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Sample records for reduced dimensionality models

  1. Rigorous joining of advanced reduced-dimensional beam models to three-dimensional finite element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Huimin

    In the aerospace and automotive industries, many finite element analyses use lower-dimensional finite elements such as beams, plates and shells, to simplify the modeling. These simplified models can greatly reduce the computation time and cost; however, reduced-dimensional models may introduce inaccuracies, particularly near boundaries and near portions of the structure where reduced-dimensional models may not apply. Another factor in creation of such models is that beam-like structures frequently have complex geometry, boundaries and loading conditions, which may make them unsuitable for modeling with single type of element. The goal of this dissertation is to develop a method that can accurately and efficiently capture the response of a structure by rigorous combination of a reduced-dimensional beam finite element model with a model based on full two-dimensional (2D) or three-dimensional (3D) finite elements. The first chapter of the thesis gives the background of the present work and some related previous work. The second chapter is focused on formulating a system of equations that govern the joining of a 2D model with a beam model for planar deformation. The essential aspect of this formulation is to find the transformation matrices to achieve deflection and load continuity on the interface. Three approaches are provided to obtain the transformation matrices. An example based on joining a beam to a 2D finite element model is examined, and the accuracy of the analysis is studied by comparing joint results with the full 2D analysis. The third chapter is focused on formulating the system of equations for joining a beam to a 3D finite element model for static and free-vibration problems. The transition between the 3D elements and beam elements is achieved by use of the stress recovery technique of the variational-asymptotic method as implemented in VABS (the Variational Asymptotic Beam Section analysis). The formulations for an interface transformation matrix and

  2. A Reduced Order, One Dimensional Model of Joint Response

    SciTech Connect

    DOHNER,JEFFREY L.

    2000-11-06

    As a joint is loaded, the tangent stiffness of the joint reduces due to slip at interfaces. This stiffness reduction continues until the direction of the applied load is reversed or the total interface slips. Total interface slippage in joints is called macro-slip. For joints not undergoing macro-slip, when load reversal occurs the tangent stiffness immediately rebounds to its maximum value. This occurs due to stiction effects at the interface. Thus, for periodic loads, a softening and rebound hardening cycle is produced which defines a hysteretic, energy absorbing trajectory. For many jointed sub-structures, this hysteretic trajectory can be approximated using simple polynomial representations. This allows for complex joint substructures to be represented using simple non-linear models. In this paper a simple one dimensional model is discussed.

  3. SCALING ANALYSIS OF REPOSITORY HEAT LOAD FOR REDUCED DIMENSIONALITY MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    MICHAEL T. ITAMUA AND CLIFFORD K. HO

    1998-06-04

    The thermal energy released from the waste packages emplaced in the potential Yucca Mountain repository is expected to result in changes in the repository temperature, relative humidity, air mass fraction, gas flow rates, and other parameters that are important input into the models used to calculate the performance of the engineered system components. In particular, the waste package degradation models require input from thermal-hydrologic models that have higher resolution than those currently used to simulate the T/H responses at the mountain-scale. Therefore, a combination of mountain- and drift-scale T/H models is being used to generate the drift thermal-hydrologic environment.

  4. A Reduced Three Dimensional Model for SAW Sensors Using Finite Element Analysis

    PubMed Central

    El Gowini, Mohamed M.; Moussa, Walied A.

    2009-01-01

    A major problem that often arises in modeling Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) such as Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) sensors using Finite Element Analysis (FEA) is the extensive computational capacity required. In this study a new approach is adopted to significantly reduce the computational capacity needed for analyzing the response of a SAW sensor using the finite element (FE) method. The approach is based on the plane wave solution where the properties of the wave vary in two dimensions and are uniform along the thickness of the device. The plane wave solution therefore allows the thickness of the SAW device model to be minimized; the model is referred to as a Reduced 3D Model (R3D). Various configurations of this novel R3D model are developed and compared with theoretical and experimental frequency data and the results show very good agreement. In addition, two-dimensional (2D) models with similar configurations to the R3D are developed for comparison since the 2D approach is widely adopted in the literature as a computationally inexpensive approach to model SAW sensors using the FE method. Results illustrate that the R3D model is capable of capturing the SAW response more accurately than the 2D model; this is demonstrated by comparison of centre frequency and insertion loss values. These results are very encouraging and indicate that the R3D model is capable of capturing the MEMS-based SAW sensor response without being computationally expensive. PMID:22303156

  5. A reduced-order vortex model of three-dimensional unsteady non-linear aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldredge, Jeff D.

    2014-11-01

    Rapid, large-amplitude maneuvers of low aspect ratio wings are inherent to biologically-inspired flight. These give rise to unsteady phenomena associated with the interactions among the coherent structures shed from wing edges. The objective of this work is to distill these phenomena into a low-order physics-based dynamical model. The model is based on interconnected vortex loops, composed of linear segments between a small number of vertices. Thus, the dynamics of the fluid are reduced to tracking the evolution of the vertices, whose motions are determined from the velocity field induced by the loops and wing motion. The feature that distinguishes this method from previous treatments is that the vortex loops, analogous to point vortices in our two-dimensional model, have time-varying strength. That is, the flux of vorticity from the wing is concentrated in the constituent segments. Chains of interconnected loops can be shed from any edge of the wing. The evolution equation for the loop vertices is based on the impulse matching principle developed in previous work. We demonstrate the model in various maneuvers, including impulse starts of low aspect ratio wings, oscillatory pitching, etc., and compare with experimental results and high-fidelity simulations where applicable. This work was supported by AFOSR under Award FA9550-11-1-0098.

  6. Forward Modeling of Reduced Power Spectra from Three-dimensional k-space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Papen, Michael; Saur, Joachim

    2015-06-01

    We present results from a numerical forward model to evaluate one-dimensional reduced power spectral densities (PSDs) from arbitrary energy distributions in {\\boldsymbol{k}} -space. In this model, we can separately calculate the diagonal elements of the spectral tensor for incompressible axisymmetric turbulence with vanishing helicity. Given a critically balanced turbulent cascade with {{k}\\parallel }∼ k\\bot α and α \\lt 1, we explore the implications on the reduced PSD as a function of frequency. The spectra are obtained under the assumption of Taylor’s hypothesis. We further investigate the functional dependence of the spectral index κ on the field-to-flow angle θ between plasma flow and background magnetic field from MHD to electron kinetic scales. We show that critically balanced turbulence asymptotically develops toward θ-independent spectra with a slope corresponding to the perpendicular cascade. This occurs at a transition frequency {{f}2D}(L,α ,θ ), which is analytically estimated and depends on outer scale L, critical balance exponent α, and field-to-flow angle θ. We discuss anisotropic damping terms acting on the {\\boldsymbol{k}} -space distribution of energy and their effects on the PSD. Further, we show that the spectral anisotropies κ (θ ) as found by Horbury et al. and Chen et al. in the solar wind are in accordance with a damped critically balanced cascade of kinetic Alfvén waves. We also model power spectra obtained by Papen et al. in Saturn’s plasma sheet and find that the change of spectral indices inside 9 {{R}s} can be explained by damping on electron scales.

  7. Experimental validation of a three-dimensional reduced-order continuum model of phonation.

    PubMed

    Farahani, Mehrdad H; Zhang, Zhaoyan

    2016-08-01

    Due to the complex nature of the phonation process, a one-dimensional (1D) glottal flow description is often used in current phonation models. Although widely used in voice research, these 1D flow-based phonation models have not been rigorously validated against experiments. In this study, a 1D glottal flow model is coupled with a three-dimensional nonlinear continuum model of the vocal fold and its predictions are compared to physical model experiments. The results show that the 1D flow-based model is able to predict the phonation threshold pressure and onset frequency within reasonable accuracy and to reproduce major vibratory features observed in the experiments. PMID:27586776

  8. Reduced-order modeling for rotating rotor-bearing systems with cracked impellers using three-dimensional finite element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuai; Wang, Yu; Zi, Yanyang; Li, Bing; He, Zhengjia

    2015-10-01

    A novel reduced-order modeling method is presented in this paper for dynamics analysis of rotating impeller-shaft-bearing assembly with cracked impellers. Based on three-dimensional finite element model, the complex component mode synthesis (CMS) method is employed to generate an efficient reduced-order model (ROM) for studying the effects of crack on the global vibration of the rotating assembly. First, a modeling framework for impeller-shaft-bearing systems in rotating frame is presented. Rotational effects, including Coriolis matrix and centrifugal softening, have been taken into account. Then, the governing equation of motion of the damped gyroscopic system is reduced by the complex CMS method. Finally, the obtained ROM is employed to study the effects of crack on assembly's vibration. During the steady-state response analysis, external excitations on the impeller due to rotor-stator interactions have been taken into account, which was however neglected in previous investigations on rotordynamics. Numerical results show that the lower-order eigenvalues and the unbalance response of the assembly are not sensitive to the local crack on impeller. Nevertheless, the flexible coupling between impeller and shaft becomes more complex when the air flow-induced excitations are considered. Under EO1 traveling wave excitations, a crack leads to slight changes in the assembly's response. In contrast, the effect of crack becomes significant when the assembly is excited by EO2 and higher EO excitations. Moreover, the nonlinear crack breathing effects affect the assembly's response obviously. Finally, a potential technique for detecting the crack on impeller during operation is discussed.

  9. Assimilating in-situ Measurements into a Reduced-Dimensionality Model of an Estuary- Plume System.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, S.; Baptista, A.; Leen, T.; Lu, Z.; van der Merwe, R.

    2006-12-01

    A very fast, model independent, fully non-linear extension to the reduced space Kalman filter has been recently proposed and demonstrated for the assimilation of the non-linear circulation in both a synthetic estuary and in the river-dominated Columbia River estuary. Here, we extend the application to another complex problem the simulation of a coupled estuary-plume system. Our data assimilation method is based on the same three stages as in our previous work: (1) generate a database of hindcast runs with a forward numerical circulation model like SELFE; (2) use examples from the hindcast database to train a fast, non-linear neural network model surrogate that approximates the dynamics of the forward model; and (3) use a Sigma Point Kalman filter, incorporating the model surrogate dynamics, to estimate the true state of the system. Both model surrogates (2) and state estimation (3) operate in the reduced space spanned by the Empirical Orthogonal Functions (EOFs, aka principal components). The key modifications that we are introducing are the improved EOF analysis for more accurate dimension reduction in the plume region, a more compact noise model for faster DA, and the improved treatment of wetting and drying. The resulting data assimilation system is ~100 faster than the forward model and ~10000 faster than the existing variational and sequential methods for data assimilation. As a test of the system, we assimilate in-situ data from four offshore moorings and 14 estuarine stations during May-September of 2004. For validation of the experiments we use cross-validation against in-situ data, data from research cruises, and satellite imagery. We show that data assimilation is effective for improving the simulation of at least three highly non-linear processes: the dynamics of the estuarine salt-wedge, the response of the plume to wind shifts, the propagation of the shallow water tides, and wetting and drying of tidal flats.

  10. A reduced-dimensional model for near-wall transport in cardiovascular flows.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Kirk B; Shadden, Shawn C

    2016-06-01

    Near-wall mass transport plays an important role in many cardiovascular processes, including the initiation of atherosclerosis, endothelial cell vasoregulation, and thrombogenesis. These problems are characterized by large Péclet and Schmidt numbers as well as a wide range of spatial and temporal scales, all of which impose computational difficulties. In this work, we develop an analytical relationship between the flow field and near-wall mass transport for high-Schmidt-number flows. This allows for the development of a wall-shear-stress-driven transport equation that lies on a codimension-one vessel-wall surface, significantly reducing computational cost in solving the transport problem. Separate versions of this equation are developed for the reaction-rate-limited and transport-limited cases, and numerical results in an idealized abdominal aortic aneurysm are compared to those obtained by solving the full transport equations over the entire domain. The reaction-rate-limited model matches the expected results well. The transport-limited model is accurate in the developed flow regions, but overpredicts wall flux at entry regions and reattachment points in the flow. PMID:26298313

  11. Supersymmetric soliton solution in a dimensionally reduced Schroedinger-Chern-Simons model

    SciTech Connect

    Sourrouille, Lucas

    2011-02-15

    We obtain, by dimensional reduction, a (1+1) supersymmetric system introduced in the description of ultracold quantum gases. The correct supercharges are identified and their algebra is constructed. Finally, novel solitonic equations emerge and their solution is constructed for the bosonic case.

  12. Three dimensional simulations of plasma filaments in the scrape off layer: A comparison with models of reduced dimensionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Easy, L.; Militello, F.; Omotani, J.; Dudson, B.; Havlíčková, E.; Tamain, P.; Naulin, V.; Nielsen, A. H.

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents simulations of isolated 3D filaments in a slab geometry obtained using a newly developed 3D reduced fluid code, written using the BOUT++ framework. First, systematic scans were performed to investigate how the dynamics of a filament are affected by its amplitude, perpendicular size, and parallel extent. The perpendicular size of the filament was found to have a strong influence on its motions, as it determined the relative importance of parallel currents to polarization and viscous currents, whilst drift-wave instabilities were observed if the initial amplitude of the blob was increased sufficiently. Next, the 3D simulations were compared to 2D simulations using different parallel closures; namely, the sheath dissipation closure, which neglects parallel gradients, and the vorticity advection closure, which neglects the influence of parallel currents. The vorticity advection closure was found to not replicate the 3D perpendicular dynamics and overestimated the initial radial acceleration of all the filaments studied. In contrast, a more satisfactory comparison with the sheath dissipation closure was obtained, even in the presence of significant parallel gradients, where the closure is no longer valid. Specifically, it captured the contrasting dynamics of filaments with different perpendicular sizes that were observed in the 3D simulations which the vorticity advection closure failed to replicate. However, neither closure successfully replicated the Boltzmann spinning effects nor the associated poloidal drift of the blob that was observed in the 3D simulations. Although the sheath dissipation closure was concluded to be more successful in replicating the 3D dynamics, it is emphasized that the vorticity advection closure may still be relevant for situations where the parallel current is inhibited from closing through the sheath due to effects such as strong magnetic shear around X points or increased resistivity near the targets.

  13. Dimensionally reduced emulation of an AOGCM for application to integrated assessment modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, P. B.; Edwards, N. R.

    2010-11-01

    Integrated Assessment Models are widely used tools for the evaluation of environmental policy. In order to include uncertainty estimates or derive optimal policies, highly efficient calculations of global change are generally required, often using pattern scaling to derive spatial distributions of change. Here we develop an alternative to pattern scaling that allows for nonlinear spatio-temporal behaviour. We use an intermediate complexity AOGCM to perform an ensemble of simulations for a range of greenhouse gas concentration profiles and model parameters. We decompose climate change fields into a series of spatial patterns and then derive the functional dependence of the dominant patterns on model input. This allows us to rapidly reconstruct a good approximation to the simulated change from an arbitrary concentration profile (without the need for further simulation). The efficiency of the approach paves the way for incorporating improved calculations of climate change into integrated assessment, including location-dependent estimates of uncertainty.

  14. Testing the Palma-Clary Reduced Dimensionality Model Using Classical Mechanics on the CH4 + H → CH3 + H2 Reaction.

    PubMed

    Vikár, Anna; Nagy, Tibor; Lendvay, György

    2016-07-14

    Application of exact quantum scattering methods in theoretical reaction dynamics of bimolecular reactions is limited by the complexity of the equations of nuclear motion to be solved. Simplification is often achieved by reducing the number of degrees of freedom to be explicitly handled by freezing the less important spectator modes. The reaction cross sections obtained in reduced-dimensionality (RD) quantum scattering methods can be used in the calculation of rate coefficients, but their physical meaning is limited. The accurate test of the performance of a reduced-dimensionality method would be a comparison of the RD cross sections with those obtained in accurate full-dimensional (FD) calculations, which is not feasible because of the lack of complete full-dimensional results. However, classical mechanics allows one to perform reaction dynamics calculations using both the RD and the FD model. In this paper, an RD versus FD comparison is made for the 8-dimensional Palma-Clary model on the example of four isotopologs of the CH4 + H → CH3 + H2 reaction, which has 12 internal dimensions. In the Palma-Clary model, the only restriction is that the methyl group is confined to maintain C3v symmetry. Both RD and FD opacity and excitation functions as well as differential cross sections were calculated using the quasiclassical trajectory method. The initial reactant separation has been handled according to our one-period averaging method [ Nagy et al. J. Chem. Phys. 2016, 144, 014104 ]. The RD and FD excitation functions were found to be close to each other for some isotopologs, but in general, the RD reactivity parameters are lower than the FD reactivity parameters beyond statistical error, and for one of the isotopologs, the deviation is significant. This indicates that the goodness of RD cross sections cannot be taken for granted. PMID:26918703

  15. Emergent reduced dimensionality by vertex frustration in artificial spin ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Ian; Lao, Yuyang; Carrasquillo, Isaac; O'Brien, Liam; Watts, Justin D.; Manno, Michael; Leighton, Chris; Scholl, Andreas; Nisoli, Cristiano; Schiffer, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Reducing the dimensionality of a physical system can have a profound effect on its properties, as in the ordering of low-dimensional magnetic materials, phonon dispersion in mercury chain salts, sliding phases, and the electronic states of graphene. Here we explore the emergence of quasi-one-dimensional behaviour in two-dimensional artificial spin ice, a class of lithographically fabricated nanomagnet arrays used to study geometrical frustration. We extend the implementation of artificial spin ice by fabricating a new array geometry, the so-called tetris lattice. We demonstrate that the ground state of the tetris lattice consists of alternating ordered and disordered bands of nanomagnetic moments. The disordered bands can be mapped onto an emergent thermal one-dimensional Ising model. Furthermore, we show that the level of degeneracy associated with these bands dictates the susceptibility of island moments to thermally induced reversals, thus establishing that vertex frustration can reduce the relevant dimensionality of physical behaviour in a magnetic system.

  16. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome alters nuclear shape and reduces cell motility in three dimensional model substrates.

    PubMed

    Booth-Gauthier, Elizabeth A; Du, Vicard; Ghibaudo, Marion; Rape, Andrew D; Dahl, Kris Noel; Ladoux, Benoit

    2013-03-01

    Cell migration through tight interstitial spaces in three dimensional (3D) environments impacts development, wound healing and cancer metastasis and is altered by the aging process. The stiffness of the extracellular matrix (ECM) increases with aging and affects the cells and cytoskeletal processes involved in cell migration. However, the nucleus, which is the largest and densest organelle, has not been widely studied during cell migration through the ECM. Additionally, the nucleus is stiffened during the aging process through the accumulation of a mutant nucleoskeleton protein lamin A, progerin. By using microfabricated substrates to mimic the confined environment of surrounding tissues, we characterized nuclear movements and deformation during cell migration into micropillars where interspacing can be tuned to vary nuclear confinement. Cell motility decreased with decreased micropillar (μP) spacing and correlated with increased dysmorphic shapes of nuclei. We examined the effects of increased nuclear stiffness which correlates with cellular aging by studying Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome cells which are known to accumulate progerin. With the expression of progerin, cells showed a threshold response to decreased μP spacing. Cells became trapped in the close spacing, possibly from visible micro-defects in the nucleoskeleton induced by cell crawling through the μP and from reduced force generation, measured independently. We suggest that ECM changes during aging could be compounded by the increasing stiffness of the nucleus and thus changes in cell migration through 3D tissues. PMID:23370891

  17. Ligand-Stabilized Reduced-Dimensionality Perovskites.

    PubMed

    Quan, Li Na; Yuan, Mingjian; Comin, Riccardo; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Beauregard, Eric M; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Buin, Andrei; Kirmani, Ahmad R; Zhao, Kui; Amassian, Aram; Kim, Dong Ha; Sargent, Edward H

    2016-03-01

    Metal halide perovskites have rapidly advanced thin-film photovoltaic performance; as a result, the materials' observed instabilities urgently require a solution. Using density functional theory (DFT), we show that a low energy of formation, exacerbated in the presence of humidity, explains the propensity of perovskites to decompose back into their precursors. We find, also using DFT, that intercalation of phenylethylammonium between perovskite layers introduces quantitatively appreciable van der Waals interactions. These drive an increased formation energy and should therefore improve material stability. Here we report reduced-dimensionality (quasi-2D) perovskite films that exhibit improved stability while retaining the high performance of conventional three-dimensional perovskites. Continuous tuning of the dimensionality, as assessed using photophysical studies, is achieved by the choice of stoichiometry in materials synthesis. We achieve the first certified hysteresis-free solar power conversion in a planar perovskite solar cell, obtaining a 15.3% certified PCE, and observe greatly improved performance longevity. PMID:26841130

  18. Empirical extensions of the lasso penalty to reduce the false discovery rate in high-dimensional Cox regression models.

    PubMed

    Ternès, Nils; Rotolo, Federico; Michiels, Stefan

    2016-07-10

    Correct selection of prognostic biomarkers among multiple candidates is becoming increasingly challenging as the dimensionality of biological data becomes higher. Therefore, minimizing the false discovery rate (FDR) is of primary importance, while a low false negative rate (FNR) is a complementary measure. The lasso is a popular selection method in Cox regression, but its results depend heavily on the penalty parameter λ. Usually, λ is chosen using maximum cross-validated log-likelihood (max-cvl). However, this method has often a very high FDR. We review methods for a more conservative choice of λ. We propose an empirical extension of the cvl by adding a penalization term, which trades off between the goodness-of-fit and the parsimony of the model, leading to the selection of fewer biomarkers and, as we show, to the reduction of the FDR without large increase in FNR. We conducted a simulation study considering null and moderately sparse alternative scenarios and compared our approach with the standard lasso and 10 other competitors: Akaike information criterion (AIC), corrected AIC, Bayesian information criterion (BIC), extended BIC, Hannan and Quinn information criterion (HQIC), risk information criterion (RIC), one-standard-error rule, adaptive lasso, stability selection, and percentile lasso. Our extension achieved the best compromise across all the scenarios between a reduction of the FDR and a limited raise of the FNR, followed by the AIC, the RIC, and the adaptive lasso, which performed well in some settings. We illustrate the methods using gene expression data of 523 breast cancer patients. In conclusion, we propose to apply our extension to the lasso whenever a stringent FDR with a limited FNR is targeted. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26970107

  19. Stimuli Reduce the Dimensionality of Cortical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mazzucato, Luca; Fontanini, Alfredo; La Camera, Giancarlo

    2016-01-01

    The activity of ensembles of simultaneously recorded neurons can be represented as a set of points in the space of firing rates. Even though the dimension of this space is equal to the ensemble size, neural activity can be effectively localized on smaller subspaces. The dimensionality of the neural space is an important determinant of the computational tasks supported by the neural activity. Here, we investigate the dimensionality of neural ensembles from the sensory cortex of alert rats during periods of ongoing (inter-trial) and stimulus-evoked activity. We find that dimensionality grows linearly with ensemble size, and grows significantly faster during ongoing activity compared to evoked activity. We explain these results using a spiking network model based on a clustered architecture. The model captures the difference in growth rate between ongoing and evoked activity and predicts a characteristic scaling with ensemble size that could be tested in high-density multi-electrode recordings. Moreover, we present a simple theory that predicts the existence of an upper bound on dimensionality. This upper bound is inversely proportional to the amount of pair-wise correlations and, compared to a homogeneous network without clusters, it is larger by a factor equal to the number of clusters. The empirical estimation of such bounds depends on the number and duration of trials and is well predicted by the theory. Together, these results provide a framework to analyze neural dimensionality in alert animals, its behavior under stimulus presentation, and its theoretical dependence on ensemble size, number of clusters, and correlations in spiking network models. PMID:26924968

  20. Stimuli Reduce the Dimensionality of Cortical Activity.

    PubMed

    Mazzucato, Luca; Fontanini, Alfredo; La Camera, Giancarlo

    2016-01-01

    The activity of ensembles of simultaneously recorded neurons can be represented as a set of points in the space of firing rates. Even though the dimension of this space is equal to the ensemble size, neural activity can be effectively localized on smaller subspaces. The dimensionality of the neural space is an important determinant of the computational tasks supported by the neural activity. Here, we investigate the dimensionality of neural ensembles from the sensory cortex of alert rats during periods of ongoing (inter-trial) and stimulus-evoked activity. We find that dimensionality grows linearly with ensemble size, and grows significantly faster during ongoing activity compared to evoked activity. We explain these results using a spiking network model based on a clustered architecture. The model captures the difference in growth rate between ongoing and evoked activity and predicts a characteristic scaling with ensemble size that could be tested in high-density multi-electrode recordings. Moreover, we present a simple theory that predicts the existence of an upper bound on dimensionality. This upper bound is inversely proportional to the amount of pair-wise correlations and, compared to a homogeneous network without clusters, it is larger by a factor equal to the number of clusters. The empirical estimation of such bounds depends on the number and duration of trials and is well predicted by the theory. Together, these results provide a framework to analyze neural dimensionality in alert animals, its behavior under stimulus presentation, and its theoretical dependence on ensemble size, number of clusters, and correlations in spiking network models. PMID:26924968

  1. Reduced Vector Preisach Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Umesh D.; Torre, Edward Della; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A new vector Preisach model, called the Reduced Vector Preisach model (RVPM), was developed for fast computations. This model, derived from the Simplified Vector Preisach model (SVPM), has individual components that like the SVPM are calculated independently using coupled selection rules for the state vector computation. However, the RVPM does not require the rotational correction. Therefore, it provides a practical alternative for computing the magnetic susceptibility using a differential approach. A vector version, using the framework of the DOK model, is implemented. Simulation results for the reduced vector Preisach model are also presented.

  2. Do muscle synergies reduce the dimensionality of behavior?

    PubMed Central

    Kuppuswamy, Naveen; Harris, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    The muscle synergy hypothesis is an archetype of the notion of Dimensionality Reduction (DR) occurring in the central nervous system due to modular organization. Toward validating this hypothesis, it is important to understand if muscle synergies can reduce the state-space dimensionality while maintaining task control. In this paper we present a scheme for investigating this reduction utilizing the temporal muscle synergy formulation. Our approach is based on the observation that constraining the control input to a weighted combination of temporal muscle synergies also constrains the dynamic behavior of a system in a trajectory-specific manner. We compute this constrained reformulation of system dynamics and then use the method of system balancing for quantifying the DR; we term this approach as Trajectory Specific Dimensionality Analysis (TSDA). We then investigate the consequence of minimization of the dimensionality for a given task. These methods are tested in simulations on a linear (tethered mass) and a non-linear (compliant kinematic chain) system. Dimensionality of various reaching trajectories is compared when using idealized temporal synergies. We show that as a consequence of this Minimum Dimensional Control (MDC) model, smooth straight-line Cartesian trajectories with bell-shaped velocity profiles emerged as the optima for the reaching task. We also investigated the effect on dimensionality due to adding via-points to a trajectory. The results indicate that a trajectory and synergy basis specific DR of behavior results from muscle synergy control. The implications of these results for the synergy hypothesis, optimal motor control, motor development, and robotics are discussed. PMID:25002844

  3. Evaluation of Floodplain Modifications to Reduce the Effect of Floods Using a Two-Dimensional Hydrodynamic Model of the Flint River at Albany, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Musser, Jonathan W.

    2008-01-01

    Potential flow characteristics of future flooding along a 4.8-mile reach of the Flint River in Albany, Georgia, were simulated using recent digital-elevation-model data and the U.S. Geological Survey finite-element surface-water modeling system for two-dimensional flow in the horizontal plane (FESWMS-2DH). The model was run at four water-surface altitudes at the Flint River at Albany streamgage (02352500): 181.5-foot (ft) altitude with a flow of 61,100 cubic feet per second (ft3/s), 184.5-ft altitude with a flow of 75,400 ft3/s, 187.5-ft altitude with a flow of 91,700 ft3/s, and 192.5-ft altitude with a flow of 123,000 ft3/s. The model was run to measure changes in inundated areas and water-surface altitudes for eight scenarios of possible modifications to the 4.8-mile reach on the Flint River. The eight scenarios include removing a human-made peninsula located downstream from Oglethorpe Boulevard, increasing the opening under the Oakridge Drive bridge, adding culverts to the east Oakridge Drive bridge approach, adding culverts to the east and west Oakridge Drive bridge approaches, adding an overflow across the oxbow north of Oakridge Drive, making the overflow into a channel, removing the Oakridge Drive bridge, and adding a combination of an oxbow overflow and culverts on both Oakridge Drive bridge approaches. The modeled inundation and water-surface altitude changes were mapped for use in evaluating the river modifications. The most effective scenario at reducing inundated area was the combination scenario. At the 187.5-ft altitude, the inundated area decreased from 4.24 square miles to 4.00 square miles. The remove-peninsula scenario was the least effective with a reduction in inundated area of less than 0.01 square miles. In all scenarios, the inundated area reduction increased with water-surface altitude, peaking at the 187.5-ft altitude. The inundated area reduction then decreased at the gage altitude of 192.5 ft.

  4. Reducing the dimensionality of data with neural networks.

    PubMed

    Hinton, G E; Salakhutdinov, R R

    2006-07-28

    High-dimensional data can be converted to low-dimensional codes by training a multilayer neural network with a small central layer to reconstruct high-dimensional input vectors. Gradient descent can be used for fine-tuning the weights in such "autoencoder" networks, but this works well only if the initial weights are close to a good solution. We describe an effective way of initializing the weights that allows deep autoencoder networks to learn low-dimensional codes that work much better than principal components analysis as a tool to reduce the dimensionality of data. PMID:16873662

  5. Reduced basis ANOVA methods for partial differential equations with high-dimensional random inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Qifeng; Lin, Guang

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we present a reduced basis ANOVA approach for partial deferential equations (PDEs) with random inputs. The ANOVA method combined with stochastic collocation methods provides model reduction in high-dimensional parameter space through decomposing high-dimensional inputs into unions of low-dimensional inputs. In this work, to further reduce the computational cost, we investigate spatial low-rank structures in the ANOVA-collocation method, and develop efficient spatial model reduction techniques using hierarchically generated reduced bases. We present a general mathematical framework of the methodology, validate its accuracy and demonstrate its efficiency with numerical experiments.

  6. A three-dimensional ground-water-flow model modified to reduce computer-memory requirements and better simulate confining-bed and aquifer pinchouts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leahy, P.P.

    1982-01-01

    The Trescott computer program for modeling groundwater flow in three dimensions has been modified to (1) treat aquifer and confining bed pinchouts more realistically and (2) reduce the computer memory requirements needed for the input data. Using the original program, simulation of aquifer systems with nonrectangular external boundaries may result in a large number of nodes that are not involved in the numerical solution of the problem, but require computer storage. (USGS)

  7. Perpendicular diffusion of energetic particles: Numerical test of the theorem on reduced dimensionality

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, G.; Shalchi, A.

    2015-01-15

    A fundamental statement in diffusion theory is provided by the so-called theorem on reduced dimensionality. The latter theorem is saying that if the dimensionality of the turbulence is reduced, charged particles are tied to a single magnetic field line. If there is pitch-angle scattering and therewith parallel diffusion, this usually means that perpendicular transport is subdiffusive. Subdiffusive transport was found in numerous simulations for slab turbulence. However, it was unclear whether the theorem is valid for other models with reduced dimensionality such as the two-dimensional model. In the current paper, we simultaneously trace magnetic field lines and energetic particles and we compute the distance between the particle and the initial field line. We confirm the aforementioned theorem for slab turbulence but we cannot confirm it for two-dimensional turbulence. We also show that particles are not tied to field lines for two-component turbulence.

