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Sample records for reduced gravity fields

  1. Experiments to investigate particulate materials in reduced gravity fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowden, M.; Eden, H. F.; Felsenthal, P.; Glaser, P. E.; Wechsler, A. E.

    1967-01-01

    Study investigates agglomeration and macroscopic behavior in reduced gravity fields of particles of known properties by measuring and correlating thermal and acoustical properties of particulate materials. Experiment evaluations provide a basis for a particle behavior theory and measure bulk properties of particulate materials in reduced gravity.

  2. Bubble Formation and Detachment in Reduced Gravity Under the Influence of Electric Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Cila; Iacona, Estelle; Chang, Shinan

    2002-01-01

    The objective of the study is to investigate the behavior of individual air bubbles injected through an orifice into an electrically insulating liquid under the influence of a static electric field. Both uniform and nonuniform electric field configurations were considered. Bubble formation and detachment were recorded and visualized in reduced gravity (corresponding to gravity levels on Mars, on the Moon as well as microgravity) using a high-speed video camera. Bubble volume, dimensions and contact angle at detachment were measured. In addition to the experimental studies, a simple model, predicting bubble characteristics at detachment was developed. The model, based on thermodynamic considerations, accounts for the level of gravity as well as the magnitude of the uniform electric field. Measured data and model predictions show good agreement and indicate that the level of gravity and the electric field magnitude significantly affect bubble shape, volume and dimensions.

  3. An Experimental Study of Boiling in Reduced and Zero Gravity Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usiskin, C. M.; Siegel, R.

    1961-01-01

    A pool boiling apparatus was mounted on a counterweighted platform which could be dropped a distance of nine feet. By varying the size of the counterweight, the effective gravity field on the equipment was adjusted between zero and unity. A study of boiling burnout in water indicated that a variation in the critical heat flux according to the one quarter power of gravity was reasonable. A consideration of the transient burnout process was necessary in order to properly interpret the data. A photographic study of nucleate boiling showed how the velocity of freely rising vapor bubbles decreased as gravity was reduced. The bubble diameters at the time of breakoff from the heated surface were found to vary inversely as gravity to the 1/3.5 power. Motion pictures were taken to illustrate both nucleate and film boiling in the low gravity range.

  4. Demonstrating Reduced Gravity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearlman, Howard; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes the construction of the Reduced-Gravity Demonstrator, which can be used to illustrate the effects of gravity on a variety of phenomena, including the way fluids flow, flames burn, and mechanical systems behave. Presents experiments, appropriate for classroom use, to demonstrate how the behavior of common physical systems change when…

  5. Demonstrating Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, Howard; Stocker, Dennis; Gotti, Daniel; Urban, David; Ross, Howard; Sours, Thomas

    1996-01-01

    A miniature drop tower, Reduced-Gravity Demonstrator is developed to illustrate the effects of gravity on a variety of phenomena including the way fluids flow, flames burn, and mechanical systems (such as pendulum) behave. A schematic and description of the demonstrator and payloads are given, followed by suggestions for how one can build his (her) own.

  6. Quantitative Velocity Field Measurements in Reduced-Gravity Combustion Science and Fluid Physics Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, Paul S.; Wernet, Mark P.

    1999-01-01

    Systems have been developed and demonstrated for performing quantitative velocity measurements in reduced gravity combustion science and fluid physics investigations. The unique constraints and operational environments inherent to reduced-gravity experimental facilities pose special challenges to the development of hardware and software systems. Both point and planar velocimetric capabilities are described, with particular attention being given to the development of systems to support the International Space Station laboratory. Emphasis has been placed on optical methods, primarily arising from the sensitivity of the phenomena of interest to intrusive probes. Limitations on available power, volume, data storage, and attendant expertise have motivated the use of solid-state sources and detectors, as well as efficient analysis capabilities emphasizing interactive data display and parameter control.

  7. Artificial gravity field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markley, Larry C.; Lindner, John F.

    Using computer algebra to run Einstein's equations "backward", from field to source rather than from source to field, we design an artificial gravity field for a space station or spaceship. Everywhere inside astronauts experience normal Earth gravity, while outside they float freely. The stress-energy that generates the field contains exotic matter of negative energy density but also relies importantly on pressures and shears, which we describe. The same techniques can be readily used to design other interesting spacetimes and thereby elucidate the connection between the source and field in general relativity.

  8. Reduced Gravity Education Flight Program

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA'€™s Reduced Gravity Education Flight Program gives students and educators the opportunity to design, build and fly an experiment in microgravity and get a look at what it takes to be a NASA en...

  9. ISS Update: Reduced Gravity Education

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Dan Huot interviews Veronica Seyl, Acting Manager for Reduced Gravity Education. NASA works with students and educators to design experiments for flight testing aboard t...

  10. Cubesat Gravity Field Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burla, Santoshkumar; Mueller, Vitali; Flury, Jakob; Jovanovic, Nemanja

    2016-04-01

    CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE missions have been successful in the field of satellite geodesy (especially to improve Earth's gravity field models) and have established the necessity towards the next generation gravity field missions. Especially, GRACE has shown its capabilities beyond any other gravity field missions. GRACE Follow-On mission is going to continue GRACE's legacy which is almost identical to GRACE mission with addition of laser interferometry. But these missions are not only quite expensive but also takes quite an effort to plan and to execute. Still there are few drawbacks such as under-sampling and incapability of exploring new ideas within a single mission (ex: to perform different orbit configurations with multi satellite mission(s) at different altitudes). The budget is the major limiting factor to build multi satellite mission(s). Here, we offer a solution to overcome these drawbacks using cubesat/ nanosatellite mission. Cubesats are widely used in research because they are cheaper, smaller in size and building them is easy and faster than bigger satellites. Here, we design a 3D model of GRACE like mission with available sensors and explain how the Attitude and Orbit Control System (AOCS) works. The expected accuracies on final results of gravity field are also explained here.

  11. The Application of Centrifuges 'Reduced Gravity' Research.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Loon, Jack J. W. A.

    It is shown that life has emerged on Earth somewhere in the early Archaean (3800-2500 million years ago). Since then life has evolved from single cell into to multicellular complex organism under unit gravity conditions. Little is known about how life would have been evolved under different gravity conditions. In light of the current quests for Earth-like planets by astronomers; what life forms could be expected on planets with different gravity fields? Also the human endeavors in spaceflight (microgravity) and exploration programs (Moon, Mars) it is interesting and might be even vital to know and understand how gravity acts upon the human body in long duration space flights. Hyper-gravity, any acceleration acceding 9.81 ms-2, can relatively easily be generated on Earth using centrifuges. Long duration hypo-gravity (¡9.81 ms-2) is more cumbersome. For real microgravity we need free falling satellites such as ISS. For simulation on ground one can use clinostats, random positioning machines or levitating magnets. But could centrifuges also be applied to study a reduced gravity environment? What I would explore in this paper are the possibilities how centrifuges could be applied to study the effects of a 'reduced gravity environment' in, especially, life sciences studies.

  12. Electrohydrodynamic Pool Boiling in Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Benjamin D.; Stahl, S. L.

    1996-01-01

    This research is concerned with studying the effects of applied electric fields on pool boiling in a reduced-gravity environment. Experiments are conducted at the NASA Lewis 2.2 sec Drop tower using a drop rig constructed at UC Davis. In the experiments, a platinum wire is heated while immersed in saturated liquid refrigerants (FC-72 and FC-87), or water, causing vapor formation at the wire surface. Electric fields are applied between the wire surface and an outer screen electrode that surrounds the wire. Preliminary normal-gravity experiments with water have demonstrated that applied electric fields generated by the rig electronics can influence boiling characteristics. Reduced-gravity experiments will be performed in the summer of 1996. The experiments will provide fundamental data on electric field strengths required to disrupt film boiling (for various wire heat generation input rates) in reduced gravity for a cylindrical geometry. The experiments should also shed light on the roles of characteristic bubble generation times and charge relaxation times in determining the effects of electric fields on pool boiling. Normal-gravity comparison experiments will also be performed.

  13. Soldering Tested in Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struk, Peter M.; Pettegrew, Richard D.; Watson, J. Kevin; Down, Robert S.; Haylett, Daniel R.

    2005-01-01

    Whether used occasionally for contingency repair or routinely in nominal repair operations, soldering will become increasingly important to the success of future long-duration human space missions. As a result, it will be critical to have a thorough understanding of the service characteristics of solder joints produced in reduced-gravity environments. The National Center for Space Exploration Research (via the Research for Design program), the NASA Glenn Research Center, and the NASA Johnson Space Center are conducting an experimental program to explore the influence of reduced gravity environments on the soldering process. Solder joint characteristics that are being considered include solder fillet geometry, porosity, and microstructural features. Both through-hole (see the drawing and image on the preceding figure) and surface-mounted devices are being investigated. This effort (the low-gravity portion being conducted on NASA s KC-135 research aircraft) uses the soldering hardware currently available on the International Space Station. The experiment involves manual soldering by a contingent of test operators, including both highly skilled technicians and less skilled individuals to provide a skill mix that might be encountered in space mission crews. The experiment uses both flux-cored solder and solid-core solder with an externally applied flux. Other experimental parameters include the type of flux, gravitational level (nominally zero,

  14. Feeling Gravity's Pull: Gravity Modeling. The Gravity Field of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemoine, Frank; Smith, David; Rowlands, David; Zuber, Maria; Neumann, G.; Chinn, Douglas; Pavlis, D.

    2000-01-01

    Most people take the constant presence of gravitys pull for granted. However, the Earth's gravitational strength actually varies from location to location. This variation occurs because mass, which influences an object's gravitational pull, is not evenly distributed within the planet. Changes in topography, such as glacial movement, an earthquake, or a rise in the ocean level, can subtly affect the gravity field. An accurate measurement of the Earth's gravity field helps us understand the distribution of mass beneath the surface. This insight can assist us in locating petroleum, mineral deposits, ground water, and other valuable substances. Gravity mapping can also help notice or verify changes in sea surface height and other ocean characteristics. Such changes may indicate climate change from polar ice melting and other phenomena. In addition, gravity mapping can indicate how land moves under the surface after earthquakes and other plate tectonic processes. Finally, changes in the Earth's gravity field might indicate a shift in water distribution that could affect agriculture, water supplies for population centers, and long-term weather prediction. Scientists can map out the Earth's gravity field by watching satellite orbits. When a satellite shifts in vertical position, it might be passing over an area where gravity changes in strength. Gravity is only one factor that may shape a satellite's orbital path. To derive a gravity measurement from satellite movement, scientists must remove other factors that might affect a satellite's position: 1. Drag from atmospheric friction. 2. Pressure from solar radiation as it heads toward Earth and. as it is reflected off the surface of the Earth 3. Gravitational pull from the Sun, the Moon, and other planets in the Solar System. 4. The effect of tides. 5. Relativistic effects. Scientists must also correct for the satellite tracking process. For example, the tracking signal must be corrected for refraction through the

  15. Escherichia coli growth under modeled reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Paul W.; Meyer, Michelle L.; Leff, Laura G.

    2004-01-01

    Bacteria exhibit varying responses to modeled reduced gravity that can be simulated by clino-rotation. When Escherichia coli was subjected to different rotation speeds during clino-rotation, significant differences between modeled reduced gravity and normal gravity controls were observed only at higher speeds (30-50 rpm). There was no apparent affect of removing samples on the results obtained. When E. coli was grown in minimal medium (at 40 rpm), cell size was not affected by modeled reduced gravity and there were few differences in cell numbers. However, in higher nutrient conditions (i.e., dilute nutrient broth), total cell numbers were higher and cells were smaller under reduced gravity compared to normal gravity controls. Overall, the responses to modeled reduced gravity varied with nutrient conditions; larger surface to volume ratios may help compensate for the zone of nutrient depletion around the cells under modeled reduced gravity.

  16. Gravity Field Characterization around Small Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Yu

    A small body rendezvous mission requires accurate gravity field characterization for safe, accurate navigation purposes. However, the current techniques of gravity field modeling around small bodies are not achieved to the level of satisfaction. This thesis will address how the process of current gravity field characterization can be made more robust for future small body missions. First we perform the covariance analysis around small bodies via multiple slow flybys. Flyby characterization requires less laborious scheduling than its orbit counterpart, simultaneously reducing the risk of impact into the asteroid's surface. It will be shown that the level of initial characterization that can occur with this approach is no less than the orbit approach. Next, we apply the same technique of gravity field characterization to estimate the spin state of 4179 Touatis, which is a near-Earth asteroid in close to 4:1 resonance with the Earth. The data accumulated from 1992-2008 are processed in a least-squares filter to predict Toutatis' orientation during the 2012 apparition. The center-of-mass offset and the moments of inertia estimated thereof can be used to constrain the internal density distribution within the body. Then, the spin state estimation is developed to a generalized method to estimate the internal density distribution within a small body. The density distribution is estimated from the orbit determination solution of the gravitational coefficients. It will be shown that the surface gravity field reconstructed from the estimated density distribution yields higher accuracy than the conventional gravity field models. Finally, we will investigate two types of relatively unknown gravity fields, namely the interior gravity field and interior spherical Bessel gravity field, in order to investigate how accurately the surface gravity field can be mapped out for proximity operations purposes. It will be shown that these formulations compute the surface gravity field with

  17. Reduced gravity multibody dynamics testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sillanpaa, Meija

    1993-01-01

    The Final Report on reduced gravity multibody dynamics testing is presented. Tests were conducted on board the NASA KC-135 RGA in Houston, Texas. The objective was to analyze the effects of large angle rotations on flexible, multi-segmented structures. The flight experiment was conducted to provide data which will be compared to the data gathered from ground tests of the same configurations. The flight and ground tested data will be used to validate the TREETOPS software, software which models dynamic multibody systems, and other multibody codes. The flight experiment consisted of seven complete flights on board the KC-135 RGA during two one-week periods. The first period of testing was 4-9 Apr. 1993. The second period of testing was 13-18 Jun. 1993.

  18. A reduced gravity fiber pulling apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, D. S.

    1992-01-01

    A reduced gravity fiber pulling apparatus (FPA) was constructed in order to study the effects of gravity on glass fiber formation. The apparatus was specifically designed and built for use on NASA's KC-135 aircraft. To date, four flights have been completed during which E-glass fiber was successfully produced in simulated lunar gravity.

  19. Laser welding in a reduced gravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Kaukler, William F.

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary results on the effects of reduced gravity on laser welding of stainless steel and other materials are reported. Laser welding experiments using a low power (10-18 watts) Nd-YAG laser have been performed on the NASA KC-135, which flies parabolic maneuvers to simulate reduced gravity conditions. Experiments on 0.005-0.010 inch thick stainless steel samples displayed a pronounced change in weld bead width, depth of penetration and surface ripple with changes in gravity level.

  20. Thermosyphon Flooding in Reduced Gravity Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Marc Andrew

    2013-01-01

    An innovative experiment to study the thermosyphon flooding limits was designed and flown on aparabolic flight campaign to achieve the Reduced Gravity Environments (RGE) needed to obtainempirical data for analysis. Current correlation models of Faghri and Tien and Chung do not agreewith the data. A new model is presented that predicts the flooding limits for thermosyphons inearths gravity and lunar gravity with a 95 confidence level of +- 5W.

  1. Human Performance in Simulated Reduced Gravity Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowley, Matthew; Harvill, Lauren; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2014-01-01

    NASA is currently designing a new space suit capable of working in deep space and on Mars. Designing a suit is very difficult and often requires trade-offs between performance, cost, mass, and system complexity. Our current understanding of human performance in reduced gravity in a planetary environment (the moon or Mars) is limited to lunar observations, studies from the Apollo program, and recent suit tests conducted at JSC using reduced gravity simulators. This study will look at our most recent reduced gravity simulations performed on the new Active Response Gravity Offload System (ARGOS) compared to the C-9 reduced gravity plane. Methods: Subjects ambulated in reduced gravity analogs to obtain a baseline for human performance. Subjects were tested in lunar gravity (1.6 m/sq s) and Earth gravity (9.8 m/sq s) in shirt-sleeves. Subjects ambulated over ground at prescribed speeds on the ARGOS, but ambulated at a self-selected speed on the C-9 due to time limitations. Subjects on the ARGOS were given over 3 minutes to acclimate to the different conditions before data was collected. Nine healthy subjects were tested in the ARGOS (6 males, 3 females, 79.5 +/- 15.7 kg), while six subjects were tested on the C-9 (6 males, 78.8 +/- 11.2 kg). Data was collected with an optical motion capture system (Vicon, Oxford, UK) and was analyzed using customized analysis scripts in BodyBuilder (Vicon, Oxford, UK) and MATLAB (MathWorks, Natick, MA, USA). Results: In all offloaded conditions, variation between subjects increased compared to 1-g. Kinematics in the ARGOS at lunar gravity resembled earth gravity ambulation more closely than the C-9 ambulation. Toe-off occurred 10% earlier in both reduced gravity environments compared to earth gravity, shortening the stance phase. Likewise, ankle, knee, and hip angles remained consistently flexed and had reduced peaks compared to earth gravity. Ground reaction forces in lunar gravity (normalized to Earth body weight) were 0.4 +/- 0.2 on

  2. GRAIL gravity field determination using the Celestial Mechanics Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Daniel; Bertone, Stefano; Jäggi, Adrian; Beutler, Gerhard; Mervart, Leos

    2015-11-01

    The NASA mission GRAIL (Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory) inherited its concept from the GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) mission to determine the gravity field of the Moon. We present lunar gravity fields based on the data of GRAIL's primary mission phase. Gravity field recovery is realized in the framework of the Celestial Mechanics Approach, using a development version of the Bernese GNSS Software along with Ka-band range-rate data series as observations and the GNI1B positions provided by NASA JPL as pseudo-observations. By comparing our results with the official level-2 GRAIL gravity field models we show that the lunar gravity field can be recovered with a high quality by adapting the Celestial Mechanics Approach, even when using pre-GRAIL gravity field models as a priori fields and when replacing sophisticated models of non-gravitational accelerations by appropriately spaced pseudo-stochastic pulses (i.e., instantaneous velocity changes). We present and evaluate two lunar gravity field solutions up to degree and order 200 - AIUB-GRL200A and AIUB-GRL200B. While the first solution uses no gravity field information beyond degree 200, the second is obtained by using the official GRAIL field GRGM900C up to degree and order 660 as a priori information. This reduces the omission errors and demonstrates the potential quality of our solution if we resolved the gravity field to higher degree.

  3. Optical measurements of gravity fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, L.; Yu, N.; Matsko, A.

    2003-01-01

    Optical measurements of a gravitational field with sensitivity close to the sensitivity of atomic devices are possible if one detects properties of light after its interaction with optically thick atomic cloud moving freely in the gravity field. A nondestructive detection of a number of ultracold atoms in a cloud as well as tracking of the ground state population distribution of the atoms is possible by optical means.

  4. Generating a Reduced Gravity Environment on Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dungan, Larry K.; Cunningham, Tom; Poncia, Dina

    2010-01-01

    Since the 1950s several reduced gravity simulators have been designed and utilized in preparing humans for spaceflight and in reduced gravity system development. The Active Response Gravity Offload System (ARGOS) is the newest and most realistic gravity offload simulator. ARGOS provides three degrees of motion within the test area and is scalable for full building deployment. The inertia of the overhead system is eliminated by an active motor and control system. This presentation will discuss what ARGOS is, how it functions, and the unique challenges of interfacing to the human. Test data and video for human and robotic systems will be presented. A major variable in the human machine interaction is the interface of ARGOS to the human. These challenges along with design solutions will be discussed.

  5. Short Duration Reduced Gravity Drop Tower Design and Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, B.; Welch, C.

    The industrial and commercial development of space-related activities is intimately linked to the ability to conduct reduced gravity research. Reduced gravity experimentation is important to many diverse fields of research in the understanding of fundamental and applied aspects of physical phenomena. Both terrestrial and extra-terrestrial experimental facilities are currently available to allow researchers access to reduced gravity environments. This paper discusses two drop tower designs, a 2.0 second facility built in Australia and a proposed 2.2 second facility in the United Kingdom. Both drop towers utilise a drag shield for isolating the falling experiment from the drag forces of the air during the test. The design and development of The University of Queensland's (Australia) 2.0 second drop tower, including its specifications and operational procedures is discussed first. Sensitive aspects of the design process are examined. Future plans are then presented for a new short duration (2.2 sec) ground-based reduced gravity drop tower. The new drop tower has been designed for Kingston University (United Kingdom) to support teaching and research in the field of reduced gravity physics. The design has been informed by the previous UQ drop tower design process and utilises a catapult mechanism to increase test time and also incorporates features to allow participants for a variety of backgrounds (from high school students through to university researchers) to learn and experiment in reduced gravity. Operational performance expectations for this new facility are also discussed.

  6. Gravity Field Recovery with Simulated GOCE Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marty, J.; Bruinsma, S.; Balmino, G.; Abrikosov, O.; Foerste, C.; Rothacher, M.

    2005-12-01

    Numerical simulations of the gravity field parameter recovery using the direct method, with satellite positions as pseudo observations instead of simulated GPS Satellite-to-Satellite (SST) tracking data, and with gravity gradients (SGG data), were done and are ongoing in the framework of the European GOCE Gravity Consortium test and validation plan for GOCE mission data processing. This work shows the latest results from the CNES and GFZ software packages, GINS and EPOS, respectively. After the iterative least-squares orbit adjustment procedure has converged to the highest attainable precision level, the gravity field normal equations are computed in a subsequent step. These SST normal equations, representing the long wavelength gravity field signal, are then reduced for arc-dependent parameters (i.e. state vector at epoch, empirical parameters) and cumulated over the entire observation period. Secondly, the gravity gradient measurements (SGG) are processed, taking into account the coloured noise in these data, and yield (high resolution) normal equations. They are combined with the SST normal equations and the gravity field and gradiometer common mode calibration parameters are simultaneously estimated. The coloured noise in the SGG data is based on the latest and realistic gradiometer specifications. The precision in the measurement bandwidth is approximately 3-5 milliEotvos, but rapidly decreasing for lower frequencies. Due to this behaviour, the observation equations have to be filtered in order to obtain the most accurate recovery. The filter algorithm, design and results are presented to considerable detail since this particular step is the key element that will enable the achievement of the GOCE mission objectives from the ground segment point of view.

  7. Progress in the Determination of the Earth's Gravity Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, Richard H. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    Topics addressed include: global gravity model development; methods for approximation of the gravity field; gravity field measuring techniques; global gravity field applications and requirements in geophysics and oceanography; and future gravity missions.

  8. Prediction of physical workload in reduced gravity.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, J H; Alred, J W

    1988-12-01

    As we plan for long-term living and working in low-gravity environments, a system to predict mission support requirements, such as food and water, becomes critical. Such a system must consider the workload imposed by physical tasks for efficient estimation of these supplies. An accurate estimate of human energy expenditure on a space station or lunar base is also necessary to allocate personnel to tasks, and to assign work-rest schedules. An elemental analysis approach for predicting one's energy expenditure in industrial jobs was applied to low-gravity conditions in this paper. This was achieved by a reduction of input body and load weights in a well-accepted model, in proportion to lowered gravity, such as on the moon. Validation was achieved by applying the model to Apollo-era energy expenditure data. These data were from simulated lunar gravity walking studies, observed Apollo 14 walking, simulated lunar gravity upper body torquing, and simulated lunar gravity cart pulling. The energy expenditure model generally underpredicted high energy expenditures, and overpredicted low to medium energy expenditures. The predictions for low to medium workloads were, however, within 15-30% of actual values. Future developmental work will be necessary to include the effects of traction changes, as well as other nonlinear expenditure changes in reduced gravity environments. PMID:3240215

  9. Gravity field information from Gravity Probe-B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. E.; Lerch, F. J.; Colombo, O. L.; Everitt, C. W. F.

    1989-01-01

    The Gravity Probe-B Mission will carry the Stanford Gyroscope relativity experiment into orbit in the mid 1990's, as well as a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver whose tracking data will be used to study the earth gravity field. Estimates of the likely quality of a gravity field model to be derived from the GPS data are presented, and the significance of this experiment to geodesy and geophysics are discussed.

  10. CSR Gravity Field Data Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettadpur, Srinivas

    2014-05-01

    The joint NASA/DLR GRACE mission has successfully operated for nearly 12 years, and has provided a remarkable record of global mass flux due to a large variety of geophysical and climate processes at various spatio-temporal scales. The University of Texas Center for Space Research (CSR) hosts the mission PI, and is responsible for delivery of operational (presently denoted as Release-05 or RL05) gravity field data products. In addition, CSR generates and distributes a variety of other gravity field data products, including products generated from the use of satellite laser ranging data. This poster will provide an overview of all these data products, their relative quality, potential applications, and future plans for their development and delivery.

  11. Improvements in GRACE Gravity Fields Using Regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Save, H.; Bettadpur, S.; Tapley, B. D.

    2008-12-01

    The unconstrained global gravity field models derived from GRACE are susceptible to systematic errors that show up as broad "stripes" aligned in a North-South direction on the global maps of mass flux. These errors are believed to be a consequence of both systematic and random errors in the data that are amplified by the nature of the gravity field inverse problem. These errors impede scientific exploitation of the GRACE data products, and limit the realizable spatial resolution of the GRACE global gravity fields in certain regions. We use regularization techniques to reduce these "stripe" errors in the gravity field products. The regularization criteria are designed such that there is no attenuation of the signal and that the solutions fit the observations as well as an unconstrained solution. We have used a computationally inexpensive method, normally referred to as "L-ribbon", to find the regularization parameter. This paper discusses the characteristics and statistics of a 5-year time-series of regularized gravity field solutions. The solutions show markedly reduced stripes, are of uniformly good quality over time, and leave little or no systematic observation residuals, which is a frequent consequence of signal suppression from regularization. Up to degree 14, the signal in regularized solution shows correlation greater than 0.8 with the un-regularized CSR Release-04 solutions. Signals from large-amplitude and small-spatial extent events - such as the Great Sumatra Andaman Earthquake of 2004 - are visible in the global solutions without using special post-facto error reduction techniques employed previously in the literature. Hydrological signals as small as 5 cm water-layer equivalent in the small river basins, like Indus and Nile for example, are clearly evident, in contrast to noisy estimates from RL04. The residual variability over the oceans relative to a seasonal fit is small except at higher latitudes, and is evident without the need for de-striping or

  12. Simulation of sediment settling in reduced gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Nikolaus; Kuhn, Brigitte; Rüegg, Hans-Rudolf; Gartmann, Andres

    2015-04-01

    Gravity has a non-linear effect on the settling velocity of sediment particles in liquids and gases due to the interdependence of settling velocity, drag and friction. However, Stokes' Law or similar empirical models, the common way of estimating the terminal velocity of a particle settling in a gas or liquid, carry the notion of a drag as a property of a particle, rather than a force generated by the flow around the particle. For terrestrial applications, this simplifying assumption is not relevant, but it may strongly influence the terminal velocity achieved by settling particles on other planetary bodies. False estimates of these settling velocities will, in turn, affect the interpretation of particle sizes observed in sedimentary rocks, e.g. on Mars and the search for traces of life. Simulating sediment settling velocities on other planets based on a numeric simulation using Navier-Stokes equations and Computational Fluid Dynamics requires a prohibitive amount of time and lacks measurements to test the quality of the results. The aim of the experiments presented in this study was therefore to quantify the error incurred by using settling velocity models calibrated on Earth at reduced gravities, such as those on the Moon and Mars. In principle, the effect of lower gravity on settling velocity can be achieved by reducing the difference in density between particle and liquid. However, the use of such analogues creates other problems because the properties (i.e. viscosity) and interaction of the liquids and sediment (i.e. flow around the boundary layer between liquid and particle) differ from those of water and mineral particles. An alternative for measuring the actual settling velocities of particles under reduced gravity, on Earth, is offered by placing a settling tube on a reduced gravity flight and conduct settling velocity measurements within the 20 to 25 seconds of Martian gravity that can be simulated during such a flight. In this presentation, the results

  13. Generating a Reduced Gravity Environment on Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dungan, L. K.; Valle, P.; Shy, C.

    2015-01-01

    The Active Response Gravity Offload System (ARGOS) is designed to simulate reduced gravity environments, such as Lunar, Martian, or microgravity using a vertical lifting hoist and horizontal motion system. Three directions of motion are provided over a 41 ft x 24 ft x 25 ft tall area. ARGOS supplies a continuous offload of a portion of a person's weight during dynamic motions such as walking, running, and jumping. The ARGOS system tracks the person's motion in the horizontal directions to maintain a vertical offload force directly above the person or payload by measuring the deflection of the cable and adjusting accordingly.

  14. Gait transitions in simulated reduced gravity.

    PubMed

    Ivanenko, Yuri P; Labini, Francesca Sylos; Cappellini, Germana; Macellari, Velio; McIntyre, Joseph; Lacquaniti, Francesco

    2011-03-01

    Gravity has a strong effect on gait and the speed of gait transitions. A gait has been defined as a pattern of locomotion that changes discontinuously at the transition to another gait. On Earth, during gradual speed changes, humans exhibit a sudden discontinuous switch from walking to running at a specific speed. To study the effects of altered gravity on both the stance and swing legs, we developed a novel unloading exoskeleton that allows a person to step in simulated reduced gravity by tilting the body relative to the vertical. Using different simulation techniques, we confirmed that at lower gravity levels the transition speed is slower (in accordance with the previously reported Froude number ∼0.5). Surprisingly, however, we found that at lower levels of simulated gravity the transition between walking and running was generally gradual, without any noticeable abrupt change in gait parameters. This was associated with a significant prolongation of the swing phase, whose duration became virtually equal to that of stance in the vicinity of the walk-run transition speed, and with a gradual shift from inverted-pendulum gait (walking) to bouncing gait (running). PMID:21212248

  15. Global marine gravity field map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloss, Peter W.

    A color relief image of the marine gravity field from SEASAT altimeter measurements of the topography of the ocean surface is now available through the National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. This image, prepared by William F. Haxby (Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory of Columbia University, Palisades, N.Y.), has been published by NGDC for the Office of Naval Research, which was the principal sponsor of the effort leading to the development of the image. The U.S. Geological Survey, National Mapping Division, printed the map.

  16. Improving Realism in Reduced Gravity Simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowley, Matthew; Harvil, Lauren; Clowers, Kurt; Clark, Timothy; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2010-01-01

    Since man was first determined to walk on the moon, simulating the lunar environment became a priority. Providing an accurate reduced gravity environment is crucial for astronaut training and hardware testing. This presentation will follow the development of reduced gravity simulators to a final comparison of environments between the currently used systems. During the Apollo program era, multiple systems were built and tested, with several NASA centers having their own unique device. These systems ranged from marionette-like suspension devices where the subject laid on his side, to pneumatically driven offloading harnesses, to parabolic flights. However, only token comparisons, if any, were made between systems. Parabolic flight allows the entire body to fall at the same rate, giving an excellent simulation of reduced gravity as far as the biomechanics and physical perceptions are concerned. While the effects are accurate, there is limited workspace, limited time, and high cost associated with these tests. With all mechanical offload systems only the parts of the body that are actively offloaded feel any reduced gravity effects. The rest of the body still feels the full effect of gravity. The Partial Gravity System (Pogo) is the current ground-based offload system used to training and testing at the NASA Johnson Space Center. The Pogo is a pneumatic type system that allows for offloaded motion in the z-axis and free movement in the x-axis, but has limited motion in the y-axis. The pneumatic system itself is limited by cylinder stroke length and response time. The Active Response Gravity Offload System (ARGOS) is a next generation groundbased offload system, currently in development, that is based on modern robotic manufacturing lines. This system is projected to provide more z-axis travel and full freedom in both the x and y-axes. Current characterization tests are underway to determine how the ground-based offloading systems perform, how they compare to parabolic

  17. Study of two-phase flows in reduced gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Tirthankar

    Study of gas-liquid two-phase flows under reduced gravity conditions is extremely important. One of the major applications of gas-liquid two-phase flows under reduced gravity conditions is in the design of active thermal control systems for future space applications. Previous space crafts were characterized by low heat generation within the spacecraft which needed to be redistributed within the craft or rejected to space. This task could easily have been accomplished by pumped single-phase loops or passive systems such as heat pipes and so on. However with increase in heat generation within the space craft as predicted for future missions, pumped boiling two-phase flows are being considered. This is because of higher heat transfer co-efficients associated with boiling heat transfer among other advantages. Two-phase flows under reduced gravity conditions also find important applications in space propulsion as in space nuclear power reactors as well as in many other life support systems of space crafts. Two-fluid model along with Interfacial Area Transport Equation (IATE) is a useful tool available to predict the behavior of gas-liquid two-phase flows under reduced gravity conditions. It should be noted that considerable differences exist between two-phase flows under reduced and normal gravity conditions especially for low inertia flows. This is because due to suppression of the gravity field the gas-liquid two-phase flows take a considerable time to develop under reduced gravity conditions as compared to normal gravity conditions. Hence other common methods of analysis applicable for fully developed gas-liquid two-phase flows under normal gravity conditions, like flow regimes and flow regime transition criteria, will not be applicable to gas-liquid two-phase flows under reduced gravity conditions. However the two-fluid model and the IATE need to be evaluated first against detailed experimental data obtained under reduced gravity conditions. Although lot of studies

  18. Thermosyphon Flooding Limits in Reduced Gravity Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Marc A.; Jaworske, Donald A.; Sanzi, James L.; Ljubanovic, Damir

    2012-01-01

    Fission Power Systems have long been recognized as potential multi-kilowatt power solutions for lunar, Martian, and extended planetary surface missions. Current heat rejection technology associated with fission surface power systems has focused on titanium water thermosyphons embedded in carbon composite radiator panels. The thermosyphons, or wickless heat pipes, are used as a redundant and efficient way to spread the waste heat from the power conversion unit(s) over the radiator surface area where it can be rejected to space. It is well known that thermosyphon performance is reliant on gravitational forces to keep the evaporator wetted with the working fluid. One of the performance limits that can be encountered, if not understood, is the phenomenon of condenser flooding, otherwise known as evaporator dry out. This occurs when the gravity forces acting on the condensed fluid cannot overcome the shear forces created by the vapor escaping the evaporator throat. When this occurs, the heat transfer process is stalled and may not re-stabilize to effective levels without corrective control actions. The flooding limit in earth's gravity environment is well understood as experimentation is readily accessible, but when the environment and gravity change relative to other planetary bodies, experimentation becomes difficult. An innovative experiment was designed and flown on a parabolic flight campaign to achieve the Reduced Gravity Environments (RGE) needed to obtain empirical data for analysis. The test data is compared to current correlation models for validation and accuracy.

