antibodies against oxycodone and oxymorphone. Immunization with the bivalent vaccine produced consistently high antibody titers against both immunogens. Bivalent vaccine antibody titers against the individual immunogens were higher than with the monovalent vaccines alone owing, at least in part, to cross-reactivity of the antibodies. Administration of a single concurrent intravenous dose of 6-MAM and oxycodone to rats immunized with the bivalent vaccine increased 6-MAM, morphine and oxycodone retention in serum and reduced the distribution of 6-MAM and oxycodone to brain. Vaccine efficacy correlated with serum antibody titers for both monovalent vaccines, alone or in combination. Efficacy of the individual vaccines was not compromised by their combined use. Consistent with the enhanced titers in the bivalent group, a trend toward enhanced pharmacokinetic efficacy with the bivalent vaccine was observed. These data support the possibility of co-administering two or more opioid vaccines concurrently to target multiple abusable opioids without compromising the immunogenicity or efficacy of the individual components. PMID:22583811

  18. Reduced GABAergic Inhibition in the Basolateral Amygdala and the Development of Anxiety-Like Behaviors after Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Almeida-Suhett, Camila P.; Prager, Eric M.; Pidoplichko, Volodymyr; Figueiredo, Taiza H.; Marini, Ann M.; Li, Zheng; Eiden, Lee E.; Braga, Maria F. M.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major public health concern affecting a large number of athletes and military personnel. Individuals suffering from a TBI risk developing anxiety disorders, yet the pathophysiological alterations that result in the development of anxiety disorders have not yet been identified. One region often damaged by a TBI is the basolateral amygdala (BLA); hyperactivity within the BLA is associated with increased expression of anxiety and fear, yet the functional alterations that lead to BLA hyperexcitability after TBI have not been identified. We assessed the functional alterations in inhibitory synaptic transmission in the BLA and one mechanism that modulates excitatory synaptic transmission, the α7 containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7-nAChR), after mTBI, to shed light on the mechanisms that contribute to increased anxiety-like behaviors. Seven and 30 days after a mild controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury, animals displayed significantly greater anxiety-like behavior. This was associated with a significant loss of GABAergic interneurons and significant reductions in the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous and miniature GABAA-receptor mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs). Decreases in the mIPSC amplitude were associated with reduced surface expression of α1, β2, and γ2 GABAA receptor subunits. However, significant increases in the surface expression and current mediated by α7-nAChR, were observed, signifying increases in the excitability of principal neurons within the BLA. These results suggest that mTBI causes not only a significant reduction in inhibition in the BLA, but also an increase in neuronal excitability, which may contribute to hyperexcitability and the development of anxiety disorders. PMID:25047645

  19. Impact of Angiotensin-II receptor blockers on vasogenic edema in glioblastoma patients.

    PubMed

    Kourilsky, Antoine; Bertrand, Guillaume; Ursu, Renata; Doridam, Jennifer; Barlog, Ciprian; Faillot, Thierry; Mandonnet, Emmanuel; Belin, Catherine; Levy, Christine; Carpentier, Antoine F

    2016-03-01

    Glioblastoma patients often require chronic administration of steroids due to peri-tumoral edema. Preliminary studies showed that treatment with Angiotensin-II Receptor Blockers (ARBs) for high blood pressure might be associated with reduced peri-tumoral edema. In this study, we aim to radiologically assess the effect of ARBs on peri-tumoral edema. We conducted a cross-sectional survey on patients with newly diagnosed GBM. Patients treated with ARBs for high blood pressure were paired to non ARB-treated patients based on similar age, tumor location and tumor size. Patients taking steroids at the time of pre-operative Magnetic Resonance Imaging were excluded from the study. In each pair of patients, we compared the volumes of peri-tumoral hyper T2-Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR) signal and the Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) in the same area. Eleven (11) ARB-treated patients were selected and paired to 11 non ARB-treated controls. Volumes of peri-tumoral hyper T2-FLAIR signal were significantly lower in the ARB-treated group than in the non ARB-treated group (p = 0.02). Additionally, peri-tumoral ADCs were also significantly lower in the treated group (p = 0.02), suggesting that the peri-tumoral area in this group had less edematous features. These results suggest that ARBs may reduce the volume of peri-tumoral hyper T2-FLAIR signal by decreasing edema. PMID:26754004

  20. Molecular pathology of pulmonary edema after injury in forensic autopsy cases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Ishikawa, Takaki; Michiue, Tomomi; Zhu, Bao-Li; Guan, Da-Wei; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2012-11-01

    The lung is vulnerable to trauma; pulmonary edema starts quickly as part of the systemic responses involved in shock. The present study investigated the molecular pathology of posttraumatic alveolar damage and responses involving pulmonary edema in forensic autopsy cases of injury (n = 66) compared with acute cardiac death cases (n = 13). Intrapulmonary mRNA and immunohistochemical expressions of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs; MMP-2 and MMP-9), intercellular adhesion molecule-1, claudin-5, and aquaporins (AQPs, AQP-1 and AQP-5) were examined. Subacute injury deaths showed an increase in lung weight similar to that in acute cardiac death, but relative mRNA quantification using the Taqman real-time PCR assay demonstrated different findings among the causes of death; higher expressions were detected for all markers, except for AQP-5 in sharp instrument injury, for MMP-2 in blunt brain injury, and for MMP-9 in non-brain blunt injury, but these expression levels were lower in acute cardiac death. In immunostaining, only MMPs showed differences among the causes of death: MMP-2 expression was evident in most subacute deaths due to blunt brain injury and sharp instrument injury, whereas MMP-9 was intensely positive in those of non-brain blunt injury and sharp instrument injury. These findings suggest significant differences in the mechanism of pulmonary edema among fatal injuries and acute cardiac death, especially between blunt and sharp instrument injury. Systematic analysis of gene expressions using real-time PCR in combination with immunohistochemistry may be useful in evaluating pulmonary damage and responses after injury in death investigations, especially in connection with posttraumatic shock. PMID:22885909

  1. New Compton densitometer for measuring pulmonary edema

    SciTech Connect

    Loo, B.W.; Goulding, F.S.; Simon, D.S.

    1985-10-01

    Pulmonary edema is the pathological increase of extravascular lung water found most often in patients with congestive heart failure and other critically ill patients who suffer from intravenous fluid overload. A non-invasive lung density monitor that is accurate, easily portable, safe and inexpensive is needed for clinical evaluation of pulmonary edema. Other researchers who have employed Compton scattering techniques generally used systems of extended size and detectors with poor energy resolution. This has resulted in significant systematic biases from multiply-scattered photons and larger errors in counting statistics at a given radiation dose to the patient. We are proposing a patented approach in which only backscattered photons are measured with a high-resolution HPGe detector in a compact system geometry. By proper design and a unique data extraction scheme, effects of the variable chest wall on lung density measurements are minimized. Preliminary test results indicate that with a radioactive source of under 30 GBq, it should be possible to make an accurate lung density measurement in one minute, with a risk of radiation exposure to the patient a thousand times smaller than that from a typical chest x-ray. The ability to make safe, frequent lung density measurements could be very helpful for monitoring the course of P.E. at the hospital bedside or outpatient clinics, and for evaluating the efficacy of therapy in clinical research. 6 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Chronic type 2 diabetes reduces the integrity of the blood-brain barrier by reducing tight junction proteins in the hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    YOO, Dae Young; YIM, Hee Sun; JUNG, Hyo Young; NAM, Sung Min; KIM, Jong Whi; CHOI, Jung Hoon; SEONG, Je Kyung; YOON, Yeo Sung; KIM, Dae Won; HWANG, In Koo

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effects of type 2 diabetes-induced hyperglycemia on the integrity of the blood–brain barrier and tight junction markers in the rat hippocampus. Forty-week-old diabetic (Zucker diabetic fatty, ZDF) rats and littermate control (Zucker lean control, ZLC) rats were used in this study. We evaluated the integrity of the blood–brain barrier by measuring sodium fluorescein extravasation and blood vessel ultrastructure. In addition, tight junction markers, such as zona occludens-1, occludin and claudin-5, were quantified by western blot analysis. ZDF rats showed significantly increased sodium fluorescein leakage in the hippocampus. Tight junction markers, such as occludin and claudin-5, were significantly decreased in the hippocampi of ZDF rats compared to those of ZLC rats. In addition, ZDF rats showed ultrastructural changes with phagocytic findings in the blood vessels. These results suggest that chronic untreated diabetes impairs the permeability of the hippocampal blood–brain barrier by down-regulating occludin and claudin-5, indicating that chronic untreated diabetes may cause hippocampus-dependent dysfunction. PMID:26876499

  3. Chronic type 2 diabetes reduces the integrity of the blood-brain barrier by reducing tight junction proteins in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Dae Young; Yim, Hee Sun; Jung, Hyo Young; Nam, Sung Min; Kim, Jong Whi; Choi, Jung Hoon; Seong, Je Kyung; Yoon, Yeo Sung; Kim, Dae Won; Hwang, In Koo

