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Sample records for reduction alters mode

  1. Intrinsic emittance reduction in transmission mode photocathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyeri; Cultrera, Luca; Bazarov, Ivan

    2016-03-01

    High quantum efficiency (QE) and low emittance electron beams provided by multi-alkali photocathodes make them of great interest for next generation high brightness photoinjectors. Spicer's three-step model well describes the photoemission process; however, some photocathode characteristics such as their thickness have not yet been completely exploited to further improve the brightness of the generated electron beams. In this work, we report on the emittance and QE of a multi-alkali photocathode grown onto a glass substrate operated in transmission and reflection modes at different photon energies. We observed a 20% reduction in the intrinsic emittance from the reflection to the transmission mode operation. This observation can be explained by inelastic electron-phonon scattering during electrons' transit towards the cathode surface. Due to this effect, we predict that thicker photocathode layers will further reduce the intrinsic emittance of electron beams generated by photocathodes operated in transmission mode.

  2. Mode Transitions for the ST7 Disturbance Reduction System Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Oscar C.; Maghami, Peiman G.; Markley, Francis L.; ODonnell, James R., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    The Space Technology 7 Disturbance Reduction System experiment will perform an on-orbit system-level validation of two technologies: a gravitational reference sensor employing a free-floating test mass and a set of colloidal micronewton thrusters. The Disturbance Reduction System is designed to maintain the spacecraft s position with respect to a free floating test mass to less than 10 nm/& over the frequency range of 1 to 30 m= mi paper presents the modes that compose the Disturbance Reduction System spacecraft control as well as the strategy used to transition between modes. A high-fidelity model of the system, which incorporates rigid-body models of the spacecraft and two test masses (18 degrees of freedom), is developed and used to evaluate the performance of each mode and the efficacy of the transition strategy.

  3. Congruent reduction and mode conversion in 4-dimensional plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Friedland, L.; Kaufman, A.N.

    1987-04-01

    Standard eikonal theory reduces, to N=1, the order of the system of equations underlying wave propagation in inhomogeneous plasmas. The condition for this remarkable reducibility is that only one eigenvalue of the unreduced NxN dispersion matrix D(k,x) vanishes at a time. If, however, two or more eigenvalues of D become simultaneously small, the geometric optics reduction scheme becomes singular. These regions are associated with linear mode conversion, and are described by higher order systems. A new reduction scheme based on congruent transformations of D is developed, and it is shown that, in ''degenerate'' plasma regions, a partial reduction of order is possible. The method comprises a constructive step-by-step procedure, which, in the most frequent (doubly) degenerate case, yields a second order system, describing the pairwise mode conversion problems, the solution of which in general geometry has been found recently.

  4. The default mode network and altered consciousness in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Danielson, Nathan B; Guo, Jennifer N; Blumenfeld, Hal

    2011-01-01

    The default mode network has been hypothesized based on the observation that specific regions of the brain are consistently activated during the resting state and deactivated during engagement with task. The primary nodes of this network, which typically include the precuneus/posterior cingulate, the medial frontal and lateral parietal cortices, are thought to be involved in introspective and social cognitive functions. Interestingly, this same network has been shown to be selectively impaired during epileptic seizures associated with loss of consciousness. Using a wide range of neuroimaging and electrophysiological modalities, decreased activity in the default mode network has been confirmed during complex partial, generalized tonic-clonic, and absence seizures. In this review we will discuss these three seizure types and will focus on possible mechanisms by which decreased default mode network activity occurs. Although the specific mechanisms of onset and propagation differ considerably across these seizure types, we propose that the resulting loss of consciousness in all three types of seizures is due to active inhibition of subcortical arousal systems that normally maintain default mode network activity in the awake state. Further, we suggest that these findings support a general "network inhibition hypothesis", by which active inhibition of arousal systems by seizures in certain cortical regions leads to cortical deactivation in other cortical areas. This may represent a push-pull mechanism similar to that seen operating between cortical networks under normal conditions. PMID:21447899

  5. Genetically altered mice for evaluation of mode-of-action (MOA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Genetically altered mice for evaluation of mode-of-action (MOA). Barbara D. Abbott, Cynthia J. Wolf, Kaberi P. Das, Christopher S. Lau. (Presented by B. Abbott). This presentation provides an example of the use of genetically modified mice to determine the mode-of-action of r...

  6. Mood alterations in mindful versus aerobic exercise modes.

    PubMed

    Netz, Yael; Lidor, Ronnie

    2003-09-01

    The results of most recent studies have generally indicated an improvement in mood after participation in aerobic exercise. However, only a few researchers have compared mindful modes of exercise with aerobic exercise to examine the effect of 1 single session of exercise on mood. In the present study, the authors assessed state anxiety, depressive mood, and subjective well-being prior to and following 1 class of 1 of 4 exercise modes: yoga, Feldenkrais (awareness through movement), aerobic dance, and swimming; a computer class served as a control. Participants were 147 female general curriculum and physical education teachers (mean age = 40.15, SD = 0.2) voluntarily enrolled in a 1-year enrichment program at a physical education college. Analyses of variance for repeated measures revealed mood improvement following Feldenkrais, swimming, and yoga but not following aerobic dance and computer lessons. Mindful low-exertion activities as well as aerobic activities enhanced mood in 1 single session of exercise. The authors suggest that more studies assessing the mood-enhancing benefits of mindful activities such as Feldenkrais and yoga are needed. PMID:14629072

  7. Temporal Dynamics of the Default Mode Network Characterize Meditation-Induced Alterations in Consciousness.

    PubMed

    Panda, Rajanikant; Bharath, Rose D; Upadhyay, Neeraj; Mangalore, Sandhya; Chennu, Srivas; Rao, Shobini L

    2016-01-01

    Current research suggests that human consciousness is associated with complex, synchronous interactions between multiple cortical networks. In particular, the default mode network (DMN) of the resting brain is thought to be altered by changes in consciousness, including the meditative state. However, it remains unclear how meditation alters the fast and ever-changing dynamics of brain activity within this network. Here we addressed this question using simultaneous electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to compare the spatial extents and temporal dynamics of the DMN during rest and meditation. Using fMRI, we identified key reductions in the posterior cingulate hub of the DMN, along with increases in right frontal and left temporal areas, in experienced meditators during rest and during meditation, in comparison to healthy controls (HCs). We employed the simultaneously recorded EEG data to identify the topographical microstate corresponding to activation of the DMN. Analysis of the temporal dynamics of this microstate revealed that the average duration and frequency of occurrence of DMN microstate was higher in meditators compared to HCs. Both these temporal parameters increased during meditation, reflecting the state effect of meditation. In particular, we found that the alteration in the duration of the DMN microstate when meditators entered the meditative state correlated negatively with their years of meditation experience. This reflected a trait effect of meditation, highlighting its role in producing durable changes in temporal dynamics of the DMN. Taken together, these findings shed new light on short and long-term consequences of meditation practice on this key brain network. PMID:27499738

  8. Temporal Dynamics of the Default Mode Network Characterize Meditation-Induced Alterations in Consciousness

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Rajanikant; Bharath, Rose D.; Upadhyay, Neeraj; Mangalore, Sandhya; Chennu, Srivas; Rao, Shobini L.

    2016-01-01

    Current research suggests that human consciousness is associated with complex, synchronous interactions between multiple cortical networks. In particular, the default mode network (DMN) of the resting brain is thought to be altered by changes in consciousness, including the meditative state. However, it remains unclear how meditation alters the fast and ever-changing dynamics of brain activity within this network. Here we addressed this question using simultaneous electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to compare the spatial extents and temporal dynamics of the DMN during rest and meditation. Using fMRI, we identified key reductions in the posterior cingulate hub of the DMN, along with increases in right frontal and left temporal areas, in experienced meditators during rest and during meditation, in comparison to healthy controls (HCs). We employed the simultaneously recorded EEG data to identify the topographical microstate corresponding to activation of the DMN. Analysis of the temporal dynamics of this microstate revealed that the average duration and frequency of occurrence of DMN microstate was higher in meditators compared to HCs. Both these temporal parameters increased during meditation, reflecting the state effect of meditation. In particular, we found that the alteration in the duration of the DMN microstate when meditators entered the meditative state correlated negatively with their years of meditation experience. This reflected a trait effect of meditation, highlighting its role in producing durable changes in temporal dynamics of the DMN. Taken together, these findings shed new light on short and long-term consequences of meditation practice on this key brain network. PMID:27499738

  9. H.264 SVC Complexity Reduction Based on Likelihood Mode Decision

    PubMed Central

    Balaji, L.; Thyagharajan, K. K.

    2015-01-01

    H.264 Advanced Video Coding (AVC) was prolonged to Scalable Video Coding (SVC). SVC executes in different electronics gadgets such as personal computer, HDTV, SDTV, IPTV, and full-HDTV in which user demands various scaling of the same content. The various scaling is resolution, frame rate, quality, heterogeneous networks, bandwidth, and so forth. Scaling consumes more encoding time and computational complexity during mode selection. In this paper, to reduce encoding time and computational complexity, a fast mode decision algorithm based on likelihood mode decision (LMD) is proposed. LMD is evaluated in both temporal and spatial scaling. From the results, we conclude that LMD performs well, when compared to the previous fast mode decision algorithms. The comparison parameters are time, PSNR, and bit rate. LMD achieve time saving of 66.65% with 0.05% detriment in PSNR and 0.17% increment in bit rate compared with the full search method. PMID:26221623

  10. H.264 SVC Complexity Reduction Based on Likelihood Mode Decision.

    PubMed

    Balaji, L; Thyagharajan, K K

    2015-01-01

    H.264 Advanced Video Coding (AVC) was prolonged to Scalable Video Coding (SVC). SVC executes in different electronics gadgets such as personal computer, HDTV, SDTV, IPTV, and full-HDTV in which user demands various scaling of the same content. The various scaling is resolution, frame rate, quality, heterogeneous networks, bandwidth, and so forth. Scaling consumes more encoding time and computational complexity during mode selection. In this paper, to reduce encoding time and computational complexity, a fast mode decision algorithm based on likelihood mode decision (LMD) is proposed. LMD is evaluated in both temporal and spatial scaling. From the results, we conclude that LMD performs well, when compared to the previous fast mode decision algorithms. The comparison parameters are time, PSNR, and bit rate. LMD achieve time saving of 66.65% with 0.05% detriment in PSNR and 0.17% increment in bit rate compared with the full search method. PMID:26221623

  11. Distinguishing solid bitumens formed by thermochemical sulfate reduction and thermal chemical alteration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelemen, S.R.; Walters, C.C.; Kwiatek, P.J.; Afeworki, M.; Sansone, M.; Freund, H.; Pottorf, R.J.; Machel, H.G.; Zhang, T.; Ellis, G.S.; Tang, Y.; Peters, K.E.

    2008-01-01

    Insoluble solid bitumens are organic residues that can form by the thermal chemical alteration (TCA) or thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR) of migrated petroleum. TCA may actually encompass several low temperature processes, such as biodegradation and asphaltene precipitation, followed by thermal alteration. TSR is an abiotic redox reaction where petroleum is oxidized by sulfate. It is difficult to distinguish solid bitumens associated with TCA of petroleum from those associated with TSR when both processes occur at relatively high temperature. The focus of the present work was to characterize solid bitumen samples associated with TCA or TSR using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). XPS is a surface analysis conducted on either isolated or in situ (>25 ??m diameter) solid bitumen that can provide the relative abundance and chemical speciation of carbon, organic and inorganic heteroatoms (NSO). In this study, naturally occurring solid bitumens from three locations, Nisku Fm. Brazeau River area (TSR-related), LaBarge Field Madison Fm. (TSR-related), and the Alaskan Brooks range (TCA-related), are compared to organic solids generated during laboratory simulation of the TSR and TCA processes. The abundance and chemical nature of organic nitrogen and sulfur in solid bitumens can be understood in terms of the nature of (1) petroleum precursor molecules, (2) the concentration of nitrogen by way of thermal stress and (3) the mode of sulfur incorporation. TCA solid bitumens originate from polar materials that are initially rich in sulfur and nitrogen. Aromaticity and nitrogen increase as thermal stress cleaves aliphatic moieties and condensation reactions take place. Organic sulfur in TCA organic solids remains fairly constant with increasing maturation (3.5 to ???17 sulfur per 100 carbons) into aromatic structures and to the low levels of nitrogen in their hydrocarbon precursors. Hence, XPS results provide organic chemical composition information that helps to

  12. A component modes projection and assembly model reduction methodology for articulated, multi-flexible body structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Allan Y.; Tsuha, Walter S.

    1992-01-01

    A two-stage model reduction methodology, combining the classical Component Mode Synthesis (CMS) method and the newly developed Enhanced Projection and Assembly (EP&A) method is proposed in this research. The first stage of this methodology, called COmponent Mode Projection and Assembly model REduction (COMPARE) method, involves the generations of CMS mode sets, such as the MacNeal-Rubin mode sets. These mode sets are then used to reduce the order of each component model in the Rayleigh-Ritz sense. The resultant component models are then combined to generate reduced-order system models at various system configurations. A composite mode set which retains important system modes at all system configurations is then selected from these reduced-order system models. In the second stage, the EP&A model reduction method is employed to reduce further the order of the system model generated in the first stage. The effectiveness of the COMPARE methodology has been successfully demonstrated on a high-order, finite-element model of the cruise-configured Galileo spacecraft.

  13. A component modes projection and assembly model reduction methodology for articulated, multi-flexible body structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Allan Y.; Tsuha, Walter S.

    1993-01-01

    A two-stage model reduction methodology, combining the classical Component Mode Synthesis (CMS) method and the newly developed Enhanced Projection and Assembly (EP&A) method, is proposed in this research. The first stage of this methodology, called the COmponent Modes Projection and Assembly model REduction (COMPARE) method, involves the generation of CMS mode sets, such as the MacNeal-Rubin mode sets. These mode sets are then used to reduce the order of each component model in the Rayleigh-Ritz sense. The resultant component models are then combined to generate reduced-order system models at various system configurations. A composite mode set which retains important system modes at all system configurations is then selected from these reduced-order system models. In the second stage, the EP&A model reduction method is employed to reduce further the order of the system model generated in the first stage. The effectiveness of the COMPARE methodology has been successfully demonstrated on a high-order, finite-element model of the cruise-configured Galileo spacecraft.

  14. Simplified data reduction methods for the ECT test for mode 3 interlaminar fracture toughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jian; Obrien, T. Kevin

    1995-01-01

    Simplified expressions for the parameter controlling the load point compliance and strain energy release rate were obtained for the Edge Crack Torsion (ECT) specimen for mode 3 interlaminar fracture toughness. Data reduction methods for mode 3 toughness based on the present analysis are proposed. The effect of the transverse shear modulus, G(sub 23), on mode 3 interlaminar fracture toughness characterization was evaluated. Parameters influenced by the transverse shear modulus were identified. Analytical results indicate that a higher value of G(sub 23) results in a low load point compliance and lower mode 3 toughness estimation. The effect of G(sub 23) on the mode 3 toughness using the ECT specimen is negligible when an appropriate initial delamination length is chosen. A conservative estimation of mode 3 toughness can be obtained by assuming G(sub 23) = G(sub 12) for any initial delamination length.

  15. Multibody model reduction by component mode synthesis and component cost analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spanos, J. T.; Mingori, D. L.

    1990-01-01

    The classical assumed-modes method is widely used in modeling the dynamics of flexible multibody systems. According to the method, the elastic deformation of each component in the system is expanded in a series of spatial and temporal functions known as modes and modal coordinates, respectively. This paper focuses on the selection of component modes used in the assumed-modes expansion. A two-stage component modal reduction method is proposed combining Component Mode Synthesis (CMS) with Component Cost Analysis (CCA). First, each component model is truncated such that the contribution of the high frequency subsystem to the static response is preserved. Second, a new CMS procedure is employed to assemble the system model and CCA is used to further truncate component modes in accordance with their contribution to a quadratic cost function of the system output. The proposed method is demonstrated with a simple example of a flexible two-body system.

  16. Mode of metabolism is altered in 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Muzi, G; Gorski, J R; Rozman, K

    1989-04-01

    Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed either a high-fat (HF) or a high-carbohydrate (HC) diet and subsequently injected with either 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) (125 micrograms/kg) or vehicle (pair-fed controls). In all TCDD-treated animals, a reduction in caloric intake was evident as early as 1 day after dosage. Respiratory quotients (RQ) were determined at 5-day intervals. Their pattern for the HC-fed but not for the HF-fed TCDD-treated rats was different from that of the corresponding pair-fed controls. After an initial parallel decrease the RQ values remained low for TCDD-treated rats whereas they increased again for pair-fed controls. Serum total thyroxine (T4) was significantly lower in TCDD-treated animals and this reduction was not influenced by the composition of the diet. Serum triiodothyronine (T3) was neither altered by diet nor by TCDD. Thymic atrophy was as severe in pair-fed as in TCDD-treated rats fed the HC diet but not in rats fed the HF diet. Our results suggest that TCDD-treated rats are in a different mode of metabolism from pair-fed rats and that this difference is related to gluconeogenesis. PMID:2711413

  17. Functional Connectivity with the Default Mode Network Is Altered in Fibromyalgia Patients.

    PubMed

    Fallon, Nicholas; Chiu, Yee; Nurmikko, Turo; Stancak, Andrej

    2016-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) patients show altered connectivity with the network maintaining ongoing resting brain activity, known as the default mode network (DMN). The connectivity patterns of DMN with the rest of the brain in FMS patients are poorly understood. This study employed seed-based functional connectivity analysis to investigate resting-state functional connectivity with DMN structures in FMS. Sixteen female FMS patients and 15 age-matched, healthy control subjects underwent T2-weighted resting-state MRI scanning and functional connectivity analyses using DMN network seed regions. FMS patients demonstrated alterations to connectivity between DMN structures and anterior midcingulate cortex, right parahippocampal gyrus, left superior parietal lobule and left inferior temporal gyrus. Correlation analysis showed that reduced functional connectivity between the DMN and the right parahippocampal gyrus was associated with longer duration of symptoms in FMS patients, whereas augmented connectivity between the anterior midcingulate and posterior cingulate cortices was associated with tenderness and depression scores. Our findings demonstrate alterations to functional connectivity between DMN regions and a variety of regions which are important for pain, cognitive and emotional processing in FMS patients, and which may contribute to the development or maintenance of chronic symptoms in FMS. PMID:27442504

  18. Functional Connectivity with the Default Mode Network Is Altered in Fibromyalgia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Yee; Nurmikko, Turo; Stancak, Andrej

    2016-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) patients show altered connectivity with the network maintaining ongoing resting brain activity, known as the default mode network (DMN). The connectivity patterns of DMN with the rest of the brain in FMS patients are poorly understood. This study employed seed-based functional connectivity analysis to investigate resting-state functional connectivity with DMN structures in FMS. Sixteen female FMS patients and 15 age-matched, healthy control subjects underwent T2-weighted resting-state MRI scanning and functional connectivity analyses using DMN network seed regions. FMS patients demonstrated alterations to connectivity between DMN structures and anterior midcingulate cortex, right parahippocampal gyrus, left superior parietal lobule and left inferior temporal gyrus. Correlation analysis showed that reduced functional connectivity between the DMN and the right parahippocampal gyrus was associated with longer duration of symptoms in FMS patients, whereas augmented connectivity between the anterior midcingulate and posterior cingulate cortices was associated with tenderness and depression scores. Our findings demonstrate alterations to functional connectivity between DMN regions and a variety of regions which are important for pain, cognitive and emotional processing in FMS patients, and which may contribute to the development or maintenance of chronic symptoms in FMS. PMID:27442504

  19. Altered resting perfusion and functional connectivity of default mode network in youth with autism spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    Jann, Kay; Hernandez, Leanna M; Beck-Pancer, Devora; McCarron, Rosemary; Smith, Robert X; Dapretto, Mirella; Wang, Danny J J

    2015-01-01

    Background Neuroimaging studies can shed light on the neurobiological underpinnings of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Studies of the resting brain have shown both altered baseline metabolism from PET/SPECT and altered functional connectivity (FC) of intrinsic brain networks based on resting-state fMRI. To date, however, no study has investigated these two physiological parameters of resting brain function jointly, or explored the relationship between these measures and ASD symptom severity. Methods Here, we used pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling with 3D background-suppressed GRASE to assess resting cerebral blood flow (CBF) and FC in 17 youth with ASD and 22 matched typically developing (TD) children. Results A pattern of altered resting perfusion was found in ASD versus TD children including frontotemporal hyperperfusion and hypoperfusion in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex. We found increased local FC in the anterior module of the default mode network (DMN) accompanied by decreased CBF in the same area. In our cohort, both alterations were associated with greater social impairments as assessed with the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS-total T scores). While FC was correlated with CBF in TD children, this association between FC and baseline perfusion was disrupted in children with ASD. Furthermore, there was reduced long-range FC between anterior and posterior modules of the DMN in children with ASD. Conclusion Taken together, the findings of this study – the first to jointly assess resting CBF and FC in ASD – highlight new avenues for identifying novel imaging markers of ASD symptomatology. PMID:26445698

  20. Component mode synthesis for model order reduction of nonclassically damped systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Roy R., Jr.; Ni, Zhenhau

    1989-01-01

    Based on a component mode synthesis approach, a model-order-reduction method for linear structures with arbitrary linear damping has been developed. Projection matrices are introduced to make the method applicable to systems having rigid-body freedom. To test the method, eigenvalues of a reduced-order model of a free-free beam with nonproportional damping were compared to exact eigenvalues and to eigenvalues obtained using two other model-reduction strategies. The present model-reduction strategy proved to be decidedly superior.

  1. Reduced models of multi-stage cyclic structures using cyclic symmetry reduction and component mode synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Duc-Minh

    2014-10-01

    Reduced models of multi-stage cyclic structures such as bladed-disk assemblies are developed by using the multi-stage cyclic symmetry reduction and/or component mode synthesis methods. The multi-stage cyclic symmetry reduction consists in writing the equations of the bladed disks, the inter-disk structures, the inter-disk constraints and the whole multi-stage coupled system in terms of the traveling wave coordinates for all the phase indexes of the reference sectors and for all the bladed disks. Several reduced coupled systems are then solved by selecting at each time only one or a few phase indexes for each bladed disk and by applying the cyclic symmetry boundary conditions. On the other hand, component mode synthesis methods are used either independently or in combination with the multi-stage cyclic symmetry reduction to obtain reduced models of the multi-stage structure. Two of them are particularly efficient, that are firstly component mode synthesis methods with interface modes applied on the bladed disks and secondly component mode synthesis methods with traveling wave coordinates applied on the reference sectors.

  2. Iron reduction and alteration of nontronite NAu-2 by a sulfate-reducing bacterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yi-Liang; Vali, Hojatollah; Sears, S. Kelly; Yang, John; Deng, Baolin; Zhang, Chuanlun L.

    2004-08-01

    Iron-rich clay minerals are abundant in the natural environment and are an important source of iron for microbial metabolism. The objective of this study was to understand the mechanism(s) of enhanced reduction of Fe(III) in iron-rich 2:1 clay minerals under sulfate-reducing conditions. In particular, biogenic reduction of structural Fe(III) in nontronite NAu-2, an Fe-rich smectite-group mineral, was studied using a Desulfovibrio spp. strain G-11 with or without amended sulfate. The microbial production of Fe(II) from NAu-2 is about 10% of total structural Fe(III) (30 mM) when Fe(III) is available as the sole electron acceptor. The measured production of Fe(II), however, can reach 29% of the total structural Fe(III) during sulfate reduction by G-11 when sulfate (50 mM) is concurrently added with NAu-2. In contrast, abiotic production of Fe(II) from the reaction of NAu-2 with Na 2S (50 mM) is only ca. 7.5% of the total structural Fe(III). The enhanced reduction of structural Fe(III) by G-11, particularly in the presence of sulfate, is closely related to the growth rate and metabolic activities of the bacteria. Analyses by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy reveal significant changes in the structure and composition of NAu-2 during its alteration by bacterial sulfate reduction. G-11 can also derive nutrients from NAu-2 to support its growth in the absence of amended minerals and vitamins. Results of this study suggest that sulfate-reducing bacteria may play a more significant role than previously recognized in the cycling of Fe, S, and other elements during alteration of Fe-rich 2:1 clay minerals and other silicate minerals.

  3. Ductile opening-mode fracture by pore growth and coalescence during combustion alteration of siliceous mudstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichhubl, Peter; Aydin, Atilla

    2003-01-01

    Opening-mode fractures with blunt tips and large maximum apertures are characteristic of clinker that formed by combustion alteration of siliceous mudstone. These fractures are inferred to result from pore growth and coalescence, with initially circular pores inherited from the diatomaceous protolith. Circular pores grow preferentially in an en-échelon arrangement and coalesce to elongate pores and blunt-tipped fractures by thinning and rupture of bridges between pores. Coalescence of overlapping en-échelon pores causes fracture propagation in a zig-zag path that is considered indicative of significant inelastic deformation outside the immediate vicinity of the fracture tips. This process of fracture formation by void growth and coalescence is inferred to result from solution mass transfer and possible bulk melt movement during partial melting of clinker. Chemical mass transfer provides a mechanism for extensive inelastic deformation in the surrounding host rock concurrent with fracturing that is considered characteristic of ductile fracture. The preferred elongation of coalescing pores and local rupture of pore bridges is explained by a tensile sintering stress due to the thermodynamic tendency of the system for energy minimization of solid and liquid surfaces. It is suggested that ductile fracture processes that are accompanied by extensive inelastic deformation lead to opening-mode fractures with large apertures in a variety of crustal settings including metamorphic and magmatic systems as well as in reactive diagenetic environments, thus affecting fracture-controlled transfer of heat and mass and the rheology of the Earth's crust.

  4. A default mode of brain function in altered states of consciousness.

    PubMed

    Guldenmund, P; Vanhaudenhuyse, A; Boly, M; Laureys, S; Soddu, A

    2012-01-01

    Using modern brain imaging techniques, new discoveries are being made concerning the spontaneous activity of the brain when it is devoid of attention-demanding tasks. Spatially separated patches of neuronal assemblies have been found to show synchronized oscillatory activity behavior and are said to be functionally connected. One of the most robust of these is the default mode network, which is associated with intrinsic processes like mind wandering and self-projection. Furthermore, activity in this network is anticorrelated with activity in a network that is linked to attention to external stimuli. The integrity of both networks is disturbed in altered states of consciousness, like sleep, general anesthesia and hypnosis. In coma and related disorders of consciousness, encompassing the vegetative state (unresponsive wakefulness syndrome) and minimally conscious state, default mode network integrity correlates with the level of remaining consciousness, offering the possibility of using this information for diagnostic and prognostic purposes. Functional brain imaging is currently being validated as a valuable addition to the standardized behavioral assessments that are already in use. PMID:23165872

  5. Influence of Turbulent Energy Spectra on Damping and Frequency Reduction of the Solar F-Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mędrek, M.; Murawski, K.

    2000-01-01

    This paper generalizes the random wave theory that was developed to explain the recently observed line width spreading and frequency reduction of the f-mode. The generalization is based on a replacement of the Gaussian energy spectrum by a more realistic spectrum such as von Karman, Reynolds, or exponential as well as on an averaging of the results over various granules. The f-mode reduces its frequency as it spends more time propagating against the flow than with the flow. As a result, its effective speed and consequent frequency ω are reduced. This reduction is revealed by the real part of ω. The negative imaginary part of the frequency represents the damping of the coherent f-mode field due to scattering by turbulent flow. The f-mode damping is a result of the generation of the turbulent field at the expense of the coherent field. Theoretical estimation of the line width and frequency shift leads to the conclusion that for high spherical degree the results are consistent with the properties of the f-mode obtained from the high-resolution Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) data from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory recently reported by Duvall et al. As a result of averaging, we have obtained a significant improvement of our theoretical results.

  6. Altered functional connectivity of the default mode network in Williams syndrome: a multimodal approach.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, Adriana; Moreira, Pedro Silva; Osório, Ana; Magalhães, Ricardo; Vasconcelos, Cristiana; Férnandez, Montse; Carracedo, Angel; Alegria, Joana; Gonçalves, Óscar F; Soares, José Miguel

    2016-07-01

    Resting state brain networks are implicated in a variety of relevant brain functions. Importantly, abnormal patterns of functional connectivity (FC) have been reported in several neurodevelopmental disorders. In particular, the Default Mode Network (DMN) has been found to be associated with social cognition. We hypothesize that the DMN may be altered in Williams syndrome (WS), a neurodevelopmental genetic disorder characterized by an unique cognitive and behavioral phenotype. In this study, we assessed the architecture of the DMN using fMRI in WS patients and typically developing matched controls (sex and age) in terms of FC and volumetry of the DMN. Moreover, we complemented the analysis with a functional connectome approach. After excluding participants due to movement artifacts (n = 3), seven participants with WS and their respective matched controls were included in the analyses. A decreased FC between the DMN regions was observed in the WS group when compared with the typically developing group. Specifically, we found a decreased FC in a posterior hub of the DMN including the precuneus, calcarine and the posterior cingulate of the left hemisphere. The functional connectome approach showed a focalized and global increased FC connectome in the WS group. The reduced FC of the posterior hub of the DMN in the WS group is consistent with immaturity of the brain FC patterns and may be associated with the singularity of their visual spatial phenotype. PMID:27412230

  7. Chemopreventive agents alters global gene expression pattern: predicting their mode of action and targets.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Bhagavathi A

    2006-12-01

    Chemoprevention has the potential to be a major component of colon, breast, prostate and lung cancer control. Epidemiological, experimental, and clinical studies provide evidence that antioxidants, anti-inflammatory agents, n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and several other phytochemicals possess unique modes of action against cancer growth. However, the mode of action of several of these agents at the gene transcription level is not completely understood. Completion of the human genome sequence and the advent of DNA microarrays using cDNAs enhanced the detection and identification of hundreds of differentially expressed genes in response to anticancer drugs or chemopreventive agents. In this review, we are presenting an extensive analysis of the key findings from studies using potential chemopreventive agents on global gene expression patterns, which lead to the identification of cancer drug targets. The summary of the study reports discussed in this review explains the extent of gene alterations mediated by more than 20 compounds including antioxidants, fatty acids, NSAIDs, phytochemicals, retinoids, selenium, vitamins, aromatase inhibitor, lovastatin, oltipraz, salvicine, and zinc. The findings from these studies further reveal the utility of DNA microarray in characterizing and quantifying the differentially expressed genes that are possibly reprogrammed by the above agents against colon, breast, prostate, lung, liver, pancreatic and other cancer types. Phenolic antioxidant resveratrol found in berries and grapes inhibits the formation of prostate tumors by acting on the regulatory genes such as p53 while activating a cascade of genes involved in cell cycle and apoptosis including p300, Apaf-1, cdk inhibitor p21, p57 (KIP2), p53 induced Pig 7, Pig 8, Pig 10, cyclin D, DNA fragmentation factor 45. The group of genes significantly altered by selenium includes cyclin D1, cdk5, cdk4, cdk2, cdc25A and GADD 153. Vitamine D shows impact on p21(Waf1/Cip1) p27 cyclin B

  8. Petroleum alteration by thermochemical sulfate reduction - A comprehensive molecular study of aromatic hydrocarbons and polar compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, Clifford C.; Wang, Frank C.; Qian, Kuangnan; Wu, Chunping; Mennito, Anthony S.; Wei, Zhibin

    2015-03-01

    Thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR) alters petroleum composition as it proceeds towards the complete oxidation of hydrocarbons to CO2. The effects of TSR on the molecular and isotopic composition of volatile species are well known; however, the non-volatile higher molecular weight aromatic and polar species have not been well documented. To address this deficiency, a suite of onshore Gulf coast oils and condensates generated from and accumulating in Smackover carbonates was assembled to include samples that experienced varying levels of TSR alteration and in reservoir thermal cracking. The entire molecular composition of aromatic hydrocarbons and NSO species were characterized and semi-quantified using comprehensive GC × GC (FID and CSD) and APPI-FTICR-MS. The concentration of thiadiamondoids is a reliable indicator of the extent of TSR alteration. Once generated by TSR, thiadiamondoids remain thermally stable in all but the most extreme reservoir temperatures (>180 °C). Hydrocarbon concentrations and distributions are influenced by thermal cracking and TSR. With increasing TSR alteration, oils become enriched in monoaromatic hydrocarbons and the distribution of high molecular weight aromatic hydrocarbons shifts towards more condensed species with a decrease in the number of alkyl carbons. Organosulfur compounds are created by the TSR process. In addition to the increase in benzothiophenes and dibenzothiophenes noted in previous studies, TSR generates condensed species containing one or more sulfur atoms that likely are composed of a single or multiple thiophenic cores. We hypothesize that these species are generated from the partial oxidation of PAHs and dealkylation reactions, followed by sulfur incorporation and condensation reactions. The organosulfur species remaining in the TSR altered oils are "proto-solid bitumen" moieties that upon further condensation, oxidation or sulfur incorporation result in highly sulfur enriched solid bitumen, which is

  9. Sleep disturbance in mild cognitive impairment is associated with alterations in the brain's default mode network.

    PubMed

    McKinnon, Andrew C; Lagopoulos, Jim; Terpening, Zoe; Grunstein, Ron; Hickie, Ian B; Batchelor, Jennifer; Lewis, Simon J G; Duffy, Shantel; Shine, James M; Naismith, Sharon L

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to identify default mode network (DMN) functional connectivity deficits in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and sleep disturbance, relative to those with MCI and no sleep disturbance. A control group was included to aid in identifying DMN changes specific to MCI. A cross-sectional, single-center study was performed at the Brain and Mind Research Centre in Sydney, Australia. Participants (95 adults over the age of 65: 38 controls and 57 meeting criteria for MCI) underwent resting-state functional MRI along with comprehensive neuropsychological, medical, and psychiatric assessment. Self-report data were collected including sleep quality assessment via the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. A total score of greater than 5 on the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index was used to signify the presence of significant sleep disturbance, as per commonly used methodology. Using this criterion, 53% (n = 30) of our MCI group were classified as sleep-disturbed. Whereas the total group of MCI subjects and controls demonstrated no significant differences, sleep-disturbed MCIs demonstrated increased connectivity between temporal and parietal regions, and decreased connectivity between the prefrontal cortex and the temporoparietal junction relative to sleep-disturbed controls. Relative to those MCIs without sleep disturbance, sleep-disturbed MCI participants demonstrated significantly diminished DMN connectivity between temporal and parietal regions, a finding that was particularly pronounced in amnestic MCI. Sleep disturbance in MCI is associated with distinct alterations in DMN functional connectivity in brain regions underpinning salient memory and sleep systems. Future studies may build on these results via experimental manipulation and objective measurement of sleep. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26963234

  10. A novel method of common-mode voltage reduction in matrix converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hoang M.; Lee, Hong-Hee; Chun, Tae-Won

    2012-01-01

    This article proposes a novel direct space vector modulation (DSVM) strategy that can restrict the common-mode voltage of a three-phase-to-three-phase matrix converter and maintain sinusoidal input/output waveforms, as well as a unity power factor at the input side. The proposed control method has been developed using active, non-zero space vectors instead of zero space vectors. A new space vector modulation table is also presented with the space vector rearrangement. One advantage of the proposed method is a 42% reduction of the peak value of the common-mode voltage besides the lower harmonic components compared to the conventional DSVM method. Furthermore, the maximum voltage transfer ratio is unaffected by the proposed method. Simulation and experimental results are shown to validate the advantages of the proposed DSVM method.

  11. Effect of Data Reduction and Fiber-Bridging on Mode I Delamination Characterization of Unidirectional Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Gretchen B.

    2011-01-01

    Reliable delamination characterization data for laminated composites are needed for input in analytical models of structures to predict delamination onset and growth. The double-cantilevered beam (DCB) specimen is used to measure fracture toughness, GIc, and strain energy release rate, GImax, for delamination onset and growth in laminated composites under mode I loading. The current study was conducted as part of an ASTM Round Robin activity to evaluate a proposed testing standard for Mode I fatigue delamination propagation. Static and fatigue tests were conducted on specimens of IM7/977-3 and G40-800/5276-1 graphite/epoxies, and S2/5216 glass/epoxy DCB specimens to evaluate the draft standard "Standard Test Method for Mode I Fatigue Delamination Propagation of Unidirectional Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites." Static results were used to generate a delamination resistance curve, GIR, for each material, which was used to determine the effects of fiber-bridging on the delamination growth data. All three materials were tested in fatigue at a cyclic GImax level equal to 90% of the fracture toughness, GIc, to determine the delamination growth rate. Two different data reduction methods, a 2-point and a 7-point fit, were used and the resulting Paris Law equations were compared. Growth rate results were normalized by the delamination resistance curve for each material and compared to the nonnormalized results. Paris Law exponents were found to decrease by 5.4% to 46.2% due to normalizing the growth data. Additional specimens of the IM7/977-3 material were tested at 3 lower cyclic GImax levels to compare the effect of loading level on delamination growth rates. The IM7/977-3 tests were also used to determine the delamination threshold curve for that material. The results show that tests at a range of loading levels are necessary to describe the complete delamination behavior of this material.

  12. A magnetic damper for first mode vibration reduction in multimass flexible rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasarda, M. E. F.; Allaire, P. E.; Humphris, R. R.; Barrett, L. E.

    1989-01-01

    Many rotating machines such as compressors, turbines and pumps have long thin shafts with resulting vibration problems, and would benefit from additional damping near the center of the shaft. Magnetic dampers have the potential to be employed in these machines because they can operate in the working fluid environment unlike conventional bearings. An experimental test rig is described which was set up with a long thin shaft and several masses to represent a flexible shaft machine. An active magnetic damper was placed in three locations: near the midspan, near one end disk, and close to the bearing. With typical control parameter settings, the midspan location reduced the first mode vibration 82 percent, the disk location reduced it 75 percent and the bearing location attained a 74 percent reduction. Magnetic damper stiffness and damping values used to obtain these reductions were only a few percent of the bearing stiffness and damping values. A theoretical model of both the rotor and the damper was developed and compared to the measured results. The agreement was good.

  13. Cardiac contractile dysfunction during mild coronary flow reductions is due to an altered calcium-pressure relationship in rat hearts.

    PubMed Central

    Figueredo, V M; Brandes, R; Weiner, M W; Massie, B M; Camacho, S A

    1992-01-01

    Coronary artery stenosis or occlusion results in reduced coronary flow and myocardial contractile depression. At severe flow reductions, increased inorganic phosphate (Pi) and intracellular acidosis clearly play a role in contractile depression. However, during milder flow reductions the mechanism(s) underlying contractile depression are less clear. Previous perfused heart studies demonstrated no change of Pi or pH during mild flow reductions, suggesting that changes of intravascular pressure (garden hose effect) may be the mediator of this contractile depression. Others have reported conflicting results regarding another possible mediator of contractility, the cytosolic free calcium (Cai). To examine the respective roles of Cai, Pi, pH, and vascular pressure in regulating contractility during mild flow reductions, Indo-1 calcium fluorescence and 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements were performed on Langendorff-perfused rat hearts. Cai and diastolic calcium levels did not change during flow reductions to 50% of control. Pi demonstrated a close relationship with developed pressure and significantly increased from 2.5 +/- 0.3 to 4.2 +/- 0.4 mumol/g dry weight during a 25% flow reduction. pH was unchanged until a 50% flow reduction. Increasing vascular pressure to superphysiological levels resulted in further increases of developed pressure, with no change in Cai. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that during mild coronary flow reductions, contractile depression is mediated by an altered relationship between Cai and pressure, rather than by decreased Cai. Furthermore, increased Pi and decreased intravascular pressure may be responsible for this altered calcium-pressure relationship during mild coronary flow reductions. PMID:1430205

  14. The mode of action alginic acid compound in the reduction of gastroesophageal reflux.

    PubMed

    Malmud, L S; Charkes, N D; Littlefield, J; Reilley, J; Stern, H; Rosenberg, R; Fisher, R S

    1979-10-01

    This study was designed to evaluate quantitatively the mode of action of alginic acid compound (AAC) in the treatment of patients with symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux. Gastroesophageal scintigraphy using an orall administered Tc-99m sulfur colloid solution was used to demonstrate that AAC decreased significantly the gastroesophageal reflux index from (9.9 +/- 1.3) % to (6.5 +/- 0.8) % (p less than 0.05). No alteration of lower esophageal sphincter pressure was observed. After ACC was suitably labeled with Sr-87m, a dual-nuclide scintigraphic technique was used to show that most (greater than 75%) of the AAC was located in the upper half of the stomach in both normal subjects and patients with gastroesophageal reflux. In those subjects in whom reflux did occur after treatment with AAC, the Sr-87m-AAC refluxed into the esophagus preferentially compared with the liquid containing Tc-99m sulfur colloid. These findings suggest that AAC dimishes gastroesophageal reflux by means of its foaming, floating, and viscous properties. PMID:231639

  15. Cardiorespiratory and metabolic alterations during exercise and passive recovery after three modes of exercise.

    PubMed

    Mandroukas, Athanasios; Heller, Jan; Metaxas, Thomas I; Sendelides, Thomas; Riganas, Cheistos; Vamvakoudis, Efstratios; Christoulas, Kosmas; Stefanidis, Panagiotis; Karagiannis, Vasilis; Kyparos, Antonios; Mandroukas, Konstantinos

    2011-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the potential variations in cardiorespiratory and metabolic parameters and running performance among 3 modes of exercise of the same duration, namely, intermittent running with active recovery (AR) or passive recovery (PR) and continuous running (CR) and whether these variations could affect passive recovery time (PRT). Fifteen male physical education students with a subspecialty in soccer were studied (mean age 22.3 ± 2.5 years, training experience 12.3 ± 2.5 years) in the middle of the playing season. The results showed that during exercise, the highest heart rate (HR) and VO2 values were observed in CR, whereas the lowest values in PR followed by AR. Blood lactate (BLa) concentration was higher in PR by 38% compared to that in AR (p < 0.05). The exercise duration was similar between PR and AR tests and longer than in CR. With regard to PRT, the highest HR (186 ± 9 b · min(-1)), VO2 (55.5 ± 5.2 ml · kg(-1) · min(-1)), and BLa (5.1 ± 1.7 mmol · L(-1)) values were found in CR. No differences in HR and VO2 between PR and AR were detected. However, despite the differences in BLa concentration between AR and PR during exercise, the PRT BLa values between these 2 exercise modes were not different. Among the 3 running protocols, only CR appeared to have fully challenged the cardiorespiratory system inducing maximal HR and VO2 responses during exercise and high BLa values in PRT, yet these responses were not associated with better exercise performance compared to intermittent running. Therefore, intermittent exercise, regardless of implementing passive or active interval, might be the preferable exercise mode particularly in activities extended over 30 minutes. PMID:21273910

  16. Constant-distance mode SECM as a tool to visualize local electrocatalytic activity of oxygen reduction catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Nebel, Michaela; Erichsen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Summary Multidimensional shearforce-based constant-distance mode scanning electrochemical microscopy (4D SF/CD-SECM) was utilized for the investigation of the activity distribution of oxygen reduction catalysts. Carbon-supported Pt model catalyst powders have been immobilized in recessed microelectrodes and compared to a spot preparation technique. Microcavities serve as platform for the binder-free catalyst sample preparation exhibiting beneficial properties for constant-distance mode SECM imaging concerning modified surface area and catalyst loading. The integration of the redox competition mode of SECM into the detection scheme of the 4D SF/CD mode is demonstrated for specifically adapting high-resolution SECM experiments to powder-based catalyst preparations. PMID:24600538

  17. Alteration of the Intra- and Cross- Hemisphere Posterior Default Mode Network in Frontal Lobe Glioma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haosu; Shi, Yonghong; Yao, Chengjun; Tang, Weijun; Yao, Demin; Zhang, Chenxi; Wang, Manning; Wu, Jinsong; Song, Zhijian

    2016-01-01

    Patients with frontal lobe gliomas often experience neurocognitive dysfunctions before surgery, which affects the default mode network (DMN) to different degrees. This study quantitatively analyzed this effect from the perspective of cerebral hemispheric functional connectivity (FC). We collected resting-state fMRI data from 20 frontal lobe glioma patients before treatment and 20 healthy controls. All of the patients and controls were right-handed. After pre-processing the images, FC maps were built from the seed defined in the left or right posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) to the target regions determined in the left or right temporal-parietal junction (TPJ), respectively. The intra- and cross-group statistical calculations of FC strength were compared. The conclusions were as follows: (1) the intra-hemisphere FC strength values between the PCC and TPJ on the left and right were decreased in patients compared with controls; and (2) the correlation coefficients between the FC pairs in the patients were increased compared with the corresponding controls. When all of the patients were grouped by their tumor’s hemispheric location, (3) the FC of the subgroups showed that the dominant hemisphere was vulnerable to glioma, and (4) the FC in the dominant hemisphere showed a significant correlation with WHO grade. PMID:27248706

  18. Altered effective connectivity within default mode network in major depression disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liang; Li, Baojuan; Bai, Yuanhan; Wang, Huaning; Zhang, Linchuan; Cui, Longbiao; Lu, Hongbing

    2016-03-01

    Understanding the neural basis of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) is important for the diagnosis and treatment of this mental disorder. The default mode network (DMN) is considered to be highly involved in the MDD. To find directed interaction between DMN regions associated with the development of MDD, the effective connectivity within the DMN of the MDD patients and matched healthy controls was estimated by using a recently developed spectral dynamic causal modeling. Sixteen patients with MDD and sixteen matched healthy control subjects were included in this study. While the control group underwent the resting state fMRI scan just once, all patients underwent resting state fMRI scans before and after two months' treatment. The spectral dynamic causal modeling was used to estimate directed connections between four DMN nodes. Statistical analysis on connection strengths indicated that efferent connections from the medial frontal cortex (MFC) to posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and to right parietal cortex (RPC) were significant higher in pretreatment MDD patients than those of the control group. After two-month treatment, the efferent connections from the MFC decreased significantly, while those from the left parietal cortex (LPC) to MFC, PCC and RPC showed a significant increase. These findings suggest that the MFC may play an important role for inhibitory conditioning of the DMN, which was disrupted in MDD patients. It also indicates that disrupted suppressive function of the MFC could be effectively restored after two-month treatment.

  19. Variation of the default mode network with altered alertness levels induced by propofol

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoyuan; Li, Huandong; Luo, Fang; Zhang, Lei; Han, Ruquan; Wang, Baoguo

    2015-01-01

    Background The default mode network (DMN) is closely associated with the maintenance of alertness and cognitive functions. This study aimed to observe the changes in DMN induced by increasing doses of propofol and progressively deepening sedation. Methods Twelve healthy subjects were selected; they received target-controlled infusion of propofol (1.0 and 3.0 μg/mL of plasma) and underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging before sedation and when they achieved light and deep sedation states. The average degree, average shortest path length, global efficiency, local efficiency, and clustering coefficient of DMN were assessed to study the overall and internal changes of DMN with gradual changes in alertness level, as well as the relationship between thalamus and DMN. Meanwhile, basic vital signs and respiratory inhibition were recorded. Results DMN parameters were gradually inhibited with decreasing level of alertness, the differences were significant between light sedation and awake states (all P<0.01), but not between deep and light sedation states. However, the shortest path lengths of the posterior cingulate cortex, medial prefrontal cortex, and lateral parietal cortexes in the DMN were significantly increased under deep sedation. Conclusion Overall, DMN is propofol-sensitive. A small dose of propofol can significantly inhibit the DMN, affecting the level of alertness. The posterior cingulate cortex, medial prefrontal cortex, and lateral parietal cortexes in the DMN are less sensitive to propofol, and could be significantly inhibited by a higher concentration of propofol, further reducing the level of alertness. PMID:26504389

  20. GAMMA RADIATION INTERACTS WITH MELANIN TO ALTER ITS OXIDATION-REDUCTION POTENTIAL AND RESULTS IN ELECTRIC CURRENT PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Turick, C.; Ekechukwu, A.; Milliken, C.

    2011-05-17

    The presence of melanin pigments in organisms is implicated in radioprotection and in some cases, enhanced growth in the presence of high levels of ionizing radiation. An understanding of this phenomenon will be useful in the design of radioprotective materials. However, the protective mechanism of microbial melanin in ionizing radiation fields has not yet been elucidated. Here we demonstrate through the electrochemical techniques of chronoamperometry, chronopotentiometry and cyclic voltammetry that microbial melanin is continuously oxidized in the presence of gamma radiation. Our findings establish that ionizing radiation interacts with melanin to alter its oxidation-reduction potential. Sustained oxidation resulted in electric current production and was most pronounced in the presence of a reductant, which extended the redox cycling capacity of melanin. This work is the first to establish that gamma radiation alters the oxidation-reduction behavior of melanin, resulting in electric current production. The significance of the work is that it provides the first step in understanding the initial interactions between melanin and ionizing radiation taking place and offers some insight for production of biomimetic radioprotective materials.

  1. Gamma radiation interacts with melanin to alter its oxidation-reduction potential and results in electric current production.

    PubMed

    Turick, Charles E; Ekechukwu, Amy A; Milliken, Charles E; Casadevall, Arturo; Dadachova, Ekaterina

    2011-08-01

    The presence of melanin pigments in organisms is implicated in radioprotection and in some cases, enhanced growth in the presence of high levels of ionizing radiation. An understanding of this phenomenon will be useful in the design of radioprotective materials. However, the protective mechanism of microbial melanin in ionizing radiation fields has not yet been elucidated. Here we demonstrate through the electrochemical techniques of chronoamperometry, chronopotentiometry and cyclic voltammetry that microbial melanin is continuously oxidized in the presence of gamma radiation. Our findings establish that ionizing radiation interacts with melanin to alter its oxidation-reduction potential. Sustained oxidation resulted in electric current production and was most pronounced in the presence of a reductant, which extended the redox cycling capacity of melanin. This work is the first to establish that gamma radiation alters the oxidation-reduction behavior of melanin, resulting in electric current production. The significance of the work is that it provides the first step in understanding the initial interactions between melanin and ionizing radiation taking place and offers some insight for production of biomimetic radioprotective materials. PMID:21632287

  2. Default mode network alterations during implicit emotional faces processing in first-episode, treatment-naive major depression patients

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Huqing; Wang, Xiang; Yi, Jinyao; Zhu, Xiongzhao; Zhang, Xiaocui; Yang, Juan; Yao, Shuqiao

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have focused on resting-state default mode network (DMN) alterations in the development and maintenance of depression; however, only a few studies have addressed DMN changes during task-related processing and their results are inconsistent. Therefore, we explored DMN patterns in young adult patients with first-episode, treatment-naïve major depressive disorder (MDD) performing an implicit emotional processing task. Patients with MDD (N = 29) and healthy controls (N = 33) were subjected to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) at rest and while performing a gender judgment task. Group independent component analysis (ICA) was used to identify DMN component under task state for both groups. The DMN of participants with MDD had decreased functional connectivity in bilateral prefrontal areas compared to controls. Right prefrontal gyrus connectivity for MDD patients correlated negatively with scores on maladaptive scales of the Cognitive Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (CERQ). Our findings suggest that depressed people have altered DMN patterns during implicit emotional processing, which might be related to impaired internal monitoring and emotional regulation ability. PMID:26322003

  3. Carbon nanotube-based mode-locked wavelength-switchable fiber laser via net gain cross section alteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latif, A. A.; Mohamad, H.; Abu Bakar, M. H.; Muhammad, F. D.; Mahdi, M. A.

    2016-02-01

    We have proposed and demonstrated a carbon nanotube-based mode-locked erbium-doped fiber laser with switchable wavelength in the C-band wavelength region by varying the net gain cross section of erbium. The carbon nanotube is coated on a tapered fiber to form the saturable absorber for the purpose of mode-locking by exploiting the concept of evanescent field interaction on the tapered fiber with the carbon nanotube in a ring cavity configuration. The propagation loss is adjusted by inducing macrobend losses of the optical fiber in the cavity through a fiber spooling technique. Since the spooling radius can be gradually adjusted to achieve continuous tuning of attenuation, this passive tuning approach can be an alternative to optical tunable attenuator, with freedom of external device integration into the laser cavity. Based on this alteration, the net gain cross section of the laser system can be tailored to three different lasing wavelength ranges; 1533, 1560 nm and both (1533 and 1560 nm) with the minimum pulse duration of 734 fs. The proposed design is simple and stable with high beam quality and good reliability for multiple applications.

  4. Illustrating a new approach to estimating potential reduction in fish species richness due to flow alteration on a global scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, S.; Yanagawa, A.; Khajuria, A.; Sui, P.; Iwasaki, Y.; Hirano, K.; Mahendran, R.; Koirala, S.; Hirabayashi, Y.; Yoshimura, C.; Kanae, S.

    2013-06-01

    Changes in river discharge due to human activities and climate change would affect the sustainability of freshwater ecosystem. In order to globally assess the future status of freshwater ecosystem under regime shifts in river discharge, global-scale hydrological simulations need to be connected with a model to estimate the soundness of freshwater ecosystem. However, the explicit combination of those two on a global scale is still in its infancy. A couple of statistical models are introduced here to link flow regimes to fish species richness (FSR): one based on a linear relationship between FSR and mean river discharge, and the other based on a relationship between FSR and ecologically relevant flow indices involving other several flow characteristics as well as mean river discharge. The former one has been sometimes used in global simulation studies, but the latter one is newly introduced here in the context of global simulation. These statistical models for estimating FSR were combined with a set of global river discharge simulations to evaluate the potential impact of flow alterations due to climate change on FSR changes. Generally, future reductions in FSR by the latter method are larger and much more scattered rather than by the former method. In arid regions, both models provide reductions in FSR because mean discharge is projected to decrease from past to future, although the magnitude of reduction in FSR is different. On the other hand, large reductions in FSR only by the latter model are detected in heavy-snow regions due to the increases of mean discharge and frequency of low and high flows. Although we need further research to conclude which is more relevant, this study demonstrates that the new model could show a considerably different behavior in assessing the global impact of flow alteration on freshwater ecosystem change.

  5. Illustrating a new global-scale approach to estimating potential reduction in fish species richness due to flow alteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, S.; Yanagawa, A.; Iwasaki, Y.; Sui, P.; Koirala, S.; Hirano, K.; Khajuria, A.; Mahendran, R.; Hirabayashi, Y.; Yoshimura, C.; Kanae, S.

    2014-02-01

    Changes in river discharge due to human activities and climate change would affect the sustainability of freshwater ecosystems. To globally assess how changes in river discharge will affect the future status of freshwater ecosystems, global-scale hydrological simulations need to be connected with a model to estimate the durability of freshwater ecosystems. However, the development of this specific modelling combination for the global scale is still in its infancy. In this study, two statistical methods are introduced to link flow regimes to fish species richness (FSR): one is based on a linear relationship between FSR and mean river discharge (hereafter, FSR-MAD method), and the other is based on a multi-linear relationship between FSR and ecologically relevant flow indices involving several other flow characteristics and mean river discharge (FSR-FLVAR method). The FSR-MAD method has been used previously in global simulation studies. The FSR-FLVAR method is newly introduced here. These statistical methods for estimating FSR were combined with a set of global river discharge simulations to evaluate the potential impact of climate-change-induced flow alterations on FSR changes. Generally, future reductions in FSR with the FSR-FLVAR method are greater and much more scattered than with the FSR-MAD method. In arid regions, both methods indicate reductions in FSR because mean discharge is projected to decrease from past to future, although the magnitude of reductions in FSR is different between the two methods. In contrast, in heavy-snow regions a large reduction in FSR is shown by the FSR-FLVAR method due to increases in the frequency of low and high flows. Although further research is clearly needed to conclude which method is more appropriate, this study demonstrates that the FSR-FLVAR method could produce considerably different results when assessing the global role of flow alterations in changing freshwater ecosystems.

  6. Task deactivation reductions and atrophy within parietal default mode regions are overlapping but only weakly correlated in mild cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Threlkeld, Zachary D.; Jicha, Greg A.; Smith, Charles D.; Gold, Brian T.

    2012-01-01

    Reduced task deactivation within regions of the default mode network (DMN) has been frequently reported in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI). As task deactivations reductions become increasingly used in the study of early AD states, it is important to understand their relationship to atrophy. To address this issue, the present study compared task deactivation reductions during a lexical decision task and atrophy in aMCI, using a series of parallel voxel-wise and region-wise analyses of fMRI and structural data. Our results identified multiple regions within parietal cortex as convergence areas of task deactivation and atrophy in aMCI. Relationships between parietal regions showing overlapping task deactivation reductions and atrophy in aMCI were then explored. Regression analyses demonstrated minimal correlation between task deactivation reductions and either local or global atrophy in aMCI. In addition, a logistic regression model which combined task deactivation reductions and atrophy in parietal DMN regions showed higher classificatory accuracy of aMCI than separate task deactivation or atrophy models. Results suggest that task deactivation reductions and atrophy in parietal regions provide complementary rather than redundant information in aMCI. Future longitudinal studies will be required to assess the utility of combining task deactivation reductions and atrophy in the detection of early AD. PMID:21860094

  7. Alteration of the mode of antibacterial action of a defensin by the amino-terminal loop substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Bin; Zhu, Shunyi

    2012-10-05

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al-M is an engineered fungal defensin with the n-loop of an insect defensin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al-M adopts a native defensin-like structure with high antibacterial potency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al-M kills bacteria through a membrane disruptive mechanism. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This work sheds light on the functional evolution of CS{alpha}{beta}-type defensins. -- Abstract: Ancient invertebrate-type and classical insect-type defensins (AITDs and CITDs) are two groups of evolutionarily related antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) that adopt a conserved cysteine-stabilized {alpha}-helical and {beta}-sheet (CS{alpha}{beta}) fold with a different amino-terminal loop (n-loop) size and diverse modes of antibacterial action. Although they both are identified as inhibitors of cell wall biosynthesis, only CITDs evolved membrane disruptive ability by peptide oligomerization to form pores. To understand how this occurred, we modified micasin, a fungus-derived AITDs with a non-membrane disruptive mechanism, by substituting its n-loop with that of an insect-derived CITDs. After air oxidization, the synthetic hybrid defensin (termed Al-M) was structurally identified by circular dichroism (CD) and functionally evaluated by antibacterial and membrane permeability assays and electronic microscopic observation. Results showed that Al-M folded into a native-like defensin structure, as determined by its CD spectrum that is similar to that of micasin. Al-M was highly efficacious against the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus megaterium with a lethal concentration of 1.76 {mu}M. As expected, in contrast to micasin, Al-M killed the bacteria through a membrane disruptive mechanism of action. The alteration in modes of action supports a key role of the n-loop extension in assembling functional surface of CITDs for membrane disruption. Our work provides mechanical evidence for evolutionary relationship between AITDs and CITDs.

  8. Scale-selective turbulence reduction in H-mode plasmas in the TJ-II stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Happel, T.; Conway, G. D.; Stroth, U.; Estrada, T.; Blanco, E.; Hidalgo, C.; Collaboration: TJ-II Team

    2011-10-15

    Wavenumber spectra of density turbulence in L- and H-mode plasmas have been measured in the TJ-II stellarator by means of Doppler reflectometry. A pronounced suppression of the density fluctuation level is observed in H-mode close to the radial position of maximum radial electric field (E{sub r}) shear. Furthermore, intermediate scale density turbulence is reduced preferentially. This effect can be interpreted within the framework of vortex stretching feeding energy through Reynolds stress into zonal flows, while shear decorrelation of turbulent structures might not play a central role in TJ-II. Moreover, it is shown that in both L- and H-mode, the phase velocity of density fluctuations does not depend on the structure scale.

  9. An operations manual for the Spinning Mode Synthesizer in the Langley Aircraft Noise Reduction Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, D. L.

    1981-01-01

    The need for a dependable and controllable noise source and the consequent development of the Spinning Mode Synthesizer (SMS) is discussed. Configuration of the SMS incorporated into the flow duct facility is reported. Turbofan noise is composed of a series of fundamental acoustical modes, which are produced by acoustic drivers equispaced circumferentially around the flow duct. Pressure field is compared to an ideal result in an optimization algorithm, adjusting driver settings until system error is minimized. The following items are included: operating instructions, a detailed description of the system, and a user's guide to data acquisition packages available.

  10. MODE OF ACTION: REDUCTION OF TESTOSTERONE AVAILABILITY--MOLINATE-INDUCED INHIBITION OF SPERMATOGENESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Molinate is a preemergent herbicide that has been demonstrated to affect reproduction in the rat via alterations in sperm production. A wealth of standard toxicological studies and targeted research efforts relating to this adverse effect is available, and these were used to eval...

  11. Reduction in sphingosine kinase 1 influences the susceptibility to dengue virus infection by altering antiviral responses.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Jennifer N; Davies, Lorena K; Calvert, Julie K; Gliddon, Briony L; Al Shujari, Wisam H; Aloia, Amanda L; Helbig, Karla J; Beard, Michael R; Pitson, Stuart M; Carr, Jillian M

    2016-01-01

    Sphingosine kinase (SK) 1 is a host kinase that enhances some viral infections. Here we investigated the ability of SK1 to modulate dengue virus (DENV) infection in vitro. Overexpression of SK1 did not alter DENV infection; however, targeting SK1 through chemical inhibition resulted in reduced DENV RNA and infectious virus release. DENV infection of SK1⁻/ ⁻ murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) resulted in inhibition of infection in an immortalized line (iMEF) but enhanced infection in primary MEFs (1°MEFs). Global cellular gene expression profiles showed expected innate immune mRNA changes in DENV-infected WT but no induction of these responses in SK1⁻/⁻  iMEFs. Reverse transciption PCR demonstrated a low-level induction of IFN-β and poor induction of mRNA for the interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) viperin, IFIT1 and CXCL10 in DENV-infected SK1⁻/⁻  compared with WT iMEFs. Similarly, reduced induction of ISGs was observed in SK1⁻/⁻  1°MEFs, even in the face of high-level DENV replication. In both iMEFs and 1°MEFs, DENV infection induced production of IFN-β protein. Additionally, higher basal levels of antiviral factors (IRF7, CXCL10 and OAS1) were observed in uninfected SK1⁻/⁻  iMEFs but not 1°MEFs. This suggests that, in this single iMEF line, lack of SK1 upregulates the basal levels of factors that may protect cells against DENV infection. More importantly, regardless of the levels of DENV replication, all cells that lacked SK1 produced IFN-β but were refractory to induction of ISGs such as viperin, IFIT1 and CXCL10. Based on these findings, we propose new roles for SK1 in affecting innate responses that regulate susceptibility to DENV infection. PMID:26541871

  12. Acute Reduction of Microglia Does Not Alter Axonal Injury in a Mouse Model of Repetitive Concussive Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Rachel E.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The pathological processes that lead to long-term consequences of multiple concussions are unclear. Primary mechanical damage to axons during concussion is likely to contribute to dysfunction. Secondary damage has been hypothesized to be induced or exacerbated by inflammation. The main inflammatory cells in the brain are microglia, a type of macrophage. This research sought to determine the contribution of microglia to axon degeneration after repetitive closed-skull traumatic brain injury (rcTBI) using CD11b-TK (thymidine kinase) mice, a valganciclovir-inducible model of macrophage depletion. Low-dose (1 mg/mL) valganciclovir was found to reduce the microglial population in the corpus callosum and external capsule by 35% after rcTBI in CD11b-TK mice. At both acute (7 days) and subacute (21 days) time points after rcTBI, reduction of the microglial population did not alter the extent of axon injury as visualized by silver staining. Further reduction of the microglial population by 56%, using an intermediate dose (10 mg/mL), also did not alter the extent of silver staining, amyloid precursor protein accumulation, neurofilament labeling, or axon injury evident by electron microscopy at 7 days postinjury. Longer treatment of CD11b-TK mice with intermediate dose and treatment for 14 days with high-dose (50 mg/mL) valganciclovir were both found to be toxic in this injury model. Altogether, these data are most consistent with the idea that microglia do not contribute to acute axon degeneration after multiple concussive injuries. The possibility of longer-term effects on axon structure or function cannot be ruled out. Nonetheless, alternative strategies directly targeting injury to axons may be a more beneficial approach to concussion treatment than targeting secondary processes of microglial-driven inflammation. PMID:24797413

  13. Altered oxido-reductive state in the diabetic heart: loss of cardioprotection due to protein disulfide isomerase.

    PubMed

    Toldo, Stefano; Boccellino, Mariarosaria; Rinaldi, Barbara; Seropian, Ignacio M; Mezzaroma, Eleonora; Severino, Anna; Quagliuolo, Lucio; Van Tassell, Benjamin W; Marfella, Raffaele; Paolisso, Giuseppe; Rossi, Francesco; Natarajan, Ramesh; Voelkel, Norbert; Abbate, Antonio; Crea, Filippo; Baldi, Alfonso

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with an increased risk of heart failure, in part explained by endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptosis. Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) prevents stressed cardiomyocytes apoptosis. We hypothesized that diabetes impairs PDI function by an alteration in its oxido-reductive state. Myocardial biopsies harvested from the anterolateral left ventricular wall from diabetic (n = 7) and nondiabetic (n = 8) patients were used to assess PDI expression and cardiomyocyte death. A mouse model of diabetes (streptozotocin injection, 130 mg/mL) was used to study PDI expression and its redox state after ischemia/reperfusion injury induced by 30-min occlusion of the left anterior coronary artery followed by reperfusion. Transthoracic echocardiography was performed to assess cardiac remodeling after 1 wk. Western blot analysis was used to analyze PDI expression, and methoxy-polyethyleneglycol-maleimide was used to assess its redox state. Dehydroascorbate (DHA) administration was used to restore the PDI redox state. Diabetic patients had a greater number of transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells than nondiabetic patients despite a greater myocardial PDI expression suggesting altered PDI function. Diabetic mice had a worse postinfarction remodeling associated with an altered PDI redox state. DHA treatment restored functional PDI redox state and ameliorated post-myocardial infarction remodeling. An increase in PDI levels with a paradoxical decrease of its active form occurs in the diabetic heart after ischemia and may explain the lack of protective effects of PDI in diabetes. Restoration of PDI redox state prevents adverse remodeling. The potential significance of these findings deserves to be validated in a clinical setting. PMID:21637911

  14. A noise-reduction GWAS analysis implicates altered regulation of neurite outgrowth and guidance in autism

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Genome-wide Association Studies (GWAS) have proved invaluable for the identification of disease susceptibility genes. However, the prioritization of candidate genes and regions for follow-up studies often proves difficult due to false-positive associations caused by statistical noise and multiple-testing. In order to address this issue, we propose the novel GWAS noise reduction (GWAS-NR) method as a way to increase the power to detect true associations in GWAS, particularly in complex diseases such as autism. Methods GWAS-NR utilizes a linear filter to identify genomic regions demonstrating correlation among association signals in multiple datasets. We used computer simulations to assess the ability of GWAS-NR to detect association against the commonly used joint analysis and Fisher's methods. Furthermore, we applied GWAS-NR to a family-based autism GWAS of 597 families and a second existing autism GWAS of 696 families from the Autism Genetic Resource Exchange (AGRE) to arrive at a compendium of autism candidate genes. These genes were manually annotated and classified by a literature review and functional grouping in order to reveal biological pathways which might contribute to autism aetiology. Results Computer simulations indicate that GWAS-NR achieves a significantly higher classification rate for true positive association signals than either the joint analysis or Fisher's methods and that it can also achieve this when there is imperfect marker overlap across datasets or when the closest disease-related polymorphism is not directly typed. In two autism datasets, GWAS-NR analysis resulted in 1535 significant linkage disequilibrium (LD) blocks overlapping 431 unique reference sequencing (RefSeq) genes. Moreover, we identified the nearest RefSeq gene to the non-gene overlapping LD blocks, producing a final candidate set of 860 genes. Functional categorization of these implicated genes indicates that a significant proportion of them cooperate in a

  15. Least square based sliding mode control for a quad-rotor helicopter and energy saving by chattering reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumantri, Bambang; Uchiyama, Naoki; Sano, Shigenori

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a new control structure for a quad-rotor helicopter that employs the least squares method is introduced. This proposed algorithm solves the overdetermined problem of the control input for the translational motion of a quad-rotor helicopter. The algorithm allows all six degrees of freedom to be considered to calculate the control input. The sliding mode controller is applied to achieve robust tracking and stabilization. A saturation function is designed around a boundary layer to reduce the chattering phenomenon that is a common problem in sliding mode control. In order to improve the tracking performance, an integral sliding surface is designed. An energy saving effect because of chattering reduction is also evaluated. First, the dynamics of the quad-rotor helicopter is derived by the Newton-Euler formulation for a rigid body. Second, a constant plus proportional reaching law is introduced to increase the reaching rate of the sliding mode controller. Global stability of the proposed control strategy is guaranteed based on the Lyapunov's stability theory. Finally, the robustness and effectiveness of the proposed control system are demonstrated experimentally under wind gusts, and are compared with a regular sliding mode controller, a proportional-differential controller, and a proportional-integral-differential controller.

