Science.gov

Sample records for reduced death toll

  1. Uncovering the 2010 Haiti earthquake death toll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniell, J. E.; Khazai, B.; Wenzel, F.

    2013-05-01

    Casualties are estimated for the 12 January 2010 earthquake in Haiti using various reports calibrated by observed building damage states from satellite imagery and reconnaissance reports on the ground. By investigating various damage reports, casualty estimates and burial figures, for a one year period from 12 January 2010 until 12 January 2011, there is also strong evidence that the official government figures of 316 000 total dead and missing, reported to have been caused by the earthquake, are significantly overestimated. The authors have examined damage and casualties report to arrive at their estimation that the median death toll is less than half of this value (±137 000). The authors show through a study of historical earthquake death tolls, that overestimates of earthquake death tolls occur in many cases, and is not unique to Haiti. As death toll is one of the key elements for determining the amount of aid and reconstruction funds that will be mobilized, scientific means to estimate death tolls should be applied. Studies of international aid in recent natural disasters reveal that large distributions of aid which do not match the respective needs may cause oversupply of help, aggravate corruption and social disruption rather than reduce them, and lead to distrust within the donor community.

  2. Mangroves protected villages and reduced death toll during Indian super cyclone.

    PubMed

    Das, Saudamini; Vincent, Jeffrey R

    2009-05-01

    Protection against coastal disasters has been identified as an important service of mangrove ecosystems. Empirical studies on this service have been criticized, however, for using small samples and inadequately controlling for confounding factors. We used data on several hundred villages to test the impact of mangroves on human deaths during a 1999 super cyclone that struck Orissa, India. We found that villages with wider mangroves between them and the coast experienced significantly fewer deaths than ones with narrower or no mangroves. This finding was robust to the inclusion of a wide range of other variables to our statistical model, including controls for the historical extent of mangroves. Although mangroves evidently saved fewer lives than an early warning issued by the government, the retention of remaining mangroves in Orissa is economically justified even without considering the many benefits they provide to human society besides storm-protection services. PMID:19380735

  3. Combined Prediction Model of Death Toll for Road Traffic Accidents Based on Independent and Dependent Variables

    PubMed Central

    Zhong-xiang, Feng; Shi-sheng, Lu; Wei-hua, Zhang; Nan-nan, Zhang

    2014-01-01

    In order to build a combined model which can meet the variation rule of death toll data for road traffic accidents and can reflect the influence of multiple factors on traffic accidents and improve prediction accuracy for accidents, the Verhulst model was built based on the number of death tolls for road traffic accidents in China from 2002 to 2011; and car ownership, population, GDP, highway freight volume, highway passenger transportation volume, and highway mileage were chosen as the factors to build the death toll multivariate linear regression model. Then the two models were combined to be a combined prediction model which has weight coefficient. Shapley value method was applied to calculate the weight coefficient by assessing contributions. Finally, the combined model was used to recalculate the number of death tolls from 2002 to 2011, and the combined model was compared with the Verhulst and multivariate linear regression models. The results showed that the new model could not only characterize the death toll data characteristics but also quantify the degree of influence to the death toll by each influencing factor and had high accuracy as well as strong practicability. PMID:25610454

  4. Differential immunomodulatory activity of tumor cell death induced by cancer therapeutic toll-like receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Klein, Johanna C; Wild, Clarissa A; Lang, Stephan; Brandau, Sven

    2016-06-01

    Synthetic toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands stimulate defined immune cell subsets and are currently tested as novel immunotherapeutic agents against cancer with, however, varying clinical efficacy. Recent data showed the expression of TLR receptors also on tumor cells. In this study we investigated immunological events associated with the induction of tumor cell death by poly(I:C) and imiquimod. A human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell line was exposed to poly(I:C) and imiquimod, which were delivered exogenously via culture medium or via electroporation. Cell death and cell biological consequences thereof were analyzed. For in vivo analyses, a human xenograft and a syngeneic immunocompetent mouse model were used. Poly(I:C) induced cell death only if delivered by electroporation into the cytosol. Cell death induced by poly(I:C) resulted in cytokine release and activation of monocytes in vitro. Monocytes activated by the supernatant of cancer cells previously exposed to poly(I:C) recruited significantly more Th1 cells than monocytes exposed to control supernatants. If delivered exogenously, imiquimod also induced tumor cell death and some release of interleukin-6, but cell death was not associated with release of Th1 cytokines, interferons, monocyte activation and Th1 recruitment. Interestingly, intratumoral injection of poly(I:C) triggered tumor cell death in tumor-bearing mice and reduced tumor growth independent of TLR signaling on host cells. Imiquimod did not affect tumor size. Our data suggest that common cancer therapeutic RNA compounds can induce functionally diverse types of cell death in tumor cells with implications for the use of TLR ligands in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27034235

  5. The Boundaries of Genocide: Quantifying the Uncertainty of the Death Toll During the Pol Pot Regime (1975-1979)

    PubMed Central

    Heuveline, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Estimates of excess deaths under Pol Pot's rule of Cambodia (1975-79) range from under one million to over three million. The more plausible among those, methodologically, still vary from one to two million deaths, but this range of independent point estimates has no particular statistical meaning. Stochastically reconstructing population dynamics in Cambodia from extant historical and demographic data yields interpretable distributions of the death toll and other demographic indicators. The resulting 95-percent simulation interval (1.2 to 2.8 million excess deaths) demonstrates substantial uncertainty with regards to the exact scale of mortality, yet still excludes nearly half of the previous death-toll estimates. The 1.5 to 2.25 million interval contains 69 per cent of the simulations for the actual number of excess death, more than the wider (one to two million) range of previous plausible estimates. The median value of 1.9 million excess deaths represents 21 percent of the population at risk. PMID:26218856

  6. Reducing deaths from pregnancy and childbirth. Asia.

    PubMed

    Pillai, G

    1993-01-01

    99% of all maternal deaths occur in the developing world, and South Asian countries account for most deaths. The causes are obstructed labor, hemorrhage, pregnancy-related hypertension (eclampsia), or unsafe abortion. The United Nation's Children's Fund estimates 340 maternal deaths for every 100,000 live births in India. In Indian rural areas, the maternal mortality rate is between 800 and 900 deaths per 100,000 live births in Bangladesh, 600; in Nepal, 830; and in Bhutan, 1710. IN comparison, the rate in the United States is 8 deaths per 100,000 live births. The technology for reducing maternal mortality has been utilized in most developed countries, as well as in parts of South Asia, in particular in Sri Lanka. The goal of the Safe Motherhood Initiative was to reduce maternal mortality by 50% by the year 2000. The immediate causes of maternal mortality include pregnancy and delivery and the management of complications such as hemorrhage, toxic and bacterial infections (sepsis), eclampsia, and obstructed labor. The poor health, nutrition, and socioeconomic status of women are the underlying causes of maternal death. One study in India found that inadequate medical treatment contributes to 36% to 47% of maternal deaths in hospitals. In India, abortion services are legal and acceptable on social, religious, and political grounds, but services are inaccessible. In Bangladesh, the availability of menstrual regulation is estimated to save 100,000 to 160,000 women from unsafe abortions each year. However, the inaccessibility of this service accounts for 700,000 unsafe abortions and 7000 maternal deaths. Gender bias in the allocation of meager food supplies results in the poor health and nutritional status of women, rendering a woman's pelvis too small, which causes obstructed labor and even death. Socioeconomic status is linked to access the family planning and health services which affect mortality and reproductive health. In Sri Lanka and Kerala, government

  7. Common Therapy for Rheumatoid Arthritis Reduces Risk of Death

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research 2013 April 2013 (historical) Common Therapy for Rheumatoid Arthritis Reduces Risk of Death Taking methotrexate—a commonly ... reduce the risk of death among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), according to recently-published research in the ...

  8. Thinking about Death Reduces Delay Discounting

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Nicholas J.; Schmeichel, Brandon J.

    2015-01-01

    The current study tested competing predictions regarding the effect of mortality salience on delay discounting. One prediction, based on evolutionary considerations, was that reminders of death increase the value of the present. Another prediction, based in part on construal level theory, was that reminders of death increase the value of the future. One-hundred eighteen participants thought about personal mortality or a control topic and then completed an inter-temporal choice task pitting the chance to gain $50 now against increasingly attractive rewards three months later. Consistent with the hypothesis inspired by construal theory, participants in the mortality salience condition traded $50 now for $66.67 in three months, whereas participants in the dental pain salience condition required $72.84 in three months in lieu of $50 now. Thus, participants in the mortality salience condition discounted future monetary gains less than other participants, suggesting that thoughts of death may increase the subjective value of the future. PMID:26630664

  9. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Reduces Oxidative Injury via Glutathione Activity in Sheep.

    PubMed

    Deng, Shoulong; Yu, Kun; Wu, Qian; Li, Yan; Zhang, Xiaosheng; Zhang, Baolu; Liu, Guoshi; Liu, Yixun; Lian, Zhengxing

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is an important sensor of Gram-negative bacteria and can trigger activation of the innate immune system. Increased activation of TLR4 can lead to the induction of oxidative stress. Herein, the pathway whereby TLR4 affects antioxidant activity was studied. In TLR4-overexpressing sheep, TLR4 expression was found to be related to the integration copy number when monocytes were challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Consequently, production of malondialdehyde (MDA) was increased, which could increase the activation of prooxidative stress enzymes. Meanwhile, activation of an antioxidative enzyme, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), was increased. Real-time PCR showed that expression of activating protein-1 (AP-1) and the antioxidative-related genes was increased. By contrast, the expression levels of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) and catalase (CAT) were reduced. In transgenic sheep, glutathione (GSH) levels were dramatically reduced. Furthermore, transgenic sheep were intradermally injected with LPS in each ear. The amounts of inflammatory infiltrates were correlated with the number of TLR4 copies that were integrated in the genome. Additionally, the translation of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS) was increased. Our findings indicated that overexpression of TLR4 in sheep could ameliorate oxidative injury through GSH secretion that was induced by LPS stimulation. Furthermore, TLR4 promoted γ-GCS translation through the AP-1 pathway, which was essential for GSH synthesis. PMID:26640618

  10. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Reduces Oxidative Injury via Glutathione Activity in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Shoulong; Yu, Kun; Wu, Qian; Li, Yan; Zhang, Xiaosheng; Zhang, Baolu; Liu, Guoshi; Liu, Yixun; Lian, Zhengxing

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is an important sensor of Gram-negative bacteria and can trigger activation of the innate immune system. Increased activation of TLR4 can lead to the induction of oxidative stress. Herein, the pathway whereby TLR4 affects antioxidant activity was studied. In TLR4-overexpressing sheep, TLR4 expression was found to be related to the integration copy number when monocytes were challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Consequently, production of malondialdehyde (MDA) was increased, which could increase the activation of prooxidative stress enzymes. Meanwhile, activation of an antioxidative enzyme, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), was increased. Real-time PCR showed that expression of activating protein-1 (AP-1) and the antioxidative-related genes was increased. By contrast, the expression levels of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) and catalase (CAT) were reduced. In transgenic sheep, glutathione (GSH) levels were dramatically reduced. Furthermore, transgenic sheep were intradermally injected with LPS in each ear. The amounts of inflammatory infiltrates were correlated with the number of TLR4 copies that were integrated in the genome. Additionally, the translation of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS) was increased. Our findings indicated that overexpression of TLR4 in sheep could ameliorate oxidative injury through GSH secretion that was induced by LPS stimulation. Furthermore, TLR4 promoted γ-GCS translation through the AP-1 pathway, which was essential for GSH synthesis. PMID:26640618

  11. Pleural mesothelioma: forecasts of the death toll in the area of Casale Monferrato, Italy.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Claudia; Mortarino, Cinzia

    2012-12-20

    In the city of Casale Monferrato, the largest Italian factory that produced asbestos-cement goods was active from 1907 to 1985. Consequently, asbestos fibers scattered in the surrounding area and caused an enormous number of cases of pleural mesothelioma. Owing to the very long latency of this disease, many subjects have not exhibited its symptoms yet. The aim of this paper is to model and predict the future evolution of the number of deaths due to this disease among residents in the area around that city. The model used here is based on a cellular automata that is assumed to pass through three steps: exposure, contamination, and diagnosis. In this way, forecasts of the future evolution take into account the environmental conditions that changed over the last century because of different levels of plant activity. The model is fitted to annual diagnosis data from 1954 to 2008. Results show that deaths will not end until 2031 and that in the next two decades, at least 505 more subjects will be diagnosed with this disease. PMID:22829461

  12. The boundaries of genocide: Quantifying the uncertainty of the death toll during the Pol Pot regime in Cambodia (1975-79).

    PubMed

    Heuveline, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The range of estimates of excess deaths under Pol Pot's rule of Cambodia (1975-79) is too wide to be useful: they range from under 1 to over 3 million, with the more plausible estimates still varying from 1 to 2 million. By stochastically reconstructing population dynamics in Cambodia from extant historical and demographic data, we produced interpretable distributions of the death toll and other demographic indicators. The resulting 95 per cent simulation interval (1.2-2.8 million excess deaths) demonstrates substantial uncertainty over the exact scale of mortality, yet it still excludes nearly half of the previous death-toll estimates. The 1.5-2.25 million interval contains 69 per cent of the simulations for the actual number of excess deaths, more than the wider (1-2 million) range of previous plausible estimates. The median value of 1.9 million excess deaths represents 21 per cent of the population at risk. Supplementary material for this article is available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00324728.2015.1045546. PMID:26218856

  13. Reducing the Child Death Rate. KIDS COUNT Indicator Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shore, Rima; Shore, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    In the 20th century's final decades, advances in the prevention and treatment of infectious diseases sharply reduced the child death rate. Despite this progress, the child death rate in the U.S. remains higher than in many other wealthy nations. The under-five mortality rate in the U.S. is almost three times higher than that of Iceland and Sweden…

  14. Suppression of Ischemia-Induced Hippocampal Pyramidal Neuron Death by Hyaluronan Tetrasaccharide through Inhibition of Toll-Like Receptor 2 Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Sunabori, Takehiko; Koike, Masato; Asari, Akira; Oonuki, Yoji; Uchiyama, Yasuo

    2016-08-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are one of the main contributors that induce inflammation under tissue injury and infection. Because excessive inflammation can aggravate disease states, it is important to control inflammation at a moderate level. Herein, we show that hyaluronan (HA) oligomer, HA tetrasaccharide (HA4), could suppress the expression of proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β when stimulated with both TLR2- and TLR4-specific agonists in primary hippocampal neurons. To understand the effect of HA4 against ischemic insult, we performed hypoxic-ischemic (H/I) brain injury against neonatal mice. HA4 treatment significantly prevented hippocampal pyramidal cell death even 7 days after H/I injury, compared with the control mice. Although TLR2 and TLR4 are known as receptors for HA and also act as a receptor for inducing inflammation, only TLR2-deficient mice showed tolerance against H/I injury. Moreover, HA4 administration suppressed gliosis by inhibiting the activation of NF-κB, the downstream target of TLR2, which led to the suppression of IL-1β expression. Taken together, our data suggest that the neuroprotective effect of HA4 relies on antagonizing the TLR2/NF-κB pathway to reduce inflammation through suppressing the expression of proinflammatory cytokines after neonatal H/I brain injury. PMID:27301359

  15. Use of toll-like receptor agonists to reduce Salmonella colonization in neonatal swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) are members of a highly conserved group of receptors which recognize conserved molecular aspects of microbes. The purpose of these experiments were to ascertain the effects of the administration of the TLR 9 agonist, CpG, on the colonization of neonatal swine with Salmonel...

  16. Monocytes from tuberculosis patients that exhibit cleaved caspase 9 and denaturalized cytochrome c are more susceptible to death mediated by Toll-like receptor 2

    PubMed Central

    Chávez-Galán, Leslie; Sada-Ovalle, Isabel; Baez-Saldaña, Renata; Chávez, Raúl; Lascurain, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    Experimental models have shown that lipoproteins from Mycobacterium tuberculosis induce apoptosis via Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) in the THP-1 cell line and in monocyte-derived macrophages from healthy volunteers. We found an increased percentage of circulating monocytes in patients with tuberculosis (TB) in comparison to healthy controls. Patients with TB showed a higher TLR2 and TLR4 expression density on monocytes, and a higher proportion of TLR2+ monocytes, as well as increased serum tumour necrosis factor-α level. In culture, monocytes from TB patients were more susceptible to death than monocytes from healthy controls. Moreover, death-susceptible monocytes were positive to both TLR2 and TLR4 at the start of culture. Freshly obtained monocytes from TB patients exhibited cleaved caspase 9 and denaturalized cytochrome c. For levels of caspase 8, apoptosis-regulating signal kinase 1, and phospho-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase there was no difference between samples from TB patients and from healthy controls. The culture filtrate antigen extract from M. tuberculosis H37Rv strain induced the death of monocytes from patient with TB after a 4-hr incubation, which was abrogated by neutralizing antibodies for TLR2 but not TLR4. Similarly, Pam3CSK4, a synthetic agonist triacylated ligand to TLR2, also induced the death of monocytes, although it did not increase levels of cleaved caspase 9. Our findings suggest that monocytes from TB patients are more susceptible to death, probably through mitochondrial damage, and that cell death increases in the presence of mycobacterial antigen by a TLR2-dependent pathway. PMID:22133266

  17. How Can the Science Community Support Reality Based Policies to Reducing the Escalating Toll of Natural Hazards?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, E. A.

    2012-12-01

    Worldwide, the toll of disaster damage caused by foreseeable natural hazards is growing, despite the fact that science is increasingly able to quantify the risk and foresee the likely location of natural events (NCDC 2012; NHC 2010). Those events can cause disastrous consequences if human built infrastructure is not properly designed for both the current state and future events (IBHS, 2012). Our existing approaches are not working at reducing the mounting toll of disasters which follow foreseeable natural events. Rather, even if the climate were not changing, current land use decisions coupled with development, engineering, design, and construction practices are significantly contributing to further increasing an unsustainable toll from disasters (Pielke, Gratz et al. 2007). Safe and proper construction practices developed to reduce flood losses (e.g. Design for Flooding, Watson, Adams et al., 2010) are all too often thought of as a zero sum situation where the community wins and the developer loses. In reality, the United States and the rest of the world often can find win-win solutions based on sound economics, law, ethics, and environmental sustainability that will benefit communities, developers, and natural hazard risk mitigation practitioners. While such solutions are being implemented in a fragmentary manner throughout the United States, communities implementing these solutions are increasingly working together in peer networks, such as the Natural Hazard Mitigation Association (NHMA)'s Resilient Neighbors Network. Examples include the Urban Drainage and Flood Control District that covers the metropolitan Denver area and recent work in Tulsa, Oklahoma. This presentation will set forth the scientific, ethical, and legal basis of higher development standards which, when combined with good negotiations techniques, can significantly decrease the terrible misery from wildfires, tornadoes, floods, and other natural disasters. Communities clearly have the legal

  18. Reduced cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury in Toll-like receptor 4 deficient mice

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Canxiang; Yang Qingwu . E-mail: yangqwmlys@hotmail.com; Lv Fenglin; Cui Jie; Fu Huabin; Wang Jingzhou

    2007-02-09

    Inflammatory reaction plays an important role in cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury, however, its mechanism is still unclear. Our study aims to explore the function of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in the process of cerebral ischemia-reperfusion. We made middle cerebral artery ischemia-reperfusion model in mice with line embolism method. Compared with C3H/OuJ mice, scores of cerebral water content, cerebral infarct size and neurologic impairment in C3H/Hej mice were obviously lower after 6 h ischemia and 24 h reperfusion. Light microscopic and electron microscopic results showed that cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury in C3H/Hej mice was less serious than that in C3H/OuJ mice. TNF-{alpha} and IL-6 contents in C3H/HeJ mice were obviously lower than that in C3H/OuJ mice with ELISA. The results showed that TLR4 participates in the process of cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury probably through decrease of inflammatory cytokines. TLR4 may become a new target for prevention of cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury. Our study suggests that TLR4 is one of the mechanisms of cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury besides its important role in innate immunity.

  19. Power and death: Mortality salience increases power seeking while feeling powerful reduces death anxiety.

    PubMed

    Belmi, Peter; Pfeffer, Jeffrey

    2016-05-01

    According to Terror Management Theory, people respond to reminders of mortality by seeking psychological security and bolstering their self-esteem. Because previous research suggests that having power can provide individuals a sense of security and self-worth, we hypothesize that mortality salience leads to an increased motivation to acquire power, especially among men. Study 1 found that men (but not women) who wrote about their death reported more interest in acquiring power. Study 2A and Study 2B demonstrated that when primed with reminders of death, men (but not women) reported behaving more dominantly during the subsequent week, while both men and women reported behaving more prosocially during that week. Thus, mortality salience prompts people to respond in ways that help them manage their death anxiety but in ways consistent with normative gender expectations. Furthermore, Studies 3-5 showed that feeling powerful reduces anxiety when mortality is salient. Specifically, we found that when primed to feel more powerful, both men and women experienced less mortality anxiety. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26867106

  20. Carbon monoxide down-modulates Toll-like receptor 4/MD2 expression on innate immune cells and reduces endotoxic shock susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Riquelme, Sebastián A; Bueno, Susan M; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2015-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) has been recently reported as the main anti-inflammatory mediator of the haem-degrading enzyme haem-oxygenase 1 (HO-1). It has been shown that either HO-1 induction or CO treatment reduces the ability of monocytes to respond to inflammatory stimuli, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), due to an inhibition of the signalling pathways leading to nuclear factor-κB, mitogen-activated protein kinases and interferon regulatory factor 3 activation. Hence, it has been suggested that CO impairs the stimulation of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)/myeloid differentiation factor-2 (MD2) complex located on the surface of immune cells. However, whether CO can negatively modulate the surface expression of the TLR4/MD2 complex in immune cells remains unknown. Here we report that either HO-1 induction or treatment with CO decreases the surface expression of TLR4/MD2 in dendritic cells (DC) and neutrophils. In addition, in a septic shock model of mice intraperitoneally injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), prophylactic treatment with CO protected animals from hypothermia, weight loss, mobility loss and death. Further, mice pre-treated with CO and challenged with LPS showed reduced recruitment of DC and neutrophils to peripheral blood, suggesting that this gas causes a systemic tolerance to endotoxin challenge. No differences in the amount of innate cells in lymphoid tissues were observed in CO-treated mice. Our results suggest that CO treatment reduces the expression of the TLR4/MD2 complex on the surface of myeloid cells, which renders them resistant to LPS priming in vitro, as well as in vivo in a model of endotoxic shock. PMID:25179131

  1. Vaccination greatly reduces disease, disability, death and inequity worldwide.

    PubMed

    Andre, F E; Booy, R; Bock, H L; Clemens, J; Datta, S K; John, T J; Lee, B W; Lolekha, S; Peltola, H; Ruff, T A; Santosham, M; Schmitt, H J

    2008-02-01

    In low-income countries, infectious diseases still account for a large proportion of deaths, highlighting health inequities largely caused by economic differences. Vaccination can cut health-care costs and reduce these inequities. Disease control, elimination or eradication can save billions of US dollars for communities and countries. Vaccines have lowered the incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma and will control cervical cancer. Travellers can be protected against "exotic" diseases by appropriate vaccination. Vaccines are considered indispensable against bioterrorism. They can combat resistance to antibiotics in some pathogens. Noncommunicable diseases, such as ischaemic heart disease, could also be reduced by influenza vaccination. Immunization programmes have improved the primary care infrastructure in developing countries, lowered mortality in childhood and empowered women to better plan their families, with consequent health, social and economic benefits. Vaccination helps economic growth everywhere, because of lower morbidity and mortality. The annual return on investment in vaccination has been calculated to be between 12% and 18%. Vaccination leads to increased life expectancy. Long healthy lives are now recognized as a prerequisite for wealth, and wealth promotes health. Vaccines are thus efficient tools to reduce disparities in wealth and inequities in health. PMID:18297169

  2. Reducing the Teen Death Rate. KIDS COUNT Indicator Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shore, Rima; Shore, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Life continues to hold considerable risk for adolescents in the United States. In 2006, the teen death rate stood at 64 deaths per 100,000 teens (13,739 teens) (KIDS COUNT Data Center, 2009). Although it has declined by 4 percent since 2000, the rate of teen death in this country remains substantially higher than in many peer nations, based…

  3. The Mortality Toll of Estrogen Avoidance: An Analysis of Excess Deaths Among Hysterectomized Women Aged 50 to 59 Years

    PubMed Central

    Njike, Valentine Y.; Vinante, Valentina; Katz, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the effect of estrogen avoidance on mortality rates among hysterectomized women aged 50 to 59 years. Methods. We derived a formula to relate the excess mortality among hysterectomized women aged 50 to 59 years assigned to placebo in the Women’s Health Initiative randomized controlled trial to the entire population of comparable women in the United States, incorporating the decline in estrogen use observed between 2002 and 2011. Results. Over a 10-year span, starting in 2002, a minimum of 18 601 and as many as 91 610 postmenopausal women died prematurely because of the avoidance of estrogen therapy (ET). Conclusions. ET in younger postmenopausal women is associated with a decisive reduction in all-cause mortality, but estrogen use in this population is low and continuing to fall. Our data indicate an associated annual mortality toll in the thousands of women aged 50 to 59 years. Informed discussion between these women and their health care providers about the effects of ET is a matter of considerable urgency. PMID:23865654

  4. Reducing deaths from diarrhoea through oral rehydration therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Victora, C. G.; Bryce, J.; Fontaine, O.; Monasch, R.

    2000-01-01

    In 1980, diarrhoea was the leading cause of child mortality, accounting for 4.6 million deaths annually. Efforts to control diarrhoea over the past decade have been based on multiple, potentially powerful interventions implemented more or less simultaneously. Oral rehydration therapy (ORT) was introduced in 1979 and rapidly became the cornerstone of programmes for the control of diarrhoeal diseases. We report on the strategy for controlling diarrhoea through case management, with special reference to ORT, and on the relationship between its implementation and reduced mortality. Population-based data on the coverage and quality of facility-based use of ORT are scarce, despite its potential importance in reducing mortality, especially for severe cases. ORT use rates during the 1980s are available for only a few countries. An improvement in the availability of data occurred in the mid-1990s. The study of time trends is hampered by the use of several different definitions of ORT. Nevertheless, the data show positive trends in diarrhoea management in most parts of the world. ORT is now given to the majority of children with diarrhoea. The annual number of deaths attributable to diarrhoea among children aged under 5 years fell from the estimated 4.6 million in 1980 to about 1.5 million today. Case studies in Brazil, Egypt, Mexico, and the Philippines confirm increases in the use of ORT which are concomitant with marked falls in mortality. In some countries, possible alternative explanations for the observed decline in mortality have been fairly confidently ruled out. Experience with ORT can provide useful guidance for child survival programmes. With adequate political will and financial support, cost-effective interventions other than that of immunization can be successfully delivered by national programmes. Furthermore, there are important lessons for evaluators. The population-based data needed to establish trends in health service delivery, outcomes and impact are not

  5. Widely Used Type 2 Diabetes Drug May Reduce Cancer Death Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Used Type 2 Diabetes Drug May Reduce Cancer Death Risk Older women taking metformin saw a boost ... a risk factor for cancer and cancer-related death, and metformin therapy, compared to other diabetes medications, ...

  6. A Century of Australian Natural Disasters and How to Reduce the Toll from Future Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAneney, J.

    2014-12-01

    This study reviews Australian experience of natural disasters over the last century and considers how to reduce this nation's vulnerability to such events in the future. In line with global experience, the cost of Australian weather-related natural disasters has been increasing, while loss of life has decreased, with extreme heat events responsible for more fatalities than all other natural perils combined, baring epidemics. However when disaster costs arising from historical events are normalised to current day exposure, no long-term trend emerges. Moreover the frequency of these losses shows no sign of increasing since 1950. In other words, the rising cost of natural disasters can be firmly sheeted home to the fact that there are now more of us living in vulnerable places with more to lose. In view of the above, emergency management and government risk management and strategic planning should focus on plausible large event scenarios, whatever their cause. If we wish to reduce disaster losses, land-use planning has to become risk-informed and building codes need to consider potential economic impacts, rather than just life safety. Insurers can play a role by pricing risk correctly and sending clear signals to homeowners (and governments) to stimulate risk-reducing behaviours. The tools to achieve fine-grained risk assessments are increasingly available. The success of the regulated use of the building code in tropical cyclone-prone regions in Australia and the performance of modern seismic building codes in New Zealand, shows what can be achieved when there is a demonstrated need and political will.

  7. Pneumococal Surface Protein A (PspA) Regulates Programmed Death Ligand 1 Expression on Dendritic Cells in a Toll-Like Receptor 2 and Calcium Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Vashishta, Mohit; Khan, Naeem; Mehto, Subhash; Sehgal, Devinder; Natarajan, Krishnamurthy

    2015-01-01

    Pneumonia leads to high mortality in children under the age of five years worldwide, resulting in close to 20 percent of all deaths in this age group. Therefore, investigations into host-pathogen interactions during Streptococcus pneumoniae infection are key in devising strategies towards the development of better vaccines and drugs. To that end, in this study we investigated the role of S. pneumoniae and its surface antigen Pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) in modulating the expression of co-stimulatory molecule Programmed Death Ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression on dendritic cells (DCs) and the subsequent effects of increased PD-L1 on key defence responses. Our data indicate that stimulation of DCs with PspA increases the surface expression of PD-L1 in a time and dose dependent manner. Characterization of mechanisms involved in PspA induced expression of PD-L1 indicate the involvement of Toll-Like Receptor 2 (TLR2) and calcium homeostasis. While calcium release from intracellular stores positively regulated PD-L1 expression, calcium influx from external milieu negatively regulated PD-L1 expression. Increase in PD-L1 expression, when costimulated with PspA and through TLR2 was higher than when stimulated with PspA or through TLR2. Further, knockdown of TLR2 and the intermediates in the TLR signaling machinery pointed towards the involvement of a MyD88 dependent pathway in PspA induced PD-L1 expression. Incubation of DCs with S. pneumoniae resulted in the up-regulation of PD-L1 expression, while infection with a strain lacking surface PspA failed to do so. Our data also suggests the role of PspA in ROS generation. These results suggest a novel and specific role for PspA in modulating immune responses against S. pneumoniae by regulating PD-L1 expression. PMID:26214513

  8. RIPK1 and RIPK3 Kinases Promote Cell-Death-Independent Inflammation by Toll-like Receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Najjar, Malek; Saleh, Danish; Zelic, Matija; Nogusa, Shoko; Shah, Saumil; Tai, Albert; Finger, Joshua N; Polykratis, Apostolos; Gough, Peter J; Bertin, John; Whalen, Michael J; Pasparakis, Manolis; Balachandran, Siddharth; Kelliher, Michelle; Poltorak, Alexander; Degterev, Alexei

    2016-07-19

    Macrophages are a crucial component of the innate immune system in sensing pathogens and promoting local and systemic inflammation. RIPK1 and RIPK3 are homologous kinases, previously linked to activation of necroptotic death. In this study, we have described roles for these kinases as master regulators of pro-inflammatory gene expression induced by lipopolysaccharide, independent of their well-documented cell death functions. In primary macrophages, this regulation was elicited in the absence of caspase-8 activity, required the adaptor molecule TRIF, and proceeded in a cell autonomous manner. RIPK1 and RIPK3 kinases promoted sustained activation of Erk, cFos, and NF-κB, which were required for inflammatory changes. Utilizing genetic and pharmacologic tools, we showed that RIPK1 and RIPK3 account for acute inflammatory responses induced by lipopolysaccharide in vivo; notably, this regulation did not require exogenous manipulation of caspases. These findings identified a new pharmacologically accessible pathway that may be relevant to inflammatory pathologies. PMID:27396959

  9. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Deficiency Causes Reduced Exploratory Behavior in Mice Under Approach-Avoidance Conflict.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunlu; Yan, Yixiu; Cheng, Jingjing; Xiao, Gang; Gu, Jueqing; Zhang, Luqi; Yuan, Siyu; Wang, Junlu; Shen, Yi; Zhou, Yu-Dong

    2016-04-01

    Abnormal approach-avoidance behavior has been linked to deficits in the mesolimbic dopamine (DA) system of the brain. Recently, increasing evidence has indicated that toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), an important pattern-recognition receptor in the innate immune system, can be directly activated by substances of abuse, resulting in an increase of the extracellular DA level in the nucleus accumbens. We thus hypothesized that TLR4-dependent signaling might regulate approach-avoidance behavior. To test this hypothesis, we compared the novelty-seeking and social interaction behaviors of TLR4-deficient (TLR4(-/-)) and wild-type (WT) mice in an approach-avoidance conflict situation in which the positive motivation to explore a novel object or interact with an unfamiliar mouse was counteracted by the negative motivation to hide in exposed, large spaces. We found that TLR4(-/-) mice exhibited reduced novelty-seeking and social interaction in the large open spaces. In less stressful test apparatuses similar in size to the mouse cage, however, TLR4(-/-) mice performed normally in both novelty-seeking and social interaction tests. The reduced exploratory behaviors under approach-avoidance conflict were not due to a high anxiety level or an enhanced fear response in the TLR4(-/-) mice, as these mice showed normal anxiety and fear responses in the open field and passive avoidance tests, respectively. Importantly, the novelty-seeking behavior in the large open field induced a higher level of c-Fos activation in the nucleus accumbens shell (NAcSh) in TLR4(-/-) mice than in WT mice. Partially inactivating the NAcSh via infusion of GABA receptor agonists restored the novelty-seeking behavior of TLR4(-/-) mice. These data suggested that TLR4 is crucial for positive motivational behavior under approach-avoidance conflict. TLR4-dependent activation of neurons in the NAcSh may contribute to this phenomenon. PMID:26898297

  10. Hydrocortisone Reduces Toll-Like Receptor 4 Expression on Peripheral CD14+ Monocytes in Patients Undergoing Percutanoues Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, Bahador; Sohrabi, Bahram; Movassaghpour, Ali Akbar; Mashayekhi, Simin; Garjani, Afagh; Shokri, Mehriar; Pezeshkian, Masoud; Garjani, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Bacground: Evidence from several lines of investigations suggests that Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is involved in atherosclerosis as a bridge between innate and acquired immunity. Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) can trigger inflammation through activation of human TLR4 (hTLR4) on monocytes. Hydrocortisone as an anti-inflammatory and immuno-suppressant agent has multiple mechanisms of action. In this study, we aimed at assessing the effects of hydrocortisone on monocyte expression and activity of hTLR4 in patients underwent PCI. Methods: Blood samples were taken from a total of 71 patients with chronic stable angina who were scheduled for a PCI, before the intervention. Thirty patients received 100 mg hydrocortisone prior to the procedure. Control group was composed of 41 patients underwent PCI without receiving hydrocortisone. Blood collection was repeated 2 and 4 h after PCI. The expression of hTLR4 on the surface of CD14+ monocytes and the serum levels of TNF-α and IL-1β were measured using flowcytometry and Sandwich ELISA. Results: Compared with controls, hydrocortisone significantly reduced monocyte expression of hTLR4 in test group (P<0.01). In addition, it had a significant effect on reduction of serum concentrations of TNF-α and IL-1β in test group in a time-dependent manner (P<0.01). Conclusion: In this study, hydrocortisone was able to reduce the hTLR4/CD14 positive monocytes and its related pro-inflammatory cytokines, thus it can decrease inflammatory responses following PCI. PMID:24518547

  11. Sudden Unexpected Infant Death and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome: Reducing the Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... organizations offer support: CJ Foundation for SIDS First Candle Sudden Unexplained Death In Childhood Foundation (SUDC) The ... and Caregivers Healthy Children Safe to Sleep First Candle CJ Foundation for SIDS Cribs for Kids Safe ...