  19. The gravity field of Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    Preliminary analysis of two-way Doppler data from Pioneers 10 and 11 has provided the first detailed model of the Jovian gravity field. A review of the determination of the zonal harmonic coefficients through the sixth degree is presented, and the results are used to derive a number of geodetic parameters in the atmospheric region of the planet. On a level surface at a pressure of one bar, the net acceleration due to gravity is found to vary from a maximum of 2707 cm/sec squared at the poles to a minimum of 2322 cm/sec squared at the equator. The large dynamical flattening at the one-bar level produces a significant deviation of the local vertical from the Jovicentric radius vector. The angular difference is as much as 3.83 degrees of arc in the high temperature zones of the planet. These considerations are important for the accurate modeling of the atmosphere of Jupiter and for the interpretation of occultation data.

  20. Flow Boiling Critical Heat Flux in Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mudawar, Issam; Zhang, Hui; Hasan, Mohammad M.

    2004-01-01

    This study provides systematic method for reducing power consumption in reduced gravity systems by adopting minimum velocity required to provide adequate CHF and preclude detrimental effects of reduced gravity . This study proves it is possible to use existing 1 ge flow boiling and CHF correlations and models to design reduced gravity systems provided minimum velocity criteria are met

  1. LeRC reduced gravity fluid management technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aydelott, J. C.; Symons, E. P.

    1980-01-01

    A survey of the reduced gravity fluid management technology program is presented. Information on reduced gravity fluid behavior, techniques for thermal control of cryogenic tankage, and design for fluid management systems are discussed. The development of Spacelab experiments, propellant management systems for orbit transfer vehicles, and computer techniques for simulating reduced gravity fluid dynamic processes is reported.

  2. Reduced gravity fecal collector seat and urinal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, J. W. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A waste collection system for use in a reduced gravity including a seat having an opening centrally located with a pair of opposed depressed valleys on opposite sides of said opening for accommodating the ischial tuberosities of a user. The seat has contoured surfaces for providing support of the user's body and includes a prominent ridge towards the rear, which provides forward-aft positioning cue to the user. A curved recess is provided adjacent the forward portion of the seat for accommodating a tubular urinal having an enlarged open mouth.

  3. Accuracy of mapping the Earth's gravity field fine structure with a spaceborne gravity gradiometer mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, W. D.

    1984-01-01

    The spaceborne gravity gradiometer is a potential sensor for mapping the fine structure of the Earth's gravity field. Error analyses were performed to investigate the accuracy of the determination of the Earth's gravity field from a gravity field satellite mission. The orbital height of the spacecraft is the dominating parameter as far as gravity field resolution and accuracies are concerned.

  4. Gravity field of the Western Weddell Sea: Comparison of airborne gravity and Geosat derived gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, R. E.; Brozena, J. M.; Haxby, W. F.; Labrecque, J. L.

    1989-01-01

    Marine gravity surveying in polar regions was typically difficult and costly, requiring expensive long range research vessels and ice-breakers. Satellite altimetry can recover the gravity field in these regions where it is feasible to survey with a surface vessel. Unfortunately, the data collected by the first global altimetry mission, Seasat, was collected only during the austral winter, producing a very poor quality gravitational filed for the southern oceans, particularly in the circum-Antarctic regions. The advent of high quality airborne gravity (Brozena, 1984; Brozena and Peters, 1988; Bell, 1988) and the availability of satellite altimetry data during the austral summer (Sandwell and McAdoo, 1988) has allowed the recovery of a free air gravity field for most of the Weddell Sea. The derivation of the gravity field from both aircraft and satellite measurements are briefly reviewed, before presenting along track comparisons and shaded relief maps of the Weddell Sea gravity field based on these two data sets.

  5. Gravity field determination and error assessment techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, D. N.; Shum, C. K.; Tapley, B. D.

    1989-01-01

    Linear estimation theory, along with a new technique to compute relative data weights, was applied to the determination of the Earth's geopotential field and other geophysical model parameters using a combination of satellite ground-based tracking data, satellite altimetry data, and the surface gravimetry data. The relative data weights for the inhomogeneous data sets are estimated simultaneously with the gravity field and other geophysical and orbit parameters in a least squares approach to produce the University of Texas gravity field models. New techniques to perform calibration of the formal covariance matrix for the geopotential solution were developed to obtain a reliable gravity field error estimate. Different techniques, which include orbit residual analysis, surface gravity anomaly residual analysis, subset gravity solution comparisons and consider covariance analysis, were applied to investigate the reliability of the calibration.

  6. Solid Surface Combustion at Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altenkirch, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    The spread of a flame in the gas over the surface of a solid combustible involves in an essential way the transfer of heat from the flame to the solid fuel immediately ahead of it. This heat transfer is affected by the character of the gas phase flame, and so the phenomenon of flame spreading under reduced gravity, in which the flow is generated by gasification of the solid combustible, is apt to be different from what occurs under the Earth's normal gravitational acceleration where the flow is largely buoyancy driven. An experiment is being designed for the Middeck of the Space Shuttle to aid us in understanding the process of flame spreading in the absence of a buoyancy driven flow. A chamber approximately 0.35 cu.m. in volume is to contain either a thin sample of a cellulosic material or a thick sample of polymethyl-methacrylate and an oxidizing environment of O2 and N2. Samples will be ignited at one end, and the ensuing flame spread will be filmed. The spread rate can be determined from the films, and surface and gas-phase temperatures just above the surface will also be recorded. These data will help to clarify the mechanism of forward heat transfer in the low gravity flames.

  7. Nucleate Boiling Heat Transfer Studied Under Reduced-Gravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, David F.; Hasan, Mohammad M.

    2000-01-01

    Boiling is known to be a very efficient mode of heat transfer, and as such, it is employed in component cooling and in various energy-conversion systems. In space, boiling heat transfer may be used in thermal management, fluid handling and control, power systems, and on-orbit storage and supply systems for cryogenic propellants and life-support fluids. Recent interest in the exploration of Mars and other planets and in the concept of in situ resource utilization on the Martian and Lunar surfaces highlights the need to understand how gravity levels varying from the Earth's gravity to microgravity (1g = or > g/g(sub e) = or > 10(exp -6)g) affect boiling heat transfer. Because of the complex nature of the boiling process, no generalized prediction or procedure has been developed to describe the boiling heat transfer coefficient, particularly at reduced gravity levels. Recently, Professor Vijay K. Dhir of the University of California at Los Angeles proposed a novel building-block approach to investigate the boiling phenomena in low-gravity to microgravity environments. This approach experimentally investigates the complete process of bubble inception, growth, and departure for single bubbles formed at a well-defined and controllable nucleation site. Principal investigator Professor Vijay K. Dhir, with support from researchers from the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field, is performing a series of pool boiling experiments in the low-gravity environments of the KC 135 microgravity aircraft s parabolic flight to investigate the inception, growth, departure, and merger of bubbles from single- and multiple-nucleation sites as a function of the wall superheat and the liquid subcooling. Silicon wafers with single and multiple cavities of known characteristics are being used as test surfaces. Water and PF5060 (an inert liquid) were chosen as test liquids so that the role of surface wettability and the magnitude of the effect of interfacial tension on boiling in reduced

  8. Fast gravity, gravity partials, normalized gravity, gravity gradient torque and magnetic field: Derivation, code and data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gottlieb, Robert G.

    1993-01-01

    Derivation of first and second partials of the gravitational potential is given in both normalized and unnormalized form. Two different recursion formulas are considered. Derivation of a general gravity gradient torque algorithm which uses the second partial of the gravitational potential is given. Derivation of the geomagnetic field vector is given in a form that closely mimics the gravitational algorithm. Ada code for all algorithms that precomputes all possible data is given. Test cases comparing the new algorithms with previous data are given, as well as speed comparisons showing the relative efficiencies of the new algorithms.

  9. Toward a gauge field theory of gravity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, H.

    Joint use of two differential identities (Bianchi and Freud) permits a gauge field theory of gravity in which the gravitational energy is localizable. The theory is compatible with quantum mechanics and is experimentally viable.

  10. Processing of mercurous chloride in reduced gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, C.; Thomas, A.

    1996-12-31

    In a joint experiment between the Northrop-Grumman Science and Technology Center and the University of Alabama in Huntsville, Consortium for Materials Development in Space (UAH/CMDS), single crystals of mercurous chloride (Hg{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) were grown in the Space Experiment Facility (SEF) transparent furnace that was flown on Spacelab 4 (STS-77) in May 1996. Single crystals of this material can be readily grown in normal gravity by closed-tube physical vapor transport, but the crystals generally contain structural inhomogeneities which degrade the optical performance. The nature and cause of these defects are not completely understood, but their degree appears to correlate with the Rayleigh number that characterizes the convective transport during their growth; hence, it is suspected that uncontrolled convection may play a role in the defect structure. The objective of the flight experiment was to reduce the convective flows by several orders of magnitude to see if the structural inhomogeneities can be reduced or eliminated. This paper will describe the physical and thermal properties of the SEF furnace, the ampoule design and loading procedure, and the ground testing, and will also present the preliminary flight results.

  11. The Increased Flammability of Metallic Materials in Reduced Gravity Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynn, David; Plagens, Owen; Castillo, Marin; Paulos, Todd; Steinberg, Ted

    2010-09-01

    Flammability data generated in a normal gravity environment is often used in design and risk assessment for reduced gravity applications. It has been clearly demonstrated that this is a conservative approach for non-metallic materials which have been repeatedly shown to be less flammable in a reduced gravity environment. However, recent work has demonstrated this is not true for metallic materials. This work, conducted in a newly completed drop tower observed a significant decrease in lowest burn pressure and increase in regression rate in reduced gravity. Hence the normal gravity qualification of a metallic materials’ lowest burn pressure or regression rate for reduced-gravity or space-based systems is clearly not conservative. This paper presents a summary of this work and the results obtained for several metallic materials showing an increased flammability and regression rate for a range of oxygen pressures, and discusses the implications of this work on the fire-safety of space-based systems.

  12. Robot dynamics in reduced gravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Grisham, Tollie; Hinman, Elaine; Coker, Cindy

    1990-01-01

    Robot dynamics and control will become an important issue for productive platforms in space. Robotic operations will be necessary for both man tended stations and for the efficient performance of routine operations in a manned platform. The current constraints on the use of robotic devices in a microgravity environment appears to be due to safety concerns and an anticipated increase in acceleration levels due to manipulator motion. The robot used for the initial studies was a UMI RTX robot, which was adapted to operate in a materials processing workcell to simulate sample changing in a microgravity environment. The robotic cell was flown several times on the KC-135 aircraft at Ellington Field. The primary objective of the initial flights was to determine operating characteristics of both the robot and the operator in the variable gravity of the KC-135 during parabolic maneuvers. It was demonstrated that the KC-135 aircraft can be used for observing dynamics of robotic manipulators. The difficulties associated with humans performing teleoperation tasks during varying G levels were also observed and can provide insight into some areas in which the use of artificial techniques would provide improved system performance. Additionally a graphic simulation of the workcell was developed on a Silicon Graphics Workstation using the IGRIP simulation language from Deneb Robotics. The simulation is intended to be used for predictive displays of the robot operating on the aircraft. It is also anticipated that this simulation can be useful for off-line programming of tasks in the future.

  13. Reducing Errors by Use of Redundancy in Gravity Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulikov, Igor; Zak, Michail

    2004-01-01

    A methodology for improving gravity-gradient measurement data exploits the constraints imposed upon the components of the gravity-gradient tensor by the conditions of integrability needed for reconstruction of the gravitational potential. These constraints are derived from the basic equation for the gravitational potential and from mathematical identities that apply to the gravitational potential and its partial derivatives with respect to spatial coordinates. Consider the gravitational potential in a Cartesian coordinate system {x1,x2,x3}. If one measures all the components of the gravity-gradient tensor at all points of interest within a region of space in which one seeks to characterize the gravitational field, one obtains redundant information. One could utilize the constraints to select a minimum (that is, nonredundant) set of measurements from which the gravitational potential could be reconstructed. Alternatively, one could exploit the redundancy to reduce errors from noisy measurements. A convenient example is that of the selection of a minimum set of measurements to characterize the gravitational field at n3 points (where n is an integer) in a cube. Without the benefit of such a selection, it would be necessary to make 9n3 measurements because the gravitygradient tensor has 9 components at each point. The problem of utilizing the redundancy to reduce errors in noisy measurements is an optimization problem: Given a set of noisy values of the components of the gravity-gradient tensor at the measurement points, one seeks a set of corrected values - a set that is optimum in that it minimizes some measure of error (e.g., the sum of squares of the differences between the corrected and noisy measurement values) while taking account of the fact that the constraints must apply to the exact values. The problem as thus posed leads to a vector equation that can be solved to obtain the corrected values.

  14. Granular convection and the Brazil nut effect in reduced gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güttler, Carsten; von Borstel, Ingo; Schräpler, Rainer; Blum, Jürgen

    2013-04-01

    We present laboratory experiments of a vertically vibrated granular medium consisting of 1-mm-diameter glass beads with embedded 8-mm-diameter intruder glass beads. The experiments were performed in the laboratory as well as in a parabolic flight under reduced-gravity conditions (on Martian and Lunar gravity levels). We measured the mean rise velocity of the large glass beads and present its dependence on the fill height of the sample containers, the excitation acceleration, and the ambient gravity level. We find that the rise velocity scales in the same manner for all three gravity regimes and roughly linearly with gravity.

  15. Global Lunar Gravity Field Recovery from SELENE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsumoto, Koji; Heki, Kosuke; Hanada, Hideo

    2002-01-01

    Results of numerical simulation are presented to examine the global gravity field recovery capability of the Japanese lunar exploration project SELENE (Selenological and Engineering Explorer) which will be launched in 2005. New characteristics of the SELENE lunar gravimetry include four-way satellite-to-satellite Doppler tracking of main orbiter and differential VLBI tracking of two small free-flier satellites. It is shown that planned satellites configuration will improve lunar gravity field in wide range of wavelength as well as far-side selenoid.

  16. Two-phase alkali-metal experiments in reduced gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Antoniak, Z.I.

    1986-06-01

    Future space missions envision the use of large nuclear reactors utilizing either a single or a two-phase alkali-metal working fluid. The design and analysis of such reactors require state-of-the-art computer codes that can properly treat alkali-metal flow and heat transfer in a reduced-gravity environment. A literature search of relevant experiments in reduced gravity is reported on here, and reveals a paucity of data for such correlations. The few ongoing experiments in reduced gravity are noted. General plans are put forth for the reduced-gravity experiments which will have to be performed, at NASA facilities, with benign fluids. A similar situation exists regarding two-phase alkali-metal flow and heat transfer, even in normal gravity. Existing data are conflicting and indequate for the task of modeling a space reactor using a two-phase alkali-metal coolant. The major features of past experiments are described here. Data from the reduced-gravity experiments with innocuous fluids are to be combined with normal gravity data from the two-phase alkali-metal experiments. Analyses undertaken here give every expectation that the correlations developed from this data base will provide a valid representation of alkali-metal heat transfer and pressure drop in reduced gravity.

  17. On the impact of airborne gravity data to fused gravity field models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolkas, Dimitrios; Fotopoulos, Georgia; Braun, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    In gravity field modeling, fused models that utilize satellite, airborne and terrestrial gravity observations are often employed to deal with erroneous terrestrially derived gravity datasets. These terrestrial datasets may suffer from long-wavelength systematic errors and inhomogeneous data coverage, which are not prevalent in airborne and satellite datasets. Airborne gravity acquisition plays an essential role in gravity field modeling, providing valuable information of the Earth's gravity field at medium and short wavelengths. Thus, assessing the impact of airborne gravity data to fused gravity field models is important for identifying problematic regions. Six study regions that represent different gravity field variability and terrestrial data point-density characteristics are investigated to quantify the impact of airborne gravity data to fused gravity field models. The numerical assessments of these representative regions resulted in predictions of airborne gravity impact for individual states and provinces in the USA and Canada, respectively. Prediction results indicate that, depending on the terrestrial data point-density and gravity field variability, the expected impact of airborne gravity can reach up to 3mGal (in terms of standard deviation) in Canada and Alaska (over areas of 1° × 1°). However, in the mainland US region, small changes are expected (0.2-0.4 mGal over areas of 1° × 1°) due to the availability of high spatial resolution terrestrial data. These results can serve as a guideline for setting airborne gravity data acquisition priorities and for improving future planning of airborne gravity surveys.

  18. On the impact of airborne gravity data to fused gravity field models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolkas, Dimitrios; Fotopoulos, Georgia; Braun, Alexander

    2016-06-01

    In gravity field modeling, fused models that utilize satellite, airborne and terrestrial gravity observations are often employed to deal with erroneous terrestrially derived gravity datasets. These terrestrial datasets may suffer from long-wavelength systematic errors and inhomogeneous data coverage, which are not prevalent in airborne and satellite datasets. Airborne gravity acquisition plays an essential role in gravity field modeling, providing valuable information of the Earth's gravity field at medium and short wavelengths. Thus, assessing the impact of airborne gravity data to fused gravity field models is important for identifying problematic regions. Six study regions that represent different gravity field variability and terrestrial data point-density characteristics are investigated to quantify the impact of airborne gravity data to fused gravity field models. The numerical assessments of these representative regions resulted in predictions of airborne gravity impact for individual states and provinces in the USA and Canada, respectively. Prediction results indicate that, depending on the terrestrial data point-density and gravity field variability, the expected impact of airborne gravity can reach up to 3mGal (in terms of standard deviation) in Canada and Alaska (over areas of 1° × 1°). However, in the mainland US region, small changes are expected (0.2-0.4 mGal over areas of 1° × 1°) due to the availability of high spatial resolution terrestrial data. These results can serve as a guideline for setting airborne gravity data acquisition priorities and for improving future planning of airborne gravity surveys.

  19. Induced gravity I: real scalar field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einhorn, Martin B.; Jones, D. R. Timothy

    2016-01-01

    We show that classically scale invariant gravity coupled to a single scalar field can undergo dimensional transmutation and generate an effective Einstein-Hilbert action for gravity, coupled to a massive dilaton. The same theory has an ultraviolet fixed point for coupling constant ratios such that all couplings are asymptotically free. However the catchment basin of this fixed point does not include regions of coupling constant parameter space compatible with locally stable dimensional transmutation. In a companion paper, we will explore whether this more desirable outcome does obtain in more complicated theories with non-Abelian gauge interactions.

  20. Burning of liquid pools in reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanury, A. M.

    1977-01-01

    The existing literature on the combustion of liquid fuel pools is reviewed to identify the physical and chemical aspects which require an improved understanding. Among the pre-, trans- and post-ignition processes, a delineation was made of those which seem to uniquely benefit from studies in the essential environment offered by spacelab. The role played by the gravitational constant in analytical and experimental justifications was developed. The analytical justifications were based on hypotheses, models and dimensional analyses whereas the experimental justifications were based on an examination of the range of gravity and gravity-dependent variables possible in the earth-based laboratories. Some preliminary expositions into the questions of feasibility of the proposed spacelab experiment are also reported.

  1. Effect of Numerical Error on Gravity Field Estimation for GRACE and Future Gravity Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCullough, Christopher; Bettadpur, Srinivas

    2015-04-01

    In recent decades, gravity field determination from low Earth orbiting satellites, such as the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), has become increasingly more effective due to the incorporation of high accuracy measurement devices. Since instrumentation quality will only increase in the near future and the gravity field determination process is computationally and numerically intensive, numerical error from the use of double precision arithmetic will eventually become a prominent error source. While using double-extended or quadruple precision arithmetic will reduce these errors, the numerical limitations of current orbit determination algorithms and processes must be accurately identified and quantified in order to adequately inform the science data processing techniques of future gravity missions. The most obvious numerical limitation in the orbit determination process is evident in the comparison of measured observables with computed values, derived from mathematical models relating the satellites' numerically integrated state to the observable. Significant error in the computed trajectory will corrupt this comparison and induce error in the least squares solution of the gravitational field. In addition, errors in the numerically computed trajectory propagate into the evaluation of the mathematical measurement model's partial derivatives. These errors amalgamate in turn with numerical error from the computation of the state transition matrix, computed using the variational equations of motion, in the least squares mapping matrix. Finally, the solution of the linearized least squares system, computed using a QR factorization, is also susceptible to numerical error. Certain interesting combinations of each of these numerical errors are examined in the framework of GRACE gravity field determination to analyze and quantify their effects on gravity field recovery.

  2. Plant biology in reduced gravity on the Moon and Mars.

    PubMed

    Kiss, J Z

    2014-01-01

    While there have been numerous studies on the effects of microgravity on plant biology since the beginning of the Space Age, our knowledge of the effects of reduced gravity (less than the Earth nominal 1 g) on plant physiology and development is very limited. Since international space agencies have cited manned exploration of Moon/Mars as long-term goals, it is important to understand plant biology at the lunar (0.17 g) and Martian levels of gravity (0.38 g), as plants are likely to be part of bioregenerative life-support systems on these missions. First, the methods to obtain microgravity and reduced gravity such as drop towers, parabolic flights, sounding rockets and orbiting spacecraft are reviewed. Studies on gravitaxis and gravitropism in algae have suggested that the threshold level of gravity sensing is around 0.3 g or less. Recent experiments on the International Space Station (ISS) showed attenuation of phototropism in higher plants occurs at levels ranging from 0.l g to 0.3 g. Taken together, these studies suggest that the reduced gravity level on Mars of 0.38 g may be enough so that the gravity level per se would not be a major problem for plant development. Studies that have directly considered the impact of reduced gravity and microgravity on bioregenerative life-support systems have identified important biophysical changes in the reduced gravity environments that impact the design of these systems. The author suggests that the current ISS laboratory facilities with on-board centrifuges should be used as a test bed in which to explore the effects of reduced gravity on plant biology, including those factors that are directly related to developing life-support systems necessary for Moon and Mars exploration. PMID:23889757

  3. An experiment to study fullerene formation under reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wdowiak, Thomas J.

    1992-01-01

    The activity of the summer focused on the design and construction of key components of a carbon arc/inert gas reactor for fullerene production, that is suitable for reduced gravity experiments onboard the KC-135 aircraft. The apparatus will be configured for both floor-mount and free-floating operation providing access to reduction to 10(exp -2) and 10(exp -3) of normal respectively. It is planned to incorporate 'seat belt' restraints that will allow a safe transition from reduced gravity free-float to full gravity, at the end of the parabolic.

  4. Fixed Packed Bed Reactors in Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motil, Brian J.; Balakotaiah, Vemuri; Kamotani, Yasuhiro; McCready, Mark J.

    2004-01-01

    We present experimental data on flow pattern transitions, pressure drop and flow characteristics for cocurrent gas-liquid flow through packed columns in microgravity. The flow pattern transition data indicates that the pulse flow regime exists over a wider range of gas and liquid flow rates under microgravity conditions compared to 1-g and the widely used Talmor map in 1-g is not applicable for predicting the transition boundaries. A new transition criterion between bubble and pulse flow in microgravity is proposed and tested using the data. Since there is no static head in microgravity, the pressure drop measured is the true frictional pressure drop. The pressure drop data, which has much smaller scatter than most reported 1-g data clearly shows that capillary effects can enhance the pressure drop (especially in the bubble flow regime) as much as 200% compared to that predicted by the single phase Ergun equation. The pressure drop data are correlated in terms of a two-phase friction factor and its dependence on the gas and liquid Reynolds numbers and the Suratman number. The influence of gravity on the pulse amplitude and frequency is also discussed and compared to that under normal gravity conditions. Experimental work is planned to determine the gas-liquid and liquid-solid mass transfer coefficients. Because of enhanced interfacial effects, we expect the gas-liquid transfer coefficients kLa and kGa (where a is the gas-liquid interfacial area) to be higher in microgravity than in normal gravity at the same flow conditions. This will be verified by gas absorption experiments, with and without reaction in the liquid phase, using oxygen, carbon dioxide, water and dilute aqueous amine solutions. The liquid-solid mass transfer coefficient will also be determined in the bubble as well as the pulse flow regimes using solid benzoic acid particles in the packing and measuring their rate of dissolution. The mass transfer coefficients in microgravity will be compared to

  5. Particle cloud combustion in reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berlad, A. L.

    1988-01-01

    The prinicipal objectives of this microgravity experiment program are to obtain flame propagation rate and flame extinction limit data for several important premixed, quiescent particle cloud combustion systems under near zero-gravity conditions. The data resulting from these experiments are needed for utilization with currently available and tractable flame propagation and extinction theory. These data are also expected to provide standards for the evaluation of fire hazards in particle suspensions in both Earth-based and space-based applications. Both terrestrial and space-based fire safety criteria require the identification of the critical concentrations of particulate fuels and inerts at the flame extinction conditions.

  6. Fixed Packed Bed Reactors in Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motil, Brian J.; Balakotaiah, Vemuri; Kamotani, Yasuhiro; McCready, Mark J.

    2004-01-01

    We present experimental data on flow pattern transitions, pressure drop and flow characteristics for cocurrent gas-liquid flow through packed columns in microgravity. The flow pattern transition data indicates that the pulse flow regime exists over a wider range of gas and liquid flow rates under microgravity conditions compared to 1-g and the widely used Talmor map in 1-g is not applicable for predicting the transition boundaries. A new transition criterion between bubble and pulse flow in microgravity is proposed and tested using the data. Since there is no static head in microgravity, the pressure drop measured is the true frictional pressure drop. The pressure drop data, which has much smaller scatter than most reported 1-g data clearly shows that capillary effects can enhance the pressure drop (especially in the bubble flow regime) as much as 200% compared to that predicted by the single phase Ergun equation. The pressure drop data are correlated in terms of a two-phase friction factor and its dependence on the gas and liquid Reynolds numbers and the Suratman number. The influence of gravity on the pulse amplitude and frequency is also discussed and compared to that under normal gravity conditions. Experimental work is planned to determine the gas-liquid mass transfer coefficients. Because of enhanced interfacial effects, we expect the gas-liquid transfer coefficients k(L)a and k(G)a (where a is the gas-liquid interfacial area) to be higher in microgravity than in normal gravity at the same flow conditions. This will be verified by gas absorption experiments, with and without reaction in the liquid phase, using oxygen, carbon dioxide, water and dilute aqueous amine solutions. The liquid-solid mass transfer coefficient will also be determined in the bubble as well as the pulse flow regimes using solid benzoic acid particles in the packing and measuring their rate of dissolution. The mass transfer coefficients in microgravity will be compared to those in normal

  7. Twinsat earth gravity field mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowrey, B. E.

    1975-01-01

    Results of a sensitivity study on the proposed Lo-Lo (Twinsat) satellite-to-satellite tracking mission are described. The relative range-rate signal due to a local gravitational anomaly is investigated as a function of height and satellite separation. It is shown that the signal strength is weak and that an optimal combination of signal strength and resolution is achieved when the satellites are separated by 3 deg along-track. The signal does not resolve point masses closer than 5 deg apart when the satellites are at 300 km altitude. The influence of other factors on the system is evaluated, including the low frequency gravitation field effect on the orbit and the dependence of the noise of the data type on (electronic) integration time.

  8. Gravity Field Parameter Estimation Using QR Factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klokocnik, J.; Wagner, C. A.; McAdoo, D.; Kostelecky, J.; Bezdek, A.; Novak, P.; Gruber, C.; Marty, J.; Bruinsma, S. L.; Gratton, S.; Balmino, G.; Baboulin, M.

    2007-12-01

    This study compares the accuracy of the estimated geopotential coefficients when QR factorization is used instead of the classical method applied at our institute, namely the generation of normal equations that are solved by means of Cholesky decomposition. The objective is to evaluate the gain in numerical precision, which is obtained at considerable extra cost in terms of computer resources. Therefore, a significant increase in precision must be realized in order to justify the additional cost. Numerical simulations were done in order to examine the performance of both solution methods. Reference gravity gradients were simulated, using the EIGEN-GL04C gravity field model to degree and order 300, every 3 seconds along a near-circular, polar orbit at 250 km altitude. The simulation spanned a total of 60 days. A polar orbit was selected in this simulation in order to avoid the 'polar gap' problem, which causes inaccurate estimation of the low-order spherical harmonic coefficients. Regularization is required in that case (e.g., the GOCE mission), which is not the subject of the present study. The simulated gravity gradients, to which white noise was added, were then processed with the GINS software package, applying EIGEN-CG03 as the background gravity field model, followed either by the usual normal equation computation or using the QR approach for incremental linear least squares. The accuracy assessment of the gravity field recovery consists in computing the median error degree-variance spectra, accumulated geoid errors, geoid errors due to individual coefficients, and geoid errors calculated on a global grid. The performance, in terms of memory usage, required disk space, and CPU time, of the QR versus the normal equation approach is also evaluated.

  9. Gravity field determination using boundary element methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klees, Roland

    1993-09-01

    The Boundary Element Method (BEM), a numerical technique for solving boundary integral equations, is introduced to determine the earth's gravity field. After a short survey on its main principles, we apply this method to the fixed gravimetric boundary value problem (BVP), i.e. the determination of the earth's gravitational potential from measurements of the intensity of the gravity field in points on the earth's surface. We show how to linearize this nonlinear BVP using an implicit function theorem and how to transform the linearized BVP into a boundary integral equation using the single layer representation. A Galerkin method is used to transform the boundary integral equation using the single layer representation. A Galerkin method is used to transform the boundary integral equation into a linear system of equations. We discuss the major problems of this approach for setting up and solving the linear system. The BVP is numerically solved for a bounded part of the earth's surface using a high resolution reference gravity model, measured gravity values of high density, and a 50 ṡ 50 m2 digital terrain model to describe the earth's surface. We obtain a gravity field resolution of 1 ṡ 1 km2 with an accuracy of the order 10-3 to 10-4 in about 1 CPU-hour on a Siemens/Fujitsu SIMD vector pipeline machine using highly sophisticated numerical integration techniques and fast equation solvers. We conclude that BEM is a powerful numerical tool for solving boundary value problems and may be an alternative to classical geodetic techniques.

  10. Cell proliferation inhibition in reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moos, P. J.; Fattaey, H. K.; Johnson, T. C.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Extended durations of spaceflight have been shown to be deleterious on an organismic level; however, mechanisms underlying cellular sensitivity to the gravitational environment remain to be elucidated. The majority of the gravitational studies to date indicates that cell regulatory pathways may be influenced by their gravitational environment. Still, few cell biology experiments have been performed in space flight and even fewer experiments have been repeated on subsequent flights. With flight opportunities on STS-50, 54, and 57, Sf9 cells were flown in the BioServe Fluids Processing Apparatus and cell proliferation was measured with and without exposure to a cell regulatory sialoglycopeptide (CeReS) inhibitor. Results from these flights indicate that the Sf9 cells grew comparable to ground controls, that the CeReS inhibitor bound to its specific receptor, and that its signal transduction cascade was not gravity sensitive.

  11. Intraspecific differences in bacterial responses to modelled reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, P. W.; Leff, L. G.

    2005-01-01

    AIMS: Bacteria are important residents of water systems, including those of space stations which feature specific environmental conditions, such as lowered effects of gravity. The purpose of this study was to compare responses with modelled reduced gravity of space station, water system bacterial isolates with other isolates of the same species. METHODS AND RESULTS: Bacterial isolates, Stenotrophomonas paucimobilis and Acinetobacter radioresistens, originally recovered from the water supply aboard the International Space Station (ISS) were grown in nutrient broth under modelled reduced gravity. Their growth was compared with type strains S. paucimobilis ATCC 10829 and A. radioresistens ATCC 49000. Acinetobacter radioresistens ATCC 49000 and the two ISS isolates showed similar growth profiles under modelled reduced gravity compared with normal gravity, whereas S. paucimobilis ATCC 10829 was negatively affected by modelled reduced gravity. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that microgravity might have selected for bacteria that were able to thrive under this unusual condition. These responses, coupled with impacts of other features (such as radiation resistance and ability to persist under very oligotrophic conditions), may contribute to the success of these water system bacteria. SIGNIFICANCE AND IMPACT OF THE STUDY: Water quality is a significant factor in many environments including the ISS. Efforts to remove microbial contaminants are likely to be complicated by the features of these bacteria which allow them to persist under the extreme conditions of the systems.

  12. Thermosyphon Flooding in Reduced Gravity Environments Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Marc A.; Jaworske, Donald A.; Sanzi, Jim; Ljubanovic, Damir

    2013-01-01

    The condenser flooding phenomenon associated with gravity aided two-phase thermosyphons was studied using parabolic flights to obtain the desired reduced gravity environment (RGE). The experiment was designed and built to test a total of twelve titanium water thermosyphons in multiple gravity environments with the goal of developing a model that would accurately explain the correlation between gravitational forces and the maximum axial heat transfer limit associated with condenser flooding. Results from laboratory testing and parabolic flights are included in this report as part I of a two part series. The data analysis and correlations are included in a follow on paper.

