Science.gov

Sample records for reducing noise emission

  1. QCGAT aircraft/engine design for reduced noise and emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanson, L.; Terrill, K. M.

    1980-01-01

    The high bypass ratio QCGAT engine played an important role in shaping the aircraft design. The aircraft which evolved is a sleek, advanced design, six-place aircraft with 3538 kg (7,800 lb) maximum gross weight. It offers a 2778 kilometer (1500 nautical mile) range with cruise speed of 0.5 Mach number and will take-off and land on the vast majority of general aviation airfields. Advanced features include broad application of composite materials and a supercritical wing design with winglets. Full-span fowler flaps were introduced to improve landing capability. Engines are fuselage-mounted with inlets over the wing to provide shielding of fan noise by the wing surfaces. The design objectives, noise, and emission considerations, engine cycle and engine description are discussed as well as specific design features.

  2. Analytic treatment of source photon emission times to reduce noise in implicit Monte Carlo calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Trahan, Travis J.; Gentile, Nicholas A.

    2012-09-10

    Statistical uncertainty is inherent to any Monte Carlo simulation of radiation transport problems. In space-angle-frequency independent radiative transfer calculations, the uncertainty in the solution is entirely due to random sampling of source photon emission times. We have developed a modification to the Implicit Monte Carlo algorithm that eliminates noise due to sampling of the emission time of source photons. In problems that are independent of space, angle, and energy, the new algorithm generates a smooth solution, while a standard implicit Monte Carlo solution is noisy. For space- and angle-dependent problems, the new algorithm exhibits reduced noise relative to standard implicit Monte Carlo in some cases, and comparable noise in all other cases. In conclusion, the improvements are limited to short time scales; over long time scales, noise due to random sampling of spatial and angular variables tends to dominate the noise reduction from the new algorithm.

  3. Reducing Printed Circuit Board Emissions with Low-Noise Design Practices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Arthur T.; Fowler, Jennifer; Yavoich, Brian J.; Jennings, Stephen A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experiment designed to determine the effectiveness of adopting several low-noise printed circuit board (PCB) design practices. Two boards were designed and fabricated, each consisting of identical mixed signal circuitry. Several important differences were introduced between the board layouts: one board was constructed using recommended low-noise practices and the other constructed without such attention. The emissions from the two boards were then measured and compared, demonstrating an improvement in radiated emissions of up to 22 dB.

  4. Noise Emission from Laboratory Air Blowers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossing, Thomas D.; Windham, Betty

    1978-01-01

    Product noise ratings for a number of laboratory air blowers are reported and several recommendations for reducing laboratory noise from air blowers are given. Relevant noise ratings and methods for measuring noise emission of appliances are discussed. (BB)

  5. Evaluation of a Hydrogen Fuel Cell Powered Blended-Wing-Body Aircraft Concept for Reduced Noise and Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guynn, Mark D.; Freh, Joshua E.; Olson, Erik D.

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the analytical modeling and evaluation of an unconventional commercial transport aircraft concept designed to address aircraft noise and emission issues. A blended-wing-body configuration with advanced technology hydrogen fuel cell electric propulsion is considered. Predicted noise and emission characteristics are compared to a current technology conventional configuration designed for the same mission. The significant technology issues which have to be addressed to make this concept a viable alternative to current aircraft designs are discussed. This concept is one of the "Quiet Green Transport" aircraft concepts studied as part of NASA's Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts (RASC) Program. The RASC Program was initiated to develop revolutionary concepts that address strategic objectives of the NASA Enterprises, such as reducing aircraft noise and emissions, and to identify advanced technology requirements for the concepts.

  6. Evaluation of an Aircraft Concept With Over-Wing, Hydrogen-Fueled Engines for Reduced Noise and Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guynn, Mark D.; Olson, Erik D.

    2002-01-01

    This report describes the analytical modeling and evaluation of an unconventional commercial transport aircraft concept designed to address aircraft noise and emission issues. A strut-braced wing configuration with overwing, ultra-high bypass ratio, hydrogen fueled turbofan engines is considered. Estimated noise and emission characteristics are compared to a conventional configuration designed for the same mission and significant benefits are identified. The design challenges and technology issues which would have to be addressed to make the concept a viable alternative to current aircraft designs are discussed. This concept is one of the "Quiet Green Transport" aircraft concepts studied as part of NASA's Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts (RASC) Program. The RASC Program seeks to develop revolutionary concepts that address strategic objectives of the NASA Enterprises, such as reducing aircraft noise and emissions, and to identify enabling advanced technology requirements for the concepts.

  7. Ultra High Bypass Ratio Engine Research for Reducing Noise, Emissions, and Fuel Consumption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Christopher E.; Schweitzer, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    A pictorial history of NASA development of advanced engine technologies for reducing environmental emissions and increasing performance from the 1970s to 2000s is presented. The goals of the Subsonic Fixed Wing Program portion of the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program are discussed, along with the areas of investigation currently being pursued by the Ultra High Bypass Partnership Element of the Subsonic Fixed Wing Program.

  8. Collaborative Research on the Ultra High Bypass Ratio Engine Cycle to Reduce Noise, Emissions and Fuel Consumption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    A pictorial history of NASA development of advanced engine technologies for reducing environmental emissions and increasing performance from the 1970s to present is presented. The goals of the Subsonic Fixed Wing Program portion of the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program are addressed, along with the areas of investigation currently being pursued by the Ultra High Bypass Partnership Element of the Subsonic Fixed Wing Program to meet the goals. Ultra High Bypass cycle research collaboration successes with Pratt & Whitney are presented.

  9. Device and Method for Reducing Aircraft Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Streett, Craig L. (Inventor); Lin, John C. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A noise abatement device that is positioned adjacent to a body. The noise abatement device generally includes tabs or cavities which thicken the shear layer created by fluid flow over, around, or near the body, by creating horseshoe-shaped vortices; this thickening of the shear layer reduces the strength of fluctuations in the flow which produce noise.

  10. Microwave Antenna With Reduced Noise Leakage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cha, A. G.

    1986-01-01

    Gain or gain-to-temperature ratio of dual-shaped subreflector receiving antenna increased when illumination is tapered near aperture edge. Taper imposed in antenna feed reduces spillover in transmitting mode and reduces noise pickup in receiving mode.

  11. Emissions and Noise Pervasive Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda; Lee, Chi

    2008-01-01

    Objectives include: Provide interagency coordination of technology development, aimed at engine noise reduction. a) Provide recommendations to the Steering Committee on potential areas of interagency technology collaboration to maximize the use of government investments in noise reduction. b) Serve as a forum for information and technology exchange in order to coordinate gas turbine engine environmental strategies and policies among the member agencies and industry; c) Coordinate activities across panel representatives; and d) Communicate progress to VAATE steering committee.

  12. 40 CFR 205.52 - Vehicle noise emission standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Vehicle noise emission standards. 205... ABATEMENT PROGRAMS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Medium and Heavy Trucks § 205.52 Vehicle noise emission standards. (a) Low Speed Noise Emission Standard. Vehicles which are manufactured...

  13. 40 CFR 205.166 - Noise emission standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Noise emission standards. 205.166... PROGRAMS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Motorcycle Exhaust Systems § 205.166 Noise emission standards. (a) Noise emission standards. (1) Exhaust systems and exhaust system components...

  14. 40 CFR 205.152 - Noise emission standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... standard. For the purpose of Low-Noise-Emission Product certification pursuant to 40 CFR part 203... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Noise emission standards. 205.152... PROGRAMS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Motorcycles § 205.152 Noise emission...

  15. 40 CFR 205.152 - Noise emission standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... standard. For the purpose of Low-Noise-Emission Product certification pursuant to 40 CFR part 203... PROGRAMS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Motorcycles § 205.152 Noise emission standards. (a) Noise emission standards. (1) Street motorcycles of the following and subsequent model years...

  16. 40 CFR 205.152 - Noise emission standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... standard. For the purpose of Low-Noise-Emission Product certification pursuant to 40 CFR part 203... PROGRAMS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Motorcycles § 205.152 Noise emission standards. (a) Noise emission standards. (1) Street motorcycles of the following and subsequent model years...

  17. 40 CFR 205.52 - Vehicle noise emission standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Vehicle noise emission standards. 205... ABATEMENT PROGRAMS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Medium and Heavy Trucks § 205.52 Vehicle noise emission standards. (a) Low Speed Noise Emission Standard. Vehicles which are manufactured...

  18. Farm noise emissions during common agricultural activities.

    PubMed

    Depczynski, J; Franklin, R C; Challinor, K; Williams, W; Fragar, L J

    2005-08-01

    Noise injury in agriculture is a significant yet often unrecognized problem. Many farmers, farm workers, and family members are exposed to noise levels above recommended levels and have greater hearing loss than their non-farming contemporaries. The aim of this study was to gather up-to-date information on farm noise levels and to enhance the quality of information available to assist farmers in reducing noise exposure and meeting Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) regulations regarding noise management. Farm visits were conducted on 48 agricultural establishments that produce a range of commodities. Noise levels were measured at the ears of operators and bystanders involved in typical activities on farms. The average and peak noise levels were measured for 56 types of machinery or sites of farming activity, totaling 298 separate items and activities. Common noise hazards identified included firearms, tractors without cabs, workshop tools, small motors (e.g., chainsaws, augers, pumps), manual handling of pigs, shearing sheds, older cabbed tractors, and heavy machinery such as harvesters, bulldozers, and cotton module presses. We found that use of firearms without hearing protection presents a pressing hearing health priority. However, farming activities involving machinery used for prolonged periods also present significant risks to farmers' hearing health. Noise management strategies on the farm are essential in order to prevent noise injury among farmers. PMID:16184791

  19. Tail Rotor Airfoils Stabilize Helicopters, Reduce Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Founded by former Ames Research Center engineer Jim Van Horn, Van Horn Aviation of Tempe, Arizona, built upon a Langley Research Center airfoil design to create a high performance aftermarket tail rotor for the popular Bell 206 helicopter. The highly durable rotor has a lifetime twice that of the original equipment manufacturer blade, reduces noise by 40 percent, and displays enhanced performance at high altitudes. These improvements benefit helicopter performance for law enforcement, military training, wildfire and pipeline patrols, and emergency medical services.

  20. Reducing traffic noise with quieter pavements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donavan, Paul

    2005-09-01

    In recent years, interest has increased in the use of pavement type to reduce traffic noise. This has been driven by public concern over noise from freeways and state transportation agencies' interest in using pavement instead of sound walls to mitigate traffic noise. Beginnings of the recent interest go back to 1998 with the formation of the Institute for Safe, Quiet & Durable Highways at Purdue University and the initiation long-term research by the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) on the effectiveness of quieter pavements. In 2002, the State of Arizona announced plans to overlay 115 miles of concrete freeway in the greater Phoenix area with a quieter asphalt rubber surface. This turned into the first Quiet Pavement Pilot Program in partnership between Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and the Arizona Department of Transportation. Since that time, the FHWA in cooperation with the American Association of State Highway Transportation Agencies conducted a fact finding ``Scan'' tour in Europe to evaluate their quiet pavement technology and policy. This was followed by the first comparative tire/pavement noise testing in the US and Europe using the same procedures and test tires. The results, issues, and future directions surrounding these activities will be discussed.

  1. Engine Validation of Noise and Emission Reduction Technology Phase I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weir, Don (Editor)

    2008-01-01

    This final report has been prepared by Honeywell Aerospace, Phoenix, Arizona, a unit of Honeywell International, Inc., documenting work performed during the period December 2004 through August 2007 for the NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio, under the Revolutionary Aero-Space Engine Research (RASER) Program, Contract No. NAS3-01136, Task Order 8, Engine Validation of Noise and Emission Reduction Technology Phase I. The NASA Task Manager was Dr. Joe Grady of the NASA Glenn Research Center. The NASA Contract Officer was Mr. Albert Spence of the NASA Glenn Research Center. This report is for a test program in which NASA funded engine validations of integrated technologies that reduce aircraft engine noise. These technologies address the reduction of engine fan and jet noise, and noise associated with propulsion/airframe integration. The results of these tests will be used by NASA to identify the engineering tradeoffs associated with the technologies that are needed to enable advanced engine systems to meet stringent goals for the reduction of noise. The objectives of this program are to (1) conduct system engineering and integration efforts to define the engine test-bed configuration; (2) develop selected noise reduction technologies to a technical maturity sufficient to enable engine testing and validation of those technologies in the FY06-07 time frame; (3) conduct engine tests designed to gain insight into the sources, mechanisms and characteristics of noise in the engines; and (4) establish baseline engine noise measurements for subsequent use in the evaluation of noise reduction.

  2. Reducing environmental noise impacts: A USAREUR noise management program handbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feather, Timothy D.; Shekell, Ted K.

    1991-06-01

    Noise pollution is a major environmental problem faced by the U.S. Army in Europe. Noise-related complaints from German citizens can escalate into intense political issues in German communities. This in turn hampers efficient operation of military training and often times threatens the Army's mission. In order to remedy these problems, USAREUR has developed a noise management program. A successful noise management program will limit the impact of unavoidable noise on the populace. This report, a component of the noise management program, is a reference document for noise management planning. It contains guidelines and rules-of-thumb for noise management. This document contains procedures which operation and training level personnel can understand and apply in their day to day noise management planning. Noise mitigation tips are given. Basic technical information that will aid in understanding noise mitigation is provided along with noise management through land use planning. Noise management for specific components of the military community, (airfields, base operations, training areas, and housing and recreation areas) are addressed. The nature of noise generated, means of noise abatement at the source, path, and receiver (both physical and organizational/public relations methods), and a case study example are described.

  3. The control and optimization of environmental noise emissions from combustion turbine plants

    SciTech Connect

    Hessler, G.F. Jr.; Hessler, D.M.

    1996-12-31

    The methodology for performing an environmental noise assessment or impact study is reviewed to provide an overall framework for the importance of comprehensive noise control design for planned or existing combustion turbine facilities. Since ambient or background noise levels in residential communities usually drive the acoustical design goal for plant noise emissions, typical levels that can be expected are categorized. Noise emission criteria are discussed with regard to both satisfying mandated and responsible neighbor levels. Quantitative guidelines for designing plants to responsible neighbor levels are also examined. The principal equipment noise emissions sources are rank ordered for typical plants in the 25 to 100 MW size range. The basic acoustical engineering principles for predicting and modeling environmental noise emissions from complex arrangements of equipment are explained and illustrated. These principles are used to show that thoughtful siting or arrangement of equipment can often reduce, or at least minimize, the cost and performance penalties of noise mitigation measures.

  4. Noise source emissions, Davis Canyon site, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-07-01

    This report has been prepared for the purpose of documenting the development of the data provided to the Repository Project Management (RPM) organization. The data provided encompass all phases of activity, from site preparation through the exploratory shaft facility (ESF) and repository construction and operation, and decommissioning. Noise environments expected from construction and operation of transportation corridors associated with the activity were also modeled. The data for the construction of transportation corridors were provided by Bechtel National, Inc. Use of the quietest equipment available within the proven state of the art was assumed, as was the use of acoustical enclosures to the extent practical. The programmatic assumptions are based on the noise-sensitive nature of the Canyonlands National Park. Another feature of the data is the use of 1/3-octave-band rather than 1/1-octave-band resolution of emission spectra. This was done to permit evaluation of audibility of sounds reaching the park.

  5. 40 CFR 205.52 - Vehicle noise emission standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Vehicle noise emission standards. 205.52 Section 205.52 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Medium and Heavy Trucks § 205.52...

  6. 40 CFR 205.52 - Vehicle noise emission standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Vehicle noise emission standards. 205.52 Section 205.52 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Medium and Heavy Trucks § 205.52...

  7. Reduced-Noise Gas Flow Design Guide Developed as a Noise-Control Design Tool for Meeting Glenn's Hearing Conservation and Community Noise Goals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Beth A.

    2000-01-01

    A Reduced-Noise Gas Flow Design Guide has been developed for the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field by Nelson Acoustical Engineering of Elgin, Texas. Gas flow systems are a significant contributor to t he noise exposure landscape at Glenn. Because of the power of many of these systems, hearing conservation and community noise are importan t issues. The purpose of the Guide is to allow Glenn engineers and de signers to address noise emission and control at the design stage by using readily available system parameters. Although the Guide was deve loped with Glenn equipment and systems in mind, it is expected to hav e wide application in industry.

  8. Method of reducing impulsive noise in electromagnetic geophysical data

    SciTech Connect

    Spies, B.R.

    1990-07-31

    This patent describes a method of reducing impulsive noise in electromagnetic geophysical data. It comprises: providing receiving antenna means for receiving an electromagnetic signal. The receiving antenna means receiving impulsive noise; providing noise sensor means for receiving the impulsive noise and placing the noise sensor means so as to receive the impulsive noise that is received by the receiving antenna means and so as to minimize the reception of the electromagnetic signal; simultaneously receiving the electromagnetic signal with the receiving antenna means so as to create a signal record and receiving the impulsive noise with the noise sensor means so as to create a noise record; examining the noise record for occurrences of the impulsive noise by comparing the noise record with a threshold noise value and identifying those instances of time in which the noise record exceeds the threshold; removing those portions of the signal record which are simultaneous with the identified instances in which the noise records exceeds the threshold, wherein the signal record has reduced impulsive noise.

  9. Traffic noise reduces foraging efficiency in wild owls.

    PubMed

    Senzaki, Masayuki; Yamaura, Yuichi; Francis, Clinton D; Nakamura, Futoshi

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic noise has been increasing globally. Laboratory experiments suggest that noise disrupts foraging behavior across a range of species, but to reveal the full impacts of noise, we must examine the impacts of noise on foraging behavior among species in the wild. Owls are widespread nocturnal top predators and use prey rustling sounds for localizing prey when hunting. We conducted field experiments to examine the effect of traffic noise on owls' ability to detect prey. Results suggest that foraging efficiency declines with increasing traffic noise levels due to acoustic masking and/or distraction and aversion to traffic noise. Moreover, we estimate that effects of traffic noise on owls' ability to detect prey reach >120 m from a road, which is larger than the distance estimated from captive studies with bats. Our study provides the first evidence that noise reduces foraging efficiency in wild animals, and highlights the possible pervasive impacts of noise. PMID:27537709

  10. Traffic noise reduces foraging efficiency in wild owls

    PubMed Central

    Senzaki, Masayuki; Yamaura, Yuichi; Francis, Clinton D.; Nakamura, Futoshi

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic noise has been increasing globally. Laboratory experiments suggest that noise disrupts foraging behavior across a range of species, but to reveal the full impacts of noise, we must examine the impacts of noise on foraging behavior among species in the wild. Owls are widespread nocturnal top predators and use prey rustling sounds for localizing prey when hunting. We conducted field experiments to examine the effect of traffic noise on owls’ ability to detect prey. Results suggest that foraging efficiency declines with increasing traffic noise levels due to acoustic masking and/or distraction and aversion to traffic noise. Moreover, we estimate that effects of traffic noise on owls’ ability to detect prey reach >120 m from a road, which is larger than the distance estimated from captive studies with bats. Our study provides the first evidence that noise reduces foraging efficiency in wild animals, and highlights the possible pervasive impacts of noise. PMID:27537709

  11. Reducing Noise in a College Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luyben, Paul D.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Discusses an experiment on controlling library noise by rearrangement of furniture groupings and the separation of existing clusters of furniture. While electromechanical tests showed no significant differences, user measures indicated more acceptable noise levels. There are numerous illustrations and 30 references. (RAA)

  12. Burner retrofits reduce brewery emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    In 1988, the South Coast Air Quality Management District in California (SCAQMD) tightened its grip on industrial emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx). The new statute, Rule 1146, mandates a 75% reduction in NOx emissions over a five-year period ending this July. Anheuser-Busch Inc.'s second-largest brewery in Van Nuys fell under the new law's jurisdiction. Under the new law, the maximum allowable NOx emission must be reduced from 120 to 30 ppm for the two largest boilers. There were two alternatives: either prevent its formation inside the boiler, or remove it from the off-gases via selective catalytic reduction (SCR) or selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR). Prevention was chosen, because the NOx-removal technologies are unproven in the US on natural-gas-fired boilers. In addition, it was not known whether SCR or SNCR could respond to the wide swings in boiler demand. At any given time, loads between 30 and 100% of capacity would be required from the boilers. The brewery retrofitted the 125,000-lb/h boilers with Variflame burners, based upon an earlier retrofit at Anheuser-Busch's Merrimack, N.H., brewery. The paper describes this burner and its performance.

  13. A designer's viewpoint: Requirements for reducing helicopter noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, E. E.

    1982-01-01

    Functional requirements of helicopter noise reduction are discussed from the work environment point by view, i.e., what conditions must exist before the designer can take aim, without too many restraints, at reducing noise, community demand for noise reduction, regulatory requirements, competition, and penalties are among the topics discussed.

  14. Spontaneous emission noise in long-range surface plasmon polariton waveguide based optical gyroscope

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang-Yang; Zhang, Tong

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous emission noise is an important limit to the performance of active plasmonic devices. Here, we investigate the spontaneous emission noise in the long-range surface plasmon-polariton waveguide based optical gyroscope. A theoretical model of the sensitivity is established to study the incoherent multi-beam interference of spontaneous emission in the gyroscope. Numerical results show that spontaneous emission produces a drift in the transmittance spectra and lowers the signal-to-noise-ratio of the gyroscope. It also strengthens the shot noise to be the main limit to the sensitivity of the gyroscope for high propagation loss. To reduce the negative effects of the spontaneous emission noise on the gyroscope, an external feedback loop is suggested to estimate the drift in the transmittance spectra and therefor enhance the sensitivity. Our work lays a foundation for the improvement of long-range surface plasmon-polariton gyroscope and paves the way to its practical application. PMID:25234712

  15. Monitoring noise susceptibility: sensitivity of otoacoustic emissions and subjective audiometry.

    PubMed

    Plinkert, P K; Hemmert, W; Wagner, W; Just, K; Zenner, H P

    1999-12-01

    The capacity of different audiological methods to detect a high noise susceptibility was examined in 20 normally hearing and 26 especially noise-susceptible subjects. The latter were selected from 422 soldiers in field studies: they had shown a temporary threshold shift (TTS) in pure tone audiometry (PTA) after regular training with firearms. In laboratory experiments, the TTS-positive soldiers were re-examined using greatly reduced sound intensities, which caused no TTS in a control subject group. Before and after acoustic stimulation, different subjective (PTA, high frequency audiometry (HFA), upper limit of hearing (ULH)) and objective (transiently evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE), distortion products (DPOAE)) audiological tests were performed. After exposure to low impact noise in the laboratory, in both PTA and HFA, a TTS was observed in 11.5% (N = 3) of the noise-susceptible group (compared to 0% in the control group). In the TTS-positive group, deterioration of the ULH occurred in 28% (N = 7) (compared to 15% (N = 3) in the control group). An ULH improvement occurred in only one subject (3.8%) (compared to 25% (N = 5) in the control group). Significant alterations of click-evoked OAE-amplitudes were found in 26.9% (N = 7) of the selected groups, whereas stable emissions were observed in all but one subject (5%) of the control group. However, DPOAE alterations were seen in 19.2% (N = 5) of the TTS-positive soldiers but also in 25% (N = 5) of the control group. These results suggest that TEOAE provides a more sensitive and more objective method of detecting a subtle noise-induced disturbance of cochlear function than do PTA or DPOAE. PMID:10656598

  16. Noise of fan designed to reduce stator lift fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittmar, J. H.; Woodward, R. P.; Stakolich, E. G.

    1977-01-01

    An existing fan stage was redesigned to reduce stator lift fluctuations and was acoustically tested at three nozzle sizes for reduced noise generation. The lift fluctuations on the stator were reduced by increasing the stator cord, adjusting incidence angles, and adjusting the rotor velocity diagrams. Broadband noise levels were signficantly reduced in the middle to high frequencies. Blade passage tone sound power was not lessened, but decreases in the harmonics were observed. Aerodynamic improvements in both performance and efficiency were obtained.

  17. Limiting valve noise in gas metering, reducing stations

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, S.J.

    1996-07-01

    There are three general reasons why valve noise should be a concern. First, workplace noise can result in gradual, job-related hearing loss to employees over a period of years. Second, communities often have restrictions on acceptable levels, hours during which noise can occur, and factors like duration and frequency of noise. Last, extremely high noise levels can cause serious damage, failure and malfunction to valves, piping and related equipment. Special low noise valves make less noise than conventional valves. They use one of three design strategies: multipath--splitting the flow into many small orifices; multistage--splitting the pressure drop into a series of smaller steps; and multipath/multistage combined in a single unit. Another approach to reducing noise generation involves placing carefully sized static restrictors in the pipeline. The restrictor absorbs a portion of the system pressure drop, so the valve`s share of the drop is lowered. While the restrictor and valve both make noise, the net sound level is reduced. Another approach is to allow the noise to happen, then hide it. Some methods include: pipe insulation, thermal or acoustic; heavy wall pipe; buried valves; silences; and sound enclosures. These approaches can work in some cases, but caution must be used. The major drawback with all these approaches is that the damage potential associated with extreme noise, turbulence, and vibration still exists at some locations in the system.

  18. Nozzle Thrust Optimization While Reducing Jet Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiner, J. M.; Gilinsky, M. M.

    1995-01-01

    A Bluebell nozzle design concept is proposed for jet noise reduction with minimal thrust loss or even thrust augmentation. A Bluebell nozzle has a sinusoidal lip line edge (chevrons) and a sinusoidal cross section shape with linear amplitude increasing downstream in the divergent nozzle part (corrugations). The experimental tests of several Bluebell nozzle designs have shown nose reduction relative to a convergent-divergent round nozzle with design exhaust number M(e) = 1.5. The best design provides an acoustic benefit near 4dB with about 1 percent thrust augmentation. For subsonic flow ((M(e)= 0.6)), the tests indicated that the present method for design of Bluebell nozzles gives less acoustic benefit and in most cases jet noise increased. The proposed designs incorporate analytical theory and 2D and 3D numerical simulations. Full Navier-Stokes and Euler solvers were utilized. Boundary layer effects were used. Several different designs were accounted for in the Euler applications.

  19. Controlling Technically Produced Noise to Reduce Psychological Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlestam, Gosta

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the causes and problems associated with increasing levels of noise pollution in urban societies. Particular attention is given to noise emanating from aircraft and to possible means of reducing this problem and its resulting psychological stress and social strain. (JR)

  20. Reducing hospital ICU noise: a behavior-based approach.

    PubMed

    Konkani, Avinash; Oakley, Barbara; Penprase, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Noise in Intensive Care Units (ICUs) is gaining increasing attention as a significant source of stress and fatigue for nursing staff. Extensive research indicates that hospital noise also has negative impact on patients. The objective of this study was to analyze noise variations as experienced by both nursing staff and patients, to gain a better understanding of noise levels and frequencies observed in ICU settings over extended (week-long) durations, and to implement a low cost behavior modification program to reduce noise. The results of our study indicate that behavioral modification alone is not adequate to control excessive noise. There is a need for further research involving the supportive involvement by clinicians, ICU staff, along with effective medical device alarm management, and continuous process improvement methods. PMID:24918185

  1. Reducing environmental emissions in tanneries.

    PubMed

    van Groenestijn, J W; Langerwerf, J S A; Lucas, M

    2002-01-01

    Tanning, in particular chrome leather production, is still characterised by an inefficient use of raw material and the production of highly polluted wastewater and solid wastes. A part of the emissions can be prevented by introducing clean tanning technologies, the remaining emissions can be treated. Clean production technologies and waste (water) treatment technologies should have a designed complimentarity. Anaerobic wastewater treatment with recovery of sulfides, sulfur and energy (biogas) is a cornerstone in such integral clean chrome leather technology. PMID:12046670

  2. 40 CFR 205.52 - Vehicle noise emission standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ABATEMENT PROGRAMS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Medium and Heavy Trucks § 205.52 Vehicle... of a new motor vehicle subject to the standards prescribed in this paragraph shall, prior to...

  3. 40 CFR 205.152 - Noise emission standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... standard. For the purpose of Low-Noise-Emission Product certification pursuant to 40 CFR part 203... motorcycles with engine displacements of 170 cc and lower: Model year A-weighted noise level (dB) (A) 1983 83 (B) 1986 80 (ii) Off-road motorcycles with engine displacements greater than 170 cc: Model year...

  4. 40 CFR 205.152 - Noise emission standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... standard. For the purpose of Low-Noise-Emission Product certification pursuant to 40 CFR part 203... motorcycles with engine displacements of 170 cc and lower: Model year A-weighted noise level (dB) (A) 1983 83 (B) 1986 80 (ii) Off-road motorcycles with engine displacements greater than 170 cc: Model year...

  5. 40 CFR 205.166 - Noise emission standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Motorcycle Exhaust Systems § 205.166 Noise... are designed and marketed for use on any Federally regulated street motorcycle of the following and subsequent model years must be designed and built so that when installed on any such motorcycle which is...

  6. 40 CFR 205.166 - Noise emission standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Motorcycle Exhaust Systems § 205.166 Noise... are designed and marketed for use on any Federally regulated street motorcycle of the following and subsequent model years must be designed and built so that when installed on any such motorcycle which is...

  7. 40 CFR 205.166 - Noise emission standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Motorcycle Exhaust Systems § 205.166 Noise... are designed and marketed for use on any Federally regulated street motorcycle of the following and subsequent model years must be designed and built so that when installed on any such motorcycle which is...

  8. The investigation of noise attenuation by plants and the corresponding noise-reducing spectrum.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yang; Zhiyi, Bao; Zhujun, Zhu; Jiani, Liu

    2010-04-01

    As noise pollution is becoming more and more serious, many researchers are studying the noise attenuation effect provided by plants. This article examines six kinds of evergreens as research subjects so as to compare the different arrangements and densities of plants and their effect on noise attenuation. The authors studied the relationship between each of the plant's characteristics (the characteristics include leaf area, leaf fresh weight, leaf tactility, and leaf shape) and their average relative noise attenuation (deltaLAep). The authors then generated the noise-reducing spectrum of the six plants. The results show that there is a notable difference in noise-reducing effects for low frequency and high frequency (p < .05) when the plants are arranged differently. Also, every plant demonstrates a specific noise-reducing spectrum. By quantifying noise attenuation characteristics and abilities of plants, the authors combine noise attenuation species to achieve the mutual benefits of plant varieties and establish an ecotypic sound barrier model with effective density and arrangement. PMID:20420048

  9. Methods To Reduce Soil Fumigation Emissions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil fumigation is an important management practice for controlling soil pests in many high value crops including almonds. Reducing atmospheric emissions is necessary to minimize the environmental impact of soil fumigation. Water seals (sprinkling water on soil surface) to reduce fumigant emissions...

  10. Reducing emissions from uranium dissolving

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, W.L.; Compere, A.L.; Huxtable, W.P.; Googin, J.M.

    1992-10-01

    This study was designed to assess the feasibility of decreasing NO{sub x} emissions from the current uranium alloy scrap tray dissolving facility. In the current process, uranium scrap is dissolved in boiling nitric acid in shallow stainless-steel trays. As scrap dissolves, more metal and more nitric acid are added to the tray by operating personnel. Safe geometry is assured by keeping liquid level at or below 5 cm, the depth of a safe infinite slab. The accountability batch control system provides additional protection against criticality. Both uranium and uranium alloys are dissolved. Nitric acid is recovered from the vapors for reuse. Metal nitrates are sent to uranium recovery. Brown NO{sub x} fumes evolved during dissolving have occasionally resulted in a visible plume from the trays. The fuming is most noticeable during startup and after addition of fresh acid to a tray. Present environmental regulations are expected to require control of brown NO{sub x} emissions. A detailed review of the literature, indicated the feasibility of slightly altering process chemistry to favor the production of NO{sub 2} which can be scrubbed and recycled as nitric acid. Methods for controlling the process to manage offgas product distribution and to minimize chemical reaction hazards were also considered.

  11. Reducing emissions from uranium dissolving

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, W.L.; Compere, A.L.; Huxtable, W.P.; Googin, J.M.

    1992-10-01

    This study was designed to assess the feasibility of decreasing NO[sub x] emissions from the current uranium alloy scrap tray dissolving facility. In the current process, uranium scrap is dissolved in boiling nitric acid in shallow stainless-steel trays. As scrap dissolves, more metal and more nitric acid are added to the tray by operating personnel. Safe geometry is assured by keeping liquid level at or below 5 cm, the depth of a safe infinite slab. The accountability batch control system provides additional protection against criticality. Both uranium and uranium alloys are dissolved. Nitric acid is recovered from the vapors for reuse. Metal nitrates are sent to uranium recovery. Brown NO[sub x] fumes evolved during dissolving have occasionally resulted in a visible plume from the trays. The fuming is most noticeable during startup and after addition of fresh acid to a tray. Present environmental regulations are expected to require control of brown NO[sub x] emissions. A detailed review of the literature, indicated the feasibility of slightly altering process chemistry to favor the production of NO[sub 2] which can be scrubbed and recycled as nitric acid. Methods for controlling the process to manage offgas product distribution and to minimize chemical reaction hazards were also considered.

  12. Application of Feedforward Adaptive Active-Noise Control for Reducing Blade Passing Noise in Centrifugal Fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    WU, J.-D.; BAI, M. R.

    2001-02-01

    This paper describes two configurations of feedforward adaptive active-noise control (ANC) technique for reducing blade passing noise in centrifugal fans. In one configuration, the control speaker is installed at the cut-off region of the fan, while in the other configuration at the exit duct. The proposed ANC system is based on the filtered-x least-mean-squares (FXLMS) algorithm with multi-sine synthesized reference signal and frequency counting and is implemented by using a digital signal processor (DSP). Experiments are carried out to evaluate the proposed system for reducing the noise at the blade passing frequency (BPF) and its harmonics at various flow speeds. The results of the experiment indicated that the ANC technique is effective in reducing the blade passing noise for two configurations by using the feedforward adaptive control.

  13. Reducing Emissions from Uranium Dissolving

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, W.L.

    1992-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the feasibility of decreasing NO{sub x} emissions from the current uranium alloy scrap tray dissolving facility. In the current process, uranium scrap is dissolved in boiling nitric acid in shallow stainless-steel trays. As scrap dissolves, more metal and more nitric acid are added to the tray by operating personnel. Safe geometry is assured by keeping liquid level at or below 5 cm, the depth of a safe infinite slab. The accountability batch control system provides additional protection against criticality. The trays are steam coil heated. The process has operated satisfactorily, with few difficulties, for decades. Both uranium and uranium alloys are dissolved. Nitric acid is recovered from the vapors for reuse. Metal nitrates are sent to uranium recovery. Brown NO{sub x} fumes evolved during dissolving have occasionally resulted in a visible plume from the trays. The fuming is most noticeable during startup and after addition of fresh acid to a tray. Present environmental regulations are expected to require control of brown NO{sub x} emissions. Because NO{sub x} is hazardous, fumes should be suppressed whenever the electric blower system is inoperable. Because the tray dissolving process has worked well for decades, as much of the current capital equipment and operating procedures as possible were preserved. A detailed review of the literature, indicated the feasibility of slightly altering process chemistry to favor the production of NO{sub 2}, which can be scrubbed and recycled as nitric acid. Methods for controlling the process to manage offgas product distribution and to minimize chemical reaction hazards were also considered.

  14. Development of elastomeric isolators to reduce roof bolting machine drilling noise

    PubMed Central

    Michael, Robert; Yantek, David; Johnson, David; Ferro, Ernie; Swope, Chad

    2015-01-01

    Among underground coal miners, hearing loss remains one of the most common occupational illnesses. In response to this problem, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Office of Mine Safety and Health Research (OMSHR) conducts research to reduce the noise emission of underground coal-mining equipment, an example of which is a roof bolting machine. Field studies show that, on average, drilling noise is the most significant contributor to a roof bolting machine operator’s noise exposure. NIOSH OMSHR has determined that the drill steel and chuck are the dominant sources of drilling noise. NIOSH OMSHR, Corry Rubber Corporation, and Kennametal, Inc. have developed a bit isolator that breaks the steel-to-steel link between the drill bit and drill steel and a chuck isolator that breaks the mechanical connection between the drill steel and the chuck, thus reducing the noise radiated by the drill steel and chuck, and the noise exposure of the roof bolter operator. This paper documents the evolution of the bit isolator and chuck isolator including various alternative designs which may enhance performance. Laboratory testing confirms that production bit and chuck isolators reduce the A-weighted sound level generated during drilling by 3.7 to 6.6 dB. Finally, this paper summarizes results of a finite element analysis used to explore the key parameters of the drill bit isolator and chuck isolator to understand the impact these parameters have on noise. PMID:26568650

  15. Otoacoustic emission sensitivity to exposure to styrene and noise.

    PubMed

    Sisto, R; Cerini, L; Gatto, M P; Gherardi, M; Gordiani, A; Sanjust, F; Paci, E; Tranfo, G; Moleti, A

    2013-11-01

    The ototoxic effect of the exposure to styrene is evaluated, also in the presence of simultaneous exposure to noise, using otoacoustic emissions as biomarkers of mild cochlear damage. Transient-evoked and distortion product otoacoustic emissions were recorded and analyzed in a sample of workers (15 subjects) exposed to styrene and noise in a fiberglass manufacturing facility and in a control group of 13 non-exposed subjects. Individual exposure monitoring of the airborne styrene concentrations was performed, as well as biological monitoring, based on the urinary concentration of two styrene metabolites, the Mandelic and Phenylglyoxylic acids. Noise exposure was evaluated using wearable phonometers, and hearing loss with pure tone audiometry. Due to their different job tasks, one group of workers was exposed to high noise and low styrene levels, another group to higher styrene levels, close to the limit of 20 ppm, and to low noise levels. A significant negative correlation was found between the otoacoustic emission levels and the concentration of the styrene urinary metabolites. Otoacoustic emissions, and particularly distortion products, were able to discriminate the exposed workers from the controls, providing also a rough estimate of the slope of the dose-response relation between otoacoustic levels and styrene exposure. PMID:24180784

  16. 40 CFR 203.4 - Low-noise-emission product determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Low-noise-emission product determination. 203.4 Section 203.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS LOW-NOISE-EMISSION PRODUCTS § 203.4 Low-noise-emission product determination. (a)...

  17. 40 CFR 203.4 - Low-noise-emission product determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Low-noise-emission product determination. 203.4 Section 203.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS LOW-NOISE-EMISSION PRODUCTS § 203.4 Low-noise-emission product determination. (a)...

  18. 40 CFR 203.6 - Contracts for low-noise-emission products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Contracts for low-noise-emission products. 203.6 Section 203.6 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS LOW-NOISE-EMISSION PRODUCTS § 203.6 Contracts for low-noise-emission products. (a)...

  19. 40 CFR 203.6 - Contracts for low-noise-emission products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Contracts for low-noise-emission products. 203.6 Section 203.6 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS LOW-NOISE-EMISSION PRODUCTS § 203.6 Contracts for low-noise-emission products. (a)...

  20. 40 CFR 203.6 - Contracts for low-noise-emission products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Contracts for low-noise-emission products. 203.6 Section 203.6 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS LOW-NOISE-EMISSION PRODUCTS § 203.6 Contracts for low-noise-emission products. (a)...

  1. 40 CFR 203.4 - Low-noise-emission product determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Low-noise-emission product determination. 203.4 Section 203.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS LOW-NOISE-EMISSION PRODUCTS § 203.4 Low-noise-emission product determination. (a)...

  2. 40 CFR 203.6 - Contracts for low-noise-emission products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Contracts for low-noise-emission products. 203.6 Section 203.6 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS LOW-NOISE-EMISSION PRODUCTS § 203.6 Contracts for low-noise-emission products. (a)...

  3. 40 CFR 203.4 - Low-noise-emission product determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Low-noise-emission product determination. 203.4 Section 203.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS LOW-NOISE-EMISSION PRODUCTS § 203.4 Low-noise-emission product determination. (a)...

  4. 40 CFR 203.4 - Low-noise-emission product determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Low-noise-emission product determination. 203.4 Section 203.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS LOW-NOISE-EMISSION PRODUCTS § 203.4 Low-noise-emission product determination. (a) The Administrator will, within ninety (90)...

  5. 40 CFR 203.6 - Contracts for low-noise-emission products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Contracts for low-noise-emission products. 203.6 Section 203.6 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS LOW-NOISE-EMISSION PRODUCTS § 203.6 Contracts for low-noise-emission products. (a) Data relied upon by the Administrator...

  6. 40 CFR Appendix I to Subparts D... - Motorcycle Noise Emission Test Procedures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Motorcycle Noise Emission Test... AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Motorcycle...—Motorcycle Noise Emission Test Procedures Appendix I-1 to Subparts D and E—Test Procedure for Street and...

  7. Reducing exhaust gas emissions from Citydiesel busses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikkonen, Seppo

    The effect of fuel composition and exhaust gas aftertreatment on the emissions was measured from truck and bus engines. Possibilities to measure unregulated emissions (aldehydes, polyaromatic hydrocarbons, mutagenicity) were built. A reformulated diesel fuel 'Citydiesel' was developed. Citydiesel was able to reduce emissions compared to standard diesel fuel as follows: particulates by 10 to 30%, nitrogen oxides by 2 to 10%, sulphur dioxide by 97%, polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) over 50%, mutagenicity of the exhaust particulates clearly, odor of the exhaust, and smoke after a cold start. The use of Citydiesel fuel reduces emissions of the existing vehicles immediately which is a remarkable benefit. The very low sulphur content (below 50 ppm) makes it possible to use oxidation. catalytic converters to reduce emissions of diesel vehicles. The new Euro 2 exhaust regulations coming into force during 1996 can be met with a modern diesel engine, Citydiesel fuel, and exhaust gas aftertreatment. Properties of Citydiesel fuel were verified in a three year field test with 140 city buses. Experience was good; e.g., engine oil change interval could be lengthened. Total value of the exhaust was estimated with different fuels and aftertreatment device in order to find out cheap ways to reduce emissions.

  8. Ball valve regulator reduces noise at regulating stations

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, M.P.

    1998-10-01

    In recent years, there has been growing concern within the natural gas industry regarding the effect regulating stations have on their surrounding environments. To reduce excessive noise and pollution, many gas distribution and transmission companies have begun utilizing equipment which reduces environmental impact. The below grade ball valve regulator is a prime example of this environment-friendly equipment. Its high capacity, control capabilities, rangeability, and dependability makes the below grade ball valve regulator the preferred method for controlling natural gas flow. Its long-term reliability makes the below grade ball valve regulator the ideal method of, not only maintaining superior flow characteristics, but also of greatly reducing noise created in the station facilities.

  9. Low stimulus environments: reducing noise levels in continuing care.

    PubMed

    Brown, Juliette; Fawzi, Waleed; Shah, Amar; Joyce, Margaret; Holt, Genevieve; McCarthy, Cathy; Stevenson, Carmel; Marange, Rosca; Shakes, Joy; Solomon-Ayeh, Kwesi

    2016-01-01

    In the low stimulus environment project, we aimed to reduce the levels of intrusive background noise on an older adult mental health ward, combining a very straightforward measure on decibel levels with a downstream measure of reduced distress and agitation as expressed in incidents of violence. This project on reducing background noise levels on older adult wards stemmed from work the team had done on reducing levels of violence and aggression. We approached the problem using quality improvement methods. Reducing harm to patients and staff is a strategic aim of our Trust and in our efforts we were supported by the Trust's extensive programme of quality improvement, including training and support provided by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement and the trust's own Quality Improvement team. Prior to the project we were running a weekly multi-disciplinary quality improvement group on the ward. We established from this a sub-group to address the specific problem of noise levels and invited carers of people with dementia on our ward to the group. The project was led by nursing staff. We used a noise meter app readily downloadable from the internet to monitor background noise levels on the ward and establish a baseline measure. As a group we used a driver diagram to identify an overall aim and a clear understanding of the major factors that would drive improvements. We also used a staff and carer survey to identify further areas to work on. Change ideas that came from staff and carers included the use of the noise meter to track and report back on noise levels, the use of posters to remind staff about noise levels, the introduction of a visual indication of current noise levels (the Yacker Tracker), the addition of relaxing background music, and adaptations to furniture and environment. We tested many of these over the course of nine months in 2015, using the iterative learning gained from multiple PDSA cycles. The specific aim was a decrease from above 60dB to

  10. Low stimulus environments: reducing noise levels in continuing care

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Juliette; Fawzi, Waleed; Shah, Amar; Joyce, Margaret; Holt, Genevieve; McCarthy, Cathy; Stevenson, Carmel; Marange, Rosca; Shakes, Joy; Solomon-Ayeh, Kwesi

    2016-01-01

    In the low stimulus environment project, we aimed to reduce the levels of intrusive background noise on an older adult mental health ward, combining a very straightforward measure on decibel levels with a downstream measure of reduced distress and agitation as expressed in incidents of violence. This project on reducing background noise levels on older adult wards stemmed from work the team had done on reducing levels of violence and aggression. We approached the problem using quality improvement methods. Reducing harm to patients and staff is a strategic aim of our Trust and in our efforts we were supported by the Trust's extensive programme of quality improvement, including training and support provided by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement and the trust's own Quality Improvement team. Prior to the project we were running a weekly multi-disciplinary quality improvement group on the ward. We established from this a sub-group to address the specific problem of noise levels and invited carers of people with dementia on our ward to the group. The project was led by nursing staff. We used a noise meter app readily downloadable from the internet to monitor background noise levels on the ward and establish a baseline measure. As a group we used a driver diagram to identify an overall aim and a clear understanding of the major factors that would drive improvements. We also used a staff and carer survey to identify further areas to work on. Change ideas that came from staff and carers included the use of the noise meter to track and report back on noise levels, the use of posters to remind staff about noise levels, the introduction of a visual indication of current noise levels (the Yacker Tracker), the addition of relaxing background music, and adaptations to furniture and environment. We tested many of these over the course of nine months in 2015, using the iterative learning gained from multiple PDSA cycles. The specific aim was a decrease from above 60dB to

  11. Evoked otoacoustic emissions in workers exposed to noise: A review

    PubMed Central

    Alcarás, Patrícia Arruda de Souza; Lüders, Débora; França, Denise Maria Vaz Romano; Klas, Regina Maria; Lacerda, Adriana Bender Moreira de; Gonçalves, Cláudia Giglio de Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Summary Introduction: The otoacoustic emissions test is an essential tool in the evaluation of auditory function, since it allows the early detection of cochlear damage of occupational origin. Objective: To present a review of the literature and analyze the effectiveness of the clinical application of the otoacoustic emissions test in workers exposed to noise. Methods: A bibliographical search covering a period of 10 years was performed in the Virtual Health Library including published articles in national and international journals indexed in the internationally recognized databases for the health sciences, LILACS, SCIELO, and MEDLINE, using the terms “otoacoustic emissions” and “occupational exposure.” The type of published article (national/international), the type and intensity of the stimulus most commonly used for the evoked otoacoustic emissions, the gender and age of the subjects, and the conclusions from the retrospective studies were all taken into consideration. Results and Conclusions: A total of 19 articles were analyzed, 7 national and 12 international, covering subjects from 17 to 77 years of age, mostly men. The type of stimulus most commonly used for the evoked otoacoustic emissions was the distortion method (12). Through this review, we have concluded that testing of evoked otoacoustic emissions in workers exposed to noise is an important tool in the early diagnosis of noise-induced cochlear hearing disorders. PMID:25991982

  12. Low frequency noise peak near magnon emission energy in magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Liang; Xiang, Li; Guo, Huiqiang; Wei, Jian; Li, D. L.; Yuan, Z. H.; Feng, J. F. Han, X. F.; Coey, J. M. D.

    2014-12-15

    We report on the low frequency (LF) noise measurements in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) below 4 K and at low bias, where the transport is strongly affected by scattering with magnons emitted by hot tunnelling electrons, as thermal activation of magnons from the environment is suppressed. For both CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB and CoFeB/AlO{sub x}/CoFeB MTJs, enhanced LF noise is observed at bias voltage around magnon emission energy, forming a peak in the bias dependence of noise power spectra density, independent of magnetic configurations. The noise peak is much higher and broader for unannealed AlO{sub x}-based MTJ, and besides Lorentzian shape noise spectra in the frequency domain, random telegraph noise (RTN) is visible in the time traces. During repeated measurements the noise peak reduces and the RTN becomes difficult to resolve, suggesting defects being annealed. The Lorentzian shape noise spectra can be fitted with bias-dependent activation of RTN, with the attempt frequency in the MHz range, consistent with magnon dynamics. These findings suggest magnon-assisted activation of defects as the origin of the enhanced LF noise.

  13. Aircraft noise reduction technology. [to show impact on individuals and communities, component noise sources, and operational procedures to reduce impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Aircraft and airport noise reduction technology programs conducted by NASA are presented. The subjects discussed are: (1) effects of aircraft noise on individuals and communities, (2) status of aircraft source noise technology, (3) operational procedures to reduce the impact of aircraft noise, and (4) NASA relations with military services in aircraft noise problems. References to more detailed technical literature on the subjects discussed are included.

  14. Aircraft Geared Architecture Reduces Fuel Cost and Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2015-01-01

    In an effort to increase fuel efficiency and reduce noise in commercial airplanes, NASA aeronautics teamed up with East Hartford, Connecticut-based Pratt & Whitney through a Space Act Agreement to help the company increase the efficiency of its turbofan engine. The company's new PurePower line of engines is 15 percent more fuel-efficient and up to 75 percent quieter than its competitors.

  15. Hyperspectral data analysis procedures with reduced sensitivity to noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landgrebe, David A.

    1993-01-01

    Multispectral sensor systems have become steadily improved over the years in their ability to deliver increased spectral detail. With the advent of hyperspectral sensors, including imaging spectrometers, this technology is in the process of taking a large leap forward, thus providing the possibility of enabling delivery of much more detailed information. However, this direction of development has drawn even more attention to the matter of noise and other deleterious effects in the data, because reducing the fundamental limitations of spectral detail on information collection raises the limitations presented by noise to even greater importance. Much current effort in remote sensing research is thus being devoted to adjusting the data to mitigate the effects of noise and other deleterious effects. A parallel approach to the problem is to look for analysis approaches and procedures which have reduced sensitivity to such effects. We discuss some of the fundamental principles which define analysis algorithm characteristics providing such reduced sensitivity. One such analysis procedure including an example analysis of a data set is described, illustrating this effect.

  16. A new design of MRPC to reduce noise and crosstalk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiping, Z.; Yi, W.; Yuanjing, L.; Jianping, C.

    2014-07-01

    The CBM time of flight wall is proposed to be built with MRPC technology. In the past few years we have successfuly improved the rate capability of MRPCs to CBM level. However, in a relative high particle multiplicity situation (over 20 kHz/cm2), multi-hit capability is one of the most demanding requirement of the detector. In a free running mode too many noise not only affect the performance of MRPC but also enlarge the data file or even damage the FIFO. So it is needed to develop low crosstalk and low noise MRPC to meet CBM-TOF requirement. Three strip-readout MRPC with or without shielding grounds were designed to study how to reduce noise and crosstalk of MRPCs. In this paper we report on the performance of three different structures of MRPCs named G-0, G-2 and G-3. Tests with cosmic rays were performed at Tsinghua University. The results show that MRPC G-2 can perform better than other two structures, the average cluster size of G-2 is lower than 1.28 strips and the noise level is below 0.5 Hz/cm2. The detection efficiency is over 98% and the time resolution is around 65 ps.

  17. WDM optical steganography based on amplified spontaneous emission noise.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ben; Tait, Alexander N; Chang, Matthew P; Prucnal, Paul R

    2014-10-15

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a wavelength-division multiplexed (WDM) optical stealth transmission system carried by amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) noise. The stealth signal is hidden in both time and frequency domains by using ASE noise as the signal carrier. Each WDM channel uses part of the ASE spectrum, which provides more flexibility to apply stealth transmission in a public network and adds another layer of security to the stealth channel. Multi-channel transmission also increases the overall channel capacity, which is the major limitation of the single stealth channel transmission based on ASE noise. The relations between spectral bandwidth and coherence length of ASE carrier have been theoretically analyzed and experimentally investigated. PMID:25361121

  18. Optical steganography based on amplified spontaneous emission noise.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ben; Wang, Zhenxing; Tian, Yue; Fok, Mable P; Shastri, Bhavin J; Kanoff, Daniel R; Prucnal, Paul R

    2013-01-28

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate an optical steganography method in which a data signal is transmitted using amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) noise as a carrier. The ASE serving as a carrier for the private signal has an identical frequency spectrum to the existing noise generated by the Erbium doped fiber amplifiers (EDFAs) in the transmission system. The system also carries a conventional data channel that is not private. The so-called "stealth" or private channel is well-hidden within the noise of the system. Phase modulation is used for both the stealth channel and the public channel. Using homodyne detection, the short coherence length of the ASE ensures that the stealth signal can only be recovered if the receiver closely matches the delay-length difference, which is deliberately changed in a dynamic fashion that is only known to the transmitter and its intended receiver. PMID:23389187

  19. Method and apparatus for reducing microwave oscillator output noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, G. John (Inventor); Saunders, Jonathan E. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Microwave oscilltors incorporate r.f. feedback with carrier suppression to reduce phase noise. In a direct feedback oscillator arrngement a circulator is interposed between the r.f. amplifier and the high-Q resonator. The amplifier output is applied to the slightly over-coupled input port of the resonator so that the resultant net return signal is the vectorial difference between the signals emitted and reflected from the resonator. The gain of the r.f. amplifier is chosen to regenerate the forward signal from the net return signal. In a STALO-type arrangement, the resonator is critically coupled and an r.f. amplifier added to the path of the net return signal. The sensitivity of the STALO-type feedback loop is thereby enhanced while added amplifier noise is minimized by the superposition of the signals emitted by and reflected from the resonator.

  20. Passive Porous Treatment for Reducing Flap Side-Edge Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhari, Meelan M.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.

    2008-01-01

    A passive porous treatment has been proposed as a means of suppressing noise generated by the airflow around the side edges of partial-span flaps on airplane wings when the flaps are extended in a high-lift configuration. The treatment proposed here does not incur any aerodynamic penalties and could easily be retrofit to existing airplanes. The treatment could also be applied to reduce noise generated by turbomachinery, including wind turbines. Innovative aspects of the proposed treatment include a minimum treatment area and physics-based procedure for treatment design. The efficacy of the treatment was confirmed during wind-tunnel experiments at NASA Ames, wherein the porous treatment was applied to a minute surface area in the vicinity of a flap edge on a 26-percent model of Boeing 777-200 wing.

  1. Reducing Noise in the MSU Daily Lower-Tropospheric Global Temperature Dataset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christy, John R.; Spencer, Roy W.; McNider, Richard T.

    1995-01-01

    The daily global-mean values of the lower-tropospheric temperature determined from microwave emissions measured by satellites are examined in terms of their signal, noise, and signal-to-noise ratio. Daily and 30-day average noise estimates are reduced by, almost 50% and 35%, respectively, by analyzing and adjusting (if necessary) for errors due to (1) missing data, (2) residual harmonics of the annual cycle unique to particular satellites, (3) lack of filtering, and (4) spurious trends. After adjustments, the decadal trend of the lower-tropospheric global temperature from January 1979 through February 1994 becomes -0.058 C, or about 0.03 C per decade cooler than previously calculated.

  2. QED (quantum-electrodynamical) theory of excess spontaneous emission noise

    SciTech Connect

    Milonni, P.W.

    1990-01-01

    The results of a quantum-electrodynamical theory of excess spontaneous emission noise in lossy resonators will be presented. The Petermann K factor'' does not enter into the spontaneous emission rate of a single atom in the cavity. The QED theory allows different interpretations of the K factor, and we use this fact to justify semiclassical analyses and to provide in one example a simple derivation of K in terms of the amplification of the quantum vacuum field entering the resonator through its mirrors. 17 refs.

  3. Impedance control reduces instability that arises from motor noise

    PubMed Central

    Selen, Luc P.J.; Franklin, David W.; Wolpert, Daniel M.

    2009-01-01

    There is ample evidence that humans are able to control the endpoint impedance of their arms in response to active destabilizing force fields. However, such fields are uncommon in daily life. Here, we examine whether the CNS selectively controls the arm’s endpoint impedance in the absence of active force fields but in the presence of instability arising from task geometry and signal-dependent noise in the neuromuscular system. Subjects were required to generate forces, in two orthogonal directions, onto four differently curved rigid objects simulated by a robotic manipulandum. The endpoint stiffness of the limb was estimated for each object curvature. With increasing curvature, the endpoint stiffness increased mainly parallel to the object surface, and to a lesser extent in the orthogonal direction. Therefore, the orientation of the stiffness ellipses did not orient to the direction of instability. Simulations showed that the observed stiffness geometries and their pattern of change with instability are the result of a trade-off between maximizing the mechanical stability and minimizing the destabilizing effects of signal-dependent noise. Therefore, it would have been sub-optimal to align the stiffness ellipse in the direction of instability. The time course of the changes in stiffness geometry suggests that modulation takes place both within and across trials. Our results show that an increase in stiffness relative to the increase in noise can be sufficient to reduce kinematic variability, thereby allowing stiffness control to improve stability in natural tasks. PMID:19812335

  4. Rotor blade system with reduced blade-vortex interaction noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leishman, John G. (Inventor); Han, Yong Oun (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A rotor blade system with reduced blade-vortex interaction noise includes a plurality of tube members embedded in proximity to a tip of each rotor blade. The inlets of the tube members are arrayed at the leading edge of the blade slightly above the chord plane, while the outlets are arrayed at the blade tip face. Such a design rapidly diffuses the vorticity contained within the concentrated tip vortex because of enhanced flow mixing in the inner core, which prevents the development of a laminar core region.

  5. Reducing Antenna Mechanical Noise in Precision Doppler Tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, J. W.; Estabrook, F. B.; Asmar, S. W.; Iess, L.; Tortora, P.

    2006-05-01

    Precision Doppler tracking of deep-space probes is central to spacecraft navigation and many radio science investigations. The most sensitive Doppler observations to date have been taken using the NASA/JPL Deep Space Network (DSN) antenna DSS 25, a 34-m-diameter beam-waveguide station especially instrumented with simultaneous X-band (approximately 8.4-GHz) and Ka-band (approximately 32-GHz) links and tropospheric scintillation calibration equipment, tracking the Cassini spacecraft. These Cassini observations achieved Doppler fractional frequency stability (Doppler frequency fluctuation divided by center frequency, Delta f / f_o ) of approximately 3 x 10^-15 at tau = 1000 s integration. In those very-high-sensitivity tracks, the leading disturbance was antenna mechanical noise: time-dependent unmodeled physical motion of the ground antenna's phase center caused by antenna sag as the elevation angle changed, unmodeled subreflector motion, wind loading, bulk motion of the antenna as it rolled over irregularities in the supporting azimuth ring, differential thermal expansion of the structure, etc. This noise has seemed irreducible at reasonable cost, since it is unclear how to build a practical, large, moving, steel structure having mechanical stability significantly better than that of current tracking stations. Here we show how the mechanical noise of a large tracking antenna can effectively be removed when two-way Doppler tracking data from an existing DSN antenna are suitably combined with simultaneous tracking data using an ancillary (smaller and stiffer) antenna. Using our method, the mechanical noise in the final Doppler observable can be reduced, substantially, to that of the stiffer antenna.