  12. Progress in reducing road-related deaths and injuries in Irish children.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, J; Bimpeh, Y; Trace, F; Waters, A; Nicholson, A J

    2012-04-01

    The aim was to study road-related injuries and fatalities in under 15 year olds in two time periods (1996-2000 and 2004-2008 inclusive) to assess whether progress has been made via cross-sectoral efforts to reduce this injury toll in Ireland. For pedestrian and car-related accidents, police assistance is required and at the time a detailed CT 68 form is completed by the attending officer and sent to the Road Safety Authority for analysis. Details re the severity of injury, light and road conditions and safety measures such as seat belt or car restraint use, seat position and helmet use if a cyclist were recorded. Injuries were sub-classified as fatalities, serious (detained in hospital, fractures, severe head injury, severe internal injuries or shock requiring treatment) or minor. All data for the two time periods was entered onto an SPSS database. A concerted national campaign re road safety media campaign allied to random breath testing, penalty points for driving offences, on the spot fines for speeding and far greater police enforcement took place between the two time frames and continues to this day. When looked at as most likely estimates of death ratios the results were found to be statistically significant with an overall p value of < 0.0001 CI [0.39, 0.69]. When broken down into specific age ranges all were significant apart from the 0-3 age range with a p value of 0.69 CI [0.26, 1.1]. The most significant changes were found in the 7-9 years, 10-12 and 13-15 year age ranges with p values of < 0.0001, 0.0002 and 0.0007 respectively. When results were compared between the two cohorts, car occupant fatalities between both groups dropped by 36%. Pedestrian injuries dropped from 1719 to 1232, pedestrian fatalities decreased by almost 50% as did serious pedestrian injuries from 261 down to 129. Cyclist fatalities saw the most significant fall (76%) with a dramatic reduction in cyclist injuries from 25 down to 6 (63%). The 13-15 year old age group had the highest

  13. Colonoscopy Reduces Risk of Death from Colorectal Cancer in High-Risk Patients

    Cancer.gov

    Long-term results from the National Polyp Study confirm that removing precancerous adenomas not only reduces the risk of colorectal cancer but also reduces the number of deaths from the disease by more than half.

  14. Toll-like receptor ligands sensitize B-cell receptor signalling by reducing actin-dependent spatial confinement of the receptor

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Spencer A.; Jaumouillé, Valentin; Choi, Kate; Hsu, Brian E.; Wong, Harikesh S.; Abraham, Libin; Graves, Marcia L.; Coombs, Daniel; Roskelley, Calvin D.; Das, Raibatak; Grinstein, Sergio; Gold, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Integrating signals from multiple receptors allows cells to interpret the physiological context in which a signal is received. Here we describe a mechanism for receptor crosstalk in which receptor-induced increases in actin dynamics lower the threshold for signalling by another receptor. We show that the Toll-like receptor ligands lipopolysaccharide and CpG DNA, which are conserved microbial molecules, enhance signalling by the B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) by activating the actin-severing protein cofilin. Single-particle tracking reveals that increased severing of actin filaments reduces the spatial confinement of the BCR within the plasma membrane and increases BCR mobility. This allows more frequent collisions between BCRs and greater signalling in response to low densities of membrane-bound antigen. These findings implicate actin dynamics as a means of tuning receptor signalling and as a mechanism by which B cells distinguish inert antigens from those that are accompanied by indicators of microbial infection. PMID:25644899

  15. Stable Toll-Like Receptor 10 Knockdown in THP-1 Cells Reduces TLR-Ligand-Induced Proinflammatory Cytokine Expression.

    PubMed

    Le, Hai Van; Kim, Jae Young

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 10 (TLR10) is the only orphan receptor whose natural ligand and function are unknown among the 10 human TLRs. In this study, to test whether TLR10 recognizes some known TLR ligands, we established a stable TLR10 knockdown human monocytic cell line THP-1 using TLR10 short hairpin RNA lentiviral particle and puromycin selection. Among 60 TLR10 knockdown clones that were derived from each single transduced cell, six clones were randomly selected, and then one of those clones, named E7, was chosen for the functional study. E7 exhibited approximately 50% inhibition of TLR10 mRNA and protein expression. Of all the TLRs, only the expression of TLR10 changed significantly in this cell line. Additionally, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-induced macrophage differentiation of TLR10 knockdown cells was not affected in the knockdown cells. When exposed to TLR ligands, such as synthetic diacylated lipoprotein (FSL-1), lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and flagellin, significant induction of proinflammatory cytokine gene expression including Interleukin-8 (IL-8), Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and Chemokine (C-C Motif) Ligand 20 (CCL20) expression, was found in the control THP-1 cells, whereas the TLR10 knockdown cells exhibited a significant reduction in the expression of IL-8, IL-1β, and CCL20. TNF-α was the only cytokine for which the expression did not decrease in the TLR10 knockdown cells from that measured in the control cells. Analysis of putative binding sites for transcription factors using a binding-site-prediction program revealed that the TNF-α promoter does not have putative binding sites for AP-1 or c-Jun, comprising a major transcription factor along with NF-κB for TLR signaling. Our results suggest that TLR10 is involved in the recognition of FSL-1, LPS, and flagellin and TLR-ligand-induced expression of TNF-α does not depend on TLR10. PMID:27258267

  16. Stable Toll-Like Receptor 10 Knockdown in THP-1 Cells Reduces TLR-Ligand-Induced Proinflammatory Cytokine Expression

    PubMed Central

    Le, Hai Van; Kim, Jae Young

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 10 (TLR10) is the only orphan receptor whose natural ligand and function are unknown among the 10 human TLRs. In this study, to test whether TLR10 recognizes some known TLR ligands, we established a stable TLR10 knockdown human monocytic cell line THP-1 using TLR10 short hairpin RNA lentiviral particle and puromycin selection. Among 60 TLR10 knockdown clones that were derived from each single transduced cell, six clones were randomly selected, and then one of those clones, named E7, was chosen for the functional study. E7 exhibited approximately 50% inhibition of TLR10 mRNA and protein expression. Of all the TLRs, only the expression of TLR10 changed significantly in this cell line. Additionally, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-induced macrophage differentiation of TLR10 knockdown cells was not affected in the knockdown cells. When exposed to TLR ligands, such as synthetic diacylated lipoprotein (FSL-1), lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and flagellin, significant induction of proinflammatory cytokine gene expression including Interleukin-8 (IL-8), Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and Chemokine (C–C Motif) Ligand 20 (CCL20) expression, was found in the control THP-1 cells, whereas the TLR10 knockdown cells exhibited a significant reduction in the expression of IL-8, IL-1β, and CCL20. TNF-α was the only cytokine for which the expression did not decrease in the TLR10 knockdown cells from that measured in the control cells. Analysis of putative binding sites for transcription factors using a binding-site-prediction program revealed that the TNF-α promoter does not have putative binding sites for AP-1 or c-Jun, comprising a major transcription factor along with NF-κB for TLR signaling. Our results suggest that TLR10 is involved in the recognition of FSL-1, LPS, and flagellin and TLR-ligand-induced expression of TNF-α does not depend on TLR10. PMID:27258267

  17. In ovo delivery of Toll-like receptor 2 ligand, lipoteichoic acid induces pro-inflammatory mediators reducing post-hatch infectious laryngotracheitis virus infection.

    PubMed

    Thapa, S; Nagy, E; Abdul-Careem, M F

    2015-04-15

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands are pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) recognized by the TLRs resulting in induction of host innate immune responses. One of the PAMPs that binds to TLR2 and cluster of differentiation (CD) 14 is lipotechoic acid (LTA), which activates downstream signals culminating in the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In this study, we investigated whether in ovo LTA delivery leads to the induction of antiviral responses against post-hatch infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) infection. We first delivered the LTA into embryo day (ED)18 eggs via in ovo route so that the compound is available at the respiratory mucosa. Then the LTA treated and control ED18 eggs were allowed to hatch and the hatched chicken was infected with ILTV intratracheally on the day of hatch. We found that in ovo delivered LTA reduces ILTV infection post-hatch. We also found that in ovo delivery of LTA significantly increases mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory mediators in pre-hatch embryo lungs as well as mononuclear cell infiltration, predominantly macrophages, in lung of post-hatch chickens. Altogether, the data suggest that in ovo delivered LTA could be used to reduce ILTV infection in newly hatched chickens. PMID:25764942

  18. Limiting Cumulative HIV Viremia Copy-Years by Early Treatment Reduces Risk of AIDS and Death

    PubMed Central

    Walker, A. Sarah; Suthar, Amitabh B.; Sabin, Caroline; Bucher, Heiner C.; Jarrin, Inma; Moreno, Santiago; Perez-Hoyos, Santiago; Porter, Kholoud; Ford, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Background: Viremia copy-years (VCY), a time-updated measure of cumulative HIV exposure, predicts AIDS/death; although its utility in deciding when to start combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) remains unclear. We aimed to assess the impact of initiating versus deferring cART on risk of AIDS/death by levels of VCY both independent of and within CD4 cell count strata ≥500 cells per cubic millimeter. Methods: Using Concerted Action on Seroconversion to AIDS and Death in Europe (CASCADE) data, we created a series of nested “trials” corresponding to consecutive months for individuals ≥16 years at seroconversion after 1995 who were cART-naive and AIDS-free. Pooling across all trials, time to AIDS/death by CD4, and VCY strata was compared in those initiating vs. deferring cART using Cox models adjusted for: country, sex, risk group, seroconversion year, age, time since last HIV-RNA, and current CD4, VCY, HIV-RNA, and mean number of previous CD4/HIV-RNA measurements/year. Results: Of 9353 individuals, 5312 (57%) initiated cART and 486 (5%) acquired AIDS/died. Pooling CD4 strata, risk of AIDS/death associated with initiating vs. deferring cART reduced as VCY increased. In patients with high CD4 cell counts, ≥500 cells per cubic millimeter, there was a trend for a greater reduction for those initiating vs. deferring with increasing VCY (P = 0.09), with the largest benefit in the VCY ≥100,000 copy-years/mL group [hazard ratio (95% CI) = 0.41 (0.19 to 0.87)]. Conclusions: For individuals with CD4 ≥500 cells per cubic millimeter, limiting the cumulative HIV burden to <100,000 copy-years/mL through cART may reduce the risk of AIDS/death. PMID:27116045

  19. Induced superficial chondrocyte death reduces catabolic cartilage damage in murine posttraumatic osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Minjie; Mani, Sriniwasan B; He, Yao; Hall, Amber M; Xu, Lin; Li, Yefu; Zurakowski, David; Jay, Gregory D; Warman, Matthew L

    2016-08-01

    Joints that have degenerated as a result of aging or injury contain dead chondrocytes and damaged cartilage. Some studies have suggested that chondrocyte death precedes cartilage damage, but how the loss of chondrocytes affects cartilage integrity is not clear. In this study, we examined whether chondrocyte death undermines cartilage integrity in aging and injury using a rapid 3D confocal cartilage imaging technique coupled with standard histology. We induced autonomous expression of diphtheria toxin to kill articular surface chondrocytes in mice and determined that chondrocyte death did not lead to cartilage damage. Moreover, cartilage damage after surgical destabilization of the medial meniscus of the knee was increased in mice with intact chondrocytes compared with animals whose chondrocytes had been killed, suggesting that chondrocyte death does not drive cartilage damage in response to injury. These data imply that chondrocyte catabolism, not death, contributes to articular cartilage damage following injury. Therefore, therapies targeted at reducing the catabolic phenotype may protect against degenerative joint disease. PMID:27427985

  20. A minocycline derivative reduces nerve injury-induced allodynia, LPS-induced prostaglandin E2 microglial production and signaling via toll-like receptors 2 and 4

    PubMed Central

    Bastos, Leandro F. S.; Godin, Adriana M.; Zhang, Yingning; Jarussophon, Suwatchai; Ferreira, Bruno C. S.; Machado, Renes R.; Maier, Steven F.; Konishi, Yasuo; de Freitas, Rossimiriam P.; Fiebich, Bernd L.; Watkins, Linda R.; Coelho, Márcio M.; Moraes, Márcio F. D.

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have shown that minocycline, an antibacterial tetracycline, suppresses experimental pain. While minocycline’s positive effects on pain resolution suggest that clinical use of such drugs may prove beneficial, minocycline’s antibiotic actions and divalent cation (Ca2+; Mg2+) chelating effects detract from its potential utility. Thus, we tested the antiallodynic effect induced by a non-antibacterial, non-chelating minocycline derivative in a model of neuropathic pain and performed an initial investigation of its anti-inflammatory effects in vitro. Intraperitoneal minocycline (100 mg/kg) and 12S-hydroxy-1,12-pyrazolinominocycline (PMIN; 23.75, 47.50 or 95.00 mg/kg) reduce the mechanical allodynia induced by chronic constriction injury of mouse sciatic nerve. PMIN reduces the LPS-induced production of PGE2 by primary microglial cell cultures. Human embryonic kidney cells were transfected to express human toll-like receptors 2 and 4, and the signaling via both receptors stimulated with PAM3CSK4 or LPS (respectively) was affected either by minocycline or PMIN. Importantly, these treatments did not affect the cell viability, as assessed by MTT test. Altogether, these results reinforce the evidence that the anti-inflammatory and experimental pain suppressive effects induced by tetracyclines are neither necessarily linked to antibacterial nor to Ca2+ chelating activities. This study supports the evaluation of the potential usefulness of PMIN in the management of neuropathic pain, as its lack of antibacterial and Ca2+ chelating activities might confer greater safety over conventional tetracyclines. PMID:23523650

  1. A minocycline derivative reduces nerve injury-induced allodynia, LPS-induced prostaglandin E2 microglial production and signaling via toll-like receptors 2 and 4.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Leandro F S; Godin, Adriana M; Zhang, Yingning; Jarussophon, Suwatchai; Ferreira, Bruno C S; Machado, Renes R; Maier, Steven F; Konishi, Yasuo; de Freitas, Rossimiriam P; Fiebich, Bernd L; Watkins, Linda R; Coelho, Márcio M; Moraes, Márcio F D

    2013-05-24

    Many studies have shown that minocycline, an antibacterial tetracycline, suppresses experimental pain. While minocycline's positive effects on pain resolution suggest that clinical use of such drugs may prove beneficial, minocycline's antibiotic actions and divalent cation (Ca(2+); Mg(2+)) chelating effects detract from its potential utility. Thus, we tested the antiallodynic effect induced by a non-antibacterial, non-chelating minocycline derivative in a model of neuropathic pain and performed an initial investigation of its anti-inflammatory effects in vitro. Intraperitoneal minocycline (100mg/kg) and 12S-hydroxy-1,12-pyrazolinominocycline (PMIN; 23.75 mg/kg, 47.50mg/kg or 95.00 mg/kg) reduce the mechanical allodynia induced by chronic constriction injury of mouse sciatic nerve. PMIN reduces the LPS-induced production of PGE2 by primary microglial cell cultures. Human embryonic kidney cells were transfected to express human toll-like receptors 2 and 4, and the signaling via both receptors stimulated with PAM3CSK4 or LPS (respectively) was affected either by minocycline or PMIN. Importantly, these treatments did not affect the cell viability, as assessed by MTT test. Altogether, these results reinforce the evidence that the anti-inflammatory and experimental pain suppressive effects induced by tetracyclines are neither necessarily linked to antibacterial nor to Ca(2+) chelating activities. This study supports the evaluation of the potential usefulness of PMIN in the management of neuropathic pain, as its lack of antibacterial and Ca(2+) chelating activities might confer greater safety over conventional tetracyclines. PMID:23523650

  2. Extracellular mtDNA activates NF-κB via toll-like receptor 9 and induces cell death in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Bliksøen, Marte; Mariero, Lars Henrik; Torp, May Kristin; Baysa, Anton; Ytrehus, Kirsti; Haugen, Fred; Seljeflot, Ingebjørg; Vaage, Jarle; Valen, Guro; Stensløkken, Kåre-Olav

    2016-07-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) causes sterile inflammation, which exacerbates tissue injury. Elevated levels of circulating mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have been associated with AMI. We hypothesized that mtDNA triggers an innate immune response via TLR9 and NF-κB activation, causing cardiomyocyte injury. Murine cardiomyocytes express TLR9 mRNA and protein and were able to internalize fluorescently labeled mouse mtDNA. Incubation of human embryonic kidney cells with serum from AMI patients containing naturally elevated levels of mtDNA induced TLR9-dependent NF-κB activity. This effect was mimicked by isolated mtDNA. mtDNA activated NF-κB in reporter mice both in vivo and in isolated cardiomyocytes. Moreover, incubation of isolated cardiomyocytes with mtDNA induced cell death after 4 and 24 h. Laser confocal microscopy showed that incubation of cardiomyocytes with mtDNA accelerated mitochondrial depolarization induced by reactive oxygen species. In contrast to mtDNA, isolated total DNA did not activate NF-κB nor induce cell death. In conclusion, mtDNA can induce TLR9-dependent NF-κB activation in reporter cells and activate NF-κB in cardiomyocytes. In cardiomyocytes, mtDNA causes mitochondrial dysfunction and death. Endogenous mtDNA in the extracellular space is a danger signal with direct detrimental effects on cardiomyocytes. PMID:27164906

  3. Inhibition of microglial activity alters spinal wide dynamic range neuron discharge and reduces microglial Toll-like receptor 4 expression in neuropathic rats.

    PubMed

    Nazemi, Samad; Manaheji, Homa; Noorbakhsh, Syyed Mohammad; Zaringhalam, Jalal; Sadeghi, Mehdi; Mohammad-Zadeh, Mohammad; Haghparast, Abbas

    2015-07-01

    It is believed that neuropathic pain results from aberrant neuronal discharges although some evidence suggests that the activation of glia cells contributes to pain after an injury to the nervous system. This study aimed to evaluate the role of microglial activation on the hyper-responsiveness of wide dynamic range neurons (WDR) and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expressions in a chronic constriction injury (CCI) model of neuropathic pain in rats. Adult male Wistar rats (230 ± 30 g) underwent surgery for induction of CCI neuropathy. Six days after surgery, administration of minocycline (10, 20, and 40 mg/kg, i.p.) was initiated and continued until day 14. After administration of the last dose of minocycline or saline, a behavioral test was conducted, then animals were sacrificed and lumbar segments of the spinal cord were collected for Western blot analysis of TLR4 expression. The electrophysiological properties of WDR neurons were investigated by single unit recordings in separate groups. The findings showed that after CCI, in parallel with thermal hyperalgesia, the expression of TLR4 in the spinal cord and the evoked response of the WDR neurons to electrical, mechanical, and thermal stimulation significantly increased. Post-injury administration of minocycline effectively decreased thermal hyperalgesia, TLR4 expression, and hyper-responsiveness of WDR neurons in CCI rats. The results of this study indicate that post-injury, repeated administration of minocycline attenuated neuropathic pain by suppressing microglia activation and reducing WDR neuron hyper-responsiveness. This study confirms that post-injury modulation of microglial activity is a new strategy for treating neuropathic pain. PMID:25933029

  4. Elevated CO2 Reduced Floret Death in Wheat Under Warmer Average Temperatures and Terminal Drought

    PubMed Central

    Dias de Oliveira, Eduardo; Palta, Jairo A.; Bramley, Helen; Stefanova, Katia; Siddique, Kadambot H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated CO2 often increases grain yield in wheat by enhancing grain number per ear, which can result from an increase in the potential number of florets or a reduction in the death of developed florets. The hypotheses that elevated CO2 reduces floret death rather than increases floret development, and that grain size in a genotype with more grains per unit area is limited by the rate of grain filling, were tested in a pair of sister lines contrasting in tillering capacity (restricted- vs. free-tillering). The hypotheses were tested under elevated CO2, combined with +3°C above ambient temperature and terminal drought, using specialized field tunnel houses. Elevated CO2 increased net leaf photosynthetic rates and likely the availability of carbon assimilates, which significantly reduced the rates of floret death and increased the potential number of grains at anthesis in both sister lines by an average of 42%. The restricted-tillering line had faster grain-filling rates than the free-tillering line because the free-tillering line had more grains to fill. Furthermore, grain-filling rates were faster under elevated CO2 and +3°C above ambient. Terminal drought reduced grain yield in both lines by 19%. Elevated CO2 alone increased the potential number of grains, but a trade-off in yield components limited grain yield in the free-tillering line. This emphasizes the need for breeding cultivars with a greater potential number of florets, since this was not affected by the predicted future climate variables. PMID:26635837

  5. Efficacy of side air bags in reducing driver deaths in driver-side collisions.

    PubMed

    Braver, Elisa R; Kyrychenko, Sergey Y

    2004-03-15

    Side air bags, a relatively new technology designed to protect the head and/or torso in side-impact collisions, are becoming increasingly common in automobiles. Their efficacy in preventing US driver deaths among cars struck on the near (driver's) side was examined using data from the Fatality Analysis Reporting System and the General Estimates System. Risk ratios for driver death per nearside collision during 1999-2001 were computed for head/torso and torso-only side air bags in cars from model years 1997-2002, relative to cars without side air bags. Confounding was addressed by adjusting nearside risk ratios for front- and rear-impact mortality, which is unaffected by side air bags. Risk ratios were 0.55 (95% confidence interval: 0.43, 0.71) for head/torso air bags and 0.89 (95% confidence interval: 0.79, 1.01) for torso-only air bags. Risk was reduced when cars with head/torso air bags were struck by cars/minivans (significant) or pickup trucks/sport utility vehicles (nonsignificant). Risk was reduced in two-vehicle collisions and among male drivers and drivers aged 16-64 years. Protective effects associated with torso-only air bags were observed in single-vehicle crashes and among male and 16- to 64-year-old drivers. Head/torso side air bags appear to be very effective in reducing nearside driver deaths, whereas torso-only air bags appear less protective. PMID:15003959

  6. β-Blockers Reduce Breast Cancer Recurrence and Breast Cancer Death: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Childers, W Kurtis; Hollenbeak, Christopher S; Cheriyath, Pramil

    2015-12-01

    The normal physiologic stress mechanism, mediated by the sympathetic nervous system, causes a release of the neurotransmitters epinephrine and norepinephrine. Preclinical data have demonstrated an effect on tumor progression and metastasis via the sympathetic nervous system mediated primarily through the β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) pathway. In vitro data have shown an increase in tumor growth, migration, tumor angiogenesis, and metastatic spread in breast cancer through activation of the β-AR. Retrospective cohort studies on the clinical outcomes of β-blockers in breast cancer outcomes showed no clear consensus. The purpose of this study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of the effect of β-blockers on breast cancer outcomes. A systematic review was performed using the Cochrane library and PubMed. Publications between the dates of January 2010 and December 2013 were identified. Available hazard ratios (HRs) were extracted for breast cancer recurrence, breast cancer death, and all-cause mortality and pooled using a random effects meta-analysis. A total of 7 studies contained results for at least 1 of the outcomes of breast cancer recurrence, breast cancer death, or all-cause mortality in breast cancer patients receiving β-blockers. In the 5 studies that contained results for breast cancer recurrence, there was no statistically significant risk reduction (HR, 0.67; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.39-1.13). Breast cancer death results were contained in 4 studies, which also suggested a significant reduction in risk (HR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.32-0.80). Among the 4 studies that reported all-cause mortality, there was no significant effect of β-blockers on risk (HR, 1.02; 95% CI, 0.75-1.37). Results of this systematic review and meta-analysis suggest that the use of β-blockers significantly reduced risk of breast cancer death among women with breast cancer. PMID:26516037

  7. Reduced death rates from cyclones in Bangladesh: what more needs to be done?

    PubMed

    Haque, Ubydul; Hashizume, Masahiro; Kolivras, Korine N; Overgaard, Hans J; Das, Bivash; Yamamoto, Taro

    2012-02-01

    Tropical storms, such as cyclones, hurricanes and typhoons, present major threats to coastal communities. Around two million people worldwide have died and millions have been injured over the past two centuries as a result of tropical storms. Bangladesh is especially vulnerable to tropical cyclones, with around 718 000 deaths from them in the past 50 years. However, cyclone-related mortality in Bangladesh has declined by more than 100-fold over the past 40 years, from 500 000 deaths in 1970 to 4234 in 2007. The main factors responsible for these reduced fatalities and injuries are improved defensive measures, including early warning systems, cyclone shelters, evacuation plans, coastal embankments, reforestation schemes and increased awareness and communication. Although warning systems have been improved, evacuation before a cyclone remains a challenge, with major problems caused by illiteracy, lack of awareness and poor communication. Despite the potential risks of climate change and tropical storms, little empirical knowledge exists on how to develop effective strategies to reduce or mitigate the effects of cyclones. This paper summarizes the most recent data and outlines the strategy adopted in Bangladesh. It offers guidance on how similar strategies can be adopted by other countries vulnerable to tropical storms. Further research is needed to enable countries to limit the risks that cyclones present to public health. PMID:22423166

  8. Reduced death rates from cyclones in Bangladesh: what more needs to be done?

    PubMed Central

    Hashizume, Masahiro; Kolivras, Korine N; Overgaard, Hans J; Das, Bivash; Yamamoto, Taro

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Tropical storms, such as cyclones, hurricanes and typhoons, present major threats to coastal communities. Around two million people worldwide have died and millions have been injured over the past two centuries as a result of tropical storms. Bangladesh is especially vulnerable to tropical cyclones, with around 718 000 deaths from them in the past 50 years. However, cyclone-related mortality in Bangladesh has declined by more than 100-fold over the past 40 years, from 500 000 deaths in 1970 to 4234 in 2007. The main factors responsible for these reduced fatalities and injuries are improved defensive measures, including early warning systems, cyclone shelters, evacuation plans, coastal embankments, reforestation schemes and increased awareness and communication. Although warning systems have been improved, evacuation before a cyclone remains a challenge, with major problems caused by illiteracy, lack of awareness and poor communication. Despite the potential risks of climate change and tropical storms, little empirical knowledge exists on how to develop effective strategies to reduce or mitigate the effects of cyclones. This paper summarizes the most recent data and outlines the strategy adopted in Bangladesh. It offers guidance on how similar strategies can be adopted by other countries vulnerable to tropical storms. Further research is needed to enable countries to limit the risks that cyclones present to public health. PMID:22423166

  9. Improving patient safety to reduce preventable deaths: the case of a California safety net hospital.

    PubMed

    Leach, Linda Searle; Kagawa, Frank; Mayo, Ann; Pugh, Connie

    2012-01-01

    Preventable deaths occur when signs and symptoms of risk and decline are not detected yet are present many hours prior to a deteriorating course. Rapid responses teams (RRTs), also referred to as medical emergency teams (METs) were introduced to improve patient safety by preventing code arrests and death. This research using a case study methodology describes a nurse-led RRT, developed at a large, safety net, teaching hospital in California. Safety-net hospitals are challenged to deliver care and meet the complex needs of vulnerable patient populations. This hospital is a mission driven organization that is focused on the patient and the needs of underserved populations. To respond to the call for reform for patient safety and reduce adverse events, the organization adopted RRTs, early recognition rounds by RRT registered nurses (RNs) and the use of trigger alerts by nursing assistants (NAs) to expand the surveillance and identification of patients most at risk of clinical deterioration. Collaboration with interns and residents (house staff) facilitated their involvement and response to RRT calls. Using quality data from 2005 to 2010, findings from this patient safety innovation address RRT utilization, frequency of non-ICU code arrests, hospital mortality, and post-arrest survival outcomes. PMID:23552203

  10. The costs of a suburban paramedic program in reducing deaths due to cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Urban, N; Bergner, L; Eisenberg, M S

    1981-04-01

    The marginal costs per averted death of a suburban paramedic program are estimated to be approximately $42,000, when program costs are attributed entirely to cardiac arrest cases due to underlying heart disease, and indirect costs attributable to episode-related hospitalization are included, It is suggested that at $42,000 per cardiac arrest death averted the program is cost-beneficial by two criteria. First, it compares favorably with an estimate obtained from the literature of the value to the average individual of saving the life of a myocardial infarction patient. Second, the people of King County passed a cost-commensurate Paramedic Program Property Tax Levy in 1979, revealing their willingness to support the program. Results of the study should be generalized in accordance with the facts that in King County 1) the population density averages approximately 1,300 per square mile; 2) a basic emergency medical system ensures a 4-minute average response time to initiation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation; 3) a citizen-training program in cardiopulmonary resuscitation further reduces average time to initiation of basic life support; and 4) the paramedic program is designed to ensure a 10-minute average time to definitive care. PMID:6785539

  11. Teaching Child Care Providers to Reduce the Risk of SIDS (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byington, Teresa; Martin, Sally; Reilly, Jackie; Weigel, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Keeping children safe and healthy is one of the main concerns of parents and child care providers. SIDS (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome) is the leading cause of death in infants 1 month to 12 months of age. Over 2,000 infants die from SIDS every year in the United States, and almost 15% of these deaths occur in child care settings. A targeted…

  12. Management Strategies Aiming to Improve Horse Welfare Reduce Embryonic Death Rates in Mares.

    PubMed

    Malschitzky, E; Pimentel, A M; Garbade, P; Jobim, Mim; Gregory, R M; Mattos, R C

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this retrospective study was to evaluate the effect of management strategies aiming to improve animal well-being on pregnancy and embryonic death (ED) rates. Breeding records of a cohort of 1206 Thoroughbred mares brought to a stallion station facility, to be bred with the stallions housed there, were evaluated during ten breeding seasons. Mares were blocked according to management strategies in two groups: Stress and Relax. Strategies used to improve animal well-being (Relax group) were as follows: stopping the teasing routine, reducing or eliminating stall confinement, reducing the number of mares per group and maintaining herd stability during the breeding season. In barren mares, the pregnancy rate was higher in the Relax group (91.8%) when compared to the observed in Stress group (84.7%). However, no difference in pregnancy rates were observed (Stress = 85.2% vs. Relax = 86.2) in foaling mares. ED rate was higher in barren and foaling mares of the Stress group mares (25.5% and 26.8%, respectively) compared with the Relax group (16.1% and 14.7%, respectively). No significant differences were observed on foal heat pregnancy rate between groups; yet, the embryo loss on foal heat was significant reduced in Relax mares (Relax = 8.7% vs Stress = 24.5%). In conclusion, management strategies aimed to reduce social stress can reduce early pregnancy losses and the average cycles per pregnancy, improving reproductive performance in mares. PMID:25981406

  13. Sigma-1 receptor deficiency reduces MPTP-induced parkinsonism and death of dopaminergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hong, J; Sha, S; Zhou, L; Wang, C; Yin, J; Chen, L

    2015-01-01

    Sigma-1 receptor (σ1R) has been reported to be decreased in nigrostriatal motor system of Parkinson's disease patients. Using heterozygous and homozygous σ1R knockout (σ1R+/− and σ1R−/−) mice, we investigated the influence of σ1R deficiency on 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-impaired nigrostriatal motor system. The injection of MPTP for 5 weeks in wild-type mice (MPTP-WT mice), but not in σ1R+/− or σ1R−/− mice (MPTP-σ1R+/− or MPTP-σ1R−/− mice), caused motor deficits and ~40% death of dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra pars compacta with an elevation of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAr) NR2B phosphorylation. The σ1R antagonist NE100 or the NR2B inhibitor Ro25-6981 could alleviate the motor deficits and the death of dopaminergic neurons in MPTP-WT mice. By contrast, MPTP-σ1R+/− mice treated with the σ1R agonist PRE084 or MPTP-σ1R−/− mice treated with the NMDAr agonist NMDA appeared to have similar motor deficits and loss of dopaminergic neurons as MPTP-WT mice. The pharmacological or genetic inactivation of σ1R suppressed the expression of dopamine transporter (DAT) in substantia nigra, which was corrected by NMDA. The activation of σ1R by PRE084 enhanced the DAT expression in WT mice or σ1R+/− mice. By contrast, the level of vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) in σ1R+/− mice or σ1R−/− mice had no difference from WT mice. Interestingly, MPTP-WT mice showed the reduction in the levels of DAT and VMAT2, but MPTP-σ1R−/− mice did not. The inactivation of σ1R by NE100 could prevent the reduction of VMAT2 in MPTP-WT mice. In addition, the activation of microglia cells in substantia nigra was equally enhanced in MPTP-WT mice and MPTP-σ1R−/− mice. The number of activated astrocytes in MPTP-σ1R−/− mice was less than that in MPTP-WT mice. The findings indicate that the σ1R deficiency through suppressing NMDAr function and DAT expression can reduce MPTP-induced death of

  14. Cabergoline, Dopamine D2 Receptor Agonist, Prevents Neuronal Cell Death under Oxidative Stress via Reducing Excitotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Odaka, Haruki; Numakawa, Tadahiro; Adachi, Naoki; Ooshima, Yoshiko; Nakajima, Shingo; Katanuma, Yusuke; Inoue, Takafumi; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Several lines of evidence demonstrate that oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease. Potent antioxidants may therefore be effective in the treatment of such diseases. Cabergoline, a dopamine D2 receptor agonist and antiparkinson drug, has been studied using several cell types including mesencephalic neurons, and is recognized as a potent radical scavenger. Here, we examined whether cabergoline exerts neuroprotective effects against oxidative stress through a receptor-mediated mechanism in cultured cortical neurons. We found that neuronal death induced by H2O2 exposure was inhibited by pretreatment with cabergoline, while this protective effect was eliminated in the presence of a dopamine D2 receptor inhibitor, spiperone. Activation of ERK1/2 by H2O2 was suppressed by cabergoline, and an ERK signaling pathway inhibitor, U0126, similarly protected cortical neurons from cell death. This suggested the ERK signaling pathway has a critical role in cabergoline-mediated neuroprotection. Furthermore, increased extracellular levels of glutamate induced by H2O2, which might contribute to ERK activation, were reduced by cabergoline, while inhibitors for NMDA receptor or L-type Ca2+ channel demonstrated a survival effect against H2O2. Interestingly, we found that cabergoline increased expression levels of glutamate transporters such as EAAC1. Taken together, these results suggest that cabergoline has a protective effect on cortical neurons via a receptor-mediated mechanism including repression of ERK1/2 activation and extracellular glutamate accumulation induced by H2O2. PMID:24914776

  15. Adalimumab Reduces Photoreceptor Cell Death in A Mouse Model of Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Fernández de la Cámara, Cristina; Hernández-Pinto, Alberto M.; Olivares-González, Lorena; Cuevas-Martín, Carmen; Sánchez-Aragó, María; Hervás, David; Salom, David; Cuezva, José M.; de la Rosa, Enrique J.; Millán, José M; Rodrigo, Regina

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that inflammation is involved in the progression of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) both in patients and in animal models. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Adalimumab, a monoclonal anti-TNFα antibody, on retinal degeneration in a murine model of human autosomal recessive RP, the rd10 mice at postnatal day (P) 18. In our housing conditions, rd10 retinas were seriously damaged at P18. Adalimumab reduced photoreceptor cell death, as determined by scoring the number of TUNEL-positive cells. In addition, nuclear poly (ADP) ribose (PAR) content, an indirect measure of PAR polymerase (PARP) activity, was also reduced after treatment. The blockade of TNFα ameliorated reactive gliosis, as visualized by decreased GFAP and IBA1 immunolabelling (Müller cell and microglial markers, respectively) and decreased up-regulation of TNFα gene expression. Adalimumab also improved antioxidant response by restoring total antioxidant capacity and superoxide dismutase activity. Finally, we observed that Adalimumab normalized energetic and metabolic pattern in rd10 mouse retinas. Our study suggests that the TNFα blockade could be a successful therapeutic approach to increase photoreceptor survival during the progression of RP. Further studies are needed to characterize its effect along the progression of the disease. PMID:26170250

  16. Reduced photoreceptor death and improved retinal function during retinal degeneration in mice lacking innate immunity adaptor protein MyD88

    PubMed Central

    Syeda, Sarah; Patel, Amit K.; Lee, Tinthu; Hackam, Abigail S.

    2015-01-01

    The injury inflammatory response mediated by the innate immune system is an important contributor to neurodegeneration in the central nervous system (CNS) and retina. A major branch of the innate immune system is regulated by the Toll-like receptors (TLRs), which are receptors for endogenous damage associated molecules released from injured cells as well as pathogen-derived molecules, and interleukin-1 receptors (IL-1R), which are activated by IL-1α, IL-1β and IL-18 cytokines. TLRs and IL-1R are expressed on immune and non-immune cell types and act as first responders to cell damage, which results in tissue repair, or inflammation and apoptosis. Both TLR and IL-1R require the adaptor protein myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88) for signaling. Although inflammation is implicated in neuronal death in the retina, the role of MyD88-dependent TLR and IL-1R signaling in retinal degeneration is unknown. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the role of MyD88-mediated signaling in neuronal degeneration in the retinal degeneration 1 (rd1) mouse model, which exhibits a phenotype of rapid photoreceptor death and inflammation. To generate rd1 mice lacking the MyD88 gene, rd1 were bred with MyD88 knockout mice (MyD88-/-) for several generations to produce rd1/MyD88+/+ and rd1/MyD88-/- genotypes. Chemokine mRNA expression levels were analyzed by qRT-PCR, and recruitment of activated microglia was quantified by immunodetection of the IBA-1 protein. Retinal outer nuclear layer cell counts were performed to quantify photoreceptor degeneration, and retinal function was assessed using electroretinograms (ERG). Our results revealed that retinal expression of Ccl2, Ccl4, Ccl7 and Cxcl10 was reduced by 2 to 8-fold in rd1/MyD88-/- mice compared with rd1/MyD88+/+ mice (p<0.05), which coincided with attenuated microglial activation, higher numbers of photoreceptors and higher retina responses to photopic and scotopic stimuli. At later ages, rd1/MyD88

  17. Performance-based regulation: enterprise responsibility for reducing death, injury, and disease caused by consumer products.