  16. An approach based on tool mode control for surface roughness reduction in high-frequency vibration cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostasevicius, V.; Gaidys, R.; Rimkeviciene, J.; Dauksevicius, R.

    2010-11-01

    The presented research work, aimed at deeper understanding of vibrational process during high-frequency vibration cutting, is accomplished by treating cutting tool as an elastic structure which is characterized by several modes of natural vibrations. An approach for surface quality improvement is proposed in this paper by taking into account that quality of machined surface is related to the intensity of tool-tip (cutting edge) vibrations. It is based on the excitation of a particular higher vibration mode of a turning tool, which leads to the reduction of deleterious vibrations in the machine-tool-workpiece system through intensification of internal energy dissipation in the tool material. The combined application of numerical analysis with accurate finite element model as well as different experimental methods during investigation of the vibration turning process allowed to determine that the most favorable is the second flexural vibration mode of the tool in the direction of vertical cutting force component. This mode is excited by means of piezoelectric transducer vibrating in axial tool direction at the corresponding natural frequency, thereby enabling minimization of surface roughness and tool wear.

  17. Urethane anesthesia depresses activities of thalamocortical neurons and alters its response to nociception in terms of dual firing modes

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Yeowool; Cho, Jeiwon

    2013-01-01

    Anesthetics are often used to characterize the activity of single neurons in vivo for their advantages such as reduction of noise level and convenience in noxious stimulations. Urethane has been a widely used anesthetic in thalamic studies under the assumption that sensory signals are still relayed to the thalamus under urethane anesthesia and that thalamic response would therefore reflect the response of the awake state. We tested this assumption by comparing thalamic activity in terms of tonic and burst firing modes during “the awake state” or under “urethane anesthesia” using the extracellular single unit recording technique. We first tested how thalamic relay neurons respond to the introduction of urethane, and then tested how urethane influences thalamic discharges under formalin-induced nociception. Urethane significantly depressed overall firing rates of thalamic relay neurons, which was sustained despite the delayed increase of burst activity over a 4 h recording period. Thalamic response to nociception under anesthesia was also similar overall except for the slight and transient increase of burst activity. Overall, results demonstrated that urethane suppresses the activity of thalamic relay neurons and that, despite the slight fluctuation of burst firing, formalin-induced nociception cannot significantly change the firing pattern of thalamic relay neurons that was caused by urethane. PMID:24133420

  18. Local surface plasmon mediated extraordinary optical transmission of multi-spatial-mode quantum noise reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrie, Benjamin J; Evans, Philip G; Pooser, Raphael C

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the coherent transduction of quantum noise reduction, or squeezed light, by Ag localized surface plasmons (LSPs). Squeezed light, generated through four-wave-mixing in Rb vapor, is coupled to a Ag nanohole array designed to exhibit LSP mediated extraordinary-optical transmission (EOT) spectrally coincident with the squeezed light source at 795 nm. We demonstrate that quantum noise reduction as a function of transmission is found to match closely with linear attenuation models, thus demonstrating that the photon-LSP-photon transduction process is coherent near the LSP resonance.

  19. Application of real-time B-mode ultrasound in posterior decompression and reduction for thoracolumbar burst fracture.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wu-Peng; Wang, Zhe; Feng, Nai-Qi; Wang, Chun-Mei; DU, Shao-Long

    2013-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the role of real-time B-mode ultrasound in posterior decompression and reduction and to observe the signal changes in spinal cord blood flow in a thoracolumbar burst fracture (TBF). Between February 2004 and December 2008, 138 patients with TBF were divided into group A (108 cases) and group B (30 cases). In group A, under the assistance of real-time B-mode ultrasound, posterior decompression and fracture piece reduction were performed, and we observed the signal changes in spinal cord blood flow. In group B, posterior fenestration was combined with pushing the fracture piece into the fractured vertebral body using an L-shaped operative tool. Presurgical and postsurgical recovery of neurological function was evaluated according to American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) standards, and the range of spinal decompression was determined by measuring the proportion of encroached fracture piece in the spinal canal (spinal stenosis rate) on the computed tomography (CT) image. In group A, 12 patients had a grade A spinal injury according to the Frankel grading system, and there were six cases without neurological recovery. In the other patients, neurological function increased by 1-3 grades. There were no aggravated spinal cord injuries or other serious complications. In group B, three patients were categorized as grade A and there were two cases without neurological recovery. In the other patients, neurological function increased by 1-3 grades. In groups A and B, the postsurgical spinal stenosis rate was significantly lower than the presurgical stenosis rate (P<0.05). The postsurgical spinal stenosis rate in group B was significantly higher compared with group A (P<0.05). There was no significant difference in neurological function recovery between the groups (P>0.05). Real-time B-mode ultrasound is an effective method for posterior decompression and reduction and to observe signal changes in spinal cord blood flow in TBF. PMID:24137306

  20. Application of real-time B-mode ultrasound in posterior decompression and reduction for thoracolumbar burst fracture

    PubMed Central

    YANG, WU-PENG; WANG, ZHE; FENG, NAI-QI; WANG, CHUN-MEI; DU, SHAO-LONG

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the role of real-time B-mode ultrasound in posterior decompression and reduction and to observe the signal changes in spinal cord blood flow in a thoracolumbar burst fracture (TBF). Between February 2004 and December 2008, 138 patients with TBF were divided into group A (108 cases) and group B (30 cases). In group A, under the assistance of real-time B-mode ultrasound, posterior decompression and fracture piece reduction were performed, and we observed the signal changes in spinal cord blood flow. In group B, posterior fenestration was combined with pushing the fracture piece into the fractured vertebral body using an L-shaped operative tool. Presurgical and postsurgical recovery of neurological function was evaluated according to American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) standards, and the range of spinal decompression was determined by measuring the proportion of encroached fracture piece in the spinal canal (spinal stenosis rate) on the computed tomography (CT) image. In group A, 12 patients had a grade A spinal injury according to the Frankel grading system, and there were six cases without neurological recovery. In the other patients, neurological function increased by 1–3 grades. There were no aggravated spinal cord injuries or other serious complications. In group B, three patients were categorized as grade A and there were two cases without neurological recovery. In the other patients, neurological function increased by 1–3 grades. In groups A and B, the postsurgical spinal stenosis rate was significantly lower than the presurgical stenosis rate (P<0.05). The postsurgical spinal stenosis rate in group B was significantly higher compared with group A (P<0.05). There was no significant difference in neurological function recovery between the groups (P>0.05). Real-time B-mode ultrasound is an effective method for posterior decompression and reduction and to observe signal changes in spinal cord blood flow in TBF. PMID

  1. Stiffness-generated rigid-body mode shapes for Lanczos eigensolution with SUPORT DOF by way of a MSC/NASTRAN DMAP alter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdallah, Ayman A.; Barnett, Alan R.; Widrick, Timothy W.; Manella, Richard T.; Miller, Robert P.

    1994-01-01

    When using all MSC/NASTRAN eigensolution methods except Lanczos, the analyst can replace the coupled system rigid-body modes calculated within DMAP module READ with mass orthogonalized and normalized rigid-body modes generated from the system stiffness. This option is invoked by defining MSC/NASTRAN r-set degrees of freedom via the SUPORT bulk data card. The newly calculated modes are required if the rigid-body modes calculated by the eigensolver are not 'clean' due to numerical roundoffs in the solution. When performing transient structural dynamic load analysis, the numerical roundoffs can result in inaccurate rigid-body accelerations which affect steady-state responses. Unfortunately, when using the Lanczos method and defining r-set degrees of freedom, the rigid-body modes calculated within DMAP module REIGL are retained. To overcome this limitation and to allow MSC/NASTRAN to handle SUPORT degrees of freedom identically for all eigensolvers, a DMAP Alter has been written which replaces Lanczos-calculated rigid-body modes with stiffness-generated rigid-body modes. The newly generated rigid-body modes are normalized with respect to the system mass and orthogonalized using the Gram-Schmidt technique. This algorithm has been implemented as an enhancement to an existing coupled loads methodology.

  2. Three Averaging Techniques for Reduction of Antenna Temperature Variance Measured by a Dicke Mode, C-Band Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackenzie, Anne I.; Lawrence, Roland W.

    2000-01-01

    As new radiometer technologies provide the possibility of greatly improved spatial resolution, their performance must also be evaluated in terms of expected sensitivity and absolute accuracy. As aperture size increases, the sensitivity of a Dicke mode radiometer can be maintained or improved by application of any or all of three digital averaging techniques: antenna data averaging with a greater than 50% antenna duty cycle, reference data averaging, and gain averaging. An experimental, noise-injection, benchtop radiometer at C-band showed a 68.5% reduction in Delta-T after all three averaging methods had been applied simultaneously. For any one antenna integration time, the optimum 34.8% reduction in Delta-T was realized by using an 83.3% antenna/reference duty cycle.

  3. Altering the sulfur content in the propanethiol plasma polymers using the capacitive-to-inductive mode transition in inductively coupled plasma discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Thiry, Damien; Britun, Nikolay; Konstantinidis, Stephanos; Dauchot, Jean-Pierre; Denis, Laurent; Snyders, Rony

    2012-02-13

    The effect of the transition from capacitive (E) to inductive (H) mode on propanethiol plasma polymer films properties was investigated by optical emission as well as by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The E mode is characterized by low deposition rate and by high sulfur content in the films ({approx}40% vs {approx}20% in H mode). After aging, a strong decrease of sulfur to carbon content (from {approx}0.75 to 0.13), attributed to desorption of unbounded sulfur-based molecules (e.g., H{sub 2}S), is detected at low power in E mode. The importance of the E-H transition for altering the film properties is highlighted.

  4. Altering the sulfur content in the propanethiol plasma polymers using the capacitive-to-inductive mode transition in inductively coupled plasma discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiry, Damien; Britun, Nikolay; Konstantinidis, Stephanos; Dauchot, Jean-Pierre; Denis, Laurent; Snyders, Rony

    2012-02-01

    The effect of the transition from capacitive (E) to inductive (H) mode on propanethiol plasma polymer films properties was investigated by optical emission as well as by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The E mode is characterized by low deposition rate and by high sulfur content in the films (˜40% vs ˜20% in H mode). After aging, a strong decrease of sulfur to carbon content (from ˜0.75 to 0.13), attributed to desorption of unbounded sulfur-based molecules (e.g., H2S), is detected at low power in E mode. The importance of the E-H transition for altering the film properties is highlighted.

  5. Illustrating a New Global-scale Approach to Estimating Potential Reduction in Fish Species Richness due to Flow Alteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Sayaka; Yanagawa, Aki; Iwasaki, Yuichi; Sui, Pengzhe; Koirala, Sujan; Khajuria, Anupam; Hirano, Kazunari; Mahendran, Roobavannan; Hirabayashi, Yukiko; Yoshimura, Chihiro; Kanae, Shinjiro

    2014-05-01

    Changes in river discharge due to human activities and climate change would affect the sustainability of freshwater ecosystems. To globally assess how changes in river discharge will affect the future status of freshwater ecosystems, global-scale hydrological simulations need to be connected with a model to estimate the durability of freshwater ecosystems. However, the development of this specific modelling combination for the global scale is still in its infancy. In this study, two statistical methods are introduced to link flow regimes to fish species richness (FSR): one is based on a linear relationship between FSR and mean river discharge (hereafter, FSR-MAD method), and the other is based on a multi-linear relationship between FSR and ecologically relevant flow indices involving several other flow characteristics and mean river discharge (FSR-FLVAR method). The FSR-MAD method has been used previously in global simulation studies. The FSR-FLVAR method is newly introduced here. These statistical methods for estimating FSR were combined with a set of state-of-art global river discharge simulations using latest outputs of 11 coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models to evaluate the potential impact of climate- change-induced flow alterations on FSR changes. Generally, future reductions in FSR with the FSR-FLVAR method are greater and much more scattered than those with the FSR-MAD method. In arid regions, both methods indicate reductions in FSR because mean discharge is projected to decrease in the future, although the magnitude of reductions in FSR is different between the two methods. In contrast, in heavy-snow regions a large reduction in FSR is shown by the FSR-FLVAR method due to increases in the frequency of low and high flows. Although we cannot determine only by this study which this prediction is more reliable, it can be argued that efforts to take plural ecologically relevant flow indices into account would lead to more appropriate methods for

  6. Complexity reduction in the H.264/AVC using highly adaptive fast mode decision based on macroblock motion activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdellah, Skoudarli; Mokhtar, Nibouche; Amina, Serir

    2015-11-01

    The H.264/AVC video coding standard is used in a wide range of applications from video conferencing to high-definition television according to its high compression efficiency. This efficiency is mainly acquired from the newly allowed prediction schemes including variable block modes. However, these schemes require a high complexity to select the optimal mode. Consequently, complexity reduction in the H.264/AVC encoder has recently become a very challenging task in the video compression domain, especially when implementing the encoder in real-time applications. Fast mode decision algorithms play an important role in reducing the overall complexity of the encoder. In this paper, we propose an adaptive fast intermode algorithm based on motion activity, temporal stationarity, and spatial homogeneity. This algorithm predicts the motion activity of the current macroblock from its neighboring blocks and identifies temporal stationary regions and spatially homogeneous regions using adaptive threshold values based on content video features. Extensive experimental work has been done in high profile, and results show that the proposed source-coding algorithm effectively reduces the computational complexity by 53.18% on average compared with the reference software encoder, while maintaining the high-coding efficiency of H.264/AVC by incurring only 0.097 dB in total peak signal-to-noise ratio and 0.228% increment on the total bit rate.

  7. Structure-Based Alteration of Substrate Specificity and Catalytic Activity of Sulfite Oxidase from Sulfite Oxidation to Nitrate Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, James A.; Wilson, Heather L.; Rajagopalan, K.V.

    2012-04-18

    Eukaryotic sulfite oxidase is a dimeric protein that contains the molybdenum cofactor and catalyzes the metabolically essential conversion of sulfite to sulfate as the terminal step in the metabolism of cysteine and methionine. Nitrate reductase is an evolutionarily related molybdoprotein in lower organisms that is essential for growth on nitrate. In this study, we describe human and chicken sulfite oxidase variants in which the active site has been modified to alter substrate specificity and activity from sulfite oxidation to nitrate reduction. On the basis of sequence alignments and the known crystal structure of chicken sulfite oxidase, two residues are conserved in nitrate reductases that align with residues in the active site of sulfite oxidase. On the basis of the crystal structure of yeast nitrate reductase, both positions were mutated in human sulfite oxidase and chicken sulfite oxidase. The resulting double-mutant variants demonstrated a marked decrease in sulfite oxidase activity but gained nitrate reductase activity. An additional methionine residue in the active site was proposed to be important in nitrate catalysis, and therefore, the triple variant was also produced. The nitrate reducing ability of the human sulfite oxidase triple mutant was nearly 3-fold greater than that of the double mutant. To obtain detailed structural data for the active site of these variants, we introduced the analogous mutations into chicken sulfite oxidase to perform crystallographic analysis. The crystal structures of the Mo domains of the double and triple mutants were determined to 2.4 and 2.1 {angstrom} resolution, respectively.

  8. Preliminary Assessment of Optimal Longitudinal-Mode Control for Drag Reduction through Distributed Aeroelastic Shaping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ippolito, Corey; Nguyen, Nhan; Lohn, Jason; Dolan, John

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of advanced lightweight materials is resulting in a new generation of lighter, flexible, more-efficient airframes that are enabling concepts for active aeroelastic wing-shape control to achieve greater flight efficiency and increased safety margins. These elastically shaped aircraft concepts require non-traditional methods for large-scale multi-objective flight control that simultaneously seek to gain aerodynamic efficiency in terms of drag reduction while performing traditional command-tracking tasks as part of a complete guidance and navigation solution. This paper presents results from a preliminary study of a notional multi-objective control law for an aeroelastic flexible-wing aircraft controlled through distributed continuous leading and trailing edge control surface actuators. This preliminary study develops and analyzes a multi-objective control law derived from optimal linear quadratic methods on a longitudinal vehicle dynamics model with coupled aeroelastic dynamics. The controller tracks commanded attack-angle while minimizing drag and controlling wing twist and bend. This paper presents an overview of the elastic aircraft concept, outlines the coupled vehicle model, presents the preliminary control law formulation and implementation, presents results from simulation, provides analysis, and concludes by identifying possible future areas for research

  9. Core flooding tests to investigate the effects of IFT reduction and wettability alteration on oil recovery during MEOR process in an Iranian oil reservoir.

    PubMed

    Rabiei, Arash; Sharifinik, Milad; Niazi, Ali; Hashemi, Abdolnabi; Ayatollahi, Shahab

    2013-07-01

    Microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) refers to the process of using bacterial activities for more oil recovery from oil reservoirs mainly by interfacial tension reduction and wettability alteration mechanisms. Investigating the impact of these two mechanisms on enhanced oil recovery during MEOR process is the main objective of this work. Different analytical methods such as oil spreading and surface activity measurements were utilized to screen the biosurfactant-producing bacteria isolated from the brine of a specific oil reservoir located in the southwest of Iran. The isolates identified by 16S rDNA and biochemical analysis as Enterobacter cloacae (Persian Type Culture Collection (PTCC) 1798) and Enterobacter hormaechei (PTCC 1799) produce 1.53 g/l of biosurfactant. The produced biosurfactant caused substantial surface tension reduction of the growth medium and interfacial tension reduction between oil and brine to 31 and 3.2 mN/m from the original value of 72 and 29 mN/m, respectively. A novel set of core flooding tests, including in situ and ex situ scenarios, was designed to explore the potential of the isolated consortium as an agent for MEOR process. Besides, the individual effects of wettability alteration and IFT reduction on oil recovery efficiency by this process were investigated. The results show that the wettability alteration of the reservoir rock toward neutrally wet condition in the course of the adsorption of bacteria cells and biofilm formation are the dominant mechanisms on the improvement of oil recovery efficiency. PMID:23553033

  10. Acid and reduction stimulated logic "and"-type combinational release mode achieved in DOX-loaded superparamagnetic nanogel.

    PubMed

    Song, Meifang; Xue, Yanan; Chen, Lidi; Xia, Xiaoyang; Zhou, Yang; Liu, Lei; Yu, Bo; Long, Sihui; Huang, Shiwen; Yu, Faquan

    2016-08-01

    A superparamagnetic nanogel featured with a logic "and"-type pH/reduction combinational stimulated release mode was fabricated as a drug delivery system by virtue of parallel crosslinking. The disulfide bond and electrostatic interaction between thiolated alginate (SA-SH) and thiolated/aminated iron oxide nanoparticles (SH-MION-NH2) were employed to achieve the mechanism. The obtained DOX-loaded magnetic nanogel is 122.7±20.3nm in size with superparamagnetism. The combinational conditions of pH5.0/10mM glutathione (GSH) stimulated a significantly high accumulative release. However, either pH7.4/10mM (GSH) or pH5.0 alone induced much low release. This verified the typical logic "and"-type combinationally stimulated release mode. In vitro cytotoxicity tests clearly illustrated the effective selectivity of killing the human cervical cancer cells (HeLa) with IC50 of 1.01μg/mL and the human hepatoma cells (HepG2) with IC50 of 1.57μg/mL but significantly low cytotoxicity to the cercopithecus aethiops kidney cells (Vero). CLSM presented the internationalization of the nanogel into cytoplasm and nuclei with time. In vivo investigation revealed that the selective intratumoral accumulation and antitumor efficacy were considerably advantageous over free DOX whereas low systemic toxicity exhibited up-regulated security as compared to free DOX. Overall, the DOX-loaded magnetic nanogel with enhanced antitumor efficacy and down-regulated adverse effect was a promising nanoplatform for the clinical chemotherapy of malignancy. PMID:27157762

  11. Fast modal extraction in NASTRAN via the FEER computer program. [based on automatic matrix reduction method for lower modes of structures with many degrees of freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, M. B.; Pipano, A.

    1973-01-01

    A new eigensolution routine, FEER (Fast Eigensolution Extraction Routine), used in conjunction with NASTRAN at Israel Aircraft Industries is described. The FEER program is based on an automatic matrix reduction scheme whereby the lower modes of structures with many degrees of freedom can be accurately extracted from a tridiagonal eigenvalue problem whose size is of the same order of magnitude as the number of required modes. The process is effected without arbitrary lumping of masses at selected node points or selection of nodes to be retained in the analysis set. The results of computational efficiency studies are presented, showing major arithmetic operation counts and actual computer run times of FEER as compared to other methods of eigenvalue extraction, including those available in the NASTRAN READ module. It is concluded that the tridiagonal reduction method used in FEER would serve as a valuable addition to NASTRAN for highly increased efficiency in obtaining structural vibration modes.

  12. Predator Stress Engages Corticotropin-releasing Factor and Opioid Systems to Alter the Operating Mode of Locus Coeruleus Norepinephrine Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Andre L.; Leiser, Steven C.; Snyder, Kevin; Valentino, Rita J.

    2012-01-01

    The norepinephrine nucleus, locus coeruleus (LC), has been implicated in cognitive aspects of the stress response, in part through its regulation by the stress-related neuropeptide, corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF). LC neurons discharge in tonic and phasic modes that differentially modulate attention and behavior. Here, the effects of exposure to an ethologically relevant stressor, predator odor, on spontaneous (tonic) and auditory-evoked (phasic) LC discharge were characterized in unanesthetized rats. Similar to the effects of CRF, stressor presentation increased tonic LC discharge and decreased phasic auditory-evoked discharge, thereby decreasing the signal-to-noise ratio of the sensory response. This stress-induced shift in LC discharge towards a high tonic mode was prevented by a CRF antagonist. Moreover, CRF antagonism during stress unmasked a large decrease in tonic discharge rate that was opioid mediated because it was prevented by pretreatment with the opiate antagonist, naloxone. Elimination of both CRF and opioid influences with an antagonist combination rendered LC activity unaffected by the stressor. These results demonstrate that both CRF and opioid afferents are engaged during stress to fine-tune LC activity. The predominant CRF influence shifts the operational mode of LC activity towards a high tonic state that is thought to facilitate behavioral flexibility and may be adaptive in coping with the stressor. Simultaneously, stress engages an opposing opioid influence that restrains the CRF influence and may facilitate recovery towards pre-stress levels of activity. Changes in the balance of CRF:opioid regulation of the LC could have consequences for stress vulnerability. PMID:22210331

  13. Morphologic and Functional Connectivity Alterations of Corticostriatal and Default Mode Network in Treatment-Naïve Patients with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Jingming; Song, Lingheng; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Wenjing; Wang, Jian; Zhou, Daiquan; Qu, Wei; Guo, Junwei; Gu, Shanshan; He, Mei; Xie, Bing; Li, Haitao

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies have demonstrated that structural deficits and functional connectivity imbalances might underlie the pathophysiology of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The purpose of the present study was to investigate gray matter deficits and abnormal resting-state networks in patients with OCD and further investigate the association between the anatomic and functional alterations and clinical symptoms. Methods Participants were 33 treatment-naïve OCD patients and 33 matched healthy controls. Voxel-based morphometry was used to investigate the regions with gray matter abnormalities and resting-state functional connectivity analysis was further conducted between each gray matter abnormal region and the remaining voxels in the brain. Results Compared with healthy controls, patients with OCD showed significantly increased gray matter volume in the left caudate, left thalamus, and posterior cingulate cortex, as well as decreased gray matter volume in the bilateral medial orbitofrontal cortex, left anterior cingulate cortex, and left inferior frontal gyrus. By using the above morphologic deficits areas as seed regions, functional connectivity analysis found abnormal functional integration in the cortical-striatum-thalamic-cortical (CSTC) circuits and default mode network. Subsequent correlation analyses revealed that morphologic deficits in the left thalamus and increased functional connectivity within the CSTC circuits positively correlated with the total Y-BOCS score. Conclusion This study provides evidence that morphologic and functional alterations are seen in CSTC circuits and default mode network in treatment-naïve OCD patients. The association between symptom severity and the CSTC circuits suggests that anatomic and functional alterations in CSTC circuits are especially important in the pathophysiology of OCD. PMID:24358320

  14. Mild reductions in mitochondrial NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase activity result in altered nitrate assimilation and pigmentation but do not impact growth.

    PubMed

    Sienkiewicz-Porzucek, Agata; Sulpice, Ronan; Osorio, Sonia; Krahnert, Ina; Leisse, Andrea; Urbanczyk-Wochniak, Ewa; Hodges, Michael; Fernie, Alisdair R; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano

    2010-01-01

    Transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants were generated expressing a fragment of the mitochondrial NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase gene (SlIDH1) in the antisense orientation. The transgenic plants displayed a mild reduction in the activity of the target enzyme in the leaves but essentially no visible alteration in growth from the wild-type. Fruit size and yield were, however, reduced. These plants were characterized by relatively few changes in photosynthetic parameters, but they displayed a minor decrease in maximum photosynthetic efficiency (Fv/Fm). Furthermore, a clear reduction in flux through the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle was observed in the transformants. Additionally, biochemical analyses revealed that the transgenic lines exhibited considerably altered metabolism, being characterized by slight decreases in the levels of amino acids, intermediates of the TCA cycle, photosynthetic pigments, starch, and NAD(P)H levels, but increased levels of nitrate and protein. Results from these studies show that even small changes in mitochondrial NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase activity lead to noticeable alterations in nitrate assimilation and suggest the presence of different strategies by which metabolism is reprogrammed to compensate for this deficiency. PMID:20035036

  15. Electrocatalytic Reduction of Carbon Dioxide by Mn(CN)(2,2'-bipyridine)(CO)3: CN Coordination Alters Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Machan, Charles W; Stanton, Charles J; Vandezande, Jonathon E; Majetich, George F; Schaefer, Henry F; Kubiak, Clifford P; Agarwal, Jay

    2015-09-01

    MnBr(2,2'-bipyridine)(CO)3 is an efficient and selective electrocatalyst for the conversion of CO2 to CO. Herein, substitution of the axial bromide for a pseudohalogen (CN) is investigated, yielding Mn(CN)(2,2'-bipyridine)(CO)3. This replacement shifts the first and second reductions to more negative potentials (-1.94 and -2.51 V vs Fc/Fc(+), respectively), but imparts quasi-reversibility at the first feature. The two-electron, two-proton reduction of CO2 to CO and H2O is observed at the potential of the first reduction. Data from IR spectroelectrochemistry, cyclic voltammetry, and controlled potential electrolysis indicate that this behavior arises from the disproportionation of two one-electron-reduced species to generate the catalytically active species. Computations using density functional theory are also presented in support of this new mechanism. PMID:26288172

  16. Altered effective connectivity patterns of the default mode network in Alzheimer's disease: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yufang; Huang, Liyu; Cai, Suping; Zhang, Yun; von Deneen, Karen M; Ren, Aifeng; Ren, Junchan

    2014-08-22

    The aim of this work is to investigate the differences of effective connectivity of the default mode network (DMN) in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and normal controls (NC). The technique of independent component analysis (ICA) was applied to identify DMN components and multivariate Granger causality analysis (mGCA) was used to explore an effective connectivity pattern. We found that: (i) connections in AD were decreased than those in NC, in terms of intensity and quantity. Posterior cingulated cortex (PCC) exhibited significant activity in NC as it connected with most of the other regions within the DMN. Besides, the PCC was the convergence center which only received interactions from other regions; (ii) right inferior temporal cortex (rITC) in the NC exhibited stronger interactions with other regions within the DMN compared with AD patients; and (iii) interactions between medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) and bilateral inferior parietal cortex (IPC) in the NC were weaker than those in AD patients. These findings may implicate a brain dysfunction in AD patients and reveal more pathophysiological characteristics of AD. PMID:24996191

  17. Microbial sulfate reduction and the sulfur budget for a complete section of altered oceanic basalts, IODP Hole 1256D (eastern Pacific)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alt, Jeffrey C.; Shanks, Wayne C.

    2011-10-01

    Sulfide mineralogy and the contents and isotope compositions of sulfur were analyzed in a complete oceanic volcanic section from IODP Hole 1256D in the eastern Pacific, in order to investigate the role of microbes and their effect on the sulfur budget in altered upper oceanic crust. Basalts in the 800 m thick volcanic section are affected by a pervasive low-temperature background alteration and have mean sulfur contents of 530 ppm, reflecting loss of sulfur relative to fresh glass through degassing during eruption and alteration by seawater. Alteration halos along fractures average 155 ppm sulfur and are more oxidized, have high SO 4/ΣS ratios (0.43), and lost sulfur through oxidation by seawater compared to host rocks. Although sulfur was lost locally, sulfur was subsequently gained through fixation of seawater-derived sulfur in secondary pyrite and marcasite in veins and in concentrations at the boundary between alteration halos and host rocks. Negative δ 34S sulfide-S values (down to - 30‰) and low temperatures of alteration (down to ~ 40 °C) point to microbial reduction of seawater sulfate as the process resulting in local additions of sulfide-S. Mass balance calculations indicate that 15-20% of the sulfur in the volcanic section is microbially derived, with the bulk altered volcanic section containing 940 ppm S, and with δ 34S shifted to - 6.0‰ from the mantle value (0‰). The bulk volcanic section may have gained or lost sulfur overall. The annual flux of microbial sulfur into oceanic basement based on Hole 1256D is 3-4 × 10 10 mol S yr - 1 , within an order of magnitude of the riverine sulfate source and the sedimentary pyrite sink. Results indicate a flux of bacterially derived sulfur that is fixed in upper ocean basement of 7-8 × 10 - 8 mol cm - 2 yr - 1 over 15 m.y. This is comparable to that in open ocean sediment sites, but is one to two orders of magnitude less than for ocean margin sediments. The global annual subduction of sulfur in

  18. Microbial sulfate reduction and the sulfur budget for a complete section of altered oceanic basalts, IODP Hole 1256D (eastern Pacific)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alt, Jeffrey C.; Shanks, Wayne C.

    2011-01-01

    Sulfide mineralogy and the contents and isotope compositions of sulfur were analyzed in a complete oceanic volcanic section from IODP Hole 1256D in the eastern Pacific, in order to investigate the role of microbes and their effect on the sulfur budget in altered upper oceanic crust. Basalts in the 800m thick volcanic section are affected by a pervasive low-temperature background alteration and have mean sulfur contents of 530ppm, reflecting loss of sulfur relative to fresh glass through degassing during eruption and alteration by seawater. Alteration halos along fractures average 155ppm sulfur and are more oxidized, have high SO4/ΣS ratios (0.43), and lost sulfur through oxidation by seawater compared to host rocks. Although sulfur was lost locally, sulfur was subsequently gained through fixation of seawater-derived sulfur in secondary pyrite and marcasite in veins and in concentrations at the boundary between alteration halos and host rocks. Negative δ34Ssulfide-S values (down to -30 °) and low temperatures of alteration (down to ~40 °C) point to microbial reduction of seawater sulfate as the process resulting in local additions of sulfide-S. Mass balance calculations indicate that 15-20% of the sulfur in the volcanic section is microbially derived, with the bulk altered volcanic section containing 940ppm S, and with δ34S shifted to -6.0‰) from the mantle value (0 ‰). The bulk volcanic section may have gained or lost sulfur overall. The annual flux of microbial sulfur into oceanic basement based on Hole 1256D is 3-4 X1010molSyr-1, within an order of magnitude of the riverine sulfate source and the sedimentary pyrite sink. Results indicate a flux of bacterially derived sulfur that is fixed in upper ocean basement of 7-8 X 10-8molcm-2yr-1 over 15m.y. This is comparable to that in open ocean sediment sites, but is one to two orders of magnitude less than for ocean margin sediments. The global annual subduction of sulfur in altered oceanic basalt lavas based

  19. Local stochastic subgrid-scale modeling for a one dimensional shallow water model using stochastic mode reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharuk, Matthias; Stamen, Dolaptchiev; Ulrich, Achatz; Ilya, Timofeyev

    2016-04-01

    Due to the finite spatial resolution in numerical atmospheric models subgrid-scale (SGS) processes are excluded. A SGS parameterization of these excluded processes might improve the model on all scales. To parameterize the SGS processes we choose the MTV stochastic mode reduction (Majda, Timofeyev, Vanden-Eijnden 2001, A mathematical framework for stochastic climate models. Commun. Pure Appl. Math., 54:891-974). For this the model is separated into fast and slow processes. Using the statistics of the fast processes, a SGS parameterization is found. To identify fast processes the state vector of the model is separated into two state vectors. One vector is the average of the full model state vector in a coarse grid cell. The other describes SGS processes which are defined as the deviation of the full state vector from the coarse cell average. If the SGS vector decorrelates faster in time than the coarse grid vector, the interactions of SGS processes in the equation of the SGS processes are replaced by a local Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. Afterwards the MTV SGS parameterization can be derived. This method was successfully applied on the Burgers-equation (Dolaptchiev et al. 2013, Stochastic closure for local averages in the finite-difference discretization of the forced Burgers equation. Theor. Comp. Fluid Dyn., 27:297-317). In this study we consider a more atmosphere like model and choose a model of the one dimensional shallow water equations (SWe). It will be shown, that the fine state vector decorrelates faster than the coarse state vector. Due to the non-polynomial form of the SWe in flux formulation an approximation of all 1/h (h = fluid depth) terms needs to be done, except of the interactions between coarse state vector to coarse state vector. It will be shown, that this approximation has only minor impact on the model results. In the following the model with the local Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process approximation of SGS interactions is analyzed and compared to the

  20. Reductions in frontocortical cytokine levels are associated with long-lasting alterations in reward valuation after methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Stolyarova, Alexandra; Thompson, Andrew B; Barrientos, Ruth M; Izquierdo, Alicia

    2015-04-01

    Alterations in reward valuation are thought to have a central role at all stages of the addiction process. We previously reported work aversion in an effortful T-maze task following a binge exposure to methamphetamine, and no such changes in effort following escalating doses. Limitations of the T-maze task include its two available options, with an effort requirement, in the form of increasing barrier height, varying incrementally as a function of time, and reward magnitudes held constant. Reward preferences and choices, however, are likely affected by the number of options available and the manner in which alternatives are presented. In the present experiment, we investigated the long-lasting, off-drug effects of methamphetamine on reward choices in a novel effortful maze task with three possible courses of action, each associated with different effort requirements and reward magnitudes. Neuroinflammatory responses associated with drug exposure, proposed as one of the mechanisms contributing to suboptimal choices on effort-based tasks, were also examined. We investigated region-specific changes in pro- and anti-inflammatory markers in the mesocorticolimbic pathway after methamphetamine, and their relationship with animals' reward choices. We observed long-lasting, increased sensitivity to differences in reward magnitude in the methamphetamine group: animals were more likely to overcome greater effort costs to obtain larger rewards on our novel effortful maze task. These behavioral changes were strongly predicted by pronounced decreases in frontocortical cytokines, but not amygdalar or striatal markers. The present results provide the first evidence that neuroinflammatory processes are associated with alterations in reward valuation during protracted drug withdrawal. PMID:25409594

  1. Supramammillary serotonin reduction alters place learning and concomitant hippocampal, septal, and supramammillar theta activity in a Morris water maze.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Pérez, J Jesús; Gutiérrez-Guzmán, Blanca E; López-Vázquez, Miguel Á; Olvera-Cortés, María E

    2015-01-01

    Hippocampal theta activity is related to spatial information processing, and high-frequency theta activity, in particular, has been linked to efficient spatial memory performance. Theta activity is regulated by the synchronizing ascending system (SAS), which includes mesencephalic and diencephalic relays. The supramamillary nucleus (SUMn) is located between the reticularis pontis oralis and the medial septum (MS), in close relation with the posterior hypothalamic nucleus (PHn), all of which are part of this ascending system. It has been proposed that the SUMn plays a role in the modulation of hippocampal theta-frequency; this could occur through direct connections between the SUMn and the hippocampus or through the influence of the SUMn on the MS. Serotonergic raphe neurons prominently innervate the hippocampus and several components of the SAS, including the SUMn. Serotonin desynchronizes hippocampal theta activity, and it has been proposed that serotonin may regulate learning through the modulation of hippocampal synchrony. In agreement with this hypothesis, serotonin depletion in the SUMn/PHn results in deficient spatial learning and alterations in CA1 theta activity-related learning in a Morris water maze. Because it has been reported that SUMn inactivation with lidocaine impairs the consolidation of reference memory, we asked whether changes in hippocampal theta activity related to learning would occur through serotonin depletion in the SUMn, together with deficiencies in memory. We infused 5,7-DHT bilaterally into the SUMn in rats and evaluated place learning in the standard Morris water maze task. Hippocampal (CA1 and dentate gyrus), septal and SUMn EEG were recorded during training of the test. The EEG power in each region and the coherence between the different regions were evaluated. Serotonin depletion in the SUMn induced deficient spatial learning and altered the expression of hippocampal high-frequency theta activity. These results provide evidence in

  2. Supramammillary serotonin reduction alters place learning and concomitant hippocampal, septal, and supramammillar theta activity in a Morris water maze

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Pérez, J. Jesús; Gutiérrez-Guzmán, Blanca E.; López-Vázquez, Miguel Á.; Olvera-Cortés, María E.

    2015-01-01

    Hippocampal theta activity is related to spatial information processing, and high-frequency theta activity, in particular, has been linked to efficient spatial memory performance. Theta activity is regulated by the synchronizing ascending system (SAS), which includes mesencephalic and diencephalic relays. The supramamillary nucleus (SUMn) is located between the reticularis pontis oralis and the medial septum (MS), in close relation with the posterior hypothalamic nucleus (PHn), all of which are part of this ascending system. It has been proposed that the SUMn plays a role in the modulation of hippocampal theta-frequency; this could occur through direct connections between the SUMn and the hippocampus or through the influence of the SUMn on the MS. Serotonergic raphe neurons prominently innervate the hippocampus and several components of the SAS, including the SUMn. Serotonin desynchronizes hippocampal theta activity, and it has been proposed that serotonin may regulate learning through the modulation of hippocampal synchrony. In agreement with this hypothesis, serotonin depletion in the SUMn/PHn results in deficient spatial learning and alterations in CA1 theta activity-related learning in a Morris water maze. Because it has been reported that SUMn inactivation with lidocaine impairs the consolidation of reference memory, we asked whether changes in hippocampal theta activity related to learning would occur through serotonin depletion in the SUMn, together with deficiencies in memory. We infused 5,7-DHT bilaterally into the SUMn in rats and evaluated place learning in the standard Morris water maze task. Hippocampal (CA1 and dentate gyrus), septal and SUMn EEG were recorded during training of the test. The EEG power in each region and the coherence between the different regions were evaluated. Serotonin depletion in the SUMn induced deficient spatial learning and altered the expression of hippocampal high-frequency theta activity. These results provide evidence in

  3. Loss reduction in few-mode photonic crystal fiber by reducing inner surface imperfections in air holes.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lin; Hanzawa, Nobutomo; Tsujikawa, Kyozo; Aozasa, Shinichi; Yamamoto, Fumihiko

    2015-05-18

    We studied both theoretically and experimentally the additional loss in photonic crystal fiber (PCF) that results from inner surface imperfections such as contamination and the surface roughness of air holes. We estimated the modal loss dependence of these imperfections using a model with a "defective layer" for the first time. The theoretical studies suggest that higher order modes have a larger loss due to imperfections in the air holes. By minimizing the inner surface imperfections of the six innermost air holes, we can theoretically expect any additional loss to be reduced to a negligible level. Moreover, we examined our theoretical prediction experimentally. We fabricated few-mode PCFs by employing a suitable inner surface treatment for just the six innermost holes. As expected theoretically, the transmission loss was greatly reduced by employing these processes. The lowest transmission losses in the 1550 nm band were 0.31 dB/km for the LP01 mode and 0.43 dB/km for the LP11 mode. Our theoretical model will be useful with a view to realizing few-mode PCF with a loss comparable to that of conventional fibers. PMID:26074611

  4. Genetic and chemical reductions in protein phosphatase activity alter auxin transport, gravity response, and lateral root growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashotte, A. M.; DeLong, A.; Muday, G. K.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Auxin transport is required for important growth and developmental processes in plants, including gravity response and lateral root growth. Several lines of evidence suggest that reversible protein phosphorylation regulates auxin transport. Arabidopsis rcn1 mutant seedlings exhibit reduced protein phosphatase 2A activity and defects in differential cell elongation. Here we report that reduced phosphatase activity alters auxin transport and dependent physiological processes in the seedling root. Root basipetal transport was increased in rcn1 or phosphatase inhibitor-treated seedlings but showed normal sensitivity to the auxin transport inhibitor naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA). Phosphatase inhibition reduced root gravity response and delayed the establishment of differential auxin-induced gene expression across a gravity-stimulated root tip. An NPA treatment that reduced basipetal transport in rcn1 and cantharidin-treated wild-type plants also restored a normal gravity response and asymmetric auxin-induced gene expression, indicating that increased basipetal auxin transport impedes gravitropism. Increased auxin transport in rcn1 or phosphatase inhibitor-treated seedlings did not require the AGR1/EIR1/PIN2/WAV6 or AUX1 gene products. In contrast to basipetal transport, root acropetal transport was normal in phosphatase-inhibited seedlings in the absence of NPA, although it showed reduced NPA sensitivity. Lateral root growth also exhibited reduced NPA sensitivity in rcn1 seedlings, consistent with acropetal transport controlling lateral root growth. These results support the role of protein phosphorylation in regulating auxin transport and suggest that the acropetal and basipetal auxin transport streams are differentially regulated.

  5. Reduction of TEM/ETG-scale Density Fluctuations in the Core and Edge of H-mode DIII-D Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, L.

    2008-11-01

    Improved confinement during H-mode has been linked to ExB shear suppression of large-scale (kθρs<=0.3) turbulence within an edge transport barrier. While larger scale eddies are preferentially suppressed by increased shear flow in this paradigm, the effects on smaller scale (TEM/ETG-scale) turbulence are less certain. Recent results from DIII-D provide the first experimental evidence that intermediate-scale turbulence (1 < kθρs<=3) together with larger-scale electron temperature fluctuations [1] are also reduced promptly at the L-H transition. These reductions are not confined to the edge region. Intermediate-scale density fluctuations obtained via Doppler backscattering, are significantly reduced (30%-50%) over a range of normalized radii (0.5 <=r/a <=0.85) within a few ms of the L-H transition. A larger reduction (>=75%) is observed at the top of the pedestal (r/a ˜0.9) within 0.2 ms. In addition, low-k electron temperature fluctuations (kθρs<=0.3, from correlation ECE) are strongly reduced (>75%) at the L-H mode transition and during QH-mode (r/a ˜0.7). Gyrokinetic simulation results [2] predict that Te fluctuations contribute significantly to L-mode electron heat transport, hence, the observed reduction is likely an important factor in the observed improved H-mode electron heat confinement (χe^QH/χ3^L < 0.25). Doppler backscattering is also utilized to probe time-dependent shear flows (i.e. zonal flows). The results clearly indicate that zonal flow levels are anti-correlated with the amplitude of intermediate-scale density turbulence in L-mode, suggesting that zonal flows play an important role in turbulence/transport regulation. 3pt [1] L. Schmitz et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 035002 (2008).[2] A.E. White et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 056116 (2008).

  6. A highly tilted binding mode by a self-reactive T cell receptor results in altered engagement of peptide and MHC

    SciTech Connect

    Sethi, D.K.; Heroux, A.; Schubert, D. A.; Anders, A.-K.; Bonsor, D. A.; Thomas, C. P.; Sundberg, E. J.; Pyrdol, J.; Wucherpfennig, K. W.

    2011-01-17

    Self-reactive T cells that escape elimination in the thymus can cause autoimmune pathology, and it is therefore important to understand the structural mechanisms of self-antigen recognition. We report the crystal structure of a T cell receptor (TCR) from a patient with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis that engages its self-peptide-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) ligand in an unusual manner. The TCR is bound in a highly tilted orientation that prevents interaction of the TCR-{alpha} chain with the MHC class II {beta} chain helix. In this structure, only a single germline-encoded TCR loop engages the MHC protein, whereas in most other TCR-pMHC structures all four germline-encoded TCR loops bind to the MHC helices. The tilted binding mode also prevents peptide contacts by the short complementarity-determining region (CDR) 3{beta} loop, and interactions that contribute to peptide side chain specificity are focused on the CDR3{alpha} loop. This structure is the first example in which only a single germline-encoded TCR loop contacts the MHC helices. Furthermore, the reduced interaction surface with the peptide may facilitate TCR cross-reactivity. The structural alterations in the trimolecular complex are distinct from previously characterized self-reactive TCRs, indicating that there are multiple unusual ways for self-reactive TCRs to bind their pMHC ligand.

  7. A Highly Tilted Binding Mode by a Self-Reactive T Cell Receptor Results in Altered Engagement of Peptide and MHC

    SciTech Connect

    D Sethi; D Schubert; A Anders; A Heroux; D Bonsor; C Thomas; E Sundberg; J Pyrdol; K Wucherpfennig

    2011-12-31

    Self-reactive T cells that escape elimination in the thymus can cause autoimmune pathology, and it is therefore important to understand the structural mechanisms of self-antigen recognition. We report the crystal structure of a T cell receptor (TCR) from a patient with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis that engages its self-peptide-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) ligand in an unusual manner. The TCR is bound in a highly tilted orientation that prevents interaction of the TCR-{alpha} chain with the MHC class II {beta} chain helix. In this structure, only a single germline-encoded TCR loop engages the MHC protein, whereas in most other TCR-pMHC structures all four germline-encoded TCR loops bind to the MHC helices. The tilted binding mode also prevents peptide contacts by the short complementarity-determining region (CDR) 3{beta} loop, and interactions that contribute to peptide side chain specificity are focused on the CDR3{alpha} loop. This structure is the first example in which only a single germline-encoded TCR loop contacts the MHC helices. Furthermore, the reduced interaction surface with the peptide may facilitate TCR cross-reactivity. The structural alterations in the trimolecular complex are distinct from previously characterized self-reactive TCRs, indicating that there are multiple unusual ways for self-reactive TCRs to bind their pMHC ligand.

  8. Altered functional connectivity in the brain default-mode network of earthquake survivors persists after 2 years despite recovery from anxiety symptoms.

    PubMed

    Du, Ming-Ying; Liao, Wei; Lui, Su; Huang, Xiao-Qi; Li, Fei; Kuang, Wei-Hong; Li, Jing; Chen, Hua-Fu; Kendrick, Keith Maurice; Gong, Qi-Yong

    2015-11-01

    Although acute impact of traumatic experiences on brain function in disaster survivors is similar to that observed in post-traumatic stress disorders (PTSD), little is known about the long-term impact of this experience. We have used structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate resting-state functional connectivity and gray and white matter (WM) changes occurring in the brains of healthy Wenchuan earthquake survivors both 3 weeks and 2 years after the disaster. Results show that while functional connectivity changes 3 weeks after the disaster involved both frontal-limbic-striatal and default-mode networks (DMN), at the 2-year follow-up only changes in the latter persisted, despite complete recovery from high initial levels of anxiety. No gray or WM volume changes were found at either time point. Taken together, our findings provide important new evidence that while altered functional connectivity in the frontal-limbic-striatal network may underlie the post-trauma anxiety experienced by survivors, parallel changes in the DMN persist despite the apparent absence of anxiety symptoms. This suggests that long-term changes occur in neural networks involved in core aspects of self-processing, cognitive and emotional functioning in disaster survivors which are independent of anxiety symptoms and which may also confer increased risk of subsequent development of PTSD. PMID:25862672

  9. Cephalosporin-induced alteration in hepatic glutathione redox state. A potential mechanism for inhibition of hepatic reduction of vitamin K1,2,3-epoxide in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, M C; Mallat, A; Lipsky, J J

    1990-01-01

    Hypoprothrombinemia is a serious adverse effect of antimicrobial therapy that occurs after administration of some second- and third-generation cephalosporins which contain the methyltetrazole-thiol (MTT) group. Previous studies have shown that in vitro MTT directly inhibits microsomal gamma-carboxylation of a synthetic pentapeptide. Since MTT is a thiocarbamide, a type of compound that can increase oxidation of glutathione, the present studies were carried out to determine whether alterations in hepatic glutathione redox state might interfere with vitamin K metabolism. Dose-related increases in biliary efflux and hepatic concentration of oxidized glutathione (GSSG) occurred after intravenous administration of MTT or MTT-containing antibiotics to rats. This finding suggested that these compounds could alter the hepatic glutathione redox state in vivo. Microsomal reduction of vitamin K epoxide occurred in the presence of 100 microM dithiothreitol (DTT), but was inhibited by preincubation with GSSG at concentrations as low as 10 microM. At higher concentrations of DTT (1.0 mM) inhibition by GSSG persisted, but higher concentrations were required, suggesting that the thiol/disulfide ratio, rather than the absolute concentration of GSSG was important. By contrast, GSSG did not effect microsomal gamma-carboxylation of a pentapeptide, using either vitamin K1 or its hydroquinone as a cofactor. These findings suggest a novel mechanism for the hypoprothrombinemia occurring after administration of MTT-containing antibiotics. PMID:1978724

  10. Sulfur geochemistry and microbial sulfate reduction during low-temperature alteration of uplifted lower oceanic crust: Insights from ODP Hole 735B

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alford, Susan E.; Alt, Jeffrey C.; Shanks, Wayne C., III

    2011-01-01

    Sulfide petrography plus whole rock contents and isotope ratios of sulfur were measured in a 1.5 km section of oceanic gabbros in order to understand the geochemistry of sulfur cycling during low-temperature seawater alteration of the lower oceanic crust, and to test whether microbial effects may be present. Most samples have low SO4/ΣS values (≤ 0.15), have retained igneous globules of pyrrhotite ± chalcopyrite ± pentlandite, and host secondary aggregates of pyrrhotite and pyrite laths in smectite ± iron-oxyhydroxide ± magnetite ± calcite pseudomorphs of olivine and clinopyroxene. Compared to fresh gabbro containing 100–1800 ppm sulfur our data indicate an overall addition of sulfide to the lower crust. Selection of samples altered only at temperatures ≤ 110 °C constrains microbial sulfate reduction as the only viable mechanism for the observed sulfide addition, which may have been enabled by the production of H2 from oxidation of associated olivine and pyroxene. The wide range in δ34Ssulfide values (− 1.5 to + 16.3‰) and variable additions of sulfide are explained by variable εsulfate-sulfide under open system pathways, with a possible progression into closed system pathways. Some samples underwent oxidation related to seawater penetration along permeable fault horizons and have lost sulfur, have high SO4/ΣS (≥ 0.46) and variable δ34Ssulfide (0.7 to 16.9‰). Negative δ34Ssulfate–δ34Ssulfide values for the majority of samples indicate kinetic isotope fractionation during oxidation of sulfide minerals. Depth trends in sulfide–sulfur contents and sulfide mineral assemblages indicate a late-stage downward penetration of seawater into the lower 1 km of Hole 735B. Our results show that under appropriate temperature conditions, a subsurface biosphere can persist in the lower oceanic crust and alter its geochemistry.

  11. A Noise Reduction Method for Dual-Mass Micro-Electromechanical Gyroscopes Based on Sample Entropy Empirical Mode Decomposition and Time-Frequency Peak Filtering

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chong; Li, Jie; Zhang, Xiaoming; Shi, Yunbo; Tang, Jun; Cao, Huiliang; Liu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The different noise components in a dual-mass micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) gyroscope structure is analyzed in this paper, including mechanical-thermal noise (MTN), electronic-thermal noise (ETN), flicker noise (FN) and Coriolis signal in-phase noise (IPN). The structure equivalent electronic model is established, and an improved white Gaussian noise reduction method for dual-mass MEMS gyroscopes is proposed which is based on sample entropy empirical mode decomposition (SEEMD) and time-frequency peak filtering (TFPF). There is a contradiction in TFPS, i.e., selecting a short window length may lead to good preservation of signal amplitude but bad random noise reduction, whereas selecting a long window length may lead to serious attenuation of the signal amplitude but effective random noise reduction. In order to achieve a good tradeoff between valid signal amplitude preservation and random noise reduction, SEEMD is adopted to improve TFPF. Firstly, the original signal is decomposed into intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) by EMD, and the SE of each IMF is calculated in order to classify the numerous IMFs into three different components; then short window TFPF is employed for low frequency component of IMFs, and long window TFPF is employed for high frequency component of IMFs, and the noise component of IMFs is wiped off directly; at last the final signal is obtained after reconstruction. Rotation experimental and temperature experimental are carried out to verify the proposed SEEMD-TFPF algorithm, the verification and comparison results show that the de-noising performance of SEEMD-TFPF is better than that achievable with the traditional wavelet, Kalman filter and fixed window length TFPF methods. PMID:27258276

  12. A Noise Reduction Method for Dual-Mass Micro-Electromechanical Gyroscopes Based on Sample Entropy Empirical Mode Decomposition and Time-Frequency Peak Filtering.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chong; Li, Jie; Zhang, Xiaoming; Shi, Yunbo; Tang, Jun; Cao, Huiliang; Liu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The different noise components in a dual-mass micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) gyroscope structure is analyzed in this paper, including mechanical-thermal noise (MTN), electronic-thermal noise (ETN), flicker noise (FN) and Coriolis signal in-phase noise (IPN). The structure equivalent electronic model is established, and an improved white Gaussian noise reduction method for dual-mass MEMS gyroscopes is proposed which is based on sample entropy empirical mode decomposition (SEEMD) and time-frequency peak filtering (TFPF). There is a contradiction in TFPS, i.e., selecting a short window length may lead to good preservation of signal amplitude but bad random noise reduction, whereas selecting a long window length may lead to serious attenuation of the signal amplitude but effective random noise reduction. In order to achieve a good tradeoff between valid signal amplitude preservation and random noise reduction, SEEMD is adopted to improve TFPF. Firstly, the original signal is decomposed into intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) by EMD, and the SE of each IMF is calculated in order to classify the numerous IMFs into three different components; then short window TFPF is employed for low frequency component of IMFs, and long window TFPF is employed for high frequency component of IMFs, and the noise component of IMFs is wiped off directly; at last the final signal is obtained after reconstruction. Rotation experimental and temperature experimental are carried out to verify the proposed SEEMD-TFPF algorithm, the verification and comparison results show that the de-noising performance of SEEMD-TFPF is better than that achievable with the traditional wavelet, Kalman filter and fixed window length TFPF methods. PMID:27258276

  13. Reduction of mode partition noise of FP-LD by using Mach-Zehnder interferometer for RSOA-based DWDM applications.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Sang-Hwa; Moon, Sang-Rok; Kye, Myeonggyun; Lee, Chang-Hee

    2016-06-27

    We investigate reduction of mode partition noise of a spectrally sliced Fabry-Perot laser diode (FP-LD) for application to seeded DWDM systems. The proposed scheme for the noise reduction incorporates a fiber-based Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) and a reflective semiconductor optical amplifier (RSOA). The MZI enables to reduce a relative intensity noise (RIN) more than 3 dB with better noise distributions. Experimental results of 10-Gb/s signal transmission exhibit a considerable bit-error-rate (BER) reduction by three orders of magnitude at the given received power. After the noise reduction, the FP-LD is applied to a 10-Gb/s DWDM system as a seed-light-source. In a local-seeding scheme, return-to-zero (RZ) and carrier-suppressed (CS)-RZ signal formats are compared as a function of transmission distance. Furthermore, a back-reflection induced impairment is evaluated in a remote-seeding scheme. We also count the number of useable channels to show the feasibility of DWDM transmission. PMID:27410602

  14. Recent progress in the understanding of mode instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jauregui, Cesar; Otto, Hans-Jürgen; Modsching, Norbert; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2015-03-01

    In this work the latest progress in the understanding of mode instabilities is reviewed. Particular emphasis is put on the recently established influence of photodarkening on the mode instability threshold and its behavior. It is shown, for example, that even degradations of the output power in the order of a few percent can lead to very significant reductions of the mode instability threshold. Moreover, our analysis shows that photodarkening also alters the expected behavior of the mode instability threshold with respect to the signal wavelength and the seed power. Thus photodarkening is revealed as one of the main effects shaping the behavior of the mode instability threshold observed in experiments.

  15. Novel mode of microbial energy metabolism: organic carbon oxidation coupled to dissimilatory reduction of iron or manganese.

    PubMed

    Lovley, D R; Phillips, E J

    1988-06-01

    A dissimilatory Fe(III)- and Mn(IV)-reducing microorganism was isolated from freshwater sediments of the Potomac River, Maryland. The isolate, designated GS-15, grew in defined anaerobic medium with acetate as the sole electron donor and Fe(III), Mn(IV), or nitrate as the sole electron acceptor. GS-15 oxidized acetate to carbon dioxide with the concomitant reduction of amorphic Fe(III) oxide to magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)). When Fe(III) citrate replaced amorphic Fe(III) oxide as the electron acceptor, GS-15 grew faster and reduced all of the added Fe(III) to Fe(II). GS-15 reduced a natural amorphic Fe(III) oxide but did not significantly reduce highly crystalline Fe(III) forms. Fe(III) was reduced optimally at pH 6.7 to 7 and at 30 to 35 degrees C. Ethanol, butyrate, and propionate could also serve as electron donors for Fe(III) reduction. A variety of other organic compounds and hydrogen could not. MnO(2) was completely reduced to Mn(II), which precipitated as rhodochrosite (MnCO(3)). Nitrate was reduced to ammonia. Oxygen could not serve as an electron acceptor, and it inhibited growth with the other electron acceptors. This is the first demonstration that microorganisms can completely oxidize organic compounds with Fe(III) or Mn(IV) as the sole electron acceptor and that oxidation of organic matter coupled to dissimilatory Fe(III) or Mn(IV) reduction can yield energy for microbial growth. GS-15 provides a model for how enzymatically catalyzed reactions can be quantitatively significant mechanisms for the reduction of iron and manganese in anaerobic environments. PMID:16347658

  16. Patterned flattened modes.

    PubMed

    Messerly, Michael J; Pax, Paul H; Dawson, Jay W

    2013-09-01

    We show that field-flattened strands may be added to and arbitrarily positioned within a field-flattened shell to create patterned, flattened modes. Patterning does not alter the effective index or flatness of the flattened mode but does alter the characteristics of other modes; we show that it can improve a flattened mode's bend performance significantly. Patterning provides a new and potentially valuable waveguide design tool that may lead to higher-power transport and laser fibers. PMID:23988948

  17. Sliding mode attitude control with L 2-gain performance and vibration reduction of flexible spacecraft with actuator dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Qinglei

    2010-09-01

    This paper presents a dual-stage control system design method for the rotational maneuver control and vibration stabilization of a flexible spacecraft. In this design approach, the sub-systems of attitude control and vibration suppression are designed separately using the low order model. Based on the sliding mode control (SMC) theory, a discontinuous attitude control law in the form of the input voltage of the reaction wheel is derived to control the orientation of the spacecraft, incorporating the L 2-gain performance criterion constraint. The resulting closed-loop system is proven to be uniformly ultimately bounded stability and the effect of the external disturbance on both attitude quaternion and angular velocity can be attenuated to the prescribed level as well. In addition, an adaptive version of the control law is designed for adapting the unknown upper bounds of the lumped disturbance such that the limitation of knowing the bound of the disturbance in advance is released. For actively suppressing the induced vibration, strain rate feedback control method is also investigated by using piezoelectric materials as additional sensors and actuators bonded on the surface of the flexible appendages. Numerical simulations are performed to show that rotational maneuver and vibration suppression are accomplished in spite of the presence of disturbance and uncertainty.

  18. Observations of vortex merger and growth reduction in a dual-mode, supersonic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Willow; Malamud, Guy; Shimony, Assaf; Trantham, Matt; Klein, Sallee; Shvarts, Dov; Kuranz, Carolyn; Drake, R. Paul

    2015-11-01

    The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) generates vortical structures and turbulence at an interface with shear flow. This instability is ubiquitous in natural and engineering systems including astrophysical environments and laboratory plasmas. Detailed measurements of modulation amplitude growth reduction and vortex merger evolving from well-defined initial conditions can benchmark hydrodynamic models and theories. This experiment provides the first measurements of the vortex merger rate of well-characterized seed perturbations evolving under the influence of the KHI in a supersonic flow. These data were obtained by utilizing a sustained laser pulse to drive a steady shockwave into low-density carbon foam, introducing shear along a precision-machined plastic interface. The evolution and merger of the modulations was measured with x-ray radiography and reproduced with 2D hydrodynamic simulations. This work is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, through the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas, grant number DE-NA0001840, and the National Laser User Facility Program, grant number DE-NA0002032, and through the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester by the NNSA/OICF under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC52-08NA28302.

  19. Assessment of buccal marginal alveolar peri-implant and periodontal defects using a cone beam CT system with and without the application of metal artefact reduction mode

    PubMed Central

    Kamburoğlu, K; Kolsuz, E; Murat, S; Eren, H; Yüksel, S; Paksoy, C S

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the accuracy of cone beam CT (CBCT) images obtained with and without artefact reduction (AR) in detecting simulated buccal peri-implant and buccal periodontal defects. Methods: 42 implants inserted into edentulous mandibles, and 38 teeth present in dry mandibles were used. Simulated buccal peri-implant defects (n = 22) and buccal periodontal defects (n = 22) were prepared. 20 implants and 18 teeth without simulated defects were the control group. Images of the mandibles were obtained using a Planmeca ProMax® 3D Max CBCT unit (Planmeca Oy, Helsinki, Finland). Image reconstructions were prepared without and with low, medium and high AR modes. Images were viewed randomly by six observers twice for the presence of defects. Kappa coefficient was calculated. F2_LD_F1 design for non-parametric analysis of longitudinal data was used. Area under curves (AUCs) were calculated for each observer. Significance level was taken as α = 0.05. Results: Intraobserver kappa ranged from 0.140 to 0.792 for peri-implant and from 0.189 to 1.0 for periodontal defects. All factors were statistically significant (p < 0.001), except for image mode and implant brand. Pairwise interactions were found between periodontal defects and peri-implant defects (p < 0.001), observers (p < 0.001), observer and image mode (p < 0.001), defect model and observer (p < 0.001) and defect model, image mode and observer (p = 0.04). AUC values ranged from 0.39 to 0.52 for peri-implant and from 0.45 to 0.71 for periodontal defects. Higher AUC values were found for periodontal defects than for peri-implant defects. Conclusions: Buccal peri-implant defects were more difficult to detect than buccal periodontal defects. No difference was found among CBCT images obtained with and without AR modes. PMID:23956236

  20. Dissolution-and-reduction CVD synthesis of few-layer graphene on ultra-thin nickel film lifted off for mode-locking fiber lasers

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Kaung-Jay; Lin, Yung-Hsiang; Wu, Chung-Lun; Lin, Sheng-Fong; Yang, Chun-Yu; Lin, Shih-Meng; Tsai, Din-Ping; Lin, Gong-Ru

    2015-01-01

    The in-situ dissolution-and-reduction CVD synthesized few-layer graphene on ultra-thin nickel catalyst film is demonstrated at temperature as low as 550 °C, which can be employed to form transmission-type or reflection-type saturable absorber (SA) for mode-locking the erbium-doped fiber lasers (EDFLs). With transmission-type graphene SA, the EDFL shortens its pulsewidth from 483 to 441 fs and broadens its spectral linewidth from 4.2 to 6.1 nm with enlarging the pumping current from 200 to 900 mA. In contrast, the reflection-type SA only compresses the pulsewidth from 875 to 796 fs with corresponding spectral linewidth broadened from 2.2 to 3.3 nm. The reflection-type graphene mode-locker increases twice of its equivalent layer number to cause more insertion loss than the transmission-type one. Nevertheless, the reflection-type based saturable absorber system can generate stabilized soliton-like pulse easier than that of transmission-type system, because the nonlinearity induced self-amplitude modulation depth is simultaneously enlarged when passing through the graphene twice under the retro-reflector design. PMID:26328535

  1. Long-term clinical effects of ventricular pacing reduction with a changeover mode to minimize ventricular pacing in a general pacemaker population

    PubMed Central

    Stockburger, Martin; Boveda, Serge; Moreno, Javier; Da Costa, Antoine; Hatala, Robert; Brachmann, Johannes; Butter, Christian; Garcia Seara, Javier; Rolando, Mara; Defaye, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Aim Right ventricular pacing (VP) has been hypothesized to increase the risk in heart failure (HF) and atrial fibrillation (AF). The ANSWER study evaluated, whether an AAI-DDD changeover mode to minimize VP (SafeR) improves outcome compared with DDD in a general dual-chamber pacemaker population. Methods and results ANSWER was a randomized controlled multicentre trial assessing SafeR vs. standard DDD in sinus node disease (SND) or AV block (AVB) patients. After a 1-month run-in period, they were randomized (1 : 1) and followed for 3 years. Pre-specified co-primary end-points were VP and the composite of hospitalization for HF, AF, or cardioversion. Pre-specified secondary end-points were cardiac death or HF hospitalizations and cardiovascular hospitalizations. ANSWER enrolled 650 patients (52.0% SND, 48% AVB) at 43 European centres and randomized in SafeR (n = 314) or DDD (n = 318). The SafeR mode showed a significant decrease in VP compared with DDD (11.5 vs. 93.6%, P < 0.0001 at 3 years). Deaths and syncope did not differ between randomization arms. No significant difference between groups [HR = 0.78; 95% CI (0.48–1.25); P = 0.30] was found in the time to event of the co-primary composite of hospitalization for HF, AF, or cardioversion, nor in the individual components. SafeR showed a 51% risk reduction (RR) in experiencing cardiac death or HF hospitalization [HR = 0.49; 95% CI (0.27–0.90); P = 0.02] and 30% RR in experiencing cardiovascular hospitalizations [HR = 0.70; 95% CI (0.49–1.00); P = 0.05]. Conclusion SafeR safely and significantly reduced VP in a general pacemaker population though had no effect on hospitalization for HF, AF, or cardioversion, when compared with DDD. PMID:25179761

  2. Altered intrinsic organisation of brain networks implicated in attentional processes in adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: a resting-state study of attention, default mode and salience network connectivity.