  6. FETC Programs for Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Ruether, J.A.

    1998-02-01

    Mark Twain once quipped that everyone talks about the weather but no one does anything about it. With interest in global climate change on the rise, researchers in the fossil-energy sector are feeling the heat to provide new technology to permit continued use of fossil fuels but with reduced emissions of so-called `greenhouse gases.` Three important greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide, are released to the atmosphere in the course of recovering and combusting fossil fuels. Their importance for trapping radiation, called forcing, is in the order given. In this report, we briefly review how greenhouse gases cause forcing and why this has a warming effect on the Earth`s atmosphere. Then we discuss programs underway at FETC that are aimed at reducing emissions of methane and carbon dioxide.

  7. Aluminum: Reducing chloride emissions from aluminum production

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, P.

    1999-09-29

    Reynolds Metals Company (RMC), with assistance from a NICE{sup 3} grant, is developing for commercialization a closed-loop control process that greatly reduces chlorine emissions and increases plant efficiency while maintaining metal quality. The process still utilizes chlorine to remove impurities during aluminum processing, but is more effective than current methods. With the new technology chlorine in the stack is monitored and input chlorine is adjusted continuously. This optimization of chlorine use results in substantially less waste because less chlorine has to be bought or produced by aluminum manufacturers. This innovation is a significant improvement over conventional aluminum treatments, in which chlorine is injected in a more costly and wasteful manner. By the year 2010, the new technology has the potential to reduce the energy it takes to create chlorine by 8.4 billion Btu per year and to cut greenhouse gas emissions by 1,377 tons per year.

  8. Options for reducing carbon dioxide emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenfeld, A.H.; Price, L.

    1991-08-01

    Improvements in energy efficiency can significantly reduce the annual growth in greenhouse gas emissions. Such improvements occur when energy intensity is reduced; no reduction in energy services is required. Using the concept of cost of conserved energy'' to develop conservation supply curves similar to resource supply curves, researchers consistently find that electricity and natural gas savings of nearly 50% of current consumption are possible for US buildings. Such reductions in energy consumption directly reduce emissions of greenhouse gases. To capture these savings, we must continue to develop energy-efficient technologies and strategies. This paper describes three recent energy-efficient technologies that benefited from energy conservation research and development (R D) funding: high-frequency ballasts, compact fluorescent lamps, and low-emissivity windows. Other advanced technologies and strategies of spectrally selective windows, superwindows, electrochromic windows, advanced insulation, low-flow showerheads, improved recessed lamp fixtures, whitening surfaces and planting urban trees, daylighting, and thermal energy storage are also discussed. 33 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Reducing Methyl Halide Emissions from Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, S. R.; Xuan, R.; Ashworth, D.; Luo, L.

    2011-12-01

    Volatilization and soil transformation are major pathways by which pesticides dissipate from treated agricultural soil. Methyl bromide (MeBr) emissions from agricultural fumigation can lead to depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer. This has led to a gradual phase-out of MeBr and replacement by other halogenated chemicals. However, MeBr continues to be widely used under Critical Use Exemptions and development of emission-reduction strategies remains important. Several methods to reduce emissions of MeBr, and other halogenated soil fumigants, have been developed and are currently being tested under field conditions. In this paper, several approaches for reducing fumigant emissions to the atmosphere are described and include the use of virtually impermeable films, the creation of reactive soil barriers and a recently developed reactive film which was designed to limit loss of MeBr from soil without adding any material to the soil surface. Ammonium thiosulfate (ATS) was used to create a reactive layer. For a reactive soil layer, ATS was sprayed on the soil surface or incorporated to a depth of 1-2 cm. For the reactive film, ATS was placed between two layers of plastic film. The lower plastic layer was a high-density polyethylene film (HDPE), which is readily permeable to MeBr. The upper layer was a virtually impermeable film (VIF) and limits MeBr diffusion. MeBr diffusion and transformation through VIFs and reactive layers were tested in laboratory and field experiments. Although ineffective when dry, when sufficient water was present, reactive barriers substantially depleted halogenated fumigants, including MeBr. When ATS was activated in laboratory experiments, MeBr half-life was about 9.0 h (20C) in a reactive film barrier, and half life decreased with increasing temperature. When the soil was covered with VIF, less than 10% of the added MeBr diffused through the film and the remainder was transformed within the soil. This compares with 60 to 90% emission

  10. Retrofit methods reduce valves' fugitive emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Gallupe, W. )

    1993-06-01

    Retrofitting in-service valves is a practical alternative that reduces plant fugitive emissions and meets the federal and state environmental provisions. Plant operators must find cost-effective technologies that control and restrain valve emissions. Unfortunately, valves are dynamic devices and must move to perform their functions. Surveying all options, total replacement is not viable due to cost and scale of magnitude. However, retrofit technologies are practical measures that concentrate on correcting the problem points on a valve--the stem, the valve body and piping connections. Retrofits examine if the proper valve type is being used. Retrofit methods can meet the emission standards and reduce capital costs for environmental compliance. Leaks from nearly all types of process equipment fall under the provisions of the Clean Air Act Amendments, but valves are the most serious challenge for the process industries, and consequently, the most costly to control. The paper discusses the following: valves as dynamic devices; compliance with environmental regulations; what makes valves leak; enhanced stem sealing; modular stem sealing devices; custom design solutions; special valves; and bellows seals.

  11. Reduced Coronal Emission Above Large Isolated Sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabov, B. I.; Gary, D. E.; Peterova, N. G.; Shibasaki, K.; Topchilo, N. A.

    2015-01-01

    We analysed specific regions of reduced soft X-ray and microwave emission in five large isolated sunspots. The Nobeyama Radioheliograph 17 GHz observations reveal a local depression of microwave brightness in the peripheral area of the sunspots. The depression regions appear light (weak absorption) in the He 10830 Å line in areas with extended (open) field lines, as indicated by potential field source surface model (PFSS) extrapolations up to 1.5 R⊙. The observed depressions of 3 - 8 % in ordinary mode at 17 GHz are interpreted as resulting from free-free emission when the plasma density is lower by 5 - 10 %. Our model estimates show that the decrease in density in both the coronal and the lower layers above the depression region accounts for the depression. These depression regions lend themselves well to marking the location of outward plasma motions.

  12. Using Kalman filters to reduce noise from RFID location system.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Pedro Henriques; Xavier, José; Silva, Daniel Castro; Reis, Luís Paulo; Petry, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, there are many technologies that support location systems involving intrusive and nonintrusive equipment and also varying in terms of precision, range, and cost. However, the developers some time neglect the noise introduced by these systems, which prevents these systems from reaching their full potential. Focused on this problem, in this research work a comparison study between three different filters was performed in order to reduce the noise introduced by a location system based on RFID UWB technology with an associated error of approximately 18 cm. To achieve this goal, a set of experiments was devised and executed using a miniature train moving at constant velocity in a scenario with two distinct shapes-linear and oval. Also, this train was equipped with a varying number of active tags. The obtained results proved that the Kalman Filter achieved better results when compared to the other two filters. Also, this filter increases the performance of the location system by 15% and 12% for the linear and oval paths respectively, when using one tag. For a multiple tags and oval shape similar results were obtained (11-13% of improvement). PMID:24592186

  13. Using Kalman Filters to Reduce Noise from RFID Location System

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, José; Reis, Luís Paulo; Petry, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, there are many technologies that support location systems involving intrusive and nonintrusive equipment and also varying in terms of precision, range, and cost. However, the developers some time neglect the noise introduced by these systems, which prevents these systems from reaching their full potential. Focused on this problem, in this research work a comparison study between three different filters was performed in order to reduce the noise introduced by a location system based on RFID UWB technology with an associated error of approximately 18 cm. To achieve this goal, a set of experiments was devised and executed using a miniature train moving at constant velocity in a scenario with two distinct shapes—linear and oval. Also, this train was equipped with a varying number of active tags. The obtained results proved that the Kalman Filter achieved better results when compared to the other two filters. Also, this filter increases the performance of the location system by 15% and 12% for the linear and oval paths respectively, when using one tag. For a multiple tags and oval shape similar results were obtained (11–13% of improvement). PMID:24592186

  14. Environment, Renewable Energy and Reduced Carbon Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, S.; Khazanov, G.; Kishimoto, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Increased energy security and reduced carbon emissions pose significant challenges for science and technology. However, they also create substantial opportunities for innovative research and development. In this review paper, we highlight some of the key opportunities and mention public policies that are needed to enable the efforts and to maximize the probability of their success. Climate is among the uttermost nonlinear behaviors found around us. As recent studies showed the possible effect of cosmic rays on the Earth's climate, we investigate how complex interactions between the planet and its environment can be responsible for climate anomalies.

  15. 40 CFR 204.52 - Portable air compressor noise emission standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Portable air compressor noise emission standard. 204.52 Section 204.52 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS NOISE EMISSION STANDARDS FOR CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT Portable Air Compressors § 204.52 Portable air compressor...

  16. 40 CFR 204.52 - Portable air compressor noise emission standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Portable air compressor noise emission standard. 204.52 Section 204.52 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS NOISE EMISSION STANDARDS FOR CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT Portable Air Compressors §...

  17. 40 CFR 204.52 - Portable air compressor noise emission standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Portable air compressor noise emission standard. 204.52 Section 204.52 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS NOISE EMISSION STANDARDS FOR CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT Portable Air Compressors §...

  18. 40 CFR 204.52 - Portable air compressor noise emission standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Portable air compressor noise emission standard. 204.52 Section 204.52 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS NOISE EMISSION STANDARDS FOR CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT Portable Air Compressors §...

  19. 40 CFR 204.52 - Portable air compressor noise emission standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Portable air compressor noise emission standard. 204.52 Section 204.52 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS NOISE EMISSION STANDARDS FOR CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT Portable Air Compressors §...

  20. 40 CFR Appendix I to Subparts D and E - Motorcycle Noise Emission Test Procedures [Note

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Motorcycle Noise Emission Test Procedures I Appendix I to Subparts D and E Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Motorcycles Recall...

  1. 40 CFR Appendix I to Subparts D and E - Motorcycle Noise Emission Test Procedures [Note

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Motorcycle Noise Emission Test Procedures I Appendix I to Subparts D and E Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Motorcycles Recall...

  2. 40 CFR Appendix I to Subparts D and E - Motorcycle Noise Emission Test Procedures [Note

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Motorcycle Noise Emission Test Procedures I Appendix I to Subparts D and E Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Motorcycles Recall...

  3. 40 CFR Appendix I to Subparts D and E - Motorcycle Noise Emission Test Procedures [Note

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Motorcycle Noise Emission Test Procedures I Appendix I to Subparts D and E Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Motorcycles Recall...

  4. 40 CFR Appendix I to Subparts D and E - Motorcycle Noise Emission Test Procedures [Note

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Motorcycle Noise Emission Test Procedures I Appendix I to Subparts D and E Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Motorcycles Recall...

  5. Reducing environmental noise impacts: A USAREUR noise-management program handbook. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Feather, T.D.; Shekell, T.K.

    1991-06-01

    Noise pollution is a major environmental problem faced by the U.S. Army in Europe. Noise-related complaints from German citizens can escalate into intense political issues in German communities. This in turn hampers efficient operation of military training and often times threatens the Army's mission. In order to remedy these problems, USAREUR has developed a noise management program. A successful noise management program will limit the impact of unavoidable noise on the populace. This report, a component of the noise management program, is a reference document for noise management planning. It contains guidelines and rules-of-thumb for noise management. This document contains procedures which operation and training level personnel can understand and apply in their day to day noise management planning. Noise mitigation tips are given. Basic technical information that will aid in understanding noise mitigation is provided along with noise management through land use planning. Noise management for specific components of the military community, (airfields, base operations, training areas, and housing and recreation areas) are addressed. The nature of noise generated, means of noise abatement at the source, path, and receiver (both physical and organizational/public relations methods), and a case study example are described.

  6. Assessing the environmental impacts of aircraft noise and emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahashabde, Anuja; Wolfe, Philip; Ashok, Akshay; Dorbian, Christopher; He, Qinxian; Fan, Alice; Lukachko, Stephen; Mozdzanowska, Aleksandra; Wollersheim, Christoph; Barrett, Steven R. H.; Locke, Maryalice; Waitz, Ian A.

    2011-01-01

    With the projected growth in demand for commercial aviation, many anticipate increased environmental impacts associated with noise, air quality, and climate change. Therefore, decision-makers and stakeholders are seeking policies, technologies, and operational procedures that balance environmental and economic interests. The main objective of this paper is to address shortcomings in current decision-making practices for aviation environmental policies. We review knowledge of the noise, air quality, and climate impacts of aviation, and demonstrate how including environmental impact assessment and quantifying uncertainties can enable a more comprehensive evaluation of aviation environmental policies. A comparison is presented between the cost-effectiveness analysis currently used for aviation environmental policy decision-making and an illustrative cost-benefit analysis. We focus on assessing a subset of the engine NO X emissions certification stringency options considered at the eighth meeting of the International Civil Aviation Organization’s Committee on Aviation Environmental Protection. The FAA Aviation environmental Portfolio Management Tool (APMT) is employed to conduct the policy assessments. We show that different conclusions may be drawn about the same policy options depending on whether benefits and interdependencies are estimated in terms of health and welfare impacts versus changes in NO X emissions inventories as is the typical practice. We also show that these conclusions are sensitive to a variety of modeling uncertainties. While our more comprehensive analysis makes the best policy option less clear, it represents a more accurate characterization of the scientific and economic uncertainties underlying impacts and the policy choices.

  7. A simple analog clock used for reducing pedestal noise

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    Experimental facilities are inherently noisy places. Try as one might to eliminate it, there always seems to be some residual low frequency electronic hum that works its way into low level analog signals, such as calorimetry into analog-to-digital converters (ADC). At the Fermilab Wide Band Lab, the predominant noise (between experimental hall and counting room, and between electronics racks within experimental hall and within counting room) consists of a combination of 60 Hz plus 180 Hz adding together with equal amplitudes and identical phase. The noise contributions at these low frequencies are easily removed by capacitor-coupling or isolation transformers. This approach works well for most detector systems. However, for the highest rate analog detector systems, e.g. the calorimeters within the beam stops for the electron (RESH-0), positron (POSH-O), and photon (BGM) beams for E-831 lFOCUS, these AC couplers introduce unacceptable signal distortion and rate-dependent analog baseline shifts. The residual 60/180 Hz hum, between these detectors and their ADCS, is typically on the order of 10 revolt peak-to-peak at the Wide Band Laboratory, which drastically smears the pedestal spectra and constitutes the major contribution to the resolution for these detector systems. The author, rather than continue to beat his head against the wall in trying to eliminate all this noise, implemented a simple 60 Hz analog clock ramp which was read into an ADC channel simultaneously as part of the data event record and which indicated the instantaneous phase relative to the 60 Hz AC power at Wide Band Laboratory. The pedestal was then monitored and parameterized as a function of this phase. During analysis, the digitized analog system had its phase-dependent pedestal subtracted, thereby substantially reducing the low-frequency pedestal noise. The 60 Hz analog clock circuit is a simple saw-tooth ramp generator. It is packaged in two NIM modules to provide additional isolation between

  8. Cermet Filters To Reduce Diesel Engine Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Peter

    2001-08-05

    Pollution from diesel engines is a significant part of our nation's air-quality problem. Even under the more stringent standards for heavy-duty engines set to take effect in 2004, these engines will continue to emit large amounts of nitrogen oxides and particulate matter, both of which affect public health. To address this problem, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) invented a self-cleaning, high temperature, cermet filter that reduces heavy-duty diesel engine emissions. The main advantage of the INEEL cermet filter, compared to current technology, is its ability to destroy carbon particles and NOx in diesel engine exhaust. As a result, this technology is expected to improve our nation's environmental quality by meeting the need for heavy-duty diesel engine emissions control. This paper describes the cermet filter technology and the initial research and development effort.Diesel engines currently emit soot and NOx that pollute our air. It is expected that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will begin tightening the regulatory requirements to control these emissions. The INEEL's self-cleaning, high temperature cermet filter provides a technology to clean heavy-duty diesel engine emissions. Under high engine exhaust temperatures, the cermet filter simultaneously removes carbon particles and NOx from the exhaust gas. The cermet filter is made from inexpensive starting materials, via net shape bulk forming and a single-step combustion synthesis process, and can be brazed to existing structures. It is self-cleaning, lightweight, mechanically strong, thermal shock resistant, and has a high melting temperature, high heat capacity, and controllable thermal expansion coefficient. The filter's porosity is controlled to provide high removal efficiency for carbon particulate. It can be made catalytic to oxidize CO, H2, and hydrocarbons, and reduce NOx. When activated by engine exhaust, the filter produces NH3 and light hydrocarbon

  9. An Effective, Economical Method of Reducing Environmental Noise in the Vivarium

    PubMed Central

    Young, Maggie T; French, Alan L; Clymer, Jeffrey W

    2011-01-01

    High levels of ambient noise can have detrimental effects on laboratory animal wellbeing and may affect experimental results. In addition, excessive noise can reduce technician comfort and performance. This study was performed to determine whether inexpensive, passive acoustic noise abatement measures could meaningfully reduce noise levels. Sound level measurements for various activities were obtained in the incoming processing room for pigs before and after installing gypsum acoustic paneling, covering metal-to-metal contact points with strips of adhesive-backed rubber, and replacing hard plastic wheels on transport carts with neoprene wheels. The modifications reduced the overall average noise level by 8.1 dB. Average noise levels for each activity were all less than 85 dB after the modifications. Average noise levels can be reduced effectively and economically with passive abatement methods. Intermittent spikes in noise are more difficult to control and may require attention to the individual activity. PMID:21838981

  10. An effective, economical method of reducing environmental noise in the vivarium.

    PubMed

    Young, Maggie T; French, Alan L; Clymer, Jeffrey W

    2011-07-01

    High levels of ambient noise can have detrimental effects on laboratory animal wellbeing and may affect experimental results. In addition, excessive noise can reduce technician comfort and performance. This study was performed to determine whether inexpensive, passive acoustic noise abatement measures could meaningfully reduce noise levels. Sound level measurements for various activities were obtained in the incoming processing room for pigs before and after installing gypsum acoustic paneling, covering metal-to-metal contact points with strips of adhesive-backed rubber, and replacing hard plastic wheels on transport carts with neoprene wheels. The modifications reduced the overall average noise level by 8.1 dB. Average noise levels for each activity were all less than 85 dB after the modifications. Average noise levels can be reduced effectively and economically with passive abatement methods. Intermittent spikes in noise are more difficult to control and may require attention to the individual activity. PMID:21838981

  11. Reducing VOC Press Emission from OSB Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Gary D. McGinnis; Laura S. WIlliams; Amy E. Monte; Jagdish Rughani: Brett A. Niemi; Thomas M. Flicker

    2001-12-31

    Current regulations require industry to meet air emission standards with regard to particulates, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) and other gases. One of many industries that will be affected by the new regulations is the wood composites industry. This industry generates VOCs, HAPs, and particulates mainly during the drying and pressing of wood. Current air treatment technologies for the industry are expensive to install and operate. As regulations become more stringent, treatment technologies will need to become more efficient and cost effective. The overall objective of this study is to evaluate the use of process conditions and chemical additives to reduce VOC/HAPs in air emitted from presses and dryers during the production of oriented strand board.

  12. High spectral density transmission emulation using amplified spontaneous emission noise.

    PubMed

    Elson, Daniel J; Galdino, Lidia; Maher, Robert; Killey, Robert I; Thomsen, Benn C; Bayvel, Polina

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of spectrally shaped amplified spontaneous emission (SS-ASE) noise for wideband channel loading in the investigation of nonlinear transmission limits in wavelength-division multiplexing transmission experiments using Nyquist-spaced channels. The validity of this approach is explored through statistical analysis and experimental transmission of Nyquist-spaced 10 GBaud polarization-division multiplexing (PDM) quadrature phase-shift keying and PDM-16-ary quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) channels, co-propagated with SS-ASE over single mode fiber. It is shown that this technique, which is simpler to implement than a fully modulated comb of channels, is valid for distances exceeding 240 km for PDM-16QAM with dispersion of 16 ps/nm/km, yields a good agreement with theory, and provides a conservative measure of system performance. PMID:26696160

  13. High speed train noise emission: Latest investigation of the aerodynamic/rolling noise contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellet, C.; Létourneaux, F.; Poisson, F.; Talotte, C.

    2006-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to discuss the quantification of aeroacoustic and rolling noise sources emitted by high-speed trains externally. This work relies on the comparison of experimental data obtained in the DEUFRAKO Annex K and K2 projects and those produced more recently. These are firstly measurements obtained within the NOEMIE project dedicated to the High Speed Technical Specifications for Interoperability involving the measurement of the acoustic emission of different rolling stock travelling at 250, 300 and 320 km/h (TGV-Duplex, ICE3, Thalys). Additionally, measurements are considered that are obtained in the framework of an SNCF acoustic test campaign performed on a TGV-Duplex at speeds up to 350 km/h. These comprise source localisation using two-dimensional acoustic array measurements and assessment of the wayside noise increase as a function of the speed. The conclusions drawn in the DEUFRAKO K project are compared with the new set of data. A detailed analysis of the results is also provided, supported by complementary measurements (wheel and rail measurements) and simulations (TWINS calculations).

  14. Equatorial Noise Emissions and Their Quasi-Periodic Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemec, F.; Santolik, O.; Hrbackova, Z.; Pickett, J. S.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Parrot, M.; Hayosh, M.

    2015-12-01

    Equatorial noise (EN) emissions are electromagnetic waves at frequencies between the proton cyclotron frequency and the lower hybrid frequency routinely observed in the equatorial region of the inner magnetosphere. They propagate in the extraordinary mode nearly perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field, and they exhibit a harmonic structure related to the ion cyclotron frequency in the source region. We analyze more than 2000 EN events observed by the wave instruments on board the Cluster spacecraft, and we find that about 5% of EN events are not continuous in time, but exhibit a quasi-periodic (QP) modulation of the wave intensity. Typical modulation periods are on the order of minutes. The events predominantly occur in the noon-to-dawn local time sector, and their occurrence is related to the periods of increased geomagnetic activity and higher solar wind speeds. We suggest that the QP modulation of EN events may be due to compressional ULF pulsations, which periodically modulate the wave growth in the source region. These compressional ULF pulsations were identified in about half of the events. Finally, we demonstrate that EN emissions with QP modulation of the wave intensity can propagate down to altitudes as low as 700 km.

  15. Method for reducing CO and HC emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, K.; Hegedus, L.; Oh, S.H.

    1980-09-16

    A method is described for decreasing CO and HC emissions in a vehicle exhaust stream during the period of engine warm-up following the start of engine operation, in which the A/F mixture to the engine is pulsed by first using a mixture which is leaner than that otherwise used thus reducing the CO and HC content of the exhaust stream exiting the engine to an amount below that of the CO and HC otherwise present and then using an A/F mixture which is richer than such lean mixture and is substantially that otherwise used thus increasing the amount of CO and HC in the vehicle exhaust stream to substantially the amount otherwise present, passing the pulsed exhaust stream through a catalytic converter adapted to oxidize the CO and HC constituents, and repeating this pulsing continuously through the period of engine warm-up and at a rate sufficient to achieve increased catalytic conversion of CO and HC over that obtained without pulsing, the rate being also sufficiently rapid so as to preclude engine-stall. A preferred system for practicing the method involves apparatus for the repeated opening of the choke plate of the engine carburetor during the period when the choke plate is not full-open.

  16. Reducing the overhead for quantum computation when noise is biased

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Paul; Bartlett, Stephen D.; Poulin, David

    2015-12-01

    We analyze a model for fault-tolerant quantum computation with low overhead suitable for situations where the noise is biased. The basis for this scheme is a gadget for the fault-tolerant preparation of magic states that enable universal fault-tolerant quantum computation using only Clifford gates that preserve the noise bias. We analyze the distillation of |T > -type magic states using this gadget at the physical level, followed by concatenation with the 15-qubit quantum Reed-Muller code, and comparing our results with standard constructions. In the regime where the noise bias (rate of Pauli Z errors relative to other single-qubit errors) is greater than a factor of 10, our scheme has lower overhead across a broad range of relevant noise rates.

  17. Ultrasound harmonic imaging with reducing speckle noise by spatial-frequency compounding approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wei; Wang, Yuanyuan; Yu, Jinhua

    2015-12-01

    Speckle noise is a phenomenon inherent in any coherent imaging process and decreases the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), which brings down the imaging quality. Speckle noise reduction is particularly important in the tissue harmonic imaging (THI) since it has the lower energy and the poorer SNR than the fundamental imaging (FI). Recently plane wave imaging (PWI) has been widely explored. Since the entire imaging region can be covered in one emission, the frame rate increases greatly. In PWI, speckle can be reduced by incoherently averaging images with different speckle patterns. Such images can be acquired by varying the angle from which a target is imaged (spatial compounding, SC) or by changing the spectrum of the pulse (frequency compounding, FC). In this paper we demonstrate here that each approach is only a partial solution and that combining them provides a better result than applying either approach separately. We propose a spatial-frequency compounding (SFC) method for THI. The new method brings a good speckle suppression result. To illustrate the performance of our method, experiments have been conducted on the simulated data. A nonlinear simulation platform based on the full-wave model is used in the harmonic imaging simulation. Results show that our method brings the SNR an improvement of up to 50% in comparison with the single frame HI while maintaining a far better performance in both terms of resolution and contrast than the FI. Similar results can be obtained from our further experiments.

  18. Recent Progress with Atmospheric Noise-Reducing Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedlin, M. A.

    2003-12-01

    Wind noise is one of the key issues facing the community of acousticians who monitor the atmosphere for long-period signals from natural atmospheric phenomena or from man-made sources, such as nuclear weapons tests. Presently, a network of infrasound observing sites is being constructed to provide global coverage of acoustic sources in the atmosphere. It is well known that spatial filters can be used to attenuate noise due to atmospheric turbulence near the recording point and increase the ratio of signal-to-noise. Rosette spatial filters are currently used at the new infrasound monitoring stations and have been found to provide a significant reduction of noise across the frequency band of interest to the acoustic monitoring community. Research continues into modifications to existing rosette filters that might improve their performance. Additional research is providing insight into entirely different filters, such as wind barriers. Some of the monitoring system's array sites are located on oceanic islands at locations where spatially extensive noise filters will not be practical. This practical limitation fuels our interest in effective, spatially compact filtering methods. This presentation gives an overview of the various filters currently being used and research into improvements for these filters and into entirely different filter designs.

  19. Recent progress with atmospheric noise-reducing filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedlin, Michael

    2003-04-01

    Wind noise is one of the key issues facing the community of acousticians who monitor the atmosphere for long-period signals from natural atmospheric phenomena or from man-made sources, such as nuclear weapons tests. Presently, a network of infrasound observing sites is being constructed to provide global coverage of acoustic sources in the atmosphere. It is well known that spatial filters can be used to attenuate noise due to atmospheric turbulence near the recording point and increase the ratio of signal-to-noise. Rosette spatial filters are currently used at the new infrasound monitoring stations and have been found to provide a significant reduction of noise across the frequency band of interest to the acoustic monitoring community. Research continues into modifications to existing rosette filters that might improve their performance. Additional research is providing insight into entirely different filters, such as wind barriers. Some of the monitoring systems array sites are located on oceanic islands at locations where spatially extensive noise filters will not be practical. This practical limitation fuels our interest in effective, spatially compact filtering methods. This presentation gives an overview of the various filters currently being used and research into improvements for these filters and into entirely different filter designs.

  20. Further studies of methods for reducing community noise around airports. [aircraft noise - aircraft engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, R. H.; Barry, D. J.; Kline, D. M.

    1975-01-01

    A simplified method of analysis was used in which all flights at a 'simulated' airport were assumed to operate from one runway in a single direction. For this simulated airport, contours of noise exposure forecast were obtained and evaluated. A flight schedule of the simulated airport which is representative of the 23 major U. S. airports was used. The effect of banning night-time operations by four-engine, narrow-body aircraft in combination with other noise reduction options was studied. The reductions in noise which would occur of two- and three-engine, narrow-body aircraft equipped with a refanned engine was examined. A detailed comparison of the effects of engine cutback on takeoff versus the effects of retrofitting quiet nacelles for narrow-body aircraft was also examined. A method of presenting the effects of various noise reduction options was treated.

  1. An evaluation of some alternative approaches for reducing fan tone noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittmar, James H.; Woodward, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    The potential of two alternative approaches for reducing fan ton noise was investigated in this study. One of these approaches increases the number of rotor blades to shift the tone noise to higher frequencies that are not rated as strongly by the perceived noise scale. This alternative fan also would have a small number of long chord stator vanes which would reduce the stator response and lower rotor-stator interaction noise. Comparison of the conventional and alternative fan concepts showed that this alternative approach has as large or larger a perceived tone noise reduction potential as the conventional approach. The other alternative, a high Mach number inlet, is evaluated both for its noise attenuation and for its change in noise directivity.

  2. Integrated Spacesuit Audio System Enhances Speech Quality and Reduces Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Yiteng Arden; Chen, Jingdong; Chen, Shaoyan Sharyl

    2009-01-01

    A new approach has been proposed for increasing astronaut comfort and speech capture. Currently, the special design of a spacesuit forms an extreme acoustic environment making it difficult to capture clear speech without compromising comfort. The proposed Integrated Spacesuit Audio (ISA) system is to incorporate the microphones into the helmet and use software to extract voice signals from background noise.

  3. Reducing Noise by Repetition: Introduction to Signal Averaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassan, Umer; Anwar, Muhammad Sabieh

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes theory and experiments, taken from biophysics and physiological measurements, to illustrate the technique of signal averaging. In the process, students are introduced to the basic concepts of signal processing, such as digital filtering, Fourier transformation, baseline correction, pink and Gaussian noise, and the cross- and…

  4. Equatorial noise emissions with quasiperiodic modulation of wave intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Němec, F.; Santolík, O.; Hrbáčková, Z.; Pickett, J. S.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.

    2015-04-01

    Equatorial noise (EN) emissions are electromagnetic wave events at frequencies between the proton cyclotron frequency and the lower hybrid frequency observed in the equatorial region of the inner magnetosphere. They propagate nearly perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field, and they exhibit a harmonic line structure characteristic of the proton cyclotron frequency in the source region. However, they were generally believed to be continuous in time. We investigate more than 2000 EN events observed by the Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Field Fluctuations and Wide-Band Data Plasma Wave investigation instruments on board the Cluster spacecraft, and we show that this is not always the case. A clear quasiperiodic (QP) time modulation of the wave intensity is present in more than 5% of events. We perform a systematic analysis of these EN events with QP modulation of the wave intensity. Such events occur usually in the noon-to-dawn magnetic local time sector. Their occurrence seems to be related to the increased geomagnetic activity, and it is associated with the time intervals of enhanced solar wind flow speeds. The modulation period of these events is on the order of minutes. Compressional ULF magnetic field pulsations with periods about double the modulation periods of EN wave intensity and magnitudes on the order of a few tenths of nanotesla were identified in about 46% of events. We suggest that these compressional magnetic field pulsations might be responsible for the observed QP modulation of EN wave intensity, in analogy to formerly reported VLF whistler mode QP events.

  5. HHC study in the DNW to reduce BVI noise - An analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Booth, Earl R., Jr.; Boyd, D. D., Jr.; Splettstoesser, Wolf R.; Schultz, Klaus -J.; Kube, Roland; Niesl, Georg H.; Streby, Olivier

    1991-01-01

    The noise of an aeroelastically scaled helicopter rotor has been studied in the German-Dutch wind tunnel in order to assess the utility of higher-harmonic control (HHC) in reducing blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise. Acoustic data are presented for 3/rev, 4/rev, and 5/rev HHC, as applied to a typical landing approach rotor operating condition; noise reduction of up to 6 dB were found for advancing-blade BVI noise radiating upstream of the rotor, as well as for retreating blade BVI noise radiating below and downstream of the rotor.

  6. Antioxidants reduce cellular and functional changes induced by intense noise in the inner ear and cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jianzhong; Li, Wei; Du, Xiaoping; Ewert, Donald L; West, Matthew B; Stewart, Charles; Floyd, Robert A; Kopke, Richard D

    2014-06-01

    The present study marks the first evaluation of combined application of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and the free radical spin trap reagent, disodium 2,4-disulfophenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone (HPN-07), as a therapeutic approach for noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). Pharmacokinetic studies and C-14 tracer experiments demonstrated that both compounds achieve high blood levels within 30 min after i.p injection, with sustained levels of radiolabeled cysteine (released from NAC) in the cochlea, brainstem, and auditory cortex for up to 48 h. Rats exposed to 115 dB octave-band noise (10-20 kHz) for 1 h were treated with combined NAC/HPN-07 beginning 1 h after noise exposure and for two consecutive days. Auditory brainstem responses (ABR) showed that treatment substantially reduced the degree of threshold shift across all test frequencies (2-16 kHz), beginning at 24 h after noise exposure and continuing for up to 21 days. Reduced distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) level shifts were also detected at 7 and 21 days following noise exposure in treated animals. Noise-induced hair cell (HC) loss, which was localized to the basal half of the cochlea, was reduced in treated animals by 85 and 64% in the outer and inner HC regions, respectively. Treatment also significantly reduced an increase in c-fos-positive neuronal cells in the cochlear nucleus following noise exposure. However, no detectable spiral ganglion neuron loss was observed after noise exposure. The results reported herein demonstrate that the NAC/HPN-07 combination is a promising pharmacological treatment of NIHL that reduces both temporary and permanent threshold shifts after intense noise exposure and acts to protect cochlear sensory cells, and potentially afferent neurites, from the damaging effects of acoustic trauma. In addition, the drugs were shown to reduce aberrant activation of neurons in the central auditory regions of the brain following noise exposure. It is likely that the protective

  7. Noise reduction for model counterrotation propeller at cruise by reducing aft-propeller diameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittmar, James H.; Stang, David B.

    1987-01-01

    The forward propeller of a model counterrotation propeller was tested with its original aft propeller and with a reduced diameter aft propeller. Noise reductions with the reduced diameter aft propeller were measured at simulated cruise conditions. Reductions were as large as 7.5 dB for the aft-propeller passing tone and 15 dB in the harmonics at specific angles. The interaction tones, mostly the first, were reduced probably because the reduced-diameter aft-propeller blades no longer interacted with the forward propeller tip vortex. The total noise (sum of primary and interaction noise) at each harmonic was significantly reduced. The chief noise reduction at each harmonic came from reduced aft-propeller-alone noise, with the interaction tones contributing little to the totals at cruise. Total cruise noise reductions were as much as 3 dB at given angles for the blade passing tone and 10 dB for some of the harmonics. These reductions would measurably improve the fuselage interior noise levels and represent a definite cruise noise benefit from using a reduced diameter aft propeller.

  8. Subsonic Jet Noise Reduced With Improved Internal Exhaust Gas Mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Aircraft noise pollution is becoming a major environmental concern for the world community. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is responding to this concern by imposing more stringent noise restrictions for aircraft certification then ever before to keep the U.S. industry competitive with the rest of the world. At the NASA Lewis Research Center, attempts are underway to develop noise-reduction technology for newer engines and for retrofitting existing engines so that they are as quiet as (or quieter than) required. Lewis conducted acoustic and Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) tests using Pratt & Whitney's Internal Exhaust Gas Mixers (IEGM). The IEGM's mix the core flow with the fan flow prior to their common exhaust. All tests were conducted in Lewis' Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory--a semihemispheric dome open to the ambient atmosphere. This was the first time Laser Doppler Velocimetry was used in such a facility at Lewis. Jet exhaust velocity and turbulence and the internal velocity fields were detailed. Far-field acoustics were also measured. Pratt & Whitney provided 1/7th scale model test hardware (a 12-lobe mixer, a 20-lobe mixer, and a splitter) for 1.7 bypass ratio engines, and NASA provided the research engineers, test facility, and test time. The Pratt & Whitney JT8D-200 engine power conditions were used for all tests.

  9. Models of reduced-noise, probabilistic linear amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combes, Joshua; Walk, Nathan; Lund, A. P.; Ralph, T. C.; Caves, Carlton M.

    2016-05-01

    We construct an amplifier that interpolates between a nondeterministic, immaculate linear amplifier and a deterministic, ideal linear amplifier and beyond to nonideal linear amplifiers. The construction involves cascading an immaculate linear amplifier that has amplitude gain g1 with a (possibly) nonideal linear amplifier that has gain g2. With respect to normally ordered moments, the device has output noise μ2(G2-1 ) where G =g1g2 is the overall amplitude gain and μ2 is a noise parameter. When μ2≥1 , our devices realize ideal (μ2=1 ) and nonideal (μ2>1 ) linear amplifiers. When 0 ≤μ2<1 , these devices work effectively only over a restricted region of phase space and with some subunity success probability p✓. We investigate the performance of our μ2 amplifiers in terms of a gain-corrected probability-fidelity product and the ratio of input to output signal-to-noise ratios corrected for success probability.

  10. Improvements in Spiral-Bevel Gears to Reduce Noise and Increase Strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Handschuh, Robert F.; Henry, Zachary S.; Litvin, Faydor L.

    1994-01-01

    Advanced-design spiral-bevel gears were tested in an OH-58D helicopter transmission using the NASA 500 hp Helicopter Transmission Test Stand. Four different gear designs were tested. The four designs tested were the current design of the OH-58D transmission, a higher-strength design the same as the current but with an increased fillet radius to reduce gear tooth bending stress, and two versions of a lower-noise design the same as the high-strength but with modified tooth geometry to reduce transmission error and noise. Noise, vibration, and tooth strain tests were performed and significant gear stress and noise reductions were achieved.

  11. Full-scale experiments with an ejector to reduce jet engine exhaust noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, B. J.

    1973-01-01

    Experiments with a modified J65 turbojet engine and ejector resulted in noise power reductions as large as 13 decibels in the low-frequency range. High-frequency noise power, which appeared to originate mainly from the mixing processes within the ejector, increased. Peak velocities at the ejector exit were reduced by one-half to two-thirds, although survey rakes showed that mixing was not complete. Acoustical lining inside the ejector would reduce the perceived noise level (in PNdB) by removing much of the high-frequency noise.

  12. REDUCING STYRENE EMISSIONS FROM SPRAYED FILLED RESINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Styrene emissions are coming under increasing study as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) develops maximum achievable control technology standards. During the manufacture of fiber-reinforced plastics/composites products, styrene, a volatile organic compound and a haz...

  13. Reduced environmental emissions and carbon sequestration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural ecosystems can play a significant role in the production and consumption of greenhouse gases, specifically, carbon dioxide. Information is needed on the mechanism and magnitude of gas generation and emission from agricultural soils with specific emphasis on tillage mechanisms. The objec...

  14. Characterization and Impact of Low Frequency Wind Turbine Noise Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finch, James

    Wind turbine noise is a complex issue that requires due diligence to minimize any potential impact on quality of life. This study enhances existing knowledge of wind turbine noise through focused analyses of downwind sound propagation, directionality, and the low frequency component of the noise. Measurements were conducted at four wind speeds according to a design of experiments at incremental distances and angles. Wind turbine noise is shown to be highly directional, while downwind sound propagation is spherical with limited ground absorption. The noise is found to have a significant low frequency component that is largely independent of wind speed over the 20-250 Hz range. The generated low frequency noise is shown to be audible above 40 Hz at the MOE setback distance of 550 m. Infrasound levels exhibit higher dependency on wind speed, but remain below audible levels up to 15 m/s.

  15. Active noise control to reduce the blade tone noise of centrifugal fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koopmann, G. H.; Neise, W.; Chen, W.

    1988-07-01

    An active noise control method for suppressing the blade tones of centrifugal fans is presented which uses two secondary sound sources mounted into the cutoff region of the fan casing. Experiments were conducted for centrifugal fans with impeller diameters between 280 and 710 mm using two different designs for the secondary sources. The results indicate that the sound field inside the casing is dominated by the rotor locked pressure field, and that the blade tone noise measured in the far-field is generated by the unsteady pressures at the cutoff, which in turn are produced by the flow leaving the impeller.

  16. A research to reduce interior noise in general aviation airplanes. General aviation interior noise study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roskam, J.; Muirhead, V. U.; Smith, H. W.; Peschier, T. D.

    1977-01-01

    The construction, calibration, and properties of a facility for measuring sound transmission through aircraft type panels are described along with the theoretical and empirical methods used. Topics discussed include typical noise source, sound transmission path, and acoustic cabin properties and their effect on interior noise. Experimental results show an average sound transmission loss in the mass controlled frequency region comparable to theoretical predictions. The results also verify that transmission losses in the stiffness controlled region directly depend on the fundamental frequency of the panel. Experimental and theoretical results indicate that increases in this frequency, and consequently in transmission loss, can be achieved by applying pressure differentials across the specimen.

  17. Evaluation of methods of reducing community noise impact around San Jose municipal airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glick, J. M.; Shevell, R. S.; Bowles, J. V.

    1975-01-01

    A computer simulation of the airport noise impact on the surrounding communities was used to evaluate alternate operational procedures, improved technology, and land use conversion as methods of reducing community noise impact in the airport vicinity. In addition, a constant density population distribution was analyzed for possible application to other airport communities with fairly uniform population densities and similar aircraft operational patterns. The introduction of sound absorption material (SAM) was found to reduce community noise annoyance by over 25 percent, and the introduction of refan was found to reduce community annoyance by over 60 percent. Replacing the present aircraft was found to reduce the noise problem to very small proportions, and the introduction of an advanced technology twin was found to essentially eliminate the community noise problem.

  18. A Method to Further Reduce the Perceived Noise of Low Tip Speed Fans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittmar, James H.

    2000-01-01

    The use of low tip speed, high bypass ratio fans is a method for reducing the noise of turbofan jet engines. These fans typically have a low number of rotor blades and a number of stator vanes sufficient to achieve cut-off of the blade passing tone. Their perceived noise levels are typically dominated by broadband noise caused by the rotor wake turbulence - stator interaction mechanism. A 106 bladed, 1100 ft/sec takeoff tip speed fan, the Alternative Low Noise Fan, has been tested and shown to have reduced broadband noise. This reduced noise is believed to be the result of the high rotor blade number. Although this fan with 106 blades would not be practical with materials as they exist today, a fan with 50 or so blades could be practically realized. A noise estimate has indicated that such a 50 bladed, low tip speed fan could be 2 to 3 EPNdB quieter than an 18 bladed fan. If achieved, this level of noise reduction would be significant and points to the use of a high blade number, low tip speed fan as a possible configuration for reduced fan noise.

  19. Fluid dynamics and noise emission associated with supersonic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiner, John M.

    1992-01-01

    Methods have long been sought to find an efficient means for reduction of jet noise using either active or passive turbulence control measures. Progress in this area is limited by unclear understanding of the physical supersonic jet noise source mechanisms as they relate to the jet plume turbulence structure. These mechanisms have been extensively studied using round jets. This paper shows that jets with nonround jet exit geometry can provide beneficial noise reduction relative to round jets. Both the fluid dynamic structure and noise of several nonround jets are examined in the paper.

  20. Numerical Simulation of Flow-Induced Noise in High Pressure Reducing Valve

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Lin; Zhu, Guorong; Qian, Jinyuan; Fei, Yang; Jin, Zhijiang

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to study the characteristics of flow-induced noise in high pressure reducing valve (HPRV) and to provide some guidance for noise control. Based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD), numerical method was used to compute flow field. Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings Model was applied to obtain acoustic signals. The unsteady flow field shows that noise sources are located at the bottom of plug for valve without perforated plate, and noise sources are behind the plate for valve with perforated plate. Noise directivity analysis and spectrum characteristics indicate that the perforated plate could help to reduce noise effectively. Inlet pressure has great effects on sound pressure level (SPL). The higher inlet pressure will lead to larger SPL at high frequency. When the maximum Ma is close to 1, SPL at low frequency becomes very high. PMID:26061396

  1. TECHNICAL NOTE: Observations on the use of a viscoelastic joint to provide noise reduced sonar domes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    House, J. R.

    1997-10-01

    This paper concerns the noise and vibration advantages of an energy absorbing composite joint and its relevance to noise reduced glass reinforced polyester (GRP) sonar domes. Once installed on an operational boat, hydrodynamic flow and supporting structural induced vibrations cause the dome to vibrate, thus radiating noise and interfering with sonar sensor response. The results of a vibration transmissibility study on a GRP - steel interface are discussed as the first step in designing a composite viscoelastic joint that can act as a vibration sink to absorb flow generated and structure borne noise within GRP sonar domes. Preliminary investigations concerning the absorption of compressional waves by use of a tapered viscoelastic interlayer are discussed. It is shown that a tapered viscoelastic interlayer placed between a GRP beam and steel supporting substrate can produce a significant absorption of vibrational energy, reducing water borne radiated noise and providing a significantly quieter noise platform than conventional sonar jointing technology.

  2. Estimating atmospheric parameters and reducing noise for multispectral imaging

    DOEpatents

    Conger, James Lynn

    2014-02-25

    A method and system for estimating atmospheric radiance and transmittance. An atmospheric estimation system is divided into a first phase and a second phase. The first phase inputs an observed multispectral image and an initial estimate of the atmospheric radiance and transmittance for each spectral band and calculates the atmospheric radiance and transmittance for each spectral band, which can be used to generate a "corrected" multispectral image that is an estimate of the surface multispectral image. The second phase inputs the observed multispectral image and the surface multispectral image that was generated by the first phase and removes noise from the surface multispectral image by smoothing out change in average deviations of temperatures.

  3. Method of calibrating an interferometer and reducing its systematic noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammer, Philip D. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Methods of operation and data analysis for an interferometer so as to eliminate the errors contributed by non-responsive or unstable pixels, interpixel gain variations that drift over time, and spurious noise that would otherwise degrade the operation of the interferometer are disclosed. The methods provide for either online or post-processing calibration. The methods apply prescribed reversible transformations that exploit the physical properties of interferograms obtained from said interferometer to derive a calibration reference signal for subsequent treatment of said interferograms for interpixel gain variations. A self-consistent approach for treating bad pixels is incorporated into the methods.

  4. Surface seals reduce 1,3-dichloropropene and chloropicrin emissions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reducing emissions is essential for minimizing the detrimental impact of soil fumigation and for maintaining the availability of fumigants to agricultural uses. This study determined the effectiveness of surface water applications to reduce emissions of 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D) and chloropicrin ...

  5. Reducing Carbon Dioxide Emissions: Using the Mole Concept.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Provides an application of quantitative chemistry concepts in the context of motor vehicle emissions. Shows how carbon dioxide emissions from cars may be reduced by up to 25% by reducing motorway speeds from 70-75 mph to 60 mph. (Author/MM)

  6. Subsurface manure application to reduce ammonia emissions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Incorporation into soil is generally recommended to reduce ammonia volatilization and nutrient runoff following land application of manures. A range of subsurface applicators are available for manure incorporation with minimal soil disturbance in reduced tillage systems, but none have been widely a...

  7. The use of wavelet filters for reducing noise in posterior fossa Computed Tomography images

    SciTech Connect

    Pita-Machado, Reinado; Perez-Diaz, Marlen Lorenzo-Ginori, Juan V. Bravo-Pino, Rolando

    2014-11-07

    Wavelet transform based de-noising like wavelet shrinkage, gives the good results in CT. This procedure affects very little the spatial resolution. Some applications are reconstruction methods, while others are a posteriori de-noising methods. De-noising after reconstruction is very difficult because the noise is non-stationary and has unknown distribution. Therefore, methods which work on the sinogram-space don’t have this problem, because they always work over a known noise distribution at this point. On the other hand, the posterior fossa in a head CT is a very complex region for physicians, because it is commonly affected by artifacts and noise which are not eliminated during the reconstruction procedure. This can leads to some false positive evaluations. The purpose of our present work is to compare different wavelet shrinkage de-noising filters to reduce noise, particularly in images of the posterior fossa within CT scans in the sinogram-space. This work describes an experimental search for the best wavelets, to reduce Poisson noise in Computed Tomography (CT) scans. Results showed that de-noising with wavelet filters improved the quality of posterior fossa region in terms of an increased CNR, without noticeable structural distortions.

  8. Multi-images deconvolution improves signal-to-noise ratio on gated stimulated emission depletion microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Castello, Marco; Diaspro, Alberto; Vicidomini, Giuseppe

    2014-12-08

    Time-gated detection, namely, only collecting the fluorescence photons after a time-delay from the excitation events, reduces complexity, cost, and illumination intensity of a stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscope. In the gated continuous-wave- (CW-) STED implementation, the spatial resolution improves with increased time-delay, but the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) reduces. Thus, in sub-optimal conditions, such as a low photon-budget regime, the SNR reduction can cancel-out the expected gain in resolution. Here, we propose a method which does not discard photons, but instead collects all the photons in different time-gates and recombines them through a multi-image deconvolution. Our results, obtained on simulated and experimental data, show that the SNR of the restored image improves relative to the gated image, thereby improving the effective resolution.

  9. Fabrication manual for a reduced-noise auger miner cutting head. Information circular/1984

    SciTech Connect

    Pettitt, M.R.; Aljoe, W.W.

    1984-01-01

    After a long series of laboratory and in-mine tests, a cost-effective, mineworthy, reduced-noise auger miner cutting head was designed, fabricated, and field-tested by Wyle Laboratories under contract to the Bureau of Mines. Compared with standard auger cutting heads, the new heads reduced noise by 10 dBA at the jacksetter's position and by 6 dBA at the operator's position. This report contains detailed fabrication instructions, including engineering drawings, that show how a standard auger cutting head can be modified to produce a reduced-noise auger.

  10. Some design philosophy for reducing the community noise of advanced counter-rotation propellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittmar, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    Advanced counter-rotation propellers have been indicated as possibly generating an unacceptable amount of noise for the people living near an airport. This report has explored ways to reduce this noise level, which is treated as being caused by the interaction of the upstream propeller wakes and vortices with the downstream propeller. The noise reduction techniques fall into two categories: (1) reducing the strength of the wakes and vortices, and (2) reducing the response of the downstream blades to them. The noise from the wake interaction was indicated as being reduced by increased propeller spacing and decreased blade drag coefficient. The vortex-interaction noise could be eliminated by having the vortex pass over the tips of the downstream blade, and it could be reduced by increased spacing or decreased initial circulation. The downstream blade response could be lessened by increasing the reduced frequency parameter omega or by phasing of the response from different sections to have a mutual cancellation effect. Uneven blade to blade spacing for the downstream blading was indicated as having a possible effect on the annoyance of counter-rotation propeller noise. Although there are undoubtedly additional methods of noise reduction not covered in this report, the inclusion of the design methods discussed would potentially result in a counter-rotation propeller that is acceptably quiet.

  11. Reducing Centroid Error Through Model-Based Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Shinhak

    2006-01-01

    A method of processing the digitized output of a charge-coupled device (CCD) image detector has been devised to enable reduction of the error in computed centroid of the image of a point source of light. The method involves model-based estimation of, and correction for, the contributions of bias and noise to the image data. The method could be used to advantage in any of a variety of applications in which there are requirements for measuring precise locations of, and/or precisely aiming optical instruments toward, point light sources. In the present method, prior to normal operations of the CCD, one measures the point-spread function (PSF) of the telescope or other optical system used to project images on the CCD. The PSF is used to construct a database of spot models representing the nominal CCD pixel outputs for a point light source projected onto the CCD at various positions incremented by small fractions of a pixel.

  12. Methods for reducing pollutant emissions from jet aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butze, H. F.

    1971-01-01

    Pollutant emissions from jet aircraft and combustion research aimed at reducing these emissions are defined. The problem of smoke formation and results achieved in smoke reduction from commercial combustors are discussed. Expermental results of parametric tests performed on both conventional and experimental combustors over a range of combustor-inlet conditions are presented. Combustor design techniques for reducing pollutant emissions are discussed. Improved fuel atomization resulting from the use of air-assist fuel nozzles has brought about significant reductions in hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide emissions at idle. Diffuser tests have shown that the combustor-inlet airflow profile can be controlled through the use of diffuser-wall bleed and that it may thus be possible to reduce emissions by controlling combustor airflow distribution. Emissions of nitric oxide from a shortlength annular swirl-can combustor were significantly lower than those from a conventional combustor operating at similar conditions.

  13. Noise Levels during Aerobics and the Potential Effects on Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emissions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torre, Peter, III; Howell, Jennifer C.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure noise levels during aerobics classes and to examine how outer hair cell (OHC) function, using distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs), may be affected by this exposure. Fifty individuals (48 women and 2 men, ages 19-41 years) participated in 50-min aerobics classes. Noise levels were measured…

  14. Noise reduction studies of several aircraft to reduce their aural detection distances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dingeldein, R. C.; Connor, A. B.; Hilton, D. A.

    1975-01-01

    A study was conducted to assess the extent to which practicable reductions of the external noise level of various aircraft could be achieved by different methods. The aircraft included in the study are the O-1, O-2, U-10, OV-1, and A-6. The noise signatures obtained from field measurements and the estimated aural detection distance of aircraft operating in low speed cruising flight are presented. The characteristics of each aircraft and the modifications made to reduce the aerodynamic noise are explained. Tables of data are included to show the effectiveness of the noise reduction modifications for each aircraft.

  15. Microwave oscillator with reduced phase noise by negative feedback incorporating microwave signals with suppressed carrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, G. J.; Saunders, J.

    1989-01-01

    Oscillator configurations which reduce the effect of 1/f noise sources for both direct feedback and stabilized local oscillator (STALO) circuits are developed and analyzed. By appropriate use of carrier suppression, a small signal is generated which suffers no loss of loop phase information or signal-to-noise ratio. This small signal can be amplified without degradation by multiplicative amplifier noise, and can be detected without saturation of the detector. Together with recent advances in microwave resonator Qs, these circuit improvements will make possible lower phase noise than can be presently achieved without the use of cryogenic devices.

  16. Reducing greenhouse gas emissions in Czechoslovakia

    SciTech Connect

    Kostalova, M.; Suk, J.; Kolar, S.

    1991-12-01

    In this paper are presented important findings on the potential for energy conservation and carbon emissions reduction over the coming decades in Czechoslovakia. The authors describe the state of the energy use in Czechoslovakia today and the measures required to transform its energy system to a market-based economy oriented towards the environmental goal of decreased energy intensity. This work furthers our understanding of the need for energy efficiency in the newly forming market economies of East and Central Europe. This paper is part of a series of country studies sponsored by the Global Climate Division of the Office of Policy, Planning, and Evaluation, United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). We have completed similar studies in Canada, the former Soviet Union, France, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Poland the United Kingdom, and the United States. Research is currently underway or planned in Bulgaria, Romania, and Ukraine.

  17. Heat Pipes Reduce Engine-Exhaust Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, D. F.

    1986-01-01

    Increased fuel vaporization raises engine efficiency. Heat-pipe technology increased efficiency of heat transfer beyond that obtained by metallic conduction. Resulted in both improved engine operation and reduction in fuel consumption. Raw material conservation through reduced dependence on strategic materials also benefit from this type of heat-pipe technology. Applications result in improved engine performance and cleaner environment.

  18. Nutrient Plasma Levels Achieved During Treatment that Reduces Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Le Prell, C. G.; Dolan, D. F.; Bennett, D. C.; Boxer, P. A.

    2011-01-01

    Hearing loss encompasses both temporary and permanent deficits. If temporary threshold shift (TTS) and permanent threshold shift (PTS) share common pathological mechanisms, then agents that reduce PTS should also reduce TTS. Several antioxidant agents have reduced PTS in rodent models; however, reductions in TTS have been inconsistent. This study first determined whether dietary antioxidants (beta-carotene, and vitamins C and E) delivered in combination with magnesium (Mg) reliably increase plasma concentrations of the active agents. Then, additional manipulations tested the hypothesis that these nutrients reduce acute TTS insult in the first 24 hours following loud sound, as well as longer lasting changes in hearing measured up to 7 days post-noise. Saline or nutrients were administered to guinea pigs prior to and after noise exposure. Sound-evoked electrophysiological responses were measured before noise, with tests repeated 1-hour post-noise, as well as 1-, 3-, 5-, and 7-days post-noise. All subjects showed significant functional recovery; subjects treated with nutrients recovered more rapidly, and had better hearing outcomes at early post-noise times as well as the final test time. Thus, this combination of nutrients, which produced significant increases in plasma concentrations of vitamins C and E and Mg, effectively reduced hearing loss at multiple post-noise times. These data suggest free radical formation contributes to TTS as well as PTS insults, and suggest a potential opportunity to prevent TTS in human populations. PMID:21708356

  19. Noise emission and propagation in an air flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legendre, R.

    1983-01-01

    Sound propagation from a jet engine on an aircraft moving at a constant airspeed is examined in terms of the turbulent field, the near field, and the far field. The near and far fields are irrotational disturbances of a permanently adiabatic flow for which the entropy and enthalpy are the critical parameters. The propagation velocity of the noise is formulated, together with the extent of the acoustic field. The acoustic excitation is shown to dominate the extent of the acoustic field, while the pseudo-noise and the sound density are equal to the sound pressure and are not noise sources. The unsteady part of the turbulence noise is controlled by the pressure gradient, particularly that around the axes of the eddies.

  20. Incentives for reducing emissions in Krakow

    SciTech Connect

    Uberman, R.; Pierce, B.; Lazecki, A.

    1994-06-01

    This effort is identifying, specific incentives that may be used by Krakow city officials to encourage, residents to change the way they heat their homes and businesses in order to reduce pollution. This paper describes the incentives study for converting small coal or coke-fired boilers to gas in the Old Town area. A similar study looked at incentives for expanding the district heating system and future analyses will be performed for home stove options.

  1. Apparatus for reducing solvent luminescence background emissions

    DOEpatents

    Affleck, R.L.; Ambrose, W.P.; Demas, J.N.; Goodwin, P.M.; Johnson, M.E.; Keller, R.A.; Petty, J.T.; Schecker, J.A.; Wu, M.

    1998-11-10

    The detectability of luminescent molecules in solution is enhanced by reducing the background luminescence due to impurity species also present in the solution. A light source that illuminates the solution acts to photolyze the impurities so that the impurities do not luminesce in the fluorescence band of the molecule of interest. Molecules of interest may be carried through the photolysis region in the solution or may be introduced into the solution after the photolysis region. 6 figs.

  2. Apparatus for reducing solvent luminescence background emissions

    DOEpatents

    Affleck, Rhett L.; Ambrose, W. Patrick; Demas, James N.; Goodwin, Peter M.; Johnson, Mitchell E.; Keller, Richard A.; Petty, Jeffrey T.; Schecker, Jay A.; Wu, Ming

    1998-01-01

    The detectability of luminescent molecules in solution is enhanced by reducing the background luminescence due to impurity species also present in the solution. A light source that illuminates the solution acts to photolyze the impurities so that the impurities do not luminesce in the fluorescence band of the molecule of interest. Molecules of interest may be carried through the photolysis region in the solution or may be introduced into the solution after the photolysis region.

  3. A new VOX technique for reducing noise in voice communication systems. [voice operated keying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, C. F.; Morgan, W. C.; Shack, P. E.