    PubMed

    Sugarman, Stephen D

    2009-12-01

    This article offers a bold new idea for confronting the staggering level of death, injury, and disease caused by five consumer products: cigarettes, alcohol, guns, junk food, and motor vehicles. Business leaders try to frame these negative outcomes as "collateral damage" that is someone else's problem. That framing not only is morally objectionable but also overlooks the possibility that, with proper prodding, industry could substantially lessen these public health disasters. I seek to reframe the public perception of who is responsible and propose to deploy a promising approach called "performance-based regulation" to combat the problem. Performance-based regulation would impose on manufacturers a legal obligation to reduce the negative social costs of their products. Rather than involving them in litigation or forcing them to operate differently (as "command-and-control" regimes do), performance-based regulation allows the firms to determine how best to decrease bad public health consequences. Like other public health strategies, performance-based regulation focuses on those who are far more likely than individual consumers to achieve real gains. Analogous to a tax on causing harm that exceeds a threshold level, performance-based regulation seeks to harness private initiative in pursuit of the public good. PMID:20018990

  18. Reduced expression of plasma membrane calcium ATPase 2 and collapsin response mediator protein 1 promotes death of spinal cord neurons.

    PubMed

    Kurnellas, M P; Li, H; Jain, M R; Giraud, S N; Nicot, A B; Ratnayake, A; Heary, R F; Elkabes, S

    2010-09-01

    The mechanisms underlying neuronal pathology and death in the spinal cord (SC) during inflammation remain elusive. We previously showed the important role of plasma membrane calcium ATPases (PMCAs) in the survival of SC neurons, in vitro. We also postulated that a decrease in PMCA2 expression could cause neuronal death during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis. The current studies were undertaken to define the specific contribution of PMCA2 to degeneration of SC neurons, the effectors downstream to PMCA2 mediating neuronal death and the triggers that reduce PMCA2 expression. We report that knockdown of PMCA2 in SC neurons decreases collapsin response mediator protein 1 (CRMP1) levels. This is followed by cell death. Silencing of CRMP1 expression also leads to neuronal loss. Kainic acid reduces both PMCA2 and CRMP1 levels and induces neuronal death. Administration of an alpha-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate (AMPA)/kainate receptor antagonist, at onset or peak of EAE, restores the decreased PMCA2 and CRMP1 levels to control values and ameliorates clinical deficits. Thus, our data link the reduction in PMCA2 expression with perturbations in the expression of CRMP1 and the ensuing death of SC neurons. This represents an additional mechanism underlying AMPA/kainate receptor-mediated excitotoxicity with relevance to neurodegeneration in EAE. PMID:20489728

  19. Safety assessment of the conversion of toll plazas to all-electronic toll collection system.

    PubMed

    Abuzwidah, Muamer; Abdel-Aty, Mohamed

    2015-07-01

    Traditional mainline toll plaza (TMTP) is considered the most high-risk location on the toll roads. Conversion from TMTP or hybrid mainline toll plaza (HMTP) to an all-electronic toll collection (AETC) system has demonstrated measured improvement in traffic operations and environmental issues. However, there is a lack of research that quantifies the safety impacts of these new tolling systems. This study evaluated the safety effectiveness of the conversion from TMTP or HMTP to AETC system. An extensive data collection was conducted that included hundred mainline toll plazas located on more than 750 miles of toll roads in Florida. Various observational before-after studies including the empirical Bayes method were applied. The results indicated that the conversion from the TMTP to an AETC system resulted in an average crash reduction of 76, 75, and 68% for total, fatal-and-injury and property damage only (PDO) crashes, respectively; for rear end and lane change related (LCR) crashes the average reductions were 80 and 74%, respectively. The conversion from HMTP to AETC system enhanced traffic safety by reducing crashes by 24, 28 and 20% of total, fatal-and-injury, and PDO crashes respectively; also, for rear end and LCR crashes, the average reductions were 15 and 22%, respectively. Overall, this paper provided an up-to-date safety impact of using different toll collection systems. The results proved that the AETC system significantly improved traffic safety for all crash categories; and changed toll plazas from the highest risk on Expressways to be similar to regular segments. PMID:25909391

  20. Prophylactic Oophorectomy: Reducing the U.S. Death Rate from Epithelial Ovarian Cancer. A Continuing Debate.

    PubMed

    Piver

    1996-01-01

    If instead of the title "Prophylactic Oophorectomy: Reducing the U.S. Death Rate from Epithelial Ovarian Cancer," the title were "Drug X Reducing the U.S. Death Rate from Epithelial Ovarian Cancer," there would be great media and medical attention worldwide to such a report. Correctly so. Regrettably, there probably is no new Drug X in the foreseeable future that will significantly reduce the death rate from ovarian cancer, be it Taxol®, taxotere, topotecan, gemcitabine, or liposomal doxorubicin-although each may result in significant responses and some prolongation of median survival. Epithelial ovarian cancer is a much more complex disease than anyone envisioned, when it was believed that extensive debulking surgery and the newest cytotoxic chemotherapy would radically reduce the death rate from ovarian cancer in the United States. Over 20 years after the first patient was treated with cisplatin for epithelial ovarian cancer, the annual death rate from ovarian cancer continued to increase. Just in the past decade, the number of women in the United States dying from ovarian cancer has increased 18% (Fig. 1) [1]. Although ovarian cancer is estimated to account for 26,700 cases and 14,800 deaths in 1996, it is a low-prevalence disease in comparison with breast cancer, which in 1996 is estimated to account for 185,700 cases and 44,560 deaths. Inexplicably, similar to breast cancer, the lifetime risk for ovarian cancer in the United States continues to increase. The most recent Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) calculations of lifetime risk for ovarian cancer are that 1 in 55 women will develop ovarian cancer over their lifetime, or 1.8%, up from the 1970 figures of 1 in 70, or 1.4% [2]. The 1.8% baseline lifetime risk for the general population is used to estimate the lifetime risk of known ovarian cancer risk factors (Table 1). Even utilizing what are now believed to be two of the most effective cytotoxic drugs against stage III and IV epithelial

  1. Ovarian Cancer Screening Method Fails to Reduce Deaths from the Disease

    Cancer.gov

    New results from the NCI-sponsored PLCO Cancer Screening Trial show that screening for ovarian cancer with transvaginal ultrasound (TVU) and the CA-125 blood test did not result in fewer deaths from the disease compared with usual care.

  2. Reducing death on the road: the effects of minimum safety standards, publicized crash tests, seat belts, and alcohol.

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, L S

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. Two phases of attempts to improve passenger car crash worthiness have occurred: minimum safety standards and publicized crash tests. This study evaluated these attempts, as well as changes in seat belt and alcohol use, in terms of their effect on occupant death and fatal crash rates. METHODS. Data on passenger car occupant fatalities and total involvement in fatal crashes, for 1975 through 1991, were obtained from the Fatal Accident Reporting System. Rates per mile were calculated through published sources on vehicle use by vehicle age. Regression estimates of effects of regulation, publicized crash tests, seat belt use and alcohol involvement were obtained. RESULTS. Substantial reductions in fatalities occurred in the vehicle model years from the late 1960s through most of the 1970s, when federal standards were applied. Some additional increments in reduced death rates, attributable to additional improved vehicle crashworthiness, occurred during the period of publicized crash tests. Increased seat belt use and reduced alcohol use also contributed significantly to reduced deaths. CONCLUSIONS. Minimum safety standards, crashworthiness improvements, seat belt use laws, and reduced alcohol use each contributed to a large reduction in passenger car occupant deaths. PMID:8561238

  3. Blocking TWEAK-Fn14 interaction inhibits hematopoietic stem cell transplantation-induced intestinal cell death and reduces GVHD.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Martin; Brandl, Andreas; Siegmund, Daniela; Mottok, Anja; Schäfer, Viktoria; Biehl, Marlene; Kraus, Sabrina; Bäuerlein, Carina A; Ritz, Miriam; Mattenheimer, Katharina; Schwinn, Stefanie; Seher, Axel; Grabinger, Thomas; Einsele, Hermann; Rosenwald, Andreas; Brunner, Thomas; Beilhack, Andreas; Wajant, Harald

    2015-07-23

    Inhibition of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK)/fibroblast growth factor-inducible 14 (Fn14) system reduces intestinal cell death and disease development in several models of colitis. In view of the crucial role of TNF and intestinal cell death in graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and the ability of TWEAK to enhance TNF-induced cell death, we tested here the therapeutic potential of Fn14 blockade on allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT)-induced intestinal GVHD. An Fn14-specific blocking human immunoglobulin G1 antibody variant with compromised antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity strongly inhibited the severity of murine allo-HCT-induced GVHD. Treatment of the allo-HCT recipients with this monoclonal antibody reduced cell death of gastrointestinal cells but neither affected organ infiltration by donor T cells nor cytokine production. Fn14 blockade also inhibited intestinal cell death in mice challenged with TNF. This suggests that the protective effect of Fn14 blockade in allo-HCT is based on the protection of intestinal cells from TNF-induced apoptosis and not due to immune suppression. Importantly, Fn14 blockade showed no negative effect on graft-versus-leukemia/lymphoma (GVL) activity. Thus, ADCC-defective Fn14-blocking antibodies are not only possible novel GVL effect-sparing therapeutics for the treatment of GVHD but might also be useful for the treatment of other inflammatory bowel diseases where TNF-induced cell death is of relevance. PMID:26012567

  4. Toll-like receptor 4 and high-mobility group box-1 are involved in ictogenesis and can be targeted to reduce seizures.

    PubMed

    Maroso, Mattia; Balosso, Silvia; Ravizza, Teresa; Liu, Jaron; Aronica, Eleonora; Iyer, Anand M; Rossetti, Carlo; Molteni, Monica; Casalgrandi, Maura; Manfredi, Angelo A; Bianchi, Marco E; Vezzani, Annamaria

    2010-04-01

    Brain inflammation is a major factor in epilepsy, but the impact of specific inflammatory mediators on neuronal excitability is incompletely understood. Using models of acute and chronic seizures in C57BL/6 mice, we discovered a proconvulsant pathway involving high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) release from neurons and glia and its interaction with Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), a key receptor of innate immunity. Antagonists of HMGB1 and TLR4 retard seizure precipitation and decrease acute and chronic seizure recurrence. TLR4-defective C3H/HeJ mice are resistant to kainate-induced seizures. The proconvulsant effects of HMGB1, like those of interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), are partly mediated by ifenprodil-sensitive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. Increased expression of HMGB1 and TLR4 in human epileptogenic tissue, like that observed in the mouse model of chronic seizures, suggests a role for the HMGB1-TLR4 axis in human epilepsy. Thus, HMGB1-TLR4 signaling may contribute to generating and perpetuating seizures in humans and might be targeted to attain anticonvulsant effects in epilepsies that are currently resistant to drugs. PMID:20348922

  5. Ovarian Cancer Screening Method Fails to Reduce Deaths from the Disease | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    New results from the NCI-sponsored Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial show that screening for ovarian cancer with transvaginal ultrasound (TVU) and the CA-125 blood test did not result in fewer deaths from the disease compared with usual care. |

  6. Lung cancer deaths from indoor radon and the cost effectiveness and potential of policies to reduce them

    PubMed Central

    Read, Simon; McGale, Paul; Darby, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine the number of deaths from lung cancer related to radon in the home and to explore the cost effectiveness of alternative policies to control indoor radon and their potential to reduce lung cancer mortality. Design Cost effectiveness analysis. Setting United Kingdom. Data sources Epidemiological data on risks from indoor radon and from smoking, vital statistics on deaths from lung cancer, survey information on effectiveness and costs of radon prevention and remediation. Main outcome measures Estimated number of deaths from lung cancer related to indoor radon, lifetime risks of death from lung cancer before and after various potential interventions to control radon, the cost per quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained from different policies for control of radon, and the potential of those policies to reduce lung cancer mortality. Results The mean radon concentration in UK homes is 21 becquerels per cubic metre (Bq/m3). Each year around 1100 deaths from lung cancer (3.3% of all deaths from lung cancer) are related to radon in the home. Over 85% of these arise from radon concentrations below 100 Bq/m3 and most are caused jointly by radon and active smoking. Current policy requiring basic measures to prevent radon in new homes in selected areas is highly cost effective, and such measures would remain cost effective if extended to the entire UK, with a cost per QALY gained of £11 400 ( €12 200; $16 913). Current policy identifying and remediating existing homes with high radon levels is, however, neither cost effective (cost per QALY gained £36 800) nor effective in reducing lung cancer mortality. Conclusions Policies requiring basic preventive measures against radon in all new homes throughout the UK would be cost effective and could complement existing policies to reduce smoking. Policies involving remedial work on existing homes with high radon levels cannot prevent most radon related deaths, as these are caused by moderate exposure

  7. Toll Bar on Sea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Dave

    2008-01-01

    In the summer of 2007 the United Kingdom experienced some of the heaviest rainfall since records began. Toll Bar in South Yorkshire featured prominently in media coverage as the village and the homes surrounding it began to flood. Many people lost everything: their homes, their furniture, their possessions. In an effort to come to terms with what…

  8. Toll Gate Metrication Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Izzi, John

    1974-01-01

    The project director of the Toll Gate Metrication Project describes the project as the first structured United States public school educational experiment in implementing change toward the adoption of the International System of Units. He believes the change will simplify, rather than complicate, the educational task. (AG)

  9. Mincle suppresses Toll-like receptor 4 activation.

    PubMed

    Greco, Stephanie H; Mahmood, Syed Kashif; Vahle, Anne-Kristin; Ochi, Atsuo; Batel, Jennifer; Deutsch, Michael; Barilla, Rocky; Seifert, Lena; Pachter, H Leon; Daley, Donnele; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Hundeyin, Mautin; Mani, Vishnu R; Miller, George

    2016-07-01

    Regulation of Toll-like receptor responses is critical for limiting tissue injury and autoimmunity in both sepsis and sterile inflammation. We found that Mincle, a C-type lectin receptor, regulates proinflammatory Toll-like receptor 4 signaling. Specifically, Mincle ligation diminishes Toll-like receptor 4-mediated inflammation, whereas Mincle deletion or knockdown results in marked hyperresponsiveness to lipopolysaccharide in vitro, as well as overwhelming lipopolysaccharide-mediated inflammation in vivo. Mechanistically, Mincle deletion does not up-regulate Toll-like receptor 4 expression or reduce interleukin 10 production after Toll-like receptor 4 ligation; however, Mincle deletion decreases production of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent inhibitory intermediate suppressor of cytokine signaling 1, A20, and ABIN3 and increases expression of the Toll-like receptor 4 coreceptor CD14. Blockade of CD14 mitigates the increased sensitivity of Mincle(-/-) leukocytes to Toll-like receptor 4 ligation. Collectively, we describe a major role for Mincle in suppressing Toll-like receptor 4 responses and implicate its importance in nonmycobacterial models of inflammation. PMID:26747838

  10. Deletion of a Malaria Invasion Gene Reduces Death and Anemia, in Model Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Noé D.; Safeukui, Innocent; Adelani, Aanuoluwa A.; Tewari, Rita; Reddy, Janardan K.; Rao, Sam; Holder, Anthony; Buffet, Pierre; Mohandas, Narla; Haldar, Kasturi

    2011-01-01

    Malaria parasites induce complex cellular and clinical phenotypes, including anemia, cerebral malaria and death in a wide range of mammalian hosts. Host genes and parasite ‘toxins’ have been implicated in malarial disease, but the contribution of parasite genes remains to be fully defined. Here we assess disease in BALB/c mice and Wistar rats infected by the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium berghei with a gene knock out for merozoite surface protein (MSP) 7. MSP7 is not essential for infection but in P. falciparum, it enhances erythrocyte invasion by 20%. In vivo, as compared to wild type, the P. berghei Δmsp7 mutant is associated with an abrogation of death and a decrease from 3% to 2% in peak, circulating parasitemia. The Δmsp7 mutant is also associated with less anemia and modest increase in the size of follicles in the spleen. Together these data show that deletion of a single parasite invasion ligand modulates blood stage disease, as measured by death and anemia. This work is the first to assess the contribution of a gene present in all plasmodial species in severe disease. PMID:21980474

  11. Resuscitation and Obstetrical Care to Reduce Intrapartum-Related Neonatal Deaths: A MANDATE Study.

    PubMed

    Kamath-Rayne, Beena D; Griffin, Jennifer B; Moran, Katelin; Jones, Bonnie; Downs, Allan; McClure, Elizabeth M; Goldenberg, Robert L; Rouse, Doris; Jobe, Alan H

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the impact of neonatal resuscitation and basic obstetric care on intrapartum-related neonatal mortality in low and middle-income countries, using the mathematical model, Maternal and Neonatal Directed Assessment of Technology (MANDATE). Using MANDATE, we evaluated the impact of interventions for intrapartum-related events causing birth asphyxia (basic neonatal resuscitation, advanced neonatal care, increasing facility birth, and emergency obstetric care) when implemented in home, clinic, and hospital settings of sub-Saharan African and India for 2008. Total intrapartum-related neonatal mortality (IRNM) was acute neonatal deaths from intrapartum-related events plus late neonatal deaths from ongoing intrapartum-related injury. Introducing basic neonatal resuscitation in all settings had a large impact on decreasing IRNM. Increasing facility births and scaling up emergency obstetric care in clinics and hospitals also had a large impact on decreasing IRNM. Increasing prevalence and utilization of advanced neonatal care in hospital settings had limited impact on IRNM. The greatest improvement in IRNM was seen with widespread advanced neonatal care and basic neonatal resuscitation, scaled-up emergency obstetric care in clinics and hospitals, and increased facility deliveries, resulting in an estimated decrease in IRNM to 2.0 per 1,000 live births in India and 2.5 per 1,000 live births in sub-Saharan Africa. With more deliveries occurring in clinics and hospitals, the scale-up of obstetric care can have a greater effect than if modeled individually. Use of MANDATE enables health leaders to direct resources towards interventions that could prevent intrapartum-related deaths. A lack of widespread implementation of basic neonatal resuscitation, increased facility births, and emergency obstetric care are missed opportunities to save newborn lives. PMID:25656720

  12. Photobiomodulation reduces photoreceptor death and regulates cytoprotection in early states of P23H retinal dystrophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, Diana K.; Gopalakrishnan, Sandeep; Schmitt, Heather; Abroe, Betsy; Stoehr, Michele; Dubis, Adam; Carroll, Joseph; Stone, Jonathan; Valter, Krisztina; Eells, Janis

    2013-03-01

    Irradiation by light in the far-red to near-infrared (NIR) region of the spectrum (photobiomodulation, PBM) has been demonstrated to attenuate the severity of neurodegenerative disease in experimental and clinical studies. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that 670 nm PBM would protect against the loss of retinal function and improve photoreceptor survival in a rodent model of retinitis pigmentosa, the P23H transgenic rat. P23H rat pups were treated once per day with a 670 nm LED array (180 sec treatments at 50 mW/cm2; fluence 9 joules/cm2) (Quantum Devices Inc., Barneveld WI) from postnatal day (p) 16-20 or from p10-20. Sham-treated rats were restrained, but not exposed to NIR light. The status of the retina was determined at p22 by assessment of mitochondrial function, oxidative stress and cell death. In a second series of studies, retinal status was assessed at p30 by measuring photoreceptor function by ERG and retinal morphology by Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT). 670 nm PBM increased retinal mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase activity and upregulated the retina's production of the key mitochondrial antioxidant enzyme, MnSOD. PBM also attenuated photoreceptor cell loss and improved photoreceptor function. PBM protects photoreceptors in the developing P23H retina, by augmenting mitochondrial function and stimulating antioxidant protective pathways. Photobiomodulation may have therapeutic potential, where mitochondrial damage is a step in the death of photoreceptors.

  13. Fetal death and reduced birth rates associated with exposure to lead-contaminated drinking water.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Marc

    2014-01-01

    This ecologic study notes that fetal death rates (FDR) during the Washington DC drinking water "lead crisis" (2000-2004) peaked in 2001 when water lead levels (WLLs) were highest, and were minimized in 2004 after public health interventions were implemented to protect pregnant women. Changes in the DC FDR vs neighboring Baltimore City were correlated to DC WLL (R(2) = 0.72). Birth rates in DC also increased versus Baltimore City and versus the United States in 2004-2006, when consumers were protected from high WLLs. The increased births in DC neighborhoods comparing 2004 versus 2001 was correlated to the incidence of lead pipes (R(2) = 0.60). DC birth rates from 1999 to 2007 correlated with proxies for maternal blood lead including the geometric mean blood lead in DC children (R(2) = 0.68) and the incidence of lead poisoning in children under age 1.3 years (R(2) = 0.64). After public health protections were removed in 2006, DC FDR spiked in 2007-2009 versus 2004-2006 (p < 0.05), in a manner consistent with high WLL health risks to consumers arising from partial lead service line replacements, and DC FDR dropped to historically low levels in 2010-2011 after consumers were protected and the PSLR program was terminated. Re-evaluation of a historic construction-related miscarriage cluster in the USA Today Building (1987-1988), demonstrates that high WLLs from disturbed plumbing were a possible cause. Overall results are consistent with prior research linking increased lead exposure to higher incidence of miscarriages and fetal death, even at blood lead elevations (≈5 μg/dL) once considered relatively low. PMID:24321041

  14. Activation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor reduces carbendazim-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Wei, Kuo-Liang; Chen, Fei-Yun; Lin, Chih-Yi; Gao, Guan-Lun; Kao, Wen-Ya; Yeh, Chi-Hui; Chen, Chang-Rong; Huang, Hao-Chun; Tsai, Wei-Ren; Jong, Koa-Jen; Li, Wan-Jung; Su, Jyan-Gwo Joseph

    2016-09-01

    Carbendazim inhibits microtubule assembly, thus blocking mitosis and inhibiting cancer cell proliferation. Accordingly, carbendazim is being explored as an anticancer drug. Data show that carbendazim increased mRNA and protein expressions and promoter activity of CYP1A1. In addition, carbendazim activated transcriptional activity of the aryl hydrocarbon response element, and induced nuclear translocation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a sign the AhR is activated. Carbendazim-induced CYP1A1 expression was blocked by AhR antagonists, and was abolished in AhR signal-deficient cells. Results demonstrated that carbendazim activated the AhR, thereby stimulating CYP1A1 expression. In order to understand whether AhR-induced metabolic enzymes turn carbendazim into less-toxic metabolites, Hoechst 33342 staining to reveal carbendazim-induced nuclear changes and flow cytometry to reveal the subG0/G1 population were applied to monitor carbendazim-induced cell apoptosis. Carbendazim induced less apoptosis in Hepa-1c1c7 cells than in AhR signal-deficient Hepa-1c1c7 mutant cells. Pretreatment with β-NF, an AhR agonist that highly induces CYP1A1 expression, decreased carbendazim-induced cell death. In addition, the lower the level of AhR was, the lower the vitality present in carbendazim-treated cells, including hepatoma cells and their derivatives with AhR RNA interference, also embryonic kidney cells, bladder carcinoma cells, and AhR signal-deficient Hepa-1c1c7 cells. In summary, carbendazim is an AhR agonist. The toxicity of carbendazim was lower in cells with the AhR signal. This report provides clues indicating that carbendazim is more potent at inducing cell death in tissues without than in those with the AhR signal, an important reference for applying carbendazim in cancer chemotherapy. PMID:27286660

  15. Substance P reduces apoptotic cell death possibly by modulating the immune response at the early stage after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Mei Hua; Lim, Ji Eun; Chi, Guang Fan; Ahn, Woosung; Zhang, Mingzi; Chung, Eunkyung; Son, Youngsook

    2013-10-23

    Previously, we have reported that substance P (SP) enhanced functional recovery from spinal cord injury (SCI) possibly by the anti-inflammatory modulation associated with the induction of M2-type macrophages at the injured lesion. In this study, we explored the cytokine expression profiles and apoptotic cell death in the lesion site of the SCI after an immediate intravenous injection of SP. SP injection increased the levels of interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-6, and IL-10 at day 1 after the SCI approximately by 2-, 9-, and 10-folds when compared with the control SCI, respectively. On the basis of double immunofluorescence staining with IL-10 and CD11b, activated macrophages or microglia expressing IL-10 appeared in the margin of the lesion site at day 1 only after the SP injection. This SP-mediated alteration in the lesion microenvironment was shown to be associated with the lower cell death of neuronal cells at day 1 and oligodendrocytes at day 5 by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay, which was also accompanied by a decrease in caspase-3 activation. These findings suggest that SP may reduce the inflammation-induced secondary cell death, possibly through immune modulation at an early stage after the SCI. PMID:23995292

  16. Diva Reduces Cell Death in Response to Oxidative Stress and Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Nicole Suyun; Du, Xiaoli; Lu, Jia; He, Bei Ping

    2012-01-01

    Diva is a member of the Bcl2 family but its function in apoptosis remains largely unclear because of its specific expression found within limited adult tissues. Previous overexpression studies done on various cell lines yielded conflicting conclusions pertaining to its apoptotic function. Here, we discovered the expression of endogenous Diva in PC12 neuronal-like cell line and rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs), leading to their utilisation for the functional study of Diva. Through usage of recombinant Fas ligand, hydrogen peroxide, overexpression and knock down experiments, we discovered that Diva plays a crucial pro-survival role via the mitochondrial death pathway. In addition, immunoprecipitation studies also noted a decrease in Diva’s interaction with Bcl2 and Bax following apoptosis induced by oxidative stress. By overexpressing Diva in BMSCs, we had observed an increase in the cells’ capacity to survive under oxidative stress and microglial toxicity. The result obtained from our study gives us reason to believe that Diva plays an important role in controlling the survival of BMSCs. Through overexpression of Diva, the viability of these BMSCs may be boosted under adverse conditions. PMID:22905226

  17. Para-Phenylenediamine Induces Apoptotic Death of Melanoma Cells and Reduces Melanoma Tumour Growth in Mice.

    PubMed

    Bhowmick, Debajit; Bhar, Kaushik; Mallick, Sanjaya K; Das, Subhadip; Chatterjee, Nabanita; Sarkar, Tuhin Subhra; Chakrabarti, Rajarshi; Das Saha, Krishna; Siddhanta, Anirban

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is one of the most aggressive forms of cancer, usually resistant to standard chemotherapeutics. Despite a huge number of clinical trials, any success to find a chemotherapeutic agent that can effectively destroy melanoma is yet to be achieved. Para-phenylenediamine (p-PD) in the hair dyes is reported to purely serve as an external dyeing agent. Very little is known about whether p-PD has any effect on the melanin producing cells. We have demonstrated p-PD mediated apoptotic death of both human and mouse melanoma cells in vitro. Mouse melanoma tumour growth was also arrested by the apoptotic activity of intraperitoneal administration of p-PD with almost no side effects. This apoptosis is shown to occur primarily via loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and caspase 8 activation. p-PD mediated apoptosis was also confirmed by the increase in sub-G0/G1 cell number. Thus, our experimental observation suggests that p-PD can be a potential less expensive candidate to be developed as a chemotherapeutic agent for melanoma. PMID:27293892

  18. Methoxychlor and fenvalerate induce neuronal death by reducing GluR2 expression.

    PubMed

    Umeda, Kanae; Kotake, Yaichiro; Miyara, Masatsugu; Ishida, Keishi; Sanoh, Seigo; Ohta, Shigeru

    2016-04-01

    GluR2, an α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) receptor subunit, plays important roles in neuronal survival. We previously showed that exposure of cultured rat cortical neurons to several chemicals decreases GluR2 protein expression, leading to neuronal toxicity. Methoxychlor, the bis-p-methoxy derivative of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, and fenvalerate, a synthetic pyrethroid chemical, have been used commercially as agricultural pesticides in several countries. In this study, we investigated the effects of long-term methoxychlor and fenvalerate exposure on neuronal glutamate receptors. Treatment of cultured rat cortical neurons with 1 or 10 µM methoxychlor and fenvalerate for 9 days selectively decreased GluR2 protein expression; the expression of other AMPA receptor subunits GluR1, GluR3, and GluR4 did not change under the same conditions. Importantly, the decreases in GluR2 protein expression were also observed on the cell surface membrane where AMPA receptors typically function. In addition, both chemicals decreased neuronal viability, which was blocked by pretreatment with 1-naphtylacetylspermine, an antagonist of GluR2-lacking AMPA receptors, and MK-801, an N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist. These results suggest that long-term exposure to methoxychlor and fenvalerate decreases GluR2 protein expression, leading to neuronal death via overactivation of GluR2-lacking AMPA and NMDA receptors. PMID:26961610

  19. Para-Phenylenediamine Induces Apoptotic Death of Melanoma Cells and Reduces Melanoma Tumour Growth in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bhowmick, Debajit; Bhar, Kaushik; Mallick, Sanjaya K.; Das, Subhadip; Chatterjee, Nabanita; Sarkar, Tuhin Subhra; Chakrabarti, Rajarshi; Das Saha, Krishna; Siddhanta, Anirban

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is one of the most aggressive forms of cancer, usually resistant to standard chemotherapeutics. Despite a huge number of clinical trials, any success to find a chemotherapeutic agent that can effectively destroy melanoma is yet to be achieved. Para-phenylenediamine (p-PD) in the hair dyes is reported to purely serve as an external dyeing agent. Very little is known about whether p-PD has any effect on the melanin producing cells. We have demonstrated p-PD mediated apoptotic death of both human and mouse melanoma cells in vitro. Mouse melanoma tumour growth was also arrested by the apoptotic activity of intraperitoneal administration of p-PD with almost no side effects. This apoptosis is shown to occur primarily via loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and caspase 8 activation. p-PD mediated apoptosis was also confirmed by the increase in sub-G0/G1 cell number. Thus, our experimental observation suggests that p-PD can be a potential less expensive candidate to be developed as a chemotherapeutic agent for melanoma. PMID:27293892

  20. Meeting the community halfway to reduce maternal deaths? Evidence from a community-based maternal death review in Uttar Pradesh, India

    PubMed Central

    Raj, Sunil Saksena; Maine, Deborah; Sahoo, Pratap Kumar; Manthri, Suneedh; Chauhan, Kavita

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Uttar Pradesh (UP) is the most populous state in India with the second highest reported maternal mortality ratio in the country. In an effort to analyze the reasons for maternal deaths and implement appropriate interventions, the Government of India introduced Maternal Death Review guidelines in 2010. Methods: We assessed causes of and factors leading to maternal deaths in Unnao District, UP, through 2 methods. First, we conducted a facility gap assessment in 15 of the 16 block-level and district health facilities to collect information on the performance of the facilities in terms of treating obstetric complications. Second, teams of trained physicians conducted community-based maternal death reviews (verbal autopsies) in a sample of maternal deaths occurring between June 1, 2009, and May 31, 2010. Results: Of the 248 maternal deaths that would be expected in this district in a year, we identified 153 (62%) through community workers and conducted verbal autopsies with families of 57 of them. Verbal autopsies indicated that 23% and 30% of these maternal deaths occurred at home and on the way to a health facility, respectively. Most of the women who died had been taken to at least 2 health facilities. The facility assessment revealed that only the district hospital met the recommended criteria for either basic or comprehensive emergency obstetric and neonatal care. Conclusions: Life-saving treatment of obstetric complications was not offered at the appropriate level of government facilities in a representative district in UP, and an inadequate referral system provided fatal delays. Expensive transportation costs to get pregnant women to a functioning medical facility also contributed to maternal death. The maternal death review, coupled with the facility gap assessment, is a useful tool to address the adequacy of emergency obstetric and neonatal care services to prevent further maternal deaths. PMID:25276519

  1. A High Soy Diet Reduces Programmed Cell Death and Enhances Bcl-xL Expression In Experimental Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lovekamp-Swan, Tara; Glendenning, Michele; Schreihofer, Derek A.

    2009-01-01

    Soy phytoestrogens have been proposed as an alternative to estrogen replacement therapy and have demonstrated potential neuroprotective effects in the brain. We have shown that a high soy diet significantly reduces infarct size following permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Here, we tested the hypothesis that a high soy diet would attenuate programmed cell death after stroke. Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were ovariectomized and fed either an isoflavone-reduced diet (IFP) or a high soy diet (SP) for 2 weeks before undergoing 90 minutes of transient MCAO (tMCAO) followed by 22.5 hr reperfusion. Infarct size, as assessed by TTC staining, was significantly reduced by a high soy diet (p< 0.05). Apoptosis in the ischemic cortex, measured by TUNEL staining, was significantly reduced by the high soy diet. The number of active caspase-3 positive cells and caspase-mediated α-spectrin cleavage was also significantly decreased in the ischemic cortex of SP rats. Furthermore, nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) was significantly reduced in the ischemic cortex of SP rats. Soy significantly increased bcl-xL mRNA and protein expression in the ischemic cortex compared to IFP rats. Immunohistochemistry revealed increased neuronal expression of bcl-2 and bcl-xL in the ischemic cortex of both IFP and SP rats following tMCAO. These results suggest that a high soy diet decreases both caspase-dependent and caspase-independent programmed cell death following tMCAO. Further, a high soy diet enhances expression of the cell survival factor bcl-xL following tMCAO, contributing to the neuroprotective effects of soy in the ischemic cortex. PMID:17706879

  2. SIRT1 activating compounds reduce oxidative stress and prevent cell death in neuronal cells

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Reas S.; Fonseca-Kelly, Zoe; Callinan, Catherine; Zuo, Ling; Sachdeva, Mira M.; Shindler, Kenneth S.

    2012-01-01

    Activation of SIRT1, an NAD+-dependent deacetylase, prevents retinal ganglion cell (RGC) loss in optic neuritis, an inflammatory demyelinating optic nerve disease. While SIRT1 deacetylates numerous protein targets, downstream mechanisms of SIRT1 activation mediating this neuroprotective effect are unknown. SIRT1 increases mitochondrial function and reduces oxidative stress in muscle and other cells, and oxidative stress occurs in neuronal degeneration. We examined whether SIRT1 activators reduce oxidative stress and promote mitochondrial function in neuronal cells. Oxidative stress, marked by reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, was induced in RGC-5 cells by serum deprivation, or addition of doxorubicin or hydrogen peroxide, and resulted in significant cell loss. SIRT1 activators resveratrol (RSV) and SRTAW04 reduced ROS levels and promoted cell survival in RGC-5 cells as well as primary RGC cultures. Effects were blocked by SIRT1 siRNA. SIRT1 activators also increased expression of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), a mitochondrial enzyme, and promoted deacetylation of PGC-1α, a co-enzyme involved in mitochondrial function. Results show SIRT1 activators prevent cell loss by reducing oxidative stress and promoting mitochondrial function in a neuronal cell line. Results suggest SIRT1 activators can mediate neuroprotective effects during optic neuritis by these mechanisms, and they have the potential to preserve neurons in other neurodegenerative diseases that involve oxidative stress. PMID:23293585

  3. Safe Sleep for My Grandbaby: Reduce the Risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS)

    MedlinePlus

    For more information on sleep position for babies and reducing the risk of SIDS, contact the Back to Sleep campaign at: Mail: 31 Center Drive, 31/2A32, ... http://www.nichd.nih.gov/SIDS Back to Sleep campaign sponsors include: National Institute of Child Health ...

  4. Annual Screening with Chest X-Ray Does Not Reduce Lung Cancer Deaths

    Cancer.gov

    Annual screening for lung cancer using a standard chest x-ray does not reduce the risk of dying from lung cancer when compared with no annual screening, according to findings from the NCI-led Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) screening trial.

  5. Inverse Susceptibility to Oxidative Death of Lymphocytes Obtained From Alzheimer's Patients and Skin Cancer Survivors: Increased Apoptosis in Alzheimer's and Reduced Necrosis in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Monica; Salech, Felipe; Ponce, Daniela P.; Merino, Daniela; Sinning, Mariana; Xiong, Chengjie; Roe, Catherine M.; Quest, Andrew F. G.