    PubMed

    Sidlauskaite, Justina; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund; Roeyers, Herbert; Wiersema, Jan R

    2016-06-01

    Deficits in task-related attentional engagement in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have been hypothesised to be due to altered interrelationships between attention, default mode and salience networks. We examined the intrinsic connectivity during rest within and between these networks. Six-minute resting-state scans were obtained. Using a network-based approach, connectivity within and between the dorsal and ventral attention, the default mode and the salience networks was compared between the ADHD and control group. The ADHD group displayed hyperconnectivity between the two attention networks and within the default mode and ventral attention network. The salience network was hypoconnected to the dorsal attention network. There were trends towards hyperconnectivity within the dorsal attention network and between the salience and ventral attention network in ADHD. Connectivity within and between other networks was unrelated to ADHD. Our findings highlight the altered connectivity within and between attention networks, and between them and the salience network in ADHD. One hypothesis to be tested in future studies is that individuals with ADHD are affected by an imbalance between ventral and dorsal attention systems with the former playing a dominant role during task engagement, making individuals with ADHD highly susceptible to distraction by salient task-irrelevant stimuli. PMID:26260900

  3. SVPWM Technique with Varying DC-Link Voltage for Common Mode Voltage Reduction in a Matrix Converter and Analytical Estimation of its Output Voltage Distortion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padhee, Varsha

    Common Mode Voltage (CMV) in any power converter has been the major contributor to premature motor failures, bearing deterioration, shaft voltage build up and electromagnetic interference. Intelligent control methods like Space Vector Pulse Width Modulation (SVPWM) techniques provide immense potential and flexibility to reduce CMV, thereby targeting all the afore mentioned problems. Other solutions like passive filters, shielded cables and EMI filters add to the volume and cost metrics of the entire system. Smart SVPWM techniques therefore, come with a very important advantage of being an economical solution. This thesis discusses a modified space vector technique applied to an Indirect Matrix Converter (IMC) which results in the reduction of common mode voltages and other advanced features. The conventional indirect space vector pulse-width modulation (SVPWM) method of controlling matrix converters involves the usage of two adjacent active vectors and one zero vector for both rectifying and inverting stages of the converter. By suitable selection of space vectors, the rectifying stage of the matrix converter can generate different levels of virtual DC-link voltage. This capability can be exploited for operation of the converter in different ranges of modulation indices for varying machine speeds. This results in lower common mode voltage and improves the harmonic spectrum of the output voltage, without increasing the number of switching transitions as compared to conventional modulation. To summarize it can be said that the responsibility of formulating output voltages with a particular magnitude and frequency has been transferred solely to the rectifying stage of the IMC. Estimation of degree of distortion in the three phase output voltage is another facet discussed in this thesis. An understanding of the SVPWM technique and the switching sequence of the space vectors in detail gives the potential to estimate the RMS value of the switched output voltage of any

  4. Oscillations in the reduction of permanganate by hydrogen peroxide or by ninhydrin in a batch reactor and mixed-mode oscillations in a continuous-flow stirred tank reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóthová, Mária; Nagy, Arpád; Treindl, Ľudovít.

    1999-01-01

    The periodical reduction of permanganate by hydrogen peroxide or by ninhydrin with transient oscillations in a closed system has been observed and discussed in relation to the first two permanganate oscillators described earlier. The mixed-mode oscillations of the permanganate-H 2O 2 oscillating system in a continuous-flow stirred tank reactor have been described.

  5. Varying the Pre-discharge Lithium Wall Coatings to Alter the Characteristics of the ELM-free H-mode Pedestal in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    D.P. Boyle, J.M. Canik, R. Maing, P.B. Snyder, T.H. Osborne, and the NSTX Team

    2012-06-28

    A previous experiment in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) showed pre-discharge lithium deposition gradually suppresed edge-localized modes (ELMs) and had nearly continuous relationships with reduced recycling and transport. In this paper, additional data filled gaps in the earlier experiment, and demonstrates that recycling, confinement, and pedestal structure continued to improve with additional lithium, even after ELMs were completely suppressed. New analysis shows that toroidal rotation and ion temperature also increased continuously with additional lithium. Besides its evolution with additional lithium, we also characterize the time evolution of the ELM-free H-mode pedestal as average density rose and impurities accumulated. We find that the pedestal structure, divertor heat flux and Dalpha profiles, and inferred recycling coefficient did not change significantly, at least until radiative losses become dominant. This suggests that the low-recycling properties of lithium were not significantly degraded over the duration of the discharge.

  6. Alterations in default-mode network connectivity may be influenced by cerebrovascular changes within 1 week of sports related concussion in college varsity athletes: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Militana, Adam R; Donahue, Manus J; Sills, Allen K; Solomon, Gary S; Gregory, Andrew J; Strother, Megan K; Morgan, Victoria L

    2016-06-01

    The goal of this pilot study is to use complementary MRI strategies to quantify and relate cerebrovascular reactivity, resting cerebral blood flow and functional connectivity alterations in the first week following sports concussion in college varsity athletes. Seven college athletes (3F/4M, age = 19.7 ± 1.2 years) were imaged 3-6 days following a diagnosed sports related concussion and compared to eleven healthy controls with no history of concussion (5M/6F, 18-23 years, 7 athletes). Cerebrovascular reactivity and functional connectivity were measured using functional MRI during a hypercapnia challenge and via resting-state regional partial correlations, respectively. Resting cerebral blood flow was quantified using arterial spin labeling MRI methods. Group comparisons were made within and between 18 regions of interest. Cerebrovascular reactivity was increased after concussion when averaged across all regions of interest (p = 0.04), and within some default-mode network regions, the anterior cingulate and the right thalamus (p < 0.05) independently. The FC was increased in the concussed athletes within the default-mode network including the left and right hippocampus, precuneus and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (p < 0.01), with measures being linearly related to cerebrovascular reactivity in the hippocampus in the concussed athletes. Significant resting cerebral blood flow changes were not detected between the two groups. This study provides evidence for increased cerebrovascular reactivity and functional connectivity in the medial regions of the default-mode network within days of a single sports related concussion in college athletes. Our findings emphasize the utility of complementary cerebrovascular measures in the interpretation of alterations in functional connectivity following concussion. PMID:25972119

  7. Quantification of the effects of secondary matrix on the analysis of sandstone composition, and a petrographic-chemical technique for retrieving original framework grain modes of altered sandstones.

    PubMed

    Cox, R; Lowe, D R

    1996-05-01

    Most studies of sandstone provenance involve modal analysis of framework grains using techniques that exclude the fine-grained breakdown products of labile mineral grains and rock fragments, usually termed secondary matrix or pseudomatrix. However, the data presented here demonstrate that, when the proportion of pseudomatrix in a sandstone exceeds 10%, standard petrographic analysis can lead to incorrect provenance interpretation. Petrographic schemes for provenance analysis such as QFL and QFR should not therefore be applied to sandstones containing more than 10% secondary matrix. Pseudomatrix is commonly abundant in sandstones, and this is therefore a problem for provenance analysis. The difficulty can be alleviated by the use of whole-rock chemistry in addition to petrographic analysis. Combination of chemical and point-count data permits the construction of normative compositions that approximate original framework grain compositions. Provenance analysis is also complicated in many cases by fundamental compositional alteration during weathering and transport. Many sandstones, particularly shallow marine deposits, have undergone vigorous reworking, which may destroy unstable mineral grains and rock fragments. In such cases it may not be possible to retrieve provenance information by either petrographic or chemical means. Because of this, pseudomatrix-rich sandstones should be routinely included in chemical-petrological provenance analysis. Because of the many factors, both pre- and post-depositional, that operate to increase the compositional maturity of sandstones, petrologic studies must include a complete inventory of matrix proportions, grain size and sorting parameters, and an assessment of depositional setting. PMID:11539329

  8. Dose addition models based on biologically-relevant reductions in fetal testosterone accurately predict postnatal reproductive tract alterations by a phthalate mixture in rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Challenges in cumulative risk assessment of anti-androgenic phthalate mixtures include a lack of data on all the individual phthalates and difficulty determining the biological relevance of reduction in fetal testosterone (T) on postnatal development. The objectives of the curren...

  9. Compliant wall-turbulent skin-friction reduction research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, M. C.; Weinstein, L. M.; Bushnell, D. M.; Ash, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    Previous compliant-wall experiments successful in reducing skin-friction drag probably have had a (unplanned) membrane resonance at a favorable frequency, amplitude, wave shape, length, and speed. The most probable drag reduction mechanism involves a direct coupling between the fluid and the moving wall when the wall natural resonance frequencies are near the fundamental turbulent burst frequency. Local skin-friction reductions of 61% were measured with mylar/PVC plastisol compliant surfaces. These reductions were observed only at certain flow conditions, indicating that changing tunnel total temperature may have altered the substrate dynamic modulus, damping, and coupled mylar tension. Apparently, the coupled membrane/substrate must be excited in compatible narrow-band natural frequency modes. An accelerated effort is required to develop practical durable compliant surfaces optimized for maximum drag reduction. Application of compliant walls to other transportation modes appears feasible with liquid flows offering the greatest skin-friction drag reduction potential.

  10. Water- and nitrogen-dependent alterations in the inheritance mode of transpiration efficiency in winter wheat at the leaf and whole-plant level.

    PubMed

    Ratajczak, Dominika; Górny, Andrzej G

    2012-11-01

    The effects of contrasting water and nitrogen (N) supply on the observed inheritance mode of transpiration efficiency (TE) at the flag-leaf and whole-season levels were examined in winter wheat. Major components of the photosynthetic capacity of leaves and the season-integrated efficiency of water use in vegetative and grain mass formation were evaluated in parental lines of various origins and their diallel F(2)-hybrids grown in a factorial experiment under different moisture and N status of the soil. A broad genetic variation was mainly found for the season-long TE measures. The variation range in the leaf photosynthetic indices was usually narrow, but tended to slightly enhance under water and N shortage. Genotype-treatment interaction effects were significant for most characters. No consistency between the leaf- and season-long TE measures was observed. Preponderance of additivity-dependent variance was mainly identified for the season-integrated TE and leaf CO(2) assimilation rate. Soil treatments exhibited considerable influence on the phenotypic expression of gene action for the residual leaf measures. The contribution of non-additive gene effects and degree of dominance tended to increase in water- and N-limited plants, especially for the leaf transpiration rate and stomatal conductance. The results indicate that promise exists to improve the season-integrated TE. However, selection for TE components should be prolonged for later hybrid generations to eliminate the masking of non-additive causes. Such evaluation among families grown under sub-optimal water and nitrogen supply seems to be the most promising strategy in winter wheat. PMID:22878956

  11. How Light-Harvesting Semiconductors Can Alter the Bias of Reversible Electrocatalysts in Favor of H2 Production and CO2 Reduction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The most efficient catalysts for solar fuel production should operate close to reversible potentials, yet possess a bias for the fuel-forming direction. Protein film electrochemical studies of Ni-containing carbon monoxide dehydrogenase and [NiFeSe]-hydrogenase, each a reversible electrocatalyst, show that the electronic state of the electrode strongly biases the direction of electrocatalysis of CO2/CO and H+/H2 interconversions. Attached to graphite electrodes, these enzymes show high activities for both oxidation and reduction, but there is a marked shift in bias, in favor of CO2 or H+ reduction, when the respective enzymes are attached instead to n-type semiconductor electrodes constructed from CdS and TiO2 nanoparticles. This catalytic rectification effect can arise for a reversible electrocatalyst attached to a semiconductor electrode if the electrode transforms between semiconductor- and metallic-like behavior across the same narrow potential range (<0.25 V) that the electrocatalytic current switches between oxidation and reduction. PMID:24070184

  12. An unprecedented alteration in mode of action of IsCT resulting its translocation into bacterial cytoplasm and inhibition of macromolecular syntheses.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Jitendra K; Kathuria, Manoj; Kumar, Amit; Mitra, Kalyan; Ghosh, Jimut K

    2015-01-01

    IsCT, a 13-residue, non-cell-selective antimicrobial peptide is comprised of mostly hydrophobic residues and lesser cationic residues. Assuming that placement of an additional positive charge in the non-polar face of IsCT could reduce its hydrophobic interaction, resulting in its reduction of cytotoxicity, an analog, I9K-IsCT was designed. Two more analogs, namely, E7K-IsCT and E7K,I9K-IsCT, were designed to investigate the impact of positive charges in the polar face as well as polar and non-polar faces at a time. These amino acid substitutions resulted in a significant enhancement of therapeutic potential of IsCT. IsCT and E7K-IsCT seem to target bacterial membrane for their anti-bacterial activity. However, I9K-IsCT and E7K,I9K-IsCT inhibited nucleic acid and protein syntheses in tested E. coli without perturbing its membrane. This was further supported by the observation that NBD-IsCT localized onto bacterial membrane while NBD-labeled I9K-IsCT and E7K,I9K-IsCT translocated into bacterial cytoplasm. Interestingly, IsCT and E7K-IsCT were significantly helical while I9K-IsCT and E7K,I9K-IsCT were mostly unstructured with no helix content in presence of mammalian and bacterial membrane-mimetic lipid vesicles. Altogether, the results identify two novel cell-selective analogs of IsCT with new prototype amino acid sequences that can translocate into bacterial cytoplasm without any helical structure and inhibit macromolecular syntheses. PMID:25773522

  13. One-Class Support Vector Machines Identify the Language and Default Mode Regions As Common Patterns of Structural Alterations in Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders.

    PubMed

    Retico, Alessandra; Gori, Ilaria; Giuliano, Alessia; Muratori, Filippo; Calderoni, Sara

    2016-01-01

    The identification of reliable brain endophenotypes of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) has been hampered to date by the heterogeneity in the neuroanatomical abnormalities detected in this condition. To handle the complexity of neuroimaging data and to convert brain images in informative biomarkers of pathology, multivariate analysis techniques based on Support Vector Machines (SVM) have been widely used in several disease conditions. They are usually trained to distinguish patients from healthy control subjects by making a binary classification. Here, we propose the use of the One-Class Classification (OCC) or Data Description method that, in contrast to two-class classification, is based on a description of one class of objects only. This approach, by defining a multivariate normative rule on one class of subjects, allows recognizing examples from a different category as outliers. We applied the OCC to 314 regional features extracted from brain structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scans of young children with ASD (21 males and 20 females) and control subjects (20 males and 20 females), matched on age [range: 22-72 months of age; mean = 49 months] and non-verbal intelligence quotient (NVIQ) [range: 31-123; mean = 73]. We demonstrated that a common pattern of features characterize the ASD population. The OCC SVM trained on the group of ASD subjects showed the following performances in the ASD vs. controls separation: the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was 0.74 for the male and 0.68 for the female population, respectively. Notably, the ASD vs. controls discrimination results were maximized when evaluated on the subsamples of subjects with NVIQ ≥ 70, leading to AUC = 0.81 for the male and AUC = 0.72 for the female populations, respectively. Language regions and regions from the default mode network-posterior cingulate cortex, pars opercularis and pars triangularis of the inferior frontal gyrus, and transverse temporal gyrus

  14. One-Class Support Vector Machines Identify the Language and Default Mode Regions As Common Patterns of Structural Alterations in Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Retico, Alessandra; Gori, Ilaria; Giuliano, Alessia; Muratori, Filippo; Calderoni, Sara

    2016-01-01

    The identification of reliable brain endophenotypes of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) has been hampered to date by the heterogeneity in the neuroanatomical abnormalities detected in this condition. To handle the complexity of neuroimaging data and to convert brain images in informative biomarkers of pathology, multivariate analysis techniques based on Support Vector Machines (SVM) have been widely used in several disease conditions. They are usually trained to distinguish patients from healthy control subjects by making a binary classification. Here, we propose the use of the One-Class Classification (OCC) or Data Description method that, in contrast to two-class classification, is based on a description of one class of objects only. This approach, by defining a multivariate normative rule on one class of subjects, allows recognizing examples from a different category as outliers. We applied the OCC to 314 regional features extracted from brain structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scans of young children with ASD (21 males and 20 females) and control subjects (20 males and 20 females), matched on age [range: 22–72 months of age; mean = 49 months] and non-verbal intelligence quotient (NVIQ) [range: 31–123; mean = 73]. We demonstrated that a common pattern of features characterize the ASD population. The OCC SVM trained on the group of ASD subjects showed the following performances in the ASD vs. controls separation: the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was 0.74 for the male and 0.68 for the female population, respectively. Notably, the ASD vs. controls discrimination results were maximized when evaluated on the subsamples of subjects with NVIQ ≥ 70, leading to AUC = 0.81 for the male and AUC = 0.72 for the female populations, respectively. Language regions and regions from the default mode network—posterior cingulate cortex, pars opercularis and pars triangularis of the inferior frontal gyrus, and transverse temporal

  15. Surface Modification of Halogenated Polymers. 7. Local Reduction of Poly(tetrafluoroethylene) and Poly(chlorotrifluoroethylene) by a Scanning Electrochemical Microscope in the Feedback Mode.

    PubMed

    Combellas, Catherine; Ghilane, Jalal; Kanoufi, Frédéric; Mazouzi, Driss

    2004-05-20

    Fluoropolymers have been reduced locally by the radical anion of a redox mediator electrogenerated at a microelectrode operating in the configuration of a scanning electrochemical microscope. Approach curves with different redox mediators were used to investigate the reduction mechanism of the fluoropolymer. Different factors are discussed, such as the monomer reduction mechanism, the kinetic control by the surface modification growth, and the conductivity of the modified surface. The fluoropolymers' reduction parallels the trends observed in organic electrochemistry in solution within the haloalkane series. PMID:18950126

  16. Does Extraction or Retention of the Wisdom Tooth at the Time of Surgery for Open Reduction and Internal Fixation of the Mandible Alter the Patient Outcome?

    PubMed

    Hammond, Douglas; Parmar, Sat; Whitty, Justin; Pigadas, Nick

    2015-12-01

    Whether to extract or retain wisdom teeth present in a fracture line is a controversial topic. This study reviewed the records of all patients who had mandibular wisdom teeth at the time of the injury, and had an open reduction and internal fixation procedure between January 2009 and January 2012. The cohort of patients who concomitantly had their wisdom tooth extracted at the time of fixation had a greater complication rate (24.3%) compared with patients who did not (14.9%). This suggests that if third molars in the line of a fracture have caries, are fractured, show signs of pericoronitis, are periodontally involved, or are interfering with the occlusion are extracted at the time of fixation, this will increase the incidence of complications. PMID:26576231

  17. Reduction of edge localized mode intensity on DIII-D by on-demand triggering with high frequency pellet injection and implications for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Baylor, L. R.; Commaux, N.; Jernigan, T. C.; Meitner, S. J.; Combs, S. K.; Isler, R. C.; Unterberg, E. A.; Brooks, N. H.; Evans, T. E.; Leonard, A. W.; Osborne, T. H.; Parks, P. B.; Snyder, P. B.; Strait, E. J.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Lasnier, C. J.; Moyer, R. A.; Loarte, A.; Huijsmans, G. T. A.; Futatani, S.

    2013-08-15

    The injection of small deuterium pellets at high repetition rates up to 12× the natural edge localized mode (ELM) frequency has been used to trigger high-frequency ELMs in otherwise low natural ELM frequency H-mode deuterium discharges in the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon and L. G. Davis, Fusion Technol. 8, 441 (1985)]. The resulting pellet-triggered ELMs result in up to 12× lower energy and particle fluxes to the divertor than the natural ELMs. The plasma global energy confinement and density are not strongly affected by the pellet perturbations. The plasma core impurity density is strongly reduced with the application of the pellets. These experiments were performed with pellets injected from the low field side pellet in plasmas designed to match the ITER baseline configuration in shape and normalized β operation with input heating power just above the H-mode power threshold. Nonlinear MHD simulations of the injected pellets show that destabilization of ballooning modes by a local pressure perturbation is responsible for the pellet ELM triggering. This strongly reduced ELM intensity shows promise for exploitation in ITER to control ELM size while maintaining high plasma purity and performance.

  18. Reduction of Edge Localized Mode Intensity on DIII-D by On-demand triggering with High Frequency Pellet Injection and Implications for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Baylor, Larry R; Commaux, Nicolas JC; Jernigan, T. C.; Meitner, Steven J; Combs, Stephen Kirk; Isler, Ralph C; Unterberg, Ezekial A; Brooks, N. H.; Evans, T. E.; Leonard, A. W.; Osborne, T. H.; Parks, P. B.; Snyder, P. B.; Strait, E. J.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Lasnier, C. J.; Moyer, R. A.; Loarte, A.; Huijsmans, G. T.A.; Futantani, S.

    2013-01-01

    The injection of small deuterium pellets at high repetition rates up to 12 the natural edge localized mode (ELM) frequency has been used to trigger high-frequency ELMs in otherwise low natural ELM frequency H-mode deuterium discharges in the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon and L. G. Davis, Fusion Technol. 8, 441 (1985)]. The resulting pellet-triggered ELMs result in up to 12 lower energy and particle fluxes to the divertor than the natural ELMs. The plasma global energy confinement and density are not strongly affected by the pellet perturbations. The plasma core impurity density is strongly reduced with the application of the pellets. These experiments were performed with pellets injected from the low field side pellet in plasmas designed to match the ITER baseline configuration in shape and normalized operation with input heating power just above the H-mode power threshold. Nonlinear MHD simulations of the injected pellets show that destabilization of ballooning modes by a local pressure perturbation is responsible for the pellet ELM triggering. This strongly reduced ELM intensity shows promise for exploitation in ITER to control ELM size while maintaining high plasma purity and performance.

  19. Sulfur and oxygen isotope study of the Vermont copper belt: evidence of seawater hydrothermal alteration and sulfate reduction in a high-grade metamorphic terrane

    SciTech Connect

    Shanks, W.C. III; Woodruff, L.G.; Slack, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    Massive sulfide deposits of the Orange County copper district, in east-central Vermont, consist of stratiform lenses of pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite, and minor sphalerite within amphibolite-facies rocks of Early Devonian (.) age. The deposits occur at several different stratigraphic levels. The two largest, Elizabeth and Ely, are in quartz-mica schists of the Gile Mountain Formation; the Pike Hill deposit occurs in calcareous quartz-mica schist of the underlying Waits River Formation. Two small deposits (Orange and Gove) are within the Standing Pond Volcanics, a thin tholeiitic amphibolite near the Gile Mountain-Waits River contact. The Elizabeth deposit in particularly distinctive, and contains a suite of unusual wall rocks rich in quartz, carbonate, muscovite, amphibole, phlogopite, tourmaline, spessartine, and sodic plagioclase. Sulfur isotope values at Elizabeth and Ely of 5.1 to 9.1 per thousands contrast with values for Gove (1.9 to 4.2) and Pike Hill (1.5 to 4.6). Disseminated sulfides in amphibolites of the Standing Pond Volcanics have sulfur isotope values in the range -0.1 to 1.7 per thousands, typical of MORB. These data require sulfur contributions to massive sulfide deposits both from basalt and from contemporaneous seawater sulfate sources. Whole-rock (carbonate free) oxygen isotope analyses of host lithologies range from 7.9 per thousands (Standing Pond Volcanics) to 19.9 per thousands (Waits River Formation). Detailed sampling of Elizabeth wall rocks (including those high in B, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Mn) yields a narrow range of oxygen isotope values (11.1 to 14.1); heavier values correlate with higher silica contents. Isotopically light wallrock lithologies are probably due to premetamorphic seawater hydrothermal alteration.

  20. Effect of root planing on the reduction of probing depth and the gain of clinical attachment depending on the mode of interproximal bone resorption

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoon Mi; Lee, Ju-Youn; Choi, Jeomil

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of root planing on the reduction of probing pocket depth and the gain of clinical attachment depending on the pattern of bone resorption (vertical versus horizontal bone loss) in the interproximal aspect of premolar teeth that showed an initial probing pocket depth of 4-6 mm. Methods In this study, we analyzed 68 teeth (15 from the maxilla and 53 from the mandible) from 32 patients with chronic periodontitis (17 men and 15 women; mean age, 53.6 years). The probing pocket depth and clinical attachment level at all six sites around each tooth were recorded before treatment to establish a baseline value, and then three months and six months after root planing. Results The reduction in interdental pocket depth was 1.1 mm in teeth that experienced horizontal bone loss and 0.7 mm in teeth that experienced vertical bone loss. Interdental attachment was increased by 1.0 mm in teeth with horizontal bone loss and by 0.7 mm in teeth with vertical bone loss. The reduction of probing pocket depth and the gain of clinical attachment occurred regardless of defect patterns three and six months after root planing. Conclusions The reduction of pocket depth and gain in the clinical attachment level were significantly larger in horizontally patterned interproximal bone defects than in vertical bone defects. PMID:26550527

  1. Sludge reduction by direct addition of chlorine dioxide into a sequencing batch reactor under operational mode of repeatedly alternating aeration/non-aeration.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hong; Liu, Weiyi; Li, Yuanmei; Xiao, Hong

    2015-01-01

    The effect of direct addition of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) into a repeatedly alternating aeration/non-aeration sequencing batch reactor (SBR) on its sludge reduction and process performance was investigated. The experimental results showed that the sludge reduction efficiency was 32.9% and the observed growth yield (Yobs) of SBR was 0.11 kg VSS (volatile suspended solids) /kg COD (chemical oxygen demand) for 80 days' operation at the optimum ClO2 dosage of 2.0 mg/g TSS (total suspended solids). It was speculated that cell lysis and cryptic growth, uncoupled metabolism and endogenous metabolism were jointly responsible for the sludge reduction in this study. COD, NH3-N, total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) in the effluent increased on average 29.47, 4.44, 1.97 and 0.05 mg/L, respectively. However, the effluent quality still satisfied the first-class B discharge standards for municipal wastewater treatment plants in China. In that case, the sludge maintained fine viability with the specific oxygen uptake rate (SOUR) being 14.47 mg O2/(g VSS·h) and demonstrated good settleability with the sludge volume index (SVI) being 116 mL/g. The extra cost of sludge reduction at the optimum ClO2 dosage was estimated to be 2.24 CNY (or 0.36 dollar)/kg dry sludge. PMID:26524444

  2. ROTATIONAL SPLITTING OF PULSATION MODES

    SciTech Connect

    Deupree, Robert G.; Beslin, Wilfried

    2010-10-01

    Mode splittings produced by uniform rotation and a particular form of differential rotation are computed for two-dimensional rotating 10 M{sub sun} zero-age main sequence stellar models. The change in the character of the mode splitting is traced as a function of uniform rotation rate, and it is found that only relatively slow rotation rates are required before the mode splitting becomes asymmetric about the azimuthally symmetric (m = 0) mode. Increased rotation produces a progressively altered pattern of the individual modes with respect to each other. Large mode splittings begin to overlap with the mode splittings produced by different radial and latitudinal modes at relatively low rotation rates. The mode-splitting pattern for the differentially rotating stars we model is different than that for uniformly rotating stars, making the mode splitting a possible discriminant of the internal angular momentum distribution if one assumes that the formidable challenge of mode identification can be overcome.

  3. Modes of Large-Scale Brain Network Organization during Threat Processing and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptom Reduction during TF-CBT among Adolescent Girls

    PubMed Central

    Cisler, Josh M.; Sigel, Benjamin A.; Kramer, Teresa L.; Smitherman, Sonet; Vanderzee, Karin; Pemberton, Joy; Kilts, Clinton D.

    2016-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is often chronic and disabling across the lifespan. The gold standard treatment for adolescent PTSD is Trauma-Focused Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT), though treatment response is variable and mediating neural mechanisms are not well understood. Here, we test whether PTSD symptom reduction during TF-CBT is associated with individual differences in large-scale brain network organization during emotion processing. Twenty adolescent girls, aged 11–16, with PTSD related to assaultive violence completed a 12-session protocol of TF-CBT. Participants completed an emotion processing task, in which neutral and fearful facial expressions were presented either overtly or covertly during 3T fMRI, before and after treatment. Analyses focused on characterizing network properties of modularity, assortativity, and global efficiency within an 824 region-of-interest brain parcellation separately during each of the task blocks using weighted functional connectivity matrices. We similarly analyzed an existing dataset of healthy adolescent girls undergoing an identical emotion processing task to characterize normative network organization. Pre-treatment individual differences in modularity, assortativity, and global efficiency during covert fear vs neutral blocks predicted PTSD symptom reduction. Patients who responded better to treatment had greater network modularity and assortativity but lesser efficiency, a pattern that closely resembled the control participants. At a group level, greater symptom reduction was associated with greater pre-to-post-treatment increases in network assortativity and modularity, but this was more pronounced among participants with less symptom improvement. The results support the hypothesis that modularized and resilient brain organization during emotion processing operate as mechanisms enabling symptom reduction during TF-CBT. PMID:27505076

  4. The H(sub infinity) optimal controller design and reduction for the inertial hold mode of the attitude control system of the XTE spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Zhong Ling; Zhou, Gui AN

    1994-01-01

    The Inertial Hold Mode (IHM) is one mode of the attitude control system of the X-ray Timing Explorer spacecraft that is disturbed by both parametric uncertainties and external torque disturbance. The IHM model is modified into a typical H-infinity mixed-sensitivity problem through choosing suitable weighting functions W(sub 1)(s) and W(sub 3)(s). The controller is designed by the H-infinity optimization technique with the transformation of shifting the imaginary axis. It can stabilize the plant with uncertainties from the natural frequencies of the flexible body. The gain margin and phase margin of the system are 24.03 db and 55.04 deg, respectively. The step response attenuates to zero within 150 seconds. These show that the controller satisfies the specified requirements. Since the order of the controller appears high, it is reduced to fourth order one. The results show that the stability and the performance of the system with the reduced controller are retained perfectly.

  5. The H(sub infinity) optimal controller design and reduction for the inertial hold mode of the attitude control system of the XTE spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhong Ling; Zhou, Gui An

    1994-02-01

    The Inertial Hold Mode (IHM) is one mode of the attitude control system of the X-ray Timing Explorer spacecraft that is disturbed by both parametric uncertainties and external torque disturbance. The IHM model is modified into a typical H-infinity mixed-sensitivity problem through choosing suitable weighting functions W(sub 1)(s) and W(sub 3)(s). The controller is designed by the H-infinity optimization technique with the transformation of shifting the imaginary axis. It can stabilize the plant with uncertainties from the natural frequencies of the flexible body. The gain margin and phase margin of the system are 24.03 db and 55.04 deg, respectively. The step response attenuates to zero within 150 seconds. These show that the controller satisfies the specified requirements. Since the order of the controller appears high, it is reduced to fourth order one. The results show that the stability and the performance of the system with the reduced controller are retained perfectly.

  6. Reduction of timing jitter and intensity noise in normal-dispersion passively mode-locked fiber lasers by narrow band-pass filtering.

    PubMed

    Qin, Peng; Song, Youjian; Kim, Hyoji; Shin, Junho; Kwon, Dohyeon; Hu, Minglie; Wang, Chingyue; Kim, Jungwon

    2014-11-17

    Fiber lasers mode-locked with normal cavity dispersion have recently attracted great attention due to large output pulse energy and femtosecond pulse duration. Here we accurately characterized the timing jitter of normal-dispersion fiber lasers using a balanced cross-correlation method. The timing jitter characterization experiments show that the timing jitter of normal-dispersion mode-locked fiber lasers can be significantly reduced by using narrow band-pass filtering (e.g., 7-nm bandwidth filtering in this work). We further identify that the timing jitter of the fiber laser is confined in a limited range, which is almost independent of cavity dispersion map due to the amplifier-similariton formation by insertion of the narrow bandpass filter. The lowest observed timing jitter reaches 0.57 fs (rms) integrated from 10 kHz to 10 MHz Fourier frequency. The rms relative intensity noise (RIN) is also reduced from 0.37% to 0.02% (integrated from 1 kHz to 5 MHz Fourier frequency) by the insertion of narrow band-pass filter. PMID:25402069

  7. Reduction of Common-Mode Conducted Noise Emissions in PWM Inverter-fed AC Motor Drive Systems using Optimized Passive EMI Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jettanasen, C.; Ngaopitakkul, A.

    2010-10-01

    Conducted electromagnetic interference (EMI) generated by PWM inverter-fed induction motor drive systems, which are currently widely used in many industrial and/or avionic applications, causes severe parasitic current problems, especially at high frequencies (HF). These restrict power electronic drive's evolution. In order to reduce or minimize these EMI problems, several techniques can be applied. In this paper, insertion of an optimized passive EMI filter is proposed. This filter is optimized by taking into account real impedances of each part of a considered AC motor drive system contrarily to commercial EMI filters designed by considering internal impedance of disturbance source and load, equal to 50Ω. Employing the latter EMI filter would make EMI minimization less effective. The proposed EMI filter optimization is mainly dedicated to minimize common mode (CM) currents due to its most dominant effects in this kind of system. The efficiency of the proposed optimization method using two-port network approach is deduced by comparing the minimized CM current spectra to an applied normative level (ex. DO-160D in aeronautics).

  8. Comparing State-Space Multivariable Controls to Multi-SISO Controls for Load Reduction of Drivetrain-Coupled Modes on Wind Turbines through Field-Testing: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, P. A.; van Wingerden, J. W.; Wright, A. D.

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents the structure of an ongoing controller comparison experiment at NREL's National Wind Technology Center; the design process for the two controllers compared in this phase of the experiment, and initial comparison results obtained in field-testing. The intention of the study is to demonstrate the advantage of using modern multivariable methods for designing control systems for wind turbines versus conventional approaches. We will demonstrate the advantages through field-test results from experimental turbines located at the NWTC. At least two controllers are being developed side-by-side to meet an incrementally increasing number of turbine load-reduction objectives. The first, a multiple single-input, single-output (m-SISO) approach, uses separately developed decoupled and classicially tuned controllers, which is, to the best of our knowledge, common practice in the wind industry. The remaining controllers are developed using state-space multiple-input and multiple-output (MIMO) techniques to explicity account for coupling between loops and to optimize given known frequency structures of the turbine and disturbance. In this first publication from the study, we present the structure of the ongoing controller comparison experiment, the design process for the two controllers compared in this phase, and initial comparison results obtained in field-testing.

  9. Comparing State-Space Multivariable Controls to Multi-SISO Controls for Load Reduction of Drivetrain-Coupled Modes on Wind Turbines Through Field-Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, P. A.; Van Wingerden, J. W.; Wright, A. D.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present results from an ongoing controller comparison study at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). The intention of the study is to demonstrate the advantage of using modern multivariable methods for designing control systems for wind turbines versus conventional approaches. We will demonstrate the advantages through field-test results from experimental turbines located at the NWTC. At least two controllers are being developed side-by-side to meet an incrementally increasing number of turbine load-reduction objectives. The first, a multiple single-input, single-output (m-SISO) approach, uses separately developed decoupled and classicially tuned controllers, which is, to the best of our knowledge, common practice in the wind industry. The remaining controllers are developed using state-space multiple-input and multiple-output (MIMO) techniques to explicity account for coupling between loops and to optimize given known frequency structures of the turbine and disturbance. In this first publication from the study, we present the structure of the ongoing controller comparison experiment, the design process for the two controllers compared in this phase, and initial comparison results obtained in field-testing.

  10. Waveguides having patterned, flattened modes

    DOEpatents

    Messerly, Michael J.; Pax, Paul H.; Dawson, Jay W.

    2015-10-27

    Field-flattening strands may be added to and arbitrarily positioned within a field-flattening shell to create a waveguide that supports a patterned, flattened mode. Patterning does not alter the effective index or flattened nature of the mode, but does alter the characteristics of other modes. Compared to a telecom fiber, a hexagonal pattern of strands allows for a three-fold increase in the flattened mode's area without reducing the separation between its effective index and that of its bend-coupled mode. Hexagonal strand and shell elements prove to be a reasonable approximation, and, thus, to be of practical benefit vis-a-vis fabrication, to those of circular cross section. Patterned flattened modes offer a new and valuable path to power scaling.

  11. Non-perturbative measurement of cross-field thermal diffusivity reduction at the O-point of 2/1 neoclassical tearing mode islands in the DIII-D tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardóczi, L.; Rhodes, T. L.; Carter, T. A.; Crocker, N. A.; Peebles, W. A.; Grierson, B. A.

    2016-05-01

    Neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) often lead to the decrease of plasma performance and can lead to disruptions, which makes them a major impediment in the development of operating scenarios in present toroidal fusion devices. Recent gyrokinetic simulations predict a decrease of plasma turbulence and cross-field transport at the O-point of the islands, which in turn affects the NTM dynamics. In this paper, a heat transport model of magnetic islands employing spatially non-uniform cross-field thermal diffusivity (χ⊥) is presented. This model is used to derive χ⊥ at the O-point from electron temperature data measured across 2/1 NTM islands in DIII-D. It was found that χ⊥ at the O-point is 1 to 2 orders of magnitude smaller than the background plasma transport, in qualitative agreement with gyrokinetic predictions. As the anomalously large values of χ⊥ are often attributed to turbulence driven transport, the reduction of the O-point χ⊥ is consistent with turbulence reduction found in recent experiments. Finally, the implication of reduced χ⊥ at the O-point on NTM dynamics was investigated using the modified Rutherford equation that predicts a significant effect of reduced χ⊥ at the O-point on NTM saturation.

  12. Excursions through KK modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuuchi, Kazuyuki

    2016-07-01

    In this article we study Kaluza-Klein (KK) dimensional reduction of massive Abelian gauge theories with charged matter fields on a circle. Since local gauge transformations change position dependence of the charged fields, the decomposition of the charged matter fields into KK modes is gauge dependent. While whole KK mass spectrum is independent of the gauge choice, the mode number depends on the gauge. The masses of the KK modes also depend on the field value of the zero-mode of the extra dimensional component of the gauge field. In particular, one of the KK modes in the KK tower of each massless 5D charged field becomes massless at particular values of the extra-dimensional component of the gauge field. When the extra-dimensional component of the gauge field is identified with the inflaton, this structure leads to recursive cosmological particle productions.

  13. DNA ALTERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The exposure of an organism to genotoxic chemicals may induce a cascade of genetic events. nitially, structural alterations to DNA are formed. ext, the DNA damage is processed and subsequently expressed in mutant gene products. inally, diseases result from the genetic damage. he ...

  14. A noniterative improvement of Guyan reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganesan, N.

    1993-01-01

    In determining the natural modes and frequencies of a linear elastic structure, Guyan reduction is often used to reduce the size of the mass and stiffness matrices and the solution of the reduced system is obtained first. The reduced system modes are then expanded to the size of the original system by using a static transformation linking the retained degrees of freedom to the omitted degrees of freedom. In the present paper, the transformation matrix of Guyan reduction is modified to include additional terms from a series accounting for the inertial effects. However, the inertial terms are dependent on the unknown frequencies. A practical approximation is employed to compute the inertial terms without any iteration. This new transformation is implemented in NASTRAN using a DMAP sequence alter. Numerical examples using a cantilever beam illustrate the necessary condition for allowing a large number of additional terms in the proposed series correction of Guyan reduction. A practical example of a large model of the Plasma Motor Generator module to be flown on a Delta launch vehicle is also presented.

  15. TUTOR User's Memo Using AUTHOR MODE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avner, R. A.

    While a PLATO station is normally used to present lessons (STUDENT MODE), a station can also be used by a teacher to produce or alter lessons or to control lesson presentation (AUTHOR MODE). This memo describes the manner in which student records and lesson material are stored in the computer memory, prescribes the method of entry to AUTHOR MODE,…

  16. Control of neoclassical tearing modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maraschek, M.

    2012-07-01

    Neoclassically driven tearing modes (NTMs) are a major problem for tokamaks operating in a conventional ELMy H-mode scenario. Depending on the mode numbers these pressure-driven perturbations cause a mild reduction in the maximum achievable βN = βt/(Ip/aBt) before the onset of the NTM, or can even lead to disruptions at a low edge safety factor, q95. A control of these types of modes in high βN plasmas is therefore of vital interest for magnetically confined fusion plasmas. The control consists of two major approaches, namely the control of the excitation of these modes and the removal, or at least mitigation, of these modes, once an excitation could not be avoided. For both routes examples will be given and the applicability of these approaches to ITER will be discussed.

  17. Theory of psychological adaptive modes.

    PubMed

    Lehti, Juha

    2016-05-01

    When an individual is facing a stressor and normal stress-response mechanism cannot guarantee sufficient adaptation, special emotional states, adaptive modes, are activated (for example a depressive reaction). Adaptive modes are involuntary states of mind, they are of comprehensive nature, they interfere with normal functioning, and they cannot be repressed or controlled the same way as many emotions. Their transformational nature differentiates them from other emotional states. The object of the adaptive mode is to optimize the problem-solving abilities according to the situation that has provoked the mode. Cognitions and emotions during the adaptive mode are different than in a normal mental state. These altered cognitions and emotional reactions guide the individual to use the correct coping skills in order to deal with the stressor. Successful adaptation will cause the adaptive mode to fade off since the adaptive mode is no longer necessary, and the process as a whole will lead to raised well-being. However, if the adaptation process is inadequate, then the transformation period is prolonged, and the adaptive mode will turn into a dysfunctional state. Many psychiatric disorders are such maladaptive processes. The maladaptive processes can be turned into functional ones by using adaptive skills that are used in functional adaptive processes. PMID:27063089

  18. Suspensions with reduced violin string modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, B. H.; Ju, L.; Blair, D. G.

    2006-03-01

    We discuss the possibility of significantly reducing the number and Q-factor of violin string modes in the mirror suspension. Simulations of a bar-flexure suspension and an orthogonal ribbon have shown a reduction in the number of violin string modes when compared to a normal ribbon suspension. By calculating the expected suspension thermal noise, we find that the orthogonal ribbon provides a promising suspension alternative. A lower number of violin modes oscillating in the direction of the laser and a reduction in violin mode peak values of at least 23dB can be achieved with a slight increase in thermal noise above 40Hz.

  19. "He Said What?!" Constructed Dialogue in Various Interface Modes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Lesa; Morris, Carla; Langdon, Clifton

    2012-01-01

    This study analyzes the manifestation of constructed dialogue in ASL narratives as dependent on the interface mode (i.e., face-to-face conversation, electronic conversation over videophone, and vlog monologues). Comparisons of eye gaze over three interface modes shows how aspects of constructed dialogue are altered to fit the communication mode.…

  20. Mode 2 fatigue crack growth specimen development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buzzard, R. J.; Gross, B.; Srawley, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    A Mode II test specimen was developed which has potential application in understanding phemonena associated with mixed mode fatigue failures in high performance aircraft engine bearing races. The attributes of the specimen are: it contains one single ended notch, which simplifiers data gathering and reduction; the fatigue crack grous in-line with the direction of load application; a single axis test machine is sufficient to perform testing; and the Mode I component is vanishingly small.

  1. Macroscopic (and microscopic) massless modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, Michael C.; Aniceto, Inês

    2015-05-01

    We study certain spinning strings exploring the flat directions of AdS3 ×S3 ×S3 ×S1, the massless sector cousins of su (2) and sl (2) sector spinning strings. We describe these, and their vibrational modes, using the D(2, 1 ; α) 2 algebraic curve. By exploiting a discrete symmetry of this structure which reverses the direction of motion on the spheres, and alters the masses of the fermionic modes s → κ - s, we find out how to treat the massless fermions which were previously missing from this formalism. We show that folded strings behave as a special case of circular strings, in a sense which includes their mode frequencies, and we are able to recover this fact in the worldsheet formalism. We use these frequencies to calculate one-loop corrections to the energy, with a version of the Beisert-Tseytlin resummation.

  2. [Altered states of consciousness].

    PubMed

    Gora, E P

    2005-01-01

    The review of modern ideas concerning the altered states of consciousness is presented in this article. Various methods of entry into the altered states of consciousness are looked over. It is shown that the altered states of consciousness are insufficiently known, but important aspects of human being existence. The role of investigation of the altered states of consciousness for the creation of integrative scientific conception base is discussed. PMID:15810684

  3. Decoupling of the brain's default mode network during deep sleep

    PubMed Central

    Horovitz, Silvina G.; Braun, Allen R.; Carr, Walter S.; Picchioni, Dante; Balkin, Thomas J.; Fukunaga, Masaki; Duyn, Jeff H.

    2009-01-01

    The recent discovery of a circuit of brain regions that is highly active in the absence of overt behavior has led to a quest for revealing the possible function of this so-called default-mode network (DMN). A very recent study, finding similarities in awake humans and anesthetized primates, has suggested that DMN activity might not simply reflect ongoing conscious mentation but rather a more general form of network dynamics typical of complex systems. Here, by performing functional MRI in humans, it is shown that a natural, sleep-induced reduction of consciousness is reflected in altered correlation between DMN network components, most notably a reduced involvement of frontal cortex. This suggests that DMN may play an important role in the sustenance of conscious awareness. PMID:19549821

  4. Altering sexual reproductive mode by interspecific exchange of MAT loci

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sexual fungi can be self-sterile (heterothallic, requiring genetically distinct partners) or selffertile (homothallic, no partner required). In most ascomycetes, a single mating type locus (MAT) controls the ability to reproduce sexually. In the genus Cochliobolus, all heterothallic species have eit...

  5. Linear gyrokinetic simulations of microinstabilities within the pedestal region of H-mode NSTX discharges in a highly shaped geometry

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Coury, M.; Guttenfelder, W.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Canik, J. M.; Canal, G. P.; Diallo, A.; Kaye, S.; Kramer, G. J.; Maingi, R.

    2016-06-30

    Linear (local) gyrokinetic predictions of edge microinstabilities in highly shaped, lithiated and non-lithiated NSTX discharges are reported using the gyrokinetic code GS2. Microtearing modes dominate the non-lithiated pedestal top. The stabilization of these modes at the lithiated pedestal top enables the electron temperature pedestal to extend further inwards, as observed experimentally. Kinetic ballooning modes are found to be unstable mainly at the mid-pedestal of both types of discharges, with un- stable trapped electron modes nearer the separatrix region. At electron wavelengths, ETG modes are found to be unstable from mid-pedestal outwards for ηe, exp ~2.2 with higher growth rates formore » the lithiated discharge. Near the separatrix, the critical temperature gradient for driving ETG modes is reduced in the presence of lithium, re ecting the reduction of the lithiated density gradients observed experimentally. A preliminary linear study in the edge of non-lithiated discharges shows that the equilibrium shaping alters the electrostatic modes stability, found more unstable at high plasma shaping.« less

  6. CNS development under altered gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajdel-Sulkowska, E.

    The future of space exploration depends on a solid understanding of the developmental process under microgravity. In furtherance of this goal, the present studies assessed the impact of altered gravity on the developing rat cerebellum. Specifically, the expression of selected cerebellar proteins and corresponding genes was compared in rat neonates exposed to hypergravity (1.5G) from embryonic day (E) 11 to postnatal day (P) 6 and P9 against their expression in rat neonates developing under normal gravity. Cerebellar proteins were analyzed by quantitative western blots of cerebellar homogenates; RNA analysis was performed in the same samples using ribonuclease protection assay (RPA). Densitometric analysis of western blots suggested 21% to 31% reduction in neuronal cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and 31% to 45% reduction in glial acidic protein (GFAP). RPA results suggested a small reduction (<10%) in NCAM mRNA and a moderate reduction (<25%) in GFAP mRNA. These data indicate that the expression of selected cerebellar proteins may be affected at both the transcriptional and translational/postranslational level. Furthermore, these results suggest that changes in expression of selected genes may underlie hypergravity's effect on the developing CNS. (Supported by NASA grant NCC2-1042 and BWH Psychiatry Fund).

  7. Passive mitigation of mode instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jauregui, C.; Otto, H.-J.; Stutzki, F.; Jansen, F.; Limpert, J.; Tünnermann, A.

    2014-03-01

    The phenomenon of mode instabilities has quickly become the most limiting effect for a further scaling of the average power of fiber laser systems. Consequently it is of great importance to find solutions for this problem. In this work we propose two concrete possible passive mitigation strategies: the first one is based on the reduction of the heat load in the fiber, whereas the second one is based on the reduction of the pump absorption. In both cases a significant increase of the threshold is expected.

  8. Assimilation of Mode-S EHS aircraft observations with a local EnKF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Heiner; Janjic, Tijana

    2016-04-01

    Aircraft observations of wind and temperature collected by airport surveillance radars (Mode-S EHS) were assimilated in COSMO-KENDA (Kilometre-scale ENsemble Data Assimilation) which couples an Ensemble Kalman Filter to a 40 member ensemble of the convection permitting COSMO-DE (Consortium for Small-Scale Modelling) model. The number of observing aircrafts in Mode-S EHS was about 15 times larger than in the AMDAR system. Between both aircraft observation systems, comparable observation error standard deviations in wind and a larger error in temperature were diagnosed a posteriori using analysis/forecast residuals in observation space (Desrozier's method). With the high density of Mode-S EHS observations, a reduction of temperature and wind error in forecasts of one and three hours was found mainly in the flight level and less near the surface. The amount of Mode-S EHS data was reduced by random thinning to test the effect of a varying observation density. With the current data assimilation setup, a saturation of the forecast error reduction was apparent when more than 50 percent of the Mode-S EHS data were assimilated. Forecast kinetic energy spectra indicated that the reduction in error is related to analysis updates on all scales resolved by COSMO-DE. Evolution (every 15 minutes) of forecast kinetic energy spectra compared to the control experiment showed different behavior of COSMO-DE model depending on amount of data assimilated.

  9. Reduction/Transformation Operators

    SciTech Connect

    Bartlett, Roscoe A.

    2006-09-01

    RTOp (reduction/transformation operators) is a collection of C++ software that provides the basic mechanism for implementinig vector operations in a flexible and efficient manner. This is the main interface utilized by Thyra to allow for the specification of specific vector reduction and/or transformation operations. The RTOp package contains three different types of software. (a) a small number of interoperability interfaces. (b) support software including code for the parallel SPMD mode based on only Teuchos::Comm(and not MPl directly(, and (c) a library of pre-implemented RTOp subclasses for everything from simple AXPYs and norms, to more specialized vector operations. RTOp allows an algorithm developer to implement their own RTOp subclasses in a way that is independent from any specific serial, parallel, out-of-core or other type of vector implementation. RTOp is a required package by Thyra and MOOCHO. (c)

  10. Reduction/Transformation Operators

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2006-09-01

    RTOp (reduction/transformation operators) is a collection of C++ software that provides the basic mechanism for implementinig vector operations in a flexible and efficient manner. This is the main interface utilized by Thyra to allow for the specification of specific vector reduction and/or transformation operations. The RTOp package contains three different types of software. (a) a small number of interoperability interfaces. (b) support software including code for the parallel SPMD mode based on only Teuchos::Comm(and notmore » MPl directly(, and (c) a library of pre-implemented RTOp subclasses for everything from simple AXPYs and norms, to more specialized vector operations. RTOp allows an algorithm developer to implement their own RTOp subclasses in a way that is independent from any specific serial, parallel, out-of-core or other type of vector implementation. RTOp is a required package by Thyra and MOOCHO. (c)« less

  11. Maximum thrust mode evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orme, John S.; Nobbs, Steven G.

    1995-01-01

    Measured reductions in acceleration times which resulted from the application of the F-15 performance seeking control (PSC) maximum thrust mode during the dual-engine test phase is presented as a function of power setting and flight condition. Data were collected at altitudes of 30,000 and 45,000 feet at military and maximum afterburning power settings. The time savings for the supersonic acceleration is less than at subsonic Mach numbers because of the increased modeling and control complexity. In addition, the propulsion system was designed to be optimized at the mid supersonic Mach number range. Recall that even though the engine is at maximum afterburner, PSC does not trim the afterburner for the maximum thrust mode. Subsonically at military power, time to accelerate from Mach 0.6 to 0.95 was cut by between 6 and 8 percent with a single engine application of PSC, and over 14 percent when both engines were optimized. At maximum afterburner, the level of thrust increases were similar in magnitude to the military power results, but because of higher thrust levels at maximum afterburner and higher aircraft drag at supersonic Mach numbers the percentage thrust increase and time to accelerate was less than for the supersonic accelerations. Savings in time to accelerate supersonically at maximum afterburner ranged from 4 to 7 percent. In general, the maximum thrust mode has performed well, demonstrating significant thrust increases at military and maximum afterburner power. Increases of up to 15 percent at typical combat-type flight conditions were identified. Thrust increases of this magnitude could be useful in a combat situation.

  12. Failure detection system risk reduction assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aguilar, Robert B. (Inventor); Huang, Zhaofeng (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A process includes determining a probability of a failure mode of a system being analyzed reaching a failure limit as a function of time to failure limit, determining a probability of a mitigation of the failure mode as a function of a time to failure limit, and quantifying a risk reduction based on the probability of the failure mode reaching the failure limit and the probability of the mitigation.

  13. Berreman mode and epsilon near zero mode.

    PubMed

    Vassant, Simon; Hugonin, Jean-Paul; Marquier, Francois; Greffet, Jean-Jacques

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, we discuss the existence of an electromagnetic mode propagating in a thin dielectric film deposited on a metallic film at the particular frequency such that the dielectric permittivity vanishes. We discuss the remarkable properties of this mode in terms of extreme subwavelength mode confinment and its potential applications. We also discuss the link between this mode, the IR absorption peak on a thin dielectric film known as Berreman effect and the surface phonon polariton mode at the air/dielectric interface. Finally, we establish a connection with the polarization shift occuring in quantum wells. PMID:23188363

  14. Nitrate reduction

    DOEpatents

    Dziewinski, Jacek J.; Marczak, Stanislaw

    2000-01-01

    Nitrates are reduced to nitrogen gas by contacting the nitrates with a metal to reduce the nitrates to nitrites which are then contacted with an amide to produce nitrogen and carbon dioxide or acid anions which can be released to the atmosphere. Minor amounts of metal catalysts can be useful in the reduction of the nitrates to nitrites. Metal salts which are formed can be treated electrochemically to recover the metals.

  15. Deposition of thin Si and Ge films by ballistic hot electron reduction in a solution-dripping mode and its application to the growth of thin SiGe films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suda, Ryutaro; Yagi, Mamiko; Kojima, Akira; Mentek, Romain; Mori, Nobuya; Shirakashi, Jun-ichi; Koshida, Nobuyoshi

    2015-04-01

    To enhance the usefulness of ballistic hot electron injection into solutions for depositing thin group-IV films, a dripping scheme is proposed. A very small amount of SiCl4 or GeCl4 solution was dripped onto the surface of a nanocrystalline Si (nc-Si) electron emitter, and then the emitter is driven without using any counter electrodes. It is shown that thin Si and Ge films are deposited onto the emitting surface. Spectroscopic surface and compositional analyses showed no extrinsic carbon contaminations in deposited thin films, in contrast to the results of a previous study using the dipping scheme. The availability of this technique for depositing thin SiGe films is also demonstrated using a mixture SiCl4+GeCl4 solution. Ballistic hot electrons injected into solutions with appropriate kinetic energies promote preferential reduction of target ions with no by-products leading to nuclei formation for the thin film growth. Specific advantageous features of this clean, room-temperature, and power-effective process is discussed in comparison with the conventional dry and wet processes.

  16. Amazing Altered Books

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kieling, Linda W.

    2006-01-01

    Linda Kieling, an art teacher at Rosemont Ridge Middle school in West Linn, Oregon, describes an altered book art project she introduced to her students. Alteration of books is a form of recycling that started in the eleventh century when Italian monks recycled old manuscripts written on vellum by scraping off the ink and adding new text and…

  17. Mitochondrial DNA Alterations and Reduced Mitochondrial Function in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Hebert, Sadie L.; Lanza, Ian R.; Nair, K. Sreekumaran

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative damage to mitochondrial DNA increases with aging. This damage has the potential to affect mitochondrial DNA replication and transcription which could alter the abundance or functionality of mitochondrial proteins. This review describes mitochondrial DNA alterations and changes in mitochondrial function that occur with aging. Age-related alterations in mitochondrial DNA as a possible contributor to the reduction in mitochondrial function are discussed. PMID:20307565

  18. List mode multichannel analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Daniel E.; Luke, S. John; Mauger, G. Joseph; Riot, Vincent J.; Knapp, David A.

    2007-08-07

    A digital list mode multichannel analyzer (MCA) built around a programmable FPGA device for onboard data analysis and on-the-fly modification of system detection/operating parameters, and capable of collecting and processing data in very small time bins (<1 millisecond) when used in histogramming mode, or in list mode as a list mode MCA.

  19. Radon reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, M.A. )

    1990-11-01

    During a radon gas screening program, elevated levels of radon gas were detected in homes on Mackinac Island, Mich. Six homes on foundations with crawl spaces were selected for a research project aimed at reducing radon gas concentrations, which ranged from 12.9 to 82.3 pCi/l. Using isolation and ventilation techniques, and variations thereof, radon concentrations were reduced to less than 1 pCi/l. This paper reports that these reductions were achieved using 3.5 mil cross laminated or 10 mil high density polyethylene plastic as a barrier without sealing to the foundation or support piers, solid and/or perforated plastic pipe and mechanical fans. Wind turbines were found to be ineffective at reducing concentrations to acceptable levels. Homeowners themselves installed all materials.

  20. Three-dimensional equilibria and island energy transport due to resonant magnetic perturbation edge localized mode suppression on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, J. D.; Strait, E. J.; Nazikian, R.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Eldon, D.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Ferraro, N. M.; Hanson, J. M.; Haskey, S. R.; La Haye, R. J.; Lanctot, M. J.; Lazerson, S. A.; Logan, N. C.; Liu, Y. Q.; Okabayashi, M.; Park, J.-K.; Shiraki, D.; Turnbull, A. D.

    2015-11-01

    Experiments in the DIII-D tokamak show that the plasma responds to resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) with toroidal mode numbers of n = 2 and n = 3 without field line reconnection, consistent with resistive magnetohydrodynamic predictions, while a strong nonlinear bifurcation is apparent when edge localized modes (ELMs) are suppressed. The magnetic response associated with this bifurcation is localized to the high field side of the machine and exhibits a dominant n = 1 component despite the application of a constant amplitude, slowly toroidally rotating, n = 2 applied field. The n = 1 mode is born locked to the vacuum vessel wall, while the n = 2 mode is entrained to the rotating field. Based on these magnetic response measurements and Thomson scattering measurements of flattening of the electron temperature profile, it is likely that these modes are magnetic island chains near the H-mode pedestal. The reduction in ∇Te occurs near the q = 4 and 5 rational surfaces, suggesting five unique islands are possible (m = 8, 9, or 10 for n = 2) and (m = 4 or 5 for n = 1). In all cases, the island width is estimated to be 2-3 cm. The Chang-Callen calculated confinement degradation due to the presence of an individual island of this size is 8%-12%, which is close to the 13%-14% measured between the ELMs and suppressed states. This suggests that edge tearing modes may alter the pedestal causing peeling-ballooning stability during RMP induced ELM suppression.

  1. The effect of the edge current density on confinement and kink mode stability in H-mode and VH-mode discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Ferron, J.R.; Lao, L.L.; Osborne, T.H.; Strait, E.J.; Taylor, T.S.; Thompson, S.J.; Turnbull, A.D.; Sauter, O.

    1994-07-01

    The effect of the local current density in the outer portion of a tokamak discharge [J({rho} {approximately} a)] is discussed in three situations. In a H-mode discharge, a strong reduction of J({rho} {approximately} a) results in the loss of the H-mode pressure pedestal. A smaller reduction in J({rho} {approximately} a) can prevent the transition from H-mode to VH-mode. Finally, a sufficiently large value of J({rho} {approximately} a) accompanied by a sufficiently large value of the pressure gradient in the same region of the discharge, can destabilize low-n (e.g., n = 1 to 5) kink-type modes in a VH-mode discharge. Conference Information: European conference on controlled fusion and plasma physics, Montpellier (France), 26 Jun - 1 Jul 1994

  2. Attention Alters Perceived Attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Störmer, Viola S; Alvarez, George A

    2016-04-01

    Can attention alter the impression of a face? Previous studies showed that attention modulates the appearance of lower-level visual features. For instance, attention can make a simple stimulus appear to have higher contrast than it actually does. We tested whether attention can also alter the perception of a higher-order property-namely, facial attractiveness. We asked participants to judge the relative attractiveness of two faces after summoning their attention to one of the faces using a briefly presented visual cue. Across trials, participants judged the attended face to be more attractive than the same face when it was unattended. This effect was not due to decision or response biases, but rather was due to changes in perceptual processing of the faces. These results show that attention alters perceived facial attractiveness, and broadly demonstrate that attention can influence higher-level perception and may affect people's initial impressions of one another. PMID:26966228

  3. Large mode radius resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Michael R.

    1987-01-01

    Resonator configurations permitting operation with large mode radius while maintaining good transverse mode discrimination are considered. Stable resonators incorporating an intracavity telescope and unstable resonator geometries utilizing an output coupler with a Gaussian reflectivity profile are shown to enable large radius single mode laser operation. Results of heterodyne studies of pulsed CO2 lasers with large (11mm e sup-2 radius) fundamental mode sizes are presented demonstrating minimal frequency sweeping in accordance with the theory of laser-induced medium perturbations.

  4. Integrated mode converter for mode division multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Galacho, Diego; Alonso-Ramos, Carlos Alberto; Marris-Morini, Delphine; Vakarin, Vladyslav; Le Roux, Xavier; Ortega-Moñux, Alejandro; Wangüemert-Perez, Juan Gonzalo; Vivien, Laurent

    2016-05-01

    The ever growing demands of bandwidth in optical communication systems are making traditional Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM) based systems to reach its limit. In order to cope with future bandwidth demand is necessary to use new levels of orthogonality, such as the waveguide mode or the polarization state. Mode Division Multiplexing (MDM) has recently attracted attention as a possible solution to increase aggregate bandwidth. In this work we discuss the proposition a of mode converter that can cover the whole C-Band of optical communications. The Mode Converter is based on two Multimode Interference (MMI) couplers and a phase shifter. Insertion loss (IL) below 0.2 dB and Extinction ratio (ER) higher than 20 dB in a broad bandwidth range of 1.5 μm to 1.6 μm have been estimated. The total length of the device is less than 30 μm.

  5. Oxidative Homeostasis Regulates the Response to Reductive Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress through Translation Control.

    PubMed

    Maity, Shuvadeep; Rajkumar, Asher; Matai, Latika; Bhat, Ajay; Ghosh, Asmita; Agam, Ganesh; Kaur, Simarjot; Bhatt, Niraj R; Mukhopadhyay, Arnab; Sengupta, Shantanu; Chakraborty, Kausik

    2016-07-19

    Reductive stress leads to the loss of disulfide bond formation and induces the unfolded protein response of the endoplasmic reticulum (UPR(ER)), necessary to regain proteostasis in the compartment. Here we show that peroxide accumulation during reductive stress attenuates UPR(ER) amplitude by altering translation without any discernible effect on transcription. Through a comprehensive genetic screen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we identify modulators of reductive stress-induced UPR(ER) and demonstrate that oxidative quality control (OQC) genes modulate this cellular response in the presence of chronic but not acute reductive stress. Using a combination of microarray and relative quantitative proteomics, we uncover a non-canonical translation attenuation mechanism that acts in a bipartite manner to selectively downregulate highly expressed proteins, decoupling the cell's transcriptional and translational response during reductive ER stress. Finally, we demonstrate that PERK, a canonical translation attenuator in higher eukaryotes, helps in bypassing a ROS-dependent, non-canonical mode of translation attenuation. PMID:27373166

  6. Minimum fan turbine inlet temperature mode evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orme, John S.; Nobbs, Steven G.