  13. Plant Science in Reduced Gravity: Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutte, Gary W.; Monje, Oscar; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of gravity on the growth and development of plants has been the subject of scientific investigation for over a century. The results obtained in space to test specific hypotheses on gravitropism, gene expression, seed formation, or growth rate are affected by both the primary effect of the microgravity and secondary effects of the spaceflight environment. The secondary effects of the spaceflight environment include physical effects arising from physical changes, such as the absence of buoyancy driven convective mixing, altered behavior of liquids and gases, and the environmental conditions in the spacecraft atmosphere. Thus, the design of biological experiments (e.g. cells, plants, animals, etc.) conducted in microgravity must account for changes in the physical forces, as well as the environmental conditions, imposed by the specific spaceflight vehicle and experimental hardware. In addition, researchers must become familiar with other aspects of spaceflight experiments: payload integration with hardware developers, safety documentation and crew procedures, and the logistics of conducting flight and ground controls. This report reviews the physical and environmental factors that directly and indirectly affect the results of plant science experiments in microgravity and is intended to serve as a guide in the design and implementation plant experiments in space.

  14. Electric field replaces gravity in laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorgolewski, S.

    For several years experiments in physical laboratories and in the fitotron have shown that one can replace gravitational field with electrical fields for plants. First obvious experiments in strong electrical fields in the MV/m regi on show that any materials and living plants respond immediately to Coulomb forces. Such fields are found in nature during thunderstorms. One has to be very careful in handling such strong fields for safety reasons. The fair weather global electrical field is about 20,000 times weaker. The coulomb forces are proportional to the square of the field strength and are thus 400 milion times weaker for a field of the order of 100 V/m.Yet it was found that some plants respond to such "weak" fields. We must remember that the electrical field is a factor of 10 38 times stronger than gravitational interaction. In plants we have dissociated in water mineral salts and the ions are subject to such ernormous forces. It was shown and published that the positive charges in the air in fields of the order of 3kV/m enhance lettuce growth by a factor of four relative to fields about 30 times weaker (100V/m). Reversal of the field polarity reverses the direction of plant growth and retards the plant's growth. Such fields overpower the gravitropism in the laboratory. More so horizontal electrical field is othogonal to gravity, now the fields do not see each other. Lettuce now growth horizontally ignoring the gravitational field. We can thus select the plants whose electrotropism even in the laboratory overwhelms gravity. This is important for the long space flights that we must grow vegetarian food for the crew. The successful harvesting of wheat in orbit does not contradict our experimental findings because wheat is not electrotropic like all plants from the grass family. The results of fitotron experiments with kV/m electrical fields are richly illustrated with colour digital photographs. We also subjected the candle flame to very strong horizontal

  15. A framework for modelling kinematic measurements in gravity field applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, K. P.; Wei, M.

    1989-01-01

    To assess the resolution of the local gravity field from kinematic measurements, a state model for motion in the gravity field of the earth is formulated. The resulting set of equations can accommodate gravity gradients, specific force, acceleration, velocity and position as input data and can take into account approximation errors as well as sensor errors.

  16. Classifying linearly shielded modified gravity models in effective field theory.

    PubMed

    Lombriser, Lucas; Taylor, Andy

    2015-01-23

    We study the model space generated by the time-dependent operator coefficients in the effective field theory of the cosmological background evolution and perturbations of modified gravity and dark energy models. We identify three classes of modified gravity models that reduce to Newtonian gravity on the small scales of linear theory. These general classes contain enough freedom to simultaneously admit a matching of the concordance model background expansion history. In particular, there exists a large model space that mimics the concordance model on all linear quasistatic subhorizon scales as well as in the background evolution. Such models also exist when restricting the theory space to operators introduced in Horndeski scalar-tensor gravity. We emphasize that whereas the partially shielded scenarios might be of interest to study in connection with tensions between large and small scale data, with conventional cosmological probes, the ability to distinguish the fully shielded scenarios from the concordance model on near-horizon scales will remain limited by cosmic variance. Novel tests of the large-scale structure remedying this deficiency and accounting for the full covariant nature of the alternative gravitational theories, however, might yield further insights on gravity in this regime. PMID:25658988

  17. On the gravity field processing of next generation satellite gravity missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daras, Ilias; Pail, Roland

    2016-04-01

    Dedicated gravity field missions delivering observations for a period longer than 16 years have drastically contributed in improving our knowledge of mass transport processes in the Earth system. At the same time, they have left a precious heritage for the design of next generation satellite gravity missions to be launched in the mid-term future. Main subject of this study is the gravity field processing of future Low-Low Satellite-to-Satellite Tracking (LL-SST) missions. We perform assessment of the contribution of all error sources and develop methods for reducing their effect at the level of gravity field processing. Advances in metrology of sensors such as the inter-satellite ranging instrument, may raise the demands for processing accuracy. We show that gravity field processing with double precision may be a limiting factor for exploiting the nm-level accuracy of a laser interferometer that future missions are expected to carry. An enhanced numerical precision processing scheme is proposed instead, where double and quadruple precision is used in different parts of the processing chain. It is demonstrated that processing with enhanced precision can efficiently handle laser measurements and take full advantage of their accuracy, while keeping the computational times within reasonable levels (Daras, 2015). However, error sources of considerably larger impact are expected to affect future missions, with the accelerometer instrument noise and temporal aliasing effects being the most significant ones. The effect of time-correlated noise such as the one present in accelerometer measurements can be efficiently handled by frequency dependent data weighting. Residual time series that contain the effect of system errors and propagated accelerometer and laser noise, is considered as a noise realization with stationary stochastic properties. The weight matrix is constructed from the auto-correlation functions of these residuals. Applying the weight matrix to a noise case

  18. [Research under reduced gravity. Part I: bases of gravitational biology].

    PubMed

    Volkmann, D; Sievers, A

    1992-02-01

    The orientation of organisms in space and their morphogenesis in relation to the gravitational field of the Earth are the main topics of research in the field of gravitational biology. For more than 100 years clinostats provided the only possibility to simulate physiological weightlessness. In contrast to animals, plants are characterized by intracellular gravireceptors. Nevertheless, there are some indications, e.g., the minimal energy of approx. 10(-18) J triggering a gravity-dependent response, for similar mechanisms of gravity perception. Stretch-activated ion channels might be the common structural basis. PMID:11536493

  19. Lubrication system with tolerance for reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Portlock, Lawrence E. (Inventor); McCune, Michael E. (Inventor); Dobek, Louis J. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A lubrication system includes an auxiliary lubricant tank 48, a supply conduit 58 extending from a source of lubricant 26 to the auxiliary lubricant tank. A reduced-G bypass line 108 branches from the conduit and enters the auxiliary tank at a first elevation E.sub.1. The system also includes an auxiliary tank discharge conduit 116, a portion of which resides within the tank. The resident portion has an opening 122 at least partially at a second elevation E.sub.2 higher than the first elevation.

  20. Lubrication System with Tolerance for Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Portlock, Lawrence E. (Inventor); McCune, Michael E. (Inventor); Dobek, Louis J. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A lubrication system includes an auxiliary lubricant tank 48, a supply conduit 58 extending from a source of lubricant 26 to the auxiliary lubricant tank. A reduced-G bypass line 108 branches from the conduit and enters the auxiliary tank at a first elevation E.sub.1. The system also includes an auxiliary tank discharge conduit 116, a portion of which resides within the tank. The resident portion has an opening 122 at least partially at a second elevation E.sub.2 higher than the first elevation.

  1. Measurement of the gravity-field curvature by atom interferometry.

    PubMed

    Rosi, G; Cacciapuoti, L; Sorrentino, F; Menchetti, M; Prevedelli, M; Tino, G M

    2015-01-01

    We present the first direct measurement of the gravity-field curvature based on three conjugated atom interferometers. Three atomic clouds launched in the vertical direction are simultaneously interrogated by the same atom interferometry sequence and used to probe the gravity field at three equally spaced positions. The vertical component of the gravity-field curvature generated by nearby source masses is measured from the difference between adjacent gravity gradient values. Curvature measurements are of interest in geodesy studies and for the validation of gravitational models of the surrounding environment. The possibility of using such a scheme for a new determination of the Newtonian constant of gravity is also discussed. PMID:25615464

  2. Study of the Earth's short-scale gravity field using the ERTM2160 gravity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirt, Christian; Kuhn, Michael; Claessens, Sten; Pail, Roland; Seitz, Kurt; Gruber, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    This paper describes the computation and analysis of the Earth's short-scale gravity field through high-resolution gravity forward modelling using the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) global topography model. We use the established residual terrain modelling technique along with advanced computational resources and massive parallelisation to convert the high-pass filtered SRTM topography - complemented with bathymetric information in coastal zones - to implied short-scale gravity effects. The result is the ERTM2160 model (Earth Residual Terrain Modelled-gravity field with the spatial scales equivalent to spherical-harmonic coefficients up to degree 2160 removed). ERTM2160, used successfully for the construction of the GGMplus gravity maps, approximates the short-scale (i.e., ~10 km down to ~250 m) gravity field in terms of gravity disturbances, quasi/geoid heights and vertical deflections at ~3 billion gridded points within ±60° latitude. ERTM2160 reaches maximum values for the quasi/geoid height of ~30 cm, gravity disturbance in excess of 100 mGal, and vertical deflections of ~30″ over the Himalaya mountains. Analysis of the ERTM2160 field as a function of terrain roughness shows in good approximation a linear relationship between terrain roughness and gravity effects, with values of ~1.7 cm (quasi/geoid heights), ~11 mGal (gravity disturbances) and 1.5″ (vertical deflections) signal strength per 100 m standard deviation of the terrain. These statistics can be used to assess the magnitude of omitted gravity signals over various types of terrain when using degree-2160 gravity models such as EGM2008. Applications for ERTM2160 are outlined including its use in gravity smoothing procedures, augmentation of EGM2008, fill-in for future ultra-high resolution gravity models in spherical harmonics, or calculation of localised or global power spectra of Earth's short-scale gravity field. ERTM2160 is freely available via

  3. An analytical study of reduced-gravity flow dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradshaw, R. D.; Kramer, J. L.; Zich, J. L.

    1976-01-01

    Addition of surface tension forces to a marker-and-cell code and the performance of four incompressible fluid simulations in reduced gravity, were studied. This marker-and-cell code has a variable grid capability with arbitrary curved boundaries and time dependent acceleration fields. The surface tension logic includes a spline fit of surface marker particles as well as contact angle logic for straight and curved wall boundaries. Three types of flow motion were simulated with the improved code: impulsive settling in a model Centaur LH2 tank, continuous settling in a model and full scale Centaur LO2 tank and mixing in a Centaur LH2 tank. The impulsive settling case confirmed a drop tower analysis which indicated more orderly fluid collection flow patterns with this method providing a potential savings in settling propellants. In the LO2 tank, fluid collection and flow simulation into the thrust barrel were achieved. The mixing simulation produced good results indicating both the development of the flow field and fluid interface behavior.

  4. Electric Field Effect on Bubble Detachment in Variable Gravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iacona, Estelle; Herman, Cila; Chang, Shinan

    2003-01-01

    The subject of the present study, the process of bubble detachment from an orifice in a plane surface, shows some resemblance to bubble departure in boiling. Because of the high heat transfer coefficients associated with phase change processes, boiling is utilized in many industrial operations and is an attractive solution to cooling problems in aerospace engineering. In terrestrial conditions, buoyancy is responsible for bubble removal from the surface. In space, the gravity level being orders of magnitude smaller than on earth, bubbles formed during boiling remain attached at the surface. As a result, the amount of heat removed from the heated surface can decrease considerably. The use of electric fields is proposed to control bubble behavior and help bubble removal from the surface on which they form. The objective of the study is to investigate the behavior of individual air bubbles injected through an orifice into an electrically insulating liquid under the influence of a static electric field. Bubble cycle life were visualized in terrestrial conditions and for several reduced gravity levels. Bubble volume, dimensions and contact angle at detachment were measured and analyzed for different parameters as gravity level and electric field magnitude. Situations were considered with uniform or non-uni form electric field. Results show that these parameters significantly affect bubble behavior, shape, volume and dimensions.

  5. Gravity fields of the solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zendell, A.; Brown, R. D.; Vincent, S.

    1975-01-01

    The most frequently used formulations of the gravitational field are discussed and a standard set of models for the gravity fields of the earth, moon, sun, and other massive bodies in the solar system are defined. The formulas are presented in standard forms, some with instructions for conversion. A point-source or inverse-square model, which represents the external potential of a spherically symmetrical mass distribution by a mathematical point mass without physical dimensions, is considered. An oblate spheroid model is presented, accompanied by an introduction to zonal harmonics. This spheroid model is generalized and forms the basis for a number of the spherical harmonic models which were developed for the earth and moon. The triaxial ellipsoid model is also presented. These models and their application to space missions are discussed.

  6. Reducing errors in the GRACE gravity solutions using regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Save, Himanshu; Bettadpur, Srinivas; Tapley, Byron D.

    2012-09-01

    The nature of the gravity field inverse problem amplifies the noise in the GRACE data, which creeps into the mid and high degree and order harmonic coefficients of the Earth's monthly gravity fields provided by GRACE. Due to the use of imperfect background models and data noise, these errors are manifested as north-south striping in the monthly global maps of equivalent water heights. In order to reduce these errors, this study investigates the use of the L-curve method with Tikhonov regularization. L-curve is a popular aid for determining a suitable value of the regularization parameter when solving linear discrete ill-posed problems using Tikhonov regularization. However, the computational effort required to determine the L-curve is prohibitively high for a large-scale problem like GRACE. This study implements a parameter-choice method, using Lanczos bidiagonalization which is a computationally inexpensive approximation to L-curve. Lanczos bidiagonalization is implemented with orthogonal transformation in a parallel computing environment and projects a large estimation problem on a problem of the size of about 2 orders of magnitude smaller for computing the regularization parameter. Errors in the GRACE solution time series have certain characteristics that vary depending on the ground track coverage of the solutions. These errors increase with increasing degree and order. In addition, certain resonant and near-resonant harmonic coefficients have higher errors as compared with the other coefficients. Using the knowledge of these characteristics, this study designs a regularization matrix that provides a constraint on the geopotential coefficients as a function of its degree and order. This regularization matrix is then used to compute the appropriate regularization parameter for each monthly solution. A 7-year time-series of the candidate regularized solutions (Mar 2003-Feb 2010) show markedly reduced error stripes compared with the unconstrained GRACE release 4

  7. Locomotion while load-carrying in reduced gravities.

    PubMed

    Wickman, L A; Luna, B

    1996-10-01

    Supporting the mass of a protective suit and portable life support system (PLSS) will impose an energy requirement on planetary astronauts. To design extravehicular protective equipment for planetary missions, scientists must learn more about human physical capabilities while load-carrying in reduced gravities. In this study, an underwater treadmill and weighting system were used to simulate reduced-gravity locomotion while load-carrying. The test matrix included 3 gravity levels, 6 subjects, 2 locomotion speeds, and a range of load sizes. Energy expenditure, calculated from measured oxygen consumption, is positively correlated with gravity level, speed, and load size. The data are used to project that individuals in average physical condition will be able to walk for 8 h on the Moon while carrying up to 170% of their body mass without undue fatigue, and on Mars with up to 50% of their body mass. These approximate limits, especially for Martian gravity, may prove quite a challenge for designers of advanced protective systems. Requirements for regenerable and non-venting PLSS components have been driving the total projected masses of advanced PLSSs increasingly higher, perhaps beyond what is reasonable to carry. However, the larger mass can be beneficial in maintaining bone mass. Using Whalen's model (1988), the daily planetary walking times required to maintain bone mass were calculated for a range of carried load sizes. The calculated times were unattainably high, suggesting that some combination of loads carrying and supplemental bone maintenance measures will likely be required to maintain bone mass in reduced gravity environments. PMID:9025816

  8. Gravity Field Mapping of Mars with MGS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.; Lemoine, Frank G.

    1998-01-01

    Tracking of the MGS spacecraft in orbit at Mars by the Deep Space Network since last September has provided doppler and range measurements that are being used to improve the model of the Mars gravity field. During most of October 1997, April 1998, and June thru August 1998 high quality tracking data were obtained while the periapse was in the northern hemisphere at altitudes in the 170 to 190 km range. The eccentric orbit had a period of about 11.5 hrs and an inclination of about 96.2 degrees so that low altitude tracking was obtained over most of the northern hemisphere, including the north polar icecap. Data from the earlier Mariner 9 and Viking missions have been added to the MGS data and a series of experimental gravity models developed from the combined datasets. These models have generally been of degree and order 70 and are a significant improvement over earlier models that did not include the MGS data. Gravity anomalies over the north polar cap region of Mars are generally less than 50 to 100 mgals and show no obvious correlation with the topography. Successive MGS orbits derived using these new models are showing agreement at the 100 meter level, and this has been confirmed with the laser altimeter (MOLA) on MGS These comparisons are expected to improve significantly as more tracking data get included in the solution and the MGS orbit becomes more circular giving a more balanced geographical distribution of data at low altitude. This will happen early in 1999 as the orbit approaches the mapping configuration of a circular orbit at about 400 Km.

  9. Containment of a silicone fluid free surface in reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pline, A.; Jacobson, T.

    1988-01-01

    In support of the surface tension driven convection experiment planned for flight aboard the Space Shuttle, tests were conducted under reduced gravity in the 2.2-sec drop tower and the 5.0-sec Zero-G facility at the Lewis Research Center. The dynamics of controlling the test fluid, a 10-centistoke viscosity silicone fluid, in a low-gravity environment were investigated using different container designs and barrier coatings. Three container edge designs were tested without a barrier coating: a square edge, a sharp edge with a 45-deg slope, and a saw-tooth edge. All three edge designs were successful in containing the fluid below the edge.

  10. Bubble Formation at a Submerged Orifice in Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buyevich, Yu A.; Webbon, Bruce W.

    1994-01-01

    The dynamic regime of gas injection through a circular plate orifice into an ideally wetting liquid is considered, when successively detached bubbles may be regarded as separate identities. In normal gravity and at relatively low gas flow rates, a growing bubble is modeled as a spherical segment touching the orifice perimeter during the whole time of its evolution. If the flow rate exceeds a certain threshold value, another stage of the detachment process takes place in which an almost spherical gas envelope is connected with the orifice by a nearly cylindrical stem that lengthens as the bubble rises above the plate. The bubble shape resembles then that of a mushroom and the upper envelope continues to grow until the gas supply through the stem is completely cut off. Such a stage is always present under conditions of sufficiently low gravity, irrespective of the flow rate. Two major reasons make for bubble detachment: the buoyancy force and the force due to the momentum inflow into the bubble with the injected gas. The former force dominates the process at normal gravity whereas the second one plays a key role under negligible gravity conditions. It is precisely this fundamental factor that conditions the drastic influence on bubble growth and detachment that changes in gravity are able to cause. The frequency of bubble formation is proportional to and the volume of detached bubbles is independent of the gas flow rate in sufficiently low gravity, while at normal and moderately reduced gravity conditions the first variable slightly decreases and the second one almost linearly increases as the flow rate grows. Effects of other parameters, such as the orifice radius, gas and liquid densities, and surface tension are discussed.

  11. Fluid Interfaces of Triangular Containers in Reduced Gravity Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guttromson, Jayleen; Manning, Robert; Collicott, Steven H.

    2002-01-01

    Capillary dominated fluid dynamics will be examined in a reduced-gravity environment onboard the KC-135; in particular, the behavior of the lower portion of the meniscus in triangular tank geometries. Seven clear acrylic tanks were constructed to view seven angles of the four geometries. Silicon oil with two different viscosities, 2cs and 5cs silicon oil, were used on different days of the flight. Six tanks and one control tank are filled with a certain viscosity fluid for each flight day. During each parabola, three tanks are tested at time. The experimental tanks are exchanged between parabola sets on the KC-135. The 60deg -60deg -60deg control tank is viewed throughout the flight. To gather data, two digital video cameras and one digital still camera are placed perpendicular the viewing surface. To provide a greater contrast in the meniscus, an EL backlighting sheet was used to backlight the tanks. These images and video are then digitized, passed through NASA's mini-tracker software, and compared to a theory published my M. M. Weislogel, "Fluid Interface Phenomena in a Low-Gravity Environment: Recent Results from Drop Tower Experimentation." By focusing on a lower portion of the meniscus and using longer periods of reduced gravity, this experiment may confirm that a stationary point exists on the fluid surface. This information will enable better designing of propellant management devices, especially satellite propellant refilling and gas venting. Also, biological and material processing systems in reduced gravity environments will benefit from this data.

  12. Human Locomotion under Reduced Gravity Conditions: Biomechanical and Neurophysiological Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Sylos-Labini, Francesca; Ivanenko, Yuri P.

    2014-01-01

    Reduced gravity offers unique opportunities to study motor behavior. This paper aims at providing a review on current issues of the known tools and techniques used for hypogravity simulation and their effects on human locomotion. Walking and running rely on the limb oscillatory mechanics, and one way to change its dynamic properties is to modify the level of gravity. Gravity has a strong effect on the optimal rate of limb oscillations, optimal walking speed, and muscle activity patterns, and gait transitions occur smoothly and at slower speeds at lower gravity levels. Altered center of mass movements and interplay between stance and swing leg dynamics may challenge new forms of locomotion in a heterogravity environment. Furthermore, observations in the lack of gravity effects help to reveal the intrinsic properties of locomotor pattern generators and make evident facilitation of nonvoluntary limb stepping. In view of that, space neurosciences research has participated in the development of new technologies that can be used as an effective tool for gait rehabilitation. PMID:25247179

  13. Towards combined global monthly gravity field solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeggi, Adrian; Meyer, Ulrich; Beutler, Gerhard; Weigelt, Matthias; van Dam, Tonie; Mayer-Gürr, Torsten; Flury, Jakob; Flechtner, Frank; Dahle, Christoph; Lemoine, Jean-Michel; Bruinsma, Sean

    2014-05-01

    Currently, official GRACE Science Data System (SDS) monthly gravity field solutions are generated independently by the Centre for Space Research (CSR) and the German Research Centre for Geosciences (GFZ). Additional GRACE SDS monthly fields are provided by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for validation and outside the SDS by a number of other institutions worldwide. Although the adopted background models and processing standards have been harmonized more and more by the various processing centers during the past years, notable differences still exist and the users are more or less left alone with a decision which model to choose for their individual applications. This procedure seriously limits the accessibility of these valuable data. Combinations are well established in the area of other space geodetic techniques, such as the Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR), and Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI). Regularly comparing and combining space-geodetic products has tremendously increased the usefulness of the products in a wide range of disciplines and scientific applications. Therefore, we propose in a first step to mutually compare the large variety of available monthly GRACE gravity field solutions, e.g., by assessing the signal content over selected regions, by estimating the noise over the oceans, and by performing significance tests. We make the attempt to assign different solution characteristics to different processing strategies in order to identify subsets of solutions, which are based on similar processing strategies. Using these subsets we will in a second step explore ways to generate combined solutions, e.g., based on a weighted average of the individual solutions using empirical weights derived from pair-wise comparisons. We will also assess the quality of such a combined solution and discuss the potential benefits for the GRACE and GRACE-FO user community, but also address minimum processing

  14. Humans Running in Place on Water at Simulated Reduced Gravity

    PubMed Central

    Minetti, Alberto E.; Ivanenko, Yuri P.; Cappellini, Germana; Dominici, Nadia; Lacquaniti, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Background On Earth only a few legged species, such as water strider insects, some aquatic birds and lizards, can run on water. For most other species, including humans, this is precluded by body size and proportions, lack of appropriate appendages, and limited muscle power. However, if gravity is reduced to less than Earth’s gravity, running on water should require less muscle power. Here we use a hydrodynamic model to predict the gravity levels at which humans should be able to run on water. We test these predictions in the laboratory using a reduced gravity simulator. Methodology/Principal Findings We adapted a model equation, previously used by Glasheen and McMahon to explain the dynamics of Basilisk lizard, to predict the body mass, stride frequency and gravity necessary for a person to run on water. Progressive body-weight unloading of a person running in place on a wading pool confirmed the theoretical predictions that a person could run on water, at lunar (or lower) gravity levels using relatively small rigid fins. Three-dimensional motion capture of reflective markers on major joint centers showed that humans, similarly to the Basilisk Lizard and to the Western Grebe, keep the head-trunk segment at a nearly constant height, despite the high stride frequency and the intensive locomotor effort. Trunk stabilization at a nearly constant height differentiates running on water from other, more usual human gaits. Conclusions/Significance The results showed that a hydrodynamic model of lizards running on water can also be applied to humans, despite the enormous difference in body size and morphology. PMID:22815681

  15. The Influence of Reduced Gravity on the Crystal Growth of Electronic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ching-Hua; Gillies, D. C.; Szofran, F. R.; Watring, D. A.; Lehoczky, S. L.

    1996-01-01

    The imperfections in the grown crystals of electronic materials, such as compositional nonuniformity, dopant segregation and crystalline structural defects, are detrimental to the performance of the opto-electronic devices. Some of these imperfections can be attributed to effects caused by Earth gravity during crystal growth process and four areas have been identified as the uniqueness of material processing in reduced gravity environment. The significant results of early flight experiments, i.e. prior to space shuttle era, are briefly reviewed followed by an elaborated review on the recent flight experiments conducted on shuttle missions. The results are presented for two major growth methods of electronic materials: melt and vapor growth. The use of an applied magnetic field in the melt growth of electrically conductive melts on Earth to simulate the conditions of reduced gravity has been investigated and it is believed that the superimposed effect of moderate magnetic fields and the reduced gravity environment of space can result in reduction of convective intensities to the extent unreachable by the exclusive use of magnet on Earth or space processing. In the Discussions section each of the significant results of the flight experiments is attributed to one of the four effects of reduced gravity and the unresolved problems on the measured mass fluxes in some of the vapor transport flight experiments are discussed.

  16. Global gravity field models and their use for geophysical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pail, R.

    2015-12-01

    During the last decade, the successful operation of the dedicated satellite missions GOCE and GRACE have revolutionized our picture of the Earth's gravity field. They delivered static global gravity field maps with high and homogeneous accuracy for spatial length-scales down to 70-80 km. The current satellite-only models of the fifth generation including GOCE data have reached accuracies of about 2 cm in geoid height and less than 0.7 mGal in gravity anomalies at 100 km spatial half-wavelength. However, the spatial resolution of gravity models derived from satellite data is limited. Since precise knowledge of the Earth's gravity field structure with very high resolution is essential in solid Earth applications such as lithospheric modelling, geological interpretation and exploration geophysics, satellite-only models are complemented by combined gravity field models, which contain very high-resolution gravity field information obtained by terrestrial gravity measurements over continents, and satellite altimetry over the oceans. To further increase the spatial resolution beyond 10-20 km, measured terrestrial and satellite data can also be augmented by high-resolution gravity field signals synthesized from topographic models. In this contribution an overview of the construction of satellite-only and combined global gravity field models is given. The specific characteristics of the individual input data and the resulting models will be assessed, and their impact for geophysical modelling will be discussed. On the basis of selected case studies, commission and omission errors and thus the contribution and impact of satellite gravity data on gravity field applications will be quantified, and the benefit of current satellite gravity data shall be investigated and demonstrated. Future gravity field missions beyond GRACE Follow-On will provide global gravity field information with further increased accuracy, spatial and temporal resolution. In an international initiative

  17. Geodynamics and temporal variations in the gravity field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcadoo, D. C.; Wagner, C. A.

    1989-01-01

    Just as the Earth's surface deforms tectonically, so too does the gravity field evolve with time. Now that precise geodesy is yielding observations of these deformations it is important that concomitant, temporal changes in the gravity field be monitored. Although these temporal changes are minute they are observable: changes in the J2 component of the gravity field were inferred from satellite (LAGEOS) tracking data; changes in other components of the gravity field would likely be detected by Geopotential Research Mission (GRM), a proposed but unapproved NASA gravity field mission. Satellite gradiometers were also proposed for high-precision gravity field mapping. Using simple models of geodynamic processes such as viscous postglacial rebound of the solid Earth, great subduction zone earthquakes and seasonal glacial mass fluctuations, we predict temporal changes in gravity gradients at spacecraft altitudes. It was found that these proposed gravity gradient satellite missions should have sensitivities equal to or better than 10(exp -4) E in order to reliably detect these changes. It was also found that satellite altimetry yields little promise of useful detection of time variations in gravity.

  18. The Flow Of Granular Matter Under Reduced-Gravity Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmeister, P. G.; Blum, J.; Heißelmann, D.

    2009-06-01

    To gain a better understanding of the surfaces of planets and small bodies in the solar system, the flow behavior of granular material for various gravity levels is of utmost interest. We performed a set of reduced-gravity measurements to analyze the flow behavior of granular matter with a quasi-2D hourglass under coarse-vacuum conditions and with a tilting avalanche box. We used the Bremen drop tower and a small centrifuge to achieve residual-gravity levels between 0.01 g0 and 0.3 g0. Both experiments were carried out with basalt and glass grains as well as with two kinds of ordinary sand. For the hourglass experiments, the volume flow through the orifice, the repose and friction angles, and the flow behavior of the particles close to the surface were determined. In the avalanche-box experiment, we measured the duration of the avalanche, the maximum slope angle as well as the width of the avalanche as a function of the gravity level.

  19. GRACE gravity field modeling with an investigation on correlation between nuisance parameters and gravity field coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qile; Guo, Jing; Hu, Zhigang; Shi, Chuang; Liu, Jingnan; Cai, Hua; Liu, Xianglin

    2011-05-01

    The GRACE (Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment) monthly gravity models have been independently produced and published by several research institutions, such as Center for Space Research (CSR), GeoForschungsZentrum (GFZ), Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales (CNES) and Delft Institute of Earth Observation and Space Systems (DEOS). According to their processing standards, above institutions use the traditional variational approach except that the DEOS exploits the acceleration approach. The background force models employed are rather similar. The produced gravity field models generally agree with one another in the spatial pattern. However, there are some discrepancies in the gravity signal amplitude between solutions produced by different institutions. In particular, 10%-30% signal amplitude differences in some river basins can be observed. In this paper, we implemented a variant of the traditional variational approach and computed two sets of monthly gravity field solutions using the data from January 2005 to December 2006. The input data are K-band range-rates (KBRR) and kinematic orbits of GRACE satellites. The main difference in the production of our two types of models is how to deal with nuisance parameters. This type of parameters is necessary to absorb low-frequency errors in the data, which are mainly the aliasing and instrument errors. One way is to remove the nuisance parameters before estimating the geopotential coefficients, called NPARB approach in the paper. The other way is to estimate the nuisance parameters and geopotential coefficients simultaneously, called NPESS approach. These two types of solutions mainly differ in geopotential coefficients from degree 2 to 5. This can be explained by the fact that the nuisance parameters and the gravity field coefficients are highly correlated, particularly at low degrees. We compare these solutions with the official and published ones by means of spectral analysis. It is

  20. On a spectral method for forward gravity field modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Root, B. C.; Novák, P.; Dirkx, D.; Kaban, M.; van der Wal, W.; Vermeersen, L. L. A.

    2016-07-01

    This article reviews a spectral forward gravity field modelling method that was initially designed for topographic/isostatic mass reduction of gravity data. The method transforms 3D spherical density models into gravitational potential fields using a spherical harmonic representation. The binomial series approximation in the approach, which is crucial for its computational efficiency, is examined and an error analysis is performed. It is shown that, this method cannot be used for density layers in crustal and upper mantle regions, because it results in large errors in the modelled potential field. Here, a correction is proposed to mitigate this erroneous behaviour. The improved method is benchmarked with a tesseroid gravity field modelling method and is shown to be accurate within ±4 mGal for a layer representing the Moho density interface, which is below other errors in gravity field studies. After the proposed adjustment the method can be used for the global gravity modelling of the complete Earth's density structure.

  1. GOCE gravity field models following the time-wise approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brockmann, Jan Martin; Höck, Eduard; Loth, Ina; Mayer-Gürr, Torsten; Pail, Roland; Schuh, Wolf-Dieter; Zehentner, Norbert

    2015-04-01

    Since the launch of the European Space Agency's (ESA) Gravity field and Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite in 2009 and its end in 2013, a sequence of official GOCE gravity field models was released. One of the series of models follows the so called time-wise approach (EGM_TIM). They are purely based on GOCE observations such that they are independent of any other gravity field information available and describe the Earth's gravity field as seen by GOCE. Recently, the fifth release, EGM_TIM_RL05, was computed and made available to users. The models of the time-wise series were computed within the ESA funded High-level Processing Facility (HPF) and are part of the official ESA GOCE products. Calibrated gravity gradients in the gradiometer reference frame and the satellites position as derived by GPS measurements entered the solutions as observations. Together with the spherical harmonic coefficients, a realistic the full covariance matrix is provided reflecting the model quality. This contribution summarizes the gravity field models derived with the time-wise approach. The method is summarized and the progress along the five releases is highlighted. Special focus is put on the final release 5, the gravity field model which includes all data collected during the entire GOCE mission. This model, parametrized as 78,957 spherical harmonic coefficients (spatial resolution of 71 km), was determined from 4*109,799,264 gravity gradient measurements and 108,754,709 three dimensional positions within a joint least squares adjustment procedure. As this gravity field models only depend on GOCE observations, the gain of GOCE compared to other missions and other gravity field products can be clearly demonstrated. With release 5 of the time-wise model, a pure GOCE based model with a mean global accuracy of 2.4 cm at a spatial resolution of 100 km for the geoid is available (0.7 mGal for gravity anomalies).

  2. An improved JPL Mars gravity field and orientation from Mars orbiter and lander tracking data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konopliv, Alex S.; Park, Ryan S.; Folkner, William M.