    2012-01-01

    A paucity of cancer in individuals with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and low rates of AD in cancer survivors has been reported in epidemiological studies. Deregulation in opposite directions of biological mechanisms, such as susceptibility to cell death, might be shared in the two disorders. We analyzed lymphocytes from AD and skin cancer patients as well as healthy controls and found significantly increased vulnerability of AD lymphocytes to H2O2-induced apoptotic death and higher resistance to death of skin cancer lymphocytes, due to reduced necrosis, as compared with healthy controls by pairwise comparisons adjusted for age and sex. H2O2-induced death in lymphocytes was caspase independent and significantly reduced by PARP-1 inhibition in all three groups. These differences in the susceptibility to cell death observed for lymphocytes from AD and skin cancer patients may be one of the mechanisms that help explain the inverse correlation detected between these diseases in epidemiological studies. PMID:22367434

  6. Alpha-tubulin enhanced renal tubular cell proliferation and tissue repair but reduced cell death and cell-crystal adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Manissorn, Juthatip; Khamchun, Supaporn; Vinaiphat, Arada; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2016-01-01

    Adhesion of calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystals on renal tubular epithelial cells is a critical event for kidney stone disease that triggers many cascades of cellular response. Our previous expression proteomics study identified several altered proteins in MDCK renal tubular cells induced by CaOx crystals. However, functional significance of those changes had not been investigated. The present study thus aimed to define functional roles of such proteome data. Global protein network analysis using STRING software revealed α-tubulin, which was decreased, as one of central nodes of protein-protein interactions. Overexpression of α-tubulin (pcDNA6.2-TUBA1A) was then performed and its efficacy was confirmed. pcDNA6.2-TUBA1A could maintain levels of α-tubulin and its direct interacting partner, vimentin, after crystal exposure. Also, pcDNA6.2-TUBA1A successfully reduced cell death to almost the basal level and increased cell proliferation after crystal exposure. Additionally, tissue repair capacity was improved in pcDNA6.2-TUBA1A cells. Moreover, cell-crystal adhesion was reduced by pcDNA6.2-TUBA1A. Finally, levels of potential crystal receptors (HSP90, HSP70, and α-enolase) on apical membrane were dramatically reduced to basal levels by pcDNA6.2-TUBA1A. These findings implicate that α-tubulin has protective roles in kidney stone disease by preventing cell death and cell-crystal adhesion, but on the other hand, enhancing cell proliferation and tissue repair function. PMID:27363348

  7. Alpha-tubulin enhanced renal tubular cell proliferation and tissue repair but reduced cell death and cell-crystal adhesion.

    PubMed

    Manissorn, Juthatip; Khamchun, Supaporn; Vinaiphat, Arada; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2016-01-01

    Adhesion of calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystals on renal tubular epithelial cells is a critical event for kidney stone disease that triggers many cascades of cellular response. Our previous expression proteomics study identified several altered proteins in MDCK renal tubular cells induced by CaOx crystals. However, functional significance of those changes had not been investigated. The present study thus aimed to define functional roles of such proteome data. Global protein network analysis using STRING software revealed α-tubulin, which was decreased, as one of central nodes of protein-protein interactions. Overexpression of α-tubulin (pcDNA6.2-TUBA1A) was then performed and its efficacy was confirmed. pcDNA6.2-TUBA1A could maintain levels of α-tubulin and its direct interacting partner, vimentin, after crystal exposure. Also, pcDNA6.2-TUBA1A successfully reduced cell death to almost the basal level and increased cell proliferation after crystal exposure. Additionally, tissue repair capacity was improved in pcDNA6.2-TUBA1A cells. Moreover, cell-crystal adhesion was reduced by pcDNA6.2-TUBA1A. Finally, levels of potential crystal receptors (HSP90, HSP70, and α-enolase) on apical membrane were dramatically reduced to basal levels by pcDNA6.2-TUBA1A. These findings implicate that α-tubulin has protective roles in kidney stone disease by preventing cell death and cell-crystal adhesion, but on the other hand, enhancing cell proliferation and tissue repair function. PMID:27363348

  8. Early generation of nitric oxide contributes to copper tolerance through reducing oxidative stress and cell death in hulless barley roots.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yanfeng

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the specific role of nitric oxide (NO) in the early response of hulless barley roots to copper (Cu) stress. We used the fluorescent probe diaminofluorescein-FM diacetate to establish NO localization, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-special labeling and histochemical procedures for the detection of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the root apex. An early production of NO was observed in Cu-treated root tips of hulless barley, but the detection of NO levels was decreased by supplementation with a NO scavenger, 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (c-PTIO). Application of sodium nitroprusside (a NO donor) relieved Cu-induced root inhibition, ROS accumulation and oxidative damage, while c-PTIO treatment had a synergistic effect with Cu and further enhanced ROS levels and oxidative stress. In addition, the Cu-dependent increase in activities of superoxide dismutase, peroxidase and ascorbate peroxidase were further enhanced by exogenous NO, but application of c-PTIO decreased the activities of catalase and ascorbate peroxidase in Cu-treated roots. Subsequently, cell death was observed in root tips and was identified as a type of programed cell death (PCD) by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assay. The addition of NO prevented the increase of cell death in root tips, whereas inhibiting NO accumulation further increased the number of cells undergoing PCD. These results revealed that NO production is an early response of hulless barley roots to Cu stress and that NO contributes to Cu tolerance in hulless barley possibly by modulating antioxidant defense, subsequently reducing oxidative stress and PCD in root tips. PMID:27294966

  9. Electrocardiographic Screening for Prolonged QT Interval to Reduce Sudden Cardiac Death in Psychiatric Patients: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Blondon, Marc; Gex-Fabry, Marianne; Combescure, Christophe; Shah, Dipen; Schwartz, Peter J.; Besson, Marie; Girardin, François R.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Sudden cardiac death is a leading cause of mortality in psychiatric patients. Long QT (LQT) is common in this population and predisposes to Torsades-de-Pointes (TdP) and subsequent mortality. Objective To estimate the cost-effectiveness of electrocardiographic screening to detect LQT in psychiatric inpatients. Design, Setting, and Participants We built a decision analytic model based on a decision tree to evaluate the cost-effectiveness and utility of LQT screening from a health care perspective. LQT proportion parameters were derived from an in-hospital cross-sectional study. We performed experts' elicitation to estimate the risk of TdP, given extent of QT prolongation. A TdP reduction of 65% after LQT detection was based on positive drug dechallenge rate and through adequate treatment and electrolyte adjustments. The base-case model uncertainty was assessed with one-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Finally, the TdP related mortality and TdP avoidance parameters were varied in a two-way sensitivity analysis to assess their effect on the Incremental Cost-Effectiveness Ratio (ICER). Main Outcomes and Measures Costs, Quality Ajusted Life Year (QALY), ICER, and probability of cost effectiveness thresholds ($ 10 000, $25 000, and $50 000 per QALY). Results In the base-case scenario, the numbers of patients needed to screen were 1128 and 2817 to avoid one TdP and one death, respectively. The ICER of systematic ECG screening was $8644 (95%CI, 3144-82 498) per QALY. The probability of cost-effectiveness was 96% at a willingness-to-pay of $50 000 for one QALY. In sensitivity analyses, results were sensitive to the case-fatality of TdP episodes and to the TdP reduction following the diagnosis of LQT. Conclusion and Relevance In psychiatric hospitals, performing systematic ECG screening at admission help reduce the number of sudden cardiac deaths in a cost-effective fashion. PMID:26070071

  10. Beacon of Hope? Lessons Learned from Efforts to Reduce Civilian Deaths from Police Shootings in an Australian State.

    PubMed

    Saligari, Jessica; Evans, Richard

    2016-04-01

    In the 1990s, the police service in Victoria, Australia, faced a crisis of community confidence due to a spate of civilian deaths from police shootings. In that decade, twice as many civilians died at the hands of the police in Victoria than in every other Australian state combined. Most of those killed were mentally ill and affected by drugs and alcohol, and were rarely a serious threat except to themselves. The problem was also almost entirely an urban phenomenon. Shootings in rural communities, where mentally ill people were more likely to be personally known to local police, were (and remain) almost unknown. The large number of fatalities was recognised as a serious threat to public confidence, and Victoria Police introduced a ground-breaking training programme, Operation Beacon. Operating procedures and weapons training were fundamentally changed, to focus on de-escalation of conflict and avoiding or minimising police use of force. In the short term, Operation Beacon was successful. Shooting incidents were dramatically reduced. However, during the first decade of the new century, the number of civilians being killed again increased. This article examines Operation Beacon, both as a successful model for reducing civilian deaths at the hand of police and as a cautionary tale for police reform. We argue that the lessons of Operation Beacon have been gradually forgotten and that old habits and attitudes resurfaced. Fatal shootings of mentally ill civilians can be prevented, but if success is to be other than temporary, the Beacon philosophy must be continually reemphasised by police management. PMID:26666251

  11. Toll-like receptors.

    PubMed

    Lien, Egil; Ingalls, Robin R

    2002-01-01

    The ability of a host to sense invasion by pathogenic organisms and to respond appropriately to control infection is paramount to survival. In the case of sepsis and septic shock, however, an exaggerated systemic response may, in fact, contribute to the morbidity and mortality associated with overwhelming infections. The innate immune system has evolved as the first line of defense against invading microorganisms. The Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a part of this innate immune defense, recognizing conserved patterns on microorganisms. These TLRs and their signaling pathways are represented in such diverse creatures as mammals, fruit flies, and plants. Ten members of the TLR family have been identified in humans, and several of them appear to recognize specific microbial products, including lipopolysaccharide, bacterial lipoproteins, peptidoglycan, and bacterial DNA. Signals initiated by the interaction of TLRs with specific microbial patterns direct the subsequent inflammatory response. Thus, TLR signaling represents a key component of the innate immune response to microbial infection. PMID:11782555

  12. A positional Toll receptor code directs convergent extension in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Paré, Adam C.; Vichas, Athea; Fincher, Christopher T.; Mirman, Zachary; Farrell, Dene L.; Mainieri, Avantika; Zallen, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Elongation of the head-to-tail body axis by convergent extension is a conserved developmental process throughout metazoans. In Drosophila, patterns of transcription factor expression provide spatial cues that induce systematically oriented cell movements and promote tissue elongation. However, the mechanisms by which patterned transcriptional inputs control cell polarity and behavior have long been elusive. We demonstrate that three Toll family receptors, Toll-2, Toll-6, and Toll-8, are expressed in overlapping transverse stripes along the anterior-posterior axis and act in combination to direct planar polarity and polarized cell rearrangements during convergent extension. Simultaneous disruption of all three receptors strongly reduces actomyosin-driven junctional remodeling and axis elongation, and an ectopic stripe of Toll receptor expression is sufficient to induce planar polarized actomyosin contractility. These results demonstrate that tissue-level patterns of Toll receptor expression provide spatial signals that link positional information from the anterior-posterior patterning system to the essential cell behaviors that drive convergent extension. PMID:25363762

  13. Reduced neuronal cell death after experimental brain injury in mice lacking a functional alternative pathway of complement activation

    PubMed Central

    Leinhase, Iris; Holers, V Michael; Thurman, Joshua M; Harhausen, Denise; Schmidt, Oliver I; Pietzcker, Malte; Taha, Mohy E; Rittirsch, Daniel; Huber-Lang, Markus; Smith, Wade R; Ward, Peter A; Stahel, Philip F

    2006-01-01

    Background Neuroprotective strategies for prevention of the neuropathological sequelae of traumatic brain injury (TBI) have largely failed in translation to clinical treatment. Thus, there is a substantial need for further understanding the molecular mechanisms and pathways which lead to secondary neuronal cell death in the injured brain. The intracerebral activation of the complement cascade was shown to mediate inflammation and tissue destruction after TBI. However, the exact pathways of complement activation involved in the induction of posttraumatic neurodegeneration have not yet been assessed. In the present study, we investigated the role of the alternative complement activation pathway in contributing to neuronal cell death, based on a standardized TBI model in mice with targeted deletion of the factor B gene (fB-/-), a "key" component required for activation of the alternative complement pathway. Results After experimental TBI in wild-type (fB+/+) mice, there was a massive time-dependent systemic complement activation, as determined by enhanced C5a serum levels for up to 7 days. In contrast, the extent of systemic complement activation was significantly attenuated in fB-/- mice (P < 0.05,fB-/- vs. fB+/+; t = 4 h, 24 h, and 7 days after TBI). TUNEL histochemistry experiments revealed that posttraumatic neuronal cell death was clearly reduced for up to 7 days in the injured brain hemispheres of fB-/- mice, compared to fB+/+ littermates. Furthermore, a strong upregulation of the anti-apoptotic mediator Bcl-2 and downregulation of the pro-apoptotic Fas receptor was detected in brain homogenates of head-injured fB-/- vs. fB+/+ mice by Western blot analysis. Conclusion The alternative pathway of complement activation appears to play a more crucial role in the pathophysiology of TBI than previously appreciated. This notion is based on the findings of (a) the significant attenuation of overall complement activation in head-injured fB-/- mice, as determined by a

  14. JNK Inhibition Reduced Retinal Ganglion Cell Death after Ischemia/Reperfusion In Vivo and after Hypoxia In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Produit-Zengaffinen, Nathalie; Favez, Tatiana; Pournaras, Constantin J; Schorderet, Daniel F

    2016-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are key regulators that have been linked to cell survival and death. Among the main classes of MAPKs, c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) has been shown to mediate cell stress responses associated with apoptosis. In Vitro, hypoxia induced a significant increase in 661W cell death that paralleled increased activity of JNK and c-jun. 661W cells cultured in presence of the inhibitor of JNK (D-JNKi) were less sensitive to hypoxia-induced cell death. In vivo, elevation in intraocular pressure (IOP) in the rat promoted cell death that correlated with modulation of JNK activation. In vivo inhibition of JNK activation with D-JNKi resulted in a significant and sustained decrease in apoptosis in the ganglion cell layer, the inner nuclear layer and the photoreceptor layer. These results highlight the protective effect of D-JNKi in ischemia/reperfusion induced cell death of the retina. PMID:26427475

  15. 10. LOOKING SW DOWN UTILITY TUNNEL BENEATH EASTBOUND TOLL BOOTHS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. LOOKING SW DOWN UTILITY TUNNEL BENEATH EASTBOUND TOLL BOOTHS, SHOWING RAILS USED TO TRANSPORT COIN BOXES FROM ORIGINAL TOLL COLLECTION SYSTEM. - Chicago Skyway Toll Bridge, Toll Plaza & Service Building, 8801 South Anthony Avenue, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  16. Comparison of immune response in Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei, after knock down of Toll and IMD gene in vivo.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongjie; Song, Lei; Sun, Yuhang; Liu, Tao; Hou, Fujun; Liu, Xiaolin

    2016-07-01

    The Toll and immune deficiency (IMD) pathways are essential for inducing immune related genes during invasion of pathogens. In the present study, transcripts of eight pathway-related genes in Litopenaeus vannamei, including Toll, IMD, Pelle, IAP1, TRAF6, ALF, Crustin and Penaeidin3 were analyzed to further understand the potential relationship between Toll and IMD pathway. The high transcription levels of TRAF6, Pelle, Toll, IMD and IAP1 in selected tissues indicates their functional roles in Toll and IMD pathways. The increased mRNA expression of Toll and IMD detected in the early stage might suggest the inducible role of Toll and IMD upon bacterial infection. Moreover, the continuous increase of IMD and the high level of Pelle and TRAF6 in Vibrio anguillarum challenged group indicated that Gram-negative bacterium can activate both the Toll and IMD signaling pathway. Silencing of Toll by a dsRNA-mediated RNAi strongly increased the transcripts of IMD, Pelle, TRAF6, IAP1 and Akirin, knocking down of IMD also markedly increased the transcripts of Toll, Pelle, IAP1 and Akirin. Furthermore, ALF expression was significantly increased in response to V. anguillarum and Micrococcus lysodeikticus challenge, while the transcripts of Crustin and Pen3 in hemocytes were significantly reduced in V. anguillarum group, but rose significantly following M. lysodeikticus infection. In summary, we speculate that Toll and IMD pathway are not independent in shrimp, but linked to defense against bacterial infection. PMID:26855014

  17. Toll receptors and pathogen resistance.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Kiyoshi; Akira, Shizuo

    2003-03-01

    Toll receptors in insects, mammals and plants are key players that sense the invasion of pathogens. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in mammals have been established to detect specific components of bacterial and fungal pathogens. Furthermore, recent evidence indicates that TLRs are involved in the recognition of viral invasion. Signalling pathways via TLRs originate from the conserved Toll/IL-1 receptor (TIR) domain. The TIR domain-containing MyD88 acts as a common adaptor that induces inflammatory cytokines; however, there exists a MyD88-independent pathway that induces type I IFNs in TLR4 and TLR3 signalling. Another TIR domain-containing adaptor, TIRAP/Mal has recently been shown to mediate the MyD88-dependent activation in the TLR4 and TLR2 signalling pathway. Thus, individual TLRs may have their own signalling systems that characterize their specific activities. PMID:12614458

  18. Growth Retardation, Reduced Invasiveness, and Impaired Colistin-Mediated Cell Death Associated with Colistin Resistance Development in Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Poulou, Aggeliki; Dafopoulou, Konstantina; Chabane, Yassine Nait; Kristo, Ioulia; Makris, Demosthenes; Hardouin, Julie; Cosette, Pascal; Tsakris, Athanassios; Dé, Emmanuelle

    2014-01-01

    Two colistin-susceptible/colistin-resistant (Cols/Colr) pairs of Acinetobacter baumannii strains assigned to international clone 2, which is prevalent worldwide, were sequentially recovered from two patients after prolonged colistin administration. Compared with the respective Cols isolates (Ab248 and Ab299, both having a colistin MIC of 0.5 μg/ml), both Colr isolates (Ab249 and Ab347, with colistin MICs of 128 and 32 μg/ml, respectively) significantly overexpressed pmrCAB genes, had single-amino-acid shifts in the PmrB protein, and exhibited significantly slower growth. The Colr isolate Ab347, tested by proteomic analysis in comparison with its Cols counterpart Ab299, underexpressed the proteins CsuA/B and C from the csu operon (which is necessary for biofilm formation). This isolate also underexpressed aconitase B and different enzymes involved in the oxidative stress response (KatE catalase, superoxide dismutase, and alkyl hydroperoxide reductase), suggesting a reduced response to reactive oxygen species (ROS) and, consequently, impaired colistin-mediated cell death through hydroxyl radical production. Cols isolates that were indistinguishable by macrorestriction analysis from Ab299 caused six sequential bloodstream infections, and isolates indistinguishable from Ab248 caused severe soft tissue infection, while Colr isolates indistinguishable from Ab347 and Ab249 were mainly colonizers. In particular, a Cols isolate identical to Ab299 was still invading the bloodstream 90 days after the colonization of this patient by Colr isolates. These observations indicate considerably lower invasiveness of A. baumannii clinical isolates following the development of colistin resistance. PMID:24247145

  19. Growth retardation, reduced invasiveness, and impaired colistin-mediated cell death associated with colistin resistance development in Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Pournaras, Spyros; Poulou, Aggeliki; Dafopoulou, Konstantina; Chabane, Yassine Nait; Kristo, Ioulia; Makris, Demosthenes; Hardouin, Julie; Cosette, Pascal; Tsakris, Athanassios; Dé, Emmanuelle

    2014-01-01

    Two colistin-susceptible/colistin-resistant (Col(s)/Col(r)) pairs of Acinetobacter baumannii strains assigned to international clone 2, which is prevalent worldwide, were sequentially recovered from two patients after prolonged colistin administration. Compared with the respective Col(s) isolates (Ab248 and Ab299, both having a colistin MIC of 0.5 μg/ml), both Col(r) isolates (Ab249 and Ab347, with colistin MICs of 128 and 32 μg/ml, respectively) significantly overexpressed pmrCAB genes, had single-amino-acid shifts in the PmrB protein, and exhibited significantly slower growth. The Col(r) isolate Ab347, tested by proteomic analysis in comparison with its Col(s) counterpart Ab299, underexpressed the proteins CsuA/B and C from the csu operon (which is necessary for biofilm formation). This isolate also underexpressed aconitase B and different enzymes involved in the oxidative stress response (KatE catalase, superoxide dismutase, and alkyl hydroperoxide reductase), suggesting a reduced response to reactive oxygen species (ROS) and, consequently, impaired colistin-mediated cell death through hydroxyl radical production. Col(s) isolates that were indistinguishable by macrorestriction analysis from Ab299 caused six sequential bloodstream infections, and isolates indistinguishable from Ab248 caused severe soft tissue infection, while Col(r) isolates indistinguishable from Ab347 and Ab249 were mainly colonizers. In particular, a Col(s) isolate identical to Ab299 was still invading the bloodstream 90 days after the colonization of this patient by Col(r) isolates. These observations indicate considerably lower invasiveness of A. baumannii clinical isolates following the development of colistin resistance. PMID:24247145

  20. Acute Kidney Outreach to Reduce Deterioration and Death (AKORDD) trial: the protocol for a large pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Abdelaziz, Tarek Samy; Lindenmeyer, Antje; Baharani, Jyoti; Mistry, Hema; Sitch, Alice; Temple, R Mark; Perkins, Gavin; Thomas, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Acute kidney injury (AKI) contributes to morbidity and mortality, and its care is often suboptimal and/or delayed. The Acute Kidney Outreach to Reduce Deterioration and Death (AKORDD) study is a large pilot testing provision of early specialist advice, to improve outcomes for patients with AKI. Methods and analysis This before and after study will test an Outreach service for adult patients with AKI, identified using the national algorithm. During the 2-month before phase, AKI outcomes (30-day mortality, need for dialysis or AKI stage deterioration) will be observed in the intervention and control hospitals and their respective community areas; no interventions will be delivered. Patients will receive good standard care. During the 5-month after phase, the intervention will be delivered to patients with AKI in the intervention hospital and its area. Patients with AKI in the control hospital and its area will continue to have good standard care only. Patients already on dialysis and at end of life will be excluded. The interventions will be initially delivered via a phone call, with or without a visit to the primary clinician, aiming at rapidly establishing the aetiology, correcting reversible causes and conducting further appropriate investigation. Surviving stage 3 patients will be followed-up in an AKI clinic. We will conduct qualitative research using focus group-based discussions with primary and secondary care clinicians during the early and late phases of the trial. This will help break down potential barriers and improve care delivery. Ethics and dissemination Patients will be contacted about the study allowing them to ‘opt out’. The work of an Outreach team, guided by AKI alerts and delivering timely advice to clinicians, may improve outcomes. If the results suggest that benefits are delivered by an AKI Outreach team, this study will lead to a full cluster randomised trial. Trial registration number NCT02398682: Pre-results. PMID:27543592

  1. Back to Sleep: Reduce the Risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) [and] Questions and Answers for Professionals on Infant Sleeping Position and SIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Resources and Services Administration (DHHS/PHS), Washington, DC. Maternal and Child Health Bureau.

    The "Back to Sleep" public health campaign, which recommends that infants be placed on their backs for sleeping help reduce the risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), was initiated in 1994. The campaign was led by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, and co-sponsored by the U.S. Public Health Service, the American…

  2. 33 CFR 402.4 - Tolls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tolls. 402.4 Section 402.4 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TARIFF OF TOLLS § 402.4 Tolls. (a) Every vessel entering, passing through or leaving the Seaway shall...

  3. A WntD-Dependent Integral Feedback Loop Attenuates Variability in Drosophila Toll Signaling.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Neta; Averbukh, Inna; Haskel-Ittah, Michal; Degani, Neta; Schejter, Eyal D; Barkai, Naama; Shilo, Ben-Zion

    2016-02-22

    Patterning by morphogen gradients relies on the capacity to generate reproducible distribution profiles. Morphogen spread depends on kinetic parameters, including diffusion and degradation rates, which vary between embryos, raising the question of how variability is controlled. We examined this in the context of Toll-dependent dorsoventral (DV) patterning of the Drosophila embryo. We find that low embryo-to-embryo variability in DV patterning relies on wntD, a Toll-target gene expressed initially at the posterior pole. WntD protein is secreted and disperses in the extracellular milieu, associates with its receptor Frizzled4, and inhibits the Toll pathway by blocking the Toll extracellular domain. Mathematical modeling predicts that WntD accumulates until the Toll gradient narrows to its desired spread, and we support this feedback experimentally. This circuit exemplifies a broadly applicable induction-contraction mechanism, which reduces patterning variability through a restricted morphogen-dependent expression of a secreted diffusible inhibitor. PMID:26906736

  4. Cyanide-induced death of dopaminergic cells is mediated by uncoupling protein-2 up-regulation and reduced Bcl-2 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.; Li, L.; Zhang, L.; Borowitz, J.L.; Isom, G.E.

    2009-07-01

    Cyanide is a potent inhibitor of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism and produces mitochondria-mediated death of dopaminergic neurons and sublethal intoxications that are associated with a Parkinson-like syndrome. Cyanide toxicity is enhanced when mitochondrial uncoupling is stimulated following up-regulation of uncoupling protein-2 (UCP-2). In this study, the role of a pro-survival protein, Bcl-2, in cyanide-mediated cell death was determined in a rat dopaminergic immortalized mesencephalic cell line (N27 cells). Following pharmacological up-regulation of UCP-2 by treatment with Wy14,643, cyanide reduced cellular Bcl-2 expression by increasing proteasomal degradation of the protein. The increased turnover of Bcl-2 was mediated by an increase of oxidative stress following UCP-2 up-regulation. The oxidative stress involved depletion of mitochondrial glutathione (mtGSH) and increased H{sub 2}O{sub 2} generation. Repletion of mtGSH by loading cells with glutathione ethyl ester reduced H{sub 2}O{sub 2} generation and in turn blocked the cyanide-induced decrease of Bcl-2. To determine if UCP-2 mediated the response, RNAi knock down was conducted. The RNAi decreased cyanide-induced depletion of mtGSH, reduced H{sub 2}O{sub 2} accumulation, and inhibited down-regulation of Bcl-2, thus blocking cell death. To confirm the role of Bcl-2 down-regulation in the cell death, it was shown that over-expression of Bcl-2 by cDNA transfection attenuated the enhancement of cyanide toxicity after UCP-2 up-regulation. It was concluded that UCP-2 up-regulation sensitizes cells to cyanide by increasing cellular oxidative stress, leading to an increase of Bcl-2 degradation. Then the reduced Bcl-2 levels sensitize the cells to cyanide-mediated cell death.

  5. Down-regulation of BNIP3 by olomoucine, a CDK inhibitor, reduces LPS- and NO-induced cell death in BV2 microglial cells.

    PubMed

    Tsou, Yu-Chi; Wang, Hsiao-Hsien; Hsieh, Chii-Cheng; Sun, Kuang-Hui; Sun, Guang-Huan; Jhou, Ren-Shiang; Lin, Tz-I; Lu, Shou-Yun; Liu, Huan-Yun; Tang, Shye-Jye

    2016-08-15

    Proinflammatory responses eliciting the microglial production of cytokines and nitric oxide (NO) have been reported to play a crucial role in the acute and chronic pathogenic effects of neurodegeneration. Chemical inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) may prevent the progression of neurodegeneration by both limiting cell proliferation and reducing cell death. However, the mechanism underlying the protective effect of CDK inhibitors on microglia remains unexplored. In this study, we found that olomoucine, a CDK inhibitor, alleviated lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced BV2 microglial cell death by reducing the generation of NO and inhibiting the gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines. In addition, olomoucine reduced inducible NO synthase promoter activity and alleviated NF-κB- and E2F-mediated transcriptional activation. NO-induced cell death involved mitochondrial disruptions such as cytochrome c release and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and pretreatment with olomoucine prior to NO exposure reduced these disruptions. Microarray analysis revealed that olomoucine treatment induced prominent down-regulation of Bcl2/adenovirus E1B 19-kDa-interacting protein 3 (BNIP3), a pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family protein that is involved in mitochondrial disruption. As BNIP3 knock-down significantly increased the viability of LPS- and NO-treated BV2 cells, we conclude that olomoucine may protect cells by limiting proinflammatory responses, thereby reducing NO generation. Simultaneously, down-regulation of BNIP3 prevents NO stimulation from inducing mitochondrial disruption. PMID:27345388

  6. Pelle Modulates dFoxO-Mediated Cell Death in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chenxi; Chen, Yujun; Wang, Feng; Chen, Changyan; Zhang, Shiping; Li, Chaojie; Li, Wenzhe; Wu, Shian; Xue, Lei

    2015-10-01

    Interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinases (IRAKs) are crucial mediators of the IL-1R/TLR signaling pathways that regulate the immune and inflammation response in mammals. Recent studies also suggest a critical role of IRAKs in tumor development, though the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Pelle is the sole Drosophila IRAK homolog implicated in the conserved Toll pathway that regulates Dorsal/Ventral patterning, innate immune response, muscle development and axon guidance. Here we report a novel function of pll in modulating apoptotic cell death, which is independent of the Toll pathway. We found that loss of pll results in reduced size in wing tissue, which is caused by a reduction in cell number but not cell size. Depletion of pll up-regulates the transcription of pro-apoptotic genes, and triggers caspase activation and cell death. The transcription factor dFoxO is required for loss-of-pll induced cell death. Furthermore, loss of pll activates dFoxO, promotes its translocation from cytoplasm to nucleus, and up-regulates the transcription of its target gene Thor/4E-BP. Finally, Pll physically interacts with dFoxO and phosphorylates dFoxO directly. This study not only identifies a previously unknown physiological function of pll in cell death, but also shed light on the mechanism of IRAKs in cell survival/death during tumorigenesis. PMID:26474173

  7. Pelle Modulates dFoxO-Mediated Cell Death in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Changyan; Zhang, Shiping; Li, Chaojie; Li, Wenzhe; Wu, Shian; Xue, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinases (IRAKs) are crucial mediators of the IL-1R/TLR signaling pathways that regulate the immune and inflammation response in mammals. Recent studies also suggest a critical role of IRAKs in tumor development, though the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Pelle is the sole Drosophila IRAK homolog implicated in the conserved Toll pathway that regulates Dorsal/Ventral patterning, innate immune response, muscle development and axon guidance. Here we report a novel function of pll in modulating apoptotic cell death, which is independent of the Toll pathway. We found that loss of pll results in reduced size in wing tissue, which is caused by a reduction in cell number but not cell size. Depletion of pll up-regulates the transcription of pro-apoptotic genes, and triggers caspase activation and cell death. The transcription factor dFoxO is required for loss-of-pll induced cell death. Furthermore, loss of pll activates dFoxO, promotes its translocation from cytoplasm to nucleus, and up-regulates the transcription of its target gene Thor/4E-BP. Finally, Pll physically interacts with dFoxO and phosphorylates dFoxO directly. This study not only identifies a previously unknown physiological function of pll in cell death, but also shed light on the mechanism of IRAKs in cell survival/death during tumorigenesis. PMID:26474173

  8. Genetically induced adult oligodendrocyte cell death is associated with poor myelin clearance, reduced remyelination, and axonal damage.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Hartmut B F; Porcheri, Cristina; Mueggler, Thomas; Bachmann, Lukas C; Martino, Gianvito; Riethmacher, Dieter; Franklin, Robin J M; Rudin, Markus; Suter, Ueli

    2011-01-19

    Loss of oligodendrocytes is a feature of many demyelinating diseases including multiple sclerosis. Here, we have established and characterized a novel model of genetically induced adult oligodendrocyte death. Specific primary loss of adult oligodendrocytes leads to a well defined and highly reproducible course of disease development that can be followed longitudinally by magnetic resonance imaging. Histological and ultrastructural analyses revealed progressive myelin vacuolation, in parallel to disease development that includes motor deficits, tremor, and ataxia. Myelin damage and clearance were associated with induction of oligodendrocyte precursor cell proliferation, albeit with some regional differences. Remyelination was present in the mildly affected corpus callosum. Consequences of acutely induced cell death of adult oligodendrocytes included secondary axonal damage. Microglia were activated in affected areas but without significant influx of B-cells, T-helper cells, or T-cytotoxic cells. Analysis of the model on a RAG-1 (recombination activating gene-1)-deficient background, lacking functional lymphocytes, did not change the observed disease and pathology compared with immune-competent mice. We conclude that this model provides the opportunity to study the consequences of adult oligodendrocyte death in the absence of primary axonal injury and reactive cells of the adaptive immune system. Our results indicate that if the blood-brain barrier is not disrupted, myelin debris is not removed efficiently, remyelination is impaired, and axonal integrity is compromised, likely as the result of myelin detachment. This model will allow the evaluation of strategies aimed at improving remyelination to foster axon protection. PMID:21248132

  9. Toll-6 and Toll-7 function as neurotrophin receptors in the Drosophila central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    McIlroy, Graham; Foldi, Istvan; Aurikko, Jukka; Wentzell, Jill S.; Lim, Mei Ann; Fenton, Janine C.; Gay, Nicholas J.; Hidalgo, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Neurotrophin receptors corresponding to vertebrate Trk, p75NTR or Sortilin have not been identified in Drosophila, thus it is unknown how neurotrophism may be implemented in insects. Two Drosophila neurotrophins, DNT1 and DNT2, have nervous system functions, but their receptors are unknown. The Toll receptor superfamily has ancient evolutionary origins and a universal function in innate immunity. Here we show that Toll paralogues unrelated to the mammalian neurotrophin receptors function as neurotrophin receptors in fruit-flies. Toll-6 and Toll-7 are expressed in the central nervous system throughout development, and regulate locomotion, motoraxon targeting and neuronal survival. DNT1 and 2 interact genetically with Toll-6 and 7, bind to Toll-7 and 6 promiscuously, and are distributed in vivo in complementary or overlapping domains. We conclude that in fruit-flies, Tolls are not only involved in development and immunity but also in neurotrophism, revealing an unforeseen relationship between the neurotrophin and Toll protein families. PMID:23892553

  10. Chemical chaperones reduce ionizing radiation-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and cell death in IEC-6 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eun Sang; Lee, Hae-June; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Jeong, Jae-Hoon; Kang, Seongman; Lim, Young-Bin

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • UPR activation precedes caspase activation in irradiated IEC-6 cells. • Chemical ER stress inducers radiosensitize IEC-6 cells. • siRNAs that targeted ER stress responses ameliorate IR-induced cell death. • Chemical chaperons prevent cell death in irradiated IEC-6 cells. - Abstract: Radiotherapy, which is one of the most effective approaches to the treatment of various cancers, plays an important role in malignant cell eradication in the pelvic area and abdomen. However, it also generates some degree of intestinal injury. Apoptosis in the intestinal epithelium is the primary pathological factor that initiates radiation-induced intestinal injury, but the mechanism by which ionizing radiation (IR) induces apoptosis in the intestinal epithelium is not clearly understood. Recently, IR has been shown to induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, thereby activating the unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway in intestinal epithelial cells. However, the consequences of the IR-induced activation of the UPR signaling pathway on radiosensitivity in intestinal epithelial cells remain to be determined. In this study, we investigated the role of ER stress responses in IR-induced intestinal epithelial cell death. We show that chemical ER stress inducers, such as tunicamycin or thapsigargin, enhanced IR-induced caspase 3 activation and DNA fragmentation in intestinal epithelial cells. Knockdown of Xbp1 or Atf6 with small interfering RNA inhibited IR-induced caspase 3 activation. Treatment with chemical chaperones prevented ER stress and subsequent apoptosis in IR-exposed intestinal epithelial cells. Our results suggest a pro-apoptotic role of ER stress in IR-exposed intestinal epithelial cells. Furthermore, inhibiting ER stress may be an effective strategy to prevent IR-induced intestinal injury.