    1974-01-01

    A VOX technique for reducing noise in voice communication systems is described which is based on the separation of voice signals into contiguous frequency-band components with the aid of an adaptive VOX in each band. It is shown that this processing scheme can effectively reduce both wideband and narrowband quasi-periodic noise since the threshold levels readjust themselves to suppress noise that exceeds speech components in each band. Results are reported for tests of the adaptive VOX, and it is noted that improvements can still be made in such areas as the elimination of noise pulses, phoneme reproduction at high-noise levels, and the elimination of distortion introduced by phase delay.

  4. Noise reducing screen devices for in-flow pressure sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, Fredric (Inventor); Liu, Sandy (Inventor); Jaeger, Stephen (Inventor); Horne, W. Clifton (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    An acoustic sensor assembly is provided for sensing acoustic signals in a moving fluid such as high speed fluid stream. The assembly includes one or more acoustic sensors and a porous, acoustically transparent screen supported between the moving fluid stream and the sensor and having a major surface disposed so as to be tangent to the moving fluid. A layer of reduced velocity fluid separating the sensor from the porous screen. This reduced velocity fluid can comprise substantially still air. A foam filler material attenuates acoustic signals arriving at the assembly from other than a predetermined range of incident angles.

  5. Noise Mitigation During Pile Driving Efficiently Reduces Disturbance of Marine Mammals.

    PubMed

    Nehls, Georg; Rose, Armin; Diederichs, Ansgar; Bellmann, Michael; Pehlke, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic monitoring of harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena L., 1758) indicated a strongly reduced disturbance by noise emitted by pile driving for offshore wind turbine foundations insulated by a big bubble curtain (BBC). This newly developed noise mitigation system was tested during construction of the offshore wind farm Borkum West II (North Sea). Because porpoise activity strongly corresponded to the sound level, operation of the new system under its most suitable configuration reduced the porpoise disturbance area by ~90%. Hence, for the first time, a positive effect of a noise mitigation system during offshore pile driving on an affected marine mammal species could be demonstrated. PMID:26611029

  6. REDUCING EMISSIONS FROM THE WOOD FURNITURE INDUSTRY WITH WATERBORNE COATINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This program was initiated to develop meaningful, defensible, and reliable data on emission reduction benefits from the use of reduced hydrocarbon finishes. The program also included assessing add-on emission control options and considering installation aspects such as costs. Thi...

  7. Reducing global NOx emissions: developing advanced energy and transportation technologies.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Michael J; Jones, Brian M

    2002-03-01

    Globally, energy demand is projected to continue to increase well into the future. As a result, global NOx emissions are projected to continue on an upward trend for the foreseeable future as developing countries increase their standards of living. While the US has experienced improvements in reducing NOx emissions from stationary and mobile sources to reduce ozone, further progress is needed to reduce the health and ecosystem impacts associated with NOx emissions. In other parts of the world, (in developing countries in particular) NOx emissions have been increasing steadily with the growth in demand for electricity and transportation. Advancements in energy and transportation technologies may help avoid this increase in emissions if appropriate policies are implemented. This paper evaluates commercially available power generation and transportation technologies that produce fewer NOx emissions than conventional technologies, and advanced technologies that are on the 10-year commercialization horizon. Various policy approaches will be evaluated which can be implemented on the regional, national and international levels to promote these advanced technologies and ultimately reduce NOx emissions. The concept of the technology leap is offered as a possibility for the developing world to avoid the projected increases in NOx emissions. PMID:12078003

  8. A new algorithm to reduce noise in microscopy images implemented with a simple program in python.

    PubMed

    Papini, Alessio

    2012-03-01

    All microscopical images contain noise, increasing when (e.g., transmission electron microscope or light microscope) approaching the resolution limit. Many methods are available to reduce noise. One of the most commonly used is image averaging. We propose here to use the mode of pixel values. Simple Python programs process a given number of images, recorded consecutively from the same subject. The programs calculate the mode of the pixel values in a given position (a, b). The result is a new image containing in (a, b) the mode of the values. Therefore, the final pixel value corresponds to that read in at least two of the pixels in position (a, b). The application of the program on a set of images obtained by applying salt and pepper noise and GIMP hurl noise with 10-90% standard deviation showed that the mode performs better than averaging with three-eight images. The data suggest that the mode would be more efficient (in the sense of a lower number of recorded images to process to reduce noise below a given limit) for lower number of total noisy pixels and high standard deviation (as impulse noise and salt and pepper noise), while averaging would be more efficient when the number of varying pixels is high, and the standard deviation is low, as in many cases of Gaussian noise affected images. The two methods may be used serially. PMID:21898664

  9. Subradiant spontaneous undulator emission through collective suppression of shot noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratner, D.; Hemsing, E.; Gover, A.; Marinelli, A.; Nause, A.

    2015-05-01

    The phenomenon of Dicke's subradiance, in which the collective properties of a system suppress radiation, has received broad interest in atomic physics. Recent theoretical papers in the field of relativistic electron beams have proposed schemes to achieve subradiance through suppression of shot noise current fluctuations. The resulting "quiet" beam generates less spontaneous radiation than emitted even by a shot noise beam when oscillating in an undulator. Quiet beams could have diverse accelerator applications, including lowering power requirements for seeded free-electron lasers and improving efficiency of hadron cooling. In this paper we present experimental observation of a strong reduction in undulator radiation, demonstrating the feasibility of noise suppression as a practical tool in accelerator physics.

  10. Longitudinal annoyance responses to a road traffic noise management strategy that reduced heavy vehicles at night.

    PubMed

    Brown, A L

    2015-01-01

    A traffic management strategy was designed to reduce trucks using an urban corridor. The intervention had potential to affect night-time truck flows, but did not target truck traffic in the day, or vehicles other than trucks at any hour. A two-year long panel study measured the community's response to this intervention, using five repeated measurements of response. There were significant reductions in the panel's response to noise, both for night-time annoyance and for interference with activities. This was remarkable given that noise monitoring showed that the intervention produced no change in conventional traffic noise indicators. However, there were measureable changes in the number of articulated truck movements at night, and the benefit can be attributed to reduction in the number of noise events from heavy vehicles. The parallel tracking of changes in reported noise effects and the numbers of heavy vehicles in the night hours in this longitudinal study provides strong support to the notion that noise effects at night depend on the number of noise events experienced, not only on the overall level of traffic noise. The latter appear to be unresponsive indicators by which to assess the noise-effect benefit of heavy vehicle reduction strategies. PMID:25618048

  11. OPTIONS FOR REDUCING REFRIGERANT EMISSIONS FROM SUPERMARKET SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report was prepared to assist personnel responsible for the design, construction, and maintenance of retail food refrigeration equipment in making knowledgeable decisions regarding the implementation of refrigerant-emissions-reducing practices and technologies. It characteriz...

  12. Heat pipes to reduce engine exhaust emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, D. F. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A fuel combustor is presented that consists of an elongated casing with an air inlet conduit portion at one end, and having an opposite exit end. An elongated heat pipe is mounted longitudinally in the casing and is offset from and extends alongside the combustion space. The heat pipe is in heat transmitting relationship with the air intake conduit for heating incoming air. A guide conduit structure is provided for conveying the heated air from the intake conduit into the combustion space. A fuel discharge nozzle is provided to inject fuel into the combustion space. A fuel conduit from a fuel supply source has a portion engaged in heat transfer relationship of the heat pipe for preheating the fuel. The downstream end of the heat pipe is in heat transfer relationship with the casing and is located adjacent to the downstream end of the combustion space. The offset position of the heat pipe relative to the combustion space minimizes the quenching effect of the heat pipe on the gaseous products of combustion, as well as reducing coking of the fuel on the heat pipe, thereby improving the efficiency of the combustor.

  13. Method and apparatus for reducing NOx emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Spokoyny, F.E.; Krigmont, H.V.

    1993-08-24

    A method is described of reducing NOx from a flue gas stream produced from a burner, which flue gas stream passes from the burner through a rotary regenerative heat exchanger which rotates in a direction generally transverse to the direction of the flow of the flue gas stream and wherein at least a portion of the heat transfer elements of the heat exchanger carry a catalyst which, in the presence of a nitrogeneous compound, promote the reduction of NOx from the flue gas stream passing thereby, comprising the steps of: injecting a quantity of a nitrogeneous compound onto the catalyzed heat transfer elements, such injecting being at a plurality of fixed locations along the arcuate path of travel of the catalyzed elements with respect to the flue gas stream; determining the temperature of the portion of the heat transfer elements as such elements travel in an arcuate path with respect to the flow of the flue gas stream; and in response to said step of determining, selectively varying the quantity of nitrogeneous compound injected at each of such fixed locations.

  14. Transient-Evoked Otoacoustic Emissions as a Measure of Noise-Induced Threshold Shift.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Lynne; Heller, Laurie M.

    1998-01-01

    Otoacoustic emissions and behavioral hearing thresholds were measured in 14 participants before and after exposure to a 10-minute 105-dB SPL, half-octave band of noise centered at 1.414kHz. Results showed that the maximum temporary emissions shifts were half to one octave above the exposed frequency. Other findings are discussed. (Author/CR)

  15. Texturing Copper To Reduce Secondary Emission Of Electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Kenneth A.; Curren, Arthur N.; Roman, Robert F.

    1995-01-01

    Ion-beam process produces clean, deeply textured surfaces on copper substrates with reduced secondary electron emission. In process, molybdenum ring target positioned above and around copper substrate. Target potential repeatedly switched on and off. Switching module described in "High-Voltage MOSFET Switching Circuit" (LEW-15986). Useful for making collector electrodes for traveling-wave-tube and klystron microwave amplifiers, in which secondary emission of electrons undesirable because of reducing efficiency.

  16. Design and test of aircraft engine isolators for reduced interior noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unruh, J. F.; Scheidt, D. C.

    1982-01-01

    Improved engine vibration isolation was proposed to be the most weight and cost efficient retrofit structure-borne noise control measure for single engine general aviation aircraft. A study was carried out the objectives: (1) to develop an engine isolator design specification for reduced interior noise transmission, (2) select/design candidate isolators to meet a 15 dB noise reduction design goal, and (3) carry out a proof of concept evaluation test. Analytical model of the engine, vibration isolators and engine mount structure were coupled to an empirical model of the fuselage for noise transmission evaluation. The model was used to develop engine isolator dynamic properties design specification for reduced noise transmission. Candidate isolators ere chosen from available product literature and retrofit to a test aircraft. A laboratory based test procedure was then developed to simulate engine induced noise transmission in the aircraft for a proof of concept evaluation test. Three candidate isolator configurations were evaluated for reduced structure-borne noise transmission relative to the original equipment isolators.

  17. Underwater noise emissions from a drillship in the Arctic.

    PubMed

    Kyhn, Line A; Sveegaard, Signe; Tougaard, Jakob

    2014-09-15

    Wideband sound recordings were made of underwater noise emitted by an active drillship, Stena Forth, working in 484 m of water in Baffin Bay, western Greenland. The recordings were obtained at thirty and one-hundred meters depth. Noise was recorded during both drilling and maintenance work at ranges from 500 m to 38 km. The emitted noise levels were highest during maintenance work with estimated source levels up to 190 dB re 1 μPa (rms), while the source level during drilling was 184 dB re 1 μPa (rms). There were spectral peaks discernible from the background noise to ranges of at least 38 km from the drillship with the main energy below 3 kHz. M-weighted sound pressure levels were virtually identical to broadband levels for low-frequency cetaceans and about 5 dB lower for high-frequency cetaceans. Signals from the dynamic positioning system were clearly detectable at ranges up to two km from the drillship. PMID:25044041

  18. Noise emissions in wood chipping yards: Options compared.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, Raffaele; Magagnotti, Natascia; Deboli, Roberto; Preti, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Industrial comminution is becoming increasingly popular, as the result of a growing demand for wood biomass. Such task is performed with either chippers or grinders, which are large, powerful machines, capable of generating much noise. In turn, high noise levels may have negative impacts on the health and comfort of workers, and of the people living in the surroundings of a wood fuel yard. This study gauged the difference between the two main technology options (i.e. chippers and grinders) in order to offer additional decision elements to wood yard planners. The chipper on test generated more noise than the grinder, due to its better ability to process wood and to transmit more energy into it. Since the chipper was equipped with less working tools and turned slower than the grinder, it generated its noise peaks at lower frequency bands. The grinder on test was more suitable for use in wood yards located near settled areas, and was an obvious choice whenever dealing with a diversified and occasionally contaminated raw material stream. PMID:27135577

  19. 40 CFR 205.166 - Noise emission standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... motorcycles other than those that meet the definition of § 205.151(a)(2)(ii): Motorcycle model year A-weighted... meet the definition of § 205.151(a)(2)(ii) (moped-type street motorcycles): Motorcycle model year A-weighted noise level (dB) (A) 1983 70 (2) Exhaust systems and exhaust system components that are...

  20. Leading edge serrations which reduce the noise of low-speed rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderman, P. T.

    1973-01-01

    Acoustic effects of serrated brass strips attached near the leading edges of two different size rotors were investigated. The two bladed rotors were tested in hover. Rotor rotational speed, blade angle, serration shape, and serration position were varied. The serrations were more effective as noise suppressors at rotor tip speeds less than 135 m/sec (444 ft/sec) than at higher speeds. high frequency noise was reduced but the low frequency rotational noise was little affected. Noise reductions from 4 to 8 db overall sound pressure level and 3 to 17 db in the upper octave bands were achieved on the 1.52 m (5.0 ft) diameter rotor. Noise reductions up to 4 db overall sound pressure level were measured for the 2.59 m (8.5 ft) diameter rotor at some conditions.

  1. EFFECTS OF INTERMITTENT EMISSION: NOISE INVENTORY FOR THE SCINTILLATING PULSAR B0834+06

    SciTech Connect

    Gwinn, C. R.; Johnson, M. D.; Smirnova, T. V.; Stinebring, D. R. E-mail: michaeltdh@physics.ucsb.edu E-mail: dan.stinebring@oberlin.edu

    2011-05-20

    We compare signal and noise for observations of the scintillating pulsar B0834+06, using very long baseline interferometry and a single-dish spectrometer. Comparisons between instruments and with models suggest that amplitude variations of the pulsar strongly affect the amount and distribution of self-noise. We show that noise follows a quadratic polynomial with flux density, in spectral observations. Constant coefficients, indicative of background noise, agree well with expectation; whereas second-order coefficients, indicative of self-noise, are {approx}3 times values expected for a pulsar with constant on-pulse flux density. We show that variations in flux density during the 10 s integration accounts for the discrepancy. In the secondary spectrum, {approx}97% of spectral power lies within the pulsar's typical scintillation bandwidth and timescale; an extended scintillation arc contains {approx}3%. For a pulsar with constant on-pulse flux density, noise in the dynamic spectrum will appear as a uniformly distributed background in the secondary spectrum. We find that this uniform noise background contains 95% of noise in the dynamic spectrum for interferometric observations; but only 35% of noise in the dynamic spectrum for single-dish observations. Receiver and sky dominate noise for our interferometric observations, whereas self-noise dominates for single-dish. We suggest that intermittent emission by the pulsar, on timescales <300 {mu}s, concentrates self-noise near the origin in the secondary spectrum, by correlating noise over the dynamic spectrum. We suggest that intermittency sets fundamental limits on pulsar astrometry or timing. Accounting of noise may provide means for detection of intermittent sources, when effects of propagation are unknown or impractical to invert.

  2. Kalman filtering approach for reducing gyroscope noise effects in stabilized platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Algrain, Marcelo C.

    Stabilization systems use gyroscopes typically mounted along side sensing or imaging devices being isolated from external rotations in inertial space. The gyroscopes measure the residual angular motion of the platform stabilized member. The better the stabilization the smaller the sensed residual motion is. Conceivably, the residual motion (angular jitter) could be as small as the noise in the gyroscope outputs. This represents a low signal-to-noise ratio case. Under such conditions, lower noise gyroscopes would be required to further reduce angular jitter, at considerably higher expense. Alternatively, the performance of the stabilization system can be significantly enhanced through noise reducing optimal filtering techniques. The latter approach uses angular velocity estimates that are more accurate than raw measurements to stabilize the platform, without resorting to more precise and costly lower-noise gyroscopes. This paper presents a new Kalman filtering technique that reduces the mean-square-error (MSE) between actual angular velocity values and estimated ones by an order of magnitude (when compared to the MSE resulting from direct measurements) even under extremely low signal-to-noise ratio conditions. The electronically improved angular motion measurements can be fed into the platform stabilization control system (instead of raw measurements) considerably reducing stabilization jitter.

  3. NASA Collaborative Research on the Ultra High Bypass Engine Cycle and Potential Benefits for Noise, Performance, and Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Christopher E.

    2013-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has taken an active role in collaborative research with the U.S. aerospace industry to investigate technologies to minimize the impact of aviation on the environment. In December 2006, a new program, called the Fundamental Aeronautics Program, was established to enhance U.S. aeronautics technology and conduct research on energy, efficiency and the environment. A project within the overall program, the Subsonic Fixed Wing Project, was formed to focus on research related to subsonic aircraft with specific goals and time based milestones to reduce aircraft noise, emissions and fuel burn. This paper will present an overview of the Subsonic Fixed Wing Project environmental goals and describe a segment of the current research within NASA and also were worked collaboratively with partners from the U.S. aerospace industry related to the next generation of aircraft that will have lower noise, emissions and fuel burn.

  4. Reducing the suspension thermal noise of advanced gravitational wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, G. D.; Cumming, A. V.; Hough, J.; Kumar, R.; Tokmakov, K.; Reid, S.; Rowan, S.

    2012-06-01

    The international network of gravitational wave detectors is currently undergoing sensitivity upgrades (aLIGO, aVIRGO and GEO-HF) which will lead to the first detection and subsequent observation of a rich variety of astrophysical sources. To obtain a factor of 10 improvement in the strain sensitivity at low frequencies requires the use of ultralow mechanical loss materials and monolithic fused silica suspensions, optimized mirror coatings and the development of cutting edge techniques to super-polish and figure the interferometer optics. The possibility of applying incremental upgrades to the second generation detectors can be realized by making small but significant changes to the suspensions and/or optical mirror coatings. This includes the use of longer suspensions to increase the dissipation dilution, the development of techniques to reduce the surface loss in fused silica suspensions and methods to lower the mechanical loss from the metal springs used to support the test mass. Such upgrades can potentially improve the strain sensitivity by a factor of 2.5. Looking beyond 2015, the development of techniques to further improve the sensitivity by one order of magnitude are discussed. The third generation detectors will be located underground and will be operated at cryogenic temperatures. At low temperatures, silicon is a particularly promising candidate material as it displays good thermal conductivity, high tensile strength and zero thermal expansion coefficient at 120 K, 18 K and T → 0 K.

  5. Reduced In-Plane, Low Frequency Helicopter Noise of an Active Flap Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sim, Ben W.; Janakiram, Ram D.; Barbely, Natasha L.; Solis, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Results from a recent joint DARPA/Boeing/NASA/Army wind tunnel test demonstrated the ability to reduce in-plane, low frequency noise of the full-scale Boeing-SMART rotor using active flaps. Test data reported in this paper illustrated that acoustic energy in the first six blade-passing harmonics could be reduced by up to 6 decibels at a moderate airspeed, level flight condition corresponding to advance ratio of 0.30. Reduced noise levels were attributed to selective active flap schedules that modified in-plane blade airloads on the advancing side of the rotor, in a manner, which generated counteracting acoustic pulses that partially offset the negative pressure peaks associated with in-plane, steady thickness noise. These favorable reduced-noise operating states are a strong function of the active flap actuation amplitude, frequency and phase. The associated noise reductions resulted in reduced aural detection distance by up to 18%, but incurred significant vibratory load penalties due to increased hub shear forces. Small reductions in rotor lift-to-drag ratios, of no more than 3%, were also measured

  6. Hair Cell Overexpression of Islet1 Reduces Age-Related and Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Mingqian; Kantardzhieva, Albena; Scheffer, Deborah; Liberman, M. Charles

    2013-01-01

    Isl1 is a LIM-homeodomain transcription factor that is critical in the development and differentiation of multiple tissues. In the mouse inner ear, Isl1 is expressed in the prosensory region of otocyst, in young hair cells and supporting cells, and is no longer expressed in postnatal auditory hair cells. To evaluate how continuous Isl1 expression in postnatal hair cells affects hair cell development and cochlear function, we created a transgenic mouse model in which the Pou4f3 promoter drives Isl1 overexpression specifically in hair cells. Isl1 overexpressing hair cells develop normally, as seen by morphology and cochlear functions (auditory brainstem response and otoacoustic emissions). As the mice aged to 17 months, wild-type (WT) controls showed the progressive threshold elevation and outer hair cell loss characteristic of the age-related hearing loss (ARHL) in the background strain (C57BL/6J). In contrast, the Isl1 transgenic mice showed significantly less threshold elevation with survival of hair cells. Further, the Isl1 overexpression protected the ear from noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL): both ABR threshold shifts and hair cell death were significantly reduced when compared with WT littermates. Our model suggests a common mechanism underlying ARHL and NIHL, and provides evidence that hair cell-specific Isl1 expression can promote hair cell survival and therefore minimize the hearing impairment that normally occurs with aging and/or acoustic overexposure. PMID:24048839

  7. Heterogeneous Integration for Reduced Phase Noise and Improved Reliability of Semiconductor Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Sudharsanan

    Significant savings in cost, power and space are possible in existing optical data transmission networks, sensors and metrology equipment through photonic integration. Photonic integration can be broadly classified into two categories, hybrid and monolithic integration. The former involves assembling multiple single functionality optical devices together into a single package including any optical coupling and/or electronic connections. On the other hand monolithic integration assembles many devices or optical functionalities on a single chip so that all the optical connections are on chip and require no external alignment. This provides a substantial improvement in reliability and simplifies testing. Monolithic integration has been demonstrated on both indium phosphide (InP) and silicon (Si) substrates. Integration on larger 300mm Si substrates can further bring down the cost and has been a major area of research in recent years. Furthermore, with increasing interest from industry, the hybrid silicon platform is emerging as a new technology for integrating various active and passive optical elements on a single chip. This is both in the interest of bringing down manufacturing cost through scaling along with continued improvement in performance and to produce multi-functional photonic integrated circuits (PIC). The goal of this work is twofold. First, we show four laser demonstrations that use the hybrid silicon platform to lower phase noise due to spontaneous emission, based on the following two techniques, viz. confinement factor reduction and negative optical feedback. The first two demonstrations are of mode-locked lasers and the next two are of tunable lasers. Some of the key results include; (a) 14dB white frequency noise reduction of a 20GHz radio-frequency (RF) signal from a harmonically mode-locked long cavity laser with greater than 55dB supermode noise suppression, (b) 8dB white frequency noise reduction from a colliding pulse mode-locked laser by

  8. Technology Opportunities to Reduce U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    National Lab Directors, . .

    2001-04-05

    The rise in greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel combustion and industrial and agricultural activities has aroused international concern about the possible impacts of these emissions on climate. Greenhouse gases--mostly carbon dioxide, some methane, nitrous oxide and other trace gases--are emitted to the atmosphere, enhancing an effect in which heat reflected from the earth's surface is kept from escaping into space, as in a greenhouse. Thus, there is concern that the earth's surface temperature may rise enough to cause global climate change. Approximately 90% of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions from anthropogenic sources come from energy production and use, most of which are a byproduct of the combustion of fossil fuels. On a per capita basis, the United States is one of the world's largest sources of greenhouse gas emissions, comprising 4% of the world's population, yet emitting 23% of the world's greenhouse gases. Emissions in the United States are increasing at around 1.2% annually, and the Energy Information Administration forecasts that emissions levels will continue to increase at this rate in the years ahead if we proceed down the business-as-usual path. President Clinton has presented a two-part challenge for the United States: reduce greenhouse gas emissions and grow the economy. Meeting the challenge will mean that in doing tomorrow's work, we must use energy more efficiently and emit less carbon for the energy expended than we do today. To accomplish these goals, President Clinton proposed on June 26, 1997, that the United States ''invest more in the technologies of the future''. In this report to Secretary of Energy Pena, 47 technology pathways are described that have significant potential to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. The present study was completed before the December 1997 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and is intended to provide a basis to evaluate technology feasibility and options to reduce greenhouse gas emissions

  9. Noise

    MedlinePlus

    Noise is all around you, from televisions and radios to lawn mowers and washing machines. Normally, you ... sensitive structures of the inner ear and cause noise-induced hearing loss. More than 30 million Americans ...

  10. A Noise and Emissions Assessment of the N3-X Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berton, Jeffrey J.; Haller, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Analytical predictions of certification noise and exhaust emissions for NASA's N3-X - a notional, hybrid wingbody airplane - are presented in this paper. The N3-X is a 300-passenger concept transport propelled by an array of fans distributed spanwise near the trailing edge of the wingbody. These fans are driven by electric motors deriving power from twin generators driven by turboshaft engines. Turboelectric distributed hybrid propulsion has the potential to dramatically increase the propulsive efficiency of aircraft. The noise and exhaust emission estimates presented here are generated using NASA's conceptual design systems analysis tools with several key modifications to accommodate this unconventional architecture. These tools predict certification noise and the emissions of oxides of nitrogen by leveraging data generated from a recent analysis of the N3-X propulsion system.

  11. Use of First Order Reversal Curve Measurements to Understand Barkhausen Noise Emission in Nuclear Steel

    SciTech Connect

    McCloy, John S.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Henager, Charles H.

    2013-02-25

    A prototypical ferritic/martensitic alloy, HT-9, of interest to the nuclear materials community was investigated for microstructure effects on Barkhausen noise emission and first-order reversal curve (FORC) analysis for three different heat-treated samples. It was observed that Barkhausen noise emission and reversible component of magnetization, computed from the FORC data, decreased with increasing measured mechanical hardness. The results are discussed in terms of the use of magnetic signatures for use in nondestructive interrogation of radiation damage and other microstructural changes in ferritic/martensitic alloys. FORC analysis is shown to be particularly useful for detailed characterization of defect density and pinning, which can be correlated to bulk non-destructive evaluation field measurements such as Barkhausen noise emission.

  12. Determination and Applications of Environmental Costs at Different Sized Airports: Aircraft Noise and Engine Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Cherie; Lierens, Abigail

    2003-01-01

    With the increasing trend of charging for externalities and the aim of encouraging the sustainable development of the air transport industry, there is a need to evaluate the social costs of these undesirable side effects, mainly aircraft noise and engine emissions, for different airports. The aircraft noise and engine emissions social costs are calculated in monetary terms for five different airports, ranging from hub airports to small regional airports. The number of residences within different levels of airport noise contours and the aircraft noise classifications are the main determinants for accessing aircraft noise social costs. Whist, based on the damages of different engine pollutants on the human health, vegetation, materials, aquatic ecosystem and climate, the aircraft engine emissions social costs vary from engine types to aircraft categories. The results indicate that the relationship appears to be curvilinear between environmental costs and the traffic volume of an airport. The results and methodology of environmental cost calculation could input for to the proposed European wide harmonized noise charges as well as the social cost benefit analysis of airports.

  13. Hunting at the highway: traffic noise reduces foraging efficiency in acoustic predators.

    PubMed

    Siemers, Björn M; Schaub, Andrea

    2011-06-01

    Noise pollution from human traffic networks and industrial activity impacts vast areas of our planet. While anthropogenic noise effects on animal communication are well documented, we have very limited understanding of noise impact on more complex ecosystem processes, such as predator-prey interactions, albeit urgently needed to devise mitigation measures. Here, we show that traffic noise decreases the foraging efficiency of an acoustic predator, the greater mouse-eared bat (Myotis myotis). These bats feed on large, ground-running arthropods that they find by listening to their faint rustling sounds. We measured the bats' foraging performance on a continuous scale of acoustically simulated highway distances in a behavioural experiment, designed to rule out confounding factors such as general noise avoidance. Successful foraging bouts decreased and search time drastically increased with proximity to the highway. At 7.5 m to the road, search time was increased by a factor of five. From this increase, we predict a 25-fold decrease in surveyed ground area and thus in foraging efficiency for a wild bat. As most of the bats' prey are predators themselves, the noise impact on the bats' foraging performance will have complex effects on the food web and ultimately on the ecosystem stability. Similar scenarios apply to other ecologically important and highly protected acoustic predators, e.g. owls. Our study provides the empirical basis for quantitative predictions of anthropogenic noise impacts on ecosystem processes. It highlights that an understanding of the effects of noise emissions and other forms of 'sensory pollution' are crucially important for the assessment of environmental impact of human activities. PMID:21084347

  14. Effect of natural compounds on reducing formaldehyde emission from plywood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchiyama, Shigehisa; Matsushima, Erica; Kitao, Nahoko; Tokunaga, Hiroshi; Ando, Masanori; Otsubo, Yasufumi

    The effects of natural compounds on reducing formaldehyde emission from plywood were investigated. Urea, catechin and vanillin were examined as the natural formaldehyde reducers. The microemission cell, with an internal volume of 35 ml, the maximum exposed test surface area of 177 cm 2 and an air purge flow rate of 50 ml min -1, was used to measure specific emission rate (SER). In the case of no reducer treatment, formaldehyde emission from plywood was fast and SERs were 4.4 mg m -2 h -1 at 30 °C and 15 mg m -2 h -1 at 60 °C. When this plywood was treated with the natural compounds, the SERs of formaldehyde were decreased at all temperatures. In the case of urea treatment, the SERs of formaldehyde decreased to 0.30 mg m -2 h -1 at 30 °C and 0.65 mg m -2 h -1 at 60 °C. When the urea treatment was applied to the inside of kitchen cabinet (made from plywood; 270 cm wide, 60 cm deep, 250 cm high), the concentration of formaldehyde was reduced substantially from 1600 to 130 μg m -3. The reducing effect of formaldehyde continued during the observation period (6 months), with a mean concentration of 100 μg m -3. Reducers in the plywood would react with released formaldehyde. Application of natural compounds such as urea, catechin and vanillin could provide a simple and effective approach for suppressing formaldehyde emission from plywood.

  15. In Brief: Reducing black carbon emissions could immediately reduce global temperature increases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretkoff, Ernie

    2011-03-01

    A new assessment by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) shows that measures to reduce emissions of black carbon, or soot, which is produced through burning of wood and other biofuels as well as by some industrial processes, could improve public health and help to significantly reduce projected global temperature increases. The Integrated Assessment of Black Carbon and Tropospheric Ozone highlights how specific measures targeting black carbon and other emissions from fossil fuel extraction, residential wood-burning cooking, diesel vehicles, waste management, agriculture, and small industries could affect climate. Full implementation of a variety of measures to reduce black carbon and methane emissions could reduce future global warming by about 0.5°C, the assessment found. Reducing black carbon could have substantial benefits in the Arctic, the Himalayas, and other snow-covered regions because black carbon that settles on top of snow absorbs heat, speeding melting of snow and ice. Black carbon emission reductions would affect global temperatures more quickly than carbon dioxide emission reductions. Furthermore, reducing black carbon emissions would improve public health in the regions that emit large amounts of the harmful air pollutant.

  16. Reduced Sensitivity to Charge Noise in Semiconductor Spin Qubits via Symmetric Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, M. D.; Maune, B. M.; Andrews, R. W.; Borselli, M. G.; Eng, K.; Jura, M. P.; Kiselev, A. A.; Ladd, T. D.; Merkel, S. T.; Milosavljevic, I.; Pritchett, E. J.; Rakher, M. T.; Ross, R. S.; Schmitz, A. E.; Smith, A.; Wright, J. A.; Gyure, M. F.; Hunter, A. T.

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate improved operation of exchange-coupled semiconductor quantum dots by substantially reducing the sensitivity of exchange operations to charge noise. The method involves biasing a double dot symmetrically between the charge-state anticrossings, where the derivative of the exchange energy with respect to gate voltages is minimized. Exchange remains highly tunable by adjusting the tunnel coupling. We find that this method reduces the dephasing effect of charge noise by more than a factor of 5 in comparison to operation near a charge-state anticrossing, increasing the number of observable exchange oscillations in our qubit by a similar factor. Performance also improves with exchange rate, favoring fast quantum operations.

  17. Reducing atmospheric noise in RST analysis of TIR satellite radiances for earthquakes prone areas satellite monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisi, Mariano; Filizzola, Carolina; Genzano, Nicola; Paciello, Rossana; Pergola, Nicola; Tramutoli, Valerio

    Space-time fluctuations of the Earth's emitted Thermal Infrared (TIR) radiation observed from satellite from months to weeks before an earthquake are reported in several studies. Among the others, a Robust Satellite data analysis Technique (RST) was proposed (and applied to different satellite sensors in various geo-tectonic contexts) to discriminate anomalous signal transients possibly associated with earthquake occurrence from normal TIR signal fluctuations due to other possible causes (e.g. solar diurnal-annual cycle, meteorological conditions, changes in observational conditions, etc.). Variations in satellite view angle depending on satellite's passages (for polar satellites) and atmospheric water vapour fluctuations were recognized in the past as the main factors affecting the residual signal variability reducing the overall Signal-to-Noise (S/N) ratio and the potential of the RST-based approach in identifying seismically related thermal anomalies. In this paper we focus on both factors for the first time, applying the RST approach to geostationary satellites (which guarantees stable view angles) and using Land Surface Temperature (LST) data products (which are less affected by atmospheric water vapour variability) instead of just TIR radiances at the sensor. The first results, obtained in the case of the Abruzzo earthquake (6 April 2009, MW ∼ 6.3) by analyzing 6 years of SEVIRI (Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager on board the geostationary Meteosat Second Generation satellite) LST products provided by EUMETSAT, seem to confirm the major sensitivity of the proposed approach in detecting perturbations of the Earth's thermal emission a few days before the main shock. The results achieved in terms of increased S/N ratio (in validation) and reduced "false alarms" rate (in confutation) are discussed comparing results obtained by applying RST to LST products with those achieved by applying an identical RST analysis (using the same MSG-SEVIRI 2005

  18. Autophagy Attenuates Noise-Induced Hearing Loss by Reducing Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hu; Wang, Xianren; Hill, Kayla; Chen, Jun; Lemasters, John; Yang, Shi-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Reactive oxygen species play a dual role in mediating both cell stress and defense pathways. Here, we used pharmacological manipulations and siRNA silencing to investigate the relationship between autophagy and oxidative stress under conditions of noise-induced temporary, permanent, and severe permanent auditory threshold shifts (temporary threshold shift [TTS], permanent threshold shift [PTS], and severe PTS [sPTS], respectively) in adult CBA/J mice. Results: Levels of oxidative stress markers (4-hydroxynonenal [4-HNE] and 3-nitrotyrosine [3-NT]) increased in outer hair cells (OHCs) in a noise-dose-dependent manner, whereas levels of the autophagy marker microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 B (LC3B) were sharply elevated after TTS but rose only slightly in response to PTS and were unaltered by sPTS noise. Furthermore, green fluorescent protein (GFP) intensity increased in GFP-LC3 mice after TTS-noise exposure. Treatment with rapamycin, an autophagy activator, significantly increased LC3B expression, while diminishing 4-HNE and 3-NT levels, reducing noise-induced hair cell loss, and, subsequently, noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). In contrast, treatment with either the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3MA) or LC3B siRNA reduced LC3B expression, increased 3-NT and 4-HNE levels, and exacerbated TTS to PTS. Innovation: This study demonstrates a relationship between oxidative stress and autophagy in OHCs and reveals that autophagy is an intrinsic cellular process that protects against NIHL by attenuating oxidative stress. Conclusions: The results suggest that the lower levels of oxidative stress incurred by TTS-noise exposure induce autophagy, which promotes OHC survival. However, excessive oxidative stress under sPTS-noise conditions overwhelms the beneficial potential of autophagy in OHCs and leads to OHC death and NIHL. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 1308–1324. PMID:25694169

  19. Reducing dust emissions at OAO Alchevskkoks coke battery 10A

    SciTech Connect

    T.F. Trembach; E.N. Lanina

    2009-07-15

    Coke battery 10A with rammed batch is under construction at OAO Alchevskkoks. The design documentation developed by Giprokoks includes measures for reducing dust emissions to the atmosphere. Aspiration systems with dry dust trapping are employed in the new components of coke battery 10A and in the existing coke-sorting equipment. Two-stage purification of dusty air in cyclones and bag filters is employed for the coke-sorting equipment. This system considerably reduces coke-dust emissions to the atmosphere.

  20. Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Agricultural Wetlands in Borneo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul, H.; Fatah, L.; Nursyamsi, D.; Kazuyuki, I.

    2011-12-01

    At the forum G20 meeting in 2009, Indonesian President delivered Indonesia's commitment to reduce national greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 26% in 2020 by unilateral action and by 41% with support of other countries. To achieve the target, Indonesian government has put forestry, agriculture (including peatlands), energy, industry and transportation as main responsible sectors. Development of crop with low GHG emissions, increasing C sequestration and the use of organic fertilizers are among the activities to be carried out in 2010-2020 period to minimize GHG emissions from agricultural sectors. Three experiments have been carried out to elucidate the reflectivity of crop selection, soil ameliorants and organic fertilizers on GHG emissions from agricultural wetlands in Borneo. Firstly, gas samples were collected in weekly basis from oil palm, paddy, and vegetables fields and analyzed for methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) concentrations by a gas chromatography. Secondly, coal fly ash, dolomite and ZnSO4 were incorporated into a pot containing peat and/or alluvial soils taken from wetlands in South Kalimantan. The air samples were taken and analyzed for CH4 by a gas chromatography. Finally, microbial consortium are isolated from soil, sediment and cow dung. The microbes were then propagated and used in a rice straw composting processes. The CO2, CH4 and N2O emissions from composting vessel were measured at one, two and four weeks of composting processes. The results showed that shifting the use of peatlands for oil palm to vegetable field reduced the GHG emissions by about 74% and that to paddy field reduce the GHG emissions by about 82%. The CH4 emissions from paddy field can be further reduced by applying dolomite. However, the use of coal fly ash and ZnSO4 increased CH4 emissions from peat soil cultivated to rice. The use of microbe isolated from saline soil could reduce GHG emissions during the composting of rice straw. The social aspect of GHG reduction in

  1. Strategies for reducing the climate noise in model simulations: ensemble runs versus a long continuous run

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decremer, Damien; Chung, Chul E.; Räisänen, Petri

    2015-03-01

    Climate modelers often integrate the model with constant forcing over a long time period, and make an average over the period in order to reduce climate noise. If the time series is persistent, as opposed to rapidly varying, such an average does not reduce noise efficiently. In this case, ensemble runs, which ideally represent independent runs, can reduce noise more efficiently. We quantify the noise reduction gain by using ensemble runs over a long continuous run in constant-forcing simulations. We find that in terms of the amplitude of the noise, a continuous simulation of 30 years may be equivalent to as few as five 3-year long ensemble runs in a slab ocean-atmosphere coupled model and as few as two 3-year long ensemble runs in a fully coupled model. The outperformance of ensemble runs over a continuous run is strictly a function of the persistence of the time series. We find that persistence depends on model, location and variable, and that persistence in surface air temperature has robust spatial structures in coupled models. We demonstrate that lag-1 year autocorrelation represents persistence fairly well, but the use of lag-1 year-lag-5 years autocorrelations represents the persistence far more sufficiently. Furthermore, there is more persistence in coupled model output than in the output of a first-order autoregressive model with the same lag-1 autocorrelation.

  2. A Computationally Efficient Filter for Reducing Shot Noise in Low S/N Data

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Mami; Ishikawa, Tomoe; Ikegaya, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Functional multineuron calcium imaging (fMCI) provides a useful experimental platform to simultaneously capture the spatiotemporal patterns of neuronal activity from a large cell population in situ. However, fMCI often suffers from low signal-to-noise ratios (S/N). The main factor that causes the low S/N is shot noise that arises from photon detectors. Here, we propose a new denoising procedure, termed the Okada filter, which is designed to reduce shot noise under low S/N conditions, such as fMCI. The core idea of the Okada filter is to replace the fluorescence intensity value of a given frame time with the average of two values at the preceding and following frames unless the focused value is the median among these three values. This process is iterated serially throughout a time-series vector. In fMCI data of hippocampal neurons, the Okada filter rapidly reduces background noise and significantly improves the S/N. The Okada filter is also applicable for reducing shot noise in electrophysiological data and photographs. Finally, the Okada filter can be described using a single continuous differentiable equation based on the logistic function and is thus mathematically tractable. PMID:27304217

  3. Reducing transit bus emissions: Alternative fuels or traffic operations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Ahsan; Hatzopoulou, Marianne

    2014-06-01

    In this study, we simulated the operations and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of transit buses along a busy corridor and quantified the effects of two different fuels (conventional diesel and compressed natural gas) as well as a set of driving conditions on emissions. Results indicate that compressed natural gas (CNG) reduces GHG emissions by 8-12% compared to conventional diesel, this reduction could increase to 16% with high levels of traffic congestion. However, the benefits of switching from conventional diesel to CNG are less apparent when the road network is uncongested. We also investigated the effects of bus operations on emissions by applying several strategies such as transit signal priority (TSP), queue jumper lanes, and relocation of bus stops. Results show that in congested conditions, TSP alone can reduce GHG emissions by 14% and when combined with improved technology; a reduction of 23% is achieved. The reduction benefits are even more apparent when other transit operational improvements are combined with TSP. Finally a sensitivity analysis was performed to investigate the effect of operational improvements on emissions under varying levels of network congestion. We observe that under “extreme congestion”, the benefits of TSP decrease.

  4. Semiconductor technology for reducing emissions and increasing efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Duffin, B.; Frank, R.

    1997-12-31

    The cooperation and support of all industries are required to significantly impact a worldwide reduction in gaseous emissions that may contribute to climate change. Each industry also is striving to more efficiently utilize the resources that it consumes since this is both conservation for good citizenship and an intelligent approach to business. The semiconductor industry is also extremely concerned with these issues. However, semiconductor manufacturer`s products provide solutions for reduced emissions and increased efficiency in their industry, other industries and areas that can realize significant improvements through control technology. This paper will focus on semiconductor technologies of digital control, power switching and sensing to improve efficiency and reduce emissions in automotive, industrial, and office/home applications. 10 refs., 13 figs.

  5. Wellbeing impacts of city policies for reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

    PubMed

    Hiscock, Rosemary; Mudu, Pierpaolo; Braubach, Matthias; Martuzzi, Marco; Perez, Laura; Sabel, Clive

    2014-12-01

    To mitigate climate change, city authorities are developing policies in areas such as transportation, housing and energy use, to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. In addition to their effects on greenhouse gas emissions, these policies are likely to have consequences for the wellbeing of their populations for example through changes in opportunities to take physical exercise. In order to explore the potential consequences for wellbeing, we first explore what 'wellbeing' is and how it can be operationalised for urban planners. In this paper, we illustrate how wellbeing can be divided into objective and subjective aspects which can be measured quantitatively; our review of measures informs the development of a theoretical model linking wellbeing to policies which cities use to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Finally, we discuss the extent to which the links proposed in the conceptual model are supported by the literature and how cities can assess wellbeing implications of policies. PMID:25464129

  6. Wellbeing Impacts of City Policies for Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    PubMed Central

    Hiscock, Rosemary; Mudu, Pierpaolo; Braubach, Matthias; Martuzzi, Marco; Perez, Laura; Sabel, Clive

    2014-01-01

    To mitigate climate change, city authorities are developing policies in areas such as transportation, housing and energy use, to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. In addition to their effects on greenhouse gas emissions, these policies are likely to have consequences for the wellbeing of their populations for example through changes in opportunities to take physical exercise. In order to explore the potential consequences for wellbeing, we first explore what ‘wellbeing’ is and how it can be operationalized for urban planners. In this paper, we illustrate how wellbeing can be divided into objective and subjective aspects which can be measured quantitatively; our review of measures informs the development of a theoretical model linking wellbeing to policies which cities use to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Finally, we discuss the extent to which the links proposed in the conceptual model are supported by the literature and how cities can assess wellbeing implications of policies. PMID:25464129

  7. A Novel Approach for Reducing Rotor Tip-Clearance Induced Noise in Turbofan Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Li, Fei; Choudhari, Meelan

    2001-01-01

    Rotor tip-clearance induced noise, both in the form of rotor self noise and rotor-stator interaction noise , constitutes a significant component of total fan noise. Innovative yet cost effective techniques to suppress rotor-generated noise are, therefore, of foremost importance for improving the noise signature of turbofan engines. To that end, the feasibility of a passive porous treatment strategy to positively modify the tip-clearance flow field is addressed. The present study is focused on accurate viscous flow calculations of the baseline and the treated rotor flow fields. Detailed comparison between the computed baseline solution and experimental measurements shows excellent agreement. Tip-vortex structure, trajectory, strength, and other relevant aerodynamic quantities are extracted from the computed database. Extensive comparison between the untreated and treated tip-clearance flow fields is performed. The effectiveness of the porous treatment for altering the rotor-tip vortex flow field in general and reducing the intensity of the tip vortex, in particular, is demonstrated. In addition, the simulated flow field for the treated tip clearly shows that substantial reduction in the intensity of both the shear layer roll-up and boundary layer separation on the wall is achieved.

  8. Attempts to Reduce NOx Exhaust Emissions by Using Reformulated Biodiesel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two routes were investigated for reformulating soy-based biodiesel in an effort to reduce its nitrogen oxide emissions. In the first approach, methyl soyate was modified by converting a proportion of the cis-bonds in the fatty acid chains of its methyl esters to their trans isomers. In the second ...

  9. TRANSIENT SUPPRESSION PACKAGING FOR REDUCED EMISSIONS FROM ROTARY KILN INCINERATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Experiments were performed on a 73 kW rotary kiln incinerator simulator to determine whether innovative waste packaging designs might reduce transient emissions of products of incomplete combustion due to batch charging of containerized liquid surrogate waste compounds bound on g...

  10. Reduced Crude Protein Effects on Aerial Emissions from Swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of feeding reduced crude protein (CP) diets on air emissions was evaluated using barrows fed over the course of four feeding phases: grower-1 (beginning at 24.5 kg BW), grower-2 (55.3 kg), finisher-1 (87.2 kg), and finisher-2 (111.4 kg). Pigs were offered a control diet (C), a low CP diet...

  11. Method of reducing NOx emissions in gasoline vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Gwyn, J.E.

    1993-08-10

    An unleaded fuel composition is described comprising a major amount of a hydrocarbon base fuel of the gasoline boiling range containing an amount effective to reduce NO[sub x] emissions from electronic port fuel injected engines of an ammonium compound selected from the group consisting of ammonium formate, ammonium propionate, ammonium dicitrate, ammonium carbamate, ammonium carbonate, ammonium acetate, and admixtures thereof.

  12. Structuring economic incentives to reduce emissions from deforestation within Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Busch, Jonah; Lubowski, Ruben N.; Godoy, Fabiano; Steininger, Marc; Yusuf, Arief A.; Austin, Kemen; Hewson, Jenny; Juhn, Daniel; Farid, Muhammad; Boltz, Frederick

    2012-01-01

    We estimate and map the impacts that alternative national and subnational economic incentive structures for reducing emissions from deforestation (REDD+) in Indonesia would have had on greenhouse gas emissions and national and local revenue if they had been in place from 2000 to 2005. The impact of carbon payments on deforestation is calibrated econometrically from the pattern of observed deforestation and spatial variation in the benefits and costs of converting land to agriculture over that time period. We estimate that at an international carbon price of $10/tCO2e, a “mandatory incentive structure,” such as a cap-and-trade or symmetric tax-and-subsidy program, would have reduced emissions by 163–247 MtCO2e/y (20–31% below the without-REDD+ reference scenario), while generating a programmatic budget surplus. In contrast, a “basic voluntary incentive structure” modeled after a standard payment-for-environmental-services program would have reduced emissions nationally by only 45–76 MtCO2e/y (6–9%), while generating a programmatic budget shortfall. By making four policy improvements—paying for net emission reductions at the scale of an entire district rather than site-by-site; paying for reductions relative to reference levels that match business-as-usual levels; sharing a portion of district-level revenues with the national government; and sharing a portion of the national government's responsibility for costs with districts—an “improved voluntary incentive structure” would have been nearly as effective as a mandatory incentive structure, reducing emissions by 136–207 MtCO2e/y (17–26%) and generating a programmatic budget surplus. PMID:22232665

  13. A research program to reduce the interior noise in general aviation aircraft, index and summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, L.; Jackson, K.; Roskam, J.

    1985-01-01

    This report is an index of the published works from NASA Grant NSG 1301, entitled A Research Program to Reduce the Interior Noise in General Aviation Aircraft. Included are a list of all published reports and papers, a compilation of test specimen characteristics, and summaries of each published work.

  14. Free radical scavengers, vitamins A, C, and E, plus magnesium reduces noise trauma

    PubMed Central

    Le Prell, Colleen G.; Hughes, Larry F.; Miller, Josef M.

    2007-01-01

    Free radical formation in the cochlea plays a key role in the development of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). The amount, distribution, and time course of free radical formation have been defined, including a clinically significant formation of both reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species 7–10 days following noise exposure. Reduction in cochlear blood flow as a result of free radical formation has also been described. Here we report that the antioxidant agents, vitamins A, C, and E, act in synergy with magnesium to effectively prevent noise-induced trauma. Neither the antioxidant agents nor magnesium reliably reduced NIHL or sensory cell death with the doses we used when these agents were delivered alone. In combination, however, they were highly effective in reducing both hearing loss and cell death even with treatment initiated just one hour prior to noise exposure. This study supports roles for both free radical formation and noise-induced vasoconstriction in the onset and progression of NIHL. Identification of this safe and effective antioxidant intervention that attenuates NIHL provides a compelling rationale for human trials in which free radical scavengers are used to eliminate this single major cause of acquired hearing loss. PMID:17395018

  15. A noise study of the A-6 airplane and techniques for reducing its aural detection distance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilton, D. A.; Connor, A. B.; Hubbard, H. H.

    1975-01-01

    A study was undertaken to determine the noise reduction potential of the A-6 airplane in order to reduce its aural detection distance. Static and flyby noise measurements were taken to document the basic airplane signature. The low-frequency noise which is generally most critical for aural detection was found to be broad-band in nature from this airplane, and its source is the turbojet engine exhaust. High-frequency compressor noise, which is characteristic of turbojet powerplants, and which is prominent at close range for this airplane, has no measurable effect on aural detection distance. The use of fluted-engine exhaust nozzles to change the far-field noise spectra is suggested as a possible means for reducing the aural detection distances. Detection distances associated with eight-lobe and four-lobe nozzles are estimated for a 1,000-foot altitude and grassy terrain to decrease from 4 miles to about 3 miles, and from 3 miles to about 2 miles for a 300-foot altitude and grassy terrain.

  16. Reducing media noise of perpendicular magnetic recording tape for over-50 TB class data cartridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsunuma, S.; Inoue, T.; Watanabe, T.; Doi, T.; Gomi, S.; Mashiko, Y.; Hirata, K.; Nakagawa, S.

    2011-04-01

    To reduce medium noise inherent in a perpendicular magnetic recording tape, which is deposited by facing targets sputtering, we have examined an epitaxial double-layered structure consisting of a soft magnetic underlayer (SUL), bcc-FeCoB/fcc-NiFe/Si/bcc-FeCoB, on a 4.5 μm para-aromatic polyamide (aramid) film. An epitaxial soft magnetic bilayer reduces broadband noise by 5.6 dB at 337 kilo fluxchanges per inch (kfci) compared to a single SUL medium (Tape S). This is due to the reduction in the low-frequency noise, which originates from the domain walls of the SUL. Improvement of the crystal orientation of the magnetic layer hcp-CoPtCr-SiO2 and the intermediate layer hcp-Ru by inserting a fcc-NiFe spacer in laminated SULs extends the roll-off curve toward high linear density. When each SUL layer of the bilayer was made thinner, from 25 nm (Tape D2) to 10 nm (Tape D1), the medium noise decreased, improving the signal-to-noise ratio by 8.6 dB at 337 kfci compared to Tape S. In a high resolution playback test of Tape D1, an areal density of 45.0 gigabits per square inch (Gb/in.2) was confirmed. Achieved areal density means the capability of an over-50 terabyte (TB) capacity for a typical linear-formatted data cartridge.

  17. Fluids and Combustion Facility Acoustic Emissions Controlled by Aggressive Low-Noise Design Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Beth A.; Young, Judith A.

    2004-01-01

    The Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF) is a dual-rack microgravity research facility that is being developed by Northrop Grumman Information Technology (NGIT) for the International Space Station (ISS) at the NASA Glenn Research Center. As an on-orbit test bed, FCF will host a succession of experiments in fluid and combustion physics. The Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) and the Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) must meet ISS acoustic emission requirements (ref. 1), which support speech communication and hearing-loss-prevention goals for ISS crew. To meet these requirements, the NGIT acoustics team implemented an aggressive low-noise design effort that incorporated frequent acoustic emission testing for all internal noise sources, larger-scale systems, and fully integrated racks (ref. 2). Glenn's Acoustical Testing Laboratory (ref. 3) provided acoustical testing services (see the following photograph) as well as specialized acoustical engineering support as part of the low-noise design process (ref. 4).

  18. 75 FR 67634 - Compliance With Interstate Motor Carrier Noise Emission Standards: Exhaust Systems

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-03

    ... Noise Emission Standards: Exhaust Systems'' in the Federal Register (75 FR 57191). The direct final rule... Federal Register (75 FR 57191). This rule eliminates turbochargers from the list of equipment considered... dissipative devices. FMCSA used the direct final rule procedures (75 FR 29915, May 28, 2010) because it was...

  19. Reducing crude protein in beef cattle diet reduces ammonia emissions from artificial feedyard surfaces.

    PubMed

    Todd, Richard W; Cole, N Andy; Clark, R Nolan

    2006-01-01

    Concentrated animal feeding operations are major sources of ammonia to the atmosphere. Control methods to reduce emissions include acidifying amendments, urease inhibitors, and absorbents. For beef cattle, decreasing crude protein (CP) in diets may be the most practical and cost-effective method to reduce ammonia emissions. Our objective was to quantify the effect of reducing CP in beef cattle diet on ammonia emissions. Two groups of steers were fed diets with either 11.5 or 13.0% CP and all urine and feces were collected. Manures from the two diet treatments were applied in a replicated laboratory chamber experiment, and ammonia emission was quantified using acid gas washing. In four seasonal field trials, manures from the two diet treatments were applied to two 10-m-diameter, circular, artificial feedyard surfaces, and ammonia emission was quantified using the integrated horizontal flux method. Manure from steers fed 11.5% CP diet had less urine, less urinary N, and a lesser fraction of total N in urine, compared with the 13.0% CP diet. Decreasing crude protein in beef cattle diets from 13 to 11.5% significantly decreased ammonia emission by 44% (p < 0.01) in the closed chamber laboratory experiment, and decreased mean daily ammonia flux by 30% (p = 0.10), 52% (p = 0.08), and 29% (p < 0.01) in summer, autumn, and spring field trials, respectively. No difference was observed in winter. On an annual basis, decreasing crude protein reduced daily ammonia flux by 28%. Reducing crude protein in beef cattle diets may provide the most practical and cost-effective way to reduce ammonia emissions from feedyards. PMID:16455840

  20. Effects of N-acetylcysteine on noise-induced temporary threshold shift and temporary emission shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinette, Martin

    2001-05-01

    Animal research has shown that antioxidants can provide significant protection to the cochlea from traumatic noise exposure with some benefit when given after the exposure. Similar results in humans would have a significant impact on both prevention and treatment of noise-induced hearing loss. The current study evaluates the effectiveness of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on temporary threshold shift (TTS) by using both behavioral and physiological measures. Sixteen healthy, normal-hearing subjects were given NAC or a placebo prior to exposure to a 10-min, 102-dB narrow-band noise, centered at 2 kHz. This exposure was designed to induce a 10-15-dB TTS. Following the noise exposure, pure-tone thresholds (Bekesy) and transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE) were measured for 60 min to monitor the effects of NAC on TTS recovery. Postexposure measures were compared to baseline data. [Work supported by American BioHealth Group.

  1. Opportunities for reducing greenhouse gas emissions in tropical peatlands

    PubMed Central

    Murdiyarso, D.; Hergoualc’h, K.; Verchot, L. V.

    2010-01-01

    The upcoming global mechanism for reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation in developing countries should include and prioritize tropical peatlands. Forested tropical peatlands in Southeast Asia are rapidly being converted into production systems by introducing perennial crops for lucrative agribusiness, such as oil-palm and pulpwood plantations, causing large greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Guidelines for GHG Inventory on Agriculture, Forestry, and Other Land Uses provide an adequate framework for emissions inventories in these ecosystems; however, specific emission factors are needed for more accurate and cost-effective monitoring. The emissions are governed by complex biophysical processes, such as peat decomposition and compaction, nutrient availability, soil water content, and water table level, all of which are affected by management practices. We estimate that total carbon loss from converting peat swamp forests into oil palm is 59.4 ± 10.2 Mg of CO2 per hectare per year during the first 25 y after land-use cover change, of which 61.6% arise from the peat. Of the total amount (1,486 ± 183 Mg of CO2 per hectare over 25 y), 25% are released immediately from land-clearing fire. In order to maintain high palm-oil production, nitrogen inputs through fertilizer are needed and the magnitude of the resulting increased N2O emissions compared to CO2 losses remains unclear. PMID:21081702

  2. Optimization of gasoline hydrocarbon compositions for reducing exhaust emissions.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yitao; Shuai, Shijin; Wang, Jianxin; Xiao, Jianhua

    2009-01-01

    Effects of hydrocarbon compositions on raw exhaust emissions and combustion processes were studied on an engine test bench. The optimization of gasoline hydrocarbon composition was discussed. As olefins content increased from 10.0% to 25.0% in volume, the combustion duration was shortened by about 2 degree crank angle (degrees CA), and the engine-out THC emission was reduced by about 15%. On the other hand, as aromatics content changed from 35.0% to 45.0%, the engine-out NOx emissions increased by 4%. An increment in olefins content resulted in a slight increase in engine-out CO emission, while the aromatics content had little effect on engine-out total hydrocarbon (THC) and CO emissions. Over the new European driving cycle (NEDC), the THC, NOx and CO emissions of fuel with 25.0% olefins and 35.0% aromatics were about 45%, 21% and 19% lower than those of fuel with 10.0% olefins and 40.0% aromatics, respectively. The optimized gasoline compositions for new engines and new vehicles have low aromatics and high olefins contents. PMID:19999967

  3. Noise estimation technique to reduce the effects of 1/f noise in Open Path Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectrometry (OP-TDLAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad, Israa L.; Anderson, Gary T.; Chen, Youhua

    2014-06-01

    Many techniques using high frequency modulation have been proposed to reduce the effects of 1/f noise in tunable diode-laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS). The instruments and devices used by these techniques are not suitable for space applications that require small, low mass and low power instrumentation. A new noise estimation technique has already been proposed and validated for two lasers to reduce the effect of 1/f noise at lower frequencies. This paper extends the noise estimation technique and applies it using one distribution feedback (DFB) laser diode. In this method a DFB laser diode is excited at two slightly different frequencies, giving two different harmonics that can be used to estimate the total noise in the measurement. Simulations and experimental results on ammonia gas validate that the 1/f noise is effectively reduced by the noise estimation technique using one laser. Outdoor experimental results indicate that the effect of 1/f noise is reduced to more than 1/4 its normal value.