    2016-08-01

    The Mars gravity field resolution is mostly determined by the lower altitude Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) tracking data. With nearly four years of additional MRO and Mars Odyssey tracking data since the last JPL released gravity field MRO110C and lander tracking from the MER Opportunity Rover, the gravity field and orientation of Mars have been improved. The new field, MRO120D, extends the maximum spherical harmonic degree slightly to 120, improves the determination of the higher degree coefficients as demonstrated by improved correlation with topography and reduces the uncertainty in the corresponding Mars orientation parameters by up to a factor of two versus previously combined gravity and orientation solutions. The new precession solution is ψ˙ = - 7608.3 ± 2.1 mas / yr and is consistent with previous results but with a reduced uncertainty by 40%. The Love number solution, k2 = 0.169 ± 0.006, also shows a similar result to previous studies.

  3. Microchip separations in reduced-gravity and hypergravity environments.

    PubMed

    Culbertson, Christopher T; Tugnawat, Yogesh; Meyer, Amanda R; Roman, Gregory T; Ramsey, J Michael; Gonda, Steve R

    2005-12-15

    Microfabricated fluidics technology, e.g., lab-on-a-chip devices, offers many attractive features for performing chemistry and biochemistry on space-based platforms. We have constructed a portable, battery-operated microfluidic platform that was tested under reduced gravity and hypergravity conditions that would be experienced in space flight and launch. This device consisted of a microchip, microchip holder, two 0-8-kV high-voltage power supplies, a high-voltage switch, a solid-state diode-pumped green laser, an optical train, a channel photomultiplier, and an inertial mass measurement unit all under the control of a laptop computer and powered by 10 D-cell alkaline batteries. The unit was tested on NASA's reduced gravity research aircraft at gravity levels that are relevant to NASA's intended use of bioreporter-based microchips for environmental monitoring of space and planetary environments on manned and unmanned spacecraft. Over the course of two flights, 834 fast electrophoretic separations of four amino acids were performed under a variety of gravitational environments including zero-g, Martian-g, lunar-g, and approximately 1.8-g. All separations were performed in less than 12 s and automatically analyzed. After correction with an internal migration standard, the migration time reproducibilities were all <1% relative standard deviation. PMID:16351140

  4. The combined satellite gravity field model GOCO05s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer-Guerr, Torsten

    2015-04-01

    The main objective of the GOCO ("Gravity Observation Combination") project is to compute high-accuracy and high-resolution static global gravity field models based on data of the dedicated satellite gravity missions CHAMP, GRACE, and GOCE, SLR data and kinematic orbits from different Low Earth Orbiters. For the computation of the new model GOCO05s more than 800,000,000 observations from 15 satellites are used to estimate about 122,000 gravity field parameters. GOCO05s consists not only of a static field up to degree and order 200, but the temporal variations of the gravity field are modeled as well. These are represented as regularized trend and annual signal. The main focus in the GOCO combination process is on the proper handling of the stochastic behavior of the data. Therefore, the resulting accuracy information in terms of a full variance covariance matrix is quite realistic and also published with the solution.

  5. Stability analysis of surface tension effects on a double-diffusive layer. [in reduced gravity conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. F.; Su, T. F.

    1992-01-01

    The linear stability characteristics of a fluid layer with simultaneous temperature and concentration gradients in a reduced gravity field are examined. The surface tension of the fluid is assumed to be a linear function of temperature and concentration. It is concluded that a small amount of gravity may damp out oscillatory instability or may alter its dynamics so that instability appears as steady convection. The onset of salt-finger instability may be in the overstable mode due to the surface tension method. The Lewis and Prandtl numbers of the material have a strong influence on the stability boundaries and onset characteristics of the system.

  6. Bubble Detachment in Variable Gravity Under the Influence of Electric Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Cila; Chang, Shinan; Iacona, Estelle

    2002-01-01

    The objective of the research is to investigate the behavior of individual air bubbles injected through an orifice into an electrically insulating liquid under the influence of a static electric field. Situations were considered with both uniform and nonuniform electric fields. Bubble formation and detachment were visualized in terrestrial gravity as well as for several levels of reduced gravity (lunar, martian and microgravity) using a high-speed video camera. Bubble volume, dimensions and contact angles at detachment were measured. In addition to the experimental studies, a simple model, predicting bubble characteristics at detachment in an initially uniform electric field was developed. The model, based on thermodynamic considerations, accounts for the level of gravity as well as the magnitude of the uniform electric field. The results of the study indicate that the level of gravity and the electric field magnitude significantly affect bubble behavior as well as shape, volume and dimensions.

  7. Combined absolute and relative gravity measurement for microgravity monitoring in Aso volcanic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofyan, Yayan; Nishijima, Jun; Yoshikawa, Shin; Fujimitsu, Yasuhiro; Kagiyama, Tsuneomi; Fukuda, Yoichi

    2014-05-01

    Absolute measurement with a portable A10-017 absolute gravimeter at some benchmarks in the Aso volcanic field are valuable for reducing uncertainties of regional gravity variations and will be useful for delineating the long term trends of gravity changes. A10 absolute gravimeter is a new generation of portable absolute instrument and has accuracy 10 microGal. To further the development of a high precision gravity data, we also conducted measurement using two relative gravimeter (Scintrex CG-5 [549] and LaCoste type G-1016) to be combined with an A10 absolute gravimeter. The using absolute gravimeter along with relative gravimeter can reduce drift correction factor and improve the result of gravity change data in microgravity monitoring. Microgravity monitoring is a valued tool for mapping the redistribution of subsurface mass and for assessing changes in the fluid as a dynamic process in volcanic field. Gravity changes enable the characterization of subsurface processes: i.e., the mass of the intrusion or hydrothermal flow. A key assumption behind gravity monitoring is that changes in earth's gravity reflect mass-transport processes at depth [1]. The absolute gravity network was installed at seven benchmarks using on May 2010, which re-occupied in October 2010, and June 2011. The relative gravity measurements were performed at 28 benchmarks in one month before the eruption on May 2011 and then followed by series of gravity monitoring after the eruption in every three to five months. Gravity measurements covered the area more than 60 km2 in the west side of Aso caldera. Some gravity benchmarks were measured using both absolute and relative gravimeter and is used as the reference benchmarks. In longer time period, the combined gravity method will improve the result of gravity change data for monitoring in the Aso volcanic field. As a result, the gravity changes detected the hydrothermal flow in the subsurface which has a correlation to water level fluctuation in the

  8. Time variable Earth's gravity field from SLR satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sośnica, Krzysztof; Jäggi, Adrian; Meyer, Ulrich; Thaller, Daniela; Beutler, Gerhard; Arnold, Daniel; Dach, Rolf

    2015-10-01

    The time variable Earth's gravity field contains information about the mass transport within the system Earth, i.e., the relationship between mass variations in the atmosphere, oceans, land hydrology, and ice sheets. For many years, satellite laser ranging (SLR) observations to geodetic satellites have provided valuable information of the low-degree coefficients of the Earth's gravity field. Today, the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission is the major source of information for the time variable field of a high spatial resolution. We recover the low-degree coefficients of the time variable Earth's gravity field using SLR observations up to nine geodetic satellites: LAGEOS-1, LAGEOS-2, Starlette, Stella, AJISAI, LARES, Larets, BLITS, and Beacon-C. We estimate monthly gravity field coefficients up to degree and order 10/10 for the time span 2003-2013 and we compare the results with the GRACE-derived gravity field coefficients. We show that not only degree-2 gravity field coefficients can be well determined from SLR, but also other coefficients up to degree 10 using the combination of short 1-day arcs for low orbiting satellites and 10-day arcs for LAGEOS-1/2. In this way, LAGEOS-1/2 allow recovering zonal terms, which are associated with long-term satellite orbit perturbations, whereas the tesseral and sectorial terms benefit most from low orbiting satellites, whose orbit modeling deficiencies are minimized due to short 1-day arcs. The amplitudes of the annual signal in the low-degree gravity field coefficients derived from SLR agree with GRACE K-band results at a level of 77 %. This implies that SLR has a great potential to fill the gap between the current GRACE and the future GRACE Follow-On mission for recovering of the seasonal variations and secular trends of the longest wavelengths in gravity field, which are associated with the large-scale mass transport in the system Earth.

  9. Validation of GOCE global gravity field models using terrestrial gravity data in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šprlák, M.; Gerlach, C.; Pettersen, B.

    2012-01-01

    The GOCE (Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer) satellite gravity gradiometry mission maps the Earth's gravity field. Harmonic analysis of GOCE observations provides a global gravity field model (GGFM). Three theoretical strategies, namely the direct, the space-wise and the time-wise approach, have been proposed for GOCE harmonic analysis. Based on these three methods, several GGFMs have been provided to the user community by ESA. Thereby different releases are derived from different periods of GOCE observations and some of the models are based on combinations with other sources of gravity field information. Due to the multitude of GOCE GGFMs, validation against independent data is a crucial task for the quality description of the different models. In this study, GOCE GGFMs from three releases are validated with respect to terrestrial free-air gravity anomalies in Norway. The spectral enhancement method is applied to avoid spectral inconsistency between the terrestrial and the GOCE free-air gravity anomalies. The results indicate that the time-wise approach is a reliable harmonic analysis procedure in all three releases of GOCE models. The space-wise approach, available in two releases, provides similar results as the time-wise approach. The direct approach seems to be highly affected by a-priori information.

  10. GRAIL Gravity Field Determination Using the Celestial Mechanics Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Daniel; Jäggi, Adrian; Bertone, Stefano; Beutler, Gerhard; Meyer, Ulrich; Mervart, Leos; Bock, Heike

    2014-05-01

    To determine the gravity field of the Moon, the NASA mission GRAIL (Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory) inherits its concept from the GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) mission. The use of inter-satellite Ka-band range-rate (KBRR) observations enables data acquisition even when the spacecraft are not tracked from the Earth. The data allows for a highly accurate estimation of the lunar gravity field on both sides of the Moon, which is crucial to improve the understanding of its internal structure and thermal evolution. In this presentation we discuss GRAIL-based lunar gravity fields generated with the Celestial Mechanics Approach. KBRR observations and position data (GNI1B products) are used to solve for the lunar gravity field parameters in a generalized orbit determination problem. Apart from normalized spherical harmonic coefficients up to degrees n ≤ 200, also arc- and satellite-specific parameters, like initial state vectors and pseudo-stochastic pulses, are set up as common parameters for all measurement types. The latter shall compensate for imperfect models of non-gravitational accelerations, e.g., caused by solar radiation pressure. In addition, especially for the data of the primary mission phase, it is essential to estimate time bias parameters for the KBRR observations. We compare our results from the nominal and from the extended mission phase with the official Level 2 gravity field models first released in October 2013. Our results demonstrate that the lunar gravity field can be recovered with a high quality by adapting the Celestial Mechanics Approach, even when using pre-GRAIL or pre-SELENE gravity field models as a priori fields and when replacing sophisticated models of non-gravitational accelerations by appropriately spaced and constrained pseudo-stochastic pulses.

  11. A system for conducting igneous petrology experiments under controlled redox conditions in reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    The Space Shuttle and the planned Space Station will permit experimentation under conditions of reduced gravitational acceleration offering experimental petrologists the opportunity to study crystal growth, element distribution, and phase chemistry. In particular the confounding effects of macro and micro scale buoyancy-induced convection and crystal settling or floatation can be greatly reduced over those observed in experiments in the terrestrial laboratory. Also, for experiments in which detailed replication of the environment is important, the access to reduced gravity will permit a more complete simulation of processes that may have occurred on asteroids or in free space. A technique that was developed to control, measure, and manipulate oxygen fugacites with small quantities of gas which are recirculated over the sample is described. This system should be adaptable to reduced gravity space experiments requiring redox control. Experiments done conventionally and those done using this technique yield identical results done in a 1-g field.

  12. Quantum reduced loop gravity: Universe on a lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alesci, Emanuele; Cianfrani, Francesco

    2015-10-01

    We describe the quantum flat universe in Quantum Reduced Loop Gravity in terms of states based on cuboidal graphs with six-valent nodes. We investigate the action of the scalar constraint operator at each node, and we construct proper semiclassical states. This allows us to discuss the semiclassical effective dynamics of the quantum universe, which resembles that of Loop Quantum Cosmology. In particular, the regulator is identified with the third root of the inverse number of nodes within each homogeneous patch, while inverse-volume corrections are enhanced.

  13. Gravity field models derived from Swarm GPS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira da Encarnação, João; Arnold, Daniel; Bezděk, Aleš; Dahle, Christoph; Doornbos, Eelco; van den IJssel, Jose; Jäggi, Adrian; Mayer-Gürr, Torsten; Sebera, Josef; Visser, Pieter; Zehentner, Norbert

    2016-07-01

    It is of great interest to numerous geophysical studies that the time series of global gravity field models derived from Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) data remains uninterrupted after the end of this mission. With this in mind, some institutes have been spending efforts to estimate gravity field models from alternative sources of gravimetric data. This study focuses on the gravity field solutions estimated from Swarm global positioning system (GPS) data, produced by the Astronomical Institute of the University of Bern, the Astronomical Institute (ASU, Czech Academy of Sciences) and Institute of Geodesy (IfG, Graz University of Technology). The three sets of solutions are based on different approaches, namely the celestial mechanics approach, the acceleration approach and the short-arc approach, respectively. We derive the maximum spatial resolution of the time-varying gravity signal in the Swarm gravity field models to be degree 12, in comparison with the more accurate models obtained from K-band ranging data of GRACE. We demonstrate that the combination of the GPS-driven models produced with the three different approaches improves the accuracy in all analysed monthly solutions, with respect to any of them. In other words, the combined gravity field model consistently benefits from the individual strengths of each separate solution. The improved accuracy of the combined model is expected to bring benefits to the geophysical studies during the period when no dedicated gravimetric mission is operational.

  14. The combined gravity field model GOCO05c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fecher, Thomas; Pail, Roland; Gruber, Thomas; GOCO Project Team

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of the static gravity field is of importance for various scientific disciplines, such as geodesy, geophysics and oceanography. While for geophysics the gravity field provides insight into the Earth's interior, the geoid serves as an important reference surface for oceanographic applications. Moreover this reference surface is a key parameter on the way to a globally unified height system. In order to exploit the full potential of gravity measurements and to achieve the best gravity field solution, all kinds of complementary gravity field information have to be combined. By combining GRACE and GOCE information, a state of the art satellite-only gravity field is available, which is highly accurate at the very long to medium wavelengths (80-100 km). By adding information from terrestrial/airborne gravimetry and satellite altimetry, which both are measurement techniques providing short wavelength gravity information beyond the resolution of GOCE, the full gravity field spectrum can be obtained. This paper focuses on the presentation of the combined gravity field model GOCO05c, a global gravity field model up to degree and order 720 based on full normal equation systems (more than 500,000 parameters). During the calculation of GOCO05c we put emphasis on the question how the complementary data types can be combined in a global gravity field model in the way that all data types keep their specific strengths and are not degraded by the combination with other information in certain wavelengths. Realistic stochastic modelling and a tailored weighting scheme among all available data results in different regional relative weighting of satellite and terrestrial data in the combined solution, mainly depending on the quality of the available terrestrial gravity information. From this procedure, as complementary product realistic error estimates are available in terms of a full-covariance matrix, which can be mapped in a spatial error grid reflecting regionally specific

  15. Multi-scale gravity field modeling in space and time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuo; Panet, Isabelle; Ramillien, Guillaume; Guilloux, Frédéric

    2016-04-01

    The Earth constantly deforms as it undergoes dynamic phenomena, such as earthquakes, post-glacial rebound and water displacement in its fluid envelopes. These processes have different spatial and temporal scales and are accompanied by mass displacements, which create temporal variations of the gravity field. Since 2002, the GRACE satellite missions provide an unprecedented view of the gravity field spatial and temporal variations. Gravity models built from these satellite data are essential to study the Earth's dynamic processes (Tapley et al., 2004). Up to present, time variations of the gravity field are often modelled using spatial spherical harmonics functions averaged over a fixed period, as 10 days or 1 month. This approach is well suited for modeling global phenomena. To better estimate gravity related to local and/or transient processes, such as earthquakes or floods, and adapt the temporal resolution of the model to its spatial resolution, we propose to model the gravity field using localized functions in space and time. For that, we build a model of the gravity field in space and time with a four-dimensional wavelet basis, well localized in space and time. First we design the 4D basis, then, we study the inverse problem to model the gravity field from the potential differences between the twin GRACE satellites, and its regularization using prior knowledge on the water cycle. Our demonstration of surface water mass signals decomposition in time and space is based on the use of synthetic along-track gravitational potential data. We test the developed approach on one year of 4D gravity modeling and compare the reconstructed water heights to those of the input hydrological model. Perspectives of this work is to apply the approach on real GRACE data, addressing the challenge of a realistic noise, to better describe and understand physical processus with high temporal resolution/low spatial resolution or the contrary.

  16. High pressure droplet burning experiments in reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chauveau, Christian; Goekalp, Iskender

    1995-01-01

    A parametric investigation of single droplet gasification regimes is helpful in providing the necessary physical ideas for sub-grid models used in spray combustion numerical prediction codes. A research program has been initiated at the LCSR to explore the vaporization regimes of single and interacting hydrocarbon and liquid oxygen droplets under high pressure conditions. This paper summarizes the status of the LCSR program on the high pressure burning of single fuel droplets; recent results obtained under normal and reduced gravity conditions with suspended droplets are presented. In the work described here, parabolic flights of the CNES Caravelle is used to create a reduced gravity environment of the order of 10(exp -2) g(sub O). For all the droplet burning experiments reported here, the suspended droplet initial diameters are scattered around 1.5 mm; and the ambient air temperature is 300 K. The ambient pressure is varied between 0.1 MPa and 12 MPa. Four fuels are investigated: methanol (Pc = 7.9 MPa), n-heptane (Pc = 2.74 MPa), n-hexane (Pc = 3.01 MPa) and n-octane (Pc = 2.48 MPa).

  17. Combustion of Metals in Reduced-Gravity and Extraterrestrial Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbud-Madrid, A.; Omaly, P.; Branch, M. C.; Daily, J. W.

    1999-01-01

    As a result of the ongoing exploration of Mars and the several unmanned and manned missions planned for the future, increased attention has been given to the use of the natural resources of the planet for rocket propellant production and energy generation. Since the atmosphere of Mars consists of approximately 95% carbon dioxide (CO2), this gas is the resource of choice to be employed for these purposes. Unfortunately, CO2 is also a final product in most combustion reactions, requiring further processing to extract useful reactants such as carbon monoxide (CO), oxygen (O2), and hydrocarbons. An exception is the use Of CO2 as an oxidizer reacting directly with metal fuel. Since many metals burn vigorously with CO2, these may be used as an energy source and as propellants for an ascent/descent vehicle in sample-collection missions on Mars. In response to NASA's Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) Enterprise to search for appropriate in-situ resource utilization techniques, this investigation will study the burning characteristics of promising metal/CO2 combinations. The use of reduced gravity is essential to eliminate the intrusive buoyant flows that plague the high-temperature metal reactions, to remove the destructive effect of gravity on the shape of molten metal samples, and to study the influence of radiative heat transfer from solid oxides undisturbed by natural convection. In studies with large metal specimens, the burning process is invariably influenced by strong convective currents that accelerate the reaction and shorten the burning times. Although these currents are nearly absent from small burning particles, the high emissivity of the flames, rapid reaction, small length scales, and intermittent explosions make the gathering of any useful information on burning rates and flame structure very difficult. This investigation has the ultimate goal of providing a careful probing of flame structure and dynamics by taking advantage of large, free

  18. Containerless Processing in Reduced Gravity Using the TEMPUS Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roger, Jan R.; Robinson, Michael B.

    1996-01-01

    Containerless processing provides a high purity environment for the study of high-temperature, very reactive materials. It is an important method which provides access to the metastable state of an undercooled melt. In the absence of container walls, the nucleation rate is greatly reduced and undercooling up to (Tm-Tn)/Tm approx. 0.2 can be obtained, where Tm and Tn are the melting and nucleation temperatures, respectively. Electromagnetic levitation represents a method particularly well-suited for the study of metallic melts. The TEMPUS facility is a research instrument designed to perform electromagnetic levitation studies in reduced gravity. It provides temperatures up to 2600 C, levitation of several grams of material and access to the undercooled state for an extended period of time (up to hours).

  19. Evaluation of recent Earth's global gravity field models with terrestrial gravity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpik, Alexander P.; Kanushin, Vadim F.; Ganagina, Irina G.; Goldobin, Denis N.; Kosarev, Nikolay S.; Kosareva, Alexandra M.

    2016-03-01

    In the context of the rapid development of environmental research technologies and techniques to solve scientific and practical problems in different fields of knowledge including geosciences, the study of Earth's gravity field models is still important today. The results of gravity anomaly modelling calculated by the current geopotential models data were compared with the independent terrestrial gravity data for the two territories located in West Siberia and Kazakhstan. Statistical characteristics of comparison results for the models under study were obtained. The results of investigations show that about 70% of the differences between the gravity anomaly values calculated by recent global geopotential models and those observed at the points in flat areas are within ±10 mGal, in mountainous areas are within ±20 mGal.

  20. Finite field-dependent symmetries in perturbative quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyay, Sudhaker

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the absolutely anticommuting nilpotent symmetries for perturbative quantum gravity in general curved spacetime in linear and non-linear gauges. Further, we analyze the finite field-dependent BRST (FFBRST) transformation for perturbative quantum gravity in general curved spacetime. The FFBRST transformation changes the gauge-fixing and ghost parts of the perturbative quantum gravity within functional integration. However, the operation of such symmetry transformation on the generating functional of perturbative quantum gravity does not affect the theory on physical ground. The FFBRST transformation with appropriate choices of finite BRST parameter connects non-linear Curci-Ferrari and Landau gauges of perturbative quantum gravity. The validity of the results is also established at quantum level using Batalin-Vilkovisky (BV) formulation.

  1. Soldering in a Reduced Gravity Environment (SoRGE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easton, John W.; Struk, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    Future long-duration human exploration missions will be challenged by constraints on mass and volume allocations available for spare parts. Addressing this challenge will be critical to the success of these missions. As a result, it is necessary to consider new approaches to spacecraft maintenance and repair that reduce the need for large replacement components. Currently, crew members on the International Space Station (ISS) recover from faults by removing and replacing, using backup systems, or living without the function of Orbital Replacement Units (ORUs). These ORUs are returned to a depot where the root cause of the failure is determined and the ORU is repaired. The crew has some limited repair capability with the Modulation/DeModulation (MDM) ORU, where circuit cards are removed and replace in faulty units. The next step to reducing the size of the items being replaced would be to implement component-level repair. This mode of repair has been implemented by the U.S. Navy in an operational environment and is now part of their standard approach for maintenance. It is appropriate to consider whether this approach can be adapted for future spaceflight operations. To this end, the Soldering in a Reduced Gravity Environment (SoRGE) experiment studied the effect of gravity on the formation of solder joints on electronic circuit boards. This document describes the SoRGE experiment, the analysis methods, and results to date. This document will also contain comments from the crew regarding their experience conducting the SoRGE experiment as well as recommendations for future improvements. Finally, this document will discuss the plans for the SoRGE samples which remain on ISS.

  2. Particlelike distributions of the Higgs field nonminimally coupled to gravity.

    PubMed

    Füzfa, André; Rinaldi, Massimiliano; Schlögel, Sandrine

    2013-09-20

    When the Higgs field is nonminimally coupled to gravity, there exists a family of spherically symmetric particlelike solutions to the field equations. These monopoles are the only globally regular and asymptotically flat distributions with finite energy of the Higgs field around compact objects. Moreover, spontaneous scalarization is strongly amplified for specific values of their mass and compactness. PMID:24093242

  3. Bubble Detachment in Variable Gravity Under the Influence of a Non-Uniform Electric Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Shinan; Herman, Cila; Iacona, Estelle

    2002-01-01

    The objective of the study reported in this paper is to investigate the effects of variable, reduced gravity on the formation and detachment behavior of individual air bubbles under the influence of a non-uniform electric field. For this purpose, variable gravity experiments were carried out in parabolic nights. The non-uniform electric field was generated by a spherical electrode and a plate electrode. The effect of the magnitude of the non-uniform electric field and gravity level on bubble formation, development and detachment at an orifice was investigated. An image processing code was developed that allows the measurement of bubble volume, dimensions and contact angle at detachment. The results of this research can be used to explore the possibility of enhancing boiling heat transfer in the variable and low gravity environments by substituting the buoyancy force with a force induced by the electric field. The results of experiments and measurements indicate that the level of gravity significantly affects bubble shape, size and frequency. The electric field magnitude also influences bubble detachment, however, its impact is not as profound as that of variable gravity for the range of electric field magnitudes investigated in the present study.

  4. A comparison of satellite systems for gravity field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Argentiero, P. D.; Lowrey, B. E.

    1977-01-01

    A detailed and accurate earth gravity field model is important to the understanding of the structure and composition of the earth's crust and upper mantle. Various satellite-based techniques for providing more accurate models of the gravity field are analyzed and compared. A high-low configuration satellite-to-satellite tracking mission is recommended for the determination of both the long wavelength and short wavelength portions of the field. Satellite altimetry and satellite gradiometry missions are recommended for determination of the short wavelength portion of the field.

  5. GOCE Gravity fields established by the Celestial Mechanics Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, U.; Jaeggi, A.; Bock, H.; Beutler, G.

    2011-12-01

    The Celestial Mechanics Approach (CMA) was generalized to accept not only GPS- and K-Band-observations, but also the gradiometer Level 2 observables of the GOCE mission. The gradiometer observable is modeled as a linear function of the gravity field parameters and the parameters of a piece-wise linear function, which absorbs the deficiencies of the band-limited gradiometer observable including its once-, twice-, etc. per rev biases. The spacing of successive piecewise linear (and continuous) functions is typically of the order of one to few minutes. The piecewise linear functions have to be defined in a way not to absorb the gravity signal in the measurement bandwidth of the GOCE gradiometer observable. The resulting gravity fields are by construction independent of the underlying a priori gravity field. We analyze about six months of GOCE level 2 data and generate (a) GPS-only solutions, (b) gradiometer-only solutions based on the three diagonal elements of the gravity tensor, (c) combinations of solutions (a) and (b), and (d) combinations of the solutions of type (c) with static GRACE solutions, which were generated with the CMA, as well. Currently, for proof of concept purposes, the gravity fields are limited to degree n=160. Our analysis clearly reveals the spectrally resolved contributions of the individual solution types mentioned on the combined solutions.

  6. Fluid mechanics of directional solidification at reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. F.

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective of the proposed research is to provide additional groundbased support for the flight experiment 'Casting and Solidification Technology' (CAST). This experiment is to be performed in the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1) scheduled to be flown on a space shuttle mission scheduled for 1992. In particular, we will provide data on the convective motion and freckle formation during directional solidification of NH4Cl from its aqueous solution at simulated parameter ranges equivalent to reducing the gravity from the sea-level value down to 0.1 g or lower. The secondary objectives of the proposed research are to examine the stability phenomena associated with the onset of freckles and the mechanisms for their subsequent growth and decline (to eventual demise of some) by state-of-the-art imaging techniques and to formulate mathematical models for the prediction of the observed phenomena.

  7. Gauss-Bonnet Brane World Gravity with a Scalar Field

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Stephen C.

    2004-11-17

    The effective four-dimensional, linearised gravity of a brane world model with one extra dimension and a single brane is analysed. The model includes higher order curvature terms (such as the Gauss-Bonnet term) and a conformally coupled scalar field. Large and small distance gravitational laws are derived. In contrast to the corresponding Einstein gravity models, it is possible to obtain solutions with localised gravity which are compatible with observations. Solutions with non-standard large distance Newtonian potentials are also described.

  8. Mutualism in a Reduced Gravity Environment (MuRGE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haire, Timothy C.

    2010-01-01

    Mutualism in a Reduced Gravity Environment (MuRGE) is a ground research study to determine the feasibility of assessing fungi-plant (Piriformospora indica-Arabidopsis thaliana) interactions in microgravity. Seeds from the plant Arabiddospsis thaliana (At) will be grown in the presence of Piriformospora indica (Pi) an endophytic Sebacinacae family fungus. Pi is capable of colonizing the roots of a wide variety of plant species, including non-mycorrhizal hosts like At, and promoting plant growth similarly to AMF (arbusuclar mychorrizal fungi) unlike most AMF, Pi is not an obligate plant symbiont and can be grown in the absence of a host. In the presence of a suitable plant host, Pi can attach to and colonize root tips. Interaction visualization is accomplished with strong autofluorescence in the roots, followed by root colonization via fungal hyphae, and chlamydospore production. Increased root growth can be observed even before root colonization is detectable. In addition, Pi chlamydospores generated from axenic culture in microgravity will be used to inoculate roots of At grown in 1g to determine the effect of microgravity upon the inherent virulence or beneficial effects. Based on recent reports of increased virulence of S. typhimurium, P. aeruginosa, and S. Pneumoniae in reduced gravity, differences in microbial pathogenic responses and host plant systemic acquired resistance are expected. The focus of this project within MuRGE involved the development P. indica culture media evaluation and microscopy protocol development. High, clean spore harvest yields for the detection of fungi-plant interactions microscopically was the immediate goal of this experiment.

  9. Bi-Component Droplet Combustion in Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Benjamin D.

    2004-01-01

    This research deals with reduced-gravity combustion of bi-component droplets initially in the mm size range or larger. The primary objectives of the research are to study the effects of droplet internal flows, thermal and solutal Marangoni stresses, and species volatility differences on liquid species transport and overall combustion phenomena (e.g., gas-phase unsteadiness, burning rates, sooting, radiation, and extinction). The research program utilizes a reduced gravity environment so that buoyancy effects are rendered negligible. Use of large droplets also facilitates visualization of droplet internal flows, which is important for this research. In the experiments, droplets composed of low- and high-volatility species are burned. The low-volatility components are initially present in small amounts. As combustion of a droplet proceeds, the liquid surface mass fraction of the low-volatility component will increase with time, resulting in a sudden and temporary decrease in droplet burning rates as the droplet rapidly heats to temperatures close to the boiling point of the low-volatility component. This decrease in burning rates causes a sudden and temporary contraction of the flame. The decrease in burning rates and the flame contraction can be observed experimentally. Measurements of burning rates as well as the onset time for flame contraction allow effective liquid-phase species diffusivities to be calculated, e.g., using asymptotic theory. It is planned that droplet internal flows will be visualized in flight and ground-based experiments. In this way, effective liquid species diffusivities can be related to droplet internal flow characteristics. This program is a continuation of extensive ground-based experimental and theoretical research on bi-component droplet combustion that has been ongoing for several years. The focal point of this program is a flight experiment (Bi-Component Droplet Combustion Experiment, BCDCE). This flight experiment is under

  10. Lessons Learned from Performance Testing of Humans in Spacesuits in Simulated Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norcross, Jason R.; Chappell, Steven P.; Gernhardt, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The overarching objective of the Integrated Suit Test (IST) series is to evaluate suited human performance using reduced-gravity analogs and learn what aspects of an EVA suit system affect human performance. For this objective to be successfully achieved, the testing methodology should be valid and reproducible, and the partial-gravity simulations must be as accurate and realistic as possible. Objectives: To highlight some of the key lessons learned about partial-gravity analogs and testing methodology, and to suggest considerations for optimizing the effectiveness and quality of results of future tests. Methods: Performance testing of suited and unsuited subjects was undertaken in different reduced-gravity analogs including the Space Vehicle Mockup Facility s Partial Gravity Simulator (POGO), parabolic flight on the C-9 aircraft, underwater environments including NASA s Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) and the Neutral Buoyancy Lab (NBL), and in field analogs including Desert Research and Technology Studies (RATS), the Haughton Mars Project (HMP), and the JSC Rock Pile. Subjects performed level walking, incline/decline walking, running, shoveling, picking up and transferring rocks, kneeling/standing, and task boards. Lessons Learned Analogs: No single analog will properly simulate all aspects of the true partial-gravity environment. The POGO is an ideal environment from the standpoint that there are no time limits or significant volumetric constraints, but it does have several limitations. It allows only 2 translational degrees of freedom (DOF) and applies true partial-gravity offload only through the subject s center of gravity (CG). Also, when a subject is doing non-stationary tasks, significant overhead inertia from the lift column seems to have a negative impact on performance. Parabolic flight allows full translational and rotational DOF and applies offload to all parts of the body, but the simulation lasts less than 30 seconds

  11. Local Earth's gravity field in view of fractal dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mészárosová, Katarína; Minarechová, Zuzana; Janák, Juraj

    2013-04-01

    The poster presents the relative roughness of chosen characteristics of the Earth's gravity field in several small regions in area of Slovakia (e.g. free-air anomaly, Bouguer anomaly, gravity disturbance...) using the values of fractal dimension. In this approach, a three dimensional box counting method and the Hurst analysis method are applied to estimate the values of fractal dimensions. Then the computed fractal dimension values are used to compare all 3D models of all chosen characteristics.