  11. Toll-Like Receptors in Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Nicotra, Lauren; Loram, Lisa C; Watkins, Linda R; Hutchinson, Mark R

    2011-01-01

    Proinflammatory central immune signaling contributes significantly to the initiation and maintenance of heightened pain states. Recent discoveries have implicated the innate immune system, pattern recognition Toll-like receptors in triggering these proinflammatory central immune signaling events. These exciting developments have been complemented by the discovery of neuronal expression of Toll-like receptors, suggesting pain pathways can be activated directly by the detection of pathogen associated molecular patterns or danger associated molecular patterns. This review will examine the evidence to date implicating Toll-like receptors and their associated signaling components in heightened pain states. In addition, insights into the impact Toll-like receptors have on priming central immune signaling systems for heightened pain states will be discussed. The influence possible sex differences in Toll-like receptor signaling have for female pain and the recognition of small molecule xenobiotics by Toll-like receptors will also be reviewed. PMID:22001158

  12. Road traffic casualties: understanding the night-time death toll.

    PubMed

    Plainis, S; Murray, I J; Pallikaris, I G

    2006-04-01

    A disproportionate number of fatal injuries occur after dark. The paper presents some statistics of road traffic injuries in a novel way which suggests that low luminance plays a major role in this effect. A sound physiological explanation for this is advanced based on the poor temporal characteristics of rod photoreceptors. It is argued that processing information based on low luminance, low contrast targets is much slower than that for high contrast bright targets. To test the idea, simple visual reaction times were measured under typical low visibility conditions encountered on non-lit roads and were found to be substantially longer than under optimal conditions. It is shown that longer reaction times translate into significantly increased stopping distances. This important point has received insufficient attention in the road safety literature, by the Highways Agency, the police, injury prevention officials, and the UK Highway Code. PMID:16595429

  13. Social group memberships in retirement are associated with reduced risk of premature death: evidence from a longitudinal cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Steffens, Niklas K; Cruwys, Tegan; Haslam, Catherine; Jetten, Jolanda; Haslam, S Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Retirement constitutes a major life transition that poses significant challenges to health, with many retirees experiencing a precipitous decline in health status following retirement. We examine the extent to which membership in social groups following retirement determines quality of life and mortality. Design The longitudinal impact of the number of social group memberships before and after the transition to retirement was assessed on retirees’ quality of life and risk of death 6 years later. Setting Nationally representative cohort study of older adults living in England. Participants Adults who underwent the transition to retirement (N=424). A matched control group (N=424) of participants who had comparable demographic and health characteristics at baseline but did not undergo the transition to retirement were also examined. Outcome measures Analyses examined participants’ quality of life and mortality during a period of 6 years. Results Retirees who had two group memberships prior to retirement had a 2% risk of death in the first 6 years of retirement if they maintained membership in two groups, a 5% risk if they lost one group and a 12% risk if they lost both groups. Furthermore, for every group membership that participants lost in the year following retirement, their experienced quality of life 6 years later was approximately 10% lower. These relationships are robust when controlling for key sociodemographic variables (age, gender, relationship status and socioeconomic status prior to retirement). A comparison with a matched control group confirmed that these effects were specific to those undergoing the transition to retirement. The effect of social group memberships on mortality was comparable to that of physical exercise. Conclusions Theoretical implications for our understanding of the determinants of retiree quality of life and health, and practical implications for the support of people transitioning from a life of work to

  14. Expression of Interferon Lambda 4 Is Associated with Reduced Proliferation and Increased Cell Death in Human Hepatic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Onabajo, Olusegun O.; Porter-Gill, Patricia; Paquin, Ashley; Rao, Nina; Liu, Luyang; Tang, Wei; Brand, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    Interferon lambda 4 (IFN-λ4) is a novel type-III interferon that can be generated only in individuals carrying a ΔG frame-shift allele of an exonic genetic variant (rs368234815-ΔG/TT). The rs368234815-ΔG allele is strongly associated with decreased clearance of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Here, we further explored the biological function of IFN-λ4 expressed in human hepatic cells—a hepatoma cell line HepG2 and fresh primary human hepatocytes (PHHs). We performed live confocal imaging, cell death and proliferation assays, mRNA expression profiling, protein detection, and antibody blocking assays using transient and inducible stable in vitro systems. Not only did we observe significant intracellular retention of IFN-λ4 but also detected secreted IFN-λ4 in the culture media of expressing cells. Secreted IFN-λ4 induced strong activation of the interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) in IFN-λ4-expressing and surrounding cells in transwell assays. Specifically, in PHHs, secreted IFN-λ4 induced expression of the CXCL10 transcript and a corresponding pro-inflammatory chemokine, IP-10. In IFN-λ4-expressing HepG2 cells, we also observed decreased proliferation and increased cell death. All IFN-λ4-induced phenotypes—activation of ISGs, decreased proliferation, and increased cell death—could be inhibited by an anti-IFN-λ4-specific antibody. Our study offers new insights into biology of IFN-λ4 and its possible role in HCV clearance. PMID:26134097

  15. Toll-Like Receptors and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shu; Zhang, Yifan; Zhang, Qingyuan; Wang, Fen; Zhang, Dekai

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in men after lung cancer. Immune responses clearly play a critical role in the tumorigenesis and in the efficacy of radiation therapy and chemotherapy in prostate cancer; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms are still poorly understood. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a well-known family of pattern recognition receptors that play a key role in host immune system. Recent studies demonstrate that there are links between TLRs and cancer; however, the function and biological importance of TLRs in prostate cancer seems complex. To elucidate the role of TLRs and innate immunity in prostate cancer might provide us with a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of this disease. Moreover, utilizing the agonists or antagonists of TLRs might represent a promising new strategy against prostate cancer. In this review, we summarize recent advances on the studies of association between TLR signaling and prostate cancer, TLR polymorphisms and prostate cancer risk, and provide some insights about TLRs as potential targets for prostate cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25101092

  16. Role of climate variability in the heatstroke death rates of Kanto region in Japan.

    PubMed

    Akihiko, Takaya; Morioka, Yushi; Behera, Swadhin K

    2014-01-01

    The death toll by heatstroke in Japan, especially in Kanto region, has sharply increased since 1994 together with large interannual variability. The surface air temperature and humidity observed during boreal summers of 1980-2010 were examined to understand the role of climate in the death toll. The extremely hot days, when the daily maximum temperature exceeds 35 °C, are more strongly associated with the death toll than the conventional Wet Bulb Globe Temperature index. The extremely hot days tend to be associated with El Niño/Southern Oscillation or the Indian Ocean Dipole, suggesting a potential link with tropical climate variability to the heatstroke related deaths. Also, the influence of these climate modes on the death toll has strengthened since 1994 probably related to global warming. It is possible to develop early warning systems based on seasonal climate predictions since recent climate models show excellent predictability skills for those climate modes. PMID:25008122

  17. [Innate immunity, Toll receptor and sepsis].

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Esper, Raúl

    2003-01-01

    The innate immune response is the first line of defense against infection. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize bacterial lipopolysaccharide and other pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Intracellular signals initiated by interaction between Toll receptors and specific PAMPs results in inflammatory response. Sepsis and septic shock are the result of an exaggerated inflammatory systemic response induced by innate immune dysregulation. PMID:14617415

  18. Inhibition of diacylglycerol kinase α restores restimulation-induced cell death and reduces immunopathology in XLP-1.

    PubMed

    Ruffo, Elisa; Malacarne, Valeria; Larsen, Sasha E; Das, Rupali; Patrussi, Laura; Wülfing, Christoph; Biskup, Christoph; Kapnick, Senta M; Verbist, Katherine; Tedrick, Paige; Schwartzberg, Pamela L; Baldari, Cosima T; Rubio, Ignacio; Nichols, Kim E; Snow, Andrew L; Baldanzi, Gianluca; Graziani, Andrea

    2016-01-13

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP-1) is an often-fatal primary immunodeficiency associated with the exuberant expansion of activated CD8(+) T cells after Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. XLP-1 is caused by defects in signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM)-associated protein (SAP), an adaptor protein that modulates T cell receptor (TCR)-induced signaling. SAP-deficient T cells exhibit impaired TCR restimulation-induced cell death (RICD) and diminished TCR-induced inhibition of diacylglycerol kinase α (DGKα), leading to increased diacylglycerol metabolism and decreased signaling through Ras and PKCθ (protein kinase Cθ). We show that down-regulation of DGKα activity in SAP-deficient T cells restores diacylglycerol signaling at the immune synapse and rescues RICD via induction of the proapoptotic proteins NUR77 and NOR1. Pharmacological inhibition of DGKα prevents the excessive CD8(+) T cell expansion and interferon-γ production that occur in SAP-deficient mice after lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection without impairing lytic activity. Collectively, these data highlight DGKα as a viable therapeutic target to reverse the life-threatening EBV-associated immunopathology that occurs in XLP-1 patients. PMID:26764158

  19. Improvements In US Diet Helped Reduce Disease Burden And Lower Premature Deaths, 1999-2012; Overall Diet Remains Poor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong D; Li, Yanping; Chiuve, Stephanie E; Hu, Frank B; Willett, Walter C

    2015-11-01

    Evaluation of time trends in dietary quality and their relation to disease burden provides essential feedback for policy making. We used an index titled the Alternate Healthy Eating Index 2010 to evaluate trends in dietary quality among 33,885 US adults. From 1999 to 2012 the index increased from 39.9 to 48.2 (perfect score = 110). Gaps in performance on the index across socioeconomic groups persisted or widened. Using data relating index scores to health outcomes in two large cohorts, we estimated that the improvements in dietary quality from 1999 to 2012 prevented 1.1 million premature deaths. Also, this improvement in diet quality resulted in 8.6 percent fewer cardiovascular disease cases, 1.3 percent fewer cancer cases, and 12.6 percent fewer type 2 diabetes cases. Although the steady improvement in dietary quality likely accounted for substantial reductions in disease burden from 1999 to 2012, overall dietary quality in the United States remains poor. Policy initiatives are needed to ensure further improvements. PMID:26526250

  20. Improvements In US Diet Helped Reduce Disease Burden And Lower Premature Deaths, 1999–2012; But Overall Diet Remains Poor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dong D.; Li, Yanping; Chiuve, Stephanie E.; Hu, Frank B.; Willett, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of time trends in dietary quality and their relation to disease burden provides essential feedback for policy making. We used an index titled the Alternate Healthy Eating Index 2010 to evaluate trends in dietary quality among 33,885 US adults. From 1999 to 2012, the index increased from 39.9 to 48.2 (perfect score = 110). Gaps in performance on the index persisted across socioeconomic groups or widened. Using data relating index scores to health outcomes in two large cohorts, we estimated that the improvements in dietary quality from 1999 to 2012 prevented 1,064,840 premature deaths. Also, this improvement in diet quality resulted in 8.6 percent fewer cardiovascular disease cases, 1.3 percent fewer cancer cases, and 12.6 percent fewer type 2 diabetes cases. Although the steady improvement in dietary quality likely accounted for substantial reductions in disease burden from 1999 to 2012, overall dietary quality in the US remains poor. Policy initiatives are needed to ensure further improvements. PMID:26526250

  1. Does Resuscitation Training Reduce Neonatal Deaths in Low-Resource Communities? A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Sarah; Mielke, John G

    2015-10-01

    Every year, nearly 1 million babies succumb to birth asphyxia (BA) within the Asia-Pacific region. The present study sought to determine whether educational interventions containing some element of resuscitation training would decrease the relative risk (RR) of neonatal mortality attributable to BA in low-resource communities. We systematically reviewed 3 electronic databases and identified 14 relevant reports. For community deliveries, providing traditional birth attendants (TBAs) with neonatal resuscitation training modestly reduced the RR in 3 of 4 studies. For institutional deliveries, training a range of clinical staff clearly reduced the RR within 2 of 8 studies. When resuscitation-specific training was directed to community and institutional health care workers, a slight benefit was observed in 1 of 2 studies. Specific training in neonatal resuscitation appears most effective when provided to TBAs (specifically, those presented with ongoing opportunities to review and update their skills), but this particular intervention alone may not appreciably reduce mortality. PMID:26378066

  2. Local Anaesthetic Infiltration and Indwelling Postoperative Wound Catheters for Patients with Hip Fracture Reduce Death Rates and Length of Stay

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, William D.; Lees, Deborah; A'Court, Jamie; Ankers, Thomas; Harper, Ian; Inman, Dominic; Reed, Mike R.

    2015-01-01

    Background. An analgesic enhanced recovery (ER) protocol for patients with a hip fracture was introduced. It was hypothesised that the ER would reduce pain, length of stay and improve clinical outcomes. The protocol used intraoperative infiltration of levobupivacaine followed by ongoing wound infusions. Methods. Consecutive patients admitted to two hospitals were eligible for the ER protocol. Numerical Reporting Scale pain scores (0–10) were recorded alongside opiate requirements. 434 patients in the ER group (316 full ER, 90 partial ER, and 28 no ER) were compared to a control group (CG) of 100 consecutive patients managed with traditional opiate analgesia. Results. Mean opiate requirement was 49.2 mg (CG) versus 32.5 mg (ER). Pain scores were significantly reduced in the full ER group, p < 0.0001. Direct discharge home and mean acute inpatient stay were significantly reduced (p = 0.0031 and p < 0.0001, resp.). 30-day mortality was 15% (CG) versus 5.5% (ER), p = 0.0024. Conclusions. This analgesic ER protocol for patients with a hip fracture was safe and effective and was associated with reduced inpatient stay and mortality. PMID:26649330

  3. Annual Screening with Chest X-Ray Does Not Reduce Lung Cancer Deaths | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Annual screening for lung cancer using a standard chest x-ray does not reduce the risk of dying from lung cancer when compared with no annual screening, according to findings from the NCI-led Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) screening trial. The results from a median of nearly 12 years of follow-up were published online October 26 in JAMA. |

  4. The role of tobacco control policies in reducing smoking and deaths caused by smoking in an Eastern European nation: results from the Albania SimSmoke simulation model.

    PubMed

    Levy, David T; Ross, Hana; Zaloshnja, Eduard; Shuperka, Roland; Rusta, Meriglena

    2008-12-01

    The Albania SimSmoke simulation model is used to examine the effects of tobacco control policies. The model is used to consider the projected trends in smoking prevalence and associated smoking-attributable deaths in the absence of new policies, and then to examine the effect of new policies that are consistent with the Framework Convention for Tobacco Control (FCTC) on these outcomes. The model shows that significant inroads to reducing smoking prevalence and premature mortality can be achieved through tax increases. Acomprehensive strategy to further reduce smoking rates should include a media campaign complete with programs to publicize and enforce clean air laws, a comprehensive cessation treatment program, strong health warnings, advertising bans, and youth access laws. Besides presenting the benefits of a comprehensive tobacco control strategy, the model helps to identify important information needed for both modeling and policymaking. The effectiveness of future tobacco control policy will require proper surveillance and evaluation schemes for Albania. PMID:19256288

  5. Occupational Noise Exposure among Toll Tellers at Toll Plaza in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azmi, Sharifah Nadya Syed; Dawal, Siti Zawiah Md; Ya, Tuan Mohammad Yusoff Shah Tuan; Saidin, Hamidi

    2010-10-01

    Toll tellers working at toll plaza have potential of exposure to high noise from the vehicles especially for the peak level of sound emitted by the heavy vehicles. However, occupational exposures in this workplace have not been adequately characterized and identified. Occupational noise exposure among toll tellers at toll plaza was assessed using Sound Level Meter, Noise Dosimeter and through questionnaire survey. These data were combined to estimate the work shift exposure level and health impacts to the toll tellers by using statistical analysis. Noise Dosimeter microphone was located at the hearing zone of the toll teller which working inside the toll booth and full-period measurements were collected for each work shift. The measurements were taken at 20 toll booths from 6.00 am to 2.00 pm for 5 days. 71 respondents participated in the survey to identify the symptoms of noise induced hearing loss and other health related problems among toll tellers. Results of this study indicated that occupational noise exposure among toll tellers for Mean Continuous Equivalent Level, Leq was 79.2±1.4 dB(A), Mean Maximum Level, Lmax was 107.8±3.6 dB(A) and Mean Peak Level, Lpeak was 136.6±9.9 dB. The Peak Level reported statistically significantly at 140 dB, the level of TLV recommended by ACGIH. The research findings indicated that the primary risk exposure to toll tellers comes from noise that emitted from heavy vehicles. Most of the toll tellers show symptoms of noise induced hearing loss and annoyed by the sources of noise at the toll plaza.

  6. Forecasting toll traffic: energy and other impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, D.W.

    1981-01-01

    This analysis focuses on passenger-car activity and attempts to shed some light on the question that is asked so often these days: what is going to happen to future toll road traffic, particularly as influenced by the energy situation. Three main points are covered: (1) a look at the recent losses in passenger car traffic experienced on most toll facilities; (2) a brief analysis of factors causing these losses together with an attempt at forecasting future passenger-car-traffic trends; and, (3) an observation on conditions that may be influencing long-term traffic trends to an even greater degree than the energy situation. Considering the expected energy situation, passenger-car traffic on toll facilities can be expected to increase but generally at a very modest rate. The costs of operating and maintaining toll facilities will rise at a substantially faster rate than the toll traffic. For many toll road operators, periodic toll increases will be a fact of life. In summary, it appears that forecasting techniques, based on detailed analyses of actual operating results, are still valid in these times of change. In the future, the impacts of fuel shortages or prices, assuming no catastrophic changes, probably will be minimal. Changing life styles and economic considerations, however, should be the principal concerns and these will keep automobile traffic from growing as it once did.

  7. 47 CFR 52.111 - Toll free number assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Toll free number assignment. 52.111 Section 52.111 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) NUMBERING Toll Free Numbers § 52.111 Toll free number assignment. Toll free numbers shall be made...

  8. 47 CFR 52.111 - Toll free number assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Toll free number assignment. 52.111 Section 52.111 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) NUMBERING Toll Free Numbers § 52.111 Toll free number assignment. Toll free numbers shall be made...

  9. 47 CFR 52.111 - Toll free number assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Toll free number assignment. 52.111 Section 52.111 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) NUMBERING Toll Free Numbers § 52.111 Toll free number assignment. Toll free numbers shall be made...

  10. 47 CFR 52.111 - Toll free number assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Toll free number assignment. 52.111 Section 52.111 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) NUMBERING Toll Free Numbers § 52.111 Toll free number assignment. Toll free numbers shall be made...

  11. 47 CFR 52.111 - Toll free number assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Toll free number assignment. 52.111 Section 52.111 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) NUMBERING Toll Free Numbers § 52.111 Toll free number assignment. Toll free numbers shall be made...

  12. Alcohol resistance in Drosophila is modulated by the Toll innate immune pathway.

    PubMed

    Troutwine, B R; Ghezzi, A; Pietrzykowski, A Z; Atkinson, N S

    2016-04-01

    A growing body of evidence has shown that alcohol alters the activity of the innate immune system and that changes in innate immune system activity can influence alcohol-related behaviors. Here, we show that the Toll innate immune signaling pathway modulates the level of alcohol resistance in Drosophila. In humans, a low level of response to alcohol is correlated with increased risk of developing an alcohol use disorder. The Toll signaling pathway was originally discovered in, and has been extensively studied in Drosophila. The Toll pathway is a major regulator of innate immunity in Drosophila, and mammalian Toll-like receptor signaling has been implicated in alcohol responses. Here, we use Drosophila-specific genetic tools to test eight genes in the Toll signaling pathway for effects on the level of response to ethanol. We show that increasing the activity of the pathway increases ethanol resistance whereas decreasing the pathway activity reduces ethanol resistance. Furthermore, we show that gene products known to be outputs of innate immune signaling are rapidly induced following ethanol exposure. The interaction between the Toll signaling pathway and ethanol is rooted in the natural history of Drosophila melanogaster. PMID:26916032

  13. The role of the African-American physician in reducing traffic-related injury and death among African Americans: consensus report of the National Medical Association.

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Fernando; Moore, Wayne; Conti, Christopher; Norville Perez, Lucille C.; Gaines, Beverly M.; Hood, Rodney G.; Swain, Ian J. J.; Williams, Rudolph; Burgess, Chaka T.

    2002-01-01

    ISSUE: Traffic-related injuries and fatalities disproportionately affect the African American community. These high rates of traffic-related death and injury among African Americans manifest in multiple areas of traffic safety, including: Failure to use seat belts and child restraints. High incidence of alcohol-impaired driving. Failure to follow child passenger and seat belt safety laws and recommendations. High rates of pedestrian accidents, ofen brought on by impairments of drivers and/or pedestrians. Research indicates that national public information campaigns, with general messages only slightly modified for African American audiences, have not been culturally appropriate or effective in changing traffic safety behavior. In addition, traditional distribution mechanisms for these messages have not effectively reached the target population. Evidence suggests that in the African American community, there is a pervasive lack of knowledge of the devastating impact of traffic-related accidents on the overall health status of the community. This lack of information has resulted in a tragic cycle, in which parents fail to model safe operation of motor vehicles, and generation after generation copy this behavior, increasing the community's vulnerability to serious injuries and untimely deaths. This trend toward improper traffic safety habits among African Americans persists despite federal, state and local laws to enforce and promote sound traffic safety practices. OBJECTIVE: To study the existence of disparities in traffic-related injury and death among African Americans and to determine what kinds of traffic safety messages and campaigns will be effective in encouraging African Americans to respond to safety laws in sufficient numbers to reduce the disproportionately high rate of injury and death. Traffic safety issues were examined to effectively recommend policy, address barriers, best practices, and intervention strategies for the National Medical Association

  14. Butanol extract of Ecklonia cava prevents production and aggregation of beta-amyloid, and reduces beta-amyloid mediated neuronal death.

    PubMed

    Kang, Il-Jun; Jeon, Young Eun; Yin, Xing Fu; Nam, Jin-Sik; You, Sang Guan; Hong, Myo Soon; Jang, Bong Geom; Kim, Min-Ju

    2011-09-01

    Beta-amyloid (Aβ) is a major pathogenic peptide for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and is generated by the processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP). The Aβ monomers aggregate into oligomeric and fibrillar forms which have been implicated as the toxic species inducing the neuronal dysfunction. Brown algae Ecklonia cava is known for its anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory functions. Therefore, we tested the effect of E. cava extract on the production and aggregation of Aβ peptides. The butanol extract of E. cava reduced Aβ secretion from HEK293 cells expressing APP with Swedish mutation and increased soluble APPα and C-terminal fragment-α (CTFα), of which activity was similar to BACE (β-site of APP cleaving enzyme) inhibitors. Furthermore, the extract inhibited Aβ oligomerization, particularly mid-size oligomer formation, confirmed by the ultrastructural morphology. Congo red, thioflavin T assays, and electron microscopy showed that the extract inhibited Aβ fibril formation effectively. Finally, the extract protected primary cortical neurons from various Aβ-induced cell deaths, especially oligomer-induced death. Although further study is needed to test the effectiveness of the extract in vivo, our results demonstrate, for the first time, that the butanol extract of E. cava could be used as an anti-Aβ agent for AD therapeutics. PMID:21693162

  15. Enhancing mitochondrial calcium buffering capacity reduces aggregation of misfolded SOD1 and motor neuron cell death without extending survival in mouse models of inherited amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Parone, Philippe A; Da Cruz, Sandrine; Han, Joo Seok; McAlonis-Downes, Melissa; Vetto, Anne P; Lee, Sandra K; Tseng, Eva; Cleveland, Don W

    2013-03-13

    Mitochondria have been proposed as targets for toxicity in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a progressive, fatal adult-onset neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the selective loss of motor neurons. A decrease in the capacity of spinal cord mitochondria to buffer calcium (Ca(2+)) has been observed in mice expressing ALS-linked mutants of SOD1 that develop motor neuron disease with many of the key pathological hallmarks seen in ALS patients. In mice expressing three different ALS-causing SOD1 mutants, we now test the contribution of the loss of mitochondrial Ca(2+)-buffering capacity to disease mechanism(s) by eliminating ubiquitous expression of cyclophilin D, a critical regulator of Ca(2+)-mediated opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore that determines mitochondrial Ca(2+) content. A chronic increase in mitochondrial buffering of Ca(2+) in the absence of cyclophilin D was maintained throughout disease course and was associated with improved mitochondrial ATP synthesis, reduced mitochondrial swelling, and retention of normal morphology. This was accompanied by an attenuation of glial activation, reduction in levels of misfolded SOD1 aggregates in the spinal cord, and a significant suppression of motor neuron death throughout disease. Despite this, muscle denervation, motor axon degeneration, and disease progression and survival were unaffected, thereby eliminating mutant SOD1-mediated loss of mitochondrial Ca(2+) buffering capacity, altered mitochondrial morphology, motor neuron death, and misfolded SOD1 aggregates, as primary contributors to disease mechanism for fatal paralysis in these models of familial ALS. PMID:23486940

  16. Mono-galloyl glucose derivatives are potent poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) inhibitors and partially reduce PARP-1-dependent cell death

    PubMed Central

    Formentini, L; Arapistas, P; Pittelli, M; Jacomelli, M; Pitozzi, V; Menichetti, S; Romani, A; Giovannelli, L; Moroni, F; Chiarugi, A

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Maintenance of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymers at homoeostatic levels by PAR glycohydrolase (PARG) is central in cell functioning and survival. Yet the pharmacological relevance of PARG inhibitors is still debated. Gallotannin, a complex mixture of hydrolysable tannins from oak gall, inhibits PARG but which of its constituents is responsible for the inhibition and whether the pharmacodynamic properties are due to its antioxidant properties, has not yet been established. Experimental approach: A structure–activity relationship study was conducted on different natural and synthetic tannins/galloyl derivatives as potential PARG inhibitors, using a novel in vitro enzymic assay. Cytotoxicity was assayed in cultured HeLa cells. Key results: Mono-galloyl glucose compounds were potent inhibitors of PARG, with activities similar to that of ADP-(hydroxymethyl) pyrrolidinediol, the most potent PARG inhibitor yet identified. When tested on HeLa cells exposed to the PAR polymerase (PARP)-1-activating compound 1-methyl-3-nitro-1-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), 3-galloyl glucose weakly inhibited PAR degradation. Conversely, the more lipophilic, 3-galloyl-1,2-O-isopropylidene glucose, despite being inactive on the pure enzyme, efficiently prolonged the half-life of the polymers in intact HeLa cells. Also, PARG inhibitors, but not radical scavengers, reduced, in part, cell death caused by MNNG. Conclusions and implications: Taken together, our findings identify mono-galloyl glucose derivatives as potent PARG inhibitors, and emphasize the active function of this enzyme in cell death. PMID:18806807

  17. PUFA-induced cell death is mediated by Yca1p-dependent and -independent pathways, and is reduced by vitamin C in yeast.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Magnus; Chen, Xin; Milanova, Stefina; Santos, Cristiano; Petranovic, Dina

    2016-03-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) such as linoleic acid (LA, n-6, C18:2) and γ-linolenic acid (GLA, n-6, C18:3) are essential and must be obtained from the diet. There has been a growing interest in establishing a bio-sustainable production of PUFA in several microorganisms, e.g. in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, PUFAs can also be toxic to cells because of their susceptibility to peroxidation. Here we investigated the negative effects of LA and GLA production on S. cerevisiae by characterizing a strain expressing active Δ6 and Δ12 desaturases from the fungus Mucor rouxii. Previously, we showed that the PUFA-producing strain has low viability, down-regulated genes for oxidative stress response, and decreased proteasome activity. Here we show that the PUFA strain accumulates high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lipid peroxides, and accumulates damaged proteins. The PUFA strain also showed great increase in metacaspase Yca1p activity, suggesting cells could die by caspase-mediated cell death. When treated with antioxidant vitamin C, ROS, lipid peroxidation and protein carbonylation were greatly reduced, and the activity of the metacaspase was significantly decreased too, ultimately doubling the lifespan of the PUFA strain. When deleting YCA1, the caspase-like activity and the oxidative stress decreased and although the lifespan was slightly prolonged, the phenotype could not be fully reversed, pointing that Yca1p was not the main executor of cell death. PMID:26833421

  18. Oxygen-glucose deprivation of neurons transfected with toll-like receptor 3-siRNA: Determination of an optimal transfection sequence

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Guiyun; Wang, Xiaopeng; Ye, Xinchun; Zu, Jie; Zan, Kun; Hua, Fang

    2013-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 3 protein expression has been shown to be upregulated during cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats. In this study, rat primary cortical neurons were subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation to simulate cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. Chemically synthesized small interfering RNA (siRNA)-1280, -1724 and -418 specific to toll-like receptor 3 were transfected into oxygen-glucose deprived cortical neurons to suppress the upregulation of toll-like receptor 3 protein expression. Western blotting demonstrated that after transfection with siRNA, toll-like receptor 3 protein expression reduced, especially in the toll-like receptor 3-1724 group. These results suggested that siRNA-1724 is an optimal sequence for inhibiting toll-like receptor 3 expression in cortical neurons following oxygen-glucose deprivation. PMID:25206644

  19. 60 million non-facility births: Who can deliver in community settings to reduce intrapartum-related deaths?

    PubMed Central

    Darmstadt, Gary L.; Lee, Anne CC; Cousens, Simon; Sibley, Lynn; Bhutta, Zulqar A.; Donnay, France; Osrin, Dave; Bang, Abhay; Kumar, Vishwajeet; Wall, Steve N.; Baqui, Abdullah; Lawn, Joy E.

    2012-01-01

    care for the rural poor, help reduce gross inequities in maternal and newborn survival and stillbirth rates, and provide an effective transition to higher coverage for facility births. PMID:19815200

  20. The complement system and toll-like receptors as integrated players in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hovland, Anders; Jonasson, Lena; Garred, Peter; Yndestad, Arne; Aukrust, Pål; Lappegård, Knut T; Espevik, Terje; Mollnes, Tom E

    2015-08-01

    Despite recent medical advances, atherosclerosis is a global burden accounting for numerous deaths and hospital admissions. Immune-mediated inflammation is a major component of the atherosclerotic process, but earlier research focus on adaptive immunity has gradually switched towards the role of innate immunity. The complement system and toll-like receptors (TLRs), and the crosstalk between them, may be of particular interest both with respect to pathogenesis and as therapeutic targets in atherosclerosis. Animal studies indicate that inhibition of C3a and C5a reduces atherosclerosis. In humans modified LDL-cholesterol activate complement and TLRs leading to downstream inflammation, and histopathological studies indicate that the innate immune system is present in atherosclerotic lesions. Moreover, clinical studies have demonstrated that both complement and TLRs are upregulated in atherosclerotic diseases, although interventional trials have this far been disappointing. However, based on recent research showing an intimate interplay between complement and TLRs we propose a model in which combined inhibition of both complement and TLRs may represent a potent anti-inflammatory therapeutic approach to reduce atherosclerosis. PMID:26086357

  1. Effectiveness of Scotland's National Naloxone Programme for reducing opioid‐related deaths: a before (2006–10) versus after (2011–13) comparison

    PubMed Central

    McAuley, Andrew; Perry, Samantha; Hunter, Carole

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims To assess the effectiveness for Scotland's National Naloxone Programme (NNP) by comparison between 2006–10 (before) and 2011–13 (after NNP started in January 2011) and to assess cost‐effectiveness. Design This was a pre–post evaluation of a national policy. Cost‐effectiveness was assessed by prescription costs against life‐years gained per opioid‐related death (ORD) averted. Setting Scotland, in community settings and all prisons. Intervention Brief training and standardized naloxone supply became available to individuals at risk of opioid overdose. Measurements ORDs as identified by National Records of Scotland. Look‐back determined the proportion of ORDs who, in the 4 weeks before ORD, had been (i) released from prison (primary outcome) and (ii) released from prison or discharged from hospital (secondary). We report 95% confidence intervals for effectiveness in reducing the primary (and secondary) outcome in 2011–13 versus 2006–10. Prescription costs were assessed against 1 or 10 life‐years gained per averted ORD. Findings In 2006–10, 9.8% of ORDs (193 of 1970) were in people released from prison within 4 weeks of death, whereas only 6.3% of ORDs in 2011–13 followed prison release (76 of 1212, P < 0.001; this represented a difference of 3.5% [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.6–5.4%)]. This reduction in the proportion of prison release ORDs translates into 42 fewer prison release ORDs (95% CI = 19–65) during 2011–13, when 12 000 naloxone kits were issued at current prescription cost of £225 000. Scotland's secondary outcome reduced from 19.0 to 14.9%, a difference of 4.1% (95% CI = 1.4–6.7%). Conclusions Scotland's National Naloxone Programme, which started in 2011, was associated with a 36% reduction in the proportion of opioid‐related deaths that occurred in the 4 weeks following release from prison. PMID:26642424

  2. Patient barriers to implantable cardioverter defibrillator implantation for the primary prevention of sudden cardiac death in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Laura Lihua; Lim, Choon Pin; Aung, Soe Tin; Quetua, Paul; Ho, Kah Leng; Chong, Daniel; Teo, Wee Siong; Sim, David; Ching, Chi Keong

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Device therapy is efficacious in preventing sudden cardiac death (SCD) in patients with reduced ejection fraction. However, few who need the device eventually opt to undergo implantation and even fewer reconsider their decisions after deliberation. This is due to many factors, including unresolved patient barriers. This study identified the factors that influenced patients’ decision to decline implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) implantation, and those that influenced patients who initially declined an implant to reconsider having one. METHODS A single-centre survey was conducted among 240 patients who had heart failure with reduced ejection fraction and met the ICD implantation criteria, but had declined ICD implantation. RESULTS Participants who refused ICD implantation were mostly male (84%), Chinese (71%), married (72%), currently employed (54%), and had up to primary or secondary education (78%) and monthly income of < SGD 3,000 (51%). Those who were more likely to reconsider their decision were aware that SCD was a consequence of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction, knowledgeable of the preventive role of ICDs, currently employed and aware that their doctor strongly recommended the implant. Based on multivariate analysis, knowledge of the role of ICDs for primary prophylaxis was the most important factor influencing patient decision. CONCLUSION This study identified the demographic and social factors of patients who refused ICD therapy. Knowledge of the role of ICDs in preventing SCD was found to be the strongest marker for reconsidering ICD implantation. Measures to address this information gap may lead to higher rates of ICD implantation. PMID:27075476

  3. Dietary Blueberry Attenuates Whole-Body Insulin Resistance in High Fat-Fed Mice by Reducing Adipocyte Death and Its Inflammatory Sequelae1–3

    PubMed Central

    DeFuria, Jason; Bennett, Grace; Strissel, Katherine J.; Perfield, James W.; Milbury, Paul E.; Greenberg, Andrew S.; Obin, Martin S.

    2009-01-01

    Adipose tissue (AT) inflammation promotes insulin resistance (IR) and other obesity complications. AT inflammation and IR are associated with oxidative stress, adipocyte death, and the scavenging of dead adipocytes by proinflammatory CD11c+ AT macrophages (ATMΦ). We tested the hypothesis that supplementation of an obesitogenic (high-fat) diet with whole blueberry (BB) powder protects against AT inflammation and IR. Male C57Bl/6j mice were maintained for 8 wk on 1 of 3 diets: low-fat (10% of energy) diet (LFD), high-fat (60% of energy) diet (HFD) or the HFD containing 4% (wt:wt) whole BB powder (1:1 Vaccinium ashei and V. corymbosum) (HFD+B). BB supplementation (2.7% of total energy) did not affect HFD-associated alterations in energy intake, metabolic rate, body weight, or adiposity. We observed an emerging pattern of gene expression in AT of HFD mice indicating a shift toward global upregulation of inflammatory genes (tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, inducible nitric oxide synthase), increased M1-polarized ATMΦ (CD11c+), and increased oxidative stress (reduced glutathione peroxidase 3). This shift was attenuated or nonexistent in HFD+B-fed mice. Furthermore, mice fed the HFD+B were protected from IR and hyperglycemia coincident with reductions in adipocyte death. Salutary effects of BB on adipocyte physiology and ATMΦ gene expression may reflect the ability of BB anthocyanins to alter mitogen-activated protein kinase and nuclear factor-κB stress signaling pathways, which regulate cell fate and inflammatory genes. These results suggest that cytoprotective and antiinflammatory actions of dietary BB can provide metabolic benefits to combat obesity-associated pathology. PMID:19515743

  4. Zinc Sensing Receptor Signaling, Mediated by GPR39, Reduces Butyrate-Induced Cell Death in HT29 Colonocytes via Upregulation of Clusterin

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Limor; Azriel-Tamir, Hagit; Arotsker, Natan; Sekler, Israel; Hershfinkel, Michal

    2012-01-01

    Zinc enhances epithelial proliferation, protects the digestive epithelial layer and has profound antiulcerative and antidiarrheal roles in the colon. Despite the clinical significance of this ion, the mechanisms linking zinc to these cellular processes are poorly understood. We have previously identified an extracellular Zn2+ sensing G-protein coupled receptor (ZnR) that activates Ca2+ signaling in colonocytes, but its molecular identity as well as its effects on colonocytes' survival remained elusive. Here, we show that Zn2+, by activation of the ZnR, protects HT29 colonocytes from butyrate induced cell death. Silencing of the G-protein coupled receptor GPR39 expression abolished ZnR-dependent Ca2+ release and Zn2+-dependent survival of butyrate-treated colonocytes. Importantly, GPR39 also mediated ZnR-dependent upregulation of Na+/H+ exchange activity as this activity was found in native colon tissue but not in tissue obtained from GPR39 knock-out mice. Although ZnR-dependent upregulation of Na+/H+ exchange reduced the cellular acid load induced by butyrate, it did not rescue HT29 cells from butyrate induced cell death. ZnR/GPR39 activation however, increased the expression of the anti-apoptotic protein clusterin in butyrate-treated cells. Furthermore, silencing of clusterin abolished the Zn2+-dependent survival of HT29 cells. Altogether, our results demonstrate that extracellular Zn2+, acting through ZnR, regulates intracellular pH and clusterin expression thereby enhancing survival of HT29 colonocytes. Moreover, we identify GPR39 as the molecular moiety of ZnR in HT29 and native colonocytes. PMID:22545109

  5. Can a nudge keep you warm? Using nudges to reduce excess winter deaths: insight from the Keeping Warm in Later Life Project (KWILLT).