    1995-01-01

    Measured reductions in turbine temperature which resulted from the application of the F-15 performance seeking control (PSC) minimum fan turbine inlet temperature (FTIT) mode during the dual-engine test phase is presented as a function of net propulsive force and flight condition. Data were collected at altitudes of 30,000 and 45,000 feet at military and partial afterburning power settings. The FTIT reductions for the supersonic tests are less than at subsonic Mach numbers because of the increased modeling and control complexity. In addition, the propulsion system was designed to be optimized at the mid supersonic Mach number range. Subsonically at military power, FTIT reductions were above 70 R for either the left or right engines, and repeatable for the right engine. At partial afterburner and supersonic conditions, the level of FTIT reductions were at least 25 R and as much as 55 R. Considering that the turbine operates at or very near its temperature limit at these high power settings, these seemingly small temperature reductions may significantly lengthen the life of the turbine. In general, the minimum FTIT mode has performed well, demonstrating significant temperature reductions at military and partial afterburner power. Decreases of over 100 R at cruise flight conditions were identified. Temperature reductions of this magnitude could significantly extend turbine life and reduce replacement costs.

  7. Quantum Vacuum Photon Modes and Superhydrophobicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellieu, Louis; Deparis, Olivier; Muller, Jérôme; Sarrazin, Michaël

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructures are commonly used for developing superhydrophobic surfaces. However, available wetting theoretical models ignore the effect of vacuum photon-mode alteration on van der Waals forces and thus on hydrophobicity. Using first-principles calculations, we show that superhydrophibicity of nanostructured surfaces is dramatically enhanced by vacuum photon-mode tuning. As a case study, wetting contact angles of a water droplet above a polyethylene nanostructured surface are obtained from the interaction potential energy calculated as a function of the droplet-surface separation distance. This new approach could pave the way for the design of novel superhydrophobic coatings.

  8. A comparative study of two stochastic mode reduction methods

    SciTech Connect

    Stinis, Panagiotis

    2005-09-01

    We present a comparative study of two methods for thereduction of the dimensionality of a system of ordinary differentialequations that exhibits time-scale separation. Both methods lead to areduced system of stochastic differential equations. The novel feature ofthese methods is that they allow the use, in the reduced system, ofhigher order terms in the resolved variables. The first method, proposedby Majda, Timofeyev and Vanden-Eijnden, is based on an asymptoticstrategy developed by Kurtz. The second method is a short-memoryapproximation of the Mori-Zwanzig projection formalism of irreversiblestatistical mechanics, as proposed by Chorin, Hald and Kupferman. Wepresent conditions under which the reduced models arising from the twomethods should have similar predictive ability. We apply the two methodsto test cases that satisfy these conditions. The form of the reducedmodels and the numerical simulations show that the two methods havesimilar predictive ability as expected.

  9. How Misinformation Alters Memories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Daniel B.; Loftus, Elizabeth F.

    1998-01-01

    Notes that a multitude of studies have demonstrated that misleading postevent information affects people's memories. Contents that the fuzzy-trace theory is a positive step toward understanding the malleability of memory. Discusses fuzzy-trace theory in terms of three primary areas of study: altered response format, maximized misinformation…

  10. Immunization alters body odor.

    PubMed

    Kimball, Bruce A; Opiekun, Maryanne; Yamazaki, Kunio; Beauchamp, Gary K

    2014-04-10

    Infections have been shown to alter body odor. Because immune activation accompanies both infection and immunization, we tested the hypothesis that classical immunization might similarly result in the alteration of body odors detectable by trained biosensor mice. Using a Y-maze, we trained biosensor mice to distinguish between urine odors from rabies-vaccinated (RV) and unvaccinated control mice. RV-trained mice generalized this training to mice immunized with the equine West Nile virus (WNV) vaccine compared with urine of corresponding controls. These results suggest that there are similarities between body odors of mice immunized with these two vaccines. This conclusion was reinforced when mice could not be trained to directly discriminate between urine odors of RV- versus WNV-treated mice. Next, we trained biosensor mice to discriminate the urine odors of mice treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS; a general elicitor of innate immunological responses) from the urine of control mice. These LPS-trained biosensors could distinguish between the odors of LPS-treated mouse urine and RV-treated mouse urine. Finally, biosensor mice trained to distinguish between the odors of RV-treated mouse urine and control mouse urine did not generalize this training to discriminate between the odors of LPS-treated mouse urine and control mouse urine. From these experiments, we conclude that: (1) immunization alters urine odor in similar ways for RV and WNV immunizations; and (2) immune activation with LPS also alters urine odor but in ways different from those of RV and WNV. PMID:24524972

  11. Network community structure alterations in adult schizophrenia: identification and localization of alterations

    PubMed Central

    Lerman-Sinkoff, Dov B.; Barch, Deanna M.

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of literature suggests functional connectivity alterations in schizophrenia. While findings have been mixed, evidence points towards a complex pattern of hyper-connectivity and hypo-connectivity. This altered connectivity can be represented and analyzed using the mathematical frameworks provided by graph and information theory to represent functional connectivity data as graphs comprised of nodes and edges linking the nodes. One analytic technique in this framework is the determination and analysis of network community structure, which is the grouping of nodes into linked communities or modules. This data-driven technique finds a best-fit structure such that nodes in a given community have greater connectivity with nodes in their community than with nodes in other communities. These community structure representations have been found to recapitulate known neural-systems in healthy individuals, have been used to identify novel functional systems, and have identified and localized community structure alterations in a childhood onset schizophrenia cohort. In the present study, we sought to determine whether community structure alterations were present in an adult onset schizophrenia cohort while stringently controlling for sources of imaging artifacts. Group level average graphs in healthy controls and individuals with schizophrenia exhibited visually similar network community structures and high amounts of normalized mutual information (NMI). However, testing of individual subject community structures identified small but significant alterations in community structure with alterations being driven by changes in node community membership in the somatosensory, auditory, default mode, salience, and subcortical networks. PMID:26793435

  12. Network community structure alterations in adult schizophrenia: identification and localization of alterations.

    PubMed

    Lerman-Sinkoff, Dov B; Barch, Deanna M

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of literature suggests functional connectivity alterations in schizophrenia. While findings have been mixed, evidence points towards a complex pattern of hyper-connectivity and hypo-connectivity. This altered connectivity can be represented and analyzed using the mathematical frameworks provided by graph and information theory to represent functional connectivity data as graphs comprised of nodes and edges linking the nodes. One analytic technique in this framework is the determination and analysis of network community structure, which is the grouping of nodes into linked communities or modules. This data-driven technique finds a best-fit structure such that nodes in a given community have greater connectivity with nodes in their community than with nodes in other communities. These community structure representations have been found to recapitulate known neural-systems in healthy individuals, have been used to identify novel functional systems, and have identified and localized community structure alterations in a childhood onset schizophrenia cohort. In the present study, we sought to determine whether community structure alterations were present in an adult onset schizophrenia cohort while stringently controlling for sources of imaging artifacts. Group level average graphs in healthy controls and individuals with schizophrenia exhibited visually similar network community structures and high amounts of normalized mutual information (NMI). However, testing of individual subject community structures identified small but significant alterations in community structure with alterations being driven by changes in node community membership in the somatosensory, auditory, default mode, salience, and subcortical networks. PMID:26793435

  13. Alterations in prey capture and induction of metallothioneins in grass shrimp fed cadmium-contaminated prey

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, W.G.; Hoexum Brouwer, T.M.; Brouwer, M.; Lopez, G.R.

    2000-04-01

    The aquatic oligochaete Limnodrilus hoffmeisteri from a Cd-contaminated cove on the Hudson River, Foundry Cove, New York, USA, has evolved Cd resistance. Past studies have focused on how the mode of detoxification of Cd by these Cd-resistant worms influences Cd trophic transfer to the grass shrimp Palaemonetes pugio. In the present study, the authors investigate reductions in prey capture in grass shrimp fed Cd-contaminated prey. They also investigate the induction of metal-binding proteins, metallothioneins, in these Cd-exposed shrimp. Grass shrimp were fed field-exposed Cd-contaminated Foundry Cove oligochaetes or laboratory-exposed Cd-contaminated Artemia salina. Following these exposures, the ability of Cd- dosed and control shrimp to capture live A. salina was compared. Results show that shrimp fed laboratory-exposed Cd-contaminated A. salina for 2 weeks exhibit significant reductions in their ability to successfully capture prey (live A. salina). Reductions in prey capture were also apparent, though not as dramatic in shrimp fed for 1 week on field-exposed Cd-contained Foundry Cove oligochaetes. Shrimp were further investigated for their subcellular distribution of Cd to examine if alterations in prey capture could be linked to saturation of Cd-metallothionein. Cd-dosed shrimp produced a low molecular weight CD-binding metallothionein protein in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Most importantly, successful prey capture decreased with increased Cd body burdens and increased Cd concentration bound to high molecular weight proteins.

  14. Cataclasis and processes of particle size reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blenkinsop, Tom G.

    1991-05-01

    The particle size distribution (P.S.D.) of fragmented geological materials is affected by the fragmentation process, initial size distribution, number of fracturing events, energy input, strain, and confining pressure. A summary of literature shows that the fractal dimension ( D) of the P.S.D. is increased by the number of fracturing events, energy input, strain, and confining pressure. Cenozoic cataclasis of granite, granodiorites, gneisses and arkose seen in cores from the Cajon Pass drillhole, southern California, produced P.S.D.s with values of D that varied from 1.88 to 3.08. Each rock type has a characteristic and more limited range of D. Areas of dilatant texture and mode I fracture-fillings have low average values (2.32 and 2.37) compared to an average value of 2.67 in shear fracture-fillings D has a good inverse correlation with average particle size. Data from fault rocks in the San Gabriel fault zone, southern California ( Anderson et al., 1983) have been reanalyzed to show that values of D are higher (2.10 5.52) and average particle size is lower than the Cajon Pass samples, but the ranges of values overlap, and the inverse correlation between D and average particle size is extended. Microstructural observations combined with these results suggest that three processes contributed to particle size reduction during cataclasis. The first process of feldspar alteration, which leads to low values of D, has not been previously recognized. The second process is probably constrained comminution ( Sammis et al., 1987), since the average D in shear fracture-fillings is close to the value of 2.58 predicted by this theory. A further stage of particle size reduction is demonstrated by an increase of D with cataclasis. This third process is selective fracture of larger particles, which may also operate during localization and the cataclastic flow-to-faulting transition as observed in experiments. A transition from constrained comminution to selective fracture of

  15. Pyrochlores from the Lueshe carbonatite complex (Democratic Republic of Congo): a geochemical record of different alteration stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasraoui, M.; Bilal, E.

    2000-04-01

    Magmatic pyrochlores from the Lueshe syenite-carbonatite complex from the northeastern part of Democratic Republic of Congo (ex-Zaı̈re) are characterized by Ta/Nb ratios in an increasing order from pyroxenite, calcite-carbonatite (sövite), silicate xenoliths (nodules) to syenite. Substitutions involving Nb, Ta, Ti and REE have been precisely described. Hydrothermal alteration of Lueshe pyrochlore involves the substitution of Na ++F -=VA+VY and Ca+O=VA+VY (VA=A-site vacancy and VY=Y-site vacancy). In calcite carbonatite, hydrothermal alteration of pyrochlore took place during and after the precipitation of ancylite-(Ce), strontianite, celestite, baryte and fayalite according to a fluid composition of relatively low pH, aNa +, aCa 2+ and aHF, and high aSr 2+ and aLREE 3+. The supergene alteration is characterized by complete leaching of Na, Ca and F and partial incorporation of K, Ba, Sr and Ce resulting in the formation of kali-, bario-, strontio- and ceriopyrochlore respectively. The Na-poor pyrochlore may be an intermediate variety corresponding to an alteration stage between the hydrothermal and weathered pyrochlores. The IR spectroscopic study has indicated that the weathered pyrochlore is a hydrated variety containing two bands of OH vibration modes at 3413 and 1630 cm -1. During hydrothermal and supergene alterations, the cations at B-site remain relatively constant. The variable chemical compositions of the pyrochlores from the Lueshe complex represent geochemical memories of the different alteration conditions including the variation in the oxidation-reduction environment.

  16. Analysis of nonlinear structures via mode synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gieseke, R. K.

    1975-01-01

    An effective procedure for NASTRAN was developed that permits any number of substructures of any size to be synthesized for the purpose of developing normal modes of vibration of the complete structural system. The technique is extended to permit modal transient analysis of the subdivided system. This latter procedure permits the use of NASTRAN's ability to include nonlinear forces in the problem. The five-phase process is accomplished using standard NASTRAN rigid formats with problem-independent alter packages and DMAP sequences.

  17. Dual-Mode Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trefny, Charles J (Inventor); Dippold, Vance F (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A new dual-mode ramjet combustor used for operation over a wide flight Mach number range is described. Subsonic combustion mode is usable to lower flight Mach numbers than current dual-mode scramjets. High speed mode is characterized by supersonic combustion in a free-jet that traverses the subsonic combustion chamber to a variable nozzle throat. Although a variable combustor exit aperture is required, the need for fuel staging to accommodate the combustion process is eliminated. Local heating from shock-boundary-layer interactions on combustor walls is also eliminated.

  18. Hindlimb unloading alters ligament healing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Provenzano, Paolo P.; Martinez, Daniel A.; Grindeland, Richard E.; Dwyer, Kelley W.; Turner, Joanne; Vailas, Arthur C.; Vanderby, Ray Jr

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that hindlimb unloading inhibits healing in fibrous connective tissue such as ligament. Male rats were assigned to 3- and 7-wk treatment groups with three subgroups each: sham control, ambulatory healing, and hindlimb-suspended healing. Ambulatory and suspended animals underwent surgical rupture of their medial collateral ligaments, whereas sham surgeries were performed on control animals. After 3 or 7 wk, mechanical and/or morphological properties were measured in ligament, muscle, and bone. During mechanical testing, most suspended ligaments failed in the scar region, indicating the greatest impairment was to ligament and not to bone-ligament insertion. Ligament testing revealed significant reductions in maximum force, ultimate stress, elastic modulus, and low-load properties in suspended animals. In addition, femoral mineral density, femoral strength, gastrocnemius mass, and tibialis anterior mass were significantly reduced. Microscopy revealed abnormal scar formation and cell distribution in suspended ligaments with extracellular matrix discontinuities and voids between misaligned, but well-formed, collagen fiber bundles. Hence, stress levels from ambulation appear unnecessary for formation of fiber bundles yet required for collagen to form structurally competent continuous fibers. Results support our hypothesis that hindlimb unloading impairs healing of fibrous connective tissue. In addition, this study provides compelling morphological evidence explaining the altered structure-function relationship in load-deprived healing connective tissue.

  19. Genetically Altered Plant Species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Researchers in Robert Ferl's lab at the University of Florida in Gainesville, genetically altered this Arabdopsis Thaliana (a brassica species) plant to learn how extreme environments, such as the low atmospheric pressure on Mars, affect plant genes. They inserted green fluorescent protein (GFP) near the on/off switches for anoxia and drought genes. When those genes were turned on after exposure to reduced atmospheric pressure, GFP was turned on as well, causing cells expressing those genes to glow green under a blue light. The natural fluorescence of chlorophyll accounts for the red glow.

  20. Reduction of iron-oxide-carbon composites: part I. Estimation of the rate constants

    SciTech Connect

    Halder, S.; Fruehan, R.J.

    2008-12-15

    A new ironmaking concept using iron-oxide-carbon composite pellets has been proposed, which involves the combination of a rotary hearth furnace (RHF) and an iron bath smelter. This part of the research focuses on studying the two primary chemical kinetic steps. Efforts have been made to experimentally measure the kinetics of the carbon gasification by CO{sub 2} and wustite reduction by CO by isolating them from the influence of heat- and mass-transport steps. A combined reaction model was used to interpret the experimental data and determine the rate constants. Results showed that the reduction is likely to be influenced by the chemical kinetics of both carbon oxidation and wustite reduction at the temperatures of interest. Devolatilized wood-charcoal was observed to be a far more reactive form of carbon in comparison to coal-char. Sintering of the iron-oxide at the high temperatures of interest was found to exert a considerable influence on the reactivity of wustite by virtue of altering the internal pore surface area available for the reaction. Sintering was found to be predominant for highly porous oxides and less of an influence on the denser ores. It was found using an indirect measurement technique that the rate constants for wustite reduction were higher for the porous iron-oxide than dense hematite ore at higher temperatures (> 1423 K). Such an indirect mode of measurement was used to minimize the influence of sintering of the porous oxide at these temperatures.

  1. Tearing Modes in Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, R. B.

    2008-05-01

    This lecture gives a basic introduction to magnetic £elds, magnetic surface destruction, toroidal equilibrium and tearing modes in a tokamak, including the linear and nonlinear development of these modes and their modi£cation by current drive and bootstrap current, and sawtooth oscillations and disruptions.

  2. Mode decomposition evolution equations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Wei, Guo-Wei; Yang, Siyang

    2011-01-01

    Partial differential equation (PDE) based methods have become some of the most powerful tools for exploring the fundamental problems in signal processing, image processing, computer vision, machine vision and artificial intelligence in the past two decades. The advantages of PDE based approaches are that they can be made fully automatic, robust for the analysis of images, videos and high dimensional data. A fundamental question is whether one can use PDEs to perform all the basic tasks in the image processing. If one can devise PDEs to perform full-scale mode decomposition for signals and images, the modes thus generated would be very useful for secondary processing to meet the needs in various types of signal and image processing. Despite of great progress in PDE based image analysis in the past two decades, the basic roles of PDEs in image/signal analysis are only limited to PDE based low-pass filters, and their applications to noise removal, edge detection, segmentation, etc. At present, it is not clear how to construct PDE based methods for full-scale mode decomposition. The above-mentioned limitation of most current PDE based image/signal processing methods is addressed in the proposed work, in which we introduce a family of mode decomposition evolution equations (MoDEEs) for a vast variety of applications. The MoDEEs are constructed as an extension of a PDE based high-pass filter (Europhys. Lett., 59(6): 814, 2002) by using arbitrarily high order PDE based low-pass filters introduced by Wei (IEEE Signal Process. Lett., 6(7): 165, 1999). The use of arbitrarily high order PDEs is essential to the frequency localization in the mode decomposition. Similar to the wavelet transform, the present MoDEEs have a controllable time-frequency localization and allow a perfect reconstruction of the original function. Therefore, the MoDEE operation is also called a PDE transform. However, modes generated from the present approach are in the spatial or time domain and can be

  3. Zero-mode waveguides

    DOEpatents

    Levene, Michael J.; Korlach, Jonas; Turner, Stephen W.; Craighead, Harold G.; Webb, Watt W.

    2007-02-20

    The present invention is directed to a method and an apparatus for analysis of an analyte. The method involves providing a zero-mode waveguide which includes a cladding surrounding a core where the cladding is configured to preclude propagation of electromagnetic energy of a frequency less than a cutoff frequency longitudinally through the core of the zero-mode waveguide. The analyte is positioned in the core of the zero-mode waveguide and is then subjected, in the core of the zero-mode waveguide, to activating electromagnetic radiation of a frequency less than the cut-off frequency under conditions effective to permit analysis of the analyte in an effective observation volume which is more compact than if the analysis were carried out in the absence of the zero-mode waveguide.

  4. Spin waves and domain wall modes in curved magnetic nanowires.

    PubMed

    Bocklage, Lars; Motl-Ziegler, Sandra; Topp, Jesco; Matsuyama, Toru; Meier, Guido

    2014-07-01

    The confinement of spin waves in inhomogeneous fields and spin wave interaction with domain walls has attracted interest due to possible applications in magnonics. We investigate spin waves in curved ferromagnetic nanowires. The field dispersion and localization of spin waves is revealed by comparison to known modes in stripes and taking into account the specific field reversal of the curved wire. In small wires we find a strongly altered mode spectrum in a certain field regime. Micromagnetic simulations show an extended domain wall within the wire in this field region. The domain wall shows several dynamic modes and changes the remaining spin wave modes. We find mode suppression as well as newly arising modes due to the strong inhomogenous internal field of the wall. PMID:24911994

  5. Amplitude Noise Reduction of Ion Lasers with Optical Feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, Gregory C.

    2011-01-01

    A reduction in amplitude noise on the output of a multi-mode continuous-wave Ar-ion laser was previously demonstrated when a fraction of the output power was retroreflected back into the laser cavity. This result was reproduced in the present work and a Fabry-Perot etalon was used to monitor the longitudinal mode structure of the laser. A decrease in the number of operating longitudinal cavity modes was observed simultaneously with the introduction of the optical feedback and the onset of the amplitude noise reduction. The noise reduction is a result of a reduced number of lasing modes, resulting in less mode beating and amplitude fluctuations of the laser output power.

  6. Squeezing Alters Frequency Tuning of WGM Optical Resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohageg, Makan; Maleki, Lute

    2010-01-01

    Mechanical squeezing has been found to alter the frequency tuning of a whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) optical resonator that has an elliptical shape and is made of lithium niobate. It may be possible to exploit this effect to design reconfigurable optical filters for optical communications and for scientific experiments involving quantum electrodynamics. Some background information is prerequisite to a meaningful description of the squeezing-induced alteration of frequency tuning: The spectrum of a WGM resonator is represented by a comblike plot of intensity versus frequency. Each peak of the comblike plot corresponds to an electromagnetic mode represented by an integer mode number, and the modes are grouped into sets represented by integer mode indices. Because lithium niobate is an electro-optically active material, the WGM resonator can be tuned (that is, the resonance frequencies can be shifted) by applying a suitable bias potential. The frequency shift of each mode is quantified by a tuning rate defined as the ratio between the frequency shift and the applied potential. In the absence of squeezing, all modes exhibit the same tuning rate. This concludes the background information. It has been demonstrated experimentally that when the resonator is squeezed along part of either of its two principal axes, tuning rates differ among the groups of modes represented by different indices (see figure). The differences in tuning rates could be utilized to configure the resonance spectrum to obtain a desired effect; for example, through a combination of squeezing and electrical biasing, two resonances represented by different mode indices could be set at a specified frequency difference something that could not be done through electrical biasing alone.

  7. Untangled modes in multimode waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plöschner, Martin; Tyc, TomáÅ.¡; Čižmár, TomáÅ.¡

    2016-03-01

    Small, fibre-based endoscopes have already improved our ability to image deep within the human body. A novel approach introduced recently utilised disordered light within a standard multimode optical fibre for lensless imaging. Importantly, this approach brought very significant reduction of the instruments footprint to dimensions below 100 μm. The most important limitations of this exciting technology is the lack of bending flexibility - imaging is only possible as long as the fibre remains stationary. The only route to allow flexibility of such endoscopes is in trading-in all the knowledge about the optical system we have, particularly the cylindrical symmetry of refractive index distribution. In perfect straight step-index cylindrical waveguides we can find optical modes that do not change their spatial distribution as they propagate through. In this paper we present a theoretical background that provides description of such modes in more realistic model of real-life step-index multimode fibre taking into account common deviations in distribution of the refractive index from its ideal step-index profile. Separately, we discuss how to include the influence of fibre bending.

  8. Mode II fatigue crack propagation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, R.; Kibler, J. J.

    1971-01-01

    Fatigue crack propagation rates were obtained for 2024-T3 bare aluminum plates subjected to in-plane, mode I, extensional loads and transverse, mode II, bending loads. These results were compared to the results of Iida and Kobayashi for in-plane mode I-mode II extensional loads. The engineering significance of mode I-mode II fatigue crack growth is considered in view of the present results. A fatigue crack growth equation for handling mode I-mode II fatigue crack growth rates from existing mode I data is also discussed.

  9. Single mode thermal emission.

    PubMed

    Fohrmann, Lena Simone; Petrov, Alexander Yu; Lang, Slawa; Jalas, Dirk; Krauss, Thomas F; Eich, Manfred

    2015-10-19

    We report on the properties of a thermal emitter which radiates into a single mode waveguide. We show that the maximal power of thermal radiation into a propagating single mode is limited only by the temperature of the thermal emitter and does not depend on other parameters of the waveguide. Furthermore, we show that the power of the thermal emitter cannot be increased by resonant coupling. For a given temperature, the enhancement of the total emitted power is only possible if the number of excited modes is increased. Either a narrowband or a broadband thermal excitation of the mode is possible, depending on the properties of the emitter. We finally discuss an example system, namely a thermal source for silicon photonics. PMID:26480429

  10. Supersymmetric mode converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Matthias; Miri, Mohammad-Ali; Stützer, Simon; Nolte, Stefan; Szameit, Alexander; Christodoulides, Demetrios N.

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, the ever-increasing demand for high-capacity transmission systems has driven remarkable advances in technologies that encode information on an optical signal. Mode-division multiplexing makes use of individual modes supported by an optical waveguide as mutually orthogonal channels. The key requirement in this approach is the capability to selectively populate and extract specific modes. Optical supersymmetry (SUSY) has recently been proposed as a particularly elegant way to resolve this design challenge in a manner that is inherently scalable, and at the same time maintains compatibility with existing multiplexing strategies. Supersymmetric partners of multimode waveguides are characterized by the fact that they share all of their effective indices with the original waveguide. The crucial exception is the fundamental mode, which is absent from the spectrum of the partner waveguide. Here, we demonstrate experimentally how this global phase-matching property can be exploited for efficient mode conversion. Multimode structures and their superpartners are experimentally realized in coupled networks of femtosecond laser-written waveguides, and the corresponding light dynamics are directly observed by means of fluorescence microscopy. We show that SUSY transformations can readily facilitate the removal of the fundamental mode from multimode optical structures. In turn, hierarchical sequences of such SUSY partners naturally implement the conversion between modes of adjacent order. Our experiments illustrate just one of the many possibilities of how SUSY may serve as a building block for integrated mode-division multiplexing arrangements. Supersymmetric notions may enrich and expand integrated photonics by versatile optical components and desirable, yet previously unattainable, functionalities.

  11. Altered fingerprints: analysis and detection.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Soweon; Feng, Jianjiang; Jain, Anil K

    2012-03-01

    The widespread deployment of Automated Fingerprint Identification Systems (AFIS) in law enforcement and border control applications has heightened the need for ensuring that these systems are not compromised. While several issues related to fingerprint system security have been investigated, including the use of fake fingerprints for masquerading identity, the problem of fingerprint alteration or obfuscation has received very little attention. Fingerprint obfuscation refers to the deliberate alteration of the fingerprint pattern by an individual for the purpose of masking his identity. Several cases of fingerprint obfuscation have been reported in the press. Fingerprint image quality assessment software (e.g., NFIQ) cannot always detect altered fingerprints since the implicit image quality due to alteration may not change significantly. The main contributions of this paper are: 1) compiling case studies of incidents where individuals were found to have altered their fingerprints for circumventing AFIS, 2) investigating the impact of fingerprint alteration on the accuracy of a commercial fingerprint matcher, 3) classifying the alterations into three major categories and suggesting possible countermeasures, 4) developing a technique to automatically detect altered fingerprints based on analyzing orientation field and minutiae distribution, and 5) evaluating the proposed technique and the NFIQ algorithm on a large database of altered fingerprints provided by a law enforcement agency. Experimental results show the feasibility of the proposed approach in detecting altered fingerprints and highlight the need to further pursue this problem. PMID:21808092

  12. Hemostasis alterations in metabolic syndrome (review).

    PubMed

    Palomo, Iván; Alarcón, Marcelo; Moore-Carrasco, Rodrigo; Argilés, Josep M

    2006-11-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is characterized by the presence of at least three of the following alterations: enlargement of the waist diameter, higher levels of arterial pressure, low density lipoprotein cholesterol and glycemia, and reduction of high density lipoprotein cholesterol. The prevalence of MS reaches 23% in young adults, a percentage that increases with age. People with MS have a greater risk of suffering from cardiovascular disease (CVD). The physiopathologic alterations now found to exist in MS are diverse; among them is endothelial dysfunction, which triggers atherogenic lesions and hypercoagulability characterized by alterations of the coagulation factors and the regulatory proteins of fibrinolysis such as the plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1). The increase in oxidative stress and/or the reactive oxygen species in patients with MS is partially related to the oxidation state of the lipoproteins, especially of the low density lipoproteins. This fact favors atherogenesis. Moreover, the oxidative stress produces alterations in the production of adipokines, cytokines secreted by the adipose tissues. The abnormality in the transport of lipoprotein diminishes the catabolism of the very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) and increases the catabolism of the high density lipoprotein (HDL), which creates insulin resistance. This process is associated with a lower concentration of adiponectin that in turn regulates the catabolism of VLDL and HDL; consequently increasing the flow of fatty acids from the adipose tissue to the liver and muscles. The proinflammatory cytokines, among them tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), are of great importance in MS regulating different processes and molecules such as PAI-1. PAI-1 is controlled by the group of transcription factors peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR), especially by PPAR gamma and alpha ligands. In summary, MS includes multiple alterations related to insulin resistance at several levels: hepatic

  13. NASTRAN component-mode synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guyan, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    Procedure for dynamic substructuring analysis technique is generally as follows: calculation of component modes; selection of component normal modes, calculation of component generalized matrices, assembly of system matrices, and computation of normal modes; and retrieval of component response.

  14. Parasites alter community structure.

    PubMed

    Wood, Chelsea L; Byers, James E; Cottingham, Kathryn L; Altman, Irit; Donahue, Megan J; Blakeslee, April M H

    2007-05-29

    Parasites often play an important role in modifying the physiology and behavior of their hosts and may, consequently, mediate the influence hosts have on other components of an ecological community. Along the northern Atlantic coast of North America, the dominant herbivorous snail Littorina littorea structures rocky intertidal communities through strong grazing pressure and is frequently parasitized by the digenean trematode Cryptocotyle lingua. We hypothesized that the effects of parasitism on host physiology would induce behavioral changes in L. littorea, which in turn would modulate L. littorea's influence on intertidal community composition. Specifically, we hypothesized that C. lingua infection would alter the grazing rate of L. littorea and, consequently, macroalgal communities would develop differently in the presence of infected versus uninfected snails. Our results show that uninfected snails consumed 40% more ephemeral macroalgal biomass than infected snails in the laboratory, probably because the digestive system of infected snails is compromised by C. lingua infection. In the field, this weaker grazing by infected snails resulted in significantly greater expansion of ephemeral macroalgal cover relative to grazing by uninfected snails. By decreasing the per-capita grazing rate of the dominant herbivore, C. lingua indirectly affects the composition of the macroalgal community and may in turn affect other species that depend on macroalgae for resources or habitat structure. In light of the abundance of parasites across systems, we suggest that, through trait-mediated indirect effects, parasites may be a common determinant of structure in ecological communities. PMID:17517667

  15. Algal toxins alter copepod feeding behavior.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jiarong; Talapatra, Siddharth; Katz, Joseph; Tester, Patricia A; Waggett, Rebecca J; Place, Allen R

    2012-01-01

    Using digital holographic cinematography, we quantify and compare the feeding behavior of free-swimming copepods, Acartia tonsa, on nutritional prey (Storeatula major) to that occurring during exposure to toxic and non-toxic strains of Karenia brevis and Karlodinium veneficum. These two harmful algal species produce polyketide toxins with different modes of action and potency. We distinguish between two different beating modes of the copepod's feeding appendages-a "sampling beating" that has short durations (<100 ms) and involves little fluid entrainment and a longer duration "grazing beating" that persists up to 1200 ms and generates feeding currents. The durations of both beating modes have log-normal distributions. Without prey, A. tonsa only samples the environment at low frequency. Upon introduction of non-toxic food, it increases its sampling time moderately and the grazing period substantially. On mono algal diets for either of the toxic dinoflagellates, sampling time fraction is high but the grazing is very limited. A. tonsa demonstrates aversion to both toxic algal species. In mixtures of S. major and the neurotoxin producing K. brevis, sampling and grazing diminish rapidly, presumably due to neurological effects of consuming brevetoxins while trying to feed on S. major. In contrast, on mixtures of cytotoxin producing K. veneficum, both behavioral modes persist, indicating that intake of karlotoxins does not immediately inhibit the copepod's grazing behavior. These findings add critical insight into how these algal toxins may influence the copepod's feeding behavior, and suggest how some harmful algal species may alter top-down control exerted by grazers like copepods. PMID:22629336

  16. Nox Emission Reduction in Commercial Jets Through Water Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balepin, Vladimir; Ossello, Chris; Snyder, Chris

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses a method of the nitrogen oxides (NOx) emission reduction through the injection of water in commercial turbofan engines during the takeoff and climbout cycles. In addition to emission reduction, this method can significantly reduce turbine temperature during the most demanding operational modes (takeoff and climbout) and increase engine reliability and life.

  17. Configuring a powered knee and ankle prosthesis for transfemoral amputees within five specific ambulation modes.

    PubMed

    Simon, Ann M; Ingraham, Kimberly A; Fey, Nicholas P; Finucane, Suzanne B; Lipschutz, Robert D; Young, Aaron J; Hargrove, Levi J

    2014-01-01

    Lower limb prostheses that can generate net positive mechanical work may restore more ambulation modes to amputees. However, configuration of these devices imposes an additional burden on clinicians relative to conventional prostheses; devices for transfemoral amputees that require configuration of both a knee and an ankle joint are especially challenging. In this paper, we present an approach to configuring such powered devices. We developed modified intrinsic control strategies--which mimic the behavior of biological joints, depend on instantaneous loads within the prosthesis, or set impedance based on values from previous states, as well as a set of starting configuration parameters. We developed tables that include a list of desired clinical gait kinematics and the parameter modifications necessary to alter them. Our approach was implemented for a powered knee and ankle prosthesis in five ambulation modes (level-ground walking, ramp ascent/descent, and stair ascent/descent). The strategies and set of starting configuration parameters were developed using data from three individuals with unilateral transfemoral amputations who had previous experience using the device; this approach was then tested on three novice unilateral transfemoral amputees. Only 17% of the total number of parameters (i.e., 24 of the 140) had to be independently adjusted for each novice user to achieve all five ambulation modes and the initial accommodation period (i.e., time to configure the device for all modes) was reduced by 56%, to 5 hours or less. This approach and subsequent reduction in configuration time may help translate powered prostheses into a viable clinical option where amputees can more quickly appreciate the benefits such devices can provide. PMID:24914674

  18. Configuring a Powered Knee and Ankle Prosthesis for Transfemoral Amputees within Five Specific Ambulation Modes

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Ann M.; Ingraham, Kimberly A.; Fey, Nicholas P.; Finucane, Suzanne B.; Lipschutz, Robert D.; Young, Aaron J.; Hargrove, Levi J.

    2014-01-01

    Lower limb prostheses that can generate net positive mechanical work may restore more ambulation modes to amputees. However, configuration of these devices imposes an additional burden on clinicians relative to conventional prostheses; devices for transfemoral amputees that require configuration of both a knee and an ankle joint are especially challenging. In this paper, we present an approach to configuring such powered devices. We developed modified intrinsic control strategies—which mimic the behavior of biological joints, depend on instantaneous loads within the prosthesis, or set impedance based on values from previous states, as well as a set of starting configuration parameters. We developed tables that include a list of desired clinical gait kinematics and the parameter modifications necessary to alter them. Our approach was implemented for a powered knee and ankle prosthesis in five ambulation modes (level-ground walking, ramp ascent/descent, and stair ascent/descent). The strategies and set of starting configuration parameters were developed using data from three individuals with unilateral transfemoral amputations who had previous experience using the device; this approach was then tested on three novice unilateral transfemoral amputees. Only 17% of the total number of parameters (i.e., 24 of the 140) had to be independently adjusted for each novice user to achieve all five ambulation modes and the initial accommodation period (i.e., time to configure the device for all modes) was reduced by 56%, to 5 hours or less. This approach and subsequent reduction in configuration time may help translate powered prostheses into a viable clinical option where amputees can more quickly appreciate the benefits such devices can provide. PMID:24914674

  19. Mode of action from dose-response microarray data: case study using 10 environmental chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ligand-activated nuclear receptors regulate many biological processes through complex interactions with biological macromolecules. Certain xenobiotics alter nuclear receptor signaling through direct or indirect interactions. Defining the mode of action of such xenobiotics is di...

  20. Reductive dissolution of goethite by phenolic reductants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaKind, Judy S.; Stone, Alan T.

    1989-05-01

    The reductive dissolution of goethite (α-FeOOH) and hematite (α-Fe 2O 3) by phenolic reductants has been examined in order to improve the understanding of iron transformations in soils, sediments and aquifers. Rates of goethite reductive dissolution by hydroquinone increased as the pH was increased from pH 1.8 to 4.65, arid the following reaction stoichiometry was obeyed: 2 α- FeOOH + QH2 = 2 Fe2+ + Q + 4 OH-. As the pH was increased from pH 4.5 to 6.0, the reductive dissolution rate decreased to below the detection limit. At pH 3.4, the reductive dissolution of hematite was two orders of magnitude slower than goethite. The relationship between structure and reactivity was examined for a series of mono-, di-, and tri-hydroxybenzene reductants. Rates of reductive dissolution decreased in the following order: catechol ˜- hydroquinone > 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid > resorcinol-phenol-4-hydroxybenzoic acid.

  1. Ferrihydrite Alteration to Magnetite, Maghemite and Hematite; Implications for Iron Oxides on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zent, A. P.; Bishop, J. L.; Mancinelli, R. L.; Olsen, M.; Wagner, P. A.

    2000-01-01

    Synthetic ferrihydrites have been altered to form magnetite, maghemite and hematite through low-temperature heating experiments (some with an organic reductant). Maghemite formed in this manner could become an indicator for Astrobiology on Mars.

  2. A minimalist operating mode for UKIRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, Tom; Davis, Gary R.; Craig, Simon C.; Walther, Craig; Chuter, Tim

    2012-09-01

    In late 2010, driven by funding pressure from its governing body, the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT) underwent the most significant operational change in its history culminating in a new "minimalist mode" operation. Since 13th December 2010 this telescope, situated at the summit of Mauna Kea, Hawaii, has been operated remotely from the Joint Astronomy Centre in Hilo, with a priority on completing the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS) but also continued support of other international programmes. In mid-2012, while remaining in minimalist mode, the observatory plans to start a new and ambitious near-infrared survey of the northern sky called the UKIRT Hemisphere Survey. The change to minimalist mode has resulted in the following: the cost of running the observatory has been reduced from 3.9M to 2.0M yet despite the changes, which included a reduction in staff and support, the UKIRT continues to operate at 90% efficiency, a level it has operated at for the last several years. The fault rate remains extremely low (approximately 3%) and has not been affected by remote operations and up until February 2012 no time-losing faults were attributed to operating remotely. This paper discusses the motivations behind the change to minimalist mode, the new mode of operation itself, the effect, if any, of the change on operational efficiency and the challenges facing a remotely operated telescope at a remote mountain site.

  3. Current trends in breast reduction.

    PubMed

    Roje, Zdravko; Roje, Zeljka; Milosević, Milan; Varvodić, Josip; Mance, Marko

    2012-06-01

    Results of our study describe the long term effects of reduction mammaplasty. Many women with excessively small or large breasts have an altered personal self-image and often suffer from low self-esteem and other psychological stresses. This procedure is designed to reduce and reshape large breasts, and since the size, shape, and symmetry of a woman's breasts can have a profound effect on her mental and physical well-being it is important to observe the patient's long-term outcome. Currently, breast reduction surgery is safe, effective and beneficial to the patient. In Croatia, reduction mammoplasty is often excluded from the general health care plan. The distinction between "reconstructive" versus "cosmetic" breast surgery is very well defined by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons Board of Directors. Unfortunately, the Croatian Health Society has yet to standardize such a distinction. There is an imperative need for evidence-based selection criteria. We retrospectively analyzed data of 59 female patients suffering from symptomatic macromastia who underwent reduction mammaplasty over a 16 year period (1995 until 2011). Our aim was to compare and contrast the various techniques available for reduction mammaplasty and to determine, based on patient outcome and satisfaction, which technique is most suited for each patient. The results of our study generally reinforce the observation that reduction mammaplasty significantly provides improvements in health status, long-term quality of life, postsurgical breast appearance and significantly decrease physical symptoms of pain. A number of 59 consecutive cases were initially treated with the four different breast reduction techniques: inverted-T scat or Wisa pattern breast reduction, vertical reduction mammaplasty, simplified vertical reduction mammaplasty, inferior pedicle and free nipple graft techniques. The average clinical follow-up period was 6-months, and included 48 patients. The statistical analysis of the

  4. Mediation Analysis of Mode Deactivation Therapy (Reanalysis and Interpretation)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bass, Christopher K.; Apsche, Jack A.

    2013-01-01

    A key component of Mode Deactivation Therapy (MDT) is the development of self-awareness and regulatory skills by the client with the aim of helping adolescent males with conduct disordered behaviors, including sexually inappropriate behaviors and emotional dysregulation. The goal includes altering specific behaviors to fall within socially…

  5. ARSENIC MODE OF ACTION AND DEVELOPING A BBDR MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The current USEPA cancer risk assessment for inorganic arsenic is based on a linear extrapolation of the epidemiological data from exposed populations in Taiwan. However, proposed key events in the mode of action (MoA) for arsenic-induced cancer (which may include altered DNA me...

  6. A Simple Laser Teaching Aid for Transverse Mode Structure Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ren, Cheng; Zhang, Shulian

    2009-01-01

    A teaching aid for demonstrating the transverse mode structure in lasers is described. A novel device called "multi-dimension adjustable combined cat-eye reflector" has been constructed from easily available materials to form a He-Ne laser resonator. By finely adjusting the cat-eye, the boundary conditions of the laser cavity can be altered, which…

  7. Whispering Bloch modes

    PubMed Central

    Craster, R. V.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate eigenvalue problems for the planar Helmholtz equation in open systems with a high order of rotational symmetry. The resulting solutions have similarities with the whispering gallery modes exploited in photonic micro-resonators and elsewhere, but unlike these do not necessarily require a surrounding material boundary, with confinement instead resulting from the geometry of a series of inclusions arranged in a ring. The corresponding fields exhibit angular quasi-periodicity reminiscent of Bloch waves, and hence we refer to them as whispering Bloch modes (WBMs). We show that if the geometry of the system is slightly perturbed such that the rotational symmetry is broken, modes with asymmetric field patterns can be observed, resulting in field enhancement and other potentially desirable effects. We investigate the WBMs of two specific geometries first using expansion methods and then by applying a two-scale asymptotic scheme. PMID:27493564

  8. The nonlinear tearing mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Hoven, G.; Steinolfson, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    A series of nonlinear computations of tearing-mode development have been performed which achieve higher values of the magnetic Reynolds number and larger wavelengths than previously considered. A prime candidate for the realization of dynamic reconnection is the resistive magnetic tearing mode, a spontaneous instability of a stressed magnetic field. Typical simulations are described for a magnetic Lundquist number S of 10 to the 4th and wavelength parameters alpha from 0.05 to 0.5. In all cases, the nonlinear mode initially evolves at the linear growth rate, followed by a period of reduced growth. Another common feature is the formation of secondary flow vortices, near the tearing surface, which are opposite in direction to the initial linear vortices.

  9. Violin plate modes.

    PubMed

    Gough, Colin

    2015-01-01

    As the first step toward developing a generic model for the acoustically radiating vibrational modes of the violin and related instruments, the modes of both freely supported and edge-constrained top and back plates have been investigated as functions of shape, arching height, elastic anisotropy, the f-holes and associated island area, thickness graduations, and the additional boundary constraints of the ribs, soundpost, and bass-bar present in the assembled instrument. Comsol shell structure finite element software has been used as a quasi-experimental tool, with physical and geometric properties varied smoothly, often over several orders of magnitude, allowing the development of the plate modes to be followed continuously from those of an initially square plate to those of doubly-arched, guitar-shaped, orthotropic plates and their dependence on all the above factors. PMID:25618046

  10. A streamlined failure mode and effects analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Eric C. Smith, Koren; Terezakis, Stephanie; Croog, Victoria; Gollamudi, Smitha; Gage, Irene; Keck, Jordie; DeWeese, Theodore; Sibley, Greg

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Explore the feasibility and impact of a streamlined failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) using a structured process that is designed to minimize staff effort. Methods: FMEA for the external beam process was conducted at an affiliate radiation oncology center that treats approximately 60 patients per day. A structured FMEA process was developed which included clearly defined roles and goals for each phase. A core group of seven people was identified and a facilitator was chosen to lead the effort. Failure modes were identified and scored according to the FMEA formalism. A risk priority number,RPN, was calculated and used to rank failure modes. Failure modes with RPN > 150 received safety improvement interventions. Staff effort was carefully tracked throughout the project. Results: Fifty-two failure modes were identified, 22 collected during meetings, and 30 from take-home worksheets. The four top-ranked failure modes were: delay in film check, missing pacemaker protocol/consent, critical structures not contoured, and pregnant patient simulated without the team's knowledge of the pregnancy. These four failure modes hadRPN > 150 and received safety interventions. The FMEA was completed in one month in four 1-h meetings. A total of 55 staff hours were required and, additionally, 20 h by the facilitator. Conclusions: Streamlined FMEA provides a means of accomplishing a relatively large-scale analysis with modest effort. One potential value of FMEA is that it potentially provides a means of measuring the impact of quality improvement efforts through a reduction in risk scores. Future study of this possibility is needed.

  11. Multi-mode horn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neilson, Jeffrey M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A horn has an input aperture and an output aperture, and comprises a conductive inner surface formed by rotating a curve about a central axis. The curve comprises a first arc having an input aperture end and a transition end, and a second arc having a transition end and an output aperture end. When rotated about the central axis, the first arc input aperture end forms an input aperture, and the second arc output aperture end forms an output aperture. The curve is then optimized to provide a mode conversion which maximizes the power transfer of input energy to the Gaussian mode at the output aperture.

  12. Microbial colonization and alteration of basaltic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einen, J.; Kruber, C.; Øvreås, L.; Thorseth, I. H.; Torsvik, T.

    2006-03-01

    Microorganisms have been reported to be associated with the alteration of the glassy margin of seafloor pillow basalts (Thorseth et al., 2001, 2003; Lysnes et al., 2004). The amount of iron and other biological important elements present in basalts and the vast abundance of basaltic glass in the earth's crust, make glass alteration an important process in global element cycling. To gain further insight into microbial communities associated with glass alteration, five microcosm experiments mimicking seafloor conditions were inoculated with seafloor basalt and incubated for one year. Mineral precipitations, microbial attachment to the glass and glass alteration were visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the bacterial community composition was fingerprinted by PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) in combination with sequencing. SEM analysis revealed a microbial community with low morphological diversity of mainly biofilm associated and prosthecate microorganisms. Approximately 30 nm thick alteration rims developed on the glass in all microcosms after one year of incubation; this however was also seen in non inoculated controls. Calcium carbonate precipitates showed parallel, columnar and filamentous crystallization habits in the microcosms as well as in the sterile controls. DGGE analysis showed an alteration in bacterial community profiles in the five different microcosms, as a response to the different energy and redox regimes and time. In all microcosms a reduction in number of DGGE bands, in combination with an increase in cell abundance were recorded during the experiment. Sequence analysis showed that the microcosms were dominated by four groups of organisms with phylogenetic affiliation to four taxa: The Rhodospirillaceae, a family containing phototrophic marine organisms, in which some members are capable of heterotrophic growth in darkness and N2 fixation; the family Hyphomicrobiaceae, a group of prosthecate oligotrophic

  13. High order mode damping in a pill box cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Voelker, F.; Lambertson, G.; Rimmer, R.

    1991-04-01

    We have substantially damped the higher order modes (HOM's) in a pill box cavity with attached beam pipe, while reducing the Q of the principal mode by less that 10%. This was accomplished by cutting slots in the cavity end wall at a radius at which the magnetic field of the lowest frequency HOM's is large. The slots couple energy from the cavity into waveguides which are below cut off for the principal mode, but which propagate energy at the HOM frequencies. Three slots 120 degrees apart couple HOM energy to three waveguides. We are concerned primarily with accelerating and deflecting modes: i.e. the TM{sub mnp} modes of order m=0 and m=1. For the strongest damping, only three m=0 and m=1 modes were detectable. These were the principal TM{sub 010} mode, the TM{sub 011} longitudinal mode, and the TM{sub 110} deflecting mode. In addition the HOM Q's and the reduction of Q for the principal mode were determined by computer calculation. The principal mode Q for an actual rf cavity could not be measured because the bolted joints used in the construction of the cavity were not sufficiently good to support Q's above 6000. The measured Q of the first longitudinal mode was 31 and of the first transverse mode 37. Our maximum damping was limited by how well we could terminated the waveguides, and indeed, the computer calculations for the TM{sub 011} and TM{sub 110} modes give values in the range we measured. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  14. The Middeck 0-gravity Dynamics Experiment (MODE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawley, Edward F.; Deluis, Javier

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on the middeck 0-gravity dynamics experiment (MODE) are presented. Topics covered include: MODE flight hardware elements; MODE science objectives; MODE team; flight operations; and summary.

  15. Thermodynamics of Radiation Modes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pina, Eduardo; de la Selva, Sara Maria Teresa

    2010-01-01

    We study the equilibrium thermodynamics of the electromagnetic radiation in a cavity of a given volume and temperature. We found three levels of description, the thermodynamics of one mode, the thermodynamics of the distribution of frequencies in a band by summing over the frequencies in it and the global thermodynamics by summing over all the…

  16. Two Modes of Sexuality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Firestone, Robert W.

    This paper describes the essential difference between two modes of sexual relating: (1) a personal, outward style of interaction that is the natural extension of affection, tenderness, and companionship between two people; and (2) an impersonal, inward, more masturbatory expression in which sex is used primarily as a narcotic. The origins of…

  17. Theories and Modes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apsche, Jack A.

    2005-01-01

    In his work on the Theory of Modes, Beck (1996) suggested that there were flaws with his cognitive theory. He suggested that though there are shortcomings to his cognitive theory, there were not similar shortcomings to the practice of Cognitive Therapy. The author suggests that if there are shortcomings to cognitive theory the same shortcomings…

  18. Synthesize Modes and Correlate

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-10-01

    SMAC is an automated experimental modal parameter extraction package which determines the natural frequencies of vibration, viscous damping ratios and mode shapes from experimental accelerance frequency response functions (FRFs). It is written in the MATLAB interpretive matrix language and has a graphical user interface.

  19. Mode conversion in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, E. F.; Berry, L. A.; Myra, J. R.

    2006-10-01

    Fast magnetosonic waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) can convert to much shorter wavelength modes such as ion Bernstein waves (IBW) and ion cyclotron waves (ICW) [1]. These modes are potentially useful for plasma control through the generation of localized currents and sheared flows. As part of the SciDAC Center for Simulation of Wave-Plasma Interactions project, the AORSA global-wave solver [2] has been ported to the new, dual-core Cray XT-3 (Jaguar) at ORNL where it demonstrates excellent scaling with the number of processors. Preliminary calculations using 4096 processors have allowed the first full-wave simulations of mode conversion in ITER. Mode conversion from the fast wave to the ICW is observed in mixtures of deuterium, tritium and helium3 at 53 MHz. The resulting flow velocity and electric field shear will be calculated. [1] F.W. Perkins, Nucl. Fusion 17, 1197 (1977). [2] E.F. Jaeger, L.A. Berry, J.R. Myra, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 195001-1 (2003).

  20. Modes of Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewatripont, Mathias; Tirole, Jean

    2005-01-01

    The paper develops a theory of costly communication in which the sender's and receiver's motivations and abilities endogenously determine the communication mode and the transfer of knowledge. Communication is modeled as a problem of moral hazard in teams, in which the sender and receiver select persuasion and message elaboration efforts. The model…

  1. The pipeline for the GOSSS data reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sota, A.; Maíz Apellániz, J.

    2011-11-01

    The Galactic O-Star Spectroscopic Survey (GOSSS) is an ambitious project that is observing all known Galactic O stars with B < 13 in the blue-violet part of the spectrum with R ˜ 2500. It is based on version 2 of the most complete catalog to date of Galactic O stars with accurate spectral types (v1, Maíz Apellániz et al. 2004; v2, Sota et al. 2008). Given the large amount of data that we are getting (more than 150 nights of observations at three different observatories in the last 4 years) we have developed an automatic spectroscopic reduction pipeline. This pipeline has been programmed in IDL and automates the process of data reduction. It can operate in two modes: automatic data reduction (quicklook) or semi-automatic data reduction (full). In "quicklook", we are able to get rectified and calibrated spectra of all stars of a full night just minutes after the observations. The pipeline automatically identifies the type of image and applies the standard reduction procedure (bias subtraction, flat field correction, application of bad pixel mask, ...). It also extracts all spectra of the stars in one image (including close visual binaries), aligns and merges all spectra of the same star (to increase the signal to noise ratio and to correct defects such as cosmic rays), calibrates in wavelength and rectifies the continuum. The same operations are performed in full mode, but allowing the user to adjust the parameters used in the process.

  2. Improved feedback control of wall stabilized kink modes with different plasma-wall couplings and mode rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Q.; Levesque, J. P.; Stoafer, C. C.; Bialek, J.; Byrne, P.; Hughes, P. E.; Mauel, M. E.; Navratil, G. A.; Rhodes, D. J.

    2016-04-01

    A new algorithm for feedback control of rotating, wall-stabilized kink modes in the High Beta Tokamak-Extended Pulse (HBT-EP) device maintains an accurate phase shift between the perturbation and the measured rotating mode through current control, with control power emphasizing fast rotation and phase jumps over fast amplitude changes. In HBT-EP, wall-stabilized kink modes become unstable above the ideal wall stability limit, and feedback suppression is aimed at delaying the onset of discharge disruption through reduction of the kink mode amplitude. Performance of the new feedback algorithm is tested under different experimental conditions, including variation of the plasma-wall coupling, insertion of a ferritic wall, changing mode rotation frequency over the range of 4-8 kHz using an internal biased electrode, and adjusting the feedback phase-angle to accelerate, amplify, or suppress the mode. We find the previously reported excitation of the slowly rotating mode at high feedback gain in HBT-EP is mitigated by the current control scheme. We also find good agreement between the observed and predicted changes to the mode rotation frequency and amplitude. When ferritic material is introduced, or the plasma-wall coupling becomes weaker as the walls are retracted from plasma, the feedback gain needs to be increased to achieve the same level of suppression. When mode rotation is slowed by a biased electrode, the feedback system still achieves mode suppression, and demonstrates wide bandwidth effectiveness.

  3. Interplay between ballooning and peeling modes in simulations of the time evolution of edge localized modes

    SciTech Connect

    Onjun, Thawatchai; Kritz, Arnold H.; Bateman, Glenn; Parail, Vassili; Wilson, Howard R.; Dnestrovskij, Alex

    2005-01-01

    The time evolution of edge localized modes (ELMs) in the Joint European Torus tokamak [P. H. Rebut et al., Nucl. Fusion 25, 1011 (1985)] is investigated using the JETTO predictive modeling code [M. Erba et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 39, 261 (1997)]. It is found that both pressure-driven ballooning and current-driven peeling modes can play a role in triggering the ELM crashes. In the simulations carried out, each large ELM consists of a sequence of quasicontinuous small ELM crashes. Each sequence of ELM crashes is separated from the next sequence by a relatively longer ELM-free period. The initial crash in each ELM sequence can be triggered either by a pressure-driven ballooning mode or by a current-driven peeling mode, while the subsequent crashes within that sequence are triggered by current-driven peeling modes, which are made more unstable by the reduction in the pressure gradient resulting from the initial crash. The HELENA and MISHKA ideal magnetohydrodynamic stability codes [A. B. Mikhailovskii et al., Plasma Phys. Rep. 23, 713 (1997)] are used to validate the stability criteria used in the JETTO simulations. This stability analysis includes infinite-n ideal ballooning, finite-n ballooning, and low-n kink/peeling modes.

  4. Elucidation of the Mode of Action of a New Antibacterial Compound Active against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Gerits, Evelien; Blommaert, Eline; Lippell, Anna; O'Neill, Alex J; Weytjens, Bram; De Maeyer, Dries; Fierro, Ana Carolina; Marchal, Kathleen; Marchand, Arnaud; Chaltin, Patrick; Spincemaille, Pieter; De Brucker, Katrijn; Thevissen, Karin; Cammue, Bruno P A; Swings, Toon; Liebens, Veerle; Fauvart, Maarten; Verstraeten, Natalie; Michiels, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Nosocomial and community-acquired infections caused by multidrug resistant bacteria represent a major human health problem. Thus, there is an urgent need for the development of antibiotics with new modes of action. In this study, we investigated the antibacterial characteristics and mode of action of a new antimicrobial compound, SPI031 (N-alkylated 3, 6-dihalogenocarbazol 1-(sec-butylamino)-3-(3,6-dichloro-9H-carbazol-9-yl)propan-2-ol), which was previously identified in our group. This compound exhibits broad-spectrum antibacterial activity, including activity against the human pathogens Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We found that SPI031 has rapid bactericidal activity (7-log reduction within 30 min at 4x MIC) and that the frequency of resistance development against SPI031 is low. To elucidate the mode of action of SPI031, we performed a macromolecular synthesis assay, which showed that SPI031 causes non-specific inhibition of macromolecular biosynthesis pathways. Liposome leakage and membrane permeability studies revealed that SPI031 rapidly exerts membrane damage, which is likely the primary cause of its antibacterial activity. These findings were supported by a mutational analysis of SPI031-resistant mutants, a transcriptome analysis and the identification of transposon mutants with altered sensitivity to the compound. In conclusion, our results show that SPI031 exerts its antimicrobial activity by causing membrane damage, making it an interesting starting point for the development of new antibacterial therapies. PMID:27167126

  5. Elucidation of the Mode of Action of a New Antibacterial Compound Active against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Gerits, Evelien; Blommaert, Eline; Lippell, Anna; O’Neill, Alex J.; Weytjens, Bram; De Maeyer, Dries; Fierro, Ana Carolina; Marchal, Kathleen; Marchand, Arnaud; Chaltin, Patrick; Spincemaille, Pieter; De Brucker, Katrijn; Thevissen, Karin; Cammue, Bruno P. A.; Swings, Toon; Liebens, Veerle; Fauvart, Maarten; Verstraeten, Natalie; Michiels, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Nosocomial and community-acquired infections caused by multidrug resistant bacteria represent a major human health problem. Thus, there is an urgent need for the development of antibiotics with new modes of action. In this study, we investigated the antibacterial characteristics and mode of action of a new antimicrobial compound, SPI031 (N-alkylated 3, 6-dihalogenocarbazol 1-(sec-butylamino)-3-(3,6-dichloro-9H-carbazol-9-yl)propan-2-ol), which was previously identified in our group. This compound exhibits broad-spectrum antibacterial activity, including activity against the human pathogens Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We found that SPI031 has rapid bactericidal activity (7-log reduction within 30 min at 4x MIC) and that the frequency of resistance development against SPI031 is low. To elucidate the mode of action of SPI031, we performed a macromolecular synthesis assay, which showed that SPI031 causes non-specific inhibition of macromolecular biosynthesis pathways. Liposome leakage and membrane permeability studies revealed that SPI031 rapidly exerts membrane damage, which is likely the primary cause of its antibacterial activity. These findings were supported by a mutational analysis of SPI031-resistant mutants, a transcriptome analysis and the identification of transposon mutants with altered sensitivity to the compound. In conclusion, our results show that SPI031 exerts its antimicrobial activity by causing membrane damage, making it an interesting starting point for the development of new antibacterial therapies. PMID:27167126

  6. Mechanisms for altered carnitine content in hypertrophied rat hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Reibel, D.K.; O'Rourke, B.; Foster, K.A.

    1987-03-01

    Carnitine levels are reduced in hypertrophied hearts of rats subjected to aortic constriction (banding) and evaluated in hypertrophied hearts of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). In an attempt to determine the mechanisms for these alterations, L-(/sup 14/C)carnitine transport was examined in isolated perfused hearts. Total carnitine uptake was significantly reduced by approx.20% in hypertrophied hearts of banded rats at all perfusate carnitine concentrations employed. The reduction in total uptake was due to a 40% reduction in carrier-mediated carnitine uptake with no difference in uptake by diffusion. In contrast, carnitine uptake was not altered in isolated hypertrophied hearts of SHR. However, serum carnitine levels were elevated in SHR, which could result in increased myocardial carnitine uptake in vivo. The data suggest that altered carnitine content in hypertrophied hearts of aortic-banded rats is due to an alteration in the carrier-mediated carnitine transport system in the myocardium. However, altered carnitine content in hypertrophied hearts of SHR is not due to a change in the carnitine transport system per se but may rather be due to a change in serum carnitine levels.

  7. Dependence of recycling and edge profiles on lithium evaporation in high triangularity, high performance NSTX H-mode discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maingi, R.; Osborne, T. H.; Bell, M. G.; Bell, R. E.; Boyle, D. P.; Canik, J. M.; Diallo, A.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S. M.; Kugel, H. W.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Skinner, C. H.; Soukhanovskii, V. A.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, the effects of a pre-discharge lithium evaporation variation on highly shaped discharges in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) are documented. Lithium wall conditioning ('dose') was routinely applied onto graphite plasma facing components between discharges in NSTX, partly to reduce recycling. Reduced Dα emission from the lower and upper divertor and center stack was observed, as well as reduced midplane neutral pressure; the magnitude of reduction increased with the pre-discharge lithium dose. Improved energy confinement, both raw τE and H-factor normalized to scalings, with increasing lithium dose was also observed. At the highest doses, we also observed elimination of edge-localized modes. The midplane edge plasma profiles were dramatically altered, comparable to lithium dose scans at lower shaping, where the strike point was farther from the lithium deposition centroid. This indicates that the benefits of lithium conditioning should apply to the highly shaped plasmas planned in NSTX-U.

  8. Testing and analysis of dual-mode adaptive landing gear, taxi mode test system for YF-12A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamon, M. A.

    1979-01-01

    The effectiveness of a dual mode adaptive landing gear system in reducing the dynamic response of an airplane during ground taxiing was studied. The dynamic taxi tests of the YF-12A research airplane are presented. A digital computer program which simulated the test conditions is discussed. The dual mode system as tested provides dynamic taxi response reductions of 25 percent at the cg and 30 to 45 percent at the cockpit.

  9. Van Kampen modes for bunch longitudinal motion

    SciTech Connect

    Burov, A.; /Fermilab

    2010-09-01

    Conditions for existence, uniqueness and stability of bunch steady states are considered. For the existence uniqueness problem, simple algebraic equations are derived, showing the result both for the action and Hamiltonian domain distributions. For the stability problem, van Kampen theory is used. Emerging of discrete van Kampen modes show either loss of Landau damping, or instability. This method can be applied for an arbitrary impedance, RF shape and beam distribution function Available areas on intensity-emittance plane are shown for resistive wall wake and single harmonic, bunch shortening and bunch lengthening RF configurations. Language of van Kampen modes is a powerful tool for studying beam stability. Its unique efficiency reveals itself in those complicated cases, when the dielectric function cannot be obtained, as it is for the longitudinal bunch motion. Emergence of a discrete mode means either loss of Landau damping or instability. By definition, the discrete modes lie outside the continuous incoherent spectrum, but they still may stay within the bucket. In the last case, the discrete mode would disappear after a tiny portion of resonant particles would be added. However, if the discrete mode lie outside the bucket, the Landau damping cannot be restored by tiny perturbation of the particle distribution; LLD is called radical in that case. For a given bunch emittance and RF voltage, the intensity is limited either by reduction of the bucket acceptance or by (radical) LLD. In this paper, results are presented for longitudinal bunch stability in weak head-tail approximation and resistive wall impedance; three RF configurations are studied: single harmonic, bunch shortening and bunch lengthening. It is shown that every RF configuration may be preferable, depending on the bunch emittance and intensity.

  10. Kinetic effect of toroidal rotation on the geodesic acoustic mode

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, W. Ye, L.; Zhou, D.; Xiao, X.; Wang, S.

    2015-01-15

    Kinetic effects of the toroidal rotation on the geodesic acoustic mode are theoretically investigated. It is found that when the toroidal rotation increases, the damping rate increases in the weak rotation regime due to the rotation enhancement of wave-particle interaction, and it decreases in the strong rotation regime due to the reduction of the number of resonant particles. Theoretical results are consistent with the behaviors of the geodesic acoustic mode recently observed in DIII-D and ASDEX-Upgrade. The kinetic damping effect of the rotation on the geodesic acoustic mode may shed light on the regulation of turbulence through the controlling the toroidal rotation.

  11. Altered orbitofrontal sulcogyral pattern in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Motoaki; Nestor, Paul G.; McCarley, Robert W.; Levitt, James J.; Hsu, Lillian; Kawashima, Toshiro; Niznikiewicz, Margaret; Shenton, Martha E.

    2009-01-01

    patients without Type III (t40 = 2.29, P = 0.027). The present study provides evidence of altered distribution of orbitofrontal sulcogyral pattern in schizophrenia, possibly reflecting a neurodevelopmental aberration in schizophrenia. Such altered sulcogyral pattern is unlikely to be due to secondary effects of the illness such as medication. Moreover, the structural association between Type III and small ICC volume, observed in the patient group, may suggest that Type III expression could be part of a systematic neurodevelopmental alteration, given that the small ICC volume could reflect early reduction of cranial growth driven by brain growth. The observed contrasting association of Type III expression with poorer outcome, and that of Type I expression with better outcome, further suggests clinical heterogeneity, and possible differences in treatment responsiveness in schizophrenia. PMID:17347256

  12. Modes of Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Partridge, Susan

    This literature review is divided into two parts. The first part is a survey of materials in the William S. Gray Collection at the University of Chicago that deal with modes of learning. The studies reviewed range from the 1930s to the 1960s. The second part of the paper extends the review to studies published during the 1970s. Each section of the…

  13. Single mode cavity laser

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, D.W.; Levy, J.L.

    1984-01-17

    This external cavity laser utilizes an unstable resonator in conjuction with a high reflectivity stripe end mirror which is oriented substantially parallel to the plane of the maximum divergence of the laser diode output beam and whose axis is substantially parallel to the plane of the junction of the laser diode. This configuration operates with high efficiency to select only the fundamental mode of the laser diode with a minimal divergence in the output beam.

  14. Resistance to Antibiotics Mediated by Target Alterations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spratt, Brian G.

    1994-04-01

    The development of resistance to antibiotics by reductions in the affinities of their enzymatic targets occurs most rapidly for antibiotics that inactivate a single target and that are not analogs of substrate. In these cases of resistance (for example, resistance to rifampicin), numerous single amino acid substitutions may provide large decreases in the affinity of the target for the antibiotic, leading to clinically significant levels of resistance. Resistance due to target alterations should occur much more slowly for those antibiotics (penicillin, for example) that inactivate multiple targets irreversibly by acting as close analogs of substrate. Resistance to penicillin because of target changes has emerged, by unexpected mechanisms, only in a limited number of species. However, inactivating enzymes commonly provide resistance to antibiotics that, like penicillin, are derived from natural products, although such enzymes have not been found for synthetic antibiotics. Thus, the ideal antibiotic would be produced by rational design, rather than by the modification of a natural product.