  12. Time lapse gravity monitoring at Coso geothermal field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolf, Rachel Vest

    An extensive time lapse gravity data set was acquired over the Coso geothermal field near Ridgecrest, California starting in 1987, with the latest data set acquired in 2013. In this thesis I use these gravity data to obtain a better understanding of mass changes occurring within the geothermal field. Geothermal energy is produced by flashing naturally heated ground water into steam which is used to turn turbines. Brine and re-condensed steam are then re-injected into the reservoir. A percentage of the water removed from the system is lost to the process. The time lapse gravity method consists of gravity measurements taken at the same locations over time, capturing snap shots of the changing field. After careful processing, the final data are differenced to extract the change in gravity over time. This change in gravity can then be inverted to recover the change in density and therefore mass over time. The inversion process also produces information on the three dimensional locations of these mass changes. Thirty five gravity data sets were processed and a subsection were inverted with two different starting times, a sixteen point data set collected continuously between 1991 and 2005, and a thirty-eight point data set collected between 1996 and 2005. The maximum change in gravity in the 1991 data group was -350 microGal observed near station CSE2. For the 1996 data group the maximum gravity change observed over the nine year period was -248 microGal. The gravity data were then inverted using the surface inversion method. Three values of density contrast were used, -0.05 g/cm3, -0.10 g/cm3, and -0.20 g/cm3. The starting surface in 1991 was set to 2,500 ft above sea level. The changes in surfaces were then converted to mass changes. The largest total mass change recovered was -1.39x1011 kg. This mass value is of the same order of magnitude as published well production data for the field. Additionally, the gravity data produces a better understanding of the spatial

  13. The Effect of Gravity Fields on Cellular Gene Expression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes-Fulford, Millie

    1999-01-01

    Early theoretical analysis predicted that microgravity effects on the isolated cell would be minuscule at the subcellular level; however, these speculations have not proven true in the real world. Astronauts experience a significant bone and muscle loss in as little as 2 weeks of spaceflight and changes are seen at the cellular level soon after exposure to microgravity. Changes in biological systems may be primarily due to the lack of gravity and the resulting loss of mechanical stress on tissues and cells. Recent ground and flight studies examining the effects of gravity or mechanical stress on cells demonstrate marked changes in gene expression when relatively small changes in mechanical forces or gravity fields were made. Several immediate early genes (IEG) like c-fos and c-myc are induced by mechanical stimulation within minutes. In contrast, several investigators report that the absence of mechanical forces during space flight result in decreased sera response element (SRE) activity and attenuation of expression of IEGs such as c-fos, c-jun and cox-2 mRNAs. Clearly, these early changes in gene expression may have long term consequences on mechanically sensitive cells. In our early studies on STS-56, we reported four major changes in the osteoblast; 1) prostaglandin synthesis in flight, 2) changes in cellular morphology, 3) altered actin cytoskeleton and 4) reduced osteoblast growth after four days exposure to microgravity. Initially, it was believed that changes in fibronectin (FN) RNA, FN protein synthesis or subsequent FN matrix formation might account for the changes in cytoskeleton and/ or reduction of growth. However our recent studies on Biorack (STS-76, STS-81 and STS-84), using ground and in-flight 1-G controls, demonstrated that fibronectin synthesis and matrix formation were normal in microgravity. In addition, in our most recent Biorack paper, our laboratory has documented that relative protein synthesis and mRNA synthesis are not changed after 24

  14. Interior Models and Gravity Field of Jupiter's Moon Amalthea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinwurm, G.; Weber, R.

    2003-12-01

    Before its final plunge into Jupiter in September 2003, GALILEO made a last visit to Jupiters moon Amalthea. This final flyby of the spacecrafts successful mission occurred on November 5, 2002. In order to analyse the spacecraft data with respect to Amaltheas gravity field, interior models of the moon had to be provided. The method used for this approach is based on the numerical integration of infinitesimal volume elements, which are calculated by the scale factors of a three-axial ellipsoid (elliptic coordinates). To derive the gravity field coefficients of the body, the second method of Neumann was applied. Based on the spacecraft trajectory data provided by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, GALILEOs velocity perturbations at closest approach could be calculated. We have derived the harmonic coefficients of Amaltheas gravity field up to degree and order six, for both homogeneous and reasonable heterogeneous cases. Based on these numbers we calculated the impact on the trajectory of GALILEO and compared it to existing Doppler data. Although no two-way Doppler-data was available during the flyby and the harmonic coefficients of the gravity field are buried in the one-way Doppler-noise, the calculated gravity field models of Amalthea can be a basis for further exploration of the Jupiter system. Furthermore, the model approach can be used for any planetary body.

  15. Gravity field models derived from Swarm GPS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Teixeira da Encarnação, João; Arnold, Daniel; Bezděk, Aleš; Dahle, Christoph; Doornbos, Eelco; van den IJssel, Jose; Jäggi, Adrian; Mayer-Gürr, Torsten; Sebera, Josef; Visser, Pieter; Zehentner, Norbert

    2016-04-01

    The GPS instruments on-board the three Earth's Magnetic Field and Environment Explorer (Swarm) satellites provide the opportunity to measure the gravity field model at basin-wide spatial scales. In spite of being a geo-magnetic satellite mission, Swarm's GPS receiver collects highly accurate hl-SST data (van den IJssel et al., 2015), which has been exploited to produce gravity field models at a number of institutes, namely at the Astronomical Institute (ASU) of the Czech Academy of Sciences (Bezděk et al., 2014), the Astronomical Institute of the University of Bern (AIUB, Jäggi et al., 2015) and the Institute of Geodesy (IfG) of the Graz University of Technology (Zehentner et al., 2015). With the help of GRACE gravity field models, which are derived from much more accurate ll-SST data, we investigate the best combination strategy for producing a superior model on the basis of the solutions produced by the three institutes, similarly to the approach taken by the European Gravity Service for Improved Emergency Management project (http://egsiem.eu). We demonstrate that the Swarm-derived gravity field models are able to resolve monthly solutions with 1666km spatial resolutions (roughly up to degree 12). We illustrate how these monthly solutions correlate with GRACE-derived monthly solutions, for the period of 2014 - 2015, as well as indicate which geographical areas are measured more or less accurately.

  16. Near real-time GRACE gravity field solutions for hydrological monitoring applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvas, Andreas; Gouweleeuw, Ben; Mayer-Gürr, Torsten; Güntner, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Within the EGSIEM (European Gravity Service for Improved Emergency Management) project, a demonstrator for a near real-time (NRT) gravity field service which provides daily GRACE gravity field solutions will be established. Compared to the official GRACE gravity products, these NRT solutions will increase the temporal resolution from one month to one day and reduce the latency from currently two months to five days. This fast availability allows the monitoring of total water storage variations and of hydrological extreme events as they occur, in contrast to a 'confirmation after occurrence' as is the situation today. The service will be jointly run by GFZ (German Research Centre for Geosciences) and Graz University of Technology, with each analysis center providing an independent solution. A Kalman filter framework, in which GRACE data is combined with prior information, serves as basis for the gravity field recovery in order to increase the redundancy of the gravity field estimates. The on-line nature of the NRT service necessitates a tailored smoothing algorithm as opposed to post-processing applications, where forward-backward smoothing can be applied. This contribution gives an overview on the near real-time processing chain and highlights differences between the computed NRT solutions and the standard GRACE products. We discuss the special characteristics of the Kalman filtered gravity field models as well as derived products and give an estimate of the expected error levels. Additionally, we show the added value of the NRT solutions through comparison of the first results of the pre-operational phase with in-situ data and monthly GRACE gravity field models.

  17. Comustion of HAN-Based Monopropellant Droplets in Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, B. D.

    2001-01-01

    Hydroxylammonium nitrate (HAN) is a major constituent in a class of liquid monopropellants that have many attractive characteristics and which display phenomena that differ significantly from other liquid monopropellants. They are composed primarily of HAN, H2O and a fuel species, often triethanolammonium nitrate (TEAN). HAN-based propellants have attracted attention as liquid gun propellants, and are attractive for NASA spacecraft propulsion applications. A representative propellant is XM46. This mixture is 60.8% HAN, 19.2% TEAN and 20% H2O by weight. Other HAN-based propellant mixtures are also of interest. For example, methanol and glycine have been investigated as potential fuel species for HAN-based monopropellants for thruster applications. In the present research, experimental and theoretical studies are performed on combustion of HAN-based monopropellant droplets. The fuel species considered are TEAN, methanol and glycine. Droplets initially in the mm size range are studied at pressures up to 30 atm. These pressures are applicable to spacecraft thruster applications. The droplets are placed in environments with various amounts of Ar, N2, O2, NO2 and N2O. Reduced gravity is employed to enable observations of burning rates and flame structures to be made without the complicating effects of buoyant and forced convection. Normal gravity experiments are also performed in this research program. The experiment goals are to provide accurate fundamental data on deflagration rates, gasphase temperature profiles, transient gas-phase flame behaviors, the onset of bubbling in droplets at lower pressures, and the low-pressure deflagration limit. Theoretical studies are performed to provide rational models of deflagration mechanisms of HAN-based liquid propellants. Besides advancing fundamental knowledge, this research should aid in applications (e.g., spacecraft thrusters and liquid propellant guns) of this unique class of monopropellants.

  18. Cartan gravity, matter fields, and the gauge principle

    SciTech Connect

    Westman, Hans F.; Zlosnik, Tom G.

    2013-07-15

    Gravity is commonly thought of as one of the four force fields in nature. However, in standard formulations its mathematical structure is rather different from the Yang–Mills fields of particle physics that govern the electromagnetic, weak, and strong interactions. This paper explores this dissonance with particular focus on how gravity couples to matter from the perspective of the Cartan-geometric formulation of gravity. There the gravitational field is represented by a pair of variables: (1) a ‘contact vector’ V{sup A} which is geometrically visualized as the contact point between the spacetime manifold and a model spacetime being ‘rolled’ on top of it, and (2) a gauge connection A{sub μ}{sup AB}, here taken to be valued in the Lie algebra of SO(2,3) or SO(1,4), which mathematically determines how much the model spacetime is rotated when rolled. By insisting on two principles, the gauge principle and polynomial simplicity, we shall show how one can reformulate matter field actions in a way that is harmonious with Cartan’s geometric construction. This yields a formulation of all matter fields in terms of first order partial differential equations. We show in detail how the standard second order formulation can be recovered. In particular, the Hodge dual, which characterizes the structure of bosonic field equations, pops up automatically. Furthermore, the energy–momentum and spin-density three-forms are naturally combined into a single object here denoted the spin-energy–momentum three-form. Finally, we highlight a peculiarity in the mathematical structure of our first-order formulation of Yang–Mills fields. This suggests a way to unify a U(1) gauge field with gravity into a SO(1,5)-valued gauge field using a natural generalization of Cartan geometry in which the larger symmetry group is spontaneously broken down to SO(1,3)×U(1). The coupling of this unified theory to matter fields and possible extensions to non-Abelian gauge fields are left as

  19. Temporal gravity field modeling based on least square collocation with short-arc approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ran, jiangjun; Zhong, Min; Xu, Houze; Liu, Chengshu; Tangdamrongsub, Natthachet

    2014-05-01

    After the launch of the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) in 2002, several research centers have attempted to produce the finest gravity model based on different approaches. In this study, we present an alternative approach to derive the Earth's gravity field, and two main objectives are discussed. Firstly, we seek the optimal method to estimate the accelerometer parameters, and secondly, we intend to recover the monthly gravity model based on least square collocation method. The method has been paid less attention compared to the least square adjustment method because of the massive computational resource's requirement. The positions of twin satellites are treated as pseudo-observations and unknown parameters at the same time. The variance covariance matrices of the pseudo-observations and the unknown parameters are valuable information to improve the accuracy of the estimated gravity solutions. Our analyses showed that introducing a drift parameter as an additional accelerometer parameter, compared to using only a bias parameter, leads to a significant improvement of our estimated monthly gravity field. The gravity errors outside the continents are significantly reduced based on the selected set of the accelerometer parameters. We introduced the improved gravity model namely the second version of Institute of Geodesy and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (IGG-CAS 02). The accuracy of IGG-CAS 02 model is comparable to the gravity solutions computed from the Geoforschungszentrum (GFZ), the Center for Space Research (CSR) and the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). In term of the equivalent water height, the correlation coefficients over the study regions (the Yangtze River valley, the Sahara desert, and the Amazon) among four gravity models are greater than 0.80.

  20. Finite field-dependent symmetries in perturbative quantum gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyay, Sudhaker

    2014-01-15

    In this paper we discuss the absolutely anticommuting nilpotent symmetries for perturbative quantum gravity in general curved spacetime in linear and non-linear gauges. Further, we analyze the finite field-dependent BRST (FFBRST) transformation for perturbative quantum gravity in general curved spacetime. The FFBRST transformation changes the gauge-fixing and ghost parts of the perturbative quantum gravity within functional integration. However, the operation of such symmetry transformation on the generating functional of perturbative quantum gravity does not affect the theory on physical ground. The FFBRST transformation with appropriate choices of finite BRST parameter connects non-linear Curci–Ferrari and Landau gauges of perturbative quantum gravity. The validity of the results is also established at quantum level using Batalin–Vilkovisky (BV) formulation. -- Highlights: •The perturbative quantum gravity is treated as gauge theory. •BRST and anti-BRST transformations are developed in linear and non-linear gauges. •BRST transformation is generalized by making it finite and field dependent. •Connection between linear and non-linear gauges is established. •Using BV formulation the results are established at quantum level also.

  1. Shear waves in inhomogeneous, compressible fluids in a gravity field.

    PubMed

    Godin, Oleg A

    2014-03-01

    While elastic solids support compressional and shear waves, waves in ideal compressible fluids are usually thought of as compressional waves. Here, a class of acoustic-gravity waves is studied in which the dilatation is identically zero, and the pressure and density remain constant in each fluid particle. These shear waves are described by an exact analytic solution of linearized hydrodynamics equations in inhomogeneous, quiescent, inviscid, compressible fluids with piecewise continuous parameters in a uniform gravity field. It is demonstrated that the shear acoustic-gravity waves also can be supported by moving fluids as well as quiescent, viscous fluids with and without thermal conductivity. Excitation of a shear-wave normal mode by a point source and the normal mode distortion in realistic environmental models are considered. The shear acoustic-gravity waves are likely to play a significant role in coupling wave processes in the ocean and atmosphere. PMID:24606251

  2. An improved model for the Earth's gravity field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tapley, B. D.; Shum, C. K.; Yuan, D. N.; Ries, J. C.; Schutz, B. E.

    1989-01-01

    An improved model for the Earth's gravity field, TEG-1, was determined using data sets from fourteen satellites, spanning the inclination ranges from 15 to 115 deg, and global surface gravity anomaly data. The satellite measurements include laser ranging data, Doppler range-rate data, and satellite-to-ocean radar altimeter data measurements, which include the direct height measurement and the differenced measurements at ground track crossings (crossover measurements). Also determined was another gravity field model, TEG-1S, which included all the data sets in TEG-1 with the exception of direct altimeter data. The effort has included an intense scrutiny of the gravity field solution methodology. The estimated parameters included geopotential coefficients complete to degree and order 50 with selected higher order coefficients, ocean and solid Earth tide parameters, Doppler tracking station coordinates and the quasi-stationary sea surface topography. Extensive error analysis and calibration of the formal covariance matrix indicate that the gravity field model is a significant improvement over previous models and can be used for general applications in geodesy.

  3. Validation of the EGSIEM combined monthly GRACE gravity fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhao; van Dam, Tonie; Chen, Qiang; Weigelt, Matthias; Güntner, Andreas; Jäggi, Adrian; Meyer, Ulrich; Jean, Yoomin; Altamimi, Zuheir; Rebischung, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Observations indicate that global warming is affecting the water cycle. Here in Europe predictions are for more frequent high precipitation events, wetter winters, and longer and dryer summers. The consequences of these changes include the decreasing availability of fresh water resources in some regions as well as flooding and erosion of coastal and low-lying areas in other regions. These weather related effects impose heavy costs on society and the economy. We cannot stop the immediate effects global warming on the water cycle. But there may be measures that we can take to mitigate the costs to society. The Horizon2020 supported project, European Gravity Service for Improved Emergency Management (EGSIEM), will add value to EO observations of variations in the Earth's gravity field. In particular, the EGSIEM project will interpret the observations of gravity field changes in terms of changes in continental water storage. The project team will develop tools to alert the public water storage conditions could indicate the onset of regional flooding or drought. As part of the EGSIEM project, a combined GRACE gravity product is generated, using various monthly GRACE solutions from associated processing centers (ACs). Since each AC follows a set of common processing standards but applies its own independent analysis method, the quality, robustness, and reliability of the monthly combined gravity fields should be significantly improved as compared to any individual solution. In this study, we present detailed and updated comparisons of the combined EGSIEM GRACE gravity product with GPS position time series, hydrological models, and existing GRACE gravity fields. The GPS residuals are latest REPRO2 station position residuals, obtained by rigorously stacking the IGS Repro 2 , daily solutions, estimating, and then restoring the annual and semi-annual signals.

  4. High-Resolution Gravity and Time-Varying Gravity Field Recovery using GRACE and CHAMP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shum, C. K.

    2002-01-01

    This progress report summarizes the research work conducted under NASA's Solid Earth and Natural Hazards Program 1998 (SENH98) entitled High Resolution Gravity and Time Varying Gravity Field Recovery Using GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) and CHAMP (Challenging Mini-satellite Package for Geophysical Research and Applications), which included a no-cost extension time period. The investigation has conducted pilot studies to use the simulated GRACE and CHAMP data and other in situ and space geodetic observable, satellite altimeter data, and ocean mass variation data to study the dynamic processes of the Earth which affect climate change. Results from this investigation include: (1) a new method to use the energy approach for expressing gravity mission data as in situ measurements with the possibility to enhance the spatial resolution of the gravity signal; (2) the method was tested using CHAMP and validated with the development of a mean gravity field model using CHAMP data, (3) elaborate simulation to quantify errors of tides and atmosphere and to recover hydrological and oceanic signals using GRACE, results show that there are significant aliasing effect and errors being amplified in the GRACE resonant geopotential and it is not trivial to remove these errors, and (4) quantification of oceanic and ice sheet mass changes in a geophysical constraint study to assess their contributions to global sea level change, while the results improved significant over the use of previous studies using only the SLR (Satellite Laser Ranging)-determined zonal gravity change data, the constraint could be further improved with additional information on mantle rheology, PGR (Post-Glacial Rebound) and ice loading history. A list of relevant presentations and publications is attached, along with a summary of the SENH investigation generated in 2000.

  5. Combined Gravity Gradient and Jitter Accelerations Acting on Liquid-Vapor Interface Oscillations in Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Pan, H. L.

    1995-01-01

    The dynamical behavior of fluids affected by the asymmetric combined gravity gradient and jitter accelerations, in particular the effect of surface tension on partially-filled rotating fluids applicable to a full-scale Gravity Probe-B Spacecraft dewar tank, have been investigated. Three different cases of accelerations, one gravity gradient-dominated, one equally weighted between gravity gradient and jitter, and the others gravity jitter-dominated are studied. Results of slosh wave excitation along the liquid-vapor interface induced by gravity gradient-dominated acceleration indicate that the gravity gradient-dominated acceleration is equivalent to the combined effect of a twisting force and torsional moment acting on the spacecraft. Results of the slosh wave excitation along the liquid vapor interface induced by gravity jitter-dominated acceleration indicate that the gravity jitter-dominated acceleration is equivalent to time-dependent oscillatory forces which push the bubble in the combined directions of down-and-up and sideward -and-middleward as the bubble is rotating with respect to rotating dewar axis. This study discloses the slosh wave excitation along the liquid-vapor interface driven by the combined effects of gravity gradient and jitter accelerations which are two major driving forces affecting the stability of the fluid system in microgravity.

  6. Propagation of acoustic pulses in random gravity wave fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millet, Christophe; de La Camara, Alvaro; Lott, François

    2015-11-01

    A linear solution modeling the interaction between an incoming acoustic wave and a randomly perturbed atmosphere is developed, using the normal mode method. The wave mode structure is determined by a sound speed profile that is confining. The environmental uncertainty is described by a stochastic field obtained with a multiwave stochastic parameterization of gravity waves (GW). Using the propagating modes of the unperturbed atmosphere, the wave propagation problem is reduced to solving a system of ordinary differential equations. We focus on the asymptotic behavior of the transmitted waves in the weakly heterogeneous regime. In this regime, the coupling between the acoustic pulse and the randomly perturbed waveguides is weak and the propagation distance must be large enough for the wave to experience significant scattering. A general expression for the pressure far-field is derived in terms of saddle-point contributions. The saddle-points are obtained from a WKB approximation of the vertical eigenvalue problem. We present preliminary results that show how statistics of the transmitted signal are related to some eigenvalues and how an ``optimal'' GW field can trigger large deviations in the acoustic signals. The present model is used to explain the variability of infrasound signals.

  7. Phobos interior structure from its gravity field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Maistre, S.; Rosenblatt, P.; Rivoldini, A.

    2015-10-01

    Phobos origin remains mysterious. It could be a captured asteroid, or an in-situ object co-accreted with Mars or formed by accretion from a disk of impact ejecta.Although it is not straightforward to relate its interior properties to its origin, it is easy to agree that the interior properties of any body has to be accounted for to explain its life's history. What event could explain such an internal structure? Where should this object formed to present such interior characteristics and composition? We perform here numerical simulations to assess the ability of a gravity experiment to constrain the interior structure of the martian moon Phobos, which could in turn allow distinguishing among the competing scenarios for the moon's origin.

  8. New Views of Earth's Gravity Field from GRACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Map 1Map 2

    Gravity and the Earth's Shape Gravity is the force that is responsible for the weight of an object and is determined by how the material that makes up the Earth is distributed throughout the Earth. Because gravity changes over the surface of the Earth, the weight of an object changes along with it. One can define standard gravity as the value of gravity for an perfectly smooth 'idealized' Earth, and the gravity 'anomaly' is a measure of how actual gravity deviates from this standard. Gravity reflects the Earth's surface topography to a high degree and is associated with features that most people are familiar with such as large mountains and deep ocean trenches.

    Progress in Measuring the Earth's Gravity Field Through GRACE Prior to GRACE, the Earth's gravity field was determined using measurements of varying quality from different satellites and of incomplete coverage. Consequently the accuracy and resolution of the gravity field were limited. As is shown in Figure 1, the long wavelength components of the gravity field determined from satellite tracking were limited to a resolution of approximately 700 km. At shorter wavelengths, the errors were too large to be useful. Only broad geophysical features of the Earth's structure could be detected (see map 1).

    In contrast, GRACE, by itself, has provided accurate gravity information with a resolution of 200 km. Now, much more detail is clearly evident in the Earth's geophysical features (see map 2). High resolution features detected by GRACE that are representative of geophysical phenomena include the Tonga/Kermadec region (a zone where one tectonic plate slides under another), the Himalayan/Tibetan Plateau region (an area of uplift due to colliding plates), and the mid-Atlantic ridge (an active spreading center in the middle of the Atlantic ocean where new crust is being created). Future GRACE gravity

  9. TR-GRAV: National Center for Turkish Gravity Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simav, Mehmet; Akpınar, İlyas; Sezen, Erdinc; Cingöz, Ayhan; Yıldız, Hasan

    2016-04-01

    TR-GRAV, the National Center for Turkish Gravity Field (TR-GRAV) that has recently become operational,is a national center that collects, processes and distributes Absolute Gravimetry,Relative Gravimetry, Airborne Gravimetry,Shipborne Gravimetry,Satellite Gravimetry, GNSS/Levelling, Astrogeodetic Vertical Deflection data to model and improve regional gravity field for the Turkish territory and its surrounding regions and to provide accurate, consistent and value-added data & products to the scientific and engineering communities. In this presentation, we will introduce the center web portal and give some details about the database.

  10. Transition from Pool to Flow Boiling: The Effect of Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhir, Vijay K.

    2004-01-01

    Applications of boiling heat transfer in space can be found in the areas of thermal management, fluid handling and control, power systems, on-orbit storage and supply systems for cryogenic propellants and life support fluids, and for cooling of electronic packages for power systems associated with various instrumentation and control systems. Recent interest in exploration of Mars and other planets, and the concepts of in-situ resource utiliLation on Mars highlights the need to understand the effect of gravity on boiling heat transfer at gravity levels varying from 1>= g/g(sub e) >=10(exp -6). The objective of the proposed work was to develop a mechanistic understanding of nucleate boiling and critical heat flux under low and micro-gravity conditions when the velocity of the imposed flow is small. For pool boiling, the effect of reduced gravity is to stretch both the length scale as well as the time scale for the boiling process. At high flow velocities, the inertia of the liquid determines the time and the length scales and as such the gravitational acceleration plays little role. However, at low velocities and at low gravity levels both liquid inertia and buoyancy are of equal importance. At present, we have little understanding of the interacting roles of gravity and liquid inertia on the nucleate boiling process. Little data that has been reported in the literature does not have much practical value in that it can not serve as a basis for design of heat exchange components to be used in space. Both experimental and complete numerical simulations of the low velocity, low-gravity nucleate boiling process were carried out. A building block type of approach was used in that first the growth and detachment process of a single bubble and flow and heat transfer associated with the sliding motion of the bubble over the heater surface after detachment was studied. Liquid subcooling and flow velocity were varied parametrically. The experiments were conducted at 1 g(sub e

  11. A test on a Neuro-Fuzzy algorithm used to reduce continuous gravity records for the effect of meteorological parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andò, Bruno; Carbone, Daniele

    2004-05-01

    Gravity measurements are utilized at active volcanoes to detect mass changes linked to magma transfer processes and thus to recognize forerunners to paroxysmal volcanic events. Continuous gravity measurements are now increasingly performed at sites very close to active craters, where there is the greatest chance to detect meaningful gravity changes. Unfortunately, especially when used against the adverse environmental conditions usually encountered at such places, gravimeters have been proved to be affected by meteorological parameters, mainly by changes in the atmospheric temperature. The pseudo-signal generated by these perturbations is often stronger than the signal generated by actual changes in the gravity field. Thus, the implementation of well-performing algorithms for reducing the gravity signal for the effect of meteorological parameters is vital to obtain sequences useful from the volcano surveillance standpoint. In the present paper, a Neuro-Fuzzy algorithm, which was already proved to accomplish the required task satisfactorily, is tested over a data set from three gravimeters which worked continuously for about 50 days at a site far away from active zones, where changes due to actual fluctuation of the gravity field are expected to be within a few microgal. After accomplishing the reduction of the gravity series, residuals are within about 15 μGal peak-to-peak, thus confirming the capabilities of the Neuro-Fuzzy algorithm under test of performing the required task satisfactorily.

  12. Earth's gravity field mapping requirements and concept. [using a supercooled gravity gradiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonbun, F. O.; Kahn, W. D.

    1981-01-01

    A future sensor is considered for mapping the Earth's gravity field to meet future scientific and practical requirements for earth and oceanic dynamics. These are approximately + or - 0.1 to 10 mgal over a block size of about 50 km and over land and an ocean geoid to 1 to 2 cm over a distance of about 50 km. To achieve these values requires a gravity gradiometer with a sensitivity of approximately 10 to the -4 power EU in a circular polar orbiting spacecraft with an orbital altitude ranging 160 km to 180 km.

  13. A study of forced convection boiling under reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merte, Herman, Jr.

    1992-01-01

    This report presents the results of activities conducted over the period 1/2/85-12/31/90, in which the study of forced convection boiling under reduced gravity was initiated. The study seeks to improve the understanding of the basic processes that constitute forced convection boiling by removing the buoyancy effects which may mask other phenomena. Specific objectives may also be expressed in terms of the following questions: (1) what effects, if any, will the removal of body forces to the lowest possible levels have on the forced convection boiling heat transfer processes in well-defined and meaningful circumstances? (this includes those effects and processes associated with the nucleation or onset of boiling during the transient increase in heater surface temperature, as well as the heat transfer and vapor bubble behaviors with established or steady-state conditions); and (2) if such effects are present, what are the boundaries of the relevant parameters such as heat flux, heater surface superheat, fluid velocity, bulk subcooling, and geometric/orientation relationships within which such effects will be produced?

  14. Mutualism in a Reduced Gravity Environment (MuRGE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Karishma K.

    2010-01-01

    MuRGE (Mutualism in a Reduced Gravity Environment) is a NASA flight-research experiment to investigate the microgravity effects associated with cell-cell communication and beneficial microbe-host interactions using a plant-fungal model system. This investigation will use a clinostat, an instrument that slowly rotates the plants to negate the effects of gravitational pull on plant growth (gravitropism) and development, to simulate microgravity. I will be using the endophytic fungus Piriformospora indica (Pi) and the model plant species Arabidopsis thaliana (At). P. indica has been shown to colonize roots of various plant species, including A. thaliana, and to increase plant growth and resistance to stress. The fungus has the ability to grow from spores or in axenic cultures without the presence of a host. P. indica spores and P. indica extract will be used to inoculate Arabidopsis seeds germinated on a clinostat in order to determine if simulated microgravity affects the interaction between the fungus and its plant host.

  15. [Mutualism in a Reduced Gravity Environment (MuRGE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Karishma

    2010-01-01

    MuRGE (Mutualism in a Reduced Gravity Environment) is a NASA flight-research experiment to investigate the microgravity effects associated with cell-cell communication and beneficial microbe-host interactions using a plant-fungal model system. This investigation will use a clinostat, an instrument that slowly rotates the plants to negate the effects of gravitational pull on plant growth (gravitropism) and development, to simulate microgravity. I will be using the endophytic fungus Piriformospora indica (Pi) and the model plant species Arabidopsis thaliana (At). P. indica has been shown to colonize roots of various plant species, including A. thaliana, and to increase plant growth and resistance to stress. The fungus has the ability to grow from spores or in axenic cultures without the presence of a host. P. indica spores and P. indica extract will be used to inoculate Arabidopsis seeds germinated on a clinostat in order to determine if simulated microgravity affects the interaction between the fungus and its plant host.

  16. Experimental Methods in Reduced-gravity Soldering Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettegrew, Richard D.; Struk, Peter M.; Watson, John K.; Haylett, Daniel R.

    2002-01-01

    The National Center for Microgravity Research, NASA Glenn Research Center, and NASA Johnson Space Center are conducting an experimental program to explore the influence of reduced gravity environments on the soldering process. An improved understanding of the effects of the acceleration environment is important to application of soldering during current and future human space missions. Solder joint characteristics that are being considered include solder fillet geometry, porosity, and microstructural features. Both through-hole and surface mounted devices are being investigated. This paper focuses on the experimental methodology employed in this project and the results of macroscopic sample examination. The specific soldering process, sample configurations, materials, and equipment were selected to be consistent with those currently on-orbit. Other apparatus was incorporated to meet requirements imposed by operation onboard NASA's KC-135 research aircraft and instrumentation was provided to monitor both the atmospheric and acceleration environments. The contingent of test operators was selected to include both highly skilled technicians and less skilled individuals to provide a population cross-section that would be representative of the skill mix that might be encountered in space mission crews.

  17. Electric field in 3D gravity with torsion

    SciTech Connect

    Blagojevic, M.; Cvetkovic, B.

    2008-08-15

    It is shown that in static and spherically symmetric configurations of the system of Maxwell field coupled to 3D gravity with torsion, at least one of the Maxwell field components has to vanish. Restricting our attention to the electric sector of the theory, we find an interesting exact solution, corresponding to the azimuthal electric field. Its geometric structure is to a large extent influenced by the values of two different central charges, associated to the asymptotic AdS structure of spacetime.

  18. Static scalar field solutions in symmetric gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossenfelder, S.

    2016-09-01

    We study an extension of general relativity with a second metric and an exchange symmetry between the two metrics. Such an extension might help to address some of the outstanding problems with general relativity, for example the smallness of the cosmological constant. We here derive a family of exact solutions for this theory. In this two-parameter family of solutions the gravitational field is sourced by a time-independent massless scalar field. We find that the only limit in which the scalar field entirely vanishes is flat space. The regular Schwarzschild-solution is left with a scalar field hidden in the second metric’s sector.

  19. Alternative methods to smooth the Earth's gravity field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jekeli, C.

    1981-01-01

    Convolutions on the sphere with corresponding convolution theorems are developed for one and two dimensional functions. Some of these results are used in a study of isotropic smoothing operators or filters. Well known filters in Fourier spectral analysis, such as the rectangular, Gaussian, and Hanning filters, are adapted for data on a sphere. The low-pass filter most often used on gravity data is the rectangular (or Pellinen) filter. However, its spectrum has relatively large sidelobes; and therefore, this filter passes a considerable part of the upper end of the gravity spectrum. The spherical adaptations of the Gaussian and Hanning filters are more efficient in suppressing the high-frequency components of the gravity field since their frequency response functions are strongly field since their frequency response functions are strongly tapered at the high frequencies with no, or small, sidelobes. Formulas are given for practical implementation of these new filters.

  20. Higher derivative gravity: Field equation as the equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Ramit; Liberati, Stefano; Mohd, Arif

    2016-08-01

    One of the striking features of general relativity is that the Einstein equation is implied by the Clausius relation imposed on a small patch of locally constructed causal horizon. The extension of this thermodynamic derivation of the field equation to more general theories of gravity has been attempted many times in the last two decades. In particular, equations of motion for minimally coupled higher-curvature theories of gravity, but without the derivatives of curvature, have previously been derived using a thermodynamic reasoning. In that derivation the horizon slices were endowed with an entropy density whose form resembles that of the Noether charge for diffeomorphisms, and was dubbed the Noetheresque entropy. In this paper, we propose a new entropy density, closely related to the Noetheresque form, such that the field equation of any diffeomorphism-invariant metric theory of gravity can be derived by imposing the Clausius relation on a small patch of local causal horizon.

  1. A dynamic model of Venus's gravity field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, W. S.; Richards, M. A.; Hager, B. H.; Bills, B. G.

    1984-01-01

    Unlike Earth, long wavelength gravity anomalies and topography correlate well on Venus. Venus's admittance curve from spherical harmonic degree 2 to 18 is inconsistent with either Airy or Pratt isostasy, but is consistent with dynamic support from mantle convection. A model using whole mantle flow and a high viscosity near surface layer overlying a constant viscosity mantle reproduces this admittance curve. On Earth, the effective viscosity deduced from geoid modeling increases by a factor of 300 from the asthenosphere to the lower mantle. These viscosity estimates may be biased by the neglect of lateral variations in mantle viscosity associated with hot plumes and cold subducted slabs. The different effective viscosity profiles for Earth and Venus may reflect their convective styles, with tectonism and mantle heat transport dominated by hot plumes on Venus and by subducted slabs on Earth. Convection at degree 2 appears much stronger on Earth than on Venus. A degree 2 convective structure may be unstable on Venus, but may have been stabilized on Earth by the insulating effects of the Pangean supercontinental assemblage.

