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Sample records for reef ore flotation

  1. Investigation of impact of water type on borate ore flotation.

    PubMed

    Ozkan, S G; Acar, A

    2004-04-01

    In this work, the impact of water type on borate ore flotation was investigated, while various physical parameters during flotation were considered in order to compare the results. Two different colemanite samples from Emet deposits of Turkey, named as Emet-A and Emet-B contained 44% B(2)O(3) and 40% B(2)O(3), respectively. The flotation tests were performed at feed particle size range of -210 +20 microm. Optimal consumption values for the reagents were determined as 2000 gt(-1) for AeroPromoter R825 from Cytec Company, a sulphonate type collector, 1500 gt(-1) for Procol CA927 from Allied Colloids Company, a sulphosuccinamate type collector and 100 gt(-1) for AeroFrother 70 from Cytec Company, an alcohol-type frother. In the tests, the impeller speed of the Denver-type flotation machine was set to 1200 rpm and the samples were fed into a litre cell at 25% solid/liquid ratio and at natural pH value of the slurry at room temperature. The flotation results obtained from the tests with use of tap water, demineralised water and the artificial water prepared with Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) cations deliberately added into demineralised water were compared to each other in optimal flotation conditions. PMID:15026231

  2. Beneficiation of flotation tailing from Polish copper sulfide ores

    SciTech Connect

    Luszczkiewicz, A.; Sztaba, K.S.

    1995-12-31

    Flotation tailing of Polish copper sulfide ores represents more than 90% of the mass of run-of-mine ore. The tailing contains mainly quartz, dolomite, clay minerals, traces of sulfides, and some accessory minerals. Almost all minerals of the tailing are well liberated and, therefore, any further beneficiation process applied to the tailing is expected to be inexpensive. In this work, results of investigations on utilization of flotation tailing using classification and gravity concentration are presented. It is shown that due to classification of flotation tailing in hydrocyclones, the coarse fraction becomes suitable material for gravity separation providing backfill material for underground mines as well as heavy minerals, a source of valuable rare elements. It was also found that heavy minerals separated by gravity methods contain a significant amount of rare elements such as zirconium, titanium, silver, rare earth metals, and uranium. The light fraction of the gravity separation contains well deslimed quartz particles and meets strict requirements for hydraulic filling material used for structural support in underground mines. Evaluation of the cost of the proposed technology indicated that investment to implement the method would provide a return within 2--4 years.

  3. Estimated water requirements for the conventional flotation of copper ores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bleiwas, Donald I.

    2012-01-01

    This report provides a perspective on the amount of water used by a conventional copper flotation plant. Water is required for many activities at a mine-mill site, including ore production and beneficiation, dust and fire suppression, drinking and sanitation, and minesite reclamation. The water required to operate a flotation plant may outweigh all of the other uses of water at a mine site, [however,] and the need to maintain a water balance is critical for the plant to operate efficiently. Process water may be irretrievably lost or not immediately available for reuse in the beneficiation plant because it has been used in the production of backfill slurry from tailings to provide underground mine support; because it has been entrapped in the tailings stored in the TSF, evaporated from the TSF, or leaked from pipes and (or) the TSF; and because it has been retained as moisture in the concentrate. Water retained in the interstices of the tailings and the evaporation of water from the surface of the TSF are the two most significant contributors to water loss at a conventional flotation circuit facility.

  4. Effectiveness of sodium silicate as gangue depressants in iron ore slimes flotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Danda Srinivas; Vijayakumar, Tadiparthi Venkata; Rao, Sripada Subba; Prabhakar, Swarna; Raju, Guntamadugu Bhaskar

    2011-10-01

    The recovery of iron from the screw classifier overflow slimes by direct flotation was studied. The relative effectiveness of sodium silicates with different silica-to-soda mole ratios as depressants for silica and silicate bearing minerals was investigated. Silica-to-soda mole ratio and silicate dosage were found to have significant effect on the separation efficiency. The results show that an increase of Fe content in the concentrate is observed with concomitant reduction in SiO2 and Al2O3 levels when a particular type of sodium silicate at a proper dosage is used. The concentrate of 58.89wt% Fe, 4.68wt% SiO2, and 5.28wt% Al2O3 with the weight recovery of 38.74% and the metal recovery of 41.13% can be obtained from the iron ore slimes with 54.44wt% Fe, 6.72wt% SiO2, and 6.80wt% Al2O3, when Na2SiO3 with a silica-to-soda mole ratio of 2.19 is used as a depressant at a feed rate of 0.2 kg/t.