    PubMed

    Allmark, Peter; Tod, Angela M

    2014-03-01

    Nudges are interventions that aim to change people's behaviour through changing the environment in which they choose rather than appealing to their reasoning. Nudges have been proposed as of possible use in relation to health-related behaviour. However, nudges have been criticized as ethically dubious because they bypass peoples reasoning and (anyway) are of little help in relation to affecting ill-health that results from social determinants, such as poverty. Reducing the rate of excess winter deaths (EWDs) is a public health priority; however, EWD seems clearly to be socially determined such that nudges arguably have little role. This article defends two claims: (i) nudges could have a place in tackling even the heavily socially determined problem of EWD. We draw on evidence from an empirical study, the Keeping Warm in Later Life Project (KWILLT), to argue that in some cases the risk of cold is within the person's control to some extent such that environmental modifications to influence behaviour such as nudges are possible. (ii) Some uses of behavioural insights in the form of nudges are acceptable, including some in the area of EWD. We suggest a question-based framework by which to judge the ethical acceptability of nudges. PMID:23873728

  6. Can a nudge keep you warm? Using nudges to reduce excess winter deaths: insight from the Keeping Warm in Later Life Project (KWILLT)

    PubMed Central

    Allmark, Peter; Tod, Angela M.

    2014-01-01

    Nudges are interventions that aim to change people's behaviour through changing the environment in which they choose rather than appealing to their reasoning. Nudges have been proposed as of possible use in relation to health-related behaviour. However, nudges have been criticized as ethically dubious because they bypass peoples reasoning and (anyway) are of little help in relation to affecting ill-health that results from social determinants, such as poverty. Reducing the rate of excess winter deaths (EWDs) is a public health priority; however, EWD seems clearly to be socially determined such that nudges arguably have little role. This article defends two claims: (i) nudges could have a place in tackling even the heavily socially determined problem of EWD. We draw on evidence from an empirical study, the Keeping Warm in Later Life Project (KWILLT), to argue that in some cases the risk of cold is within the person’s control to some extent such that environmental modifications to influence behaviour such as nudges are possible. (ii) Some uses of behavioural insights in the form of nudges are acceptable, including some in the area of EWD. We suggest a question-based framework by which to judge the ethical acceptability of nudges. PMID:23873728

  7. MiR-335 Regulates Hif-1α to Reduce Cell Death in Both Mouse Cell Line and Rat Ischemic Models

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fu Jia; Kaur, Prameet; Karolina, Dwi S.; Sepramaniam, Sugunavathi; Armugam, Arunmozhiarasi; Wong, Peter T. H.; Jeyaseelan, Kandiah

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia inducible factor-1α facilitates cellular adaptation to hypoxic conditions. Hence its tight regulation is crucial in hypoxia related diseases such as cerebral ischemia. Changes in hypoxia inducible factor-1α expression upon cerebral ischemia influence the expression of its downstream genes which eventually determines the extent of cellular damage. MicroRNAs are endogenous regulators of gene expression that have rapidly emerged as promising therapeutic targets in several diseases. In this study, we have identified miR-335 as a direct regulator of hypoxia inducible factor-1α and as a potential therapeutic target in cerebral ischemia. MiR-335 and hypoxia inducible factor-1α mRNA showed an inverse expression profile, both in vivo and in vitro ischemic conditions. Given the biphasic nature of hypoxia inducible factor-1α expression during cerebral ischemia, miR-335 mimic was found to reduce infarct volume in the early time (immediately after middle cerebral artery occlusion) of embolic stroke animal models while the miR-335 inhibitor appears to be beneficial at the late time of stroke (24 hrs after middle cerebral artery occlusion). Modulation of hypoxia inducible factor-1α expression by miR-335 also influenced the expression of crucial genes implicated in neurovascular permeability, cell death and maintenance of the blood brain barrier. These concerted effects, resulting in a reduction in infarct volume bring about a beneficial outcome in ischemic stroke. PMID:26030758

  8. Hydrogen-rich saline reduces cell death through inhibition of DNA oxidative stress and overactivation of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 in retinal ischemia-reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    LIU, HONGWEI; HUA, NING; XIE, KELIANG; ZHAO, TINGTING; YU, YONGHAO

    2015-01-01

    Overactivation of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1), as a result of sustained DNA oxidation in ischemia-reperfusion injury, triggers programmed cell necrosis and apoptosis. The present study was conducted to demonstrate whether hydrogen-rich saline (HRS) has a neuroprotective effect on retinal ischemia reperfusion (RIR) injury through inhibition of PARP-1 activation. RIR was induced by transient elevation of intraocular pressure in rats. HRS (5 ml/kg) was administered peritoneally every day from the beginning of reperfusion in RIR rats until the rats were sacrificed. Retinal damage and cell death was determined using hematoxylin and eosin and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling staining. DNA oxidative stress was evaluated by immunofluorescence staining of 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine. In addition, the expression of PARP-1 and caspase-3 was investigated by western blot analysis and/or immunohistochemical staining. The results demonstrated that HRS administration improved morphological alterations and reduced apoptosis following RIR injury. Furthermore, the present study found that HRS alleviated DNA oxidation and PARP-1 overactivation in RIR rats. HRS can protect RIR injury by inhibition of PARP-1, which may be involved in DNA oxidative stress and caspase-3-mediated apoptosis. PMID:25954991

  9. Hydrogen-rich saline reduces cell death through inhibition of DNA oxidative stress and overactivation of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 in retinal ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongwei; Hua, Ning; Xie, Keliang; Zhao, Tingting; Yu, Yonghao

    2015-08-01

    Overactivation of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1), as a result of sustained DNA oxidation in ischemia-reperfusion injury, triggers programmed cell necrosis and apoptosis. The present study was conducted to demonstrate whether hydrogen-rich saline (HRS) has a neuroprotective effect on retinal ischemia reperfusion (RIR) injury through inhibition of PARP-1 activation. RIR was induced by transient elevation of intraocular pressure in rats. HRS (5 ml/kg) was administered peritoneally every day from the beginning of reperfusion in RIR rats until the rats were sacrificed. Retinal damage and cell death was determined using hematoxylin and eosin and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling staining. DNA oxidative stress was evaluated by immunofluorescence staining of 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine. In addition, the expression of PARP-1 and caspase-3 was investigated by western blot analysis and/or immunohistochemical staining. The results demonstrated that HRS administration improved morphological alterations and reduced apoptosis following RIR injury. Furthermore, the present study found that HRS alleviated DNA oxidation and PARP-1 overactivation in RIR rats. HRS can protect RIR injury by inhibition of PARP-1, which may be involved in DNA oxidative stress and caspase-3-mediated apoptosis. PMID:25954991

  10. Incidence of sudden cardiac death associated with coronary artery occlusion in dogs with hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy is reduced by chronic beta-adrenergic blockade.

    PubMed

    Dellsperger, K C; Martins, J B; Clothier, J L; Marcus, M L

    1990-09-01

    Because beta-adrenergic blockade has as one of its many effects altered electrophysiological abnormalities after dogs with left ventricular hypertrophy have been subjected to coronary occlusion, we tested the hypothesis that metoprolol (200-400 mg/day) would reduce mortality rates in dogs with one-kidney, one clip left ventricular hypertrophy while a similar reduction in arterial pressure with enalapril (20-40 mg/day) would not. Dogs with left ventricular hypertrophy were given metoprolol or enalapril for 5-7 days before a 3-hour coronary occlusion. Infarct size and risk area were measured with triphenyltetrazolium chloride stain and barium angiography, respectively. For control (n = 15), left ventricular hypertrophy (n = 17), left ventricular hypertrophy plus metoprolol (n = 12), and left ventricular hypertrophy plus enalapril (n = 15) groups, mean arterial pressure, ratio of infarct size to risk area, and dogs experiencing sudden death were 110 +/- 4, 142 +/- 4, 121 +/- 7, and 120 +/- 3 mm Hg; 44 +/- 5%, 65 +/- 5%, 44 +/- 7%, and 30 +/- 4%; and 27%, 65%, 17%, and 53%, respectively. Thus, the excessive increase in early mortality occurring when dogs with hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy undergo coronary occlusion is interrupted with beta-blockade, possibly via electrophysiological effects rather than by changes in arterial pressure or infarct size. PMID:1975521

  11. A health survey of toll booth workers

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, P.; Orris, P.; Buckley, L. )

    1992-01-01

    The prevalence of respiratory and other health problems in a cohort of highway toll booth workers was surveyed by mailed questionnaire. In a low proportion of respondents (43.2%), a high prevalence of central nervous system complaints (headaches, irritability, or anxiety, and unusual tiredness), mucous membrane irritation (eye irritation, nasal congestion, and dry throat), and musculoskeletal problems (joint and back pains) was found. We believe these symptoms are reflective of the acute irritant and central nervous system effects of exposure to motor vehicle exhaust. The musculoskeletal complaints are likely the result of bending, reaching, and leaning out of the toll booth. The need for in-depth evaluation of the ventilation systems and the ergonomic and job stressors of work at toll booths is suggested by these results.

  12. Cot Deaths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyrrell, Shelagh

    1985-01-01

    Addresses the tragedy of crib deaths, giving particular attention to causes, prevention, and medical research on Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). Gives anecdotal accounts of coping strategies used by parents and families of SIDS infants. (DT)

  13. Understanding Death.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, Charles P.

    1986-01-01

    Bibliotherapy can help children prepare for and understand the death of a loved one. An annotated bibliography lists references with age level information on attitudes toward death and deaths of a father, friend, grandparent, mother, pet, and sibling. (Author/CL)

  14. 40 CFR 52.111 - Toll free number assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Toll free number assignment. 52.111... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Arizona § 52.111 Toll free number assignment. Toll free numbers shall be made available on a first-come, first-served basis unless otherwise...

  15. 40 CFR 52.111 - Toll free number assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Toll free number assignment. 52.111... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Arizona § 52.111 Toll free number assignment. Toll free numbers shall be made available on a first-come, first-served basis unless otherwise...

  16. 40 CFR 52.111 - Toll free number assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Toll free number assignment. 52.111... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Arizona § 52.111 Toll free number assignment. Toll free numbers shall be made available on a first-come, first-served basis unless otherwise...

  17. 40 CFR 52.111 - Toll free number assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Toll free number assignment. 52.111... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Arizona § 52.111 Toll free number assignment. Toll free numbers shall be made available on a first-come, first-served basis unless otherwise...

  18. 40 CFR 52.111 - Toll free number assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Toll free number assignment. 52.111... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Arizona § 52.111 Toll free number assignment. Toll free numbers shall be made available on a first-come, first-served basis unless otherwise...

  19. 47 CFR 51.209 - Toll dialing parity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Toll dialing parity. 51.209 Section 51.209... Obligations of All Local Exchange Carriers § 51.209 Toll dialing parity. (a) A LEC shall implement throughout each state in which it offers telephone exchange service intraLATA and interLATA toll dialing...

  20. 47 CFR 51.209 - Toll dialing parity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Toll dialing parity. 51.209 Section 51.209... Obligations of All Local Exchange Carriers § 51.209 Toll dialing parity. (a) A LEC shall implement throughout each state in which it offers telephone exchange service intraLATA and interLATA toll dialing...

  1. 47 CFR 51.209 - Toll dialing parity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Toll dialing parity. 51.209 Section 51.209... Obligations of All Local Exchange Carriers § 51.209 Toll dialing parity. (a) A LEC shall implement throughout each state in which it offers telephone exchange service intraLATA and interLATA toll dialing...

  2. 47 CFR 51.209 - Toll dialing parity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Toll dialing parity. 51.209 Section 51.209... Obligations of All Local Exchange Carriers § 51.209 Toll dialing parity. (a) A LEC shall implement throughout each state in which it offers telephone exchange service intraLATA and interLATA toll dialing...

  3. 47 CFR 51.209 - Toll dialing parity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Toll dialing parity. 51.209 Section 51.209... Obligations of All Local Exchange Carriers § 51.209 Toll dialing parity. (a) A LEC shall implement throughout each state in which it offers telephone exchange service intraLATA and interLATA toll dialing...

  4. Clean birth and postnatal care practices to reduce neonatal deaths from sepsis and tetanus: a systematic review and Delphi estimation of mortality effect

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Annually over 520,000 newborns die from neonatal sepsis, and 60,000 more from tetanus. Estimates of the effect of clean birth and postnatal care practices are required for evidence-based program planning. Objective To review the evidence for clean birth and postnatal care practices and estimate the effect on neonatal mortality from sepsis and tetanus for the Lives Saved Tool (LiST). Methods We conducted a systematic review of multiple databases. Data were abstracted into standard tables and assessed by GRADE criteria. Where appropriate, meta-analyses were undertaken. For interventions with low quality evidence but a strong GRADE recommendation, a Delphi process was conducted. Results Low quality evidence supports a reduction in all-cause neonatal mortality (19% (95% c.i. 1–34%)), cord infection (30% (95% c.i. 20–39%)) and neonatal tetanus (49% (95% c.i. 35–62%)) with birth attendant handwashing. Very low quality evidence supports a reduction in neonatal tetanus mortality with a clean birth surface (93% (95% c.i. 77-100%)) and no relationship between a clean perineum and tetanus. Low quality evidence supports a reduction of neonatal tetanus with facility birth (68% (95% c.i. 47-88%). No relationship was found between birth place and cord infections or sepsis mortality. For postnatal clean practices, all-cause mortality is reduced with chlorhexidine cord applications in the first 24 hours of life (34% (95% c.i. 5–54%, moderate quality evidence) and antimicrobial cord applications (63% (95% c.i. 41–86%, low quality evidence). One study of postnatal maternal handwashing reported reductions in all-cause mortality (44% (95% c.i. 18–62%)) and cord infection ((24% (95% c.i. 5-40%)). Given the low quality of evidence, a Delphi expert opinion process was undertaken. Thirty experts reached consensus regarding reduction of neonatal sepsis deaths by clean birth practices at home (15% (IQR 10–20)) or in a facility (27% IQR 24–36)), and by clean

  5. Operational benefits of electronic toll collection: Case study

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Deek, H.M.; Mohamed, A.A.; Radwan, A.E.

    1997-11-01

    This paper reports the improvements in traffic operations at the electronic toll collection plazas of the Orlando-Orange County Expressway Authority. Service time, vehicle arrival times, and departure times, as well as vehicle counts were collected before and after the installation of automatic vehicle identification technology known as E-PASS. The findings indicate that, for the dedicated E-PASS lane, the measured capacity has tripled, the service time has decreased by five seconds per vehicle, the average queuing delay has decreased by one minute per vehicle, the maximum queuing delay has decreased by 2.5--3 minutes per vehicle, and the total queuing delay has decreased by 8.5--9.5 vehicle-hours per morning peak hour for that lane. Also, variability in the headway has been reduced significantly in the dedicated E-PASS lane. Capacity, headway, and service times of the mixed (manual/E-PASS or automatic/E-PASS) lanes did not change significantly. However, arrivals have shifted to the dedicated E-PASS lanes, thus reducing delays at the mixed lanes and improving traffic operations for the entire toll plaza.

  6. Exposure to electromagnetic field attenuates oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced microglial cell death by reducing intracellular Ca(2+) and ROS.

    PubMed

    Duong, Cao Nguyen; Kim, Jae Young

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this research was to demonstrate the protective effects of electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure on the human microglial cell line, HMO6, against ischemic cell death induced by in vitro oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). Materials and methods HMO6 cells were cultured for 4 h under OGD with or without exposure to EMF with different combinations of frequencies and intensities (10, 50, or 100 Hz/1 mT and 50 Hz/0.01, 0.1, or 1 mT). Cell survival, intracellular calcium and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were measured. Results OGD caused significant HMO6 cell death as well as elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) and ROS levels. Among different combinations of EMF frequencies and intensities, 50 Hz/1 mT EMF was the most potent to attenuate OGD-induced cell death and intracellular Ca(2+) and ROS levels. A significant but less potent protective effect was also found at 10 Hz/1 mT, whereas no protective effect was found at other combinations of EMF. A xanthine oxidase inhibitor reversed OGD-induced ROS production and cell death, while NADPH oxidase and mitochondrial respiration chain complex II inhibitors did not affect cell death. Conclusions 50 Hz/1 mT EMF protects human microglial cells from OGD-induced cell death by interfering with OGD-induced elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) and ROS levels, and xanthine oxidase is one of the main mediators involved in OGD-induced HMO6 cell death. Non-invasive treatment of EMF radiation may be clinically useful to attenuate hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. PMID:26882219

  7. The Excess Winter Deaths Measure

    PubMed Central

    Gasparrini, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Background: Excess winter deaths, the ratio between average daily deaths in December–March versus other months, is a measure commonly used by public health practitioners and analysts to assess health burdens associated with wintertime weather. We seek to demonstrate that this measure is fundamentally biased and can lead to misleading conclusions about health impacts associated with current and future winter climate. Methods: Time series regression analysis of 779,372 deaths from natural causes in London over 15 years (1 August 1997–31 July 2012),collapsed by day of death and linked to daily temperature values. The outcome measures were the excess winter deaths index, and daily and annual deaths attributable specifically to cold. Results: Most of the excess winter deaths are driven by cold: The excess winter deaths index decreased from 1.19 to 1.07 after excluding deaths attributable to low temperatures. Over 40% of cold-attributable deaths occurred outside of the December–March period, leading to bias in the excess winter deaths measure. Although there was no relationship between winter severity and annual excess winter deaths, there was a clear correlation with annual cold-attributable deaths. Conclusions: Excess winter deaths is not an appropriate indicator of cold-related health impacts, and its use should be discontinued. We advocate alternative measures. The findings we present bring into doubt previous claims that cold-related deaths in the UK will not reduce in future as a result of climate change. PMID:26986872

  8. Hypothermic Machine Perfusion Reduced Inflammatory Reaction by Downregulating the Expression of Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 in a Reperfusion Model of Donation After Cardiac Death.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhen; Ye, Qifa; Zhang, Yang; Zhong, Zibiao; Xiong, Yan; Wang, Yanfeng; Hu, Long; Wang, Wei; Huang, Wei; Ko, Dicken Shiu-Chung

    2016-06-01

    The exact mechanism by which hypothermic machine perfusion (HMP) improves the graft quality in kidney transplantation of donation after cardiac death (DCD) remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between the expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) and inflammatory reaction in kidney ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury injury followed by cold storage (CS) or HMP model of DCD. New Zealand white rabbit kidneys were subjected to 35 min of warm ischemia and 1 h reperfusion, then preserved by either 1 h reperfusion (sham-operated group), 4 h CS or 4 h HMP in vivo. Kidneys were reperfused 24 h followed by further analysis. No treatment was given to rabbits in the normal control group. The expression of MMP-9, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), and MMP-2 mRNA were detected by real-time PCR (RT-PCR). MMP-9 was located by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence methods. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), myeloperoxidase (MPO), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and malondialdehyde (MDA) were measured by kits for each groups. Compared with the CS group, the expression of MMP-9 and NF-κB mRNA were downregulated in HMP group (P < 0.05). In contrast, expression of MMP-2 mRNA had no statistical significance between CS group and HMP group (P > 0.05). In normal control and sham-operated groups, a low level of MMP-9 expression was detected in glomeruli. However, positive signals of MMP-9 were mostly located in the tubulointerstitium and the vascular wall of CS and HMP groups. Expression of TNF-α, IL-6, MDA, and activity of MPO decreased while activity of SOD in the HMP group increased in contrast to the CS group (P < 0.05). In conclusion, inflammatory cytokines mediated MMP-9 expression through NF-κB band to MMP-9 promoter region, resulting in renal injury. Therefore, HMP reduced inflammatory reaction by downregulating the expression of MMP-9, which may be the mechanism of kidney protection in I

  9. Wnt3a mitigates acute lung injury by reducing P2X7 receptor-mediated alveolar epithelial type I cell death

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Y; Mishra, A; Weng, T; Chintagari, N R; Wang, Y; Zhao, C; Huang, C; Liu, L

    2014-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is characterized by pulmonary endothelial and epithelial cell damage, and loss of the alveolar–capillary barrier. We have previously shown that P2X7 receptor (P2X7R), a cell death receptor, is specifically expressed in alveolar epithelial type I cells (AEC I). In this study, we hypothesized that P2X7R-mediated purinergic signaling and its interaction with Wnt/β-catenin signaling contributes to AEC I death. We examined the effect of P2X7R agonist 2′-3′-O-(4-benzoylbenzoyl)-ATP (BzATP) and Wnt agonist Wnt3a on AEC I death in vitro and in vivo. We also assessed the therapeutic potential of Wnt3a in a clinically relevant ALI model of intratracheal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure in ventilated mice. We found that the activation of P2X7R by BzATP caused the death of AEC I by suppressing Wnt/β-catenin signaling through stimulating glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) and proteasome. On the other hand, the activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling by Wnt3a, GSK-3β inhibitor, or proteasome inhibitor blocked the P2X7R-mediated cell death. More importantly, Wnt3a attenuated the AEC I damage caused by intratracheal instillation of BzATP in rats or LPS in ventilated mice. Our results suggest that Wnt3a overrides the effect of P2X7R on the Wnt/β-catenin signaling to prevent the AEC I death and restrict the severity of ALI. PMID:24922070

  10. Practicing death.

    PubMed

    Avny, Ohad; Alon, Aya

    2016-07-01

    This narrative describes the struggle of a primary care physician contending with the challenge of remaining committed to his patient's care despite a sense of burnout in relation to an intense period of patient deaths. The story presents two patient deaths and the physician's reflections on how he handled both cases. PMID:26899633

  11. Enhanced antimicrobial peptide-induced activity in the mollusc Toll-2 family through evolution via tandem Toll/interleukin-1 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jun; Chen, Yihong; Jin, Min; Ren, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Toll receptors play an important role in the innate immunity of invertebrates. All reported Tolls have only one Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain at the C-terminal. In this study, numerous Tolls with tandem TIRs at the C-terminal were found in molluscs. Such Tolls presented an extra TIR (TIR-1) compared with Toll-I. Thus, Toll-I might be the ancestor of tandem TIRs containing Toll. To test this hypothesis, 83 Toll-I and Toll-2 (most have two TIRs, but others seem to be the evolutionary intermediates) genes from 29 shellfish species were identified. These Tolls were divided into nine groups based on phylogenetic analyses. A strong correlation between phylogeny and motif composition was found. All Toll proteins contained the TIR-2 domain, whereas the TIR-1 domain only existed in some Toll-2 protein, suggesting that TIR-1 domain insertion may play an important role in Toll protein evolution. Further analyses of functional divergence and adaptive evolution showed that some of the critical sites responsible for functional divergence may have been under positive selection. An additional intragenic recombination played an important role in the evolution of the Toll-I and Toll-2 genes. To investigate the functional difference of Toll-I and Toll-2, over expression of Hcu_Toll-I or Hcu_Toll-2-2 in Drosophila S2 cells was performed. Results showed that Hcu_Toll-2-2 had stronger antimicrobial peptide (AMP) activity than Hcu_Toll-I. Therefore, enhanced AMP-induced activity resulted from tandem TIRs in Toll-2s of molluscs during evolution history. PMID:27429771

  12. Enhanced antimicrobial peptide-induced activity in the mollusc Toll-2 family through evolution via tandem Toll/interleukin-1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jun; Chen, Yihong; Jin, Min; Ren, Qian

    2016-06-01

    Toll receptors play an important role in the innate immunity of invertebrates. All reported Tolls have only one Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain at the C-terminal. In this study, numerous Tolls with tandem TIRs at the C-terminal were found in molluscs. Such Tolls presented an extra TIR (TIR-1) compared with Toll-I. Thus, Toll-I might be the ancestor of tandem TIRs containing Toll. To test this hypothesis, 83 Toll-I and Toll-2 (most have two TIRs, but others seem to be the evolutionary intermediates) genes from 29 shellfish species were identified. These Tolls were divided into nine groups based on phylogenetic analyses. A strong correlation between phylogeny and motif composition was found. All Toll proteins contained the TIR-2 domain, whereas the TIR-1 domain only existed in some Toll-2 protein, suggesting that TIR-1 domain insertion may play an important role in Toll protein evolution. Further analyses of functional divergence and adaptive evolution showed that some of the critical sites responsible for functional divergence may have been under positive selection. An additional intragenic recombination played an important role in the evolution of the Toll-I and Toll-2 genes. To investigate the functional difference of Toll-I and Toll-2, over expression of Hcu_Toll-I or Hcu_Toll-2-2 in Drosophila S2 cells was performed. Results showed that Hcu_Toll-2-2 had stronger antimicrobial peptide (AMP) activity than Hcu_Toll-I. Therefore, enhanced AMP-induced activity resulted from tandem TIRs in Toll-2s of molluscs during evolution history. PMID:27429771

  13. Dietary blueberry attenuates whole-body insulin resistance in high fat-fed mice by reducing adipocyte death and its inflammatory sequelae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adipose tissue (AT) inflammation promotes insulin resistance (IR) and other obesity complications. AT inflammation and IR are associated with oxidative stress, adipocyte death, and the scavenging of dead adipocytes by proinflammatory CD11c+ AT macrophages (ATMF). We tested the hypothesis that supple...

  14. The biology of Toll-like receptors.

    PubMed

    Means, T K; Golenbock, D T; Fenton, M J

    2000-09-01

    In 1997, a human homologue of the Drosophila Toll protein was described, a protein later to be designated Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Since that time, additional human and murine TLR proteins have been identified. Mammalian TLR proteins appear to represent a conserved family of innate immune recognition receptors. These receptors are coupled to a signaling pathway that is conserved in mammals, insects, and plants, resulting in the activation of genes that mediate innate immune defenses. Numerous studies have now identified a wide variety of chemically-diverse bacterial products that serve as putative ligands for TLR proteins. More recent studies have identified the first endogenous protein ligands for TLR proteins. TLR signaling represents a key feature of innate immune response to pathogen invasion. PMID:10817965

  15. 23 CFR 950.5 - Requirement to use electronic toll collection technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Requirement to use electronic toll collection technology... technology. (a) Any toll agency operating a toll facility pursuant to authority under a 1604 toll program... agency using electronic toll collection technology must develop and implement reasonable methods...

  16. 23 CFR 950.5 - Requirement to use electronic toll collection technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Requirement to use electronic toll collection technology... technology. (a) Any toll agency operating a toll facility pursuant to authority under a 1604 toll program... agency using electronic toll collection technology must develop and implement reasonable methods...

  17. 23 CFR 950.5 - Requirement to use electronic toll collection technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Requirement to use electronic toll collection technology... technology. (a) Any toll agency operating a toll facility pursuant to authority under a 1604 toll program... agency using electronic toll collection technology must develop and implement reasonable methods...

  18. 23 CFR 950.5 - Requirement to use electronic toll collection technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Requirement to use electronic toll collection technology... technology. (a) Any toll agency operating a toll facility pursuant to authority under a 1604 toll program... agency using electronic toll collection technology must develop and implement reasonable methods...

  19. 23 CFR 950.5 - Requirement to use electronic toll collection technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Requirement to use electronic toll collection technology... technology. (a) Any toll agency operating a toll facility pursuant to authority under a 1604 toll program... agency using electronic toll collection technology must develop and implement reasonable methods...

  20. Death duties

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Kathryn A.; Eden, David

    2007-01-01

    PROBLEM BEING ADDRESSED Family physicians are often called upon to pronounce and certify the deaths of patients. Inadequate knowledge of the Coroners Act (in the province of Ontario) and of the correct process of certifying death can make physicians uncomfortable when confronted with these tasks. OBJECTIVE OF PROGRAM To educate family physicians about how to perform the administrative tasks required of them when patients die. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The program included an educational video, a tutorial outlining the process of death certification, and discussion with a regional coroner about key features of the Coroners Act. In small groups, participants worked through cases of patient deaths in which they were asked to determine whether a coroner needed to be involved, to determine the manner of death, and to complete a mock death certificate for each case. CONCLUSION All participants reported a high level of satisfaction with the workshop and thought the main objective of the program had been achieved. Results of a test given 3 months after the workshop showed substantial improvement in participants’ knowledge of the coroner’s role and of the process of death certification. PMID:17872782

  1. Neonatal Death

    MedlinePlus

    ... story First Candle Centering Corporation The Compassionate Friends Star Legacy Foundation Last reviewed: November, 2015 Neonatal death ... story First Candle Centering Corporation The Compassionate Friends Star Legacy Foundation Last reviewed: November, 2015 Complications & Loss ...

  2. Fructus ligustri lucidi extracts induce human glioma cell death through regulation of Akt/mTOR pathway in vitro and reduce glioma tumor growth in U87MG xenograft mouse model.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Ji Cheon; Kim, Jin Won; Kwon, Chae Hwa; Kim, Thae Hyun; Kim, Yong Keun

    2011-03-01

    The present study was undertaken to examine the effect of Fructus ligustri lucidi (FLL) extracts on glioma cell growth and to determine the underlying mechanism by which FLL extracts exert anticancer properties in human U87MG glioma cells. The FLL extracts resulted in cell death in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Western blot analysis showed that treatment with FLL extracts caused down-regulation of the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway. Overexpression of Akt prevented the cell death induced by the FLL extracts. The FLL extracts caused a decrease in the expression of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and the FLL extract-induced cell death was increased by the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin. The FLL extracts decreased the expression of survivin. Oral administration of FLL extracts in subcutaneous U87MG xenograft models reduced the glioma tumor volume. These findings indicate that the FLL extracts resulted in glioma cell death through regulation of the Akt/mTOR/survivin pathway in vitro and inhibited glioma tumor growth in vivo. These data suggest that the FLL extracts may serve as a potential therapeutic agent for malignant human gliomas. PMID:20737659

  3. Emergency department naloxone distribution: a Rhode Island department of health, recovery community, and emergency department partnership to reduce opioid overdose deaths.

    PubMed

    Samuels, Elizabeth

    2014-10-01

    In response to increasing rates of opioid overdose deaths in Rhode Island (RI), the RI Department of Health, RI emergency physicians, and Anchor Community Recovery Center designed an emergency department (ED) naloxone distribution and peer-recovery coach program for people at risk of opioid overdose. ED patients at risk for overdose are offered a take home naloxone kit, patient education video, and, when available, an Anchor peer recovery coach to provide recovery support and referral to treatment. In August 2014, the program launched at Kent, Miriam, and Rhode Island Hospital Emergency Departments. PMID:25271659

  4. T-cell death following immune activation is mediated by mitochondria-localized SARM.

    PubMed

    Panneerselvam, P; Singh, L P; Selvarajan, V; Chng, W J; Ng, S B; Tan, N S; Ho, B; Chen, J; Ding, J L

    2013-03-01

    Following acute-phase infection, activated T cells are terminated to achieve immune homeostasis, failure of which results in lymphoproliferative and autoimmune diseases. We report that sterile α- and heat armadillo-motif-containing protein (SARM), the most conserved Toll-like receptors adaptor, is proapoptotic during T-cell immune response. SARM expression is significantly reduced in natural killer (NK)/T lymphoma patients compared with healthy individuals, suggesting that decreased SARM supports NK/T-cell proliferation. T cells knocked down of SARM survived and proliferated more significantly compared with wild-type T cells following influenza infection in vivo. During activation of cytotoxic T cells, the SARM level fell before rising, correlating inversely with cell proliferation and subsequent T-cell clearance. SARM knockdown rescued T cells from both activation- and neglect-induced cell deaths. The mitochondria-localized SARM triggers intrinsic apoptosis by generating reactive oxygen species and depolarizing the mitochondrial potential. The proapoptotic function is attributable to the C-terminal sterile alpha motif and Toll/interleukin-1 receptor domains. Mechanistically, SARM mediates intrinsic apoptosis via B cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) family members. SARM suppresses B cell lymphoma-extra large (Bcl-xL) and downregulates extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation, which are cell survival effectors. Overexpression of Bcl-xL and double knockout of Bcl-2 associated X protein and Bcl-2 homologous antagonist killer substantially reduced SARM-induced apoptosis. Collectively, we have shown how T-cell death following infection is mediated by SARM-induced intrinsic apoptosis, which is crucial for T-cell homeostasis. PMID:23175186

  5. 47 CFR 51.213 - Toll dialing parity implementation plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Toll dialing parity implementation plans. 51... parity implementation plans. (a) A LEC must file a plan for providing intraLATA toll dialing parity... dialing parity within a state until the implementation plan has been approved by the appropriate...

  6. 47 CFR 51.213 - Toll dialing parity implementation plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Toll dialing parity implementation plans. 51... parity implementation plans. (a) A LEC must file a plan for providing intraLATA toll dialing parity... dialing parity within a state until the implementation plan has been approved by the appropriate...

  7. 47 CFR 51.213 - Toll dialing parity implementation plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Toll dialing parity implementation plans. 51... parity implementation plans. (a) A LEC must file a plan for providing intraLATA toll dialing parity... dialing parity within a state until the implementation plan has been approved by the appropriate...

  8. 47 CFR 51.213 - Toll dialing parity implementation plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Toll dialing parity implementation plans. 51... parity implementation plans. (a) A LEC must file a plan for providing intraLATA toll dialing parity... dialing parity within a state until the implementation plan has been approved by the appropriate...

  9. 33 CFR 401.26 - Security for tolls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Section 401.26 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT... applies, security for the payment of tolls in accordance with the “St. Lawrence Seaway Tariff of Tolls” as... sufficient to cover the tolls established in the “St. Lawrence Seaway Tariff of Tolls” for the...