  2. A dynamic model of Venus's gravity field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, W. S.; Richards, M. A.; Hager, B. H.; Bills, B. G.

    1986-01-01

    Unlike Earth, long wavelength gravity anomalies and topography correlate well on Venus. Venus's admittance curve from spherical harmonic degree 2 to 18 is inconsistent with either Airy or Pratt isostasy, but is consistent with dynamic support from mantle convection. A model using whole mantle flow and a high viscosity near surface layer overlying a constant viscosity mantle reproduces this admittance curve. On Earth, the effective viscosity deduced from geoid modeling increases by a factor of 300 from the asthenosphere to the lower mantle. These viscosity estimates may be biased by the neglect of lateral variations in mantle viscosity associated with hot plumes and cold subducted slabs. The different effective viscosity profiles for Earth and Venus may reflect their convective styles, with tectonism and mantle heat transport dominated by hot plumes on Venus and by subducted slabs on Earth. Convection at degree 2 appears much stronger on Earth than on Venus. A degree 2 convective structure may be unstable on Venus, but may have been stabilized on Earth by the insulating effects of the Pangean supercontinental assemblage.

  3. Edge detection of gravity field using eigenvalue analysis of gravity gradient tensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Boxin; Hu, Xiangyun

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, eigenvalues of the full gravity gradient tensor (GGT) are used to detect edges of geological structure. First, the solving of GGT eigenvalues is discussed; then a new edge detection method is proposed by using the eigenvalues of GGT. Comparing with the pervious edge detection method based on curvature gravity gradient tensor (CGGT), the full gravity gradient tensor contains more independent gradient components that are helpful to detect more subtle structures of the sources. The proposed method is applied to the synthetic data with and without noise to determine the locations of the edges of the mixed positive/negative contract density bodies. It has also been tested on real field data. All of the experimental results have shown that the newly proposed method is effective for edge detection.

  4. Combustion of Metals in Reduced-Gravity and Extraterrestrial Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branch, M. C.; Abbud-Madrid, A.; Daily, J. W.

    2001-01-01

    As a result of the ongoing exploration of Mars and the several unmanned and possibly manned missions planned for the near future, increased attention has been given to the use of the natural resources of the planet for rocket propellant production and energy generation. Since the atmosphere of Mars consists of approximately 95% carbon dioxide (CO2), this gas is the resource of choice to be employed for these purposes. Since many metals burn vigorously with CO2, these may be used as an energy source or as propellants for a research vehicle on the surface of Mars. Shafirovich and Goldshleger conducted experiments with spherical particles up to 2.5 mm in diameter and found that the burning process was controlled by diffusion and that the particles exhibited pulsating combustion due to superheating of the Mg vapor trapped inside a protective oxide shell. They also proposed a reaction mechanism based on the gas-phase reaction, Mg + CO2 yields MgO + CO and the heterogeneous reaction Mg + CO yields MgO + C occurring on the sample surface. In all the above studies with large Mg particles, the burning process is invariably influenced by strong convective currents that accelerate the combustion reaction and shorten the burning times. Although these currents are nearly absent in the burning of small particles, the high emissivity of the flames, rapid reaction, and small length scales make the gathering of any useful information on burning rates and flame structure very difficult. The goal of this investigation is to provide a detailed study of flame structure by taking advantage of large, free-floating spherical metal samples and their corresponding long burning times available in a weightless environment. The use of reduced gravity is essential to eliminate the intrusive buoyant flows that plague high temperature metal reactions, to remove the destructive effect of gravity on the shape of molten metal samples, and to study the combustion behavior of metals in the presence of

  5. Swarm kinematic orbits and gravity fields from 18 months of GPS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäggi, A.; Dahle, C.; Arnold, D.; Bock, H.; Meyer, U.; Beutler, G.; van den IJssel, J.

    2016-01-01

    The Swarm mission consists of three satellites orbiting the Earth at low orbital altitudes. The onboard GPS receivers, star cameras, and laser retro-reflectors make the Swarm mission an interesting candidate to explore the contribution of Swarm GPS data to the recovery of both the static and time-variable gravity fields. We use 1.5 years of Swarm GPS and attitude data to generate kinematic positions of high quality to perform gravity field determination using the Celestial Mechanics Approach. The generated gravity fields reveal severe systematic errors along the geomagnetic equator. Their size is correlated with the ionospheric density and thus strongly varying over the analyzed time period. Similar to the findings of the GOCE mission, the systematic errors are related to the Swarm GPS carrier phase data and may be reduced by rejecting GPS data affected by large ionospheric changes. Such a measure yields a strong reduction of the systematic errors along the geomagnetic equator in the gravity field recovery. Long wavelength signatures of the gravity field may then be recovered with a similar quality as achieved with GRACE GPS data, which makes the Swarm mission well suited to bridge a potential gap between the current GRACE and the future GRACE Follow-On mission.

  6. Boiling in variable gravity under the action of an electric field: results of parabolic flight experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Marco, P.; Raj, R.; Kim, J.

    2011-12-01

    Results from the variable gravity pool boiling experiments performed during the 52nd ESA parabolic flight campaign are reported in this paper. During a typical parabola, the gravity acceleration changes from 1.8gE (high gravity) to ~0gE (low gravity) and finally back to 1.8gE. The two high gravity periods and the microgravity period are each roughly maintained for 20 seconds while the transition from high gravity to low gravity and vice versa occurs over a period of 3-5 seconds. Use of the high feedback frequency microheater array allowed quasi-steady boiling data over the continuous range of gravity levels (0gE-1.8gE). The experimental apparatus consisted of a boiling chamber with a 7×7 mm2 microheater array in a 10×10 configuration. Each heater in the array was individually controlled to maintain a constant temperature. The array could be operated in a full configuration or a selectively powered reduced set of 3×3 heaters. Experiments were performed with FC-72 as the test fluid, the pressure was maintained at a constant value between 1 and 1.13 atm and the subcooling ranged from 27 to 11 K. An external electric field was imposed over the boiling surface by means of a grid consisting of 4 rods, laid parallel to the surface; voltages up to 10 kV were applied. The electric field was effective in reducing the size of the detaching bubbles, and increasing the heat transfer compared to the values in low-g, although its effectiveness decayed as the heat flux/superheat increased. The current results compared well with previous results obtained in the ARIEL apparatus that was operated in orbital flight.

  7. Dynamic crystallization experiments on chondrule melts in reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lofgren, Gary; Williams, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    Chondrules crystallized during the earliest formational history of the solar system; and, if crystal settling and flotation are indicators of crystallization in the presence of gravity, they formed without the influence of gravity. In fact, attempts to duplicate the crystallization history of chondrules in the laboratory have met with limited success, because of the difficulty of comparing objects formed under the influence of gravity with objects that did not. These comparisons are difficult because there are several recognized features introduced by the presence of gravity and no doubt some which are not yet recognized. As a result there are several microscale and macroscale aspects of chondrule petrology which are difficult to understand quantitatively. Most of the features relate to the settling or flotation of early formed crystals. The proposed experiments are briefly described.

  8. Users Guide for NASA Lewis Research Center DC-9 Reduced-Gravity Aircraft Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neumann, Eric S.; Withrow, James P.; Yaniec, John S.

    1996-01-01

    The document provides guidelines and information for users of the DC-9 Reduced-Gravity Aircraft Program. It describes the facilities, requirements for test personnel, equipment design and installation, mission preparation, and in-flight procedures. Those who have used the KC-135 reduced-gravity aircraft will recognize that many of the procedures and guidelines are the same.

  9. Arctic Ocean Gravity Field Derived From ERS-1 Satellite Altimetry.

    PubMed

    Laxon, S; McAdoo, D

    1994-07-29

    The derivation of a marine gravity field from satellite altimetry over permanently ice-covered regions of the Arctic Ocean provides much new geophysical information about the structure and development of the Arctic sea floor. The Arctic Ocean, because of its remote location and perpetual ice cover, remains from a tectonic point of view the most poorly understood ocean basin on Earth. A gravity field has been derived with data from the ERS-1 radar altimeter, including permanently ice-covered regions. The gravity field described here clearly delineates sections of the Arctic Basin margin along with the tips of the Lomonosov and Arctic mid-ocean ridges. Several important tectonic features of the Amerasia Basin are clearly expressed in this gravity field. These include the Mendeleev Ridge; the Northwind Ridge; details of the Chukchi Borderland; and a north-south trending, linear feature in the middle of the Canada Basin that apparently represents an extinct spreading center that "died" in the Mesozoic. Some tectonic models of the Canada Basin have proposed such a failed spreading center, but its actual existence and location were heretofore unknown. PMID:17752757

  10. Collapse of charged scalar field in dilaton gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Borkowska, Anna; Rogatko, Marek; Moderski, Rafal

    2011-04-15

    We elaborated the gravitational collapse of a self-gravitating complex charged scalar field in the context of the low-energy limit of the string theory, the so-called dilaton gravity. We begin with the regular spacetime and follow the evolution through the formation of an apparent horizon and the final central singularity.

  11. Modeling of jet-induced geyser formation in a reduced gravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wendl, M. C.; Hochstein, J. I.; Sasmal, G. P.

    1991-01-01

    Flow patterns predicted by a computational model of jet-induced geyser formation in a reduced gravity environment are presented and comparison is made to patterns predicted by experimentally based correlations. The configuration studied is an idealization of a forthcoming flight experiment to examine cryogenic propellant management issues. A transitional version of the ECLIPSE code used as a computational tool for the analyses is described. It is shown that computationally predicted flow patterns are in qualitative agreement with the correlation-based predictions, and some details of the predicted flow fields are given.

  12. A study of two-phase flow in a reduced gravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, D.; Downing, Robert S.

    1987-01-01

    A test loop was designed and fabricated for observing and measuring pressure drops of two-phase flow in reduced gravity. The portable flow test loop was then tested aboard the NASA-JSC KC135 reduced gravity aircraft. The test loop employed the Sundstrand Two-Phase Thermal Management System (TPTMS) concept which was specially fitted with a clear two-phase return line and condenser cover for flow observation. A two-phase (liquid/vapor) mixture was produced by pumping nearly saturated liquid through an evaporator and adding heat via electric heaters. The quality of the two-phase flow was varied by changing the evaporator heat load. The test loop was operated on the ground before and after the KC135 flight tests to create a one-gravity data base. The ground testing included all the test points run during the reduced gravity testing. Two days of reduced gravity tests aboard the KC135 were performed. During the flight tests, reduced-gravity, one-gravity, and nearly two-gravity accelerations were experienced. Data was taken during the entire flight which provided flow regime and pressure drop data for the three operating conditions. The test results show that two-phase pressure drops and flow regimes can be accurately predicted in zero-gravity.

  13. Simulation and preparation of surface EVA in reduced gravity at the Marseilles Bay subsea analogue sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, P.; Gardette, B.; Chirié, B.; Collina-Girard, J.; Delauze, H. G.

    2012-12-01

    Extravehicular activity (EVA) of astronauts during space missions is simulated nowadays underwater in neutral buoyancy facilities. Certain aspects of weightlessness can be reproduced underwater by adding buoyancy to a diver-astronaut, therefore exposing the subject to the difficulties of working without gravity. Such tests were done at the COMEX' test pool in Marseilles in the 1980s to train for a French-Russian mission to the MIR station, for the development of the European HERMES shuttle and the COLUMBUS laboratory. However, space agencies are currently studying missions to other destinations than the International Space Station in orbit, such as the return to the Moon, NEO (near-Earth objects) or Mars. All these objects expose different gravities: Moon has one sixth of Earth's gravity, Mars has a third of Earth's gravity and asteroids have virtually no surface gravity; the astronaut "floats" above the ground. The preparation of such missions calls for a new concept in neutral buoyancy training, not on man-made structures, but on natural terrain, underwater, to simulate EVA operations such as sampling, locomotion or even anchoring in low gravity. Underwater sites can be used not only to simulate the reduced gravity that astronauts will experience during their field trips, also human factors like stress are more realistically reproduced in such environment. The Bay of Marseille hosts several underwater sites that can be used to simulate various geologic morphologies, such as sink-holes which can be used to simulate astronaut descends into craters, caves where explorations of lava tubes can be trained or monolithic rock structures that can be used to test anchoring devices (e.g., near Earth objects). Marseilles with its aerospace and maritime/offshore heritage hosts the necessary logistics and expertise that is needed to perform such simulations underwater in a safe manner (training of astronaut-divers in local test pools, research vessels, subsea robots and

  14. On a more rigorous gravity field processing for future LL-SST type gravity satellite missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daras, I.; Pail, R.; Murböck, M.

    2013-12-01

    In order to meet the augmenting demands of the user community concerning accuracies of temporal gravity field models, future gravity missions of low-low satellite-to-satellite tracking (LL-SST) type are planned to carry more precise sensors than their precedents. A breakthrough is planned with the improved LL-SST measurement link, where the traditional K-band microwave instrument of 1μm accuracy will be complemented by an inter-satellite ranging instrument of several nm accuracy. This study focuses on investigations concerning the potential performance of the new sensors and their impact in gravity field solutions. The processing methods for gravity field recovery have to meet the new sensor standards and be able to take full advantage of the new accuracies that they provide. We use full-scale simulations in a realistic environment to investigate whether the standard processing techniques suffice to fully exploit the new sensors standards. We achieve that by performing full numerical closed-loop simulations based on the Integral Equation approach. In our simulation scheme, we simulate dynamic orbits in a conventional tracking analysis to compute pseudo inter-satellite ranges or range-rates that serve as observables. Each part of the processing is validated separately with special emphasis on numerical errors and their impact in gravity field solutions. We demonstrate that processing with standard precision may be a limiting factor for taking full advantage of new generation sensors that future satellite missions will carry. Therefore we have created versions of our simulator with enhanced processing precision with primarily aim to minimize round-off system errors. Results using the enhanced precision show a big reduction of system errors that were present at the standard precision processing even for the error-free scenario, and reveal the improvements the new sensors will bring into the gravity field solutions. As a next step, we analyze the contribution of

  15. Rhea gravity field and interior modeling from Cassini data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tortora, Paolo; Zannoni, Marco; Hemingway, Doug; Nimmo, Francis; Jacobson, Robert A.; Iess, Luciano; Parisi, Marzia

    2016-01-01

    During its tour of the Saturn system, Cassini performed two close flybys of Rhea dedicated to gravity investigations, the first in November 2005 and the second in March 2013. This paper presents an estimation of Rhea's fully unconstrained quadrupole gravity field obtained from a joint multi-arc analysis of the two Cassini flybys. Our best estimates of the main gravity quadrupole unnormalized coefficients are J2 × 106 = 946.0 ± 13.9, C22 × 106 = 242.1 ± 4.0 (uncertainties are 1-σ). Their resulting ratio is J2/C22 = 3.91 ± 0.10, statistically not compatible (at a 5-σ level) with the theoretical value of 10/3, predicted for a hydrostatic satellite in slow, synchronous rotation around a planet. Therefore, it is not possible to infer the moment of inertia factor directly using the Radau-Darwin approximation. The observed excess J2 (gravity oblateness) was investigated using a combined analysis of gravity and topography, under different plausible geophysical assumptions. The observed gravity is consistent with that generated by the observed shape for an undifferentiated (uniform density) body. However, because the surface is more likely to be water ice, a two-layer model may be a better approximation. In this case, and assuming a mantle density of 920 kg/m3, some 1-3 km of excess core oblateness is consistent with the observed gravity. A wide range of moments of inertia is allowed, but models with low moments of inertia (i.e., more differentiation) require greater magnitudes of excess core topography to satisfy the observations.

  16. Perturbative quantum gravity in double field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boels, Rutger H.; Horst, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    We study perturbative general relativity with a two-form and a dilaton using the double field theory formulation which features explicit index factorisation at the Lagrangian level. Explicit checks to known tree level results are performed. In a natural covariant gauge a ghost-like scalar which contributes even at tree level is shown to decouple consistently as required by perturbative unitarity. In addition, a lightcone gauge is explored which bypasses the problem altogether. Using this gauge to study BCFW on-shell recursion, we can show that most of the D-dimensional tree level S-matrix of the theory, including all pure graviton scattering amplitudes, is reproduced by the double field theory. More generally, we argue that the integrand may be reconstructed from its single cuts and provide limited evidence for off-shell cancellations in the Feynman graphs. As a straightforward application of the developed technology double field theory-like expressions for four field string corrections are derived.

  17. Dirac fields in loop quantum gravity and big bang nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Bojowald, Martin; Das, Rupam; Scherrer, Robert J.

    2008-04-15

    Big bang nucleosynthesis requires a fine balance between equations of state for photons and relativistic fermions. Several corrections to equation of state parameters arise from classical and quantum physics, which are derived here from a canonical perspective. In particular, loop quantum gravity allows one to compute quantum gravity corrections for Maxwell and Dirac fields. Although the classical actions are very different, quantum corrections to the equation of state are remarkably similar. To lowest order, these corrections take the form of an overall expansion-dependent multiplicative factor in the total density. We use these results, along with the predictions of big bang nucleosynthesis, to place bounds on these corrections and especially the patch size of discrete quantum gravity states.

  18. Inflation with a massive vector field nonminimally coupled to gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolami, O.; Bessa, V.; Páramos, J.

    2016-03-01

    We study the possibility that inflation is driven by a massive vector field with S O (3 ) global symmetry nonminimally coupled to gravity. From an E3-invariant Robertson-Walker metric we propose an Ansatz for the vector field, allowing us to study the evolution of the system. We study the behavior of the equations of motion using the methods of the theory of dynamical systems and find exponential inflationary regimes.

  19. Torsion-gravity for Dirac fields and their effective phenomenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabbri, Luca

    2014-08-01

    We will consider the torsional completion of gravity for a background filled with Dirac matter fields, studying the weak-gravitational non-relativistic approximation, in view of an assessment about their effective phenomenology: we discuss how the torsionally-induced nonlinear interactions among fermion fields in this limit are compatible with all experiments and remarks on the role of torsion to suggest new physics are given.

  20. Effective field theory from modified gravity with massive modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capozziello, Salvatore; de Laurentis, Mariafelicia; Paolella, Mariacristina; Ricciardi, Giulia

    2015-10-01

    Massive gravitational modes in effective field theories can be recovered by extending General Relativity and taking into account generic functions of the curvature invariants, not necessarily linear in the Ricci scalar R. In particular, adopting the minimal extension of f(R) gravity, an effective field theory with massive modes is straightforwardly recovered. This approach allows to evade shortcomings like ghosts and discontinuities if a suitable choice of expansion parameters is performed.

  1. Relativistic gravity and parity-violating nonrelativistic effective field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chaolun; Wu, Shao-Feng

    2015-06-01

    We show that the relativistic gravity theory can offer a framework to formulate the nonrelativistic effective field theory in a general coordinate invariant way. We focus on the parity violating case in 2 +1 dimensions which is particularly appropriate for the study on quantum Hall effects and chiral superfluids. We discuss how the nonrelativistic spacetime structure emerges from relativistic gravity. We present covariant maps and constraints that relate the field contents in the two theories, which also serve as the holographic dictionary in the context of gauge/gravity duality. A low energy effective action for fractional quantum Hall states is constructed, which captures universal geometric properties and generates nonuniversal corrections systematically. We give another holographic example with dyonic black brane background to calculate thermodynamic and transport properties of strongly coupled nonrelativistic fluids in magnetic field. In particular, by identifying the shift function in the gravity as a minus of guiding center velocity, we obtain the Hall viscosity with its relation to Landau orbital angular momentum density proportional to Wen-Zee shift. Our formalism has a good projection to lowest Landau level.

  2. Properties of the gravity fields of terrestrial planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaula, William M.

    1992-01-01

    The properties of the gravity fields of the earth, Mars, and Venus, as expressed by spherical harmonic coefficients, are examined, using the harmonic expansions of the respective planetary topographies reported by Balmino et al. (1973), Bills and Ferrari (1978), and Bills and Kobrick (1985). The items examined include the spectral magnitudes and slopes of the gravity coefficients; the correlations between gravity and topography; and the correlations among different gravity harmonics, expressed by axiality and angularity. It was found that Venus differs from the other two planets in its great apparent depths of compensation, indicating a tectonics dominated by a stiff upper mantle. In addition, Venus has less activity deep in the mantle than do earth or Mars. Mars is marked by large gravity irregularities, as well as by their axial symmetry on a global scale. Although earth is probably the most peculiar planet, spherical harmonics do not bring out its varied characteristics. It is clearly a more active planet than Venus, with activity deep in the mantle. The lower magnitude of its higher harmonics is considered to be due to water recycled to the upper mantle.

  3. Combustion of Metals in Reduced-Gravity and Extra Terrestrial Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branch, M.C.; Abbud-Madrid, A.; Daily, J. W.

    1999-01-01

    The combustion of metals is a field with important practical applications in rocket propellants, high-temperature flames, and material synthesis. Also, the safe operation of metal containers in high-pressure oxygen systems and with cryogenic fuels and oxidizers remains an important concern in industry. The increasing use of metallic components in spacecraft and space structures has also raised concerns about their flammability properties and fire suppression mechanisms. In addition, recent efforts to embark on unmanned and manned planetary exploration, such as on Mars, have also renewed the interest in metal/carbon-dioxide combustion as an effective in situ resource utilization technology. In spite of these practical applications, the understanding of the combustion properties of metals remains far behind that of the most commonly used fuels such as hydrocarbons. The lack of understanding is due to the many problems unique to metal- oxidizer reactions such as: low-temperature surface oxidation prior to ignition, heterogeneous reactions, very high combustion temperatures, product condensation, high emissivity of products, and multi-phase interactions. Very few analytical models (all neglecting the influence of gravity) have been developed to predict the burning characteristics and the flame structure details. Several experimental studies attempting to validate these models have used small metal particles to recreate gravity-free conditions. The high emissivity of the flames, rapid reaction, and intermittent explosions experienced by these particles have made the gathering of any useful information on burning rates and flame structure very difficult. The use of a reduced gravity environment is needed to clarify some of the complex interactions among the phenomena described above. First, the elimination of the intrusive buoyant flows that plague all combustion phenomena is of paramount importance in metal reactions due to the much higher temperatures reached during

  4. New standards for reducing gravity data: The North American gravity database

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinze, W. J.; Aiken, C.; Brozena, J.; Coakley, B.; Dater, D.; Flanagan, G.; Forsberg, R.; Hildenbrand, T.; Keller, Gordon R.; Kellogg, J.; Kucks, R.; Li, X.; Mainville, A.; Morin, R.; Pilkington, M.; Plouff, D.; Ravat, D.; Roman, D.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Veronneau, M.; Webring, M.; Winester, D.

    2005-01-01

    The North American gravity database as well as databases from Canada, Mexico, and the United States are being revised to improve their coverage, versatility, and accuracy. An important part of this effort is revising procedures for calculating gravity anomalies, taking into account our enhanced computational power, improved terrain databases and datums, and increased interest in more accurately defining long-wavelength anomaly components. Users of the databases may note minor differences between previous and revised database values as a result of these procedures. Generally, the differences do not impact the interpretation of local anomalies but do improve regional anomaly studies. The most striking revision is the use of the internationally accepted terrestrial ellipsoid for the height datum of gravity stations rather than the conventionally used geoid or sea level. Principal facts of gravity observations and anomalies based on both revised and previous procedures together with germane metadata will be available on an interactive Web-based data system as well as from national agencies and data centers. The use of the revised procedures is encouraged for gravity data reduction because of the widespread use of the global positioning system in gravity fieldwork and the need for increased accuracy and precision of anomalies and consistency with North American and national databases. Anomalies based on the revised standards should be preceded by the adjective "ellipsoidal" to differentiate anomalies calculated using heights with respect to the ellipsoid from those based on conventional elevations referenced to the geoid. ?? 2005 Society of Exploration Geophysicists. All rights reserved.

  5. Diffraction patterns in ferrofluids: Effect of magnetic field and gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radha, S.; Mohan, Shalini; Pai, Chintamani

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we report the experimental observation of diffraction patterns in a ferrofluid comprising of Fe3O4 nanoparticles in hexane by a 10 mW He-Ne laser beam. An external dc magnetic field (0-2 kG) was applied perpendicular to the beam. The diffraction pattern showed a variation at different depths of the sample in both zero and applied magnetic field. The patterns also exhibit a change in shape and size as the external field is varied. This effect arises due to thermally induced self-diffraction under the influence of gravity and external magnetic field.

  6. Aerosol Deposition in the Human Lung in Reduced Gravity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The deposition of aerosol in the human lung occurs mainly through a combination of inertial impaction, gravitational sedimentation, and diffusion. For 0.5- to 5-μm-diameter particles and resting breathing conditions, the primary mechanism of deposition in the intrathoracic airways is sedimentation, and therefore the fate of these particles is markedly affected by gravity. Studies of aerosol deposition in altered gravity have mostly been performed in humans during parabolic flights in both microgravity (μG) and hypergravity (∼1.6G), where both total deposition during continuous aerosol mouth breathing and regional deposition using aerosol bolus inhalations were performed with 0.5- to 3-μm particles. Although total deposition increased with increasing gravity level, only peripheral deposition as measured by aerosol bolus inhalations was strongly dependent on gravity, with central deposition (lung depth<200 mL) being similar between gravity levels. More recently, the spatial distribution of coarse particles (mass median aerodynamic diameter≈5 μm) deposited in the human lung was assessed using planar gamma scintigraphy. The absence of gravity caused a smaller portion of 5-μm particles to deposit in the lung periphery than in the central region, where deposition occurred mainly in the airways. Indeed, 5-μm-diameter particles deposit either by inertial impaction, a mechanism most efficient in the large and medium-sized airways, or by gravitational sedimentation, which is most efficient in the distal lung. On the contrary, for fine particles (∼1 μm), both aerosol bolus inhalations and studies in small animals suggest that particles deposit more peripherally in μG than in 1G, beyond the reach of the mucociliary clearance system. PMID:24870702

  7. Rapid 3-D forward modeling of gravity and gravity gradient tensor fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longwei, C.; Dai, S.; Zhang, Q.

    2014-12-01

    Three-dimensional inversion are the key process in gravity exploration. In the commonly used scheme of inversion, the subsurface of the earth is usually divided into many small prism blocks (or grids) with variable density values. A key task in gravity inversion is to calculate the composite fields (gravity and gravity gradient tensor) generated by all these grids, this is known as forward modeling. In general forward modeling is memory-demanding and time-consuming. One scheme to rapidly calculate the fields is to implement it in Fourier domain and use fast Fourier transform algorithm. The advantage of the Fourier domain method is, obviously, much faster. However, the intrinsic edge effect of the Fourier domain method degrades the precision of the calculated fields. We have developed an innovative scheme to directly calculate the fields in spatial domain. There are two key points in this scheme. One key point is spatial discretization. Spatial convolution formula is discretized using an approach similar to normal difference method. A key idea during discretization is to use the analytical formula of a cubic prism, and this makes the resultant discrete formula have clear physical meaning: it embodies the superposition principle of the fields and is the exact formula to calculate the fields generated by all grids. The discretization only requires the grids have the same dimension in horizontal directions, and grids in different layers may have different dimension in vertical direction, and this offers more flexibility for inversion. Another key point is discrete convolution calculation. We invoke a high efficient two-dimensional discrete convolution algorithm, and it guarantees both time-saving and memory-saving. Its memory cost has the same order as the number of grids. Numerical test result shows that for a model with a dimension of 1000x1000x201 grids, it takes about 300s to calculate the fields on 1000x1000 field points in a personal computer with 3.4-GHz CPU

  8. Tunable Superconducting Gravity Gradiometer for Mars Climate, Atmosphere, and Gravity Field Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griggs, C. E.; Paik, H. J.; Moody, M. V.; Han, S.-C.; Rowlands, D. D.; Lemoine, F. G.; Shirron, P. J.

    2015-01-01

    We are developing a compact tensor superconducting gravity gradiometer (SGG) for obtaining gravimetric measurements from planetary orbits. A new and innovative design gives a potential sensitivity of approximately 10(sup -4) E Hz(sup - 1/2)( 1 E = 10(sup -9 S(sup -2) in the measurement band up to 0.1 Hz (suitale for short wavelength static gravity) and of approximately 10(sup -4) E Hz(sup - 1/2) in the frequency band less than 1 mHz (for long wavelength time-variable gravity) from the same device with a baseline just over 10 cm. The measurement band and sensitiy can be optimally tuned in-flight during the mission by changing resonance frequencies, which allows meaurements of both static and time-variable gravity fields from the same mission. Significant advances in the technologies needed for space-based cryogenic instruments have been made in the last decade. In particular, the use of cryocoolers will alleviate the previously severe constraint on mission lifetime imposed by the use of liquid helium, enabling mission durations in the 5 - 10 year range.

  9. Satellite laser ranging and gravity field modeling accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosborough, George W.

    1990-01-01

    Gravitational field mismodeling procedures errors in the estimated orbital motion of near Earth satellites. This effect is studied using a linear perturbation approach following the analysis of Kaula. The perturbations in the orbital position as defined by either orbital elements or Cartesian components are determined. From these perturbations it is possible to ascertain the expected signal due to gravitational mismodeling that would be present in station-to-satellite laser ranging measurements. This expected signal has been estimated for the case of the Lageos satellite and using the predicted uncertainties of the GEM-T1 and GEM-T2 gravity field models. The results indicate that observable signal still exists in the laser range residuals given the current accuracy of the range measurements and the accuracy of the gravity field models.

  10. Cautionary tales for reduced-gravity particle research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, John R.; Greeley, Ronald; Tucker, D. W.

    1987-01-01

    Failure of experiments conducted on the KC-135 aircraft in zero gravity are discussed. Tests that were a total failure are reported. Why the failure occurred and the sort of questions that potential researchers should ask in order to avoid the appearance of abstracts such as this are discussed. Many types of aggregation studies were proposed for the Space Station, and it is hoped that the following synopsis of events will add a touch of reality to experimentation proposed for this zero-gravity environment.

  11. Gravity- and strain-induced electric fields outside metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, F.; Opat, G. I.

    1992-05-01

    The gravity-induced electric field outside a metal object supported against gravity is predominantly due to its differential compression which arises in supporting its own weight. This Dessler-Michel-Rorschach-Trammell (DMRT) field, as it has come to be known, is expected to be proportional to the strain derivative of the work function of the surface. We report the results of an experiment designed to produce this effect with mechanically applied strain rather than with gravity. In essence, we have measured the strain-induced contact-potential variation between a metal surface of known strain gradient and an unstrained capacitive probe. We describe useful solutions to the problems faced in such an experiment, which were not adequately addressed by earlier workers. A knowledge of the DMRT field is of considerable importance to experiments designed to compare the gravitational acceleration of charged particles and antiparticles inside a metallic shield. Past experiments with electrons yielded results contrary to the then-expected DMRT field. We review and partially extend the theoretical background by drawing on later results based on the jellium model of metal surfaces. Our results for Cu and Au surfaces are consistent with jellium-based calculations which imply a DMRT field that is about an order of magnitude smaller and of opposite sign to the early estimates.

  12. Time-variable gravity fields from satellite tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettadpur, Srinivas; Cheng, Minkang; Ries, John

    2014-05-01

    At the University of Texas Center for Space Research (CSR), we routinely deliver time-series of Earth's gravity field variations, some of it spanning more than two decades. These time-series are derived - in a consistent manner - from satellite laser ranging (SLR) data, from low-Earth orbiters tracked using GPS, and from low-low satellite to satellite tracking data from GRACE. In this paper, we review the information content in the gravity field time-series derived from each of these methods. We provide a comparison of the time-series at the decadal and annual time-scales, and identify the spatial modes of variability that are well or poorly estimated by each of the observing systems. The results have important bearing on the prospects of extending GRACE time-variable gravity time-series in the event of gaps between dedicated gravity missions, and for extending the time-series into the past. Support for this research from joint NASA/DLR GRACE mission, the NASA MEASURs program, and the NASA ROSES/GRACE Science Team is gratefully acknowledged.

  13. The Gravity Field of Enceladus from the three Cassini Flybys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iess, L.; Parisi, M.; Ducci, M.; Jacobson, R. A.; Armstrong, J. W.; Asmar, S. W.; Lunine, J. I.; Stevenson, D. J.; Tortora, P.