  5. Flotation separation of waste plastics for recycling-A review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong-qing; Wang, Hui; Fu, Jian-gang; Liu, You-nian

    2015-07-01

    The sharp increase of plastic wastes results in great social and environmental pressures, and recycling, as an effective way currently available to reduce the negative impacts of plastic wastes, represents one of the most dynamic areas in the plastics industry today. Froth flotation is a promising method to solve the key problem of recycling process, namely separation of plastic mixtures. This review surveys recent literature on plastics flotation, focusing on specific features compared to ores flotation, strategies, methods and principles, flotation equipments, and current challenges. In terms of separation methods, plastics flotation is divided into gamma flotation, adsorption of reagents, surface modification and physical regulation. PMID:25869841

  6. Magmatic ore deposits in layered intrusions - Descriptive model for reef-type PGE and contact-type Cu-Ni-PGE deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zientek, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    Layered, ultramafic to mafic intrusions are uncommon in the geologic record, but host magmatic ore deposits containing most of the world's economic concentrations of platinum-group elements (PGE) (figs. 1 and 2). These deposits are mined primarily for their platinum, palladium, and rhodium contents (table 1). Magmatic ore deposits are derived from accumulations of crystals of metallic oxides, or immiscible sulfide, or oxide liquids that formed during the cooling and crystallization of magma, typically with mafic to ultramafic compositions. "PGE reefs" are stratabound PGE-enriched lode mineralization in mafic to ultramafic layered intrusions. The term "reef" is derived from Australian and South African literature for this style of mineralization and used to refer to (1) the rock layer that is mineralized and has distinctive texture or mineralogy (Naldrett, 2004), or (2) the PGE-enriched sulfide mineralization that occurs within the rock layer. For example, Viljoen (1999) broadly defined the Merensky Reef as "a mineralized zone within or closely associated with an unconformity surface in the ultramafic cumulate at the base of the Merensky Cyclic Unit." In this report, we will use the term PGE reef to refer to the PGE-enriched mineralization, not the host rock layer. Within a layered igneous intrusion, reef-type mineralization is laterally persistent along strike, extending for the length of the intrusion, typically tens to hundreds of kilometers. However, the mineralized interval is thin, generally centimeters to meters thick, relative to the stratigraphic thickness of layers in an intrusion that vary from hundreds to thousands of meters. PGE-enriched sulfide mineralization is also found near the contacts or margins of layered mafic to ultramafic intrusions (Iljina and Lee, 2005). This contact-type mineralization consists of disseminated to massive concentrations of iron-copper-nickel-PGE-enriched sulfide mineral concentrations in zones that can be tens to hundreds of meters thick. The modes and textures of the igneous rocks hosting the mineralization vary irregularly on the scale of centimeters to meters; autoliths and xenoliths are common. Mineralization occurs in the igneous intrusion and in the surrounding country rocks. Mineralization can be preferentially localized along contact with country rocks that are enriched in sulfur-, iron-, or CO2-bearing lithologies. Reef-type and contact-type deposits, in particular those in the Bushveld Complex, South Africa, are the world's primary source of platinum and rhodium (tables 2 and 3; fig. 2). Reef-type PGE deposits are mined only in the Bushveld Complex (Merensky Reef and UG2), the Stillwater Complex (J-M Reef), and the Great Dyke (Main Sulphide Layer). PGE-enriched contact-type deposits are only mined in the Bushveld Complex. The other deposits in tables 2 and 3 are undeveloped; some are still under exploration.

  7. Pressure flotation of nitrocellulose fines: Hydrodynamics and interfacial chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Grasso, D.; Hu, H.L.; LaFrance, P.; Kim, B.J.

    1996-11-01

    The production of nitrocellulose (NC) creates large quantities of waste NC fines in wash water streams. Current processing techniques attempt to remove these fines by cross-flow microfiltration, pressure flotation, settling, centrifugation, and lime precipitation. Pressure flotation, or dissolved air flotation (DAF), is a solid/liquid separation process first developed in the ore processing industry. DAF has since found many applications in the environmental engineering field including: drinking water clarification, sludge thickening, and the clarification of wastewater from a variety of industrial and municipal processes. The work presented herein is part of a larger effort to explore techniques to recover and reuse nitrocellulose (NC) fines resulting from propellant manufacturing processes. Previous papers investigated NC particle stability and interfacial thermodynamics and developed a flotation trajectory model. This paper builds on that work and presents a sensitivity analysis of the flotation trajectory model. The sensitivity analysis explores both operational and parameter estimation uncertainty.

  8. A review of zinc oxide mineral beneficiation using flotation method.

    PubMed

    Ejtemaei, Majid; Gharabaghi, Mahdi; Irannajad, Mehdi

    2014-04-01

    In recent years, extraction of zinc from low-grade mining tailings of oxidized zinc has been a matter of discussion. This is a material which can be processed by flotation and acid-leaching methods. Owing to the similarities in the physicochemical and surface chemistry of the constituent minerals, separation of zinc oxide minerals from their gangues by flotation is an extremely complex process. It appears that selective leaching is a promising method for the beneficiation of this type of ore. However, with the high consumption of leaching acid, the treatment of low-grade oxidized zinc ores by hydrometallurgical methods is expensive and complex. Hence, it is best to pre-concentrate low-grade oxidized zinc by flotation and then to employ hydrometallurgical methods. This paper presents a critical review on the zinc oxide mineral flotation technique. In this paper, the various flotation methods of zinc oxide minerals which have been proposed in the literature have been detailed with the aim of identifying the important factors involved in the flotation process. The various aspects of recovery of zinc from these minerals are also dealt with here. The literature indicates that the collector type, sulfidizing agent, pH regulator, depressants and dispersants types, temperature, solid pulp concentration, and desliming are important parameters in the process. The range and optimum values of these parameters, as also the adsorption mechanism, together with the resultant flotation of the zinc oxide minerals reported in the literature are summarized and highlighted in the paper. This review presents a comprehensive scientific guide to the effectiveness of flotation strategy. PMID:23571227

  9. Advances in flotation technology

    SciTech Connect

    Parekh, B.K.; Miller, J.D.