  10. Toll-Like Receptor Gene Expression during Trichinella spiralis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sin; Park, Mi Kyung; Yu, Hak Sun

    2015-01-01

    In Trichinella spiralis infection, type 2 helper T (Th2) cell-related and regulatory T (Treg) cell-related immune responses are the most important immune events. In order to clarify which Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are closely associated with these responses, we analyzed the expression of mouse TLR genes in the small intestine and muscle tissue during T. spiralis infection. In addition, the expression of several chemokine- and cytokine-encoding genes, which are related to Th2 and Treg cell mediated immune responses, were analyzed in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) isolated from myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88)/TIR-associated proteins (TIRAP) and Toll receptor-associated activator of interferons (TRIF) adapter protein deficient and wild type (WT) mice. The results showed significantly increased TLR4 and TLR9 gene expression in the small intestine after 2 weeks of T. spiralis infection. In the muscle, TLR1, TLR2, TLR5, and TLR9 gene expression significantly increased after 4 weeks of infection. Only the expression of the TLR4 and TLR9 genes was significantly elevated in WT MEF cells after treatment with excretory-secretory (ES) proteins. Gene expression for Th2 chemokine genes were highly enhanced by ES proteins in WT MEF cells, while this elevation was slightly reduced in MyD88/TIRAP-/- MEF cells, and quite substantially decreased in TRIF-/- MEF cells. In contrast, IL-10 and TGF-β expression levels were not elevated in MyD88/TIRAP-/- MEF cells. In conclusion, we suggest that TLR4 and TLR9 might be closely linked to Th2 cell and Treg cell mediated immune responses, although additional data are needed to convincingly prove this observation. PMID:26323841

  11. Toll-Like Receptor Gene Expression during Trichinella spiralis Infection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sin; Park, Mi Kyung; Yu, Hak Sun

    2015-08-01

    In Trichinella spiralis infection, type 2 helper T (Th2) cell-related and regulatory T (Treg) cell-related immune responses are the most important immune events. In order to clarify which Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are closely associated with these responses, we analyzed the expression of mouse TLR genes in the small intestine and muscle tissue during T. spiralis infection. In addition, the expression of several chemokine- and cytokine-encoding genes, which are related to Th2 and Treg cell mediated immune responses, were analyzed in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) isolated from myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88)/TIR-associated proteins (TIRAP) and Toll receptor-associated activator of interferons (TRIF) adapter protein deficient and wild type (WT) mice. The results showed significantly increased TLR4 and TLR9 gene expression in the small intestine after 2 weeks of T. spiralis infection. In the muscle, TLR1, TLR2, TLR5, and TLR9 gene expression significantly increased after 4 weeks of infection. Only the expression of the TLR4 and TLR9 genes was significantly elevated in WT MEF cells after treatment with excretory-secretory (ES) proteins. Gene expression for Th2 chemokine genes were highly enhanced by ES proteins in WT MEF cells, while this elevation was slightly reduced in MyD88/TIRAP(-/-) MEF cells, and quite substantially decreased in TRIF(-/-) MEF cells. In contrast, IL-10 and TGF-β expression levels were not elevated in MyD88/TIRAP(-/-) MEF cells. In conclusion, we suggest that TLR4 and TLR9 might be closely linked to Th2 cell and Treg cell mediated immune responses, although additional data are needed to convincingly prove this observation. PMID:26323841

  12. Conventional and Non-Conventional Drosophila Toll Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Scott A.; Wasserman, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of Toll in Drosophila and of the remarkable conservation in pathway composition and organization catalyzed a transformation in our understanding of innate immune recognition and response. At the center of that picture is a cascade of interactions in which specific microbial cues activate Toll receptors, which then transmit signals driving transcription factor nuclear localization and activity. Experiments gave substance to the vision of pattern recognition receptors, linked phenomena in development, gene regulation, and immunity into a coherent whole, and revealed a rich set of variations for identifying non-self and responding effectively. More recently, research in Drosophila has illuminated the positive and negative regulation of Toll activation, the organization of signaling events at and beneath membranes, the sorting of information flow, and the existence of non-conventional signaling via Toll-related receptors. Here, we provide an overview of the Toll pathway of flies and highlight these ongoing realms of research. PMID:23632253

  13. Toll-like Receptors in Tumor Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Paulos, Chrystal M.; Kaiser, Andrew; Wrzesinski, Claudia; Hinrichs, Christian S.; Cassard, Lydie; Boni, Andrea; Muranski, Pawel; Sanchez-Perez, Luis; Palmer, Douglas C.; Yu, Zhiya; Antony, Paul A.; Gattinoni, Luca; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Restifo, Nicholas P.

    2007-01-01

    Lymphodepletion with chemotherapeutic agents or total body irradiation (TBI) before adoptive transfer of tumor-specific T cells is a critical advancement in the treatment of patients with melanoma. More than 50% of patients that are refractory to other treatments experience an objective or curative response with this approach. Emerging data indicate that the key mechanisms underlying how TBI augments the functions of adoptively transferred T cells include (a) the depletion of regulatory Tcells (Treg) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells that limit the function and proliferation of adoptively transferred cells; (b) the removal of immune cells that act as “sinks” for homeostatic cytokines, whose levels increase after lymphodepletion; and (c) the activation of the innate immune system via Toll-like receptor 4 signaling, which is engaged by microbial lipopolysaccharide that translocated across the radiation-injured gut. Here, we review these mechanisms and focus on the effect of Toll-like receptor agonists in adoptive immunotherapy. We also discuss alternate regimens to chemotherapy or TBI, which might be used to safely treat patients with advanced disease and promote tumor regression. PMID:17875756

  14. 47 CFR 63.65 - Closure of public toll station where another toll station of applicant in the community will...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Closure of public toll station where another toll station of applicant in the community will continue service. 63.65 Section 63.65 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) EXTENSION OF LINES, NEW LINES, AND DISCONTINUANCE,...

  15. The Heart of 25 by 25: Achieving the Goal of Reducing Global and Regional Premature Deaths From Cardiovascular Diseases and Stroke: A Modeling Study From the American Heart Association and World Heart Federation.

    PubMed

    Sacco, Ralph L; Roth, Gregory A; Reddy, K Srinath; Arnett, Donna K; Bonita, Ruth; Gaziano, Thomas A; Heidenreich, Paul A; Huffman, Mark D; Mayosi, Bongani M; Mendis, Shanthi; Murray, Christopher J L; Perel, Pablo; Piñeiro, Daniel J; Smith, Sidney C; Taubert, Kathryn A; Wood, David A; Zhao, Dong; Zoghbi, William A

    2016-06-01

    In 2011, the United Nations set key targets to reach by 2025 to reduce the risk of premature noncommunicable disease death by 25% by 2025. With cardiovascular disease being the largest contributor to global mortality, accounting for nearly half of the 36 million annual noncommunicable disease deaths, achieving the 2025 goal requires that cardiovascular disease and its risk factors be aggressively addressed. The Global Cardiovascular Disease Taskforce, comprising the World Heart Federation, American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology Foundation, European Heart Network, and European Society of Cardiology, with expanded representation from Asia, Africa, and Latin America, along with global cardiovascular disease experts, disseminates information and approaches to reach the United Nations 2025 targets. The writing committee, which reflects Global Cardiovascular Disease Taskforce membership, engaged the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, University of Washington, to develop region-specific estimates of premature cardiovascular mortality in 2025 based on various scenarios. Results show that >5 million premature CVD deaths among men and 2.8 million among women are projected worldwide by 2025, which can be reduced to 3.5 million and 2.2 million, respectively, if risk factor targets for blood pressure, tobacco use, diabetes mellitus, and obesity are achieved. However, global risk factor targets have various effects, depending on region. For most regions, United Nations targets for reducing systolic blood pressure and tobacco use have more substantial effects on future scenarios compared with maintaining current levels of body mass index and fasting plasma glucose. However, preventing increases in body mass index has the largest effect in some high-income countries. An approach achieving reductions in multiple risk factors has the largest impact for almost all regions. Achieving these goals can be accomplished only if countries set priorities

  16. The Heart of 25 by 25: Achieving the Goal of Reducing Global and Regional Premature Deaths From Cardiovascular Diseases and Stroke: A Modeling Study From the American Heart Association and World Heart Federation.

    PubMed

    Sacco, Ralph L; Roth, Gregory A; Reddy, K Srinath; Arnett, Donna K; Bonita, Ruth; Gaziano, Thomas A; Heidenreich, Paul A; Huffman, Mark D; Mayosi, Bongani M; Mendis, Shanthi; Murray, Christopher J L; Perel, Pablo; Piñeiro, Daniel J; Smith, Sidney C; Taubert, Kathryn A; Wood, David A; Zhao, Dong; Zoghbi, William A

    2016-06-01

    In 2011, the United Nations set key targets to reach by 2025 to reduce the risk of premature noncommunicable disease death by 25% by 2025. With cardiovascular disease being the largest contributor to global mortality, accounting for nearly half of the 36 million annual noncommunicable disease deaths, achieving the 2025 goal requires that cardiovascular disease and its risk factors be aggressively addressed. The Global Cardiovascular Disease Taskforce, comprising the World Heart Federation, American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology Foundation, European Heart Network, and European Society of Cardiology, with expanded representation from Asia, Africa, and Latin America, along with global cardiovascular disease experts, disseminates information and approaches to reach the United Nations 2025 targets. The writing committee, which reflects Global Cardiovascular Disease Taskforce membership, engaged the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, University of Washington, to develop region-specific estimates of premature cardiovascular mortality in 2025 based on various scenarios. Results show that >5 million premature CVD deaths among men and 2.8 million among women are projected worldwide by 2025, which can be reduced to 3.5 million and 2.2 million, respectively, if risk factor targets for blood pressure, tobacco use, diabetes mellitus, and obesity are achieved. However, global risk factor targets have various effects, depending on region. For most regions, United Nations targets for reducing systolic blood pressure and tobacco use have more substantial effects on future scenarios compared with maintaining current levels of body mass index and fasting plasma glucose. However, preventing increases in body mass index has the largest effect in some high-income countries. An approach achieving reductions in multiple risk factors has the largest impact for almost all regions. Achieving these goals can be accomplished only if countries set priorities

  17. Phloroglucinols inhibit chemical mediators and xanthine oxidase, and protect cisplatin-induced cell death by reducing reactive oxygen species in normal human urothelial and bladder cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kai-Wei; Huang, A-Mei; Tu, Huang-Yao; Weng, Jing-Ru; Hour, Tzyh-Chyuan; Wei, Bai-Luh; Yang, Shyh-Chyun; Wang, Jih-Pyang; Pu, Yeong-Shiau; Lin, Chun-Nan

    2009-10-14

    Phloroglucinols, garcinielliptones HA-HE (1-5), and C (6) were studied in vitro for their inhibitory effects on chemical mediators released from mast cells, neutrophils, and macrophages. Compound 6 revealed significant inhibitory effect on release of lysozyme from rat neutrophils stimulated with formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP)/cytochalasin B (CB). Compounds 3, 4, and 6 showed significant inhibitory effects on superoxide anion generation in rat neutrophils stimulated with (fMLP)/(CB), while compounds 1 and 5 revealed inhibitory effects on tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) formation in macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Compounds 1 and 3-6 showed inhibitory effects on xanthine oxidase (XO) and could inhibit the DNA breakage caused by O2(-*). Treatment of NTUB1 with 2 to 60 microM compound 3 and 5 microM cisplatin and SV-HUC1 with 9 to 60 microM 3 and 5 microM cisplatin, respectively, resulted in an increase of viability of cells. These results indicated that compounds 1 and 3-6 showed anti-inflammatory effects and antioxidant activities. Compound 3 mediates through the suppression of XO activity and reduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and protection of subsequent cell death. PMID:19754119

  18. Brain death.

    PubMed

    Wijdicks, Eelco F M

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis of brain death should be based on a simple premise. If every possible confounder has been excluded and all possible treatments have been tried or considered, irreversible loss of brain function is clinically recognized as the absence of brainstem reflexes, verified apnea, loss of vascular tone, invariant heart rate, and, eventually, cardiac standstill. This condition cannot be reversed - not even partly - by medical or surgical intervention, and thus is final. Many countries in the world have introduced laws that acknowledge that a patient can be declared brain-dead by neurologic standards. The U.S. law differs substantially from all other brain death legislation in the world because the U.S. law does not spell out details of the neurologic examination. Evidence-based practice guidelines serve as a standard. In this chapter, I discuss the history of development of the criteria, the current clinical examination, and some of the ethical and legal issues that have emerged. Generally, the concept of brain death has been accepted by all major religions. But patients' families may have different ideas and are mostly influenced by cultural attitudes, traditional customs, and personal beliefs. Suggestions are offered to support these families. PMID:24182378

  19. Death of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 in real mayonnaise and reduced-calorie mayonnaise dressing as influenced by initial population and storage temperature.

    PubMed Central

    Hathcox, A K; Beuchat, L R; Doyle, M P

    1995-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the survivability of low-density populations (10(0) and 10(2) CFU/g) of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 inoculated into real mayonnaise and reduced-calorie mayonnaise dressing and stored at 20 and 30 degrees C, temperatures within the range used for normal commercial mayonnaise distribution and storage. Inactivation patterns at 5 degrees C and inactivation of high-inoculum populations (10(6) CFU/g) were also determined. The pathogen did not grow in either mayonnaise formulation, regardless of the inoculum level or storage temperature. Increases in storage temperature from 5 to 20 degrees C and from 20 to 30 degrees C resulted in dramatic increases in the rate of inactivation. Populations of E. coli O157:H7 in the reduced-calorie and real formulations inoculated with a population of 0.23 to 0.29 log10 CFU/g and held at 30 degrees C were reduced to undetectable levels within 1 and 2 days, respectively; viable cells were not detected after 1 day at 20 degrees C. In mayonnaise containing an initial population of 2.23 log10 CFU/g, viable cells were not detected after 4 days at 30 degrees C or 7 days at 20 degrees C; tolerance was greater in real mayonnaise than in reduced-calorie mayonnaise dressing stored at 5 degrees C. The tolerance of E. coli O157:H7 inoculated at the highest population density (6.23 log 10 CFU/g) was less in reduced-calorie mayonnaise dressing than in real mayonnaise at all storage temperatures. In reduced-calorie mayonnaise dressing and real mayonnaise initially containing 2.23 log10 CFU/g, levels were undetectable after 28 and 58 days at 5 degrees C, respectively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8534084

  20. Toll-Like Receptors: A Key Marker for Periodontal Disease and Preterm Birth – A Contemporary Review

    PubMed Central

    Mahendra, Jaideep

    2015-01-01

    The receptors of the innate immune system have evolved to recognize pathogenic bacteria in a complex manner. Out of these immune receptors, the pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) such as Toll like receptors have gained importance off late to play a key role in the activation of cascade of inflammatory cytokines in pathogenesis of preterm birth. Preterm birth has become leading cause of neonatal deaths globally. The concept of oral infection influencing the occurrence of preterm delivery has gained importance. Translocation of periodontal pathogens and inflammatory mediators play role in the pathogenesis of preterm labour. The transmembrane toll like receptors of innate immunity have been recently implicated in the association of periodontal infection and preterm labour. The TLRs are considered as a key marker and TLR blockade can be a critical method for treating women who are exposed to periodontal pathogens. This review is aimed at discussing the role of TLR in periodontal disease and its relationship with preterm birth. PMID:26501032

  1. Evaluation of bedtime basics for babies: a national crib distribution program to reduce the risk of sleep-related sudden infant deaths.

    PubMed

    Hauck, Fern R; Tanabe, Kawai O; McMurry, Timothy; Moon, Rachel Y

    2015-06-01

    Rates of sleep-related infant deaths have remained stagnant in recent years. Although most parents are aware of safe sleep recommendations, barriers to adherence, including lack of access to a safe crib, remain. The objective of this study was to describe parental knowledge and practices regarding infant sleep position, bedsharing, pacifier use, and feeding practices before and after receipt of a free crib and safe sleep education. Bedtime Basics for Babies (BBB) enrolled high-risk families in Washington, Indiana, and Washington, DC and provided them with cribs and safe sleep education. Parents completed surveys before ("prenatal" and "postnatal") and 1-3 months after crib receipt ("follow-up"). Descriptive and bivariate analyses were completed. 3,303 prenatal, 1,483 postnatal, and 1,729 follow-up surveys were collected. Parental knowledge of recommended infant sleep position improved from 76% (prenatal) and 77% (postnatal) to 94% after crib receipt (p < 0.001). Intended use of supine positioning increased from 84% (prenatal) and 80% (postnatal) to 87% after the intervention (p < 0.001). Although only 8% of parents intended to bedshare when asked prenatally, 38% of parents receiving the crib after the infant's birth reported that they had bedshared the night before. This decreased to 16% after the intervention. Ninety percent reported that the baby slept in a crib after the intervention, compared with 51% postnatally (p < 0.01). BBB was successful in changing knowledge and practices in the majority of high-risk participants with regards to placing the infant supine in a crib for sleep. Crib distribution and safe sleep education positively influence knowledge and practices about safe sleep. PMID:25331608

  2. Reduced cellular redox status induces 4-hydroxynonenal-mediated caspase 3 activation leading to erythrocyte death during chronic arsenic exposure in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Debabrata; Sen, Gargi; Biswas, Tuli

    2010-05-01

    Chronic exposure to arsenic in rats led to gradual accumulation of the toxicant in erythrocytes causing oxidative stress in these cells. 4-Hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), a major aldehyde product of lipid peroxidation, contributed significantly to the cytopathological events observed during oxidative stress in the erythrocytes of exposed rats. 4-HNE triggered death signal cascade that was initiated with the formation of HNE-protein adducts in cytosol. HNE-protein adduct formation resulted in depletion of cytosolic antioxidants followed by increased generation of ROS. Results showed accumulation of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) from the early stages of arsenic exposure, while superoxide (O{sub 2}{sup c}entre dot{sup -}) and hydroxyl radical ({sup c}entre dotOH) also contributed to the oxidative stress during longer period of exposure. Suppression of antioxidant system coupled with increased generation of ROS eventually led to activation of caspase 3 during arsenic exposure. Attenuation of HNE-mediated activation of caspase 3 in presence of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) indicated the involvement of GSH in the process. Prevention of HNE-mediated degradation of membrane proteins in presence of Z-DEVD-FMK identified caspase 3 as the principal mediator of HNE-induced cellular damage during arsenic exposure. Degradation of band 3 followed by its aggregation on the red cell surface promoted immunologic recognition of redistributed band 3 by autologous IgG with subsequent attachment of C3b. Finally, the formation of C3b-IgG-band 3 immune complex accelerated the elimination of affected cells from circulation and led to the decline of erythrocyte life span during chronic arsenic toxicity.

  3. Treatment of Elderly Hypertensive Patients with Epithelial Sodium Channel Inhibitors Combined with a Thiazide Diuretic Reduces Coronary Mortality and Sudden Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    Hebert, Patricia R.; Coffey, Christopher S.; Byrne, Daniel W.; Scott, Theresa A.; Fagard, Robert H.; Rottman, Jeffrey N.; Murray, Katherine T.; Oates, John A.

    2008-01-01

    Background No reduction in either coronary mortality or sudden cardiac death (SCD) has been demonstrated in overviews of randomized trials of treatment of hypertension with diuretics. Methods An overview was conducted of coronary mortality and SCD in randomized controlled antihypertensive trials in which an epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) inhibitor/ hydrochlorthiazide (HCTZ) combination was used. Secondarily, an analogous overview in which thiazide diuretic was used alone was performed. Randomized trials that used an ENaC inhibitor/ HCTZ combination (or, alternatively, thiazide diuretic alone) were identified from previous meta-analyses, searches of PubMed, search of the Cochrane Clinical Trials database, and review of publications that addressed the consequences of treating hypertension. Trials in which participants were randomized to either an ENaC inhibitor combined with a thiazide diuretic (or to a thiazide diuretic alone) or to control treatment for at least one year and in which coronary mortality was reported were included. Numbers of events in individual trials were abstracted independently by 2 authors. Results Significant reductions in both coronary mortality and SCD were observed in the overview of trials in which elderly patients received an ENaC inhibitor/ HCTZ combination. The odds ratio (OR) for coronary mortality was 0.59 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.44, 0.78) and for SCD was 0.60 (95% CI 0.38, 0.94). In contrast, an overview of the trials using thiazide diuretics alone showed no significant reductions of either coronary mortality (OR 0.94; 95% CI 0.81, 1.09) or SCD (OR 1.27; 95% CI 0.93, 1.75). Conclusions Use of an ENaC inhibitor combined with HCTZ for treatment of hypertension in the elderly results in favorable effects on coronary mortality and SCD. PMID:19727429

  4. Concentrations of ultrafine particles at a highway toll collection booth and exposure implications for toll collectors.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Hsiang; Huang, Cheng-Hsiung; Huang, Hsiao-Lin; Tsai, Chuen-Jinn

    2010-12-15

    Research regarding the magnitude of ultrafine particle levels at highway toll stations is limited. This study measured ambient concentrations of ultrafine particles at a highway toll station from October 30 to November 1 and November 5 to November 6, 2008. A scanning mobility particle sizer was used to measure ultrafine particle concentrations at a ticket/cash tollbooth. Levels of hourly average ultrafine particles at the tollbooth were about 3-6 times higher than those in urban backgrounds, indicating that a considerable amount of ultrafine particles are exhausted from passing vehicles. A bi-modal size distribution pattern with a dominant mode at about <6 nm and a minor mode at about 40 nm was observed at the tollbooth. The high amounts of nanoparticles in this study can be attributed to gas-to-particle reactions in fresh fumes emitted directly from vehicles. The influences of traffic volume, wind speed, and relative humidity on ultrafine particle concentrations were also determined. High ambient concentrations of ultrafine particles existed under low wind speed, low relative humidity, and high traffic volume. Although different factors account for high ambient concentrations of ultrafine particles at the tollbooth, measurements indicate that toll collectors who work close to traffic emission sources have a high exposure risk. PMID:21071066

  5. Structure of toll-like receptors.

    PubMed

    Gay, Nicholas J; Gangloff, Monique

    2008-01-01

    The ten human Toll-like receptors are able to respond to an extremely diverse range of microbial products ranging from di- and tri-acylated lipids to nucleic acids. An understanding of the molecular structure adopted by the receptor extracellular, transmembrane, and cytoplasmic domains and the way in which these structures interact with ligands and downstream signaling adapters can explain how recognition and signal transduction are achieved at a molecular level. In this article we discuss how the leucine-rich repeats of the receptor ectodomain have evolved to bind a wide variety of biological molecules. We also discuss how ligand binding induces dimerization of two receptor chains and initiates a series of protein conformational changes that lead to a signaling event in the cytoplasm of the immune system cell. Thus, the signaling process of the TLRs can be viewed as a unidirectional molecular switch. PMID:18071660

  6. Mycobacterial signaling through toll-like receptors

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Joyoti; Shin, Dong-Min; Jo, Eun-Kyeong

    2012-01-01

    Studies over the past decade have helped to decipher molecular networks dependent on Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, in mycobacteria-infected macrophages. Stimulation of TLRs by mycobacteria and their antigenic components rapidly induces intracellular signaling cascades involved in the activation of nuclear factor-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, which play important roles in orchestrating proinflammatory responses and innate defense through generation of a variety of antimicrobial effector molecules. Recent studies have provided evidence that mycobacterial TLR-signaling cross talks with other intracellular antimicrobial innate pathways, the autophagy process and functional vitamin D receptor (VDR) signaling. In this article we describe recent advances in the recognition, responses, and regulation of mycobacterial signaling through TLRs. PMID:23189273

  7. Toll-Like Receptor Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Takumi; Kawai, Taro

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play crucial roles in the innate immune system by recognizing pathogen-associated molecular patterns derived from various microbes. TLRs signal through the recruitment of specific adaptor molecules, leading to activation of the transcription factors NF-κB and IRFs, which dictate the outcome of innate immune responses. During the past decade, the precise mechanisms underlying TLR signaling have been clarified by various approaches involving genetic, biochemical, structural, cell biological, and bioinformatics studies. TLR signaling appears to be divergent and to play important roles in many aspects of the innate immune responses to given pathogens. In this review, we describe recent progress in our understanding of TLR signaling regulation and its contributions to host defense. PMID:25309543

  8. Enhanced UV-B radiation during pupal stage reduce body mass and fat content, while increasing deformities, mortality and cell death in female adults of solitary bee Osmia bicornis.

    PubMed

    Wasielewski, Oskar; Wojciechowicz, Tatiana; Giejdasz, Karol; Krishnan, Natraj

    2015-08-01

    The effects of enhanced UV-B radiation on the oogenesis and morpho-anatomical characteristics of the European solitary red mason bee Osmia bicornis L. (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae) were tested under laboratory conditions. Cocooned females in the pupal stage were exposed directly to different doses (0, 9.24, 12.32, and 24.64 kJ/m(2) /d) of artificial UV-B. Our experiments revealed that enhanced UV-B radiation can reduce body mass and fat body content, cause deformities and increase mortality. Following UV exposure at all 3 different doses, the body mass of bees was all significantly reduced compared to the control, with the highest UV dose causing the largest reduction. Similarly, following UV-B radiation, in treated groups the fat body index decreased and the fat body index was the lowest in the group receiving the highest dose of UV radiation. Mortality and morphological deformities, between untreated and exposed females varied considerably and increased with the dose of UV-B radiation. Morphological deformities were mainly manifested in the wings and mouthparts, and occurred more frequently with an increased dose of UV. Cell death was quantified by the Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay (DNA fragmentation) during early stages of oogenesis of O. bicornis females. The bees, after UV-B exposure exhibited more germarium cells with fragmented DNA. The TUNEL test indicated that in germarium, low doses of UV-B poorly induced the cell death during early development. However, exposure to moderate UV-B dose increased programmed cell death. In females treated with the highest dose of UV-B the vast majority of germarium cells were TUNEL-positive. PMID:24644123

  9. Activation of the ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas pathway reduces oxygen-glucose deprivation induced tissue swelling, ROS production, and cell death in mouse brain with angiotensin II overproduction

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jiaolin; Li, Guangze; Chen, Shuzhen; Chen, Ji; Buck, Joshua; Zhu, Yulan; Xia, Huijing; Lazartigues, Eric; Chen, Yanfang; Olson, James E.

    2014-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that mice which overexpress human renin and angiotensinogen (R+A+) show enhanced cerebral damage in both in vivo and in vitro experimental ischemia models. Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) counteracts the effects of angiotensin (Ang-II) by transforming it into Ang-(1-7), thus reducing the ligand for the AT1 receptor and increasing stimulation of the Mas receptor. Triple transgenic mice, SARA, which specifically overexpress ACE2 in neurons of R+A+ mice were used to study the role of ACE2 in ischemic stroke using oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) of brain slices as an in vitro model. We examined tissue swelling, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and cell death in cerebral cortex (CX) and the hippocampal CA1 region during OGD. Expression levels of NADPH oxidase isoforms, Nox2 and Nox4 were measured using western blots. Results show that SARA mice and R+A+ mice treated with the Mas receptor agonist Ang-(1-7) had less swelling, cell death, and ROS production in CX and CA1 areas compared to those in R+A+ animals. Treatment of slices from SARA mice with the Mas antagonist A779 eliminated this protection. Finally, western blots revealed less Nox2 and Nox4 expression in SARA mice compared with R+A+ mice both before and after OGD. We suggest that reduced brain swelling and cell death observed in SARA animals exposed to OGD results from diminished ROS production coupled with lower expression of NADPH oxidases. Thus, the ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas receptor pathway plays a protective role in brain ischemic damage by counteracting the detrimental effects of Ang-II-induced ROS production. PMID:24814023

  10. Activation of the ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas pathway reduces oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced tissue swelling, ROS production, and cell death in mouse brain with angiotensin II overproduction.

    PubMed

    Zheng, J; Li, G; Chen, S; Bihl, J; Buck, J; Zhu, Y; Xia, H; Lazartigues, E; Chen, Y; Olson, J E

    2014-07-25

    We previously demonstrated that mice which overexpress human renin and angiotensinogen (R+A+) show enhanced cerebral damage in both in vivo and in vitro experimental ischemia models. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) counteracts the effects of angiotensin (Ang-II) by transforming it into Ang-(1-7), thus reducing the ligand for the AT1 receptor and increasing stimulation of the Mas receptor. Triple transgenic mice, SARA, which specifically overexpress ACE2 in neurons of R+A+ mice were used to study the role of ACE2 in ischemic stroke using oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) of brain slices as an in vitro model. We examined tissue swelling, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and cell death in the cerebral cortex (CX) and the hippocampal CA1 region during OGD. Expression levels of NADPH oxidase (Nox) isoforms, Nox2 and Nox4 were measured using western blots. Results show that SARA mice and R+A+ mice treated with the Mas receptor agonist Ang-(1-7) had less swelling, cell death, and ROS production in CX and CA1 areas compared to those in R+A+ animals. Treatment of slices from SARA mice with the Mas antagonist A779 eliminated this protection. Finally, western blots revealed less Nox2 and Nox4 expression in SARA mice compared with R+A+ mice both before and after OGD. We suggest that reduced brain swelling and cell death observed in SARA animals exposed to OGD result from diminished ROS production coupled with lower expression of Nox isoforms. Thus, the ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas receptor pathway plays a protective role in brain ischemic damage by counteracting the detrimental effects of Ang-II-induced ROS production. PMID:24814023

  11. Effect of Chlamydia pneumoniae on Cellular ATP Content in Mouse Macrophages: Role of Toll-Like Receptor 2

    PubMed Central

    Yaraei, Kambiz; Campbell, Lee Ann; Zhu, Xiaodong; Liles, W. Conrad; Kuo, Cho-chou; Rosenfeld, Michael E.

    2005-01-01

    Chlamydiae are obligate intracellular gram-negative bacteria and are dependent on the host cell for ATP. Thus, chlamydial infection may alter the intracellular levels of ATP and affect all energy-dependent processes within the cell. We have shown that both live C. pneumoniae and inactivated C. pneumoniae induce markers of cell death prior to completion of the bacterial growth cycle. As depletion of ATP could account for the observed increase in cell death, the effects of C. pneumoniae on ATP concentrations within mouse macrophages were investigated. Live, heat-killed, and UV-inactivated C. pneumoniae cultures (at multiplicities of infection [MOIs] of 0.01, 0.1, and 1.0) were incubated with mouse bone marrow macrophages isolated from C57BL/6J mice and mice deficient in Toll-like receptors. Treatment of the macrophages with both live and inactivated C. pneumoniae increased the ATP content of the cells. In cells infected with live C. pneumoniae, the increase was inversely proportional to the MOI. In cells treated with inactivated C. pneumoniae, the increase in ATP content was smaller than that induced by infection with live organisms and was proportional to the MOI. The increase in ATP content early in the developmental cycle was independent of the growth of C. pneumoniae, while sustained induction required live organisms. The capacity of C. pneumoniae to increase the ATP content was ablated in macrophages deficient in expression of either Toll-like receptor 2 or the Toll-like receptor accessory protein MyD88. In contrast, no effect was observed in macrophages lacking expression of Toll-like receptor 4. PMID:15972526

  12. Tobacco Control and the Reduction in Smoking-related Premature Deaths in the United States, 1964–2012

    PubMed Central

    Holford, Theodore R.; Meza, Rafael; Warner, Kenneth E.; Meernik, Clare; Jeon, Jihyoun; Moolgavkar, Suresh H.; Levy, David T.

    2014-01-01

    Importance The 50th anniversary of the first Surgeon General’s Report on smoking and health is celebrated in 2014. This seminal document inspired efforts by government s, non-governmental organizations, and the private sector to reduce the toll of cigarette smoking through reduced initiation and increased cessation. Objective To quantify reductions in smoking -related mortality associated with implementation of tobacco control since 1964. Design, Setting and Participants Smoking histories for individual birth cohorts that actually occurred and under likely scenarios had tobacco control never emerged were estimated. National mortality rates and mortality rate ratio estimates from analytical studies of the effect of smoking on mortality yielded death rates by smoking status. Actual smoking -related mortality from 1964–2012 was compared to estimated mortality under no tobacco control that included a likely scenario (primary counterfactual) and upper and lower bounds that would capture plausible alternatives. Exposure National Health Interview Surveys yielded cigarette smoking histories for the US adult population from 1964–2012. Main Outcomes and Measures Number of premature deaths avoided and years of life saved were primary outcomes. Change in life expectancy at age 40 associated with change in cigarette smoking exposure constituted another measure of overall health outcomes. Results From 1964–2012, an estimated 17.6 million deaths were related to smoking, an estimated 8.0 (7.4–8.3, for the lower and upper tobacco control counterfactuals, respectively) million fewer premature smoking-induced deaths than what would have occurred under the alternatives and thus associated with tobacco control (5.3 (4.8–5.5) million males and 2.7 (2.5–2.7) million females). This resulted in an estimated 157 (139–165) million years of life saved, a mean of 19.6 years for each beneficiary, (111 (97–117) million for males, 46 (42–48) million for females). During this

  13. A novel Toll like receptor with two TIR domains (HcToll-2) is involved in regulation of antimicrobial peptide gene expression of Hyriopsis cumingii.

    PubMed

    Ren, Qian; Lan, Jiang-Feng; Zhong, Xue; Song, Xiao-Jun; Ma, Fei; Hui, Kai-Min; Wang, Wen; Yu, Xiao-Qiang; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2014-07-01

    Animal Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are involved in innate immunity. Toll proteins are generally transmembrane proteins. In this study, an atypical Toll-like receptor (HcToll-2) was identified from the triangle-shell pearl mussel Hyriopsis cumingii, which belongs to phylum Mollusca. Unlike the typical Toll like receptors with extracellular leucine-rich repeats (LRRs), transmembrane, and intracellular Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domains, HcToll-2 has two homologous TIR domains located at the C-terminal (designated as HcTIR1 and HcTIR2) and lacks a transmembrane domain. Phylogenetic analysis showed that HcTIR1 was clustered with TIR of sea anemone Toll, and HcTIR2 was clustered with TIR of Drosophila Toll. HcToll-2 mRNA could be detected in the hepatopancreas and was upregulated after challenge with Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Recombinant HcLRR protein with GST tag could bind to bacteria and also to LPS and PGN. Over-expression of both HcTIR1 and HcTIR2 induced drosomycin genes in Drosophila S2 cells. RNAi analysis showed that HcToll-2 was required for the expression of theromacin, which is a cysteine-rich antimicrobial peptide (AMP) gene. This research is the first report of an atypical Toll-like receptor HcToll-2 involved in antibacterial immunity through induction of AMP expression. PMID:24631579

  14. Toll-Like Receptor 7-Targeted Therapy in Respiratory Disease.

    PubMed

    Lebold, Katie M; Jacoby, David B; Drake, Matthew G

    2016-03-01

    Allergic asthma and allergic rhinitis are inflammatory diseases of the respiratory tract characterized by an excessive type-2 T helper cell (Th2) immune response. Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) is a single-stranded viral RNA receptor expressed in the airway that initiates a Th1 immune response and has garnered interest as a novel therapeutic target for treatment of allergic airway diseases. In animal models, synthetic TLR7 agonists reduce airway hyperreactivity, eosinophilic inflammation, and airway remodeling while decreasing Th2-associated cytokines. Furthermore, activation of TLR7 rapidly relaxes airway smooth muscle via production of nitric oxide. Thus, TLR7 has dual bronchodilator and anti-inflammatory effects. Two TLR7 ligands with promising pharmacologic profiles have entered clinical trials for the treatment of allergic rhinitis. Moreover, TLR7 agonists are potential antiviral therapies against respiratory viruses. TLR7 agonists enhance influenza vaccine efficacy and also reduce viral titers when given during an active airway infection. In this review, we examine the current data supporting TLR7 as a therapeutic target in allergic airway diseases. PMID:27226793

  15. Toll-Like Receptor 7-Targeted Therapy in Respiratory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lebold, Katie M.; Jacoby, David B.; Drake, Matthew G.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Allergic asthma and allergic rhinitis are inflammatory diseases of the respiratory tract characterized by an excessive type-2 T helper cell (Th2) immune response. Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) is a single-stranded viral RNA receptor expressed in the airway that initiates a Th1 immune response and has garnered interest as a novel therapeutic target for treatment of allergic airway diseases. In animal models, synthetic TLR7 agonists reduce airway hyperreactivity, eosinophilic inflammation, and airway remodeling while decreasing Th2-associated cytokines. Furthermore, activation of TLR7 rapidly relaxes airway smooth muscle via production of nitric oxide. Thus, TLR7 has dual bronchodilator and anti-inflammatory effects. Two TLR7 ligands with promising pharmacologic profiles have entered clinical trials for the treatment of allergic rhinitis. Moreover, TLR7 agonists are potential antiviral therapies against respiratory viruses. TLR7 agonists enhance influenza vaccine efficacy and also reduce viral titers when given during an active airway infection. In this review, we examine the current data supporting TLR7 as a therapeutic target in allergic airway diseases. PMID:27226793

  16. PTEN Overexpression Cooperates With Lithium to Reduce the Malignancy and to Increase Cell Death by Apoptosis via PI3K/Akt Suppression in Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    de Araujo, Wallace Martins; Robbs, Bruno Kaufmann; Bastos, Lilian G; de Souza, Waldemir F; Vidal, Flávia C B; Viola, João P B; Morgado-Diaz, Jose A

    2016-02-01

    Lithium is a well-established non-competitive inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), a kinase that is involved in several cellular processes related to cancer progression. GSK-3β is regulated upstream by PI3K/Akt, which is negatively modulated by PTEN. The role that lithium plays in cancer is controversial because lithium can activate or inhibit survival signaling pathways depending on the cell type. In this study, we analyzed the mechanisms by which lithium can modulate events related to colorectal cancer (CRC) progression and evaluated the role that survival signaling pathways such as PI3K/Akt and PTEN play in this context. We show that the administration of lithium decreased the proliferative potential of CRC cells in a GSK-3β-independent manner but induced the accumulation of cells in G2/M phase. Furthermore, high doses of lithium increased apoptosis, which was accompanied by decreased proteins levels of Akt and PTEN. Then, cells that were induced to overexpress PTEN were treated with lithium; we observed that low doses of lithium strongly increased apoptosis. Additionally, PTEN overexpression reduced proliferation, but this effect was minor compared with that in cells treated with lithium alone. Furthermore, we demonstrated that PTEN overexpression and lithium treatment separately reduced cell migration, colony formation, and invasion, and these effects were enhanced when lithium treatment and PTEN overexpression were combined. In conclusion, our findings indicate that PTEN overexpression and lithium treatment cooperate to reduce the malignancy of CRC cells and highlight lithium and PTEN as potential candidates for studies to identify new therapeutic approaches for CRC treatment. PMID:26224641

  17. A Role for the Adaptor Proteins TRAM and TRIF in Toll-like Receptor 2 Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Nilsen, Nadra J.; Vladimer, Gregory I.; Stenvik, Jørgen; Orning, M. Pontus A.; Zeid-Kilani, Maria V.; Bugge, Marit; Bergstroem, Bjarte; Conlon, Joseph; Husebye, Harald; Hise, Amy G.; Fitzgerald, Katherine A.; Espevik, Terje; Lien, Egil

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are involved in sensing invading microbes by host innate immunity. TLR2 recognizes bacterial lipoproteins/lipopeptides, and lipopolysaccharide activates TLR4. TLR2 and TLR4 signal via the Toll/interleukin-1 receptor adaptors MyD88 and MAL, leading to NF-κB activation. TLR4 also utilizes the adaptors TRAM and TRIF, resulting in activation of interferon regulatory factor (IRF) 3. Here, we report a new role for TRAM and TRIF in TLR2 regulation and signaling. Interestingly, we observed that TLR2-mediated induction of the chemokine Ccl5 was impaired in TRAM or TRIF deficient macrophages. Inhibition of endocytosis reduced Ccl5 release, and the data also suggested that TRAM and TLR2 co-localize in early endosomes, supporting the hypothesis that signaling may occur from an intracellular compartment. Ccl5 release following lipoprotein challenge additionally involved the kinase Tbk-1 and Irf3, as well as MyD88 and Irf1. Induction of Interferon-β and Ccl4 by lipoproteins was also partially impaired in cells lacking TRIF cells. Our results show a novel function of TRAM and TRIF in TLR2-mediated signal transduction, and the findings broaden our understanding of how Toll/interleukin-1 receptor adaptor proteins may participate in signaling downstream from TLR2. PMID:25505250

  18. Artesunate ameliorates severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) in rats by inhibiting expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and Toll-like receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Cen, Yanyan; Liu, Chao; Li, Xiaoli; Yan, Zifei; Kuang, Mei; Su, Yujie; Pan, Xichun; Qin, Rongxin; Liu, Xin; Zheng, Jiang; Zhou, Hong

    2016-09-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is a severe clinical condition with significant morbidity and mortality. Multiple organs dysfunction (MOD) is the leading cause of SAP-related death. The over-release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α is the underlying mechanism of MOD; however, there is no effective agent against the inflammation. Herein, artesunate (AS) was found to increase the survival of SAP rats significantly when injected with 3.5% sodium taurocholate into the biliopancreatic duct in a retrograde direction, improving their pancreatic pathology and decreasing serum amylase and pancreatic lipase activities along with substantially reduced pancreatic IL-1β and IL-6 release. In vitro, AS-pretreatment strongly inhibited IL-1β and IL-6 release and their mRNA expressions in the pancreatic acinar cells treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) but exerted little effect on TNF-α release. Additionally, AS reduced the mRNA expressions of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65 as well as their protein expressions in the pancreatic acinar cells. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that AS could significantly protect SAP rats, and this protection was related to the reduction of digestive enzyme activities and pro-inflammatory cytokine expressions via inhibition of TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway. Therefore, AS may be considered as a potential therapeutic agent against SAP. PMID:27318790

  19. CDC Vital Signs: Preventable Deaths from Heart Disease and Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... 35 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Preventable Deaths from Heart Disease & Stroke Improving care can save ... can reduce death among all ages. Problem Many deaths from heart disease and stroke can be prevented. ...