    2013-12-01

    The Cassini spacecraft carried out gravity measurements of the small Saturnian moon Enceladus during three close flybys on April 28, 2010, November 30, 2010 and May 2, 2012 (designated E9, E12 and E19), at the low altitudes of 100, 48 and 70 km to maximize the accelerations exerted by the moon on the spacecraft. The goals of these observations were the determination of the gravitational quadrupole and the search for a North-South asymmetry in the gravity field, controlled primarily by the spherical harmonic coefficient C30. The estimation of Enceladus' gravity field is especially complex because of the small surface gravity (0.11 m/s2), the short duration of the gravitational interaction and the small number of available flybys. In addition to the gravitational accelerations, the spacecraft was also subject to small but non-negligible drag when it flew through the plume emitted from the south pole of the satellite. This effect occurred during the two south polar flybys E9 and E19. The inclusion of these non-gravitational accelerations proved to be crucial to attain a stable solution for the gravity field. Our estimation relied entirely on precise range rate measurements enabled by a coherent, two-way, microwave link at X-band (7.2-8.4 GHz). Measurement accuracies of 10 micron/s at 60 s integration times were attained under favorable conditions, thanks also to an advanced tropospheric calibration system. The data were fitted using the MONTE orbit determination code, recently developed by JPL for deep space navigation. In addition to the satellite degree 2 gravity field and C30, the solution included the state vector of the spacecraft (one for each flyby) and corrections to the mass and the initial orbital elements of Enceladus. The effect of the drag in E9 and E19 was modeled either as an unknown, impulsive, vectorial delta-V at closest approach, or by using density profiles from models of the plume and solving for the aerodynamic coefficient of the spacecraft. Both

  14. Production of Gas Bubbles in Reduced Gravity Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oguz, Hasan N.; Takagi, Shu; Misawa, Masaki

    1996-01-01

    In a wide variety of applications such as waste water treatment, biological reactors, gas-liquid reactors, blood oxygenation, purification of liquids, etc., it is necessary to produce small bubbles in liquids. Since gravity plays an essential role in currently available techniques, the adaptation of these applications to space requires the development of new tools. Under normal gravity, bubbles are typically generated by forcing gas through an orifice in a liquid. When a growing bubble becomes large enough, the buoyancy dominates the surface tension force causing it to detach from the orifice. In space, the process is quite different and the bubble may remain attached to the orifice indefinitely. The most practical approach to simulating gravity seems to be imposing an ambient flow to force bubbles out of the orifice. In this paper, we are interested in the effect of an imposed flow in 0 and 1 g. Specifically, we investigate the process of bubble formation subject to a parallel and a cross flow. In the case of parallel flow, we have a hypodermic needle in a tube from which bubbles can be produced. On the other hand, the cross flow condition is established by forcing bubbles through an orifice on a wall in a shear flow. The first series of experiments have been performed under normal gravity conditions and the working fluid was water. A high quality microgravity facility has been used for the second type and silicone oil is used as the host liquid.

  15. The JPL lunar gravity field to spherical harmonic degree 660 from the GRAIL Primary Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konopliv, Alex S.; Park, Ryan S.; Yuan, Dah-Ning; Asmar, Sami W.; Watkins, Michael M.; Williams, James G.; Fahnestock, Eugene; Kruizinga, Gerhard; Paik, Meegyeong; Strekalov, Dmitry; Harvey, Nate; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2013-07-01

    The lunar gravity field and topography provide a way to probe the interior structure of the Moon. Prior to the Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission, knowledge of the lunar gravity was limited mostly to the nearside of the Moon, since the farside was not directly observable from missions such as Lunar Prospector. The farside gravity was directly observed for the first time with the SELENE mission, but was limited to spherical harmonic degree n ≤ 70. The GRAIL Primary Mission, for which results are presented here, dramatically improves the gravity spectrum by up to ~4 orders of magnitude for the entire Moon and for more than 5 orders-of-magnitude over some spectral ranges by using interspacecraft measurements with near 0.03 μm/s accuracy. The resulting GL0660B (n = 660) solution has 98% global coherence with topography to n = 330, and has variable regional surface resolution between n = 371 (14.6 km) and n = 583 (9.3 km) because the gravity data were collected at different spacecraft altitudes. The GRAIL data also improve low-degree harmonics, and the uncertainty in the lunar Love number has been reduced by ~5× to k2 = 0.02405 ± 0.00018. The reprocessing of the Lunar Prospector data indicates ~3× improved orbit uncertainty for the lower altitudes to ~10 m, whereas the GRAIL orbits are determined to an accuracy of 20 cm.

  16. From Mars to Greenland: Charting gravity with space and airborne instruments - Fields, tides, methods, results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombo, Oscar L.

    This symposium on space and airborne techniques for measuring gravity fields, and related theory, contains papers on gravity modeling of Mars and Venus at NASA/GSFC, an integrated laser Doppler method for measuring planetary gravity fields, observed temporal variations in the earth's gravity field from 16-year Starlette orbit analysis, high-resolution gravity models combining terrestrial and satellite data, the effect of water vapor corrections for satellite altimeter measurements of the geoid, and laboratory demonstrations of superconducting gravity and inertial sensors for space and airborne gravity measurements. Other papers are on airborne gravity measurements over the Kelvin Seamount; the accuracy of GPS-derived acceleration from moving platform tests; airborne gravimetry, altimetry, and GPS navigation errors; controlling common mode stabilization errors in airborne gravity gradiometry, GPS/INS gravity measurements in space and on a balloon, and Walsh-Fourier series expansion of the earth's gravitational potential.

  17. From Mars to Greenland: Charting gravity with space and airborne instruments - Fields, tides, methods, results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, Oscar L. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    This symposium on space and airborne techniques for measuring gravity fields, and related theory, contains papers on gravity modeling of Mars and Venus at NASA/GSFC, an integrated laser Doppler method for measuring planetary gravity fields, observed temporal variations in the earth's gravity field from 16-year Starlette orbit analysis, high-resolution gravity models combining terrestrial and satellite data, the effect of water vapor corrections for satellite altimeter measurements of the geoid, and laboratory demonstrations of superconducting gravity and inertial sensors for space and airborne gravity measurements. Other papers are on airborne gravity measurements over the Kelvin Seamount; the accuracy of GPS-derived acceleration from moving platform tests; airborne gravimetry, altimetry, and GPS navigation errors; controlling common mode stabilization errors in airborne gravity gradiometry, GPS/INS gravity measurements in space and on a balloon, and Walsh-Fourier series expansion of the earth's gravitational potential.

  18. Investigating High Field Gravity using Astrophysical Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, Elliott D.; /SLAC

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of these lectures is to introduce particle physicists to astrophysical techniques. These techniques can help us understand certain phenomena important to particle physics that are currently impossible to address using standard particle physics experimental techniques. As the subject matter is vast, compromises are necessary in order to convey the central ideas to the reader. Many general references are included for those who want to learn more. The paragraphs below elaborate on the structure of these lectures. I hope this discussion will clarify my motivation and make the lectures easier to follow. The lectures begin with a brief review of more theoretical ideas. First, elements of general relativity are reviewed, concentrating on those aspects that are needed to understand compact stellar objects (white dwarf stars, neutron stars, and black holes). I then review the equations of state of these objects, concentrating on the simplest standard models from astrophysics. After these mathematical preliminaries, Sec. 2(c) discusses 'The End State of Stars'. Most of this section also uses the simplest standard models. However, as these lectures are for particle physicists, I also discuss some of the more recent approaches to the equation of state of very dense compact objects. These particle-physics-motivated equations of state can dramatically change how we view the formation of black holes. Section 3 focuses on the properties of the objects that we want to characterize and measure. X-ray binary systems and Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) are stressed because the lectures center on understanding very dense stellar objects, black hole candidates (BHCs), and their accompanying high gravitational fields. The use of x-ray timing and gamma-ray experiments is also introduced in this section. Sections 4 and 5 review information from x-ray and gamma-ray experiments. These sections also discuss the current state of the art in x-ray and gamma-ray satellite experiments and

  19. Reducing Non-Uniqueness in Satellite Gravity Inversion using 3D Object Oriented Image Analysis Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadel, I.; van der Meijde, M.; Kerle, N.

    2013-12-01

    Non-uniqueness of satellite gravity interpretation has been usually reduced by using a priori information from various sources, e.g. seismic tomography models. The reduction in non-uniqueness has been based on velocity-density conversion formulas or user interpretation for 3D subsurface structures (objects) in seismic tomography models. However, these processes introduce additional uncertainty through the conversion relations due to the dependency on the other physical parameters such as temperature and pressure, or through the bias in the interpretation due to user choices and experience. In this research, a new methodology is introduced to extract the 3D subsurface structures from 3D geophysical data using a state-of-art 3D Object Oriented Image Analysis (OOA) technique. 3D OOA is tested using a set of synthetic models that simulate the real situation in the study area of this research. Then, 3D OOA is used to extract 3D subsurface objects from a real 3D seismic tomography model. The extracted 3D objects are used to reconstruct a forward model and its response is compared with the measured satellite gravity. Finally, the result of the forward modelling, based on the extracted 3D objects, is used to constrain the inversion process of satellite gravity data. Through this work, a new object-based approach is introduced to interpret and extract the 3D subsurface objects from 3D geophysical data. This can be used to constrain modelling and inversion of potential field data using the extracted 3D subsurface structures from other methods. In summary, a new approach is introduced to constrain inversion of satellite gravity measurements and enhance interpretation capabilities.

  20. Quantum reduced loop gravity and the foundation of loop quantum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alesci, Emanuele; Cianfrani, Francesco

    2016-06-01

    Quantum reduced loop gravity is a promising framework for linking loop quantum gravity and the effective semiclassical dynamics of loop quantum cosmology. We review its basic achievements and its main perspectives, outlining how it provides a quantum description of the Universe in terms of a cuboidal graph which constitutes the proper framework for applying loop techniques in a cosmological setting.

  1. GOCE Precise Science Orbits for the Entire Mission and their Use for Gravity Field Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäggi, Adrian; Bock, Heike; Meyer, Ulrich; Weigelt, Matthias

    The Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE), ESA's first Earth Explorer Core Mission, was launched on March 17, 2009 into a sun-synchronous dusk-dawn orbit and re-entered into the Earth's atmosphere on November 11, 2013. It was equipped with a three-axis gravity gradiometer for high-resolution recovery of the Earth's gravity field, as well as with a 12-channel, dual-frequency Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver for precise orbit determination (POD), instrument time-tagging, and the determination of the long wavelength part of the Earth’s gravity field. A precise science orbit (PSO) product was provided during the entire mission by the GOCE High-level Processing Facility (HPF) from the GPS high-low Satellite-to-Satellite Tracking (hl-SST) data. We present the reduced-dynamic and kinematic PSO results for the entire mission period. Orbit comparisons and validations with independent Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) measurements demonstrate the high quality of both orbit products being close to 2 cm 1-D RMS, but also reveal a correlation between solar activity, GPS data availability, and the quality of the orbits. We use the 1-sec kinematic positions of the GOCE PSO product for gravity field determination and present GPS-only solutions covering the entire mission period. The generated gravity field solutions reveal severe systematic errors centered along the geomagnetic equator, which may be traced back to the GPS carrier phase observations used for the kinematic orbit determination. The nature of the systematic errors is further investigated and reprocessed orbits free of systematic errors along the geomagnetic equator are derived. Eventually, the potential of recovering time variable signals from GOCE kinematic positions is assessed.

  2. Application of covariant analytic mechanics to gravity with Dirac field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Satoshi

    2016-03-01

    We applied the covariant analytic mechanics with the differential forms to the Dirac field and the gravity with the Dirac field. The covariant analytic mechanics treats space and time on an equal footing regarding the differential forms as the basis variables. A significant feature of the covariant analytic mechanics is that the canonical equations, in addition to the Euler-Lagrange equation, are not only manifestly general coordinate covariant but also gauge covariant. Combining our study and the previous works (the scalar field, the abelian and non-abelian gauge fields and the gravity without the Dirac field), the applicability of the covariant analytic mechanics was checked for all fundamental fields. We studied both the first and second order formalism of the gravitational field coupled with matters including the Dirac field. It was suggested that gravitation theories including higher order curvatures cannot be treated by the second order formalism in the covariant analytic mechanics. In addition, we showed that the covariant analytic mechanics is equivalent to corrected De Donder-Weyl theory.

  3. AIUB-RL02: an improved time-series of monthly gravity fields from GRACE data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, U.; Jäggi, A.; Jean, Y.; Beutler, G.

    2016-05-01

    The new release AIUB-RL02 of monthly gravity models from GRACE GPS and K-Band range-rate data is based on reprocessed satellite orbits referring to the reference frame IGb08. The release is consistent with the IERS2010 conventions. Improvements with respect to its predecessor AIUB-RL01 include the use of reprocessed (RL02) GRACE observations, new atmosphere and ocean dealiasing products (RL05), an upgraded ocean tide model (EOT11A), and the interpolation of shallow ocean tides (admittances). The stochastic parametrization of AIUB-RL02 was adapted to include daily accelerometer scale factors, which drastically reduces spurious signal at the 161 d period in C20 and at other low degree and order gravity field coefficients. Moreover, the correlation between the noise in the monthly gravity models and solar activity is considerably reduced in the new release. The signal and the noise content of the new AIUB-RL02 monthly gravity fields are studied and calibrated errors are derived from their non-secular and non-seasonal variability. The short-period time-variable signal over the oceans, mostly representing noise, is reduced by 50 per cent with respect to AIUB-RL01. Compared to the official GFZ-RL05a and CSR-RL05 monthly models, the AIUB-RL02 stands out by its low noise at high degrees, a fact emerging from the estimation of seasonal variations for selected river basins and of mass trends in polar regions. Two versions of the monthly AIUB-RL02 gravity models, with spherical harmonics resolution of degree and order 60 and 90, respectively, are available for the time period from March 2003 to March 2014 at the International Center for Global Earth Models or from ftp://ftp.unibe.ch/aiub/GRAVITY/GRACE (last accessed 22 March 2016).

  4. AIUB-RL02: an improved time series of monthly gravity fields from GRACE data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, U.; Jäggi, A.; Jean, Y.; Beutler, G.

    2016-03-01

    The new release AIUB-RL02 of monthly gravity models from GRACE GPS and K-Band range-rate data is based on reprocessed satellite orbits referring to the reference frame IGb08. The release is consistent with the IERS2010 conventions. Improvements with respect to its predecessor AIUB-RL01 include the use of reprocessed (RL02) GRACE observations, new atmosphere and ocean dealiasing products (RL05), an upgraded ocean tide model (EOT11A), and the interpolation of shallow ocean tides (admittances). The stochastic parametrization of AIUB-RL02 was adapted to include daily accelerometer scale factors, which drastically reduces spurious signal at the 161 day period in C20 and at other low degree and order gravity field coefficients. Moreover, the correlation between the noise in the monthly gravity models and solar activity is considerably reduced in the new release. The signal and the noise content of the new AIUB-RL02 monthly gravity fields are studied and calibrated errors are derived from their non-secular and non-seasonal variability. The short-period time-variable signal over the oceans, mostly representing noise, is reduced by 50% with respect to AIUB-RL01. Compared to the official GFZ-RL05a and CSR-RL05 monthly models, the AIUB-RL02 stands out by its low noise at high degrees, a fact emerging from the estimation of seasonal variations for selected river basins and of mass trends in polar regions. Two versions of the monthly AIUB-RL02 gravity models, with spherical harmonics resolution of degree and order 60 and 90, respectively, are available for the time period from March 2003 to March 2014 at the International Center for Global Earth Models (ICGEM) or from ftp://ftp.unibe.ch/aiub/GRAVITY/GRACE

  5. Computation of the gravity field and its gradient: Some applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, C. P.; Tiwari, V. M.

    2016-03-01

    New measuring instruments of Earth's gravity gradient tensors (GGT) have offered a fresh impetus to gravimetry and its application in subsurface exploration. Several efforts have been made to provide a thorough understanding of the complex properties of the gravity gradient tensor and its mathematical formulations to compute GGT. However, there is not much open source software available. Understanding of the tensor properties leads to important guidelines in the development of real three dimensional geological models. We present a MATLAB computational algorithm to calculate the gravity field and full gravity gradient tensor for an undulated surface followed by regular geometries like an infinite horizontal slab, a vertical sheet, a solid sphere, a vertical cylinder, a normal fault model and a rectangular lamina or conglomerations of such bodies and the results are compared with responses using professional software based on different computational schemes. Real subsurface geometries of complex geological structures of interest are approximated through arrangements of vertical rectangular laminas. The geological application of this algorithm is demonstrated over a horst-type structure of Oklahoma Aulacogen, USA and Vredefort Dome, South Africa, where measured GGT data are available.

  6. High-resolution gravity field modeling using GRAIL mission data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemoine, F. G.; Goossens, S. J.; Sabaka, T. J.; Nicholas, J. B.; Mazarico, E.; Rowlands, D. D.; Neumann, G. A.; Loomis, B.; Chinn, D. S.; Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.

    2015-12-01

    The Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) spacecraft were designed to map the structure of the Moon through high-precision global gravity mapping. The mission consisted of two spacecraft with Ka-band inter-satellite tracking complemented by tracking from Earth. The mission had two phases: a primary mapping mission from March 1 until May 29, 2012 at an average altitude of 50 km, and an extended mission from August 30 until December 14, 2012, with an average altitude of 23 km before November 18, and 20 and 11 km after. High-resolution gravity field models using both these data sets have been estimated, with the current resolution being degree and order 1080 in spherical harmonics. Here, we focus on aspects of the analysis of the GRAIL data: we investigate eclipse modeling, the influence of empirical accelerations on the results, and we discuss the inversion of large-scale systems. In addition to global models we also estimated local gravity adjustments in areas of particular interest such as Mare Orientale, the south pole area, and the farside. We investigate the use of Ka-band Range Rate (KBRR) data versus numerical derivatives of KBRR data, and show that the latter have the capability to locally improve correlations with topography.

  7. Noncommutative Gravity and Quantum Field Theory on Noncommutative Curved Spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenkel, Alexander

    2012-10-01

    The focus of this PhD thesis is on applications, new developments and extensions of the noncommutative gravity theory proposed by Julius Wess and his group. In part one we propose an extension of the usual symmetry reduction procedure to noncommutative gravity. We classify in the case of abelian Drinfel'd twists all consistent deformations of spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmologies and of the Schwarzschild black hole. The deformed symmetry structure allows us to obtain exact solutions of the noncommutative Einstein equations in many of our models. In part two we develop a new formalism for quantum field theory on noncommutative curved spacetimes by combining methods from the algebraic approach to quantum field theory with noncommutative differential geometry. We also study explicit examples of deformed wave operators and find that there can be noncommutative corrections even on the level of free field theories. The convergent deformation of simple toy models is investigated and it is found that these theories have an improved behaviour at short distances, i.e. in the ultraviolet. In part three we study homomorphisms between and connections on noncommutative vector bundles. We prove that all homomorphisms and connections of the deformed theory can be obtained by applying a quantization isomorphism to undeformed homomorphisms and connections. The extension of homomorphisms and connections to tensor products of bimodules is clarified. As a nontrivial application of the new mathematical formalism we extend our studies of exact noncommutative gravity solutions to more general deformations.

  8. Planetary Gravity Fields and Their Impact on a Spacecraft Trajectory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinwurm, G.; Weber, R.

    2005-01-01

    The present work touches an interdisciplinary aspect of space exploration: the improvement of spacecraft navigation by means of enhanced planetary interior model derivation. The better the bodies in our solar system are known and modelled, the more accurately (and safely) a spacecraft can be navigated. In addition, the information about the internal structure of a planet, moon or any other planetary body can be used in arguments for different theories of solar system evolution. The focus of the work lies in a new approach for modelling the gravity field of small planetary bodies: the implementation of complex ellipsoidal coordinates (figure 1, [4]) for irregularly shaped bodies that cannot be represented well by a straightforward spheroidal approach. In order to carry out the required calculations the computer programme GRASP (Gravity Field of a Planetary Body and its Influence on a Spacecraft Trajectory) has been developed [5]. The programme furthermore allows deriving the impact of the body s gravity field on a spacecraft trajectory and thus permits predictions for future space mission flybys.

  9. An alternative computation of a gravity field model from GOCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Weiyong

    2012-08-01

    GOCE is the first satellite with a gravitational gradiometer (SGG). This allows to determine a gravity field model with high spatial resolution and high accuracy. Four of the six independent components of the gravitational gradient tensors (GGT) are measured with high accuracy in the so-called measurement band (MB) from 5 to 100 mHz by the GOCE gradiometer. Based on more than 1 year of GOCE measurements, two gravity field models have been derived. Here, we introduce a strategy for spherical harmonic analysis (SHA) from GOCE measurements, with a bandpass filter applied to the SGG data, combined with orbit analysis based on the integral equation approach, and additional constraints (or stabilization) in the polar areas where no observation is available due to the orbit geometry. In addition, we combined the GOCE SGG part with a set of GRACE normal equations. This improves the accuracy of the gravity field in the long-wavelength parts, due to the complementarity of GOCE and GRACE. Comparison with other models and with external data shows that our results are rather close to the GPS-levelling data in well-selected test regions, with an uncertainty of 4-7 cm, for truncation at degree 200.

  10. Lunar gravity field recovery: sensitivity studies from simulated tracking data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, A.; Baur, O.

    2012-04-01

    The lunar gravity field is essential for understanding the structure and the thermal evolution of the Moon. Typically, the gravity field is inferred from tracking data to satellites orbiting the Moon. Due to the fact that the Moon is in the state of synchronous rotation with the Earth, direct tracking to the farside is impossible. NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), launched in 2009, is equipped with various instruments whose purpose is to prepare for save robotic returns to the Moon. To geolocate LRO, the spacecraft is tracked by means of radiometric techniques (ranges, range rates, angles) and optical laser (laser ranges). We analyzed tracking data to LRO with respect to various aspects, such as the number of observations, their spatial distribution on the lunar surface, and the present noise level. We used these real-data characteristics to simulate tracking data to LRO. We generated three different simulation scenarios: observations were simulated (1) during the exact time spans when LRO was tracked from a specific ground station, (2) whenever the spacecraft was in view from a station, and (3) for the nearside as well as for the farside of the Moon. Based on the resulting trajectories, we estimated three sets of spherical harmonic coefficients representing the lunar gravity field. Moreover, we varied the maximum degree of estimated coefficients and investigated the effect of noise on the estimated parameters. Observation simulation and parameter estimation was accomplished with the software packages GEODYN and SOLVE.

  11. Resolution of the Scripps/NOAA Marine Gravity Field from satellite altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, Karen M.

    The July 1995 declassification of the entire Geosat GM satellite altimeter data set enabled a joint Scripps/NOAA effort to compute a new (version 7.2) marine gravity field on a 2-minute grid. This gravity field covers the world's oceans between 72°N and 72°S, and is derived from a combination of ERS-1 and Geosat GM and ERM data. An earlier NOAA Geosat-only gravity field solution was confined to the southern latitudes because the 1992 declassification was limited to GM data south of 30°S. A simple coherence analysis between accurately-navigated ship gravity profiles and comparable gravity profiles obtained from the gravity grids reveals that the Scripps/NOAA gravity field is coherent with ship gravity down to ˜≥ 23-30 km. This slight increase in resolution over the previous NOAA Geosat-only gravity field (short-wavelength resolution of ˜26-30 km) implies that the increased spatial coverage provided by the ERS-I altimeter, when combined with Geosat, improves the solution. Coherence analyses between satellite gravity and ship topography, and ship gravity and ship topography, show that even shorter wavelength gravity anomalies (˜13 km) are present in sea-surface measurements made by ship. Even so, the Scripps/NOAA marine gravity field does an excellent job of resolving most of the short-wavelength gravity anomalies covering the world’s oceans.

  12. Prediction of physical workload in reduced gravity environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Joseph H.

    1987-01-01

    The background, development, and application of a methodology to predict human energy expenditure and physical workload in low gravity environments, such as a Lunar or Martian base, is described. Based on a validated model to predict energy expenditures in Earth-based industrial jobs, the model relies on an elemental analysis of the proposed job. Because the job itself need not physically exist, many alternative job designs may be compared in their physical workload. The feasibility of using the model for prediction of low gravity work was evaluated by lowering body and load weights, while maintaining basal energy expenditure. Comparison of model results was made both with simulated low gravity energy expenditure studies and with reported Apollo 14 Lunar EVA expenditure. Prediction accuracy was very good for walking and for cart pulling on slopes less than 15 deg, but the model underpredicted the most difficult work conditions. This model was applied to example core sampling and facility construction jobs, as presently conceptualized for a Lunar or Martian base. Resultant energy expenditures and suggested work-rest cycles were well within the range of moderate work difficulty. Future model development requirements were also discussed.

  13. The gravity field of the Saturnian satellites Enceladus and Dione

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iess, L.; Jacobson, R.; Ducci, M.; Stevenson, D. J.; Lunine, J. I.; Armstrong, J. W.; Asmar, S.; Racioppa, P.; Rappaport, N. J.; Tortora, P.

    2012-12-01

    Enceladus and Dione are the innermost moons of the Saturnian system visited by the spacecraft Cassini for gravity investigations. The small surface gravity (0.11 and 0.23 m/s2 respectively for Enceladus and Dione), the short duration of the gravitational interaction and the small number of available flybys (three for Enceladus and just one for Dione) make the determination of their gravity field particularly challenging. In spite of these limitations, we have measured the low degree gravity field of both satellites with sufficient accuracy to draw preliminary geophysical conclusions. The estimation relied primarily on precise range rate data, whose accuracy reached 10 micron/s at 60 s integration times under favorable conditions. In order to disentangle the effects of the spacecraft orbit, the satellite orbit and the satellite gravity, tracking coverage is required not only across closest approach, but also days before and after the flyby. The dynamical model used for the fits includes all relevant gravitational perturbations and the main non-gravitational accelerations (Cassini RTG's anisotropic thermal emission, solar radiation pressure). In addition to the gravity field coefficients a correction to the orbit of the spacecraft and the satellites was also estimated. The first and so far only Dione's flyby with tracking at closest approach occurred on December 12, 2011, at an altitude of 99 km. (A second gravity flyby is scheduled in 2015.) Although the low solar elongation angle caused a significant increase of the plasma noise in Doppler data, the low spacecraft altitude at closest approach and the otherwise favorable geometry allowed an estimation of the harmonic coefficients J2 and C22 to a relative accuracy below 2%. We have produced, in addition to an unconstrained estimate, a second solution where the quadrupole field is constrained by the requirement of hydrostaticity. Doppler residuals are unbiased and consistent with the expected noise in both cases. When

  14. Combination of monthly gravity field solutions from different processing centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean, Yoomin; Meyer, Ulrich; Jäggi, Adrian

    2015-04-01

    Currently, the official GRACE Science Data System (SDS) monthly gravity field solutions are generated independently by the Centre for Space Research (CSR) and the German Research Centre for Geosciences (GFZ). Additional GRACE SDS monthly fields are provided by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for validation and outside the SDS by a number of other institutions worldwide. Although the adopted background models and processing standards have been harmonized more and more by the various processing centers during the past years, notable differences still exist and the users are more or less left alone with a decision which model to choose for their individual applications. Combinations are well-established in the area of other space geodetic techniques, such as the Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR), and Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI), where regular comparisons and combinations of space-geodetic products have tremendously increased the usefulness of the products in a wide range of disciplines and scientific applications. In the frame of the recently started Horizon 2020 project European Gravity Service for Improved Emergency Management (EGSIEM), a scientific combination service shall therefore be established to deliver the best gravity products for applications in Earth and environmental science research based on the unified knowledge of the European GRACE community. In a first step the large variety of available monthly GRACE gravity field solutions shall be mutually compared spatially and spectrally. We assess the noise of the raw as well as filtered solutions and compare the secular and seasonal periodic variations fitted to the monthly solutions. In a second step we will explore ways to generate combined solutions, e.g., based on a weighted average of the individual solutions using empirical weights derived from pair-wise comparisons. We will also assess the quality of such a combined solution and discuss the

  15. The Gravity Field of Titan From Four Cassini Flybys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappaport, N. J.; Jacobson, R. A.; Iess, L.; Racioppa, P.; Armstrong, J. W.; Asmar, S. W.; Stevenson, D. J.; Tortora, P.; di Benedetto, M.; Graziani, A.; Meriggiola, R.

    2008-12-01

    Doppler tracking of the Cassini spacecraft across four flybys has been used for a preliminary determination of Titan's gravity field. The flybys occurred on February 27, 2006, December 28, 2006, June 29, 2007 and July 31, 2008, with closest approach altitudes between 1300 and 2100 km. X- and Ka-band Doppler data from each flyby have been combined in a multi-arc solution for the Stokes coefficients up to degree-3. The dynamical models employed in the data fit were limited to the static component of the gravity field and did not include eccentricity tides. Tidal variations of the quadrupole coefficients are expected at a level of a few percents if the surface hides an internal ocean, and are therefore accessible to Cassini measurements. As the flybys were evenly distributed about pericenter and apocenter of Titan's orbit, the current analysis provides a good representation of the static component of the quadrupole field. In one setup, Titan's ephemerides were also updated, leading to improved determination of the satellite's orbit and gravitational parameter (GM). The measured gravity field is dominated by a large, nearly hydrostatic, quadrupole component, consistent with an equilibrium response to the perturbations due to rotation and Saturn gravity gradient. The magnitude of the degree-3 coefficients accounts for about 1-3% of the overall field, with significant gravity disturbances (at a level of 2-5 mgal) over broad regions of the surface. The corresponding peak-to-peak geoid height variations amount to a few tens of meters. The ellipsoidal reference surface shows variations among the axes of a few hundred meters. The near hydrostaticity of Titan justifies the application of Radau-Darwin equilibrium theory, which provides the fluid Love number and the average moment of inertia. The latter is consistent with a partial, but not full, differentiation of the interior. This work was partly conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology

  16. Combined GRACE-SLR monthly gravity field solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Ulrich; Sosnica, Krzysytof; Maier, Andrea; Jäggi, Adrian

    2015-04-01

    Monthly gravity field solutions from GRACE GPS and GRACE K-Band data provide remarkable information about the mass transport in the system Earth by capturing the temporal variability of the gravity field at long to medium wavelengths. The GRACE solutions suffer, however, from the poor determination of the C20 coefficient from GRACE K-Band data, which describes the Earth's oblateness. C20 and its temporal variability can, on the other hand, be very well determined using satellite laser ranges (SLR) to spherical geodetic satellites such as LAGEOS and LARES. It is common practice to replace the C20 coefficient in GRACE solutions by SLR-derived values. We perform a meaningful combination of GRACE and SLR solutions at the level of normal equations using the SLR-only monthly gravity fields from the combined analysis of up to nine geodetic satellites that capture the temporal variability to degree 10 of the global spherical harmonic expansion. We present combined monthly GRACE-SLR solutions and compare them to GRACE GPS/K-Band, GRACE GPS-only, and SLR-only solutions. We discuss the relative weighting scheme of the normal equations and evaluate the secular and seasonal periodic time variations of the combined solutions at long wavelengths. We observe a positive influence of the SLR data not only on C20 but also on the formal errors of the other degree-2 spherical harmonic coefficients, which correspond to the excitation of the polar motion. A possible reduction of the influence of aliasing with the S2 tide on some GRACE-derived coefficients using a combination with SLR data will also be addressed. The analysis of SLR-only solutions indicates sensitivity to time variable signal for selected coefficients at even higher degree but special care has to be taken not to corrupt coefficients with the inferior quality in SLR solutions in the combined solutions with GRACE data. In recent years, K-Band tracking between GRACE satellites was deactivated several times resulting in

  17. Weak gravity strongly constrains large-field axion inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidenreich, Ben; Reece, Matthew; Rudelius, Tom

    2015-12-01

    Models of large-field inflation based on axion-like fields with shift symmetries can be simple and natural, and make a promising prediction of detectable primordial gravitational waves. The Weak Gravity Conjecture is known to constrain the simplest case in which a single compact axion descends from a gauge field in an extra dimension. We argue that the Weak Gravity Conjecture also constrains a variety of theories of multiple compact axions including N-flation and some alignment models. We show that other alignment models entail surprising consequences for how the mass spectrum of the theory varies across the axion moduli space, and hence can be excluded if further conjectures hold. In every case that we consider, plausible assumptions lead to field ranges that cannot be parametrically larger than M Pl. Our results are strongly suggestive of a general inconsistency in models of large-field inflation based on compact axions, and possibly of a more general principle forbidding super-Planckian field ranges.

  18. An overview of the cosmic dust analogue material production in reduced gravity: the STARDUST experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, F.; Lilleleht, L. U.; Nuth, J.; Stephens, J. R.; Bussoletti, E.; Colangeli, L.; Mennella, V.; Dell'Aversana, P.; Mirra, C.

    1993-01-01

    The formation, properties and chemical dynamics of microparticles are important in a wide variety of technical and scientific fields including synthesis of semiconductor crystals from the vapour, heterogeneous chemistry in the stratosphere and the formation of cosmic dust surrounding the stars. Gravitational effects on particle formation from vapors include gas convection and buoyancy and particle sedimentation. These processes can be significantly reduced by studying condensation and agglomeration of particles in microgravity. In addition, to accurately simulate particle formation near stars, which takes place under low gravity conditions, studies in microgravity are desired. We report here the STARDUST experience, a recent collaborative effort that brings together a successful American program of microgravity experiments on particle formation aboard NASA KC-135 Reduced Gravity Research Aircraft and several Italian research groups with expertise in microgravity research and astrophysical dust formation. The program goal is to study the formation and properties of high temperature particles and gases that are of interest in astrophysics and planetary science. To do so we are developing techniques that are generally applicable to study particle formation and properties, taking advantage of the microgravity environment to allow accurate control of system parameters.

  19. Experiments in materials science on the ground and in reduced gravity using electrostatic levitators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradis, P.-F.; Ishikawa, T.; Yoda, S.

    To counter residual accelerations and to support a host of materials science experiments in microgravity the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency JAXA developed levitation facilities dedicated to the processing of glass and ceramics under pressurized atmospheres as well as metals and semiconductors in vacuum All levitators e g aerodynamic acoustic electromagnetic electrostatic optical have their own merits and limitations but the electrostatic scheme offers the combined advantages of processing millimeter-size objects independent heating quasi-spherical shape of molten materials handling of materials under extreme temperatures for hours virtually convection-free samples and wide view around the samples for diagnostic These attributes provide unique research opportunities in materials science on the ground as well as under reduced gravity In particular electrostatic levitators are very attractive to measure the physical e g viscosity and structural properties of equilibrium and supercooled liquids to synthesize multi-function materials and to understand metastable phase formation vitrification and diffusion In this paper JAXA s research and development over the years in the field of electrostatic levitation are summarized and the main results obtained in materials science on the ground and in reduced gravity are presented

  20. New Results in Two-Phase Pressure Drop Calculations at Reduced Gravity Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braisted, Jon; Kurwitz, Cable; Best, Frederick

    2004-02-01

    The mass, power, and volume energy savings of two-phase systems for future spacecraft creates many advantages over current single-phase systems. Current models of two-phase phenomena such as pressure drop, void fraction, and flow regime prediction are still not well defined for space applications. Commercially available two-phase modeling software has been developed for a large range of acceleration fields including reduced-gravity conditions. Recently, a two-phase experiment has been flown to expand the two-phase database. A model of the experiment was created in the software to determine how well the software could predict the pressure drop observed in the experiment. Of the simulations conducted, the computer model shows good agreement of the pressure drop in the experiment to within 30%. However, the software does begin to over-predict pressure drop in certain regions of a flow regime map indicating that some models used in the software package for reduced-gravity modeling need improvement.