  4. Reducing the Read Noise of the James Webb Space Telescope Near Infrared Spectrograph Detector Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauscher, Bernard; Arendt, Richard G.; Fixsen, D. J.; Lindler, Don; Loose, Markus; Moseley, S. H.; Wilson, D. V.

    2012-01-01

    We describe a Wiener optimal approach to using the reference output and reference pixels that are built into Teledyne's HAWAII-2RG detector arrays. In this way, we are reducing the total noise per approximately 1000 second 88 frame up-the-ramp dark integration from about 6.5 e- rms to roughly 5 e- rms. Using a principal components analysis formalism, we achieved these noise improvements without altering the hardware in any way. In addition to being lower, the noise is also cleaner with much less visible correlation. For example, the faint horizontal banding that is often seen in HAWAII-2RG images is almost completely removed. Preliminary testing suggests that the relative gains are even higher when using non flight grade components. We believe that these techniques are applicable to most HAWAII-2RG based instruments.

  5. Methods for designing treatments to reduce interior noise of predominant sources and paths in a single engine light aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayden, Richard E.; Remington, Paul J.; Theobald, Mark A.; Wilby, John F.

    1985-01-01

    The sources and paths by which noise enters the cabin of a small single engine aircraft were determined through a combination of flight and laboratory tests. The primary sources of noise were found to be airborne noise from the propeller and engine casing, airborne noise from the engine exhaust, structureborne noise from the engine/propeller combination and noise associated with air flow over the fuselage. For the propeller, the primary airborne paths were through the firewall, windshield and roof. For the engine, the most important airborne path was through the firewall. Exhaust noise was found to enter the cabin primarily through the panels in the vicinity of the exhaust outlet although exhaust noise entering the cabin through the firewall is a distinct possibility. A number of noise control techniques were tried, including firewall stiffening to reduce engine and propeller airborne noise, to stage isolators and engine mounting spider stiffening to reduce structure-borne noise, and wheel well covers to reduce air flow noise.

  6. Recovery of otoacoustic emissions after high-level noise exposure in the American bullfrog

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Dwayne D.; Lohr, Rachel; Wotring, Helena; Burton, Miriam D.; Hooper, Rebecca A.; Baird, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    The American bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) has an amphibian papilla (AP) that senses airborne, low-frequency sound and generates distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) similar to other vertebrate species. Although ranid frogs are typically found in noisy environments, the effects of noise on the AP have not been studied. First, we determined the noise levels that diminished DPOAE at 2f1–f2 using an f2 stimulus level at 80 dB SPL and that also produced morphological damage of the sensory epithelium. Second, we compared DPOAE (2f1–f2) responses with histopathologic changes occurring in bullfrogs after noise exposure. Consistent morphological damage, such as fragmented hair cells and missing bundles, as well as elimination of DPOAE responses were seen only after very high-level (>150 dB SPL) sound exposures. The morphological response of hair cells to noise differed along the mediolateral AP axis: medial hair cells were sensitive to noise and lateral hair cells were relatively insensitive to noise. Renewed or repaired hair cells were not observed until 9 days post-exposure. Following noise exposure, DPOAE responses disappeared within 24 h and then recovered to normal pre-exposure levels within 3–4 days. Our results suggest that DPOAEs in the bullfrog are sensitive to the initial period of hair cell damage. After noise-induced damage, the bullfrog AP has functional recovery mechanisms that do not depend on substantial hair cell regeneration or repair. Thus, the bullfrog auditory system might serve as an interesting model for investigation of ways to prevent noise damage. PMID:24501139

  7. Signal Amplification Technique (SAT): an approach for improving resolution and reducing image noise in computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Phelps, M.E.; Huang, S.C.; Hoffman, E.J.; Plummer, D.; Carson, R.

    1981-01-01

    Spatial resolution improvements in computed tomography (CT) have been limited by the large and unique error propagation properties of this technique. The desire to provide maximum image resolution has resulted in the use of reconstruction filter functions designed to produce tomographic images with resolution as close as possible to the intrinsic detector resolution. Thus, many CT systems produce images with excessive noise with the system resolution determined by the detector resolution rather than the reconstruction algorithm. CT is a rigorous mathematical technique which applies an increasing amplification to increasing spatial frequencies in the measured data. This mathematical approach to spatial frequency amplification cannot distinguish between signal and noise and therefore both are amplified equally. We report here a method in which tomographic resolution is improved by using very small detectors to selectively amplify the signal and not noise. Thus, this approach is referred to as the signal amplification technique (SAT). SAT can provide dramatic improvements in image resolution without increases in statistical noise or dose because increases in the cutoff frequency of the reconstruction algorithm are not required to improve image resolution. Alternatively, in cases where image counts are low, such as in rapid dynamic or receptor studies, statistical noise can be reduced by lowering the cutoff frequency while still maintaining the best possible image resolution. A possible system design for a positron CT system with SAT is described.

  8. Reduced Connexin26 in the Mature Cochlea Increases Susceptibility to Noise-Induced Hearing Lossin Mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xing-Xing; Chen, Sen; Xie, Le; Ji, Yu-Zi; Wu, Xia; Wang, Wen-Wen; Yang, Qi; Yu, Jin-Tao; Sun, Yu; Lin, Xi; Kong, Wei-Jia

    2016-01-01

    Connexin26 (Cx26, encoded by GJB2) mutations are the most common cause of non-syndromic deafness. GJB2 is thought to be involved in noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). However, the role of Cx26 in NIHL is still obscure. To explore the association between Cx26 and NIHL, we established a Cx26 knockdown (KD) mouse model by conditional knockdown of Cx26 at postnatal day 18 (P18), and then we observed the auditory threshold and morphologic changes in these mice with or without noise exposure. The Cx26 KD mice did not exhibit substantial hearing loss and hair cell degeneration, while the Cx26 KD mice with acoustic trauma experienced higher hearing loss than simple noise exposure siblings and nearly had no recovery. Additionally, extensive outer hair cell loss and more severe destruction of the basal organ of Corti were observed in Cx26 KD mice after noise exposure. These data indicate that reduced Cx26 expression in the mature mouse cochlea may increase susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss and facilitate the cell degeneration in the organ of Corti. PMID:26927086

  9. Observation of reduced 1/f noise in graphene field effect transistors on boron nitride substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayyalha, Morteza; Chen, Yong P.

    2015-09-01

    We have investigated the low frequency (f) flicker (also called 1/f) noise of single-layer graphene devices on h-BN (placed on SiO2/Si) along with those on SiO2/Si. We observe that the devices fabricated on h-BN have on average one order of magnitude lower noise amplitude compared with devices fabricated on SiO2/Si despite having comparable mobilities at room temperature. We associate this noise reduction to the lower densities of impurities and trap sites in h-BN than in SiO2. Furthermore, the gate voltage dependent noise amplitude shows a broad maximum at Dirac point for devices on h-BN, in contrast to the M-shaped behavior showing a minimum at Dirac point for devices on SiO2, consistent with the reduced charge inhomogeneity (puddles) for graphene on h-BN. This study demonstrates that the use of h-BN as a substrate or dielectric can be a simple and efficient noise reduction technique valuable for electronic applications of graphene and other nanomaterials.

  10. Observation of reduced 1/f noise in graphene field effect transistors on boron nitride substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Kayyalha, Morteza; Chen, Yong P.

    2015-09-14

    We have investigated the low frequency (f) flicker (also called 1/f) noise of single-layer graphene devices on h-BN (placed on SiO{sub 2}/Si) along with those on SiO{sub 2}/Si. We observe that the devices fabricated on h-BN have on average one order of magnitude lower noise amplitude compared with devices fabricated on SiO{sub 2}/Si despite having comparable mobilities at room temperature. We associate this noise reduction to the lower densities of impurities and trap sites in h-BN than in SiO{sub 2}. Furthermore, the gate voltage dependent noise amplitude shows a broad maximum at Dirac point for devices on h-BN, in contrast to the M-shaped behavior showing a minimum at Dirac point for devices on SiO{sub 2}, consistent with the reduced charge inhomogeneity (puddles) for graphene on h-BN. This study demonstrates that the use of h-BN as a substrate or dielectric can be a simple and efficient noise reduction technique valuable for electronic applications of graphene and other nanomaterials.

  11. Feeding reduced crude protein diets with crystalline amino acids supplementation reduce air gas emissions from housing.

    PubMed

    Li, Q-F; Trottier, N; Powers, W

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that reducing dietary CP by 1.5% and supplementing crystalline AA (CAA) to meet the standardized ileal digestible (SID) AA requirements for growing and finishing pigs decreases air emissions of ammonia (NH), nitrous oxide (NO), and carbon dioxide (CO) compared with an industry standard diet, without reducing growth performance. Seventy-two pigs were allocated to 12 rooms (6 pigs per room) and 2 diets (6 rooms per diet) formulated according to a 5-phase feeding program across the grow-finish period (107 d total). The diets consisted of a standard diet containing 18.5 to 12.2% CP or a reduced CP diet containing 17.5 to 11.0% CP + CAA over the course of the 5-phase feeding program. Gases (NH, NO, hydrogen sulfide, methane, nonmethane total hydrocarbon, and CO) and ventilation rates were measured continuously from the rooms. Compared with standard diet, ADG and feed conversion of pigs fed reduced CP + CAA diets did not differ (2.7 kg gain/d and 0.37 kg gain/kg feed, respectively). Compared with standard diet, feeding reduced CP + CAA diets decreased ( < 0.01) NH emissions by 46% over the 107-d period (5.4 and 2.9 g · pig · d, respectively). Change in NH emissions for each percentage unit reduction in dietary CP concentration corresponded with 47.9, 53.2, 26.8, 26.5, and 51.6% during Phases 1 through 5, respectively. Emissions of other gases did not differ between diets. Feeding reduced CP diets formulated based on SID AA requirements for grow-finisher swine is effective in reducing NH emissions from housing compared with recent industry formulations and does not impact growth performances. PMID:26020753

  12. A process for the quantification of aircraft noise and emissions interdependencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Luis, Jorge

    The main purpose of this dissertation is to develop a process to improve actual policy-making procedures in terms of aviation environmental effects. This research work expands current practices with physics based publicly available models. The current method uses solely information provided by industry members, and this information is usually proprietary, and not physically intuitive. The process herein proposed provides information regarding the interdependencies between the environmental effects of aircraft. These interdependencies are also tied to the actual physical parameters of the aircraft and the engine, making it more intuitive for decision-makers to understand the impacts to the vehicle due to different policy scenarios. These scenarios involve the use of fleet analysis tools in which the existing aircraft are used to predict the environmental effects of imposing new stringency levels. The aircraft used are reduced to a series of coefficients that represent their performance, in terms of flight characteristics, fuel burn, noise, and emissions. These coefficients are then utilized to model flight operations and calculate what the environmental impacts of those aircraft are. If a particular aircraft does not meet the stringency to be analyzed, a technology response is applied to it, in order to meet that stringency. Depending on the level of reduction needed, this technology response can have an effect on the fuel burn characteristic of the aircraft. Another important point of the current stringency analysis process is that it does not take into account both noise and emissions concurrently, but instead, it considers them separately, one at a time. This assumes that the interdependencies between the two do not exists, which is not realistic. The latest stringency process delineated in 2004 imposed a 2% fuel burn penalty for any required improvements on NOx, no matter the type of aircraft or engine, assuming that no company had the ability to produce a

  13. Can reducing black carbon emissions counteract global warming?

    SciTech Connect

    Tami C. Bond; Haolin Sun

    2005-08-15

    Field measurements and model results have recently shown that aerosols may have important climatic impacts. One line of inquiry has investigated whether reducing climate-warming soot or black carbon aerosol emissions can form a viable component of mitigating global warming. Black carbon is produced by poor combustion, from our example hard coal cooking fires for and industrial pulverized coal boilers. The authors review and acknowledge scientific arguments against considering aerosols and greenhouse gases in a common framework, including the differences in the physical mechanisms of climate change and relevant time scales. It is argued that such a joint consideration is consistent with the language of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Results from published climate-modeling studies are synthesized to obtain a global warming potential for black carbon relative to that of CO{sub 2} (680 on a 100 year basis). This calculation enables a discussion of cost-effectiveness for mitigating the largest sources of black carbon. It is found that many emission reductions are either expensive or difficult to enact when compared with greenhouse gases, particularly in Annex I countries. Finally, a role for black carbon in climate mitigation strategies is proposed that is consistent with the apparently conflicting arguments raised during the discussion. Addressing these emissions is a promising way to reduce climatic interference primarily for nations that have not yet agreed to address greenhouse gas emissions and provides the potential for a parallel climate agreement. 31 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Method of reducing chlorofluorocarbon refrigerant emissions in the atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    DeVault, R.C.; Fairchild, P.D.; Biermann, W.J.

    1990-06-19

    This patent describes a method of reducing escape of refrigerant emissions to the atmosphere during removal of a chlorofluorocarbon refrigerant from a vapor compression cooling system or heat pump. The method comprises contacting the chlorofluorocarbon refrigerant during removal with a sorbent material into which the chlorofluorocarbon refrigerant can be dissolved, the sorbent material being selected from the group consisting of N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone, ethyl tetrahydro furfuryl ether, tetramethylene glycol dimethylether, triethylene glycol dimethylether, N,N-dimethyl formamide, dimethylamides, and tetrachloroethane.

  15. Kalman filtering approach for reducing gyroscope noise effects in stabilized platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Algrain, Marcelo C.

    1992-11-01

    Stabilization systems use gyroscopes typically mounted along side-sensing or imaging devices isolated from external rotations in inertial space. The gyroscopes measure the residual angular motion of the platform stabilized member. The better the stabilization, the smaller the sensed residual motion is. Conceivably, the residual motion (angular jitter) could be as small as the noise in the gyroscope outputs. This represents a low SNR case. Under such conditions, lower noise gyroscopes would be required to further reduce angular jitter, at considerably higher expense. Alternatively, the performance of the stabilization system can be significantly enhanced through noise-reducing optimal filtering techniques. The latter approach uses angular velocity estimates that are more accurate than raw measurements to stabilize the platform. This paper presents a new Kalman filtering technique that reduces the mean-square-error (MSE) between actual angular velocity values and estimated ones by an order of magnitude compared to the MSE resulting from direct measurements even under extremely low SNR conditions. The electronically improved angular motion measurements can be fed into the platform stabilization control system instead of raw measurements, considerably reducing stabilization jitter.

  16. Suppression of Fiber Modal Noise Induced Radial Velocity Errors for Bright Emission-line Calibration Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadevan, Suvrath; Halverson, Samuel; Ramsey, Lawrence; Venditti, Nick

    2014-05-01

    Modal noise in optical fibers imposes limits on the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) and velocity precision achievable with the next generation of astronomical spectrographs. This is an increasingly pressing problem for precision radial velocity spectrographs in the near-infrared (NIR) and optical that require both high stability of the observed line profiles and high S/N. Many of these spectrographs plan to use highly coherent emission-line calibration sources like laser frequency combs and Fabry-Perot etalons to achieve precision sufficient to detect terrestrial-mass planets. These high-precision calibration sources often use single-mode fibers or highly coherent sources. Coupling light from single-mode fibers to multi-mode fibers leads to only a very low number of modes being excited, thereby exacerbating the modal noise measured by the spectrograph. We present a commercial off-the-shelf solution that significantly mitigates modal noise at all optical and NIR wavelengths, and which can be applied to spectrograph calibration systems. Our solution uses an integrating sphere in conjunction with a diffuser that is moved rapidly using electrostrictive polymers, and is generally superior to most tested forms of mechanical fiber agitation. We demonstrate a high level of modal noise reduction with a narrow bandwidth 1550 nm laser. Our relatively inexpensive solution immediately enables spectrographs to take advantage of the innate precision of bright state-of-the art calibration sources by removing a major source of systematic noise.

  17. The Physical Mechanism for Retinal Discrete Dark Noise: Thermal Activation or Cellular Ultraweak Photon Emission?

    PubMed Central

    Salari, Vahid; Scholkmann, Felix; Bokkon, Istvan; Shahbazi, Farhad; Tuszynski, Jack

    2016-01-01

    For several decades the physical mechanism underlying discrete dark noise of photoreceptors in the eye has remained highly controversial and poorly understood. It is known that the Arrhenius equation, which is based on the Boltzmann distribution for thermal activation, can model only a part (e.g. half of the activation energy) of the retinal dark noise experimentally observed for vertebrate rod and cone pigments. Using the Hinshelwood distribution instead of the Boltzmann distribution in the Arrhenius equation has been proposed as a solution to the problem. Here, we show that the using the Hinshelwood distribution does not solve the problem completely. As the discrete components of noise are indistinguishable in shape and duration from those produced by real photon induced photo-isomerization, the retinal discrete dark noise is most likely due to ‘internal photons’ inside cells and not due to thermal activation of visual pigments. Indeed, all living cells exhibit spontaneous ultraweak photon emission (UPE), mainly in the optical wavelength range, i.e., 350–700 nm. We show here that the retinal discrete dark noise has a similar rate as UPE and therefore dark noise is most likely due to spontaneous cellular UPE and not due to thermal activation. PMID:26950936

  18. Suppression of fiber modal noise induced radial velocity errors for bright emission-line calibration sources

    SciTech Connect

    Mahadevan, Suvrath; Halverson, Samuel; Ramsey, Lawrence; Venditti, Nick

    2014-05-01

    Modal noise in optical fibers imposes limits on the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) and velocity precision achievable with the next generation of astronomical spectrographs. This is an increasingly pressing problem for precision radial velocity spectrographs in the near-infrared (NIR) and optical that require both high stability of the observed line profiles and high S/N. Many of these spectrographs plan to use highly coherent emission-line calibration sources like laser frequency combs and Fabry-Perot etalons to achieve precision sufficient to detect terrestrial-mass planets. These high-precision calibration sources often use single-mode fibers or highly coherent sources. Coupling light from single-mode fibers to multi-mode fibers leads to only a very low number of modes being excited, thereby exacerbating the modal noise measured by the spectrograph. We present a commercial off-the-shelf solution that significantly mitigates modal noise at all optical and NIR wavelengths, and which can be applied to spectrograph calibration systems. Our solution uses an integrating sphere in conjunction with a diffuser that is moved rapidly using electrostrictive polymers, and is generally superior to most tested forms of mechanical fiber agitation. We demonstrate a high level of modal noise reduction with a narrow bandwidth 1550 nm laser. Our relatively inexpensive solution immediately enables spectrographs to take advantage of the innate precision of bright state-of-the art calibration sources by removing a major source of systematic noise.

  19. Method for reducing CO2, CO, NOX, and SOx emissions

    DOEpatents

    Lee, James Weifu; Li, Rongfu

    2002-01-01

    Industrial combustion facilities are integrated with greenhouse gas-solidifying fertilizer production reactions so that CO.sub.2, CO, NO.sub.x, and SO.sub.x emissions can be converted prior to emission into carbonate-containing fertilizers, mainly NH.sub.4 HCO.sub.3 and/or (NH.sub.2).sub.2 CO, plus a small fraction of NH.sub.4 NO.sub.3 and (NH.sub.4).sub.2 SO.sub.4. The invention enhances sequestration of CO.sub.2 into soil and the earth subsurface, reduces N0.sub.3.sup.- contamination of surface and groundwater, and stimulates photosynthetic fixation of CO.sub.2 from the atmosphere. The method for converting CO.sub.2, CO, NO.sub.x, and SO.sub.x emissions into fertilizers includes the step of collecting these materials from the emissions of industrial combustion facilities such as fossil fuel-powered energy sources and transporting the emissions to a reactor. In the reactor, the CO.sub.2, CO, N.sub.2, SO.sub.x, and/or NO.sub.x are converted into carbonate-containing fertilizers using H.sub.2, CH.sub.4, or NH.sub.3. The carbonate-containing fertilizers are then applied to soil and green plants to (1) sequester inorganic carbon into soil and subsoil earth layers by enhanced carbonation of groundwater and the earth minerals, (2) reduce the environmental problem of NO.sub.3.sup.- runoff by substituting for ammonium nitrate fertilizer, and (3) stimulate photosynthetic fixation of CO.sub.2 from the atmosphere by the fertilization effect of the carbonate-containing fertilizers.

  20. Time-frequency analysis of transiently evoked otoacoustic emissions of subjects exposed to noise.

    PubMed

    Jedrzejczak, W Wiktor; Blinowska, Katarzyna J; Konopka, Wieslaw

    2005-07-01

    Transiently evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE) were measured from 124 ears from two subject groups: healthy subjects (62 ears), and workers (62 ears) exposed to noise of jet engines. The recordings were analyzed using the method of adaptive approximations based on a matching pursuit (MP) algorithm. The method allows for description of the signal components in terms of their amplitude, frequency, latency, and time-span (or duration). The purpose of this work was to determine the repeatability and usefulness of these parameters in studies of hearing impairment of populations exposed to potentially harmful noise. Good distinction between the two datasets was achieved in all investigated frequency bands when amplitude was used as a discrimination parameter. Also latency was affected in frequency bands starting at 2000 Hz, while the time-span parameter associated with the duration of the waveform was less influenced by noise. PMID:15953533

  1. Temporal phase mask encrypted optical steganography carried by amplified spontaneous emission noise.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ben; Wang, Zhenxing; Shastri, Bhavin J; Chang, Matthew P; Frost, Nicholas A; Prucnal, Paul R

    2014-01-13

    A temporal phase mask encryption method is proposed and experimentally demonstrated to improve the security of the stealth channel in an optical steganography system. The stealth channel is protected in two levels. In the first level, the data is carried by amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) noise, which cannot be detected in either the time domain or spectral domain. In the second level, even if the eavesdropper suspects the existence of the stealth channel, each data bit is covered by a fast changing phase mask. The phase mask code is always combined with the wide band noise from ASE. Without knowing the right phase mask code to recover the stealth data, the eavesdropper can only receive the noise like signal with randomized phase. PMID:24515055

  2. Global cost estimates of reducing carbon emissions through avoided deforestation

    PubMed Central

    Kindermann, Georg; Obersteiner, Michael; Sohngen, Brent; Sathaye, Jayant; Andrasko, Kenneth; Rametsteiner, Ewald; Schlamadinger, Bernhard; Wunder, Sven; Beach, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Tropical deforestation is estimated to cause about one-quarter of anthropogenic carbon emissions, loss of biodiversity, and other environmental services. United Nations Framework Convention for Climate Change talks are now considering mechanisms for avoiding deforestation (AD), but the economic potential of AD has yet to be addressed. We use three economic models of global land use and management to analyze the potential contribution of AD activities to reduced greenhouse gas emissions. AD activities are found to be a competitive, low-cost abatement option. A program providing a 10% reduction in deforestation from 2005 to 2030 could provide 0.3–0.6 Gt (1 Gt = 1 × 105 g) CO2·yr−1 in emission reductions and would require $0.4 billion to $1.7 billion·yr−1 for 30 years. A 50% reduction in deforestation from 2005 to 2030 could provide 1.5–2.7 Gt CO2·yr−1 in emission reductions and would require $17.2 billion to $28.0 billion·yr−1. Finally, some caveats to the analysis that could increase costs of AD programs are described. PMID:18650377

  3. Exercise based transportation reduces oil consumption and carbon emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, P. A.

    2004-12-01

    Current abuse and misrepresentation of science hinders society's ability to address climate change. Scientific abuse results, in part, from a widespread perception that curbing emissions will require substantial economic, political, or personal sacrifice. Here I provide one example to illustrate that this perception is false. Simply walking or biking the amount recommended for a healthy lifestyle could reduce carbon emissions up to 11 percent if the distances traveled were substituted for car travel. This level of exercise is also sufficient to eliminate obese and overweight conditions in a few years without draconian diet plans. A reduction in carbon dioxide emissions of roughly 35 percent is possible if the revenue saved through decreased health care spending on obesity is redirected toward carbon abatement. This emissions reduction far exceeds that required by the Kyoto Protocol at no net cost. Finally, widespread substitution of driving with distances traveled during recommended daily exercise would considerably ease societal dependence on oil, which leads not only to climate change but also to air pollution, political and economic instability and habitat degradation. Thus, exercise based transportation constitutes a potentially favorable alternative to the energy and diet plans that are currently under consideration and a substantial step toward dealing with the threat of climate change.

  4. Predictors of hearing threshold levels and distortion product otoacoustic emissions among noise exposed young adults

    PubMed Central

    Seixas, N; Kujawa, S; Norton, S; Sheppard, L; Neitzel, R; Slee, A

    2004-01-01

    Aim: To examine the relations between noise exposure and other risk factors with hearing function as measured by audiometric thresholds and distortion product otoacoustic emissions. Methods: A total of 456 subjects were studied (393 apprentices in construction trades and 63 graduate students). Hearing and peripheral auditory function were quantified using standard, automated threshold audiometry, tympanometry, and distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs). The analysis addressed relations of noise exposure history and other risk factors with hearing threshold levels (HTLs) and DPOAEs at the baseline test for the cohort. Results: The cohort had a mean age of 27 (7) years. The construction apprentices reported more noise exposure than students in both their occupational and non-occupational exposure histories. A strong effect of age and years of work in construction was observed at 4, 6, and 8 kHz for both HTLs and DPOAEs. Each year of construction work reported prior to baseline was associated with a 0.7 dB increase in HTL or 0.2 dB decrease DPOAE amplitude. Overall, there was a very similar pattern of effects between the HTLs and DPOAEs. Conclusions: This analysis shows a relatively good correspondence between the associations of noise exposures and other risk factors with DPOAEs and the associations observed with pure-tone audiometric thresholds in a young adult working population. The results provide further evidence that DPOAEs can be used to assess damage to hearing from a variety of exposures including noise. Clarifying advantages of DPOAEs or HTLs in terms of sensitivity to early manifestations of noise insults, or their utility in predicting future loss in hearing will require longitudinal follow up. PMID:15477283

  5. Reduced emissions from inexpensive high-sulphur coal briquettes

    SciTech Connect

    Gammage, R.B.; Wachter, E.A.; Wade, J.; Wilson, D.L.; Haas, J.W. ); Ahmad, N.; Siltain, F.; Raza, M.Z. )

    1992-01-01

    Airborne emissions were measured during the combustion of Pakistani high-sulphur coal, cold briquetted with lime and clay; comparison was made to emissions from raw coal and traditional fuels burnt in a native, mud-lined Angethi stove. Compared to raw coal, the amended coal gave fourfold reduced emission of respirable-size particles (RSP) and threefold reduced total releases of SO[sub 2]. In domestic cooking, substitution of the amended coal briquettes for traditional fuels will not worsen indoor air quality with respect to CO, SO[sub 2], NO[sub x], and RSP. The high peak amounts of CO (100--250 ppm), SO[sub 2] (2--5 ppm), and NO[sub x] (1--5 ppm) were limited to the early phase of burning. The high thermal value of the coal briquettes together with a simple briquetting technology, make this fuel an attractive energy alternative in countries that are underdeveloped, developing, or experiencing major restructuring.

  6. Reduced emissions from inexpensive high-sulphur coal briquettes

    SciTech Connect

    Gammage, R.B.; Wachter, E.A.; Wade, J.; Wilson, D.L.; Haas, J.W.; Ahmad, N.; Siltain, F.; Raza, M.Z.

    1992-12-01

    Airborne emissions were measured during the combustion of Pakistani high-sulphur coal, cold briquetted with lime and clay; comparison was made to emissions from raw coal and traditional fuels burnt in a native, mud-lined Angethi stove. Compared to raw coal, the amended coal gave fourfold reduced emission of respirable-size particles (RSP) and threefold reduced total releases of SO{sub 2}. In domestic cooking, substitution of the amended coal briquettes for traditional fuels will not worsen indoor air quality with respect to CO, SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and RSP. The high peak amounts of CO (100--250 ppm), SO{sub 2} (2--5 ppm), and NO{sub x} (1--5 ppm) were limited to the early phase of burning. The high thermal value of the coal briquettes together with a simple briquetting technology, make this fuel an attractive energy alternative in countries that are underdeveloped, developing, or experiencing major restructuring.

  7. Enhanced Thermionic Emission and Low 1/f Noise in Exfoliated Graphene/GaN Schottky Barrier Diode.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashutosh; Kashid, Ranjit; Ghosh, Arindam; Kumar, Vikram; Singh, Rajendra

    2016-03-30

    Temperature-dependent electrical transport characteristics of exfoliated graphene/GaN Schottky diodes are investigated and compared with conventional Ni/GaN Schottky diodes. The ideality factor of graphene/GaN and Ni/GaN diodes are measured to be 1.33 and 1.51, respectively, which is suggestive of comparatively higher thermionic emission current in graphene/GaN diode. The barrier height values for graphene/GaN diode obtained using thermionic emission model and Richardson plots are found to be 0.60 and 0.72 eV, respectively, which are higher than predicted barrier height ∼0.40 eV as per the Schottky-Mott model. The higher barrier height is attributed to hole doping of graphene due to graphene-Au interaction which shifts the Fermi level in graphene by ∼0.3 eV. The magnitude of flicker noise of graphene/GaN Schottky diode increases up to 175 K followed by its decrease at higher temperatures. This indicates that diffusion currents and barrier inhomogeneities dominate the electronic transport at lower and higher temperatures, respectively. The exfoliated graphene/GaN diode is found to have lower level of barrier inhomogeneities than conventional Ni/GaN diode, as well as earlier reported graphene/GaN diode fabricated using chemical vapor deposited graphene. The lesser barrier inhomogeneities in graphene/GaN diode results in lower flicker noise by 2 orders of magnitude as compared to Ni/GaN diode. Enhanced thermionic emission current, lower level of inhomogeneities, and reduced flicker noise suggests that graphene-GaN Schottky diodes may have the underlying trend for replacing metal-GaN Schottky diodes. PMID:26963627

  8. Potential options to reduce GHG emissions in Venezuela

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, N.; Bonduki, Y.; Perdomo, M.

    1996-12-31

    The Government of Venezuela ratified the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in December, 1994. The Convention requires all parties to develop and publish national inventories of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) as well as national plans to reduce or control emissions, taking into account their common but differentiated responsibilities and their specific national and regional development priorities, objectives, and circumstances. Within this context, the Ministry of Environment and Renewable Natural Resources and the Ministry of Energy and Mines developed the `Venezuelan Case-Study to Address Climate Change`. The study was initiated in October 1993, with the financial and technical assistance of the Government of United States, through the U.S. Country Studies Program (USCSP), and the Global Environment Facility (GEF), through the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP).

  9. Reducing cold-start emissions by catalytic converter thermal management

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, S D; Potter, T F; Keyser, M A; Brady, M J; Michaels, K F

    1995-01-01

    Vacuum insulation and phase-change thermal storage have been used to enhance the heat retention of a prototype catalytic converter. Storing heat in the converter between trips allows exhaust gases to be converted more quickly, significantly reducing cold-start emissions. Using a small metal hydride, the thermal conductance of the vacuum insulation can be varied continuously between 0.49 and 27 W/m{sup 2}K (R-12 to R-0.2 insulation) to prevent overheating of the catalyst. A prototype was installed in a Dodge Neon with a 2.0-liter engine. Following a standard preconditioning and a 23-hour cold soak, an FTP (Federal Test Procedure) emissions test was performed. Although exhaust temperatures during the preconditioning were not hot enough to melt the phase-change material, the vacuum insulation performed well, resulting in a converter temperature of 146{degrees}C after the 23-hour cold soak at 27{degrees}C. Compared to the same converter at ambient conditions, overall emissions of CO and HC were reduced by 52 % and 29 %, to 0.27 and 0.037 g/mile, respectively. The maximum converter temperature during the FTP cycle was 720{degrees}C. This limited testing was performed with a nearly-fresh palladium-only catalyst, but demonstrates the potential of this vacuum insulation approach for emissions reduction and thermal control. Further testing is ongoing. An initial assessment of several production issues is made, including high-volume fabrication challenges, durability, and cost.

  10. Immediate and long-term effect of rifle blast noise on transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions.

    PubMed

    Duvdevany, Amnon; Furst, Miriam

    2006-01-01

    Firing noise of small-arms is characterized by a rapid change in pressure and a sharp peak in sound pressure level of 155-170 dB SPL. In the present study, we examined the behavior of transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE) of a group of soldiers exposed initially to the noise of small-arms fire during their basic training. The study included 15 soldiers and lasted 6 months. Measurements were performed before and immediately after two firing sessions, 2 weeks apart, and after 6 months. There was no significant difference between the audiograms that were measured prior to the noise exposure and those measured after 6 months. Wide-band TEOAE levels decreased over time, but the most significant decrease occurred between the two last sessions that were 5.5 months apart. No significant changes in TEOAE levels were observed before and immediately after exposure. However, at the high frequency range, an increase in TEOAE levels was observed in the third session relative to the previous one. During the 2 weeks after the first exposure, the soldiers were not exposed to noise. This TEOAE property might indicate the existence of a protective mechanism in the ear from traumatic harmful noise. PMID:17598308

  11. A research program to reduce interior noise in general aviation airplanes: Noise reduction through a cavity-backed flexible plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roskam, J.; Vandam, C. P. G.

    1978-01-01

    A prediction method is reported for noise reduction through a cavity-backed panel. The analysis takes into account only cavity modes in one direction. The results of this analysis were to find the effect of acoustic stiffness of a backing cavity on the panel behavior. The resulting changes in the noise reduction through the panel are significant.

  12. Emission of reduced malodorous sulfur gases from wastewater treatment plants

    SciTech Connect

    Devai, I.; DeLaune, R.D.

    1999-03-01

    The emission of malodorous gaseous compounds from wastewater collection and treatment facilities is a growing maintenance and environmental problem. Numerous gaseous compounds with low odor detection thresholds are emitted from these facilities. Sulfur-bearing gases represent compounds with the lowest odor detection threshold. Using solid adsorbent preconcentration and gas chromatographic methods, the quantity and composition of reduced malodorous sulfur gases emitted from various steps of the treatment process were determined in wastewater treatment plants in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Hydrogen sulfide, which is a malodorous, corrosive, and potentially toxic gas, was the most dominant volatile reduced sulfur (S) compound measured. Concentrations were not only more than the odor detection threshold of hydrogen sulfide, but above levels that may affect health during long-term exposure. The concentrations of methanethiol, dimethyl sulfide, carbon disulfide, and carbonyl sulfide were significantly less than hydrogen sulfide. However, even though emissions of reduced sulfur gases other than hydrogen sulfide were low, previous studies suggested that long-term exposure to such levels may cause respiratory problems and other symptoms.

  13. Nutrient-Enhanced Diet Reduces Noise-Induced Damage to the Inner Ear and Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Le Prell, C. G.; Gagnon, P. M; Bennett, D. C.; Ohlemiller, K. K.

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been broadly implicated as a cause of cell death and neural degeneration in multiple disease conditions; however, the evidence for successful intervention with dietary antioxidant manipulations has been mixed. In this study, we investigated the potential for protection of cells in the inner ear using a dietary supplement with multiple antioxidant components, selected for their potential interactive effectiveness. Protection against permanent threshold shift (PTS) was observed in CBA/J mice maintained on a diet supplemented with a combination of β-carotene, vitamins C and E, and magnesium when compared to PTS in control mice maintained on a nutritionally complete control diet. Although hair cell survival was not enhanced, noise-induced loss of Type II fibrocytes in the lateral wall was significantly reduced (p<0.05), and there was a trend towards less noise-induced loss in strial cell density in animals maintained on the supplemented diet. Taken together, our data suggest that pre-noise oral treatment with the high-nutrient diet can protect cells in the inner ear and reduce PTS in mice. Demonstration of functional and morphological preservation of cells in the inner ear with oral administration of this antioxidant supplemented diet supports the possibility of translation to human patients, and suggests an opportunity to evaluate antioxidant protection in mouse models of oxidative stress-related disease and pathology. PMID:21708355

  14. On Certain New Methodology for Reducing Sensor and Readout Electronics Circuitry Noise in Digital Domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kizhner, Semion; Miko, Joseph; Bradley, Damon; Heinzen, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    NASA Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and upcoming cosmology science missions carry instruments with multiple focal planes populated with many large sensor detector arrays. These sensors are passively cooled to low temperatures for low-level light (L3) and near-infrared (NIR) signal detection, and the sensor readout electronics circuitry must perform at extremely low noise levels to enable new required science measurements. Because we are at the technological edge of enhanced performance for sensors and readout electronics circuitry, as determined by thermal noise level at given temperature in analog domain, we must find new ways of further compensating for the noise in the signal digital domain. To facilitate this new approach, state-of-the-art sensors are augmented at their array hardware boundaries by non-illuminated reference pixels, which can be used to reduce noise attributed to sensors. There are a few proposed methodologies of processing in the digital domain the information carried by reference pixels, as employed by the Hubble Space Telescope and the James Webb Space Telescope Projects. These methods involve using spatial and temporal statistical parameters derived from boundary reference pixel information to enhance the active (non-reference) pixel signals. To make a step beyond this heritage methodology, we apply the NASA-developed technology known as the Hilbert- Huang Transform Data Processing System (HHT-DPS) for reference pixel information processing and its utilization in reconfigurable hardware on-board a spaceflight instrument or post-processing on the ground. The methodology examines signal processing for a 2-D domain, in which high-variance components of the thermal noise are carried by both active and reference pixels, similar to that in processing of low-voltage differential signals and subtraction of a single analog reference pixel from all active pixels on the sensor. Heritage methods using the aforementioned statistical parameters in the

  15. Reducing audible noise for distribution transformer with HB1 amorphous core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yeong-Hwa; Hsu, Chang-Hung; Lin, Hung-Wei; Tseng, Ching-Pei

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, the way to reduce the audible noise of a distribution transformer is presented by incorporating a newly developed transformer core and a rigid-structure tank. The vibrations related tothe core structure and tank frame are considered, so that a distribution transformer with accelerometers mounted on the internal core and external tank, respectively, is addressed. In practice, the core with a new joint structure and the tank with a strong rigid-frame (H-type) are applied to a single-phase amorphous HB1-cored transformer with capacity 167 kVA for performance verification. Finally, a personal computer-based data acquisition platform is setup for signal measurement and processing. Experimental results demonstrate that the HB1 amorphous-cored transformer with the proposed core joint and rigid-structure tank can be performed well in the aspect of audible noise reduction.

  16. A numerical method for reducing the random noise in a two-dimensional waveform

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, A.J.

    1991-01-23

    This invention is comprised of a method for reducing random noise in a two-dimensional waveform having an irregular curvature includes the steps of selecting a plurality of points initially positioned at preselected locations on the waveform. For each point selected, the straight line is found which connects it to the midpoint between its neighboring points. A new location for the point is calculated to lie on the straight line a fraction of the distance between the initial location of the point and the midpoint. This process is repeated for each point positioned on the waveform. After a single iteration of the method is completed, the entire process is repeated a predetermined number of times to identify final calculated locations for the plurality of points selected. The final calculated locations of the points are then connected to form a relatively random noise-free waveform having a substantially smooth curvature.

  17. Enhanced field emission from reduced graphene oxide polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Viskadouros, Georgios M; Stylianakis, Minas M; Kymakis, Emmanuel; Stratakis, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Results on electron field emission (FE) from reduced graphene oxide (rGO):poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) composite layers are presented. Three different FE cathodes were tested and compared: rGO layers on (a) n(+)-Si, (b) composite films with different rGO:P3HT ratios, (c) rGO layers on composite films with different rGO:P3HT ratios. Experiments show that there is a critical rGO:P3HT ratio in which the field-emission performance is remarkably improved. Notably, such performance is always superior to that of the optimum rGO/n(+)-Si cathode. On the contrary, it is inferior to that attained upon deposition of a second rGO layer on top of the rGO:P3HT composite showed the best FE performance that showed turn-on field of as low as ~0.9 V/μm and field enhancement factor of ~1900. The contributions of the composite film morphology as well as the role of rGO sheet-substrate interaction on the emission performance are evaluated and discussed. PMID:24320752

  18. Theory of Light Emission from Quantum Noise in Plasmonic Contacts: Above-Threshold Emission from Higher-Order Electron-Plasmon Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaasbjerg, Kristen; Nitzan, Abraham

    2015-03-01

    We develop a theoretical framework for the description of light emission from plasmonic contacts based on the nonequilibrium Green function formalism. Our theory establishes a fundamental link between the finite-frequency quantum noise and ac conductance of the contact and the light emission. Calculating the quantum noise to higher orders in the electron-plasmon interaction, we identify a plasmon-induced electron-electron interaction as the source of experimentally observed above-threshold light emission from biased STM contacts. Our findings provide important insight into the effect of interactions on the light emission from atomic-scale contacts.

  19. Reducing GHG emissions in the United States' transportation sector

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Sujit; Andress, David A; Nguyen, Tien

    2011-01-01

    Reducing GHG emissions in the U.S. transportation sector requires both the use of highly efficient propulsion systems and low carbon fuels. This study compares reduction potentials that might be achieved in 2060 for several advanced options including biofuels, hybrid electric vehicles (HEV), plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV), and fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEV), assuming that technical and cost reduction targets are met and necessary fueling infrastructures are built. The study quantifies the extent of the reductions that can be achieved through increasing engine efficiency and transitioning to low-carbon fuels separately. Decarbonizing the fuels is essential for achieving large reductions in GHG emissions, and the study quantifies the reductions that can be achieved over a range of fuel carbon intensities. Although renewables will play a vital role, some combination of coal gasification with carbon capture and sequestration, and/or nuclear energy will likely be needed to enable very large reductions in carbon intensities for hydrogen and electricity. Biomass supply constraints do not allow major carbon emission reductions from biofuels alone; the value of biomass is that it can be combined with other solutions to help achieve significant results. Compared with gasoline, natural gas provides 20% reduction in GHG emissions in internal combustion engines and up to 50% reduction when used as a feedstock for producing hydrogen or electricity, making it a good transition fuel for electric propulsion drive trains. The material in this paper can be useful information to many other countries, including developing countries because of a common factor: the difficulty of finding sustainable, low-carbon, cost-competitive substitutes for petroleum fuels.

  20. Inverting seismic noise cross-correlations for noise source distribution: A step towards reducing source-induced bias in seismic noise interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermert, Laura; Afanasiev, Michael; Sager, Korbinian; Gokhberg, Alexey; Fichtner, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    We report on the ongoing development of a new inversion method for the space- and time-dependent power spectral density distribution of ambient seismic noise sources. The method, once complete, will mainly serve two purposes: First, it will allow us to construct more realistic forward models for noise cross-correlation waveforms, thereby opening new possibilities for waveform imaging by ambient noise tomography. Second, it may provide new insights about the properties of ambient noise sources, complementing studies based on beamforming or numerical modeling of noise based on oceanographic observations. To invert for noise sources, we consider surface wave signal energy measurements on the 'causal' (station A to B) and on the 'acausal' (station B to A) correlation branch, and the ratio between them. These and similar measurements have proven useful for locating noise sources using cross-correlations in several past studies. The inversion procedure is the following: We construct correlation forward models based on Green's functions from a spectral element wave propagation code. To construct these models efficiently, we use source-receiver reciprocity and assume spatial uncorrelation of noise sources. In such a setting, correlations can be calculated from a pre-computed set of Green's functions between the seismic receivers and sources located at the Earth's surface. We then calculate spatial sensitivity kernels for the noise source distribution with respect to the correlation signal energy measurements. These in turn allow us to construct a misfit gradient and optimize the source distribution model to fit our observed cross-correlation signal energies or energy ratios. We will present the workflow for calculation of the forward model and sensitivity kernels, as well as results for both forward modeling and kernels for an example data set of long-period noise or 'hum' at a global scale. We will also provide an outlook on the noise source inversion considering the

  1. Noise-induced coherence and network oscillations in a reduced bursting model.

    PubMed

    Reinker, Stefan; Li, Yue-Xian; Kuske, Rachel

    2006-08-01

    The dynamics of the Hindmarsh-Rose (HR) model of bursting thalamic neurons is reduced to a system of two linear differential equations that retains the subthreshold resonance properties of the HR model. Introducing a reset mechanism after a threshold crossing, we turn this system into a resonant integrate-and-fire (RIF) model. Using Monte-Carlo simulations and mathematical analysis, we examine the effects of noise and the subthreshold dynamic properties of the RIF model on the occurrence of coherence resonance (CR). Synchronized burst firing occurs in a network of such model neurons with excitatory pulse-coupling. The coherence level of the network oscillations shows a stochastic resonance-like dependence on the noise level. Stochastic analysis of the equations shows that the slow recovery from the spike-induced inhibition is crucial in determining the frequencies of the CR and the subthreshold resonance in the original HR model. In this particular type of CR, the oscillation frequency strongly depends on the intrinsic time scales but changes little with the noise intensity. We give analytical quantities to describe this CR mechanism and illustrate its influence on the emerging network oscillations. We discuss the profound physiological roles this kind of CR may have in information processing in neurons possessing a subthreshold resonant frequency and in generating synchronized network oscillations with a frequency that is determined by intrinsic properties of the neurons. PMID:17149822

  2. Reduced noise susceptibility in littermate offspring from heterozygous animals of the German waltzing guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Skjönsberg, Åsa; Mannström, Paula

    2015-07-01

    The German waltzing guinea pig is a spontaneously mutated strain with severe auditory and vestibular impairment caused by a so far unknown genetic mutation. The animals are born deaf and show a circling behavior. The heterozygote animals of this guinea pig strain have functionally normal hearing and balance. However, these animals have, in earlier studies, shown an increased resistance to noise compared with normal wild-type guinea pigs. In the present study, we explored the functional hearing with auditory brainstem response thresholds before and at different time points after noise exposure. Symptom-free littermates from heterozygote couples of the German waltzing guinea pigs were exclusively used for the study, which, after the hearing test, were sent back for breeding to confirm their genotype (i.e. heterozygote or normal). The aim of this paper was to ascertain that the previously shown reduced susceptibility to noise trauma in the heterozygote animals of the German waltzing guinea pig was also evident when littermates were used as control animals. The findings are important for further analysis of the heterozygote animals of this strain and for future investigations of the underlying mechanisms behind the diverse susceptibility to exposures of loud sound. PMID:26053702

  3. Nonspecific transcription factor binding can reduce noise in the expression of downstream proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltani, M.; Bokes, P.; Fox, Z.; Singh, A.

    2015-10-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) interact with a multitude of binding sites on DNA and partner proteins inside cells. We investigate how nonspecific binding/unbinding to such decoy binding sites affects the magnitude and time-scale of random fluctuations in TF copy numbers arising from stochastic gene expression. A stochastic model of TF gene expression, together with decoy site interactions is formulated. Distributions for the total (bound and unbound) and free (unbound) TF levels are derived by analytically solving the chemical master equation under physiologically relevant assumptions. Our results show that increasing the number of decoy binding sides considerably reduces stochasticity in free TF copy numbers. The TF autocorrelation function reveals that decoy sites can either enhance or shorten the time-scale of TF fluctuations depending on model parameters. To understand how noise in TF abundances propagates downstream, a TF target gene is included in the model. Intriguingly, we find that noise in the expression of the target gene decreases with increasing decoy sites for linear TF-target protein dose-responses, even in regimes where decoy sites enhance TF autocorrelation times. Moreover, counterintuitive noise transmissions arise for nonlinear dose-responses. In summary, our study highlights the critical role of molecular sequestration by decoy binding sites in regulating the stochastic dynamics of TFs and target proteins at the single-cell level.

  4. Detecting incipient inner-ear damage from impulse noise with otoacoustic emissions.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Lynne; Lapsley Miller, Judi A; Heller, Laurie M; Wolgemuth, Keith S; Hughes, Linda M; Smith, Shelley D; Kopke, Richard D

    2009-02-01

    Audiometric thresholds and otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) were measured in 285 U.S. Marine Corps recruits before and three weeks after exposure to impulse-noise sources from weapons' fire and simulated artillery, and in 32 non-noise-exposed controls. At pre-test, audiometric thresholds for all ears were noise-exposed volunteers with complete data sets for both ears showed significant decreases in OAE amplitude but no change in audiometric thresholds. STSs and significant emission shifts (SESs) between 2 and 4 kHz in individual ears were identified using criteria based on the standard error of measurement from the control group. There was essentially no association between the occurrence of STS and SES. There were more SESs than STSs, and the group of SES ears had more STS ears than the group of no-SES ears. The increased sensitivity of OAEs in comparison to audiometric thresholds was shown in all analyses, and low-level OAEs indicate an increased risk of future hearing loss by as much as ninefold. PMID:19206875

  5. Improving patients' sleep: reducing light and noise levels on wards at night.

    PubMed

    Hewart, Carol; Fethney, Loveday

    2016-02-01

    There is much research concerning the psychological and physical effects of sleep deprivation on patients in healthcare systems, yet interrupted sleep on hospital wards at night remains a problem. Staff at Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Devon, wanted to identify the factors that prevent patients from sleeping well at night. Two audits were carried out, between April and August 2015, to assess noise and light levels on wards at night, and to engage nurses in ways of reducing these. A number of recommendations were made based on the audit findings, many of which have been put into practice. PMID:26938911

  6. The effect of longitudinal noise exposure on behavioral audiograms and transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions.

    PubMed

    Duvdevany, Amnon; Furst, Miriam

    2007-03-01

    The ear vulnerability of a group of combat soldiers was tested. The study initially included 84 soldiers and lasted two years. The soldiers were exposed to the noise of small-arms fire. Measurements included transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE) and pure-tone audiometry. Measurements, initially performed prior to the soldiers' basic training, were repeated several times during the study. In general, TEOAE levels (Em) decreased over time. About 57% of the ears developed a slight hearing loss (SHL) after two years of noise exposure. We define SHL as a threshold shift of 10 dB or greater, in at least at one of the audiometric frequencies 1000, 2000, 3000, 4000, or 6000 Hz. About 63% of the tested ears that had medium TEOAE level (1noise exposure, developed SHL. On the other hand, among the ears whose Em were either very low (Em< or =1 dB SPL) or very high (Em> or =8 dB SPL), less than 30% developed SHL. We suggest a prediction for ear vulnerability on the basis of Em prior to noise exposure. PMID:17365065

  7. Reducing Radiation Dose in Coronary Angiography and Angioplasty Using Image Noise Reduction Technology.

    PubMed

    Kastrati, Mirlind; Langenbrink, Lukas; Piatkowski, Michal; Michaelsen, Jochen; Reimann, Doris; Hoffmann, Rainer

    2016-08-01

    This study sought to quantitatively evaluate the reduction of radiation dose in coronary angiography and angioplasty with the use of image noise reduction technology in a routine clinical setting. Radiation dose data from consecutive 605 coronary procedures (397 consecutive coronary angiograms and 208 consecutive coronary interventions) performed from October 2014 to April 2015 on a coronary angiography system with noise reduction technology (Allura Clarity IQ) were collected. For comparison, radiation dose data from consecutive 695 coronary procedures (435 coronary angiograms and 260 coronary interventions) performed on a conventional coronary angiography system from October 2013 to April 2014 were evaluated. Patient radiation dosage was evaluated based on the cumulative dose area product. Operators and operator practice did not change between the 2 evaluated periods. Patient characteristics were collected to evaluate similarity of patient groups. Image quality was evaluated on a 5-grade scale in 30 patients of each group. There were no significant differences between the 2 evaluated groups in gender, age, weight, and fluoroscopy time (6.8 ± 6.1 vs 6.9 ± 6.3 minutes, not significant). The dose area product was reduced from 3195 ± 2359 to 983 ± 972 cGycm(2) (65%, p <0.001) in coronary angiograms and from 7123 ± 4551 to 2431 ± 1788 cGycm(2) (69%, p <0.001) in coronary interventions using the new noise reduction technology. Image quality was graded as similar between the evaluated systems (4.0 ± 0.7 vs 4.2 ± 0.6, not significant). In conclusion, a new x-ray technology with image noise reduction algorithm provides a substantial reduction in radiation exposure without the need to prolong the procedure or fluoroscopy time. PMID:27344273

  8. Selective attention reduces physiological noise in the external ear canals of humans. II: visual attention.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Kyle P; Pasanen, Edward G; McFadden, Dennis

    2014-06-01

    Human subjects performed in several behavioral conditions requiring, or not requiring, selective attention to visual stimuli. Specifically, the attentional task was to recognize strings of digits that had been presented visually. A nonlinear version of the stimulus-frequency otoacoustic emission (SFOAE), called the nSFOAE, was collected during the visual presentation of the digits. The segment of the physiological response discussed here occurred during brief silent periods immediately following the SFOAE-evoking stimuli. For all subjects tested, the physiological-noise magnitudes were substantially weaker (less noisy) during the tasks requiring the most visual attention. Effect sizes for the differences were >2.0. Our interpretation is that cortico-olivo influences adjusted the magnitude of efferent activation during the SFOAE-evoking stimulation depending upon the attention task in effect, and then that magnitude of efferent activation persisted throughout the silent period where it also modulated the physiological noise present. Because the results were highly similar to those obtained when the behavioral conditions involved auditory attention, similar mechanisms appear to operate both across modalities and within modalities. Supplementary measurements revealed that the efferent activation was spectrally global, as it was for auditory attention. PMID:24732070

  9. Reducing uncertainty in methane emission estimates from permafrost peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Torben R.

    2016-04-01

    Reducing uncertainty in methane emission estimates from permafrost peatlands Torben R. Christensen1,2 and coworkers 1) Department of Physical Geography and Ecosystem Science, Lund University, Sweden 2) Arctic Research Centre, Aarhus University, Denmark Depending on factors including temperature, snow duration and soil moisture conditions, emissions of the greenhouse gas methane from permafrost peatlands can vary by factors of 2-4 between years. This variability is clear in atmospheric measurements of the gas, but a lack of ground-based data is making it hard to locate the methane sources responsible. Methane monitoring in the Arctic is expensive, requiring sophisticated analysis equipment such as power requiring laser spectrometer analysis made in remote places. This also puts demands on the logistics where infrastructures and field stations that offer line-power in the field are in high demand but very rarely found. Research projects therefore typically focus on one site, and run for a year or two. Longer term monitoring programs, which document climate, hydrology, phenology and population dynamics of birds and mammals, rarely include carbon fluxes since it is technically challenging to measure. One that does is the Greenland Ecosystem Monitoring program that started at the Zackenberg research station, which has recorded substantial methane flux variations for almost a decade in North-east Greenland. Such multi-year studies show that, while there is some connection between the amounts of methane released from one year to the next, accurate forecasting is difficult. They also highlight the importance of extending monitoring beyond the growing period into the frozen season, both in spring and autumn. A spatially distributed network of long-term monitoring stations in the Arctic, with consistency between measurements, is badly needed to improve this situation. Productive methane 'hot spots', many sporadic, have also been identified in recent studies. By ventilating

  10. Reducing CO2 Emissions through Lightweight Design and Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carruth, Mark A.; Allwood, Julian M.; Milford, Rachel L.

    2011-05-01

    To meet targeted 50% reductions in industrial CO2 emissions by 2050, demand for steel and aluminium must be cut. Many steel and aluminium products include redundant material, and the manufacturing routes to produce them use more material than is necessary. Lightweight design and optimized manufacturing processes offer a means of demand reduction, whilst creating products to perform the same service as existing ones. This paper examines two strategies for demand reduction: lightweight product design; and minimizing yield losses through the product supply chain. Possible mass savings are estimated for specific case-studies on metal-intensive products, such as I-beams and food cans. These estimates are then extrapolated to other sectors to produce a global estimate for possible demand reductions. Results show that lightweight product design may offer potential mass savings of up to 30% for some products, whilst yield in the production of others could be improved by over 20%. If these two strategies could be combined for all products, global demand for steel and aluminium would be reduced by nearly 50%. The impact of demand reduction on CO2 emissions is presented, and barriers to the adoption of new, lightweight technologies are discussed.

  11. Method for reducing emissions utilizing pre-atomized fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, M.E.; Hrebenar, K.R.; Deal, J.F. III; Bolden, P.L. Jr.

    1987-05-19

    A method is described for reducing particulate emissions during combustion of a hydrocarbon with API gravity of about 20/sup 0/ API or less, viscosity of about 40,000 centipoise at 122/sup 0/F, paraffin content of about 50% by weight or less, aromatic content of about 15% by weight or greater, and asphaltene content of about 50% by weight or greater. The method comprises: emulsifying such hydrocarbon to form a hydrocarbon-in-water emulsion having a hydrocarbon water ratio from about 60:40 to about 90:10 by volume and in which emulsion the hydrocarbon has a particle size predominantly of about 50 microns in diameter or less; preheating such hydrocarbon-in-water emulsion prior to combustion; and burning such hydrocarbon-in-water emulsion.

  12. Nutrient-enhanced diet reduces noise-induced damage to the inner ear and hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Le Prell, Colleen G; Gagnon, Patricia M; Bennett, David C; Ohlemiller, Kevin K

    2011-07-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated broadly as a cause of cell death and neural degeneration in multiple disease conditions; however, the evidence for successful intervention with dietary antioxidant manipulations has been mixed. In this study, we investigated the potential for protection of cells in the inner ear using a dietary supplement with multiple antioxidant components, which were selected for their potential interactive effectiveness. Protection against permanent threshold shift (PTS) was observed in CBA/J mice maintained on a diet supplemented with a combination of β-carotene, vitamins C and E, and magnesium when compared with PTS in control mice maintained on a nutritionally complete control diet. Although hair cell survival was not enhanced, noise-induced loss of type II fibrocytes in the lateral wall was significantly reduced (P < 0.05), and there was a trend toward less noise-induced loss in strial cell density in animals maintained on the supplemented diet. Taken together, our data suggest that prenoise oral treatment with the high-nutrient diet can protect cells in the inner ear and reduce PTS in mice. The demonstration of functional and morphologic preservation of cells in the inner ear with oral administration of this antioxidant supplemented diet supports the possibility of translation to human patients and suggests an opportunity to evaluate antioxidant protection in mouse models of oxidative stress-related disease and pathology. PMID:21708355

  13. Reduced choice-related activity and correlated noise accompany perceptual deficits following unilateral vestibular lesion

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sheng; Dickman, J. David; Newlands, Shawn D.; DeAngelis, Gregory C.; Angelaki, Dora E.