  20. Flint Water Crisis Taking High Toll on Health, Productivity

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160307.html Flint Water Crisis Taking High Toll on Health, Productivity Michigan ... 2016 MONDAY, Aug. 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The water crisis in Flint, Mich., has cost $395 million ...

  1. Stress May Take Greatest Toll on Younger Women's Hearts

    MedlinePlus

    ... 160597.html Stress May Take Greatest Toll on Younger Women's Hearts: Study Female heart disease patients under ... may be especially hard on the hearts of younger women who have heart disease, new research suggests. ...

  2. Sleep Apnea May Take Toll on Your Mood, Thinking Skills

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_157515.html Sleep Apnea May Take Toll on Your Mood, Thinking ... 29, 2016 MONDAY, Feb. 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Sleep apnea may have an impact on brain function, ...

  3. Amelioration of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase mediated stress reduces cell death after blast-induced traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon P; Naser, Zachary J; Logsdon, Aric F; Turner, Ryan C; Smith, Kelly E; Robson, Matthew J; Bailes, Julian E; Lee, John M; Rosen, Charles L; Huber, Jason D

    2015-12-01

    A total of 1.7 million traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) occur each year in the United States, but available pharmacologic options for the treatment of acute neurotrauma are limited. Oxidative stress is an important secondary mechanism of injury that can lead to neuronal apoptosis and subsequent behavioral changes. Using a clinically relevant and validated rodent blast model, we investigated how nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (Nox) expression and associated oxidative stress contribute to cellular apoptosis after single and repeat blast injuries. Nox4 forms a complex with p22phox after injury, forming free radicals at neuronal membranes. Using immunohistochemical-staining methods, we found a visible increase in Nox4 after single blast injury in Sprague Dawley rats. Interestingly, Nox4 was also increased in postmortem human samples obtained from athletes diagnosed with chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Nox4 activity correlated with an increase in superoxide formation. Alpha-lipoic acid, an oxidative stress inhibitor, prevented the development of superoxide acutely and increased antiapoptotic markers B-cell lymphoma 2 (t = 3.079, P < 0.05) and heme oxygenase 1 (t = 8.169, P < 0.001) after single blast. Subacutely, alpha-lipoic acid treatment reduced proapoptotic markers Bax (t = 4.483, P < 0.05), caspase 12 (t = 6.157, P < 0.001), and caspase 3 (t = 4.573, P < 0.01) after repetitive blast, and reduced tau hyperphosphorylation indicated by decreased CP-13 and paired helical filament staining. Alpha-lipoic acid ameliorated impulsive-like behavior 7 days after repetitive blast injury (t = 3.573, P < 0.05) compared with blast exposed animals without treatment. TBI can cause debilitating symptoms and psychiatric disorders. Oxidative stress is an ideal target for neuropharmacologic intervention, and alpha-lipoic acid warrants further investigation as a therapeutic for prevention of chronic neurodegeneration. PMID:26414010

  4. The toll of traffic-related fatalities in a metropolitan Italian area through the experience of the Department of Legal Medicine.

    PubMed

    Amadasi, Alberto; Cerutti, Elisa; Spagnoli, Laura; Blandino, Alberto; Rancati, Alessandra; Gallo, Carlotta; Mancini, Elisabetta; Rizzi, Vittorio; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2016-06-01

    Despite the introduction of new traffic laws in Italy, traffic-related deaths are still a huge burden. The study presents data and medico-legal issues behind traffic deaths in Milan between 2001 and 2012 (1506 traffic-related deaths). Data were collected from the database of the Department of Legal Medicine: 79.4% males and 20.6% females (mean age 44.14). The target group concerned traumatic deaths as a consequence of the accident as well as deaths not directly related to an accident. Although 6.1% were non-traumatic deaths (cause of death unconnected to the accident, i.e. because of a heart attack, or when death occurred after survival and cause of death was not related certainly to the accident), multiple skeletal/visceral injuries were the main cause of death (57.9%), occurring in motorcyclists the most (63.7%). Injuries to the skull and brain were the second cause of death (25.9%). Victims were mostly males (79.4%) and drivers (77.6%). Fifty-five per cent were deaths on-scene, while 45% survived. Other variables were also considered: medications, medical history, and drugs/alcohol/smoke. A downward trend in traffic-related fatalities was evident, but the toll is still high. This study should be a glimpse at the actual situation, since it is indicative of a metropolitan area where autopsies are systematically performed. PMID:25563928

  5. 47 CFR 63.504 - Contents of applications to close a public toll station where no other such toll station of the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... station where no other such toll station of the applicant in the community will continue service and where... station where no other such toll station of the applicant in the community will continue service and where... community; (g) Name of other carrier or carriers, if any, which will provide toll station service in...

  6. Encountering Death: Structured Activities for Death Awareness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, Ira David; And Others

    This book is intended to be used as a supplement to standard textbooks on death and dying for college students. Chapter 1 "Encountering Death in the Self" builds the foundation for increased self-awareness for the study of death and dying. Chapter 2 "Encountering Death in the Family" provides activities which are appropriate for a wide variety of…

  7. Toll-Like Receptors of Deuterostome Invertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Satake, Honoo; Sekiguchi, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    Defensive systems against pathogens are responsible not only for survival or lifetime of an individual but also for the evolution of a species. Innate immunity is expected to be more important for invertebrates than mammals, given that adaptive immunity has not been acquired in the former. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) have been shown to play a crucial role in host defense of pathogenic microbes in innate immunity of mammals. Recent genome-wide analyses have suggested that TLR or their related genes are conserved in invertebrates. In particular, numerous TLR-related gene candidates were detected in deuterostome invertebrates, including a sea urchin (222 TLR-related gene candidates) and amphioxus (72 TLR-related gene candidates). Molecular phylogenetic analysis verified that most of sea urchin or amphioxus TLR candidates are paralogous, suggesting that these organisms expanded TLR-related genes in a species-specific manner. In contrast, another deuterostome invertebrate, the ascidian Ciona intestinalis, was found to possess only two TLR genes. Moreover, Ciona TLRs, Ci-TLR1 and Ci-TLR2, were shown to possess “hybrid” functionality of mammalian TLRs. Such functionality of Ci-TLRs could not be predicted by sequence comparison with vertebrate TLRs, indicating confounding evolutionary lineages of deuterostome invertebrate TLRs or their candidates. In this review article, we present recent advances in studies of TLRs or their candidates among deuterostome invertebrates, and provide insight into an evolutionary process of TLRs. PMID:22566918

  8. Deviation from major codons in the Toll-like receptor genes is associated with low Toll-like receptor expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Fei; Cao, Weiping; Chan, Edmund; Tay, Puei Nam; Cahya, Florence Feby; Zhang, Haifeng; Lu, Jinhua

    2005-01-01

    Microbial structures activate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and TLR-mediated cell signalling elicits and regulates host immunity. Most TLRs are poorly expressed but the underlying expression mechanism is not clear. Examination TLR sequences revealed that most human TLR genes deviated from using major human codons. CD14 resembles TLRs in sequence but its gene preferentially uses major codons. Indeed, CD14 expression on monocytes was higher than expression of TLR1 and TLR2. The TLR9 gene is abundant in major codons and it also showed higher expression than TLR1, TLR2 and TLR7 in transfected 293T cells. Change of the 5′-end 302 base pairs of the TLR2 sequence into major human codons markedly increased TLR2 expression, which led to increased TLR2-mediated constitutive nuclear factor-κB activation. Change of the 5′-end 381 base pairs of the CD14 sequence into prevalent TLR codons markedly reduced CD14 expression. These results collectively show that the deviation of TLR sequences from using major codons dictates the low TLR expression and this may protect the host against excessive inflammation and tissue damages. PMID:15606798

  9. Toll Genes Have an Ancestral Role in Axis Elongation.

    PubMed

    Benton, Matthew A; Pechmann, Matthias; Frey, Nadine; Stappert, Dominik; Conrads, Kai H; Chen, Yen-Ta; Stamataki, Evangelia; Pavlopoulos, Anastasios; Roth, Siegfried

    2016-06-20

    One of the key morphogenetic processes used during development is the controlled intercalation of cells between their neighbors. This process has been co-opted into a range of developmental events, and it also underlies an event that occurs in each major group of bilaterians: elongation of the embryo along the anterior-posterior axis [1]. In Drosophila, a novel component of this process was recently discovered by Paré et al., who showed that three Toll genes function together to drive cell intercalation during germband extension [2]. This finding raises the question of whether this role of Toll genes is an evolutionary novelty of flies or a general mechanism of embryonic morphogenesis. Here we show that the Toll gene function in axis elongation is, in fact, widely conserved among arthropods. First, we functionally demonstrate that two Toll genes are required for cell intercalation in the beetle Tribolium castaneum. We then show that these genes belong to a previously undescribed Toll subfamily and that members of this subfamily exhibit striped expression (as seen in Tribolium and previously reported in Drosophila [3-5]) in embryos of six other arthropod species spanning the entire phylum. Last, we show that two of these Toll genes are required for normal morphogenesis during anterior-posterior embryo elongation in the spider Parasteatoda tepidariorum, a member of the most basally branching arthropod lineage. From our findings, we hypothesize that Toll genes had a morphogenetic function in embryo elongation in the last common ancestor of all arthropods, which existed over 550 million years ago. PMID:27212406

  10. Low expression of Toll-like receptors in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Cuaxospa, María; Contreras-Ramos, Alejandra; Pérez-Figueroa, Erandi; Medina-Sansón, Aurora; Jiménez-Hernández, Elva; Torres-Nava, José R; Rojas-Castillo, Emilio; Maldonado-Bernal, Carmen

    2016-08-01

    Cancer is the second most common cause of death among children aged 1-14 years. Leukemia accounts for one-third of all childhood cancers, 78% of which is acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The development of cancer has been associated with malignant cells that express low levels of immunogenic molecules, which facilitates their escape from the antineoplastic immune response. It is thought that it may be possible to rescue the antineoplastic immune response through the activation of recognition receptors, such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs), which activate the innate immune system. TLRs are type I membrane glycoproteins expressed mainly in immune system cells such as monocytes, neutrophils, macrophages, dendritic cells, T, B and natural killer cells. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the expression of TLR1, TLR3, TLR4, TLR7 and TLR9 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in patients with ALL and prior to any treatment. PBMCs were obtained from 50 pediatric patients diagnosed with ALL and from 20 children attending the ophthalmology and orthopedics services. The mean fluorescence intensity was obtained by analysis of immunofluorescence. We found lower expression levels of TLR1, TLR3, TLR4, TLR7 and TLR9 in PBMCs from patients with ALL compared with those from control patients. We also observed that the PBMCs from patients with Pre-B and B ALL had lower TLR4 expression than controls and patients with Pro-B, Pre-B, B and T ALL had lower TLR7 expression than controls. The present study is the first to demonstrate reduced expression of TLRs in PBMCs from pediatric patients with ALL. This finding is of great relevance and may partly explain the reduction in the antineoplastic immune response in patients with ALL. PMID:27277333

  11. Toll like receptor 9 antagonism modulates spinal cord neuronal function and survival: Direct versus astrocyte-mediated mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Acioglu, Cigdem; Mirabelli, Ersilia; Baykal, Ahmet Tarik; Ni, Li; Ratnayake, Ayomi; Heary, Robert F; Elkabes, Stella

    2016-08-01

    Toll like receptors (TLRs) are expressed by cells of the immune system and mediate the host innate immune responses to pathogens. However, increasing evidence indicates that they are important contributors to central nervous system (CNS) function in health and in pathological conditions involving sterile inflammation. In agreement with this idea, we have previously shown that intrathecal administration of a TLR9 antagonist, cytidine-phosphate-guanosine oligodeoxynucleotide 2088 (CpG ODN 2088), ameliorates the outcomes of spinal cord injury (SCI). Although these earlier studies showed a marked effect of CpG ODN 2088 on inflammatory cells, the expression of TLR9 in spinal cord (SC) neurons and astrocytes suggested that the antagonist exerts additional effects through direct actions on these cells. The current study was undertaken to assess the direct effects of CpG ODN 2088 on SC neurons, astrocytes and astrocyte-neuron interactions, in vitro. We report, for the first time, that inhibition of TLR9 in cultured SC neurons alters their function and confers protection against kainic acid (KA)-induced excitotoxic death. Moreover, the TLR9 antagonist attenuated the KA-elicited endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response in neurons, in vitro. CpG ODN 2088 also reduced the transcript levels and release of chemokine (C-X-C) motif ligand 1 (CXCL1) and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1) by astrocytes and it diminished interleukin-6 (IL-6) release without affecting transcript levels in vitro. Conditioned medium (CM) of CpG ODN 2088-treated astroglial cultures decreased the viability of SC neurons compared to CM of vehicle-treated astrocytes. However, this toxicity was not observed when astrocytes were co-cultured with neurons. Although CpG ODN 2088 limited the survival-promoting effects of astroglia, it did not reduce neuronal viability compared to controls grown in the absence of astrocytes. We conclude that the TLR9 antagonist acts directly on both SC neurons and astrocytes

  12. Sleep Deprivation and Divergent Toll-like Receptor-4 Activation of Cellular Inflammation in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Judith E.; Carrillo, Carmen; Olmstead, Richard; Witarama, Tuff; Breen, Elizabeth C.; Yokomizo, Megumi; Seeman, Teresa E.; Irwin, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Sleep disturbance and aging are associated with increases in inflammation, as well as increased risk of infectious disease. However, there is limited understanding of the role of sleep loss on age-related differences in immune responses. This study examines the effects of sleep deprivation on toll-like receptor activation of monocytic inflammation in younger compared to older adults. Design, Setting, and Participants: Community-dwelling adults (n = 70) who were categorized as younger (25–39 y old, n = 21) and older (60–84 y old, n = 49) participants, underwent a sleep laboratory-based experimental partial sleep deprivation (PSD) protocol including adaptation, an uninterrupted night of sleep, sleep deprivation (sleep restricted to 03:00–07:00), and recovery. Measurement and Results: Blood samples were obtained each morning to measure toll-like receptor-4 activation of monocyte intracellular production of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Partial sleep deprivation induced a significant increase in the production of IL-6 and/or TNF-α that persisted after a night of recovery sleep (F(2,121.2) = 3.8, P < 0.05). Age moderated the effects of sleep loss, such that younger adults had an increase in inflammatory cytokine production that was not present in older adults (F(2,121.2) = 4.0, P < 0.05). Conclusion: Older adults exhibit reduced toll-like receptor 4 stimulated cellular inflammation that, unlike in younger adults, is not activated after a night of partial sleep loss. Whereas sleep loss increases cellular inflammation in younger adults and may contribute to inflammatory disorders, blunted toll-like receptor activation in older adults may increase the risk of infectious disease seen with aging. Citation: Carroll JE, Carrillo C, Olmstead R, Witarama T, Breen EC, Yokomizo M, Seeman TE, Irwin MR. Sleep deprivation and divergent toll-like receptor-4 activation of cellular inflammation in aging. SLEEP

  13. Death and injury from motor vehicle crashes in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Posada, J; Ben-Michael, E; Herman, A; Kahan, E; Richter, E

    2000-02-01

    We report data on the distribution and determinants of road deaths and injuries for all victims in Colombia, with the aim of defining targets and priorities for highway death prevention in that country and other rapidly urbanizing nations. Using information from Colombia's Fund for the Prevention of Road Injury and the national death registry, we studied data on deaths and injuries from 1991 to 1995 for the nation as a whole and for the country's two largest cities, Santa Fe de Bogotá and Medellín. Deaths and injuries are rising in the nation as a whole. Of the deaths, 75% occur in urban areas, and 80% are in males. Pedestrians aged 15-34 are a peak subgroup. Thirty-four percent of deaths are attributable to speeding and/or alcohol consumption. Death tolls are highest at night and on weekends. Specific priority targets for intervention are indicated by the fact that 75% of road deaths in Colombia occur in urban areas and that 80% of all victims are males. PMID:10748658

  14. Molecular cloning and characterization of a Toll receptor gene from Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    PubMed

    Srisuk, Chutima; Longyant, Siwaporn; Senapin, Saengchan; Sithigorngul, Paisarn; Chaivisuthangkura, Parin

    2014-02-01

    Toll receptors are cell surface molecules acting as pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that have been implicated in the signaling pathway of innate immune responses. In this study, the full-length cDNA of a Toll receptor gene of Macrobrachium rosenbergii, designated MrToll, was successfully isolated using designed degenerate primers and the rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The MrToll gene sequence contained an open reading frame (ORF) of 2799 nucleotides encoding a protein of 932 amino acid residues. The protein contained distinct structural motifs of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family, including an extracellular domain containing 15 leucine-rich repeats (LRRs), a transmembrane segment of 23 amino acids, and a cytoplasmic Toll/interleukin-1R (TIR) domain of 139 residues. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that MrToll and Toll receptor of Marsupenaeus japonicus (MjToll) evolved closely. However, the MrToll ORF demonstrated only 48-49% identity with shrimp Toll1, suggesting that MrToll isolated from a palaemonid shrimp might belong to a novel class of Toll receptors in shrimp. The transcripts of the MrToll gene were constitutively expressed in various tissues, with high levels in hemocytes, the stomach and muscle. A reverse transcriptase PCR assay demonstrated that the expression patterns of MrToll were distinctly modulated after Aeromonas caviae stimulation, with significant enhancement at 3-12 h post-challenge and a decline to basal levels at 24 h post-challenge. In addition, when MrToll-silenced shrimp were challenged with A. caviae, there was a significant increase in mortality and bacterial CFU counts. These results suggest that MrToll might be involved in host innate defense, especially against the pathogen A. caviae. PMID:24398262

  15. Genetic Screen in Drosophila Larvae Links ird1 Function to Toll Signaling in the Fat Body and Hemocyte Motility

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Martin R.; Anderl, Ines; Vo, Hoa T. M.; Valanne, Susanna; Yang, Hairu; Kronhamn, Jesper; Rämet, Mika; Rusten, Tor Erik

    2016-01-01

    To understand how Toll signaling controls the activation of a cellular immune response in Drosophila blood cells (hemocytes), we carried out a genetic modifier screen, looking for deletions that suppress or enhance the mobilization of sessile hemocytes by the gain-of-function mutation Toll10b (Tl10b). Here we describe the results from chromosome arm 3R, where five regions strongly suppressed this phenotype. We identified the specific genes immune response deficient 1 (ird1), headcase (hdc) and possibly Rab23 as suppressors, and we studied the role of ird1 in more detail. An ird1 null mutant and a mutant that truncates the N-terminal kinase domain of the encoded Ird1 protein affected the Tl10b phenotype, unlike mutations that affect the C-terminal part of the protein. The ird1 null mutant suppressed mobilization of sessile hemocytes, but enhanced other Tl10b hemocyte phenotypes, like the formation of melanotic nodules and the increased number of circulating hemocytes. ird1 mutants also had blood cell phenotypes on their own. They lacked crystal cells and showed aberrant formation of lamellocytes. ird1 mutant plasmatocytes had a reduced ability to spread on an artificial substrate by forming protrusions, which may explain why they did not go into circulation in response to Toll signaling. The effect of the ird1 mutation depended mainly on ird1 expression in hemocytes, but ird1-dependent effects in other tissues may contribute. Specifically, the Toll receptor was translocated from the cell membrane to intracellular vesicles in the fat body of the ird1 mutant, and Toll signaling was activated in that tissue, partially explaining the Tl10b-like phenotype. As ird1 is otherwise known to control vesicular transport, we conclude that the vesicular transport system may be of particular importance during an immune response. PMID:27467079

  16. Genetic Screen in Drosophila Larvae Links ird1 Function to Toll Signaling in the Fat Body and Hemocyte Motility.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Martin R; Anderl, Ines; Vo, Hoa T M; Valanne, Susanna; Yang, Hairu; Kronhamn, Jesper; Rämet, Mika; Rusten, Tor Erik; Hultmark, Dan

    2016-01-01

    To understand how Toll signaling controls the activation of a cellular immune response in Drosophila blood cells (hemocytes), we carried out a genetic modifier screen, looking for deletions that suppress or enhance the mobilization of sessile hemocytes by the gain-of-function mutation Toll10b (Tl10b). Here we describe the results from chromosome arm 3R, where five regions strongly suppressed this phenotype. We identified the specific genes immune response deficient 1 (ird1), headcase (hdc) and possibly Rab23 as suppressors, and we studied the role of ird1 in more detail. An ird1 null mutant and a mutant that truncates the N-terminal kinase domain of the encoded Ird1 protein affected the Tl10b phenotype, unlike mutations that affect the C-terminal part of the protein. The ird1 null mutant suppressed mobilization of sessile hemocytes, but enhanced other Tl10b hemocyte phenotypes, like the formation of melanotic nodules and the increased number of circulating hemocytes. ird1 mutants also had blood cell phenotypes on their own. They lacked crystal cells and showed aberrant formation of lamellocytes. ird1 mutant plasmatocytes had a reduced ability to spread on an artificial substrate by forming protrusions, which may explain why they did not go into circulation in response to Toll signaling. The effect of the ird1 mutation depended mainly on ird1 expression in hemocytes, but ird1-dependent effects in other tissues may contribute. Specifically, the Toll receptor was translocated from the cell membrane to intracellular vesicles in the fat body of the ird1 mutant, and Toll signaling was activated in that tissue, partially explaining the Tl10b-like phenotype. As ird1 is otherwise known to control vesicular transport, we conclude that the vesicular transport system may be of particular importance during an immune response. PMID:27467079

  17. Escherichia coli Nissle 1917-derived factors reduce cell death and late apoptosis and increase transepithelial electrical resistance in a model of 5-fluorouracil-induced intestinal epithelial cell damage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hanru; Bastian, Susan EP; Cheah, Ker Y; Lawrence, Andrew; Howarth, Gordon S

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the capacity for supernatants (SNs) derived from Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN), cultured under different growth conditions, to prevent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced intestinal epithelial cell damage. EcN was cultured in: Luria Bertani (LB) broth, tryptone soya broth (TSB), de Man Rogosa Sharpe (MRS) broth, and M17 broth supplemented with 10% (v/v) lactose solution (M17). Intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6) were treated with the following EcN SNs: LB+, TSB+, MRS+, and M17+ in the presence and absence of 5-FU (1.5 or 5 μM). Cell viability, apoptotic activity and cell monolayer permeability were measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), flow cytometry, and transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) assays, respectively. 5-FU significantly reduced cell viability (P < 0.05) at both 24 and 48 h. However, only EcN SN produced from LB and M17 growth media significantly decreased cell death induced by 5-FU (by approximately 10% after 24 and 48 h; and 10% after 24 h, respectively [P < 0.05]). When measured by flow cytometry all EcN SNs in the presence of 5-FU increased the proportion of viable cells (by 3–5% for 24 h, 3–7% for 48 h, P < 0.05) and reduced late-apoptotic cells after 24 and 48 h, compared with 5-FU control. Moreover, all EcN SNs significantly reduced the disruption of IEC-6 cell barrier function induced by 5-FU by 7–10% (P < 0.05), compared with DMEM control. We conclude that EcN derived factors could potentially reduce the severity of intestinal mucositis. PMID:24556751

  18. Escherichia coli Nissle 1917-derived factors reduce cell death and late apoptosis and increase transepithelial electrical resistance in a model of 5-fluorouracil-induced intestinal epithelial cell damage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hanru; Bastian, Susan E P; Cheah, Ker Y; Lawrence, Andrew; Howarth, Gordon S

    2014-05-01

    We evaluated the capacity for supernatants (SNs) derived from Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN), cultured under different growth conditions, to prevent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced intestinal epithelial cell damage. EcN was cultured in: Luria Bertani (LB) broth, tryptone soya broth (TSB), de Man Rogosa Sharpe (MRS) broth, and M17 broth supplemented with 10% (v/v) lactose solution (M17). Intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6) were treated with the following EcN SNs: LB(+), TSB(+), MRS(+), and M17(+) in the presence and absence of 5-FU (1.5 or 5 μM). Cell viability, apoptotic activity and cell monolayer permeability were measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), flow cytometry, and transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) assays, respectively. 5-FU significantly reduced cell viability (P<0.05) at both 24 and 48 h. However, only EcN SN produced from LB and M17 growth media significantly decreased cell death induced by 5-FU (by approximately 10% after 24 and 48 h; and 10% after 24 h, respectively [P<0.05]). When measured by flow cytometry all EcN SNs in the presence of 5-FU increased the proportion of viable cells (by 3-5% for 24 h, 3-7% for 48 h, P<0.05) and reduced late-apoptotic cells after 24 and 48 h, compared with 5-FU control. Moreover, all EcN SNs significantly reduced the disruption of IEC-6 cell barrier function induced by 5-FU by 7-10% (P<0.05), compared with DMEM control. We conclude that EcN derived factors could potentially reduce the severity of intestinal mucositis. PMID:24556751

  19. 25 CFR 170.131 - How can a tribe find out more about designing and operating a toll facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... operating a toll facility? Information on designing and operating a toll highway, bridge or tunnel is available from the International Bridge, Tunnel and Turnpike Association. The Association publishes...

  20. 25 CFR 170.131 - How can a tribe find out more about designing and operating a toll facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... operating a toll facility? Information on designing and operating a toll highway, bridge or tunnel is available from the International Bridge, Tunnel and Turnpike Association. The Association publishes...

  1. [Hugo Toll - physician, author, and health debater with firm views].

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Peter M

    2004-01-01

    The Swedish physician Hugo Toll (1858-1943) was brought up as the son of a farmer in mid-Sweden. He was a talented young medical student at the University of Uppsala. After finishing his studies Hugo Toll spent some years as a surgeon in the US, working in Minnesota. Before settling down again in Sweden Toll toured many European countries to increase his knowledge in medical matters and public health issues. In his laborous years of work he spent time in Stockholm, running a private practice, and later on as a headmaster at Ersta School of Nursing, outside Stockholm. Through many years Hugo Toll devoted much time and efforts to writing and lecturing on public health, healthy lifestyle matters, and other topics related to medicine. As many other authors of this time, he also included views based on racial biology and the positive health selection of future parents. At this time some Swedish physicians were more or less openly committed to Nazi ideology, such as Ake Berglund, Herman Lundborg and Gösta Häggqvist. Other physicians were never members of any Nazi party, or did not see themselves as believers in any similar ideology. However, in their lectures and writings, a mixture of ideas upon public health were revealed, some of them also related to Nazi ideology. My impression is that Hugo Toll, although an elderly man and almost blind in the 1930's, was one of many Swedish physicians and debaters with ideas that other, more ideologically determined physicians with strong political views could make use of. Therefore, in current times we can learn from the experience of Hugo Toll that physicians with strong beliefs in public health and a healthy lifestyle can provide arguments that others can use in a different context for darker purposes. PMID:16025612

  2. Sudden infant death syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Crib death; SIDS ... However, SIDS is still a major cause of death in infants under 1 year old. Thousands of ... affects boys more often than girls. Most SIDS deaths occur in the winter. The following may increase ...

  3. Death: 'nothing' gives insight.

    PubMed

    Ettema, Eric J

    2013-08-01

    According to a widely accepted belief, we cannot know our own death--death means 'nothing' to us. At first sight, the meaning of 'nothing' just implies the negation or absence of 'something'. Death then simply refers to the negation or absence of life. As a consequence, however, death has no meaning of itself. This leads to an ontological paradox in which death is both acknowledged and denied: death is … nothing. In this article, I investigate whether insight into the ontological paradox of the nothingness of death can contribute to a good end-of-life. By analysing Aquinas', Heidegger's and Derrida's understanding of death as nothingness, I explore how giving meaning to death on different ontological levels connects to, and at the same time provides resistance against, the harsh reality of death. By doing so, I intend to demonstrate that insight into the nothingness of death can count as a framework for a meaningful dealing with death. PMID:23054426

  4. Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is the sudden, unexplained death of an infant younger than one year old. Some people call SIDS "crib death" because many babies who die of SIDS are found in their ...

  5. A novel redox-active metalloporphyrin reduces reactive oxygen species and inflammatory markers but does not improve marginal mass engraftment in a murine donation after circulatory death islet transplantation model.

    PubMed

    Bruni, Antonio; Pepper, Andrew R; Gala-Lopez, Boris; Pawlick, Rena; Abualhassan, Nasser; Crapo, James D; Piganelli, Jon D; Shapiro, A M James

    2016-07-01

    Islet transplantation is a highly effective treatment for stabilizing glycemic control for select patients with type-1 diabetes. Despite improvements to clinical transplantation, single-donor transplant success has been hard to achieve routinely, necessitating increasing demands on viable organ availability. Donation after circulatory death (DCD) may be an alternative option to increase organ availability however, these organs tend to be more compromised. The use of metalloporphyrin anti-inflammatory and antioxidant (MnP) compounds previously demonstrated improved in vivo islet function in preclinical islet transplantation. However, the administration of MnP (BMX-001) in a DCD islet isolation and transplantation model has yet to be established. In this study, murine donors were subjected to a 15-min warm ischemic (WI) period prior to isolation and culture with or without MnP. Subsequent to one-hour culture, islets were assessed for in vitro viability and in vivo function. A 15-minute WI period significantly reduced islet yield, regardless of MnP-treatment relative to yields from standard isolation. MnP-treated islets did not improve islet viability compared to DCD islets alone. MnP-treatment did significantly reduce the presence of extracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) (p < 0 .05). Marginal, syngeneic islets (200 islets) transplanted under the renal capsule exhibited similar in vivo outcomes regardless of WI or MnP-treatment. DCD islet grafts harvested 7 d post-transplant exhibited sustained TNF-α and IL-10, while MnP-treated islet-bearing grafts demonstrated reduced IL-10 levels. Taken together, 15-minute WI in murine islet isolation significantly impairs islet yield. DCD islets do indeed demonstrate in vivo function, though MnP therapy was unable to improve viability and engraftment outcomes. PMID:27220256

  6. Magnesium and sudden death.

    PubMed

    Leary, W P; Reyes, A J

    1983-10-22

    Magnesium deficiency may result from reduced dietary intake of the ion or increased losses in sweat, urine or faeces. Stress potentiates magnesium deficiency, and an increased incidence of sudden death associated with ischaemic heart disease is found in some areas in which soil and drinking water lack magnesium. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated experimentally that reduction of the plasma magnesium level is associated with arterial spasm. Careful studies are required to assess the clinical importance of magnesium and the benefits of magnesium supplementation in man. PMID:6353622

  7. 47 CFR 64.1504 - Restrictions on the use of toll-free numbers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Restrictions on the use of toll-free numbers... Other Information Services § 64.1504 Restrictions on the use of toll-free numbers. A common carrier... advertised or widely understood to be toll-free, in a manner that would result in: (a) The calling party...

  8. 47 CFR 64.1504 - Restrictions on the use of toll-free numbers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Restrictions on the use of toll-free numbers... Other Information Services § 64.1504 Restrictions on the use of toll-free numbers. A common carrier... advertised or widely understood to be toll-free, in a manner that would result in: (a) The calling party...

  9. The Toll pathway is required in the epidermis for muscle development in the Drosophila embryo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halfon, M. S.; Keshishian, H.

    1998-01-01

    The Toll signaling pathway functions in several Drosophila processes, including dorsal-ventral pattern formation and the immune response. Here, we demonstrate that this pathway is required in the epidermis for proper muscle development. Previously, we showed that the zygotic Toll protein is necessary for normal muscle development; in the absence of zygotic Toll, close to 50% of hemisegments have muscle patterning defects consisting of missing, duplicated and misinserted muscle fibers (Halfon, M.S., Hashimoto, C., and Keshishian, H., Dev. Biol. 169, 151-167, 1995). We have now also analyzed the requirements for easter, spatzle, tube, and pelle, all of which function in the Toll-mediated dorsal-ventral patterning pathway. We find that spatzle, tube, and pelle, but not easter, are necessary for muscle development. Mutations in these genes give a phenotype identical to that seen in Toll mutants, suggesting that elements of the same pathway used for Toll signaling in dorsal-ventral development are used during muscle development. By expressing the Toll cDNA under the control of distinct Toll enhancer elements in Toll mutant flies, we have examined the spatial requirements for Toll expression during muscle development. Expression of Toll in a subset of epidermal cells that includes the epidermal muscle attachment cells, but not Toll expression in the musculature, is necessary for proper muscle development. Our results suggest that signals received by the epidermis early during muscle development are an important part of the muscle patterning process.

  10. 77 FR 2610 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Project Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-18

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Project Committee AGENCY... Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Project Committee will be held Tuesday, February 7,...