  1. Noncommutative scalar field minimally coupled to nonsymmetric gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Kouadik, S.; Sefai, D.

    2012-06-27

    We construct a non-commutative non symmetric gravity minimally coupled model (the star product only couples matter). We introduce the action for the system considered namely a non-commutative scalar field propagating in a nontrivial gravitational background. We expand the action in powers of the anti-symmetric field and the graviton to second order adopting the assumption that the scalar is weekly coupled to the graviton. We compute the one loop radiative corrections to the self-energy of a scalar particle.

  2. Gravity field determination and characteristics: Retrospective and prospective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nerem, R. S.; Jekeli, C.; Kaula, W. M.

    Gravimetry has had a long history, using pendulums, torsion balances, and static spring gravimeters. Relative accuracy adequate for many geophysical problems was already attained by 1900, but it took another half century to build readily portable gravimeters. Calibration and datum definition remained problems until the 1970s when free-fall absolute gravimeters were developed that now have a precision of 10-3 mGal. The problems of geographic inaccessibility and field party costs (notably in areas of greatest tectonic interest) and now being overcome by airborne gravimetry that has already achieved accuracies of 1-3 mGal with resolutions of 10 to 20 km. Satellite techniques are the best way to determine the long-wavelength variations of the gravity field. The resolution of the models has steadily improved with the number of satellites and the precision of the observations. The best current model includes tracking data from more than 30 satellites, satellite altimetry, and surface gravimetry and has a resolution of about 290 km (harmonic degree 70) with the most recent improvements coming from Doppler orbitography and radiopositioning integrated by satellite (DORIS) tracking of the SPOT 2 satellite and satellite laser ranging (SLR), DORIS, and Global Positioning System (GPS) tracking of the TOPEX/POSEIDON satellite. Meanwhile, radar altimetry has become the dominant technique to infer the marine geoid with a resolution of tens of kilometers or shorter. Similarly, the gravity fields of the Moon, Venus, and Mars have been determined to harmonic degrees 70, 75, and 50, respectively, although tracking limitations result in variations of spatial resolution. Modeling Earth's gravity field from the abundance of precise data has become an increasingly complex task, with which the development of computer capacity has kept pace. Contemporary solutions now entail about 10,000 parameters, half of them for effects other than the fixed gravity field of Earth. Temporal variations

  3. Gravity field and internal structure of Mercury from MESSENGER.

    PubMed

    Smith, David E; Zuber, Maria T; Phillips, Roger J; Solomon, Sean C; Hauck, Steven A; Lemoine, Frank G; Mazarico, Erwan; Neumann, Gregory A; Peale, Stanton J; Margot, Jean-Luc; Johnson, Catherine L; Torrence, Mark H; Perry, Mark E; Rowlands, David D; Goossens, Sander; Head, James W; Taylor, Anthony H

    2012-04-13

    Radio tracking of the MESSENGER spacecraft has provided a model of Mercury's gravity field. In the northern hemisphere, several large gravity anomalies, including candidate mass concentrations (mascons), exceed 100 milli-Galileos (mgal). Mercury's northern hemisphere crust is thicker at low latitudes and thinner in the polar region and shows evidence for thinning beneath some impact basins. The low-degree gravity field, combined with planetary spin parameters, yields the moment of inertia C/MR(2) = 0.353 ± 0.017, where M and R are Mercury's mass and radius, and a ratio of the moment of inertia of Mercury's solid outer shell to that of the planet of C(m)/C = 0.452 ± 0.035. A model for Mercury's radial density distribution consistent with these results includes a solid silicate crust and mantle overlying a solid iron-sulfide layer and an iron-rich liquid outer core and perhaps a solid inner core. PMID:22438509

  4. Gravity Field and Internal Structure of Mercury from MESSENGER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.; Phillips, Roger J.; Solomon, Sean C.; Hauck, Steven A., II; Lemoine, Frank G.; Mazarico, Erwan; Neumann, Gregory A.; Peale, Stanton J.; Margot, Jean-Luc; Johnson, Catherine L.; Torrence, Mark H.; Perry, Mark E.; Rowlands, David D.; Goossens, Sander; Head, James W.; Taylor, Anthony H.

    2012-01-01

    Radio tracking of the MESSENGER spacecraft has provided a model of Mercury's gravity field. In the northern hemisphere, several large gravity anomalies, including candidate mass concentrations (mascons), exceed 100 milli-Galileos (mgal). Mercury's northern hemisphere crust is thicker at low latitudes and thinner in the polar region and shows evidence for thinning beneath some impact basins. The low-degree gravity field, combined with planetary spin parameters, yields the moment of inertia C/M(R(exp 2) = 0.353 +/- 0.017, where M and R are Mercury's mass and radius, and a ratio of the moment of inertia of Mercury's solid outer shell to that of the planet of C(sub m)/C = 0.452 +/- 0.035. A model for Mercury s radial density distribution consistent with these results includes a solid silicate crust and mantle overlying a solid iron-sulfide layer and an iron-rich liquid outer core and perhaps a solid inner core.

  5. Users Guide for NASA Lewis Research Center DC-9 Reduced-Gravity Aircraft Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yaniec, John S.

    1995-01-01

    The document provides guidelines and information for users of the DC-9 Reduced-Gravity Aircraft Program. It describes the facilities, requirements for test personnel, equipment design and installation, mission preparation, and in-flight procedures. Those who have used the KC-135 reduced-gravity aircraft will recognize that many of the procedures and guidelines are the same, to ensure a commonality between the DC-9 and KC-135 programs.

  6. Ultralow Magnetic Fields and Gravity Probe B Gyroscope Readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mester, J. C.; Lockhart, J. M.; Muhlfelder, B.; Murray, D. O.; Taber, M. A.

    We describe the generation of an ultralow magnetic field of < 10-11Tesla in the flight dewar of the Gravity Probe B Relativity Mission. The field was achieved using expanded-superconducting-shield techniques and is maintained with the aid of a magnetic materials control program. A high performance magnetic shield system is required for the proper function of gyroscope readout. The readout system employs a dc SQUID to measure the London moment generated by the superconducting gyro rotor in order to resolve sub-milliarcsecond changes in the gyro spin direction. In addition to a low residual dc magnetic field, attenuation of external field variation is required to be 1012 at the gyro positions. We discuss the measurement of the dc magnetic field and ac attenuation factor and the performance of the readout system

  7. Inversion of Gravity and Magnetic Field Data for Tyrrhena Patera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milbury, C.; Schubert, G.; Raymond, C. A.; Smrekar, S. E.

    2011-01-01

    Tyrrhena Patera is located to the southeast/northeast of the Isidis/Hellas impact basin. It was geologically active into the Late Amazonian, although the main edifice was formed in the Noachian(approximately 3.7-4.0 Ga). Tyrrhena Patera and the surrounding area contain gravity and magnetic anomalies that appear to be correlated. The results presented here are for the anomalies 1a and 1b (closest to Tyrrhena Patera), however other anomalies in this region have been modeled and will be presented at the conference.The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) free-air gravity signature of Tyrrhena Patera has been studied by Kiefer, who inferred the existence of an extinct magma chamber below it. The magnetic signature has been mapped by Lillis R. J. et al., who compared electron reflectometer data, analogous to the total magnetic field, for Syrtis Major and Tyrrhena Patera and argued for demagnetization of both volcanoes.

  8. Action and entanglement in gravity and field theory.

    PubMed

    Neiman, Yasha

    2013-12-27

    In nongravitational quantum field theory, the entanglement entropy across a surface depends on the short-distance regularization. Quantum gravity should not require such regularization, and it has been conjectured that the entanglement entropy there is always given by the black hole entropy formula evaluated on the entangling surface. We show that these statements have precise classical counterparts at the level of the action. Specifically, we point out that the action can have a nonadditive imaginary part. In gravity, the latter is fixed by the black hole entropy formula, while in nongravitating theories it is arbitrary. From these classical facts, the entanglement entropy conjecture follows by heuristically applying the relation between actions and wave functions. PMID:24483789

  9. Static meniscus configurations in propellant tanks under reduced gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siekmann, J.; Scheideler, W.; Tietze, P.

    1981-08-01

    Liquids contained in propellant tanks under low gravity conditions are subject to gravitational forces, surface forces and boundary adhesion. The equilibrium configurations of a liquid in a rotationally symmetrical container are investigated numerically for cases of special technical interest, particularly those where the liquid-vapor interface meets the container walls at small contact angles. The computational studies are based on the Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg method. Both analytical and numerical solutions are dealt with in some detail. Numerical difficulties are discussed and the role of the Bond number is pointed out.

  10. Wormholes, emergent gauge fields, and the weak gravity conjecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlow, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    This paper revisits the question of reconstructing bulk gauge fields as boundary operators in AdS/CFT. In the presence of the wormhole dual to the thermofield double state of two CFTs, the existence of bulk gauge fields is in some tension with the microscopic tensor factorization of the Hilbert space. I explain how this tension can be resolved by splitting the gauge field into charged constituents, and I argue that this leads to a new argument for the "principle of completeness", which states that the charge lattice of a gauge theory coupled to gravity must be fully populated. I also claim that it leads to a new motivation for (and a clarification of) the "weak gravity conjecture", which I interpret as a strengthening of this principle. This setup gives a simple example of a situation where describing low-energy bulk physics in CFT language requires knowledge of high-energy bulk physics. This contradicts to some extent the notion of "effective conformal field theory", but in fact is an expected feature of the resolution of the black hole information problem. An analogous factorization issue exists also for the gravitational field, and I comment on several of its implications for reconstructing black hole interiors and the emergence of spacetime more generally.

  11. Matter in loop quantum gravity without time gauge: A nonminimally coupled scalar field

    SciTech Connect

    Cianfrani, Francesco; Montani, Giovanni

    2009-10-15

    We analyze the phase space of gravity nonminimally coupled to a scalar field in a generic local Lorentz frame. We reduce the set of constraints to a first class one by fixing a specific hypersurfaces in the phase space. The main issue of our analysis is to extend the features of the vacuum case to the presence of scalar matter by recovering the emergence of an SU(2) gauge structure and the nondynamical role of boost variables. Within this scheme, the supermomentum and the super-Hamiltonian are those ones associated with a scalar field minimally coupled to the metric in the Einstein frame. Hence, the kinematical Hilbert space is defined as in canonical loop quantum gravity with a scalar field, but the differences in the area spectrum are outlined to be the same as in the time-gauge approach.

  12. Reduced-gravity two-phase flow experiments in the NASA KC-135

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuta, Judith M.; Michener, Thomas E.; Best, Frederick R.; Kachnik, Leo J.

    1988-01-01

    An adequate understanding is sought of flow and heat transfer behavior in reduced and zero gravity conditions. Microgravity thermal-hydraulic analysis capabilities were developed for application to space nuclear power systems. A series of reduced gravity two phase flow experiments using the NASA KC-135 were performed. The objective was to supply basic thermal hydraulic information that could be used in development of analytical tools for design of space power systems. The experiments are described. Two main conclusions were drawn. First, the tests demonstrate that the KC-135 is a suitable test environment for obtaining two phase flow and heat transfer data in reduced gravity conditions. Second, the behavior of two phase flow in low gravity is sufficiently different from that obtained in 1 g to warrant intensive investigation of the phenomenon if adequate analytical tools are to be developed for microgravity conditions.

  13. Report of the panel on geopotential fields: Gravity field, section 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Allen Joel; Kaula, William M.; Lazarewics, Andrew R.; Lefebvre, Michel; Phillips, Roger J.; Rapp, Richard H.; Rummel, Reinhard F.; Smith, David E.; Tapley, Byron D.; Zlotnick, Victor

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the Geopotential Panel was to develop a program of data acquisition and model development for the Earth's gravity and magnetic fields that meet the basic science requirements of the solid Earth and ocean studies. Presented here are the requirements for gravity information and models through the end of the century, the present status of our knowledge, data acquisition techniques, and an outline of a program to meet the requirements.

  14. Gravity, Topography, and Magnetic Field of Mercury from Messenger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neumann, Gregory A.; Solomon, Sean C.; Zuber, Maria T.; Phillips, Roger J.; Barnouin, Olivier; Ernst, Carolyn; Goosens, Sander; Hauck, Steven A., II; Head, James W., III; Johnson, Catherine L.; Lemoine, Frank G.; Margot, Jean-Luc; McNutt, Ralph; Mazarico, Erwan M.; Oberst, Jurgen; Peale, Stanley J.; Perry, Mark; Purucker, Michael E.; Rowlands, David D.; Torrence, Mark H.

    2012-01-01

    On 18 March 2011, the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft was inserted into a 12-hour, near-polar orbit around Mercury, with an initial periapsis altitude of 200 km, initial periapse latitude of 60 deg N, and apoapsis at approximately 15,200 km altitude in the southern hemisphere. This orbit has permitted the mapping of regional gravitational structure in the northern hemisphere, and laser altimetry from the MESSENGER spacecraft has yielded a geodetically controlled elevation model for the same hemisphere. The shape of a planet combined with gravity provides fundamental information regarding its internal structure and geologic and thermal evolution. Elevations in the northern hemisphere exhibit a unimodal distribution with a dynamic range of 9.63 km, less than that of the Moon (19.9 km), but consistent with Mercury's higher surface gravitational acceleration. After one Earth-year in orbit, refined models of gravity and topography have revealed several large positive gravity anomalies that coincide with major impact basins. These candidate mascons have anomalies that exceed 100 mGal and indicate substantial crustal thinning and superisostatic uplift of underlying mantle. An additional uncompensated 1000-km-diameter gravity and topographic high at 68 deg N, 33 deg E lies within Mercury's northern volcanic plains. Mercury's northern hemisphere crust is generally thicker at low latitudes than in the polar region. The low-degree gravity field, combined with planetary spin parameters, yields the moment of inertia C/MR2 = 0.353 +/- 0.017, where M=3.30 x 10(exp 23) kg and R=2440 km are Mercury's mass and radius, and a ratio of the moment of inertia of Mercury's solid outer shell to that of the planet of Cm/C = 0.452 +/- 0.035. One proposed model for Mercury's radial density distribution consistent with these results includes silicate crust and mantle layers overlying a dense solid (possibly Fe-S) layer, a liquid Fe

  15. Study of Critical Heat Flux and Two-Phase Pressure Drop Under Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdollahian, Davood; Quintal, Joseph; Barez, Fred; Zahm, Jennifer; Lohr, Victor

    1996-01-01

    The design of the two-phase flow systems which are anticipated to be utilized in future spacecraft thermal management systems requires a knowledge of two-phase flow and heat transfer phenomena in reduced gravities. This program was funded by NASA headquarters in response to NRA-91-OSSA-17 and was managed by Lewis Research Center. The main objective of this program was to design and construct a two-phase test loop, and perform a series of normal gravity and aircraft trajectory experiments to study the effect of gravity on the Critical Heat Flux (CHF) and onset of instability. The test loop was packaged on two aircraft racks and was also instrumented to generate data for two-phase pressure drop. The normal gravity tests were performed with vertical up and downflow configurations to bound the effect of gravity on the test parameters. One set of aircraft trajectory tests was performed aboard the NASA DC-9 aircraft. These tests were mainly intended to evaluate the test loop and its operational performance under actual reduced gravity conditions, and to produce preliminary data for the test parameters. The test results were used to demonstrate the applicability of the normal gravity models for prediction of the two-phase friction pressure drop. It was shown that the two-phase friction multipliers for vertical upflow and reduced gravity conditions can be successfully predicted by the appropriate normal gravity models. Limited critical heat flux data showed that the measured CHF under reduced gravities are of the same order of magnitude as the test results with vertical upflow configuration. A simplified correlation was only successful in predicting the measured CHF for low flow rates. Instability tests with vertical upflow showed that flow becomes unstable and critical heat flux occurs at smaller powers when a parallel flow path exists. However, downflow tests and a single reduced gravity instability experiment indicated that the system actually became more stable with a

  16. The role of topography in geodetic gravity field modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forsberg, R.; Sideris, M. G.

    1989-01-01

    Masses associated with the topography, bathymetry, and its isostatic compensation are a dominant source of gravity field variations, especially at shorter wavelengths. On global scales the topographic/isostatic effects are also significant, except for the lowest harmonics. In practice, though, global effects need not be taken into account as such effects are included in the coefficients of the geopotential reference fields. On local scales, the short-wavelength gravity variations due to the topography may, in rugged terrain, be an order of magnitude larger than other effects. In such cases, explicit or implicit terrain reduction procedures are mandatory in order to obtain good prediction results. Such effects may be computed by space-domain integration or by fast Fourier transformation (FFT) methods. Numerical examples are given for areas of the Canadian Rockies. In principle, good knowledge of the topographic densities is required to produce the smoothest residual field. Densities may be determined from sample measurements or by gravimetric means, but both are somewhat troublesome methods in practice. The use of a standard density, e.g., 2.67 g/cu cm, may often yield satisfactory results and may be put within a consistent theoretical framework. The independence of density assumptions is the key point of the classical Molodensky approach to the geodetic boundary value problem. The Molodensky solutions take into account that land gravity field observations are done on a non-level surface. Molodensky's problem may be solved by integral expansions or more effective FFT methods, but the solution should not be intermixed with the use of terrain reductions. The methods are actually complimentary and may both be required in order to obtain the smoothest possible signal, least prone to aliasing and other effects coming from sparse data coverage, typical of rugged topography.

  17. Using Clocks and Atomic Interferometry for Gravity Field Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Jürgen

    2016-07-01

    New technology developed in the frame of fundamental physics may lead to enhanced capabilities for geodetic applications such as refined observations of the Earth's gravity field. Here, we will present new sensor measurement concepts that apply atomic interferometry for gravimetry and clock measurements for observing potential values. In the first case, gravity anomalies can be determined by observing free-falling atoms (quantum gravimetry). In the second case, highly precise optical clocks can be used to measure differences of the gravity potential over long distances (relativistic geodesy). Principally, also inter-satellite ranging between test masses in space with nanometer accuracy belongs to these novel developments. We will show, how the new measurement concepts are connected to classical geodetic concepts, e.g. geopotential numbers and clock readings. We will illustrate the application of these new methods and their benefit for geodesy, where local and global mass variations can be observed with unforeseen accuracy and resolution, mass variations that reflect processes in the Earth system. We will present a few examples where geodesy will potentially benefit from these developments. Thus, the novel technologies might be applied for defining and realizing height systems in a new way, but also for fast local gravimetric surveys and exploration.

  18. Reduced-Gravity Experiments Conducted to Help Bioreactor Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niederhaus, Charles E.; Nahra, Henry K.; Kizito, John P.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center and the NASA Johnson Space Center are collaborating on fluid dynamic investigations for a future cell science bioreactor to fly on the International Space Station (ISS). Project Manager Steven Gonda from the Cellular Biotechnology Program at Johnson is leading the development of the Hydrodynamic Focusing Bioreactor--Space (HFB-S) for use on the ISS to study tissue growth in microgravity. Glenn is providing microgravity fluid physics expertise to help with the design and evaluation of the HFB-S. These bioreactors are used for three-dimensional tissue culture, which cannot be done in ground-based labs in normal gravity. The bioreactors provide a continual supply of oxygen for cell growth, as well as periodic replacement of cell culture media with nutrients. The bioreactor must provide a uniform distribution of oxygen and nutrients while minimizing the shear stresses on the tissue culture.

  19. Evaluation of an ATP Assay to Quantify Bacterial Attachment to Surfaces in Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birmele, Michele N.; Roberson, Luke B.; Roberts, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To develop an assay to quantify the biomass of attached cells and biofilm formed on wetted surfaces in variable-gravity environments. Methods and Results: Liquid cultures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were exposed to 30-35 brief cycles of hypergravity (< 2-g) followed by free fall (i.e., reduced gravity) equivalent to either lunar-g (i.e., 0.17 normal Earth gravity) or micro-g (i.e., < 0.001 normal Earth gravity) in an aircraft flying a series of parabolas. Over the course of two days of parabolic flight testing, 504 polymer or metal coupons were exposed to a stationary-phase population of P. aeruginosa strain ERC1 at a concentration of 1.0 x 10(exp 5) cells per milliliter. After the final parabola on each flight test day, half of the material coupon samples were treated with either 400 micro-g/L ionic silver fluoride (microgravity-exposed cultures) or 1% formalin (lunar-gravity-exposed cultures). The remaining sample coupons from each flight test day were not treated with a fixative. All samples were returned to the laboratory for analysis within 2 hours of landing, and all biochemical assays were completed within 8 hours of exposure to variable gravity. The intracellular ATP luminescent assay accurately reflected cell physiology compared to both cultivation-based and direct-count microscopy analyses. Cells exposed to variable gravity had more than twice as much intracellular ATP as control cells exposed only to normal Earth gravity.

  20. Gravity Field, Topography, and Interior Structure of Amalthea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, J. D.; Anabtawi, A.; Jacobson, R. A.; Johnson, T. V.; Lau, E. L.; Moore, W. B.; Schubert, G.; Taylor, A. H.; Thomas, P. C.; Weinwurm, G.

    2002-12-01

    A close Galileo flyby of Jupiter's inner moon Amalthea (JV) occurred on 5 November 2002. The final aimpoint was selected by the Galileo Radio Science Team on 5 July 2002. The closest approach distance for the selected aimpoint was 221 km from the center of mass, the latitude was - 45.23 Deg and the west longitude was 266.41 Deg (IAU/IAG/COSPAR cartographic coordinate system). In order to achieve an acceptable impact probability (0.15%), and yet fly close to Amalthea, the trajectory was selected from a class of trajectories running parallel to Amalthea's long axis. The Deep Space Network (DSN) had the capability to generate continuous coherent radio Doppler data during the flyby. Such data can be inverted to obtain information on Amalthea's gravity field. Amalthea is irregular and neither a triaxial ellipsoid nor an equilibrium body. It has a volume of about 2.4 x 106 km3, and its best-fit ellipsoid has dimensions 131x73x67 km. Its mass can be determined from the 2002 flyby, and in combination with the volume, a density can be obtained accurate to about 5%, where the error is dominated by the volume uncertainty. Similarly, gravity coefficients (Cnm Snm) can be detected up to fourth degree and order, and the second degree field (quadrupole) can be measured. Topography data are available from Voyager imaging and from images taken with Galileo's solid state imaging system at various times between February and June 1997. By combining the gravity and topography data, new information can be obtained on Amalthea's interior. For example if the gravity coefficients agree with those calculated from the topography, assuming constant density, we can conclude that Amalthea is homogeneous. On the other hand, if the gravity coefficients are smaller than predicted from topography, we can conclude that there is a concentration of mass toward Amalthea's center. We are presenting preliminary pre-publication results at the Fall meeting. This work was sponsored by the Galileo Project

  1. Reduced gravity boiling and condensing experiments simulated with the COBRA/TRAC computer code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuta, Judith M.; Krotiuk, William

    1988-01-01

    A series of reduced-gravity two-phase flow experiments has been conducted with a boiler/condenser apparatus in the NASA KC-135 aircraft in order to obtain basic thermal-hydraulic data applicable to analytical design tools. Several test points from the KC-135 tests were selected for simulation by means of the COBRA/TRAC two-fluid, three-field thermal-hydraulic computer code; the points were chosen for a 25-90 percent void-fraction range. The possible causes for the lack of agreement noted between simulations and experiments are explored, with attention to the physical characteristics of two-phase flow in one-G and near-zero-G conditions.

  2. The determination of Dione's gravity field after four Cassini flybys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zannoni, Marco; Tortora, Paolo; Iess, Luciano; Jacobson, Robert A.; Armstrong, John W.; Asmar, Sami W.

    2015-04-01

    We present the expected accuracy in the determination of Dione's gravity field obtained through numerical simulations of all radio science flybys currently planned in the entire Cassini mission. During its tour of the Saturn system, Cassini already performed two flybys of Dione dedicated to the determination of its mass and gravity field, in October 2005 and December 2011, respectively. Two additional radio science flybys are planned in June 2015 and August 2015. The analysis of the Doppler data acquired during the closest approach of the second flyby allowed the first estimation of Dione's J2 and C22 but, given the limited amount of data, their estimation has a large correlation and cannot be considered fully reliable. Here we infer the expected final accuracy in the determination of Dione's J2 and C22 by combining the available results from the already performed experiments with numerical simulations of future flybys. The main observables considered in the analysis are two-way and three-way Doppler data obtained from the frequency shift of a highly stable microwave carrier between the spacecraft and the stations of NASA's Deep Space Network. White Gaussian noise was added to the simulated data, with a constant standard deviation for each tracking pass, obtained from an accurate noise budget of the Cassini mission. For the two flybys to be carried out in 2015, we consider a continuous coverage during +/-18 hours around the closest approach, plus one tracking pass 36 hours before and after it. The data analysis is carried out using a global, multi-arc fit, and comparing the independent solutions obtained from each flyby and different multi-arc solutions. The analysis of all four flybys is expected to provide the best, unconstrained, reliable estimation of the full quadrupole gravity field of Dione.

  3. Application of a novel colour imaging technique to thermal convection under reduced gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiland, H. G.; Wozniak, G.

    2010-12-01

    The quantitative measurement performance and the robustness of a novel high-speed imaging system using a liquid crystal tunable filter have been verified by a fluid dynamic experiment in a reduced gravity environment. This new type of diagnostic tool is a combination of a monochrome high-speed CCD camera with fast ferroelectric liquid crystal control. The filter can be tuned to red, green and blue colour planes (RGB filter), which provides real colour images without loss of resolution. The scientific application was the investigation of the influence of buoyancy on the surface tension-driven flow around a bubble on heated wall. The flow velocity and temperature patterns were observed in gravity and microgravity environments. The measuring technique is based on particle image velocimetry and thermometry (PIV/T). The principle of this optical full-field technique relies on seeded thermochromic liquid crystals (TLCs) as signal particles, which change colour depending on their temperature. The experimental results of the flow investigations under 1-g and μ-g conditions are discussed and compared with one another.

  4. Modeling of zero gravity venting: Studies of two-phase heat transfer under reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merte, H., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The objective is to predict the pressure response of a saturated liquid-vapor system when undergoing a venting or depressurization process in zero gravity at low vent rates. An experimental investigation of the venting of cylindrical containers partially filled with initially saturated liquids was previously conducted under zero-gravity conditions and compared with an analytical model which incorporated the effect of interfacial mass transfer on the ullage pressure response during venting. A new model is presented to improve the estimation of the interfacial mass transfer. Duhammel's superposition integral is incorporated to approximate the transient temperature response of the interface, treating the liquid as a semi-infinite solid with conduction heat transfer. Account is also taken of the condensation taking place within the bulk of a saturated vapor as isentropic expansion takes place. Computational results are presented for the venting of R-11 from a given vessel and initial state for five different venting rates over a period of three seconds, and compared to prior NASA experiments. An improvement in the prediction of the final pressure takes place, but is still considerably below the measurements.

  5. Behavior in normal and reduced gravity of an enclosed liquid/gas system with nonuniform heating from above

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, H. D.; Schiller, D. N.; Disimile, P.; Sirignano, W. A.

    1989-01-01

    The temperature and velocity fields have been investigated for a single-phase gas system and a two-layer gas-and-liquid system enclosed in a circular cylinder being heated suddenly and nonuniformly from above. The transient response of the gas, liquid, and container walls was modelled numerically in normal and reduced gravity (10 to the -5 g). Verification of the model was accomplished via flow visualization experiments in 10 cm high by 10 cm diameter plexiglass cylinders.

  6. Gravity field of the Moon from the Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission.

    PubMed

    Zuber, Maria T; Smith, David E; Watkins, Michael M; Asmar, Sami W; Konopliv, Alexander S; Lemoine, Frank G; Melosh, H Jay; Neumann, Gregory A; Phillips, Roger J; Solomon, Sean C; Wieczorek, Mark A; Williams, James G; Goossens, Sander J; Kruizinga, Gerhard; Mazarico, Erwan; Park, Ryan S; Yuan, Dah-Ning

    2013-02-01

    Spacecraft-to-spacecraft tracking observations from the Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) have been used to construct a gravitational field of the Moon to spherical harmonic degree and order 420. The GRAIL field reveals features not previously resolved, including tectonic structures, volcanic landforms, basin rings, crater central peaks, and numerous simple craters. From degrees 80 through 300, over 98% of the gravitational signature is associated with topography, a result that reflects the preservation of crater relief in highly fractured crust. The remaining 2% represents fine details of subsurface structure not previously resolved. GRAIL elucidates the role of impact bombardment in homogenizing the distribution of shallow density anomalies on terrestrial planetary bodies. PMID:23223395

  7. Paramagnetic Liquid Bridge in a Gravity-Compensating Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahajan, Milind P.; Tsige, Mesfin; Taylor, P. L.; Rosenblatt, Charles

    1999-01-01

    Magnetic levitation was used to stabilize cylindrical columns of a paramagnetic liquid in air between two solid supports. The maximum achievable length to diameter ratio R(sub max) was approx. (3.10 +/- 0.07), very close to the Rayleigh-Plateau limit of pi. For smaller R, the stability of the column was measured as a function of the Bond number, which could be continuously varied by adjusting the strength of the magnetic field. Liquid bridges supported by two solid surfaces have been attracting scientific attention since the time of Rayleigh and Plateau. For a cylindrical bridge of length L and diameter d, it was shown theoretically that in zero gravity the maximum slenderness ratio R (identically = L/d) is pi. The stability and ultimate collapse of such bridges is of interest because of their importance in a number of industrial processes and their potential for low gravity applications. In the presence of gravity, however, the cylindrical shape of an axisymmetric bridge tends to deform, limiting its stability and decreasing the maximum achievable value of R. Theoretical studies have discussed the stability and possible shapes of axisymmetric bridges. Experiments typically are performed in either a Plateau tank, in which the bridge is surrounded by a density-matched immiscible fluid, or in a space-borne microgravity environment. It has been shown, for example, that the stability limit R can be pushed beyond pi by using flow stabilization, by acoustic radiation pressure, or by forming columns in the presence of an axial electric field. In this work, magnetic levitation was used to simulate a low gravity environment and create quasi-cylindrical liquid columns in air. Use of a magnetic field permits us to continuously vary the Bond number B identically equal to (g)(rho)d(exp 2)/4(sigma), where g is the gravitational acceleration, rho is the density of the liquid, and sigma is the surface tension of the liquid in air. The dimensionless Bond number represents the

  8. Electromagnetic field and cylindrical compact objects in modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousaf, Z.; Bhatti, M. Zaeem ul Haq

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the role of different fluid parameters particularly electromagnetic field and f(R) corrections on the evolution of cylindrical compact object. We have explored the modified field equations, kinematical quantities and dynamical equations. An expression for the mass function has been found in comparison with the Misner-Sharp formalism in modified gravity, after which different mass-radius diagrams are drawn. The coupled dynamical transport equation have been formulated to discuss the role of thermoinertial effects on the inertial mass density of the cylindrical relativistic interior. Finally, we have presented a framework, according to which all possible solutions of the metric f(R)-Maxwell field equations coupled with static fluid can be written through set of scalar functions. It is found that modified gravity induced by Lagrangians f(R) = αR2, f(R) = αR2 - βR and f(R)=α R^2-β R/1+γ R are likely to host more massive cylindrical compact objects with smaller radii as compared to general relativity.

  9. Warped conformal field theory as lower spin gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofman, Diego M.; Rollier, Blaise

    2015-08-01

    Two dimensional Warped Conformal Field Theories (WCFTs) may represent the simplest examples of field theories without Lorentz invariance that can be described holographically. As such they constitute a natural window into holography in non-AdS space-times, including the near horizon geometry of generic extremal black holes. It is shown in this paper that WCFTs posses a type of boost symmetry. Using this insight, we discuss how to couple these theories to background geometry. This geometry is not Riemannian. We call it Warped Geometry and it turns out to be a variant of a Newton-Cartan structure with additional scaling symmetries. With this formalism the equivalent of Weyl invariance in these theories is presented and we write two explicit examples of WCFTs. These are free fermionic theories. Lastly we present a systematic description of the holographic duals of WCFTs. It is argued that the minimal setup is not Einstein gravity but an SL (2, R) × U (1) Chern-Simons Theory, which we call Lower Spin Gravity. This point of view makes manifest the definition of boundary for these non-AdS geometries. This case represents the first step towards understanding a fully invariant formalism for WN field theories and their holographic duals.

  10. Perturbations of single-field inflation in modified gravity theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Taotao; Xia, Jun-Qing

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we study the case of single field inflation within the framework of modified gravity theory where the gravity part has an arbitrary form f (R). Via a conformal transformation, this case can be transformed into its Einstein frame where it looks like a two-field inflation model. However, due to the existence of the isocurvature modes in such a multi-degree-of-freedom (m.d.o.f.) system, the (curvature) perturbations are not equivalent in two frames, so despite of its convenience, it is illegal to treat the perturbations in its Einstein frame as the "real" ones as we always do for pure f (R) theory or single field with nonminimal coupling. Here by pulling the results of curvature perturbations back into its original Jordan frame, we show explicitly the power spectrum and spectral index of the perturbations in the Jordan frame, as well as how it differs from the Einstein frame. We also fit our results with the newest Planck data. Since there is large parameter space in these models, we show that it is easy to fit the data very well.