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effects of type 2 diabetes-induced hyperglycemia on the integrity of the blood-brain barrier and tight junction markers in the rat hippocampus. Forty-week-old diabetic (Zucker diabetic fatty, ZDF) rats and littermate control (Zucker lean control, ZLC) rats were used in this study. We evaluated the integrity of the blood-brain barrier by measuring sodium fluorescein extravasation and blood vessel ultrastructure. In addition, tight junction markers, such as zona occludens-1, occludin and claudin-5, were quantified by western blot analysis. ZDF rats showed significantly increased sodium fluorescein leakage in the hippocampus. Tight junction markers, such as occludin and claudin-5, were significantly decreased in the hippocampi of ZDF rats compared to those of ZLC rats. In addition, ZDF rats showed ultrastructural changes with phagocytic findings in the blood vessels. These results suggest that chronic untreated diabetes impairs the permeability of the hippocampal blood-brain barrier by down-regulating occludin and claudin-5, indicating that chronic untreated diabetes may cause hippocampus-dependent dysfunction. PMID:26876499

  4. The Curious Question of Exercise-Induced Pulmonary Edema

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Melissa L.; Farrell, Emily T.; Eldridge, Marlowe W.

    2011-01-01

    The question of whether pulmonary edema develops during exercise on land is controversial. Yet, the development of pulmonary edema during swimming and diving is well established. This paper addresses the current controversies that exist in the field of exercise-induced pulmonary edema on land and with water immersion. It also discusses the mechanisms by which pulmonary edema can develop during land exercise, swimming, and diving and the current gaps in knowledge that exist. Finally, this paper discusses how these fields can continue to advance and the areas where clinical knowledge is lacking. PMID:21660232

  5. Chitosan amphiphile coating of peptide nanofibres reduces liver uptake and delivers the peptide to the brain on intravenous administration.

    PubMed

    Lalatsa, A; Schätzlein, A G; Garrett, N L; Moger, J; Briggs, Michael; Godfrey, Lisa; Iannitelli, Antonio; Freeman, Jay; Uchegbu, I F

    2015-01-10

    The clinical development of neuropeptides has been limited by a combination of the short plasma half-life of these drugs and their ultimate failure to permeate the blood brain barrier. Peptide nanofibres have been used to deliver peptides across the blood brain barrier and in this work we demonstrate that the polymer coating of peptide nanofibres further enhances peptide delivery to the brain via the intravenous route. Leucine(5)-enkephalin (LENK) nanofibres formed from the LENK ester prodrug - tyrosinyl(1)palmitate-leucine(5)-enkephalin (TPLENK) were coated with the polymer - N-palmitoyl-N-monomethyl-N,N-dimethyl-N,N,N-trimethyl-6-O-glycolchitosan (GCPQ) and injected intravenously. Peptide brain delivery was enhanced because the GCPQ coating on the peptide prodrug nanofibres, specifically enables the peptide prodrug to escape liver uptake, avoid enzymatic degradation to non-active sequences and thus enjoy a longer plasma half life. Plasma half-life is increased 520%, liver AUC0-4 decreased by 54% and brain AUC0-4 increased by 47% as a result of the GCPQ coating. The increased brain levels of the GCPQ coated peptide prodrug nanofibres result in the pharmacological activity of the parent drug (LENK) being significantly increased. LENK itself is inactive on intravenous injection. PMID:25449808

  6. Augmentation of M-type (KCNQ) potassium channels as a novel strategy to reduce stroke-induced brain injury.

    PubMed

    Bierbower, Sonya M; Choveau, Frank S; Lechleiter, James D; Shapiro, Mark S

    2015-02-01

    Cerebral ischemic stroke is a worldwide cause of mortality/morbidity and thus an important focus of research to decrease the severity of brain injury. Therapeutic options for acute stroke are still limited. In neurons throughout the brain, "M-type" K(+) currents, underlain by KCNQ subunits 2-5, play dominant roles in control over excitability, and are thus implicated in myriad neurological and psychiatric disorders. Although KCNQ channel openers, such as retigabine, have emerged as anti-epilepsy drugs, their effects on ischemic injury remain unknown. Here, we investigated the protective effects of M-channel openers on stroke-induced brain injury in mouse photothrombotic and middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) models. Both photothrombosis and MCAo led to rapid, predictable, and consistently sized necrotic brain lesions, inflammatory responses, and behavioral deficits. Administration of three distinct M-channel openers at 0-6 h after ischemic injury significantly decreased brain infarct size and inflammation, and prevented neurological dysfunction, although they were more effective when administered 0-3 h poststroke. Thus, we show beneficial effects against stroke-induced brain injury and neuronal death through pharmacological regulation of ion channels that control neuronal excitability. PMID:25653366

  7. Augmentation of M-Type (KCNQ) Potassium Channels as a Novel Strategy to Reduce Stroke-Induced Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bierbower, Sonya M.; Choveau, Frank S.; Lechleiter, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral ischemic stroke is a worldwide cause of mortality/morbidity and thus an important focus of research to decrease the severity of brain injury. Therapeutic options for acute stroke are still limited. In neurons throughout the brain, “M-type” K+ currents, underlain by KCNQ subunits 2–5, play dominant roles in control over excitability, and are thus implicated in myriad neurological and psychiatric disorders. Although KCNQ channel openers, such as retigabine, have emerged as anti-epilepsy drugs, their effects on ischemic injury remain unknown. Here, we investigated the protective effects of M-channel openers on stroke-induced brain injury in mouse photothrombotic and middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) models. Both photothrombosis and MCAo led to rapid, predictable, and consistently sized necrotic brain lesions, inflammatory responses, and behavioral deficits. Administration of three distinct M-channel openers at 0–6 h after ischemic injury significantly decreased brain infarct size and inflammation, and prevented neurological dysfunction, although they were more effective when administered 0–3 h poststroke. Thus, we show beneficial effects against stroke-induced brain injury and neuronal death through pharmacological regulation of ion channels that control neuronal excitability. PMID:25653366

  8. Intraperitoneal injection of the pancreatic peptide amylin potently reduces behavioral impairment and brain amyloid pathology in murine models of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zhu, H; Wang, X; Wallack, M; Li, H; Carreras, I; Dedeoglu, A; Hur, J-Y; Zheng, H; Li, H; Fine, R; Mwamburi, M; Sun, X; Kowall, N; Stern, R A; Qiu, W Q

    2015-02-01

    Amylin, a pancreatic peptide, and amyloid-beta peptides (Aβ), a major component of Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain, share similar β-sheet secondary structures, but it is not known whether pancreatic amylin affects amyloid pathogenesis in the AD brain. Using AD mouse models, we investigated the effects of amylin and its clinical analog, pramlintide, on AD pathogenesis. Surprisingly, chronic intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of AD animals with either amylin or pramlintide reduces the amyloid burden as well as lowers the concentrations of Aβ in the brain. These treatments significantly improve their learning and memory assessed by two behavioral tests, Y maze and Morris water maze. Both amylin and pramlintide treatments increase the concentrations of Aβ1-42 in cerebral spinal fluid (CSF). A single i.p. injection of either peptide also induces a surge of Aβ in the serum, the magnitude of which is proportionate to the amount of Aβ in brain tissue. One intracerebroventricular injection of amylin induces a more significant surge in serum Aβ than one i.p. injection of the peptide. In 330 human plasma samples, a positive association between amylin and Aβ1-42 as well as Aβ1-40 is found only in patients with AD or amnestic mild cognitive impairment. As amylin readily crosses the blood-brain barrier, our study demonstrates that peripheral amylin's action on the central nervous system results in translocation of Aβ from the brain into the CSF and blood that could be an explanation for a positive relationship between amylin and Aβ in blood. As naturally occurring amylin may play a role in regulating Aβ in brain, amylin class peptides may provide a new avenue for both treatment and diagnosis of AD. PMID:24614496

  9. PAR-1 antagonist SCH79797 ameliorates apoptosis following surgical brain injury through inhibition of ASK1-JNK in rats