    2013-01-01

    Signals from the bilateral vestibular labyrinths work in tandem to generate robust estimates of our motion and orientation in the world. The relative contributions of each labyrinth to behavior, as well as how the brain recovers after unilateral peripheral damage, have been characterized for motor reflexes, but never for perceptual functions. Here we measure perceptual deficits in a heading discrimination task following surgical ablation of the neurosensory epithelium in one labyrinth. We found large increases in heading discrimination thresholds and large perceptual biases at 1 wk postlesion. Repeated testing thereafter improved heading perception, but vestibular discrimination thresholds remained elevated 3 mo postlesion. Electrophysiological recordings from the contralateral vestibular and cerebellar nuclei revealed elevated neuronal discrimination thresholds, elevated neurometric-to-psychometric threshold ratios, and reduced trial-by-trial correlations with perceptual decisions [“choice probabilities” (CPs)]. The relationship between CP and neuronal threshold was shallower, but not significantly altered, suggesting that smaller CPs in lesioned animals could be largely attributable to greater neuronal thresholds. Simultaneous recordings from pairs of neurons revealed that correlated noise among neurons was also reduced following the lesion. Simulations of a simple pooling model, which takes into account the observed changes in tuning slope and correlated noise, qualitatively accounts for the elevated psychophysical thresholds and neurometric-to-psychometric ratios, as well as the decreased CPs. Thus, cross-labyrinthine interactions appear to play important roles in enhancing neuronal and perceptual sensitivity, strengthening interneuronal correlations, and facilitating correlations between neural activity and perceptual decisions. PMID:24127575

  14. Reducing Uncertainty in Methane Emission Estimates from Permafrost Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, T. R.; Mastepanov, M.; Lund, M.; Tamstorf, M. P.; Parmentier, F. J. W.; Rysgård, S.; Lilienthal, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    emissions are of a scale that still is in need of being reconciled with the atmospheric record. This presentation will give an overview of novel approaches including robot techniques ground-, boat- and airborne-based to reduce uncertainty in particular in relation to these 'hot spot' emissions.

  15. Reducing the Read Noise of H2RG Detector Arrays by more Efficient use of Reference Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauscher, Bernard J.; Arendt, Richard G.; Fixen, D. J.; Lindler, Don; Loose, Markus; Moseley, S. H.; Wilson, D. V.

    2011-01-01

    We present a process for characterizing the correlation properties of the noise in large two-dimensional detector arrays, and describe an efficient process for its removal. In the case of the 2k x 2k HAWAII-2RG detectors (H2RG) detectors from Teledyne which are being used on the Near Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), we find that we can reduce the read noise by thirty percent. Noise on large spatial scales is dramatically reduced. With this relatively simple process, we provide a performance improvement that is equivalent to a significant increase in telescope collecting area for high resolution spectroscopy with NIRSpec.

  16. Noise reduction of a table saw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, John

    2002-05-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) is sponsoring a design project to address the noise levels that commonly exist at construction worksites. Through engineering control, the problem of noise emission from a table saw will be addressed. The noise emitting sources will be pinpointed using a sound pressure level meter. With this knowledge, the next step will be to reduce the sound pressure levels at the noise sources. This will be done by using noise reduction techniques such as insulation, and vibration dampening. The goal is to reduce the noise emission to a level between 85 and 90 dB(A).

  17. Effect of discharge duct geometry on centrifugal fan performance and noise emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, David A.; Butrymowicz, William; Thomas, Christopher

    2005-09-01

    Non-ideal inlet and discharge duct geometries can cause significant changes to both the aerodynamic performance (``fan curve'') and specific sound power emission of a fan. A proper understanding of actual installed performance, as well as a good estimate of the system backpressure curve, is critical to achieving flow and acoustic goals as well as other criteria such as power consumption, mass and volume. To this end a battery of ISO 10302 tests was performed on a blower assembly which supports the Advanced Animal Habitat, being developed by ORBITEC for deployment on the International Space Station. The blower assembly consists of (4) identical centrifugal fans that, amongst themselves and across two prototypes, incorporated several discharge geometries. The inlet geometries were identical in all cases. Thus by comparing the dimensionless pressure-flow and noise emission characteristics across the cases, significant insight into the nature and potential magnitude of these effects is gained.

  18. Influence of sound-conditioning on noise-induced susceptibility of distortion-product otoacoustic emissions.

    PubMed

    Luebke, Anne E; Stagner, Barden B; Martin, Glen K; Lonsbury-Martin, Brenda L

    2015-07-01

    Cochlear damage caused by loud sounds can be attenuated by "sound-conditioning" methods. The amount of adaptation for distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) measured in alert rabbits previously predicted an ear's susceptibility to a subsequent noise exposure. The present study investigated if sound-conditioning influenced the robustness of such DPOAE adaptation, and if such conditioning elicited more protection by increasing the amount of DPOAE adaptation. Toward this end, rabbits were divided into two study groups: (1) experimental animals exposed to a sound-conditioning protocol, and (2) unconditioned control animals. After base-line measures, all rabbits were exposed to an overstimulation paradigm consisting of an octave band noise, and then re-assessed 3 weeks post-exposure to determine permanent changes in DPOAEs. A major result was that prior sound-conditioning protected reductions in DPOAE levels by an average of 10-15 dB. However, DPOAE adaptation decreased with sound-conditioning, so that such conditioning was no longer related to noise-induced reductions in DPOAEs. Together, these findings suggest that sound-conditioning affected neural pathways other than those that likely mediate DPOAE adaptation (e.g., medial olivocochlear efferent and/or middle-ear muscle reflexes). PMID:26233006

  19. Environmentally Responsible Aviation: Propulsion Research to Enable Fuel Burn, Noise and Emissions Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Zante, Dale; Suder, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) program is maturing technologies to enable simultaneous reduction of fuel burn, noise and emissions from an aircraft engine system. Three engine related Integrated Technology Demonstrations (ITDs) have been completed at Glenn Research Center in collaboration with Pratt Whitney, General Electric and the Federal Aviation Administration. The engine technologies being matured are: a low NOx, fuel flexible combustor in partnership with Pratt Whitney; an ultra-high bypass, ducted propulsor system in partnership with Pratt Whitney and FAA; and high pressure ratio, front-stage core compressor technology in partnership with General Electric. The technical rationale, test configurations and overall results from the test series in each ITD are described. ERA is using system analysis to project the benefits of the ITD technologies on potential aircraft systems in the 2025 timeframe. Data from the ITD experiments were used to guide the system analysis assumptions. Results from the current assessments for fuel burn, noise and oxides of nitrogen emissions are presented.

  20. Environmentally Responsible Aviation: Propulsion Research to Enable Fuel Burn, Noise and Emissions Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Zante, Dale E.; Suder, Kenneth L.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) program is maturing technologies to enable simultaneous reduction of fuel burn, noise and emissions from an aircraft engine system. Three engine related Integrated Technology Demonstrations (ITDs) have been completed at Glenn Research Center in collaboration with Pratt Whitney, General Electric and the Federal Aviation Administration. The engine technologies being matured are a low NOx, fuel flexible combustor in partnership with Pratt Whitney, an ultra-high bypass, ducted propulsor system in partnership with Pratt Whitney FAA and high pressure ratio, front-stage core compressor technology in partnership with General Electric. The technical rationale, test configurations and overall results from the test series in each ITD are described. ERA is using system analysis to project the benefits of the ITD technologies on potential aircraft systems in the 2025 timeframe. Data from the ITD experiments were used to guide the system analysis assumptions. Results from the current assessments for fuel burn, noise and oxides of nitrogen emissions are presented.

  1. Reduced sensitivity to charge noise in semiconductor spin qubits via symmetric operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Matthew

    Gated semiconductor quantum dots controlled with the exchange interaction are attractive candidates for quantum information processing because of their long coherence time and electrical controllability. Exchange is conventionally modulated by detuning the chemical potentials of neighboring dots over a fixed tunnel barrier, an approach whose precision is limited by charge noise. In this talk we demonstrate a ''symmetric'' mode of operation which substantially reduces the sensitivity of exchange operations to gate fluctuations. The method involves biasing a double-dot symmetrically between the charge-state anti-crossings, where the derivative of the exchange energy with respect to gate voltages is minimized. Exchange remains highly tunable by adjusting the tunnel coupling. We propose a metric, insensitivity, to quantify the technique's improvement and find that it increases by at least a factor of five between operating regimes. We also demonstrate a substantial increase in the number of Rabi fringes observed.

  2. Reducing Patient Radiation Dose With Image Noise Reduction Technology in Transcatheter Aortic Valve Procedures.

    PubMed

    Lauterbach, Michael; Hauptmann, Karl Eugen

    2016-03-01

    X-ray radiation exposure is of great concern for patients undergoing structural heart interventions. In addition, a larger group of medical staff is required and exposed to radiation compared with percutaneous coronary interventions. This study aimed at quantifying radiation dose reduction with implementation of specific image noise reduction technology (NRT) in transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) procedures. We retrospectively analyzed 104 consecutive patients with TAVI procedures, 52 patients before and 52 after optimization of x-ray radiation chain, and implementation of NRT. Patients with 1-step TAVI and complex coronary intervention, or complex TAVI procedures, were excluded. Before the procedure, all patients received a multislice computed tomography scan, which was used to size aortic annulus, select the optimal implantation plane, valve type and size, and guide valve implantation using a software tool. Air kerma and kerma-area product were compared in both groups to determine patient radiation dose reduction. Baseline parameters, co-morbidity, or procedural data were comparable between groups. Mean kerma-area product was significantly lower (p <0.001) in the NRT group compared with the standard group (60 ± 39 vs 203 ± 106 Gy × cm(2), p <0.001), which corresponds to a reduction of 70%. Mean air kerma was reduced by 64% (494 ± 360 vs 1,355 ± 657 mGy, p <0.001). In conclusion, using optimized x-ray chain combined with specific image noise reduction technology has the potential to significantly reduce by 2/3 radiation dose in standard TAVI procedures without worsening image quality or prolonging procedure time. PMID:26742472

  3. Grape marc reduces methane emissions when fed to dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Moate, P J; Williams, S R O; Torok, V A; Hannah, M C; Ribaux, B E; Tavendale, M H; Eckard, R J; Jacobs, J L; Auldist, M J; Wales, W J

    2014-01-01

    Grape marc (the skins, seeds, stalk, and stems remaining after grapes have been pressed to make wine) is currently a by-product used as a feed supplement by the dairy and beef industries. Grape marc contains condensed tannins and has high concentrations of crude fat; both these substances can reduce enteric methane (CH4) production when fed to ruminants. This experiment examined the effects of dietary supplementation with either dried, pelleted grape marc or ensiled grape marc on yield and composition of milk, enteric CH4 emissions, and ruminal microbiota in dairy cows. Thirty-two Holstein dairy cows in late lactation were offered 1 of 3 diets: a control (CON) diet; a diet containing dried, pelleted grape marc (DGM); and a diet containing ensiled grape marc (EGM). The diet offered to cows in the CON group contained 14.0kg of alfalfa hay dry matter (DM)/d and 4.3kg of concentrate mix DM/d. Diets offered to cows in the DGM and EGM groups contained 9.0kg of alfalfa hay DM/d, 4.3kg of concentrate mix DM/d, and 5.0kg of dried or ensiled grape marc DM/d, respectively. These diets were offered individually to cows for 18d. Individual cow feed intake and milk yield were measured daily and milk composition measured on 4d/wk. Individual cow CH4 emissions were measured by the SF6 tracer technique on 2d at the end of the experiment. Ruminal bacterial, archaeal, fungal, and protozoan communities were quantified on the last day of the experiment. Cows offered the CON, DGM, and EGM diets, ate 95, 98, and 96%, respectively, of the DM offered. The mean milk yield of cows fed the EGM diet was 12.8kg/cow per day and was less than that of cows fed either the CON diet (14.6kg/cow per day) or the DGM diet (15.4kg/cow per day). Feeding DGM and EGM diets was associated with decreased milk fat yields, lower concentrations of saturated fatty acids, and enhanced concentrations of mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids, in particular cis-9,trans-11 linoleic acid. The mean CH4 emissions were

  4. Forest management strategies for reducing carbon emissions, the French case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valade, Aude; Luyssaert, Sebastiaan; Bellassen, Valentin; Vallet, Patrick; Martin, Manuel

    2015-04-01

    International agreements now recognize the role of forest in the mitigation of climate change through the levers of in-situ sequestration, storage in products and energy and product substitution. These three strategies of carbon management are often antagonistic and it is still not clear which strategy would have the most significant impact on atmospheric carbon concentrations. With a focus on France, this study compares several scenarios of forest management in terms of their effect on the overall carbon budget from trees to wood-products. We elaborated four scenarios of forest management that target different wood production objectives. One scenario is 'Business as usual' and reproduces the current forest management and wood production levels. Two scenarios target an increase in bioenergy wood production, with either long-term or short-term goals. One scenario aims at increasing the production of timber for construction. For this, an empirical regression model was developed building on the rich French inventory database. The model can project the current forest resource at a time horizon of 20 years for characteristic variables diameter, standing volume, above-ground biomass, stand age. A simplified life-cycle analysis provides a full carbon budget for each scenario from forest management to wood use and allows the identification of the scenario that most reduces carbon emissions.

  5. Simultaneous Measurement of Noise-Activated Middle-Ear Muscle Reflex and Stimulus Frequency Otoacoustic Emissions

    PubMed Central

    Keefe, Douglas H.

    2006-01-01

    Otoacoustic emissions serve as a noninvasive probe of the medial olivocochlear (MOC) reflex. Stimulus frequency otoacoustic emissions (SFOAEs) elicited by a low-level probe tone may be the optimal type of emission for studying MOC effects because at low levels, the probe itself does not elicit the MOC reflex [Guinan et al. (2003) J. Assoc. Res. Otolaryngol. 4:521]. Based on anatomical considerations, the MOC reflex activated by ipsilateral acoustic stimulation (mediated by the crossed olivocochlear bundle) is predicted to be stronger than the reflex to contralateral stimulation. Broadband noise is an effective activator of the MOC reflex; however, it is also an effective activator of the middle-ear muscle (MEM) reflex, which can make results difficult to interpret. The MEM reflex may be activated at lower levels than measured clinically, and most previous human studies have not explicitly included measurements to rule out MEM reflex contamination. The current study addressed these issues using a higher-frequency SFOAE probe tone to test for cochlear changes mediated by the MOC reflex, while simultaneously monitoring the MEM reflex using a low-frequency probe tone. Broadband notched noise was presented ipsilaterally at various levels to elicit probe-tone shifts. Measurements are reported for 15 normal-hearing subjects. With the higher-frequency probe near 1.5 kHz, only 20% of subjects showed shifts consistent with an MOC reflex in the absence of an MEM-induced shift. With the higher-frequency probe near 3.5 kHz, up to 40% of subjects showed shifts in the absence of an MEM-induced shift. However, these responses had longer time courses than expected for MOC-induced shifts, and may have been dominated by other cochlear processes, rather than MOC reflex. These results suggest caution in the interpretation of effects observed using ipsilaterally presented acoustic activators intended to excite the MOC reflex. PMID:16568366

  6. Noise addendum experimental clean combustor program, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sofrin, T. G.; Ross, D. A.

    1975-01-01

    The development of advanced CTOL aircraft engines with reduced exhaust emissions is discussed. Combustor noise information provided during the basic emissions program and used to advantage in securing reduced levels of combustion noise is included. Results are presented of internal pressure transducer measurements made during the scheduled emissions test program on ten configurations involving variations of three basic combustor designs.

  7. Realistic simulation of reduced-dose CT with noise modeling and sinogram synthesis using DICOM CT images

    SciTech Connect

    Won Kim, Chang; Kim, Jong Hyo

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Reducing the patient dose while maintaining the diagnostic image quality during CT exams is the subject of a growing number of studies, in which simulations of reduced-dose CT with patient data have been used as an effective technique when exploring the potential of various dose reduction techniques. Difficulties in accessing raw sinogram data, however, have restricted the use of this technique to a limited number of institutions. Here, we present a novel reduced-dose CT simulation technique which provides realistic low-dose images without the requirement of raw sinogram data. Methods: Two key characteristics of CT systems, the noise equivalent quanta (NEQ) and the algorithmic modulation transfer function (MTF), were measured for various combinations of object attenuation and tube currents by analyzing the noise power spectrum (NPS) of CT images obtained with a set of phantoms. Those measurements were used to develop a comprehensive CT noise model covering the reduced x-ray photon flux, object attenuation, system noise, and bow-tie filter, which was then employed to generate a simulated noise sinogram for the reduced-dose condition with the use of a synthetic sinogram generated from a reference CT image. The simulated noise sinogram was filtered with the algorithmic MTF and back-projected to create a noise CT image, which was then added to the reference CT image, finally providing a simulated reduced-dose CT image. The simulation performance was evaluated in terms of the degree of NPS similarity, the noise magnitude, the bow-tie filter effect, and the streak noise pattern at photon starvation sites with the set of phantom images. Results: The simulation results showed good agreement with actual low-dose CT images in terms of their visual appearance and in a quantitative evaluation test. The magnitude and shape of the NPS curves of the simulated low-dose images agreed well with those of real low-dose images, showing discrepancies of less than +/−3.2% in

  8. Reducing magnetic field induced noise in broad-band seismic recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbriger, Thomas

    2007-04-01

    Seismic broad-band sensors are known to be sensitive to the magnetic field. Magnetic storms and man-made disturbances of the magnetic field can produce significant noise in seismic recordings. I show that variations in the magnetic field translate directly into apparent acceleration of the seismic sensor within the period range from 60 to 1200s for all leaf-spring sensors under investigation. For a Streckeisen STS-1V this is shown even for periods down to 1s. The sensitivity is quantified in magnitude and direction. Both are quite stable over many time windows and signal periods. The sensitivities obtained by linear regression of the acceleration signal on magnetic field recordings during a magnetic storm can effectively be applied to reduce noise in seismic signals. The sensitivity varies in magnitude from sensor to sensor but all are in the range from 0.05 to 1.2ms-2T-1. Seismograms from sensors at Black Forest Observatory (BFO) and stations of the German Regional Seismic Network were investigated. Although these are mainly equipped with leaf-spring sensors, the problem is not limited to this type of instrument. The effect is not observable on the horizontal component STS-1s at BFO while it is significant in the recordings of the vertical STS-1. The main difference between these instruments is the leaf-spring suspension in the vertical component that appears to be the source of the trouble. The suspension springs are made of temperature compensated Elinvar alloys that inherently are ferromagnetic and may respond to the magnetic field in various ways. However, the LaCoste Romberg ET-19 gravimeter at BFO, which uses this material too, does not respond to magnetic storms at a similar magnitude neither do the Invar-wire strainmeters. An active shielding, composed of three Helmholtz coils and a feedback system, is installed at station Stuttgart and provides an improvement of signal-to-noise ratio by almost a factor of 20 at this particular station. The passive

  9. Management Options for Reducing Ammonia Emissions from Poultry Litter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ammonia emissions from poultry litter not only result in air pollution; high levels of ammonia in poultry houses cause poor bird performance, increase the susceptibility of birds to viral diseases, and negatively impact human health. Although ammonia emissions are a concern, few cost-effective best ...

  10. Core-Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2010-01-01

    This presentation is a technical progress report and near-term outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external work on core (combustor and turbine) noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system level noise metrics for the 2015, 2020, and 2025 timeframes; the emerging importance of core noise and its relevance to the SFW Reduced-Noise-Aircraft Technical Challenge; the current research activities in the core-noise area, with some additional details given about the development of a high-fidelity combustion-noise prediction capability; the need for a core-noise diagnostic capability to generate benchmark data for validation of both high-fidelity work and improved models, as well as testing of future noise-reduction technologies; relevant existing core-noise tests using real engines and auxiliary power units; and examples of possible scenarios for a future diagnostic facility. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The SFW Reduced-Noise-Aircraft Technical Challenge aims to enable concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries. This reduction of aircraft noise is critical for enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic. Noise generated in the jet engine core, by sources such as the compressor, combustor, and turbine, can be a significant contribution to the overall noise signature at low-power conditions, typical of approach flight. At high engine power during takeoff, jet and fan noise have traditionally dominated over core noise. However, current design trends and expected technological advances in engine-cycle design as well as noise-reduction methods are likely to reduce non-core noise even at engine-power points higher than approach. In addition, future low-emission combustor designs could increase

  11. Prospects for residential oil burners with reduced emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Butcher, T.A.; Krajewski, R.F.; Celebi, Y.; McDonald, R.J.; Batey, J.

    1992-04-01

    In considering the emissions characteristics of residential oil heating equipment it is important to consider the magnitude of these emissions relative to all other sources. Laboratory and field test data show that home oil burners produce very low levels of pollutants when compared to all other combustion sources in the US. Home oil burners are relatively clean burning and produce less air pollution than the average combustion source in the US. This is especially true for carbon monoxide, particulates, and hydrocarbons, which are a small fraction of the average emission of other combustion equipment. In this paper results are presented of emission tests done with a number of oil burners selected as being representative of modern equipment or representing a recent development trend or a novel approach. The primary purpose of this work was to provide a benchmark of what oil equipment can do today and what the effects of some of these alternative designs are on emissions.

  12. Core Noise - Increasing Importance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation is a technical summary of and outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external research on core (combustor and turbine) noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system-level noise metrics for the 2015, 2020, and 2025 timeframes; turbofan design trends and their aeroacoustic implications; the emerging importance of core noise and its relevance to the SFW Reduced-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge; and the current research activities in the core-noise area, with additional details given about the development of a high-fidelity combustor-noise prediction capability as well as activities supporting the development of improved reduced-order, physics-based models for combustor-noise prediction. The need for benchmark data for validation of high-fidelity and modeling work and the value of a potential future diagnostic facility for testing of core-noise-reduction concepts are indicated. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The SFW Reduced-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge aims to develop concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries. This reduction of aircraft noise is critical to enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic. Noise generated in the jet engine core, by sources such as the compressor, combustor, and turbine, can be a significant contribution to the overall noise signature at low-power conditions, typical of approach flight. At high engine power during takeoff, jet and fan noise have traditionally dominated over core noise. However, current design trends and expected technological advances in engine-cycle design as well as noise-reduction methods are likely to reduce non-core noise even at engine-power points higher than approach. In addition, future low-emission combustor

  13. Observations of correlated broadband electrostatic noise and electron-cyclotron emissions in the plasma sheet. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Roeder, J.L.; Angelopoulos, V.; Baumjohann, W.; Anderson, R.R.

    1991-11-15

    Electric field wave observations in the central plasma sheet of the earth's magnetosphere show the correlated occurrence of broadband electrostatic noise and electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic emissions. A model is proposed in which the broadband emissions are electron acoustic waves generated by an observed low energy electron beam, and the cyclotron emissions are generated by the hot electron loss cone instability. The high degree of correlation between the two emissions is provided in the model by the presence of the cold electron beam population, which allows both of the plasma instabilities to grow.

  14. Coupling of acoustic emission and electrochemical noise measurement techniques in slurry erosion-corrosion studies

    SciTech Connect

    Oltra, R.; Chapey, B.; Huet, F.; Renaud, L.

    1996-12-31

    This study deals with the measurement and the subsequent signal analysis of acoustic emission and current noise recorded during continuous slurry erosion of a metallic target in a corrosive environment. According to a phenomenologic model, the localized corrosion results from the repetitive damage caused by particle impacts. The fluctuations of the acoustic signal and of the electrochemical signal both can be modeled as a shot-noise-like process. The main purpose of this work is to compare two processing techniques for the fluctuating signals: time analysis (mean value) and spectral analysis (power spectral density [PSD] spectrum) to determine the more suitable signal treatment. Another purpose is also to quantify the balance between the mechanical wear and the corrosive damage of the abraded metallic target. It will be shown that the mean value of the RMS acoustic signal, A(t), and also the PSD of A(t), are related to the mechanical wear of the target and allow real-time measurement of the actual mechanical perturbation in terms of the mass of the ablated material.

  15. Reducing flicker noise in chemical vapor deposition graphene field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Heather N.; Sangwan, Vinod K.; Schmucker, Scott W.; Cress, Cory D.; Luck, Kyle A.; Friedman, Adam L.; Robinson, Jeremy T.; Marks, Tobin J.; Hersam, Mark C.

    2016-02-01

    Single-layer graphene derived from chemical vapor deposition (CVD) holds promise for scalable radio frequency (RF) electronic applications. However, prevalent low-frequency flicker noise (1/f noise) in CVD graphene field-effect transistors is often up-converted to higher frequencies, thus limiting RF device performance. Here, we achieve an order of magnitude reduction in 1/f noise in field-effect transistors based on CVD graphene transferred onto silicon oxide substrates by utilizing a processing protocol that avoids aqueous chemistry after graphene transfer. Correspondingly, the normalized noise spectral density (10-7-10-8 μm2 Hz-1) and noise amplitude (4 × 10-8-10-7) in these devices are comparable to those of exfoliated and suspended graphene. We attribute the reduction in 1/f noise to a decrease in the contribution of fluctuations in the scattering cross-sections of carriers arising from dynamic redistribution of interfacial disorder.

  16. Intensities and spatiotemporal variability of equatorial noise emissions observed by the Cluster spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Němec, F.; Santolík, O.; Hrbáčková, Z.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.

    2015-03-01

    Equatorial noise (EN) emissions are electromagnetic waves observed in the equatorial region of the inner magnetosphere at frequencies between the proton cyclotron frequency and the lower hybrid frequency. We present the analysis of 2229 EN events identified in the Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Field Fluctuations (STAFF) experiment data of the Cluster spacecraft during the years 2001-2010. EN emissions are distinguished using the polarization analysis, and their intensity is determined based on the evaluation of the Poynting flux rather than on the evaluation of only the electric/magnetic field intensity. The intensity of EN events is analyzed as a function of the frequency, the position of the spacecraft inside/outside the plasmasphere, magnetic local time, and the geomagnetic activity. The emissions have higher frequencies and are more intense in the plasma trough than in the plasmasphere. EN events observed in the plasma trough are most intense close to the local noon, while EN events observed in the plasmasphere are nearly independent on magnetic local time (MLT). The intensity of EN events is enhanced during disturbed periods, both inside the plasmasphere and in the plasma trough. Observations of the same events by several Cluster spacecraft allow us to estimate their spatiotemporal variability. EN emissions observed in the plasmasphere do not change on the analyzed spatial scales (ΔMLT<0.2h, Δr<0.2 RE), but they change significantly on time scales of about an hour. The same appears to be the case also for EN events observed in the plasma trough, although the plasma trough dependencies are less clear.

  17. Repeated exposure reduces the response to impulsive noise in European seabass.

    PubMed

    Radford, Andrew N; Lèbre, Laurie; Lecaillon, Gilles; Nedelec, Sophie L; Simpson, Stephen D

    2016-10-01

    Human activities have changed the acoustic environment of many terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems around the globe. Mounting evidence indicates that the resulting anthropogenic noise can impact the behaviour and physiology of at least some species in a range of taxa. However, the majority of experimental studies have considered only immediate responses to single, relatively short-term noise events. Repeated exposure to noise could lead to a heightened or lessened response. Here, we conduct two long-term (12 week), laboratory-based exposure experiments with European seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax) to examine how an initial impact of different sound types potentially changes over time. Naïve fish showed elevated ventilation rates, indicating heightened stress, in response to impulsive additional noise (playbacks of recordings of pile-driving and seismic surveys), but not to a more continuous additional noise source (playbacks of recordings of ship passes). However, fish exposed to playbacks of pile-driving or seismic noise for 12 weeks no longer responded with an elevated ventilation rate to the same noise type. Fish exposed long-term to playback of pile-driving noise also no longer responded to short-term playback of seismic noise. The lessened response after repeated exposure, likely driven by increased tolerance or a change in hearing threshold, helps explain why fish that experienced 12 weeks of impulsive noise showed no differences in stress, growth or mortality compared to those reared with exposure to ambient-noise playback. Considering how responses to anthropogenic noise change with repeated exposure is important both when assessing likely fitness consequences and the need for mitigation measures. PMID:27282635

  18. Peculiarities of sudden commencement manifestation in VLF-emission generation and cosmic noise absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseyev, Alexey; Solovyev, Stepan; Boroev, Roman; Mullayarov, Viktor; Samsonov, Sergey; Du, Aimin

    The variation of the VLF emission and energetic particles precipitation (cosmic noise absorp-tion) parameters during the periods of magnetic storm sudden commencement (SC) are con-sidered. It was selected 13 events during the period 2003-2008. Among the selected events, the majority -the joint events, manifested both in riometric absorption and in the VLF emission generation, the events accompanied by only the VLF emission generation, the events manifested only in riometric absorption and also the events without the VLF emission and riometric ab-sorption. The VLF emission measurements carried out at Yakutsk station (L=3), and riometric absorption measurement conducted at the Yakut meridional chain of stations (MLat=190 deg). For the selected events were estimated azimuthal components of the solar wind electric fields (Esw) and induction electric fields (Ei), change of the field in the magnetosphere (∆Bz), re-flecting the degree of the magnetosphere compression at L shell of Yakutsk, Kp index for the 6-hour interval prior to the SC. Analysis of variations of the parameters listed above, allowed us to note the following features of the considered events: • The SCs which were registered in the noon sector MLT, preceded by intervals with higher values of the Kp index (Kp=3-6) in comparison with the SCs in the other MLT sectors (Kp=1-4). • The SC which were registered in the noon MLT sector accompanied by Esw of eastward direction (Esw <0), the SC in the other MLT sectors accompanied by westward Esw (Esw >0). • The SC which were not accompanied by the VLF emission and riometric absorption registered at small values of ∆Bz = 6-8 nT and Ei = 0.7-0.9 mV/m. The direction of Esw (to the east) in such events is opposite to Ei direction, which were directed to the west. This work was supported by the Presidium of the Russian Academy of Sciences (program 16, part 3), by the RFBR grant No.09-05-98546 and also supported by the SB RAS project No.69.

  19. Adiabatic quantum optimization in the presence of discrete noise: Reducing the problem dimensionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandrà, Salvatore; Guerreschi, Gian Giacomo; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2015-12-01

    Adiabatic quantum optimization is a procedure to solve a vast class of optimization problems by slowly changing the Hamiltonian of a quantum system. The evolution time necessary for the algorithm to be successful scales inversely with the minimum energy gap encountered during the dynamics. Unfortunately, the direct calculation of the gap is strongly limited by the exponential growth in the dimensionality of the Hilbert space associated to the quantum system. Although many special-purpose methods have been devised to reduce the effective dimensionality, they are strongly limited to particular classes of problems with evident symmetries. Moreover, little is known about the computational power of adiabatic quantum optimizers in real-world conditions. Here we propose and implement a general purposes reduction method that does not rely on any explicit symmetry and which requires, under certain general conditions, only a polynomial amount of classical resources. Thanks to this method, we are able to analyze the performance of "nonideal" quantum adiabatic optimizers to solve the well-known Grover problem, namely the search of target entries in an unsorted database, in the presence of discrete local defects. In this case, we show that adiabatic quantum optimization, even if affected by random noise, is still potentially faster than any classical algorithm.

  20. Removal of floral microbiota reduces floral terpene emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peñuelas, Josep; Farré-Armengol, Gerard; Llusia, Joan; Gargallo-Garriga, Albert; Rico, Laura; Sardans, Jordi; Terradas, Jaume; Filella, Iolanda

    2014-10-01

    The emission of floral terpenes plays a key role in pollination in many plant species. We hypothesized that the floral phyllospheric microbiota could significantly influence these floral terpene emissions because microorganisms also produce and emit terpenes. We tested this hypothesis by analyzing the effect of removing the microbiota from flowers. We fumigated Sambucus nigra L. plants, including their flowers, with a combination of three broad-spectrum antibiotics and measured the floral emissions and tissular concentrations in both antibiotic-fumigated and non-fumigated plants. Floral terpene emissions decreased by ca. two thirds after fumigation. The concentration of terpenes in floral tissues did not decrease, and floral respiration rates did not change, indicating an absence of damage to the floral tissues. The suppression of the phyllospheric microbial communities also changed the composition and proportion of terpenes in the volatile blend. One week after fumigation, the flowers were not emitting β-ocimene, linalool, epoxylinalool, and linalool oxide. These results show a key role of the floral phyllospheric microbiota in the quantity and quality of floral terpene emissions and therefore a possible key role in pollination.

  1. Removal of floral microbiota reduces floral terpene emissions

    PubMed Central

    Peñuelas, Josep; Farré-Armengol, Gerard; Llusia, Joan; Gargallo-Garriga, Albert; Rico, Laura; Sardans, Jordi; Terradas, Jaume; Filella, Iolanda

    2014-01-01

    The emission of floral terpenes plays a key role in pollination in many plant species. We hypothesized that the floral phyllospheric microbiota could significantly influence these floral terpene emissions because microorganisms also produce and emit terpenes. We tested this hypothesis by analyzing the effect of removing the microbiota from flowers. We fumigated Sambucus nigra L. plants, including their flowers, with a combination of three broad-spectrum antibiotics and measured the floral emissions and tissular concentrations in both antibiotic-fumigated and non-fumigated plants. Floral terpene emissions decreased by ca. two thirds after fumigation. The concentration of terpenes in floral tissues did not decrease, and floral respiration rates did not change, indicating an absence of damage to the floral tissues. The suppression of the phyllospheric microbial communities also changed the composition and proportion of terpenes in the volatile blend. One week after fumigation, the flowers were not emitting β-ocimene, linalool, epoxylinalool, and linalool oxide. These results show a key role of the floral phyllospheric microbiota in the quantity and quality of floral terpene emissions and therefore a possible key role in pollination. PMID:25335793

  2. Electromagnetic Signals and Earthquakes 2.0: Increasing Signals and Reducing Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunson, J. C.; Bleier, T.; Heraud, J. A.; Muller, S.; Lindholm, C.; Christman, L.; King, R.; Lemon, J.

    2013-12-01

    QuakeFinder has an international network of 150+ Magnetometers and air conductivity instruments located in California, Peru, Chile, Taiwan, and Greece. Since 2000, QuakeFinder has been collecting electromagnetic data and applying simple algorithms to identify and characterize electromagnetic signals that occur in the few weeks prior to earthquakes greater than M4.5. In this presentation, we show refinements to several aspects of our signal identification techniques that enhance detection of pre-earthquake patterns. Our magnetometers have been improved to show longer pulses, and we are now using second generation algorithms that have been refined to detect the proper shape of the earthquake-generated pulses and to allow individual site adjustments. Independent lightning strike data has also now been included to mask out lightning based on amplitude and distance from a given instrument site. Direction of arrival (Azimuth) algorithms have been added to identify patterns of pulse clustering that occur prior to nearby earthquakes. Likewise, positive and negative air ion concentration detection has been improved by building better enclosures, using stainless screens to eliminate insects and some dirt sources, conformal coating PC boards to reduce moisture contamination, and filtering out contaminated data segments based on relative humidity measurements at each site. Infra Red data from the western GOES satellite has been time-filtered, cloud-filtered, and compared to 3 year averages of each pixel's output (by seasonal month) to arrive at a relevant comparison baseline for each night's temperature/cooling slope. All these efforts have helped improve the detection of multiple, nearly simultaneous, electromagnetic signals due to earthquake preparation processes, while reducing false positive indications due to environmental noise sources.

  3. The problems of reducing the noise level on open sites of machine building plants and living areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulkin, V. V.; Kalinichenko, M. V.

    2015-09-01

    In this article there is an analysis of using noise-absorbing screens on the basis Helmholtz resonator to reduce the level of acoustic noise on open industrial sites of machinebuilding plants and adjacent living areas. A design realization of this screen was considered, the characteristic of which is a variable depth of the resonator chamber and the change of the clearance of the resonator throat. The evaluation of the efficiency of using the screen was performed using experimental modeling with an acoustic chamber and a screen model. It was shown that in the majority of the cases there is some attenuation of the acoustic signal in the zone in front of the screen. A conclusion was made about the possibility of reducing noise level in industrial and living zone

  4. Analysis of alternative pathways for reducing nitrogen oxide emissions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Strategies for reducing tropospheric ozone typically include modifying combustion processes to reduce the formation of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and applying control devices that remove NOx from the exhaust gases of power plants, industrial sources and vehicles. For portions of the ...

  5. 77 FR 18297 - Air Traffic Noise, Fuel Burn, and Emissions Modeling Using the Aviation Environmental Design Tool...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-27

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Air Traffic Noise, Fuel Burn, and Emissions Modeling Using the Aviation... methodology for performing air quality analysis modeling for aviation sources.'' Section 2.4d states that... using the most recent EDMS model available at the start of the environmental analysis process.'' ]...

  6. Airborne reduced nitrogen: ammonia emissions from agriculture and other sources.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Natalie; Strader, Ross; Davidson, Cliff

    2003-06-01

    Ammonia is a basic gas and one of the most abundant nitrogen-containing compounds in the atmosphere. When emitted, ammonia reacts with oxides of nitrogen and sulfur to form particles, typically in the fine particle size range. Roughly half of the PM(2.5) mass in eastern United States is ammonium sulfate, according to the US EPA. Results from recent studies of PM(2.5) show that these fine particles are typically deposited deep in the lungs and may lead to increased morbidity and/or mortality. Also, these particles are in the size range that will degrade visibility. Ammonia emission inventories are usually constructed by multiplying an activity level by an experimentally determined emission factor for each source category. Typical sources of ammonia include livestock, fertilizer, soils, forest fires and slash burning, industry, vehicles, the oceans, humans, pets, wild animals, and waste disposal and recycling activities. Livestock is the largest source category in the United States, with waste from livestock responsible for about 3x10(9) kg of ammonia in 1995. Volatilization of ammonia from livestock waste is dependent on many parameters, and thus emission factors are difficult to predict. Despite a seasonal variation in these values, the emission factors for general livestock categories are usually annually averaged in current inventories. Activity levels for livestock are from the USDA Census of Agriculture, which does not give information about animal raising practices such as housing types and grazing times, waste handling systems, and approximate animal slurry spreading times or methods. Ammonia emissions in the United States in 1995 from sources other than livestock are much lower; for example, annual emissions are roughly 8x10(8) kg from fertilizer, 7x10(7) kg from industry, 5x10(7) kg from vehicles and 1x10(8) kg from humans. There is considerable uncertainty in the emissions from soil and vegetation, although this category may also be significant

  7. Innovative Technology Reduces Power Plant Emissions - Commercialization Success

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde

    2004-01-01

    Emission control system development includes: (1) Development of new oxidizer scrubber system to eliminate NOx waste and produce fertilizer (2) Technology licensed and a 1 to 3 MWatt-scale prototype installed on. power plant (3) Development of method to oxidize NO. to N02 (4) Experience gained from licensing NASA technology

  8. Innovative Technology Reduces Power Plant Emissions-Commercialization Success

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde; Chung, Landy

    2004-01-01

    Overview of emission control system development: (1) Development of new oxidizer scrubber system to eliminate NOx waste and produce fertilizer (2) Technology licensed and a 1 to 3 MWatt-scale prototype installed on power plant (3) Development of method to oxidize NO to NO2 (4) Experience gained from licensing NASA technology.

  9. Reducing the impact of wind noise on cochlear implant processors with two microphones

    PubMed Central

    Kokkinakis, Kostas; Cox, Casey

    2014-01-01

    Behind-the-ear (BTE) processors of cochlear implant (CI) devices offer little to almost no protection from wind noise in most incidence angles. To assess speech intelligibility, eight CI recipients were tested in 3 and 9 m/s wind. Results indicated that speech intelligibility decreased substantially when the wind velocity, and in turn the wind sound pressure level, increased. A two-microphone wind noise suppression strategy was developed. Scores obtained with this strategy indicated substantial gains in speech intelligibility over other conventional noise reduction strategies tested. PMID:24815292

  10. Acoustic vector sensor beamforming reduces masking from underwater industrial noise during passive monitoring.

    PubMed

    Thode, Aaron M; Kim, Katherine H; Norman, Robert G; Blackwell, Susanna B; Greene, Charles R

    2016-04-01

    Masking from industrial noise can hamper the ability to detect marine mammal sounds near industrial operations, whenever conventional (pressure sensor) hydrophones are used for passive acoustic monitoring. Using data collected from an autonomous recorder with directional capabilities (Directional Autonomous Seafloor Acoustic Recorder), deployed 4.1 km from an arctic drilling site in 2012, the authors demonstrate how conventional beamforming on an acoustic vector sensor can be used to suppress noise arriving from a narrow sector of geographic azimuths. Improvements in signal-to-noise ratio of up to 15 dB are demonstrated on bowhead whale calls, which were otherwise undetectable using conventional hydrophones. PMID:27106345

  11. Emerging Community Noise Reduction Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Envia, Edmane

    2012-01-01

    An overview of the current NASA research portfolio in the area of aircraft noise reduction is presented. The emphasis of the research described herein is on meeting the aggressive near- and mid-term national goals for reducing aircraft noise emissions, which NASA internal studies have shown to be feasible using noise reduction technologies currently being developed in-house or in partnership with NASA s industry and academic partners. While NASA has an active research effort in airframe noise reduction, this overview focuses on propulsion noise reduction only.

  12. Environmental integration of measures to reduce railway noise in the Brussels Capital Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Doninck, N.; Schillemans, L.

    2003-10-01

    The Brussels Capital Region is a densely populated area with a surface area of 63 square miles and a total of 40 miles of railway lines. Earlier studies have already registered a large number of problems regarding railway noise. Moreover, the transport policy of the federal government aims to increase train travel and plans an expansion of the railway network. In order to be able to control railway noise, the Brussels authority needs an instrument that provides technical and practical information concerning: minimizing the noise produced by railways (both existing and new); the environmental integration of noise abatement measures. This paper discusses the objectives of the study, the methodology that was applied, and the main conclusions reached.

  13. Inductive pulsed phase thermography for reducing or enlarging the effect of surface emissivity variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ruizhen; He, Yunze; Gao, Bin; Tian, Gui Yun

    2014-11-01

    Emissivity variation introduces illusory temperature inhomogeneity and results in false alarms in infrared thermography, thus, it is important to separate the influence of surface emissivity variation. This letter experimentally demonstrates the advantages of phase information to reduce or enlarge the effect of surface emissivity variation with inductive pulsed phase thermography, where inductive excitation is emissivity-independent and avoids the effect of emissivity variation in heating process. The directly heated area and the indirectly heated area are divided in the phasegrams. The emissivity variation is removed or enlarged perfectly at the specific frequency and defect detectability is improved remarkably.

  14. Airport noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendley, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    The problem of airport noise at several airports and air bases is detailed. Community reactions to the noise, steps taken to reduce jet engine noise, and the effect of airport use restrictions and curfews on air transportation are discussed. The adverse effect of changes in allowable operational noise on airport safety and altenative means for reducing noise pollution are considered. Community-airport relations and public relations are discussed.

  15. An optimal energy estimator to reduce correlated noise for the EXO-200 light readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, C. G.; Hall, C.; Albert, J. B.; Barbeau, P. S.; Beck, D.; Belov, V.; Breidenbach, M.; Brunner, T.; Burenkov, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cen, W. R.; Chambers, C.; Cleveland, B.; Coon, M.; Craycraft, A.; Daniels, T.; Danilov, M.; Daugherty, S. J.; Davis, J.; Delaquis, S.; Der Mesrobian-Kabakian, A.; DeVoe, R.; Didberidze, T.; Dilling, J.; Dolgolenko, A.; Dolinski, M. J.; Dunford, M.; Fairbank, W., Jr.; Farine, J.; Feldmeier, W.; Feyzbakhsh, S.; Fierlinger, P.; Fudenberg, D.; Gornea, R.; Graham, K.; Gratta, G.; Hughes, M.; Jewell, M. J.; Johnson, A.; Johnson, T. N.; Johnston, S.; Karelin, A.; Kaufman, L. J.; Killick, R.; Koffas, T.; Kravitz, S.; Krücken, R.; Kuchenkov, A.; Kumar, K. S.; Leonard, D. S.; Licciardi, C.; Lin, Y. H.; Ling, J.; MacLellan, R.; Marino, M. G.; Mong, B.; Moore, D.; Njoya, O.; Nelson, R.; Odian, A.; Ostrovskiy, I.; Piepke, A.; Pocar, A.; Prescott, C. Y.; Retière, F.; Rowson, P. C.; Russell, J. J.; Schubert, A.; Sinclair, D.; Smith, E.; Stekhanov, V.; Tarka, M.; Tolba, T.; Tsang, R.; Twelker, K.; Vuilleumier, J.-L.; Waite, A.; Walton, J.; Walton, T.; Weber, M.; Wen, L. J.; Wichoski, U.; Wood, J.; Yang, L.; Yen, Y.-R.; Zeldovich, O. Ya.

    2016-07-01

    The energy resolution of the EXO-200 detector is limited by electronics noise in the measurement of the scintillation response. Here we present a new technique to extract optimal scintillation energy measurements for signals split across multiple channels in the presence of correlated noise. The implementation of these techniques improves the energy resolution of the detector at the neutrinoless double beta decay Q-value from [1.9641 ± 0.0039]% to [1.5820 ± 0.0044]%.

  16. Future development programs. [for defining the emission problem and developing hardware to reduce pollutant levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedrziewski, S.

    1976-01-01

    The emission problem or source points were defined and new materials, hardware, or operational procedures were developed to exercise the trends defined by the data collected. The programs to reduce the emission output of aircraft powerplants were listed. Continued establishment of baseline emissions for various engine models, continued characterization of effect of production tolerances on emissions, carbureted engine development and flight tests, and cylinder cooling/fin design programs were several of the programs investigated.

  17. Reducing methane emissions in sheep by immunization against rumen methanogens.

    PubMed

    Wright, A D G; Kennedy, P; O'Neill, C J; Toovey, A F; Popovski, S; Rea, S M; Pimm, C L; Klein, L

    2004-09-28

    This work was conducted to determine if methane emissions from sheep immunized with an anti-methanogen vaccine were significantly lower than methane emissions from non-immunized sheep, to test the effectiveness of two different vaccine formulations (VF) on methane abatement, and to compare methane emissions measured using a closed-circuit respiration chamber and the sulphur-hexafluoride (SF6) tracer technique. Thirty mature wether sheep were randomly allocated to three treatment groups (n = 10). One group received an immunization of adjuvant only on days 0 and 153 (control), a second group received an immunization with a 3-methanogen mix on days 0 and 153 (VF3 + 3), and a third group received an immunization of a 7-methanogen mix on day 0 followed by a 3-methanogen mix on day 153 (VF7 + 3). Four weeks post-secondary immunization, there was a significant 7.7% reduction in methane production per kg dry matter intake in the VF7 + 3 group compared to the controls (P = 0.051). However, methane emissions from sheep immunized with VF7 + 3 were not significantly different when compared to the sheep in the control group (P = 0.883). The average IgG and IgA antibody titres in both plasma and saliva of the VF3 + 3 immunized sheep were four to nine times higher than those immunized with VF7 + 3 (P< 0.001) at both 3 and 6 weeks post-secondary immunization. Data also revealed that SF6 methane estimates were consistently higher than the respiration chamber estimates and that there was no significant correlation between the SF6 methane estimates and the respiration chamber methane estimates (R2 = 0.11). PMID:15364447

  18. 330 kWe Packaged CHP System with Reduced Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Plahn, Paul; Keene, Kevin; Pendray, John

    2015-03-31

    The objective of this project was to develop a flexible, 330 kWe packaged Combined Heat and Power (CHP) system that can be deployed to commercial and light industrial applications at a lower total cost of ownership than current CHP solutions. The project resulted in a CHP system that is easy to use and inexpensive to install, offering world class customer support, while providing a low-emissions, higher-efficiency internal combustion engine for a CHP system of this size.

  19. Engineering Filters for Reducing Spontaneous Emission in cQED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronn, Nicholas; Masluk, Nicholas; Srinivasan, Srikanth; Chow, Jerry; Abraham, David; Rothwell, Mary; Keefe, George; Gambetta, Jay; Steffen, Matthias; Lirakis, Chris

    2014-03-01

    Inserting a notch filter between a qubit and the external environment at the qubit frequency can significantly suppress spontaneous emission mediated by the cavity (``Purcell effect''). In order to realize this filtering in multi-qubit architectures, where space comes at a premium, we will present a filter with minimal space requirements. We acknowledge support from IARPA under contract W911NF-10-1-0324.

  20. Methods of reducing low frequency cabin noise and sonically induced stresses, based on the intrinsic structural tuning concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sengupta, G.

    1977-01-01

    Control of low frequency interior noise has been difficult in all commercial and general aviation aircraft, since the existing sound attenuation techniques are less effective at these frequencies. Therefore low frequency cabin noise and sonically induced stresses can be reduced mainly by a proper design of the fuselage structure. For this purpose, a concept based on intrinsic tuning and damping of fuselage structural elements has been under development at Boeing for the past three years. This paper describes the results of some laboratory and field tests that were conducted for evaluation of the concept.

  1. 40 CFR 1036.610 - Innovative technology credits and adjustments for reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the provisions of 40 CFR 86.1866-12(d)(3). However, we will generally not seek public comment on... adjustments for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. 1036.610 Section 1036.610 Protection of Environment... adjustments for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. (a) You may ask us to apply the provisions of this...

  2. 40 CFR 1036.610 - Innovative technology credits and adjustments for reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the provisions of 40 CFR 86.1866-12(d)(3). However, we will generally not seek public comment on... adjustments for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. 1036.610 Section 1036.610 Protection of Environment... adjustments for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. (a) You may ask us to apply the provisions of this...

  3. 40 CFR 1036.610 - Innovative technology credits and adjustments for reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the provisions of 40 CFR 86.1866-12(d)(3). However, we will generally not seek public comment on... adjustments for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. 1036.610 Section 1036.610 Protection of Environment... adjustments for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. (a) You may ask us to apply the provisions of this...

  4. Reducing Ammonia Emissions from Poultry Litter with Alum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aluminum sulfate (alum) additions to poultry litter have been shown to reduce ammonia (NH3) volatilization. The objectives of this paper were to present data on the effects of alum treatment of poultry litter on: (1) the efficacy of reducing ammonia loss, (2) poultry production parameters, and (3) ...

  5. Reducing Near-Field RF Levels and Noise Temperature on a 34-m Beam-Waveguide Antenna by Strut Shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khayatian, B.; Hoppe, D. J.; Britcliffe, M. J.; Gama, E.

    2013-02-01

    Strut shaping of NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) 34-m beam-waveguide (BWG) antenna has been implemented to reduce near-field RF exposure while improving the antenna noise temperature. Strut shaping was achieved by introducing an RF shield that does not compromise the structural integrity of the existing structure. Reduction in the RF near-field exposure will compensate for the planned transmit power increase of the antenna from 20 kW to 80 kW while satisfying safety requirements for RF exposure. Antenna noise temperature was also improved by as much as 1.5 K for the low elevation angles and 0.5 K in other areas. Both reductions of RF near-field exposure and antenna noise temperature were verified through measurements and agree very well with calculated results.

  6. Reducing the Read Noise of HAWAII-2RG Detector Systems with Improved Reference Sampling and Subtraction (IRS2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauscher, Bernard J.; Arendt, Richard G.; Fixsen, D. J.; Lander, Matthew; Lindler, Don; Loose, Markus; Moseley, S. H.; Wilson, Donna V.; Xenophontos, Christos

    2012-01-01

    IRS2 is a Wiener-optimal approach to using all of the reference information that Teledyne's HAWAII-2RG detector arrays provide. Using a new readout pattern, IRS2 regularly interleaves reference pixels with the normal pixels during readout. This differs from conventional clocking, in which the reference pixels are read out infrequently, and only in a few rows and columns around the outside edges of the detector array. During calibration, the data are processed in Fourier space, which is <;:lose to the noise's eigenspace. Using IRS2, we have reduced the read noise of the James Webb Space Telescope Near Infrared Spectrograph by 15% compared to conventional readout. We are attempting to achieve further gains by calibrating out recently recognized non-stationary noise that appears at the frame rate.

  7. Numerical computation for a new way to reduce vibration and noise due to magnetostriction and magnetic forces of transformer cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lihua; Yang, Qingxin; Yan, Rongge; Li, Yongjian; Zhang, Xian; Yan, Weili; Zhu, Jianguo

    2013-05-01

    Magnetostriction (MS) caused by the global magnetization of limbs and yokes and magnetic forces are the undisputed causes of the vibration and noise in power transformer cores. This paper presents a novel way to reduce the vibration and noise, in which nanocrystalline soft magnetic composite (NSMC) material with high permeability is used to fill the step-lap joint gaps of the power transformer magnetic cores. In order to numerically predict the effectiveness of the proposed method, a 3-D magneto-mechanical strong coupled model including MS and magnetic anisotropy of steel sheet was founded. Then, the numerical model was applied to analyze the step-lap joint region of the corner of magnetic cores. The analysis results illustrated that the deformation and noise of core with NSMC are lower than with the traditional epoxy damping material. Moreover, the validity of the proposed new way was verified by the simplified step-lap joint cores, which were achieved based on Epstein Frames.

  8. Highly Doped Polycrystalline Silicon Microelectrodes Reduce Noise in Neuronal Recordings In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Rajarshi; Jackson, Nathan; Patel, Chetan; Muthuswamy, Jit

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study are to 1) experimentally validate for the first time the nonlinear current-potential characteristics of bulk doped polycrystalline silicon in the small amplitude voltage regimes (0–200 μV) and 2) test if noise amplitudes (0–15 μV) from single neuronal electrical recordings get selectively attenuated in doped polycrystalline silicon microelectrodes due to the above property. In highly doped polycrystalline silicon, bulk resistances of several hundred kilo-ohms were experimentally measured for voltages typical of noise amplitudes and 9–10 kΩ for voltages typical of neural signal amplitudes (>150–200 μV). Acute multiunit measurements and noise measurements were made in n = 6 and n = 8 anesthetized adult rats, respectively, using polycrystalline silicon and tungsten microelectrodes. There was no significant difference in the peak-to-peak amplitudes of action potentials recorded from either microelectrode (p > 0.10). However, noise power in the recordings from tungsten microelectrodes (26.36 ± 10.13 pW) was significantly higher (p < 0.001) than the corresponding value in polycrystalline silicon microelectrodes (7.49 ± 2.66 pW). We conclude that polycrystalline silicon microelectrodes result in selective attenuation of noise power in electrical recordings compared to tungsten microelectrodes. This reduction in noise compared to tungsten microelectrodes is likely due to the exponentially higher bulk resistances offered by highly doped bulk polycrystalline silicon in the range of voltages corresponding to noise in multiunit measurements. PMID:20667815

  9. Technology Opportunities to Reduce U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1997-10-01

    This report serves as the technology basis of a needed national climate change technology strategy, with the confidence that a strong technology R&D program will deliver a portfolio of technologies with the potential to provide very substantial greenhouse gas emission reductions along with continued economic growth. Much more is needed to define such a strategy, including identification of complementary deployment policies and analysis to support the seeping and prioritization of R&D programs. A national strategy must be based upon governmental, industrial, and academic partnerships.

  10. Reduced Connexin26 in the Mature Cochlea Increases Susceptibility to Noise-Induced Hearing Loss in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xing-Xing; Chen, Sen; Xie, Le; Ji, Yu-Zi; Wu, Xia; Wang, Wen-Wen; Yang, Qi; Yu, Jin-Tao; Sun, Yu; Lin, Xi; Kong, Wei-Jia

    2016-01-01

    Connexin26 (Cx26, encoded by GJB2) mutations are the most common cause of non-syndromic deafness. GJB2 is thought to be involved in noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). However, the role of Cx26 in NIHL is still obscure. To explore the association between Cx26 and NIHL, we established a Cx26 knockdown (KD) mouse model by conditional knockdown of Cx26 at postnatal day 18 (P18), and then we observed the auditory threshold and morphologic changes in these mice with or without noise exposure. The Cx26 KD mice did not exhibit substantial hearing loss and hair cell degeneration, while the Cx26 KD mice with acoustic trauma experienced higher hearing loss than simple noise exposure siblings and nearly had no recovery. Additionally, extensive outer hair cell loss and more severe destruction of the basal organ of Corti were observed in Cx26 KD mice after noise exposure. These data indicate that reduced Cx26 expression in the mature mouse cochlea may increase susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss and facilitate the cell degeneration in the organ of Corti. PMID:26927086

  11. Analysis of noise emitted from diesel engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan, S.

    2015-12-01

    In this work combustion noise produced in diesel engines has been investigated. In order to reduce the exhaust emissions various injection parameters need to be studied and optimized. The noise has been investigated by mean of data obtained from cylinder pressure measurements using piezo electric transducers and microphones on a dual cylinder diesel engine test rig. The engine was run under various operating conditions varying various injection parameters to investigate the effects of noise emissions under various testing conditions.

  12. Selective attention reduces physiological noise in the external ear canals of humans. I: auditory attention.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Kyle P; Pasanen, Edward G; McFadden, Dennis

    2014-06-01

    In this study, a nonlinear version of the stimulus-frequency OAE (SFOAE), called the nSFOAE, was used to measure cochlear responses from human subjects while they simultaneously performed behavioral tasks requiring, or not requiring, selective auditory attention. Appended to each stimulus presentation, and included in the calculation of each nSFOAE response, was a 30-ms silent period that was used to estimate the level of the inherent physiological noise in the ear canals of our subjects during each behavioral condition. Physiological-noise magnitudes were higher (noisier) for all subjects in the inattention task, and lower (quieter) in the selective auditory-attention tasks. These noise measures initially were made at the frequency of our nSFOAE probe tone (4.0 kHz), but the same attention effects also were observed across a wide range of frequencies. We attribute the observed differences in physiological-noise magnitudes between the inattention and attention conditions to different levels of efferent activation associated with the differing attentional demands of the behavioral tasks. One hypothesis is that when the attentional demand is relatively great, efferent activation is relatively high, and a decrease in the gain of the cochlear amplifier leads to lower-amplitude cochlear activity, and thus a smaller measure of noise from the ear. PMID:24732069

  13. Selective attention reduces physiological noise in the external ear canals of humans. I: Auditory attention

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Kyle P.; Pasanen, Edward G.; McFadden, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a nonlinear version of the stimulus-frequency OAE (SFOAE), called the nSFOAE, was used to measure cochlear responses from human subjects while they simultaneously performed behavioral tasks requiring, or not requiring, selective auditory attention. Appended to each stimulus presentation, and included in the calculation of each nSFOAE response, was a 30-ms silent period that was used to estimate the level of the inherent physiological noise in the ear canals of our subjects during each behavioral condition. Physiological-noise magnitudes were higher (noisier) for all subjects in the inattention task, and lower (quieter) in the selective auditory-attention tasks. These noise measures initially were made at the frequency of our nSFOAE probe tone (4.0 kHz), but the same attention effects also were observed across a wide range of frequencies. We attribute the observed differences in physiological-noise magnitudes between the inattention and attention conditions to different levels of efferent activation associated with the differing attentional demands of the behavioral tasks. One hypothesis is that when the attentional demand is relatively great, efferent activation is relatively high, and a decrease in the gain of the cochlear amplifier leads to lower-amplitude cochlear activity, and thus a smaller measure of noise from the ear. PMID:24732069

  14. Noise emission of civil and military aero-engines. Sources of generation and measures for attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grieb, H.; Heinig, K.

    1986-09-01

    It is shown that noise reduction on high bypass ratio turbofans for civil airliners is well established. The noise levels achieved meet the internationally agreed regulations (FAR 36). The same holds true for large military transport aircraft. Helicopter noise is caused essentially by the main and tail rotors. Noise reduction on afterburner and dry engines for combat and strike aircraft, which represent the major noise annoyance to the public, is very difficult because: high specific thrust is mandatory for aircraft performance and effectiveness; jet noise with and without afterburning is predominant; and the design of the reheat section and final (variable) nozzle in practice precludes the application of known concepts for jet noise attenuation in dry and reheated operation.

  15. Reducing the Effect of Transducer Mount Induced Noise on Aeroacoustic Wind Tunnel Testing Data with a New Transducer Mount Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herron, Andrew J.; Reed, Darren K.; Nance, Donald K.