  8. Dimensional models of personality disorder

    PubMed Central

    WIDIGER, THOMAS A

    2007-01-01

    There is little doubt that someday the classification of personality disorder will be dimensional. The failures of the categorical model are so many and are so well established that it is difficult to imagine that this model will ultimately survive. This paper provides a brief discussion of the major alternative proposals for a dimensional classification of personality disorder. It is possible that the authors of a future edition of a psychiatric diagnostic manual will simply choose one of these alternative proposals. However, the ideal solution might be to develop a common, integrative representation including the important contributions of each of the models. PMID:18235857

  9. Dimensionality reduction in epidemic spreading models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frasca, M.; Rizzo, A.; Gallo, L.; Fortuna, L.; Porfiri, M.

    2015-09-01

    Complex dynamical systems often exhibit collective dynamics that are well described by a reduced set of key variables in a low-dimensional space. Such a low-dimensional description offers a privileged perspective to understand the system behavior across temporal and spatial scales. In this work, we propose a data-driven approach to establish low-dimensional representations of large epidemic datasets by using a dimensionality reduction algorithm based on isometric features mapping (ISOMAP). We demonstrate our approach on synthetic data for epidemic spreading in a population of mobile individuals. We find that ISOMAP is successful in embedding high-dimensional data into a low-dimensional manifold, whose topological features are associated with the epidemic outbreak. Across a range of simulation parameters and model instances, we observe that epidemic outbreaks are embedded into a family of closed curves in a three-dimensional space, in which neighboring points pertain to instants that are close in time. The orientation of each curve is unique to a specific outbreak, and the coordinates correlate with the number of infected individuals. A low-dimensional description of epidemic spreading is expected to improve our understanding of the role of individual response on the outbreak dynamics, inform the selection of meaningful global observables, and, possibly, aid in the design of control and quarantine procedures.

  10. System for generating two-dimensional masks from a three-dimensional model using topological analysis

    DOEpatents

    Schiek, Richard

    2006-06-20

    A method of generating two-dimensional masks from a three-dimensional model comprises providing a three-dimensional model representing a micro-electro-mechanical structure for manufacture and a description of process mask requirements, reducing the three-dimensional model to a topological description of unique cross sections, and selecting candidate masks from the unique cross sections and the cross section topology. The method further can comprise reconciling the candidate masks based on the process mask requirements description to produce two-dimensional process masks.

  11. Electronic, Optical, and Thermal Properties of Reduced-Dimensional Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shouting

    Reduced-dimensional materials have attracted tremendous attention because of their new physics and exotic properties, which are of great interests for fundamental science. More importantly, the manipulation and engineering of matter on an atomic scale yield promising applications for many fields including nanoelectronics, nanobiotechnology, environments, and renewable energy. Because of the unusual quantum confinement and enhanced surface effect of reduced-dimensional materials, traditional empirical models suffer from necessary but unreliable parameters extracted from previously-studied bulk materials. In this sense, quantitative, parameter-free approaches are highly useful for understanding properties of reduced-dimensional materials and, furthermore, predicting their novel applications. The first-principles density functional theory (DFT) is proven to be a reliable and convenient tool. In particular, recent progress in many-body perturbation theory (MBPT) makes it possible to calculate excited-state properties, e.g., quasiparticle (QP) band gap and optical excitations, by the first-principles approach based on DFT. Therefore, during my PhD study, I employed first-principles calculations based on DFT and MBPT to systematically study fundamental properties of typical reduced-dimensional semiconductors, i.e., the electronic structure, phonons, and optical excitations of core-shell nanowires (NWs) and graphene-like two-dimensional (2D) structures of current interests. First, I present first-principles studies on how to engineer band alignments of nano-sized radial heterojunctions, Si/Ge core-shell NWs. Our calculation reveals that band offsets in these one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures can be tailored by applying axial strain or varying core-shell sizes. In particular, the valence band offset can be efficiently tuned across a wide range and even be diminished via applied strain. Two mechanisms contribute to this tuning of band offsets. Furthermore, varying the

  12. Reduced order modeling of wall turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moin, Parviz

    2015-11-01

    Modeling turbulent flow near a wall is a pacing item in computational fluid dynamics for aerospace applications and geophysical flows. Gradual progress has been made in statistical modeling of near wall turbulence using the Reynolds averaged equations of motion, an area of research where John Lumley has made numerous seminal contributions. More recently, Lumley and co-workers pioneered dynamical systems modeling of near wall turbulence, and demonstrated that the experimentally observed turbulence dynamics can be predicted using low dimensional dynamical systems. The discovery of minimal flow unit provides further evidence that the near wall turbulence is amenable to reduced order modeling. The underlying rationale for potential success in using low dimensional dynamical systems theory is based on the fact that the Reynolds number is low in close proximity to the wall. Presumably for the same reason, low dimensional models are expected to be successful in modeling of the laminar/turbulence transition region. This has been shown recently using dynamic mode decomposition. Furthermore, it is shown that the near wall flow structure and statistics in the late and non-linear transition region is strikingly similar to that in higher Reynolds number fully developed turbulence. In this presentation, I will argue that the accumulated evidence suggests that wall modeling for LES using low dimensional dynamical systems is a profitable avenue to pursue. The main challenge would be the numerical integration of such wall models in LES methodology.

  13. Determining Reduced Order Models for Optimal Stochastic Reduced Order Models

    SciTech Connect

    Bonney, Matthew S.; Brake, Matthew R.W.

    2015-08-01

    The use of parameterized reduced order models(PROMs) within the stochastic reduced order model (SROM) framework is a logical progression for both methods. In this report, five different parameterized reduced order models are selected and critiqued against the other models along with truth model for the example of the Brake-Reuss beam. The models are: a Taylor series using finite difference, a proper orthogonal decomposition of the the output, a Craig-Bampton representation of the model, a method that uses Hyper-Dual numbers to determine the sensitivities, and a Meta-Model method that uses the Hyper-Dual results and constructs a polynomial curve to better represent the output data. The methods are compared against a parameter sweep and a distribution propagation where the first four statistical moments are used as a comparison. Each method produces very accurate results with the Craig-Bampton reduction having the least accurate results. The models are also compared based on time requirements for the evaluation of each model where the Meta- Model requires the least amount of time for computation by a significant amount. Each of the five models provided accurate results in a reasonable time frame. The determination of which model to use is dependent on the availability of the high-fidelity model and how many evaluations can be performed. Analysis of the output distribution is examined by using a large Monte-Carlo simulation along with a reduced simulation using Latin Hypercube and the stochastic reduced order model sampling technique. Both techniques produced accurate results. The stochastic reduced order modeling technique produced less error when compared to an exhaustive sampling for the majority of methods.

  14. Sensory stimuli reduce the dimensionality of cortical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzucato, Luca; Fontanini, Alfredo; La Camera, Giancarlo

    Neural ensembles in alert animals generate complex patterns of activity. Although cortical activity unfolds in a space whose dimension is equal to the number of neurons, it is often restricted to a lower dimensional subspace. Dimensionality is the minimal number of dimensions that accurately capture neural dynamics, and may be related to the computational tasks supported by the neural circuit. Here, we investigate the dimensionality of neural ensembles from the insular cortex of alert rats during periods of `ongoing' (spontaneous) and stimulus-evoked activity. We find that the dimensionality grows with ensemble size, and does so significantly faster during ongoing compared to evoked activity. We explain both results using a recurrent spiking network with clustered architecture, and obtain analytical results on the dependence of dimensionality on ensemble size, number of clusters, and pair-wise noise correlations. The theory predicts a characteristic scaling with ensemble size and the existence of an upper bound on dimensionality, which grows with the number of clusters and decreases with the amount of noise correlations. To our knowledge, this is the first mechanistic model of neural dimensionality in cortex during both spontaneous and evoked activity.

  15. Reduced Order Modeling Incompressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helenbrook, B. T.

    2010-01-01

    The details: a) Need stable numerical methods; b) Round off error can be considerable; c) Not convinced modes are correct for incompressible flow. Nonetheless, can derive compact and accurate reduced-order models. Can be used to generate actuator models or full flow-field models

  16. REDMAPS: reduced-dimensionality matching for prostate brachytherapy seed reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Junghoon; Labat, Christian; Jain, Ameet K; Song, Danny Y; Burdette, Everette Clif; Fichtinger, Gabor; Prince, Jerry L

    2011-01-01

    The success of prostate brachytherapy critically depends on delivering adequate dose to the prostate gland. Intraoperative localization of the implanted seeds provides potential for dose evaluation and optimization during therapy. A reduced-dimensionality matching algorithm for prostate brachytherapy seed reconstruction (REDMAPS) that uses multiple X-ray fluoroscopy images obtained from different poses is proposed. The seed reconstruction problem is formulated as a combinatorial optimization problem, and REDMAPS finds a solution in a clinically acceptable amount of time using dimensionality reduction to create a smaller space of possible solutions. Dimensionality reduction is possible since the optimal solution has approximately zero cost when the poses of the acquired images are known to be within a small error. REDMAPS is also formulated to address the "hidden seed problem" in which seeds overlap on one or more observed images. REDMAPS uses a pruning algorithm to avoid unnecessary computation of cost metrics and the reduced problem is solved using linear programming. REDMAPS was first evaluated and its parameters tuned using simulations. It was then validated using five phantom and 21 patient datasets. REDMAPS was successful in reconstructing the seeds with an overall seed matching rate above 99% and a reconstruction error below 1 mm in less than 5 s. PMID:20643600

  17. Reducing the dimensionality of the protein-folding search problem.

    PubMed

    Chellapa, George D; Rose, George D

    2012-08-01

    How does a folding protein negotiate a vast, featureless conformational landscape and adopt its native structure in biological real time? Motivated by this search problem, we developed a novel algorithm to compare protein structures. Procedures to identify structural analogs are typically conducted in three-dimensional space: the tertiary structure of a target protein is matched against each candidate in a database of structures, and goodness of fit is evaluated by a distance-based measure, such as the root-mean-square distance between target and candidate. This is an expensive approach because three-dimensional space is complex. Here, we transform the problem into a simpler one-dimensional procedure. Specifically, we identify and label the 11 most populated residue basins in a database of high-resolution protein structures. Using this 11-letter alphabet, any protein's three-dimensional structure can be transformed into a one-dimensional string by mapping each residue onto its corresponding basin. Similarity between the resultant basin strings can then be evaluated by conventional sequence-based comparison. The disorder → order folding transition is abridged on both sides. At the onset, folding conditions necessitate formation of hydrogen-bonded scaffold elements on which proteins are assembled, severely restricting the magnitude of accessible conformational space. Near the end, chain topology is established prior to emergence of the close-packed native state. At this latter stage of folding, the chain remains molten, and residues populate natural basins that are approximated by the 11 basins derived here. In essence, our algorithm reduces the protein-folding search problem to mapping the amino acid sequence onto a restricted basin string. PMID:22692765

  18. Reducing the dimensionality of the protein-folding search problem

    PubMed Central

    Chellapa, George D; Rose, George D

    2012-01-01

    How does a folding protein negotiate a vast, featureless conformational landscape and adopt its native structure in biological real time? Motivated by this search problem, we developed a novel algorithm to compare protein structures. Procedures to identify structural analogs are typically conducted in three-dimensional space: the tertiary structure of a target protein is matched against each candidate in a database of structures, and goodness of fit is evaluated by a distance-based measure, such as the root-mean-square distance between target and candidate. This is an expensive approach because three-dimensional space is complex. Here, we transform the problem into a simpler one-dimensional procedure. Specifically, we identify and label the 11 most populated residue basins in a database of high-resolution protein structures. Using this 11-letter alphabet, any protein's three-dimensional structure can be transformed into a one-dimensional string by mapping each residue onto its corresponding basin. Similarity between the resultant basin strings can then be evaluated by conventional sequence-based comparison. The disorder → order folding transition is abridged on both sides. At the onset, folding conditions necessitate formation of hydrogen-bonded scaffold elements on which proteins are assembled, severely restricting the magnitude of accessible conformational space. Near the end, chain topology is established prior to emergence of the close-packed native state. At this latter stage of folding, the chain remains molten, and residues populate natural basins that are approximated by the 11 basins derived here. In essence, our algorithm reduces the protein-folding search problem to mapping the amino acid sequence onto a restricted basin string. PMID:22692765

  19. Taming EHR data: using semantic similarity to reduce dimensionality.

    PubMed

    Kalankesh, Leila; Weatherall, James; Ba-Dhfari, Thamer; Buchan, Iain; Brass, Andy

    2013-01-01

    Medical care data is a valuable resource that can be used for many purposes including managing and planning for future health needs as well as clinical research. However, the heterogeneity and complexity of medical data can be an obstacle in applying data mining techniques. Much of the potential value of this data therefore goes untapped. In this paper we have developed a methodology that reduces the dimensionality of primary care data, in order to make it more amenable to visualisation, mining and clustering. The methodology involves employing a combination of ontology-based semantic similarity and principal component analysis (PCA) to map the data into an appropriate and informative low dimensional space. Throughout the study, we had access to anonymised patient data from primary care in Salford, UK. The results of our application of this methodology show that diagnosis codes in primary care data can be used to map patients into an informative low dimensional space, which in turn provides the opportunity to support further data exploration and medical hypothesis formulation. PMID:23920514

  20. Reduced-dimensionality-induced helimagnetism in iron nanoislands.

    PubMed

    Phark, S-H; Fischer, J A; Corbetta, M; Sander, D; Nakamura, K; Kirschner, J

    2014-01-01

    Low-dimensionality in magnetic materials often leads to noncollinear magnetic order, such as a helical spin order and skyrmions, which have received much attention because of envisioned applications in spin transport and in future data storage. Up to now, however, the real-space observation of the noncollinear magnetic order has been limited mostly to systems involving a strong spin-orbit interaction. Here we report a noncollinear magnetic order in individual nanostructures of a prototypical magnetic material, bilayer iron islands on Cu (111). Spin-polarized scanning tunnelling microscopy reveals a magnetic stripe phase with a period of 1.28 nm, which is identified as a one-dimensional helical spin order. Ab initio calculations identify reduced-dimensionality-enhanced long-range antiferromagnetic interactions as the driving force of this spin order. Our findings point at the potential of nanostructured magnets as a new experimental arena of noncollinear magnetic order stabilized in a nanostructure, magnetically decoupled from the substrate. PMID:25336303

  1. Reduced dimensionality diatom--diatom reactive scattering: Application to a model H sub 2 +A sub 2 r arrow H+HA sub 2 reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Q.; Bowman, J.M. )

    1990-01-15

    We apply a recently formulated quantum theory of diatom--diatom reactions (Q. Sun and J. M. Bowman, Int. J. Quant. Chem., Quant. Chem. Symp. {bold 23}, 9 (1989)) to a model collinear H{sub 2}+A{sub 2}{r arrow}H+HA{sub 2} reaction, where A has the mass of a hydrogen atom. The theory assumes one diatom bond is nonreactive, and the reactive scattering Hamiltonian is written in terms of hyperspherical and cylindrical coordinates. The potential-energy surface used is the PK2 H+H{sub 2} surface augmented by a harmonic degree of freedom describing the nonreactive A{sub 2}. Details of the formulation and solution of the coupled-channel equations are given, along with convergence tests, and a discussion of the new state-to-state transition probabilities. In particular, the partial quenching of the well-known collinear H+H{sub 2} resonances is noted.

  2. POD/DEIM reduced-order strategies for efficient four dimensional variational data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ştefănescu, R.; Sandu, A.; Navon, I. M.

    2015-08-01

    This work studies reduced order modeling (ROM) approaches to speed up the solution of variational data assimilation problems with large scale nonlinear dynamical models. It is shown that a key requirement for a successful reduced order solution is that reduced order Karush-Kuhn-Tucker conditions accurately represent their full order counterparts. In particular, accurate reduced order approximations are needed for the forward and adjoint dynamical models, as well as for the reduced gradient. New strategies to construct reduced order based are developed for proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) ROM data assimilation using both Galerkin and Petrov-Galerkin projections. For the first time POD, tensorial POD, and discrete empirical interpolation method (DEIM) are employed to develop reduced data assimilation systems for a geophysical flow model, namely, the two dimensional shallow water equations. Numerical experiments confirm the theoretical framework for Galerkin projection. In the case of Petrov-Galerkin projection, stabilization strategies must be considered for the reduced order models. The new reduced order shallow water data assimilation system provides analyses similar to those produced by the full resolution data assimilation system in one tenth of the computational time.

  3. POD/DEIM reduced-order strategies for efficient four dimensional variational data assimilation

    SciTech Connect

    Ştefănescu, R.; Sandu, A.; Navon, I.M.

    2015-08-15

    This work studies reduced order modeling (ROM) approaches to speed up the solution of variational data assimilation problems with large scale nonlinear dynamical models. It is shown that a key requirement for a successful reduced order solution is that reduced order Karush–Kuhn–Tucker conditions accurately represent their full order counterparts. In particular, accurate reduced order approximations are needed for the forward and adjoint dynamical models, as well as for the reduced gradient. New strategies to construct reduced order based are developed for proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) ROM data assimilation using both Galerkin and Petrov–Galerkin projections. For the first time POD, tensorial POD, and discrete empirical interpolation method (DEIM) are employed to develop reduced data assimilation systems for a geophysical flow model, namely, the two dimensional shallow water equations. Numerical experiments confirm the theoretical framework for Galerkin projection. In the case of Petrov–Galerkin projection, stabilization strategies must be considered for the reduced order models. The new reduced order shallow water data assimilation system provides analyses similar to those produced by the full resolution data assimilation system in one tenth of the computational time.

  4. Hybrid reduced order modeling for assembly calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, Youngsuk; Abdel-Khalik, Hany S.; Jessee, Matthew A.; Mertyurek, Ugur

    2015-08-14

    While the accuracy of assembly calculations has greatly improved due to the increase in computer power enabling more refined description of the phase space and use of more sophisticated numerical algorithms, the computational cost continues to increase which limits the full utilization of their effectiveness for routine engineering analysis. Reduced order modeling is a mathematical vehicle that scales down the dimensionality of large-scale numerical problems to enable their repeated executions on small computing environment, often available to end users. This is done by capturing the most dominant underlying relationships between the model's inputs and outputs. Previous works demonstrated the use of the reduced order modeling for a single physics code, such as a radiation transport calculation. This paper extends those works to coupled code systems as currently employed in assembly calculations. Finally, numerical tests are conducted using realistic SCALE assembly models with resonance self-shielding, neutron transport, and nuclides transmutation/depletion models representing the components of the coupled code system.

  5. Hybrid reduced order modeling for assembly calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, Y.; Abdel-Khalik, H. S.; Jessee, M. A.; Mertyurek, U.

    2013-07-01

    While the accuracy of assembly calculations has considerably improved due to the increase in computer power enabling more refined description of the phase space and use of more sophisticated numerical algorithms, the computational cost continues to increase which limits the full utilization of their effectiveness for routine engineering analysis. Reduced order modeling is a mathematical vehicle that scales down the dimensionality of large-scale numerical problems to enable their repeated executions on small computing environment, often available to end users. This is done by capturing the most dominant underlying relationships between the model's inputs and outputs. Previous works demonstrated the use of the reduced order modeling for a single physics code, such as a radiation transport calculation. This manuscript extends those works to coupled code systems as currently employed in assembly calculations. Numerical tests are conducted using realistic SCALE assembly models with resonance self-shielding, neutron transport, and nuclides transmutation/depletion models representing the components of the coupled code system. (authors)

  6. Hybrid reduced order modeling for assembly calculations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bang, Youngsuk; Abdel-Khalik, Hany S.; Jessee, Matthew A.; Mertyurek, Ugur

    2015-08-14

    While the accuracy of assembly calculations has greatly improved due to the increase in computer power enabling more refined description of the phase space and use of more sophisticated numerical algorithms, the computational cost continues to increase which limits the full utilization of their effectiveness for routine engineering analysis. Reduced order modeling is a mathematical vehicle that scales down the dimensionality of large-scale numerical problems to enable their repeated executions on small computing environment, often available to end users. This is done by capturing the most dominant underlying relationships between the model's inputs and outputs. Previous works demonstrated the usemore » of the reduced order modeling for a single physics code, such as a radiation transport calculation. This paper extends those works to coupled code systems as currently employed in assembly calculations. Finally, numerical tests are conducted using realistic SCALE assembly models with resonance self-shielding, neutron transport, and nuclides transmutation/depletion models representing the components of the coupled code system.« less

  7. Sparse High Dimensional Models in Economics

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jianqing; Lv, Jinchi; Qi, Lei

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on sparse high dimensional models and discusses some applications in economics and finance. Recent developments of theory, methods, and implementations in penalized least squares and penalized likelihood methods are highlighted. These variable selection methods are proved to be effective in high dimensional sparse modeling. The limits of dimensionality that regularization methods can handle, the role of penalty functions, and their statistical properties are detailed. Some recent advances in ultra-high dimensional sparse modeling are also briefly discussed. PMID:22022635

  8. Extra-dimensional models on the lattice

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Knechtli, Francesco; Rinaldi, Enrico

    2016-08-05

    In this paper we summarize the ongoing effort to study extra-dimensional gauge theories with lattice simulations. In these models the Higgs field is identified with extra-dimensional components of the gauge field. The Higgs potential is generated by quantum corrections and is protected from divergences by the higher dimensional gauge symmetry. Dimensional reduction to four dimensions can occur through compactification or localization. Gauge-Higgs unification models are often studied using perturbation theory. Numerical lattice simulations are used to go beyond these perturbative expectations and to include nonperturbative effects. We describe the known perturbative predictions and their fate in the strongly-coupled regime formore » various extra-dimensional models.« less

  9. THREE-DIMENSIONAL MODEL FOR HYPERTHERMIA CALCULATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Realistic three-dimensional models that predict temperature distributions with a high degree of spatial resolution in bodies exposed to electromagnetic (EM) fields are required in the application of hyperthermia for cancer treatment. To ascertain the thermophysiologic response of...

  10. Reduced Order Modeling in General Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiglio, Manuel

    2014-03-01

    Reduced Order Modeling is an emerging yet fast developing filed in gravitational wave physics. The main goals are to enable fast modeling and parameter estimation of any detected signal, along with rapid matched filtering detecting. I will focus on the first two. Some accomplishments include being able to replace, with essentially no lost of physical accuracy, the original models with surrogate ones (which are not effective ones, that is, they do not simplify the physics but go on a very different track, exploiting the particulars of the waveform family under consideration and state of the art dimensional reduction techniques) which are very fast to evaluate. For example, for EOB models they are at least around 3 orders of magnitude faster than solving the original equations, with physically equivalent results. For numerical simulations the speedup is at least 11 orders of magnitude. For parameter estimation our current numbers are about bringing ~100 days for a single SPA inspiral binary neutron star Bayesian parameter estimation analysis to under a day. More recently, it has been shown that the full precessing problem for, say, 200 cycles, can be represented, through some new ideas, by a remarkably compact set of carefully chosen reduced basis waveforms (~10-100, depending on the accuracy requirements). I will highlight what I personally believe are the challenges to face next in this subarea of GW physics and where efforts should be directed. This talk will summarize work in collaboration with: Harbir Antil (GMU), Jonathan Blackman (Caltech), Priscila Canizares (IoA, Cambridge, UK), Sarah Caudill (UWM), Jonathan Gair (IoA. Cambridge. UK), Scott Field (UMD), Chad R. Galley (Caltech), Frank Herrmann (Germany), Han Hestahven (EPFL, Switzerland), Jason Kaye (Brown, Stanford & Courant). Evan Ochsner (UWM), Ricardo Nochetto (UMD), Vivien Raymond (LIGO, Caltech), Rory Smith (LIGO, Caltech) Bela Ssilagyi (Caltech) and MT (UMD & Caltech).

  11. Reduced-Order Modeling: New Approaches for Computational Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beran, Philip S.; Silva, Walter A.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we review the development of new reduced-order modeling techniques and discuss their applicability to various problems in computational physics. Emphasis is given to methods ba'sed on Volterra series representations and the proper orthogonal decomposition. Results are reported for different nonlinear systems to provide clear examples of the construction and use of reduced-order models, particularly in the multi-disciplinary field of computational aeroelasticity. Unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic behaviors of two- dimensional and three-dimensional geometries are described. Large increases in computational efficiency are obtained through the use of reduced-order models, thereby justifying the initial computational expense of constructing these models and inotivatim,- their use for multi-disciplinary design analysis.

  12. [Dimensional modeling analysis for outpatient payments].

    PubMed

    Guo, Yi-zhong; Guo, Yi-min

    2008-09-01

    This paper introduces a data warehouse model for outpatient payments, which is designed according to the requirements of the hospital financial management while dimensional modeling technique is combined with the analysis on the requirements. This data warehouse model can not only improve the accuracy of financial management requirements, but also greatly increase the efficiency and quality of the hospital management. PMID:19119657

  13. Finding four dimensional symplectic maps with reduced chaos: Preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Weishi Wan; Cary, J.R.; Shasharina, S.G.

    1998-06-01

    A method for finding integrable four-dimensional symplectic maps is outlined. The method relies on solving for parameter values at which the linear stability factors of the fixed points of the map have the values corresponding to integrability. This method is applied to accelerator lattices in order to increase dynamic aperture. Results show a increase of the dynamic aperture after correction, which implies the validity of the method.

  14. 3-Dimensional Topographic Models for the Classroom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, J. W.; Roark, J. H.; Sakimoto, S. E. H.; Stockman, S.; Frey, H. V.

    2003-01-01

    We have recently undertaken a program to develop educational tools using 3-dimensional solid models of digital elevation data acquired by the Mars Orbital Laser Altimeter (MOLA) for Mars as well as a variety of sources for elevation data of the Earth. This work is made possible by the use of rapid prototyping technology to construct solid 3-Dimensional models of science data. We recently acquired rapid prototyping machine that builds 3-dimensional models in extruded plastic. While the machine was acquired to assist in the design and development of scientific instruments and hardware, it is also fully capable of producing models of spacecraft remote sensing data. We have demonstrated this by using Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) topographic data and Earth based topographic data to produce extruded plastic topographic models which are visually appealing and instantly engage those who handle them.

  15. Reduced Model for Detonation Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maillet, Jean-Bernard; Soulard, Laurent; Stoltz, Gabriel

    2007-06-01

    We present a mesoscopic model for reactive waves which extends the model proposed by G. Stoltz (G. Stoltz, Europhys. Lett. 76 (2006) 849). A complex molecule (or a group of molecules) is replaced by a single mesoparticle, evolving according to some Dissipative Particle Dynamics. Chemical reactions can be handled in a mean way by considering an additional variable per particle describing a rate of reaction. The evolution of this rate is governed by the kinetics of a reversible exothermic reaction. Numerical results show that the reactive wave behaves like a detonation wave.

  16. One-dimensional XY model: Ergodic properties and hydrodynamic limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuhov, A. G.; Suhov, Yu. M.

    1986-11-01

    We prove theorems on convergence to a stationary state in the course of time for the one-dimensional XY model and its generalizations. The key point is the well-known Jordan-Wigner transformation, which maps the XY dynamics onto a group of Bogoliubov transformations on the CAR C *-algebra over Z 1. The role of stationary states for Bogoliubov transformations is played by quasifree states and for the XY model by their inverse images with respect to the Jordan-Wigner transformation. The hydrodynamic limit for the one-dimensional XY model is also considered. By using the Jordan-Wigner transformation one reduces the problem to that of constructing the hydrodynamic limit for the group of Bogoliubov transformations. As a result, we obtain an independent motion of "normal modes," which is described by a hyperbolic linear differential equation of second order. For the XX model this equation reduces to a first-order transfer equation.

  17. Reduced fidelity in the Kitaev honeycomb model

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhi; Ma, Tianxing; Gu, Shi-Jian; Lin, Hai-Qing

    2010-06-15

    We study reduced fidelity and reduced fidelity susceptibility in the Kitaev honeycomb model. It is shown that the nearest-two-site reduced fidelity susceptibility manifests itself as a peak at the quantum phase transition point, although the one-site reduced fidelity susceptibility vanishes. Our results directly reveal that the reduced fidelity susceptibility can be used to characterize the quantum phase transition in the Kitaev honeycomb model, which suggests that, despite its local nature, the reduced fidelity susceptibility is an accurate marker of the topological phase transition when it is properly chosen.

  18. Response characteristics of a low-dimensional model neuron.

    PubMed

    Cartling, B

    1996-11-15

    It is shown that a low-dimensional model neuron with a response time constant smaller than the membrane time constant closely reproduces the activity and excitability behavior of a detailed conductance-based model of Hodgkin-Huxley type. The fast response of the activity variable also makes it possible to reduce the model to a one-dimensional model, in particular for typical conditions. As an example, the reduction to a single-variable model from a multivariable conductance-based model of a neocortical pyramidal cell with somatic input is demonstrated. The conditions for avoiding a spurious damped oscillatory response to a constant input are derived, and it is shown that a limit-cycle response cannot occur. The capability of the low-dimensional model to approximate higher-dimensional models accurately makes it useful for describing complex dynamics of nets of interconnected neurons. The simplicity of the model facilitates analytic studies, elucidations of neurocomputational mechanisms, and applications to large-scale systems. PMID:8888611

  19. Two-dimensional charge-control model for MODFET's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young Min; Roblin, Patrick

    1986-11-01

    A dc model for MODFET's accounting for two-dimensional effects is proposed. In this model, charge control is realized by solving the two-dimensional Poisson equation in the depleted AlGaAs region. The transport picture used for the two-dimensional electron gas (2-DEG) in the AlGaAs/GaAs heterojunction relies on the quasi-Fermi level together with a field-dependent mobility and therefore includes 2-DEG diffusion effects. The approach reduces the analysis to a single integral equation. I-V curves, which provide a good fitting to the reported experimental data, are obtained using a smooth velocity-field curve. The channel voltage, 2-DEG concentration, parallel electric-field, and drift velocity along the channel are given in this study and provide a clear picture of current saturation. The model is consistent with the approximate two-region saturation picture but provides a smoother transition.

  20. Rank-Based Similarity Search: Reducing the Dimensional Dependence.

    PubMed

    Houle, Michael E; Nett, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a data structure for k-NN search, the Rank Cover Tree (RCT), whose pruning tests rely solely on the comparison of similarity values; other properties of the underlying space, such as the triangle inequality, are not employed. Objects are selected according to their ranks with respect to the query object, allowing much tighter control on the overall execution costs. A formal theoretical analysis shows that with very high probability, the RCT returns a correct query result in time that depends very competitively on a measure of the intrinsic dimensionality of the data set. The experimental results for the RCT show that non-metric pruning strategies for similarity search can be practical even when the representational dimension of the data is extremely high. They also show that the RCT is capable of meeting or exceeding the level of performance of state-of-the-art methods that make use of metric pruning or other selection tests involving numerical constraints on distance values. PMID:26353214

  1. Escherichia coli growth under modeled reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Paul W.; Meyer, Michelle L.; Leff, Laura G.

    2004-01-01

    Bacteria exhibit varying responses to modeled reduced gravity that can be simulated by clino-rotation. When Escherichia coli was subjected to different rotation speeds during clino-rotation, significant differences between modeled reduced gravity and normal gravity controls were observed only at higher speeds (30-50 rpm). There was no apparent affect of removing samples on the results obtained. When E. coli was grown in minimal medium (at 40 rpm), cell size was not affected by modeled reduced gravity and there were few differences in cell numbers. However, in higher nutrient conditions (i.e., dilute nutrient broth), total cell numbers were higher and cells were smaller under reduced gravity compared to normal gravity controls. Overall, the responses to modeled reduced gravity varied with nutrient conditions; larger surface to volume ratios may help compensate for the zone of nutrient depletion around the cells under modeled reduced gravity.