    PubMed Central

    Manaenko, Anatol; Sun, Xuejun; Kim, Cherine; Yan, Junhao; Ma, Qingyi

    2012-01-01

    Neurosurgical procedures inevitably produce intraoperative hemorrhage. The subsequent entry of blood into the brain parenchyma results in the release of large amounts of thrombin, a known contributor to perihematomal edema formation and apoptosis after brain injury. The present study seeks to test 1) the effect of surgically induced brain injury (SBI) on thrombin activity, expression of thrombin’s receptor PAR-1, and PAR-1 mediated apoptosis; 2) the effect of thrombin inhibition by argatroban and PAR-1 inhibition by SCH79797 on the development of secondary brain injury in the SBI model on rats. A total of 88 Sprague-Dawley male rats were randomly divided into sham, vehicle-, argatroban-, or SCH79797-treated groups. SBI involved partial resection of the right frontal lobe under inhalation isoflurane anesthesia. Sham-operated animals received only craniotomy. Thrombin activity, brain water content, and neurological deficits were measured at 24 hours following SBI. Involvement of the Ask1/JNK pathway in PAR-1-induced post-SBI apoptosis was characterized by using Ask1 or JNK inhibitors. We observed that SBI increased thrombin activity, yet failed to demonstrate any effect on PAR-1 expression. Argatroban and SCH79797 reduced SBI-induced brain edema and neurological deficits in a dose-dependent manner. SBI-induced apoptosis seemed mediated by the PAR-1/Ask1/JNK pathways. Administration of SCH79797 ameliorated the apoptosis following SBI. Our finding indicate that PAR-1 antagonist protects against secondary brain injury after SBI by decreasing both brain edema and apoptosis by inactivating PAR-1/Ask1/JNK pathway. The anti-apoptotic effect of PAR-1 antagonists may provide a promising path for therapy following SBI. PMID:23000356

  10. Matrix Metalloproteinase Expression in Contusional Traumatic Brain Injury: A Paired Microdialysis Study

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Keri L.H.; Helmy, Adel; Pickard, John D.; Menon, David K.; Hutchinson, Peter J.A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are extracellular enzymes that have been implicated in the pathophysiology of blood–brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, contusion expansion, and vasogenic edema after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Specifically, in focal injury models, increased MMP-9 expression has been observed in pericontusional brain, and MMP-9 inhibitors reduce brain swelling and final lesion volume. The aim of this study was to examine whether there is a similarly localized increase of MMP concentrations in patients with contusional TBI. Paired microdialysis catheters were inserted into 12 patients with contusional TBI (with or without associated mass lesion) targeting pericontusional and radiologically normal brain defined on admission computed tomography scan. Microdialysate was pooled every 8 h and analyzed for MMP-1, -2, -7, -9, and -10 using a multiplex immunoassay. Concentrations of MMP-1, -2, and -10 were similar at both monitoring sites and did not show discernible temporal trends. Overall, there was a gradual increase in MMP-7 concentrations in both normal and injured brain over the monitoring period, although this was not consistent in every patient. MMP-9 concentrations were elevated in pericontusional, compared to normal, brain, with the maximal difference at the earliest monitoring times (i.e., <24 h postinjury). Repeated-measures analysis of variance showed that MMP-9 concentrations were significantly higher in pericontusional brain (p=0.03) and within the first 72 h of injury, compared with later in the monitoring period (p=0.04). No significant differences were found for the other MMPs assayed. MMP-9 concentrations are increased in pericontusional brain early post-TBI and may represent a potential therapeutic target to reduce hemorrhagic progression and vasogenic edema. PMID:25858502

  11. Gold ions bio-released from metallic gold particles reduce inflammation and apoptosis and increase the regenerative responses in focal brain injury.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Agnete; Kolind, Kristian; Pedersen, Dan Sonne; Doering, Peter; Pedersen, Mie Ostergaard; Danscher, Gorm; Penkowa, Milena; Stoltenberg, Meredin

    2008-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury results in loss of neurons caused as much by the resulting neuroinflammation as by the injury. Gold salts are known to be immunosuppressive, but their use are limited by nephrotoxicity. However, as we have proven that implants of pure metallic gold release gold ions which do not spread in the body, but are taken up by cells near the implant, we hypothesize that metallic gold could reduce local neuroinflammation in a safe way. Bio-liberation, or dissolucytosis, of gold ions from metallic gold surfaces requires the presence of disolycytes i.e. macrophages and the process is limited by their number and activity. We injected 20-45 mum gold particles into the neocortex of mice before generating a cryo-injury. Comparing gold-treated and untreated cryolesions, the release of gold reduced microgliosis and neuronal apoptosis accompanied by a transient astrogliosis and an increased neural stem cell response. We conclude that bio-liberated gold ions possess pronounced anti-inflammatory and neuron-protective capacities in the brain and suggest that metallic gold has clinical potentials. Intra-cerebral application of metallic gold as a pharmaceutical source of gold ions represents a completely new medical concept that bypasses the blood-brain-barrier and allows direct drug delivery to inflamed brain tissue. PMID:18542984

  12. Propofol Attenuates Early Brain Injury After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats.

    PubMed

    Shi, Song-sheng; Zhang, Hua-bin; Wang, Chun-hua; Yang, Wei-zhong; Liang, Ri-sheng; Chen, Ye; Tu, Xian-kun

    2015-12-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that propofol protects rat brain against focal cerebral ischemia. However, whether propofol attenuates early brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats remains unknown until now. The present study was performed to evaluate the effect of propofol on early brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats and further explore the potential mechanisms. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) by endovascular perforation then received treatment with propofol (10 or 50 mg/kg) or vehicle after 2 and 12 h of SAH. SAH grading, neurological scores, brain water content, Evans blue extravasation, the myeloperoxidase activity, and malondialdehyde (MDA) content were measured 24 h after SAH. Expression of nuclear factor erythroid-related factor 2 (Nrf2), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) p65, and aquaporin 4 (AQP4) expression in rat brain were detected by Western blot. Expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Expressions of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) were assessed by ELISA. Neurological scores, brain water content, Evans blue extravasation, the myeloperoxidase activity, and MDA content were significantly reduced by propofol. Furthermore, expression of Nrf2 in rat brain was upregulated by propofol, and expression of NF-κB p65, AQP4, COX-2, MMP-9, TNF-α, and IL-1β in rat brain were attenuated by propofol. Our results demonstrated that propofol improves neurological scores, reduces brain edema, blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability, inflammatory reaction, and lipid peroxidation in rats of SAH. Propofol exerts neuroprotection against SAH-induced early brain injury, which might be associated with the inhibition of inflammation and lipid peroxidation. PMID:26342279

  13. Osteopontin reduced hypoxia-ischemia neonatal brain injury by suppression of apoptosis in a rat pup model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wanqiu; Ma, Qingyi; Suzuki, Hidenori; Hartman, Richard; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose Osteopontin (OPN) is neuroprotective in ischemic brain injuries in adult experimental models, therefore, we hypothesized that OPN would provide neuroprotection and improve long term neurological function in the immature brain after hypoxic-ischemic (HI) injury. Methods HI was induced by unilateral ligation of the right carotid artery followed by hypoxia (8% O2 for 2h) in postnatal day 7 rats. OPN (0.03 µg or 0.1 µg) was injected intracerebroventricularly at 1h post HI. Temporal expression of endogenous OPN was evaluated in the normal rat brain at the age of day 0, 4, 7, 11, 14, and 21, and in the ipsilateral hemisphere following HI. The effects of OPN were evaluated using TTC staining, apoptotic cell death assay, and cleaved caspase-3 expression. Neurological function was assessed by Morris water maze test. Results Endogenous OPN expression in the brain was the highest at the age of day 0, with continuous reduction till the age of day 21 during development. After HI injury, endogenous OPN expression was increased and peaked at 48h. Exogenous OPN decreased infarct volume and improved neurological outcomes 7 weeks after HI injury. OPN-induced neuroprotection was blocked by an integrin antagonist. Conclusions OPN-induced neuroprotection was associated with cleaved-caspase-3 inhibition and antiapoptotic cell death. OPN treatment improved long-term neurological function against neonatal HI brain injury. PMID:21273567

  14. Macrophage-epithelial paracrine crosstalk inhibits lung edema clearance during influenza infection

    PubMed Central

    Peteranderl, Christin; Morales-Nebreda, Luisa; Lecuona, Emilia; Vadász, István; Morty, Rory E.; Schmoldt, Carole; Bespalowa, Julia; Pleschka, Stephan; Mayer, Konstantin; Gattenloehner, Stefan; Fink, Ludger; Lohmeyer, Juergen; Seeger, Werner; Sznajder, Jacob I.; Mutlu, Gökhan M.; Budinger, G.R. Scott

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A viruses (IAV) can cause lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), which is characterized by accumulation of excessive fluid (edema) in the alveolar airspaces and leads to hypoxemia and death if not corrected. Clearance of excess edema fluid is driven mostly by the alveolar epithelial Na,K-ATPase and is crucial for survival of patients with ARDS. We therefore investigated whether IAV infection alters Na,K-ATPase expression and function in alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) and the ability of the lung to clear edema. IAV infection reduced Na,K-ATPase in the plasma membrane of human and murine AECs and in distal lung epithelium of infected mice. Moreover, induced Na,K-ATPase improved alveolar fluid clearance (AFC) in IAV-infected mice. We identified a paracrine cell communication network between infected and noninfected AECs and alveolar macrophages that leads to decreased alveolar epithelial Na,K-ATPase function and plasma membrane abundance and inhibition of AFC. We determined that the IAV-induced reduction of Na,K-ATPase is mediated by a host signaling pathway that involves epithelial type I IFN and an IFN-dependent elevation of macrophage TNF-related apoptosis–inducing ligand (TRAIL). Our data reveal that interruption of this cellular crosstalk improves edema resolution, which is of biologic and clinical importance to patients with IAV-induced lung injury. PMID:26999599