    2015-01-01

    Flight vehicle aeroacoustic environments induced during transonic and supersonic flight are usually predicted by subscale wind tunnel testing utilizing high frequency miniature pressure transducers. In order to minimize noise induced by the measurement itself, transducer flush mounting with the model surface is very important. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has accomplished flushness in recent testing campaigns via use of a transducer holder that can be machined and sanded. A single hole in the holder allows the flow medium to interact with the transducer diaphragm. Noise is induced by the resulting cavity however, and is a challenge to remove in post-processing. A new holder design has been developed that minimizes the effects of this transducer mount induced noise (XMIN) by reducing the resonance amplitude or increasing its resonance frequency beyond the range of interest. This paper describes a test conducted at the NASA/George C. Marshall Space Flight Center Trisonic Wind Tunnel intended to verify the effectiveness of this design. The results from this test show that this new transducer holder design does significantly reduce the influence of XMIN on measured fluctuating pressure levels without degrading a transducer's ability to accurately measure the noise external to the model.

  16. Investigation of signal thresholding to reduce the effects of instrument noise of an EMCCD based micro-CT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgorsak, Alexander R.; Bysani Krishnakumar, Sumukh; Setlur Nagesh, S. V.; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Rudin, Stephen; Ionita, Ciprian N.

    2016-03-01

    This project investigated the signal thresholding effectiveness at reducing the instrument noise of an electron multiplying charged coupled device (EMCCD) based micro-CT system at low x-ray exposure levels. Scans of a mouse spine and an iodine phantom were taken using an EMCCD detector coupled with a micro-CT system. An iodine filter of 4 mg/cm2 area density was placed in the beam. The output signal was thresholded using some multiple of the inherent background noise. For each threshold, 100, 200, and 300 frames were summed for each projection to evaluate the effect on the reconstructed image. The projection images from the scans were compared using line profiles and their SNR. Our results indicate that, as the threshold was increased, the line profiles of the projection images showed less statistical variation, but also lower signal levels, so that the SNR of the projection images decreased as the threshold increased. When the line profile of a projection image obtained using a signal threshold is compared with one obtained using energy integrating mode, the profile obtained using thresholding had less variation than that obtained using energy integration, which indicates less instrument noise. The SNR at the edges of the scan object is higher in the thresholded images when compared with the energy integrated projection images. We conclude that thresholding the output signal from an EMCCD detector at low x-ray exposure levels is an effective method to reduce the instrument noise of an EMCCD detector.

  17. Noise sources in wind turbines. Source identification research: Noise suppression design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanschie, L. W. A.; Debruijn, A.; Vantol, F. H.

    1985-06-01

    Aerodynamic and mechanical noise measurements on medium-sized wind turbines were carried out; literature on aerodynamic noise sources at wings was reviewed. The total emission level as a function of the average wind velocity was determined. Aerodynamic wing noise was measured seperately from the nacelle noise using a microphone. A trigger unit consisting of an optical sensor and telelens was developed to measure synchronically the noise signal of the wing in horizontal position. In the nacelle, noise and vibration measurements were done at the entering axis, the gear casing, and the generator. Main sources are the gear casing, the generator, and obstacles on the wings. Noise reducing design recommendations are given.

  18. Greenhouse gas emissions during composting of dairy manure: Delaying pile mixing does not reduce overall emissions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of the timing of pile mixing on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions during dairy manure composting was determined using large flux chambers designed to completely cover replicate pilot-scale compost piles. GHG emissions from compost piles that were mixed at 2, 3, 4, or 5 weeks after initial c...

  19. A Systems Approach to Reducing Institutional GHG Emissions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Sean R.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to establish necessity and methods for considering greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation policies at a system-level. The research emphasizes connecting narrowly focused GHG mitigation objectives (e.g. reduce single occupancy vehicle travel) with broader institutional objectives (e.g. growth in student population) to…

  20. The environmental cost of reducing agricultural fine particulate matter emissions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) revised the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) in 2006, reducing acceptable fine particulate (PM2.5) levels; state environmental protection agencies in states with non-attainment areas are required to draft State Implementation Plans (SIP) det...

  1. Toward Reduced Aircraft Community Noise Impact Via a Perception-Influenced Design Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    This is an exciting time for aircraft design. New configurations, including small multi-rotor uncrewed aerial systems, fixed- and tilt-wing distributed electric propulsion aircraft, high-speed rotorcraft, hybrid-electric commercial transports, and low-boom supersonic transports, are being made possible through a host of propulsion and airframe technology developments. The resulting noise signatures may be radically different, both spectrally and temporally, than those of the current fleet. Noise certification metrics currently used in aircraft design do not necessarily reflect these characteristics and therefore may not correlate well with human response. Further, as operations and missions become less airport-centric, e.g., those associated with on-demand mobility or package delivery, vehicles may operate in closer proximity to the population than ever before. Fortunately, a new set of tools are available for assessing human perception during the design process in order to affect the final design in a positive manner. The tool chain utilizes system noise prediction methods coupled with auralization and psychoacoustic testing, making possible the inclusion of human response to noise, along with performance criteria and certification requirements, into the aircraft design process. Several case studies are considered to illustrate how this approach could be used to influence the design of future aircraft.

  2. Comparison of high-MTF and reduced-noise radiographic imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunch, Phillip C.

    1995-05-01

    The objective imaging characteristics of a wide range of gandolinium oxysulfide-based, zero- crossover, screen-film combinations are presented and compared. It is shown that complex high-spatial frequency versus low-spatial frequency performance tradeoffs are found among these systems, when these systems are examined in terms of sensitometric response, modulation transfer function, noise equivalent quanta, and detective quantum efficiency.

  3. Continuous White Noise to Reduce Resistance Going to Sleep and Night Wakings in Toddlers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forquer, LeAnne M.; Johnson, C. Merle

    2005-01-01

    White noise generators were turned on at 75 dB at bedtime and kept on all night to treat resistance going to sleep and night wakings in one-year-old toddlers. In a multiple baseline design four sets of parents recorded duration of resistance going to sleep, number of night wakings, completed surveys of their child's feeding and sleeping patterns…

  4. The Effect of a Noise Reducing Test Accommodation on Elementary Students with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Gregory W.; Riccomini, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Researchers in the fields of cognitive psychology and education have been studying the negative effects of noise on human performance for almost a century. A new empirical study that builds upon past relevant research on (1) test accommodations and (2) auditory distraction and academic performance was conducted with elementary age students.…

  5. Evaluation of TIF to reduce fumigant emissions and the potential to use reduced rates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Strawberry growers in California rely heavily on soil fumigation to assure profitable berries and high yields. However, the adverse impact on air quality from fumigant emissions threatens the availability of fumigants for agricultural use. The objective of this research was to determine the performa...

  6. Bioenergy and biobased products hold promise of reducing pollution emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    Trees and other plants have, of course, long been useful for the wood and agricultural benefits they provide. Now, this organic matter is gaining new cachet as “biomass.”Some scientists hope that this stuff can be converted into practically a panacea of goods, including transportation fuels, electricity, commercial products such as chemicals, glues, and paints, and other materials—reducing societal dependence on petrochemical products.

  7. Method and apparatus for reducing solvent luminescence background emissions

    DOEpatents

    Affleck, Rhett L.; Ambrose, W. Patrick; Demas, James N.; Goodwin, Peter M.; Johnson, Mitchell E.; Keller, Richard A.; Petty, Jeffrey T.; Schecker, Jay A.; Wu, Ming

    1998-01-01

    The detectability of luminescent molecules in solution is enhanced by reducing the background luminescence due to impurity species also present in the solution. A light source that illuminates the solution acts to photolyze the impurities so that the impurities do not luminesce in the fluorescence band of the molecule of interest. Molecules of interest may be carried through the photolysis region in the solution or may be introduced into the solution after the photolysis region.

  8. Method and apparatus for reducing solvent luminescence background emissions

    DOEpatents

    Affleck, R.L.; Ambrose, W.P.; Demas, J.N.; Goodwin, P.M.; Johnson, M.E.; Keller, R.A.; Petty, J.T.; Schecker, J.A.; Wu, M.

    1998-10-27

    The detectability of luminescent molecules in solution is enhanced by reducing the background luminescence due to impurity species also present in the solution. A light source that illuminates the solution acts to photolyze the impurities so that the impurities do not luminesce in the fluorescence band of the molecule of interest. Molecules of interest may be carried through the photolysis region in the solution or may be introduced into the solution after the photolysis region. 6 figs.

  9. Challenges for Reducing Emissions of Black Carbon from the Transport Sector in Urban Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavala, M. A.; Molina, L. T.

    2013-05-01

    The transport sector is a large contributor of harmful gaseous and particulate emissions in many urban areas. Black carbon is a component of short-lived particulate matter emitted predominantly by freight, public transport, and heavy- duty trucks. Controlling the emissions of black carbon from the transport sector is important for mitigating its impacts on climate, ecosystems, and human health. However, reducing the emissions of black carbon from mobile sources may be a challenging task in many developing urban areas due to economic, social, and technical constrains. Several emissions control technologies offer a proven approach for reducing emissions of black carbon from diesel-powered mobile sources, but the accurate quantification of associated emissions benefits in developing urban areas is not well documented. We describe recent advances for the estimation of black carbon emissions from the transport sector in real world driving conditions and present examples of the potential benefits of implementing various emission control technologies in Mexico. The results can help in the identification of key factors that hinder the implementation of control emissions for reducing emissions of black carbon elsewhere.

  10. An optimal control model for reducing and trading of carbon emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Huaying; Liang, Jin

    2016-03-01

    A stochastic optimal control model of reducing and trading for carbon emissions is established in this paper. With considerations of reducing the carbon emission growth and the price of the allowances in the market, an optimal policy is searched to have the minimum total costs to achieve the agreement of emission reduction targets. The model turns to a two-dimension HJB equation problem. By the methods of reducing dimension and Cole-Hopf transformation, a semi-closed form solution of the corresponding HJB problem under some assumptions is obtained. For more general cases, the numerical calculations, analysis and comparisons are presented.

  11. Inhaled hydrogen gas therapy for prevention of noise-induced hearing loss through reducing reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Kurioka, Takaomi; Matsunobu, Takeshi; Satoh, Yasushi; Niwa, Katsuki; Shiotani, Akihiro

    2014-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) that form in the inner ear play an important role in noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). Recent studies have revealed that molecular hydrogen (H2) has great potential for reducing ROS. In this study, we examined the potential of hydrogen gas to protect against NIHL. We tested this hypothesis in guinea pigs with 0.5%, 1.0% and 1.5% H2 inhalation in air for 5h a day after noise exposure, for five consecutive days. All animals underwent measurements for auditory brainstem response after the noise exposure; the results revealed that there was a better improvement in the threshold shift for the 1.0% and 1.5% H2-treated groups than the non-treated group. Furthermore, outer hair cell (OHC) loss was examined 7 days after noise exposure. A significantly higher survival rate of OHCs was observed in the 1.0% and 1.5% H2-treated group as compared to that of the non-treated group in the basal turn. Immunohistochemical analyses for 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) were performed to examine the amount of oxidative DNA damage. While strong immunoreactivities against 8-OHdG were observed of the non-treated group, the H2-treated group showed decreased immunoreactivity for 8-OHdG. These findings strongly suggest that inhaled hydrogen gas protects against NIHL. PMID:25196919

  12. Schottky diode characteristics and 1/f noise of high sensitivity reduced graphene oxide/Si heterojunction photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Miao; Li, Xinming; Li, Xiao; Zang, Xiaobei; Zhen, Zhen; Xie, Dan; Fang, Ying; Zhu, Hongwei

    2016-03-01

    Reduced graphene oxide (RGO)/Si Schottky diode has been reported nowadays to show excellent performances in photodetection and other photoelectrical devices. Different from pure graphene, there are large amounts of function groups and structural defects left on the base plane of RGO, which may influence the interfacial properties of RGO/Si Schottky diode. Herein, the barrier inhomogeneity and junction characteristics were systematically investigated to help to describe the interface of RGO/Si diode. From the perspective of its applications, the influences of gas molecule and noise properties are considered to be important. Thus, the photovoltaic performance of RGO/Si devices in air and vacuum is investigated to analyze their effects. Meanwhile, 1/f noise of RGO/Si diodes is investigated under air/vacuum conditions and varied temperatures. It is found that the devices in vacuum and under higher power incident light show much lower 1/f noise. These results are meaningful to the noise control and performance improvement in the development of Schottky diode based devices.

  13. Application of the Karhunen-Loeve transform temporal image filter to reduce noise in real-time cardiac cine MRI.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yu; Chung, Yiu-Cho; Raman, Subha V; Simonetti, Orlando P

    2009-06-21

    Real-time dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) typically sacrifices the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) to achieve higher spatial and temporal resolution. Spatial and/or temporal filtering (e.g., low-pass filtering or averaging) of dynamic images improves the SNR at the expense of edge sharpness. We describe the application of a temporal filter for dynamic MR image series based on the Karhunen-Loeve transform (KLT) to remove random noise without blurring stationary or moving edges and requiring no training data. In this paper, we present several properties of this filter and their effects on filter performance, and propose an automatic way to find the filter cutoff based on the autocorrelation of the eigenimages. Numerical simulation and in vivo real-time cardiac cine MR image series spanning multiple cardiac cycles acquired using multi-channel sensitivity-encoded MRI, i.e., parallel imaging, are used to validate and demonstrate these properties. We found that in this application, the noise standard deviation was reduced to 42% of the original with no apparent image blurring by using the proposed filter cutoff. Greater noise reduction can be achieved by increasing the length of the image series. This advantage of KLT filtering provides flexibility in the form of another scan parameter to trade for SNR. PMID:19491455

  14. A performance standards approach to reducing CO{sub 2} emissions from electric power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, E.S.

    2009-06-15

    The CO{sub 2} emission performance standard policies outlined in this paper could complement a cap-and-trade program that puts a price on carbon and serve to significantly reduce the CO{sub 2} emissions from coal use for electricity generation. Emission performance standards have a long history in the United States and have been successfully used to control emissions of various air pollutants from electric generators. This paper explores the rationale for using emission performance standards and describes the various types of performance standard policies. Emission performance standards that address CO{sub 2} emissions could promote the deployment of carbon capture and storage technology coupled with new and existing coal-fueled electric power plants. 28 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Reducing noise from a Stirling micro cooler used with an InSb diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingham, Nicolas R.; Ashley, Michael C. B.

    2014-07-01

    Stirling micro coolers, such as the K508 from Ricor, are useful components of scientific instruments when there is a need to remove modest amounts of heat (~1/2W) at liquid nitrogren temperatures with an input power of less than 10W. The action of the cooler can, however, couple noise into sensitive detectors through a variety of mechanisms such as electromagnetic interference, mechanical vibration, and small temperature fluctuations. We report on successful noise-mitigation strategies for our application, an InSb diode for detecting light at 2.4 microns. The largest benefit was obtained by sychronizing the integration times with the position of the piston in the micro cooler. The piston position was determined using a hall-effect rotor position sensor in the driving motor.

  16. Reducing the Effect of Transducer Mount Induced Noise on Aeroacoustic Wind Tunnel Testing Data with a New Transducer Mount Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herron, A. J.; Reed, D. K.; Nance, D. K.

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of launch vehicle unsteady aerodynamics is a field best studied through experimentation, which is often carried out in the form of large scale wind tunnel testing. Measurement of the fluctuating pressures induced by the boundary layer noise is customarily made with miniature pressure transducers installed into a model of the vehicle of interest. Literature shows that noise level increases between two to five decibels (dB referenced to 20 micropascal) can be induced when the transducer surface is not mounted perfectly flush with the model outer surface. To reduce this artificially induced noise, special transducer holders have been used for aeroacoustic wind tunnel testing by NASA. This holder is a sleeve into which the transducer fits, with a cap that allows it to be mounted in a recessed hole in the model. A single hole in the holder allows the transport of the tunnel medium so the transducer can discriminate the fluctuating pressure due to the turbulent boundary layer noise. The holder is first dry fitted into the model and any difference in height between the holder and the model surface can be sanded flush. The holder is then removed from the model, the transducer glued inside the holder, and the holder replaced in the model, secured also with glue, thus eliminating the problem of noise level increases due to lack of flushness. In order to work with this holder design, special transducers have been ordered with their standard screen removed and the diaphragm moved as close to the top of the casing as possible to minimize any cavity volume. Although this greatly reduces induced noise due to the transducers being out of flush, the holders can also induce a cavity resonance that is usually at a very high frequency. This noise is termed transducer mount induced noise (XMIN). The peak of the mode can vary with the cavity depth, boundary layer noise that can excite the mode, tunnel flow medium, and the build of the transducers. Because the boundary

  17. Optimal packaging of dispersion-compensating fibers for matched nonlinear compensation and reduced optical noise.

    PubMed

    Wei, Haiqing; Plant, David V

    2005-09-15

    A method of packaging dispersion-compensating fibers (DCFs) is discussed that achieves optimal nonlinearity compensation and a good signal-to-noise ratio simultaneously. An optimally packaged dispersion-compensating module (DCM) may consist of portions of DCFs with higher and lower loss coefficients. Such optimized DCMs may be paired with transmission fibers to form scaled translation-symmetric lines that could effectively compensate for signal distortions due to dispersion and nonlinearity, with or without optical phase conjugation. PMID:16196322

  18. APPLICATION OF POLLUTION PREVENTION TECHNIQUES TO REDUCE INDOOR AIR EMISSIONS FROM ENGINEERED WOOD PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an investigation of pollution prevention options to reduce indoor emissions from a type of finished engineered wood. Emissions were screened from four types of finished engineered wood: oak-veneered particleboard coated and cured with a heat-curable, a...

  19. Reducing Energy Cost and Greenhouse Gas Emission in the Corporate Sector, a Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, Maxim L.

    2013-01-01

    The study is titled "Reducing energy cost and GreenHouse Gas emission in the corporate sector, A Delphi Study". The study applied the Delphi methodology and focused on the Green IT solutions that can help the modern corporate organizations with less than 1000 employees to decrease their energy costs and GHG emissions. The study presents…

  20. LOW PERMEABLE TARPS REDUCE EMISSIONS FROM DRIP-APPLIED INLINE IN A STRAWBERRY FIELD TRIAL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plastic tarps are often used to reduce fumigant emissions in raised-bed strawberry fields. In September 2007 near Oxnard, CA, a field study was conducted to determine the emission reductions under four tarp treatments: standard polyethylene (PE), virtually impermeable film (VIF), semi-impermeable fi...

  1. Reducing N2O emissions from orchard using subsurfce drip irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural soil is the major source for N2O emissions. Minimizing N2O emissions along with increasing N use efficiency, reducing leaching loss, and maintaining crop economic yield and quality can lead to increased sustainability of crop production. The main objective of this research is to evaluat...

  2. On-site denitrification beds could reduce indirect greenhouse gas emissions from agricultural drainage waters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrate (NO3-) laden agricultural drainage waters are non-point sources of indirect nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, which represent a significant fraction of total N2O emissions in the USA. On-site denitrification beds filled with woodchips were used to reduce NO3- under carbon rich anaerobic conditi...

  3. Effect of feeding distiller’s grains on reduced sulfur emissions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Odorous reduced sulfur compounds are produced during manure decomposition and emitted from confined animal feeding operations. Feeding high-sulfur distiller’s byproducts may increase the emission of these compounds. The objectives of a series of feedlot pen studies was to (i) determine if emission...

  4. Application of microbial inoculants as tools for reducing nitrous oxide emissions from different nitrogen fertilizers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O) are increasing due to several factors, including increased use of nitrogen fertilizers. New management tools are needed to reduce N2O emissions from production agriculture. One potential such tool is the use of microbial inoculants, which are increasingly being used ...

  5. Institute a modest carbon tax to reduce carbon emissions, finance clean energy technology development, cut taxes, and reduce the deficit

    SciTech Connect

    Muro, Mark; Rothwell, Jonathan

    2012-11-15

    The nation should institute a modest carbon tax in order to help clean up the economy and stabilize the nation’s finances. Specifically, Congress and the president should implement a $20 per ton, steadily increasing carbon excise fee that would discourage carbon dioxide emissions while shifting taxation onto pollution, financing energy efficiency (EE) and clean technology development, and providing opportunities to cut taxes or reduce the deficit. The net effect of these policies would be to curb harmful carbon emissions, improve the nation’s balance sheet, and stimulate job-creation and economic renewal.

  6. Reducing CO2-Emission by using Eco-Cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voit, K.; Bergmeister, K.; Janotka, I.

    2012-04-01

    CO2 concentration in the air is rising constantly. Globally, cement companies are emitting nearly two billion tonnes/year of CO2 (or around 6 to 7 % of the planet's total CO2 emissions) by producing portland cement clinker. At this pace, by 2025 the cement industry will be emitting CO2 at a rate of 3.5 billion tones/year causing enormous environmental damage (Shi et al., 2011; Janotka et al., 2012). At the dawn of the industrial revolution in the mid-eighteenth century the concentration of CO2 was at a level of ca. 280 ppm. 200 years later at the time of World War II the CO2 level had risen to 310 ppm what results in a rate of increase of 0,15 ppm per year for that period (Shi et al., 2011). In November 2011 the CO2 concentration reached a value of 391 ppm (NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, 2011), a rise of ca. 81 ppm in 66 years and an increased rate of around 1,2 ppm/year respectively. In the same period cement production in tons of cement has multiplied by a factor of ca. 62 (Kelly & Oss, US Geological Survey, 2010). Thus new CO2-saving eco-cement types are gaining in importance. In these cement types the energy-consuming portland cement clinker is partially replaced by latent hydraulic additives such as blast furnace slag, fly ash or zeolite. These hydraulic additives do not need to be fired in the rotary furnace. They ony need to be pulverized to the required grain size and added to the ground portland cement clinker. Hence energy is saved by skipping the engery-consuming firing process, in addition there is no CO2-degassing as there is in the case of lime burning. Therefore a research project between Austria and Slovakia, funded by the EU (Project ENVIZEO), was initiated in 2010. The main goal of this project is to develop new CEM V eco-types of cements and certificate them for common usage. CEM V is a portland clinker saving cement kind that allows the reduction of clinker to a proportion of 40-64% for CEM V/A and 20-39% for CEM V/B respectively by the

  7. Technological progress in reducing CFC (chlorofluorocarbon) and halon emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, N.D.; Shapiro, P.S.

    1989-04-01

    This paper discusses EPA's development of a technological program to implement in the U.S. the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer. EPA's Office of Air and Radiation (OAR) has the lead for developing the technical and economic goals of the program, and EPA's Office of Research and Development (ORD) has the lead in providing technical support to meet the goals, including both short-term projects and long-term research. EPA's strategy is to target the halon and high chlorofluorocarbon (CFC)-using industries or industry subgroups to identify opportunities to reduce CFC and halon usage and find alternatives. When such opportunities are found, cooperative industry/government groups are formed to identify and solve the problems that impede transition away from CFC and halon usage. Other groups (including academic, non-profit research institutes, other government agencies, and foreign individuals or groups) are invited to join in the effort if they have a special expertise or interest. Identifying the high-use industry sectors and subsectors is not difficult; however, identifying appropriate industries, individuals, and groups who are willing to influence industry usage of CFCs is not easy.

  8. Reducing CO2 emissions and energy consumption of heat-integrated distillation systems.

    PubMed

    Gadalla, Mamdouh A; Olujic, Zarko; Jansens, Peter J; Jobson, Megan; Smith, Robin

    2005-09-01

    Distillation systems are energy and power intensive processes and contribute significantly to the greenhouse gases emissions (e.g. carbon dioxide). Reducing CO2 emissions is an absolute necessity and expensive challenge to the chemical process industries in orderto meetthe environmental targets as agreed in the Kyoto Protocol. A simple model for the calculation of CO2 emissions from heat-integrated distillation systems is introduced, considering typical process industry utility devices such as boilers, furnaces, and turbines. Furnaces and turbines consume large quantities of fuels to provide electricity and process heats. As a result, they produce considerable amounts of CO2 gas to the atmosphere. Boilers are necessary to supply steam for heating purposes; besides, they are also significant emissions contributors. The model is used in an optimization-based approach to optimize the process conditions of an existing crude oil atmospheric tower in order to reduce its CO2 emissions and energy demands. It is also applied to generate design options to reduce the emissions from a novel internally heat-integrated distillation column (HIDiC). A gas turbine can be integrated with these distillation systems for larger emissions reduction and further energy savings. Results show that existing crude oil installations can save up to 21% in energy and 22% in emissions, when the process conditions are optimized. Additionally, by integrating a gas turbine, the total emissions can be reduced further by 48%. Internal heat-integrated columns can be a good alternative to conventional heat pump and other energy intensive close boiling mixtures separations. Energy savings can reach up to 100% with respect to reboiler heat requirements. Emissions of these configurations are cut down by up to 83%, compared to conventional units, and by 36%, with respect to heat pump alternatives. Importantly, cost savings and more profit are gained in parallel to emissions minimization. PMID:16190250

  9. Soy Biodiesel Emissions Have Reduced Inflammatory Effects Compared to Diesel Emissions in Healthy and Allergic Mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxicity of exhaust from combustion of petroleum diesel (BO), soy-based biodiesel (B100), or a 20% biodiesel/80% petrodiesel mix (B20) was compared in healthy and house dust mite (HDM)-allergic mice. Fuel emissions were diluted to target fine particulate matter (PM2.5) conrentrat...

  10. Status of Technological Advancements for Reducing Aircraft Gas Turbine Engine Pollutant Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudey, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    Combustor test rig results indicate that substantial reductions from current emission levels of carbon monoxide (CO), total unburned hydrocarbons (THC), oxides of nitrogen (NOx), and smoke are achievable by employing varying degrees of technological advancements in combustion systems. Minor to moderate modifications to existing conventional combustors produced significant reductions in CO and THC emissions at engine low power (idle/taxi) operating conditions but did not effectively reduce NOx at engine full power (takeoff) operating conditions. Staged combusiton techniques were needed to simultaneously reduce the levels of all the emissions over the entire engine operating range (from idle to takeoff). Emission levels that approached or were below the requirements of the 1979 EPA standards were achieved with the staged combustion systems and in some cases with the minor to moderate modifications to existing conventional combustion systems. Results from research programs indicate that an entire new generation of combustor technology with extremely low emission levels may be possible in the future.

  11. Reducing noise in the time-frequency representation using sparsity promoting kernel design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jokanović, Branka; Amin, Moeness G.; Zhang, Yimin D.

    2014-05-01

    Missing samples in the time domain introduce noise-like artifacts in the ambiguity domain due to their de facto zero values assumed by the bilinear transform. These artifacts clutter the dual domain of the time-frequency signal representation and obscures the time-frequency signature of single and multicomponent signals. In order to suppress the artifacts influence, we formulate a problem based on the sparsity aware kernel. The proposed kernel design is more robust to the artifacts caused by the missing samples.

  12. Description of the Role of Shot Noise in Spectroscopic Absorption and Emission Measurements with Photodiode and Photomultiplier Tube Detectors: Information for an Instrumental Analysis Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClain, Robert L.; Wright, John C.

    2014-01-01

    A description of shot noise and the role it plays in absorption and emission measurements using photodiode and photomultiplier tube detection systems is presented. This description includes derivations of useful forms of the shot noise equation based on Poisson counting statistics. This approach can deepen student understanding of a fundamental…

  13. Status review of NASA programs for reducing aircraft gas turbine engine emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudey, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    Programs initiated by NASA to develop and demonstrate low emission advanced technology combustors for reducing aircraft gas turbine engine pollution are reviewed. Program goals are consistent with urban emission level requirements as specified by the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency and with upper atmosphere cruise emission levels as recommended by the U. S. Climatic Impact Assessment Program and National Research Council. Preliminary tests of advanced technology combustors indicate that significant reductions in all major pollutant emissions should be attainable in present generation aircraft gas turbine engines without adverse effects on fuel consumption. Preliminary test results from fundamental studies indicate that extremely low emission combustion systems may be possible for future generation jet aircraft. The emission reduction techniques currently being evaluated in these programs are described along with the results and a qualitative assessment of development difficulty.

  14. Coincident bursts of auroral kilometric radiation and VLF emissions associted with a type 3 solar radio noise event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, T. J.; Singh, S.; Wu, C. S.; Labelle, J.; Treumann, R. A.; Inan, U. S.; Lanzerotti, L. J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper examines an isolated magnetospheric VLF/radio noise event that is highly suggestive of the triggering of terrestrial auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) bu solar type III radio emission and of a close relation between AKR and broadband hiss. The solar type III burst was measured on polar HF riometers and was coincident with local dayside VLF/LF noise emission bursts at South Pole station. It was also coincident with AKR bursts detected onthe AMPTE/IRM satellite, at the same magnetic local time as South Pole. On the basis of the close association of AKR and VLF bursts, and from geometric considerations relating to wave propagation, it is likely that the AKR source was on the dayside and on field lines near South Pole station. The general level of geomagnetic activity was very low. However, an isolated magnetic impulse event (MIE) accompanied by a riometer absorption pulse was in progress when all of the VLF/radio noise bursts occurred. The very close association of the typew III burst at HF with the AKR is consistent with external stimulation of the AKR, is different, more immediate,triggering process than that implied by Calvert (1981) is invoked. It is suggested here that some of the HF solar radiant energy may decay into waves with frequences comparable to those of the AKR by paraetric excitation or some other process, thus providing the few background photons required for the generation of AKR by the WU and Lee (1979) cyclotron maser instability. The AKR, perhaps by modifying the magnetospheric electron velocity distribution, might have produced the observed VLF emissions. Alternatively, the VLF emissions may have arisen from the same anisotropic and unstable electron distribution function responsible for the AKR.

  15. Emission of sound from axisymmetric turbulence convected by a mean flow with application to jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. E.; Rosenbaum, B. M.

    1972-01-01

    A model, based on Lighthill's theory, for predicting aerodynamic noise from a turbulent shear flow is developed. This model is a generalization of the one developed by Ribner. Unlike Ribner's model, it does not require that the turbulent correlations factor into space and time-dependent parts. It replaces his assumption of isotropic. turbulence by the more realistic one of axisymmetric turbulence. The implications of the model for jet noise are discussed.

  16. Introduction to NASA contracts. [on engine modifications to reduce exhaust emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempke, E. E., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center issued requests for proposal to Avco Lycoming and Teledyne Continental Motors for a contractual effort to establish and demonstrate engine modifications to reduce exhaust emissions safely with minimum adverse effects on cost, weight, and fuel economy. The secondary objective was reducing fuel consumption.

  17. Pilot study to reduce emissions, improve health, and offset BC emissions through the distribution of improved cook stoves in Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banmali Pradhan, B.; Panday, A. K.; Surapipith, V.

    2013-12-01

    In most developing countries, wood and other biomass fuels are still the primary source of energy for the majority of the people, particularly the poor. It is estimated that cook stoves account for approximately 20% of global black carbon emissions. In Nepal 87% of energy is supplied from traditional biomass and 75% of households still depend on biomass as a cooking fuel. The substitution of traditional cook stoves with improved cook stoves provides an important way to reduce black carbon emissions. In 2013 the International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD) has commenced a pilot study that both examines ways to effectively disseminate improved cookstoves across remote rural mountain regions, and also quantifies the resulting changes in emissions, air quality and health. The selected study area is in Bajrabarahi Village in Makawanpur district, to the southwest of Kathmandu. The study area consists of around 1600 households, which are divided into control groups and groups where the cook stove intervention is taking place. The study complements the ';Clean Cooking energy solution for all by 2017' announced by the Government of Nepal recently, and will provide insights to the government on ways to effectively reduce black carbon emissions from cook stoves. To make the study robust and sustainable, local women's group and a local medical institution are involved in the project right from the conceptualization stage. The study region has been chosen in part because the medical school Patan Academy of Health Sciences (PAHS) has already started a long term health assessment in the region, and has built up considerable local contacts. The local women's group is working on the modality of cook stove distribution through micro credit programmes in the village. We will distribute the best available manufactured, fan-assisted cook stoves that are expected to reduce BC emissions the most. Health assessments, emissions estimates, as well as measurements of

  18. Profiling stainless steel welding processes to reduce fume emissions, hexavalent chromium emissions and operating costs in the workplace

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Michael; Siert, Arlen; Stone, Samuel; Chen, Bean T.

    2016-01-01

    Nine gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes for stainless steel were assessed for fume generation rates, fume generation rates per g of electrode consumed, and emission rates for hexavalent chromium (Cr6+). Elemental manganese, nickel, chromium, iron emissions per unit length of weld and labor plus consumables costs were similarly measured. Flux-cored arc welding and shielded metal arc (SMAW) processes were also studied. The objective was to identify the best welding processes for reducing workplace exposures, and estimate costs for all processes. Using a conical chamber, fumes were collected, weighed, recovered and analyzed by inductively-coupled atomic emission spectroscopy for metals, and by ion chromatography for Cr6+. GMAW processes used were Surface Tension Transfer™, Regulated Metal Deposition™, Cold Metal Transfer™, short-circuit, axial spray, and pulsed spray modes. Flux-cored welding used gas shielding; SMAW used E308 rods. Costs were estimated as dollars per m length of a ¼ in (6.3 mm) thick horizontal butt weld; equipment costs were estimated as ratios of new equipment costs to a 250 ampere capacity SMAW welding machine. Results indicate a broad range of fume emission factors for the processes studied. Fume emission rates per g of electrode were lowest for GMAW processes such as pulsed-spray mode (0.2 mg/g), and highest for SMAW (8 mg fume/g electrode). Emission rates of Cr6+ ranged from 50 to 7800 μg/min, and Cr6+ generation rates per g electrode ranged from 1 to 270μg/g. Elemental Cr generation rates spanned 13 to 330μg/g. Manganese emission rates ranged from 50 to 300μg/g. Nickel emission rates ranged from 4 to140 μg/g. Labor and consumables costs ranged from $3.15 (GMAW pulsed spray) to $7.40 (SMAW) per meter of finished weld, and were measured or estimated for all 11 processes tested. Equipment costs for some processes may be as much as 5 times the cost of a typical SMAW welding machine. The results show that all of the GMAW processes

  19. Profiling stainless steel welding processes to reduce fume emissions, hexavalent chromium emissions and operating costs in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Keane, Michael; Siert, Arlen; Stone, Samuel; Chen, Bean T

    2016-01-01

    Nine gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes for stainless steel were assessed for fume generation rates, fume generation rates per g of electrode consumed, and emission rates for hexavalent chromium (Cr(6+)). Elemental manganese, nickel, chromium, iron emissions per unit length of weld, and labor plus consumables costs were similarly measured. Flux-cored arc welding and shielded metal arc (SMAW) processes were also studied. The objective was to identify the best welding processes for reducing workplace exposures, and estimate costs for all processes. Using a conical chamber, fumes were collected, weighed, recovered, and analyzed by inductively coupled atomic emission spectroscopy for metals, and by ion chromatography for Cr(6+). GMAW processes used were Surface Tension Transfer, Regulated Metal Deposition, Cold Metal Transfer, short-circuit, axial spray, and pulsed spray modes. Flux-cored welding used gas shielding; SMAW used E308 rods. Costs were estimated as dollars per m length of a ¼ in (6.3 mm) thick horizontal butt weld; equipment costs were estimated as ratios of new equipment costs to a 250 ampere capacity SMAW welding machine. Results indicate a broad range of fume emission factors for the processes studied. Fume emission rates per g of electrode were lowest for GMAW processes such as pulsed-spray mode (0.2 mg/g), and highest for SMAW (8 mg fume/g electrode). Emission rates of Cr(6+) ranged from 50-7800 µg/min, and Cr(6+) generation rates per g electrode ranged from 1-270 µg/g. Elemental Cr generation rates spanned 13-330 µg/g. Manganese emission rates ranged from 50-300 µg/g. Nickel emission rates ranged from 4-140 µg/g. Labor and consumables costs ranged from $3.15 (GMAW pulsed spray) to $7.40 (SMAW) per meter of finished weld, and were measured or estimated for all 11 processes tested. Equipment costs for some processes may be as much as five times the cost of a typical SMAW welding machine. The results show that all of the GMAW processes in this

  20. Homomorphic filtering textural analysis technique to reduce multiplicative noise in the 11Oba nano-doped liquid crystalline compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhav, B. T. P.; Pardhasaradhi, P.; Manepalli, R. K. N. R.; Pisipati, V. G. K. M.

    2015-07-01

    The compound undecyloxy benzoic acid (11Oba) exhibits nematic and smectic-C phases while a nano-doped undecyloxy benzoic acid with ZnO exhibits the same nematic and smectic-C phases with reduced clearing temperature as expected. The doping is done with 0.5% and 1% ZnO molecules. The clearing temperatures are reduced by approximately 4 ° and 6 °, respectively (differential scanning calorimeter data). While collecting the images from a polarizing microscope connected with hot stage and camera, the illumination and reflectance combined multiplicatively and the image quality was reduced to identify the exact phase in the compound. A novel technique of homomorphic filtering is used in this manuscript through which multiplicative noise components of the image are separated linearly in the frequency domain. This technique provides a frequency domain procedure to improve the appearance of an image by gray level range compression and contrast enhancement.

  1. Cost-effective means of reducing ammonia emissions from UK agriculture using the NARSES model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, J.; Ryan, M.; Anthony, S. G.; Brewer, A.; Laws, J.; Aller, M. F.; Misselbrook, T. H.

    To comply with International agreements to improve air quality, signatory states need to reduce emissions of ammonia (NH 3). Since the majority of NH 3 emissions come from agriculture, measures may need to be implemented by the farming industry. Member states of the EU will, by 2010, require large pig and poultry production units to reduce NH 3 emissions to comply with the integrated pollution prevention and control directive (IPPC). The NARSES model uses a mass-flow method to estimate NH 3 emission from UK agriculture and to identify the most cost-effective means of reducing NH 3 emissions. Model runs were carried out to assess the likely impact of the IPPC Directive on UK NH 3 emissions and the sensitivity of model output to input data on the costs and abatement efficiencies of proposed abatement measures. The impact of the IPPC Directive is likely to be small, offering a reduction of c. 8700 t, 3.5% of total UK agricultural NH 3 emissions. Even large (30%) changes in our estimates of cost or changes of 10% in our estimates of abatement efficiency will make little difference to the ranking of abatement techniques according to cost-effectiveness. The most cost-effective reductions may be achieved by replacing urea fertilizer with ammonium nitrate, immediate incorporation of manures and slurries to tillage land by discs, storing all FYM and poultry manures before spreading to land and applying slurries to grassland by trailing shoe.

  2. Effectiveness of US state policies in reducing CO2 emissions from power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Don; Bergstrand, Kelly; Running, Katrina

    2014-11-01

    President Obama's landmark initiative to reduce the CO2 emissions of existing power plants, the nation's largest source of greenhouse gas (GHG) pollutants, depends heavily on states and their ability to devise policies that meet the goals set by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Under the EPA's proposed Clean Power Plan, states will be responsible for cutting power plants' carbon pollution 30% from 2005 levels by 2030. States have already adopted several policies to reduce the electricity sector's climate impact. Some of these policies focus on reducing power plants' CO2 emissions, and others address this outcome in a more roundabout fashion by encouraging energy efficiency and renewable energy. However, it remains unclear which, if any, of these direct and indirect strategies actually mitigate plants' emissions because scholars have yet to test their effects using plant-level emission data. Here we use a newly released data source to determine whether states' policies significantly shape individual power plants' CO2 emissions. Findings reveal that certain types of direct strategy (emission caps and GHG targets) and indirect ones (public benefit funds and electric decoupling) lower plants' emissions and thus are viable building blocks of a federal climate regime.

  3. Programs and measures to reduce GHG emissions in agriculture and waste treatment in Slovakia

    SciTech Connect

    Mareckova, K.; Bratislava, S.; Kucirek, S.

    1996-12-31

    Slovakia is a UN FCCC Annex I country and is obliged to limit its anthropogenic GHG emissions in the year 2000 to 1990 level. The key greenhouse gas in Slovakia is CO{sub 2} resulting mainly from fuel combustion processes. However the share of CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O is approximately 20% of the total emissions on GWP basis. These gases are occurring mainly in non-energy sectors. The construction of the non-CO{sub 2} emission scenarios to reduce GHG and the uncertainty in N{sub 2}O and CH{sub 4} emission estimation are discussed focusing on agriculture and waste treatment. The presentation will also include information on emission trends of CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O since 1988. There are already implemented measures reducing GHG emissions in Slovakia, however, not motivated by global warming. A short view of implemented measures with an assessment of their benefit concerning non-CO{sub 2} GHG emissions reduction and some proposed mitigation options for agriculture and waste treatment are shown. Expected difficulties connected with preparing scenarios and with implementation of reducing measures are discussed.

  4. Relative effectiveness of several simulated jet engine noise spectral treatments in reducing annoyance in a TV-viewing situation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunn, W. J.; Shigehisa, T.; Shepherd, W. T.

    1976-01-01

    An experiment was conducted in order to determine the relative effectiveness of several hypothetical jet engine noise treatments and to test hypothesis that speech interference, at least in part, mediates annoyance in a TV-viewing situation. Twenty-four subjects watched television in a simulated living room. Recorded jet flyover noises were presented in such a way as to create the illusion that aircraft were actually flying overhead. There were 27 stimuli (nine spectra at three overall levels) presented at an average rate of approximately one flight every 2 minutes. Subjects judged the annoyance value of individual stimuli using either a category rating method or magnitude estimation method in each of two 1-hour sessions. The spectral treatments most effective in reducing annoyance were at 1.6 Khz and 800 Hz, in that order. The degree of annoyance reduction resulting from all treatments was affected by the overall sound level of the stimuli, with the greatest reduction at the intermediate overall sound level, about 88 to 89 db(A), peak value. The results are interpreted as supporting the hypothesis that speech interference, at least in part, mediates annoyance with aircraft noise in a TV-viewing situation.

  5. A new digital readout integrated circuit (DROIC) with pixel parallel A/D conversion with reduced quantization noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayahan, Huseyin; Ceylan, Ömer; Yazici, Melik; Gurbuz, Yasar

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents a digital ROIC for staring type arrays with extending counting method to realize very low quantization noise while achieving a very high charge handling capacity. Current state of the art has shown that digital readouts with pulse frequency method can achieve charge handling capacities higher than 3Ge- with quantization noise higher than 1000e-. Even if the integration capacitance is reduced, it cannot be lower than 1-3 fF due to the parasitic capacitance of the comparator. For achieving a very low quantization noise of 161 electrons in a power efficient way, a new method based on measuring the time to measure the remaining charge on the integration capacitor is proposed. With this approach SNR of low flux pixels are significantly increased while large flux pixels can store electrons as high as 2.33Ge-. A prototype array of 32×32 pixels with 30μm pitch is implemented in 90nm CMOS process technology for verification. Measurement results are given for complete readout.

  6. Directional microphone arrays: Reducing wind noise without killing your signal or filling up your disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zumberge, M. A.; Walker, K. T.; Dewolf, S.; Hedlin, M. A.; Shearer, P. M.; Berger, J.

    2008-12-01

    The bane of infrasound signal detection is the noise generated by the wind. While the physics of the noise is still a subject of investigation, it is clear that sampling pressure at many points over a length scale larger than the spatial coherence length of wind turbulence attenuates the noise. A dense array of microphones can exploit this approach, but this presents different challenges. Two mechanical wind filters using this approach are commonly employed by the nuclear monitoring community (rosette pipe and porous-hoses networks) and attach to a central microphone. To get large wind noise reduction and a low signal detection threshold in the frequency band of interest, these filters require large apertures. However, these wind filters with such large apertures have a poor omnidirectional instrument response for typical infrasound signals because the pressure signal propagates at the speed of sound through the pipes/hoses to the central microphone. A simple, but improved averaging approach would be to instantaneously sample a long length of the infrasound signal wavefront. Optical fiber infrasound sensors (OFIS) are an implementation of this idea. These sensors are compliant sealed tubes wrapped with two optical fibers that integrate pressure change instantaneously along the length of the tube with laser interferometery. Infrasound arrays typically consist of several microbarometers with wind filters separated by distances that provide predictable signal time separations, forming the basis for processing techniques that estimate the phase velocity direction. An analogous approach is to form an array of OFIS arms. The OFIS instrument response is a predictable function of the orientation of the arm with respect to the signal wavefront. An array of many OFIS arms with different azimuths permits at least one OFIS to record any signal without the signal attenuation inherent in equivalently-sized onmi-directional mechanical filters. OFIS arms that are wavefront

  7. Aeroacoustic probe design for microphone to reduce flow-induced self-noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allew, Cristopher S.; Soderman, Paul T.

    1993-01-01

    A new aerodynamic microphone forebody design was tested in the National Full-scale Aerodynamics Complex (NFAC) at NASA Ames Research Center. An overview of the design theory is presented. The new microphone forebody was tested along with the industry standard Bruel and Kjaer (B&K) aerodynamic microphone forebody in the Ames 7- by 10-Foot Wind Tunnel, NFAC 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel and Anechoic Chamber. The wind tunnel results show that high frequency tones, present with the B&K microphone forebody, are eliminated with the new probe. Broad band background noise levels at lower frequencies are also shown to decrease with the 1/4 inch version of the new probe. Finally, the Anechoic Chamber results show no difference in the directional characteristics between the new and B&K microphone forebodies below 80 kHz.

  8. Spectral demixing avoids registration errors and reduces noise in multicolor localization-based super-resolution microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampe, André; Tadeus, Georgi; Schmoranzer, Jan

    2015-09-01

    Multicolor single molecule localization-based super-resolution microscopy (SMLM) approaches are challenged by channel crosstalk and errors in multi-channel registration. We recently introduced a spectral demixing-based variant of direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (SD-dSTORM) to perform multicolor SMLM with minimal color crosstalk. Here, we demonstrate that the spectral demixing procedure is inherently free of errors in multicolor registration and therefore does not require multicolor channel alignment. Furthermore, spectral demixing significantly reduces single molecule noise and is applicable to astigmatism-based 3D multicolor imaging achieving 25 nm lateral and 66 nm axial resolution on cellular nanostructures.

  9. Reducing Ultrafine Particle Emissions Using Air Injection in Wood-Burning Cookstoves.

    PubMed

    Rapp, Vi H; Caubel, Julien J; Wilson, Daniel L; Gadgil, Ashok J

    2016-08-01

    In order to address the health risks and climate impacts associated with pollution from cooking on biomass fires, researchers have focused on designing new cookstoves that improve cooking performance and reduce harmful emissions, specifically particulate matter (PM). One method for improving cooking performance and reducing emissions is using air injection to increase turbulence of unburned gases in the combustion zone. Although air injection reduces total PM mass emissions, the effect on PM size distribution and number concentration has not been thoroughly investigated. Using two new wood-burning cookstove designs from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, this research explores the effect of air injection on cooking performance, PM and gaseous emissions, and PM size distribution and number concentration. Both cookstoves were created using the Berkeley-Darfur Stove as the base platform to isolate the effects of air injection. The thermal performance, gaseous emissions, PM mass emissions, and particle concentrations (ranging from 5 nm to 10 μm in diameter) of the cookstoves were measured during multiple high-power cooking tests. The results indicate that air injection improves cookstove performance and reduces total PM mass but increases total ultrafine (less than 100 nm in diameter) PM concentration over the course of high-power cooking. PMID:27348315

  10. Comparisons of soil surface sealing methods to reduce fumigant emission loss.

    PubMed

    Gao, Suduan; Hanson, Bradley D; Qin, Ruijun; Wang, Dong; Yates, Scott R

    2011-01-01

    State and federal regulatory agencies depend on quality field data for determining the effects of agricultural management practices on fumigant emissions to develop sound, science-based policies and regulations on preplant soil fumigants. Field plot tests, using growers' standard field operation procedures, were used to simultaneously determine the effectiveness of several commonly proposed emission reduction methods, in a trial involving shank injection of Telone II [a.i. 1,3-dichloropropnene (1,3-D)] to a sandy loam soil to a target rate of 372 kg ha(-1). The experiment was conducted in late September 2008 in the San Joaquin Valley of California. Fumigant emissions were captured using dynamic flux chambers. The results showed that virtually impermeable film (VIF) reduced emissions >95% when compared to bare soil, and the glue joints in the film did not significantly affect the tarp performance. The VIF also created a more uniform distribution of gaseous fumigant in the soil profile, which would likely benefit pest control efficacy. Standard high-density polyethylene (HDPE) tarp reduced total 1,3-D emissions about 50% (higher than most reported values) in this trial, whereas postfumigation intermittent water treatments (seals) reduced cumulative emission losses by approximately 20%. Adding 49.4 Mg ha (equivalent to 20 tons per acre) of composted dairy manure to surface soils did not reduce 1,3-D emissions during this experiment. Use of VIF was the most promising technique in reducing emissions and has the potential to allow lower application rates while providing satisfactory pest control. PMID:21869510

  11. Noise-reducing algorithms do not necessarily provide superior dose optimisation for hepatic lesion detection with multidetector CT

    PubMed Central

    Dobeli, K L; Lewis, S J; Meikle, S R; Thiele, D L; Brennan, P C

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare the dose-optimisation potential of a smoothing filtered backprojection (FBP) and a hybrid FBP/iterative algorithm to that of a standard FBP algorithm at three slice thicknesses for hepatic lesion detection with multidetector CT. Methods: A liver phantom containing a 9.5-mm opacity with a density of 10 HU below background was scanned at 125, 100, 75, 50 and 25 mAs. Data were reconstructed with standard FBP (B), smoothing FBP (A) and hybrid FBP/iterative (iDose4) algorithms at 5-, 3- and 1-mm collimation. 10 observers marked opacities using a four-point confidence scale. Jackknife alternative free-response receiver operating characteristic figure of merit (FOM), sensitivity and noise were calculated. Results: Compared with the 125-mAs/5-mm setting for each algorithm, significant reductions in FOM (p<0.05) and sensitivity (p<0.05) were found for all three algorithms for all exposures at 1-mm thickness and for all slice thicknesses at 25 mAs, with the exception of the 25-mAs/5-mm setting for the B algorithm. Sensitivity was also significantly reduced for all exposures at 3-mm thickness for the A algorithm (p<0.05). Noise for the A and iDose4 algorithms was approximately 13% and 21% lower, respectively, than for the B algorithm. Conclusion: Superior performance for hepatic lesion detection was not shown with either a smoothing FBP algorithm or a hybrid FBP/iterative algorithm compared with a standard FBP technique, even though noise reduction with thinner slices was demonstrated with the alternative approaches. Advances in knowledge: Reductions in image noise with non-standard CT algorithms do not necessarily translate to an improvement in low-contrast object detection. PMID:23392194

  12. A simplified approach for the calculation of acoustic emission in the case of friction-induced noise and vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soobbarayen, K.; Besset, S.; Sinou, J.-. J.

    2015-01-01

    The acoustic response associated with squeal noise radiations is a hard issue due to the need to consider non-linearities of contact and friction, to solve the associated nonlinear dynamic problem and to calculate the noise emissions due to self-excited vibrations. In this work, the focus is on the calculation of the sound pressure in free space generated during squeal events. The calculation of the sound pressure can be performed by the Boundary Element Method (BEM). The inputs of this method are a boundary element model, a field of normal velocity characterized by a unique frequency. However, the field of velocity associated with friction-induced vibrations is composed of several harmonic components. So, the BEM equation has to be solved for each frequency and in most cases, the number of harmonic components is significant. Therefore, the computation time can be prohibitive. The reduction of the number of harmonic component is a key point for the quick estimation of the squeal noise. The proposed approach is based on the detection and the selection of the predominant harmonic components in the mean square velocity. It is applied on two cases of squeal and allows us to consider only few frequencies. In this study, a new method will be proposed in order to quickly well estimate the noise emission in free space. This approach will be based on an approximated acoustic power of brake system which is assumed to be a punctual source, an interpolated directivity and the decrease of the acoustic power levels. This method is applied on two classical cases of squeal with one and two unstable modes. It allows us to well reconstruct the acoustic power levels map. Several error estimators are introduced and show that the reconstructed field is close to the reference calculated with a complete BEM.

  13. A research program to reduce interior noise in general aviation airplanes. Influence of depressurization and damping material on the noise reduction characteristics of flat and curved stiffened panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navaneethan, R.; Streeter, B.; Koontz, S.; Roskam, J.

    1981-01-01

    Some 20 x 20 aluminum panels were studied in a frequency range from 20 Hz to 5000 Hz. The noise sources used were a swept sine wave generator and a random noise generator. The effect of noise source was found to be negligible. Increasing the pressure differential across the panel gave better noise reduction below the fundamental resonance frequency due to an increase in stiffness. The largest increase occurred in the first 1 psi pressure differential. The curved, stiffened panel exhibited similar behavior, but with a lower increase of low frequency noise reduction. Depressurization on these panels resulted in decreased noise reduction at higher frequencies. The effect of damping tapes on the overall noise reduction values of the test specimens was small away from the resonance frequency. In the mass-law region, a slight and proportional improvement in noise reduction was observed by adding damping material. Adding sound absorbtion material to a panel with damping material beneficially increased noise reduction at high frequencies.

  14. A study on large coherent structures and noise emission in a turbulent round jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, ZhenHua; Zhou, Lin; Sun, DeJun

    2014-08-01

    A moderate Reynolds number, and high subsonic turbulent round jet is investigated by large eddy simulation. The detailed results (e.g. mean flow properties, turbulence intensities, etc.) are validated against the experimental data, and special attention is paid to study motions of coherent structures and their contributions to far-field noise. Eulerian methods (e.g. Q-criteria and λ2 criteria) are utilized for visualizing coherent structures directly for instantaneous flow fields, and Lagrangian coherent structures accounting for integral effect are shown via calculating fields of finite time Lyapunov exponents based on bidimensional velocity fields. All visualizations demonstrate that intrusion of three-dimensional vortical structures into jet core occurs intermittently at the end of the potential core, resulting from the breakdown of helical vortex rings in the shear layer. Intermittencies in the shear layer and on the centerline are studied quantitatively, and distinctively different distributions of probability density function are observed. Moreover, the physical sound sources are obtained through a filtering operation of defined sources in Lighthill's analogy, and their distributions verify that intrusion of vortical structures into the core region serves as important sound sources, in particular for noise at aft angles. The facts that intermittent behaviors are caused by motions of coherent structures and correlated with noise generation imply that to establish reasonable sound sources in active noise production region based on intermittent coherent structures is one of the key issues for far-field noise prediction.

  15. Effects of impulse noise on transiently evoked otoacoustic emission in soldiers.

    PubMed

    Konopka, Wieslaw; Pawlaczyk-Luszczynska, Malgorzata; Sliwinska-Kowalska, Mariola; Grzanka, Antoni; Zalewski, Piotr

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the effects of exposure to impulse noise on TEOAE, as compared to PTA. The study comprised 92 soldiers, subjected to impulse noise during military service. The control group consisted of secondary school students, not exposed to noise. Extended high frequency PTA, and TEOAE were recorded before and after one year of military service. The total level of noise and spectrum analysis were performed for all kinds of weapons, separately. The highest levels of noise for weapons were related to frequencies from 1.6-16 kHz. After military service significant deterioration of hearing was observed on average by 6 dB exclusively at the frequencies of 10 and 12 kHz. TEOAE reduction was registered predominantly at frequencies of 2, 3 and 4 kHz, with the greatest decrease at 2 kHz (p <0.02). The control group did not show any significant audiometric changes as well as TEOAE during the time of experiment. PMID:15796096

  16. Assessment of alternative disposal methods to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from municipal solid waste in India.

    PubMed

    Yedla, Sudhakar; Sindhu, N T

    2016-06-01

    Open dumping, the most commonly practiced method of solid waste disposal in Indian cities, creates serious environment and economic challenges, and also contributes significantly to greenhouse gas emissions. The present article attempts to analyse and identify economically effective ways to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from municipal solid waste. The article looks at the selection of appropriate methods for the control of methane emissions. Multivariate functional models are presented, based on theoretical considerations as well as the field measurements to forecast the greenhouse gas mitigation potential for all the methodologies under consideration. Economic feasibility is tested by calculating the unit cost of waste disposal for the respective disposal process. The purpose-built landfill system proposed by Yedla and Parikh has shown promise in controlling greenhouse gas and saving land. However, these studies show that aerobic composting offers the optimal method, both in terms of controlling greenhouse gas emissions and reducing costs, mainly by requiring less land than other methods. PMID:27118738

  17. Elements for the expected mechanisms on 'reduced emissions from deforestation and degradation, REDD' under UNFCCC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollicone, D.; Freibauer, A.; Schulze, E. D.; Braatz, S.; Grassi, G.; Federici, S.

    2007-10-01

    Carbon emissions from deforestation and degradation account for about 20% of global anthropogenic emissions. Strategies and incentives for reduced emissions from deforestation and degradation (REDD) have emerged as one of the most active areas in the international climate change negotiations under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). While the current negotiations focus on a REDD mechanism in developing countries, it should be recognized that risks of carbon losses from forests occur in all climate zones and also in industrialized countries. A future climate change agreement would be more effective if it included all carbon losses and gains from land use in all countries and climate zones. The REDD mechanism will be an important step towards reducing emissions from land use change in developing countries, but needs to be followed by steps in other land use systems and regions. A national approach to REDD and significant coverage globally are needed to deal with the risk that deforestation and degradation activities are displaced rather than avoided. Favourable institutional and governance conditions need to be established that guarantee in the long-term a stable incentive and control system for maintaining forest carbon stocks. Ambitious emission reductions from deforestation and forest degradation need sustained financial incentives, which go beyond positive incentives for reduced emissions but also give incentives for sustainable forest management. Current data limitations need—and can be—overcome in the coming years to allow accurate accounting of reduced emissions from deforestation and degradation. A proper application of the conservativeness approach in the REDD context could allow a simplified reporting of emissions from deforestation in a first phase, consistent with the already agreed UNFCCC reporting principles.

  18. Federal, state and utility roles in reducing new building greenhouse gas emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.A.; Shankle, D.; Boulin, J.

    1995-03-01

    This paper will explore the role of implementation of building energy codes and standards in reducing US greenhouse gas emissions. It will discuss the role of utilities in supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Environmental Protection Agency in improving the efficiency of new buildings. The paper will summarize Federal policies and programs that improve code compliance and increase overall greenhouse gas emission reductions. Finally, the paper will discuss the role of code compliance and the energy and greenhouse gas emission reductions that have been realized from various Federal, State and utility programs that enhance compliance.

  19. Energy Recovery from End-of-Life Tyres: Untapped Possibility to Reduce CO2 Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzene, Ilze; Rochas, Claudio; Blumberga, Dagnija; Rosa, Marika; Erdmanis, Andris

    2010-01-01

    In this paper the possibility to reduce CO2 emissions by energy recovery from waste tyres is discussed. The objective of the study is to analyze the end-of-life tyre market in Latvia, to assess the amount of used tyres available and to calculate the potential reduction of CO2 emissions by energy recovery from tyres in mineral products industry. Calculation results show that an improved collection and combustion of end-of-life tyres in the cement industry can save up to 17% of the present CO2 emissions in the mineral products industry.

  20. Environmental Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumberg, Martin

    Environmental noise may be defined as unwanted sound that is caused by emissions from traffic (roads, air traffic corridors, and railways), industrial sites and recreational infrastructures, which may cause both annoyance and damage to health. Noise in the environment or community seriously affects people, interfering with daily activities at school, work and home and during leisure time.