  15. Forest canopy interactions with nucleation mode particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pryor, S. C.; Hornsby, K. E.; Novick, K. A.

    2014-11-01

    Ultrafine particle size distributions through a deciduous forest canopy indicate that nucleation mode particle concentrations decline with depth into the canopy, such that number concentrations at the bottom of the canopy are an average of 16% lower than those at the top. However, growth rates of nucleation mode particles (diameters 6-30 nm) are invariant with height within the canopy, which implies that the semi-volatile gases contributing to their growth are comparatively well-mixed through the canopy. Growth rates of nucleation mode particles during a meteorological drought year (2012) were substantially lower than during a meteorologically normal year with high soil water potential (2013). This may reflect suppression of actual biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions by drought and thus a reduction in the production of condensable products during the drought-affected vegetation season. This hypothesis is supported by evidence that growth rates during the normal year exhibit a positive correlation with emissions of BVOC modeled on observed forest composition, leaf area index, temperature and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), but particle growth rates during the drought-affected vegetation season are not correlated with modeled BVOC emissions. These data thus provide indirect evidence that drought stress in forests may reduce BVOC emissions and limit growth of nucleation mode particles to climate-relevant sizes.

  16. Model reduction for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Trevor

    1992-01-01

    Model reduction is an important practical problem in the control of flexible spacecraft, and a considerable amount of work has been carried out on this topic. Two of the best known methods developed are modal truncation and internal balancing. Modal truncation is simple to implement but can give poor results when the structure possesses clustered natural frequencies, as often occurs in practice. Balancing avoids this problem but has the disadvantages of high computational cost, possible numerical sensitivity problems, and no physical interpretation for the resulting balanced 'modes'. The purpose of this work is to examine the performance of the subsystem balancing technique developed by the investigator when tested on a realistic flexible space structure, in this case a model of the Permanently Manned Configuration (PMC) of Space Station Freedom. This method retains the desirable properties of standard balancing while overcoming the three difficulties listed above. It achieves this by first decomposing the structural model into subsystems of highly correlated modes. Each subsystem is approximately uncorrelated from all others, so balancing them separately and then combining yields comparable results to balancing the entire structure directly. The operation count reduction obtained by the new technique is considerable: a factor of roughly r(exp 2) if the system decomposes into r equal subsystems. Numerical accuracy is also improved significantly, as the matrices being operated on are of reduced dimension, and the modes of the reduced-order model now have a clear physical interpretation; they are, to first order, linear combinations of repeated-frequency modes.

  17. Rotating Rake Turbofan Duct Mode Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Daniel L.

    2005-01-01

    An experimental measurement system was developed and implemented by the NASA Glenn Research Center in the 1990s to measure turbofan duct acoustic modes. The system is a continuously rotating radial microphone rake that is inserted into the duct. This Rotating Rake provides a complete map of the acoustic duct modes present in a ducted fan and has been used on a variety of test articles: from a low-speed, concept test rig, to a full-scale production turbofan engine. The Rotating Rake has been critical in developing and evaluating a number of noise reduction concepts as well as providing experimental databases for verification of several aero-acoustic codes. More detailed derivation of the unique Rotating Rake equations are presented in the appendix.

  18. Hypothesis tests for hydrologic alteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroll, Charles N.; Croteau, Kelly E.; Vogel, Richard M.

    2015-11-01

    Hydrologic systems can be altered by anthropogenic and climatic influences. While there are a number of statistical frameworks for describing and evaluating the extent of hydrologic alteration, here we present a new framework for assessing whether statistically significant hydrologic alteration has occurred, or whether the shift in the hydrologic regime is consistent with the natural variability of the system. Four hypothesis tests based on shifts of flow duration curves (FDCs) are developed and tested using three different experimental designs based on different strategies for resampling of annual FDCs. The four hypothesis tests examined are the Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS), Kuiper (K), confidence interval (CI), and ecosurplus and ecodeficit (Eco). Here 117 streamflow sites that have potentially undergone hydrologic alteration due to reservoir construction are examined. 20 years of pre-reservoir record is used to develop the critical value of the test statistic for type I errors of 5% and 10%, while 10 years of post-alteration record is used to examine the power of each test. The best experimental design, based on calculating the mean annual FDC from an exhaustive jackknife resampling regime, provided a larger number of unique values of each test statistic and properly reproduced type I errors. Of the four tests, the CI test consistently had the highest power, while the K test had the second highest power; KS and Eco always had the lowest power. The power of the CI test appeared related to the storage ratio of the reservoir, a rough measure of the hydrologic alteration of the system.

  19. Probing plasmonic breathing modes optically

    SciTech Connect

    Krug, Markus K. Reisecker, Michael; Hohenau, Andreas; Ditlbacher, Harald; Trügler, Andreas; Hohenester, Ulrich; Krenn, Joachim R.

    2014-10-27

    The confinement of surface plasmon modes in flat nanoparticles gives rise to plasmonic breathing modes. With a vanishing net dipole moment, breathing modes do not radiate, i.e., they are optically dark. Having thus escaped optical detection, breathing modes were only recently revealed in silver nanodisks with electron energy loss spectroscopy in an electron microscope. We show that for disk diameters >200 nm, retardation induced by oblique optical illumination relaxes the optically dark character. This makes breathing modes and thus the full plasmonic mode spectrum accessible to optical spectroscopy. The experimental spectroscopy data are in excellent agreement with numerical simulations.

  20. Splicing tolerances of weakly coupled few-mode fibers for mode-division-multiplexed transmission using sparse MIMO equalizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jiawei

    2016-01-01

    For one-polarization mode-division-multiplexed (MDM) system using sparse 2 × 2 MIMO equalizers over twofold spatially degenerate (TSD) LP modes, we numerically investigate the discrete modal crosstalk (XT) behaviors due to splices in weakly coupled few-mode fibers. Its impacts on transmission distance of uncoupled MDM link are comparably analyzed by evaluating the extreme cases relevant to the required splicing tolerances. Under different splicing conditions, the complexity of 2 × 2 MIMO equalizers is assessed by intra-modal relative group delay (RGD) emulation. Simulation results show that, by specifically controlling the lateral offsets at splicing points, an intra-modal RGD reduction of TSD LP11 modes can be obtained, benefiting the tap number decrease of the corresponding 2 × 2 MIMO equalizer. Besides, the propagation of TSD LP21 modes is verified to possess intra-modal splice-XT-immune property, indicating that the relevant intra-modal RGD will not be affected by splices.

  1. Constraining primordial vector mode from B-mode polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Saga, Shohei; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Shiraishi, Maresuke E-mail: maresuke.shiraishi@pd.infn.it

    2014-10-01

    The B-mode polarization spectrum of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) may be the smoking gun of not only the primordial tensor mode but also of the primordial vector mode. If there exist nonzero vector-mode metric perturbations in the early Universe, they are known to be supported by anisotropic stress fluctuations of free-streaming particles such as neutrinos, and to create characteristic signatures on both the CMB temperature, E-mode, and B-mode polarization anisotropies. We place constraints on the properties of the primordial vector mode characterized by the vector-to-scalar ratio r{sub v} and the spectral index n{sub v} of the vector-shear power spectrum, from the Planck and BICEP2 B-mode data. We find that, for scale-invariant initial spectra, the ΛCDM model including the vector mode fits the data better than the model including the tensor mode. The difference in χ{sup 2} between the vector and tensor models is Δχ{sup 2} = 3.294, because, on large scales the vector mode generates smaller temperature fluctuations than the tensor mode, which is preferred for the data. In contrast, the tensor mode can fit the data set equally well if we allow a significantly blue-tilted spectrum. We find that the best-fitting tensor mode has a large blue tilt and leads to an indistinct reionization bump on larger angular scales. The slightly red-tilted vector mode supported by the current data set can also create O(10{sup -22})-Gauss magnetic fields at cosmological recombination. Our constraints should motivate research that considers models of the early Universe that involve the vector mode.

  2. Transdiagnostic commonalities and differences in resting state functional connectivity of the default mode network in schizophrenia and major depression.

    PubMed

    Schilbach, L; Hoffstaedter, F; Müller, V; Cieslik, E C; Goya-Maldonado, R; Trost, S; Sorg, C; Riedl, V; Jardri, R; Sommer, I; Kogler, L; Derntl, B; Gruber, O; Eickhoff, S B

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia and depression are prevalent psychiatric disorders, but their underlying neural bases remains poorly understood. Neuroimaging evidence has pointed towards the relevance of functional connectivity aberrations in default mode network (DMN) hubs, dorso-medial prefrontal cortex and precuneus, in both disorders, but commonalities and differences in resting state functional connectivity of those two regions across disorders has not been formally assessed. Here, we took a transdiagnostic approach to investigate resting state functional connectivity of those two regions in 75 patients with schizophrenia and 82 controls from 4 scanning sites and 102 patients with depression and 106 controls from 3 sites. Our results demonstrate common dysconnectivity patterns as indexed by a significant reduction of functional connectivity between precuneus and bilateral superior parietal lobe in schizophrenia and depression. Furthermore, our findings highlight diagnosis-specific connectivity reductions of the parietal operculum in schizophrenia relative to depression. In light of evidence that points towards the importance of the DMN for social cognitive abilities and well documented impairments of social interaction in both patient groups, it is conceivable that the observed transdiagnostic connectivity alterations may contribute to interpersonal difficulties, but this could not be assessed directly in our study as measures of social behavior were not available. Given the operculum's role in somatosensory integration, diagnosis-specific connectivity reductions may indicate a pathophysiological mechanism for basic self-disturbances that is characteristic of schizophrenia, but not depression. PMID:26904405

  3. Transdiagnostic commonalities and differences in resting state functional connectivity of the default mode network in schizophrenia and major depression

    PubMed Central

    Schilbach, L.; Hoffstaedter, F.; Müller, V.; Cieslik, E.C.; Goya-Maldonado, R.; Trost, S.; Sorg, C.; Riedl, V.; Jardri, R.; Sommer, I.; Kogler, L.; Derntl, B.; Gruber, O.; Eickhoff, S.B.

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia and depression are prevalent psychiatric disorders, but their underlying neural bases remains poorly understood. Neuroimaging evidence has pointed towards the relevance of functional connectivity aberrations in default mode network (DMN) hubs, dorso-medial prefrontal cortex and precuneus, in both disorders, but commonalities and differences in resting state functional connectivity of those two regions across disorders has not been formally assessed. Here, we took a transdiagnostic approach to investigate resting state functional connectivity of those two regions in 75 patients with schizophrenia and 82 controls from 4 scanning sites and 102 patients with depression and 106 controls from 3 sites. Our results demonstrate common dysconnectivity patterns as indexed by a significant reduction of functional connectivity between precuneus and bilateral superior parietal lobe in schizophrenia and depression. Furthermore, our findings highlight diagnosis-specific connectivity reductions of the parietal operculum in schizophrenia relative to depression. In light of evidence that points towards the importance of the DMN for social cognitive abilities and well documented impairments of social interaction in both patient groups, it is conceivable that the observed transdiagnostic connectivity alterations may contribute to interpersonal difficulties, but this could not be assessed directly in our study as measures of social behavior were not available. Given the operculum's role in somatosensory integration, diagnosis-specific connectivity reductions may indicate a pathophysiological mechanism for basic self-disturbances that is characteristic of schizophrenia, but not depression. PMID:26904405

  4. Reductive Dechlorination of PCE DNAPL Source Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleep, B. E.; Edwards, E. A.

    2006-12-01

    dissolution. Gas pore blockage from methanogenesis significantly altered flow through the source zone, thereby reducing the availability of electron donor to support reductive dechlorination.

  5. Drag reduction in nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bushnell, D. M.; Moore, K. J.

    Recent studies on the drag-reducing shapes, structures, and behaviors of swimming and flying animals are reviewed, with an emphasis on potential analogs in vehicle design. Consideration is given to form drag reduction (turbulent flow, vortex generation, mass transfer, and adaptations for body-intersection regions), skin-friction drag reduction (polymers, surfactants, and bubbles as surface 'additives'), reduction of the drag due to lift, drag-reduction studies on porpoises, and drag-reducing animal behavior (e.g., leaping out of the water by porpoises). The need for further research is stressed.

  6. Drag reduction in nature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, D. M.; Moore, K. J.

    1991-01-01

    Recent studies on the drag-reducing shapes, structures, and behaviors of swimming and flying animals are reviewed, with an emphasis on potential analogs in vehicle design. Consideration is given to form drag reduction (turbulent flow, vortex generation, mass transfer, and adaptations for body-intersection regions), skin-friction drag reduction (polymers, surfactants, and bubbles as surface 'additives'), reduction of the drag due to lift, drag-reduction studies on porpoises, and drag-reducing animal behavior (e.g., leaping out of the water by porpoises). The need for further research is stressed.

  7. Method to monitor HC-SCR catalyst NOx reduction performance for lean exhaust applications

    DOEpatents

    Viola, Michael B.; Schmieg, Steven J.; Sloane, Thompson M.; Hilden, David L.; Mulawa, Patricia A.; Lee, Jong H.; Cheng, Shi-Wai S.

    2012-05-29

    A method for initiating a regeneration mode in selective catalytic reduction device utilizing hydrocarbons as a reductant includes monitoring a temperature within the aftertreatment system, monitoring a fuel dosing rate to the selective catalytic reduction device, monitoring an initial conversion efficiency, selecting a determined equation to estimate changes in a conversion efficiency of the selective catalytic reduction device based upon the monitored temperature and the monitored fuel dosing rate, estimating changes in the conversion efficiency based upon the determined equation and the initial conversion efficiency, and initiating a regeneration mode for the selective catalytic reduction device based upon the estimated changes in conversion efficiency.

  8. Free boundary ballooning mode representation

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, L. J.

    2012-10-15

    A new type of ballooning mode invariance is found in this paper. Application of this invariance is shown to be able to reduce the two-dimensional problem of free boundary high n modes, such as the peeling-ballooning modes, to a one-dimensional problem. Here, n is toroidal mode number. In contrast to the conventional ballooning representation, which requires the translational invariance of the Fourier components of the perturbations, the new invariance reflects that the independent solutions of the high n mode equations are translationally invariant from one radial interval surrounding a single singular surface to the other intervals. The conventional ballooning mode invariance breaks down at the vicinity of plasma edge, since the Fourier components with rational surfaces in vacuum region are completely different from those with rational surfaces in plasma region. But, the new type of invariance remains valid. This overcomes the limitation of the conventional ballooning mode representation for studying free boundary modes.

  9. MODE: Structural Test Article (STA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawley, Edward F.; Masters, Brett

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on the Middeck 0-gravity Dynamics Experiment (MODE): Structural Test Article (STA) are presented. Topics covered include: MODE: structural test article motivation; hardware; sensors and actuators; experimental support module; data; preliminary results; supporting analysis program; and modeling approach.

  10. Chlordecone, a mixed pregnane X receptor (PXR) and estrogen receptor alpha (ER{alpha}) agonist, alters cholesterol homeostasis and lipoprotein metabolism in C57BL/6 mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Junga; Scheri, Richard C.; Zhang Yuan; Curtis, Lawrence R.

    2008-12-01

    Chlordecone (CD) is one of many banned organochlorine (OC) insecticides that are widespread persistent organic pollutants. OC insecticides alter lipid homeostasis in rodents at doses that are not neurotoxic or carcinogenic. Pretreatment of mice or rats with CD altered tissue distribution of a subsequent dose of [{sup 14}C]CD or [{sup 14}C]cholesterol (CH). Nuclear receptors regulate expression of genes important in the homeostasis of CH and other lipids. In this study, we report that CD suppresses in vitro reporter systems for human liver X receptors (LXRs) and activates those for human farnesoid X receptor (FXR), pregnane X receptor (PXR) and estrogen receptor {alpha} (ER{alpha}) in a concentration-dependent manner (0-50 {mu}M). Consistent with human PXR activation in vitro, three days after a single dose of CD (15 mg/kg) hepatic microsomal CYP3A11 protein increases in C57BL/6 mice. CD decreases hepatic CH ester content without altering total CH concentration. Apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) contents of hepatic lipoprotein-rich and microsomal fractions of CD-treated mice are higher than controls. There is a significant reduction in non-high density lipoprotein CH but not apolipoprotein B-48/100 (apoB-48/100) in plasma from CD-treated mice after a 4 h fast. At 14 days after 15 mg CD/kg apoA-I and apoB-100 proteins but not CYP3A11 protein in hepatic microsomes are similar to controls. This work indicates that altered CH homeostasis is a mode of OC insecticide action of relevance after a single dose. This at least partially explains altered CH tissue distribution in CD-pretreated mice.

  11. All-silica, large mode area, single mode photonic bandgap fibre with Fabry-Perot resonant structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Várallyay, Zoltán; Kovács, Péter

    2016-03-01

    All-silica, photonic crystal fibres consisting of a low index, silica core surrounded by higher index inclusions embedded in a silica matrix to form a photonic bandgap cladding were numerically analysed. The aim of the investigations was to modify the guiding properties of the fibre by introducing resonant structural entities. These structural modifications are realised by altering the refractive index of certain high index inclusions in the photonic crystal cladding resulting in mode coupling between the core mode and the mode propagated in the modified index region. This results in an increased effective core area of the fundamental core mode and consequently decreased nonlinearity as well as modified effective index compared to the effective index of the unmodified structure and resonant dispersion profile that can be used for pulse compression or optical delay purposes.

  12. Reductions in aircraft particulate emissions due to the use of Fischer-Tropsch fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyersdorf, A. J.; Timko, M. T.; Ziemba, L. D.; Bulzan, D.; Corporan, E.; Herndon, S. C.; Howard, R.; Miake-Lye, R.; Thornhill, K. L.; Winstead, E.; Wey, C.; Yu, Z.; Anderson, B. E.

    2013-06-01

    The use of alternative fuels for aviation is likely to increase due to concerns over fuel security, price stability and the sustainability of fuel sources. Concurrent reductions in particulate emissions from these alternative fuels are expected because of changes in fuel composition including reduced sulfur and aromatic content. The NASA Alternative Aviation Fuel Experiment (AAFEX) was conducted in January-February 2009 to investigate the effects of synthetic fuels on gas-phase and particulate emissions. Standard petroleum JP-8 fuel, pure synthetic fuels produced from natural gas and coal feedstocks using the Fischer-Tropsch (FT) process, and 50% blends of both fuels were tested in the CFM-56 engines on a DC-8 aircraft. To examine plume chemistry and particle evolution with time, samples were drawn from inlet probes positioned 1, 30, and 145 m downstream of the aircraft engines. No significant alteration to engine performance was measured when burning the alternative fuels. However, leaks in the aircraft fuel system were detected when operated with the pure FT fuels as a result of the absence of aromatic compounds in the fuel. Dramatic reductions in soot emissions were measured for both the pure FT fuels (reductions of 84% averaged over all powers) and blended fuels (64%) relative to the JP-8 baseline with the largest reductions at idle conditions. The alternative fuels also produced smaller soot (e.g. at 85% power, volume mean diameters were reduced from 78 nm for JP-8 to 51 nm for the FT fuel), which may reduce their ability to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The reductions in particulate emissions are expected for all alternative fuels with similar reductions in fuel sulfur and aromatic content regardless of the feedstock. As the plume cools downwind of the engine, nucleation-mode aerosols form. For the pure FT fuels, reductions (94% averaged over all powers) in downwind particle number emissions were similar to those measured at the exhaust plane (84

  13. Localized acoustic surface modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, Mohamed; Chen, Pai-Yen; Bağcı, Hakan

    2016-04-01

    We introduce the concept of localized acoustic surface modes. We demonstrate that they are induced on a two-dimensional cylindrical rigid surface with subwavelength corrugations under excitation by an incident acoustic plane wave. Our results show that the corrugated rigid surface is acoustically equivalent to a cylindrical scatterer with uniform mass density that can be represented using a Drude-like model. This, indeed, suggests that plasmonic-like acoustic materials can be engineered with potential applications in various areas including sensing, imaging, and cloaking.

  14. Damage mechanics - failure modes

    SciTech Connect

    Krajcinovic, D.; Vujosevic, M.

    1996-12-31

    The present study summarizes the results of the DOE sponsored research program focused on the brittle failure of solids with disordered microstructure. The failure is related to the stochastic processes on the microstructural scale; namely, the nucleation and growth of microcracks. The intrinsic failure modes, such as the percolation, localization and creep rupture, are studied by emphasizing the effect of the micro-structural disorder. A rich spectrum of physical phenomena and new concepts that emerges from this research demonstrates the reasons behind the limitations of traditional, deterministic, and local continuum models.

  15. Structural mode significance using INCA. [Interactive Controls Analysis computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Frank H.; Downing, John P.; Thorpe, Christopher J.

    1990-01-01

    Structural finite element models are often too large to be used in the design and analysis of control systems. Model reduction techniques must be applied to reduce the structural model to manageable size. In the past, engineers either performed the model order reduction by hand or used distinct computer programs to retrieve the data, to perform the significance analysis and to reduce the order of the model. To expedite this process, the latest version of INCA has been expanded to include an interactive graphical structural mode significance and model order reduction capability.

  16. Intelligent Data Reduction (IDARE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, D. Michael; Ford, Donnie R.

    1990-01-01

    A description of the Intelligent Data Reduction (IDARE) expert system and an IDARE user's manual are given. IDARE is a data reduction system with the addition of a user profile infrastructure. The system was tested on a nickel-cadmium battery testbed. Information is given on installing, loading, maintaining the IDARE system.

  17. Does Source Reduction Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allaway, David

    1992-01-01

    Suggests that quantification is essential to establish the cost-effectiveness of source reduction (SR). Presents case studies of monitoring methods for seven different kinds of SR efforts: (1) packaging changes, (2) SR businesses, (3) waste exchanges, (4) individual nonresidential efforts, (5) variable garbage rates, (6) yard waste reduction, and…

  18. ACCA College English Teaching Mode

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ding, Renlun

    2008-01-01

    This paper elucidates a new college English teaching mode--"ACCA" (Autonomous Cooperative Class-teaching All-round College English Teaching Mode). Integrated theories such as autonomous learning and cooperative learning into one teaching mode, "ACCA", which is being developed and advanced in practice as well, is the achievement…

  19. Standardization of Keyword Search Mode

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Su, Di

    2010-01-01

    In spite of its popularity, keyword search mode has not been standardized. Though information professionals are quick to adapt to various presentations of keyword search mode, novice end-users may find keyword search confusing. This article compares keyword search mode in some major reference databases and calls for standardization. (Contains 3…

  20. Three-dimensional equilibria and island energy transport due to resonant magnetic perturbation edge localized mode suppression on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    King, J. D.; Strait, E. J.; Nazikian, R.; Paz-Soldan, Carlos; Eldon, D.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Ferraro, N. M.; Hanson, J. M.; Haskey, S. R.; La Haye, R. J.; Lanctot, Matthew J.; Lazerson, Sam A.; Logan, N. C.; Liu, Y. Q.; Okabayashi, M.; Park, J. -K.; Turnbull, A. D.

    2015-11-16

    In this research, we conducted experiments in the DIII-D tokamak that show that the plasma responds to resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) with toroidalmode numbers of n=2 and n=3 without field line reconnection, consistent with resistive magnetohydrodynamic predictions, while a strong nonlinear bifurcation is apparent when edge localized modes(ELMs) are suppressed. The magnetic response associated with this bifurcation is localized to the high field side of the machine and exhibits a dominant n=1 component despite the application of a constant amplitude, slowly toroidally rotating, n=2 applied field. The n=1 mode is born locked to the vacuum vessel wall, while the n=2 mode is entrained to the rotating field. Based on these magnetic response measurements and Thomson scattering measurements of flattening of the electron temperature profile, it is likely that these modes are magnetic island chains near the H-mode pedestal. The reduction in ∇Te occurs near the q=4 and 5 rational surfaces, suggesting five unique islands are possible (m=8, 9, or 10 for n=2) and (m=4 or 5 for n=1). In all cases, the island width is estimated to be 2–3 cm. The Chang-Callen calculated confinement degradation due to the presence of an individual island of this size is 8%–12%, which is close to the 13%–14% measured between the ELMs and suppressed states. In conclusion, this suggests that edge tearing modes may alter the pedestal causing peeling-ballooning stability during RMP induced ELM suppression.

  1. Three-dimensional equilibria and island energy transport due to resonant magnetic perturbation edge localized mode suppression on DIII-D

    DOE PAGESBeta

    King, J. D.; Strait, E. J.; Nazikian, R.; Paz-Soldan, Carlos; Eldon, D.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Ferraro, N. M.; Hanson, J. M.; Haskey, S. R.; La Haye, R. J.; et al

    2015-11-16

    In this research, we conducted experiments in the DIII-D tokamak that show that the plasma responds to resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) with toroidalmode numbers of n=2 and n=3 without field line reconnection, consistent with resistive magnetohydrodynamic predictions, while a strong nonlinear bifurcation is apparent when edge localized modes(ELMs) are suppressed. The magnetic response associated with this bifurcation is localized to the high field side of the machine and exhibits a dominant n=1 component despite the application of a constant amplitude, slowly toroidally rotating, n=2 applied field. The n=1 mode is born locked to the vacuum vessel wall, while the n=2more » mode is entrained to the rotating field. Based on these magnetic response measurements and Thomson scattering measurements of flattening of the electron temperature profile, it is likely that these modes are magnetic island chains near the H-mode pedestal. The reduction in ∇Te occurs near the q=4 and 5 rational surfaces, suggesting five unique islands are possible (m=8, 9, or 10 for n=2) and (m=4 or 5 for n=1). In all cases, the island width is estimated to be 2–3 cm. The Chang-Callen calculated confinement degradation due to the presence of an individual island of this size is 8%–12%, which is close to the 13%–14% measured between the ELMs and suppressed states. In conclusion, this suggests that edge tearing modes may alter the pedestal causing peeling-ballooning stability during RMP induced ELM suppression.« less

  2. Noise Reduction in Arterial Spin Labeling Based Functional Connectivity Using Nuisance Variables.

    PubMed

    Jann, Kay; Smith, Robert X; Rios Piedra, Edgar A; Dapretto, Mirella; Wang, Danny J J

    2016-01-01

    Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) perfusion image series have recently been utilized for functional connectivity (FC) analysis in healthy volunteers and children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Noise reduction by using nuisance variables has been shown to be necessary to minimize potential confounding effects of head motion and physiological signals on BOLD based FC analysis. The purpose of the present study is to systematically evaluate the effectiveness of different noise reduction strategies (NRS) using nuisance variables to improve perfusion based FC analysis in two cohorts of healthy adults using state of the art 3D background-suppressed (BS) GRASE pseudo-continuous ASL (pCASL) and dual-echo 2D-EPI pCASL sequences. Five different NRS were performed in healthy volunteers to compare their performance. We then compared seed-based FC analysis using 3D BS GRASE pCASL in a cohort of 12 children with ASD (3f/9m, age 12.8 ± 1.3 years) and 13 typically developing (TD) children (1f/12m; age 13.9 ± 3 years) in conjunction with NRS. Regression of different combinations of nuisance variables affected FC analysis from a seed in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) to other areas of the default mode network (DMN) in both BOLD and pCASL data sets. Consistent with existing literature on BOLD-FC, we observed improved spatial specificity after physiological noise reduction and improved long-range connectivity using head movement related regressors. Furthermore, 3D BS GRASE pCASL shows much higher temporal SNR compared to dual-echo 2D-EPI pCASL and similar effects of noise reduction as those observed for BOLD. Seed-based FC analysis using 3D BS GRASE pCASL in children with ASD and TD children showed that noise reduction including physiological and motion related signals as nuisance variables is crucial for identifying altered long-range connectivity from PCC to frontal brain areas associated with ASD. This is the first study that systematically evaluated the effects of

  3. Noise Reduction in Arterial Spin Labeling Based Functional Connectivity Using Nuisance Variables

    PubMed Central

    Jann, Kay; Smith, Robert X.; Rios Piedra, Edgar A.; Dapretto, Mirella; Wang, Danny J. J.

    2016-01-01

    Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) perfusion image series have recently been utilized for functional connectivity (FC) analysis in healthy volunteers and children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Noise reduction by using nuisance variables has been shown to be necessary to minimize potential confounding effects of head motion and physiological signals on BOLD based FC analysis. The purpose of the present study is to systematically evaluate the effectiveness of different noise reduction strategies (NRS) using nuisance variables to improve perfusion based FC analysis in two cohorts of healthy adults using state of the art 3D background-suppressed (BS) GRASE pseudo-continuous ASL (pCASL) and dual-echo 2D-EPI pCASL sequences. Five different NRS were performed in healthy volunteers to compare their performance. We then compared seed-based FC analysis using 3D BS GRASE pCASL in a cohort of 12 children with ASD (3f/9m, age 12.8 ± 1.3 years) and 13 typically developing (TD) children (1f/12m; age 13.9 ± 3 years) in conjunction with NRS. Regression of different combinations of nuisance variables affected FC analysis from a seed in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) to other areas of the default mode network (DMN) in both BOLD and pCASL data sets. Consistent with existing literature on BOLD-FC, we observed improved spatial specificity after physiological noise reduction and improved long-range connectivity using head movement related regressors. Furthermore, 3D BS GRASE pCASL shows much higher temporal SNR compared to dual-echo 2D-EPI pCASL and similar effects of noise reduction as those observed for BOLD. Seed-based FC analysis using 3D BS GRASE pCASL in children with ASD and TD children showed that noise reduction including physiological and motion related signals as nuisance variables is crucial for identifying altered long-range connectivity from PCC to frontal brain areas associated with ASD. This is the first study that systematically evaluated the effects of

  4. Reduction of Iron-Oxide-Carbon Composites: Part I. Estimation of the Rate Constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halder, S.; Fruehan, R. J.

    2008-12-01

    A new ironmaking concept using iron-oxide-carbon composite pellets has been proposed, which involves the combination of a rotary hearth furnace (RHF) and an iron bath smelter. This part of the research focuses on studying the two primary chemical kinetic steps. Efforts have been made to experimentally measure the kinetics of the carbon gasification by CO2 and wüstite reduction by CO by isolating them from the influence of heat- and mass-transport steps. A combined reaction model was used to interpret the experimental data and determine the rate constants. Results showed that the reduction is likely to be influenced by the chemical kinetics of both carbon oxidation and wüstite reduction at the temperatures of interest. Devolatilized wood-charcoal was observed to be a far more reactive form of carbon in comparison to coal-char. Sintering of the iron-oxide at the high temperatures of interest was found to exert a considerable influence on the reactivity of wüstite by virtue of altering the internal pore surface area available for the reaction. Sintering was found to be predominant for highly porous oxides and less of an influence on the denser ores. It was found using an indirect measurement technique that the rate constants for wüstite reduction were higher for the porous iron-oxide than dense hematite ore at higher temperatures (>1423 K). Such an indirect mode of measurement was used to minimize the influence of sintering of the porous oxide at these temperatures.

  5. Single-Mode VISAR

    SciTech Connect

    Krauter, K

    2007-11-16

    High energy-density physics (HEDP) experiments examine the properties of materials under extreme conditions. These experiments rely on the measurement of one or two velocities. These velocities are used to obtain Hugoniot relationships and thermodynamic equations of state. This methodology is referred to as 'velocimetry' and an instrument used to measure the shock wave is called a 'velocimeter' or a '(velocity) diagnostic'. The two most-widely used existing velocity diagnostics are; photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) and velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR). PDV's advantages are a fast rise-time and ease of implementation but PDV has an upper velocity limit. Traditional implementations of VISAR have a rise time 10 times slower than PDV and are not easily implemented but are capable of measuring any velocity produced during HEDP experiments. This thesis describes a novel method of combining the positive attributes of PDV and VISAR into a more cost effective diagnostic called a Single-Mode VISAR (SMV). The new diagnostic will consist of PDV parts in a VISAR configuration. This configuration will enable the measurement of any velocity produced during shock physics experiments while the components used to build the diagnostic will give the diagnostic a fast rise time and make it easy to use. This thesis describes the process of building and testing the first single-mode VISAR. The tests include verifying the performance of the components and the diagnostic as a whole.

  6. SAMPEX Spin Stabilized Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Dean C.; Markley, F. Landis; Watson, Todd P.

    2008-01-01

    The Solar, Anomalous, and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer (SAMPEX), the first of the Small Explorer series of spacecraft, was launched on July 3, 1992 into an 82' inclination orbit with an apogee of 670 km and a perigee of 520 km and a mission lifetime goal of 3 years. After more than 15 years of continuous operation, the reaction wheel began to fail on August 18,2007. With a set of three magnetic torquer bars being the only remaining attitude actuator, the SAMPEX recovery team decided to deviate from its original attitude control system design and put the spacecraft into a spin stabilized mode. The necessary operations had not been used for many years, which posed a challenge. However, on September 25, 2007, the spacecraft was successfully spun up to 1.0 rpm about its pitch axis, which points at the sun. This paper describes the diagnosis of the anomaly, the analysis of flight data, the simulation of the spacecraft dynamics, and the procedures used to recover the spacecraft to spin stabilized mode.

  7. Modes of fossil preservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schopf, J.M.

    1975-01-01

    The processes of geologic preservation are important for understanding the organisms represented by fossils. Some fossil differences are due to basic differences in organization of animals and plants, but the interpretation of fossils has also tended to be influenced by modes of preservation. Four modes of preservation generally can be distinguished: (1) Cellular permineralization ("petrifaction") preserves anatomical detail, and, occasionally, even cytologic structures. (2) Coalified compression, best illustrated by structures from coal but characteristic of many plant fossils in shale, preserves anatomical details in distorted form and produces surface replicas (impressions) on enclosing matrix. (3) Authigenic preservation replicates surface form or outline (molds and casts) prior to distortion by compression and, depending on cementation and timing, may intergrade with fossils that have been subject to compression. (4) Duripartic (hard part) preservation is characteristic of fossil skeletal remains, predominantly animal. Molds, pseudomorphs, or casts may form as bulk replacements following dissolution of the original fossil material, usually by leaching. Classification of the kinds of preservation in fossils will aid in identifying the processes responsible for modifying the fossil remains of both animals and plants. ?? 1975.

  8. Nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of the I-mode high confinement regime and comparisons with experiment

    SciTech Connect

    White, A. E. Howard, N. T.; Creely, A. J.; Chilenski, M. A.; Greenwald, M.; Hubbard, A. E.; Hughes, J. W.; Marmar, E.; Rice, J. E.; Sierchio, J. M.; Sung, C.; Walk, J. R.; Whyte, D. G.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Edlund, E. M.; Kung, C.; Holland, C.; Candy, J.; Petty, C. C.; Reinke, M. L.; and others

    2015-05-15

    For the first time, nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of I-mode plasmas are performed and compared with experiment. I-mode is a high confinement regime, featuring energy confinement similar to H-mode, but without enhanced particle and impurity particle confinement [D. G. Whyte et al., Nucl. Fusion 50, 105005 (2010)]. As a consequence of the separation between heat and particle transport, I-mode exhibits several favorable characteristics compared to H-mode. The nonlinear gyrokinetic code GYRO [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] is used to explore the effects of E × B shear and profile stiffness in I-mode and compare with L-mode. The nonlinear GYRO simulations show that I-mode core ion temperature and electron temperature profiles are more stiff than L-mode core plasmas. Scans of the input E × B shear in GYRO simulations show that E × B shearing of turbulence is a stronger effect in the core of I-mode than L-mode. The nonlinear simulations match the observed reductions in long wavelength density fluctuation levels across the L-I transition but underestimate the reduction of long wavelength electron temperature fluctuation levels. The comparisons between experiment and gyrokinetic simulations for I-mode suggest that increased E × B shearing of turbulence combined with increased profile stiffness are responsible for the reductions in core turbulence observed in the experiment, and that I-mode resembles H-mode plasmas more than L-mode plasmas with regards to marginal stability and temperature profile stiffness.

  9. Nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of the I-mode high confinement regime and comparisons with experimenta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, A. E.; Howard, N. T.; Creely, A. J.; Chilenski, M. A.; Greenwald, M.; Hubbard, A. E.; Hughes, J. W.; Marmar, E.; Rice, J. E.; Sierchio, J. M.; Sung, C.; Walk, J. R.; Whyte, D. G.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Edlund, E. M.; Kung, C.; Holland, C.; Candy, J.; Petty, C. C.; Reinke, M. L.; Theiler, C.

    2015-05-01

    For the first time, nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of I-mode plasmas are performed and compared with experiment. I-mode is a high confinement regime, featuring energy confinement similar to H-mode, but without enhanced particle and impurity particle confinement [D. G. Whyte et al., Nucl. Fusion 50, 105005 (2010)]. As a consequence of the separation between heat and particle transport, I-mode exhibits several favorable characteristics compared to H-mode. The nonlinear gyrokinetic code GYRO [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] is used to explore the effects of E × B shear and profile stiffness in I-mode and compare with L-mode. The nonlinear GYRO simulations show that I-mode core ion temperature and electron temperature profiles are more stiff than L-mode core plasmas. Scans of the input E × B shear in GYRO simulations show that E × B shearing of turbulence is a stronger effect in the core of I-mode than L-mode. The nonlinear simulations match the observed reductions in long wavelength density fluctuation levels across the L-I transition but underestimate the reduction of long wavelength electron temperature fluctuation levels. The comparisons between experiment and gyrokinetic simulations for I-mode suggest that increased E × B shearing of turbulence combined with increased profile stiffness are responsible for the reductions in core turbulence observed in the experiment, and that I-mode resembles H-mode plasmas more than L-mode plasmas with regards to marginal stability and temperature profile stiffness.

  10. Origins of topological bulk modes in isostatic lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocklin, D. Zeb; Chen, Bryan; Falk, Martin; Lubensky, Tom; Vitelli, Vincenzo

    2015-03-01

    Mechanical lattices under periodic boundary conditions with coordination z = 2 d , where d is the spatial dimensionality, and with a gapped phonon spectrum at all wavenumbers not equal to zero are isostatic. When cut, these lattices with N sites in two dimensions necessarily have of order N 1 / 2 zero modes on their boundaries. Recently, Kane and Lubensky showed that these systems can be described by a super-symmetric Hamiltonian analogous to that of the Su-Schrieffer model for polyacetylene and they identified a topological invariant, the topological polarization, that determines on which edges zero modes lie in finite systems. We show that a family of two-dimensional four-site-per-unit-cell isostatic lattices possess topologically protected bulk zero modes. These ``Weyl modes'' are novel, tunable low-energy mechanisms of the mechanical lattice. They are the analogs of the zero-energy electronic modes of topological semimetals. We discuss how adjusting the lattice parameters induces Weyl modes and alters their wavevectors (generally incommensurate with the lattice) and how they can transport zero modes from one edge to an opposite one as surface wavenumber varies. An accompanying talk discusses the novel dynamical properties of the system.

  11. The Detection of Radiated Modes from Ducted Fan Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, F.; Nark, Douglas M.; Thomas, Russell H.

    2001-01-01

    The bypass duct of an aircraft engine is a low-pass filter allowing some spinning modes to radiate outside the duct. The knowledge of the radiated modes can help in noise reduction, as well as the diagnosis of noise generation mechanisms inside the duct. We propose a nonintrusive technique using a circular microphone array outside the engine measuring the complex noise spectrum on an arc of a circle. The array is placed at various axial distances from the inlet or the exhaust of the engine. Using a model of noise radiation from the duct, an overdetermined system of linear equations is constructed for the complex amplitudes of the radial modes for a fixed circumferential mode. This system of linear equations is generally singular, indicating that the problem is illposed. Tikhonov regularization is employed to solve this system of equations for the unknown amplitudes of the radiated modes. An application of our mode detection technique using measured acoustic data from a circular microphone array is presented. We show that this technique can reliably detect radiated modes with the possible exception of modes very close to cut-off.

  12. The Aerosol Coarse Mode Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnott, W. P.; Adhikari, N.; Air, D.; Kassianov, E.; Barnard, J.

    2014-12-01

    Many areas of the world show an aerosol volume distribution with a significant coarse mode and sometimes a dominant coarse mode. The large coarse mode is usually due to dust, but sea salt aerosol can also play an important role. However, in many field campaigns, the coarse mode tends to be ignored, because it is difficult to measure. This lack of measurements leads directly to a concomitant "lack of analysis" of this mode. Because, coarse mode aerosols can have significant effects on radiative forcing, both in the shortwave and longwave spectrum, the coarse mode -- and these forcings -- should be accounted for in atmospheric models. Forcings based only on fine mode aerosols have the potential to be misleading. In this paper we describe examples of large coarse modes that occur in areas of large aerosol loading (Mexico City, Barnard et al., 2010) as well as small loadings (Sacramento, CA; Kassianov et al., 2012; and Reno, NV). We then demonstrate that: (1) the coarse mode can contribute significantly to radiative forcing, relative to the fine mode, and (2) neglecting the coarse mode may result in poor comparisons between measurements and models. Next we describe -- in general terms -- the limitations of instrumentation to measure the coarse mode. Finally, we suggest a new initiative aimed at examining coarse mode aerosol generation mechanisms; transport and deposition; chemical composition; visible and thermal IR refractive indices; morphology; microphysical behavior when deposited on snow and ice; and specific instrumentation needs. Barnard, J. C., J. D. Fast, G. Paredes-Miranda, W. P. Arnott, and A. Laskin, 2010: Technical Note: Evaluation of the WRF-Chem "Aerosol Chemical to Aerosol Optical Properties" Module using data from the MILAGRO campaign, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 10, 7325-7340. Kassianov, E. I., M. S. Pekour, and J. C. Barnard, 2012: Aerosols in Central California: Unexpectedly large contribution of coarse mode to aerosol radiative forcing

  13. Separation of crack extension modes in orthotropic delamination models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beuth, Jack L.

    1995-01-01

    In the analysis of an interface crack between dissimilar elastic materials, the mode of crack extension is typically not unique, due to oscillatory behavior of near-tip stresses and displacements. This behavior currently limits the applicability of interfacial fracture mechanics as a means to predict composite delamination. The Virtual Crack Closure Technique (VCCT) is a method used to extract mode 1 and mode 2 energy release rates from numerical fracture solutions. The mode of crack extension extracted from an oscillatory solution using the VCCT is not unique due to the dependence of mode on the virtual crack extension length, Delta. In this work, a method is presented for using the VCCT to extract Delta-independent crack extension modes for the case of an interface crack between two in-plane orthotropic materials. The method does not involve altering the analysis to eliminate its oscillatory behavior. Instead, it is argued that physically reasonable, Delta-independent modes of crack extension can be extracted from oscillatory solutions. Knowledge of near-tip fields is used to determine the explicit Delta dependence of energy release rate parameters. Energy release rates are then defined that are separated from the oscillatory dependence on Delta. A modified VCCT using these energy release rate definitions is applied to results from finite element analyses, showing that Delta-independent modes of crack extension result. The modified technique has potential as a consistent method for extracting crack extension modes from numerical solutions. The Delta-independent modes extracted using this technique can also serve as guides for testing the convergence of finite element models. Direct applications of this work include the analysis of planar composite delamination problems, where plies or debonded laminates are modeled as in-plane orthotropic materials.

  14. Non-linear mode interaction between spin torque driven and damped modes in spin torque nano-oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Romera, M.; Monteblanco, E.; Garcia-Sanchez, F.; Buda-Prejbeanu, L. D.; Ebels, U.; Delaët, B.

    2015-05-11

    The influence of dynamic coupling in between magnetic layers of a standard spin torque nano-oscillator composed of a synthetic antiferromagnet (SyF) as a polarizer and an in-plane magnetized free layer has been investigated. Experiments on spin valve nanopillars reveal non-continuous features such as kinks in the frequency field dependence that cannot be explained without such interactions. Comparison of experiments to numerical macrospin simulations shows that this is due to non-linear interaction between the spin torque (STT) driven mode and a damped mode that is mediated via the third harmonics of the STT mode. It only occurs at large applied currents and thus at large excitation amplitudes of the STT mode. Under these conditions, a hybridized mode characterized by a strong reduction of the linewidth appears. The reduced linewidth can be explained by a reduction of the non-linear contribution to the linewidth via an enhanced effective damping. Interestingly, the effect depends also on the exchange interaction within the SyF. An enhancement of the current range of reduced linewidth by a factor of two and a reduction of the minimum linewidth by a factor of two are predicted from simulation when the exchange interaction strength is reduced by 30%. These results open directions to optimize the design and microwave performances of spin torque nano-oscillators taking advantage of the coupling mechanisms.

  15. Reductive dechlorination reduces negative impact of PCBs on in vitro fertilization

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, K.; Mousa, M.; Quensen, J.

    1995-12-31

    The variety of toxic effects ascribed to commercial PCB mixtures is likely because the individual congeners differ in their modes of toxicity and potencies. Similarly, a change in the congener composition of a PCB mixture due to reductive dechlorination by anaerobic microorganisms might be expected to alter the toxicological properties of that PCB mixture. In this study, Aroclors 1,242 and 1,254 were reductively dechlorinated using cultures of microorganisms from two different sites. The resulting dechlorination products and Aroclors were then tested for their effects on in vitro fertilization using mouse gametes. In general, percent fertilization increased with the extent of dechlorination. For example, fertilization in treatments with 10 {micro}g/ml of either Aroclor was only 40% of that in controls without Aroclor, but equal total molar concentrations of the dechlorination products produced by River Raisin microorganisms had no significant effect on fertilization. By this measure, therefore, the microbial dechlorination of PCBs appears to have a beneficial effect in reducing reproductive toxicity.

  16. Theory of intermodal four-wave mixing with random linear mode coupling in few-mode fibers.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yuzhe; Essiambre, René-Jean; Desgroseilliers, Marc; Tulino, Antonia M; Ryf, Roland; Mumtaz, Sami; Agrawal, Govind P

    2014-12-29

    We study intermodal four-wave mixing (FWM) in few-mode fibers in the presence of birefringence fluctuations and random linear mode coupling. Two different intermodal FWM processes are investigated by including all nonlinear contributions to the phase-matching condition and FWM bandwidth. We find that one of the FWM processes has a much larger bandwidth than the other. We include random linear mode coupling among fiber modes using three different models based on an analysis of the impact of random coupling on differences of propagation constants between modes. We find that random coupling always reduces the FWM efficiency relative to its vale in the absence of linear coupling. The reduction factor is relatively small (about 3 dB) when only a few modes are linearly coupled but can become very large (> 40 dB) when all modes couple strongly. In the limit of a coupling length much shorter than the nonlinear length, intermodal FWM efficiency becomes vanishingly small. These results should prove useful in the context of space-division multiplexing with few-mode and multimode fibers. PMID:25607171

  17. Footprint reduction's 'multiple paybacks'.

    PubMed

    2010-06-01

    Some of the measures that EFM personnel can take to further reduce their estates' carbon footprint at a time when pressure to cut energy consumption must be balanced both against the requirement to create the best possible patient environment, and new medical technology that may require substantial energy to operate, were the focus of a recent IHEEM carbon reduction seminar in London. The one-day event, "Planning to achieve Carbon Reduction Commitment targets for healthcare premises", also included a look at the key steps affected healthcare organisations, and especially their estates teams, need to be taking already to ensure compliance with the new Carbon Reduction Commitment scheme. PMID:20597381

  18. Dual-Mode Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goyne, Christopher P.; McDaniel, James C.

    2002-01-01

    The Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at the University of Virginia has conducted an investigation of the mixing and combustion processes in a hydrogen fueled dual-mode scramjet combustor. The experiment essentially consisted of the "direct connect" continuous operation of a Mach 2 rectangular combustor with a single unswept ramp fuel injector. The stagnation enthalpy of the test flow simulated a flight Mach number of 5. Measurements were obtained using conventional wall instrumentation and laser based diagnostics. These diagnostics included, pressure and wall temperature measurements, Fuel Plume Imaging (FPI) and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). A schematic of the combustor configuration and a summary of the measurements obtained are presented. The experimental work at UVa was parallel by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) work at NASA Langley. The numerical and experiment results are compared in this document.

  19. Mixed Mode Matrix Multiplication

    SciTech Connect

    Meng-Shiou Wu; Srinivas Aluru; Ricky A. Kendall

    2004-09-30

    In modern clustering environments where the memory hierarchy has many layers (distributed memory, shared memory layer, cache,...), an important question is how to fully utilize all available resources and identify the most dominant layer in certain computations. When combining algorithms on all layers together, what would be the best method to get the best performance out of all the resources we have? Mixed mode programming model that uses thread programming on the shared memory layer and message passing programming on the distributed memory layer is a method that many researchers are using to utilize the memory resources. In this paper, they take an algorithmic approach that uses matrix multiplication as a tool to show how cache algorithms affect the performance of both shared memory and distributed memory algorithms. They show that with good underlying cache algorithm, overall performance is stable. When underlying cache algorithm is bad, superlinear speedup may occur, and an increasing number of threads may also improve performance.

  20. Predicting substrate resonance mode frequency shifts using conductive, through-substrate vias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Conal E.; Abraham, D. W.

    2016-02-01

    Through-substrate-vias (TSVs) provide conduction paths to allow for three-dimensional integration of microelectronic structures. It is also known that metallic TSVs can be used to suppress resonance modes within dielectric substrates by altering the propagation of electromagnetic waves. Numerical analyses of transmission through substrates containing metallic TSVs revealed that although resonance modes of the composite structure are shifted to higher frequencies, these frequencies are not solely dictated by the TSV periodicity. Simulations show that hybrid modes are formed through a convolution of the original substrate modes and a long-wavelength mode analogous to that found in a two-dimensional photonic crystal. An analytical formula is proposed that provides a simple relation between the intrinsic substrate mode frequencies and the long-wavelength mode that scales with the ratio of TSV radius to its periodicity.

  1. Epigenetic Alterations in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Mut, Jose V; Gräff, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the major cause of dementia in Western societies. It progresses asymptomatically during decades before being belatedly diagnosed when therapeutic strategies have become unviable. Although several genetic alterations have been associated with AD, the vast majority of AD cases do not show strong genetic underpinnings and are thus considered a consequence of non-genetic factors. Epigenetic mechanisms allow for the integration of long-lasting non-genetic inputs on specific genetic backgrounds, and recently, a growing number of epigenetic alterations in AD have been described. For instance, an accumulation of dysregulated epigenetic mechanisms in aging, the predominant risk factor of AD, might facilitate the onset of the disease. Likewise, mutations in several enzymes of the epigenetic machinery have been associated with neurodegenerative processes that are altered in AD such as impaired learning and memory formation. Genome-wide and locus-specific epigenetic alterations have also been reported, and several epigenetically dysregulated genes validated by independent groups. From these studies, a picture emerges of AD as being associated with DNA hypermethylation and histone deacetylation, suggesting a general repressed chromatin state and epigenetically reduced plasticity in AD. Here we review these recent findings and discuss several technical and methodological considerations that are imperative for their correct interpretation. We also pay particular focus on potential implementations and theoretical frameworks that we expect will help to better direct future studies aimed to unravel the epigenetic participation in AD. PMID:26734709

  2. Altered Vision Near the Hands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrams, Richard A.; Davoli, Christopher C.; Du, Feng; Knapp, William H., III; Paull, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    The present study explored the manner in which hand position may affect visual processing. We studied three classic visual attention tasks (visual search, inhibition of return, and attentional blink) during which the participants held their hands either near the stimulus display, or far from the display. Remarkably, the hands altered visual…

  3. Art as Alterity in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Guoping

    2014-01-01

    In education, art has often been perceived as entertainment and decoration and is the first subject to go when there are budget cuts or test-score pressures. Drawing on Emmanuel Lévinas's idea of the primacy of radical alterity that breaks the totality of our being, enables self-transformation and ethics, and ensures community as a totality…

  4. Tunable asymmetric mode conversion using the dark-mode of three-mode waveguide system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joonsoo; Lee, Seung-Yeol; Lee, Yohan; Kim, Hwi; Lee, Byoungho

    2014-11-17

    A design scheme for low-reflection asymmetric mode conversion structure in three-mode waveguide system is proposed. By using a dark-mode of three-mode system, which can be interpreted in terms of destructive interference of transition amplitudes, the transmission characteristics for forward and backward directions can be designed separately. After explanation of the proposed design scheme, we demonstrate an example of asymmetric mode converter that consists of two gratings. The proposed scheme may be useful for the design of tunable asymmetric transmission devices due to its design flexibility and efficient design process. PMID:25402109

  5. Model reduction for flexible spacecraft with clustered natural frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, T. W. C.; Gawronski, W. K.

    1989-01-01

    Two approaches to the problem of model reduction for flexible spacecraft that have proved very useful are balancing and model truncation. Furthermore, it is well known that a model representation of a lightly damped flexible structure with widely spaced natural frequencies is approximately balanced. Consequently, reduction in either coordinate system gives similar results for this case. It is important to note, however, that flexible space structures typically have clusters of closely spaced frequencies. In such cases, reduction in model coordinates can give large errors, while the error obtained using balancing is generally much smaller. A new reduction procedure which combines the best features of model and balanced reduction is therefore developed. It is more efficient than balanced reduction of the full system, as it only involves balancing those subsystems of close modes that are highly correlated, yet is shown to yield results which are essentially as good.

  6. The Integrated Mode Management Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchins, Edwin

    1996-01-01

    Mode management is the processes of understanding the character and consequences of autoflight modes, planning and selecting the engagement, disengagement and transitions between modes, and anticipating automatic mode transitions made by the autoflight system itself. The state of the art is represented by the latest designs produced by each of the major airframe manufacturers, the Boeing 747-400, the Boeing 777, the McDonnell Douglas MD-11, and the Airbus A320/A340 family of airplanes. In these airplanes autoflight modes are selected by manipulating switches on the control panel. The state of the autoflight system is displayed on the flight mode annunciators. The integrated mode management interface (IMMI) is a graphical interface to autoflight mode management systems for aircraft equipped with flight management computer systems (FMCS). The interface consists of a vertical mode manager and a lateral mode manager. Autoflight modes are depicted by icons on a graphical display. Mode selection is accomplished by touching (or mousing) the appropriate icon. The IMMI provides flight crews with an integrated interface to autoflight systems for aircraft equipped with flight management computer systems (FMCS). The current version is modeled on the Boeing glass-cockpit airplanes (747-400, 757/767). It runs on the SGI Indigo workstation. A working prototype of this graphics-based crew interface to the autoflight mode management tasks of glass cockpit airplanes has been installed in the Advanced Concepts Flight Simulator of the CSSRF of NASA Ames Research Center. This IMMI replaces the devices in FMCS equipped airplanes currently known as mode control panel (Boeing), flight guidance control panel (McDonnell Douglas), and flight control unit (Airbus). It also augments the functions of the flight mode annunciators. All glass cockpit airplanes are sufficiently similar that the IMMI could be tailored to the mode management system of any modern cockpit. The IMMI does not replace the

  7. Reduction of bone strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bingham, Cindy

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on reduction of bone strength are presented. WEHI 231 B growth rates, experimental chambers used to apply the electric field to the cell cultures, and a mouse suspended by rotating cuff in electromagnetic field are shown.

  8. AMD NOX REDUCTION IMPACTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is the first phase of a potentially multi-phase project aimed at identifying scientific methodologies that will lead to the development of innnovative analytical tools supporting the analysis of control strategy effectiveness, namely. accountabilty. Significant reductions i...

  9. Optimization of few-mode-fiber based mode converter for mode division multiplexing transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yiwei; Fu, Songnian; Zhang, Minming; Tang, M.; Shum, P.; Liu, Deming

    2013-10-01

    Few-mode-fiber (FMF) based mode division multiplexing (MDM) is a promising technique to further increase the transmission capacity of single mode fibers. We propose and numerically investigate a fiber-optical mode converter (MC) using long period gratings (LPGs) fabricated on the FMF by point-by-point CO2 laser inscription technique. In order to precisely excite three modes (LP01, LP11, and LP02), both untilted LPG and tilted LPG are comprehensively optimized through the length, index modulation depth, and tilt angle of the LPG in order to achieve a mode contrast ratio (MCR) of more than 20 dB with less wavelength dependence. It is found that the proposed MCs have obvious advantages of high MCR, low mode crosstalk, easy fabrication and maintenance, and compact size.

  10. Mitigation of mode instabilities by dynamic excitation of fiber modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, Hans-Jürgen; Jauregui, Cesar; Stutzki, Fabian; Jansen, Florian; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2013-03-01

    By dynamically varying the power content of the excited fiber modes of the main amplifier of a fiber-based MOPA system at high average output power levels, it was possible to mitigate mode instabilities to a large extent. In order to achieve the excitation variation, we used an acousto-optic deflector in front of the Yb-doped rod-type fiber. Therewith, it was possible to significantly increase both the average and the instantaneous minimum power content of the fundamental mode. This, consequently, led to a substantial improvement of the beam quality and pointing stability at power levels well beyond the threshold of mode instabilities.

  11. Automatic determination of important mode-mode correlations in many-mode vibrational wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Carolin; Christiansen, Ove

    2015-04-01

    We introduce new automatic procedures for parameterizing vibrational coupled cluster (VCC) and vibrational configuration interaction wave functions. Importance measures for individual mode combinations in the wave function are derived based on upper bounds to Hamiltonian matrix elements and/or the size of perturbative corrections derived in the framework of VCC. With a threshold, this enables an automatic, system-adapted way of choosing which mode-mode correlations are explicitly parameterized in the many-mode wave function. The effect of different importance measures and thresholds is investigated for zero-point energies and infrared spectra for formaldehyde and furan. Furthermore, the direct link between important mode-mode correlations and coordinates is illustrated employing water clusters as examples: Using optimized coordinates, a larger number of mode combinations can be neglected in the correlated many-mode vibrational wave function than with normal coordinates for the same accuracy. Moreover, the fraction of important mode-mode correlations compared to the total number of correlations decreases with system size. This underlines the potential gain in efficiency when using optimized coordinates in combination with a flexible scheme for choosing the mode-mode correlations included in the parameterization of the correlated many-mode vibrational wave function. All in all, it is found that the introduced schemes for parameterizing correlated many-mode vibrational wave functions lead to at least as systematic and accurate calculations as those using more standard and straightforward excitation level definitions. This new way of defining approximate calculations offers potential for future calculations on larger systems.

  12. Monolithic enhancement-mode and depletion-mode GaN-based MOSHEMTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ching-Ting; Chang, Jhe-Hao; Tseng, Chun-Yen

    2016-02-01

    GaN-based metal-oxide-semiconductor high-electron-mobility transistors (MOSHEMTs) with outstanding properties of high operation speed and high breakdown voltage are promising for high frequency switching operation in ICs. To further develop the GaN-based digital ICs, the AlGaN/GaN MOSHEMT inverters integrated with the enhancement/depletion-mode (E/D-mode) transistors were investigated. In this work, the ferroelectric LiNbO3 (LNO) gate oxide layer and the photoelectrochemical (PEC)-recessed structure were simultaneously utilized to fabricate the critical E-mode AlGaN/GaN MOSHEMTs. Among the ferroelectric materials, the high dielectric constant LNO film with the larger spontaneous polarization of 80 μC/cm2, the wider bandgap of 3.9 eV, and the lower interface state density on the GaN-based semiconductor was beneficial to the modulation of the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) channel and the reduction of the gate leakage current. Besides, using the PEC-recessed structure could improve the transconductance of the E-mode transistors and adjust the operation current of the D-mode transistors without destroying the etched AlGaN surface. Instead of the typical tuning area size method, the PEC etching method was demonstrated in this work to adjust the current ratio (β) of the E/D-mode transistors with keeping the matched area size for the miniaturization of the AlGaN/GaN MOSHEMT inverters. From the voltage transfer curve, the corresponded VOUT was equaled to VIN = VDD/2 = 2.5 V, and the output swing were about 4.9 Vp-p as the input signal was 5 Vp-p. It revealed that the resulting AlGaN/GaN MOSHEMT inverter with the β of 25 was operated as a high performance un-skewed inverter.

  13. Neonatal exposure to benzo[a]pyrene induces oxidative stress causing altered hippocampal cytomorphometry and behavior during early adolescence period of male Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Patel, Bhupesh; Das, Saroj Kumar; Das, Swagatika; Das, Lipsa; Patri, Manorama

    2016-05-01

    Environmental neurotoxicants like benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) have been well documented regarding their potential to induce oxidative stress. However, neonatal exposure to B[a]P and its subsequent effect on anti-oxidant defence system and hippocampal cytomorphometry leading to behavioral changes have not been fully elucidated. We investigated the effect of acute exposure of B[a]P on five days old male Wistar pups administered with single dose of B[a]P (0.2 μg/kg BW) through intracisternal mode. Control group was administered with vehicle i.e., DMSO and a separate group of rats without any treatment was taken as naive group. Behavioral analysis showed anxiolytic-like behavior with significant increase in time spent in open arm in elevated plus maze. Further, significant reduction in fall off time during rotarod test showing B[a]P induced locomotor hyperactivity and impaired motor co-ordination in adolescent rats. B[a]P induced behavioral changes were further associated with altered anti-oxidant defence system involving significant reduction in the total ATPase, Na(+) K(+) ATPase, Mg(2+) ATPase, GR and GPx activity with a significant elevation in the activity of catalase and GST as compared to naive and control groups. Cytomorphometry of hippocampus showed that the number of neurons and glia in B[a]P treated group were significantly reduced as compared to naive and control. Subsequent observation showed that the area and perimeter of hippocampus, hippocampal neurons and neuronal nucleus were significantly reduced in B[a]P treated group as compared to naive and control. The findings of the present study suggest that the alteration in hippocampal cytomorphometry and neuronal population associated with impaired antioxidant signaling and mood in B[a]P treated group could be an outcome of neuromorphological alteration leading to pyknotic cell death or impaired differential migration of neurons during early postnatal brain development. PMID:26946409

  14. Glaucoma Alters the Circadian Timing System

    PubMed Central

    Drouyer, Elise; Dkhissi-Benyahya, Ouria; Chiquet, Christophe; WoldeMussie, Elizabeth; Ruiz, Guadalupe; Wheeler, Larry A.; Denis, Philippe; Cooper, Howard M.

    2008-01-01

    Glaucoma is a widespread ocular disease and major cause of blindness characterized by progressive, irreversible damage of the optic nerve. Although the degenerative loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGC) and visual deficits associated with glaucoma have been extensively studied, we hypothesize that glaucoma will also lead to alteration of the circadian timing system. Circadian and non-visual responses to light are mediated by a specialized subset of melanopsin expressing RGCs that provide photic input to mammalian endogenous clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). In order to explore the molecular, anatomical and functional consequences of glaucoma we used a rodent model of chronic ocular hypertension, a primary causal factor of the pathology. Quantitative analysis of retinal projections using sensitive anterograde tracing demonstrates a significant reduction (∼50–70%) of RGC axon terminals in all visual and non-visual structures and notably in the SCN. The capacity of glaucomatous rats to entrain to light was challenged by exposure to successive shifts of the light dark (LD) cycle associated with step-wise decreases in light intensity. Although glaucomatous rats are able to entrain their locomotor activity to the LD cycle at all light levels, they require more time to re-adjust to a shifted LD cycle and show significantly greater variability in activity onsets in comparison with normal rats. Quantitative PCR reveals the novel finding that melanopsin as well as rod and cone opsin mRNAs are significantly reduced in glaucomatous retinas. Our findings demonstrate that glaucoma impacts on all these aspects of the circadian timing system. In light of these results, the classical view of glaucoma as pathology unique to the visual system should be extended to include anatomical and functional alterations of the circadian timing system. PMID:19079596

  15. Plant growth conditions alter phytolith carbon

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Kimberley L.; Alfonso-Garcia, Alba; Sanchez, Jessica; Potma, Eric O.; Santos, Guaciara M.

    2015-01-01

    Many plants, including grasses and some important human food sources, accumulate, and precipitate silica in their cells to form opaline phytoliths. These phytoliths contain small amounts of organic matter (OM) that are trapped during the process of silicification. Previous work has suggested that plant silica is associated with compounds such as proteins, lipids, lignin, and carbohydrate complexes. It is not known whether these compounds are cellular components passively encapsulated as the cell silicifies, polymers actively involved in the precipitation process or random compounds assimilated by the plant and discarded into a “glass wastebasket.” Here, we used Raman spectroscopy to map the distribution of OM in phytoliths, and to analyze individual phytoliths isolated from Sorghum bicolor plants grown under different laboratory treatments. Using mapping, we showed that OM in phytoliths is distributed throughout the silica and is not related to dark spots visible in light microscopy, previously assumed to be the repository for phytolith OM. The Raman spectra exhibited common bands indicative of C-H stretching modes of general OM, and further more diagnostic bands consistent with carbohydrates, lignins, and other OM. These Raman spectra exhibited variability of spectral signatures and of relative intensities between sample treatments indicating that differing growth conditions altered the phytolith carbon. This may have strong implications for understanding the mechanism of phytolith formation, and for use of phytolith carbon isotope values in dating or paleoclimate reconstruction. PMID:26442066

  16. Plant growth conditions alter phytolith carbon.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Kimberley L; Alfonso-Garcia, Alba; Sanchez, Jessica; Potma, Eric O; Santos, Guaciara M

    2015-01-01

    Many plants, including grasses and some important human food sources, accumulate, and precipitate silica in their cells to form opaline phytoliths. These phytoliths contain small amounts of organic matter (OM) that are trapped during the process of silicification. Previous work has suggested that plant silica is associated with compounds such as proteins, lipids, lignin, and carbohydrate complexes. It is not known whether these compounds are cellular components passively encapsulated as the cell silicifies, polymers actively involved in the precipitation process or random compounds assimilated by the plant and discarded into a "glass wastebasket." Here, we used Raman spectroscopy to map the distribution of OM in phytoliths, and to analyze individual phytoliths isolated from Sorghum bicolor plants grown under different laboratory treatments. Using mapping, we showed that OM in phytoliths is distributed throughout the silica and is not related to dark spots visible in light microscopy, previously assumed to be the repository for phytolith OM. The Raman spectra exhibited common bands indicative of C-H stretching modes of general OM, and further more diagnostic bands consistent with carbohydrates, lignins, and other OM. These Raman spectra exhibited variability of spectral signatures and of relative intensities between sample treatments indicating that differing growth conditions altered the phytolith carbon. This may have strong implications for understanding the mechanism of phytolith formation, and for use of phytolith carbon isotope values in dating or paleoclimate reconstruction. PMID:26442066

  17. Single mode acoustic fiber waveguide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, B. S.; May, R. G.; Claus, R. O.