  15. Nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy and macular edema.

    PubMed

    Smith, S C

    1999-01-01

    As previously noted, although visual loss usually does not fall below 20/200 in the presence of ME, it may nevertheless be a significant disability. Additional interventions may include referral to low vision clinics, home health agencies, visual loss support groups, and local or regional blindness agencies to aid the patient's occupational rehabilitation, coping mechanisms, and adaptation responses in the presence of this potentially debilitating process. Control of blood sugar, blood pressure, and the intervention of focal/grid laser treatments to seal leaks and prevent further edema provide the best chance of maintaining useful vision throughout life. Patient education is paramount to improve comprehension of the condition, recommended treatment modalities, and compliance with prescribed regimens. Assessments and interventions related to knowledge and sensory deficits, anxiety, discomfort, ineffective coping mechanisms, and health maintenance behaviors add a quality link in the multidisciplinary approach surrounding the delivery of care to patients with NPDR and clinically significant ME. PMID:11907881

  16. Serotonin syndrome presenting as pulmonary edema

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nilima Deepak; Jain, Ajay B.

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin syndrome (SS) is a potentially life-threatening condition resulting from excessive central and peripheral serotonergic activity. Clinically, it is a triad of mental-status changes, neuromuscular abnormalities, and autonomic disturbances. It can be caused by intentional self-poisoning, overdose, or inadvertent drug interactions. We report the case of a 58-year-old male with type 2 diabetes mellitus and obsessive compulsive disorder who developed pulmonary edema as a possible complication of SS. SS was caused by a combination of three specific serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, and sertraline), linezolid, and fentanyl. The hospital course was further complicated by difficult weaning from the ventilator. SS was identified and successfully treated with cyproheptadine and lorazepam. The case highlights the importance of effective consultation-liaison and prompt recognition of SS as the presentation may be complex in the presence of co-morbid medical illness. PMID:26997733

  17. Serotonin syndrome presenting as pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Shah, Nilima Deepak; Jain, Ajay B

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin syndrome (SS) is a potentially life-threatening condition resulting from excessive central and peripheral serotonergic activity. Clinically, it is a triad of mental-status changes, neuromuscular abnormalities, and autonomic disturbances. It can be caused by intentional self-poisoning, overdose, or inadvertent drug interactions. We report the case of a 58-year-old male with type 2 diabetes mellitus and obsessive compulsive disorder who developed pulmonary edema as a possible complication of SS. SS was caused by a combination of three specific serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, and sertraline), linezolid, and fentanyl. The hospital course was further complicated by difficult weaning from the ventilator. SS was identified and successfully treated with cyproheptadine and lorazepam. The case highlights the importance of effective consultation-liaison and prompt recognition of SS as the presentation may be complex in the presence of co-morbid medical illness. PMID:26997733

  18. Oxygen-deficient metabolism and corneal edema

    PubMed Central

    Leung, B.K.; Bonanno, J.A.; Radke, C.J.

    2014-01-01

    Wear of low-oxygen-transmissible soft contact lenses swells the cornea significantly, even during open eye. Although oxygen-deficient corneal edema is well-documented, a self-consistent quantitative prediction based on the underlying metabolic reactions is not available. We present a biochemical description of the human cornea that quantifies hypoxic swelling through the coupled transport of water, salt, and respiratory metabolites. Aerobic and anaerobic consumption of glucose, as well as acidosis and pH buffering, are incorporated in a seven-layer corneal model (anterior chamber, endothelium, stroma, epithelium, postlens tear film, contact lens, and prelens tear film). Corneal swelling is predicted from coupled transport of water, dissolved salts, and especially metabolites, along with membrane-transport resistances at the endothelium and epithelium. At the endothelium, the Na+/K+ - ATPase electrogenic channel actively transports bicarbonate ion from the stroma into the anterior chamber. As captured by the Kedem–Katchalsky membrane-transport formalism, the active bicarbonate-ion flux provides the driving force for corneal fluid pump-out needed to match the leak-in tendency of the stroma. Increased lactate-ion production during hypoxia osmotically lowers the pump-out rate requiring the stroma to swell to higher water content. Concentration profiles are predicted for glucose, water, oxygen, carbon dioxide, and hydronium, lactate, bicarbonate, sodium, and chloride ions, along with electrostatic potential and pressure profiles. Although the active bicarbonate-ion pump at the endothelium drives bicarbonate into the aqueous humor, we find a net flux of bicarbonate ion into the cornea that safeguards against acidosis. For the first time, we predict corneal swelling upon soft-contact-lens wear from fundamental biophysico-chemical principles. We also successfully predict that hypertonic tear alleviates contact-lens-induced edema. PMID:21820076

  19. Oxygen-deficient metabolism and corneal edema.

    PubMed

    Leung, B K; Bonanno, J A; Radke, C J

    2011-11-01

    Wear of low-oxygen-transmissible soft contact lenses swells the cornea significantly, even during open eye. Although oxygen-deficient corneal edema is well-documented, a self-consistent quantitative prediction based on the underlying metabolic reactions is not available. We present a biochemical description of the human cornea that quantifies hypoxic swelling through the coupled transport of water, salt, and respiratory metabolites. Aerobic and anaerobic consumption of glucose, as well as acidosis and pH buffering, are incorporated in a seven-layer corneal model (anterior chamber, endothelium, stroma, epithelium, postlens tear film, contact lens, and prelens tear film). Corneal swelling is predicted from coupled transport of water, dissolved salts, and especially metabolites, along with membrane-transport resistances at the endothelium and epithelium. At the endothelium, the Na+/K+ - ATPase electrogenic channel actively transports bicarbonate ion from the stroma into the anterior chamber. As captured by the Kedem-Katchalsky membrane-transport formalism, the active bicarbonate-ion flux provides the driving force for corneal fluid pump-out needed to match the leak-in tendency of the stroma. Increased lactate-ion production during hypoxia osmotically lowers the pump-out rate requiring the stroma to swell to higher water content. Concentration profiles are predicted for glucose, water, oxygen, carbon dioxide, and hydronium, lactate, bicarbonate, sodium, and chloride ions, along with electrostatic potential and pressure profiles. Although the active bicarbonate-ion pump at the endothelium drives bicarbonate into the aqueous humor, we find a net flux of bicarbonate ion into the cornea that safeguards against acidosis. For the first time, we predict corneal swelling upon soft-contact-lens wear from fundamental biophysico-chemical principles. We also successfully predict that hypertonic tear alleviates contact-lens-induced edema. PMID:21820076

  20. Massive vulvar edema in 2 prepartum dairy cows

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Soon Hon; Gilbert, Robert O.

    2014-01-01

    Two late gestation Holstein cows about to begin the third lactation developed massive vulvar edema. These were the only affected animals in the herd of 500 milking cows. The vulvar edema spontaneously regressed postpartum for both cows. Massive vulvar swelling is seldom observed in dairy cows in advanced pregnancy and is not described in the literature. PMID:24790232

  1. Lung Edema Clearance: Relevance to Patients with Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Azzam, Zaher S.; Sznajder, Jacob I.