  2. Pattern recognition in volcano seismology - Reducing spectral dimensionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unglert, K.; Radic, V.; Jellinek, M.

    2015-12-01

    Variations in the spectral content of volcano seismicity can relate to changes in volcanic activity. Low-frequency seismic signals often precede or accompany volcanic eruptions. However, they are commonly manually identified in spectra or spectrograms, and their definition in spectral space differs from one volcanic setting to the next. Increasingly long time series of monitoring data at volcano observatories require automated tools to facilitate rapid processing and aid with pattern identification related to impending eruptions. Furthermore, knowledge transfer between volcanic settings is difficult if the methods to identify and analyze the characteristics of seismic signals differ. To address these challenges we evaluate whether a machine learning technique called Self-Organizing Maps (SOMs) can be used to characterize the dominant spectral components of volcano seismicity without the need for any a priori knowledge of different signal classes. This could reduce the dimensions of the spectral space typically analyzed by orders of magnitude, and enable rapid processing and visualization. Preliminary results suggest that the temporal evolution of volcano seismicity at Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i, can be reduced to as few as 2 spectral components by using a combination of SOMs and cluster analysis. We will further refine our methodology with several datasets from Hawai`i and Alaska, among others, and compare it to other techniques.

  3. Local properties of the two-dimensional Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drewes, Jan; Miller, Luke; Cocchi, Eugenio; Chan, Chun Fai; Pertot, Daniel; Brennecke, Ferdinand; Köhl, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Quantum gases of interacting fermionic atoms in optical lattices promise to shed new light on the low-temperature phases of the Hubbard model such as spin-ordered phases, or in particular, on possible d-wave superconductivity. In this context it remains challenging to further reduce the temperature of the trapped gas. We experimentally realize the two-dimensional Hubbard model by loading a quantum degenerate Fermi gas of 40K atoms into a three-dimensional optical lattice geometry. By tuning the interaction between the two lowest hyperfine states to strong repulsion the two-dimensional Mott-insulator is created. High resolution absorption imaging in combination with radio-frequency spectroscopy is applied to spatially resolve the atomic distribution in a single layer in the vertical direction. This measurement scheme gives direct access to the local properties of the trapped gas and we present most recent data on the distribution of entropy and density-density fluctuations.

  4. Science and technology of reduced-dimensional magnetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Heffner, R.H.; Bishop, A.R.; Hundley, M.F.; Jia, Q.; Neumeier, J.J.; Trugman, S.A.; Thompson, J.D.; Wu, X.D.; Zhang, J.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This work involved the synthesis of single crystal and thin film samples of magnetoresistive manganites (LaMnO{sub 3} doped with Ca and Sr) and the characterization of their electronic transport properties to understand the underlying physical mechanisms responsible for the colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) of these materials. The experimental program was supplemented by a modeling effort that sought to develop microscopic mathematical models of the observed phenomena. The authors succeeded in finding an important relation between the magnetization and resistivity in these materials, which helps to explain the importance of lattice distortions accompanied by clusters of ferromagnetic spins (called spin-lattice polarons) in the CMR phenomena. In addition, they developed rudimentary tunnel junctions of CMR-insulator-CMR multilayers that will lead to possible applications of these materials as magnetic sensors.

  5. Anisotropic 2-dimensional Robin Hood model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buldyrev, Sergey; Cwilich, Gabriel; Zypman, Fredy

    2009-03-01

    We have considered the Robin Hood model introduced by Zaitsev[1] to discuss flux creep and depinning of interfaces in a two dimensional system. Although the model has been studied extensively analytically in 1-d [2], its scaling laws have been verified numerically only in that case. Recent work suggest that its properties might be important to understand surface friction[3], where its 2-dimensional properties are important. We show that in the 2-dimensional case scaling laws can be found provided one considers carefully the anisotropy of the model, and different ways of introducing that anisotropy lead to different exponents and scaling laws, in analogy with directed percolation, with which this model is closely related[4]. We show that breaking the rotational symmetry between the x and y axes does not change the scaling properties of the model, but the introduction of a preferential direction of accretion (``robbing'' in the language of the model) leads to new scaling exponents. [1] S.I.Zaitsev, Physica A189, 411 (1992) [2] M. Pacuzki, S. Maslov and P.Bak, Phys Rev. E53, 414 (1996) [3] S. Buldyrev, J. Ferrante and F. Zypman Phys. Rev E64, 066110 (2006) [4] G. Odor, Rev. Mod. Phys. 76, 663 (2004) .

  6. Two dimensional thick center vortex model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafibakhsh, Shahnoosh; Ahmadi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    The potential between static color source is calculated in the SU (3) gauge group by introducing a two dimensional vortex flux. To generalize the model, the length of the Wilson loop is equal to R oriented along the x axis, and the vortex flux is considered as a function of x and y. The comparison between the generalized model and the original one shows that the intermediate linear regime is increased significantly and better agreement with Casimir scaling is achieved. Furthermore, the model is applied to calculate the potential between baryons.

  7. Three-dimensional modeling of ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Erin, White; Hilary, Kenny; Ernst, Lengyel

    2015-01-01

    New models for epithelial ovarian cancer initiation and metastasis are required to obtain a mechanistic understanding of the disease and to develop new therapeutics. Modeling ovarian cancer however is challenging as a result of the genetic heterogeneity of the malignancy, the diverse pathology, the limited availability of human tissue for research, the atypical mechanisms of metastasis, and because the origin is unclear. Insights into the origin of high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas and mechanisms of metastasis have resulted in the generation of novel three-dimensional (3D) culture models that better approximate the behavior of the tumor cells in vivo than prior two-dimensional models. The 3D models aim to recapitulate the tumor microenvironment, which has a critical role in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer. Ultimately, findings using models that accurately reflect human ovarian cancer biology are likely to translate into improved clinical outcomes. In this review we discuss the design of new 3D culture models of ovarian cancer primarily using human cells, key studies in which these models have been applied, current limitations, and future applications. PMID:25034878

  8. Semi-Empirical Modeling of Two-Dimensional and Three-Dimensional Dynamic Stall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modarres, Ramin

    Helicopters are generally limited in their performance by the phenomenon of dynamic stall. The purpose of this work is to develop a method for modeling dynamic stall that is appropriate to preliminary design and flight simulator applications. Unlike other semi-empirical dynamic stall models, the model developed in this thesis, not only counts for the well-known, three-dimensional flow effects on the stalled loads but also captures the secondary vortex-shedding phenomenon that has been seen in experiments. The fundamental physics that modify dynamic-stall behavior and that have been extended from two-dimensional to three-dimensional flow are, namely: 1.) yawed flow, 2.) time-varying velocity, 3.) the rotational environment and 4.) the radial blade coupling. For the reduced-order modeling, extra nonlinear states have been added to the dynamic stall model in order to simulate the double-dynamic-stall phenomenon. The results of this study will have practical applications to aerospace systems, such as compliant or morphing surfaces in rotary-wing systems that encounter transient or periodic separation and reattachment during phenomena such as dynamic stall.

  9. Finite-dimensional models of diffusion chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glyzin, S. D.; Kolesov, A. Yu.; Rozov, N. Kh.

    2010-05-01

    Some parabolic systems of the reaction-diffusion type exhibit the phenomenon of diffusion chaos. Specifically, when the diffusivities decrease proportionally, while the other parameters of a system remain fixed, the system exhibits a chaotic attractor whose dimension increases indefinitely. Various finite-dimensional models of diffusion chaos are considered that represent chains of coupled ordinary differential equations and similar chains of discrete mappings. A numerical analysis suggests that these chains with suitably chosen parameters exhibit chaotic attractors of arbitrarily high dimensions.

  10. Verified reduction of dimensionality for an all-vanadium redox flow battery model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, A. K.; Ling, C. Y.; Birgersson, E.; Vynnycky, M.; Han, M.

    2015-04-01

    The computational cost for all-vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFB) models that seek to capture the transport phenomena usually increases with the number of spatial dimensions considered. In this context, we carry out scale analysis to derive a reduced zero-dimensional model. Two nondimensional numbers and their limits to support the model reduction are identified. We verify the reduced model by comparing its charge-discharge curve predictions with that of a full two-dimensional model. The proposed analysis leading to reduction in dimensionality is generic and can be employed for other types of redox flow batteries.

  11. Wave turbulence in one-dimensional models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, V. E.; Guyenne, P.; Pushkarev, A. N.; Dias, F.

    2001-05-01

    A two-parameter nonlinear dispersive wave equation proposed by Majda, McLaughlin and Tabak is studied analytically and numerically as a model for the study of wave turbulence in one-dimensional systems. Our ultimate goal is to test the validity of weak turbulence theory. Although weak turbulence theory is independent on the sign of the nonlinearity of the model, the numerical results show a strong dependence on the sign of the nonlinearity. A possible explanation for this discrepancy is the strong influence of coherent structures - wave collapses and quasisolitons - in wave turbulence.

  12. Structural Modelling of Two Dimensional Amorphous Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Avishek

    The continuous random network (CRN) model of network glasses is widely accepted as a model for materials such as vitreous silica and amorphous silicon. Although it has been more than eighty years since the proposal of the CRN, there has not been conclusive experimental evidence of the structure of glasses and amorphous materials. This has now changed with the advent of two-dimensional amorphous materials. Now, not only the distribution of rings but the actual atomic ring structure can be imaged in real space, allowing for greater charicterization of these types of networks. This dissertation reports the first work done on the modelling of amorphous graphene and vitreous silica bilayers. Models of amorphous graphene have been created using a Monte Carlo bond-switching method and MD method. Vitreous silica bilayers have been constructed using models of amorphous graphene and the ring statistics of silica bilayers has been studied.

  13. Modelling of Three-Dimensional Nanographene.

    PubMed

    Mathioudakis, Christos; Kelires, Pantelis C

    2016-12-01

    Monte Carlo simulations and tight-binding calculations shed light on the properties of three-dimensional nanographene, a material composed of interlinked, covalently-bonded nanoplatelet graphene units. By constructing realistic model networks of nanographene, we study its structure, mechanical stability, and optoelectronic properties. We find that the material is nanoporous with high specific surface area, in agreement with experimental reports. Its structure is characterized by randomly oriented and curved nanoplatelet units which retain a high degree of graphene order. The material exhibits good mechanical stability with a formation energy of only ∼0.3 eV/atom compared to two-dimensional graphene. It has high electrical conductivity and optical absorption, with values approaching those of graphene. PMID:26983431

  14. Three-dimensional pancreas organogenesis models.

    PubMed

    Grapin-Botton, A

    2016-09-01

    A rediscovery of three-dimensional culture has led to the development of organ biogenesis, homeostasis and disease models applicable to human tissues. The so-called organoids that have recently flourished serve as valuable models bridging between cell lines or primary cells grown on the bottom of culture plates and experiments performed in vivo. Though not recapitulating all aspects of organ physiology, the miniature organs generated in a dish are useful models emerging for the pancreas, starting from embryonic progenitors, adult cells, tumour cells and stem cells. This review focusses on the currently available systems and their relevance to the study of the pancreas, of β-cells and of several pancreatic diseases including diabetes. We discuss the expected future developments for studying human pancreas development and function, for developing diabetes models and for producing therapeutic cells. PMID:27615129

  15. Reducing the invasiveness of modelling frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donchyts, G.; Baart, F.

    2010-12-01

    There are several modelling frameworks available that allow for environmental models to exchange data with other models. Many efforts have been made in the past years promoting solutions aimed at integrating different numerical models with each other as well as at simplifying the way to set them up, entering the data, and running them. Meanwhile the development of many modeling frameworks concentrated on the interoperability of different model engines, several standards were introduced such as ESMF, OMS and OpenMI. One of the issues with applying modelling frameworks is the invasessness, the more the model has to know about the framework, the more intrussive it is. Another issue when applying modelling frameworks are that a lot of environmental models are written in procedural and in FORTRAN, which is one of the few languages that doesn't have a proper interface with other programming languages. Most modelling frameworks are written in object oriented languages like java/c# and the modelling framework in FORTRAN ESMF is also objected oriented. In this research we show how the application of domain driven, object oriented development techniques to environmental models can reduce the invasiveness of modelling frameworks. Our approach is based on four different steps: 1) application of OO techniques and reflection to the existing model to allow introspection. 2) programming language interoperability, between model written in a procedural programming language and modeling framework written in an object oriented programming language. 3) Domain mapping between data types used by model and other components being integrated 4) Connecting models using framework (wrapper) We compare coupling of an existing model as it was to the same model adapted using the four step approach. We connect both versions of the models using two different integrated modelling frameworks. As an example of a model we use the coastal morphological model XBeach. By adapting this model it allows for

  16. A three-dimensional asymmetric magnetopause model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, R. L.; Zhang, X. X.; Liu, S. Q.; Wang, Y. L.; Gong, J. C.

    2010-04-01

    A new three-dimensional asymmetric magnetopause model has been developed for corrected GSM coordinates and parameterized by the solar wind dynamic and magnetic pressures (Pd + Pm), the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) Bz, and the dipole tilt angle. On the basis of the magnetopause crossings from Geotail, IMP 8, Interball, TC1, Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS), Wind, Cluster, Polar, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), GOES, and Hawkeye, and the corresponding upstream solar wind parameters from ACE, Wind, or OMNI, this model is constructed by the Levenberg-Marquardt method for nonlinear multiparameter fitting step-by-step over the divided regions. The asymmetries of the magnetopause and the indentations near the cusps are appropriately described in this new model. In addition, the saturation effect of IMF Bz on the subsolar distance and the extrapolation for the distant tail magnetopause are also considered. On the basis of this model, the power law index for the subsolar distance versus Pd + Pm is a bit less than -1/6, the northward IMF Bz almost does not influence the magnetopause, and the dipole tilt angle is very important to the north-south asymmetry and the location of indentations. In comparison with the previous empirical magnetopause models based on our database, the new model improves prediction capability to describe the three-dimensional structure of the magnetopause. It is shown that this new model can be used to quantitatively study how Pd + Pm compresses the magnetopause, how the southward IMF Bz erodes the magnetopause, and how the dipole tilt angle influences the north-south asymmetry and the indentations.

  17. Low dimensional modeling of wall turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubry, Nadine

    2015-11-01

    In this talk we will review the original low dimensional dynamical model of the wall region of a turbulent boundary layer [Aubry, Holmes, Lumley and Stone, Journal of Fluid Dynamics 192, 1988] and discuss its impact on the field of fluid dynamics. We will also invite a few researchers who would like to make brief comments on the influence Lumley had on their research paths. In collaboration with Philip Holmes, Program in Applied and Computational Mathematics and Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ.

  18. Three-dimensional ring current decay model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, Mei-Ching; Moore, Thomas E.; Kozyra, Janet U.; Ho, George C.; Hamilton, Douglas C.

    1995-01-01

    This work is an extension of a previous ring current decay model. In the previous work, a two-dimensional kinetic model was constructed to study the temporal variations of the equatorially mirroring ring current ions, considering charge exchange and Coulomb drag losses along drift paths in a magnetic dipole field. In this work, particles with arbitrary pitch angle are considered. By bounce averaging the kinetic equation of the phase space density, information along magnetic field lines can be inferred from the equator. The three-dimensional model is used to simulate the recovery phase of a model great magnetic storm, similar to that which occurred in early February 1986. The initial distribution of ring current ions (at the minimum Dst) is extrapolated to all local times from AMPTE/CCE spacecraft observations on the dawnside and duskside of the inner magnetosphere spanning the L value range L = 2.25 to 6.75. Observations by AMPTE/CCE of ring current distributions over subsequent orbits during the storm recovery phase are compared to model outputs. In general, the calculated ion fluxes are consistent with observations, except for H(+) fluxes at tens of keV, which are always overestimated. A newly invented visualization idea, designated as a chromogram, is used to display the spatial and energy dependence of the ring current ion differential flux. Important features of storm time ring current, such as day-night asymmetry during injection and drift hole on the dayside at low energies (less than 10 keV), are manifested in the chromogram representation. The pitch angle distribution is well fit by the function, J(sub o)(1 + Ay(sup n)), where y is sine of the equatorial pitch angle. The evolution of the index n is a combined effect of charge exchange loss and particle drift. At low energies (less than 30 keV), both drift dispersion and charge exchange are important in determining n.

  19. Three-dimensional ring current decay model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fok, Mei Ching; Moore, Thomas E.; Kozyra, Janet U.; Ho, George C.; Hamilton, Douglas C.

    1995-06-01

    This work is an extension of a previous ring current decay model. In the previous work, a two-dimensional kinetic model was constructed to study the temporal variations of the equatorially mirroring ring current ions, considering charge exchange and Coulomb drag losses along drift paths in a magnetic dipole field. In this work, particles with arbitrary pitch angle are considered. By bounce averaging the kinetic equation of the phase space density, information along magnetic field lines can be inferred from the equator. The three-dimensional model is used to simulate the recovery phase of a model great magnetic storm, similar to that which occurred in early February 1986. The initial distribution of ring current ions (at the minimum Dst) is extrapolated to all local times from AMPTE/CCE spacecraft observations on the dawnside and duskside of the inner magnetosphere spanning the L value range L=2.25 to 6.75. Observations by AMPTE/CCE of ring current distributions over subsequent orbits during the storm recovery phase are compared to model outputs. In general, the calculated ion fluxes are consistent with observations, except for H+ fluxes at tens of keV, which are always overestimated. A newly invented visualization idea, designated as a chromogram, is used to display the spatial and energy dependence of the ring current ion diifferential flux. Important features of storm time ring current, such as day-night asymmetry during injection and drift hole on the dayside at low energies (<10 keV), are manifested in the chromogram representation. The pitch angle distribution is well fit by the function, j0(1+Ayn), where y is sine of the equatorial pitch angle. The evolution of the index n is a combined effect of charge exchange loss and particle drift. At low energies (<30 keV), both drift dispersion and charge exchange are important in determining n. ©American Geophysical 1995

  20. Vlasov multi-dimensional model dispersion relation

    SciTech Connect

    Lushnikov, Pavel M.; Rose, Harvey A.; Silantyev, Denis A.; Vladimirova, Natalia

    2014-07-15

    A hybrid model of the Vlasov equation in multiple spatial dimension D > 1 [H. A. Rose and W. Daughton, Phys. Plasmas 18, 122109 (2011)], the Vlasov multi dimensional model (VMD), consists of standard Vlasov dynamics along a preferred direction, the z direction, and N flows. At each z, these flows are in the plane perpendicular to the z axis. They satisfy Eulerian-type hydrodynamics with coupling by self-consistent electric and magnetic fields. Every solution of the VMD is an exact solution of the original Vlasov equation. We show approximate convergence of the VMD Langmuir wave dispersion relation in thermal plasma to that of Vlasov-Landau as N increases. Departure from strict rotational invariance about the z axis for small perpendicular wavenumber Langmuir fluctuations in 3D goes to zero like θ{sup N}, where θ is the polar angle and flows are arranged uniformly over the azimuthal angle.

  1. High dimensional decision dilemmas in climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracco, A.; Neelin, J. D.; Luo, H.; McWilliams, J. C.; Meyerson, J. E.

    2013-05-01

    An important source of uncertainty in climate models is linked to the calibration of model parameters. Interest in systematic and automated parameter optimization procedures stems from the desire to improve the model climatology and to quantify the average sensitivity associated with potential changes in the climate system. Neelin et al. (2010) used a quadratic metamodel to objectively calibrate an atmospheric circulation model (AGCM) around four adjustable parameters. The metamodel accurately estimates global spatial averages of common fields of climatic interest, from precipitation, to low and high level winds, from temperature at various levels to sea level pressure and geopotential height, while providing a computationally cheap strategy to explore the influence of parameter settings. Here, guided by the metamodel, the ambiguities or dilemmas related to the decision making process in relation to model sensitivity and optimization are examined. Simulations of current climate are subject to considerable regional-scale biases. Those biases may vary substantially depending on the climate variable considered, and/or on the performance metric adopted. Common dilemmas are associated with model revisions yielding improvement in one field or regional pattern or season, but degradation in another, or improvement in the model climatology but degradation in the interannual variability representation. Challenges are posed to the modeler by the high dimensionality of the model output fields and by the large number of adjustable parameters. The use of the metamodel in the optimization strategy helps visualize trade-offs at a regional level, e.g. how mismatches between sensitivity and error spatial fields yield regional errors under minimization of global objective functions.

  2. High dimensional decision dilemmas in climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracco, A.; Neelin, J. D.; Luo, H.; McWilliams, J. C.; Meyerson, J. E.

    2013-10-01

    An important source of uncertainty in climate models is linked to the calibration of model parameters. Interest in systematic and automated parameter optimization procedures stems from the desire to improve the model climatology and to quantify the average sensitivity associated with potential changes in the climate system. Building upon on the smoothness of the response of an atmospheric circulation model (AGCM) to changes of four adjustable parameters, Neelin et al. (2010) used a quadratic metamodel to objectively calibrate the AGCM. The metamodel accurately estimates global spatial averages of common fields of climatic interest, from precipitation, to low and high level winds, from temperature at various levels to sea level pressure and geopotential height, while providing a computationally cheap strategy to explore the influence of parameter settings. Here, guided by the metamodel, the ambiguities or dilemmas related to the decision making process in relation to model sensitivity and optimization are examined. Simulations of current climate are subject to considerable regional-scale biases. Those biases may vary substantially depending on the climate variable considered, and/or on the performance metric adopted. Common dilemmas are associated with model revisions yielding improvement in one field or regional pattern or season, but degradation in another, or improvement in the model climatology but degradation in the interannual variability representation. Challenges are posed to the modeler by the high dimensionality of the model output fields and by the large number of adjustable parameters. The use of the metamodel in the optimization strategy helps visualize trade-offs at a regional level, e.g., how mismatches between sensitivity and error spatial fields yield regional errors under minimization of global objective functions.

  3. Incorporating 3-dimensional models in online articles

    PubMed Central

    Cevidanes, Lucia H. S.; Ruellasa, Antonio C. O.; Jomier, Julien; Nguyen, Tung; Pieper, Steve; Budin, Francois; Styner, Martin; Paniagua, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aims of this article were to introduce the capability to view and interact with 3-dimensional (3D) surface models in online publications, and to describe how to prepare surface models for such online 3D visualizations. Methods Three-dimensional image analysis methods include image acquisition, construction of surface models, registration in a common coordinate system, visualization of overlays, and quantification of changes. Cone-beam computed tomography scans were acquired as volumetric images that can be visualized as 3D projected images or used to construct polygonal meshes or surfaces of specific anatomic structures of interest. The anatomic structures of interest in the scans can be labeled with color (3D volumetric label maps), and then the scans are registered in a common coordinate system using a target region as the reference. The registered 3D volumetric label maps can be saved in .obj, .ply, .stl, or .vtk file formats and used for overlays, quantification of differences in each of the 3 planes of space, or color-coded graphic displays of 3D surface distances. Results All registered 3D surface models in this study were saved in .vtk file format and loaded in the Elsevier 3D viewer. In this study, we describe possible ways to visualize the surface models constructed from cone-beam computed tomography images using 2D and 3D figures. The 3D surface models are available in the article’s online version for viewing and downloading using the reader’s software of choice. These 3D graphic displays are represented in the print version as 2D snapshots. Overlays and color-coded distance maps can be displayed using the reader’s software of choice, allowing graphic assessment of the location and direction of changes or morphologic differences relative to the structure of reference. The interpretation of 3D overlays and quantitative color-coded maps requires basic knowledge of 3D image analysis. Conclusions When submitting manuscripts, authors can

  4. A three-dimensional human walking model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Q. S.; Qin, J. W.; Law, S. S.

    2015-11-01

    A three-dimensional human bipedal walking model with compliant legs is presented in this paper. The legs are modeled with time-variant dampers, and the model is able to characterize the gait pattern of an individual using a minimal set of parameters. Feedback control, for both the forward and lateral movements, is implemented to regulate the walking performance of the pedestrian. The model provides an improvement over classic invert pendulum models. Numerical studies were undertaken to investigate the effects of leg stiffness and attack angle. Simulation results show that when walking at a given speed, increasing the leg stiffness with a constant attack angle results in a longer step length, a higher step frequency, a faster walking speed and an increase in both the peak vertical and lateral ground reaction forces. Increasing the attack angle with a constant leg stiffness results in a higher step frequency, a decrease in the step length, an increase in the total energy of the system and a decrease in both the peak vertical and lateral ground reaction forces.

  5. A Regression Algorithm for Model Reduction of Large-Scale Multi-Dimensional Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasekh, Ehsan

    2011-11-01

    Model reduction is an approach for fast and cost-efficient modelling of large-scale systems governed by Ordinary Differential Equations (ODEs). Multi-dimensional model reduction has been suggested for reduction of the linear systems simultaneously with respect to frequency and any other parameter of interest. Multi-dimensional model reduction is also used to reduce the weakly nonlinear systems based on Volterra theory. Multiple dimensions degrade the efficiency of reduction by increasing the size of the projection matrix. In this paper a new methodology is proposed to efficiently build the reduced model based on regression analysis. A numerical example confirms the validity of the proposed regression algorithm for model reduction.

  6. Two-Dimensional Computational Model for Wave Rotor Flow Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Gerard E.

    1996-01-01

    A two-dimensional (theta,z) Navier-Stokes solver for multi-port wave rotor flow simulation is described. The finite-volume form of the unsteady thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations are integrated in time on multi-block grids that represent the stationary inlet and outlet ports and the moving rotor passages of the wave rotor. Computed results are compared with three-port wave rotor experimental data. The model is applied to predict the performance of a planned four-port wave rotor experiment. Two-dimensional flow features that reduce machine performance and influence rotor blade and duct wall thermal loads are identified. The performance impact of rounding the inlet port wall, to inhibit separation during passage gradual opening, is assessed.

  7. Three-dimensional model of lignin structure

    SciTech Connect

    Jurasek, L.

    1995-12-01

    An attempt to build a three-dimensional model of lignin structure using a computer program is described. The program simulates the biosynthesis of spruce lignin by allowing coniferyl alcohol subunits to be added randomly by six different types of linkages, assumed to be most common. The simulated biosynthesis starts from a number of seed points within restricted space, corresponding to 50 mM initial concentration of coniferyl alcohol. Rules of three-dimensional packing of the subunits within the lignin macro-molecule are observed during the simulated biosynthetic process. Branched oligomeric structures thus generated form crosslinks at those positions where the chains grow close enough to form a link. Inter-chain crosslinking usually joins the oligomers into one macromolecule. Intra-chain crosslinks are also formed and result in closed loops. Typically, a macromolecule with molecular weight of approx. 2 x 105 is formed, with internal density of 1.35g/cm3. Various characteristics of the internal structure, such as branching, crosslinking, bond frequencies, and chain length distribution are described. Breakdown of the polymer was also simulated and the effect of closed loops on the weight average molecular weight is shown. The effect of the shape of the biosynthetic space on the degree of crosslinking is discussed and predictions of the overall molecular shape of lignin particles are made.

  8. A Standardized Generalized Dimensionality Discrepancy Measure and a Standardized Model-Based Covariance for Dimensionality Assessment for Multidimensional Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Roy; Xu, Yuning; Yel, Nedim; Svetina, Dubravka

    2015-01-01

    The standardized generalized dimensionality discrepancy measure and the standardized model-based covariance are introduced as tools to critique dimensionality assumptions in multidimensional item response models. These tools are grounded in a covariance theory perspective and associated connections between dimensionality and local independence.…

  9. Modelling Three Dimensional, Tape Spring Based, Space Deployable Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, S. J. I.; Kiley, A.; Aglietti, G. S.; Cook, A.; McDonald, A. D.

    2012-07-01

    Deployable structures are required for many satellite operations, to deploy booms for communications or area deployment for power generation, and many sophisticated mechanisms have been developed for these types of structures. However, tape springs, defined as thin metallic strips with an initially curved cross- section, are an attractive structural solution and hinge mechanism for satellite deployable structures because of their low mass, low cost and general simplicity. They have previously been used to deploy booms and array panels in various configurations that incorporate small two-dimensional tape hinges, but they also have the potential to be used in greater numbers to create larger, more geometrically complicated deployable structures. This publication investigates the applicability of using a simplified modelling approach to predict the deployment dynamics of a three dimensional deployable structure that uses a significant quantity of tape springs. This work builds on previous studies which have focused on the analysis of two dimensional tape spring based structures. The configuration being investigated consists of four walls mounted as a square. Each wall has three fold lines allowing the structure to fold down in a concertina style and each fold line is populated by a series of tape spring hinges mounted in pairs. A total number of around 600 individual tape springs elements are used across the 12 fold lines. A computationally efficient method of simulating the three dimensional deployable structure was studied based on a finite element explicit analysis. Equivalent static and dynamic experimental testing on a breadboard structure is presented allowing a direct comparison of the theoretical and experimental data. It was concluded that this simplified analysis approach is capable of modelling the structural dynamics in the deployment direction for three dimensional structural deployments. As a result, the use of this approach could significantly reduce

  10. Improved protein solubility in two-dimensional electrophoresis using tributyl phosphine as reducing agent.

    PubMed

    Herbert, B R; Molloy, M P; Gooley, A A; Walsh, B J; Bryson, W G; Williams, K L

    1998-05-01

    In this study, dithiothreitol was replaced by tributyl phosphine as the reducing agent in both the sample solution for the first-dimensional isoelectric focusing and during the immobilised pH gradient (IPG) equilibration procedure. Tributyl phosphine improves protein solubility during isoelectric focusing, which results in shorter run times and increased resolution. Tributyl phosphine is nonionic and thus does not migrate in the IPG, therefore maintaining reducing conditions during the course of the first-dimensional separation. The increased solubility provided by the maintenance of reducing conditions gives improved focusing and decreased horizontal streaking on the subsequent second-dimension gel. The use of tributyl phosphine in the equilibration step allows the procedure to be simplified, incorporating reduction and alkylation in a single step. This is possible because, in direct contrast to dithiothreitol (DTT), tributyl phosphine does not contain a free thiol and therefore does not react with thiol-specific alkylating reagents. PMID:9629925

  11. Multiscale modeling of three-dimensional genome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bin; Wolynes, Peter

    The genome, the blueprint of life, contains nearly all the information needed to build and maintain an entire organism. A comprehensive understanding of the genome is of paramount interest to human health and will advance progress in many areas, including life sciences, medicine, and biotechnology. The overarching goal of my research is to understand the structure-dynamics-function relationships of the human genome. In this talk, I will be presenting our efforts in moving towards that goal, with a particular emphasis on studying the three-dimensional organization, the structure of the genome with multi-scale approaches. Specifically, I will discuss the reconstruction of genome structures at both interphase and metaphase by making use of data from chromosome conformation capture experiments. Computationally modeling of chromatin fiber at atomistic level from first principles will also be presented as our effort for studying the genome structure from bottom up.