    1984-01-01

    The single mode operation of a clad rod acoustic waveguide is described. Unlike conventional clad optical and acoustic waveguiding structures which use modes confined to a central core surrounded by a cladding, this guide supports neither core nor cladding modes but a single interface wave field on the core-cladding boundary. The propagation of this bound field and the potential improved freedom from spurious responses is discussed.

  18. Dual-mode acoustic wave biosensors microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auner, Gregory W.; Shreve, Gina; Ying, Hao; Newaz, Golam; Hughes, Chantelle; Xu, Jianzeng

    2003-04-01

    We have develop highly sensitive and selective acoustic wave biosensor arrays with signal analysis systems to provide a fingerprint for the real-time identification and quantification of a wide array of bacterial pathogens and environmental health hazards. We have developed an unique highly sensitive dual mode acoustic wave platform prototype that, when combined with phage based selective detection elements, form a durable bacteria sensor. Arrays of these new real-time biosensors are integrated to form a biosensor array on a chip. This research and development program optimizes advanced piezoelectric aluminum nitride wide bandgap semiconductors, novel micromachining processes, advanced device structures, selective phage displays development and immobilization techniques, and system integration and signal analysis technology to develop the biosensor arrays. The dual sensor platform can be programmed to sense in a gas, vapor or liquid environment by switching between acoustic wave resonate modes. Such a dual mode sensor has tremendous implications for applications involving monitoring of pathogenic microorganisms in the clinical setting due to their ability to detect airborne pathogens. This provides a number of applications including hospital settings such as intensive care or other in-patient wards for the reduction of nosocomial infections and maintenance of sterile environments in surgical suites. Monitoring for airborn pathogen transmission in public transportation areas such as airplanes may be useful for implementation of strategies for redution of airborn transmission routes. The ability to use the same sensor in the liquid sensing mode is important for tracing the source of airborn pathogens to local liquid sources. Sensing of pathogens in saliva will be useful for sensing oral pathogens and support of decision-making strategies regarding prevention of transmission and support of treatment strategies.

  19. NASA research on viscous drag reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, R. H.; Maddalon, D. V.

    1982-01-01

    Research on natural laminar flow, laminar flow control by suction, and turbulent drag reduction is discussed. Preliminary results suggest that a significant amount of natural laminar flow can be achieved on small, straight wing airplanes. On larger, swept wing aircraft, laminar flow control by distributed suction is expected to result in significant fuel savings. The area over which laminar flow control is applied depends on tradeoffs involving structural complexity, maintenance, and cost. Several methods of reducing turbulent skin friction by altering the turbulence structure itself have shown promise in exploratory testing. The status of these technologies and the benefits of applying them to future aircraft are reviewed.

  20. Mode statistics in random lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Zaitsev, Oleg

    2006-12-15

    Representing an ensemble of random lasers with an ensemble of random matrices, we compute the average number of lasing modes and its fluctuations. The regimes of weak and strong coupling of the passive resonator to the environment are considered. In the latter case, contrary to an earlier claim in the literature, we do not find a power-law dependence of the average mode number on the pump strength. For the relative fluctuations, however, a power law can be established. It is shown that, due to the mode competition, the distribution of the number of excited modes over an ensemble of lasers is not binomial.

  1. Facing rim cavities fluctuation modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casalino, Damiano; Ribeiro, André F. P.; Fares, Ehab

    2014-06-01

    Cavity modes taking place in the rims of two opposite wheels are investigated through Lattice-Boltzmann CFD simulations. Based on previous observations carried out by the authors during the BANC-II/LAGOON landing gear aeroacoustic study, a resonance mode can take place in the volume between the wheels of a two-wheel landing gear, involving a coupling between shear-layer vortical fluctuations and acoustic modes resulting from the combination of round cavity modes and wheel-to-wheel transversal acoustic modes. As a result, side force fluctuations and tonal noise side radiation take place. A parametric study of the cavity mode properties is carried out in the present work by varying the distance between the wheels. Moreover, the effects due to the presence of the axle are investigated by removing the axle from the two-wheel assembly. The azimuthal properties of the modes are scrutinized by filtering the unsteady flow in narrow bands around the tonal frequencies and investigating the azimuthal structure of the filtered fluctuation modes. Estimation of the tone frequencies with an ad hoc proposed analytical formula confirms the observed modal properties of the filtered unsteady flow solutions. The present study constitutes a primary step in the description of facing rim cavity modes as a possible source of landing gear tonal noise.

  2. Methods of component mode synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, R. R., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A generalized substructure coupling, or component mode synthesis, procedure is described. Specific methods, applications, and such special topics as damping and experimental verification are surveyed.

  3. Ultrasonic Doppler Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tortoli, Piero; Fidanzati, Paolo; Luca, Bassi

    Any US equipment includes Doppler facilities capable of providing information about moving structures inside the human body. In most cases, the primary interest is in the investigation of blood flow dynamics, since this may be helpful for early diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases. However, there is also an increasing interest in tracking the movements of human tissues, since such movements can give an indirect evaluation of their elastic properties, which are valuable indicators of the possible presence of pathologies. This paper aims at presenting an overview of the different ways in which the Doppler technique has been developed and used in medical ultrasound (US), from early continuous wave (CW) systems to advanced pulsed wave (PW) colour-Doppler equipment. In particular, the most important technical features and clinical applications of CW, single-gate PW, multi-gate PW and flow-imaging systems are reviewed. The main signal processing approaches used for detection of Doppler frequencies are described, including time-domain and frequency-domain (spectral) methods, as well as novel strategies like, e.g., harmonic Doppler mode, which have been recently introduced to exploit the benefits of US contrast agents.

  4. Whispering gallery mode sensors

    PubMed Central

    Foreman, Matthew R.; Swaim, Jon D.; Vollmer, Frank

    2015-01-01

    We present a comprehensive overview of sensor technology exploiting optical whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonances. After a short introduction we begin by detailing the fundamental principles and theory of WGMs in optical microcavities and the transduction mechanisms frequently employed for sensing purposes. Key recent theoretical contributions to the modeling and analysis of WGM systems are highlighted. Subsequently we review the state of the art of WGM sensors by outlining efforts made to date to improve current detection limits. Proposals in this vein are numerous and range, for example, from plasmonic enhancements and active cavities to hybrid optomechanical sensors, which are already working in the shot noise limited regime. In parallel to furthering WGM sensitivity, efforts to improve the time resolution are beginning to emerge. We therefore summarize the techniques being pursued in this vein. Ultimately WGM sensors aim for real-world applications, such as measurements of force and temperature, or alternatively gas and biosensing. Each such application is thus reviewed in turn, and important achievements are discussed. Finally, we adopt a more forward-looking perspective and discuss the outlook of WGM sensors within both a physical and biological context and consider how they may yet push the detection envelope further. PMID:26973759

  5. HMD cueing mode degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speck, Richard P.; Fidopiastis, Cali M.; Herz, Norman E., Jr.

    2003-09-01

    Pilot cueing is a valuable use of Head Mounted Displays (HMDs) as it greatly helps the user to visually locate electronically identified targets. It is well known that a target which is hard to spot in the sky can be easily tracked and studied after it has been visually located. Transients, including sun glint, can reveal much about distant targets as they are visually studied. This is implicit in the "Visual Rules of Engagement". The term "Virtual Beyond Visual Range" has been coined to reflect the fact that optimized HMD cueing can extend visual identification to ranges previously covered only by radar data. The visual acquisition range can drop by a factor of three, however, when HMD image correlation errors expand the uncertainty zone a pilot must visually search. We have demonstrated that system errors, tolerable for off axis missile targeting, can produce this large drop in operational effectiveness. Studies using the Spectron SE1430 HMD analysis system have shown that errors of this magnitude can develop in current HMD models, and that these errors were neither identified by "ready room" tests nor were they correctable in the cockpit. The focus of this study was to develop affordable techniques to quantify the relationship of combat effectiveness to HMD defects for this and other advanced operating modes. When combined with field monitoring of HMD degradation, this makes economic optimization of the HMD supply/maintenance model possible while fulfilling operational mission requirements.

  6. Chemosensory alterations and cancer therapies

    SciTech Connect

    Bartoshuk, L.M. )

    1990-01-01

    Taste and olfaction provide sensory information and sensory pleasure. Cancer therapies affect both. Chemotherapy has not been shown to produce dramatic losses of taste or smell, but systematic studies on various chemotherapeutic agents and types of cancer are lacking. Radiation therapy does produce clear losses of both taste and smell. Both chemotherapy and radiation therapy alter the pleasure produced by taste and smell through the formation of conditioned aversions. That is, foods consumed in proximity with the nausea of therapy come to be unpleasant. The impact of conditioned aversions can be diminished by providing a scapegoat food just before therapy. Alterations in foods may be beneficial to the cancer patient. Increasing the concentrations of flavor ingredients can compensate for sensory losses, and providing pureed foods that retain the cognitive integrity of a meal can benefit the patient who has chewing or swallowing problems.

  7. Nonlinear mode coupling in whispering-gallery-mode resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Aguanno, Giuseppe; Menyuk, Curtis R.

    2016-04-01

    We present a first-principles derivation of the coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations that govern the interaction between two families of modes with different transverse profiles in a generic whispering-gallery-mode resonator. We find regions of modulational instability and the existence of trains of bright solitons in both the normal and the anomalous dispersion regime.

  8. Altered states: psychedelics and anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Icaza, Eduardo E; Mashour, George A

    2013-12-01

    The psychedelic experience has been reported since antiquity, but there is relatively little known about the underlying neural mechanisms. A recent neuroimaging study on psilocybin revealed a pattern of decreased cerebral blood flow and functional disconnections that is surprisingly similar to that caused by various anesthetics. In this article, the authors review historical examples of psychedelic experiences induced by general anesthetics and then contrast the mechanisms by which these two drug classes generate altered states of consciousness. PMID:24061599

  9. Radiation damage-controlled localization of alteration haloes in albite: implications for alteration types and patterns vis-à-vis mineralization and element mobilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, D. C.; Chaudhuri, T.

    2016-07-01

    Uraninite, besides occurring in other modes, occurs as inclusions in albite in feldspathic schist in the Bagjata uranium deposits, Singhbhum shear zone, India. The feldspathic schist, considered the product of Na-metasomatism, witnessed multiple hydrothermal events, the signatures of which are preserved in the alteration halo in albite surrounding uraninite. Here we report radiation damage-controlled localization of alteration halo in albite and its various geological implications. Microscopic observation and SRIM/TRIM simulations reveal that the dimension of the alteration halo is dependent collectively on the zone of maximum cumulative α dose that albite was subjected to and by the extent of dissolution of uraninite during alteration. In well-preserved alteration haloes, from uraninite to the unaltered part of albite, the alteration minerals are systematically distributed in different zones; zone-1: K-feldspar; zone-2: chlorite; zone-3: LREE-phase/pyrite/U-Y-silicate. Based on textures of alteration minerals in the alteration microdomain, we propose a generalized Na+➔K+➔H+ alteration sequence, which is in agreement with the regional-scale alteration pattern. Integrating distribution of ore and alteration minerals in the alteration zone and their geochemistry, we further propose multiple events of U, REE, and sulfide mineralization/mobilization in the Bagjata deposit. The alteration process also involved interaction of the hydrothermal fluid with uraninite inclusions resulting in resorption of uraninite, redistribution of elements, including U and Pb, and resetting of isotopic clock. Thus, our study demonstrates that alteration halo is a miniature scale-model of the regional hydrothermal alteration types and patterns vis-à-vis mineralization/mobilization. This study further demonstrates that albite is vulnerable to radiation damage and damage-controlled fluid-assisted alteration, which may redistribute metals, including actinides, from radioactive minerals

  10. Magnetic control of waveguide modes of Bragg structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylgacheva, D. A.; Khokhlov, N. E.; Kalish, A. N.; Belotelov, V. I.

    2016-05-01

    We present the study of the waveguide modes of one-dimensional magnetic photonic crystals with in-plane-magnetized layers. There is a magneto-optical effect of nonreciprocity for the TM-modes propagating along the layers perpendicularly to the magnetization. Due to the non-reciprocity the phase velocity of the modes changes with magnetization reversal. Comparison of the effect in the non-magnetic photonic crystal with additional magnetic layer on top and a magnetophotonic crystal with altering magnetic layers shows that the effect is greater in the first case due to the higher asymmetry of the claddings of the magnetic layer. This effect is important for the light modulation with external magnetic field in waveguide structures and may be used for design of novel types of the magneto-optical devices, sensors of magnetic field or biosensors.

  11. KINOMIC ALTERATIONS IN ATYPICAL MENINGIOMA

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Joshua C.; Taylor, Robert B.; Fiveash, John B.; de Wijn, Rik; Gillespie, G. Yancey; Willey, Christopher D.

    2015-01-01

    Background We sought to profile Atypical Meningioma in a high-throughput manner to better understand the altered signaling within these tumors and specifically the kinases altered in recurrent atypical meningioma. Kinomic Profiles could be used to identify prognostic biomarkers for responders/non-responders to classify future patients that are unlikely to benefit from current therapies. Directly these results could be used to identify drug-actionable kinase targets as well. Methods Peptide-substrate microarray kinase activity analysis was conducted with a PamStation®12 analyzing the tyrosine kinome in each tumor kinetically against ~144 target peptides. These data were then analyzed relative to clinical outcome (e.g., tumor recurrence). Results 3 major clusters of atypical meningiomas were identified with highly variant peptides primarily being targets of EGFR family, ABL, BRK and BMX kinases. Kinomic analysis of recurrent atypical meningiomas indicated patterns of increased phosphorylation of BMX, TYRO3 and FAK substrates as compared to non-recurrent tumors. Conclusion The atypical meningiomas profiled here exhibited molecular sub-clustering that may have phenotypic corollaries predictive of outcome. Recurrent tumors had increases in kinase activity that may predict resistance to current therapies, and may guide selection of directed therapies. Taken together these data further the understanding of kinomic alteration in atypical meningioma, and the processes that may not only mediate recurrence, but additionally may identify kinase targets for intervention. PMID:27158663

  12. Mode Launcher Design for the Multi-moded DLDS

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zenghai

    2003-04-30

    The DLDS (Delay Line Distribution System) power delivery system proposed by KEK combines several klystrons to obtain the high peak power required to drive a TeV scale linear collider. In this system the combined klystron output is subdivided into shorter pulses by proper phasing of the sources, and each subpulse is delivered to various accelerator sections via separate waveguides. A cost-saving improvement suggested by SLAC is to use a single multimoded waveguide to deliver the power of all the subpulses. This scheme requires a mode launcher that can deliver each subpulse by way of a different waveguide mode through selective phasing of the sources when combining their power. We present a compact design for such a mode launcher that converts the power from four rectangular waveguide feeds to separate modes in a multi-moded circular guide through coupling slots. Such a design has been simulated and found to satisfy the requirements for high efficiency and low surface fields.

  13. Repeated swim stress alters brain benzodiazepine receptors measured in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Weizman, R.; Weizman, A.; Kook, K.A.; Vocci, F.; Deutsch, S.I.; Paul, S.M.

    1989-06-01

    The effects of repeated swim stress on brain benzodiazepine receptors were examined in the mouse using both an in vivo and in vitro binding method. Specific in vivo binding of (/sup 3/H)Ro15-1788 to benzodiazepine receptors was decreased in the hippocampus, cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, midbrain and striatum after repeated swim stress (7 consecutive days of daily swim stress) when compared to nonstressed mice. In vivo benzodiazepine receptor binding was unaltered after repeated swim stress in the cerebellum and pons medulla. The stress-induced reduction in in vivo benzodiazepine receptor binding did not appear to be due to altered cerebral blood flow or to an alteration in benzodiazepine metabolism or biodistribution because there was no difference in (14C)iodoantipyrine distribution or whole brain concentrations of clonazepam after repeated swim stress. Saturation binding experiments revealed a change in both apparent maximal binding capacity and affinity after repeated swim stress. Moreover, a reduction in clonazepam's anticonvulsant potency was also observed after repeated swim stress (an increase in the ED50 dose for protection against pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures), although there was no difference in pentylenetetrazol-induced seizure threshold between the two groups. In contrast to the results obtained in vivo, no change in benzodiazepine receptor binding kinetics was observed using the in vitro binding method. These data suggest that environmental stress can alter the binding parameters of the benzodiazepine receptor and that the in vivo and in vitro binding methods can yield substantially different results.

  14. Effects of voids on delamination behavior under static and fatigue mode I and mode II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelal, Nisrin Rizek

    Composite materials have become materials of choice for wind turbine blade manufacturing due to their high specific stiffness, strength and fatigue life. Glass fiber composites are used extensively in light-weight structural components for wind turbines, aircrafts, marine craft and high performance automobile because glass fiber is inexpensive and usually provides high strength to weight ratio and good in-plane mechanical properties. The high cycle fatigue resistance of composite materials used in wind turbine blades has been recognized as a major uncertainty in predicting the reliability of wind turbines over their design lifetime. Blades are expected to experience 108 to 109 fatigue cycles over a 20 to 30 year lifetime. Delamination or interlaminar failure is a serious failure mode observed in composite structures. Even partial delamination will lead to a loss of local stiffness, which can preclude buckling failure. Manufacturing process defects such as voids and fiber waviness degrade the fatigue life and delamination resistance of the blade's composite. This research describes the effect of voids on static and fatigue interlaminar fracture behavior under mode I and mode II loading of wind turbine glass fiber composites. Samples with different void volume fractions in the 0.5%-7% range were successfully obtained by varying the vacuum in the hand layup vacuum bagging manufacturing process. Void content was characterized using four different methods; ultrasonic scanning, epoxy burn off, serial sectioning and X-Ray computed tomography. The effect of voids on both mode I and mode II interlaminar fracture toughness under static and fatigue loading was investigated. Finally, fractographic analysis (using optical and scanning electron microscopy) was conducted. The results showed that voids leads to slight reduction in static modes I and II interlaminar fracture toughness. In addition, voids lead to a decrease in modes I and II maximum cyclic strain energy release

  15. Electrically controlled optical-mode switch for fundamental mode and first order mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imansyah, Ryan; Tanaka, Tatsushi; Himbele, Luke; Jiang, Haisong; Hamamoto, Kiichi

    2016-08-01

    We have proposed an optical mode switch, the principle of which is based on the partial phase shift of injected light; therefore, one important issue is to clarify the proper design criteria for the mode combiner section. We focused on the bending radius of the S-bend waveguide issue that is connected to the multi mode waveguide in the Y-junction section that acts as mode combiner. Long radius leads to undesired mode coupling before the Y-junction section, whereas a short radius causes radiation loss. Thus, we simulated this mode combiner by the beam-propagation method to obtain the proper radius. In addition, we used a trench pin structure to simplify the fabrication process into a single-step dry-etching process. As a result, we successfully fabricated an optical-mode switch with the bending radius R = 610 µm. It showed the successful electrical mode switching and the achieved mode crosstalk was approximately ‑10 dB for 1550 nm wavelength with the injection current of 60 mA (5.7 V).

  16. REDUCTIONS WITHOUT REGRET: SUMMARY

    SciTech Connect

    Swegle, J.; Tincher, D.

    2013-09-16

    This paper briefly summarizes the series in which we consider the possibilities for losing, or compromising, key capabilities of the U.S. nuclear force in the face of modernization and reductions. The first of the three papers takes an historical perspective, considering capabilities that were eliminated in past force reductions. The second paper is our attempt to define the needed capabilities looking forward in the context of the current framework for force modernization and the current picture of the evolving challenges of deterrence and assurance. The third paper then provides an example for each of our undesirable outcomes: the creation of roach motels, box canyons, and wrong turns.

  17. Discrete reductive perturbation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Levi, Decio; Petrera, Matteo

    2006-04-15

    We expand a partial difference equation (P{delta}E) on multiple lattices and obtain the P{delta}E which governs its far field behavior. The perturbative-reductive approach is here performed on well-known nonlinear P{delta}Es, both integrable and nonintegrable. We study the cases of the lattice modified Korteweg-de Vries (mKdV) equation, the Hietarinta equation, the lattice Volterra-Kac-Van Moerbeke equation and a nonintegrable lattice KdV equation. Such reductions allow us to obtain many new P{delta}Es of the nonlinear Schroedinger type.

  18. Stress and stress reduction.

    PubMed

    Straub, Heather; Qadir, Sameen; Miller, Greg; Borders, Ann

    2014-09-01

    Chronic stress contributes to preterm birth (PTB), through direct physiological mechanisms or behavioral pathways. This review identified interventions to prevent PTB through decreased maternal stress. Studies were grouped according to intervention: group prenatal care (11 studies), care coordination (8 studies), health insurance expansion (4 studies), expanded prenatal education/support in the clinic (8 studies), home visitation (9 studies), telephone contact (2 studies), or stress-reduction strategies (5 studies). Group prenatal care had the most evidence for PTB prevention. Comparative studies of PTB prevention through different models of prenatal care and maternal support, education, empowerment, stress-reduction, and coping strategies are needed. PMID:24979355

  19. Time, Chance, and Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, Gerhard; Hüttemann, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    List of contributors; 1. Introduction Gerhard Ernst and Andreas Hütteman; Part I. The Arrows of Time: 2. Does a low-entropy constraint prevent us from influencing the past? Mathias Frisch; 3. The part hypothesis meets gravity Craig Callender; 4. Quantum gravity and the arrow of time Claus Kiefer; Part II. Probability and Chance: 5. The natural-range conception of probability Jacob Rosenthal; 6. Probability in Boltzmannian statistical mechanics Roman Frigg; 7. Humean mechanics versus a metaphysics of powers Michael Esfeld; Part III. Reduction: 8. The crystallisation of Clausius's phenomenological thermodynamics C. Ulises Moulines; 9. Reduction and renormalization Robert W. Batterman; 10. Irreversibility in stochastic dynamics Jos Uffink; Index.

  20. From Lessons Learned Towards Disaster Reduction Measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheer, S.

    2009-04-01

    Efforts have been undertaken over the past years in eliciting and collecting lessons as they could be derived from the outcome of natural disasters management. Lessons are viewed from various perspectives according to • the situation or triggering event which led to the disaster • the local or time-dependent characteristics of this situation and further analysed according to • their benefits • necessary actions to do in order to better implement a lesson. The explicit elicitation of all that information fosters the generation of good practices and the identification of bad practices. Hence the creation of appropriate measures concerning disaster reduction issues could be positively influenced. On the other hand, continuous efforts are undertaken in the field of establishing lists of disaster reduction measures for all major hazards. Those measures comprise both concrete techniques (e.g. a tool or a structure) and advisory techniques (teaching practices or procedural instructions). This paper gives an overview of ways to "produce" disaster reduction measures from lessons learned; moreover it will explain how context-dependent analysis of lessons can potentially lead to alterations of existing disaster reduction measures.

  1. The double-mode Cepheids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balona, L. A.

    1985-06-01

    Recent observational and theoretical results on double-mode Cepheids are reviewed. The likelihood that recently proposed candidate Cepheids are indeed Cepheids is evaluated. Periods, period ratios, and semi-amplitudes of the light and radial velocity variations of double-mode Cepheids are given. The physical and pulsational properties of double-mode Cepheids are discussed, reviewing evidence that these stars are Population I objects of high mass and that they all have the same mean effective temperature. The discovery of strong H-alpha emission occurring at seemingly random phases is addressed. Attempts to resolve the mass discrepancy problem of double-mode Cepheids, which results from observations showing that these Cepheids are indistinguishable from normal Cepheids of similar period, are reviewed along with attempts to find the cause of double-mode pulsation.

  2. Brain alterations in paedophilia: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Mohnke, Sebastian; Müller, Sabine; Amelung, Till; Krüger, Tillmann H C; Ponseti, Jorge; Schiffer, Boris; Walter, Martin; Beier, Klaus M; Walter, Henrik

    2014-11-01

    Psychosocial and biological factors have been implicated in paedophilia, such as alterations in brain structure and function. The purpose of this paper is to review the expanding body of literature on this topic including brain abnormality case reports, as well as structural and functional neuroimaging studies. Case studies of men who have committed sexual offences against children implicate frontal and temporal abnormalities that may be associated with impaired impulse inhibition. Structural neuroimaging investigations show volume reductions in paedophilic men. Although the findings have been heterogeneous, smaller amygdala volume has been replicated repeatedly. Functional neuroimaging investigations demonstrate an overlap between paedophiles and teleiophiles during sexual arousal processing. While it is controversial among studies regarding group differences, reliable discrimination between paedophilic and teleiophilic men may be achieved using functional activation patterns. Nevertheless, the heterogeneous findings published so far suggest further research is necessary to disentangle the neurobiological mechanisms of paedophilic preference. A number of methodological confounds have been identified, which may account for the inconsistent results that could prove to be beneficial for future investigations. PMID:25116710

  3. Foveal Thickness Alterations in Patients with Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Cankaya, Cem; Tecellioglu, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the alterations in foveal retinal thickness (FT) values in patients with migraine and to reveal the correlations between FT and clinical characteristics of migraine disease. Methods: This study included sixty-eight eyes of 34 migraine patients [twenty-eight eyes of 14 patients with aura (group 1), and forty eyes of 20 patients without aura (group 2)] and forty eyes of 20 healthy volunteer who served as the control group (group 3). FT values were measured by optical coherence tomography (OCT) in each group. Results: Mean age of patients in group 1, 2, and 3 was 34.0± 6.82, 35.2±10.12, and 35.1± 6.85 years, respectively (p=0.84). Mean FT was 211.07±7.36, 220.0±12.01, and 221.85±12.27 in groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. There was statistically significance among the group 1-2 and 1-3 (p=0.002 and p< 0.001). There was no statistically significance between group 2-3 (p=0.88). Conclusion: This study suggests that in particular migraine with aura may lead to a reduction in FT values. This finding can be explained by the blood flow decrease theory in migraine; however larger studies seem mandatory. PMID:27147787

  4. Bloch mode synthesis: Ultrafast methodology for elastic band-structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krattiger, Dimitri; Hussein, Mahmoud I.

    2014-12-01

    We present a methodology for fast band-structure calculations that is generally applicable to problems of elastic wave propagation in periodic media. The methodology, called Bloch mode synthesis, represents an extension of component mode synthesis, a set of substructuring techniques originally developed for structural dynamics analysis. In Bloch mode synthesis, the unit cell is divided into interior and boundary degrees-of-freedom, which are described, respectively, by a set of normal modes and a set of constraint modes. A combination of these mode sets then forms a reduced basis for the band structure eigenvalue problem. The reduction is demonstrated on a phononic-crystal model and a locally resonant elastic-metamaterial model and is shown to accurately predict the frequencies and Bloch mode shapes with a dramatic decrease in computation time in excess of two orders of magnitude.

  5. Exploiting stoichiometric redundancies for computational efficiency and network reduction

    PubMed Central

    Ingalls, Brian P.; Bembenek, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Analysis of metabolic networks typically begins with construction of the stoichiometry matrix, which characterizes the network topology. This matrix provides, via the balance equation, a description of the potential steady-state flow distribution. This paper begins with the observation that the balance equation depends only on the structure of linear redundancies in the network, and so can be stated in a succinct manner, leading to computational efficiencies in steady-state analysis. This alternative description of steady-state behaviour is then used to provide a novel method for network reduction, which complements existing algorithms for describing intracellular networks in terms of input-output macro-reactions (to facilitate bioprocess optimization and control). Finally, it is demonstrated that this novel reduction method can be used to address elementary mode analysis of large networks: the modes supported by a reduced network can capture the input-output modes of a metabolic module with significantly reduced computational effort. PMID:25547516

  6. Exploiting stoichiometric redundancies for computational efficiency and network reduction.

    PubMed

    Ingalls, Brian P; Bembenek, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of metabolic networks typically begins with construction of the stoichiometry matrix, which characterizes the network topology. This matrix provides, via the balance equation, a description of the potential steady-state flow distribution. This paper begins with the observation that the balance equation depends only on the structure of linear redundancies in the network, and so can be stated in a succinct manner, leading to computational efficiencies in steady-state analysis. This alternative description of steady-state behaviour is then used to provide a novel method for network reduction, which complements existing algorithms for describing intracellular networks in terms of input-output macro-reactions (to facilitate bioprocess optimization and control). Finally, it is demonstrated that this novel reduction method can be used to address elementary mode analysis of large networks: the modes supported by a reduced network can capture the input-output modes of a metabolic module with significantly reduced computational effort. PMID:25547516

  7. Helicon modes in uniform plasmas. I. Low m modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia, J. M.; Stenzel, R. L.

    2015-09-01

    Helicons are whistler modes with azimuthal wave numbers. They arise in bounded gaseous and solid state plasmas, but the present work shows that very similar modes also exist in unbounded uniform plasmas. The antenna properties determine the mode structure. A simple antenna is a magnetic loop with dipole moment aligned either along or across the ambient background magnetic field B0. For such configurations, the wave magnetic field has been measured in space and time in a large and uniform laboratory plasma. The observed wave topology for a dipole along B0 is similar to that of an m = 0 helicon mode. It consists of a sequence of alternating whistler vortices. For a dipole across B0, an m = 1 mode is excited which can be considered as a transverse vortex which rotates around B0. In m = 0 modes, the field lines are confined to each half-wavelength vortex while for m = 1 modes they pass through the entire wave train. A subset of m = 1 field lines forms two nested helices which rotate in space and time like corkscrews. Depending on the type of the antenna, both m = + 1 and m = -1 modes can be excited. Helicons in unbounded plasmas also propagate transverse to B0. The transverse and parallel wave numbers are about equal and form oblique phase fronts as in whistler Gendrin modes. By superimposing small amplitude fields of several loop antennas, various antenna combinations have been created. These include rotating field antennas, helical antennas, and directional antennas. The radiation efficiency is quantified by the radiation resistance. Since helicons exist in unbounded laboratory plasmas, they can also arise in space plasmas.

  8. Exercise and Fat Reduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, H. Harrison, Ed.

    1975-01-01

    This document analyzes the problems encountered by the obese individual and the effects of regular exercise on weight loss and fat reduction. Part one compares the psychological traits of obese children with age groups of normal weight and discusses the organic disorders and social attitudes which plague the overweight individual. Part two states…

  9. Hadamard speckle contrast reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trisnadi, Jahja I.

    2004-01-01

    The condition for a diffuser to produce the maximum speckle contrast reduction with the minimum number of distinct phase patterns is derived. A binary realization of this optimum diffuser is obtained by mapping the rows or columns of a Hadamard matrix to the phase patterns. The method is experimentally verified in the Grating Light Valve laser projection display.

  10. Industrial Waste Reduction Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-24

    US industry generates over 12 billion tons of wastes each year. These wastes consist of undesirable by-products of industrial production that are discarded into our environment. Energy is an integral part of these wastes; it is found in the embodied energy of industrial feedstocks not optimally used, in the energy content of the wastes themselves, and in the energy needed to transport, treat, and dispose of wastes. Estimates of the potential energy savings from reducing industrial wastes range from three to four quadrillion Btu per year -- enough to meet the annual energy needs of 30 million American homes. This document presents a plan for the Industrial Waste Reduction Program, which has been designed to help achieve national goals for energy efficiency and waste minimization. The objective of the program is to improve the energy efficiency of industrial processes through cost-effective waste reduction. The initial program focus is on waste reduction opportunities in the production and use of chemicals, due to the significant amount of energy used in these activities and the large amounts of hazardous and toxic wastes they generate. The chemical industry will be the initial subject of a series of waste reduction opportunity assessments conducted as part of the program. Assessments of other industries and waste problems will follow.

  11. Reduction in Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, R. Craig

    This chapter of "Principles of School Business Management" reviews several concerns that must be addressed by school business administrators in districts facing declining enrollments and the need for reductions in force. The chapter first looks at the business administrator's significant role in planning for retrenchment. The chapter then…

  12. Reduction in Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phay, Robert

    Chapter 2 in a book on school law discusses the reasons for reduction in force (RIF) and presents a set of model regulations for school districts as the best means of minimizing legal problems resulting from RIF. The reasons for RIF include declining student enrollments; reduced turnover among teachers; changes in programs; and more constrained…

  13. Adolescent Prejudice Reduction Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ketroser, Heidi

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the fifth annual Dr. Curtis C. Melnick Adolescent Prejudice Reduction Conference sponsored by the Greater Chicago (Illinois) Regional Office of the Anti-Defamation League of the B'nai B'rith. The day-long conference addressed issues of prejudice and allowed students and staff from various high schools to explore their concerns with…

  14. Imino Transfer Hydrogenation Reductions.

    PubMed

    Wills, Martin

    2016-04-01

    This review contains a summary of recent developments in the transfer hydrogenation of C=N bonds, with a particularly focus on reports from within the last 10 years and asymmetric transformations. However, earlier work in the area is also discussed in order to provide context for the more recent results described. I focus strongly on the Ru/TsDPEN class of asymmetric transfer hydrogenation reactions originally reported by Noyori et al., together with examples of their applications, particularly to medically valuable target molecules. The recent developments in the area of highly active imine-reduction catalysts, notably those based on iridium, are also described in some detail. I discuss diastereoselective reduction methods as a route to the synthesis of chiral amines using transfer hydrogenation. The recent development of a methodology for positioning reduction complexes within chiral proteins, permitting the generation of asymmetric reduction products through a directed modification of the protein environment in a controlled manner, is also discussed. PMID:27573139

  15. Nagel on reduction.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sahotra

    2015-10-01

    This paper attempts a critical reappraisal of Nagel's (1961, 1970) model of reduction taking into account both traditional criticisms and recent defenses. This model treats reduction as a type of explanation in which a reduced theory is explained by a reducing theory after their relevant representational items have been suitably connected. In accordance with the deductive-nomological model, the explanation is supposed to consist of a logical deduction. Nagel was a pluralist about both the logical form of the connections between the reduced and reducing theories (which could be conditionals or biconditionals) and their epistemological status (as analytic connections, conventions, or synthetic claims). This paper defends Nagel's pluralism on both counts and, in the process, argues that the multiple realizability objection to reductionism is misplaced. It also argues that the Nagel model correctly characterizes reduction as a type of explanation. However, it notes that logical deduction must be replaced by a broader class of inferential techniques that allow for different types of approximation. Whereas Nagel (1970), in contrast to his earlier position (1961), recognized the relevance of approximation, he did not realize its full import for the model. Throughout the paper two case studies are used to illustrate the arguments: the putative reduction of classical thermodynamics to the kinetic theory of matter and that of classical genetics to molecular biology. PMID:26386529

  16. Financing Class Size Reduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Achilles, C. M.

    2005-01-01

    Class size reduction has been shown to, among other things, improve academic achievement for all students and particularly for low-income and minority students. With the No Child Left Behind Act's heavy emphasis on scientifically based research, adequate yearly progress, and disaggregated results, one wonders why all children aren't enrolled in…

  17. Teaching Reductive Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armoni, Michal; Gal-Ezer, Judith

    2005-01-01

    When dealing with a complex problem, solving it by reduction to simpler problems, or problems for which the solution is already known, is a common method in mathematics and other scientific disciplines, as in computer science and, specifically, in the field of computability. However, when teaching computational models (as part of computability)…

  18. Inter-comb synchronization by mode-to-mode locking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Byung Jae; Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Seung-Woo

    2016-08-01

    Two combs of fiber femtosecond lasers are synchronized through the optical frequency reference created by injection-locking of a diode laser to a single comb mode. Maintaining a mHz-level narrow linewidth, the optical frequency reference permits two combs to be stabilized by mode-to-mode locking with a relative stability of 1.52  ×  10‑16 at 10 s with a frequency slip of 2.46 mHz. This inter-comb synchronization can be utilized for applications such as dual-comb spectroscopy or ultra-short pulse synthesis without extra narrow-linewidth lasers.

  19. Mode identification from spectroscopy of gravity-mode pulsators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, K. R.; Brunsden, E.; Cottrell, P. L.; Davie, M.; Greenwood, A.; Wright, D. J.; De Cat, P.

    2014-02-01

    The gravity modes present in γ Doradus stars probe the deep stellar interiors and are thus of particular interest in asteroseismology. For the MUSICIAN programme at the University of Canterbury, we obtain extensive high-resolution echelle spectra of γ Dor stars from the Mt John University Observatory in New Zealand. We analyze these to obtain the pulsational frequencies and identify these with the multiple pulsational modes excited in the star. A summary of recent results from our spectroscopic mode-identification programme is given.

  20. Alteration of rat polymorphonuclear leukocyte function after thermal injury.

    PubMed

    Gruber, D F; D'Alesandro, M M

    1989-01-01

    One portion of host defense to bacterial challenge(s) involves the activation and infiltration of endogenous polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Thermal injuries are frequently associated with immunologic abnormalities including alterations of polymorphonuclear leukocyte-associated nonspecific resistance. We examined isolated peripheral rat polymorphonuclear leukocytes for alterations in membrane potential, oxidative capability, and locomotor function after the experimental application of 20% full-thickness body surface area thermal injury. Thermal injury resulted in significant reductions of peripheral red blood cell concentration(s) and increases in leukocyte and platelet concentrations for 42 days after injury. In addition to the quantitative changes, polymorphonuclear leukocytes also demonstrated altered qualitative functions. Compared with phorbol myristate acetate-induced activation of normal cells, polymorphonuclear leukocyte membranes from thermal-injured animals were electrophysiologically less responsive for 3 weeks after injury. The ability of polymorphonuclear leukocytes to produce intracellular H2O2, a measure of oxidative function, was also significantly decreased for 7 days after injury. The paradox in this paradigm of thermal injury was the demonstration of peripheral polymorphonuclear leukocyte quantitative increases with concurrent significant qualitative impairment. Qualitative lesions included altered states of membrane depolarization and depressed oxidative capability that may individually, or collectively, reduce nonspecific immune capabilities of the host to levels that are inadequate to combat infection. PMID:2793916

  1. Altering prolactin concentrations in sows.

    PubMed

    Farmer, C

    2016-07-01

    Prolactin has a multiplicity of actions, but it is of particular importance in gestating and lactating animals. In sows, it is involved in the control of mammary development and also holds essential roles in the lactogenic and galactopoietic processes. Furthermore, low circulating concentrations of prolactin are associated with the agalactia syndrome. The crucial role of prolactin makes it important to understand the various factors that can alter its secretion. Regulation of prolactin secretion is largely under the negative control of dopamine, and dopamine agonists consistently decrease prolactin concentrations in sows. On the other hand, injections of dopamine antagonists can enhance circulating prolactin concentrations. Besides pharmacologic agents, many other factors can also alter prolactin concentrations in sows. The use of Chinese-derived breeds, for instance, leads to increased prolactin concentrations in lactating sows compared with standard European white breeds. Numerous husbandry and feeding practices also have a potential impact on prolactin concentrations in sows. Factors, such as provision of nest-building material prepartum, housing at farrowing, high ambient temperature, stress, transient weaning, exogenous thyrotropin-releasing factor, exogenous growth hormone-releasing factor, nursing frequency, prolonged photoperiod, fasting, increased protein and/or energy intake, altered energy sources, feeding high-fiber diets, sorghum ergot or plant extracts, were all studied with respect to their prolactinemic properties. Although some of these practices do indeed affect circulating prolactin concentrations, none leads to changes as drastic as those brought about by dopamine agonists or antagonists. It appears that the numerous factors regulating prolactin concentrations in sows are still not fully elucidated, and that studies to develop novel applicable ways of increasing prolactin concentrations in sows are warranted. PMID:27345313

  2. Coherent exciton dynamics in a dissipative environment maintained by an off-resonant vibrational mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levi, E. K.; Irish, E. K.; Lovett, B. W.

    2016-04-01

    The interplay between an open quantum system and its environment can lead to both coherent and incoherent behavior. We explore the extent to which strong coupling to a single bosonic mode can alter the coherence properties of a two-level system in a structured environment. This mode is treated exactly, with the rest of the environment comprising a Markovian bath of bosonic modes. The strength of the coupling between the two-level system and the single mode is varied for a variety of forms for the bath spectral density in order to assess whether the coherent dynamics of the two-level system are modified. We find a clear renormalization of the site population oscillation frequency that causes an altered interaction with the bath. This leads to enhanced or reduced coherent behavior of the two-level system, depending on the form of the spectral density function. We present an intuitive interpretation, based on an analytical model, to explain the behavior.

  3. Acid Sulfate Alteration on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.

    2016-01-01

    A variety of mineralogical and geochemical indicators for aqueous alteration on Mars have been identified by a combination of surface and orbital robotic missions, telescopic observations, characterization of Martian meteorites, and laboratory and terrestrial analog studies. Acid sulfate alteration has been identified at all three landing sites visited by NASA rover missions (Spirit, Opportunity, and Curiosity). Spirit landed in Gusev crater in 2004 and discovered Fe-sulfates and materials that have been extensively leached by acid sulfate solutions. Opportunity landing on the plains of Meridiani Planum also in 2004 where the rover encountered large abundances of jarosite and hematite in sedimentary rocks. Curiosity landed in Gale crater in 2012 and has characterized fluvial, deltaic, and lacustrine sediments. Jarosite and hematite were discovered in some of the lacustrine sediments. The high elemental abundance of sulfur in surface materials is obvious evidence that sulfate has played a major role in aqueous processes at all landing sites on Mars. The sulfate-rich outcrop at Meridiani Planum has an SO3 content of up to 25 wt.%. The interiors of rocks and outcrops on the Columbia Hills within Gusev crater have up to 8 wt.% SO3. Soils at both sites generally have between 5 to 14 wt.% SO3, and several soils in Gusev crater contain around 30 wt.% SO3. After normalization of major element compositions to a SO3-free basis, the bulk compositions of these materials are basaltic, with a few exceptions in Gusev crater and in lacustrine mudstones in Gale crater. These observations suggest that materials encountered by the rovers were derived from basaltic precursors by acid sulfate alteration under nearly isochemical conditions (i.e., minimal leaching). There are several cases, however, where acid sulfate alteration minerals (jarosite and hematite) formed in open hydrologic systems, e.g., in Gale crater lacustrine mudstones. Several hypotheses have been suggested for the

  4. Altered cell function in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes-Fulford, Millie

    1991-01-01

    The paper overviews published results from investigations of changes in basic biological parameters taking place as a result of spaceflight exposure. These include changes in the rates of the DNA, mRNA, and protein biosyntheses; changes in the growth rate of an organism; and alterations in the cytoskeleton structure, differentiation, hormone accumulation, and collagen matrix secretion. These results, obtained both in complex biological organisms and on cultured cells, suggest that a basic cellular function is influenced and changed by microgravity. Many of the above mentioned changes are also found to take place in aging cells.

  5. Altered Mental Status and Delirium.

    PubMed

    Wilber, Scott T; Ondrejka, Jason E

    2016-08-01

    Older patients who present to the emergency department frequently have acute or chronic alterations of their mental status, including their level of consciousness and cognition. Recognizing both acute and chronic changes in cognition are important for emergency physicians. Delirium is an acute change in attention, awareness, and cognition. Numerous life-threatening conditions can cause delirium; therefore, prompt recognition and treatment are critical. The authors discuss an organized approach that can lead to a prompt diagnosis within the time constraints of the emergency department. PMID:27475019

  6. Current-interchange tearing modes: Conversion of interchange-type modes to tearing modes

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, L. J.; Furukawa, M.

    2010-05-15

    It is shown that, in addition to usual neoclassical tearing modes, another type of nonclassical tearing mode exists in tokamaks: viz., current-interchange tearing modes (CITMs). CITMs are directly driven by unstable pressure-driven electromagnetic or electrostatic modes of the interchange type (e.g., interchange/ballooning modes, drift waves, etc.) due to the current gradient in tokamaks. Interchange-type modes exchange not only thermal and magnetic energies between flux tubes but also current. In a plasma with a current (or resistivity) gradient, such an interchange can create a current sheet at a mode resonance surface and result in the excitation of CITMs. Note that the interchange mode (i.e., Rayleigh-Taylor instability) is fundamental to tokamak physics. This new theory has an effect on both resistive magnetohydrodynamic stability and transport theories. Instabilities of the interchange type could be directly converted into CITMs, alternative to forming turbulent eddies through nonlinear coupling as in conventional transport theories. In particular, our CITM theory fills in the component in the transport theory of Rechester and Rosenbluth [Phys. Rev. Lett. 40, 38 (1978)] for the origin of magnetic island structure in axisymmetric tokamaks.

  7. SURF: Submm User Reduction Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenness, Tim; Lightfoot, John

    2014-03-01

    SURF reduces data from the SCUBA instrument from the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. Facilities are provided for reducing all the SCUBA observing modes including jiggle, scan and photometry modes. SURF uses the Starlink environment (ascl:1110.012).

  8. Methamphetamine Alters Brain Structures, Impairs Mental Flexibility

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alters Brain Structures, Impairs Mental Flexibility Methamphetamine Alters Brain Structures, Impairs Mental Flexibility Email Facebook Twitter March ... methamphetamine use, such as tobacco smoking. Can the Brain Recover? The UCLA study’s findings underscore the importance ...

  9. Experiments with enhanced mode thermionic converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oettinger, P. E.; Hussman, F. N.

    1978-01-01

    Reduction of the ionization and scattering losses associated with ignited mode cesium diodes is essential for high thermal-to-electrical conversion efficiency. Use of an auxiliary electrode in conjunction with a noble gas in the interelectrode space should permit more efficient ion generation for space charge neutralization. The characeristics of a thermionic triode utilizing a ring electrode and a dispenser cathode emitter have been studied as a function of xenon pressure, cesium reservoir temperature, spacing, electrode temperature and pulse parameters (i.e., potential, duration and repetition rate) applied to the auxiliary electrode. Pulsed operation significantly enhanced output power with uniform discharges appearing to be sustained at emitter-collector spacings as low as 0.5 mm.

  10. Alteration of Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation Properties Induced by Particle Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, R. C.; Polen, M.; Beydoun, H.; Lawlis, E.; Ahern, A.; Jahn, L.; Hill, T. C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol particles that can serve as ice nuclei frequently experience rapid and extensive chemical aging during atmospheric transport. This is known to significantly alter some ice nucleation modes of the few types of ice nucleation particle systems where aging effects have been simulated, such as for mineral dust. Yet much of our understanding of atmospheric particle freezing properties is derived from measurements of fresh or unaged particles. We know almost nothing regarding how atmospheric aging might alter the freezing properties of biomass burning aerosol or biological particle nucleants. We have investigated the effects of simulated aging using a chamber reactor on the heterogeneous ice nucleation properties of biomass burning aerosol (BBA) and ice-active bacteria particles. Some types of aging were found to enhance the freezing ability of BBA, exhibited as a shift in a portion of the droplet freezing curve to warmer temperatures by a few °C. Ice-active bacteria were found to consistently loose their most ice-active nucleants after repeated aging cycles. The bacterial systems always retained significantly efficient ice active sites that still allowed them to induce freezing at mild/warm temperatures, despite this decrease in freezing ability. A comprehensive series of online single-particle mass spectrometry and offline spectromicroscopic analysis of individual particles was used to determine how the aging altered the aerosol's composition, and gain mechanistic insights into how this in turn altered the freezing properties. Our new ice nucleation framework that uses a continuous distribution of ice active site ability (contact angle) was used to interpret the droplet freezing spectra and understand how aging alters the internal and external variability, and rigidity, of the ice active sites.

  11. Automating OSIRIS Data Reduction for the Keck Observatory Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Hien D.; Holt, J.; Goodrich, R. W.; Lyke, J. E.; Gelino, C. R.; Berriman, G. B.; KOA Team

    2014-01-01

    Since the end of 2013, the Keck Observatory Archive (KOA) has served data from all active instruments on the Keck Telescopes. OSIRIS (OH-Suppressing Infra-Red Imaging Spectrograph), the last active instrument to be archived in KOA, has been in use behind the adaptive optics (AO) system at Keck since February 2005. It uses an array of tiny lenslets to simultaneously produce spectra at up to 4096 locations. Due to the complicated nature of the OSIRIS raw data, the OSIRIS team developed a comprehensive data reduction program. This data reduction system has an online mode for quick real-time reductions which are used primarily for basic data visualization and quality assessment done at the telescope while observing. The offline version of the data reduction system includes an expanded reduction method list, does more iterations for a better construction of the data cubes, and is used to produce publication-quality products. It can also use reconstruction matrices that are developed after the observations were taken, and are more refined. The KOA team is currently utilizing the standard offline reduction mode to produce quick-look browse products for the raw data. Users of the offline data reduction system generally use a graphical user interface to manually setup the reduction parameters. However, in order to reduce and serve the ~200,000 science files on disk, all of the reduction parameters and steps need to be fully automated. This pipeline will also be used to automatically produce quick-look browse products for future OSIRIS data after each night's observations. Here we discuss the complexities of OSIRIS data, the reduction system in place, methods for automating the system, performance using virtualization, and progress made to date in generating the KOA products.

  12. Automating OSIRIS Data Reduction for the Keck Observatory Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, J.; Tran, H. D.; Goodrich, R.; Berriman, G. B.; Gelino, C. R.; KOA Team

    2014-05-01

    By the end of 2013, the Keck Observatory Archive (KOA) will serve data from all active instruments on the Keck Telescopes. OSIRIS (OH-Suppressing Infra-Red Imaging Spectrograph), the last active instrument to be archived in KOA, has been in use behind the (AO) system at Keck since February 2005. It uses an array of tiny lenslets to simultaneously produce spectra at up to 4096 locations. Due to the complicated nature of the OSIRIS raw data, the OSIRIS team developed a comprehensive data reduction program. This data reduction system has an online mode for quick real-time reductions, which are used primarily for basic data visualization and quality assessment done at the telescope while observing. The offline version of the data reduction system includes an expanded reduction method list, does more iterations for a better construction of the data cubes, and is used to produce publication-quality products. It can also use reconstruction matrices that are developed after the observations were taken, and are more refined. The KOA team is currently utilizing the standard offline reduction mode to produce quick-look browse products for the raw data. Users of the offline data reduction system generally use a graphical user interface to manually setup the reduction parameters. However, in order to reduce and serve the 200,000 science files on disk, all of the reduction parameters and steps need to be fully automated. This pipeline will also be used to automatically produce quick-look browse products for future OSIRIS data after each night's observations. Here we discuss the complexities of OSIRIS data, the reduction system in place, methods for automating the system, performance using virtualization, and progress made to date in generating the KOA products.

  13. Physical view on migration modes

    PubMed Central

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Cellular motility is essential for many processes such as embryonic development, wound healing processes, tissue assembly and regeneration, immune cell trafficing and diseases such as cancer. The migration efficiency and the migratory potential depend on the type of migration mode. The previously established migration modes such as epithelial (non-migratory) and mesenchymal (migratory) as well as amoeboid (squeezing motility) relay mainly on phenomenological criteria such as cell morphology and molecular biological criteria such as gene expression. However, the physical view on the migration modes is still not well understood. As the process of malignant cancer progression such as metastasis depends on the migration of single cancer cells and their migration mode, this review focuses on the different migration strategies and discusses which mechanical prerequisites are necessary to perform a special migration mode through a 3-dimensional microenvironment. In particular, this review discusses how cells can distinguish and finally switch between the migration modes and what impact do the physical properties of cells and their microenvironment have on the transition between the novel migration modes such as blebbing and protrusive motility. PMID:26192136

  14. Spatiotemporal mode structure of nonlinearly coupled drift wave modes

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, Christian; Grulke, Olaf; Klinger, Thomas; Negrete, Jose Jr.; Bousselin, Guillaume; Brochard, Frederic; Bonhomme, Gerard; Oldenbuerger, Stella

    2011-11-15

    This paper presents full cross-section measurements of drift waves in the linear magnetized plasma of the Mirabelle device. Drift wave modes are studied in regimes of weakly developed turbulence. The drift wave modes develop azimuthal space-time structures of plasma density, plasma potential, and visible light fluctuations. A fast camera diagnostic is used to record visible light fluctuations of the plasma column in an azimuthal cross section with a temporal resolution of 10 {mu}s corresponding approximately to 10% of the typical drift wave period. Mode coupling and drift wave dispersion are studied by spatiotemporal Fourier decomposition of the camera frames. The observed coupling between modes is compared to calculations of nonlinearly coupled oscillators described by the Kuramoto model.

  15. Spaceflight-induced bone loss alters failure mode and reduces bending strength in murine spinal segments.

    PubMed

    Berg-Johansen, Britta; Liebenberg, Ellen C; Li, Alfred; Macias, Brandon R; Hargens, Alan R; Lotz, Jeffrey C

    2016-01-01

    Intervertebral disc herniation rates are quadrupled in astronauts following spaceflight. While bending motions are main contributors to herniation, the effects of microgravity on the bending properties of spinal discs are unknown. Consequently, the goal of this study was to quantify the bending properties of tail discs from mice with or without microgravity exposure. Caudal motion segments from six mice returned from a 30-day Bion M1 mission and eight vivarium controls were loaded to failure in four-point bending. After testing, specimens were processed using histology to determine the location of failure, and adjacent motion segments were scanned with micro-computed tomography (μCT) to quantify bone properties. We observed that spaceflight significantly shortened the nonlinear toe region of the force-displacement curve by 32% and reduced the bending strength by 17%. Flight mouse spinal segments tended to fail within the growth plate and epiphyseal bone, while controls tended to fail at the disc-vertebra junction. Spaceflight significantly reduced vertebral bone volume fraction, bone mineral density, and trabecular thickness, which may explain the tendency of flight specimens to fail within the epiphyseal bone. Together, these results indicate that vertebral bone loss during spaceflight may degrade spine bending properties and contribute to increased disc herniation risk in astronauts. PMID:26285046

  16. Dual mode use requirements analysis for the institutional cluster.

    SciTech Connect

    Leland, Robert W.

    2003-09-01

    This paper analyzes what additional costs would be incurred in supporting dual-mode, i.e. both classified and unclassified use of the Institutional Computing (IC) hardware. The following five options are considered: periods processing in which a fraction of the system alternates in time between classified and unclassified modes, static split in which the system is constructed as a set of smaller clusters which remain in one mode or the other, re-configurable split in which the system is constructed in a split fashion but a mechanism is provided to reconfigure it very infrequently, red/black switching in which a mechanism is provided to switch sections of the system between modes frequently, and complementary operation in which parts of the system are operated entirely in one mode at one geographical site and entirely in the other mode at the other geographical site and other systems are repartitioned to balance work load. These options are evaluated against eleven criteria such as disk storage costs, distance computing costs, reductions in capability and capacity as a result of various factors etc. The evaluation is both qualitative and quantitative, and is captured in various summary tables.

  17. Neoclassical viscosity effects on resistive magnetohydrodynamic modes in toroidal geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J.G.; Oh, Y.H.; Choi, D.I. ); Kim, J.Y.; Horton, W. )

    1992-03-01

    The flux-surface-averaged linearized resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) boundary-layer equations including the compressibility, diamagnetic drift, and neoclassical viscosity terms are derived in toroidal geometry. These equations describe the resistive layer dynamics of resistive MHD modes over the collisionality regime between the banana plateau and the Pfirsch--Schlueter. From the resulting equations, the effects of neoclassical viscosity on the stability of the tearing and resistive ballooning modes are investigated numerically. Also, a study is given for the problem of how the neoclassical resistive MHD mode is generated as the collisionality is reduced. It is shown that the neoclassical viscosity terms give a significant destabilizing effect for the tearing and resistive ballooning modes. This destabilization comes mainly from the reduction of the stabilizing effect of the parallel ion sound compression by the ion neoclassical viscosity. In the banana-plateau collisionality limit, where the compressibility is negligible, the dispersion relations of the tearing and resistive ballooning modes reduce to the same form, with the threshold value of the driving force given by {Delta}{sub {ital c}}=0. On the other hand, with the finite neoclassical effect it is found that the neoclassical resistive MHD instability is generated in agreement with previous results. Furthermore, it is shown that this later instability can be generated in a wide range of the collisionality including near the Pfirsch--Schlueter regime as well as the banana-plateau regime, suggesting that this mode is a probable cause of anomalous transport.

  18. Correlated Alteration Effects in CM Carbonaceous Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolensky, Michael E.; Browning, Lauren B.; McSween, Harry Y., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Three parameters are proposed to determine the relative extent of alteration in CM chondrites. The mineralogic alteration index monitors the relative progress of coupled substitutions in the progressive alteration of cronstedtite to Mg-serpentine, and increases with increasing alteration. To calculate values of this index, an algorithm has been developed to estimate the average matrix phyllosilicate composition in individual CM chondrites. The second parameter is the volume percent of isolated matrix silicates, which decreases with progressive alteration due to mineral hydration. Finally, the volume percent of chondrule alteration monitors the extent of chondrule phyllosilicate production, and increases as alteration proceeds. These parameters define the first CM alteration scale that-relies on multiple indicators of progressive alteration. The following relative order of increasing alteration is established by this model: Murchison less than or equal to Bells less than Pollen less than or equal to Murray less than Mighei less than Nogoya less than Cold Bokkeveld. Bulk delta18O values generally increase with progressive alteration, providing additional support for this sequence. The relative degree of aqueous processing Cochabamba and Boriskino experienced is less precisely constrained, although both fall near the middle of this sequence. A comparison between the mineralogic alteration index and literature values of the whole-rock chemistry of CM chondrites reveals several correlations. For example, a positive, nearly linear correlation between bulk H content and progressive CM alteration suggests an approximately constant production rate of new phyllosilicates relative to the mineralogical transition from cronstedtite to Mg-serpentine. Furthermore, the abundance of trapped planetary Ar-36 decreases systematically in progressively altered CM chondrites, suggesting the wholesale destruction of primary noble gas carrier phase(s) by aqueous reactions. Multiple

  19. Mode synthesizing atomic force microscopy and mode-synthesizing sensing

    DOEpatents

    Passian, Ali; Thundat, Thomas George; Tetard, Laurene

    2013-05-17

    A method of analyzing a sample that includes applying a first set of energies at a first set of frequencies to a sample and applying, simultaneously with the applying the first set of energies, a second set of energies at a second set of frequencies, wherein the first set of energies and the second set of energies form a multi-mode coupling. The method further includes detecting an effect of the multi-mode coupling.

  20. Aqueous Alteration of Enstatite Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, M. E.; Ziegler, K.; Weisberg, M. K.; Gounelle, M.; Berger, E. L.; Le, L.; Ivanov, A.

    2014-01-01

    The Kaidun meteorite is different from all other meteorites [1], consisting largely of a mixture of “incompatible” types of meteoritic material – carbonaceous and enstatite chondrites, i.e. corre-sponding to the most oxidized and the most reduced samples of meteorite materials, including CI1, CM1-2, CV3, EH3-5, and EL3. In addition to these, minor amounts of ordinary and R chondrites are present. In addition, approximately half of the Kaidun lithologies are new materials not known as separate meteorites. Among these are aqueously altered enstatite chondrites [1], which are of considerable interest because they testify that not all reduced asteroids escaped late-stage oxidation, and hydrolysis, and also because hydrated poorly crystalline Si-Fe phase, which in turn is re-placed by serpentine (Figs 3-5). In the end the only indication of the original presence of metal is the re-sidual carbides. In other enstatite chondrite lithogies (of uncertain type) original silicates and metal have been thoroughly replaced by an assemblage of authi-genic plagioclase laths, calcite boxwork, and occasion-al residual grains of silica, Cr-rich troilite, ilmenite, and rare sulfides including heideite (Fig. 6). Fe and S have been largely leached from the rock (Fig. 4). Again the accessory phases are the first clue to the original character of the rock, which can be verified by O isotopes. It is fortunate that Kaidun displays every step of the alteration process.

  1. Videocapillaroscopic Alterations in Alopecia Areata

    PubMed Central

    Gerkowicz, Agnieszka; Krasowska, Dorota; Pietrzak, Aldona; Michalak-Stoma, Anna; Bartosińska, Joanna; Juszkiewicz-Borowiec, Maria; Chodorowska, Grażyna

    2013-01-01

    Alopecia areata (AA) is a common hair disorder observed in dermatological practice; however, the exact mechanisms that lead to the hair loss are still unknown. Disturbances in the blood supply of hair follicles may be one of the elements in the complex pathogenesis of AA. Nailfold videocapillaroscopy is a noninvasive technique that allows analysis of skin microcirculation in vivo. The aim of the study was the videocapillaroscopic assessment of skin microcirculation in AA patients. The study included 44 patients with patchy alopecia areata, 27 with alopecia universalis or totalis, and 40 healthy volunteers. Nailfold videocapillaroscopy was performed in all participants according to a standard protocol. Obtained images were assessed qualitatively and quantitatively. Two types of videocapillaroscopic images were distinguished in the study. Abnormal videocapillaroscopic images were found in 42% of patients. Tortuous and branching capillaries (P = 0.013, P = 0.001), decreased density of capillaries (P = 0.009), enlargement of the efferent limb (P < 0.017), or top part of the loop (P = 0.009) were observed significantly more often than in the control group. Only some patients with AA presented with microvascular abnormalities characterised by altered videocapillaroscopic images. More studies, including larger group of patients with AA, are required to determine the role of observed videocapillaroscopic alterations in AA. PMID:24163812

  2. Circadian Disorganization Alters Intestinal Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Voigt, Robin M.; Forsyth, Christopher B.; Green, Stefan J.; Mutlu, Ece; Engen, Phillip; Vitaterna, Martha H.; Turek, Fred W.; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal dysbiosis and circadian rhythm disruption are associated with similar diseases including obesity, metabolic syndrome, and inflammatory bowel disease. Despite the overlap, the potential relationship between circadian disorganization and dysbiosis is unknown; thus, in the present study, a model of chronic circadian disruption was used to determine the impact on the intestinal microbiome. Male C57BL/6J mice underwent once weekly phase reversals of the light:dark cycle (i.e., circadian rhythm disrupted mice) to determine the impact of circadian rhythm disruption on the intestinal microbiome and were fed either standard chow or a high-fat, high-sugar diet to determine how diet influences circadian disruption-induced effects on the microbiome. Weekly phase reversals of the light:dark (LD) cycle did not alter the microbiome in mice fed standard chow; however, mice fed a high-fat, high-sugar diet in conjunction with phase shifts in the light:dark cycle had significantly altered microbiota. While it is yet to be established if some of the adverse effects associated with circadian disorganization in humans (e.g., shift workers, travelers moving across time zones, and in individuals with social jet lag) are mediated by dysbiosis, the current study demonstrates that circadian disorganization can impact the intestinal microbiota which may have implications for inflammatory diseases. PMID:24848969

  3. Difference frequency modulation of multi-section dual-mode lasers with nanoscale surface gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uusitalo, Topi; Virtanen, Heikki; Viheriälä, Jukka; Salmi, Joel; Aho, Antti T.; Dumitrescu, Mihail

    2016-03-01

    Dual-mode multi-section quantum-well distributed feedback lasers with surface gratings have been fabricated, without regrowth, at 1310 and 1550 nm using UV nano-imprint lithography. Several laser and grating sections have been employed to control and stabilize the dual-mode emission and to reduce mode competition. Frequency differences between 15 GHz and 1 THz were achieved for different longitudinal structures. Frequency difference variations of several GHz have been measured under bias modulation with rates up to a few GHz. Higher frequency difference modulation rates are expected from improved measurement setups and from employing quantum dot active regions for further reduction of mode competition.

  4. Facial and dental alterations according to the breathing pattern

    PubMed Central

    RETAMOSO, Luciana Borges; KNOP, Luégya Amorin Henriques; GUARIZA FILHO, Odilon; TANAKA, Orlando Motohiro

    2011-01-01

    There is controversy in the literature about possible interaction of the respiratory mode with the facial and dental structures. Objectives The aim of this study was to perform a longitudinal assessment of the changes in facial and dental structures in Angle’s Class II, division 1 malocclusion individuals, divided according to the respiratory pattern (predominantly nasal or mouth), at two distinct moments of craniofacial development. Material and Methods Pogonium and nose measurements were made on the lateral cephalometric tracings (LS’-Pog’, LS’-B’, B’-Pog’, Pog’-PogTeg’, Line NB, Pog-NB, N'-Prn, Prn-NPog, N-Prn-Sn, Prn-Sn-LS). Dental measurements were made on the plaster models (distances between the tips of the canine cusps and the tips of mesial cusps of the first molars) of 40 individuals aged 10 to 14 years (moment 1) and 13 to 16 years (moment 2), 23 being nose breathers (NB) and 17 being predominantly mouth breathers (MB). Results The Student’s-t test and two-way ANOVA with repeated measures were applied to indicate differences between the mean values of these variables according to the moments and/or respiratory mode. Conclusions There were alterations in the facial measurements, without interference of the breathing pattern. However, the breathing pattern influenced dental alterations. PMID:21552720

  5. High energy components and collective modes in thermonuclear plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Coppi, B.; Cowley, S.; Detragiache, P.; Kulsrud, R.; Pegoraro, F.

    1986-02-01

    The theory of a class of collective modes of a thermonuclear magnetically confined plasma, with frequencies in the range of the ion cyclotron frequency and of its harmonics, is presented. These modes can be excited by their resonant cyclotron interaction with a plasma component of relatively high energy particles characterized by a strongly anisotropic distribution in velocity space. Normal modes that are spatially localized by the inhomogeneity of the plasma density are found. This ensures that the energy gained by their resonant interaction is not convected away. The mode spatial localization can be significantly altered by the magnetic field inhomogeneity for a given class of plasma density profiles. Special attention is devoted to the case of a spin polarized plasma, where the charged products of fusion reactions are anisotropically distributed. We show that for the mode of polarization that enhances nuclear reaction rates the tritium will be rapidly depolarized to toroidal configurations with relatively mild gradients of the confining magnetic field. 18 refs., 9 figs.