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary edema clearance is necessary for patients with lung injury to recover and survive. The mechanisms regulating edema clearance from the lungs are distinct from the factors contributing edema formation during injury. Edema clearance is effected via vectorial transport of Na+ out of the airspaces which generates an osmotic gradient causing water to follow the gradient out of the cells. This Na+ transport across the alveolar epithelium is mostly effected via apical Na+ and chloride channels and basolateral Na,K-ATPase. The Na,K-ATPase pumps Na+ out of the cell and K+ into the cell against their respective gradients in an ATP-consuming reaction. Two mechanisms contribute to the regulation of the Na,K-ATPase activity:recruitment of its subunits from intracellular compartments into the basolateral membrane, and transcriptional/translational regulation. Na,K-ATPase activity and edema clearance are increased by catecholamines, aldosterone, vasopressin, overexpression of the pump genes, and others. During lung injury, mechanisms regulating edema clearance are inhibited by yet unclear pathways. Better understanding of the mechanisms that regulate pulmonary edema clearance may lead to therapeutic interventions that counterbalance the inhibition of edema clearance during lung injury and improve the lungs’ ability to clear fluid, which is crucial for patient survival. PMID:26241220

  2. Sigma-1 Receptor Modulates Neuroinflammation After Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hui; Ma, Yunfu; Ren, Zengxi; Xu, Bin; Zhang, Yunhe; Chen, Jing; Yang, Bo

    2016-07-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains a significant clinical problem and contributes to one-third of all injury-related deaths. Activated microglia-mediated inflammatory response is a distinct characteristic underlying pathophysiology of TBI. Here, we evaluated the effect and possible mechanisms of the selective Sigma-1 receptor agonist 2-(4-morpholinethyl)-1-phenylcyclohexanecarboxylate (PRE-084) in mice TBI model. A single intraperitoneal injection 10 μg/g PRE-084, given 15 min after TBI significantly reduced lesion volume, lessened brain edema, attenuated modified neurological severity score, increased the latency time in wire hang test, and accelerated body weight recovery. Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis with Iba1 staining showed that PRE-084 lessened microglia activation. Meanwhile, PRE-084 reduced nitrosative and oxidative stress to proteins. Thus, Sigma-1 receptors play a major role in inflammatory response after TBI and may serve as useful target for TBI treatment in the future. PMID:26228028

  3. Transient blockage of the CD11d/CD18 integrin reduces contusion volume and macrophage infiltration after traumatic brain injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Utagawa, Akira; Bramlett, Helen M.; Daniels, Linda; Lotocki, George; Dekaban, Gregory; Weaver, Lynne C.; Dietrich, W. Dalton

    2008-01-01

    The early inflammatory response to traumatic brain injury (TBI) may result in secondary damage. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a transient treatment employing a blocking monoclonal antibody (mAb) to the CD11d/CD18 integrin on histopathological outcome and macrophage infiltration following TBI. A parasagittal fluid percussion (FP) brain injury (1.8 – 2.1 atmosphere) was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were randomized into two trauma groups, treated (N=7) and nontreated (N=8) animals. In the treated group, a mAb to the CD11d subunit of the CD11d/CD18 integrin was administered 30 minutes, 24 and 48 hours after brain injury. Control animals received an isotype-matched irrelevant mAb using the same dose and treatment regimen. At three days after TBI, animals were perfusion-fixed for histopathological and immunocytochemical analysis. The anti-CD11d mAb treatment reduced contusion areas as well as overall contusion volume compared to vehicle-treated animals. For example, overall contusion volume was reduced from 2.7 ± 0.5 mm3 (mean ± SEM) to 1.4 ± 0.4 with treatment (p<0.05). Immunocytochemical studies identifying CD68 immunoreactive macrophages showed that treatment caused significant attenuation of leukocyte infiltration into the contused cortical areas. These data emphasize the beneficial effects of blocking inflammatory cell recruitment into the injured brain on histopathological outcome following traumatic brain injury. PMID:18374312

  4. Transcriptional Stimulation of Anthrax Toxin Receptors by Anthrax Edema Toxin and Bacillus anthracis Sterne Spore

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingfu; Hesek, Eric D.; Zeng, Mingtao

    2007-01-01

    We used quantitative real-time RT-PCR to not only investigate the mRNA levels of anthrax toxin receptor 1 (ANTXR1) and 2 (ANTXR2) in the murine J774A.1 macrophage cells and different tissues of mice, but also evaluate the effect of anthrax edema toxin and Bacillus anthracis Sterne spores on the expression of mRNA of these receptors. The mRNA transcripts of both receptors was detected in J774A.1 cells and mouse tissues such as the lung, heart, kidney, spleen, stomach, jejunum, brain, skeleton muscle, and skin. The ANTXR2 mRNA level was significantly higher than that of ANTXR1 in J774A.1 cells and all tissues examined. The mRNA expression of both receptors in the lung was the highest among the tissues evaluated. Interestingly, the mRNA expression of both receptors in J774A.1 cells was up-regulated by edema toxin. In addition, ANTXR mRNA expression in the lung was down-regulated after subcutaneous inoculation of B. anthracis Sterne spores as well as after intranasal administration of anthrax toxin-based vaccine BioThrax™. These results suggest that anthrax edema toxin and B. anthracis Sterne spore are involved in the ANTXR mRNA regulation in host cells. PMID:17459655

  5. Genetic Deletion of Rheb1 in the Brain Reduces Food Intake and Causes Hypoglycemia with Altered Peripheral Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wanchun; Jiang, Wanxiang; Luo, Liping; Bu, Jicheng; Pang, Dejiang; Wei, Jing; Du, Chongyangzi; Xia, Xiaoqiang; Cui, Yiyuan; Liu, Shuang; Mao, Qing; Chen, Mina

    2014-01-01

    Excessive food/energy intake is linked to obesity and metabolic disorders, such as diabetes. The hypothalamus in the brain plays a critical role in the control of food intake and peripheral metabolism. The signaling pathways in hypothalamic neurons that regulate food intake and peripheral metabolism need to be better understood for developing pharmacological interventions to manage eating behavior and obesity. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a serine/threonine kinase, is a master regulator of cellular metabolism in different cell types. Pharmacological manipulations of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) activity in hypothalamic neurons alter food intake and body weight. Our previous study identified Rheb1 (Ras homolog enriched in brain 1) as an essential activator of mTORC1 activity in the brain. Here we examine whether central Rheb1 regulates food intake and peripheral metabolism through mTORC1 signaling. We find that genetic deletion of Rheb1 in the brain causes a reduction in mTORC1 activity and impairs normal food intake. As a result, Rheb1 knockout mice exhibit hypoglycemia and increased lipid mobilization in adipose tissue and ketogenesis in the liver. Our work highlights the importance of central Rheb1 signaling in euglycemia and energy homeostasis in animals. PMID:24451134

  6. Developmental Thyroid Hormone Insufficiency Reduces Expression of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) in Adults But Not in Neonates

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin critical for many developmental and physiological aspects of CNS function. Severe hypothyroidism in the early neonatal period results in developmental and cognitive impairments and reductions in mRNA and protein expressio...

  7. The Episodic Engram Transformed: Time Reduces Retrieval-Related Brain Activity but Correlates It with Memory Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furman, Orit; Mendelsohn, Avi; Dudai, Yadin

    2012-01-01

    We took snapshots of human brain activity with fMRI during retrieval of realistic episodic memory over several months. Three groups of participants were scanned during a memory test either hours, weeks, or months after viewing a documentary movie. High recognition accuracy after hours decreased after weeks and remained at similar levels after…

  8. Pediatric Cerebral Stroke: Susceptibility-Weighted Imaging May Predict Post-Ischemic Malignant Edema

    PubMed Central

    Bosemani, Thangamadhan; Poretti, Andrea; Orman, Gunes; Meoded, Avner; Huisman, Thierry A.G.M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) is an advanced MRI technique providing information on the blood oxygenation level. Deoxyhemoglobin is increased in hypoperfused tissue characterized by SWI-hypointensity, while high oxyhemoglobin concentration within hyperperfused tissue results in a SWI iso- or hyperintensity compared to healthy brain tissue. We describe a child with a stroke, where SWI in addition to excluding hemorrhage and delineating the thrombus proved invaluable in determining regions of hyperperfusion or luxury perfusion, which contributed further to the prognosis including an increased risk of developing post-ischemic malignant edema. PMID:24199819

  9. [Efficacy of the anti-edema drug L-lysine aescinat in stroke].

    PubMed

    Gafurov, B G

    2012-01-01

    Forty-nine patients with ischemic hemispheric stroke admitted within 48 hours of stroke onset were studied. Twenty-nine patients (the main group) received L-lysine aescinat as an anti-edema drug. The efficacy was evaluated clinically and by EEG and autonomic testing. The rapid recovery of wakefulness and reduction in neurological deficit as well as the improvement of brain electrical activity and autonomic functions were observed. L-lysine aescinat can be recommended to control the syndrome of intracranial hypertension in stroke. PMID:23388603

  10. Serous retinal detachment and cystoid macular edema in a patient with Wyburn-Mason syndrome.

    PubMed

    Onder, Halil Ibrahim; Alisan, Sibel; Tunc, Murat

    2015-03-01

    Wyburn-Mason syndrome is a rare phacomatosis characterized by unilateral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) involving the brain, retina, and (rarely) the skin. The diagnosis is concluded with dilated fundus examination and markedly dilated tortuous vascular loops with arteriovenous communications on fluorescent angiography. We present a 14-year-old male patient with Wyburn-Mason syndrome who developed serous macular neuroretinal detachment, cystoid macular edema (CME), and consequent visual deterioration in the left eye. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a patient with Wyburn-Mason syndrome who developed serous retinal detachment and CME. PMID:24171831

  11. Simvastatin Treatment in Traumatic Brain Injury: Operation Brain Trauma Therapy.

    PubMed

    Mountney, Andrea; Bramlett, Helen M; Dixon, C Edward; Mondello, Stefania; Dietrich, W Dalton; Wang, Kevin K W; Caudle, Krista; Empey, Philip E; Poloyac, Samuel M; Hayes, Ronald L; Povlishock, John T; Tortella, Frank C; Kochanek, Patrick M; Shear, Deborah A