  12. Volumetric techniques: three-dimensional midface modeling

    PubMed Central

    Pierzchała, Ewa; Placek, Waldemar

    2014-01-01

    Aging is a complex process caused by many factors. The most important factors include exposure to UV radiation, smoking, facial muscle movement, gravity, loss and displacement of fat and bone resorption. As a symptom of aging, face loses elasticity, volume and cheerful look. While changing face proportions, the dominant part of a face is its bottom instead of the mid part. The use of three-dimensional face modelling techniques, particularly the mid-face – tear through and cheeks, restores the skin firmness, volume and healthy look. For this purpose the hyaluronic acid is used, calcium hydroxyapatite, and L-polylactic acid fillers. Volumetric techniques require precision and proper selection of the filling agent to give a sense of satisfaction to both the patient and the doctor. PMID:25610354

  13. Reduced order modeling of fluid/structure interaction.

    SciTech Connect

    Barone, Matthew Franklin; Kalashnikova, Irina; Segalman, Daniel Joseph; Brake, Matthew Robert

    2009-11-01

    This report describes work performed from October 2007 through September 2009 under the Sandia Laboratory Directed Research and Development project titled 'Reduced Order Modeling of Fluid/Structure Interaction.' This project addresses fundamental aspects of techniques for construction of predictive Reduced Order Models (ROMs). A ROM is defined as a model, derived from a sequence of high-fidelity simulations, that preserves the essential physics and predictive capability of the original simulations but at a much lower computational cost. Techniques are developed for construction of provably stable linear Galerkin projection ROMs for compressible fluid flow, including a method for enforcing boundary conditions that preserves numerical stability. A convergence proof and error estimates are given for this class of ROM, and the method is demonstrated on a series of model problems. A reduced order method, based on the method of quadratic components, for solving the von Karman nonlinear plate equations is developed and tested. This method is applied to the problem of nonlinear limit cycle oscillations encountered when the plate interacts with an adjacent supersonic flow. A stability-preserving method for coupling the linear fluid ROM with the structural dynamics model for the elastic plate is constructed and tested. Methods for constructing efficient ROMs for nonlinear fluid equations are developed and tested on a one-dimensional convection-diffusion-reaction equation. These methods are combined with a symmetrization approach to construct a ROM technique for application to the compressible Navier-Stokes equations.

  14. Reducing Spatial Data Complexity for Classification Models

    SciTech Connect

    Ruta, Dymitr; Gabrys, Bogdan

    2007-11-29

    Intelligent data analytics gradually becomes a day-to-day reality of today's businesses. However, despite rapidly increasing storage and computational power current state-of-the-art predictive models still can not handle massive and noisy corporate data warehouses. What is more adaptive and real-time operational environment requires multiple models to be frequently retrained which further hinders their use. Various data reduction techniques ranging from data sampling up to density retention models attempt to address this challenge by capturing a summarised data structure, yet they either do not account for labelled data or degrade the classification performance of the model trained on the condensed dataset. Our response is a proposition of a new general framework for reducing the complexity of labelled data by means of controlled spatial redistribution of class densities in the input space. On the example of Parzen Labelled Data Compressor (PLDC) we demonstrate a simulatory data condensation process directly inspired by the electrostatic field interaction where the data are moved and merged following the attracting and repelling interactions with the other labelled data. The process is controlled by the class density function built on the original data that acts as a class-sensitive potential field ensuring preservation of the original class density distributions, yet allowing data to rearrange and merge joining together their soft class partitions. As a result we achieved a model that reduces the labelled datasets much further than any competitive approaches yet with the maximum retention of the original class densities and hence the classification performance. PLDC leaves the reduced dataset with the soft accumulative class weights allowing for efficient online updates and as shown in a series of experiments if coupled with Parzen Density Classifier (PDC) significantly outperforms competitive data condensation methods in terms of classification performance at the

  15. Reducing Spatial Data Complexity for Classification Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruta, Dymitr; Gabrys, Bogdan

    2007-11-01

    Intelligent data analytics gradually becomes a day-to-day reality of today's businesses. However, despite rapidly increasing storage and computational power current state-of-the-art predictive models still can not handle massive and noisy corporate data warehouses. What is more adaptive and real-time operational environment requires multiple models to be frequently retrained which further hinders their use. Various data reduction techniques ranging from data sampling up to density retention models attempt to address this challenge by capturing a summarised data structure, yet they either do not account for labelled data or degrade the classification performance of the model trained on the condensed dataset. Our response is a proposition of a new general framework for reducing the complexity of labelled data by means of controlled spatial redistribution of class densities in the input space. On the example of Parzen Labelled Data Compressor (PLDC) we demonstrate a simulatory data condensation process directly inspired by the electrostatic field interaction where the data are moved and merged following the attracting and repelling interactions with the other labelled data. The process is controlled by the class density function built on the original data that acts as a class-sensitive potential field ensuring preservation of the original class density distributions, yet allowing data to rearrange and merge joining together their soft class partitions. As a result we achieved a model that reduces the labelled datasets much further than any competitive approaches yet with the maximum retention of the original class densities and hence the classification performance. PLDC leaves the reduced dataset with the soft accumulative class weights allowing for efficient online updates and as shown in a series of experiments if coupled with Parzen Density Classifier (PDC) significantly outperforms competitive data condensation methods in terms of classification performance at the

  16. A Dimensionally Reduced Clustering Methodology for Heterogeneous Occupational Medicine Data Mining.

    PubMed

    Saâdaoui, Foued; Bertrand, Pierre R; Boudet, Gil; Rouffiac, Karine; Dutheil, Frédéric; Chamoux, Alain

    2015-10-01

    Clustering is a set of techniques of the statistical learning aimed at finding structures of heterogeneous partitions grouping homogenous data called clusters. There are several fields in which clustering was successfully applied, such as medicine, biology, finance, economics, etc. In this paper, we introduce the notion of clustering in multifactorial data analysis problems. A case study is conducted for an occupational medicine problem with the purpose of analyzing patterns in a population of 813 individuals. To reduce the data set dimensionality, we base our approach on the Principal Component Analysis (PCA), which is the statistical tool most commonly used in factorial analysis. However, the problems in nature, especially in medicine, are often based on heterogeneous-type qualitative-quantitative measurements, whereas PCA only processes quantitative ones. Besides, qualitative data are originally unobservable quantitative responses that are usually binary-coded. Hence, we propose a new set of strategies allowing to simultaneously handle quantitative and qualitative data. The principle of this approach is to perform a projection of the qualitative variables on the subspaces spanned by quantitative ones. Subsequently, an optimal model is allocated to the resulting PCA-regressed subspaces. PMID:26357403

  17. Three-dimensional modeling equatorial spread F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huba, J. D.; Krall, J.; Joyce, G.

    2008-12-01

    Equatorial spread F (ESF) is a low-latitude ionospheric phenomenon that leads to the development of large scale electron density depletions that adversely affect communications and navigation systems. The development of models to understand and predict the onset and evolution of ESF is therefore critically important to a number of space-based systems. To this end, NRL has developed a three-dimensional model of ESF. The global NRL ionosphere model SAMI3 has been modified to simulate a narrow wedge of the post-sunset ionosphere to capture the onset and evolution of ESF. Preliminary results indicate that (1) bubbles can rise to ~ 1600 km, (2) extremely steep ion density gradients can develop in both longitude and latitude, (3) upward plasma velocities approach 1 km/s, and (4) the growth time of the instability is ~eq 15 min. We will also report the effects of meridional and zonal winds on bubble development, as well as ion composition (both atomic and molecular). The simulations will focus on current, low solar activity conditions, and results will be compared to C/NOFS data where available. Research supported by ONR

  18. High dimensional model representation method for fuzzy structural dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, S.; Chowdhury, R.; Friswell, M. I.

    2011-03-01

    Uncertainty propagation in multi-parameter complex structures possess significant computational challenges. This paper investigates the possibility of using the High Dimensional Model Representation (HDMR) approach when uncertain system parameters are modeled using fuzzy variables. In particular, the application of HDMR is proposed for fuzzy finite element analysis of linear dynamical systems. The HDMR expansion is an efficient formulation for high-dimensional mapping in complex systems if the higher order variable correlations are weak, thereby permitting the input-output relationship behavior to be captured by the terms of low-order. The computational effort to determine the expansion functions using the α-cut method scales polynomically with the number of variables rather than exponentially. This logic is based on the fundamental assumption underlying the HDMR representation that only low-order correlations among the input variables are likely to have significant impacts upon the outputs for most high-dimensional complex systems. The proposed method is first illustrated for multi-parameter nonlinear mathematical test functions with fuzzy variables. The method is then integrated with a commercial finite element software (ADINA). Modal analysis of a simplified aircraft wing with fuzzy parameters has been used to illustrate the generality of the proposed approach. In the numerical examples, triangular membership functions have been used and the results have been validated against direct Monte Carlo simulations. It is shown that using the proposed HDMR approach, the number of finite element function calls can be reduced without significantly compromising the accuracy.

  19. New two-dimensional quantum models with shape invariance

    SciTech Connect

    Cannata, F.; Ioffe, M. V.; Nishnianidze, D. N.

    2011-02-15

    Two-dimensional quantum models which obey the property of shape invariance are built in the framework of polynomial two-dimensional supersymmetric quantum mechanics. They are obtained using the expressions for known one-dimensional shape invariant potentials. The constructed Hamiltonians are integrable with symmetry operators of fourth order in momenta, and they are not amenable to the conventional separation of variables.

  20. Dimensionality reduced cortical features and their use in predicting longitudinal changes in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyunjin; Yang, Jin-ju; Seo, Jongbum; Lee, Jong-min

    2013-08-29

    Neuroimaging features derived from the cortical surface provide important information in detecting changes related to the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent widespread adoption of neuroimaging has allowed researchers to study longitudinal data in AD. We adopted cortical thickness and sulcal depth, parameterized by three-dimensional meshes, from magnetic resonance imaging as the surface features. The cortical feature is high-dimensional, and it is difficult to use directly with a classifier because of the "small sample size" problem. We applied manifold learning to reduce the dimensionality of the feature and then tested the usage of the dimensionality reduced feature with a support vector machine classifier. Principal component analysis (PCA) was chosen as the method of manifold learning. PCA was applied to a region of interest within the cortical surface. We used 30 normal, 30 mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 12 conversion cases taken from the ADNI database. The classifier was trained using the cortical features extracted from normal and MCI patients. The classifier was tested for the 12 conversion patients only using the imaging data before the actual conversion. The conversion was predicted early with an accuracy of 83%. PMID:23827219

  1. Triple Resonance Solid State NMR Experiments with Reduced Dimensionality Evolution Periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astrof, Nathan S.; Lyon, Charles E.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2001-10-01

    Two solid state NMR triple resonance experiments which utilize the simultaneous incrementation of two chemical shift evolution periods to obtain a spectrum with reduced dimensionality are described. The CON CA experiment establishes the correlation of 13Ci-1 to 13Cαi and 15Ni by simultaneously encoding the 13COi-1 and 15Ni chemical shifts. The CAN COCA experiment establishes the correlation 13Cai and 15COi to 13Cαi-1 and 15Ni-1 within a single experiment by simultaneous encoding of the 13Cαi and 15Ni chemical shifts. This experiment establishes sequential amino acid correlations in close analogy to the solution state HNCA experiment. Reduced dimensionality 2D experiments are a practical alternative to recording multiple 3D data sets for the purpose of obtaining sequence-specific resonance assignments of peptides and proteins in the solid state.

  2. Inversion of infrared imaging bolometer based on one-dimensional and three-dimensional modeling in HL-2A

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, J. M. Liu, Y.; Li, W.; Cui, Z. Y.; Dong, Y. B.; Lu, J.; Xia, Z. W.; Yi, P.; Yang, Q. W.

    2014-04-15

    Linear regularization has been applied to the HL-2A infrared imaging bolometer to reconstruct local plasma emission with one-dimensional (1D) and three-dimensional (3D) modeling under the assumption of toroidal symmetry. In the 3D modeling, a new method to calculate the detector point response function is introduced. This method can be adapted to an arbitrarily shaped pinhole. With the full 3D treatment of the detector geometry, up to 50% of the mean-squared error is reduced compared with the 1D modeling. This is attributed to the effects of finite detector size being taken into account in the 3D modeling. Meanwhile, the number of the bolometer pixels has been optimized to 20 × 20 by making a trade-off between the number of bolometer pixels and the sensitivity of the system. The plasma radiated power density distributions have been calculated as a demonstration using 1D modeling and 3D modeling, respectively.

  3. Reduced cost mission design using surrogate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldhacker, Juliana D.; Jones, Brandon A.; Doostan, Alireza; Hampton, Jerrad

    2016-01-01

    This paper uses surrogate models to reduce the computational cost associated with spacecraft mission design in three-body dynamical systems. Sampling-based least squares regression is used to project the system response onto a set of orthogonal bases, providing a representation of the ΔV required for rendezvous as a reduced-order surrogate model. Models are presented for mid-field rendezvous of spacecraft in orbits in the Earth-Moon circular restricted three-body problem, including a halo orbit about the Earth-Moon L2 libration point (EML-2) and a distant retrograde orbit (DRO) about the Moon. In each case, the initial position of the spacecraft, the time of flight, and the separation between the chaser and the target vehicles are all considered as design inputs. The results show that sample sizes on the order of 102 are sufficient to produce accurate surrogates, with RMS errors reaching 0.2 m/s for the halo orbit and falling below 0.01 m/s for the DRO. A single function call to the resulting surrogate is up to two orders of magnitude faster than computing the same solution using full fidelity propagators. The expansion coefficients solved for in the surrogates are then used to conduct a global sensitivity analysis of the ΔV on each of the input parameters, which identifies the separation between the spacecraft as the primary contributor to the ΔV cost. Finally, the models are demonstrated to be useful for cheap evaluation of the cost function in constrained optimization problems seeking to minimize the ΔV required for rendezvous. These surrogate models show significant advantages for mission design in three-body systems, in terms of both computational cost and capabilities, over traditional Monte Carlo methods.

  4. Reduced order models for nonlinear aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahajan, Aparajit J.; Dowell, Earl H.; Bliss, Donald B.

    1988-01-01

    Reduced order models are needed for reliable, efficient and accurate prediction of aerodynamic forces to analyze fluid structure interaction problems in turbomachinery, including propfans. Here, a finite difference, time marching Navier-Stokes code is validated for unsteady airfoil motion by comparing results with those from classical potential flow. The Navier-Stokes code is then analyzed for calculation of primitive and exact estimates of eigenvalues and eigenvectors associated with fluid-airfoil interaction. A variational formulation for the Euler equations and Navier-Stokes equations will be the basis for reduction of order through an eigenvector transformation.

  5. A nonlinear manifold-based reduced order model for multiscale analysis of heterogeneous hyperelastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Satyaki; Matouš, Karel

    2016-05-01

    A new manifold-based reduced order model for nonlinear problems in multiscale modeling of heterogeneous hyperelastic materials is presented. The model relies on a global geometric framework for nonlinear dimensionality reduction (Isomap), and the macroscopic loading parameters are linked to the reduced space using a Neural Network. The proposed model provides both homogenization and localization of the multiscale solution in the context of computational homogenization. To construct the manifold, we perform a number of large three-dimensional simulations of a statistically representative unit cell using a parallel finite strain finite element solver. The manifold-based reduced order model is verified using common principles from the machine-learning community. Both homogenization and localization of the multiscale solution are demonstrated on a large three-dimensional example and the local microscopic fields as well as the homogenized macroscopic potential are obtained with acceptable engineering accuracy.

  6. Predicting RNA folding thermodynamics with a reduced chain representation model.

    PubMed

    Cao, Song; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2005-12-01

    Based on the virtual bond representation for the nucleotide backbone, we develop a reduced conformational model for RNA. We use the experimentally measured atomic coordinates to model the helices and use the self-avoiding walks in a diamond lattice to model the loop conformations. The atomic coordinates of the helices and the lattice representation for the loops are matched at the loop-helix junction, where steric viability is accounted for. Unlike the previous simplified lattice-based models, the present virtual bond model can account for the atomic details of realistic three-dimensional RNA structures. Based on the model, we develop a statistical mechanical theory for RNA folding energy landscapes and folding thermodynamics. Tests against experiments show that the theory can give much more improved predictions for the native structures, the thermal denaturation curves, and the equilibrium folding/unfolding pathways than the previous models. The application of the model to the P5abc region of Tetrahymena group I ribozyme reveals the misfolded intermediates as well as the native-like intermediates in the equilibrium folding process. Moreover, based on the free energy landscape analysis for each and every loop mutation, the model predicts five lethal mutations that can completely alter the free energy landscape and the folding stability of the molecule. PMID:16251382

  7. Adaptive h -refinement for reduced-order models: ADAPTIVE h -refinement for reduced-order models

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Carlberg, Kevin T.

    2014-11-05

    Our work presents a method to adaptively refine reduced-order models a posteriori without requiring additional full-order-model solves. The technique is analogous to mesh-adaptive h-refinement: it enriches the reduced-basis space online by ‘splitting’ a given basis vector into several vectors with disjoint support. The splitting scheme is defined by a tree structure constructed offline via recursive k-means clustering of the state variables using snapshot data. This method identifies the vectors to split online using a dual-weighted-residual approach that aims to reduce error in an output quantity of interest. The resulting method generates a hierarchy of subspaces online without requiring large-scale operationsmore » or full-order-model solves. Furthermore, it enables the reduced-order model to satisfy any prescribed error tolerance regardless of its original fidelity, as a completely refined reduced-order model is mathematically equivalent to the original full-order model. Experiments on a parameterized inviscid Burgers equation highlight the ability of the method to capture phenomena (e.g., moving shocks) not contained in the span of the original reduced basis.« less

  8. Towards automatic calibration of 2-dimensional flood propagation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabio, P.; Aronica, G. T.; Apel, H.

    2009-11-01

    Hydraulic models for flood propagation description are an essential tool in many fields, e.g. civil engineering, flood hazard and risk assessments, evaluation of flood control measures, etc. Nowadays there are many models of different complexity regarding the mathematical foundation and spatial dimensions available, and most of them are comparatively easy to operate due to sophisticated tools for model setup and control. However, the calibration of these models is still underdeveloped in contrast to other models like e.g. hydrological models or models used in ecosystem analysis. This has basically two reasons: first, the lack of relevant data against the models can be calibrated, because flood events are very rarely monitored due to the disturbances inflicted by them and the lack of appropriate measuring equipment in place. Secondly, especially the two-dimensional models are computationally very demanding and therefore the use of available sophisticated automatic calibration procedures is restricted in many cases. This study takes a well documented flood event in August 2002 at the Mulde River in Germany as an example and investigates the most appropriate calibration strategy for a full 2-D hyperbolic finite element model. The model independent optimiser PEST, that gives the possibility of automatic calibrations, is used. The application of the parallel version of the optimiser to the model and calibration data showed that a) it is possible to use automatic calibration in combination of 2-D hydraulic model, and b) equifinality of model parameterisation can also be caused by a too large number of degrees of freedom in the calibration data in contrast to a too simple model setup. In order to improve model calibration and reduce equifinality a method was developed to identify calibration data with likely errors that obstruct model calibration.

  9. Three-Dimensional Tectonic Model of Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Francis; Kuo-Chen, Hao; McIntosh, kirk

    2014-05-01

    We built a three-dimensional model of the interactions of the Eurasian plate (EUP) the Philippine Sea plate (PSP) and the collisional orogen, in and around Taiwan. The model is based on the results of comprehensive, milt-prong TAIGER experiments on land and at sea as well as other existing data. The clockwise rotating PSP moves NWW at ~8 cm/year relative to the Taiwan Strait. Under northern Taiwan the northward subducting PSP terminates near the edge of eastern Taiwan and collides with EUP at in increasing depth toward the north. Mountain building due to collision of EUP and PSP tapers off where the PSP goes below about 60 km. The PSP in the asthenosphere continues to advance NWW-ward. In central Taiwan PSP and EUP collide fully, lithosphere against lithosphere in the upper 60 km or so, leading to significant thickening of the crust to about 55 km on the Central Range side and about 35 km on the Coastal Range/Arc side. In between these "roots" a high velocity rise is found. Although a clear, steep dipping high velocity zone under Central Taiwan is detected, it is found not to be associated with seismicity. In southern Taiwan, mountains form over well-defined, seismically active subduction zone. The upper mantle high velocity anomaly appears to be continues with that under central Taiwan, but here an inclined seismic zone is found. In this area the Luzon Arc has not yet encountered the continental shelf - thus arc-continental collision has not yet occurred. The orogeny here may involve inversion of the subducted South China Sea lithosphere, rifted Eurasian continent, and/or escape of continental material from central Taiwan. GPS and Leveling data reflect well the 3-D plate collision model.

  10. Excitonic linewidth of organic quantum wires generated in reduced dimensionality matrices.

    PubMed

    Barisien, Thierry; Legrand, Laurent; Mu, Zhao; Hameau, Sophie

    2016-05-14

    Luminescent organic quantum wires are generated in diacetylene crystalline ultra-thin films grown on orientation-inducing surfaces obtained by poly-tetrafluoroethylene (teflon) deposition. The films are characterized by atomic force microscopy showing that quasi-two-dimensional surroundings are achieved. In this particular environment, pure dephasing processes still determine the wires' homogeneous emission widths, measured using micro-photoluminescence. Coherence times that are slightly shorter in the films also exhibit a distinctive temperature dependence. A model inspired by semiconductor physics for exciton-phonon coupling accounts for the observed behaviour and evidences the role of matrix dimensionality on the coherence properties. PMID:27108759

  11. Simple Two-Dimensional Corrections for One-Dimensional Pulse Tube Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. M.; Kittel, P.; Timmerhaus, K. D.; Radebaugh, R.

    2004-01-01

    One-dimensional oscillating flow models are very useful for designing pulse tubes. They are simple to use, not computationally intensive, and the physical relationship between temperature, pressure and mass flow are easy to understand when used in conjunction with phasor diagrams. They do not possess, however, the ability to directly calculate thermal and momentum diffusion in the direction transverse to the oscillating flow. To account for transverse effects, lumped parameter corrections, which are obtained though experiment, must be used. Or two-dimensional solutions of the differential fluid equations must be obtained. A linear two-dimensional solution to the fluid equations has been obtained. The solution provides lumped parameter corrections for one-dimensional models. The model accounts for heat transfer and shear flow between the gas and the tube. The complex Nusselt number and complex shear wall are useful in describing these corrections, with phase relations and amplitudes scaled with the Prandtl and Valensi numbers. The calculated ratio, a, between a two-dimensional solution of the oscillating temperature and velocity and a one-dimensional solution for the same shows a scales linearly with Va for Va less than 30. In this region alpha less than 0.5, that is, the enthalpy flow calculated with a two-dimensional model is 50% of a calculation using a one-dimensional model. For Va greater than 250, alpha = 0.8, showing that diffusion is still important even when it is confined to a thing layer near the tube wall.

  12. A Reduced Model for the Magnetorotational Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamroz, Ben; Julien, Keith; Knobloch, Edgar

    2008-11-01

    The magnetorotational instability is investigated within the shearing box approximation in the large Elsasser number regime. In this regime, which is of fundamental importance to astrophysical accretion disk theory, shear is the dominant source of energy, but the instability itself requires the presence of a weaker vertical magnetic field. Dissipative effects are weaker still. However, they are sufficiently large to permit a nonlinear feedback mechanism whereby the turbulent stresses generated by the MRI act on and modify the local background shear in the angular velocity profile. To date this response has been omitted in shearing box simulations and is captured by a reduced pde model derived here from the global MHD fluid equations using multiscale asymptotic perturbation theory. Results from numerical simulations of the reduced pde model indicate a linear phase of exponential growth followed by a nonlinear adjustment to algebraic growth and decay in the fluctuating quantities. Remarkably, the velocity and magnetic field correlations associated with these algebraic growth and decay laws conspire to achieve saturation of the angular momentum transport. The inclusion of subdominant ohmic dissipation arrests the algebraic growth of the fluctuations on a longer, dissipative time scale.

  13. Three-dimensional micromechanical modeling of voided polymeric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielsson, M.; Parks, D. M.; Boyce, M. C.

    2002-02-01

    A three-dimensional micromechanical unit cell model for particle-filled materials is presented. The cell model is based on a Voronoi tessellation of particles arranged on a body-centered cubic (BCC) array. The three-dimensionality of the present cell model enables the study of several deformation modes, including uniaxial, plane strain and simple shear deformations, as well as arbitrary principal stress states. The unit cell model is applied to studies on the micromechanical and macromechanical behavior of rubber-toughened polycarbonate. Different load cases are examined, including plane strain deformation, simple shear deformation and principal stress states. For a constant macroscopic strain rate, the different load cases show that the macroscopic flow strength of the blend decreases with an increase in void volume fraction, as expected. The main mechanism for plastic deformation is broad shear banding across inter-particle ligaments. The distributed nature of plastic straining acts to reduce the amount of macroscopic strain softening in the blend as the initial void volume fraction is increased. In the case of plane strain deformation, the plastic flow is observed to initiate across inter-particle ligaments in the direction of constraint. This particular mode of deformation could not have been captured using a two-dimensional, plane strain idealization of cylindrical voids in a matrix. The potential for localized crazing and/or cavitation in the matrix is addressed. It is observed that the introduction of voids acts to relieve hydrostatic stress in the matrix material, compared to the homopolymer. It is also seen that the predicted peak hydrostatic stress in the matrix is higher under plane strain deformation than under triaxial tension (with equal lateral stresses), for the same macroscopic stress triaxiality. The effect of void volume fraction on the macroscopic uniaxial tension behavior of the different blends is examined using a Considère construction for

  14. Development and Validation of a 3-Dimensional CFB Furnace Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vepsäläinen, Arl; Myöhänen, Karl; Hyppäneni, Timo; Leino, Timo; Tourunen, Antti

    At Foster Wheeler, a three-dimensional CFB furnace model is essential part of knowledge development of CFB furnace process regarding solid mixing, combustion, emission formation and heat transfer. Results of laboratory and pilot scale phenomenon research are utilized in development of sub-models. Analyses of field-test results in industrial-scale CFB boilers including furnace profile measurements are simultaneously carried out with development of 3-dimensional process modeling, which provides a chain of knowledge that is utilized as feedback for phenomenon research. Knowledge gathered by model validation studies and up-to-date parameter databases are utilized in performance prediction and design development of CFB boiler furnaces. This paper reports recent development steps related to modeling of combustion and formation of char and volatiles of various fuel types in CFB conditions. Also a new model for predicting the formation of nitrogen oxides is presented. Validation of mixing and combustion parameters for solids and gases are based on test balances at several large-scale CFB boilers combusting coal, peat and bio-fuels. Field-tests including lateral and vertical furnace profile measurements and characterization of solid materials provides a window for characterization of fuel specific mixing and combustion behavior in CFB furnace at different loads and operation conditions. Measured horizontal gas profiles are projection of balance between fuel mixing and reactions at lower part of furnace and are used together with both lateral temperature profiles at bed and upper parts of furnace for determination of solid mixing and combustion model parameters. Modeling of char and volatile based formation of NO profiles is followed by analysis of oxidizing and reducing regions formed due lower furnace design and mixing characteristics of fuel and combustion airs effecting to formation ofNO furnace profile by reduction and volatile-nitrogen reactions. This paper presents

  15. A New Method for Reducing Dimensional Variability of Extruded Hollow Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baringbing, Henry Ako; Welo, Torgeir; Søvik, Odd Perry

    2007-05-01

    Crash boxes are one recent application example of aluminum extrusions in the automotive industry. A crash box is typically made by welding an extruded tube (tower) to a foot plate at one end, providing the mounting features towards the rail tip of the vehicle. When using fully automated welding processes, the exterior dimensions of the tower have to be within a tolerance of typically +/- 0.25 mm in order to provide consistent weld properties. However, the extrusion process commonly introduces dimensional variations exceeding those required for good weld quality. In order to avoid costly hydro-forming processes, a new mechanical calibration process has been developed. This method represents a means to achieve sufficient dimensional accuracy of the crash box tower prior to welding. A prototype die was made to validate the calibration process using alloy AA6063 T4 extrusions. Tensile tests were performed in order to determine material parameters. The geometry of each tower was carefully measured before and after forming to determine the dimensional capability of the calibration process. Statistical methods were combined with FEA simulations and analytical methods to establish surrogate models and response surfaces. The results show that the calibration process is an effective method for improving the dimensional accuracy of crash box profiles, providing significant improvements in dimensional capability. It is concluded that the methodology has a high industrial potential.

  16. An Extensible Reduced Order Model Builder for Simulation and Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    2012-09-28

    REVEAL is a software framework for building reduced order models (surrogate models) for high fidelity complex scientific simulations. REVEAL is designed to do reduced order modeling and sensitivity analysis for scientific simulations. REVEAL incorporates a range of sampling and regression methods. It provides complete user environment and is adaptable to new simulators, runs jobs on any computing platform of choice, automatically post processes simulation results and provides a range of data analysis tools. The software is generic and can easily be extended to incorporate new methods, simulators.

  17. An Extensible Reduced Order Model Builder for Simulation and Modeling

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-09-28

    REVEAL is a software framework for building reduced order models (surrogate models) for high fidelity complex scientific simulations. REVEAL is designed to do reduced order modeling and sensitivity analysis for scientific simulations. REVEAL incorporates a range of sampling and regression methods. It provides complete user environment and is adaptable to new simulators, runs jobs on any computing platform of choice, automatically post processes simulation results and provides a range of data analysis tools. The softwaremore » is generic and can easily be extended to incorporate new methods, simulators.« less

  18. One-dimensional transport equation models for sound energy propagation in long spaces: theory.

    PubMed

    Jing, Yun; Larsen, Edward W; Xiang, Ning

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, a three-dimensional transport equation model is developed to describe the sound energy propagation in a long space. Then this model is reduced to a one-dimensional model by approximating the solution using the method of weighted residuals. The one-dimensional transport equation model directly describes the sound energy propagation in the "long" dimension and deals with the sound energy in the "short" dimensions by prescribed functions. Also, the one-dimensional model consists of a coupled set of N transport equations. Only N=1 and N=2 are discussed in this paper. For larger N, although the accuracy could be improved, the calculation time is expected to significantly increase, which diminishes the advantage of the model in terms of its computational efficiency. PMID:20370013

  19. Dimensional crossover in a Fermi gas and a cross-dimensional Tomonaga-Luttinger model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Guillaume; Hekking, Frank; Minguzzi, Anna

    2016-01-01

    We describe the dimensional crossover in a noninteracting Fermi gas in an anisotropic trap, obtained by populating various transverse modes of the trap. We study the dynamical structure factor and drag force. Starting from a dimension d , the (d +1 ) -dimensional case is obtained to a good approximation with relatively few modes. We show that the dynamical structure factor of a gas in a d -dimensional harmonic trap simulates an effective 2 d -dimensional box trap. We focus then on the experimentally relevant situation when only a portion of the gas in harmonic confinement is probed and give a condition to obtain the behavior of a d -dimensional gas in a box. Finally, we propose a generalized Tomonaga-Luttinger model for the multimode configuration and compare the dynamical structure factor in the two-dimensional limit with the exact result, finding that it is accurate in the backscattering region and at low energy.

  20. Reduced-order model based feedback control of the modified Hasegawa-Wakatani model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goumiri, I. R.; Rowley, C. W.; Ma, Z.; Gates, D. A.; Krommes, J. A.; Parker, J. B.

    2013-04-01

    In this work, the development of model-based feedback control that stabilizes an unstable equilibrium is obtained for the Modified Hasegawa-Wakatani (MHW) equations, a classic model in plasma turbulence. First, a balanced truncation (a model reduction technique that has proven successful in flow control design problems) is applied to obtain a low dimensional model of the linearized MHW equation. Then, a model-based feedback controller is designed for the reduced order model using linear quadratic regulators. Finally, a linear quadratic Gaussian controller which is more resistant to disturbances is deduced. The controller is applied on the non-reduced, nonlinear MHW equations to stabilize the equilibrium and suppress the transition to drift-wave induced turbulence.

  1. Reduced-order model based feedback control of the modified Hasegawa-Wakatani model

    SciTech Connect

    Goumiri, I. R.; Rowley, C. W.; Ma, Z.; Gates, D. A.; Krommes, J. A.; Parker, J. B.