  1. A warmer policy for a colder climate: Can China both reduce poverty and cap carbon emissions?

    PubMed

    Glomsrød, Solveig; Wei, Taoyuan; Aamaas, Borgar; Lund, Marianne T; Samset, Bjørn H

    2016-10-15

    Reducing global carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions is often thought to be at odds with economic growth and poverty reduction. Using an integrated assessment modeling approach, we find that China can cap CO2 emissions at 2015 level while sustaining economic growth and reducing the urban-rural income gap by a third by 2030. As a result, the Chinese economy becomes less dependent on exports and investments, as household consumption emerges as a driver behind economic growth, in line with current policy priorities. The resulting accumulated greenhouse gas emissions reduction 2016-2030 is about 60billionton (60Mg) CO2e. A CO2 tax combined with income re-distribution initially leads to a modest warming due to reduction in sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions. However, the net effect is eventually cooling when the effect of reduced CO2 emissions dominates due to the long-lasting climate response of CO2. The net reduction in global temperature for the remaining part of this century is about 0.03±0.02°C, corresponding in magnitude to the cooling from avoiding one year of global CO2 emissions. PMID:27295595

  2. Low-noise cold-field emission current obtained between two opposed carbon cone nanotips during in situ transmission electron microscope biasing

    SciTech Connect

    Knoop, L. de; Gatel, C.; Houdellier, F.; Monthioux, M.; Masseboeuf, A.; Snoeck, E.; Hÿtch, M. J.

    2015-06-29

    A dedicated transmission electron microscope sample holder has been used to study in situ the cold-field emission process of carbon cone nanotips (CCnTs). We show that when using a CCnT instead of a Au plate-anode, the standard deviation of the emission current noise can be decreased from the 10 nA range to the 1 nA range under vacuum conditions of 10{sup −5 }Pa. This shows the strong influence of the anode on the cold-field emission current noise.

  3. 75 FR 57191 - Compliance With Interstate Motor Carrier Noise Emission Standards: Exhaust Systems

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-20

    ...In response to a petition for rulemaking from the Truck Manufacturers Association (TMA), the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) amends its regulations to eliminate turbochargers from the list of equipment considered to be noise dissipative devices. As written, the regulation may allow vehicle operators to remove mufflers and still meet the Federal inspection requirements if......

  4. Modeling incipient creep damage effects on Barkhausen noise and magnetoacoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sablik, M. J.; Augustyniak, B.; Piotrowski, L.

    2004-05-01

    A model is presented for magnetoacoustic emission (MAE) and magnetic Barkhausen emission (HBN) during incipient creep damage stages in Cr-Mo steel. The model qualitatively reproduces the peak in HBN intensity as one goes through the early incipient stages, and also qualitatively reproduces the strong decrease in MAE intensity through all the incipient stages, leading to over a 50% decrease.

  5. Microbial mechanisms to reduce the uncertainties in the CH4 emissions from global rice fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamaljit, K.; Tian, H.; Ren, W.; Yang, J.

    2013-12-01

    In terrestrial ecosystems, methane (CH4) uptake or emission represents the net balance between activities of different microbial organisms including anaerobic Methanogens that produce CH4 and Methanotrophs which oxidize CH4 in the aerobic environments. In this way, anaerobic soil environments such as rice fields are major source of terrestrial CH4 emissions. However, large uncertainties in the CH4 emission estimates have been reported from rice fields. The bottom-up and top-down methods showed a wide range of CH4 emissions estimations ranging from 25 to 300 Tg yr-1 from rice fields. The major reason for uncertainties in the CH4 emissions includes the water management that alters the balance of Methanogens and Methanotrophs in the rice fields. Two kinds of water management practices are followed including continuous flooding (CF) which refers to the continuous submergence as well as alternate wetting and drying (AWD) in which the rice fields are drained for several days during the growing season. The AWD provides aeration stress on Methanogens resulting in lower CH4 emissions than CF water management followed in the rice fields. A single aeration during growing season may significantly reduce the CH4 emission from the rice fields. Currently, most of the models structures assume that Methanogens become active once the soil moisture content is raised to saturation. However, several laboratory scale studies have indicated that following aeration the Methanogens don't become fully functional immediately even if the soil moisture content is raised to saturation. In this study, we integrated the aeration stress mechanisms on the Methanogens in the Dynamic Land Ecosystem Model (DLEM). The improved version of DLEM was used to conduct uncertainty analysis on global CH4 emission estimation following CF and AWD water management in the rice fields. Results of this study have shown that inclusion of the aeration stress mechanism on Methanogens in the modeling framework has

  6. No tillage and liming reduce greenhouse gas emissions from poorly drained agricultural soils in Mediterranean regions.

    PubMed

    García-Marco, Sonia; Abalos, Diego; Espejo, Rafael; Vallejo, Antonio; Mariscal-Sancho, Ignacio

    2016-10-01

    No tillage (NT) has been associated to increased N2O emission from poorly drained agricultural soils. This is the case for soils with a low permeable Bt horizon, which generates a perched water layer after water addition (via rainfall or irrigation) over a long period of time. Moreover, these soils often have problems of acidity and require liming application to sustain crop productivity; changes in soil pH have large implications for the production and consumption of soil greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Here, we assessed in a split-plot design the individual and interactive effects of tillage practices (conventional tillage (CT) vs. NT) and liming (Ca-amendment vs. not-amendment) on N2O and CH4 emissions from poorly drained acidic soils, over a field experiment with a rainfed triticale crop. Soil mineral N concentrations, pH, temperature, moisture, water soluble organic carbon, GHG fluxes and denitrification capacity were measured during the experiment. Tillage increased N2O emissions by 68% compared to NT and generally led to higher CH4 emissions; both effects were due to the higher soil moisture content under CT plots. Under CT, liming reduced N2O emissions by 61% whereas no effect was observed under NT. Under both CT and NT, CH4 oxidation was enhanced after liming application due to decreased Al(3+) toxicity. Based on our results, NT should be promoted as a means to improve soil physical properties and concurrently reduce N2O and CH4 emissions. Raising the soil pH via liming has positive effects on crop yield; here we show that it may also serve to mitigate CH4 emissions and, under CT, abate N2O emissions. PMID:27235901

  7. The Action Programme of Uic, Cerand Uip “ABATEMENT of Railway Noise Emissions on Goods TRAINS”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HÜBNER, P.

    2000-03-01

    Although rail transport has a low environmental impact overall, noise from goods trains remains a major problem. Research has identified that wheel roughness is the critical factor and that composite materials will deliver adequate braking with less damage to the wheel surface than existing iron brake blocks. Accordingly, the UIC/CER has made a formal commitment to fit composite blocks to existing wagons as well as to all new wagons, although existing wheels cannot cope with the thermal stress from composite blocks. Fitting new wheels only when the old are worn out will be cost neutral, but will take 15-20 yr. Premature wheel replacement will involve additional cost, but will deliver the benefits in 5 years. This can be achieved with financial assistance from EU member-states, who will thereby avoid unnecessary outlay on noise barriers. At the same time proposals for a EU noise emission standard should reflect the performance achieved by the modified wagons. The railways propose a voluntary environmental agreement with the EU

  8. Nitrogen enriched combustion of a natural gas internal combustion engine to reduce NO.sub.x emissions

    DOEpatents

    Biruduganti, Munidhar S.; Gupta, Sreenath Borra; Sekar, R. Raj; McConnell, Steven S.

    2008-11-25

    A method and system for reducing nitrous oxide emissions from an internal combustion engine. An input gas stream of natural gas includes a nitrogen gas enrichment which reduces nitrous oxide emissions. In addition ignition timing for gas combustion is advanced to improve FCE while maintaining lower nitrous oxide emissions.

  9. Solid Fuel - Oxygen Fired Combustion for Production of Nodular Reduced Iron to Reduce CO2 Emissions and Improve Energy Efficiencies

    SciTech Connect

    Donald R. Fosnacht; Richard F. Kiesel; David W. Hendrickson; David J. Englund; Iwao Iwasaki; Rodney L. Bleifuss; Mathew A. Mlinar

    2011-12-22

    The current trend in the steel industry is an increase in iron and steel produced in electric arc furnaces (EAF) and a gradual decline in conventional steelmaking from taconite pellets in blast furnaces. In order to expand the opportunities for the existing iron ore mines beyond their blast furnace customer base, a new material is needed to satisfy the market demands of the emerging steel industry while utilizing the existing infrastructure and materials handling capabilities. This demand creates opportunity to convert iron ore or other iron bearing materials to Nodular Reduced Iron (NRI) in a recently designed Linear Hearth Furnace (LHF). NRI is a metallized iron product containing 98.5 to 96.0% iron and 2.5 to 4% C. It is essentially a scrap substitute with little impurity that can be utilized in a variety of steelmaking processes, especially the electric arc furnace. The objective of this project was to focus on reducing the greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) through reducing the energy intensity using specialized combustion systems, increasing production and the use of biomass derived carbon sources in this process. This research examined the use of a solid fuel-oxygen fired combustion system and compared the results from this system with both oxygen-fuel and air-fuel combustion systems. The solid pulverized fuels tested included various coals and a bio-coal produced from woody biomass in a specially constructed pilot scale torrefaction reactor at the Coleraine Minerals Research Laboratory (CMRL). In addition to combustion, the application of bio-coal was also tested as a means to produce a reducing atmosphere during key points in the fusion process, and as a reducing agent for ore conversion to metallic iron to capture the advantage of its inherent reduced carbon footprint. The results from this study indicate that the approaches taken can reduce both greenhouse gas emissions and the associated energy intensity with the Linear Hearth Furnace process for converting

  10. Application of the flux noise reducing filter for CO2 inverse modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksyutov, Shamil; Yaremchuk, Alexey

    2010-05-01

    Recent atmospheric remote sensing products from AIRS and GOSAT provide large volume of the observations but with larger errors and variance as compared to in-situ measurements, so efficient noise reduction techniques are required for inverse modeling of the surface fluxes. Inverse models of the atmospheric transport optimize regional or grid resolving surface CO2 fluxes to fit transport model simulation optimally to the observations. The optimization problem appears to be ill-posed so it is usually solved by applying regularization techniques. Most widely used regularization methods apply constraints on flux deviation from prior and/or from adjacent regions of same surface type (land-ocean, vegetation type), and from adjacent time periods. Convenient method for solving the problem of limited dimension is based on singular value decomposition (SVD) of the transport matrix, because it can decompose the solution space into a combination of the independent singular vectors. Introducing a simple constraint on fluxes limits amplitude of the corresponding singular vectors with larger reduction for smaller singular values. However this amplitude reduction is not sufficient in practice for inverse modeling of the regional CO2 fluxes, when we have large underconstrained regions in tropics. Alternatively other means of the amplitude reduction are also used, such as truncation, when all amplitudes below threshold singular value are set to zero. We apply a filter which is less abrupt is less abrupt compared to truncation but still suppressing strongly small singular value related vectors. Setting strength of a constraint is often done empirically. To decide a proper value of the cut-off singular value we suggest analyzing a dependence of the singular vector amplitude vs the singular value and set the cut-off value aiming at retaining most of useful information from observation. A graphical tool based on a plot of amplitude spectra is proposed. Advantage of the technique is

  11. The Norwegian Façade Insulation Study: the efficacy of façade insulation in reducing noise annoyance due to road traffic.

    PubMed

    Amundsen, Astrid H; Klæboe, Ronny; Aasvang, Gunn Marit

    2011-03-01

    The efficacy of façade insulation in providing an improved indoor noise environment and in reducing indoor noise annoyance was examined in a socio-acoustic before-and-after study with a control group. An average equivalent noise reduction inside the dwellings of 7 dB was obtained from the façade insulation. Whereas 42% of the respondents were highly annoyed in the before-situation, this dropped to 16% in the after study. The conclusion is therefore that the façade insulation provided a substantial improvement in the indoor noise environment. The advantage with respect to indoor noise annoyance, of having the bedroom facing the least noise-exposed side of the dwelling corresponded to a 6 dB noise reduction. The changes in annoyance from noise reduction due to the façade insulation were in accordance with what would be expected from the exposure-response curves obtained in the before-situation. A total of 637 respondents participated in the before-study. Of these, 415 also participated in the after study. Indoor and outdoor noise exposure calculations for each of the dwellings were undertaken before and after the façade insulation was implemented. PMID:21428502

  12. Reducing health risk assigned to organic emissions from a chemical weapons incinerator.

    PubMed

    Laman, David M; Weiler, B Douglas; Skeen, Rodney S

    2013-03-01

    Organic emissions from a chemical weapons incinerator have been characterized with an improved set of analytical methods to reduce the human health risk assigned to operations of the facility. A gas chromatography/mass selective detection method with substantially reduced detection limits has been used in conjunction with scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry and Fourier transform infrared microscopy to improve the speciation of semi-volatile and non-volatile organics emitted from the incinerator. The reduced detection limits have allowed a significant reduction in the assumed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and aminobiphenyl (ABP) emission rates used as inputs to the human health risk assessment for the incinerator. A mean factor of 17 decrease in assigned human health risk is realized for six common local exposure scenarios as a result of the reduced PAH and ABP detection limits. PMID:22773143

  13. Optimizing rice plant photosynthate allocation reduces N2O emissions from paddy fields.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu; Huang, Xiaomin; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Xingyue; Zhang, Yi; Zheng, Chengyan; Deng, Aixing; Zhang, Jun; Wu, Lianhai; Hu, Shuijin; Zhang, Weijian

    2016-01-01

    Rice paddies are a major source of anthropogenic nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, especially under alternate wetting-drying irrigation and high N input. Increasing photosynthate allocation to the grain in rice (Oryza sativa L.) has been identified as an effective strategy of genetic and agronomic innovation for yield enhancement; however, its impacts on N2O emissions are still unknown. We conducted three independent but complementary experiments (variety, mutant study, and spikelet clipping) to examine the impacts of rice plant photosynthate allocation on paddy N2O emissions. The three experiments showed that N2O fluxes were significantly and negatively correlated with the ratio of grain yield to total aboveground biomass, known as the harvest index (HI) in agronomy (P < 0.01). Biomass accumulation and N uptake after anthesis were significantly and positively correlated with HI (P < 0.05). Reducing photosynthate allocation to the grain by spikelet clipping significantly increased white root biomass and soil dissolved organic C and reduced plant N uptake, resulting in high soil denitrification potential (P < 0.05). Our findings demonstrate that optimizing photosynthate allocation to the grain can reduce paddy N2O emissions through decreasing belowground C input and increasing plant N uptake, suggesting the potential for genetic and agronomic efforts to produce more rice with less N2O emissions. PMID:27378420

  14. Review of cost estimates for reducing CO2 emissions. Final report, Task 9

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-10-01

    Since the ground breaking work of William Nordhaus in 1977, cost estimates for reducing CO{sub 2} emissions have been developed by numerous groups. The various studies have reported sometimes widely divergent cost estimates for reducing CO{sub 2} emissions. Some recent analyses have indicated that large reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions could be achieved at zero or negative costs (e.g. Rocky Mountain Institute 1989). In contrast, a recent study by Alan Manne of Stanford and Richard Richels of the Electric Power Research Institute (Manne-Richels 1989) concluded that in the US the total discounted costs of reducing CO{sub 2} emissions by 20 percent below the 1990 level could be as much as 3.6 trillion dollars over the period from 1990 to 2100. Costs of this order of magnitude would represent about 5 percent of US GNP. The purpose of this briefing paper is to summarize the different cost estimates for CO{sub 2} emission reduction and to identify the key issues and assumptions that underlie these cost estimates.

  15. Optimizing rice plant photosynthate allocation reduces N2O emissions from paddy fields

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yu; Huang, Xiaomin; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Xingyue; Zhang, Yi; Zheng, Chengyan; Deng, Aixing; Zhang, Jun; Wu, Lianhai; Hu, Shuijin; Zhang, Weijian

    2016-01-01

    Rice paddies are a major source of anthropogenic nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, especially under alternate wetting-drying irrigation and high N input. Increasing photosynthate allocation to the grain in rice (Oryza sativa L.) has been identified as an effective strategy of genetic and agronomic innovation for yield enhancement; however, its impacts on N2O emissions are still unknown. We conducted three independent but complementary experiments (variety, mutant study, and spikelet clipping) to examine the impacts of rice plant photosynthate allocation on paddy N2O emissions. The three experiments showed that N2O fluxes were significantly and negatively correlated with the ratio of grain yield to total aboveground biomass, known as the harvest index (HI) in agronomy (P < 0.01). Biomass accumulation and N uptake after anthesis were significantly and positively correlated with HI (P < 0.05). Reducing photosynthate allocation to the grain by spikelet clipping significantly increased white root biomass and soil dissolved organic C and reduced plant N uptake, resulting in high soil denitrification potential (P < 0.05). Our findings demonstrate that optimizing photosynthate allocation to the grain can reduce paddy N2O emissions through decreasing belowground C input and increasing plant N uptake, suggesting the potential for genetic and agronomic efforts to produce more rice with less N2O emissions. PMID:27378420

  16. Reducing GHG emissions by co-utilization of coal with natural gas or biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, I.M.

    2004-07-01

    Energy reserves price and security of supply issues are discussed in the context of the prospects for coal and policies to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Coal is projected to remain a major source of energy, with most of the demand growth in developing countries. Currently available power-generating technologies, deploying coal with natural gas or biomass, are examined. Examples of successful, partial substitution of coal by other fuels in power stations are highlighted, including the GHG emissions reductions achieved as well as the costs where available. Among various options, hybrid gasification and parallel cofiring of coal with biomass and natural gas appear to have the greatest potential to reduce GHG emissions. Much may also be achieved by cofiring, reburning, and repowering with gas turbines. The best method differs between different power systems. Co-utilization of biomass with coal is a least-cost option to reduce GHG emissions where the fuel prices are comparable, usually due to subsidies or taxes. The role of biomass is likely to increase due to greater use of subsidies, carbon taxes, and emissions trading within the context of the Kyoto Protocol. This should provide opportunities for clean coal technology transfer and diffusion, including biomass co-utilization. 32 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  17. Optimizing rice plant photosynthate allocation reduces N2O emissions from paddy fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yu; Huang, Xiaomin; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Xingyue; Zhang, Yi; Zheng, Chengyan; Deng, Aixing; Zhang, Jun; Wu, Lianhai; Hu, Shuijin; Zhang, Weijian

    2016-07-01

    Rice paddies are a major source of anthropogenic nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, especially under alternate wetting-drying irrigation and high N input. Increasing photosynthate allocation to the grain in rice (Oryza sativa L.) has been identified as an effective strategy of genetic and agronomic innovation for yield enhancement; however, its impacts on N2O emissions are still unknown. We conducted three independent but complementary experiments (variety, mutant study, and spikelet clipping) to examine the impacts of rice plant photosynthate allocation on paddy N2O emissions. The three experiments showed that N2O fluxes were significantly and negatively correlated with the ratio of grain yield to total aboveground biomass, known as the harvest index (HI) in agronomy (P < 0.01). Biomass accumulation and N uptake after anthesis were significantly and positively correlated with HI (P < 0.05). Reducing photosynthate allocation to the grain by spikelet clipping significantly increased white root biomass and soil dissolved organic C and reduced plant N uptake, resulting in high soil denitrification potential (P < 0.05). Our findings demonstrate that optimizing photosynthate allocation to the grain can reduce paddy N2O emissions through decreasing belowground C input and increasing plant N uptake, suggesting the potential for genetic and agronomic efforts to produce more rice with less N2O emissions.

  18. Delay-feedback control strategy for reducing CO2 emission of traffic flow system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li-Dong; Zhu, Wen-Xing

    2015-06-01

    To study the signal control strategy for reducing traffic emission theoretically, we first presented a kind of discrete traffic flow model with relative speed term based on traditional coupled map car-following model. In the model, the relative speed difference between two successive running cars is incorporated into following vehicle's acceleration running equation. Then we analyzed its stability condition with discrete control system stability theory. Third, we designed a delay-feedback controller to suppress traffic jam and decrease traffic emission based on modern controller theory. Last, numerical simulations are made to support our theoretical results, including the comparison of models' stability analysis, the influence of model type and signal control on CO2 emissions. The results show that the temporal behavior of our model is superior to other models, and the traffic signal controller has good effect on traffic jam suppression and traffic CO2 emission, which fully supports the theoretical conclusions.

  19. Waste management options to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from paper in Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickin, J. G.; Yuen, S. T. S.; Hennings, H.

    A lifecycle assessment to estimate greenhouse gas emissions in Australia from the paper cycle is summarised. The greenhouse gas emissions from paper in Australia in 1999/2000 were estimated to be 12.1 million tonnes (Mt) of CO 2 equivalent. Nearly half of this amount consisted of CH 4 emissions from landfilled waste paper. Various waste management options were modelled to investigate the greenhouse impact of a tonne of paper over its whole lifecycle. Options that keep paper out of landfills significantly reduce greenhouse emissions, waste-to-energy recovery being most effective. Recycling is also beneficial, and is of particular interest from a management perspective because it can be controlled by the pulp and paper industry. These findings can be extended to other wood-based and organic wastes.

  20. A PDE-Based Regularization Algorithm Toward Reducing Speckle Tracking Noise: A Feasibility Study for Ultrasound Breast Elastography.

    PubMed

    Guo, Li; Xu, Yan; Xu, Zhengfu; Jiang, Jingfeng

    2015-10-01

    Obtaining accurate ultrasonically estimated displacements along both axial (parallel to the acoustic beam) and lateral (perpendicular to the beam) directions is an important task for various clinical elastography applications (e.g., modulus reconstruction and temperature imaging). In this study, a partial differential equation (PDE)-based regularization algorithm was proposed to enhance motion tracking accuracy. More specifically, the proposed PDE-based algorithm, utilizing two-dimensional (2D) displacement estimates from a conventional elastography system, attempted to iteratively reduce noise contained in the original displacement estimates by mathematical regularization. In this study, tissue incompressibility was the physical constraint used by the above-mentioned mathematical regularization. This proposed algorithm was tested using computer-simulated data, a tissue-mimicking phantom, and in vivo breast lesion data. Computer simulation results demonstrated that the method significantly improved the accuracy of lateral tracking (e.g., a factor of 17 at 0.5% compression). From in vivo breast lesion data investigated, we have found that, as compared with the conventional method, higher quality axial and lateral strain images (e.g., at least 78% improvements among the estimated contrast-to-noise ratios of lateral strain images) were obtained. Our initial results demonstrated that this conceptually and computationally simple method could be useful for improving the image quality of ultrasound elastography with current clinical equipment as a post-processing tool. PMID:25452434

  1. Enhanced winter soil frost reduces methane emission during the subsequent growing season in a boreal peatland.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junbin; Peichl, Matthias; Nilsson, Mats B

    2016-02-01

    Winter climate change may result in reduced snow cover and could, consequently, alter the soil frost regime and biogeochemical processes underlying the exchange of methane (CH4 ) in boreal peatlands. In this study, we investigated the short-term (1-3 years) vs. long-term (11 years) effects of intensified winter soil frost (induced by experimental snow exclusion) on CH4 exchange during the following growing season in a boreal peatland. In the first 3 years (2004-2006), lower CH4 emissions in the treatment plots relative to the control coincided with delayed soil temperature increase in the treatment plots at the beginning of the growing season (May). After 11 treatment years (in 2014), CH4 emissions were lower in the treatment plots relative to the control over the entire growing season, resulting in a reduction in total growing season CH4 emission by 27%. From May to July 2014, reduced sedge leaf area coincided with lower CH4 emissions in the treatment plots compared to the control. From July to August, lower dissolved organic carbon concentrations in the pore water of the treatment plots explained 72% of the differences in CH4 emission between control and treatment. In addition, greater Sphagnum moss growth in the treatment plots resulted in a larger distance between the moss surface and the water table (i.e., increasing the oxic layer) which may have enhanced the CH4 oxidation potential in the treatment plots relative to the control in 2014. The differences in vegetation might also explain the lower temperature sensitivity of CH4 emission observed in the treatment plots relative to the control. Overall, this study suggests that greater soil frost, associated with future winter climate change, might substantially reduce the growing season CH4 emission in boreal peatlands through altering vegetation dynamics and subsequently causing vegetation-mediated effects on CH4 exchange. PMID:26452333

  2. New technologies reduce greenhouse gas emissions from nitrogenous fertilizer in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei-Feng; Dou, Zheng-Xia; He, Pan; Ju, Xiao-Tang; Powlson, David; Chadwick, Dave; Norse, David; Lu, Yue-Lai; Zhang, Ying; Wu, Liang; Chen, Xin-Ping; Cassman, Kenneth G; Zhang, Fu-Suo

    2013-05-21

    Synthetic nitrogen (N) fertilizer has played a key role in enhancing food production and keeping half of the world's population adequately fed. However, decades of N fertilizer overuse in many parts of the world have contributed to soil, water, and air pollution; reducing excessive N losses and emissions is a central environmental challenge in the 21st century. China's participation is essential to global efforts in reducing N-related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions because China is the largest producer and consumer of fertilizer N. To evaluate the impact of China's use of N fertilizer, we quantify the carbon footprint of China's N fertilizer production and consumption chain using life cycle analysis. For every ton of N fertilizer manufactured and used, 13.5 tons of CO2-equivalent (eq) (t CO2-eq) is emitted, compared with 9.7 t CO2-eq in Europe. Emissions in China tripled from 1980 [131 terrogram (Tg) of CO2-eq (Tg CO2-eq)] to 2010 (452 Tg CO2-eq). N fertilizer-related emissions constitute about 7% of GHG emissions from the entire Chinese economy and exceed soil carbon gain resulting from N fertilizer use by several-fold. We identified potential emission reductions by comparing prevailing technologies and management practices in China with more advanced options worldwide. Mitigation opportunities include improving methane recovery during coal mining, enhancing energy efficiency in fertilizer manufacture, and minimizing N overuse in field-level crop production. We find that use of advanced technologies could cut N fertilizer-related emissions by 20-63%, amounting to 102-357 Tg CO2-eq annually. Such reduction would decrease China's total GHG emissions by 2-6%, which is significant on a global scale. PMID:23671096

  3. Symbiotic relationships between soil fungi and plants reduce N2O emissions from soil.

    PubMed

    Bender, S Franz; Plantenga, Faline; Neftel, Albrecht; Jocher, Markus; Oberholzer, Hans-Rudolf; Köhl, Luise; Giles, Madeline; Daniell, Tim J; van der Heijden, Marcel Ga

    2014-06-01

    N2O is a potent greenhouse gas involved in the destruction of the protective ozone layer in the stratosphere and contributing to global warming. The ecological processes regulating its emissions from soil are still poorly understood. Here, we show that the presence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), a dominant group of soil fungi, which form symbiotic associations with the majority of land plants and which influence a range of important ecosystem functions, can induce a reduction in N2O emissions from soil. To test for a functional relationship between AMF and N2O emissions, we manipulated the abundance of AMF in two independent greenhouse experiments using two different approaches (sterilized and re-inoculated soil and non-mycorrhizal tomato mutants) and two different soils. N2O emissions were increased by 42 and 33% in microcosms with reduced AMF abundance compared to microcosms with a well-established AMF community, suggesting that AMF regulate N2O emissions. This could partly be explained by increased N immobilization into microbial or plant biomass, reduced concentrations of mineral soil N as a substrate for N2O emission and altered water relations. Moreover, the abundance of key genes responsible for N2O production (nirK) was negatively and for N2O consumption (nosZ) positively correlated to AMF abundance, indicating that the regulation of N2O emissions is transmitted by AMF-induced changes in the soil microbial community. Our results suggest that the disruption of the AMF symbiosis through intensification of agricultural practices may further contribute to increased N2O emissions. PMID:24351937

  4. Symbiotic relationships between soil fungi and plants reduce N2O emissions from soil

    PubMed Central

    Bender, S Franz; Plantenga, Faline; Neftel, Albrecht; Jocher, Markus; Oberholzer, Hans-Rudolf; Köhl, Luise; Giles, Madeline; Daniell, Tim J; van der Heijden, Marcel GA

    2014-01-01

    N2O is a potent greenhouse gas involved in the destruction of the protective ozone layer in the stratosphere and contributing to global warming. The ecological processes regulating its emissions from soil are still poorly understood. Here, we show that the presence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), a dominant group of soil fungi, which form symbiotic associations with the majority of land plants and which influence a range of important ecosystem functions, can induce a reduction in N2O emissions from soil. To test for a functional relationship between AMF and N2O emissions, we manipulated the abundance of AMF in two independent greenhouse experiments using two different approaches (sterilized and re-inoculated soil and non-mycorrhizal tomato mutants) and two different soils. N2O emissions were increased by 42 and 33% in microcosms with reduced AMF abundance compared to microcosms with a well-established AMF community, suggesting that AMF regulate N2O emissions. This could partly be explained by increased N immobilization into microbial or plant biomass, reduced concentrations of mineral soil N as a substrate for N2O emission and altered water relations. Moreover, the abundance of key genes responsible for N2O production (nirK) was negatively and for N2O consumption (nosZ) positively correlated to AMF abundance, indicating that the regulation of N2O emissions is transmitted by AMF-induced changes in the soil microbial community. Our results suggest that the disruption of the AMF symbiosis through intensification of agricultural practices may further contribute to increased N2O emissions. PMID:24351937

  5. New technologies reduce greenhouse gas emissions from nitrogenous fertilizer in China

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Zheng-xia; He, Pan; Ju, Xiao-Tang; Powlson, David; Chadwick, Dave; Norse, David; Lu, Yue-Lai; Zhang, Ying; Wu, Liang; Chen, Xin-Ping; Cassman, Kenneth G.; Zhang, Fu-Suo

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic nitrogen (N) fertilizer has played a key role in enhancing food production and keeping half of the world’s population adequately fed. However, decades of N fertilizer overuse in many parts of the world have contributed to soil, water, and air pollution; reducing excessive N losses and emissions is a central environmental challenge in the 21st century. China’s participation is essential to global efforts in reducing N-related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions because China is the largest producer and consumer of fertilizer N. To evaluate the impact of China’s use of N fertilizer, we quantify the carbon footprint of China’s N fertilizer production and consumption chain using life cycle analysis. For every ton of N fertilizer manufactured and used, 13.5 tons of CO2-equivalent (eq) (t CO2-eq) is emitted, compared with 9.7 t CO2-eq in Europe. Emissions in China tripled from 1980 [131 terrogram (Tg) of CO2-eq (Tg CO2-eq)] to 2010 (452 Tg CO2-eq). N fertilizer-related emissions constitute about 7% of GHG emissions from the entire Chinese economy and exceed soil carbon gain resulting from N fertilizer use by several-fold. We identified potential emission reductions by comparing prevailing technologies and management practices in China with more advanced options worldwide. Mitigation opportunities include improving methane recovery during coal mining, enhancing energy efficiency in fertilizer manufacture, and minimizing N overuse in field-level crop production. We find that use of advanced technologies could cut N fertilizer-related emissions by 20–63%, amounting to 102–357 Tg CO2-eq annually. Such reduction would decrease China’s total GHG emissions by 2–6%, which is significant on a global scale. PMID:23671096

  6. A SECOND-BEST EVALUATION OF EIGHT POLICY INSTRUMENTS TO REDUCE CARBON EMISSIONS. (R825313)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    This paper uses a numerical general equilibrium model to compare the costs of alternative policies for reducing carbon emissions in a second-best setting with a distortionary tax on labor. We examine a carbon tax, two energy taxes, and both narrow-based and br...

  7. Enhanced reduced sulfur emission from manures of beef cattle fed distiller's byproducts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reduced sulfur compounds are normal products of manure decomposition which are emitted from confined animal feeding operations (CAFO). These compounds not only contribute to nuisance odors, but with recent EPA regulations, H2S emissions in excess of 100 lbs per day must be reported by the livestock...

  8. Tillage tool modifications for reducing the emission of windblown dust from agricultural soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alternative tillage and cropping systems are sought for reducing dust emissions and improving air quality in the Pacific Northwest dryland cropping region. The purpose of this study was to modify the conventional rodweeder that would facilitate armoring of the soil surface with straw and large aggre...

  9. Feeding Distiller's Byproducts May Enhance Reduced Sulfur Emissions from Cattle Feedlots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reduced sulfur compounds are normal products of manure decomposition which are emitted from confined animal feeding operations (CAFO). These compounds not only contribute to nuisance odors, but with recent EPA regulations, H2S emissions in excess of 100 lbs per day must be reported by the livestock...

  10. Clean Cities Tools: Tools to Help You Drive Smarter, Use Less Petroleum, and Reduce Emissions (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-06-01

    Clean Cities' Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (AFDC) features a wide range of Web-based tools to help vehicle fleets and individual consumers reduce their petroleum use. This brochure lists and describes Clean Cities online tools related to vehicles, alternative fueling stations, electric vehicle charging stations, fuel conservation, emissions reduction, fuel economy, and more.

  11. Clean Cities Tools: Tools to Help You Save Money, Use Less Petroleum, and Reduce Emissions (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-01-01

    Clean Cities Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (AFDC) features a wide range of Web-based tools to help vehicle fleets and individual consumers reduce their petroleum use. This brochure lists and describes Clean Cities online tools related to vehicles, alternative fueling stations, electric vehicle charging stations, fuel conservation, emissions reduction, fuel economy, and more.

  12. Reducing swine farm ammonia emission with a full-scale manure treatment system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new full-scale treatment system in its second-generation was implemented at a 5000-head finishing swine farm in North Carolina to improve treatment lagoon water quality and reduce ammonia emissions. The system combined high-rate solid-liquid separation with nitrogen and phosphorus removal process...

  13. Analysis of Strategies for Reducing Multiple Emissions from Electric Power Plants: SO2, Nox, CO2

    EIA Publications

    2001-01-01

    This report responds to a request received from Senator David McIntosh on June 29, 2000 to analyze the impacts on energy consumers and producers of coordinated strategies to reduce emissions of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and carbon dioxide at U.S. power plants.

  14. Effects of Water Seal on Reducing 1,3-Dichloropropene Emissions from Different Textured Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil physical conditions can affect diffusion, environmental fate, and pest-control efficacy of fumigants in soil disinfestation treatments. Water seal (applying water using sprinklers to soil following fumigation) has shown effectiveness to reduce fumigant emissions from sandy loam soils. Soil colu...

  15. Free Energy Cost of Reducing Noise while Maintaining a High Sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, Pablo; Tu, Yuhai

    2015-09-01

    Living systems need to be highly responsive, and also to keep fluctuations low. These goals are incompatible in equilibrium systems due to the fluctuation dissipation theorem (FDT). Here, we show that biological sensory systems, driven far from equilibrium by free energy consumption, can reduce their intrinsic fluctuations while maintaining high responsiveness. By developing a continuum theory of the E. coli chemotaxis pathway, we demonstrate that adaptation can be understood as a nonequilibrium phase transition controlled by free energy dissipation, and it is characterized by a breaking of the FDT. We show that the maximum response at short time is enhanced by free energy dissipation. At the same time, the low frequency fluctuations and the adaptation error decrease with the free energy dissipation algebraically and exponentially, respectively.

  16. Reducing greenhouse gas emissions, water use, and grain arsenic levels in rice systems.

    PubMed

    Linquist, Bruce A; Anders, Merle M; Adviento-Borbe, Maria Arlene A; Chaney, Rufus L; Nalley, L Lanier; da Rosa, Eliete F F; van Kessel, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Agriculture is faced with the challenge of providing healthy food for a growing population at minimal environmental cost. Rice (Oryza sativa), the staple crop for the largest number of people on earth, is grown under flooded soil conditions and uses more water and has higher greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions than most crops. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that alternate wetting and drying (AWD--flooding the soil and then allowing to dry down before being reflooded) water management practices will maintain grain yields and concurrently reduce water use, greenhouse gas emissions and arsenic (As) levels in rice. Various treatments ranging in frequency and duration of AWD practices were evaluated at three locations over 2 years. Relative to the flooded control treatment and depending on the AWD treatment, yields were reduced by <1-13%; water-use efficiency was improved by 18-63%, global warming potential (GWP of CH4 and N2 O emissions) reduced by 45-90%, and grain As concentrations reduced by up to 64%. In general, as the severity of AWD increased by allowing the soil to dry out more between flood events, yields declined while the other benefits increased. The reduction in GWP was mostly attributed to a reduction in CH4 emissions as changes in N2 O emissions were minimal among treatments. When AWD was practiced early in the growing season followed by flooding for remainder of season, similar yields as the flooded control were obtained but reduced water use (18%), GWP (45%) and yield-scaled GWP (45%); although grain As concentrations were similar or higher. This highlights that multiple environmental benefits can be realized without sacrificing yield but there may be trade-offs to consider. Importantly, adoption of these practices will require that they are economically attractive and can be adapted to field scales. PMID:25099317

  17. Equilibrium-reduced density matrix formulation: Influence of noise, disorder, and temperature on localization in excitonic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moix, Jeremy M.; Zhao, Yang; Cao, Jianshu

    2012-03-01

    An exact method to compute the entire equilibrium-reduced density matrix for systems characterized by a system-bath Hamiltonian is presented. The approach is based upon a stochastic unraveling of the influence functional that appears in the imaginary time path integral formalism of quantum statistical mechanics. This method is then applied to study the effects of thermal noise, static disorder, and temperature on the coherence length in excitonic systems. As representative examples of biased and unbiased systems, attention is focused on the well-characterized complexes of the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) protein and the light harvesting complex of purple bacteria, LH2, respectively. Due to the bias, FMO is completely localized in the site basis at low temperatures, whereas LH2 is completely delocalized. In the latter, the presence of static disorder leads to a plateau in the coherence length at low temperature that becomes increasingly pronounced with increasing strength of the disorder. The introduction of noise, however, precludes this effect. In biased systems, it is shown that the environment may increase the coherence length, but only decrease that of unbiased systems. Finally it is emphasized that for typical values of the environmental parameters in light harvesting systems, the system and bath are entangled at equilibrium in the single excitation manifold. That is, the density matrix cannot be described as a product state as is often assumed, even at room temperature. The reduced density matrix of LH2 is shown to be in precise agreement with the steady state limit of previous exact quantum dynamics calculations.

  18. Surface irrigation reduces the emission of volatile 1,3-dichloropropene from agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Ashworth, D J; Yates, S R

    2007-04-01

    Low-cost, practicable techniques are required to limit the release of volatile organic compound-containing fumigants such as 1,3-D to the atmosphere. In this study, we aimed to quantify 1,3-D diffusion and emission from laboratory soil columns maintained under realistic conditions and thereby assess the efficacy of soil irrigation as a technique for reducing emissions. In two soils (one relatively high, and one relatively low, in organic matter), irrigation led to a limiting of upward diffusion of the fumigant and to the maintenance of higher soil gas concentrations. Therefore, rather than being emitted from the column, the 1,3-D was maintained in the soil where it was ultimately degraded. As a consequence, emission of 1,3-D from the irrigated columns was around half of thatfrom the nonirrigated columns. It is concluded that surface irrigation represents an effective, low-cost, and readily practicable approach to lessening the environmental impact of 1,3-D fumigant use. In addition, the higher organic matter soil exhibited emissions of around one-fifth of the lower organic matter soil in both irrigated and nonirrigated treatments, due to markedly enhanced degradation of the fumigant. Organic matter amendment of soils may, therefore, also represent an extremely effective, relatively low-cost approach to reducing 1,3-D emissions. PMID:17438768

  19. Invasive floating macrophytes reduce greenhouse gas emissions from a small tropical lake

    PubMed Central

    Attermeyer, K.; Flury, S.; Jayakumar, R.; Fiener, P.; Steger, K.; Arya, V.; Wilken, F.; van Geldern, R.; Premke, K.

    2016-01-01

    Floating macrophytes, including water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes), are dominant invasive organisms in tropical aquatic systems, and they may play an important role in modifying the gas exchange between water and the atmosphere. However, these systems are underrepresented in global datasets of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This study investigated the carbon (C) turnover and GHG emissions from a small (0.6 km2) water-harvesting lake in South India and analysed the effect of floating macrophytes on these emissions. We measured carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) emissions with gas chambers in the field as well as water C mineralization rates and physicochemical variables in both the open water and in water within stands of water hyacinths. The CO2 and CH4 emissions from areas covered by water hyacinths were reduced by 57% compared with that of open water. However, the C mineralization rates were not significantly different in the water between the two areas. We conclude that the increased invasion of water hyacinths and other floating macrophytes has the potential to change GHG emissions, a process that might be relevant in regional C budgets. PMID:26846590

  20. Invasive floating macrophytes reduce greenhouse gas emissions from a small tropical lake.

    PubMed

    Attermeyer, K; Flury, S; Jayakumar, R; Fiener, P; Steger, K; Arya, V; Wilken, F; van Geldern, R; Premke, K

    2016-01-01

    Floating macrophytes, including water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes), are dominant invasive organisms in tropical aquatic systems, and they may play an important role in modifying the gas exchange between water and the atmosphere. However, these systems are underrepresented in global datasets of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This study investigated the carbon (C) turnover and GHG emissions from a small (0.6 km(2)) water-harvesting lake in South India and analysed the effect of floating macrophytes on these emissions. We measured carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) emissions with gas chambers in the field as well as water C mineralization rates and physicochemical variables in both the open water and in water within stands of water hyacinths. The CO2 and CH4 emissions from areas covered by water hyacinths were reduced by 57% compared with that of open water. However, the C mineralization rates were not significantly different in the water between the two areas. We conclude that the increased invasion of water hyacinths and other floating macrophytes has the potential to change GHG emissions, a process that might be relevant in regional C budgets. PMID:26846590

  1. The role of dung beetles in reducing greenhouse gas emissions from cattle farming.

    PubMed

    Slade, Eleanor M; Riutta, Terhi; Roslin, Tomas; Tuomisto, Hanna L

    2016-01-01

    Agriculture is one of the largest anthropogenic sources of greenhouse gases (GHGs), with dairy and beef production accounting for nearly two-thirds of emissions. Several recent papers suggest that dung beetles may affect fluxes of GHGs from cattle farming. Here, we put these previous findings into context. Using Finland as an example, we assessed GHG emissions at three scales: the dung pat, pasture ecosystem, and whole lifecycle of milk or beef production. At the first two levels, dung beetles reduced GHG emissions by up to 7% and 12% respectively, mainly through large reductions in methane (CH4) emissions. However, at the lifecycle level, dung beetles accounted for only a 0.05-0.13% reduction of overall GHG emissions. This mismatch derives from the fact that in intensive production systems, only a limited fraction of all cow pats end up on pastures, offering limited scope for dung beetle mitigation of GHG fluxes. In contrast, we suggest that the effects of dung beetles may be accentuated in tropical countries, where more manure is left on pastures, and dung beetles remove and aerate dung faster, and that this is thus a key area for future research. These considerations give a new perspective on previous results, [corrected] and suggest that studies of biotic effects on GHG emissions from dung pats on a global scale are a priority for current research. PMID:26728164

  2. The role of dung beetles in reducing greenhouse gas emissions from cattle farming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slade, Eleanor M.; Riutta, Terhi; Roslin, Tomas; Tuomisto, Hanna L.

    2016-01-01

    Agriculture is one of the largest anthropogenic sources of greenhouse gases (GHGs), with dairy and beef production accounting for nearly two-thirds of emissions. Several recent papers suggest that dung beetles may affect fluxes of GHGs from cattle farming. Here, we put these previous findings into context. Using Finland as an example, we assessed GHG emissions at three scales: the dung pat, pasture ecosystem, and whole lifecycle of milk or beef production. At the first two levels, dung beetles reduced GHG emissions by up to 7% and 12% respectively, mainly through large reductions in methane (CH4) emissions. However, at the lifecycle level, dung beetles accounted for only a 0.05-0.13% reduction of overall GHG emissions. This mismatch derives from the fact that in intensive production systems, only a limited fraction of all cow pats end up on pastures, offering limited scope for dung beetle mitigation of GHG fluxes. In contrast, we suggest that the effects of dung beetles may be accentuated in tropical countries, where more manure is left on pastures, and dung beetles remove and aerate dung faster, and that this is thus a key area for future research. These considerations give a new perspective on previous results perspective, and suggest that studies of biotic effects on GHG emissions from dung pats on a global scale are a priority for current research.

  3. Economic implications of reducing carbon emissions from energy use and industrial processes in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y-H Henry; Timilsina, Govinda R; Landis, Florian

    2013-11-30

    This study assesses the economy-wide impacts of cutting CO2 emissions on the Brazilian economy. It finds that in 2040, the business-as-usual CO2 emissions from energy use and industrial processes would be almost three times as high as those in 2010 and would account for more than half of total national CO2 emissions. The current policy aims to reduce deforestation by 70 percent by 2017 and lower emissions intensity of the overall economy by 36-39 percent by 2020. If the policy were implemented as planned and continued to 2040, there would be no need to cut CO2 emissions from energy use and industrial processes until 2035, as emissions reduction through controlling deforestation would be enough to meet the voluntary carbon mitigation target of Brazil. The study also finds that using the carbon tax revenue to subsidize wind power can effectively increase the country's wind power output if that is the policy priority. Further, it finds evidence supporting the double dividend hypothesis, i.e., using revenue from a hypothetical carbon tax to finance a cut in labor income tax can significantly lower the GDP impacts of the carbon tax. PMID:24184985

  4. The role of dung beetles in reducing greenhouse gas emissions from cattle farming

    PubMed Central

    Slade, Eleanor M.; Riutta, Terhi; Roslin, Tomas; Tuomisto, Hanna L.

    2016-01-01

    Agriculture is one of the largest anthropogenic sources of greenhouse gases (GHGs), with dairy and beef production accounting for nearly two-thirds of emissions. Several recent papers suggest that dung beetles may affect fluxes of GHGs from cattle farming. Here, we put these previous findings into context. Using Finland as an example, we assessed GHG emissions at three scales: the dung pat, pasture ecosystem, and whole lifecycle of milk or beef production. At the first two levels, dung beetles reduced GHG emissions by up to 7% and 12% respectively, mainly through large reductions in methane (CH4) emissions. However, at the lifecycle level, dung beetles accounted for only a 0.05–0.13% reduction of overall GHG emissions. This mismatch derives from the fact that in intensive production systems, only a limited fraction of all cow pats end up on pastures, offering limited scope for dung beetle mitigation of GHG fluxes. In contrast, we suggest that the effects of dung beetles may be accentuated in tropical countries, where more manure is left on pastures, and dung beetles remove and aerate dung faster, and that this is thus a key area for future research. These considerations give a new perspective on previous results perspective, and suggest that studies of biotic effects on GHG emissions from dung pats on a global scale are a priority for current research. PMID:26728164

  5. Over-bias Light Emission due to Higher Order Quantum Noise of a Tunnel Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belzig, Wolfgang; Xu, Fei; Holmqvist, Cecilia

    Understanding tunneling from an atomically sharp tip to a metallic surface requires to account for interactions on a nanoscopic scale. Inelastic tunneling of electrons generates emission of photons, whose energies intuitively should be limited by the applied bias voltage. However, experiments indicate that more complex processes involving the interaction of electrons with plasmon polaritons lead to photon emission characterized by over-bias energies. We propose a model of this observation in analogy to the dynamical Coulomb blockade, originally developed for treating the electronic environment in mesoscopic circuits. We explain the experimental finding quantitatively by the correlated tunneling of two electrons interacting with an LRC circuit modeling the local plasmon-polariton mode. To explain the over-bias emission, the non-Gaussian statistics of the tunneling dynamics of the electrons is essential.

  6. Overbias light emission due to higher-order quantum noise in a tunnel junction.

    PubMed

    Xu, F; Holmqvist, C; Belzig, W

    2014-08-01

    Understanding tunneling from an atomically sharp tip to a metallic surface requires us to account for interactions on a nanoscopic scale. Inelastic tunneling of electrons generates emission of photons, whose energies intuitively should be limited by the applied bias voltage. However, experiments [G. Schull et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 057401 (2009) indicate that more complex processes involving the interaction of electrons with plasmon polaritons lead to photon emission characterized by overbias energies. We propose a model of this observation in analogy to the dynamical Coulomb blockade, originally developed for treating the electronic environment in mesoscopic circuits. We explain the experimental finding quantitatively by the correlated tunneling of two electrons interacting with a LRC circuit modeling the local plasmon-polariton mode. To explain the overbias emission, the non-Gaussian statistics of the tunneling dynamics of the electrons is essential. PMID:25148342

  7. Overbias Light Emission due to Higher-Order Quantum Noise in a Tunnel Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, F.; Holmqvist, C.; Belzig, W.

    2014-08-01

    Understanding tunneling from an atomically sharp tip to a metallic surface requires us to account for interactions on a nanoscopic scale. Inelastic tunneling of electrons generates emission of photons, whose energies intuitively should be limited by the applied bias voltage. However, experiments [G. Schull et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 057401 (2009)] indicate that more complex processes involving the interaction of electrons with plasmon polaritons lead to photon emission characterized by overbias energies. We propose a model of this observation in analogy to the dynamical Coulomb blockade, originally developed for treating the electronic environment in mesoscopic circuits. We explain the experimental finding quantitatively by the correlated tunneling of two electrons interacting with a LRC circuit modeling the local plasmon-polariton mode. To explain the overbias emission, the non-Gaussian statistics of the tunneling dynamics of the electrons is essential.

  8. High-Impact Actions for Individuals to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholas, K. A.; Wynes, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    Climate change is the result of greenhouse gas accumulation in the atmosphere, which records the aggregation of billions of individual decisions. While systemic and structural changes receive great attention for addressing climate change, the contribution that individual citizens can make is often overlooked, especially in developed countries where per-capita emissions are highest. Here we consider a broad range of individual lifestyle choices and calculate their potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. We find that four widely applicable high-impact actions have the potential to reduce personal emissions by more than 1 tonne CO2-equivalent per year: having one fewer child (59.2 tonnes of reductions), living car-free (2.3 tonnes), avoiding airplane travel (1.5 tonnes per flight) and eating a plant-based diet (0.82 tonnes). These actions have much greater potential to reduce emissions than commonly promoted strategies like recycling (4 times less effective than a plant-based diet) or changing lightbulbs (8 times). However, high school textbooks from Canada and government resources from the EU, USA, Canada, and Australia largely fail to mention these actions, instead focusing on incremental changes with much smaller potential impact. We conclude that climate policy should focus not only on national and international targets, but also on encouraging responsible behaviour, especially for adolescents who will grow up in the era of climate change and are poised to establish a lifelong pattern of sustainable lifestyle choices.

  9. Cost-effectiveness of feeding strategies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from dairy farming.

    PubMed

    Van Middelaar, C E; Dijkstra, J; Berentsen, P B M; De Boer, I J M

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of 3 feeding strategies to reduce enteric CH4 production in dairy cows by calculating the effect on labor income at the farm level and on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions at the chain level (i.e., from production of farm inputs to the farm gate). Strategies included were (1) dietary supplementation of an extruded linseed product (56% linseed; 1kg/cow per day in summer and 2kg/cow per day in winter), (2) dietary supplementation of a nitrate source (75% nitrate; 1% of dry matter intake), and (3) reducing the maturity stage of grass and grass silage (grazing at 1,400 instead of 1,700kg of dry matter/ha and harvesting at 3,000 instead of 3,500kg of dry matter/ha). A dairy farm linear programing model was used to define an average Dutch dairy farm on sandy soil without a predefined feeding strategy (reference situation). Subsequently, 1 of the 3 feeding strategies was implemented and the model was optimized again to determine the new economically optimal farm situation. Enteric CH4 production in the reference situation and after implementing the strategies was calculated based on a mechanistic model for enteric CH4 and empirical formulas explaining the effect of fat and nitrate supplementation on enteric CH4 production. Other GHG emissions along the chain were calculated using life cycle assessment. Total GHG emissions in the reference situation added up to 840kg of CO2 equivalents (CO2e) per t of fat- and protein-corrected milk (FPCM) and yearly labor income of €42,605. Supplementation of the extruded linseed product reduced emissions by 9kg of CO2e/t of FPCM and labor income by €16,041; supplementation of the dietary nitrate source reduced emissions by 32kg of CO2e/t of FPCM and labor income by €5,463; reducing the maturity stage of grass and grass silage reduced emissions by 11kg of CO2e/t of FPCM and labor income by €463. Of the 3 strategies, reducing grass maturity was the most cost

  10. Animal board invited review: genetic possibilities to reduce enteric methane emissions from ruminants.

    PubMed

    Pickering, N K; Oddy, V H; Basarab, J; Cammack, K; Hayes, B; Hegarty, R S; Lassen, J; McEwan, J C; Miller, S; Pinares-Patiño, C S; de Haas, Y

    2015-09-01

    Measuring and mitigating methane (CH4) emissions from livestock is of increasing importance for the environment and for policy making. Potentially, the most sustainable way of reducing enteric CH4 emission from ruminants is through the estimation of genomic breeding values to facilitate genetic selection. There is potential for adopting genetic selection and in the future genomic selection, for reduced CH4 emissions from ruminants. From this review it has been observed that both CH4 emissions and production (g/day) are a heritable and repeatable trait. CH4 emissions are strongly related to feed intake both in the short term (minutes to several hours) and over the medium term (days). When measured over the medium term, CH4 yield (MY, g CH4/kg dry matter intake) is a heritable and repeatable trait albeit with less genetic variation than for CH4 emissions. CH4 emissions of individual animals are moderately repeatable across diets, and across feeding levels, when measured in respiration chambers. Repeatability is lower when short term measurements are used, possibly due to variation in time and amount of feed ingested prior to the measurement. However, while repeated measurements add value; it is preferable the measures be separated by at least 3 to 14 days. This temporal separation of measurements needs to be investigated further. Given the above issue can be resolved, short term (over minutes to hours) measurements of CH4 emissions show promise, especially on systems where animals are fed ad libitum and frequency of meals is high. However, we believe that for short-term measurements to be useful for genetic evaluation, a number (between 3 and 20) of measurements will be required over an extended period of time (weeks to months). There are opportunities for using short-term measurements in standardised feeding situations such as breath 'sniffers' attached to milking parlours or total mixed ration feeding bins, to measure CH4. Genomic selection has the potential to

  11. Comparison of reduced chemical kinetic mechanisms for pollutant emissions predictions in gas turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Hamer, A.J.; Roby, R.J.; Klassen, M.S.

    1998-07-01

    Predicted flow, temperature, and emissions (CO and NO) concentration fields are presented for an axi-symmetric, swirl-stabilized gas turbine combustor operating at approximately 10 atmospheres. Flow field and emissions predictions were obtained by incorporating four different global kinetics mechanisms into the commercially available STAR{asterisk}CD CFD code. Two of these global reaction mechanisms were developed specifically for lean-premixed gas turbine combustion from the GRI and Miller-Bowman full reaction mechanisms. The other global mechanisms for hydrocarbon oxidation utilized in this study were initially developed for more general usage, but are commonly used in gas turbine applications. The latter mechanisms did not specifically include reactions for NO formation. NO formation was included in these mechanisms through incorporation of two reactions developed from the recently released GRI mechanism. Comparison between integrated exit plant emissions (NO and CO) predictions and laboratory measurements showed varied degrees of agreement for the different mechanisms. In all cases, the trend in NO exhaust emissions with change in operating condition is well predicted. However, the magnitudes of the NO emissions are reasonably predicted only for leanest cases investigated with significant overprediction found as the equivalence ratio approached 0.8 (which was slightly beyond the intended range of the reduced mechanisms). On the other hand, the predicted CO emissions showed significant variation for the different mechanisms. The high CO values predicted by the model were primarily due to quenching of the CO reaction by liner cooing air at the wall. Possible explanations for the discrepancies include current limitations of the model and measurement errors. The current work shows the impact that the choice of reduced global mechanism can have on predictions of flame location, size and emissions. Such a model can be a valuable tool for designers by providing

  12. Effects of rigorous emission controls on reducing ambient volatile organic compounds in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Wu, Rongrong; Li, Yaqi; Hao, Yufang; Xie, Shaodong; Zeng, Liming

    2016-07-01

    102 volatile organic compound (VOC) species were measured online using a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/flame ionization detector (GC-MS/FID) at an urban site in Beijing in 11 August to 3 September 2015, when a series of rigorous air quality control measures were implemented in Beijing city and neighbouring provinces. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) was applied to identify emission sources from 1h averaged values of VOC data. Based on the online VOC data and the PMF analysis results, the effectiveness of different control measures were investigated. The PMF results were compared with an emission inventory data. Results show that the rigorous air quality restrictions implemented were successful. The averaged ambient VOC mixing ratios during the emission control period and non-control period were 27.53 and 45.42ppbv, respectively. The mixing ratios of total VOC during the control period were reduced by 40%. Alkanes were the most abundant chemical group in the two periods, followed by oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs). Almost all quantified VOC species decreased during the control period. Tracers of industrial sources and vehicle exhaust reduced most, including some halocarbons, esters and aromatics. Eight sources were resolved by online PMF analysis for ambient VOCs in Beijing. Contributions of those sources varied significantly during the control and non-control period. Compared with the values before control, contributions of vehicle-related sources were most reduced, followed by solvent utilization. Reductions of vehicle-related sources, solvent utilization, secondary formation, fuel combustion, and biogenic were responsible for 65%, 19%, 10%, 5%, and 1% of the reductions in ambient VOCs. Both PMF results and emission inventory data indicated that the control measure on traffic was very effective in reducing ambient VOCs in Beijing, with the emission reductions of about 50%. PMID:27039059

  13. Carbon Footprint of Telemedicine Solutions - Unexplored Opportunity for Reducing Carbon Emissions in the Health Sector

    PubMed Central

    Holmner, Åsa; Ebi, Kristie L.; Lazuardi, Lutfan; Nilsson, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background The healthcare sector is a significant contributor to global carbon emissions, in part due to extensive travelling by patients and health workers. Objectives To evaluate the potential of telemedicine services based on videoconferencing technology to reduce travelling and thus carbon emissions in the healthcare sector. Methods A life cycle inventory was performed to evaluate the carbon reduction potential of telemedicine activities beyond a reduction in travel related emissions. The study included two rehabilitation units at Umeå University Hospital in Sweden. Carbon emissions generated during telemedicine appointments were compared with care-as-usual scenarios. Upper and lower bound emissions scenarios were created based on different teleconferencing solutions and thresholds for when telemedicine becomes favorable were estimated. Sensitivity analyses were performed to pinpoint the most important contributors to emissions for different set-ups and use cases. Results Replacing physical visits with telemedicine appointments resulted in a significant 40–70 times decrease in carbon emissions. Factors such as meeting duration, bandwidth and use rates influence emissions to various extents. According to the lower bound scenario, telemedicine becomes a greener choice at a distance of a few kilometers when the alternative is transport by car. Conclusions Telemedicine is a potent carbon reduction strategy in the health sector. But to contribute significantly to climate change mitigation, a paradigm shift might be required where telemedicine is regarded as an essential component of ordinary health care activities and not only considered to be a service to the few who lack access to care due to geography, isolation or other constraints. PMID:25188322

  14. Optimizing Technology to Reduce Mercury and Acid Gas Emissions from Electric Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey C. Quick; David E. Tabet; Sharon Wakefield; Roger L. Bon

    2005-01-31

    Revised maps and associated data show potential mercury, sulfur, and chlorine emissions for U.S. coal by county of origin. Existing coal mining and coal washing practices result in a 25% reduction of mercury in U.S. coal before it is delivered to the power plant. Selection of low-mercury coal is a good mercury control option for plants having hot-side ESP, cold-side ESP, or hot-side ESP/FGD emission controls. Chlorine content is more important for plants having cold-side ESP/FGD or SDA/FF controls; optimum net mercury capture is indicated where chlorine is between 500 and 1000 ppm. Selection of low-sulfur coal should improve mercury capture where carbon in fly ash is used to reduce mercury emissions.