    2016-03-15

    Simvastatin, the fourth drug selected for testing by Operation Brain Trauma Therapy (OBTT), is a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitor used clinically to reduce serum cholesterol. In addition, simvastatin has demonstrated potent antineuroinflammatory and brain edema reducing effects and has shown promise in promoting functional recovery in pre-clinical models of traumatic brain injury (TBI). The purpose of this study was to assess the potential neuroprotective effects of oral administration of simvastatin on neurobehavioral, biomarker, and histopathological outcome measures compared across three pre-clinical TBI animal models. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to either moderate fluid percussion injury (FPI), controlled cortical impact injury (CCI), or penetrating ballistic-like brain injury (PBBI). Simvastatin (1 or 5 mg/kg) was delivered via oral gavage at 3 h post-injury and continued once daily out to 14 days post-injury. Results indicated an intermediate beneficial effect of simvastatin on motor performance on the gridwalk (FPI), balance beam (CCI), and rotarod tasks (PBBI). No significant therapeutic benefit was detected, however, on cognitive outcome across the OBTT TBI models. In fact, Morris water maze (MWM) performance was actually worsened by treatment in the FPI model and scored full negative points for low dose in the MWM latency and swim distance to locate the hidden platform. A detrimental effect on cortical tissue loss was also seen in the FPI model, and there were no benefits on histology across the other models. Simvastatin also produced negative effects on circulating glial fibrillary acidic protein biomarker outcomes that were evident in the FPI and PBBI models. Overall, the current findings do not support the beneficial effects of simvastatin administration over 2 weeks post-TBI using the oral route of administration and, as such, it will not be further pursued by OBTT. PMID:26541177

  12. Long-term exposure to nicotine markedly reduces kynurenic acid in rat brain - In vitro and ex vivo evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Zielinska, Elzbieta; Kuc, Damian; Zgrajka, Wojciech; Turski, Waldemar A.; Dekundy, Andrzej

    2009-10-15

    Kynurenic acid (KYNA) is a recognized broad-spectrum antagonist of excitatory amino acid receptors with a particularly high affinity for the glycine co-agonist site of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor complex. KYNA is also a putative endogenous neuroprotectant. Recent studies show that KYNA strongly blocks {alpha}7 subtype of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). The present studies were aimed at assessing effects of acute and chronic nicotine exposure on KYNA production in rat brain slices in vitro and ex vivo. In brain slices, nicotine significantly increased KYNA formation at 10 mM but not at 1 or 5 mM. Different nAChR antagonists (dihydro-{beta}-erythroidine, methyllycaconitine and mecamylamine) failed to block the influence exerted by nicotine on KYNA synthesis in cortical slices in vitro. Effects of acute (1 mg/kg, i.p.), subchronic (10-day) and chronic (30-day) administration of nicotine in drinking water (100 {mu}g/ml) on KYNA brain content were evaluated ex vivo. Acute treatment with nicotine (1 mg/kg i.p.) did not affect KYNA level in rat brain. The subchronic exposure to nicotine in drinking water significantly increased KYNA by 43%, while chronic exposure to nicotine resulted in a reduction in KYNA by 47%. Co-administration of mecamylamine with nicotine in drinking water for 30 days reversed the effect exerted by nicotine on KYNA concentration in the cerebral cortex. The present results provide evidence for the hypothesis of reciprocal interaction between the nicotinic cholinergic system and the kynurenine pathway in the brain.

  13. Pathophysiology of brain dysfunction in hyperammonemic syndromes: The many faces of glutamine.

    PubMed

    Butterworth, Roger F

    2014-01-01

    Ineffective hepatic clearance of excess ammonia in the form of urea, as occurs in urea cycle enzymopathies (UCDs) and in liver failure, leads to increases in circulating and tissue concentrations of glutamine and a positive correlation between brain glutamine and the severity of neurological symptoms. Studies using 1H/13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy reveal increased de novo synthesis of glutamine in the brain in acute liver failure (ALF) but increases of synthesis rates per se do not correlate with either the severity of encephalopathy or brain edema. Skeletal muscle becomes primarily responsible for removal of excess ammonia in liver failure and in UCDs, an adaptation that results from a post-translational induction of the glutamine synthetase (GS) gene. The importance of muscle in ammonia removal in hyperammonemia accounts for the resurgence of interest in maintaining adequate dietary protein and the use of agents aimed at the stimulation of muscle GS. Alternative or additional metabolic and regulatory pathways that impact on brain glutamine homeostasis in hyperammonemia include (i) glutamine deamination by the two isoforms of glutaminase, (ii) glutamine transamination leading to the production of the putative neurotoxin alpha-ketoglutaramate and (iii) alterations of high affinity astrocytic glutamine transporters (SNATs). Findings of reduced expression of the glutamine transporter SNAT-5 (responsible for glutamine clearance from the astrocyte) in ALF raise the possibility of "glutamine trapping" within these cells. Such a trapping mechanism could contribute to cytotoxic brain edema and to the imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission in this disorder. PMID:25034052

  14. Is Traumatic Brain Injury Associated with Reduced Inter-Hemispheric Functional Connectivity? A Study of Large-Scale Resting State Networks following Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Rigon, Arianna; Duff, Melissa C; McAuley, Edward; Kramer, Arthur F; Voss, Michelle W

    2016-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) often has long-term debilitating sequelae in cognitive and behavioral domains. Understanding how TBI impacts functional integrity of brain networks that underlie these domains is key to guiding future approaches to TBI rehabilitation. In the current study, we investigated the differences in inter-hemispheric functional connectivity (FC) of resting state networks (RSNs) between chronic mild-to-severe TBI patients and normal comparisons (NC), focusing on two externally oriented networks (i.e., the fronto-parietal network [FPN] and the executive control network [ECN]), one internally oriented network (i.e., the default mode network [DMN]), and one somato-motor network (SMN). Seed voxel correlation analysis revealed that TBI patients displayed significantly less FC between lateralized seeds and both homologous and non-homologous regions in the opposite hemisphere for externally oriented networks but not for DMN or SMN; conversely, TBI patients showed increased FC within regions of the DMN, especially precuneus and parahippocampal gyrus. Region of interest correlation analyses confirmed the presence of significantly higher inter-hemispheric FC in NC for the FPN (p < 0.01), and ECN (p < 0.05), but not for the DMN (p > 0.05) or SMN (p > 0.05). Further analysis revealed that performance on a neuropsychological test measuring organizational skills and visuo-spatial abilities administered to the TBI group, the Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure Test, positively correlated with FC between the right FPN and homologous regions. Our findings suggest that distinct RSNs display specific patterns of aberrant FC following TBI; this represents a step forward in the search for biomarkers useful for early diagnosis and treatment of TBI-related cognitive impairment. PMID:25719433

  15. Treatment of surgical brain injury by immune tolerance induced by intrathymic and hepatic portal vein injection of brain antigens

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Weijian; Liu, Yong; Liu, Baolong; Tan, Huajun; Lu, Hao; Wang, Hong; Yan, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Surgical brain injury (SBI) defines complications induced by intracranial surgery, such as cerebral edema and other secondary injuries. In our study, intrathymic and hepatic portal vein injection of allogeneic myelin basic protein (MBP) or autogeneic brain cell suspensions were administered to a standard SBI model. Serum pro-inflammatory IL-2, anti-inflammatory IL-4 concentrations and the CD4+T/CD8+T ratio were measured at 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21 d after surgery to verify the establishment of immune tolerance. Furthermore, we confirmed neuroprotective effects by evaluating neurological scores at 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21 d after SBI. Anti-Fas ligand (FasL) immunohistochemistry and TUNEL assays of brain sections were tested at 21 d after surgery. Intrathymic injections of MBP or autogeneic brain cell suspensions functioned by both suppressing secondary inflammatory reactions and improving prognoses, whereas hepatic portal vein injections of autogeneic brain cell suspensions exerted a better effect than MBP. Intrathymic and hepatic portal vein injections of MBP had equal effects on reducing secondary inflammation and improving prognoses. Otherwise, hepatic portal vein injections of autogeneic brain cell suspensions had better outcomes than intrathymic injections of autogeneic brain cell suspensions. Moreover, the benefit of injecting antigens into the thymus was outweighed by hepatic portal vein injections. PMID:27554621