    2013-04-15

    In this work, the development of model-based feedback control that stabilizes an unstable equilibrium is obtained for the Modified Hasegawa-Wakatani (MHW) equations, a classic model in plasma turbulence. First, a balanced truncation (a model reduction technique that has proven successful in flow control design problems) is applied to obtain a low dimensional model of the linearized MHW equation. Then, a model-based feedback controller is designed for the reduced order model using linear quadratic regulators. Finally, a linear quadratic Gaussian controller which is more resistant to disturbances is deduced. The controller is applied on the non-reduced, nonlinear MHW equations to stabilize the equilibrium and suppress the transition to drift-wave induced turbulence.

  2. A three-dimensional transport model for the middle atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasch, Philip J.; Tie, Xuexi; Boville, Byron A.; Williamson, David L.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we describe fundamental properties of an 'off-line' three-dimensional transport model, that is, a model which uses prescribed rather than predicted winds. The model is currently used primarily for studying problems of the middle atmosphere because we have not (yet) incorporated a formulation for the convective transport of trace species, a prerequisite for many tropospheric problems. The off-line model is simpler and less expensive than a model which predicts the wind and mass evolution (an 'on-line' model), but it is more complex than the two-dimensional (2-D) zonally averaged transport models often used in the study of chemistry and transport in the middle atmosphere. It thus serves as a model of intermediate complexity and can fill a useful niche for the study of transport and chemistry. We compare simulations of four tracers, released in the lower stratosphere, in both the on- and off-line models to document the difference resulting from differences in modeling the same problem with this intermediate model. These differences identify the price to be paid in going to a cheaper and simpler calculation. The off-line model transports a tracer in three dimensions. For this reason, it requires fewer approximations than 2-D transport model, which must parameterize the effects of mixing by transient and zonally asymmetric wind features. We compare simulations of the off-line model with simulations of a 2-D model for two problems. First, we compare 2-D and three-dimensional (3-D) models by simulating the emission of an NO(x)-like tracer by a fleet of high-speed aircraft. The off-line model is then used to simulate the transport of C-14 and to contrast its simulation properties to that of the host of 2-D models which participated in an identical simulation in a recent NASA model intercomparison. The off-line model is shown to be somewhat sensitive to the sampling strategy for off-line winds. Simulations with daily averaged winds are in very good qualitative

  3. Dimensionality reduction for uncertainty quantification of nuclear engineering models.

    SciTech Connect

    Roderick, O.; Wang, Z.; Anitescu, M.

    2011-01-01

    The task of uncertainty quantification consists of relating the available information on uncertainties in the model setup to the resulting variation in the outputs of the model. Uncertainty quantification plays an important role in complex simulation models of nuclear engineering, where better understanding of uncertainty results in greater confidence in the model and in the improved safety and efficiency of engineering projects. In our previous work, we have shown that the effect of uncertainty can be approximated by polynomial regression with derivatives (PRD): a hybrid regression method that uses first-order derivatives of the model output as additional fitting conditions for a polynomial expansion. Numerical experiments have demonstrated the advantage of this approach over classical methods of uncertainty analysis: in precision, computational efficiency, or both. To obtain derivatives, we used automatic differentiation (AD) on the simulation code; hand-coded derivatives are acceptable for simpler models. We now present improvements on the method. We use a tuned version of the method of snapshots, a technique based on proper orthogonal decomposition (POD), to set up the reduced order representation of essential information on uncertainty in the model inputs. The automatically obtained sensitivity information is required to set up the method. Dimensionality reduction in combination with PRD allows analysis on a larger dimension of the uncertainty space (>100), at modest computational cost.

  4. Three-Dimensional Lithium-Ion Battery Model (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, G. H.; Smith, K.

    2008-05-01

    Nonuniform battery physics can cause unexpected performance and life degradations in lithium-ion batteries; a three-dimensional cell performance model was developed by integrating an electrode-scale submodel using a multiscale modeling scheme.

  5. Inverse regression-based uncertainty quantification algorithms for high-dimensional models: Theory and practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weixuan; Lin, Guang; Li, Bing

    2016-09-01

    Many uncertainty quantification (UQ) approaches suffer from the curse of dimensionality, that is, their computational costs become intractable for problems involving a large number of uncertainty parameters. In these situations, the classic Monte Carlo often remains the preferred method of choice because its convergence rate O (n - 1 / 2), where n is the required number of model simulations, does not depend on the dimension of the problem. However, many high-dimensional UQ problems are intrinsically low-dimensional, because the variation of the quantity of interest (QoI) is often caused by only a few latent parameters varying within a low-dimensional subspace, known as the sufficient dimension reduction (SDR) subspace in the statistics literature. Motivated by this observation, we propose two inverse regression-based UQ algorithms (IRUQ) for high-dimensional problems. Both algorithms use inverse regression to convert the original high-dimensional problem to a low-dimensional one, which is then efficiently solved by building a response surface for the reduced model, for example via the polynomial chaos expansion. The first algorithm, which is for the situations where an exact SDR subspace exists, is proved to converge at rate O (n-1), hence much faster than MC. The second algorithm, which doesn't require an exact SDR, employs the reduced model as a control variate to reduce the error of the MC estimate. The accuracy gain could still be significant, depending on how well the reduced model approximates the original high-dimensional one. IRUQ also provides several additional practical advantages: it is non-intrusive; it does not require computing the high-dimensional gradient of the QoI; and it reports an error bar so the user knows how reliable the result is.

  6. Analysis of intracellular reducing levels in human hepatocytes on three-dimensional focusing microchip.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chunxiu; Cai, Longfei

    2014-02-01

    A novel three-dimensional hydrodynamic focusing microfluidic device integrated with high-throughput cell sampling and detection of intracellular contents is presented. It has a pivotal role in maintaining the reducing environment in cells. Intracellular reducing species such as vitamin C and glutathione in normal and tumor cells were labeled by a newly synthesized 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-piperidine-1-oxyl-based fluorescent probe. Hepatocytes are adherent cells, which are prone to attaching to the channel surface. To avoid the attachment of cells on the channel surface, a single channel microchip with three sheath-flow channels located on both sides of and below the sampling channel was developed. Hydrostatic pressure generated by emptying the sample waste reservoir was used as driving force of fluid on the microchip. Owing to the difference between the liquid levels of the reservoirs, the labeled cells were three-dimensional hydrodynamically focused and transported from the sample reservoir to the sample waste reservoir. Hydrostatic pressure takes advantage of its ease of generation on a microfluidic chip without any external pressure pump, which drives three sheath-flow streams to constrain a sample flow stream into a narrow stream to avoid blockage of the sampling channel by adhered cells. The intracellular reducing levels of HepG2 cells and L02 cells were detected by home-built laser-induced fluorescence detector. The analysis throughput achieved in this microfluidic system was about 59-68 cells/min. PMID:23297173

  7. Generalized Reduced Order Modeling of Aeroservoelastic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gariffo, James Michael

    Transonic aeroelastic and aeroservoelastic (ASE) modeling presents a significant technical and computational challenge. Flow fields with a mixture of subsonic and supersonic flow, as well as moving shock waves, can only be captured through high-fidelity CFD analysis. With modern computing power, it is realtively straightforward to determine the flutter boundary for a single structural configuration at a single flight condition, but problems of larger scope remain quite costly. Some such problems include characterizing a vehicle's flutter boundary over its full flight envelope, optimizing its structural weight subject to aeroelastic constraints, and designing control laws for flutter suppression. For all of these applications, reduced-order models (ROMs) offer substantial computational savings. ROM techniques in general have existed for decades, and the methodology presented in this dissertation builds on successful previous techniques to create a powerful new scheme for modeling aeroelastic systems, and predicting and interpolating their transonic flutter boundaries. In this method, linear ASE state-space models are constructed from modal structural and actuator models coupled to state-space models of the linearized aerodynamic forces through feedback loops. Flutter predictions can be made from these models through simple eigenvalue analysis of their state-transition matrices for an appropriate set of dynamic pressures. Moreover, this analysis returns the frequency and damping trend of every aeroelastic branch. In contrast, determining the critical dynamic pressure by direct time-marching CFD requires a separate run for every dynamic pressure being analyzed simply to obtain the trend for the critical branch. The present ROM methodology also includes a new model interpolation technique that greatly enhances the benefits of these ROMs. This enables predictions of the dynamic behavior of the system for flight conditions where CFD analysis has not been explicitly

  8. Reduced-Order Model Based Feedback Control For Modified Hasegawa-Wakatani Model

    SciTech Connect

    Goumiri, I. R.; Rowley, C. W.; Ma, Z.; Gates, D. A.; Krommes, J. A.; Parker, J. B.

    2013-01-28

    In this work, the development of model-based feedback control that stabilizes an unstable equilibrium is obtained for the Modi ed Hasegawa-Wakatani (MHW) equations, a classic model in plasma turbulence. First, a balanced truncation (a model reduction technique that has proven successful in ow control design problems) is applied to obtain a low dimensional model of the linearized MHW equation. Then a modelbased feedback controller is designed for the reduced order model using linear quadratic regulators (LQR). Finally, a linear quadratic gaussian (LQG) controller, which is more resistant to disturbances is deduced. The controller is applied on the non-reduced, nonlinear MHW equations to stabilize the equilibrium and suppress the transition to drift-wave induced turbulence.

  9. Low-Dimensional Dynamical Models of Thermal Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liakopoulos, Anthony

    1996-01-01

    A low-dimensional dynamic model for transitional buoyancy-driven flow in a differentially heated tall enclosure is presented. The full governing partial differential equations with the associated boundary conditions are solved by a spectral element method for a cavity of aspect ratio A=20. Proper orthogonal decomposition is applied to the oscillatory solution at Prandtl number Pr=P tau (omega) = 0.71 and Grashof number G tau (omega) = 3.2 x 10 (exp 4) to construct empirical eigenfunctions. Using the four most energetic empirical eigenfunctions for the velocity and temperature as basis functions and applying Galerkin's method, a reduced model consisting of eight nonlinear ordinary differential equations is obtained. Close to the 'design' conditions (P tau(omega) G tau(omega)), the low-order model (LOM) predictions are in excellent agreement with the predictions of the full model. In particular, the critical Grashof number at the onset of the first temporal flow instability (Hopf bifurcation) was well as the frequency and amplitude of oscillations at supercritical conditions are in excellent agreement with the predictions of the full model. Far from the 'design' conditions, the LOM predicts the existence of multiple stable steady solutions at large values of G tau, and a unique stable steady solution at small values of G tau, and exhibits hysteretic behavior that is qualitatively similar to that observed in direct numerical simulations based on the full model.

  10. Reduced-Order Aerodynamic Model and Its Application to a Nonlinear Aeroelastic System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Deman; Conner, Mark D.; Dowell, Earl H.

    1998-01-01

    Starting from a finite state model for a two-dimensional aerodynamic flow over an airfoil, the eigenmodes of the aerodynamic flow are determined. Using a small number of these aerodynamic eigenmodes, ie., a reduced-order model, the aeroelastic model is formed by coupling them to a typical section structural model with a trailing-edge flap. A free-play nonlinearity is modeled. Results are shown from the finite state model, the reduced-order model, and previous theoretical and experimental work. All results are in good agreement.

  11. Reduced order model of draft tube flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolf, P.; Štefan, D.

    2014-03-01

    Swirling flow with compact coherent structures is very good candidate for proper orthogonal decomposition (POD), i.e. for decomposition into eigenmodes, which are the cornerstones of the flow field. Present paper focuses on POD of steady flows, which correspond to different operating points of Francis turbine draft tube flow. Set of eigenmodes is built using a limited number of snapshots from computational simulations. Resulting reduced order model (ROM) describes whole operating range of the draft tube. ROM enables to interpolate in between the operating points exploiting the knowledge about significance of particular eigenmodes and thus reconstruct the velocity field in any operating point within the given range. Practical example, which employs axisymmetric simulations of the draft tube flow, illustrates accuracy of ROM in regions without vortex breakdown together with need for higher resolution of the snapshot database close to location of sudden flow changes (e.g. vortex breakdown). ROM based on POD interpolation is very suitable tool for insight into flow physics of the draft tube flows (especially energy transfers in between different operating points), for supply of data for subsequent stability analysis or as an initialization database for advanced flow simulations.

  12. Three dimensional water quality modeling of a shallow subtropical estuary.

    PubMed

    Wan, Yongshan; Ji, Zhen-Gang; Shen, Jian; Hu, Guangdou; Sun, Detong

    2012-12-01

    Knowledge of estuarine hydrodynamics and water quality comes mostly from studies of large estuarine systems. The processes affecting algae, nutrients, and dissolved oxygen (DO) in small and shallow subtropical estuaries are relatively less studied. This paper documents the development, calibration, and verification of a three dimensional (3D) water quality model for the St. Lucie Estuary (SLE), a small and shallow estuary located on the east coast of south Florida. The water quality model is calibrated and verified using two years of measured data. Statistical analyses indicate that the model is capable of reproducing key water quality characteristics of the estuary within an acceptable range of accuracy. The calibrated model is further applied to study hydrodynamic and eutrophication processes in the estuary. Modeling results reveal that high algae concentrations in the estuary are likely caused by excessive nutrient and algae supplies in freshwater inflows. While algal blooms may lead to reduced DO concentrations near the bottom of the waterbody, this study indicates that stratification and circulation induced by freshwater inflows may also contribute significantly to bottom water hypoxia in the estuary. It is also found that high freshwater inflows from one of the tributaries can change the circulation pattern and nutrient loading, thereby impacting water quality conditions of the entire estuary. Restoration plans for the SLE ecosystem need to consider both a reduction of nutrient loading and regulation of the freshwater discharge pattern. PMID:23122270

  13. Miniaturized three-dimensional cancer model for drug evaluation.

    PubMed

    Lovitt, Carrie J; Shelper, Todd B; Avery, Vicky M

    2013-09-01

    A more relevant in vitro cell culture model that closely mimics tumor biology and provides better predictive information on anticancer therapies has been the focus of much attention in recent years. We have developed a three-dimensional (3D) human tumor cell culture model that attempts to recreate the in vivo microenvironment and tumor biology in a miniaturized 384-well plate format. This model aims to exploit the potential of 3D cell culture as a screening tool for novel therapeutics for discovery programs. Here we have evaluated a Matrigel™ based induction of 3D tumor formation using standard labware and plate reading equipment. We have demonstrated that with an optimized protocol, reproducible proliferation, and cell viability data can be obtained across a range of cell lines and reagent batches. A panel of reference drugs was used to validate the suitability of the assays for a high throughput drug discovery program. Indicators of assay reproducibility, such as Z'-factor and coefficient of variation, as well as dose response curves confirmed the robustness of the assays. Several methods of drug activity determination were examined, including metabolic and imaging based assays. These data demonstrate this model as a robust tool for drug discovery bridging the gap between monolayer cell culture and animal models, providing insights into drug efficacy at an earlier time point, ultimately reducing costs and high attrition rates. PMID:25310845

  14. Improving a regional model using reduced complexity and parameter estimation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelson, Victor A.; Hunt, Randall J.; Haitjema, Henk M.

    2002-01-01

    The availability of powerful desktop computers and graphical user interfaces for ground water flow models makes possible the construction of ever more complex models. A proposed copper-zinc sulfide mine in northern Wisconsin offers a unique case in which the same hydrologic system has been modeled using a variety of techniques covering a wide range of sophistication and complexity. Early in the permitting process, simple numerical models were used to evaluate the necessary amount of water to be pumped from the mine, reductions in streamflow, and the drawdowns in the regional aquifer. More complex models have subsequently been used in an attempt to refine the predictions. Even after so much modeling effort, questions regarding the accuracy and reliability of the predictions remain. We have performed a new analysis of the proposed mine using the two-dimensional analytic element code GFLOW coupled with the nonlinear parameter estimation code UCODE. The new model is parsimonious, containing fewer than 10 parameters, and covers a region several times larger in areal extent than any of the previous models. The model demonstrates the suitability of analytic element codes for use with parameter estimation codes. The simplified model results are similar to the more complex models; predicted mine inflows and UCODE-derived 95% confidence intervals are consistent with the previous predictions. More important, the large areal extent of the model allowed us to examine hydrological features not included in the previous models, resulting in new insights about the effects that far-field boundary conditions can have on near-field model calibration and parameterization. In this case, the addition of surface water runoff into a lake in the headwaters of a stream while holding recharge constant moved a regional ground watershed divide and resulted in some of the added water being captured by the adjoining basin. Finally, a simple analytical solution was used to clarify the GFLOW model

  15. Accelerated Gravitational Wave Parameter Estimation with Reduced Order Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canizares, Priscilla; Field, Scott E.; Gair, Jonathan; Raymond, Vivien; Smith, Rory; Tiglio, Manuel

    2015-02-01

    Inferring the astrophysical parameters of coalescing compact binaries is a key science goal of the upcoming advanced LIGO-Virgo gravitational-wave detector network and, more generally, gravitational-wave astronomy. However, current approaches to parameter estimation for these detectors require computationally expensive algorithms. Therefore, there is a pressing need for new, fast, and accurate Bayesian inference techniques. In this Letter, we demonstrate that a reduced order modeling approach enables rapid parameter estimation to be performed. By implementing a reduced order quadrature scheme within the LIGO Algorithm Library, we show that Bayesian inference on the 9-dimensional parameter space of nonspinning binary neutron star inspirals can be sped up by a factor of ˜30 for the early advanced detectors' configurations (with sensitivities down to around 40 Hz) and ˜70 for sensitivities down to around 20 Hz. This speedup will increase to about 150 as the detectors improve their low-frequency limit to 10 Hz, reducing to hours analyses which could otherwise take months to complete. Although these results focus on interferometric gravitational wave detectors, the techniques are broadly applicable to any experiment where fast Bayesian analysis is desirable.

  16. Accelerated gravitational wave parameter estimation with reduced order modeling.

    PubMed

    Canizares, Priscilla; Field, Scott E; Gair, Jonathan; Raymond, Vivien; Smith, Rory; Tiglio, Manuel

    2015-02-20

    Inferring the astrophysical parameters of coalescing compact binaries is a key science goal of the upcoming advanced LIGO-Virgo gravitational-wave detector network and, more generally, gravitational-wave astronomy. However, current approaches to parameter estimation for these detectors require computationally expensive algorithms. Therefore, there is a pressing need for new, fast, and accurate Bayesian inference techniques. In this Letter, we demonstrate that a reduced order modeling approach enables rapid parameter estimation to be performed. By implementing a reduced order quadrature scheme within the LIGO Algorithm Library, we show that Bayesian inference on the 9-dimensional parameter space of nonspinning binary neutron star inspirals can be sped up by a factor of ∼30 for the early advanced detectors' configurations (with sensitivities down to around 40 Hz) and ∼70 for sensitivities down to around 20 Hz. This speedup will increase to about 150 as the detectors improve their low-frequency limit to 10 Hz, reducing to hours analyses which could otherwise take months to complete. Although these results focus on interferometric gravitational wave detectors, the techniques are broadly applicable to any experiment where fast Bayesian analysis is desirable. PMID:25763948

  17. Reduced modeling of the magnetorotational instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamroz, Ben F.

    2009-06-01

    well understood. Many recent numerical investigations of this problem are performed in a local domain, where the global cylindrical background state is projected onto a local Cartesian domain. The resulting system is then numerically modeled within a "shearing box" framework to obtain estimates of angular momentum transport and therefore accretion. However, the simplified geometry of the local domain, and the projection of global quantities leads to a model where the instability is able to grow unboundedly. Utilizing disparate characteristic scales, this thesis presents a reduced asymptotic model for the magnetorotational instability that allows a large scale feedback of local stresses (Reynolds, Maxwell and mixed) onto the projected background state. This system is investigated numerically to determine the impact of allowing this feedback on the saturated level of angular momentum transport.

  18. A Five Dimensional Model for Educating the Net Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beyers, Ronald Noel

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes a multi-dimensional concept model of an ICT enabled classroom to highlight potential similarities and differences between where teachers perceive themselves relative to their learners. Some teachers and learners may be at the two dimensional text-book level, while others are operating in at a globalization level. Being armed…

  19. Revealing Optical Properties of Reduced-Dimensionality Materials at Relevant Length Scales.

    PubMed

    Ogletree, D Frank; Schuck, P James; Weber-Bargioni, Alexander F; Borys, Nicholas J; Aloni, Shaul; Bao, Wei; Barja, Sara; Lee, Jiye; Melli, Mauro; Munechika, Keiko; Whitelam, Stephan; Wickenburg, Sebastian

    2015-10-14

    Reduced-dimensionality materials for photonic and optoelectronic applications including energy conversion, solid-state lighting, sensing, and information technology are undergoing rapid development. The search for novel materials based on reduced-dimensionality is driven by new physics. Understanding and optimizing material properties requires characterization at the relevant length scale, which is often below the diffraction limit. Three important material systems are chosen for review here, all of which are under investigation at the Molecular Foundry, to illustrate the current state of the art in nanoscale optical characterization: 2D semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides; 1D semiconducting nanowires; and energy-transfer in assemblies of 0D semiconducting nanocrystals. For each system, the key optical properties, the principal experimental techniques, and important recent results are discussed. Applications and new developments in near-field optical microscopy and spectroscopy, scanning probe microscopy, and cathodoluminescence in the electron microscope are given detailed attention. Work done at the Molecular Foundry is placed in context within the fields under review. A discussion of emerging opportunities and directions for the future closes the review. PMID:26332202

  20. Towards beating the curse of dimensionality for gravitational waves using reduced basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, Scott E.; Galley, Chad R.; Ochsner, Evan

    2012-10-01

    Using the reduced basis approach, we efficiently compress and accurately represent the space of waveforms for nonprecessing binary black hole inspirals, which constitutes a four-dimensional parameter space (two masses, two spin magnitudes). Compared to the nonspinning case, we find that only a marginal increase in the (already relatively small) number of reduced basis elements is required to represent any nonprecessing waveform to nearly numerical round-off precision. Most parameters selected by the algorithm are near the boundary of the parameter space, leaving the bulk of its volume sparse. Our results suggest that the full eight-dimensional space (two masses, two spin magnitudes, four spin orientation angles on the unit sphere) may be highly compressible and represented with very high accuracy by a remarkably small number of waveforms, thus providing some hope that the number of numerical relativity simulations of binary black hole coalescences needed to represent the entire space of configurations is not intractable. Finally, we find that the distribution of selected parameters is robust to different choices of seed values starting the algorithm, a property which should be useful for indicating parameters for numerical relativity simulations of binary black holes. In particular, we find that the mass ratios m1/m2 of nonspinning binaries selected by the algorithm are mostly in the interval [1,3] and that the median of the distribution follows a power-law behavior ˜(m1/m2)-5.25.

  1. Bacteriophage Infection of Model Metal Reducing Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, K. A.; Bender, K. S.; Gandhi, K.; Coates, J. D.

    2008-12-01

    filtered through a 0.22 μ m sterile nylon filter, stained with phosphotungstic acid (PTA), and examined using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM revealed the presence of viral like particles in the culture exposed to mytomycin C. Together these results suggest an active infection with a lysogenic bacteriophage in the model metal reducing bacteria, Geobacter spp., which could affect metabolic physiology and subsequently metal reduction in environmental systems.

  2. ASPEN: A Fully Kinetic, Reduced-Description Particle-in-Cell Model for Modeling Parametric Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, H. X.; Bezzerides, B.; Dubois, D. F.

    1998-11-01

    A fully kinetic, reduced-description particle-in-cell (RPIC) model is presented in which deviations from quasineutrality, electron and ion kinetic effects, and nonlinear interactions between low-frequency and high-frequency parametric instabilities are modeled correctly. The model is based on a reduced description where the electromagnetic field is represented by three separate temporal WKB envelopes in order to model low-frequency and high-frequency parametric instabilities. Because temporal WKB approximations are invoked, the simulation can be performed on the electron time scale instead of the time scale of the light waves. The electrons and ions are represented by discrete finite-size particles, permitting electron and ion kinetic effects to be modeled properly. The Poisson equation is utilized to ensure that space-charge effects are included. Although RPIC is fully three dimensional, it has been implemented in only two dimensions on a CRAY-T3D with 512 processors and on the Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) parallel computer at Los Alamos National Laboratory, and the resulting simulation code has been named ASPEN. Given the current computers available to the authors, one and two dimensional simulations are feasible to, and have been, performed. Three dimensional simulations are much more expensive, and are not feasible at this time. However, with rapidly advancing computer technologies, three dimensional simulations may be feasible in the near future. We believe this code is the first PIC code capable of simulating the interaction between low-frequency and high-frequency parametric instabilites in multiple dimensions. Test simulations of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS), and Langmuir decay instability (LDI), are presented.

  3. A new algorithm for high-dimensional uncertainty quantification based on dimension-adaptive sparse grid approximation and reduced basis methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peng; Quarteroni, Alfio

    2015-10-01

    In this work we develop an adaptive and reduced computational algorithm based on dimension-adaptive sparse grid approximation and reduced basis methods for solving high-dimensional uncertainty quantification (UQ) problems. In order to tackle the computational challenge of "curse of dimensionality" commonly faced by these problems, we employ a dimension-adaptive tensor-product algorithm [16] and propose a verified version to enable effective removal of the stagnation phenomenon besides automatically detecting the importance and interaction of different dimensions. To reduce the heavy computational cost of UQ problems modelled by partial differential equations (PDE), we adopt a weighted reduced basis method [7] and develop an adaptive greedy algorithm in combination with the previous verified algorithm for efficient construction of an accurate reduced basis approximation. The efficiency and accuracy of the proposed algorithm are demonstrated by several numerical experiments.

  4. Dynamic colloidal assembly pathways via low dimensional models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuguang; Thyagarajan, Raghuram; Ford, David M.; Bevan, Michael A.

    2016-05-01

    Here we construct a low-dimensional Smoluchowski model for electric field mediated colloidal crystallization using Brownian dynamic simulations, which were previously matched to experiments. Diffusion mapping is used to infer dimensionality and confirm the use of two order parameters, one for degree of condensation and one for global crystallinity. Free energy and diffusivity landscapes are obtained as the coefficients of a low-dimensional Smoluchowski equation to capture the thermodynamics and kinetics of microstructure evolution. The resulting low-dimensional model quantitatively captures the dynamics of different assembly pathways between fluid, polycrystal, and single crystals states, in agreement with the full N-dimensional data as characterized by first passage time distributions. Numerical solution of the low-dimensional Smoluchowski equation reveals statistical properties of the dynamic evolution of states vs. applied field amplitude and system size. The low-dimensional Smoluchowski equation and associated landscapes calculated here can serve as models for predictive control of electric field mediated assembly of colloidal ensembles into two-dimensional crystalline objects.

  5. Dynamic colloidal assembly pathways via low dimensional models.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuguang; Thyagarajan, Raghuram; Ford, David M; Bevan, Michael A

    2016-05-28

    Here we construct a low-dimensional Smoluchowski model for electric field mediated colloidal crystallization using Brownian dynamic simulations, which were previously matched to experiments. Diffusion mapping is used to infer dimensionality and confirm the use of two order parameters, one for degree of condensation and one for global crystallinity. Free energy and diffusivity landscapes are obtained as the coefficients of a low-dimensional Smoluchowski equation to capture the thermodynamics and kinetics of microstructure evolution. The resulting low-dimensional model quantitatively captures the dynamics of different assembly pathways between fluid, polycrystal, and single crystals states, in agreement with the full N-dimensional data as characterized by first passage time distributions. Numerical solution of the low-dimensional Smoluchowski equation reveals statistical properties of the dynamic evolution of states vs. applied field amplitude and system size. The low-dimensional Smoluchowski equation and associated landscapes calculated here can serve as models for predictive control of electric field mediated assembly of colloidal ensembles into two-dimensional crystalline objects. PMID:27250328

  6. Reducing Dilution and Analysis Time in Online Comprehensive Two-Dimensional Liquid Chromatography by Active Modulation.

    PubMed

    Gargano, Andrea F G; Duffin, Mike; Navarro, Pablo; Schoenmakers, Peter J

    2016-02-01

    Online comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography (LC × LC) offers ways to achieve high-performance separations in terms of peak capacity (exceeding 1000) and additional selectivity to realize applications that cannot be addressed with one-dimensional chromatography (1D-LC). However, the greater resolving power of LC × LC comes at the price of higher dilutions (thus, reduced sensitivity) and, often, long analysis times (>100 min). The need to preserve the separation attained in the first dimension ((1)D) causes greater dilution for LC × LC, in comparison with 1D-LC, and long analysis times to sample the (1)D with an adequate number of second dimension separations. A way to significantly reduce these downsides is to introduce a concentration step between the two chromatographic dimensions. In this work we present a possible active-modulation approach to concentrate the fractions of (1)D effluent. A typical LC × LC system is used with the addition of a dilution flow to decrease the strength of the (1)D effluent and a modulation unit that uses trap columns. The potential of this approach is demonstrated for the separation of tristyrylphenol ethoxylate phosphate surfactants, using a combination of hydrophilic interaction and reversed-phase liquid chromatography. The modified LC × LC system enabled us to halve the analysis time necessary to obtain a similar degree of separation efficiency with respect to UHPLC based LC × LC and of 5 times with respect to HPLC instrumentation (40 compared with 80 and 200 min, respectively), while at the same time reducing dilution (DF of 142, 299, and 1529, respectively) and solvent consumption per analysis (78, 120, and 800 mL, respectively). PMID:26709410

  7. Model of a Negatively Curved Two-Dimensional Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckroth, Charles A.

    1995-01-01

    Describes the construction of models of two-dimensional surfaces with negative curvature that are used to illustrate differences in the triangle sum rule for the various Big Bang Theories of the universe. (JRH)

  8. Two-Dimensional Intercomparison of Stratospheric Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackman, Charles H. (Editor); Seals, Robert K., Jr. (Editor); Prather, Michael J. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    A detailed record is provided for the examination of fundamental differences in photochemistry and transport among atmospheric models. The results of 16 different modeling groups are presented for several model experiments.

  9. Spectral analysis of two-dimensional Bose-Hubbard models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, David; Hoffmann, Darius; Wimberger, Sandro

    2016-04-01

    One-dimensional Bose-Hubbard models are well known to obey a transition from regular to quantum-chaotic spectral statistics. We are extending this concept to relatively simple two-dimensional many-body models. Also in two dimensions a transition from regular to chaotic spectral statistics is found and discussed. In particular, we analyze the dependence of the spectral properties on the bond number of the two-dimensional lattices and the applied boundary conditions. For maximal connectivity, the systems behave most regularly in agreement with the applicability of mean-field approaches in the limit of many nearest-neighbor couplings at each site.

  10. Stochastic reduced order models for inverse problems under uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    Warner, James E.; Aquino, Wilkins; Grigoriu, Mircea D.