  6. Polarization Altering Devices in Guided Wave Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sletten, Mark Arthur

    In this thesis, four guided wave optical devices are investigated, each of which alters the state of polarization of the lightwave which passes through it. Chapter 1 contains general information on the operation of these devices and on the systems in which they are typically used, and the subsequent chapters discuss each device in detail. Chapter 2 presents a quasi-optic analysis of a thin film polarization converter formed by a thin, isotropic film on an anisotropic, electrooptic substrate. In Chapter 3, a singular perturbation technique with multiple scales is used to analyze a thick metal surface polariton polarizer for a planar optical waveguide. This analysis is extended in Chapter 4 to a similar device in which the metal is assumed to have a finite thickness. The analysis indicates two regions of operation for this device and also indicates the importance of phase matching the surface polariton to the transverse magnetic mode guided by the dielectric waveguide. An experimental investigation of a surface polariton polarizer fabricated with optical fiber and silicon v-grooves is reported in Chapter 5. The fabrication process for these devices is described, and the results of investigations into the dependence of the extinction ratio on the device length and fiber core to metal spacing are presented. Chapter 6 outlines a singular perturbation analysis of a polarization splitting directional coupler. Like the polarizers discussed in Chapters 3, 4 and 5, the coupler owes its polarization selecting capability to interactions with surface polaritons. The final chapter contains suggestions for future research related to the polarizer analysis and experiments.

  7. Age does not alter acetaminophen absorption.

    PubMed

    Divoll, M; Ameer, B; Abernethy, D R; Greenblatt, D J

    1982-04-01

    Twenty-eight healthy volunteers (age range, 22-78 years) received 650 mg of acetaminophen (AAP) on three separate occasions. The modes of administration were 1) intravenous, 5-minute infusion; 2) oral, with two 325-mg tablets; and 3) oral, with 650 mg as an elixir preparation. Plasma levels of AAP were determined in blood samples drawn up to 12 hours after the dose. The mean (+/- sd) kinetic variables for absorption of AAP from tablets in young and elderly were peak plasma concentration, 11.8 (+/- 4.2) vs 10.9 (+/- 4.1) micrograms/ml; peak time, 0.79 (+/- .54) vs 0.69 (+/- .40) hours after the dose; absorption half-life, 12.6 (+/- 9.8) vs. 8.2 (+/- 5.3) minutes; and absolute systemic availability, 79 (+/- 9) vs 72 (+/- 11) per cent. For AAP elixir, the corresponding values were 12.6 (+/- 5.4) vs 13.7 (+/- 6.0) micrograms/ml; 0.52 (+/- .24) vs 0.54 (+/- .51) hours; 8.6 (+/- 6.2) vs 6.1 (+/- 6.6) minutes; and 87 (+/- 9) vs 80 (+/- 9) per cent. Absolute bioavailability of both oral dosage forms was significantly less then 100 per cent in all groups. Elderly subjects tended to show lower availability of both oral preparations, but the difference was of borderline significance (P less than .50). Age did not influence any other measures of absorption. Since the absorption rate of acetaminophen may be indicative of the gastric emptying rate, age does not appear to alter this rate-limiting step in drug absorption. PMID:7069091

  8. Bacterial reduction of chromium

    SciTech Connect

    Schmieman, E.A.; Yonge, D.R.; Johnstone, D.L.

    1997-12-31

    A mixed culture was enriched from surface soil obtained from an eastern United States site highly contaminated with chromate. Growth of the culture was inhibited by a chromium concentration of 12 mg/L. Another mixed culture was enriched from subsurface soil obtained from the Hanford reservation, at the fringe of a chromate plume. The enrichment medium was minimal salts solution augmented with acetate as the carbon source, nitrate as the terminal electron acceptor, and various levels of chromate. This mixed culture exhibited chromate tolerance, but not chromate reduction capability, when growing anaerobically on this medium. However, this culture did exhibit chromate reduction capability when growing anaerobically on TSB. Growth of this culture was not inhibited by a chromium concentration of 12 mg/L. Mixed cultures exhibited decreasing diversity with increasing levels of chromate in the enrichment medium. An in situ bioremediation strategy is suggested for chromate contaminated soil and groundwater. 16 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Injury reduction at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Griffing, Bill; /Fermilab

    2005-06-01

    In a recent DOE Program Review, Fermilab's director presented results of the laboratory's effort to reduce the injury rate over the last decade. The results, shown in the figure below, reveal a consistent and dramatic downward trend in OSHA recordable injuries at Fermilab. The High Energy Physics Program Office has asked Fermilab to report in detail on how the laboratory has achieved the reduction. In fact, the reduction in the injury rate reflects a change in safety culture at Fermilab, which has evolved slowly over this period, due to a series of events, both planned and unplanned. This paper attempts to describe those significant events and analyze how each of them has shaped the safety culture that, in turn, has reduced the rate of injury at Fermilab to its current value.

  10. Aluminum reduction cell electrode

    DOEpatents

    Goodnow, Warren H.; Payne, John R.

    1982-01-01

    The invention is directed to cathode modules comprised of refractory hard metal materials, such as TiB.sub.2, for an electrolytic cell for the reduction of alumina wherein the modules may be installed and replaced during operation of the cell and wherein the structure of the cathode modules is such that the refractory hard metal materials are not subjected to externally applied forces or rigid constraints.

  11. Television noise reduction device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, B. L.; Stamps, J. C. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A noise reduction system that divides the color video signal into its luminance and chrominance components is reported. The luminance component of a given frame is summed with the luminance component of at least one preceding frame which was stored on a disc recorder. The summation is carried out so as to achieve a signal amplitude equivalent to that of the original signal. The averaged luminance signal is then recombined with the chrominance signal to achieve a noise-reduced television signal.

  12. [Aware and cooperative reduction].

    PubMed

    Tambone, V; Ghilardi, G

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work is to address the question of reduction in the scientific method, to evaluate its legitimacy as well as its pro and contra from an epistemological point of view. In the first paragraph we classify some kinds of reductionism, analysing their presuppositions and epistemological status and showing some examples of scientific reduction. The presentation includes a classificatory table that shows some of the different forms of biological reductionism. In the second paragraph we study the epistemology of science starting from its modern beginning: the Vienna Circle, focusing on the meaning of methodological reductionism. What did it mean for science to define itself mainly as method, which effects did this new concept of science have on methodology and what kind of problems did this movement bring about. In the third paragraph we examine the reactions triggered by methodological reductionism, we analyze the theoretical consistency of these answers, trying to offer a balanced view. We show how complexity can be seen as a paradigm of the anti-reductionism effort, and we study its epistemological basis. In the fourth paragraph we outline our operative proposal: the reduction that is both aware and cooperative. We point out the main reasons why science cannot avoid being reductive in some way, and therefore how we need to deal with this feature in order to prevent it to degenerate into reductionism. We show some examples of this new proposal taken from the practical realm and from literature, where it is possible to discern the spirit of this alternative methodology. PMID:22964706

  13. Drag reduction strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, D. Christopher

    1994-01-01

    previously a description was given of an active control scheme using wall transpiration that leads to a 15% reduction in surface skin friction beneath a turbulent boundary layer, according to direct numerical simulation. In this research brief further details of that scheme and its variants are given together with some suggestions as to how sensor/actuator arrays could be configured to reduce surface drag. The research which is summarized here was performed during the first half of 1994. This research is motivated by the need to understand better how the dynamics of near-wall turbulent flow can be modified so that skin friction is reduced. The reduction of turbulent skin friction is highly desirable in many engineering applications. Experiments and direct numerical simulations have led to an increased understanding of the cycle of turbulence production and transport in the boundary layer and raised awareness of the possibility of disrupting the process with a subsequent reduction in turbulent skin friction. The implementation of active feedback control in a computational setting is a viable approach for the investigation of the modifications to the flow physics that can be achieved. Bewley et al. and Hill describe how ideas from optimal control theory are employed to give 'sub-optimal' drag reduction schemes. The objectives of the work reported here is to investigate in greater detail the assumptions implicit within such schemes and their limitations. It is also our objective to describe how an array of sensors and actuators could be arranged and interconnected to form a 'smart' surface which has low skin friction.

  14. Aluminum reduction cell electrode

    DOEpatents

    Goodnow, W.H.; Payne, J.R.

    1982-09-14

    The invention is directed to cathode modules comprised of refractory hard metal materials, such as TiB[sub 2], for an electrolytic cell for the reduction of alumina wherein the modules may be installed and replaced during operation of the cell and wherein the structure of the cathode modules is such that the refractory hard metal materials are not subjected to externally applied forces or rigid constraints. 9 figs.

  15. Reduction of astrographic catalogues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stock, J.; Prugna, F. D.; Cova, J.

    1984-01-01

    An automatic program for the reduction of overlapping Carte du Ciel plates is described. The projection and transformation equations are given and the RAA subprogram flow is outlined. The program was applied to two different sets of data, namely to nine overlapping plates of the Cape Zone of the CdC, and to fifteen plates taken with the CIDA-refractor of the open cluster Tr10.

  16. Echocardiographic speckle reduction comparison.

    PubMed

    Finn, Seán; Glavin, Martin; Jones, Edward

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a detailed description and comparison of speckle reduction of medical ultrasound, and in particular echocardiography, is presented. Fifteen speckle reduction filters are described in a detailed fashion to facilitate implementation for research and evaluation. The filtering techniques considered include anisotropic diffusion, wavelet denoising, and local statistics. Common nomenclature and notation are adopted, to expedite comparison between approaches. Comparison of the filters is based on their application to simulated images, clinical videos, and a computational requirement analysis. The ultrasound simulation method provides a realistic model of the image acquisition process, and permits the use of a noise-free reference image for comparison. Application of objective quality metrics quantifies the preservation of image edges, overall image distortion, and improvement in image contrast. The computational analysis quantifies the number of operations required for each speckle reduction method. A speed-accuracy analysis of discretization methods for anisotropic diffusion is included. It is concluded that the optimal method is the OSRAD diffusion filter. This method is capable of strong speckle suppression, increasing the average SNRA of the simulated images by a factor of two. This method also shows favorable edge preservation and contrast improvement, and may be efficiently implemented. PMID:21244977

  17. Linear stability of low mode number tearing modes in the banana collisionality regime

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, R. , Abingdon, OX14 3DB, England )

    1989-12-01

    The semicollisional layer equations governing the linear stability of small mode number tearing modes in a low beta, large aspect ratio, tokamak equilibrium are derived from an expansion of the gyrokinetic equation. In this analysis only the cases where the ion Larmor radius is either much less than, or much greater than, the layer width are considered. Both the electrons and the ions are assumed to lie in the banana collisionality regime. One interesting feature of the derived layer equations, in the limit of small ion Larmor radius, is a substantial reduction in the effective collisionality of the system due to neoclassical ion dynamics. Next, using a shooting code, a dispersion relation is obtained from the layer equations in the limits of small ion Larmor radius and a vanishingly small fraction of trapped particles. As expected, strong semicollisional stabilization of the mode is found, but, in addition, a somewhat weaker destabilizing effect is obtained in the transition region between the collisional and semicollisional regimes.

  18. Multi-mode radio frequency device

    DOEpatents

    Gilbert, Ronald W.; Carrender, Curtis Lee; Anderson, Gordon A.; Steele, Kerry D.

    2007-02-13

    A transponder device having multiple modes of operation, such as an active mode and a passive mode, wherein the modes of operation are selected in response to the strength of a received radio frequency signal. A communication system is also provided having a transceiver configured to transmit a radio frequency signal and to receive a responsive signal, and a transponder configured to operate in a plurality of modes and to activate modes of operation in response to the radio frequency signal. Ideally, each mode of operation is activated and deactivated independent of the other modes, although two or more modes may be concurrently operational.

  19. Estimation of full modal damping matrices from complex test modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasselman, T. K.; Chrostowski, J. D.; Pappa, Richard

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the refinements of a previously published method for estimating a full modal damping matrix from complex test modes. It also documents application of the refined method to a structure where complex test modes were derived by the ERA method from multi-input random vibration test data. A numerical example based on simulated test data is presented to demonstrate the validity of the method. The application using real data was not successful, presumably because of noise in the small phase angles of the measured complex modes. Alternative test and data reduction procedures are suggested as possible remedies to the problem. A careful analysis of measurement and data processing errors should be made to examine basic feasibility before implementing the alternative procedures. The ability to estimate a full modal damping matrix is considered important for the preflight estimation of on-orbit damping, and for the synthesis of structural damping from substructure tests.

  20. Pyrogenic organic matter can alter microbial communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masiello, Caroline; Gao, Xiaodong; Cheng, Hsiao-Ying; Silberg, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    Soil microbes communicate with each other to manage a large range of processes that occur more efficiently when microbes are able to act simultaneously. This coordination occurs through the continuous production of signaling compounds that are easily diffused into and out of cells. As the number of microbes in a localized environment increases, the internal cellular concentration of these signaling compounds increases, and when a threshold concentration is reached, gene expression shifts, leading to altered (and coordinated) microbial behaviors. Many of these coordinated behaviors have biogeochemically important outcomes. For example, methanogenesis, denitrification, biofilm formation, and the development of plant-rhizobial symbioses are all regulated by a simple class of cell-cell signaling molecules known as acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs). Pyrogenic organic matter in soils can act to disrupt microbial communication through multiple pathways. In the case of AHLs, charcoal's very high surface area can sorb these signaling compounds, preventing microbes from detecting each others' presence (Masiello et al., 2014). In addition, the lactone ring in AHLs is vulnerable to pH increases accompanying PyOM inputs, with soil pH values higher than 7-8 leading to ring opening and compound destabilization. Different microbes use different classes of signaling compounds, and not all microbial signaling compounds are pH-vulnerable. This implies that PyOM-driven pH increases may trigger differential outcomes for Gram negative bacteria vs fungi, for example. A charcoal-driven reduction in microbes' ability to detect cell-cell communication compounds may lead to a shift in the ability of microbes to participate in key steps of C and N cycling. For example, an increase in an archaeon-specific AHL has been shown to lead to a cascade of metabolic processes that eventually results in the upregulation of CH4 production (Zhang et al., 2012). Alterations in similar AHL compounds leads to

  1. Alterations in grip strength during male sexual arousal.

    PubMed

    Jiao, C; Turman, B; Weerakoon, P; Knight, P

    2006-01-01

    Although it is known that alterations in grip strength occur under a number of conditions, little is known about relationships between grip strength and sexual arousal. This relationship was investigated in 30 healthy heterosexual males, who viewed both erotic and nonerotic videos. A questionnaire was used to assess the extent of sexual arousal. The grip strengths of both hands were measured with a five-position (P1-P5) dynamometer, before and after watching the videos. After watching the erotic video, there was a statistically significant reduction in grip strength for the P2 position, with nonsignificant overall reductions in grip strength for all other positions tested. No such effect was observed in control tests. The results indicate that during sexual arousal, the neural system is likely to reduce the output to muscles not directly related to sexual function, presumably to enhance the physiological responses of sexual arousal. PMID:16254571

  2. Liver enzyme alteration: a guide for clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Giannini, Edoardo G.; Testa, Roberto; Savarino, Vincenzo

    2005-01-01

    ISOLATED ALTERATIONS OF BIOCHEMICAL MARKERS OF LIVER DAMAGE in a seemingly healthy patient can present a challenge for the clinician. In this review we provide a guide to interpreting alterations to liver enzyme levels. The functional anatomy of the liver and pathophysiology of liver enzyme alteration are briefly reviewed. Using a schematic approach that classifies enzyme alterations as predominantly hepatocellular or predominantly cholestatic, we review abnormal enzymatic activity within the 2 subgroups, the most common causes of enzyme alteration and suggested initial investigations. PMID:15684121

  3. Single mode levitation and translation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin B. (Inventor); Allen, James L. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A single frequency resonance mode is applied by a transducer to acoustically levitate an object within a chamber. This process allows smooth movement of the object and suppression of unwanted levitation modes that would urge the object to a different levitation position. A plunger forms one end of the chamber, and the frequency changes as the plunger moves. Acoustic energy is applied to opposite sides of the chamber, with the acoustic energy on opposite sides being substantially 180 degrees out of phase.

  4. Instantaneous normal mode analysis of the vibrational relaxation of the amide I mode of alanine dipeptide in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farag, Marwa H.; Zúñiga, José; Requena, Alberto; Bastida, Adolfo

    2013-05-01

    Nonequilibrium Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations coupled to instantaneous normal modes (INMs) analysis are used to study the vibrational relaxation of the acetyl and amino-end amide I modes of the alanine dipeptide (AlaD) molecule dissolved in water (D2O). The INMs are assigned in terms of the equilibrium normal modes using the Effective Atomic Min-Cost algorithm as adapted to make use of the outputs of standard MD packages, a method which is well suited for the description of flexible molecules. The relaxation energy curves of both amide I modes show multiexponential decays, in good agreement with the experimental findings. It is found that ˜85%-90% of the energy relaxes through intramolecular vibrational redistribution. The main relaxation pathways are also identified. The rate at which energy is transferred into the solvent is similar for the acetyl-end and amino-end amide I modes. The conformational changes occurring during relaxation are investigated, showing that the populations of the alpha and beta region conformers are altered by energy transfer in such a way that it takes 15 ps for the equilibrium conformational populations to be recovered after the initial excitation of the AlaD molecule.

  5. Radon reduction using sub floor fans

    SciTech Connect

    Harley, N.H.; Chittaporn, P.

    1996-06-01

    The basement and second floor {sup 222}Rn concentrations in an energy efficient home were measured hourly for 6 y using continuous monitors of our design. The home had a subslab pipe network installed during construction, and for the past 2 y a 150 cfm fan was operative venting air via ductwork inside the chimney exiting on the roof. During this measurement interval, experiments were conducted with the fan in 3 modes: (1) with the subslab fan off, (2) in the conventional direction auctioning air from beneath the slab to outside, and (3) reversed, blowing outdoor air into the network under the slab. We have a large data base to show that the indoor {sup 222}R n concentration varies inversely with the indoor/outdoor temperature difference. In order to compare the 3 fan modes directly, we selected 50 to 90 d periods when the outdoor temperature was essentially the same. For the 3 modes, the fan off, blowing upward, and blowing downward, the basement concentration averaged 80, 38, and 34 Bq m{sup -3}, respectively. Radon peaks or surges occur over a period of about 1 d during falling barometric pressure. With the fan blowing downward, these {sup 222}Rn peaks tend to be smaller but only marginally so. We conclude that in this home the reduction in {sup 222}Rn with the fan and subslab pipe network operating was essentially the same regardless of the direction of flow from the fan.

  6. Adaptive mode control of a few-mode fiber by real-time mode decomposition.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liangjin; Leng, Jinyong; Zhou, Pu; Guo, Shaofeng; Lü, Haibin; Cheng, Xiang'ai

    2015-10-19

    A novel approach to adaptively control the beam profile in a few-mode fiber is experimentally demonstrated. We stress the fiber through an electric-controlled polarization controller, whose driven voltage depends on the current and target modal content difference obtained with the real-time mode decomposition. We have achieved selective excitations of LP01 and LP11 modes, as well as significant improvement of the beam quality factor, which may play crucial roles for high-power fiber lasers, fiber based telecommunication systems and other fundamental researches and applications. PMID:26480466

  7. Intrinsic Brain Activity in Altered States of Consciousness

    PubMed Central

    Boly, M.; Phillips, C.; Tshibanda, L.; Vanhaudenhuyse, A.; Schabus, M.; Dang-Vu, T.T.; Moonen, G.; Hustinx, R.; Maquet, P.; Laureys, S.

    2010-01-01

    Spontaneous brain activity has recently received increasing interest in the neuroimaging community. However, the value of resting-state studies to a better understanding of brain–behavior relationships has been challenged. That altered states of consciousness are a privileged way to study the relationships between spontaneous brain activity and behavior is proposed, and common resting-state brain activity features observed in various states of altered consciousness are reviewed. Early positron emission tomography studies showed that states of extremely low or high brain activity are often associated with unconsciousness. However, this relationship is not absolute, and the precise link between global brain metabolism and awareness remains yet difficult to assert. In contrast, voxel-based analyses identified a systematic impairment of associative frontoparieto–cingulate areas in altered states of consciousness, such as sleep, anesthesia, coma, vegetative state, epileptic loss of consciousness, and somnambulism. In parallel, recent functional magnetic resonance imaging studies have identified structured patterns of slow neuronal oscillations in the resting human brain. Similar coherent blood oxygen level–dependent (BOLD) systemwide patterns can also be found, in particular in the default-mode network, in several states of unconsciousness, such as coma, anesthesia, and slow-wave sleep. The latter results suggest that slow coherent spontaneous BOLD fluctuations cannot be exclusively a reflection of conscious mental activity, but may reflect default brain connectivity shaping brain areas of most likely interactions in a way that transcends levels of consciousness, and whose functional significance remains largely in the dark. PMID:18591474

  8. Altered resting state functional network connectivity in children absence epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Li, Qifu; Cao, Weifang; Liao, Xiaoping; Chen, Zhibin; Yang, Tianhua; Gong, Qiyong; Zhou, Dong; Luo, Cheng; Yao, Dezhong

    2015-07-15

    Altered functional connectivity has been associated with the influence of epileptic activity. Abnormalities in connectivity, particularly in dorsal attention (DAN), salience (SN) and default mode (DMN) networks, might contribute to the loss of consciousness during seizures and cognitive deficits in patients with children absence epilepsy (CAE). The objective of the present study was to identify whether the functional network connectivity (FNC) is changed between patients with CAE and healthy controls. Using independent component analysis, twelve resting state networks (RSNs) were identified in resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging data sets in eighteen CAE patients and twenty-one healthy controls. Analyses of the group differences in FNC strength were conducted, controlling for age and gender effects. The findings showed that some functional networks were clustered into two subgroups, correlated within subgroups and antagonized with each other. Compared with the controls, patients with CAE demonstrated abnormal FNC strength among three networks: DMN, DAN and SN. In addition, the antagonism of two subgroups was altered. These results might reflect the underlying neuronal functional impairment or altered integration among these RSNs in CAE, suggesting that the abnormal functional connectivity is likely to imply the pathological mechanism associated with the accumulative influence of epileptic activity. These findings contribute to the understanding of the behavior abnormality in CAE, such as disturbed executive and attentional functions and the loss of consciousness during absence seizures. PMID:25982500

  9. Epigenetic alterations underlying autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Aslani, Saeed; Mahmoudi, Mahdi; Karami, Jafar; Jamshidi, Ahmad Reza; Malekshahi, Zahra; Nicknam, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-03-01

    Recent breakthroughs in genetic explorations have extended our understanding through discovery of genetic patterns subjected to autoimmune diseases (AID). Genetics, on the contrary, has not answered all the conundrums to describe a comprehensive explanation of causal mechanisms of disease etiopathology with regard to the function of environment, sex, or aging. The other side of the coin, epigenetics which is defined by gene manifestation modification without DNA sequence alteration, reportedly has come in to provide new insights towards disease apprehension through bridging the genetics and environmental factors. New investigations in genetic and environmental contributing factors for autoimmunity provide new explanation whereby the interactions between genetic elements and epigenetic modifications signed by environmental agents may be responsible for autoimmune disease initiation and perpetuation. It is aimed through this article to review recent progress attempting to reveal how epigenetics associates with the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. PMID:26761426

  10. Single-mode squeezing in arbitrary spatial modes.

    PubMed

    Semmler, Marion; Berg-Johansen, Stefan; Chille, Vanessa; Gabriel, Christian; Banzer, Peter; Aiello, Andrea; Marquardt, Christoph; Leuchs, Gerd

    2016-04-01

    As the generation of squeezed states of light has become a standard technique in laboratories, attention is increasingly directed towards adapting the optical parameters of squeezed beams to the specific requirements of individual applications. It is known that imaging, metrology, and quantum information may benefit from using squeezed light with a tailored transverse spatial mode. However, experiments have so far been limited to generating only a few squeezed spatial modes within a given setup. Here, we present the generation of single-mode squeezing in Laguerre-Gauss and Bessel-Gauss modes, as well as an arbitrary intensity pattern, all from a single setup using a spatial light modulator (SLM). The degree of squeezing obtained is limited mainly by the initial squeezing and diffractive losses introduced by the SLM, while no excess noise from the SLM is detectable at the measured sideband. The experiment illustrates the single-mode concept in quantum optics and demonstrates the viability of current SLMs as flexible tools for the spatial reshaping of squeezed light. PMID:27137050

  11. Statistical light-mode dynamics of multipulse passive mode locking.

    PubMed

    Weill, Rafi; Well, Rafi; Vodonos, Boris; Gordon, Ariel; Gat, Omri; Fischer, Baruch

    2007-09-01

    We study the multipulse formation in passive mode locking in the framework of the statistical light-mode dynamics theory. It is a many-body theory that treats the complex many-mode laser system by statistical mechanics. We give a detailed theory and experimental verification for the important case of multiple-pulse formation in the laser cavity. We follow and extend our former work on the subject. We give a detailed analysis with a rigorous calculation of the partition function, the free energy, and the order parameter in the coarse-graining method within the mean-field theory that is exact in the light-mode system. The outcome is a comprehensive picture of multipulse formation and annihilation, pulse after pulse, in an almost quantized manner, as the noise ("temperature") or the light power is varied. We obtain the phase diagram of the system, showing a series of first-order phase transitions, each belonging to a different number of pulses. We also study the hysteresis behavior, typical for such thermodynamic systems. We elaborate on the role of the saturable absorber structure in determining the multipulse formation. The theoretical results are compared to experimental measurements that we obtained with mode-locked fiber lasers, and we find an excellent agreement. PMID:17930204

  12. Behavior of m =0 Modes in DEBS Modeling and MST Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, D.; Hesse, R.; Martin, D.; den Hartog, D. J.; Jacobson, C. M.; McCollam, K. J.; Nornberg, M. D.; Reusch, J. A.

    2015-11-01

    In the reversed field pinch (RFP), poloidal mode number m =0 fluctuations are driven through nonlinear coupling with unstable m =1 tearing modes. Many relaxation processes are strongly linked to the behavior of the m =0 modes and hence understanding and controlling them has high leverage for many physics studies. We explore the dependence of m =0 modes on several key parameters in both MST experiments and visco-resistive MHD simulations using the DEBS code. In both experiment and code, m =0 modes are suppressed by removing their resonant surface from the plasma though the suppression is more complete in the experiment. Reduced m =0 magnetic mode amplitudes are correlated with a reduction in the m =1 mode velocity fluctuations in both experiment and code. The time scale for m =0 mode amplitudes to rise and fall during relaxation events does not depend strongly on the degree of magnetic field reversal in the experiment or in the code. Systematic variation of the Lundquist number and magnetic Prandtl number in the code shows that both resistivity and viscosity affect the temporal evolution of the m =0 modes during relaxation events. The effect of the edge resistivity profile and the electric field boundary condition on m =0 modes is also examined in the code. These observations are discussed in relation to the nonlinearly driven reconnection paradigm for m =0 mode evolution. This work has been supported by the US DOE and NSF.

  13. High frequency pacing of edge localized modes by injection of lithium granules in DIII-D H-mode discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortolon, A.; Maingi, R.; Mansfield, D. K.; Nagy, A.; Roquemore, A. L.; Baylor, L. R.; Commaux, N.; Jackson, G. L.; Gilson, E. P.; Lunsford, R.; Parks, P. B.; Chrystal, C.; Grierson, B. A.; Groebner, R.; Haskey, S. R.; Makowski, M. J.; Lasnier, C. J.; Nazikian, R.; Osborne, T.; Shiraki, D.; Van Zeeland, M. A.

    2016-05-01

    A newly installed Lithium Granule Injector (LGI) was used to pace edge localized modes (ELM) in DIII-D. ELM pacing efficiency was studied injecting lithium granules of nominal diameter 0.3–0.9 mm, speed of 50–120 m s‑1 and average injection rates up to 100 Hz for 0.9 mm granules and up to 700 Hz for 0.3 mm granules. The efficiency of ELM triggering was found to depend strongly on size of the injected granules, with triggering efficiency close to 100% obtained with 0.9 mm diameter granules, lower with smaller sizes, and weakly depending on granule velocity. Robust ELM pacing was demonstrated in ITER-like plasmas for the entire shot length, at ELM frequencies 3–5 times larger than the ‘natural’ ELM frequency observed in reference discharges. Within the range of ELM frequencies obtained, the peak ELM heat flux at the outer strike point was reduced with increasing pacing frequency. The peak heat flux reduction at the inner strike point appears to saturate at high pacing frequency. Lithium was found in the plasma core, with a concurrent reduction of metallic impurities and carbon. Overall, high frequency ELM pacing using the lithium granule injection appears to be compatible with both H-mode energy confinement and attractive H-mode pedestal characteristics, but further assessment is needed to determine whether the projected heat flux reduction required for ITER can be met.

  14. CERES Spatial Extent and Scan Modes

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-03

    ... CERES Examples: Spatial Extent and Scan Modes The first three images shown below show the areal coverage for ... the areal coverage and characteristics of particular CERES scan modes performed by the CERES instruments. The Cross-Track mode, a Fixed ...

  15. Pathogen reduction in human plasma using an ultrashort pulsed laser.

    PubMed

    Tsen, Shaw-Wei D; Kingsley, David H; Kibler, Karen; Jacobs, Bert; Sizemore, Sara; Vaiana, Sara M; Anderson, Jeanne; Tsen, Kong-Thon; Achilefu, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Pathogen reduction is a viable approach to ensure the continued safety of the blood supply against emerging pathogens. However, the currently licensed pathogen reduction techniques are ineffective against non-enveloped viruses such as hepatitis A virus, and they introduce chemicals with concerns of side effects which prevent their widespread use. In this report, we demonstrate the inactivation of both enveloped and non-enveloped viruses in human plasma using a novel chemical-free method, a visible ultrashort pulsed laser. We found that laser treatment resulted in 2-log, 1-log, and 3-log reductions in human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis A virus, and murine cytomegalovirus in human plasma, respectively. Laser-treated plasma showed ≥70% retention for most coagulation factors tested. Furthermore, laser treatment did not alter the structure of a model coagulation factor, fibrinogen. Ultrashort pulsed lasers are a promising new method for chemical-free, broad-spectrum pathogen reduction in human plasma. PMID:25372037

  16. Pathogen Reduction in Human Plasma Using an Ultrashort Pulsed Laser

    PubMed Central

    Tsen, Shaw-Wei D.; Kingsley, David H.; Kibler, Karen; Jacobs, Bert; Sizemore, Sara; Vaiana, Sara M.; Anderson, Jeanne; Tsen, Kong-Thon; Achilefu, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Pathogen reduction is a viable approach to ensure the continued safety of the blood supply against emerging pathogens. However, the currently licensed pathogen reduction techniques are ineffective against non-enveloped viruses such as hepatitis A virus, and they introduce chemicals with concerns of side effects which prevent their widespread use. In this report, we demonstrate the inactivation of both enveloped and non-enveloped viruses in human plasma using a novel chemical-free method, a visible ultrashort pulsed laser. We found that laser treatment resulted in 2-log, 1-log, and 3-log reductions in human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis A virus, and murine cytomegalovirus in human plasma, respectively. Laser-treated plasma showed ≥70% retention for most coagulation factors tested. Furthermore, laser treatment did not alter the structure of a model coagulation factor, fibrinogen. Ultrashort pulsed lasers are a promising new method for chemical-free, broad-spectrum pathogen reduction in human plasma. PMID:25372037

  17. Reduction of turbomachinery noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waitz, Ian A. (Inventor); Brookfield, John M. (Inventor); Sell, Julian (Inventor); Hayden, Belva J. (Inventor); Ingard, K. Uno (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    In the invention, propagating broad band and tonal acoustic components of noise characteristic of interaction of a turbomachine blade wake, produced by a turbomachine blade as the blade rotates, with a turbomachine component downstream of the rotating blade, are reduced. This is accomplished by injection of fluid into the blade wake through a port in the rotor blade. The mass flow rate of the fluid injected into the blade wake is selected to reduce the momentum deficit of the wake to correspondingly increase the time-mean velocity of the wake and decrease the turbulent velocity fluctuations of the wake. With this fluid injection, reduction of both propagating broad band and tonal acoustic components of noise produced by interaction of the blade wake with a turbomachine component downstream of the rotating blade is achieved. In a further noise reduction technique, boundary layer fluid is suctioned into the turbomachine blade through a suction port on the side of the blade that is characterized as the relatively low-pressure blade side. As with the fluid injection technique, the mass flow rate of the fluid suctioned into the blade is here selected to reduce the momentum deficit of the wake to correspondingly increase the time-mean velocity of the wake and decrease the turbulent velocity fluctuations of the wake; reduction of both propagating broad band and tonal acoustic components of noise produced by interaction of the blade wake with a turbomachine component downstream of the rotating blade is achieved with this suction technique. Blowing and suction techniques are also provided in the invention for reducing noise associated with the wake produced by fluid flow around a stationary blade upstream of a rotating turbomachine.

  18. Dimensional reduction transition

    SciTech Connect

    Kolb, E.

    1984-11-01

    In this conference on phase transitions in the early Universe the author discusses the transition from more than four space-time dimensions to four effective space-time dimensions; the dimensional reduction transition. The basic assumption is that the true dimensionality of space-time is more than four, and that at present the extra dimensions are compact and too small to be observable. The origin of the observed gauge symmetries from symmetries of a compact space has been proposed as a possible approach for the unification of particle physics and gravity. The common assumption in all models with extra dimensions is that the unseen dimensions are compactified to a very small size, usually taken to be of the order of the Planck length. To probe the structure of the extra dimensions would require energies of the Planck mass E = m/sub pl/ = 1.2 x 10/sup 19/GeV, and the early Universe may be the only source of such energies. The author will assume for initial conditions that all spatial dimensions are small, and that initially the Universe had N = 3 + D spatial dimensions. When the temperature fell below T = R/sub D//sup -1/, where R/sub D/ is the physical size of the compact extra dimensions, the space-time dimensionality of the Universe underwent a reduction to effectively a 4 space-time dimensional Universe, and dynamical effects of the extra dimensions became unimportant. In this paper I will discuss three possible consequences of this cosmological dimensional reduction; entropy production (inflation), magnetic monopole production, and stable, massive particle production. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Electrolytic oxide reduction system

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedmeyer, Stanley G; Barnes, Laurel A; Williamson, Mark A; Willit, James L; Berger, John F

    2015-04-28

    An electrolytic oxide reduction system according to a non-limiting embodiment of the present invention may include a plurality of anode assemblies, a plurality of cathode assemblies, and a lift system configured to engage the anode and cathode assemblies. The cathode assemblies may be alternately arranged with the anode assemblies such that each cathode assembly is flanked by two anode assemblies. The lift system may be configured to selectively engage the anode and cathode assemblies so as to allow the simultaneous lifting of any combination of the anode and cathode assemblies (whether adjacent or non-adjacent).

  20. REDSPEC: NIRSPEC data reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Prato, L.; McLean, I.

    2015-07-01

    REDSPEC is an IDL based reduction package designed with NIRSPEC in mind though can be used to reduce data from other spectrographs as well. REDSPEC accomplishes spatial rectification by summing an A+B pair of a calibration star to produce an image with two spectra; the image is remapped on the basis of polynomial fits to the spectral traces and calculation of gaussian centroids to define their separation, producing straight spectral traces with respect to the detector rows. The raw images are remapped onto a coordinate system with uniform intervals in spatial extent along the slit and in wavelength along the dispersion axis.

  1. Aluminum reduction cell electrode

    DOEpatents

    Payne, John R.

    1983-09-20

    The invention is directed to an anode-cathode structure for an electrolytic cell for the reduction of alumina wherein the structure is comprised of a carbon anode assembly which straddles a wedge-shaped refractory hard metal cathode assembly having steeply sloped cathodic surfaces, each cathodic surface being paired in essentially parallel planar relationship with an anode surface. The anode-cathode structure not only takes into account the structural weakness of refractory hard metal materials but also permits the changing of the RHM assembly during operation of the cell. Further, the anode-cathode structure enhances the removal of anode gas from the interpolar gap between the anode and cathode surfaces.

  2. Alumina reduction cell

    SciTech Connect

    Tabereaux, A.T.; Gunnip, F.L.

    1987-06-16

    An alumina reduction cell is described having a cathode and an anode. The anode is formed of a carbonaceous paste and baked during operation of cell and the anode having rows of anode pins on opposing faces. The pins are positioned by passing the pins through openings in anode channels vertically stacked along the opposing faces of the anode. The lowermost row of anode pins carries current through the anode; the improvement positions the anode pins passing through along a line of constant current distribution in the anode.

  3. Aircraft engine pollution reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudey, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of engine operation on the types and levels of the major aircraft engine pollutants is described and the major factors governing the formation of these pollutants during the burning of hydrocarbon fuel are discussed. Methods which are being explored to reduce these pollutants are discussed and their application to several experimental research programs are pointed out. Results showing significant reductions in the levels of carbon monoxide, unburned hydrocarbons, and oxides of nitrogen obtained from experimental combustion research programs are presented and discussed to point out potential application to aircraft engines.

  4. Altering petrology through microbial dissimilatory phosphite oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, H.; Figueroa, I.; Coates, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    Microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) takes advantage of various microbial metabolisms to increase hydrocarbon and energy yield by improving oil flow and flood water sweep in a reservoir during tertiary recovery. Wormholing at the injection well is believed to be the result of the large drop in pressure when water exits the injection well and enters the unconsolidated reservoir matrix. One possible means of prevent this event is to consolidate the rock matrix immediately around the injection well to create a permeable zone of stable petrology. Many microbial processes are known to result in the precipitation of ionic components into their environment creating solid-phase minerals. Such processes could be judiciously applied to bind unconsolidated matrices in order to form a permeable concreted rock matrix, which would minimize wormholing events and thus improve floodwater sweep. However, to date, apart from the application of urea oxidation creating calcium carbonate precipitation, there has been little investigation of the applicability of these precipitated bioconcretions to MEOR strategies and none to control wormholing events. Here we present a novel approach to altering rock petrology to concrete unconsolidated matrices in the near well environment by the biogenesis of authigenic minerals through microbial dissimilatory phosphite oxidation. Desulfotignum phosphitoxidans, strain FiPS-3 is currently the only isolated organism capable of using phosphite (HPO32-) as an electron donor for growth. This process, known as dissimilatory phosphite oxidation (DPO), can be coupled to either sulfate reduction or homoacetogenesis and leads to the accumulation of inorganic phosphate in the medium. The resulting insoluble mineral phases can coat the rock environment resulting in a concretion binding the unconsolidated matrix particles into a single phase. In this study we demonstrate that DPO can effectively produce calcium or magnesium phosphate minerals in packed glass

  5. Vibrational modes of metal nanoshells and bimetallic core-shell nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kirakosyan, Arman S.; Shahbazyan, Tigran V.

    2008-01-01

    We theoretically study the spectrum of radial vibrational modes in composite metal nanostructures such as bimetallic core-shell particles and metal nanoshells with dielectric core in an environment. We calculate frequencies and damping rates of fundamental (breathing) modes for these nanostructures along with those of two higher-order modes. For metal nanoshells, we find that the breathing mode frequency is always lower than the one for solid particles of the same size, while the damping is higher and increases with a reduction in the shell thickness. We identify two regimes that can be characterized as weakly damped and overdamped vibrations in the presence of external medium. For bimetallic particles, we find periodic dependence of frequency and damping rate on the shell thickness with period being determined by the mode number. For both types of nanostructures, the frequency of higher modes is nearly independent of the environment, while the damping rate shows a strong sensitivity to the outside medium. PMID:18647039

  6. Resonant translational, breathing, and twisting modes of transverse magnetic domain walls pinned at notches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metaxas, Peter J.; Albert, Maximilian; Lequeux, Steven; Cros, Vincent; Grollier, Julie; Bortolotti, Paolo; Anane, Abdelmadjid; Fangohr, Hans

    2016-02-01

    We study resonant translational, breathing, and twisting modes of transverse magnetic domain walls pinned at notches in ferromagnetic nanostrips. We demonstrate that a mode's sensitivity to notches depends strongly on the mode's characteristics. For example, the frequencies of modes that involve lateral motion of the wall are the most sensitive to changes in the notch intrusion depth, especially at the narrow, more strongly confined end of the domain wall. In contrast, the breathing mode, whose dynamics are concentrated away from the notches is relatively insensitive to changes in the notches' sizes. We also demonstrate a sharp drop in the translational mode's frequency towards zero when approaching depinning which is confirmed, using a harmonic oscillator model, to be consistent with a reduction in the local slope of the notch-induced confining potential at its edge.

  7. Teaching Social Workers about Substance Use Problems via Temporary Abstinence from Normal Mood-Altering Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Paul Elliott

    2007-01-01

    Social work students enrolled in a graduate-level course in substance abuse (N = 450, over nine years) assessed their own "mood-altering" behaviors (i.e., stress-reduction strategies and leisure-time activities), abstained from one or more of these activities for one week, then completed a written summary of their personal bio-psycho-social…

  8. ALTERATION OF SOIL METAL CHEMISTRY AND PHYTOAVAILABILITY ASSOCIATED WITH BIOSOLIDS APPLICATION (ABSTRACT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biosolids are a complex mixture which contain both inorganic and organic adsorbents. Thus, addition of biosolids to soil not only increases the environmental loading of toxic metals (Cd, Zn, Cu, Ni, Pb, etc.) it alters the phytoavailability of these metals. This reduction in ph...

  9. Thiazolidinedione-8 Alters Symbiotic Relationship in C. albicans-S. mutans Dual Species Biofilm.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Mark; Ginsburg, Isaac; Al-Quntar, Abed; Steinberg, Doron

    2016-01-01

    The small molecule, thiazolidinedione-8 (S-8) was shown to impair biofilm formation of various microbial pathogens, including the fungus Candida albicans and Streptococcus mutans. Previously, we have evaluated the specific molecular mode of S-8 action against C. albicans biofilm-associated pathogenicity. In this study we investigated the influence of S-8 on dual species, C. albicans-S. mutans biofilm. We show that in the presence of S-8 a reduction of the co-species biofilm formation occurred with a major effect on C. albicans. Biofilm biomass and exopolysaccharide (EPS) production were significantly reduced by S-8. Moreover, the agent caused oxidative stress associated with a strong induction of reactive oxygen species and hydrogen peroxide uptake inhibition by a mixed biofilm. In addition, S-8 altered symbiotic relationship between these species by a complex mechanism. Streptococcal genes associated with quorum sensing (QS) (comDE and luxS), EPS production (gtfBCD and gbpB), as well as genes related to protection against oxidative stress (nox and sodA) were markedly upregulated by S-8. In contrast, fungal genes related to hyphae formation (hwp1), adhesion (als3), hydrophobicity (csh1), and oxidative stress response (sod1, sod2, and cat1) were downregulated in the presence of S-8. In addition, ywp1 gene associated with yeast form of C. albicans was induced by S-8, which is correlated with appearance of mostly yeast cells in S-8 treated dual species biofilms. We concluded that S-8 disturbs symbiotic balance between C. albicans and S. mutans in dual species biofilm. PMID:26904013

  10. Thiazolidinedione-8 Alters Symbiotic Relationship in C. albicans-S. mutans Dual Species Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Mark; Ginsburg, Isaac; Al-Quntar, Abed; Steinberg, Doron

    2016-01-01

    The small molecule, thiazolidinedione-8 (S-8) was shown to impair biofilm formation of various microbial pathogens, including the fungus Candida albicans and Streptococcus mutans. Previously, we have evaluated the specific molecular mode of S-8 action against C. albicans biofilm-associated pathogenicity. In this study we investigated the influence of S-8 on dual species, C. albicans-S. mutans biofilm. We show that in the presence of S-8 a reduction of the co-species biofilm formation occurred with a major effect on C. albicans. Biofilm biomass and exopolysaccharide (EPS) production were significantly reduced by S-8. Moreover, the agent caused oxidative stress associated with a strong induction of reactive oxygen species and hydrogen peroxide uptake inhibition by a mixed biofilm. In addition, S-8 altered symbiotic relationship between these species by a complex mechanism. Streptococcal genes associated with quorum sensing (QS) (comDE and luxS), EPS production (gtfBCD and gbpB), as well as genes related to protection against oxidative stress (nox and sodA) were markedly upregulated by S-8. In contrast, fungal genes related to hyphae formation (hwp1), adhesion (als3), hydrophobicity (csh1), and oxidative stress response (sod1, sod2, and cat1) were downregulated in the presence of S-8. In addition, ywp1 gene associated with yeast form of C. albicans was induced by S-8, which is correlated with appearance of mostly yeast cells in S-8 treated dual species biofilms. We concluded that S-8 disturbs symbiotic balance between C. albicans and S. mutans in dual species biofilm. PMID:26904013

  11. The effective degeneracy of protein normal modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Hyuntae; Song, Guang

    2016-06-01

    Normal modes are frequently computed and used to portray protein dynamics and interpret protein conformational changes. In this work, we investigate the nature of normal modes and find that the normal modes of proteins, especially those at the low frequency range (0–600 cm‑1), are highly susceptible to degeneracy. Two or more modes are degenerate if they have the same frequency and consequently any orthogonal transformation of them also is a valid representation of the mode subspace. Thus, degenerate modes can no longer characterize unique directions of motions as regular modes do. Though the normal modes of proteins are usually of different frequencies, the difference in frequency between neighboring modes is so small that, under even slight structural uncertainty that unavoidably exists in structure determination, it can easily vanish and as a result, a mode becomes effectively degenerate with its neighboring modes. This can be easily observed in that some modes seem to disappear and their matching modes cannot be found when the structure used to compute the modes is modified only slightly. We term this degeneracy the effective degeneracy of normal modes. This work is built upon our recent discovery that the vibrational spectrum of globular proteins is universal. The high density of modes observed in the vibrational frequency spectra of proteins renders their normal modes highly susceptible to degeneracy, under even the smallest structural uncertainty. Indeed, we find the degree of degeneracy of modes is proportional to the density of modes in the vibrational spectrum. This means that for modes at the same frequency, degeneracy is more severe for larger proteins. Degeneracy exists also in the modes of coarse-grained models, but to a much lesser extent than those of all-atom models. In closing, we discuss the implications of the effective degeneracy of normal modes: how it may significantly affect the ways in which normal modes are used in various normal modes

  12. The effective degeneracy of protein normal modes.

    PubMed

    Na, Hyuntae; Song, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Normal modes are frequently computed and used to portray protein dynamics and interpret protein conformational changes. In this work, we investigate the nature of normal modes and find that the normal modes of proteins, especially those at the low frequency range (0-600 cm(-1)), are highly susceptible to degeneracy. Two or more modes are degenerate if they have the same frequency and consequently any orthogonal transformation of them also is a valid representation of the mode subspace. Thus, degenerate modes can no longer characterize unique directions of motions as regular modes do. Though the normal modes of proteins are usually of different frequencies, the difference in frequency between neighboring modes is so small that, under even slight structural uncertainty that unavoidably exists in structure determination, it can easily vanish and as a result, a mode becomes effectively degenerate with its neighboring modes. This can be easily observed in that some modes seem to disappear and their matching modes cannot be found when the structure used to compute the modes is modified only slightly. We term this degeneracy the effective degeneracy of normal modes. This work is built upon our recent discovery that the vibrational spectrum of globular proteins is universal. The high density of modes observed in the vibrational frequency spectra of proteins renders their normal modes highly susceptible to degeneracy, under even the smallest structural uncertainty. Indeed, we find the degree of degeneracy of modes is proportional to the density of modes in the vibrational spectrum. This means that for modes at the same frequency, degeneracy is more severe for larger proteins. Degeneracy exists also in the modes of coarse-grained models, but to a much lesser extent than those of all-atom models. In closing, we discuss the implications of the effective degeneracy of normal modes: how it may significantly affect the ways in which normal modes are used in various normal modes

  13. Phase stability and lattice thermal conductivity reduction in CoSb3 skutterudites, doped with chalcogen atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battabyal, M.; Priyadarshini, B.; Pradipkanti, L.; Satapathy, Dillip K.; Gopalan, R.

    2016-07-01

    We report a significant reduction in the lattice thermal conductivity of the CoSb3 skuttertudites, doped with chalcogen atoms. Te/Se chalcogen atoms doped CoSb3 skutterudite samples (Te0.1Co4Sb12, Se0.1Co4Sb12, Te0.05Se0.05Co4Sb12) are processed by ball milling and spark plasma sintering. X-ray diffraction data combined with energy dispersive X-ray spectra indicate the doping of Te/Se chalcogen atoms in the skutterudite. The temperature dependent X-ray diffraction confirms the stability of the Te/Se doped CoSb3 skutterudite phase and absence of any secondary phase in the temperature range starting from 300 K to 773 K. The Raman spectroscopy reveals that different chalcogen dopant atoms cause different resonant optical vibrational modes between the dopant atom and the host CoSb3 skutterudite lattice. These optical vibrational modes do scatter heat carrying acoustic phonons in a different spectral range. It was found that among the Te/Se chalcogen atoms, Te atoms alter the host CoSb3 skutterudite lattice vibrations to a larger extent than Se atoms, and can potentially scatter more Sb related acoustic phonons. The Debye model of lattice thermal conductivity confirms that the resonant phonon scattering has important contributions to the reduction of lattice thermal conductivity in CoSb3 skutterudites doped with Te/Se chalcogen atoms. Lattice thermal conductivity ˜ 0.9 W/mK at 773 K is achieved in Te0.1Co4Sb12 skutterudites, which is the lowest value reported so far in CoSb3 skutterudites, doped with single Te chalcogen atom.

  14. Core Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation is a technical summary of and outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external research on core (combustor and turbine) noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system-level noise metrics for the 2015, 2020, and 2025 timeframes; turbofan design trends and their aeroacoustic implications; the emerging importance of core noise and its relevance to the SFW Reduce-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge; and the current research activities in the core noise area. Recent work1 on the turbine-transmission loss of combustor noise is briefly described, two2,3 new NRA efforts in the core-noise area are outlined, and an effort to develop CMC-based acoustic liners for broadband noise reduction suitable for turbofan-core application is delineated. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The reduction of aircraft noise is critical to enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic. The Subsonic Fixed Wing Project's Reduce-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge aims to develop concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries.

  15. UCAC3: ASTROMETRIC REDUCTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, Charlie T.; Zacharias, Norbert; Wycoff, Gary L.

    2010-06-15

    Presented here are the details of the astrometric reductions from the x, y data to mean right ascension (R.A.), declination (decl.) coordinates of the third U.S. Naval Observatory CCD Astrograph Catalog (UCAC3). For these new reductions we used over 216,000 CCD exposures. The Two-Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) data are used extensively to probe for coordinate and coma-like systematic errors in UCAC data mainly caused by the poor charge transfer efficiency of the 4K CCD. Errors up to about 200 mas have been corrected using complex look-up tables handling multiple dependences derived from the residuals. Similarly, field distortions and sub-pixel phase errors have also been evaluated using the residuals with respect to 2MASS. The overall magnitude equation is derived from UCAC calibration field observations alone, independent of external catalogs. Systematic errors of positions at the UCAC observing epoch as presented in UCAC3 are better corrected than in the previous catalogs for most stars. The Tycho-2 catalog is used to obtain final positions on the International Celestial Reference Frame. Residuals of the Tycho-2 reference stars show a small magnitude equation (depending on declination zone) that might be inherent in the Tycho-2 catalog.

  16. Microbial reduction of iodate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Councell, T.B.; Landa, E.R.; Lovley, D.R.

    1997-01-01

    The different oxidation species of iodine have markedly different sorption properties. Hence, changes in iodine redox states can greatly affect the mobility of iodine in the environment. Although a major microbial role has been suggested in the past to account for these redox changes, little has been done to elucidate the responsible microorganisms or the mechanisms involved. In the work presented here, direct microbial reduction of iodate was demonstrated with anaerobic cell suspensions of the sulfate reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio desulfuricans which reduced 96% of an initial 100 ??M iodate to iodide at pH 7 in 30 mM NaHCO3 buffer, whereas anaerobic cell suspensions of the dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens were unable to reduce iodate in 30 mM NaHCO3 buffer (pH 7). Both D. desulfuricans and S. putrefaciens were able to reduce iodate at pH 7 in 10 mM HEPES buffer. Both soluble ferrous iron and sulfide, as well as iron monosulfide (FeS) were shown to abiologically reduce iodate to iodide. These results indicate that ferric iron and/or sulfate reducing bacteria are capable of mediating both direct, enzymatic, as well as abiotic reduction of iodate in natural anaerobic environments. These microbially mediated reactions may be important factors in the fate and transport of 129I in natural systems.

  17. Evaluation of Contrail Reduction Strategies Based on Aircraft Flight Distances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Neil Y.; Sridhar, Banavar; Li, Jinhua; Ng, Hok Kwan

    2012-01-01

    This paper evaluates a set of contrail reduction strategies based on the flight range of aircraft as contrail reduction strategies have different impacts on aircraft depending on how they plan to fly. In general, aircraft with longer flight distances cruise at the altitudes where contrails are more likely to form. The concept of the contrail frequency index is used to quantify contrail impacts. The strategy for reducing the persistent contrail formation is to minimize the contrail frequency index by altering the aircraft's cruising altitude. A user-defined factor is used to trade off between contrail reduction and extra CO2 emissions. A higher value of tradeoff factor results in more contrail reduction and extra CO2 emissions. Results show that contrail reduction strategies using various tradeo factors behave differently from short-range flights to long-range ights. Analysis shows that short-distance flights (less than 500 miles) are the most frequent flights but contribute least to contrail reduction. Therefore these aircraft have the lowest priority when applying contrail reduction strategies. Medium-distance flights (500 to 1000 miles) have a higher priority if the goal is to achieve maximum contrail reduction in total; long-distance flights (1000 to 1500 miles) have a higher priority if the goal is to achieve maximum contrail reduction per flight. The characteristics of transcontinental flights (greater than 1500 miles) vary with different weather days so the priority of applying contrail reduction strategies to the group needs to be evaluated based on the locations of the contrail areas during any given day. For the days tested, medium-distance ights contribute up to 42.6% of the reduction among the groups during a day. The contrail frequency index per 1,000 miles for medium-distance, long-distance, and transcontinental flights can be reduced by an average of 75%. The results provide a starting point for developing operational policies to reduce the impact of

  18. Breathing Mode in Complex Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujioka, K.; Henning, C.; Ludwig, P.; Bonitz, M.; Melzer, A.; Vitkalov, S.

    2007-11-01

    The breathing mode is a fundamental normal mode present in Coulomb systems, and may have utility in identifying particle charge and the Debye length of certain systems. The question remains whether this mode can be extended to strongly coupled Yukawa balls [1]. These systems are characterized by particles confined within a parabolic potential well and interacting through a shielded Coulomb potential [2,3]. The breathing modes for a variety of systems in 1, 2, and 3 dimensions are computed by solving the eigenvalue problem given by the dynamical (Hesse) matrix. These results are compared to theoretical investigations that assume a strict definition for a breathing mode within the system, and an analysis is made of the most fitting model to utilize in the study of particular systems of complex plasmas [1,4]. References [1] T.E. Sheridan, Phys. of Plasmas. 13, 022106 (2006)[2] C. Henning et al., Phys. Rev. E 74, 056403 (2006)[3] M. Bonitz et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 075001 (2006)[4] C. Henning et al., submitted for publication

  19. F-Mode Eikonal Heliotomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ridder, S.; Zhao, J.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate 5 days of Doppler measurements geo-tracked for a sunspot. The data is cross -correlated to create time-distance impulse responses of wave propagation in the plasma. We focus on imaging the f-mode (surface gravity mode), which is separated from the other modes by k-ω filtering. Recent developments for surface wave imaging in earth-seismology include the development of an eikonal tomography technique. Eikonal tomography relies on evaluation of the local spatial derivatives of a traveltime surface to directly infer the slowness of wave-propagation. Whereas earth-seismology relies on increasing high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by cross-correlating long-time series, helioseismology relies on stacking over geometrically similar virtual sources. We assume there are two symmetries in the geometry of virtual sources around a sunspot. The first is a radial symmetry centered at the sunspot. The second is a radial symmetry of propagation around each virtual source. Because we are interested in the effect of sunspots on wave-propagation, we keep the averaging along the second symmetry axis to a minimum, and rely heavily on averaging each virtual source with equal distance from the sunspot. We will investigate the spatial variation of f-mode dispersion in a radial geometry with the sunspot at the center by creating f-mode velocity maps at different frequencies.

  20. Mode S baseline radar tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancus, E. F.; Baker, L. H.

    1982-11-01

    The baseline performance characteristics of the moving target detector (MTD) and radar data acquisition system (RDAS) as an integral part of the Mode S sensor, were determined. The MTD and RDAS were separately evaluated to determine their capability to provide radar data suitable for utilization by the Mode S sensor and automated radar terminal system (ARTS). The design modifications made to the Mode S sensor to provide the capability of interfacing to either an MTD or RDAS were evaluated to determine if they were in compliance with the Federal Aviation Administration engineering requirement, FAA-ER-240-26. Radar baseline technical performance data was provided to characterize the MTD, RDAS, Mode S, and ARTS. The minimum radar tracking requirements are studied to determine if they are adequate to provide reliable radar track data to an air traffic control facility. It was concluded that the Mode S sensor, when integrated with an MTD-2 radar digitizer, can provide reliable primary radar track data to the ARTS III system for automated radar track acquisition.

  1. Improved Peak Cancellation for PAPR Reduction in OFDM Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan, Lilin; Xiao, Yue; Ni, Wei; Li, Shaoqian

    This letter presents an improved peak cancellation (PC) scheme for peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR) reduction in orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) systems. The main idea is based on a serial peak cancellation (SPC) mode for alleviating the peak regrowth of the conventional schemes. Based on the SPC mode, two particular algorithms are developed with different tradeoff between PAPR and computational complexity. Simulation shows that the proposed scheme has a better tradeoff among PAPR, complexity and signal distortion than the conventional schemes.

  2. The Hall dynamo effect and nonlinear mode coupling during sawtooth magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.; Deng, B. H.; Almagri, A. F.; Craig, D.; Fiksel, G.; Mirnov, V.; Prager, S. C.; Sarff, J. S.; Svidzinski, V.

    2006-11-15

    During magnetic reconnection associated with sawtooth activity in a reversed field pinch, we observe a large fluctuation-induced Hall electromotive force, <{delta}Jx{delta}B>/n{sub e}e, which is capable of modifying the equilibrium current. This Hall dynamo effect is determined in the hot plasma core by laser Faraday rotation which measures equilibrium and fluctuating magnetic field and current density. We find that the Hall dynamo is strongest when nonlinear mode coupling between three spatial Fourier modes of the resistive tearing instability is present. Mode coupling alters the phase relation between magnetic and current density fluctuations for individual Fourier modes leading to a finite Hall effect. Detailed measurements of the spatial and temporal dynamics for the dominant core resonant mode under various plasma configurations are described providing evidence regarding the origin of the Hall dynamo.

  3. Reduction method for thermal analysis of complex aerospace structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shore, C. P.

    1985-01-01

    A reduction method which combines classical Rayleigh-Ritz modal superposition techniques with contemporary finite-element methods is applied to transient nonlinear thermal analysis of aerospace structures. The essence of the method is the use of a few thermal modes from eigenvalue analyses as basis vectors to represent the temperature response in the structure. The method is used to obtain approximate temperature histories for a portion of the Shuttle orbiter wing subject to reentry heating and for a large space antenna reflector subject to heating associated with a low Earth orbit. The reduction method has excellent potential for significant size reduction for radiation-dominated problems such as the antenna reflector. However, for conduction-dominated problems such as the Shuttle wing, especially those with complex spatial and temporal variations in the applied heating, additional work appears necessary to find alternate sources of basis vectors which will permit significant problem size reductions.

  4. Investigation of cadmium-induced alterations in renal glomerular function

    SciTech Connect

    Long, T.J.

    1982-01-01

    This research was designed to test the hypothesis that certain aspects of cadmium-induced renal dysfunction are the result of glomerular, rather than classic tubular, injury. To determine whether cadmium-induced proteinuria was due to altered glomerular function, cadmium was administered chronically at a concentration of 185 ppm in the drinking water. This protocol resulted in the production of proteinuria which when analyzed by high pressure liquid chromatography and radioimmunoassay was indistinguishable from that occurring in control rats. Glomerular filtration rate, renal blood flow, and filtration fraction were all significantly depressed after 20-30 weeks of exposure. In order to further investigate these alterations in glomerular function, an acute exposure model was developed. It was found that a single i.p. injection of cadmium in mercaptoethanol resulted in the onset of acute renal failure. The clinical picture was characterized by a reduction in glomerular filtrate rate of 50-90% within 24 hours, with partial to total recovery occurring by day 7 post-exposure. Histological evidence indicated that to a large extent the reduction in GFR was due to tubular blockade and/or backleak of filtrate across damaged tubules.

  5. Altered Gravity and Early Heart Development in Culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiens, Darrell J.; Lwigale, P.; Denning, J.

    1996-01-01

    The macromolecules comprising the cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix of cells may be sensitive to gravitation. Since early development of organs depends on dynamic interactions across cell surfaces, altered gravity may disturb development. We investigated this possibility for heart development. Previous studies showed that the extracellular matrix glycoprotein fibronectin (Fn) is necessary for normal heart development. We cultured precardiac tissue explants in a high aspect ratio bioreactor vessel (HARV) to simulate microgravity. We observed tissue morphology, contraction, and Fn distribution by immunolocalization in HARV rotated and control (lxg) explants, cultured 18 hr. We also measured Fn amount by immunoassay. Explants in HARV were rotated at 6 rpm to achieve continuous freefall. Thirty-five of 37 control, but only 1 of 37 matched rotated explants exhibited contractions. Tissue architecture was identical. Immunolocalization of Fn showed remarkable differences which may be related to the development of contractions. The Fn staining in the HARV explants was less intense in all areas. Areas of linear staining along epithelia were present but shorter, and there was less intercellular staining in both mesenchymal tissue and myocardium. Initial immunoassay results of 5 matched pairs of explants showed a 22% reduction in total tissue Fn in the HARV rotated samples. Our results indicate that altered gravity in the HARV reduced the amount and distribution of Fn, as assessed by two independent criteria. This was correlated with a reduction in the development of contractile activity.

  6. Scanning Mode Sensor for Detection of Flow Inhomogeneities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, Grigory (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A scanning mode sensor and method is provided for detection of flow inhomogeneities such as shock. The field of use of this invention is ground test control and engine control during supersonic flight. Prior art measuring techniques include interferometry. Schlieren, and shadowgraph techniques. These techniques. however, have problems with light dissipation. The present method and sensor utilizes a pencil beam of energy which is passed through a transparent aperture in a flow inlet in a time-sequential manner so as to alter the energy beam. The altered beam or its effects are processed and can be studied to reveal information about flow through the inlet which can in turn be used for engine control.

  7. Scanning Mode Sensor for Detection of Flow Inhomogeneities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, Grigory (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A scanning mode sensor and method is provided for detection of flow inhomogeneities such as shock. The field of use of this invention is ground test control and engine control during supersonic flight. Prior art measuring techniques include interferometry, Schlieren, and shadowgraph techniques. These techniques, however, have problems with light dissipation. The present method and sensor utilizes a pencil beam of energy which is passed through a transparent aperture in a flow inlet in a time-sequential manner so as to alter the energy beam. The altered beam or its effects are processed and can be studied to reveal information about flow through the inlet which can in turn be used for engine control.

  8. MODE OF ACTION OF CYCLODIENE INSECTICIDES: THE NERVOUS SYSTEM INFLUENCED BY TOXAPHENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was made concerning the mode of action, excretion, metabolism, and behavioral effects of toxaphene and combinations of toxaphene, methyl parathion, and/or chlordimeform in various insects, the mouse and rat. Toxaphene (1) altered ionic movements within the central nervous...

  9. Dolichol alters brain membrane functions

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, G.Y.; Sun, A.Y.; Schroeder, F.; Wood, G.; Strong, R.

    1986-03-05

    It has been well demonstrated that there is a direct correlation between increase in dolichol level in brain and aging. An abnormally high level of dolichol was found in brain tissue of patients with pathological aging disorders. The aim of this study is to examine the physiological significance of dolichol affecting membrane transport activity and phospholipid acyl group turnover. Dolichol added to synaptic plasma membranes resulted in a biphasic effect on (Na/sup +/, K/sup +/)-ATPase, i.e., an enhancement of activity at low concentrations (5 ..mu..g/125 mg protein) and an inhibition of activity at high concentrations (40-100 ..mu..g). To probe the membrane acyl group turnover, the incorporation of (/sup 14/C)-arachidonate into plasma membrane phospholipids was examined in the presence and absence of dolichol. Dolichol elicited an increase in the incorporation of label into phospholipids. However, the effects varied depending on whether BSA is present. In the absence of BSA, the increase in labeling of phosphatidylinositols is higher than that of phosphatidylcholines. These results suggest that dolichols, when inserted into membranes, may alter membrane functions.

  10. Altering the antigenicity of proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, H; Alexander, S; Getzoff, E D; Tainer, J A; Geysen, H M; Lerner, R A

    1992-01-01

    To better understand the binding interaction between antigen and antibody we need to distinguish protein residues critical to the binding energy and mechanism from residues merely localized in the interface. By analyzing the binding of monoclonal antibodies to recombinant wild-type and mutant myohemerythrin (MHr) proteins, we were able to test the role of individual critical residues at the highly antigenic site MHr-(79-84), within the context of the folded protein. The results directly show the existence of antigenically critical residues, whose mutations significantly reduce antibody binding to the folded protein, thus verifying peptide-based assignments of these critical residues and demonstrating the ability of buried side chains to influence antigenicity. Taken together, these results (i) distinguish the antigenic surface from the solvent-exposed protein surface before binding, (ii) support a two-stage interaction mechanism allowing inducible changes in protein antigens by antibody binding, and (iii) show that protein antigenicity can be significantly reduced by alteration of single critical residues without destroying biological activity. Images PMID:1373498

  11. Protamine alterations in human spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Jodar, Meritxell; Oliva, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Protamines are the major nuclear proteins in sperm cells, having a crucial role in the correct packaging of the paternal DNA. The fact that protamine haploinsufficiency in mice resulted in abnormal chromatin packaging and male infertility suggested that the protamines could also be important candidates in explaining some of the idiopathic male infertility cases in humans. The first clinical studies focused on analyzing protamines at the protein level. Various studies have found the presence of an altered amount of protamines in some infertile patients, in contrast to the normal situation in fertile individuals where the two protamines, protamine 1 and protamine 2, are both present in approximately equal quantities. Subsequently, the protamine genes were the subject of various mutational genetic screening studies in search of variants that could be associated with deregulation in the protamine expression observed. The results of these protamine mutational studies showed that the presence of high penetrant mutations is a very rare cause of male infertility. However, some variants and some haplotypes described may behave as risk factors for male infertility. More recently, the presence of RNA in the mature sperm cell has also been investigated. The present chapter will introduce the basic aspects of protamine evolution and function and review the various articles published to date on the relationship between the protamines studied at the DNA, RNA, and protein levels and male infertility. PMID:23955674

  12. The North Pacific Gyre Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, N.; di Lorenzo, E.

    2007-12-01

    Discussion of North Pacific Decadal decadal variability has focused primarily on the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, the leading mode of sea surface temperature anomalies north of the tropics. The PDO appears to result from a superposition of SST pattern forced by the North Pacific atmosphere due to its intrinsic dynamics and teleconnected from the tropics, with a regional impact of the ocean circulation in the frontal regions associated with the Kuroshio/Oyashio and their extensions into the interior. Recent modeling, however, suggest that previously unexplained decadal changes of salinity, nutrient upwelling and chlorophyl in the California Current are not dominated by the PDO. Rather, these are associated with a mode of variability associated with wind driven changes of the North Pacific Gyre. Consideration of this mode variability may thus be important to understand present and future variations of the North Pacific ecosystem, and in the interpretation of climate proxies.