  16. Treatment of surgical brain injury by immune tolerance induced by intrathymic and hepatic portal vein injection of brain antigens.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weijian; Liu, Yong; Liu, Baolong; Tan, Huajun; Lu, Hao; Wang, Hong; Yan, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Surgical brain injury (SBI) defines complications induced by intracranial surgery, such as cerebral edema and other secondary injuries. In our study, intrathymic and hepatic portal vein injection of allogeneic myelin basic protein (MBP) or autogeneic brain cell suspensions were administered to a standard SBI model. Serum pro-inflammatory IL-2, anti-inflammatory IL-4 concentrations and the CD4(+)T/CD8(+)T ratio were measured at 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21 d after surgery to verify the establishment of immune tolerance. Furthermore, we confirmed neuroprotective effects by evaluating neurological scores at 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21 d after SBI. Anti-Fas ligand (FasL) immunohistochemistry and TUNEL assays of brain sections were tested at 21 d after surgery. Intrathymic injections of MBP or autogeneic brain cell suspensions functioned by both suppressing secondary inflammatory reactions and improving prognoses, whereas hepatic portal vein injections of autogeneic brain cell suspensions exerted a better effect than MBP. Intrathymic and hepatic portal vein injections of MBP had equal effects on reducing secondary inflammation and improving prognoses. Otherwise, hepatic portal vein injections of autogeneic brain cell suspensions had better outcomes than intrathymic injections of autogeneic brain cell suspensions. Moreover, the benefit of injecting antigens into the thymus was outweighed by hepatic portal vein injections. PMID:27554621

  17. Therapy with Recombinant T-cell Receptor Ligand reduces infarct size and infiltrating inflammatory cells in brain after middle cerebral artery occlusion in mice

    PubMed Central

    Dziennis, Suzan; Mader, Sarah; Akiyoshi, Kozaburo; Ren, Xuefang; Ayala, Patricia; Burrows, Gregory G.; Vandenbark, Arthur A.; Herson, Paco S.; Hurn, Patricia D.; Offner, Halina

    2011-01-01

    Stroke induces a biphasic effect on the peripheral immune response that involves early activation of peripheral leukocytes followed by severe immunosuppression and atrophy of the spleen. Peripheral immune cells, including T lymphocytes, migrate to the brain and exacerbate the developing infarct. Recombinant T-cell receptor (TCR) Ligand (RTL)551 is designed as a partial TCR agonist for myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)-reactive T cells and has demonstrated the capacity to limit infarct volume and inflammation in brain when administered to mice undergoing middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). The goal of this study was to determine if RTL551 could retain protection when given within the therapeutically relevant 4h time window currently in clinical practice for stroke patients. RTL551 was administered subcutaneously 4h after MCAO, with repeated doses every 24h until the time of euthanasia. Cell numbers were assessed in the brain, blood, spleen and lymph nodes and infarct size was measured after 24 and 96h reperfusion. RTL551 reduced infarct size in both cortex and striatum at 24h and in cortex at 96h after MCAO and inhibited the accumulation of inflammatory cells in brain at both time points. At 24h post-MCAO, RTL551 reduced the frequency of the activation marker, CD44, on T-cells in blood and in the ischemic hemisphere. Moreover, RTL551 reduced expression of the chemokine receptors, CCR5 in lymph nodes and spleen, and CCR7 in the blood and lymph nodes. These data demonstrate effective treatment of experimental stroke with RTL551 within a therapeutically relevant 4h time window through immune regulation of myelin-reactive inflammatory T-cells. PMID:21472429

  18. Pharmacologic aspects of a phlebotropic drug in CVI-associated edema.

    PubMed

    Ramelet, A A

    2000-01-01

    Several phlebotropic drugs, or edema-protecting drugs, are available, the most important of which are found in the gamma-benzopyrone family (flavonoids). gamma-Benzopyrones can be plant extracts, semisynthetic preparations, or synthetic preparations. This family is divided into two different groups: flavones and flavonols, and flavanes (flavanones). The flavone group contains various types of molecule and includes diosmin. Here we discuss the pharmacologic aspects in edema associated with chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) of one of the reference phlebotropic drugs, micronized purified flavonoid fraction (MPFF), a semisynthetic preparation from the diosmin group, which represents the latest improvement in flavonoid formulation. Before we detail the pharmacologic aspects, a brief summary of the pathophysiology of edema in CVI is necessary. Several factors are implicated: the veins, which create the conditions favorable to edema; the microcirculation, which is the site of fluid transfer into the interstitial tissue; and the lymphatics, which have a limited possibility to reduce edema. Major discoveries are currently being made in CVI and the microcirculation. Results of studies show that MPFF decreases capillary permeability and increases capillary resistance, which could partly be explained by inhibition of leukocyte activation, migration, and adhesion. This inhibition is linked to a significant decrease in plasma levels of endothelial adhesion molecules (VCAM-1 and ICAM-1) after MPFF treatment. Thus, the CVI-induced damage to the microcirculation is counteracted by MPFF. The lymphatic system is also improved by MPFF treatment. The lymphagogue activity of MPFF has been demonstrated in experimental animal models and confirmed by microlymphographic measurement in patients suffering from severe CVI. The pharmacologic activity of MPFF in lymphedema was observed in a study using an animal model of acute lymphedema and in a study in patients with upper limb lymphedema

  19. Scutellaria baicalensis attenuates blood-brain barrier disruption after intracerebral hemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jung-Won; Kang, Ho-Chang; Shim, Jaewon; Sohn, Nak-Won

    2012-01-01

    Disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) contributes to the inflammatory response and edema formation in the brain, exacerbating brain damage. The present study evaluated the effects of Scutellaria baicalensis (SR) water extracts on BBB disruption after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in rats. ICH was induced by stereotaxic intrastriatal injection of bacterial type VII collagenase, and SR was administrated orally three times (50 mg/ml/kg) during the 48 h after ICH onset. SR treatment significantly reduced the degree of (1) hemorrhage volume and edema percentage of the ipsilateral hemisphere, (2) brain water content, (3) MPO-positive neutrophil infiltration in the peri-hematoma, and (4) BBB permeability measured by Evans blue leakage. In addition, expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, MMP-12, and tissue inhibitor of MMPs (TIMP)-1 were investigated with immunohistochemistry. SR treatment reduced MMP-9 and MMP-12 expression in the peri-hematoma after ICH. These results indicate that SR attenuates the BBB disruption through anti-inflammatory effects and suppression of MMP expression. These findings provide a pharmacological basis for the use of SR in the treatment of the BBB disruption following stroke and trauma. PMID:22298450

  20. L-Phenylalanine preloading reduces the (10)B(n, α)(7)Li dose to the normal brain by inhibiting the uptake of boronophenylalanine in boron neutron capture therapy for brain tumours.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Tsubasa; Tanaka, Hiroki; Fukutani, Satoshi; Suzuki, Minoru; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Ono, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a cellular-level particle radiation therapy that combines the selective delivery of boron compounds to tumour tissue with neutron irradiation. Previously, high doses of one of the boron compounds used for BNCT, L-BPA, were found to reduce the boron-derived irradiation dose to the central nervous system. However, injection with a high dose of L-BPA is not feasible in clinical settings. We aimed to find an alternative method to improve the therapeutic efficacy of this therapy. We examined the effects of oral preloading with various analogues of L-BPA in a xenograft tumour model and found that high-dose L-phenylalanine reduced the accumulation of L-BPA in the normal brain relative to tumour tissue. As a result, the maximum irradiation dose in the normal brain was 19.2% lower in the L-phenylalanine group relative to the control group. This study provides a simple strategy to improve the therapeutic efficacy of conventional boron compounds for BNCT for brain tumours and the possibility to widen the indication of BNCT to various kinds of other tumours. PMID:26455769

  1. Spontaneous remission of edema and regranulation of goblet cells in rat tracheae after capsaicin-induced acute inflammation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jin-Jang; Wang, Di-Seng; Huang, Hung-Tu

    2003-03-01

    Previous studies have investigated the short-term effect of capsaicin on edema formation and goblet-cell secretion in the trachea. The present study sought to investigate the long-term effect of a high dose of capsaicin (90 micro g/ml/kg), administered intravenously, on changes in the formation of endothelial gaps among venular endothelial cells, mucosal tissue edema and the secretory activity of goblet cells, including the number and size of goblet cells, and the mucus score and secretory ratio of goblet-cell mucus secretion in the trachea of rats. The tracheal whole mounts with silver staining, those stained with chloroacetate esterase reagent and Alcian blue and tracheal tissue sections stained with Alcian blue and periodic acid-Schiff reagent were used for evaluation. Formation of endothelial gaps occurred a few min after administration of capsaicin, and gaps almost closed within 12 min after capsaicin injection. Five min after capsaicin, the leaky blood vessels were numerous and the subepithelial edema ratio (% of length of edema along the inner circumference of tracheal cross section) was found to be 57.8+/-3.0% ( n=6). The number of Alcian blue-positive goblet cells (1,090+/-220 per mm(2) of mucosal surface) was reduced to half the number of goblet cells in the vehicle-treated rats (2,200+/-230). The mucus score of goblet cell secretion was not changed. The secretory ratio was greatly increased. One day after capsaicin, the edema ratio remained large and the number of Alcian blue-positive goblet cells was also small. The mucus score was also not changed. The secretory ratio was still large. On day 3, the edema ratio remained large, but the number of Alcian blue-positive goblet cells was increased to the level of the controls. The mucus score and secretory ratio returned to the control level. On day 5, the edema ratio was greatly decreased, but it was still significantly larger than that of the controls. The mucus score and secretory ratio remained at the