    2014-01-01

    This work presents a novel methodology for solving inverse problems under uncertainty using stochastic reduced order models (SROMs). Given statistical information about an observed state variable in a system, unknown parameters are estimated probabilistically through the solution of a model-constrained, stochastic optimization problem. The point of departure and crux of the proposed framework is the representation of a random quantity using a SROM - a low dimensional, discrete approximation to a continuous random element that permits e cient and non-intrusive stochastic computations. Characterizing the uncertainties with SROMs transforms the stochastic optimization problem into a deterministic one. The non-intrusive nature of SROMs facilitates e cient gradient computations for random vector unknowns and relies entirely on calls to existing deterministic solvers. Furthermore, the method is naturally extended to handle multiple sources of uncertainty in cases where state variable data, system parameters, and boundary conditions are all considered random. The new and widely-applicable SROM framework is formulated for a general stochastic optimization problem in terms of an abstract objective function and constraining model. For demonstration purposes, however, we study its performance in the specific case of inverse identification of random material parameters in elastodynamics. We demonstrate the ability to efficiently recover random shear moduli given material displacement statistics as input data. We also show that the approach remains effective for the case where the loading in the problem is random as well. PMID:25558115

  11. Three Dimensional Vapor Intrusion Modeling: Model Validation and Uncertainty Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbariyeh, S.; Patterson, B.; Rakoczy, A.; Li, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Volatile organic chemicals (VOCs), such as chlorinated solvents and petroleum hydrocarbons, are prevalent groundwater contaminants due to their improper disposal and accidental spillage. In addition to contaminating groundwater, VOCs may partition into the overlying vadose zone and enter buildings through gaps and cracks in foundation slabs or basement walls, a process termed vapor intrusion. Vapor intrusion of VOCs has been recognized as a detrimental source for human exposures to potential carcinogenic or toxic compounds. The simulation of vapor intrusion from a subsurface source has been the focus of many studies to better understand the process and guide field investigation. While multiple analytical and numerical models were developed to simulate the vapor intrusion process, detailed validation of these models against well controlled experiments is still lacking, due to the complexity and uncertainties associated with site characterization and soil gas flux and indoor air concentration measurement. In this work, we present an effort to validate a three-dimensional vapor intrusion model based on a well-controlled experimental quantification of the vapor intrusion pathways into a slab-on-ground building under varying environmental conditions. Finally, a probabilistic approach based on Monte Carlo simulations is implemented to determine the probability distribution of indoor air concentration based on the most uncertain input parameters.

  12. Application of N-Doped Three-Dimensional Reduced Graphene Oxide Aerogel to Thin Film Loudspeaker.

    PubMed

    Kim, Choong Sun; Lee, Kyung Eun; Lee, Jung-Min; Kim, Sang Ouk; Cho, Byung Jin; Choi, Jung-Woo

    2016-08-31

    We built a thermoacoustic loudspeaker employing N-doped three-dimensional reduced graphene oxide aerogel (N-rGOA) based on a simple template-free fabrication method. A two-step fabrication process, which includes freeze-drying and reduction/doping, was used to realize a three-dimensional, freestanding, and porous graphene-based loudspeaker, whose macroscopic structure can be easily modulated. The simplified fabrication process also allows the control of structural properties of the N-rGOAs, including density and area. Taking advantage of the facile fabrication process, we fabricated and analyzed thermoacoustic loudspeakers with different structural properties. The anlayses showed that a N-rGOA with lower density and larger area can produce a higher sound pressure level (SPL). Furthermore, the resistance of the proposed loudspeaker can be easily controlled through heteroatom doping, thereby helping to generate higher SPL per unit driving voltage. Our success in constructing an array of optimized N-rGOAs able to withstand input power as high as 40 W demonstrates that a practical thermoacoustic loudspeaker can be fabricated using the proposed mass-producible solution-based process. PMID:27532328

  13. Adiabatic quantum optimization in the presence of discrete noise: Reducing the problem dimensionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandrà, Salvatore; Guerreschi, Gian Giacomo; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2015-12-01

    Adiabatic quantum optimization is a procedure to solve a vast class of optimization problems by slowly changing the Hamiltonian of a quantum system. The evolution time necessary for the algorithm to be successful scales inversely with the minimum energy gap encountered during the dynamics. Unfortunately, the direct calculation of the gap is strongly limited by the exponential growth in the dimensionality of the Hilbert space associated to the quantum system. Although many special-purpose methods have been devised to reduce the effective dimensionality, they are strongly limited to particular classes of problems with evident symmetries. Moreover, little is known about the computational power of adiabatic quantum optimizers in real-world conditions. Here we propose and implement a general purposes reduction method that does not rely on any explicit symmetry and which requires, under certain general conditions, only a polynomial amount of classical resources. Thanks to this method, we are able to analyze the performance of "nonideal" quantum adiabatic optimizers to solve the well-known Grover problem, namely the search of target entries in an unsorted database, in the presence of discrete local defects. In this case, we show that adiabatic quantum optimization, even if affected by random noise, is still potentially faster than any classical algorithm.

  14. Three-dimensional computer modeling of hydrogen injection and combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, N.L.; Amsden, A.A.; Naber, J.D.; Siebers, D.L.

    1995-02-01

    The hydrodynamics of hydrogen gas injection into a fixed-volume combustion chamber is analyzed and simulated using KIVA-3, a three-dimensional, reactive flow computer code. Comparisons of the simulation results are made to data obtained at the Combustion Research Facility at Sandia National Laboratory-California (SNL-CA). Simulation of the gas injection problem is found to be of comparable difficulty as the liquid fuel injection in diesel engines. The primary challenge is the large change of length scale from the flow of gas in the orifice to the penetration in the combustion chamber. In the current experiments, the change of length scale is about 4,000. A reduction of the full problem is developed that reduces the change in length scale in the simulation to about 400, with a comparable improvement in computational times. Comparisons of the simulation to the experimental data shows good agreement in the penetration history and pressure rise in the combustion chamber. At late times the comparison is sensitive to the method of determination of the penetration in the simulations. In a comparison of the combustion modeling of methane and hydrogen, hydrogen combustion is more difficult to model, and currently available kinetic models fail to predict the observed autoignition delay at these conditions.

  15. A spatial algorithm to reduce phase wraps from two dimensional signals in fringe projection profilometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arevalillo-Herráez, Miguel; Gdeisat, Munther; Lilley, Francis; Burton, David R.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present a novel algorithm to reduce the number of phase wraps in two dimensional signals in fringe projection profilometry. The technique operates in the spatial domain, and achieves a significant computational saving with regard to existing methods based on frequency shifting. The method works by estimating the modes of the first differences distribution in each axial direction. These are used to generate a tilted plane, which is subtracted from the entire phase map. Finally, the result is re-wrapped to obtain a phase map with fewer wraps. The method may be able to completely eliminate the phase wraps in many cases, or can achieve a significant phase wrap reduction that helps the subsequent unwrapping of the signal. The algorithm has been exhaustively tested across a large number of real and simulated signals, showing similar results compared to approaches operating in the frequency domain, but at significantly lower running times.

  16. A numerical method for reducing the random noise in a two-dimensional waveform

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, A.J.

    1991-01-23

    This invention is comprised of a method for reducing random noise in a two-dimensional waveform having an irregular curvature includes the steps of selecting a plurality of points initially positioned at preselected locations on the waveform. For each point selected, the straight line is found which connects it to the midpoint between its neighboring points. A new location for the point is calculated to lie on the straight line a fraction of the distance between the initial location of the point and the midpoint. This process is repeated for each point positioned on the waveform. After a single iteration of the method is completed, the entire process is repeated a predetermined number of times to identify final calculated locations for the plurality of points selected. The final calculated locations of the points are then connected to form a relatively random noise-free waveform having a substantially smooth curvature.

  17. Reduced dimensionality 3D HNCAN for unambiguous HN, CA and N assignment in proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rout, Manoj Kumar; Mishra, Pushpa; Atreya, Hanudatta S.; Hosur, Ramakrishna V.

    2012-03-01

    We present here an improvisation of HNN (Panchal, Bhavesh et al., 2001) called RD 3D HNCAN for backbone (HN, CA and 15N) assignment in both folded and unfolded proteins. This is a reduced dimensionality experiment which employs CA chemical shifts to improve dispersion. Distinct positive and negative peak patterns of various triplet segments along the polypeptide chain observed in HNN are retained and these provide start and check points for the sequential walk. Because of co-incrementing of CA and 15N, peaks along one of the dimensions appear at sums and differences of the CA and 15N chemical shifts. This changes the backbone assignment protocol slightly and we present this in explicit detail. The performance of the experiment has been demonstrated using Ubiquitin and Plasmodium falciparum P2 proteins. The experiment is particularly valuable when two neighboring amino acid residues have nearly identical backbone 15N chemical shifts.

  18. Luminomagnetic bifunctionality of Mn2+-bonded graphene oxide/reduced graphene oxide two dimensional nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amandeep; Kedawat, Garima; Kumar, Pawan; Anshul, Avaneesh; Deshmukh, Abhay D.; Singh, Om Pal; Gupta, R. K.; Amritphale, S. S.; Gupta, Govind; Singh, V. N.; Gupta, Bipin Kumar

    2015-07-01

    Herein, we report the luminomagnetic bifunctional properties of two-dimensional (2D) Mn2+ bonded graphene oxide (GO)/reduced graphene oxide (RGO) nanosheets synthesized using a facile route of oxidation followed by a solvothermal reduction method. Photoluminescence (PL) studies (excited by different wavelengths) revealed that the resonant energy transfer between Mn2+ and sp3/sp2 clusters of GO/RGO is responsible for the enhancement of emissions. Moreover, pH-sensitive PL behaviors have also been investigated in detail. The ferromagnetic behavior is believed to arise due to defects in Mn2+ bonded GO composites. Thus, present reduction method provides a direct route to tune and enhance the optical properties of GO and RGO nanosheets bonded with Mn2+ ions, which creates an opportunity for various technological applications.Herein, we report the luminomagnetic bifunctional properties of two-dimensional (2D) Mn2+ bonded graphene oxide (GO)/reduced graphene oxide (RGO) nanosheets synthesized using a facile route of oxidation followed by a solvothermal reduction method. Photoluminescence (PL) studies (excited by different wavelengths) revealed that the resonant energy transfer between Mn2+ and sp3/sp2 clusters of GO/RGO is responsible for the enhancement of emissions. Moreover, pH-sensitive PL behaviors have also been investigated in detail. The ferromagnetic behavior is believed to arise due to defects in Mn2+ bonded GO composites. Thus, present reduction method provides a direct route to tune and enhance the optical properties of GO and RGO nanosheets bonded with Mn2+ ions, which creates an opportunity for various technological applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01095k

  19. Recent Progress in GW-based Methods for Excited-State Calculations of Reduced Dimensional Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Jornada, Felipe H.

    2015-03-01

    Ab initio calculations of excited-state phenomena within the GW and GW-Bethe-Salpeter equation (GW-BSE) approaches allow one to accurately study the electronic and optical properties of various materials, including systems with reduced dimensionality. However, several challenges arise when dealing with complicated nanostructures where the electronic screening is strongly spatially and directionally dependent. In this talk, we discuss some recent developments to address these issues. First, we turn to the slow convergence of quasiparticle energies and exciton binding energies with respect to k-point sampling. This is very effectively dealt with using a new hybrid sampling scheme, which results in savings of several orders of magnitude in computation time. A new ab initio method is also developed to incorporate substrate screening into GW and GW-BSE calculations. These two methods have been applied to mono- and few-layer MoSe2, and yielded strong environmental dependent behaviors in good agreement with experiment. Other issues that arise in confined systems and materials with reduced dimensionality, such as the effect of the Tamm-Dancoff approximation to GW-BSE, and the calculation of non-radiative exciton lifetime, are also addressed. These developments have been efficiently implemented and successfully applied to real systems in an ab initio framework using the BerkeleyGW package. I would like to acknowledge collaborations with Diana Y. Qiu, Steven G. Louie, Meiyue Shao, Chao Yang, and the experimental groups of M. Crommie and F. Wang. This work was supported by Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231 and by National Science Foundation under Grant No. DMR10-1006184.

  20. The Long Decay Model of One-Dimensional Projectile Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lattery, Mark Joseph

    2008-01-01

    This article introduces a research study on student model formation and development in introductory mechanics. As a point of entry, I present a detailed analysis of the Long Decay Model of one-dimensional projectile motion. This model has been articulated by Galileo ("in De Motu") and by contemporary students. Implications for instruction are…

  1. One-Dimensional Ising Model with "k"-Spin Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fan, Yale

    2011-01-01

    We examine a generalization of the one-dimensional Ising model involving interactions among neighbourhoods of "k" adjacent spins. The model is solved by exploiting a connection to an interesting computational problem that we call ""k"-SAT on a ring", and is shown to be equivalent to the nearest-neighbour Ising model in the absence of an external…

  2. Acceleration techniques for reduced-order models based on proper orthogonal decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Cizmas, P.; Richardson, B.; Brenner, T.; O'Brien, T.; Breault, R.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents several acceleration techniques for reduced-order models based on the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) method. The techniques proposed herein are: (i) an algorithm for splitting the database of snapshots generated by the full-order model; (ii) a method for solving quasi-symmetrical matrices; (iii) a strategy for reducing the frequency of the projection. The acceleration techniques were applied to a POD-based reduced-order model of the twophase flows in fluidized beds. This reduced-order model was developed using numerical results from a full-order computational fluid dynamics model of a two-dimensional fluidized bed. Using these acceleration techniques the computational time of the POD model was two orders of magnitude shorter than the full-order model.

  3. Existence of global weak solution for a reduced gravity two and a half layer model

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Zhenhua Li, Zilai Yao, Lei

    2013-12-15

    We investigate the existence of global weak solution to a reduced gravity two and a half layer model in one-dimensional bounded spatial domain or periodic domain. Also, we show that any possible vacuum state has to vanish within finite time, then the weak solution becomes a unique strong one.

  4. Global Well-Posedness of an Inviscid Three-Dimensional Pseudo-Hasegawa-Mima Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Chongsheng; Farhat, Aseel; Titi, Edriss S.

    2013-04-01

    The three-dimensional inviscid Hasegawa-Mima model is one of the fundamental models that describe plasma turbulence. The model also appears as a simplified reduced Rayleigh-Bénard convection model. The mathematical analysis of the Hasegawa-Mima equation is challenging due to the absence of any smoothing viscous terms, as well as to the presence of an analogue of the vortex stretching terms. In this paper, we introduce and study a model which is inspired by the inviscid Hasegawa-Mima model, which we call a pseudo-Hasegawa-Mima model. The introduced model is easier to investigate analytically than the original inviscid Hasegawa-Mima model, as it has a nicer mathematical structure. The resemblance between this model and the Euler equations of inviscid incompressible fluids inspired us to adapt the techniques and ideas introduced for the two-dimensional and the three-dimensional Euler equations to prove the global existence and uniqueness of solutions for our model. This is in addition to proving and implementing a new technical logarithmic inequality, generalizing the Brezis-Gallouet and the Brezis-Wainger inequalities. Moreover, we prove the continuous dependence on initial data of solutions for the pseudo-Hasegawa-Mima model. These are the first results on existence and uniqueness of solutions for a model that is related to the three-dimensional inviscid Hasegawa-Mima equations.

  5. Effects of confinement and external fields on structure and transport in colloidal dispersions in reduced dimensionality.

    PubMed

    Wilms, D; Deutschländer, S; Siems, U; Franzrahe, K; Henseler, P; Keim, P; Schwierz, N; Virnau, P; Binder, K; Maret, G; Nielaba, P

    2012-11-21

    In this work, we focus on low-dimensional colloidal model systems, via simulation studies and also some complementary experiments, in order to elucidate the interplay between phase behavior, geometric structures and transport properties. In particular, we try to investigate the (nonlinear!) response of these very soft colloidal systems to various perturbations: uniform and uniaxial pressure, laser fields, shear due to moving boundaries and randomly quenched disorder. We study ordering phenomena on surfaces or in monolayers by Monte Carlo computer simulations of binary hard-disk mixtures, the influence of a substrate being modeled by an external potential. Weak external fields allow a controlled tuning of the miscibility of the mixture. We discuss the laser induced de-mixing for the three different possible couplings to the external potential. The structural behavior of hard spheres interacting with repulsive screened Coulomb or dipolar interaction in 2D and 3D narrow constrictions is investigated using Brownian dynamics simulations. Due to misfits between multiples of the lattice parameter and the channel widths, a variety of ordered and disordered lattice structures have been observed. The resulting local lattice structures and defect probabilities are studied for various cross sections. The influence of a self-organized order within the system is reflected in the velocity of the particles and their diffusive behavior. Additionally, in an experimental system of dipolar colloidal particles confined by gravity on a solid substrate we investigate the effect of pinning on the dynamics of a two-dimensional colloidal liquid. This work contains sections reviewing previous work by the authors as well as new, unpublished results. Among the latter are detailed studies of the phase boundaries of the de-mixing regime in binary systems in external light fields, configurations for shear induced effects at structured walls, studies on the effect of confinement on the structures

  6. Nonminimal universal extra dimensional model confronts Bs→μ+μ-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Anindya; Shaw, Avirup

    2016-03-01

    The addition of boundary localized kinetic and Yukawa terms to the action of a five-dimensional Standard Model would nontrivially modify the Kaluza-Klein spectra and some of the interactions among the Kaluza-Klein excitations compared to the minimal version of this model, in which these boundary terms are not present. In the minimal version of this framework, known as the universal extra dimensional model, special assumptions are made about these unknown, beyond the cutoff contributions to restrict the number of unknown parameters of the theory to be minimum. We estimate the contribution of Kaluza-Klein modes to the branching ratios of Bs (d )→μ+μ- in the framework of the nonminimal universal extra dimensional model, at one-loop level. The results have been compared to the experimental data to constrain the parameters of this model. From the measured decay branching ratio of Bs→μ+μ- (depending on the values of boundary localized parameters), the lower limit on R-1 can be as high as 800 GeV. We have briefly reviewed the bounds on nonminimal universal extra dimensional parameter space coming from electroweak precision observables. The present analysis (Bs→μ+μ-) has ruled out new regions of parameter space in comparison to the analysis of electroweak data. We have revisited the bound on R-1 in the universal extra dimensional model, which came out to be 454 GeV. This limit on R-1 in the universal extra dimensional framework is not as competitive as the limits derived from the consideration of relic density or Standard Model Higgs boson production and decay to W+W-. Unfortunately, the Bd→μ+μ- decay branching ratio would not set any significant limit on R-1 in a minimal or nonminimal universal extra dimensional model.

  7. Three-dimensional hydrodynamic modeling of a bubbling fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect

    Gamwo, I.K.; Soong, Y.; Gidaspow, D.; Lyczkowski, R.W.

    1995-12-31

    A well-posed three-dimensional model for bed dynamics was developed starting from an ill-posed model. The new model has predicted a roughly-spheroidal bubble shape and computed porosity distributions consistent with experimental observations with no disturbing ``fountain`` as predicted by the earlier model. The model can be applied to a variety of gas-solids flows of practical interest such as fluidization, pneumatic conveying, and two-phase jets, as well as liquid-solids flows.

  8. Assessing and reducing hydrogeologic model uncertainty

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    NRC is sponsoring research that couples model abstraction techniques with model uncertainty assessment methods. Insights and information from this program will be useful in decision making by NRC staff, licensees and stakeholders in their assessment of subsurface radionuclide transport. All analytic...

  9. The problem of dimensional instability in airfoil models for cryogenic wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wigley, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    The problem of dimensional instability in airfoil models for cryogenic wind tunnels is discussed in terms of the various mechanisms that can be responsible. The interrelationship between metallurgical structure and possible dimensional instability in cryogenic usage is discussed for those steel alloys of most interest for wind tunnel model construction at this time. Other basic mechanisms responsible for setting up residual stress systems are discussed, together with ways in which their magnitude may be reduced by various elevated or low temperature thermal cycles. A standard specimen configuration is proposed for use in experimental investigations into the effects of machining, heat treatment, and other variables that influence the dimensional stability of the materials of interest. A brief classification of various materials in terms of their metallurgical structure and susceptability to dimensional instability is presented.

  10. Numerical modeling of two-dimensional confined flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greywall, M. S.

    1979-01-01

    A numerical model of two-dimensional confined flows is presented. The flow in the duct is partitioned into finite streams. The difference equations are then obtained by applying conservation principles directly to the individual streams. A listing of a computer code based on this approach in FORTRAN 4 language is presented. The code computes two dimensional compressible turbulent flows in ducts when the duct area along the flow is specified and the pressure gradient is unknown.

  11. A two-dimensional dam-break flood plain model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hromadka, T.V., II; Berenbrock, C.E.; Freckleton, J.R.; Guymon, G.L.

    1985-01-01

    A simple two-dimensional dam-break model is developed for flood plain study purposes. Both a finite difference grid and an irregular triangle element integrated finite difference formulation are presented. The governing flow equations are approximately solved as a diffusion model coupled to the equation of continuity. Application of the model to a hypothetical dam-break study indicates that the approach can be used to predict a two-dimensional dam-break flood plain over a broad, flat plain more accurately than a one-dimensional model, especially when the flow can break-out of the main channel and then return to the channel at other downstream reaches. ?? 1985.

  12. Creating physically-based three-dimensional microstructures: Bridging phase-field and crystal plasticity models.

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Hojun; Owen, Steven J.; Abdeljawad, Fadi F.; Hanks, Byron; Battaile, Corbett Chandler

    2015-09-01

    In order to better incorporate microstructures in continuum scale models, we use a novel finite element (FE) meshing technique to generate three-dimensional polycrystalline aggregates from a phase field grain growth model of grain microstructures. The proposed meshing technique creates hexahedral FE meshes that capture smooth interfaces between adjacent grains. Three dimensional realizations of grain microstructures from the phase field model are used in crystal plasticity-finite element (CP-FE) simulations of polycrystalline a -iron. We show that the interface conformal meshes significantly reduce artificial stress localizations in voxelated meshes that exhibit the so-called "wedding cake" interfaces. This framework provides a direct link between two mesoscale models - phase field and crystal plasticity - and for the first time allows mechanics simulations of polycrystalline materials using three-dimensional hexahedral finite element meshes with realistic topological features.

  13. One-dimensional hydrodynamic model generating a turbulent cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Takeshi; Sakajo, Takashi

    2016-05-01

    As a minimal mathematical model generating cascade analogous to that of the Navier-Stokes turbulence in the inertial range, we propose a one-dimensional partial-differential-equation model that conserves the integral of the squared vorticity analog (enstrophy) in the inviscid case. With a large-scale random forcing and small viscosity, we find numerically that the model exhibits the enstrophy cascade, the broad energy spectrum with a sizable correction to the dimensional-analysis prediction, peculiar intermittency, and self-similarity in the dynamical system structure.

  14. Multi-Scale Multi-Dimensional Ion Battery Performance Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-05-07

    The Multi-Scale Multi-Dimensional (MSMD) Lithium Ion Battery Model allows for computer prediction and engineering optimization of thermal, electrical, and electrochemical performance of lithium ion cells with realistic geometries. The model introduces separate simulation domains for different scale physics, achieving much higher computational efficiency compared to the single domain approach. It solves a one dimensional electrochemistry model in a micro sub-grid system, and captures the impacts of macro-scale battery design factors on cell performance and materialmore » usage by solving cell-level electron and heat transports in a macro grid system.« less

  15. Bootstrapping Critical Ising Model on Three Dimensional Real Projective Space.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Yu

    2016-04-01

    Given conformal data on a flat Euclidean space, we use crosscap conformal bootstrap equations to numerically solve the Lee-Yang model as well as the critical Ising model on a three dimensional real projective space. We check the rapid convergence of our bootstrap program in two dimensions from the exact solutions available. Based on the comparison, we estimate that our systematic error on the numerically solved one-point functions of the critical Ising model on a three dimensional real projective space is less than 1%. Our method opens up a novel way to solve conformal field theories on nontrivial geometries. PMID:27104697

  16. Bootstrapping Critical Ising Model on Three Dimensional Real Projective Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Yu

    2016-04-01

    Given conformal data on a flat Euclidean space, we use crosscap conformal bootstrap equations to numerically solve the Lee-Yang model as well as the critical Ising model on a three dimensional real projective space. We check the rapid convergence of our bootstrap program in two dimensions from the exact solutions available. Based on the comparison, we estimate that our systematic error on the numerically solved one-point functions of the critical Ising model on a three dimensional real projective space is less than 1%. Our method opens up a novel way to solve conformal field theories on nontrivial geometries.

  17. Low-dimensional supersymmetric lattice models

    SciTech Connect

    Bergner, G. Kaestner, T. Uhlmann, S. Wipf, A.

    2008-04-15

    We study and simulate N=2 supersymmetric Wess-Zumino models in one and two dimensions. For any choice of the lattice derivative, the theories can be made manifestly supersymmetric by adding appropriate improvement terms corresponding to discretizations of surface integrals. In one dimension, our simulations show that a model with the Wilson derivative and the Stratonovich prescription for this discretization leads to far better results at finite lattice spacing than other models with Wilson fermions considered in the literature. In particular, we check that fermionic and bosonic masses coincide and the unbroken Ward identities are fulfilled to high accuracy. Equally good results for the effective masses can be obtained in a model with the SLAC derivative (even without improvement terms). In two dimensions we introduce a non-standard Wilson term in such a way that the discretization errors of the kinetic terms are only of order O(a{sup 2}). Masses extracted from the corresponding manifestly supersymmetric model prove to approach their continuum values much quicker than those from a model containing the standard Wilson term. Again, a comparable enhancement can be achieved in a theory using the SLAC derivative.

  18. Spatial and Temporal Low-Dimensional Models for Fluid Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalb, Virginia

    2008-01-01

    A document discusses work that obtains a low-dimensional model that captures both temporal and spatial flow by constructing spatial and temporal four-mode models for two classic flow problems. The models are based on the proper orthogonal decomposition at two reference Reynolds numbers. Model predictions are made at an intermediate Reynolds number and compared with direct numerical simulation results at the new Reynolds number.

  19. Large field inflation models from higher-dimensional gauge theories

    SciTech Connect

    Furuuchi, Kazuyuki; Koyama, Yoji

    2015-02-23

    Motivated by the recent detection of B-mode polarization of CMB by BICEP2 which is possibly of primordial origin, we study large field inflation models which can be obtained from higher-dimensional gauge theories. The constraints from CMB observations on the gauge theory parameters are given, and their naturalness are discussed. Among the models analyzed, Dante’s Inferno model turns out to be the most preferred model in this framework.

  20. Large field inflation models from higher-dimensional gauge theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuuchi, Kazuyuki; Koyama, Yoji

    2015-02-01

    Motivated by the recent detection of B-mode polarization of CMB by BICEP2 which is possibly of primordial origin, we study large field inflation models which can be obtained from higher-dimensional gauge theories. The constraints from CMB observations on the gauge theory parameters are given, and their naturalness are discussed. Among the models analyzed, Dante's Inferno model turns out to be the most preferred model in this framework.

  1. Reduced Order ODE Model for Linear Contrails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inamdar, A. R.; Lele, S. K.; Jacobson, M. Z.

    2015-12-01

    It is widely acknowledged that the large uncertainties in predictions of climate impact of linear contrails stem from inadequate parametrization of contrails in GCMs. But, the parameter space on which contrail dynamics and optical properties depend is very large and spanning it using high fidelity LES is prohibitively expensive. This study leverages the large dataset of LES done so far to understand the most important physical process that governs the evolution of contrails in different stages of its life and proposes a simple, low-cost and robust ODE model to capture the evolution of quantities of interest such as ice mass, vortex downwash and contrail cross-sectional dimensions. A direct consequence of modeling the contrail using parameters impacting the most important physical process is the reduction of the original parameter space to only those groupings of parameters that impact linear contrails independently. We are able to capture the most prominent features of the contrail at every stage of the life of the contrail - the induction of the jet exhaust by the trailing vortex pair, the vortex downwash and eventual destruction and the subsequent spreading of the contrail by ambient turbulence. A simplified version of GATOR-GCMOM - a GCM - is initialized using inputs from the new ODE model to test if the inclusion of the impact of the aforementioned parameter groups has significant persistent effects. Results from the GATOR-GCMOM box model calculations show which parameter groupings show persistent effects.

  2. Hybrid Reduced Order Modeling Algorithms for Reactor Physics Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang, Youngsuk

    Reduced order modeling (ROM) has been recognized as an indispensable approach when the engineering analysis requires many executions of high fidelity simulation codes. Examples of such engineering analyses in nuclear reactor core calculations, representing the focus of this dissertation, include the functionalization of the homogenized few-group cross-sections in terms of the various core conditions, e.g. burn-up, fuel enrichment, temperature, etc. This is done via assembly calculations which are executed many times to generate the required functionalization for use in the downstream core calculations. Other examples are sensitivity analysis used to determine important core attribute variations due to input parameter variations, and uncertainty quantification employed to estimate core attribute uncertainties originating from input parameter uncertainties. ROM constructs a surrogate model with quantifiable accuracy which can replace the original code for subsequent engineering analysis calculations. This is achieved by reducing the effective dimensionality of the input parameter, the state variable, or the output response spaces, by projection onto the so-called active subspaces. Confining the variations to the active subspace allows one to construct an ROM model of reduced complexity which can be solved more efficiently. This dissertation introduces a new algorithm to render reduction with the reduction errors bounded based on a user-defined error tolerance which represents the main challenge of existing ROM techniques. Bounding the error is the key to ensuring that the constructed ROM models are robust for all possible applications. Providing such error bounds represents one of the algorithmic contributions of this dissertation to the ROM state-of-the-art. Recognizing that ROM techniques have been developed to render reduction at different levels, e.g. the input parameter space, the state space, and the response space, this dissertation offers a set of novel

  3. An Effective Parameter Screening Strategy for High Dimensional Watershed Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khare, Y. P.; Martinez, C. J.; Munoz-Carpena, R.

    2014-12-01

    Watershed simulation models can assess the impacts of natural and anthropogenic disturbances on natural systems. These models have become important tools for tackling a range of water resources problems through their implementation in the formulation and evaluation of Best Management Practices, Total Maximum Daily Loads, and Basin Management Action Plans. For accurate applications of watershed models they need to be thoroughly evaluated through global uncertainty and sensitivity analyses (UA/SA). However, due to the high dimensionality of these models such evaluation becomes extremely time- and resource-consuming. Parameter screening, the qualitative separation of important parameters, has been suggested as an essential step before applying rigorous evaluation techniques such as the Sobol' and Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test (FAST) methods in the UA/SA framework. The method of elementary effects (EE) (Morris, 1991) is one of the most widely used screening methodologies. Some of the common parameter sampling strategies for EE, e.g. Optimized Trajectories [OT] (Campolongo et al., 2007) and Modified Optimized Trajectories [MOT] (Ruano et al., 2012), suffer from inconsistencies in the generated parameter distributions, infeasible sample generation time, etc. In this work, we have formulated a new parameter sampling strategy - Sampling for Uniformity (SU) - for parameter screening which is based on the principles of the uniformity of the generated parameter distributions and the spread of the parameter sample. A rigorous multi-criteria evaluation (time, distribution, spread and screening efficiency) of OT, MOT, and SU indicated that SU is superior to other sampling strategies. Comparison of the EE-based parameter importance rankings with those of Sobol' helped to quantify the qualitativeness of the EE parameter screening approach, reinforcing the fact that one should use EE only to reduce the resource burden required by FAST/Sobol' analyses but not to replace it.

  4. Inversion of infrared imaging bolometer based on one-dimensional and three-dimensional modeling in HL-2A.

    PubMed

    Gao, J M; Liu, Y; Li, W; Cui, Z Y; Dong, Y B; Lu, J; Xia, Z W; Yi, P; Yang, Q W

    2014-04-01

    Linear regularization has been applied to the HL-2A infrared imaging bolometer to reconstruct local plasma emission with one-dimensional (1D) and three-dimensional (3D) modeling under the assumption of toroidal symmetry. In the 3D modeling, a new method to calculate the detector point response function is introduced. This method can be adapted to an arbitrarily shaped pinhole. With the full 3D treatment of the detector geometry, up to 50% of the mean-squared error is reduced compared with the 1D modeling. This is attributed to the effects of finite detector size being taken into account in the 3D modeling. Meanwhile, the number of the bolometer pixels has been optimized to 20 × 20 by making a trade-off between the number of bolometer pixels and the sensitivity of the system. The plasma radiated power density distributions have been calculated as a demonstration using 1D modeling and 3D modeling, respectively. PMID:24784605

  5. Multi-dimensional Indoor Location Information Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Q.; Zhu, Q.; Zlatanova, S.; Huang, L.; Zhou, Y.; Du, Z.