  15. Active Noise Control of Radiated Noise from Jets Originating NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Michael J.; Fuller, Christopher R.; Schiller, Noah H.; Turner, Travis L.

    2013-01-01

    The reduction of jet noise using a closed-loop active noise control system with highbandwidth active chevrons was investigated. The high frequency energy introduced by piezoelectrically-driven chevrons was demonstrated to achieve a broadband reduction of jet noise, presumably due to the suppression of large-scale turbulence. For a nozzle with one active chevron, benefits of up to 0.8 dB overall sound pressure level (OASPL) were observed compared to a static chevron nozzle near the maximum noise emission angle, and benefits of up to 1.9 dB OASPL were observed compared to a baseline nozzle with no chevrons. The closed-loop actuation system was able to effectively reduce noise at select frequencies by 1-3 dB. However, integrated OASPL did not indicate further reduction beyond the open-loop benefits, most likely due to the preliminary controller design, which was focused on narrowband performance.

  16. A proposed metric for assessing the potential of community annoyance from wind turbine low-frequency noise emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, N.D.

    1987-10-05

    Given our initial experience with the low-frequency, impulsive noise emissions from the MOD-1 wind turbine and their impact on the surrounding community, the ability to assess the potential of interior low-frequency annoyance in homes located near wind turbine installations may be important. Since there are currently no universally accepted metrics or descriptors for low-frequency community annoyance, we performed a limited program using volunteers to see if we could identify a method suitable for wind turbine noise applications. We electronically simulated three interior environments resulting from low-frequency acoustical loads radiated from both individual turbines and groups of upwind and downwind turbines. The written comments of the volunteers exposed to these interior stimuli were correlated with a number of descriptors which have been proposed for predicting low-frequency annoyance. The results are presented in this paper. We discuss our modifications of the highest correlated predictor to include the internal dynamic pressure effects associated with the response of residential structures to low-frequency acoustic loads. Finally, we outline a proposed procedure for establishing both a low-frequency ''figure of merit'' for a particular wind turbine design and, using actual measurements, estimate the potential for annoyance to nearby communities. 10 refs., 13 figs., 7 tabs.

  17. Reducing the Effects of Background Noise during Auditory Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Speech Processing: Qualitative and Quantitative Comparisons between Two Image Acquisition Schemes and Noise Cancellation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackman, Graham A.; Hall, Deborah A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The intense sound generated during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) complicates studies of speech and hearing. This experiment evaluated the benefits of using active noise cancellation (ANC), which attenuates the level of the scanner sound at the participant's ear by up to 35 dB around the peak at 600 Hz. Method: Speech and…

  18. Effectiveness of Emission Controls to Reduce the Atmospheric Concentrations of Mercury.

    PubMed

    Castro, Mark S; Sherwell, John

    2015-12-15

    Coal-fired power plants in the United States are required to reduce their emissions of mercury (Hg) into the atmosphere to lower the exposure of Hg to humans. The effectiveness of power-plant emission controls on the atmospheric concentrations of Hg in the United States is largely unknown because there are few long-term high-quality atmospheric Hg data sets. Here, we present the atmospheric concentrations of Hg and sulfur dioxide (SO2) measured from 2006 to 2015 at a relatively pristine location in western Maryland that is several (>50 km) kilometers downwind of power plants in Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia. Annual average atmospheric concentrations of gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM), SO2, fine particulate mercury (PBM2.5), and gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) declined by 75%, 75%, 43%, and 13%, respectively, and were strongly correlated with power-plant Hg emissions from the upwind states. These results provide compelling evidence that reductions in Hg emissions from power plants in the United States had their intended impact to reduce regional Hg pollution. PMID:26606506

  19. Building capacity for national carbon measurements for reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, S. J.; Laporte, N.; Horning, N.; Pelletier, J.; Jantz, P.; Ndunda, P.

    2014-12-01

    Many tropical countries are now working on developing their strategies for reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation, including activities that result in conservation or enhancement of forest carbon stocks and sustainable management of forests to effectively decrease atmospheric carbon emissions (i.e. REDD+). A new international REDD+ agreement is at the heart of recent negotiations of the parties to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). REDD+ mechanisms could provide an opportunity to not only diminish an important source of emissions, but also to promote large-scale conservation of tropical forests and establish incentives and opportunities to alleviate poverty. Most tropical countries still lack basic information for developing and implementing their forest carbon stock assessments, including the extent of forest area and the rate at which forests are being cleared and/or degraded, and the carbon amounts associated with these losses. These same countries also need support to conduct integrated assessments of the most promising approaches for reducing emissions, and in identifying those policy options that hold the greatest potential while minimizing potential negative impacts of REDD+ policies. The WHRC SERVIR project in East Africa is helping to provide these data sets to countries via best practice tools and methods to support cost effective forest carbon monitoring solutions and more informed decision making processes under REDD+. We will present the results of our capacity building activites in the region and planned future efforts being coordinated with the NASA-SERVIR Hub in Kenya to support to REDD+ decision support.

  20. When does highway construction to mitigate congestion reduce carbon emissions? A Case Study: The Caldecott Tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurlow, M. E.; Maness, H.; Wiersema, D. J.; Mcdonald, B. C.; Harley, R.; Fung, I. Y.

    2014-12-01

    The construction of the fourth bore of the Caldecott Tunnel, which connects Oakland and Moraga, CA on State Route 24, was the second largest roadway construction project in California last year with a total cost of $417 million. The objective of the fourth bore was to reduce traffic congestion before the tunnel entrance in the off-peak direction of travel, but the project was a source of conflict between policy makers and environmental and community groups concerned about the air quality and traffic impacts. We analyze the impact of the opening of the fourth bore on CO2 emissions associated with traffic. We made surface observations of CO2from a mobile platform along State Route 24 for several weeks in November 2013 incorporating the period prior to and after the opening of the fourth bore on November 16, 2013. We directly compare bottom-up and top-down approaches to estimate the change in traffic emissions associated with the fourth bore opening. A bottom-up emissions inventory was derived from the high-resolution Performance Measurement System (PeMs) dataset and the Multi-scale Motor Vehicle and Equipment Emissions System (MOVES). The emissions inventory was used to drive a box model as well as a high-resolution regional transport model (the Weather and Regional Forecasting Model). The box model was also used to derive emissions from observations in a basic inversion. We also present an analysis of long-term traffic patterns and consider the potential for compensating changes in behavior that offset the observed emissions reductions on longer timescales. Finally, we examine how the results from the Caldecott study demonstrate the general benefit of using mobile measurements for quantifying environmental impacts of congestion mitigation projects.

  1. At what cost do we reduce pollution Shadow prices of SO[sub 2] emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Swinton, J.R. )

    1998-01-01

    The US EPA's infant market for SO[sub 2] emissions has the potential for improving the cost effectiveness of reducing acid rain pollutants. If the market works as planned, over time one should see the cost of reducing additional amounts of sulfur dioxide converge across plants. The results of the study described here demonstrate that before the market opened marginal abatement costs varied wildly across plants. This work provides estimates of the shadow price of SO[sub 2] abatement using the output distance function approach for Illinois, Minnesota and Wisconsin coal-burning electric plants. The results demonstrate that the coal-burning electric plants with the highest emissions rates are also the plants with the lowest marginal abatement costs, a fact that may explain lower-than-expected prices in the new market for allowances. The data include information about plants with installed scrubber capital allowing for an investigation of the effect of scrubber capital on marginal abatement costs.

  2. Global economic potential for reducing carbon dioxide emissions from mangrove loss

    PubMed Central

    Siikamäki, Juha; Sanchirico, James N.; Jardine, Sunny L.

    2012-01-01

    Mangroves are among the most threatened and rapidly disappearing natural environments worldwide. In addition to supporting a wide range of other ecological and economic functions, mangroves store considerable carbon. Here, we consider the global economic potential for protecting mangroves based exclusively on their carbon. We develop unique high-resolution global estimates (5′ grid, about 9 × 9 km) of the projected carbon emissions from mangrove loss and the cost of avoiding the emissions. Using these spatial estimates, we derive global and regional supply curves (marginal cost curves) for avoided emissions. Under a broad range of assumptions, we find that the majority of potential emissions from mangroves could be avoided at less than $10 per ton of CO2. Given the recent range of market price for carbon offsets and the cost of reducing emissions from other sources, this finding suggests that protecting mangroves for their carbon is an economically viable proposition. Political-economy considerations related to the ability of doing business in developing countries, however, can severely limit the supply of offsets and increases their price per ton. We also find that although a carbon-focused conservation strategy does not automatically target areas most valuable for biodiversity, implementing a biodiversity-focused strategy would only slightly increase the costs. PMID:22847435

  3. Global economic potential for reducing carbon dioxide emissions from mangrove loss.

    PubMed

    Siikamäki, Juha; Sanchirico, James N; Jardine, Sunny L

    2012-09-01

    Mangroves are among the most threatened and rapidly disappearing natural environments worldwide. In addition to supporting a wide range of other ecological and economic functions, mangroves store considerable carbon. Here, we consider the global economic potential for protecting mangroves based exclusively on their carbon. We develop unique high-resolution global estimates (5' grid, about 9 × 9 km) of the projected carbon emissions from mangrove loss and the cost of avoiding the emissions. Using these spatial estimates, we derive global and regional supply curves (marginal cost curves) for avoided emissions. Under a broad range of assumptions, we find that the majority of potential emissions from mangroves could be avoided at less than $10 per ton of CO(2). Given the recent range of market price for carbon offsets and the cost of reducing emissions from other sources, this finding suggests that protecting mangroves for their carbon is an economically viable proposition. Political-economy considerations related to the ability of doing business in developing countries, however, can severely limit the supply of offsets and increases their price per ton. We also find that although a carbon-focused conservation strategy does not automatically target areas most valuable for biodiversity, implementing a biodiversity-focused strategy would only slightly increase the costs. PMID:22847435

  4. A model of plant isoprene emission based on available reducing power captures responses to atmospheric CO₂.

    PubMed

    Morfopoulos, Catherine; Sperlich, Dominik; Peñuelas, Josep; Filella, Iolanda; Llusià, Joan; Medlyn, Belinda E; Niinemets, Ülo; Possell, Malcolm; Sun, Zhihong; Prentice, Iain Colin

    2014-07-01

    We present a unifying model for isoprene emission by photosynthesizing leaves based on the hypothesis that isoprene biosynthesis depends on a balance between the supply of photosynthetic reducing power and the demands of carbon fixation. We compared the predictions from our model, as well as from two other widely used models, with measurements of isoprene emission from leaves of Populus nigra and hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × P. tremuloides) in response to changes in leaf internal CO2 concentration (C(i)) and photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) under diverse ambient CO2 concentrations (C(a)). Our model reproduces the observed changes in isoprene emissions with C(i) and PPFD, and also reproduces the tendency for the fraction of fixed carbon allocated to isoprene to increase with increasing PPFD. It also provides a simple mechanism for the previously unexplained decrease in the quantum efficiency of isoprene emission with increasing C(a). Experimental and modelled results support our hypothesis. Our model can reproduce the key features of the observations and has the potential to improve process-based modelling of isoprene emissions by land vegetation at the ecosystem and global scales. PMID:24661143

  5. Arctic Black Carbon Initiative: Reducing Emissions of Black Carbon from Power & Industry in Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cresko, J.; Hodson, E. L.; Cheng, M.; Fu, J. S.; Huang, K.; Storey, J.

    2012-12-01

    Deposition of black carbon (BC) on snow and ice is widely considered to have a climate warming effect by reducing the surface albedo and promoting snowmelt. Such positive climate feedbacks in the Arctic are especially problematic because rising surface temperatures may trigger the release of large Arctic stores of terrestrial carbon, further amplifying current warming trends. Recognizing the Arctic as a vulnerable region, the U.S. government committed funds in Copenhagen in 2009 for international cooperation targeting Arctic BC emissions reductions. As a result, the U.S. Department of State has funded three research and demonstration projects with the goal to better understand and mitigate BC deposition in the Russian Arctic from a range of sources. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Arctic BC initiative presented here is focused on mitigating BC emissions resulting from heat and power generation as well as industrial applications. A detailed understanding of BC sources and its transport and fate is required to prioritize efforts to reduce BC emissions from sources that deposit in the Russian Arctic. Sources of BC include the combustion of fossil fuels (e.g. coal, fuel oil, diesel) and the combustion of biomass (e.g. wildfires, agricultural burning, residential heating and cooking). Information on fuel use and associated emissions from the industrial and heat & power sectors in Russia is scarce and difficult to obtain from the open literature. Hence, our project includes a research component designed to locate Arctic BC emissions sources in Russia and determine associated BC transport patterns. We use results from the research phase to inform a subsequent assessment/demonstration phase. We use a back-trajectory modeling method (potential source contribution function - PSCF), which combines multi-year, high-frequency measurements with knowledge about atmospheric transport patterns. The PSCF modeling allows us to map the probability (by season and year) at course

  6. An abundance study of IC 418 using high-resolution, signal-to-noise emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharpee, Brian David

    2003-11-01

    An on-going problem in astrophysics involves the large and varying disagreement between abundances measurements made in planetary nebulae (PNe), determined from the strengths of emission lines arising from the same source ion, but excited by differing mechanisms (recombination and collisional excitation) in planetary nebulae (PNe). We investigate the extent of this problem in IC 418, a PN chosen for its great surface brightness and perceived visually uncomplicated geometry, through the use of high resolution (R ≈ 30000 = 10 km sec-1 at 6500Å) echelle emission spectroscopy in the optical regime (3500 9850Å). These observations allow us to construct the most detailed list of atomic emission lines ever compiled for IC 418, and among the most detailed from among all PNe. Ionic abundances are calculated from the fluxes of numerous weak (1 × 10-5 Hβ) atomic emission lines from the ions of C,N,O, and Ne, using the most recent and accurate atomic transition information presently available. The high resolution of these spectra provides well-defined line profiles, which, coupled with the perceived simplicity of the object's expansion velocity distribution, allows us to better determine where in the nebula lines are formed, and where the ions that produce them are concentrated. Evidence for “non-conventional” line excitation mechanisms, such as continuum fluorescence from the ground state or enhanced dielectronic recombination, is sought in the profile morphologies and relative line strengths. Non-conventional excitation processes may influence the strengths of lines enough to significantly alter abundances calculated from them. Our calculations show that recombination line-derived abundances exceed those derived from collisionally excited lines, for those ions for which we observed lines of both types: O+, O+2, and Ne +2 by real and varying amounts. We find that both continuum fluorescence and dielectronic recombination excites numerous lines in IC 418, but that

  7. Characterizing reduced sulfur compounds emissions from a swine concentrated animal feeding operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumsey, Ian C.; Aneja, Viney P.; Lonneman, William A.

    2014-09-01

    Reduced sulfur compounds (RSCs) emissions from concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) have become a potential environmental and human health concern, as a result of changes in livestock production methods. RSC emissions were determined from a swine CAFO in North Carolina. RSC measurements were made over a period of ≈1 week from both the barn and lagoon during each of the four seasonal periods from June 2007 to April 2008. During sampling, meteorological and other environmental parameters were measured continuously. Seasonal hydrogen sulfide (H2S) barn concentrations ranged from 72 to 631 ppb. Seasonal dimethyl sulfide (DMS; CH3SCH3) and dimethyl disulfide (DMDS; CH3S2CH3) concentrations were 2-3 orders of magnitude lower, ranging from 0.18 to 0.89 ppb and 0.47 to 1.02 ppb, respectively. The overall average barn emission rate was 3.3 g day-1 AU-1 (AU (animal unit) = 500 kg of live animal weight) for H2S, which was approximately two orders of magnitude higher than the DMS and DMDS overall average emissions rates, determined as 0.017 g day-1 AU-1 and 0.036 g day-1 AU-1, respectively. The overall average lagoon flux was 1.33 μg m-2 min-1 for H2S, which was approximately an order of magnitude higher than the overall average DMS (0.12 μg m-2 min-1) and DMDS (0.09 μg m-2 min-1) lagoon fluxes. The overall average lagoon emission for H2S (0.038 g day-1 AU-1) was also approximately an order of magnitude higher than the overall average DMS (0.0034 g day-1 AU-1) and DMDS (0.0028 g day-1 AU-1) emissions. H2S, DMS and DMDS have offensive odors and low odor thresholds. Over all four sampling seasons, 77% of 15 min averaged H2S barn concentrations were an order of magnitude above the average odor threshold. During these sampling periods, however, DMS and DMDS concentrations did not exceed their odor thresholds. The overall average barn and lagoon emissions from this study were used to help estimate barn, lagoon and total (barn + lagoon) RSC emissions from swine CAFOs

  8. Potential biodiversity benefits from international programs to reduce carbon emissions from deforestation.

    PubMed

    Siikamäki, Juha; Newbold, Stephen C

    2012-01-01

    Deforestation is the second largest anthropogenic source of carbon dioxide emissions and options for its reduction are integral to climate policy. In addition to providing potentially low cost and near-term options for reducing global carbon emissions, reducing deforestation also could support biodiversity conservation. However, current understanding of the potential benefits to biodiversity from forest carbon offset programs is limited. We compile spatial data on global forest carbon, biodiversity, deforestation rates, and the opportunity cost of land to examine biodiversity conservation benefits from an international program to reduce carbon emissions from deforestation. Our results indicate limited geographic overlap between the least-cost areas for retaining forest carbon and protecting biodiversity. Therefore, carbon-focused policies will likely generate substantially lower benefits to biodiversity than a more biodiversity-focused policy could achieve. These results highlight the need to systematically consider co-benefits, such as biodiversity in the design and implementation of forest conservation programs to support international climate policy. PMID:22307280

  9. System and method for making metallic iron with reduced CO.sub.2 emissions

    DOEpatents

    Kiesel, Richard F; Englund, David J; Schlichting, Mark; Meehan, John; Crouch, Jeremiah; Wilson, Logan

    2014-10-14

    A method and system for making metallic iron nodules with reduced CO.sub.2 emissions is disclosed. The method includes: assembling a linear hearth furnace having entry and exit portions, at least a conversion zone and a fusion zone, and a moving hearth adapted to move reducible iron bearing material through the furnace on contiguous hearth sections; assembling a shrouded return substantially free of air ingress extending adjacent at least the conversion and fusion zones of the furnace through which hearth sections can move from adjacent the exit portion to adjacent the entry portion of the furnace; transferring the hearth sections from the furnace to the shrouded return adjacent the exit portion; reducing reducible material in the linear hearth furnace to metallic iron nodules; and transporting gases from at least the fusion zone to the shrouded return to heat the hearth sections while in the shrouded return.

  10. The effect of front-to-rear propeller spacing on the interaction noise at cruise conditions of a model counterrotation propeller having a reduced diameter aft propeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittmar, James H.; Gordon, Eliott B.; Jeracki, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of forward-to-aft propeller spacing on the interaction noise of a counterrotation propeller with reduced aft diameter was measured at cruise conditions. In general, the tones at 100 percent speed decreased from close to nominal spacing as expected from a wake decay model. However, when the spacing was further increased to the far position, the noise did not decrease as expected and in some cases increased. The behavior at the far spacing was attributed to changing forward propeller performance, which produced larger wakes. The results of this experiment indicate that simple wake decay model is sufficient to describe the behavior of the interaction noise only if the aerodynamic coupling of the two propellers does not change with spacing. If significant coupling occurs such that the loading of the forward propeller is altered, the interaction noise does not necessarily decrease with larger forward-to-aft propeller spacing.

  11. Revealing, identifying, and assessing flaws in operating equipment by the acoustic emission image recognition method under strong background noise condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muravin, Gregory; Muravin, Boris; Lezvisky, Ludmila

    2004-05-01

    The analysis has shown that high pressure and high temperature piping in fossil and nuclear power plants suffer from unexpected and rarely predictable failures. To guarantee operational safety and to prevent failures authors have performed the complex investigations and have created Quantitative Acoustic Emission NDI technology for revealing, identifying and assessing flaws in equipment operated under strong background noise condition. These enabled: Overall inspection of the piping operated under stress, temperature, pressure, steam flow and loading, variation. Locating suspected zones and zones of flaw development with low J-integral value and the great variation of the dynamic range of flaws danger level. Identification of flaw types and their danger level. Detection of defective components in service prior to shut down. The continuous and the burst Acoustic Emission (AE) were used in combination as an information tool. As result, the significant number of flaws such as creep at stage 3a-3b, closed-edge micro-cracks, systems of randomly dispersed pores and inclusions, plastic deformation development around them, or/and individual micro-cracking were revealed, identified and assessed in 50 operating high energy piping. The findings and assessing flaw danger level obtained by QAE NDI were confirmed by independent NDI methods as TOFD, X-ray, replication, metallurgical investigations, etc. The findings and assessing flaw danger level obtained by QAE NDI were confirmed by independent NDI methods such as TOFD, X-ray, replication, metallurgical investigations, etc

  12. Effectiveness of hearing protector devices in impulse noise verified with transiently evoked and distortion product otoacoustic emissions.

    PubMed

    Bockstael, Annelies; Keppler, Hannah; Dhooge, Ingeborg; D'haenens, Wendy; Maes, Leen; Philips, Birgit; Vinck, Bart

    2008-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of impulse noise on otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) while a passive non-linear earplug or an active level-dependent earmuff was worn. Since none of the standardized attenuation measurement techniques, REAT (real ear at threshold), ATF (acoustic test fixture), or MIRE (microphone in real ear), is designed to test both types in real-wearing condition, OAEs, suitable for detecting subtle changes in the functional integrity of the cochlear outer hair cells, are used. First, DPOAEs (distortion product) and TEOAEs (transiently evoked) of 24 subjects were compared before, immediately after gunfire practice, and after one hour of non-exposure. Secondly, both types of OAEs were evaluated in 31 subjects before and after exposure during a five-day military practice. Significant differences existed between the ears in most cases; the emissions from the right ear had a tendency to be more robust. There were no significant changes in OAEs either before and after exposure, or in the second experiment over multiple days. These findings suggest that the HPDs are able to prevent cochlear damage. PMID:18307092

  13. POTENTIAL HEALTH RISK REDUCTION ARISING FROM REDUCED MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM COAL FIRED POWER PLANTS.

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, T. M.; Lipfert, F. W.; Morris, S. C.; Moskowitz, P. D.

    2001-09-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has announced plans to regulate mercury (Hg) emissions from coal-fired power plants. EPA has not prepared a quantitative assessment of the reduction in risk that could be achieved through reduction in coal plant emissions of Hg. To address this issue, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) with support from the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy (DOE FE) prepared a quantitative assessment of the reduction in human health risk that could be achieved through reduction in coal plant emissions of Hg. The primary pathway for Hg exposure is through consumption of fish. The most susceptible population to Hg exposure is the fetus. Therefore the risk assessment focused on consumption of fish by women of child-bearing age. Dose response factors were generated from studies on loss of cognitive abilities (language skills, motor skills, etc.) by young children whose mothers consumed large amounts of fish with high Hg levels. Population risks were estimated for the general population in three regions of the country, (the Midwest, Northeast, and Southeast) that were identified by EPA as being heavily impacted by coal emissions. Three scenarios for reducing Hg emissions from coal plants were considered: (1) A base case using current conditions; (2) A 50% reduction; and, (3) A 90% reduction. These reductions in emissions were assumed to translate linearly into a reduction in fish Hg levels of 8.6% and 15.5%, respectively. Population risk estimates were also calculated for two subsistence fisher populations. These groups of people consume substantially more fish than the general public and, depending on location, the fish may contain higher Hg levels than average. Risk estimates for these groups were calculated for the three Hg levels used for the general population analyses. Analysis shows that the general population risks for exposure of the fetus to Hg are small. Estimated risks under current conditions (i.e., no

  14. Reduced ammonia emissions from slurry after self-acidification with organic supplements.

    PubMed

    Clemens, J; Bergmann, S; Vandré, R

    2002-04-01

    Ammonia volatilisation from field applied slurries causes environmental hazards and loss of fertilizer value. Acidification of slurry, usually with inorganic or organic acids has previously been used to reduce NH3 emissions. In this study, we present an alternative technique for the acidification of slurry, namely the use of fermentation by endogenous microbes to form organic acids from readily degradable organic compounds. In laboratory experiments, the addition of different sugars (sucrose in dosages of 0.003, 0.01, 0.03, 0.1 and 0.3 mol l(-1), glucose in dosages of 0.05 and 0.1 mol l(-1)) and organic residues (sugar beet residues in dosages of 33 and 330 g fresh weight l(-1), biowaste at 50 g fresh weight l(-1)) to cattle slurry resulted in a considerable decrease in pH, with a minimum pH of 4.7. A subsequent pH increase indicated that the organic acids were probably further degraded with a resultant loss of acidity in the slurry. In a field study, the NH3 emissions from untreated and acidified (pH = 6) slurries were compared after field application (20 m3 ha(-1)). During the first 20 hours, the acidified slurry showed NH3 emissions of less than 5% of the applied ammonia compared to a 26% loss from the untreated slurry. The total emissions of NH4+-N were 32% for acidified and 54% for untreated slurry. Easily degradable organic amendments therefore have the potential to effectively reduce NH3 emissions from slurries and may be an alternative for the use of acids. PMID:12088370

  15. Field Tests of Surface Seals and Soil Treatments to Reduce Fumigant Emissions from Shank-Injection of Telone C35

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Telone or 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D) and chloropicrin (CP) are increasingly used soil fumigants and their emission reductions are required to reduce contribution of volatile organic compounds to the atmosphere and improve air-quality. Research has identified various methods to reduce fumigant emiss...

  16. Forest and grassland cover types reduce net greenhouse gas emissions from agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Baah-Acheamfour, Mark; Carlyle, Cameron N; Lim, Sang-Sun; Bork, Edward W; Chang, Scott X

    2016-11-15

    Western Canada's prairie region is extensively cultivated for agricultural production, which is a large source of greenhouse gas emissions. Agroforestry systems are common land uses across Canada, which integrate trees into the agricultural landscape and could play a substantial role in sequestering carbon and mitigating increases in atmospheric GHG concentrations. We measured soil CO2, CH4 and N2O fluxes and the global warming potential of microbe-mediated net greenhouse gas emissions (GWPm) in forest and herbland (areas without trees) soils of three agroforestry systems (hedgerow, shelterbelt and silvopasture) over two growing seasons (May through September in 2013 and 2014). We measured greenhouse gas fluxes and environmental conditions at 36 agroforestry sites (12 sites for each system) located along a south-north oriented soil/climate gradient of increasing moisture availability in central Alberta, Canada. The temperature sensitivity of soil CO2 emissions was greater in herbland (4.4) than in forest (3.1), but was not different among agroforestry systems. Over the two seasons, forest soils had 3.4% greater CO2 emission, 36% higher CH4 uptake, and 66% lower N2O emission than adjacent herbland soils. Combining the CO2 equivalents of soil CH4 and N2O fluxes with the CO2 emitted via heterotrophic (microbial) respiration, forest soils had a smaller GWPm than herbland soils (68 and 89kgCO2ha(-1), respectively). While emissions of total CO2 were silvopasture>hedgerow>shelterbelt, soils under silvopasture had 5% lower heterotrophic respiration, 15% greater CH4 uptake, and 44% lower N2O emission as compared with the other two agroforestry systems. Overall, the GWPm of greenhouse gas emissions was greater in hedgerow (88) and shelterbelt (85) than in the silvopasture system (76kgCO2ha(-1)). High GWPm in the hedgerow and shelterbelt systems reflects the greater contribution from the monoculture annual crops within these systems. Opportunities exist for reducing soil

  17. Growth promoting technologies reduce greenhouse gas, alcohol, and ammonia emissions from feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Stackhouse-Lawson, K R; Calvo, M S; Place, S E; Armitage, T L; Pan, Y; Zhao, Y; Mitloehner, F M

    2013-11-01

    Increased animal productivity has the potential to reduce the environmental impact per unit of consumable product and is believed to be the most promising and sustainable mitigation technique to meet increasing demand for high quality protein. The feedlot industry uses ionophores, antibiotics, growth implants, and β2-adrenergic agonists to improve health and growth performance of cattle. These technologies not only increase productivity but also alter microbes in the rumen and increase nitrogen retention in the animal, which may lead to changes in greenhouse gas (GHG), volatile organic compound (VOC), and ammonia (NH3) emissions from feedlot cattle. The present study investigated GHG, VOC, and NH3 emissions from 160 Angus crossbred steers. Steers were blocked by weight in a randomized block design and assigned to 16 pens of 10 animals each. Treatments applied were 1) control (CON; no technology application), 2) monensin and tylosin phosphate (MON), 3) monensin, tylosin phosphate, and growth implant (IMP), and 4) monensin, tylosin phosphate, growth implant, and zilpaterol hydrochloride (fed during the last 20 d of the feeding period; BAA). Cattle were on feed for an average of 107 d. Performance variables (DMI, BW, ADG, and G:F) and carcass traits (HCW, dressing percent, KPH, LM area, fat thickness, marbling score, yield grade, and quality grade) were measured. Gaseous emissions were measured during the last 10 d of the feeding period when animals were housed in 4 totally enclosed identical cattle pen enclosures. To quantify gaseous emissions a 4×4 Latin square design (n=4) was used. Gaseous emissions were analyzed using Proc Mixed in SAS and reported in grams per kilogram HCW per day and grams per kilogram per animal per hour. Treatment with IMP and BAA increased (P<0.05) ADG, final BW, and HCW. Cattle on BAA had greater HCW and LM area (P<0.05) and had lower (P<0.05) CH4, methanol, and NH3 emissions per kilogram HCW than cattle on the remaining treatments

  18. The DFP 9200 Digital Noise Reducer, A Real-Time High-Resolution Digital Video Processing System For X-Ray Fluoroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMann, Renville H.; Baron, Stanley; Kreinik, Stephen; Epperson, Don; Kruger, Robert A.

    1981-11-01

    A dedicated digital processor is described capable of digitizing a high resolution video signal from a fluoroscopic TV camera into an 810 x 600 matrix in real time. For less demanding applications, a 512 x 512 matrix can be substituted. The sampling clock frequency is 15 Megahertz giving a Nyquist bandwidth limit of 7.5 MHz. A 7 MHz phase equalized eliptical filter at the input prevents aliasing and the production of false artifacts in the picture. Eleven bit digital processing follows an 8 bit analog to digital converter. Noise reduction is accomplished by a one frame recursive filter in which the filter coefficients are adjusted by a patented motion detector on a pixel by pixel basis to reduce motion smear. The lower perceived noise permits X-ray dose reduction of 2 to 8 times while retaining high quality pictures. A noise reduced spot picture can be frozen by a foot controlled switch permitting a further reduction of dosage and eliminating the need for a troublesome disc recorder. This noise reduced picture can also be used as a subtraction mask in an optional version of the equipment. A minimum of front panel operator controls for best human interface is accomplished by the use of a programmed read only memories to control all functions including noise reduction and frame storage.

  19. Reducing emissions from the electricity sector: the costs and benefits nationwide and for the Empire State

    SciTech Connect

    Karen Palmer; Dallas Butraw; Jhih-Shyang Shih

    2005-06-15

    Using four models, this study looks at EPA's Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) as originally proposed, which differs in only small ways from the final rule issued in March 2005, coupled with several approaches to reducing emissions of mercury including one that differs in only small ways from the final rule also issued in March 2005. This study analyzes what costs and benefits each would incur to New York State and to the nation at large. Benefits to the nation and to New York State significantly outweigh the costs associated with reductions in SO{sub 2}, NOx and mercury, and all policies show dramatic net benefits. The manner in which mercury emissions are regulated will have important implications for the cost of the regulation and for emission levels for SO{sub 2} and NOx and where those emissions are located. Contrary to EPA's findings, CAIR as originally proposed by itself would not keep summer emissions of NOx from electricity generators in the SIP region below the current SIP seasonal NOx cap. In the final CAIR, EPA added a seasonal NOx cap to address seasonal ozone problems. The CAIR with the seasonal NOx cap produces higher net benefits. The effect of the different policies on the mix of fuels used to supply electricity is fairly modest under scenarios similar to the EPA's final rules. A maximum achievable control technology (MACT) approach, compared to a trading approach as the way to achieve tighter mercury targets (beyond EPA's proposal), would preserve the role of coal in electricity generation. The evaluation of scenarios with tighter mercury emission controls shows that the net benefits of a maximum achievable control technology (MACT) approach exceed the net benefits of a cap and trade approach. 39 refs., 10 figs., 30 figs., 5 apps.

  20. Biochar application reduces N2O emission in intensively managed temperate grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felber, R.; Leifeld, J.; Neftel, A.

    2012-04-01

    Biochar, a pyrolysis product of organic residues, is seen as an amendment for agricultural soils to improve soil fertility, sequester CO2 and reduce N2O emissions. Mainly used in highly weathered tropical soils, the interest of using biochar in intensively managed temperate soils is increasing. Our previous laboratory incubations have shown N2O reduction potentials of between 20 and 100% for temperate soils after biochar application (Felber et al., Biogeosciences Discuss, 2012). To assess the effect of biochar application under field conditions, a plot experiment (3 control vs. 3 biochar amended plots of 3x3 m size at a rate of 15 t ha-1) was set up in a temperate intensively managed grassland soil. N2O and CO2 emissions were quasi-continuously measured by static chambers under standard management practice over 8 months. In parallel soil samples were taken monthly from all plots and their N2O and CO2 productions were measured under controlled conditions in the lab. At the beginning of the field measurements (April 2011) cumulative N2O fluxes from biochar amended plots were above those of control plots, but the pattern reversed towards reduced fluxes from biochar plots after 3 months and the reduction reached about 15% by the end of 2011. The biochar effect on reducing N2O emissions in the laboratory was two times that of the field measurements, indicating that results from laboratory experiments are not directly transferable to field conditions. The experiments indicate a substantial N2O emission reduction potential of biochar in temperate grassland fields.

  1. Inductively coupled plasma spectrometry: Noise characteristics of aerosols, application of generalized standard additions method, and Mach disk as an emission source

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Luan

    1995-10-06

    This dissertation is focused on three problem areas in the performance of inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source. The noise characteristics of aerosols produced by ICP nebulizers are investigated. A laser beam is scattered by aerosol and detected by a photomultiplier tube and the noise amplitude spectrum of the scattered radiation is measured by a spectrum analyzer. Discrete frequency noise in the aerosol generated by a Meinhard nebulizer or a direct injection nebulizer is primarily caused by pulsation in the liquid flow from the pump. A Scott-type spray chamber suppresses white noise, while a conical, straight-pass spray chamber enhances white noise, relative to the noise seen from the primary aerosol. Simultaneous correction for both spectral interferences and matrix effects in ICP atomic emission spectrometry (AES) can be accomplished by using the generalized standard additions method (GSAM). Results obtained with the application of the GSAM to the Perkin-Elmer Optima 3000 ICP atomic emission spectrometer are presented. The echelle-based polychromator with segmented-array charge-coupled device detectors enables the direct, visual examination of the overlapping lines Cd (1) 228.802 nm and As (1) 228.812 nm. The slit translation capability allows a large number of data points to be sampled, therefore, the advantage of noise averaging is gained. An ICP is extracted into a small quartz vacuum chamber through a sampling orifice in a water-cooled copper plate. Optical emission from the Mach disk region is measured with a new type of echelle spectrometer equipped with two segmented-array charge-coupled-device detectors, with an effort to improve the detection limits for simultaneous multielement analysis by ICP-AES.

  2. A CFD study of jet mixing in reduced flow areas for lower combustor emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, C. E.; Talpallikar, M. V.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1991-01-01

    The Rich-burn/Quick-mix/Lean-burn (RQL) combustor has the potential of significantly reducing NO(x) emissions in combustion chambers of High Speed Civil Transport aircraft. Previous work on RQL combustors for industrial applications suggested the benefit of necking down the mixing section. A 3-D numerical investigation was performed to study the effects of neckdown on NO(x) emissions and to develop a correlation for optimum mixing designs in terms of neckdown area ratio. The results of the study showed that jet mixing in reduced flow areas does not enhance mixing, but does decrease residence time at high flame temperatures, thus reducing NO(x) formation. By necking down the mixing flow area by 4, a potential NO(x) reduction of 16:1 is possible for annual combustors. However, there is a penalty that accompanies the mixing neckdown: reduced pressure drop across the combustor swirler. At conventional combustor loading parameters, the pressure drop penalty does not appear to be excessive.

  3. [Application of Microbial Fuel Cells in Reducing Methane Emission from Rice Paddy].

    PubMed

    Deng, Huan; Cai, Lü-cheng; Jiang, Yun-bin; Zhong, Wen-hui

    2016-01-15

    We aimed to study whether the methane emission from rice paddy with straw return can be alleviated in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). In our study, the soil mixed with 0. 5% ( mass fraction) rice straw was packed into MFCs reactors, then flooded with excess of sterilized water and transplanted with rice seedlings followed by the operation of MFCs. The MFCs were operated for 98 days covering five stages of seeding, tillering, mid-season aeration, rice filling, and ripening. The voltage data were recorded continuously and in real time during the MFCs operation and the methane emitted was collected once a week using the static chamber method and the methane emission flux was determined by gas chromatography. The results showed that the MFCs current increased and reached the peak value in the seeding and tillering stages and the operation of MFCs significantly reduced the accumulative methane emission in these two stages. The possible reason could be that the electrogens competed with methanogens for organic substrates. The height, the above and below ground biomass, and the productivity of rice plants were not significantly affected by the 98-day operation of MFCs. Our study provides a potential green and sustainable technology for the reduction of CH, emission from rice paddy fields. PMID:27078978

  4. Health benefits of reducing NO x emissions in the presence of epidemiological and atmospheric nonlinearities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappin, A. J.; Hakami, A.; Blagden, P.; Nasari, M.; Szyszkowicz, M.; Burnett, R. T.

    2016-06-01

    Recent epidemiological evidence suggests that the logarithm of concentration is a better predictor of mortality risk from long-term exposure to ambient PM2.5 and NO2 than concentration itself. A log-concentration-response function (CRF) predicts a heightened excess risk per unit concentration at low levels of exposure that further increases as the air becomes less polluted. Using an adjoint air quality model, we estimate the public health benefits of reducing NO x emissions, on a per-ton and source-by-source basis. Our estimates of benefits-per-ton assume linear in concentration and log-concentration CRFs for NO2 and a CRF that is linear in concentration for O3. We apply risk coefficients estimated using the Canadian Census Health and Environment Cohort. We find that a log-concentration CRF for NO2 leads almost consistently to larger benefits-per-ton than a linear in concentration CRF (e.g., 500 000 ton‑1 compared to 270 000 ton‑1 for Ottawa). We observe that concentrations gradually decline due to widespread, progressive emissions abatement, entailing increasing health benefits as a result of (1) a log-concentration CRF for NO2 and (2) the nonlinear response of O3 to NO x emissions. Our results indicate that NO x abatement has the potential to incur substantial and increasing health benefits, by up to five times with 85% emission reductions, for Canada into the future.

  5. A method of reducing background radiance for emissivity-compensated radiation thermometry of silicon wafers.

    PubMed

    Iuchi, T; Toyoda, Y; Seo, T

    2013-02-01

    We studied the spectral and directional emissivities of silicon wafers using an optical polarization technique. Based on simulation and experimental results, we developed two radiation thermometry methods for silicon wafers: one is based on the polarized emissivity-invariant condition and the other is based on the relationship between the ratio of the p- and s-polarized radiance and the polarized emissivity. These methods can be performed at temperatures above 600 °C and over a wide wavelength range (0.9-4.8 μm), irrespective of the dielectric film thickness and the substrate resistivity, which depends on the dopant concentration. The temperature measurements were estimated to have expanded uncertainties (k = 2) of less than 5 °C. With a view to practically applying these methods, we investigated a method to reduce the intense background radiance produced by high-intensity heating lamps. We found that the background radiance can be greatly reduced by using a radiometer that is sensitive to wavelengths of 4.5 or 4.8 μm and suitable geometrical arrangements of a quartz plate. This opens up the possibility of using the two proposed radiation thermometry methods in practical applications. PMID:23464239

  6. A method of reducing background radiance for emissivity-compensated radiation thermometry of silicon wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iuchi, T.; Toyoda, Y.; Seo, T.

    2013-02-01

    We studied the spectral and directional emissivities of silicon wafers using an optical polarization technique. Based on simulation and experimental results, we developed two radiation thermometry methods for silicon wafers: one is based on the polarized emissivity-invariant condition and the other is based on the relationship between the ratio of the p- and s-polarized radiance and the polarized emissivity. These methods can be performed at temperatures above 600 °C and over a wide wavelength range (0.9-4.8 μm), irrespective of the dielectric film thickness and the substrate resistivity, which depends on the dopant concentration. The temperature measurements were estimated to have expanded uncertainties (k = 2) of less than 5 °C. With a view to practically applying these methods, we investigated a method to reduce the intense background radiance produced by high-intensity heating lamps. We found that the background radiance can be greatly reduced by using a radiometer that is sensitive to wavelengths of 4.5 or 4.8 μm and suitable geometrical arrangements of a quartz plate. This opens up the possibility of using the two proposed radiation thermometry methods in practical applications.

  7. Abiotic emissions of methane and reduced organic compounds from organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roeckmann, T.; Keppler, F.; Vigano, I.; Derendorp, L.; Holzinger, R.

    2012-12-01

    Recent laboratory studies show that the important greenhouse gas methane, but also other reduced atmospheric trace gases, can be emitted by abiotic processes from organic matter, such as plants, pure organic compounds and soils. It is very difficult to distinguish abiotic from biotic emissions in field studies, but in laboratory experiments this is easier because it is possible to carefully prepare/sterilize samples, or to control external parameters. For example, the abiotic emissions always show a strong increase with temperature when temperatures are increased to 70C or higher, well above the temperature optimum for bacterial activity. UV radiation has also been clearly shown to lead to emission of methane and other reduced gases from organic matter. Interesting information on the production mechanism has been obtained from isotope studies, both at natural abundance and with isotope labeling. For example, the methoxyl groups of pectin were clearly identified to produce methane. However, analysis of the isotopic composition of methane from natural samples clearly indicates that there must be other molecular mechanisms that lead to methane production. Abiotic methane generation could be a ubiquitous process that occurs naturally at low rates from many different sources.

  8. In-cylinder catalysts -- A novel approach to reduce hydrocarbon emissions from spark-ignition engines

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Z.; Ladommatos, N.

    1995-12-31

    A novel approach was proposed and investigated to reduce unburned hydrocarbon emissions from spark-ignition engines using in-cylinder catalysts. The unburned hydrocarbons in spark-ignition engines arise primarily from sources near the combustion chamber walls, such as flame quenching at the entrance of crevice volumes and at the combustion chamber wall, and the absorption and desorption of fuel vapor into oil layers on the cylinder wall. The proximity of these sources of unburned hydrocarbons to the wall means that they can be reduced significantly by simply using in-cylinder catalysts on the combustion chamber walls, in particular on the surfaces of the crevice volumes. A platinum-rhodium coating was deposited on the top and side surfaces of the piston crown, and its effects on the engine combustion and emission characteristics were examined in this experimental investigation. The in-cylinder catalyst gave rise to a reduction of exhaust unburned hydrocarbon emissions by approximately 20% over a wide range of operating conditions.

  9. Use of condensed tannin extract from quebracho trees to reduce methane emissions from cattle.

    PubMed

    Beauchemin, K A; McGinn, S M; Martinez, T F; McAllister, T A

    2007-08-01

    Our objective was to determine if condensed tannin extract from quebracho trees (Schinopsis quebracho-colorado; red quebracho) could be used to reduce enteric methane emissions from cattle. The experiment was designed as a repeated 3 x 3 Latin square (4 squares) with 3 treatments (0, 1, and 2% of dietary DM as quebracho tannin extract) and 3 28-d periods. Six spayed Angus heifers (238 +/- 13.3 kg of initial BW) and 6 Angus steers (207 +/- 8.2 kg of initial BW) were each assigned to 2 squares. The measured condensed tannin content of the extract was 91%, and the basal diet contained 70% forage (DM basis). Feeding quebracho tannin extract had no effect on BW, ADG, or nutrient intakes. Furthermore, it had no effect on DM, energy, or fiber (ADF and NDF) digestibility, but apparent digestibility of CP decreased linearly (P < 0.001) by 5 and 15% with 1 and 2% quebracho tannin extract, respectively. There were no effects of quebracho tannin extract on methane emissions (g/d, g/kg of DM, % of GE intake, or % of DE intake). Feeding up to 2% of the dietary DM as quebracho tannin extract failed to reduce enteric methane emissions from growing cattle, although the protein-binding effect of the quebracho tannin extract was evident. PMID:17468433

  10. Reducing CH4 emission from rice paddy fields by altering water management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudo, S.; Itoh, M.

    2010-12-01

    Percentage of atmospheric methane emitted form rice paddy is estimated at 60Tg/yr (20 - 100Tg/yr) which is near 10% of total global methane emission of 535Tg/yr (410 - 660Tg) (IPCC(1995), and which is near 30% of anthropogenic CH4 emission. Thus, mitigation of CH4 emission is urgently required. CH4 in paddy soil is emanated by the activities of anaerobic bacteria which is called methane producer through reduction of CO2 or decomposition of acetic acid, and it is transported to atmosphere through soil or paddy water surface. It is effective to control methane emission from rice paddy that period is extended on intermittent drainage, composted rice straw is incorporated as fertilizer instead of flesh one, or other. However, empirical approach of these kinds of experiments had not been sufficient because such a kind of experiment required significant times and efforts. In this study, we conducted demonstrative experiments to verify the effects of water management method differences in order to reduce CH4 emission from rice paddy at 9 experimental sites in 8 prefectures. In this, we used new gas analyzer which can measure CH4, CO2 and N2O at once developed by National Institute for Agro-Environmental Sciences (NIAES), Japan. In this report, we show the results in two years of this study. 'Nakaboshi' (mid-season-drainage) is one of cultivation methods in rice paddy that surface water in paddy field is once drained for about 10 days and the field is maintained like upland field to give adequate stress to rice plant for better harvest qualities and yields. Our targeted evaluation was dependencies of Nakaboshi periods lengths and Nakaboshi periods to CH4 emission reduction amounts for total cultivation periods within harvest yield maintained. The longer length of Nakaboshi period was extended, the lesser CH4 emitted even after when Nakaboshi period lasted, as a whole. In some cases, for example in Kagoshima, exceptional phenomena of that significant high emission were

  11. Effects of industrial noise on circumpulpar dentin - a field emission scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cavacas, Maria Alzira; Tavares, Vitor; Oliveira, Maria João; Oliveira, Pedro; Sezinando, Ana; Martins dos Santos, José

    2013-01-01

    Chronic exposure to Industrial Noise (IN), rich in Low Frequency Noise (LFN), causes systemic fibrotic transformation and sustained stress. Dental wear, significantly increased with exposure to LFN, affects the teeth particularly through the circumpulpar dentin. Our goal is to understand the consequences of IN exposure on the circumpulpar dentin of Wistar rats. 10 Wistar rats were exposed to IN for 4 months, according to an occupationally simulated time schedule and 10 animals were used as age-matched controls. The first and the second upper and lower molars of each animal were processed for observation by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) analysis was performed. In exposed animals FESEM showed a 2.0 to 6.0 μm-dense mineral band between dentin and the pulp with no regular continuity with the tubules. This structure had a few tubules where the odontoblasts processes could be observed embedded within the band and collagen fibers were trapped inside. EDS analysis revealed that it was hydroxyapatite similar to dentin, with a higher carbon content. FESEM results show that the band may be tertiary reparative dentin formed by odontoblast-like cells, but the increased amount of carbon (EDS) could mean that it is sclerotic dentin. IN should be acknowledge as a strong stimulus, able to cause an injury to odontoblasts and to the formation of reparative tertiary dentin, in a process that may accelerate the aging of the teeth, either by direct impact of acoustic pressure pulsations or by increased stress and dental wear. PMID:24294356

  12. The use of combined heat and power (CHP) to reduce greenhouse gas emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Asrael, J.; Milmoe, P.H.; Haydel, J.

    1999-07-01

    Cogeneration or Combined Heat and Power (CHP) is the sequential production of electric power and thermal energy. It is a more efficient way of providing electricity and process heat than producing them independently. Average overall efficiencies can range from 70% to more than 80%. CHP decisions often present an opportunity to switch to a cleaner fuel. CHP systems are an attractive opportunity to save money, increase overall efficiency, reduce net emissions, and improve environmental performance. Climate Wise, a US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) program helping industrial Partners turn energy efficiency and pollution prevention into a corporate asset, has increased awareness of CHP by providing implementation and savings information, providing peer exchange opportunities for its Partners, and recognizing the achievements of Partners that have implemented CHP at their facilities. This paper profiles Climate Wise Partners that have invested in CHP systems, including describing how CHP is used in their facilities and the resulting cost and emission reductions.

  13. Incorporation of catalytic dehydrogenation into fischer-tropsch synthesis to significantly reduce carbon dioxide emissions

    DOEpatents

    Huffman, Gerald P.

    2012-11-13

    A new method of producing liquid transportation fuels from coal and other hydrocarbons that significantly reduces carbon dioxide emissions by combining Fischer-Tropsch synthesis with catalytic dehydrogenation is claimed. Catalytic dehydrogenation (CDH) of the gaseous products (C1-C4) of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) can produce large quantities of hydrogen while converting the carbon to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). Incorporation of CDH into a FTS-CDH plant converting coal to liquid fuels can eliminate all or most of the CO.sub.2 emissions from the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction that is currently used to elevate the H.sub.2 level of coal-derived syngas for FTS. Additionally, the FTS-CDH process saves large amounts of water used by the WGS reaction and produces a valuable by-product, MWCNT.

  14. Construction of a reactive surface barrier to reduce fumigant 1,3-dichloropropene emissions.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wei; Papiernik, Sharon K; Guo, Mingxin; Dungan, Robert S; Yates, Scott R

    2005-08-01

    Halogenated fumigants have been used extensively in production agriculture to control soilborne pests. These types of pesticides are highly volatile and are prone to affect air quality and imperil public health. In the present study, a chemical tarp approach, termed a reactive surface barrier (RSB), was developed to reduce the emission of fumigant 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D) from the soil surface. The agrochemicals thiourea and allylthiourea were tested as active reagents for the construction of a RSB, where these soil amendments react with 1,3-D to form nonvolatile isothiuronium ions at the soil surface and, thereby, impede fumigant emission into the atmosphere. The feasibility of the method largely depends on the reactivity of 1,3-D and the RSB agrochemicals in soil as well as on the mobility, persistence, and toxicity of the transformation products. Therefore, the reaction kinetics and transformation mechanism of 1,3-D by thiourea and allylthiourea were studied comprehensively in aqueous solution and soil. A catalytic process occurring at the surface of soil colloids facilitated the reaction between 1,3-D and thiourea in amended soils. The rate of 1,3-D transformation in thiourea-amended soil increased with decreasing soil moisture or increasing thiourea amendment level. In a field trial, a thiourea RSB reduced cumulative 1,3-D emissions by more than 80% relative to that in bare soil surface. The present results clearly indicate that this chemical remediation technology has great potential to control the emissions of volatile halogenated organic contaminants and to mitigate atmospheric pollution. PMID:16152955

  15. Piloted Simulation Study of a Dual Thrust-Cutback Procedure for Reducing High-Speed Civil Transport Takeoff Noise Levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Donald R.; Glaab, Louis J.; Brandon, Jay M.; Person, Lee H., Jr.; Glaab, Patricia C.

    1999-01-01

    A piloted simulation study was performed for the purpose of indicating the noise reduction benefits and piloting performance that could occur for a typical 4-engine high-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) configuration during takeoff when a dual thrust-cutback procedure was employed with throttle operation under direct computer control. Two thrust cutbacks were employed with the first cutback performed while the vehicle was accelerating on the run-way and the second cutback performed at a distance farther downrange. Added vehicle performance improvements included the incorporation of high-lift increments into the aerodynamic database of the vehicle and the use of limited engine oversizing. Four single-stream turbine bypass engines that had no noise suppression of any kind were used with this configuration. This approach permitted establishing the additional noise suppression level that was needed to meet Federal Air Regulation Part 36 Stage 3 noise levels for subsonic commercial jet aircraft. Noise level results were calculated with the jet mixing and shock noise modules of the Aircraft Noise Prediction Program (ANOPP).

  16. The challenges of reducing greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution through energy sources: evidence from a panel of developed countries.

    PubMed

    Akhmat, Ghulam; Zaman, Khalid; Shukui, Tan; Sajjad, Faiza; Khan, Muhammad Azhar; Khan, Muhammad Zahir

    2014-06-01

    The objective of the study is to investigate the long-run relationship between climatic factors (i.e., greenhouse gas emissions, agricultural methane emissions, and industrial nitrous oxide emission), air pollution (i.e., carbon dioxide emissions), and energy sources (i.e., nuclear energy; oil, gas, and coal energy; and fossil fuel energy) in the panel of 35 developed countries (including EU-15, new EU member states, G-7, and other countries) over a period of 1975-2012. In order to achieve this objective, the present study uses sophisticated panel econometric techniques including panel cointegration, panel fully modified OLS (FMOLS), and dynamic OLS (DOLS). The results show that there is a long-run relationship between the variables. Nuclear energy reduces greenhouse gases and carbon emissions; however, the other emissions, i.e., agricultural methane emissions and industrial nitrous oxide, are still to increase during the study period. Electricity production from oil, gas, and coal sources increases the greenhouse gases and carbon emissions; however, the intensity to increase emissions is far less than the intensity to increase emissions through fossil fuel. Policies that reduce emissions of greenhouse gases can simultaneously alter emissions of conventional pollutants that have deleterious effects on human health and the environment. PMID:24584642

  17. Development of Nuclear Renewable Oil Shale Systems for Flexible Electricity and Reduced Fossil Fuel Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel Curtis; Charles Forsberg; Humberto Garcia

    2015-05-01

    We propose the development of Nuclear Renewable Oil Shale Systems (NROSS) in northern Europe, China, and the western United States to provide large supplies of flexible, dispatchable, very-low-carbon electricity and fossil fuel production with reduced CO2 emissions. NROSS are a class of large hybrid energy systems in which base-load nuclear reactors provide the primary energy used to produce shale oil from kerogen deposits and simultaneously provide flexible, dispatchable, very-low-carbon electricity to the grid. Kerogen is solid organic matter trapped in sedimentary shale, and large reserves of this resource, called oil shale, are found in northern Europe, China, and the western United States. NROSS couples electricity generation and transportation fuel production in a single operation, reduces lifecycle carbon emissions from the fuel produced, improves revenue for the nuclear plant, and enables a major shift toward a very-low-carbon electricity grid. NROSS will require a significant development effort in the United States, where kerogen resources have never been developed on a large scale. In Europe, however, nuclear plants have been used for process heat delivery (district heating), and kerogen use is familiar in certain countries. Europe, China, and the United States all have the opportunity to use large scale NROSS development to enable major growth in renewable generation and either substantially reduce or eliminate their dependence on foreign fossil fuel supplies, accelerating their transitions to cleaner, more efficient, and more reliable energy systems.

  18. Drops of energy: conserving urban water to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuanchun; Zhang, Bing; Wang, Haikun; Bi, Jun

    2013-10-01

    Water and energy are two essential resources of modern civilization and are inherently linked. Indeed, the optimization of the water supply system would reduce energy demands and greenhouse gas emissions in the municipal water sector. This research measured the climatic cobenefit of water conservation based on a water flow analysis. The results showed that the estimated energy consumption of the total water system in Changzhou, China, reached approximately 10% of the city's total energy consumption, whereas the industrial sector was found to be more energy intensive than other sectors within the entire water system, accounting for nearly 70% of the total energy use of the water system. In addition, four sustainable water management scenarios would bring the cobenefit of reducing the total energy use of the water system by 13.9%, and 77% of the energy savings through water conservation was indirect. To promote sustainable water management and reduce greenhouse gas emissions, China would require its water price system, both for freshwater and recycled water, to be reformed. PMID:23750633

  19. Neural network-based combustion optimization reduces NOx emissions while improving performance

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, R.C.; Roland, W.B.

    1998-07-01

    This paper presents the benefits of applying an on-line, real-time neural network to several bituminous coal fired utility boilers. The system helps reduce NOx emissions up to 60%, meeting compliance while it improves heat rate up to 2% overall (5% at low load) and reduces LOI as much as 30% through combustion optimization alone. The system can avoid or postpone large capital expenditures for low NOx burners, overfire air boiler modifications, SCRs, and SNCRs. The neural network-based system has been applied on 11 electric utility boilers that represent a wide range of furnace and burner types including units with tangential-, cell-, single wall-, and opposed wall-burner arrangements that have ranged in capacity from 146 to 800 MW in an advisory mode. Several sites have employed the neural network-based system for closed-loop supervisory combustion control. Boiler combustion profiles change continuously due to coal quality, boiler loading, changes in slag/soot deposits, ambient conditions, and the condition of plant equipment. Through on-line retraining, the neural network-based system optimizes the boiler operation by accommodating equipment performance changes due to wear and maintenance activities, adjusting to fluctuations in fuel quality, and improving operating flexibility. The system dynamically adjusts combustion setpoints and bias settings in closed-loop supervisory control to reduce NO{sub x} emissions and improve heat rate simultaneously.

  20. Neural network-based combustion optimization reduces NOx emissions while improving performance

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, R.C.; Roland, W.B. Jr.

    1998-12-31

    The NeuSIGHT neural network based system has been applied to units with tangential-, cell-, single wall-, and opposed wall-burner arrangements that have ranged in capacity from 146 to 800 MW in an advisory mode. Several sites have employed the neural network-based system for closed-loop supervisory combustion control. Boiler combustion profiles change continuously due to coal quality, boiler loading, changes in slag/soot deposits, ambient conditions, and the condition of plant equipment. Through on-line retraining, the neural network-based system optimizes the boiler operation by accommodating equipment performance changes due to wear and maintenance activities, adjusting to fluctuations in fuel quality, and improving operating flexibility. The system dynamically adjusts combustion setpoints and bias settings in closed-loop supervisory control to reduce NO{sub x} emissions and improve heat rate simultaneously. This paper presents the benefits of applying an on-line, real-time neural network to several commercially operating bituminous coal fired utility boilers. The system helps reduce NO{sub x} emissions up to 60%, meeting compliance while it improves heat rate up to 2% overall (5% at low load) and reduces LOI as much as 30% through combustion optimization alone. The system can avoid or postpone large capital expenditures for low NO{sub x} burners, overfire air boiler modifications, SCRs, and SNCRs.