  2. Graphene Functionalized Scaffolds Reduce the Inflammatory Response and Supports Endogenous Neuroblast Migration when Implanted in the Adult Brain.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Kun; Motamed, Sepideh; Thouas, George A; Bernard, Claude C; Li, Dan; Parkington, Helena C; Coleman, Harold A; Finkelstein, David I; Forsythe, John S

    2016-01-01

    Electroactive materials have been investigated as next-generation neuronal tissue engineering scaffolds to enhance neuronal regeneration and functional recovery after brain injury. Graphene, an emerging neuronal scaffold material with charge transfer properties, has shown promising results for neuronal cell survival and differentiation in vitro. In this in vivo work, electrospun microfiber scaffolds coated with self-assembled colloidal graphene, were implanted into the striatum or into the subventricular zone of adult rats. Microglia and astrocyte activation levels were suppressed with graphene functionalization. In addition, self-assembled graphene implants prevented glial scarring in the brain 7 weeks following implantation. Astrocyte guidance within the scaffold and redirection of neuroblasts from the subventricular zone along the implants was also demonstrated. These findings provide new functional evidence for the potential use of graphene scaffolds as a therapeutic platform to support central nervous system regeneration. PMID:26978268

  3. Graphene Functionalized Scaffolds Reduce the Inflammatory Response and Supports Endogenous Neuroblast Migration when Implanted in the Adult Brain

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Kun; Motamed, Sepideh; Thouas, George A.; Bernard, Claude C.; Li, Dan; Parkington, Helena C.; Coleman, Harold A.; Finkelstein, David I.; Forsythe, John S.

    2016-01-01

    Electroactive materials have been investigated as next-generation neuronal tissue engineering scaffolds to enhance neuronal regeneration and functional recovery after brain injury. Graphene, an emerging neuronal scaffold material with charge transfer properties, has shown promising results for neuronal cell survival and differentiation in vitro. In this in vivo work, electrospun microfiber scaffolds coated with self-assembled colloidal graphene, were implanted into the striatum or into the subventricular zone of adult rats. Microglia and astrocyte activation levels were suppressed with graphene functionalization. In addition, self-assembled graphene implants prevented glial scarring in the brain 7 weeks following implantation. Astrocyte guidance within the scaffold and redirection of neuroblasts from the subventricular zone along the implants was also demonstrated. These findings provide new functional evidence for the potential use of graphene scaffolds as a therapeutic platform to support central nervous system regeneration. PMID:26978268

  4. NTCP Modeling of Subacute/Late Laryngeal Edema Scored by Fiberoptic Examination

    SciTech Connect

    Rancati, Tiziana; Fiorino, Claudio; Sanguineti, Giuseppe

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: Finding best-fit parameters of normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models for laryngeal edema after radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty-eight patients were considered for this study who met the following criteria: (1) grossly uninvolved larynx, (2) no prior major surgery except for neck dissection and tonsillectomy, (3) at least one fiberoptic examination of the larynx within 2 years from radiotherapy, (4) minimum follow-up of 15 months. Larynx dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were corrected into a linear quadratic equivalent one at 2 Gy/fr with alpha/beta = 3 Gy. Subacute/late edema was prospectively scored at each follow-up examination according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale. G2-G3 edema within 15 months from RT was considered as our endpoint. Two NTCP models were considered: (1) the Lyman model with DVH reduced to the equivalent uniform dose (EUD; LEUD) and (2) the Logit model with DVH reduced to the EUD (LOGEUD). The parameters for the models were fit to patient data using a maximum likelihood analysis. Results: All patients had a minimum of 15 months follow-up (only 8/48 received concurrent chemotherapy): 25/48 (52.1%) experienced G2-G3 edema. Both NTCP models fit well the clinical data: with LOGEUD the relationship between EUD and NTCP can be described with TD50 = 46.7 +- 2.1 Gy, n = 1.41 +- 0.8 and a steepness parameter k = 7.2 +- 2.5 Gy. Best fit parameters for LEUD are n = 1.17 +- 0.6, m = 0.23 +- 0.07 and TD50 = 47.3 +- 2.1 Gy. Conclusions: A clear volume effect was found for edema, consistent with a parallel architecture of the larynx for this endpoint. On the basis of our findings, an EUD <30-35 Gy should drastically reduce the risk of G2-G3 edema.

  5. Reduced permeation of /sup 14/C-sucrose, /sup 3/H-mannitol and /sup 3/H-inulin across blood-brain barrier in nephrectomized rats

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, E.; Haas, N.; Allen, M.

    1984-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to determine if changes in the concentration-time profile of a blood-borne radiotracer such as /sup 14/C-sucrose would spuriously alter measurements of its permeation across the blood-brain barrier (permeability-area product, PA) based on a 2-compartment (plasma/brain) simple diffusion model. Anesthetized rats which were bilaterally nephrectomized and given a standard intravenous bolus injection of /sup 14/C-sucrose, /sup 3/H-mannitol or /sup 3/H-inulin exhibited an elevated plasma tracer concentration compared to control animals. However, tracer concentration measured in brain parenchyma after 30 min was not proportionally elevated, and PA calculated from the ratio, parenchymal tracer concentration: plasma concentration-time integral, was significantly reduced below control values. In control rats, distortion and elevation of the plasma /sup 14/C-sucrose profile by continuous intravenous infusion did not result in lowered PA values. This suggested that the lowering of PA by nephrectomy reflected reduced cerebrovascular permeability or area or other cerebral influence rather than a deficiency in the 2-compartment model for PA measurement.

  6. Synthetic smoke with acrolein but not HCl produces pulmonary edema

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, C.A.; Barkin, P.W.; Jung, W.; Trautman, E.; Lamborghini, D.; Herrig, N.; Burke, J.

    1988-03-01

    The chemical toxins in smoke and not the heat are responsible for the pulmonary edema of smoke inhalation. We developed a synthetic smoke composed of carbon particles (mean diameter of 4.3 microns) to which toxins known to be in smoke, such as HCl or acrolein, could be added one at a time. We delivered synthetic smoke to dogs for 10 min and monitored extravascular lung water (EVLW) accumulation thereafter with a double-indicator thermodilution technique. Final EVLW correlated highly with gravimetric values (r = 0.93, P less than 0.01). HCl in concentrations of 0.1-6 N when added to heated carbon (120 degrees C) and cooled to 39 degrees C produced airway damage but no pulmonary edema. Acrolein, in contrast, produced airway damage but also pulmonary edema, whereas capillary wedge pressures remained stable. Low-dose acrolein smoke (less than 200 ppm) produced edema in two of five animals with a 2- to 4-h delay. Intermediate-dose acrolein smoke (200-300 ppm) always produced edema at an average of 147 +/- 57 min after smoke, whereas high-dose acrolein (greater than 300 ppm) produced edema at 65 +/- 16 min after smoke. Thus acrolein but not HCl, when presented as a synthetic smoke, produced a delayed-onset, noncardiogenic, and peribronchiolar edema in a roughly dose-dependent fashion.

  7. Synthetic smoke with acrolein but not HCl produces pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Hales, C A; Barkin, P W; Jung, W; Trautman, E; Lamborghini, D; Herrig, N; Burke, J

    1988-03-01

    The chemical toxins in smoke and not the heat are responsible for the pulmonary edema of smoke inhalation. We developed a synthetic smoke composed of carbon particles (mean diameter of 4.3 microns) to which toxins known to be in smoke, such as HCl or acrolein, could be added one at a time. We delivered synthetic smoke to dogs for 10 min and monitored extravascular lung water (EVLW) accumulation thereafter with a double-indicator thermodilution technique. Final EVLW correlated highly with gravimetric values (r = 0.93, P less than 0.01). HCl in concentrations of 0.1-6 N when added to heated carbon (120 degrees C) and cooled to 39 degrees C produced airway damage but no pulmonary edema. Acrolein, in contrast, produced airway damage but also pulmonary edema, whereas capillary wedge pressures remained stable. Low-dose acrolein smoke (less than 200 ppm) produced edema in two of five animals with a 2- to 4-h delay. Intermediate-dose acrolein smoke (200-300 ppm) always produced edema at an average of 147 +/- 57 min after smoke, whereas high-dose acrolein (greater than 300 ppm) produced edema at 65 +/- 16 min after smoke. Thus acrolein but not HCl, when presented as a synthetic smoke, produced a delayed-onset, noncardiogenic, and peribronchiolar edema in a roughly dose-dependent fashion. PMID:3284867