  13. Scissors modes: The first overtone

    SciTech Connect

    Hatada, Keisuke; Hayakawa, Kuniko; Palumbo, Fabrizio

    2011-07-15

    Scissors modes were predicted in the framework of the two-rotor model. This model has an intrinsic harmonic spectrum, so that the level above the scissors mode, the first overtone, has excitation energy twice that of the scissors mode. Because the latter is of the order of 3 MeV in the rare-earth region, the energy of the overtone is below threshold for nucleon emission, and its width should remain small enough for the overtone to be observable. We find that B(E2){up_arrow}{sub overtone}=(1/64 {theta}{sub 0}{sup 2})B(E2){up_arrow}{sub scissors}, where {theta}{sub 0} is the zero-point oscillation amplitude, which in the rare-earth region is of order 10{sup -1}.

  14. Altered expression of natively glycosylated dystroglycan in pediatric solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Laura T.; Glass, Matthew; Dosunmu, Eniolami; Martin, Paul T.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Altered glycosylation and/or expression of dystroglycan have been reported in forms of congenital muscular dystrophy as well as in cancers of the breast, colon, and oral epithelium. To date, however, there has been no study of the expression of dystroglycan in pediatric solid tumors. Using a combination of immunostaining on tissue microarrays and immunoblotting of snap-frozen unfixed tissues, we demonstrate a significant reduction in native α dystroglycan expression in pediatric alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), embryonal RMS, neuroblastoma (NBL), and medulloblastoma, whereas expression of β dystroglycan, which is cotranslated with α dystroglycan, is largely unchanged. Loss of native α dystroglycan expression was significantly more pronounced in stage 4 NBL than in pooled samples of stage 1 and stage 2 NBL, suggesting that loss of native α dystroglycan expression increases with advancing tumor stage. Neuroblastoma and RMS samples with reduced expression of native α dystroglycan also showed reduced laminin binding in laminin overlay experiments. Expression of natively glycosylated α dystroglycan was not altered in several other pediatric tumor types when compared with appropriate normal tissue controls. These data provide the first evidence that α dystroglycan glycosylation and laminin binding to α dystroglycan are altered in certain pediatric solid tumors and suggest that aberrant dystroglycan glycosylation may contribute to tumor cell biology in patients with RMS, medulloblastoma, and NBL. PMID:17640712

  15. Low Reynolds Number Drag Alteration Inspired by Butterfly Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laforte, Brent; Kronenberger, Courtney; Lang, Amy

    2012-11-01

    Biomimetics is the process of looking towards nature's adaptations for answers to today's engineering obstacles. An age-old engineering dilemma is trying to find new methods to reduce the amount of drag over a body. This research finds inspiration from butterfly scales which are hypothesized to alter surface friction over the wings. Drop testing was performed on axisymmetric, streamlined, teardrop models which were rapid-prototyped such that the surface was covered with either streamwise or transverse cavities modeled after the Monarch butterfly. The drop tank contained silicone oil with a viscosity two hundred times that of water insuring flow similarity between the model cavities (2.5 mm cavity depth) and the butterfly scale structures (about 30 microns cavity depth). A variation in Reynolds number was achieved by altering the model weight such that terminal speeds ranged from 5 to 70 cm/s. Results showed a reduction in surface friction for the transverse cavity configurations based on the roller-bearing effect. These findings suggest that the cavity shape and ratio is directly correlated to the amount of drag alteration. Funded by NSF REU grant 1062611.

  16. Structural alterations of pathologically or physiologically modified DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Ciomei, M; Spadari, S; Pedrali-Noy, G; Ciarrocchi, G

    1984-01-01

    We have studied the alterations of DNA conformation in in vitro depurinated or methylated topological isomers of the plasmid pAT 153. Depurination by heat/acid treatment or alkylation by methyl methanesulfonate (pathological modifications) result in DNA unwinding detected as a reduction in the degree of supercoiling of DNA topoisomers as measured by the alteration of electrophoretic mobility on agarose gel. On the contrary, in vitro enzymic methylation at the C-5 position of cytosine (physiological modification) does not measurably alter the tertiary structure of the circular substrates. From the average number of modified sites needed to remove one superhelical twist from each single topoisomer of a population of partially relaxed DNA molecules, we have calculated an unwinding angle smaller than -3.4 degree per methylated purine and of approximately -12.0 degree per apurinic site. These results, together with previously reported values of unwinding by pyrimidine dimers, suggest a possible mechanism of recognition of damaged sites by repair mechanisms that are not single-damage specific. Images PMID:6366741

  17. On-Orbit Performance of the TRMM Mission Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Brent; Placanica, Sam; Morgenstern, Wendy; Hashmall, Joseph A.; Glickman, Jonathan; Natanson, Gregory

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Attitude Control System along with detailed in-flight performance results of the TRMM Mission mode. The TRMM spacecraft is an Earth-pointed, zero momentum bias satellite launched on November 27, 1997 from Tanegashima Space Center, Japan. TRMM is a joint mission between NASA and the National Space Development Agency of Japan designed to monitor and study tropical rainfall and the associated release of energy. Prior to calibration, the spacecraft attitude showed larger Sun sensor yaw updates than expected. This was traced to not just sensor misalignment but also to a misalignment between the two heads within each Sun sensor. In order to avoid alteration of the flight software, Sun sensor transfer function coefficients were determined to minimize the error due to head misalignment. This paper describes the design, on-orbit checkout, calibration and performance of the TRMM Mission Mode with respect to the mission level requirements.

  18. Gene Expression in Developing Brain is Altered by Modest Reductions in Circulating Levels of Thyroid Hormone.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disruption of thyroid hormone (TH) homeostasis is a known effect of environmental contaminants. Although animal models of developmental TH deficiency can predict the impact of severe insults to the thyroid system, the effects of moderate TH insufficiencies have not been adequatel...

  19. Reduction in dietary wet distillers grains alters Escherichia coli 0157:H7 in feces of cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cattle fed finishing diets with distillers grains have been shown to more often have Escherichia coli O157:H7 in the feces and on the hides. The objectives of this study were to determine if pathogen levels and prevalence differ at higher level of wet distillers grains with solubles (WDGS) in the d...

  20. Reduction in Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia rates in patients receiving haemodialysis following alteration of skin antisepsis procedures.

    PubMed

    Stewart, B J; Gardiner, T; Perry, G J; Tong, S Y C

    2016-02-01

    This study examined all cases of Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia (SAB) in the haemodialysis cohort at the Royal Darwin Hospital, Australia over a seven-year period. Midway through this period, antisepsis for arteriovenous fistulae (AVF) and central venous catheters (CVC) changed from 0.5% chlorhexidine solution to 2% chlorhexidine solution. Rates of SAB episodes were calculated using registry data. Trends in SAB over time were analysed using an interrupted regression analysis. Following the change to 2% chlorhexidine, average SAB rates decreased by 68%, and it is estimated that 0.111 cases of SAB/patient-year were prevented. CVC-related SAB rates remained low throughout. These results support the use of 2% chlorhexidine in skin antisepsis for patients with AVF. PMID:26778135

  1. The hydrothermal alteration of cooling lava domes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Jessica L.; Stauffer, Philip H.; Calder, Eliza S.; Valentine, Greg A.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrothermal alteration is a recognized cause of volcanic instability and edifice collapse, including that of lava domes or dome complexes. Alteration by percolating fluids transforms primary minerals in dome lavas to weaker secondary products such as clay minerals; moreover, secondary mineral precipitation can affect the porosity and permeability of dome lithologies. The location and intensity of alteration in a dome depend heavily on fluid pathways and availability in conjunction with heat supply. Here we investigate postemplacement lava dome weakening by hydrothermal alteration using a finite element numerical model of water migration in simplified dome geometries. This is combined with the rock alteration index (RAI) to predict zones of alteration and secondary mineral precipitation. Our results show that alteration potential is highest at the interface between the hot core of a lava dome and its clastic talus carapace. The longest lived alteration potential fields occur in domes with persistent heat sources and permeabilities that allow sufficient infiltration of water for alteration processes, but not so much that domes cool quickly. This leads us to conclude that alteration-induced collapses are most likely to be shallow seated and originate in the talus or talus/core interface in domes which have a sustained supply of magmatic heat. Mineral precipitation at these zones of permeability contrast could create barriers to fluid flow, potentially causing gas pressurization which might promote deeper seated and larger volume collapses. This study contributes to our knowledge of how hydrothermal alteration can affect lava domes and provides constraints on potential sites for alteration-related collapses, which can be used to target hazard monitoring.

  2. Reductant injection and mixing system

    DOEpatents

    Reeves, Matt; Henry, Cary A.; Ruth, Michael J.

    2016-02-16

    A gaseous reductant injection and mixing system is described herein. The system includes an injector for injecting a gaseous reductant into an exhaust gas stream, and a mixer attached to a surface of the injector. The injector includes a plurality of apertures through which the gaseous reductant is injected into an exhaust gas stream. The mixer includes a plurality of fluid deflecting elements.

  3. Tilting mode in nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Dossing, T.; Randrup, J.

    1986-02-01

    The relation between tilting relaxation and the reaction plane dynamics is discussed, providing an intuitive understanding of the expression for the cross section close to the beam direction, which has recently been derived. Second, the tilting relaxation time and the related wriggling relaxation time are discussed, based upon nucleon exchange transport (window friction). Finally, recent experimental information on the tilting mode relaxation is discussed, and the dynamics of the tilting mode is discussed qualitatively for the three different types of nuclear reactions considered, compound nucleus fission, quasifission, and damped nuclear reactions. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Hydrodynamic modes for granular gases.

    PubMed

    Dufty, James W; Brey, J Javier

    2003-09-01

    The eigenfunctions and eigenvalues of the linearized Boltzmann equation for inelastic hard spheres (d=3) or disks (d=2) corresponding to d+2 hydrodynamic modes are calculated in the long wavelength limit for a granular gas. The transport coefficients are identified and found to agree with those from the Chapman-Enskog solution. The dominance of hydrodynamic modes at long times and long wavelengths is studied via an exactly solvable kinetic model. A collisional continuum is bounded away from the hydrodynamic spectrum, assuring a hydrodynamic description at long times. The bound is closely related to the power law decay of the velocity distribution in the reference homogeneous cooling state. PMID:14524742

  5. Dual-Mode Adhesive Pad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartz, Leslie

    1994-01-01

    Tool helps worker grip and move along large, smooth structure with no handgrips or footholds. Adheres to surface but easily released by actuating simple mechanism. Includes handle and segmented contact-adhesive pad. Bulk of pad made of soft plastic foam conforming to surface of structure. Each segment reinforced with rib. In sticking mode, ribs braced by side catches. In peeling mode, side catches retracted, and segmented adhesive pad loses its stiffness. Modified versions useful in inspecting hulls of ships and scaling walls in rescue operations.

  6. Effect of substrate discontinuities on the propagating surface plasmon polariton modes in gold nanobars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johns, Paul; Yu, Kuai; Devadas, Mary Sajini; Li, Zhongming; Major, Todd A.; Hartland, Gregory V.

    2014-11-01

    The surface plasmon polariton (SPP) modes of gold nanobars (nanowires with rectangular dimensions) have been investigated by scanning pump-probe microscopy. In these experiments the nanobars were suspended over trenches cut in glass coverslips, and propagating SPP modes were launched in the supported portion of the nanobar by focusing a near-IR pump laser beam at the end of the nanobar. Transient absorption images were then collected by scanning the probe laser over the nanobar using a galvo-mirror system. The images show that the trench has a large effect on the SPP modes, specifically, for approximately half the nanowires the propagation length is significantly reduced after the trench. Finite element calculations were performed to understand this effect. The calculations show that the pump laser excites bound and leaky modes (modes that have their fields localized at the nanobar/glass or nanobar/air interfaces, respectively) in the supported portions of the nanobars. These modes propagate along the nanobar. When they meet the trench their field distributions are altered. The modes that derive from the bound mode are strongly damped over the trench. Thus, the bound mode is not reconstituted on the opposite side of the trench, and only the leaky mode contributes to the signal. Because the bound and leaky modes can have different propagation lengths, the propagation lengths measured in our experiments can change from one side of the trench to the other. The results show how the substrate can be engineered to control the SPP modes in metal nanostructures.The surface plasmon polariton (SPP) modes of gold nanobars (nanowires with rectangular dimensions) have been investigated by scanning pump-probe microscopy. In these experiments the nanobars were suspended over trenches cut in glass coverslips, and propagating SPP modes were launched in the supported portion of the nanobar by focusing a near-IR pump laser beam at the end of the nanobar. Transient absorption images

  7. Correlated alteration effects in CM carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, Lauren B.; McSween, Harry Y., Jr.; Zolensky, Michael E.

    1996-07-01

    Three parameters are proposed to determine the relative extent of alteration in CM chondrites. The mineralogic alteration index monitors the relative progress of coupled substitutions in the progressive alteration of cronstedtite to Mg-serpentine and increases with increasing alteration. To calculate values of this index, an algorithm has been developed to estimate the average matrix phyllosilicate composition in individual CM chondrites. The second parameter is the volume percent of isolated matrix silicates, which decreases with progressive alteration due to mineral hydration. Finally, the volume percent of chondrule alteration monitors the extent of chondrule phyllosilicate production and increases as alteration proceeds. These parameters define the first CM alteration scale that relies on multiple indicators of progressive alteration. The following relative order of increasing alteration is established by this model: Murchison ≤ Bells < Pollen ≤ Murray < Mighei < Nogoya < Cold Bokkeveld. The relative degree of aqueous processing Cochabamba and Boriskino experienced is less precisely constrained, although both fall near the middle of this sequence. A comparison between the mineralogic alteration index and literature values for the whole-rock chemistry of CM chondrites reveals several correlations. A positive, nearly linear correlation between bulk H content and progressive CM alteration suggests an approximately constant production rate of new phyllosilicates relative to the mineralogical transition from cronstedtite to Mg-serpentine. The abundance of trapped planetary 36Ar decreases systematically in progressively altered CM chondrites, suggesting the wholesale destruction of primary noble gas carrier phase (s) by aqueous reactions. Because low temperature fluid-rock reactions are generally associated with large isotopic mass fractionation factors, we also compared our model predictions with δ18O values for bulk CM samples. Although some of these data are

  8. Aluminum reduction cell electrode

    DOEpatents

    Payne, J.R.

    1983-09-20

    The invention is directed to an anode-cathode structure for an electrolytic cell for the reduction of alumina wherein the structure is comprised of a carbon anode assembly which straddles a wedge-shaped refractory hard metal cathode assembly having steeply sloped cathodic surfaces, each cathodic surface being paired in essentially parallel planar relationship with an anode surface. The anode-cathode structure not only takes into account the structural weakness of refractory hard metal materials but also permits the changing of the RHM assembly during operation of the cell. Further, the anode-cathode structure enhances the removal of anode gas from the interpolar gap between the anode and cathode surfaces. 10 figs.

  9. Aircraft engine pollution reduction.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudey, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of engine operation on the types and levels of the major aircraft engine pollutants is described and the major factors governing the formation of these pollutants during the burning of hydrocarbon fuel are discussed. Methods which are being explored to reduce these pollutants are discussed and their application to several experimental research programs are pointed out. Results showing significant reductions in the levels of carbon monoxide, unburned hydrocarbons, and oxides of nitrogen obtained from experimental combustion research programs are presented and discussed to point out potential application to aircraft engines. An experimental program designed to develop and demonstrate these and other advanced, low pollution combustor design methods is described. Results that have been obtained to date indicate considerable promise for reducing advanced engine exhaust pollutants to levels significantly below current engines.

  10. Secondary superheater slagging reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Larose, J.A. ); Benson, R.C. )

    1992-01-01

    Utility boilers can be modified to reduce excessive slagging on the secondary superheater lower leading edges. Reduction of the high slagging accumulation rates will increase the pendant heat absorption and reduce the required superheater cleaning and slag removal. The cause of te slagging and appropriate boiler modifications are determined with numerical modeling. Results from two utility boiler analyses showed that regions of high gas and particle temperatures and flow rates exist near the superheater lower surfaces and are the probable cause of the rapid slagging. Design modifications which redistribute the flow and reduce the temperature entering the superheater reduce the impaction of molten ash on the pendant surface; this lowers the slag accumulation rate which allows the boiler to operate longer without cleaning and at a higher capacity. This paper shows the potential improvements in the secondary superheater inlet conditions by modifying the boiler.

  11. Reductive electrolytic dechlorination

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, J.W. Jr.; Suidan, M.T.; Venosa, A.D.; Acheson, C.M.

    1995-11-01

    A biofilm-electrode reactor (BER) was used to dechlorinate pentachlorophenol (PCP), a recalcitrant halogenated organic used in wood and leather preservation. Electrical current was shown to play a necessary role in dechlorination, although it is unknown whether this was due to the resultant generation of hydrogen or the low reducing potential surface formed on the cathode of the anode-cathode cell. The PCP concentration in the feed was 5,000 {micro} g/L, and the PCP in the effluent was about 50 {micro}g/L, at a ethanol feed of 5 mg/L, which is a 99% reduction in PCP concentration. The feed ethanol was varied from zero to 100 mg/L, with the greatest PCP removal occurring at the highest ethanol feed rate. The total dechlorination decreased significantly when the ethanol was removed from the feed, indicating that the ethanol stabilized dechlorination.

  12. q-dependent, H-mode-like phenomena in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Budny, R.; Bell, M.; Bitter, M.; Bush, C.; Dylla, H.F.; Fredrickson, E.; Goldston, R.; Hendel, H.; Hill, K.; Hsuan, H.; Kilpatrick, S.; McCune, D.; McGuire, K.; Medley, S.S.; Morris, W.; Park, H.; Ramsey, A.; Scott, S.; Stratton, B.; Taylor, G.; Ulrickson, M.; Zarnstorff, M.C.; Zweben, S.

    1988-02-01

    A new phenomenon has been observed in TFTR discharges with neutral beam injection and slowly ramped plasma current. When q/sub /psi// (a) reaches certain values close to low-order rational numbers, the D/sub ..cap alpha../ emission decreases and the electron density profile broadens and increases, similar to observations during the H-mode in other tokamaks. This ''q-mode'' appears to have a neutral beam power threshold of /approximately/ 6 MW. During co-injection, the plasma toroidal rotation decreases by /approximately/ 50% at the transition. Very slowly toroidally rotating coherent adge modes, which slow and lock at the transition, were identified from the measured perturbations in /tilde B//sub theta// with mn /approximately/ q/sub /psi//(a). Calculations based on a tearing-mode model indicate that large islands, consistent with these measurements, could be present in the plasma edge and alter the plasma limiter interaction. At the transition Z/sub eff/ increases typically from 3 to 3.5. This increase and the electron density increase are caused largely by an increase in the carbon density. These increases raise the drag on fast ions, rapidly thermalizing some of the energy stored by beam ions, causing a transient rise in the plasma thermal energy. In addition, the global energy confinement time increases transiently. 26 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Beta-limiting Instabilities and Global Mode Stabilization in NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbagh, Steven

    2001-10-01

    Low aspect ratio and high edge q theoretically alter the plasma stability and mode structure compared to standard tokamak configurations. Below the no-wall limit, stability calculations with PEST, GATO, and DCON show the perturbed radial field is maximized near the center column and DCON and VALEN calculations show that mode stability is not greatly improved by a nearby conducting wall due to the short poloidal wavelength in this region. In contrast, as beta reaches and exceeds the no-wall limit, the mode becomes strongly ballooning with long poloidal wavelength at large major radius and is highly wall stabilized. In this way, wall stabilization is more effective at higher beta in low aspect ratio geometry. Research on the stability of spherical torus plasmas at and above the no-wall beta limit is being addressed on NSTX, which has produced low aspect ratio plasmas, R/a = 1.27 at plasma current up to 1.4 MA with high energy confinement (TauE/TauE-ITER89P = 2). Toroidal and normalized beta have reached 22%, and 4.3, respectively in q = 7 plasmas. The beta limit is observed to increase with increasing plasma internal inductance, li, and the stability factor betaN/li has reached 5.8, limited by sudden beta collapses at low li that was achieved by use of high-harmonic fast wave heating (HHFW). DCON stability analysis of equilibria reconstructed with EFIT using external magnetics show that the plasmas are below or at the no-wall beta limit for the n = 1 mode, which has characteristics of a current-driven kink. With more peaked current profiles (li greater than 0.7), core MHD instabilities are observed which saturate or slowly degrade beta. Sawteeth with large inversion radii can also cause substantial beta collapses, although current profile modification using HHFW, altered plasma growth, and increased toroidal field have each been successful in mitigating this effect.

  14. Reconfigurable Liquid Whispering Gallery Mode Microlasers

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shancheng; Ta, Van Duong; Wang, Yue; Chen, Rui; He, Tingchao; Demir, Hilmi Volkan; Sun, Handong

    2016-01-01

    Engineering photonic devices from liquid has been emerging as a fascinating research avenue. Reconfigurably tuning liquid optical micro-devices are highly desirable but remain extremely challenging because of the fluidic nature. In this article we demonstrate an all-liquid tunable whispering gallery mode microlaser floating on a liquid surface fabricated by using inkjet print technique. We show that the cavity resonance of such liquid lasers could be reconfigurably manipulated by surface tension alteration originated from the tiny concentration change of the surfactant in the supporting liquid. As such, remarkable sensing of water-soluble organic compounds with a sensitivity of free spectral range as high as 19.85 THz / (mol · mL−1) and the detectivity limit around 5.56 × 10−3 mol · mL−1 is achieved. Our work provides not only a novel approach to effectively tuning a laser resonator but also new insight into potential applications in biological, chemical and environmental sensing. PMID:27256771

  15. Reconfigurable Liquid Whispering Gallery Mode Microlasers.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shancheng; Ta, Van Duong; Wang, Yue; Chen, Rui; He, Tingchao; Demir, Hilmi Volkan; Sun, Handong

    2016-01-01

    Engineering photonic devices from liquid has been emerging as a fascinating research avenue. Reconfigurably tuning liquid optical micro-devices are highly desirable but remain extremely challenging because of the fluidic nature. In this article we demonstrate an all-liquid tunable whispering gallery mode microlaser floating on a liquid surface fabricated by using inkjet print technique. We show that the cavity resonance of such liquid lasers could be reconfigurably manipulated by surface tension alteration originated from the tiny concentration change of the surfactant in the supporting liquid. As such, remarkable sensing of water-soluble organic compounds with a sensitivity of free spectral range as high as 19.85 THz / (mol · mL(-1)) and the detectivity limit around 5.56 × 10(-3) mol · mL(-1) is achieved. Our work provides not only a novel approach to effectively tuning a laser resonator but also new insight into potential applications in biological, chemical and environmental sensing. PMID:27256771

  16. Dual Mode Inverter Control Test Verification

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, J.M.

    2001-04-25

    Permanent Magnet Motors with either sinusoidal back emf (permanent magnet synchronous motor [PMSM]) or trapezoidal back emf (brushless dc motor [BDCM]) do not have the ability to alter the air gap flux density (field weakening). Since the back emf increases with speed, the system must be designed to operate with the voltage obtained at its highest speed. Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center (PEEMRC) has developed a dual mode inverter controller (DMIC) that overcomes this disadvantage. This report summarizes the results of tests to verify its operation. The standard PEEMRC 75 kW hard-switched inverter was modified to implement the field weakening procedure (silicon controlled rectifier enabled phase advance). A 49.5 hp motor rated at 2800 rpm was derated to a base of 400 rpm and 7.5 hp. The load developed by a Kahn Industries hydraulic dynamometer, was measured with a MCRT9-02TS Himmelstein and Company torque meter. At the base conditions a current of 212 amperes produced the 7.5 hp. Tests were run at 400, 1215, and 2424 rpm. In each run, the current was no greater than 214 amperes. The horsepower obtained in the three runs were 7.5, 9.3, and 8.12. These results verified the basic operation of the DMIC in producing a Constant Power Speed Ratios (CPSR) of six.

  17. Reconfigurable Liquid Whispering Gallery Mode Microlasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shancheng; Ta, Van Duong; Wang, Yue; Chen, Rui; He, Tingchao; Demir, Hilmi Volkan; Sun, Handong

    2016-06-01

    Engineering photonic devices from liquid has been emerging as a fascinating research avenue. Reconfigurably tuning liquid optical micro-devices are highly desirable but remain extremely challenging because of the fluidic nature. In this article we demonstrate an all-liquid tunable whispering gallery mode microlaser floating on a liquid surface fabricated by using inkjet print technique. We show that the cavity resonance of such liquid lasers could be reconfigurably manipulated by surface tension alteration originated from the tiny concentration change of the surfactant in the supporting liquid. As such, remarkable sensing of water-soluble organic compounds with a sensitivity of free spectral range as high as 19.85 THz / (mol · mL‑1) and the detectivity limit around 5.56 × 10‑3 mol · mL‑1 is achieved. Our work provides not only a novel approach to effectively tuning a laser resonator but also new insight into potential applications in biological, chemical and environmental sensing.

  18. Explosive thermal reduction of graphene oxide-based materials: mechanism and safety implications

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yang; Guo, Fei; Hurt, Robert; Külaots, Indrek

    2014-01-01

    Thermal reduction of graphene oxide or graphite oxide (GO) is an important processing step in the fabrication of many graphene-based materials and devices. Here we show that some bulk solid GO samples can undergo explosive decomposition when small samples are heated slowly in inert gas environments, while others do not. These micro-explosions can occur for samples as small as few milligrams and are sufficiently energetic to cause laboratory equipment damage. Thermochemical analysis methods are used to understand the factors that lead to the explosive reduction mode. The studies show that the explosive mode of reduction is caused by the exothermicity of GO reduction coupled with a threshold sample mass/size that causes heat and mass transfer limitations leading to local temperature rise and a thermal runaway reaction. The explosive mode of reduction is not caused or promoted by interstitial water, and its onset temperature can be lowered by immersion in potassium hydroxide solution. By allowing early release of internal gas pressure, the explosive mode reduces the extent of surface area development in GO exfoliation from an optimum value of 1470 m2g−1 obtained under non-explosive reduction conditions. Explosive reduction of bulk GO poses industrial safety hazards during large-scale storage, handling, and processing. PMID:25018560

  19. Dose Reduction Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    WAGGONER, L.O.

    2000-05-16

    As radiation safety specialists, one of the things we are required to do is evaluate tools, equipment, materials and work practices and decide whether the use of these products or work practices will reduce radiation dose or risk to the environment. There is a tendency for many workers that work with radioactive material to accomplish radiological work the same way they have always done it rather than look for new technology or change their work practices. New technology is being developed all the time that can make radiological work easier and result in less radiation dose to the worker or reduce the possibility that contamination will be spread to the environment. As we discuss the various tools and techniques that reduce radiation dose, keep in mind that the radiological controls should be reasonable. We can not always get the dose to zero, so we must try to accomplish the work efficiently and cost-effectively. There are times we may have to accept there is only so much you can do. The goal is to do the smart things that protect the worker but do not hinder him while the task is being accomplished. In addition, we should not demand that large amounts of money be spent for equipment that has marginal value in order to save a few millirem. We have broken the handout into sections that should simplify the presentation. Time, distance, shielding, and source reduction are methods used to reduce dose and are covered in Part I on work execution. We then look at operational considerations, radiological design parameters, and discuss the characteristics of personnel who deal with ALARA. This handout should give you an overview of what it takes to have an effective dose reduction program.

  20. The role of substrate surface alteration in the fabrication of vertically aligned CdTe nanowires.

    PubMed

    Neretina, S; Hughes, R A; Devenyi, G A; Sochinskii, N V; Preston, J S; Mascher, P

    2008-05-01

    Previously we have described the deposition of vertically aligned wurtzite CdTe nanowires derived from an unusual catalytically driven growth mode. This growth mode could only proceed when the surface of the substrate was corrupted with an alcohol layer, although the role of the corruption was not fully understood. Here, we present a study detailing the remarkable role that this substrate surface alteration plays in the development of CdTe nanowires; it dramatically improves the size uniformity and largely eliminates lateral growth. These effects are demonstrated to arise from the altered surface's ability to limit Ostwald ripening of the catalytic seed material and by providing a surface unable to promote the epitaxial relationship needed to sustain a lateral growth mode. The axial growth of the CdTe nanowires is found to be exclusively driven through the direct impingement of adatoms onto the catalytic seeds leading to a self-limiting wire height associated with the sublimation of material from the sidewall facets. The work presented furthers the development of the mechanisms needed to promote high quality substrate-based vertically aligned CdTe nanowires. With our present understanding of the growth mechanism being a combination of selective area epitaxy and a catalytically driven vapour-liquid-solid growth mode, these results also raise the intriguing possibility of employing this growth mode in other material systems in an effort to produce superior nanowires. PMID:21825689

  1. Reduction of radar cross-section of a wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    McDonald, Jacob Jeremiah; Brock, Billy C.; Clem, Paul G.; Loui, Hung; Allen, Steven E.

    2016-08-02

    The various technologies presented herein relate to formation of a wind turbine blade having a reduced radar signature in comparison with a turbine blade fabricated using conventional techniques. Various techniques and materials are presented to facilitate reduction in radar signature of a wind turbine blade, where such techniques and materials are amenable for incorporation into existing manufacturing techniques without degradation in mechanical or physical performance of the blade or major alteration of the blade profile.

  2. Optical tweezers reveal how proteins alter replication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaurasiya, Kathy

    acids. We use single molecule DNA stretching to show that the nucleocapsid protein (NC) of the yeast retrotransposon Ty3, which is likely to be an ancestor of HIV NC, has optimal nucleic acid chaperone activity with only a single zinc finger. We also show that the chaperone activity of the ORF1 protein is responsible for successful replication of the mouse LINE-1 retrotransposon. LINE-1 is also 17% of the human genome, where it generates insertion mutations and alters gene expression. Retrotransposons such as LINE-1 and Ty3 are likely to be ancestors of retroviruses such as HIV. Human APOBEC3G (A3G) inhibits HIV-1 replication via cytidine deamination of the viral ssDNA genome, as well as via a distinct deamination-independent mechanism. Efficient deamination requires rapid on-off binding kinetics, but a slow dissociation rate is required for the proposed deaminase-independent mechanism. We resolve this apparent contradiction with a new quantitative single molecule method, which shows that A3G initially binds ssDNA with fast on-off rates and subsequently converts to a slow binding mode. This suggests that oligomerization transforms A3G from a fast enzyme to a slow binding protein, which is the biophysical mechanism that allows A3G to inhibit HIV replication. A complete understanding of the mechanism of A3G-mediated antiviral activity is required to design drugs that disrupt the viral response to A3G, enhance A3G packaging inside the viral core, and other potential strategies for long-term treatment of HIV infection. We use single molecule biophysics to explore the function of proteins involved in bacterial DNA replication, endogenous retrotransposition of retroelements in eukaryotic hosts such yeast and mice, and HIV replication in human cells. Our quantitative results provide insight into protein function in a range of complex biological systems and have wide-ranging implications for human health.

  3. Cost decomposition of linear systems with application to model reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skelton, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    A means is provided to assess the value or 'cst' of each component of a large scale system, when the total cost is a quadratic function. Such a 'cost decomposition' of the system has several important uses. When the components represent physical subsystems which can fail, the 'component cost' is useful in failure mode analysis. When the components represent mathematical equations which may be truncated, the 'component cost' becomes a criterion for model truncation. In this latter event component costs provide a mechanism by which the specific control objectives dictate which components should be retained in the model reduction process. This information can be valuable in model reduction and decentralized control problems.

  4. Combat aircraft noise reduction by technical measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegner, M.; Kennepohl, F.; Heinig, K.

    1992-04-01

    The noise of combat aircraft during low level flight is dominated by the jet. Technical noise reduction measures must therefore reduce the specific thrust of the engine. This can be achieved by altering the engine cycle or by using secondary air to increase the mass flow though the nozzle. In the first part the influence of nozzle area, bypass ratio and variable cycle features on the specific thrust of modern fighter engines is shown. The effects on noise, thrust and fuel consumption are discussed. In the second part ejector-mixer nozzles and the aft-fan are considered. Both reduce the jet velocity by entraining air through secondary inlets and expelling it together with the engine's exhaust flow through a common nozzle.

  5. Surface alteration and physical properties of glass from the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barkatt, A.; Sang, J.C.; Thorpe, A.N.; Senftle, F.E.; Talmy, I.G.; Norr, M.K.; Mazer, J.J.; Izett, G.; Sigurdsson, Haraldur

    1994-01-01

    The scalloped surface feature on Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary glass is often explained as being due to terrestrial aqueous leaching. Leaching of man-made glass results in a reduction in density of the glass. Also, Fe, because of its relative insolubility, is concentrated by the leaching process. Thus, the Haitian glass specimens which have been heavily altered should have a thin rim of less dense glass in which the Fe is concentrated compared to the core glass. The higher Fe concentration in the rim glass should cause it to have an enhanced Curie constant and a lower density compared to the unaltered glass. The magnetic Curie constant, density, and scanning electron microscopic studies were made on altered specimens of Haitian glass and also on specimens showing a minimum of alteration. The results show that the less altered samples have the highest density and the lowest Curie constant. The data substantiate the terrestrial hypothesis. ?? 1994.

  6. Avian assemblages on altered grasslands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knopf, Fritz L.

    1994-01-01

    Grasslands comprise 17% of the North American landscape but provide primary habitat for only 5% of native bird species. On the Great Plains, grasslands include an eastern component of tall grasses and a western component of short grasses, both of which have been regionally altered by removing native grazers, plowing sod, draining wetlands, and encouraging woody vegetation. As a group, populations of endemic bird species of the grasslands have declined more than others (including neotropical migrants) in the last quarter century. Individually, populations of the Upland Sandpiper and McCown’s Longspur have increased; the wetlands-associated Marbled Godwit and Wilson’s Phalarope appear stable; breeding ranges are shifting for the Ferruginous Hawk, Mississippi Kite, Short-eared Owl, Upland Sandpiper, Horned Lark, Vesper, Savannah, and Henslow’s sparrows, and Western Meadowlark; breeding habitats are disappearing locally for Franklin’s Gull, Dickcissel, Henslow’s and Grasshopper sparrows. Lark Bunting, and Eastern Meadowlark; and populations are declining throughout the breeding ranges for Mountain Plover, and Cassin’s and Clay-colored sparrows. Declines of these latter three species, and also the Franklin’s Gull, presumably are due to ecological phenomena on their respective wintering areas. Unlike forest species that winter in the neotropics, most birds that breed in the North American grasslands also winter on the continent and problems driving declines in grassland species are associated almost entirely with North American processes. Contemporary programs and initiatives hold promise for the conservation of breeding habitats for these birds. Ecological ignorance of wintering habits and habitats clouds the future of the endemic birds of grasslands, especially those currently experiencing widespread declines across breeding locales.

  7. Mitochondrial loss, dysfunction and altered dynamics in Huntington's disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinho; Moody, Jennifer P.; Edgerly, Christina K.; Bordiuk, Olivia L.; Cormier, Kerry; Smith, Karen; Beal, M. Flint; Ferrante, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Although a direct causative pathway from the gene mutation to the selective neostriatal neurodegeneration remains unclear in Huntington's disease (HD), one putative pathological mechanism reported to play a prominent role in the pathogenesis of this neurological disorder is mitochondrial dysfunction. We examined mitochondria in preferentially vulnerable striatal calbindin-positive neurons in moderate-to-severe grade HD patients, using antisera against mitochondrial markers of COX2, SOD2 and cytochrome c. Combined calbindin and mitochondrial marker immunofluorescence showed a significant and progressive grade-dependent reduction in the number of mitochondria in spiny striatal neurons, with marked alteration in size. Consistent with mitochondrial loss, there was a reduction in COX2 protein levels using western analysis that corresponded with disease severity. In addition, both mitochondrial transcription factor A, a regulator of mtDNA, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-co-activator gamma-1 alpha, a key transcriptional regulator of energy metabolism and mitochondrial biogenesis, were also significantly reduced with increasing disease severity. Abnormalities in mitochondrial dynamics were observed, showing a significant increase in the fission protein Drp1 and a reduction in the expression of the fusion protein mitofusin 1. Lastly, mitochondrial PCR array profiling in HD caudate nucleus specimens showed increased mRNA expression of proteins involved in mitochondrial localization, membrane translocation and polarization and transport that paralleled mitochondrial derangement. These findings reveal that there are both mitochondrial loss and altered mitochondrial morphogenesis with increased mitochondrial fission and reduced fusion in HD. These findings provide further evidence that mitochondrial dysfunction plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of HD. PMID:20660112

  8. Altered astronaut lower limb and mass center kinematics in downward jumping following space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, D. J.; Jackson, D. K.; Bloomberg, J. J.

    1997-01-01

    Astronauts exposed to the microgravity conditions encountered during space flight exhibit postural and gait instabilities upon return to earth that could impair critical postflight performance. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of microgravity exposure on astronauts' performance of two-footed jump landings. Nine astronauts from several Space Shuttle missions were tested both preflight and postflight with a series of voluntary, two-footed downward hops from a 30-cm-high step. A video-based, three-dimensional motion-analysis system permitted calculation of body segment positions and joint angular displacements. Phase-plane plots of knee, hip, and ankle angular velocities compared with the corresponding joint angles were used to describe the lower limb kinematics during jump landings. The position of the whole-body center of mass (COM) was also estimated in the sagittal plane using an eight-segment body model. Four of nine subjects exhibited expanded phase-plane portraits postflight, with significant increases in peak joint flexion angles and flexion rates following space flight. In contrast, two subjects showed significant contractions of their phase-plane portraits postflight and three subjects showed insignificant overall changes after space flight. Analysis of the vertical COM motion generally supported the joint angle results. Subjects with expanded joint angle phase-plane portraits postflight exhibited larger downward deviations of the COM and longer times from impact to peak deflection, as well as lower upward recovery velocities. Subjects with postflight joint angle phase-plane contraction demonstrated opposite effects in the COM motion. The joint kinematics results indicated the existence of two contrasting response modes due to microgravity exposure. Most subjects exhibited "compliant" impact absorption postflight, consistent with decreased limb stiffness and damping, and a reduction in the bandwidth of the postural control system

  9. Laser Mode Structure Experiments for Undergraduate Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Richard A.; Gehrz, Robert D.

    Experiments dealing with laser mode structure are presented which are suitable for an upper division undergraduate laboratory. The theory of cavity modes is summarized. The mode structure of the radiation from a helium-neon laser is measured by using a photodiode detector and spectrum analyzer to detect intermode beating. Off-axial modes can be…

  10. Dual mode nuclear rocket system applications.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boretz, J. E.; Bell, J. M.; Plebuch, R. K.; Priest, C. C.

    1972-01-01

    Mission areas where the dual-mode nuclear rocket system is superior to nondual-mode systems are demonstrated. It is shown that the dual-mode system is competitive with the nondual-mode system even for those specific missions and particular payload configurations where it does not have a clear-cut advantage.

  11. Collisionless Trapped Electron Mode Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Jianying; Chen, Yang; Parker, Scott

    2006-10-01

    Collisionless Trapped Electron Mode (CTEM) turbulence is a likely canidate for explaining anomolous transport in tokamak discharges that have a strong density gradient relative to the ion temperature gradient. Here, CTEM turbulence is investigated using the Gyrokinetic δf GEM code. GEM is electromagnetic, includes full drift-kinetic electrons, generaly axisymmetric equilbria, collisions and minority species. Here, the flux-tube limit is taken and β is so small that the simulations are essentially electrostatic. Linear theory predicts that the instability occurs at √2ɛRLn>1, which agrees very well with the simulation results. With increasing density gradient, it is observed that the most unstable mode transitions from a CTEM to drift wave mode and the short-wavelength modes are most unstable ( 2 > kρi> 1). Nonlinear simulations are underway to address the parametric dependence of particle and energy transport. The importance of zonal flows for CTEM turbulence, is still not well understood and is under investigation. D. R. Ernst et. al., Phys. Plasma 11 (2004) 2637 T. Dannert and F. Jenko, Phys. Plasma 12 (2005) 072309 R. Gatto et. al., Phys. Plasma 13 (2006) 022306 Y. Chen and S. E. Parker, J. Comput. Phys. 189 (2003) 463 Y. Chen ad S.E. Parker, accepted, to appear in J. Comput. Phys. (2006) J. Wesson (1997) Tokamaks, Oxford Science

  12. Terra is in NORMAL Mode

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-02-23

    ... 22, 2016.  TERRA has recovered from Safe Hold and is now in Normal mode. CERES will hold their CAM Wednesday morning and will ... . You can learn more about this mission at the Terra web site. The Flight Operations Team is working on resolving the issue as ...

  13. Microtearing modes in tokamak discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafiq, T.; Weiland, J.; Kritz, A. H.; Luo, L.; Pankin, A. Y.

    2016-06-01

    Microtearing modes (MTMs) have been identified as a source of significant electron thermal transport in tokamak discharges. In order to describe the evolution of these discharges, it is necessary to improve the prediction of electron thermal transport. This can be accomplished by utilizing a model for transport driven by MTMs in whole device predictive modeling codes. The objective of this paper is to develop the dispersion relation that governs the MTM driven transport. A unified fluid/kinetic approach is used in the development of a nonlinear dispersion relation for MTMs. The derivation includes the effects of electrostatic and magnetic fluctuations, arbitrary electron-ion collisionality, electron temperature and density gradients, magnetic curvature, and the effects associated with the parallel propagation vector. An iterative nonlinear approach is used to calculate the distribution function employed in obtaining the nonlinear parallel current and the nonlinear dispersion relation. The third order nonlinear effects in magnetic fluctuations are included, and the influence of third order effects on a multi-wave system is considered. An envelope equation for the nonlinear microtearing modes in the collision dominant limit is introduced in order to obtain the saturation level. In the limit that the mode amplitude does not vary along the field line, slab geometry, and strong collisionality, the fluid dispersion relation for nonlinear microtearing modes is found to agree with the kinetic dispersion relation.

  14. Current Mode Logic Fan Out

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2011-05-07

    Current mode logic is used in high speed timing systems for particle accelerators due to the fast rise time of the electrical signal. This software provides the necessary documentation to produce multiple copies of a single input for distribution to multiple devices. This software supports the DOE mission by providing a method for producing high speed signals in accelerator timing systems.

  15. Students' Perceptions of Study Modes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagel, Pauline; Shaw, Robin N.

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on a survey of how Australian undergraduate students perceive the benefits of broad study modes: face-to-face classes, web-based study, and print-based study. Two benefit types were identified through factor analysis: engagement and functionality. Respondents rated face-to-face classes highest on engagement and print-based study…

  16. Modes of Greetings in Nepali.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giri, Ram Ashish

    The greeting systems in Nepali are derived from the Hindu ethos and religious culture, and can be traced back to Hindu sacred writing. However, as tied to conventions as they are, these systems are also the product of an interplay of socio-cultural factors. A study found that despite exposure to education and Western culture, Nepali modes of…

  17. Single mode glass fiber welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, M. D.; Fearnehough, H. T.; Goldstein, R.; Goss, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    The electric-arc welding of commercially available single-mode optical fiber has been demonstrated. A mean transmission of 92% and a maximum transmission of 98% are reported for welds of fiber waveguide of 4.5 microns core diameter.

  18. Mode of Action of Glyphosate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although glyphosate is the most used and studied herbicide in the world, the available information is not enough to fully understand its mode of action. The molecular site of action of glyphosate is the enzyme 5-enolpyruvlyshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS). It is the only known compound that ...

  19. Three-Mode Orthomax Rotation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiers, Henk A. L.

    1997-01-01

    Provides a fully flexible approach for orthomax rotation of the core to simple structure with respect to three modes simultaneously. Computationally the approach relies on repeated orthomax rotation applied to supermatrices containing the frontal, lateral, or horizontal slabs, respectively. Exemplary analyses illustrate the procedure. (Author/SLD)

  20. Redux: A Common Interface for SOFIA Data Reduction Pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, M.; Vacca, W. D.; Shuping, R. Y.

    2015-09-01

    We have developed a common user interface for running the data reduction software for multiple instruments for the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). This interface, called Redux, provides a GUI for processing the data from three instruments (EXES, FORCAST, and FLITECAM) in their various modes (imaging and spectroscopy), and is currently being adapted to run a fourth (HAWC+). Redux can also be run without the GUI, in order to automatically process data in a non-interactive pipeline mode. By separating the interface from the pipeline reduction algorithms, Redux provides a standardized means of controlling the pipelines. This shields the user from the diversity of the individual software packages and formats and simplifies code maintenance and re-use. Redux is now an important element in the SOFIA Data Processing System, an overview of which is given in Shuping et al. (2014). Here, we describe the design and development of Redux.

  1. Component model reduction via the projection and assembly method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernard, Douglas E.

    1989-01-01

    The problem of acquiring a simple but sufficiently accurate model of a dynamic system is made more difficult when the dynamic system of interest is a multibody system comprised of several components. A low order system model may be created by reducing the order of the component models and making use of various available multibody dynamics programs to assemble them into a system model. The difficulty is in choosing the reduced order component models to meet system level requirements. The projection and assembly method, proposed originally by Eke, solves this difficulty by forming the full order system model, performing model reduction at the the system level using system level requirements, and then projecting the desired modes onto the components for component level model reduction. The projection and assembly method is analyzed to show the conditions under which the desired modes are captured exactly; to the numerical precision of the algorithm.

  2. Alterations in White Matter Microstructure in Neurofibromatosis-1

    PubMed Central

    Karlsgodt, Katherine H.; Rosser, Tena; Lutkenhoff, Evan S.; Cannon, Tyrone D.; Silva, Alcino; Bearden, Carrie E.

    2012-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis (NF1) represents the most common single gene cause of learning disabilities. NF1 patients have impairments in frontal lobe based cognitive functions such as attention, working memory, and inhibition. Due to its well–characterized genetic etiology, investigations of NF1 may shed light on neural mechanisms underlying such difficulties in the general population or other patient groups. Prior neuroimaging findings indicate global brain volume increases, consistent with neural over-proliferation. However, little is known about alterations in white matter microstructure in NF1. We performed diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) analyses using tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) in 14 young adult NF1 patients and 12 healthy controls. We also examined brain volumetric measures in the same subjects. Consistent with prior studies, we found significantly increased overall gray and white matter volume in NF1 patients. Relative to healthy controls, NF1 patients showed widespread reductions in white matter integrity across the entire brain as reflected by decreased fractional anisotropy (FA) and significantly increased absolute diffusion (ADC). When radial and axial diffusion were examined we found pronounced differences in radial diffusion in NF1 patients, indicative of either decreased myelination or increased space between axons. Secondary analyses revealed that FA and radial diffusion effects were of greatest magnitude in the frontal lobe. Such alterations of white matter tracts connecting frontal regions could contribute to the observed cognitive deficits. Furthermore, although the cellular basis of these white matter microstructural alterations remains to be determined, our findings of disproportionately increased radial diffusion against a background of increased white matter volume suggest the novel hypothesis that one potential alteration contributing to increased cortical white matter in NF1 may be looser packing of axons, with or without myelination

  3. Alterations in white matter microstructure in neurofibromatosis-1.

    PubMed

    Karlsgodt, Katherine H; Rosser, Tena; Lutkenhoff, Evan S; Cannon, Tyrone D; Silva, Alcino; Bearden, Carrie E

    2012-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis (NF1) represents the most common single gene cause of learning disabilities. NF1 patients have impairments in frontal lobe based cognitive functions such as attention, working memory, and inhibition. Due to its well-characterized genetic etiology, investigations of NF1 may shed light on neural mechanisms underlying such difficulties in the general population or other patient groups. Prior neuroimaging findings indicate global brain volume increases, consistent with neural over-proliferation. However, little is known about alterations in white matter microstructure in NF1. We performed diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) analyses using tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) in 14 young adult NF1 patients and 12 healthy controls. We also examined brain volumetric measures in the same subjects. Consistent with prior studies, we found significantly increased overall gray and white matter volume in NF1 patients. Relative to healthy controls, NF1 patients showed widespread reductions in white matter integrity across the entire brain as reflected by decreased fractional anisotropy (FA) and significantly increased absolute diffusion (ADC). When radial and axial diffusion were examined we found pronounced differences in radial diffusion in NF1 patients, indicative of either decreased myelination or increased space between axons. Secondary analyses revealed that FA and radial diffusion effects were of greatest magnitude in the frontal lobe. Such alterations of white matter tracts connecting frontal regions could contribute to the observed cognitive deficits. Furthermore, although the cellular basis of these white matter microstructural alterations remains to be determined, our findings of disproportionately increased radial diffusion against a background of increased white matter volume suggest the novel hypothesis that one potential alteration contributing to increased cortical white matter in NF1 may be looser packing of axons, with or without myelination

  4. Modes of clustered star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfalzner, S.; Kaczmarek, T.; Olczak, C.

    2012-09-01

    Context. The recent realization that most stars form in clusters, immediately raises the question of whether star and planet formation are influenced by the cluster environment. The stellar density in the most prevalent clusters is the key factor here. Whether dominant modes of clustered star formation exist is a fundamental question. Using near-neighbour searches in young clusters, Bressert and collaborators claim this not to be the case. They conclude that - at least in the solar neighbourhood - star formation is continuous from isolated to densely clustered environments and that the environment plays a minor role in star and planet formation. Aims: We investigate under which conditions near-neighbour searches in young clusters can distinguish between different modes of clustered star formation. Methods: Model star clusters with different memberships and density distributions are set up and near-neighbour searches are performed. We investigate the influence of the combination of different cluster modes, observational biases, and types of diagnostic on the results. Results: We find that the specific cluster density profile, the relative sample sizes, the limitations of the observation, and the choice of diagnostic method decide, whether modelled modes of clustered star formation are detected by near-neighbour searches. For density distributions that are centrally concentrated but span a wide density range (for example, King profiles), separate cluster modes are only detectable under ideal conditions (sample selection, completeness) if the mean density of the individual clusters differs by at least a factor of ~65. Introducing a central cut-off can lead to an underestimate of the mean density by more than a factor of ten especially in high density regions. The environmental effect on star and planet formation is similarly underestimated for half of the population in dense systems. Conclusions: Local surface-density distributions are a very useful tool for single

  5. Global gyrokinetic simulations of trapped-electron mode and trapped-ion mode microturbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drouot, T.; Gravier, E.; Reveille, T.; Sarrat, M.; Collard, M.; Bertrand, P.; Cartier-Michaud, T.; Ghendrih, P.; Sarazin, Y.; Garbet, X.

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a reduced kinetic model, which describes simultaneously trapped-ion (TIM) and trapped-electron (TEM) driven modes. Interestingly, the model enables the study of a full f problem for ion and electron trapped particles at very low numerical cost. The linear growth rate obtained with the full f nonlinear code Trapped Element REduction in Semi Lagrangian Approach is successfully compared with analytical predictions. Moreover, nonlinear results show some basic properties of collisionless TEM and TIM turbulence in tokamaks. A competition between streamer-like structures and zonal flows is observed for TEM and TIM turbulence. Zonal flows are shown to play an important role in suppressing the nonlinear transport and strongly depend on the temperature ratio Te/Ti .

  6. Mode selective directional coupler for NLC

    SciTech Connect

    Tantawi, S.G.

    1994-10-01

    The design method for a high power, X-band, 50 dB, circular to rectangular directional coupler is presented. The circular guide is over moded and is intended to operate in TE{sub 01} mode. The rectangular guide operates at the fundamental TE{sub 10} mode. A small percentage of higher order modes in the circular guide can cause considerable errors in the measurements because the magnitude of the axial magnetic field of these modes is higher than that of the operating mode, especially near their cutoff. We used a Hamming window patten for the coupling slots to achieve mode selectivity. Comparison of theory and experiment will be presented.

  7. Impact of hydrothermal alteration on lava dome stability: a numerical modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detienne, Marie; Delmelle, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Lava domes are a common feature of many volcanoes worldwide. They represent a serious volcanic hazard as they are prone to repeated collapses, generating devastating debris avalanches and pyroclastic flows. While it has long been known that hydrothermal alteration degrades rock properties and weakens rock mass cohesion and strength, there is still little quantitative information allowing the description of this effect and its consequences for assessing the stability of a volcanic rock mass such as a lava dome. In this study, we use the finite difference numerical model FLAC 3D to investigate the impact of hydrothermal alteration on the stability of a volcanic dome lying on a flat surface. Different hydrothermal alteration distributions were tested to encompass the variability observed in natural lava domes. Rock shear strength parameters (minimum, maximum and mean cohesion "c" and friction angle "φ" values) representative of various degrees of hydrothermal rock alteration were used in the simulations. The model predicts that reduction of the basement rock's shear strength decreases the factor of safety significantly. A similar result is found by increasing the vertical and horizontal extension of hydrothermal alteration in the basement rocks. In addition, pervasive hydrothermal alteration within the lava dome is predicted to exert a strong negative influence on the factor of safety. Through reduction of rock porosity and permeability, hydrothermal alteration may also affect pore fluid pressure within a lava dome. The results of new FLAC 3D runs which simulate the effect of hydrothermal alteration-induced pore pressure changes on lava dome stability will be presented.

  8. Replacement, reduction and refinement.

    PubMed

    Flecknell, Paul

    2002-01-01

    In 1959, William Russell and Rex Burch published "The Principles of Humane Experimental Technique". They proposed that if animals were to be used in experiments, every effort should be made to Replace them with non-sentient alternatives, to Reduce to a minimum the number of animals used, and to Refine experiments which used animals so that they caused the minimum pain and distress. These guiding principles, the "3 Rs" of animal research, were initially given little attention. Gradually, however, they have become established as essential considerations when animals are used in research. They have influenced new legislation aimed at controlling the use of experimental animals, and in the United Kingdom they have become formally incorporated into the Animal (Scientific) Procedures Act. The three principles, of Replacement, Reduction and Refinement, have also proven to be an area of common ground for research workers who use animals, and those who oppose their use. Scientists, who accept the need to use animals in some experiments, would also agree that it would be preferable not to use animals. If animals were to be used, as few as possible should be used and they should experience a minimum of pain or distress. Many of those who oppose animal experimentation, would also agree that until animal experimentation is stopped, Russell and Burch's 3Rs provide a means to improve animal welfare. It has also been recognised that adoption of the 3Rs can improve the quality of science. Appropriately designed experiments that minimise variation, provide standardised optimum conditions of animals care and minimise unnecessary stress or pain, often yield better more reliable data. Despite the progress made as a result of attention to these principles, several major problems have been identified. When replacing animals with alternative methods, it has often proven difficult to formally validate the alternative. This has proven a particular problem in regulatory toxicology

  9. Jet Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Patrick

    2004-01-01

    The Acoustics Branch is responsible for reducing noise levels for jet and fan components on aircraft engines. To do this, data must be measured and calibrated accurately to ensure validity of test results. This noise reduction is accomplished by modifications to hardware such as jet nozzles, and by the use of other experimental hardware such as fluidic chevrons, elliptic cores, and fluidic shields. To insure validity of data calibration, a variety of software is used. This software adjusts the sound amplitude and frequency to be consistent with data taken on another day. Both the software and the hardware help make noise reduction possible. work properly. These software programs were designed to make corrections for atmosphere, shear, attenuation, electronic, and background noise. All data can be converted to a one-foot lossless condition, using the proper software corrections, making a reading independent of weather and distance. Also, data can be transformed from model scale to full scale for noise predictions of a real flight. Other programs included calculations of Over All Sound Pressure Level (OASPL), Effective Perceived Noise Level (EPNL). OASPL is the integration of sound with respect to frequency, and EPNL is weighted for a human s response to different sound frequencies and integrated with respect to time. With the proper software correction, data taken in the NATR are useful in determining ways to reduce noise. display any difference between two or more data files. Using this program and graphs of the data, the actual and predicted data can be compared. This software was tested on data collected at the Aero Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory (AAPL) using a variety of window types and overlaps. Similarly, short scripts were written to test each individual program in the software suite for verification. Each graph displays both the original points and the adjusted points connected with lines. During this summer, data points were taken during a live experiment

  10. REDUCTIONS WITHOUT REGRET: HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES

    SciTech Connect

    Swegle, J.; Tincher, D.

    2013-09-09

    This is the first of three papers (in addition to an introductory summary) aimed at providing a framework for evaluating future reductions or modifications of the U.S. nuclear force, first by considering previous instances in which nuclear-force capabilities were eliminated; second by looking forward into at least the foreseeable future at the features of global and regional deterrence (recognizing that new weapon systems currently projected will have expected lifetimes stretching beyond our ability to predict the future); and third by providing examples of past or possible undesirable outcomes in the shaping of the future nuclear force, as well as some closing thoughts for the future. This paper examines the circumstances and consequences of the elimination of � The INF-range Pershing II ballistic missile and Gryphon Ground-Launched Cruise Missile (GLCM), deployed by NATO under a dual-track strategy to counter Soviet intermediate-range missiles while pursuing negotiations to limit or eliminate all of these missiles. � The Short-Range Attack Missile (SRAM), which was actually a family of missiles including SRAM A, SRAM B (never deployed), and SRAM II and SRAM T, these last two cancelled during an over-budget/behind-schedule development phase as part of the Presidential Nuclear Initiatives of 1991 and 1992. � The nuclear-armed version of the Tomahawk Land-Attack Cruise Missile (TLAM/N), first limited to shore-based storage by the PNIs, and finally eliminated in deliberations surrounding the 2010 Nuclear Posture Review Report. � The Missile-X (MX), or Peacekeeper, a heavy MIRVed ICBM, deployed in fixed silos, rather than in an originally proposed mobile mode. Peacekeeper was likely intended as a bargaining chip to facilitate elimination of Russian heavy missiles. The plan failed when START II did not enter into force, and the missiles were eliminated at the end of their intended service life. � The Small ICBM (SICBM), or Midgetman, a road-mobile, single

  11. Incremental nonlinear dimensionality reduction by manifold learning.

    PubMed

    Law, Martin H C; Jain, Anil K

    2006-03-01

    Understanding the structure of multidimensional patterns, especially in unsupervised cases, is of fundamental importance in data mining, pattern recognition, and machine learning. Several algorithms have been proposed to analyze the structure of high-dimensional data based on the notion of manifold learning. These algorithms have been used to extract the intrinsic characteristics of different types of high-dimensional data by performing nonlinear dimensionality reduction. Most of these algorithms operate in a "batch" mode and cannot be efficiently applied when data are collected sequentially. In this paper, we describe an incremental version of ISOMAP, one of the key manifold learning algorithms. Our experiments on synthetic data as well as real world images demonstrate that our modified algorithm can maintain an accurate low-dimensional representation of the data in an efficient manner. PMID:16526424

  12. Bosch CO2 Reduction System Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, R. F.; King, C. D.; Keller, E. E.

    1975-01-01

    Refinements in the design of a Bosch CO2 reduction unit for spacecraft O2 production are described. Sealing of the vacuum insulation jacket was simplified so that high vacuum and high insulation performance are easily maintained. The device includes a relatively simple concentric shell recuperative heat exchanger which operates at approximately 95% temperature effectiveness and helps lower power consumption. The influence of reactor temperature, pressure, and recycle gas composition on power consumption was investigated. In general, precise control is not required since power consumption is not very sensitive to moderate variations of these parameters near their optimum values. There are two process rate control modes which match flow rate to process demand. Catalyst conditioning, support, and packing pattern developments assure consistent starts, reduced energy consumption, and extended cartridge life. Operation levels for four or five men were maintained with overall power input values of 50 to 60 watts per man.

  13. e-MERLIN data reduction pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argo, Megan

    2014-07-01

    Written in Python and utilizing ParselTongue (ascl:1208.020) to interface with AIPS (ascl:9911.003), the e-MERLIN data reduction pipeline processes, calibrates and images data from the UK's radio interferometric array (Multi-Element Remote-Linked Interferometer Network). Driven by a plain text input file, the pipeline is modular and can be run in stages. The software includes options to load raw data, average in time and/or frequency, flag known sources of interference, flag more comprehensively with SERPent (ascl:1312.001), carry out some or all of the calibration procedures (including self-calibration), and image in either normal or wide-field mode. It also optionally produces a number of useful diagnostic plots at various stages so data quality can be assessed.

  14. 46 CFR 28.501 - Substantial alterations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Substantial alterations. 28.501 Section 28.501 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY UNINSPECTED VESSELS REQUIREMENTS FOR COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Stability § 28.501 Substantial alterations. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, a vessel that is...

  15. Altered States of Consciousness and Alcohol.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Ben Morgan; And Others

    This document contains the reports of research at a symposium on "Altered States of Consciousness and Alcohol." The participants primarily agreed that alcohol induces an altered state of consciousness similar to other drugs, but that this phenomenon has not been explicitly stated due to the current interest in newer and more novel drugs. The…

  16. Altered Books in Art Therapy with Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chilton, Gioia

    2007-01-01

    This article examines how altered books can be used in art therapy with adolescents. An altered book is a published book that has been changed into a new work of visual art through various art processes such as painting, drawing, collage, writing, and embellishment. Books are discussed as an art canvas on which to provide stimulation, structure,…

  17. Textures of Secondary Alteration Zones in Nakhla

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, D. S.; Wentworth, S. J.; Longazo, T. G.; Thomas-Keprta, K.; Gibson, E. K.

    2001-01-01

    Textures of secondary minerals in cracks in Nakhla are described and illustrated with high resolution Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and BSE. Some Nakhla textures resemble alteration textures of glass in seafloor basalts. Criteria for inorganic vs. biogenic alteration are discussed. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  18. Altered intrinsic connectivity of the auditory cortex in congenital amusia.

    PubMed

    Leveque, Yohana; Fauvel, Baptiste; Groussard, Mathilde; Caclin, Anne; Albouy, Philippe; Platel, Hervé; Tillmann, Barbara

    2016-07-01

    Congenital amusia, a neurodevelopmental disorder of music perception and production, has been associated with abnormal anatomical and functional connectivity in a right frontotemporal pathway. To investigate whether spontaneous connectivity in brain networks involving the auditory cortex is altered in the amusic brain, we ran a seed-based connectivity analysis, contrasting at-rest functional MRI data of amusic and matched control participants. Our results reveal reduced frontotemporal connectivity in amusia during resting state, as well as an overconnectivity between the auditory cortex and the default mode network (DMN). The findings suggest that the auditory cortex is intrinsically more engaged toward internal processes and less available to external stimuli in amusics compared with controls. Beyond amusia, our findings provide new evidence for the link between cognitive deficits in pathology and abnormalities in the connectivity between sensory areas and the DMN at rest. PMID:27009161

  19. Atmospheric emissions from a passenger ferry with selective catalytic reduction.

    PubMed

    Nuszkowski, John; Clark, Nigel N; Spencer, Thomas K; Carder, Daniel K; Gautam, Mridul; Balon, Thomas H; Moynihan, Paul J

    2009-01-01

    The two main propulsion engines on Staten Island Ferry Alice Austen (Caterpillar 3516A, 1550 hp each) were fitted with selective catalytic reduction (SCR) aftertreatment technology to reduce emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx). After the installation of the SCR system, emissions from the ferry were characterized both pre- and post-aftertreatment. Prior research has shown that the ferry operates in four modes, namely idle, acceleration, cruise, and maneuvering modes. Emissions were measured for both engines (designated NY and SI) and for travel in both directions between Manhattan and Staten Island. The emissions characterization used an analyzer system, a data logger, and a filter-based particulate matter (PM) measurement system. The measurement of NOx, carbon monoxide (CO), and carbon dioxide (CO2) were based on federal reference methods. With the existing control strategy for the SCR urea injection, the SCR provided approximately 64% reduction of NOx for engine NY and 36% reduction for engine SI for a complete round trip with less than 6.5 parts per million by volume (ppmv) of ammonia slip during urea injection. Average reductions during the cruise mode were 75% for engine NY and 47% for engine SI, which was operating differently than engine NY. Reductions for the cruise mode during urea injection typically exceeded 94% from both engines, but urea was injected only when the catalyst temperature reached a 300 degrees C threshold pre- and postcatalyst. Data analysis showed a total NOx mass emission split with 80% produced during cruise, and the remaining 20% spread across idle, acceleration, and maneuvering. Examination of continuous NOx data showed that higher reductions of NOx could be achieved on both engines by initiating the urea injection at an earlier point (lower exhaust temperature) in the acceleration and cruise modes of operation. The oxidation catalyst reduced the CO production 94% for engine NY and 82% for engine SI, although the high CO levels

  20. Silicon waveguide based TE mode converter.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Liow, Tsung-Yang; Yu, Mingbin; Lo, Guo-Qiang; Kwong, Dim-Lee

    2010-11-22

    A silicon waveguide based TE mode converter was designed for the mode conversion between a horizontal waveguide and vertical waveguide in the two-layer structure waveguide based polarization diversity circuit. The TE mode converter's performance was studied. The polarization mode converter with minimum length of 5 μm was demonstrated to provide the TE mode conversion while maintaining the polarization status. The insertion loss at the transition region was less than 2 dB. PMID:21164874