    2013-11-01

    Aiming at the increasing requirements of seamless indoor and outdoor navigation and location service, a Chinese standard of Multidimensional Indoor Location Information Model is being developed, which defines ontology of indoor location. The model is complementary to 3D concepts like CityGML and IndoorGML. The goal of the model is to provide an exchange GML-based format for location needed for indoor routing and navigation. An elaborated user requirements analysis and investigation of state-of-the-art technology in expressing indoor location at home and abroad was completed to identify the manner humans specify location. The ultimate goal is to provide an ontology that will allow absolute and relative specification of location such as "in room 321", "on the second floor", as well as, "two meters from the second window", "12 steps from the door".

  6. Underwater striling engine design with modified one-dimensional model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Daijin; Qin, Kan; Luo, Kai

    2015-09-01

    Stirling engines are regarded as an efficient and promising power system for underwater devices. Currently, many researches on one-dimensional model is used to evaluate thermodynamic performance of Stirling engine, but in which there are still some aspects which cannot be modeled with proper mathematical models such as mechanical loss or auxiliary power. In this paper, a four-cylinder double-acting Stirling engine for Unmanned Underwater Vehicles (UUVs) is discussed. And a one-dimensional model incorporated with empirical equations of mechanical loss and auxiliary power obtained from experiments is derived while referring to the Stirling engine computer model of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The P-40 Stirling engine with sufficient testing results from NASA is utilized to validate the accuracy of this one-dimensional model. It shows that the maximum error of output power of theoretical analysis results is less than 18% over testing results, and the maximum error of input power is no more than 9%. Finally, a Stirling engine for UUVs is designed with Schmidt analysis method and the modified one-dimensional model, and the results indicate this designed engine is capable of showing desired output power.

  7. Underwater striling engine design with modified one-dimensional model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Daijin; Qin, Kan; Luo, Kai

    2015-05-01

    Stirling engines are regarded as an efficient and promising power system for underwater devices. Currently, many researches on one-dimensional model is used to evaluate thermodynamic performance of Stirling engine, but in which there are still some aspects which cannot be modeled with proper mathematical models such as mechanical loss or auxiliary power. In this paper, a four-cylinder double-acting Stirling engine for Unmanned Underwater Vehicles (UUVs) is discussed. And a one-dimensional model incorporated with empirical equations of mechanical loss and auxiliary power obtained from experiments is derived while referring to the Stirling engine computer model of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The P-40 Stirling engine with sufficient testing results from NASA is utilized to validate the accuracy of this one-dimensional model. It shows that the maximum error of output power of theoretical analysis results is less than 18% over testing results, and the maximum error of input power is no more than 9%. Finally, a Stirling engine for UUVs is designed with Schmidt analysis method and the modified one-dimensional model, and the results indicate this designed engine is capable of showing desired output power.

  8. Three-dimensional model for fusion processes

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, A.P.

    1984-01-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) emit unusual spectra of radiation which is interpreted to signify extreme distance, extreme power, or both. The status of AGNs was recently reviewed by Balick and Heckman. It seems that the greatest conceptual difficulty with understanding AGNs is how to form a coherent phenomenological model of their properties. What drives the galactic engine. What and where are the mass-flows of fuel to this engine. Are there more than one engine. Do the engines have any symmetry properties. Is observed radiation isotropically emitted from the source. If it is polarized, what causes the polarization. Why is there a roughly spherical cloud of ionized gas about the center of our own galaxy, the Milky Way. The purpose of this paper is to discuss a new model, based on fusion processes which are not axisymmetric, uniform, isotropic, or even time-invariant. Then, the relationship to these questions will be developed. A unified model of fusion processes applicable to many astronomical phenomena will be proposed and discussed.

  9. Highly efficient supercapacitor electrode with two-dimensional tungsten disulfide and reduced graphene oxide hybrid nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Chao-Chi; Lin, Lu-Yin; Xiao, Bing-Chang; Chen, Yu-Shiang

    2016-07-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) nanostructures with their high surface area and large in-plane conductivity have been regarded as promising materials for supercapacitors (SCs). Tungsten disulfide (WS2) is highly suitable for charge accumulation with its abundant active sites in the interspacing between the 2D structures and the intraspacing of each atomic layer, as well as on the tungsten centers with the charges generated by the Faradaic reactions. This study proposes the preparation of well-constructed WS2/reduced graphene oxide (RGO) nanosheets using a simple molten salt process as the electroactive material for SCs, which presents a high specific capacitance (CF) of 2508.07 F g-1 at the scan rate of 1 mV s-1, because of the synergic effect of WS2 with its large charge-accumulating sites on the 2D planes and RGO with its highly enhanced conductivity and improved connections in the WS2 networks. The excellent cycling stability of 98.6% retention after 5000 cycles charge/discharge process and the Coulombic efficiency close to 100% for the entire measurement are also achieved for the WS2/RGO-based SC electrode. The results suggest the potential for the combination of the 2D metal sulfide and carbon materials as the charge storage material to solve the energy problems and attain a sustainable society.

  10. Dimensional reduction of symmetric gauge fields, Higgs models, and spontaneous compactification

    SciTech Connect

    Volobuev, I.P.; Kubyshin, Y.A. ); Mourao, J.M. ); Rudolph, G. )

    1989-05-01

    Questions relating to the dimensional reduction of symmetric gauge fields in multidimensional spaces of the form {ital E}={ital M}{times}{ital G}/{ital H} are discussed. For such fields a general geometrical method of dimensional reduction and a method for calculating the potentials of the scalar fields of the reduced theory in the case of symmetric spaces {ital G}/{ital H} are presented systematically. The connection between dimensional reduction of gauge fields and the theory of spontaneous compactification and the physical interpretation of the solutions of this theory is traced in detail. Much attention is devoted to the application of the method of dimensional reduction to fermion matter fields and to the construction by this method of realistic models of the interactions of elementary particles in Minkowski space.

  11. Fermions in five-dimensional brane world models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolyakov, Mikhail N.

    2016-06-01

    In the present paper the fermion fields, living in the background of five-dimensional warped brane world models with compact extra dimension, are thoroughly examined. The Kaluza-Klein decomposition and isolation of the physical degrees of freedom is performed for those five-dimensional fermion field Lagrangians, which admit such a decomposition to be performed in a mathematically consistent way and provide a physically reasonable four-dimensional effective theory. It is also shown that for the majority of five-dimensional fermion field Lagrangians there are no (at least rather obvious) ways to perform the Kaluza-Klein decomposition consistently. Moreover, in these cases one may expect the appearance of various pathologies in the four-dimensional effective theory. Among the cases, for which the Kaluza-Klein decomposition can be performed in a mathematically consistent way, the case, which reproduces the Standard Model by the zero Kaluza-Klein modes most closely regardless of the size of the extra dimension, is examined in detail in the background of the Randall-Sundrum model.

  12. Three-dimensional models. [For orbital celestial mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, C. )

    1990-06-01

    The Schwarzschild (1979) approach to the analysis of three-dimensional galactic models is reviewed. An analysis of triaxial Staeckel models is discussed which shows that such models have a wide variety of possible distribution functions. The uniqueness that Schwarzschild first encountered in his discrete formulation of the problem of finding a three-integral distribution function for a triaxial density is real and not an artifact of the finite cell approximation. 27 refs.

  13. On numerical modeling of one-dimensional geothermal histories

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haugerud, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    Numerical models of one-dimensional geothermal histories are one way of understanding the relations between tectonics and transient thermal structure in the crust. Such models can be powerful tools for interpreting geochronologic and thermobarometric data. A flexible program to calculate these models on a microcomputer is available and examples of its use are presented. Potential problems with this approach include the simplifying assumptions that are made, limitations of the numerical techniques, and the neglect of convective heat transfer. ?? 1989.

  14. Programmers manual for a one-dimensional Lagrangian transport model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schoellhamer, D.H.; Jobson, H.E.

    1986-01-01

    A one-dimensional Lagrangian transport model for simulating water-quality constituents such as temperature, dissolved oxygen , and suspended sediment in rivers is presented in this Programmers Manual. Lagrangian transport modeling techniques, the model 's subroutines, and the user-written decay-coefficient subroutine are discussed in detail. Appendices list the program codes. The Programmers Manual is intended for the model user who needs to modify code either to adapt the model to a particular need or to use reaction kinetics not provided with the model. (Author 's abstract)

  15. Evaluation of one dimensional analytical models for vegetation canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goel, Narendra S.; Kuusk, Andres

    1992-01-01

    The SAIL model for one-dimensional homogeneous vegetation canopies has been modified to include the specular reflectance and hot spot effects. This modified model and the Nilson-Kuusk model are evaluated by comparing the reflectances given by them against those given by a radiosity-based computer model, Diana, for a set of canopies, characterized by different leaf area index (LAI) and leaf angle distribution (LAD). It is shown that for homogeneous canopies, the analytical models are generally quite accurate in the visible region, but not in the infrared region. For architecturally realistic heterogeneous canopies of the type found in nature, these models fall short. These shortcomings are quantified.

  16. Reduced quasilinear models for energetic particles interaction with Alfvenic eigenmodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghantous, Katy

    The Line Broadened Quasilinear (LBQ) and the 1.5D reduced models are able to predict the effect of Alfvenic eigenmodes' interaction with energetic particles in burning plasmas. This interaction can result in energetic-particle losses that can damage the first wall, deteriorate the plasma performance, and even prevent ignition. The 1.5D model assumes a broad spectrum of overlapping modes and, based on analytic expressions for the growth and damping rates, calculates the pressure profiles that the energetic particles relax to upon interacting with the modes. 1.5D is validated with DIII-D experiments and predicted neutron losses consistent with observation. The model is employed to predict alpha-particle fusion-product losses in a large-scale operational parameter-space for burning plasmas. The LBQ model captures the interaction both in the regime of isolated modes as well as in the conventional regime of overlapping modes. Rules were established that allow quasilinear equations to replicate the expected steady-state saturation levels of isolated modes. The fitting formula is improved and the model is benchmarked with a Vlasov code, BOT. The saturation levels are accurately predicted and the mode evolution is well-replicated in the case of steady-state evolution where the collisions are high enough that coherent structures do not form. When the collisionality is low, oscillatory behavior can occur. LBQ can also exhibit non-steady behavior, but the onset of oscillations occurs for much higher collisional rates in BOT than in LBQ. For certain parameters of low collisionality, hole-clump creation and frequency chirping can occur which are not captured by the LBQ model. Also, there are cases of non-steady evolution without chirping which is possible for LBQ to study. However the results are inconclusive since the periods and amplitudes of the oscillations in the mode evolution are not well-replicated. If multiple modes exist, they can grow to the point of overlap which

  17. Predicting bite force in mammals: two-dimensional versus three-dimensional lever models.

    PubMed

    Davis, J L; Santana, S E; Dumont, E R; Grosse, I R

    2010-06-01

    Bite force is a measure of whole-organism performance that is often used to investigate the relationships between performance, morphology and fitness. When in vivo measurements of bite force are unavailable, researchers often turn to lever models to predict bite forces. This study demonstrates that bite force predictions based on two-dimensional (2-D) lever models can be improved by including three-dimensional (3-D) geometry and realistic physiological cross-sectional areas derived from dissections. Widely used, the 2-D method does a reasonable job of predicting bite force. However, it does so by over predicting physiological cross-sectional areas for the masseter and pterygoid muscles and under predicting physiological cross-sectional areas for the temporalis muscle. We found that lever models that include the three dimensional structure of the skull and mandible and physiological cross-sectional areas calculated from dissected muscles provide the best predictions of bite force. Models that accurately represent the biting mechanics strengthen our understanding of which variables are functionally relevant and how they are relevant to feeding performance. PMID:20472771

  18. Emergent friction in two-dimensional Frenkel-Kontorova models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norell, Jesper; Fasolino, Annalisa; de Wijn, Astrid S.

    2016-08-01

    Simple models for friction are typically one-dimensional, but real interfaces are two-dimensional. We investigate the effects of the second dimension on static and dynamic friction by using the Frenkel-Kontorova (FK) model. We study the two most straightforward extensions of the FK model to two dimensions and simulate both the static and dynamic properties. We show that the behavior of the static friction is robust and remains similar in two dimensions for physically reasonable parameter values. The dynamic friction, however, is strongly influenced by the second dimension and the accompanying additional dynamics and parameters introduced into the models. We discuss our results in terms of the thermal equilibration and phonon dispersion relations of the lattices, establishing a physically realistic and suitable two-dimensional extension of the FK model. We find that the presence of additional dissipation channels can increase the friction and produces significantly different temperature dependence when compared to the one-dimensional case. We also briefly study the anisotropy of the dynamic friction and show highly nontrivial effects, including that the friction anisotropy can lead to motion in different directions depending on the value of the initial velocity.

  19. Likelihood-Free Inference in High-Dimensional Models.

    PubMed

    Kousathanas, Athanasios; Leuenberger, Christoph; Helfer, Jonas; Quinodoz, Mathieu; Foll, Matthieu; Wegmann, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Methods that bypass analytical evaluations of the likelihood function have become an indispensable tool for statistical inference in many fields of science. These so-called likelihood-free methods rely on accepting and rejecting simulations based on summary statistics, which limits them to low-dimensional models for which the value of the likelihood is large enough to result in manageable acceptance rates. To get around these issues, we introduce a novel, likelihood-free Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method combining two key innovations: updating only one parameter per iteration and accepting or rejecting this update based on subsets of statistics approximately sufficient for this parameter. This increases acceptance rates dramatically, rendering this approach suitable even for models of very high dimensionality. We further derive that for linear models, a one-dimensional combination of statistics per parameter is sufficient and can be found empirically with simulations. Finally, we demonstrate that our method readily scales to models of very high dimensionality, using toy models as well as by jointly inferring the effective population size, the distribution of fitness effects (DFE) of segregating mutations, and selection coefficients for each locus from data of a recent experiment on the evolution of drug resistance in influenza. PMID:27052569

  20. Brane compactifications and 4-dimensional geometry in the IKKT model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polychronakos, Alexios P.; Steinacker, Harold; Zahn, Jochen

    2013-10-01

    We study in detail certain brane solutions with compact extra dimensions M4×K in the IKKT matrix model, with K being a two-dimensional rotating torus embedded in R6. We focus on the compactification moduli and the fluctuations of K⊂R6 and their physical significance. Mediated by the Poisson tensor, they contribute to the effective 4-dimensional metric on the brane, and thereby become gravitational degrees of freedom. We show that the zero modes corresponding to the global symmetries of the model lead to Ricci-flat 4-dimensional metric perturbations, wherever the energy-momentum tensor vanishes. Their coupling to the energy-momentum tensor depends on the extrinsic curvature of the brane.

  1. Micropolar continuum modelling of bi-dimensional tetrachiral lattices

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y.; Liu, X. N.; Hu, G. K.; Sun, Q. P.; Zheng, Q. S.

    2014-01-01

    The in-plane behaviour of tetrachiral lattices should be characterized by bi-dimensional orthotropic material owing to the existence of two orthogonal axes of rotational symmetry. Moreover, the constitutive model must also represent the chirality inherent in the lattices. To this end, a bi-dimensional orthotropic chiral micropolar model is developed based on the theory of irreducible orthogonal tensor decomposition. The obtained constitutive tensors display a hierarchy structure depending on the symmetry of the underlying microstructure. Eight additional material constants, in addition to five for the hemitropic case, are introduced to characterize the anisotropy under Z2 invariance. The developed continuum model is then applied to a tetrachiral lattice, and the material constants of the continuum model are analytically derived by a homogenization process. By comparing with numerical simulations for the discrete lattice, it is found that the proposed continuum model can correctly characterize the static and wave properties of the tetrachiral lattice. PMID:24808754

  2. FEEDBACK FROM CENTRAL BLACK HOLES IN ELLIPTICAL GALAXIES: TWO-DIMENSIONAL MODELS COMPARED TO ONE-DIMENSIONAL MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Novak, Gregory S.; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Ciotti, Luca

    2011-08-10

    We extend the black hole (BH) feedback models of Ciotti, Ostriker, and Proga to two dimensions. In this paper, we focus on identifying the differences between the one-dimensional and two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations. We examine a normal, isolated L{sub *} galaxy subject to the cooling flow instability of gas in the inner regions. Allowance is made for subsequent star formation, Type Ia and Type II supernovae, radiation pressure, and inflow to the central BH from mildly rotating galactic gas which is being replenished as a normal consequence of stellar evolution. The central BH accretes some of the infalling gas and expels a conical wind with mass, momentum, and energy flux derived from both observational and theoretical studies. The galaxy is assumed to have low specific angular momentum in analogy with the existing one-dimensional case in order to isolate the effect of dimensionality. The code then tracks the interaction of the outflowing radiation and winds with the galactic gas and their effects on regulating the accretion. After matching physical modeling to the extent possible between the one-dimensional and two-dimensional treatments, we find essentially similar results in terms of BH growth and duty cycle (fraction of the time above a given fraction of the Eddington luminosity). In the two-dimensional calculations, the cool shells forming at 0.1-1 kpc from the center are Rayleigh-Taylor unstable to fragmentation, leading to a somewhat higher accretion rate, less effective feedback, and a more irregular pattern of bursting compared with the one-dimensional case.

  3. Three dimensional global modeling of atmospheric CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, I.; Hansen, J.; Rind, D.

    1983-01-01

    A model was developed to study the prospects of extracting information on carbon dioxide sources and sinks from observed CO2 variations. The approach uses a three dimensional global transport model, based on winds from a 3-D general circulation model (GCM), to advect CO2 noninteractively, i.e., as a tracer, with specified sources and sinks of CO2 at the surface. The 3-D model employed is identified and biosphere, ocean and fossil fuel sources and sinks are discussed. Some preliminary model results are presented.

  4. A two-dimensional analytical model of petroleum vapor intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yijun; Verginelli, Iason; Suuberg, Eric M.

    2016-02-01

    In this study we present an analytical solution of a two-dimensional petroleum vapor intrusion model, which incorporates a steady-state diffusion-dominated vapor transport in a homogeneous soil and piecewise first-order aerobic biodegradation limited by oxygen availability. This new model can help practitioners to easily generate two-dimensional soil gas concentration profiles for both hydrocarbons and oxygen and estimate hydrocarbon indoor air concentrations as a function of site-specific conditions such as source strength and depth, reaction rate constant, soil characteristics and building features. The soil gas concentration profiles generated by this new model are shown in good agreement with three-dimensional numerical simulations and two-dimensional measured soil gas data from a field study. This implies that for cases involving diffusion dominated soil gas transport, steady state conditions and homogenous source and soil, this analytical model can be used as a fast and easy-to-use risk screening tool by replicating the results of 3-D numerical simulations but with much less computational effort.

  5. THREE-DIMENSIONAL NAPL FATE AND TRANSPORT MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have added several new and significant capabilities to UTCHEM to make it into a general-purpose NAPL simulator. The simulator is now capable of modeling transient and steady-state three-dimensional flow and mass transport in the groundwater (saturated) and vadose (unsaturated...

  6. A Framework for Dimensionality Assessment for Multidimensional Item Response Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svetina, Dubravka; Levy, Roy

    2014-01-01

    A framework is introduced for considering dimensionality assessment procedures for multidimensional item response models. The framework characterizes procedures in terms of their confirmatory or exploratory approach, parametric or nonparametric assumptions, and applicability to dichotomous, polytomous, and missing data. Popular and emerging…

  7. Three dimensional geometric modeling of processing-tomatoes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Characterizing tomato geometries with different shapes and sizes would facilitate the design of tomato processing equipments and promote computer-based engineering simulations. This research sought to develop a three-dimensional geometric model that can describe the morphological attributes of proce...

  8. Judgment Research and the Dimensional Model of Personality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garb, Howard N.

    2008-01-01

    Comments on the original article "Plate tectonics in the classification of personality disorder: Shifting to a dimensional model," by T. A. Widiger and T. J. Trull. The purpose of this comment is to address (a) whether psychologists know how personality traits are currently assessed by clinicians and (b) the reliability and validity of those…

  9. Interactive Multimedia and Concrete Three-Dimensional Modelling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baxter, J. H.; Preece, Peter F. W.

    1999-01-01

    Compares a multimedia package for teaching about the phases of the moon to grade 8 (12-year-old) students with a conventional three-dimensional modeling approach. Results show both methods were equally effective in terms of student learning, for male and female students, and prior computer experience was not a factor in multimedia use. (Author/LRW)

  10. A Five Dimensional Model for Teaching an Ethnic Content Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curiel, Herman; Euwing, Ella

    A model suitable for use in a required social work course or a high-interest elective social work course on ethnic groups, racism, or cross cultural studies uses a five dimensional approach. An elective course entitled "Cultural Diversity and the Helping Process" provides a case study. This course has been taught since 1981 and has occasionally…

  11. A multiphase model for three-dimensional tumor growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciumè, G.; Shelton, S.; Gray, W. G.; Miller, C. T.; Hussain, F.; Ferrari, M.; Decuzzi, P.; Schrefler, B. A.

    2013-01-01

    Several mathematical formulations have analyzed the time-dependent behavior of a tumor mass. However, most of these propose simplifications that compromise the physical soundness of the model. Here, multiphase porous media mechanics is extended to model tumor evolution, using governing equations obtained via the thermodynamically constrained averaging theory. A tumor mass is treated as a multiphase medium composed of an extracellular matrix (ECM); tumor cells (TCs), which may become necrotic depending on the nutrient concentration and tumor phase pressure; healthy cells (HCs); and an interstitial fluid for the transport of nutrients. The equations are solved by a finite element method to predict the growth rate of the tumor mass as a function of the initial tumor-to-healthy cell density ratio, nutrient concentration, mechanical strain, cell adhesion and geometry. Results are shown for three cases of practical biological interest such as multicellular tumor spheroids (MTSs) and tumor cords. First, the model is validated by experimental data for time-dependent growth of an MTS in a culture medium. The tumor growth pattern follows a biphasic behavior: initially, the rapidly growing TCs tend to saturate the volume available without any significant increase in overall tumor size; then, a classical Gompertzian pattern is observed for the MTS radius variation with time. A core with necrotic cells appears for tumor sizes larger than 150 μm, surrounded by a shell of viable TCs whose thickness stays almost constant with time. A formula to estimate the size of the necrotic core is proposed. In the second case, the MTS is confined within a healthy tissue. The growth rate is reduced, as compared to the first case—mostly due to the relative adhesion of the TCs and HCs to the ECM, and the less favorable transport of nutrients. In particular, for HCs adhering less avidly to the ECM, the healthy tissue is progressively displaced as the malignant mass grows, whereas TC

  12. Star-triangle relation for a three-dimensional model

    SciTech Connect

    Bazhanov, V.V. Institute for High Eenrgy Physics, Protvino, Moscow Region ); Baxter, R.J. Australian National Univ., Canberra )

    1993-06-01

    The solvable sl(n)-chiral Potts model can be interpreted as a three-dimensional lattice model with local interactions. To within a minor modification of the boundary conditions it is an Ising-type model on the body-centered cubic lattice with two- and three-spin interactions. The corresponding local Boltzmann weights obey a number of simple relations, including a restricted star-triangle relation, which is a modified version of the well-known star-triangle relation appearing in two-dimensional models. It is shown that these relations lead to remarkable symmetry properties of the Boltzmann weight function of an elementary cube of the lattice, related to the spatial symmetry group of the cubic lattice. These symmetry properties allow one to prove the commutativity of the row-to-row transfer matrices, bypassing the tetrahedron relation. The partition function per site for the infinite lattice is calculated exactly. 20 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Integrable cosmological models from higher dimensional Einstein equations

    SciTech Connect

    Sano, Masakazu; Suzuki, Hisao

    2007-09-15

    We consider the cosmological models for the higher dimensional space-time which includes the curvatures of our space as well as the curvatures of the internal space. We find that the condition for the integrability of the cosmological equations is that the total space-time dimensions are D=10 or D=11 which is exactly the conditions for superstrings or M theory. We obtain analytic solutions with generic initial conditions in the four-dimensional Einstein frame and study the accelerating universe when both our space and the internal space have negative curvatures.

  14. Numerical simulations of a reduced model for blood coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlova, Jevgenija; Fasano, Antonio; Sequeira, Adélia

    2016-04-01

    In this work, the three-dimensional numerical resolution of a complex mathematical model for the blood coagulation process is presented. The model was illustrated in Fasano et al. (Clin Hemorheol Microcirc 51:1-14, 2012), Pavlova et al. (Theor Biol 380:367-379, 2015). It incorporates the action of the biochemical and cellular components of blood as well as the effects of the flow. The model is characterized by a reduction in the biochemical network and considers the impact of the blood slip at the vessel wall. Numerical results showing the capacity of the model to predict different perturbations in the hemostatic system are discussed.

  15. Investigation on the Practicality of Developing Reduced Thermal Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lombardi, Giancarlo; Yang, Kan

    2015-01-01

    Throughout the spacecraft design and development process, detailed instrument thermal models are created to simulate their on-orbit behavior and to ensure that they do not exceed any thermal limits. These detailed models, while generating highly accurate predictions, can sometimes lead to long simulation run times, especially when integrated with a spacecraft observatory model. Therefore, reduced models containing less detail are typically produced in tandem with the detailed models so that results may be more readily available, albeit less accurate. In the current study, both reduced and detailed instrument models are integrated with their associated spacecraft bus models to examine the impact of instrument model reduction on run time and accuracy. Preexisting instrument bus thermal model pairs from several projects were used to determine trends between detailed and reduced thermal models; namely, the Mirror Optical Bench (MOB) on the Gravity and Extreme Magnetism Small Explorer (GEMS) spacecraft, Advanced Topography Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS) on the Ice, Cloud, and Elevation Satellite 2 (ICESat-2), and the Neutral Mass Spectrometer (NMS) on the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE). Hot and cold cases were run for each model to capture the behavior of the models at both thermal extremes. It was found that, though decreasing the number of nodes from a detailed to reduced model brought about a reduction in the run-time, a large time savings was not observed, nor was it a linear relationship between the percentage of nodes reduced and time saved. However, significant losses in accuracy were observed with greater model reduction. It was found that while reduced models are useful in decreasing run time, there exists a threshold of reduction where, once exceeded, the loss in accuracy outweighs the benefit from reduced model runtime.

  16. Three-dimensional control-volume distributed multi-point flux approximation coupled with a lower-dimensional surface fracture model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Raheel; Edwards, Michael G.; Lamine, Sadok; Huisman, Bastiaan A. H.; Pal, Mayur

    2015-12-01

    A novel cell-centred control-volume distributed multi-point flux approximation (CVD-MPFA) finite-volume formulation is presented for discrete fracture-matrix simulations on unstructured grids in three-dimensions (3D). The grid is aligned with fractures and barriers which are then modelled as lower-dimensional surface interfaces located between the matrix cells in the physical domain. The three-dimensional pressure equation is solved in the matrix domain coupled with a two-dimensional (2D) surface pressure equation solved over fracture networks via a novel surface CVD-MPFA formulation. The CVD-MPFA formulation naturally handles fractures with anisotropic permeabilities on unstructured grids. Matrix-fracture fluxes are expressed in terms of matrix and fracture pressures and define the transfer function, which is added to the lower-dimensional flow equation and couples the three-dimensional and surface systems. An additional transmission condition is used between matrix cells adjacent to low permeable fractures to couple the velocity and pressure jump across the fractures. Convergence and accuracy of the lower-dimensional fracture model is assessed for highly anisotropic fractures having a range of apertures and permeability tensors. A transport equation for tracer flow is coupled via the Darcy flux for single and intersecting fractures. The lower-dimensional approximation for intersecting fractures avoids the more restrictive CFL condition corresponding to the equi-dimensional approximation with explicit time discretisation. Lower-dimensional fracture model results are compared with equi-dimensional model results. Fractures and barriers are efficiently modelled by lower-dimensional interfaces which yield comparable results to those of the equi-dimensional model. Pressure continuity is built into the model across highly conductive fractures, leading to reduced local degrees of freedom in the CVD-MPFA approximation. The formulation is applied to geologically complex

  17. Approaches to verification of two-dimensional water quality models

    SciTech Connect

    Butkus, S.R. . Water Quality Dept.)

    1990-11-01

    The verification of a water quality model is the one procedure most needed by decision making evaluating a model predictions, but is often not adequate or done at all. The results of a properly conducted verification provide the decision makers with an estimate of the uncertainty associated with model predictions. Several statistical tests are available for quantifying of the performance of a model. Six methods of verification were evaluated using an application of the BETTER two-dimensional water quality model for Chickamauga reservoir. Model predictions for ten state variables were compared to observed conditions from 1989. Spatial distributions of the verification measures showed the model predictions were generally adequate, except at a few specific locations in the reservoir. The most useful statistics were the mean standard error of the residuals. Quantifiable measures of model performance should be calculated during calibration and verification of future applications of the BETTER model. 25 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

  18. A refined one-dimensional rotordynamics model with three-dimensional capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrera, E.; Filippi, M.

    2016-03-01

    This paper evaluates the vibration characteristics of various rotating structures. The present methodology exploits the one-dimensional Carrera Unified Formulation (1D CUF), which enables one to go beyond the kinematic assumptions of classical beam theories. According to the component-wise (CW) approach, Lagrange-like polynomial expansions (LE) are here adopted to develop the refined displacement theories. The LE elements make it possible to model each structural component of the rotor with an arbitrary degree of accuracy using either different displacement theories or localized mesh refinements. Hamilton's Principle is used to derive the governing equations, which are solved by the Finite Element Method. The CUF one-dimensional theory includes all the effects due to rotation, namely the Coriolis term, spin softening and geometrical stiffening. The numerical simulations have been performed considering a thin ring, discs and bladed-deformable shafts. The effects of the number and the position of the blades on the dynamic stability of the rotor have been evaluated. The results have been compared, when possible, with the 2D and 3D solutions that are available in the literature. CUF models appear very practical to investigate the dynamics of complex rotating structures since they provide 2D and quasi-3D results, while preserving the computational effectiveness of one-dimensional solutions.

  19. Three-dimensional "Mercedes-Benz" model for water.

    PubMed

    Dias, Cristiano L; Ala-Nissila, Tapio; Grant, Martin; Karttunen, Mikko

    2009-08-01

    In this paper we introduce a three-dimensional version of the Mercedes-Benz model to describe water molecules. In this model van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonds are given explicitly through a Lennard-Jones potential and a Gaussian orientation-dependent terms, respectively. At low temperature the model freezes forming Ice-I and it reproduces the main peaks of the experimental radial distribution function of water. In addition to these structural properties, the model also captures the thermodynamical anomalies of water: The anomalous density profile, the negative thermal expansivity, the large heat capacity, and the minimum in the isothermal compressibility. PMID:19673572

  20. Three-dimensional ``Mercedes-Benz'' model for water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Cristiano L.; Ala-Nissila, Tapio; Grant, Martin; Karttunen, Mikko

    2009-08-01

    In this paper we introduce a three-dimensional version of the Mercedes-Benz model to describe water molecules. In this model van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonds are given explicitly through a Lennard-Jones potential and a Gaussian orientation-dependent terms, respectively. At low temperature the model freezes forming Ice-I and it reproduces the main peaks of the experimental radial distribution function of water. In addition to these structural properties, the model also captures the thermodynamical anomalies of water: The anomalous density profile, the negative thermal expansivity, the large heat capacity, and the minimum in the isothermal compressibility.

  1. A one-dimensional basic oscillator model of the vircator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Debabrata

    2009-06-01

    A one-dimensional model of the virtual cathode oscillator (vircator) is proposed keeping only the essential physical processes. The basic model consists of a radiating charge in an oscillating electric field. Using parameters from (realistic) particle-in-cell simulations such as the charge Q and amplitude E1 of the oscillating electric field, the model correctly predicts the amplitude of virtual cathode oscillation and the power radiated. The basic model is then extended to incorporate beam-cavity interaction and the resonance effect.

  2. Four-Dimensional Global Reference-Atmosphere Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Dale; Blocker, Rhonda S.

    1988-01-01

    Four-Dimensional Global Reference Atmosphere Model (GRAM) computer program developed from empirical atmospheric model generating values for pressure, density, temperature, and winds, from ground to orbital altitudes. Is amalgamation of two empirical atmospheric models for low and high atmosphere with newly-developed latitude-and longitude-dependent model for middle atmosphere. UNIVAC version written in UNIVAC FORTRAN. DEC VAX version of GRAM written in FORTRAN 77. Applications include simulation of reentry trajectories of external tanks, studies of global circulation and diffusion and generation of plots or data for comparison.

  3. SOLVING THE TWO-DIMENSIONAL DIFFUSION FLOW MODEL.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hromadka, T.V., II; Lai, Chintu

    1985-01-01

    A simplification of the two-dimensional (2-D) continuity and momentum equations is the diffusion equation. To investigate its capability, the numerical model using the diffusion approach is applied to a hypothetical failure problem of a regional water reservoir. The model is based on an explicit, integrated finite-difference scheme, and the floodplain is simulated by a popular home computer which supports 64K FORTRAN. Though simple, the 2-D model can simulate some interesting flooding effects that a 1-D full dynamic model cannot.

  4. TWO-DIMENSIONAL CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA MODELS WITH MULTI-DIMENSIONAL TRANSPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Dolence, Joshua C.; Burrows, Adam; Zhang, Weiqun E-mail: burrows@astro.princeton.edu

    2015-02-10

    We present new two-dimensional (2D) axisymmetric neutrino radiation/hydrodynamic models of core-collapse supernova (CCSN) cores. We use the CASTRO code, which incorporates truly multi-dimensional, multi-group, flux-limited diffusion (MGFLD) neutrino transport, including all relevant O(v/c) terms. Our main motivation for carrying out this study is to compare with recent 2D models produced by other groups who have obtained explosions for some progenitor stars and with recent 2D VULCAN results that did not incorporate O(v/c) terms. We follow the evolution of 12, 15, 20, and 25 solar-mass progenitors to approximately 600 ms after bounce and do not obtain an explosion in any of these models. Though the reason for the qualitative disagreement among the groups engaged in CCSN modeling remains unclear, we speculate that the simplifying ''ray-by-ray'' approach employed by all other groups may be compromising their results. We show that ''ray-by-ray'' calculations greatly exaggerate the angular and temporal variations of the neutrino fluxes, which we argue are better captured by our multi-dimensional MGFLD approach. On the other hand, our 2D models also make approximations, making it difficult to draw definitive conclusions concerning the root of the differences between groups. We discuss some of the diagnostics often employed in the analyses of CCSN simulations and highlight the intimate relationship between the various explosion conditions that have been proposed. Finally, we explore the ingredients that may be missing in current calculations that may be important in reproducing the properties of the average CCSNe, should the delayed neutrino-heating mechanism be the correct mechanism of explosion.

  5. Two-dimensional Core-collapse Supernova Models with Multi-dimensional Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolence, Joshua C.; Burrows, Adam; Zhang, Weiqun

    2015-02-01

    We present new two-dimensional (2D) axisymmetric neutrino radiation/hydrodynamic models of core-collapse supernova (CCSN) cores. We use the CASTRO code, which incorporates truly multi-dimensional, multi-group, flux-limited diffusion (MGFLD) neutrino transport, including all relevant {O}(v/c) terms. Our main motivation for carrying out this study is to compare with recent 2D models produced by other groups who have obtained explosions for some progenitor stars and with recent 2D VULCAN results that did not incorporate {O}(v/c) terms. We follow the evolution of 12, 15, 20, and 25 solar-mass progenitors to approximately 600 ms after bounce and do not obtain an explosion in any of these models. Though the reason for the qualitative disagreement among the groups engaged in CCSN modeling remains unclear, we speculate that the simplifying "ray-by-ray" approach employed by all other groups may be compromising their results. We show that "ray-by-ray" calculations greatly exaggerate the angular and temporal variations of the neutrino fluxes, which we argue are better captured by our multi-dimensional MGFLD approach. On the other hand, our 2D models also make approximations, making it difficult to draw definitive conclusions concerning the root of the differences between groups. We discuss some of the diagnostics often employed in the analyses of CCSN simulations and highlight the intimate relationship between the various explosion conditions that have been proposed. Finally, we explore the ingredients that may be missing in current calculations that may be important in reproducing the properties of the average CCSNe, should the delayed neutrino-heating mechanism be the correct mechanism of explosion.

  6. Equation of State of the Two-Dimensional Hubbard Model.

    PubMed

    Cocchi, Eugenio; Miller, Luke A; Drewes, Jan H; Koschorreck, Marco; Pertot, Daniel; Brennecke, Ferdinand; Köhl, Michael

    2016-04-29

    The subtle interplay between kinetic energy, interactions, and dimensionality challenges our comprehension of strongly correlated physics observed, for example, in the solid state. In this quest, the Hubbard model has emerged as a conceptually simple, yet rich model describing such physics. Here we present an experimental determination of the equation of state of the repulsive two-dimensional Hubbard model over a broad range of interactions 0≲U/t≲20 and temperatures, down to k_{B}T/t=0.63(2) using high-resolution imaging of ultracold fermionic atoms in optical lattices. We show density profiles, compressibilities, and double occupancies over the whole doping range, and, hence, our results constitute benchmarks for state-of-the-art theoretical approaches. PMID:27176527

  7. Equation of State of the Two-Dimensional Hubbard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocchi, Eugenio; Miller, Luke A.; Drewes, Jan H.; Koschorreck, Marco; Pertot, Daniel; Brennecke, Ferdinand; Köhl, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The subtle interplay between kinetic energy, interactions, and dimensionality challenges our comprehension of strongly correlated physics observed, for example, in the solid state. In this quest, the Hubbard model has emerged as a conceptually simple, yet rich model describing such physics. Here we present an experimental determination of the equation of state of the repulsive two-dimensional Hubbard model over a broad range of interactions 0 ≲U /t ≲20 and temperatures, down to kBT /t =0.63 (2 ) using high-resolution imaging of ultracold fermionic atoms in optical lattices. We show density profiles, compressibilities, and double occupancies over the whole doping range, and, hence, our results constitute benchmarks for state-of-the-art theoretical approaches.

  8. An interactive three-dimensional nose model for rhinosurgery.

    PubMed

    Heppt, Werner Johannes; Godbersen, Heinrich; Hildebrandt, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    The motivation behind the development of a new interactive three-dimensional (3D) model of the cartilaginous and bony framework of the nose originated from the significant demand for sophisticated patient communication and for accurate documentation of the surgical steps in rhinoplasty. Basically, the model consists of three features--the viewer function, the freehand function, and default applications--enabling the surgeon to replicate fundamental compilations of findings and to graphically document operative measures easily. The user is able to save all graphics in two-dimensional format and allocate them to patient files. Because the application was designed to be sufficiently universal without being too complex, the 3D model provides a well-balanced mix between freehand and default functions, representing the consistent development of currently available tools. PMID:23564244

  9. Three Dimensional Thermal Abuse Reaction Model for Lithium Ion Batteries

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2006-06-29

    Three dimensional computer models for simulating thermal runaway of lithium ion battery was developed. The three-dimensional model captures the shapes and dimensions of cell components and the spatial distributions of materials and temperatures, so we could consider the geometrical features, which are critical especially in large cells. An array of possible exothermic reactions, such as solid-electrolyte-interface (SEI) layer decomposition, negative active/electrolyte reaction, and positive active/electrolyte reaction, were considered and formulated to fit experimental data frommore » accelerating rate calorimetry and differential scanning calorimetry. User subroutine code was written to implement NREL developed approach and to utilize a commercially available solver. The model is proposed to use for simulation a variety of lithium-ion battery safety events including thermal heating and short circuit.« less

  10. Three Dimensional Thermal Abuse Reaction Model for Lithium Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    and Ahmad Pesaran, Gi-Heon Kim

    2006-06-29

    Three dimensional computer models for simulating thermal runaway of lithium ion battery was developed. The three-dimensional model captures the shapes and dimensions of cell components and the spatial distributions of materials and temperatures, so we could consider the geometrical features, which are critical especially in large cells. An array of possible exothermic reactions, such as solid-electrolyte-interface (SEI) layer decomposition, negative active/electrolyte reaction, and positive active/electrolyte reaction, were considered and formulated to fit experimental data from accelerating rate calorimetry and differential scanning calorimetry. User subroutine code was written to implement NREL developed approach and to utilize a commercially available solver. The model is proposed to use for simulation a variety of lithium-ion battery safety events including thermal heating and short circuit.

  11. Statistical mechanics of shell models for two-dimensional turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aurell, E.; Boffetta, G.; Crisanti, A.; Frick, P.; Paladin, G.; Vulpiani, A.

    1994-12-01

    We study shell models that conserve the analogs of energy and enstrophy and hence are designed to mimic fluid turbulence in two-dimensions (2D). The main result is that the observed state is well described as a formal statistical equilibrium, closely analogous to the approach to two-dimensional ideal hydrodynamics of Onsager [Nuovo Cimento Suppl. 6, 279 (1949)], Hopf [J. Rat. Mech. Anal. 1, 87 (1952)], and Lee [Q. Appl. Math. 10, 69 (1952)]. In the presence of forcing and dissipation we observe a forward flux of enstrophy and a backward flux of energy. These fluxes can be understood as mean diffusive drifts from a source to two sinks in a system which is close to local equilibrium with Lagrange multipliers (``shell temperatures'') changing slowly with scale. This is clear evidence that the simplest shell models are not adequate to reproduce the main features of two-dimensional turbulence. The dimensional predictions on the power spectra from a supposed forward cascade of enstrophy and from one branch of the formal statistical equilibrium coincide in these shell models in contrast to the corresponding predictions for the Navier-Stokes and Euler equations in 2D. This coincidence has previously led to the mistaken conclusion that shell models exhibit a forward cascade of enstrophy. We also study the dynamical properties of the models and the growth of perturbations.

  12. A three-dimensional model of Tangential YORP

    SciTech Connect

    Golubov, O.; Scheeres, D. J.; Krugly, Yu. N.

    2014-10-10

    Tangential YORP, or TYORP, has recently been demonstrated to be an important factor in the evolution of an asteroid's rotation state. It is complementary to normal YORP, or NYORP, which used to be considered previously. While NYORP is produced by non-symmetry in the large-scale geometry of an asteroid, TYORP is due to heat conductivity in stones on the surface of the asteroid. To date, TYORP has been studied only in a simplified one-dimensional model, substituting stones with high long walls. This article for the first time considers TYORP in a realistic three-dimensional model, also including shadowing and self-illumination effects via ray tracing. TYORP is simulated for spherical stones lying on regolith. The model includes only five free parameters and the dependence of the TYORP on each of them is studied. The TYORP torque appears to be smaller than previous estimates from the one-dimensional model, but is still comparable to the NYORP torques. These results can be used to estimate TYORP of different asteroids and also as a basis for more sophisticated models of TYORP.

  13. A three-dimensional spin-diffusion model for micromagnetics

    PubMed Central

    Abert, Claas; Ruggeri, Michele; Bruckner, Florian; Vogler, Christoph; Hrkac, Gino; Praetorius, Dirk; Suess, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    We solve a time-dependent three-dimensional spin-diffusion model coupled to the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation numerically. The presented model is validated by comparison to two established spin-torque models: The model of Slonzewski that describes spin-torque in multi-layer structures in the presence of a fixed layer and the model of Zhang and Li that describes current driven domain-wall motion. It is shown that both models are incorporated by the spin-diffusion description, i.e., the nonlocal effects of the Slonzewski model are captured as well as the spin-accumulation due to magnetization gradients as described by the model of Zhang and Li. Moreover, the presented method is able to resolve the time dependency of the spin-accumulation. PMID:26442796

  14. A three-dimensional spin-diffusion model for micromagnetics.

    PubMed

    Abert, Claas; Ruggeri, Michele; Bruckner, Florian; Vogler, Christoph; Hrkac, Gino; Praetorius, Dirk; Suess, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    We solve a time-dependent three-dimensional spin-diffusion model coupled to the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation numerically. The presented model is validated by comparison to two established spin-torque models: The model of Slonzewski that describes spin-torque in multi-layer structures in the presence of a fixed layer and the model of Zhang and Li that describes current driven domain-wall motion. It is shown that both models are incorporated by the spin-diffusion description, i.e., the nonlocal effects of the Slonzewski model are captured as well as the spin-accumulation due to magnetization gradients as described by the model of Zhang and Li. Moreover, the presented method is able to resolve the time dependency of the spin-accumulation. PMID:26442796

  15. A three-dimensional spin-diffusion model for micromagnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abert, Claas; Ruggeri, Michele; Bruckner, Florian; Vogler, Christoph; Hrkac, Gino; Praetorius, Dirk; Suess, Dieter

    2015-10-01

    We solve a time-dependent three-dimensional spin-diffusion model coupled to the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation numerically. The presented model is validated by comparison to two established spin-torque models: The model of Slonzewski that describes spin-torque in multi-layer structures in the presence of a fixed layer and the model of Zhang and Li that describes current driven domain-wall motion. It is shown that both models are incorporated by the spin-diffusion description, i.e., the nonlocal effects of the Slonzewski model are captured as well as the spin-accumulation due to magnetization gradients as described by the model of Zhang and Li. Moreover, the presented method is able to resolve the time dependency of the spin-accumulation.

  16. Two dimensional hydrodynamic modeling of a high latitude braided river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphries, E.; Pavelsky, T.; Bates, P. D.

    2014-12-01

    Rivers are a fundamental resource to physical, ecologic and human systems, yet quantification of river flow in high-latitude environments remains limited due to the prevalence of complex morphologies, remote locations and sparse in situ monitoring equipment. Advances in hydrodynamic modeling and remote sensing technology allow us to address questions such as: How well can two-dimensional models simulate a flood wave in a highly 3-dimensional braided river environment, and how does the structure of such a flood wave differ from flow down a similar-sized single-channel river? Here, we use the raster-based hydrodynamic model LISFLOOD-FP to simulate flood waves, discharge, water surface height, and velocity measurements over a ~70 km reach of the Tanana River in Alaska. In order to use LISFLOOD-FP a digital elevation model (DEM) fused with detailed bathymetric data is required. During summer 2013, we surveyed 220,000 bathymetric points along the study reach using an echo sounder system connected to a high-precision GPS unit. The measurements are interpolated to a smooth bathymetric surface, using Topo to Raster interpolation, and combined with an existing five meter DEM (Alaska IfSAR) to create a seamless river terrain model. Flood waves are simulated using varying complexities in model solvers, then compared to gauge records and water logger data to assess major sources of model uncertainty. Velocity and flow direction maps are also assessed and quantified for detailed analysis of braided channel flow. The most accurate model output occurs with using the full two-dimensional model structure, and major inaccuracies appear to be related to DEM quality and roughness values. Future work will intercompare model outputs with extensive ground measurements and new data from AirSWOT, an airborne analog for the Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission, which aims to provide high-resolution measurements of terrestrial and ocean water surface elevations globally.

  17. Modeling torsional control of molecules with four-dimensional, two-dimensional, and one-dimensional approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coudert, L. H.

    2015-01-01

    Torsional control is studied theoretically using a four-dimensional (4D) model introduced recently [Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 113004 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.107.113004 and Phys. Rev. A 87, 043403 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevA.87.043403] for calculating energy levels and eigenfunctions of nonrigid biphenyl-like molecules undergoing internal rotation and subject to a strong electric field. The time-dependent Schrödinger equation is solved to determine the behavior of the molecule when submitted to a short laser pulse. Torsional alignment is investigated for four limiting hindering potentials and for several peak laser intensities. The results obtained with the 4D model are compared to those from already available 2D and 1D models. Similar results are found with the 4D and 2D model and are consistent with the molecule interacting the most with the electric field for the hindering potential displaying four minima with D2 d symmetry staggered equilibrium configurations. Molecular axis alignment is also investigated and it is found that the one arising with the 4D model starts deviating substantially from the one arising with a rigid rotator for a value of the peak laser intensity of 3 ×1013 W/cm 2.

  18. Error Estimation for Reduced Order Models of Dynamical Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Homescu, C; Petzold, L; Serban, R

    2004-01-22

    The use of reduced order models to describe a dynamical system is pervasive in science and engineering. Often these models are used without an estimate of their error or range of validity. In this paper we consider dynamical systems and reduced models built using proper orthogonal decomposition. We show how to compute estimates and bounds for these errors, by a combination of small sample statistical condition estimation and error estimation using the adjoint method. Most importantly, the proposed approach allows the assessment of regions of validity for reduced models, i.e., ranges of perturbations in the original system over which the reduced model is still appropriate. Numerical examples validate our approach: the error norm estimates approximate well the forward error while the derived bounds are within an order of magnitude.

  19. Reduced order modeling of the Newton formulation of MODFLOW to solve unconfined groundwater flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyce, Scott E.; Nishikawa, Tracy; Yeh, William W.-G.

    2015-09-01

    Projection-based model reduction techniques have been shown to be very effective for reducing the computational burden of high-dimensional groundwater simulations, but only applied to confined groundwater flow. A new methodology is proposed that reduces the dimension of a discretized, transient, unconfined groundwater-flow model. This unconfined model reduction technique is based on Galerkin projection and the Newton formulation of MODFLOW. The method is implemented following the standard package design and code structure that MODFLOW employs for all its features. When the package is invoked within MODFLOW it can collect snapshots, produce a basis, construct the reduced model and propagate the reduced model forward in time. The new formulation accurately represents the water-table surface under a variety of nonlinear settings, such as intraborehole flow from a Multi-Node Well. The unconfined model reduction is applied to four test cases to illustrate its flexibility in handling nonlinear features. Several test cases are discussed to demonstrate the unconfined model reduction applicability. The final test case applies the new model reduction methodology to a scoping MODFLOW model of Santa Barbara, CA composed of 113,578 cells, which requires solving 113,578 equations per time step, and reduces it to 127 equations.

  20. Quasi-One-Dimensional Modeling of Pulse Detonation Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Christopher I.

    2002-01-01

    Pulsed detonation rocket engines (PDREs) have generated considerable research interest in recent years as a chemical propulsion system potentially offering improved performance and reduced complexity compared to conventional rocket engines. The detonative mode of combustion employed by these devices offers a thermodynamic advantage over the constant-pressure deflagrative combustion mode used in conventional rocket engines and gas turbines. However, while this theoretical advantage has spurred a great deal of interest in building PDRE devices, the unsteady blowdown process intrinsic to the PDRE has made realistic estimates of the actual propulsive performance problematic. The recent review article by Kailasanath highlights some of the difficulties in comparing the available experimental measurements with numerical models. In a previous paper by the author, parametric studies of the performance of a single, straight-tube PDRE were reported. A 1-D, unsteady method of characteristics code, employing a constant-gamma assumption behind the detonation front, was developed for that study. Models of this type are computationally inexpensive, and are particularly useful for parametric performance comparisons. For example, a plot showing the specific impulse of various PDRE and steady-state rocket engine (SSRE) configurations as a function of blowdown pressure ratio. The performance curves clearly indicate that a straight-tube PDRE is superior in specific impulse to a SSRE with a sonic nozzle over the entire range of pressure ratios. Note, however, that a straight-tube PDRE in general does not compare favorably to a SSRE fitted with an optimized de Laval supersonic nozzle, particularly at the high pressure ratios typical for boost or in-space rocket applications. However, the calculations also show that if a dynamically optimized, supersonic de Laval nozzle could be could be fitted to a PDRE, then the specific impulse of the device would exceed that of a comparable SSRE

  1. Fermion masses and mixing in general warped extra dimensional models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Mariana; Hamzaoui, Cherif; Pourtolami, Nima; Toharia, Manuel

    2015-06-01

    We analyze fermion masses and mixing in a general warped extra dimensional model, where all the Standard Model (SM) fields, including the Higgs, are allowed to propagate in the bulk. In this context, a slightly broken flavor symmetry imposed universally on all fermion fields, without distinction, can generate the full flavor structure of the SM, including quarks, charged leptons and neutrinos. For quarks and charged leptons, the exponential sensitivity of their wave functions to small flavor breaking effects yield hierarchical masses and mixing as it is usual in warped models with fermions in the bulk. In the neutrino sector, the exponential wave-function factors can be flavor blind and thus insensitive to the small flavor symmetry breaking effects, directly linking their masses and mixing angles to the flavor symmetric structure of the five-dimensional neutrino Yukawa couplings. The Higgs must be localized in the bulk and the model is more successful in generalized warped scenarios where the metric background solution is different than five-dimensional anti-de Sitter (AdS5 ). We study these features in two simple frameworks, flavor complimentarity and flavor democracy, which provide specific predictions and correlations between quarks and leptons, testable as more precise data in the neutrino sector becomes available.

  2. New data assimilation system DNDAS for high-dimensional models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qun-bo, Huang; Xiao-qun, Cao; Meng-bin, Zhu; Wei-min, Zhang; Bai-nian, Liu

    2016-05-01

    The tangent linear (TL) models and adjoint (AD) models have brought great difficulties for the development of variational data assimilation system. It might be impossible to develop them perfectly without great efforts, either by hand, or by automatic differentiation tools. In order to break these limitations, a new data assimilation system, dual-number data assimilation system (DNDAS), is designed based on the dual-number automatic differentiation principles. We investigate the performance of DNDAS with two different optimization schemes and subsequently give a discussion on whether DNDAS is appropriate for high-dimensional forecast models. The new data assimilation system can avoid the complicated reverse integration of the adjoint model, and it only needs the forward integration in the dual-number space to obtain the cost function and its gradient vector concurrently. To verify the correctness and effectiveness of DNDAS, we implemented DNDAS on a simple ordinary differential model and the Lorenz-63 model with different optimization methods. We then concentrate on the adaptability of DNDAS to the Lorenz-96 model with high-dimensional state variables. The results indicate that whether the system is simple or nonlinear, DNDAS can accurately reconstruct the initial condition for the forecast model and has a strong anti-noise characteristic. Given adequate computing resource, the quasi-Newton optimization method performs better than the conjugate gradient method in DNDAS. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 41475094 and 41375113).

  3. A THREE-DIMENSIONAL BABCOCK-LEIGHTON SOLAR DYNAMO MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Miesch, Mark S.; Dikpati, Mausumi

    2014-04-10

    We present a three-dimensional (3D) kinematic solar dynamo model in which poloidal field is generated by the emergence and dispersal of tilted sunspot pairs (more generally bipolar magnetic regions, or BMRs). The axisymmetric component of this model functions similarly to previous 2.5 dimensional (2.5D, axisymmetric) Babcock-Leighton (BL) dynamo models that employ a double-ring prescription for poloidal field generation but we generalize this prescription into a 3D flux emergence algorithm that places BMRs on the surface in response to the dynamo-generated toroidal field. In this way, the model can be regarded as a unification of BL dynamo models (2.5D in radius/latitude) and surface flux transport models (2.5D in latitude/longitude) into a more self-consistent framework that builds on the successes of each while capturing the full 3D structure of the evolving magnetic field. The model reproduces some basic features of the solar cycle including an 11 yr periodicity, equatorward migration of toroidal flux in the deep convection zone, and poleward propagation of poloidal flux at the surface. The poleward-propagating surface flux originates as trailing flux in BMRs, migrates poleward in multiple non-axisymmetric streams (made axisymmetric by differential rotation and turbulent diffusion), and eventually reverses the polar field, thus sustaining the dynamo. In this Letter we briefly describe the model, initial results, and future plans.

  4. Reduced order modelling of an unstructured mesh air pollution model and application in 2D/3D urban street canyons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, F.; Zhang, T.; Pavlidis, D.; Pain, C. C.; Buchan, A. G.; Navon, I. M.

    2014-10-01

    A novel reduced order model (ROM) based on proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) has been developed for a finite-element (FE) adaptive mesh air pollution model. A quadratic expansion of the non-linear terms is employed to ensure the method remained efficient. This is the first time such an approach has been applied to air pollution LES turbulent simulation through three dimensional landscapes. The novelty of this work also includes POD's application within a FE-LES turbulence model that uses adaptive resolution. The accuracy of the reduced order model is assessed and validated for a range of 2D and 3D urban street canyon flow problems. By comparing the POD solutions against the fine detail solutions obtained from the full FE model it is shown that the accuracy is maintained, where fine details of the air flows are captured, whilst the computational requirements are reduced. In the examples presented below the size of the reduced order models is reduced by factors up to 2400 in comparison to the full FE model while the CPU time is reduced by up to 98% of that required by the full model.

  5. Reduced modeling of signal transduction – a modular approach

    PubMed Central

    Koschorreck, Markus; Conzelmann, Holger; Ebert, Sybille; Ederer, Michael; Gilles, Ernst Dieter

    2007-01-01

    Background Combinatorial complexity is a challenging problem in detailed and mechanistic mathematical modeling of signal transduction. This subject has been discussed intensively and a lot of progress has been made within the last few years. A software tool (BioNetGen) was developed which allows an automatic rule-based set-up of mechanistic model equations. In many cases these models can be reduced by an exact domain-oriented lumping technique. However, the resulting models can still consist of a very large number of differential equations. Results We introduce a new reduction technique, which allows building modularized and highly reduced models. Compared to existing approaches further reduction of signal transduction networks is possible. The method also provides a new modularization criterion, which allows to dissect the model into smaller modules that are called layers and can be modeled independently. Hallmarks of the approach are conservation relations within each layer and connection of layers by signal flows instead of mass flows. The reduced model can be formulated directly without previous generation of detailed model equations. It can be understood and interpreted intuitively, as model variables are macroscopic quantities that are converted by rates following simple kinetics. The proposed technique is applicable without using complex mathematical tools and even without detailed knowledge of the mathematical background. However, we provide a detailed mathematical analysis to show performance and limitations of the method. For physiologically relevant parameter domains the transient as well as the stationary errors caused by the reduction are negligible. Conclusion The new layer based reduced modeling method allows building modularized and strongly reduced models of signal transduction networks. Reduced model equations can be directly formulated and are intuitively interpretable. Additionally, the method provides very good approximations especially for

  6. Floquet Weyl phases in a three-dimensional network model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hailong; Zhou, Longwen; Chong, Y. D.

    2016-04-01

    We study the topological properties of three-dimensional (3D) Floquet band structures, which are defined using unitary evolution matrices rather than Hamiltonians. Previously, two-dimensional band structures of this sort have been shown to exhibit anomalous topological behaviors, such as topologically nontrivial zero-Chern-number phases. We show that the band structure of a 3D network model can exhibit Weyl phases, which feature "Fermi arc" surface states like those found in Weyl semimetals. Tuning the network's coupling parameters can induce transitions between Weyl phases and various topologically distinct gapped phases. We identify a connection between the topology of the gapped phases and the topology of Weyl point trajectories in k space. The model is feasible to realize in custom electromagnetic networks, where the Weyl point trajectories can be probed by scattering parameter measurements.

  7. Integrating a developmental perspective in dimensional models of personality disorders.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, Barbara; De Fruyt, Filip; Widiger, Thomas A

    2009-03-01

    There is growing evidence that manifestations of personality pathology are traceable in early years of life. Nevertheless, the existing diagnostic nomenclature contains little recognition of childhood antecedents of adult personality disorders (PD). The current paper suggests that these childhood antecedents are more readily recognized to the extent that the personality disorders are themselves understood as configurations of extreme Five-Factor Model personality traits. From this dimensional perspective, we propose the Dimensional Personality Symptom Itempool (DIPSI), an age-specific model for describing child and adolescent trait pathology. We suggest that the DIPSI represents a comprehensive conceptualization of childhood PD antecedents and may contribute to the understanding of the developmental course of personality disorders. Issues and concerns to further elaborate this life-span perspective on personality disorders are discussed. PMID:19167138

  8. HIGH DIMENSIONAL COVARIANCE MATRIX ESTIMATION IN APPROXIMATE FACTOR MODELS

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jianqing; Liao, Yuan; Mincheva, Martina

    2012-01-01

    The variance covariance matrix plays a central role in the inferential theories of high dimensional factor models in finance and economics. Popular regularization methods of directly exploiting sparsity are not directly applicable to many financial problems. Classical methods of estimating the covariance matrices are based on the strict factor models, assuming independent idiosyncratic components. This assumption, however, is restrictive in practical applications. By assuming sparse error covariance matrix, we allow the presence of the cross-sectional correlation even after taking out common factors, and it enables us to combine the merits of both methods. We estimate the sparse covariance using the adaptive thresholding technique as in Cai and Liu (2011), taking into account the fact that direct observations of the idiosyncratic components are unavailable. The impact of high dimensionality on the covariance matrix estimation based on the factor structure is then studied. PMID:22661790

  9. Modeling and Experimentation on a Two-dimensional Synthetic jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yunfei; Mohseni, Kamran

    2007-11-01

    Hotwire anemometry is employed in order to investigate the spatial development of a two-dimensional synthetic jet. Flow velocity at various locations downstream from a slit is measured. A self similar behavior in the measured velocity is observed. An analytical model for a steady synthetic jet is developed that accurately matches the experimental data. As observed by other groups, the two-dimensional synthetic jet spreads at a rate higher than a continuous jet. This rate is accurately predicted by our model. It is identified that the main difference between a continuous jet and a synthetic jet is the higher value of the virtual viscosity (eddy viscosity) in a synthetic jet. This is attributed to the pulsate nature of a synthetic jet that makes it more susceptible to turbulence.

  10. The Reduced RUM as a Logit Model: Parameterization and Constraints.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chia-Yi; Köhn, Hans-Friedrich

    2016-06-01

    Cognitive diagnosis models (CDMs) for educational assessment are constrained latent class models. Examinees are assigned to classes of intellectual proficiency defined in terms of cognitive skills called attributes, which an examinee may or may not have mastered. The Reduced Reparameterized Unified Model (Reduced RUM) has received considerable attention among psychometricians. Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) or Expectation Maximization (EM) are typically used for estimating the Reduced RUM. Commercial implementations of the EM algorithm are available in the latent class analysis (LCA) routines of Latent GOLD and Mplus, for example. Fitting the Reduced RUM with an LCA routine requires that it be reparameterized as a logit model, with constraints imposed on the parameters. For models involving two attributes, these have been worked out. However, for models involving more than two attributes, the parameterization and the constraints are nontrivial and currently unknown. In this article, the general parameterization of the Reduced RUM as a logit model involving any number of attributes and the associated parameter constraints are derived. As a practical illustration, the LCA routine in Mplus is used for fitting the Reduced RUM to two synthetic data sets and to a real-world data set; for comparison, the results obtained by using the MCMC implementation in OpenBUGS are also provided. PMID:25838247