    1999-07-01

    The ability to selectively separate fine and coarse particles by flotation is the heart of most mineral processing operations. Significant developments in flotation technology are reflected in this proceedings including: equipment design and development, instrumentation and control, sulfides and precious metals, nonsulfide minerals, coal cleaning, and fundamentals.

  10. New technology for mineral flotation based on pulp-air down-flow apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Leonov, S.B.; Polonsky, S.B.; Popov, K.I.

    1995-12-31

    The offered technological line includes a flotation pulp air conditioner operating on the impact-mechanical effect and two column apparatuses with a descending pulp-air flow mounted in series. The technology developed makes it possible to increase considerably the valuable component in the concentrate simultaneously with a reduction in energy consumption for the flotation process. The experience achieved with the technology showed the possibility for obtaining sulfide silver-bearing ore superconcentrates with the noble metal content 2--10 times higher than that in the concentrates obtained by the conventional technology. The same results were obtained in the process of calcium-bearing boron-silicate ore-dressing.

  11. Host-rock controlled epigenetic, hydrothermal metasomatic origin of the Bayan Obo REEFe-Nb ore deposit, Inner Mongolia, P.R.C.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chao, E.C.T.; Back, J.M.; Minkin, J.A.; Yinchen, R.

    1992-01-01

    Bayan Obo, a complex rare earth element (REE)FeNb ore deposit, located in Inner Mongolia, P.R.C. is the world's largest known REE deposit. The deposit is chiefly in a marble unit (H8), but extends into an overlying unit of black shale, slate and schist unit (H9), both of which are in the upper part of the Middle Proterozoic Bayan Obo Group. Based on sedimentary structures, the presence of detrital quartz and algal fossil remains, and the 16-km long geographic extent, the H8 marble is a sedimentary deposit, and not a carbonatite of magmatic origin, as proposed by some previous investigators. The unit was weakly regionally metamorphosed (most probably the lower part of the green schist facies) into marble and quartzite prior to mineralization. Tectonically, the deposit is located on the northern flank of the Sino-Korean craton. Many hypotheses have been proposed for the origin of the Bayan Obo deposit; the studies reported here support an epigenetic, hydrothermal, metasomatic origin. Such an origin is supported by field and laboratory textural evidence; 232Th/208Pb internal isochron mineral ages of selected monazite and bastnaesite samples; 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating minimum mineral ages of selected alkali amphiboles; chemical compositions of different generations of both REE ore minerals and alkali amphiboles; and evidence of host-rock influence on the various types of Bayan Obo ores. The internal isochron ages of the REE minerals indicate Caledonian ages for various episodes of REE and Fe mineralization. No evidence was found to indicate a genetic relation between the extensive biotite granitic rocks of Hercynian age in the mine region and the Bayan Obo are deposit, as suggested by previous workers. ?? 1992.

  12. A study of the interfacial chemistry of pyrite and coal in fine coal cleaning using flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, C.

    1993-12-31

    Surface oxidation, surface charge, and flotation properties have been systematically studied for coal, coal-pyrite and ore-pyrite. Electrochemical studies show that coal-pyrite exhibits much higher and more complex surface oxidation than ore-pyrite and its oxidation rate depends strongly on the carbon/coal content. Flotation studies indicate that pyrites have no self-induced floatability. Fuel oil significantly improves the floatability of coal and induces considerable flotation for coal-pyrite due to the hydrophobic interaction of fuel oil with the carbon/coal inclusions on the pyrite surface. Xanthate is a good collector for ore-pyrite but a poor collector for coal and coal-pyrite. The results from thermodynamic calculations, flotation and zeta potential measurements show that iron ions greatly affect the flotation of pyrite with xanthate and fuel oil. Various organic and inorganic chemicals have been examined for depressing coal-pyrite. It was found, for the first time, that sodium pyrophosphate is an effective depressant for coal-pyrite. Solution chemistry shows that pyrophosphate reacts with iron ions to form stable iron pyrophosphate complexes. Using pyrophosphate, the complete separation of pyrite from coal can be realized over a wide pH range at relatively low dosage.

  13. 21 CFR 890.3175 - Flotation cushion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3175 Flotation cushion. (a) Identification. A flotation...

  14. 21 CFR 890.3175 - Flotation cushion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3175 Flotation cushion. (a) Identification. A flotation...

  15. 21 CFR 890.3175 - Flotation cushion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3175 Flotation cushion. (a) Identification. A flotation...

  16. 21 CFR 890.3175 - Flotation cushion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3175 Flotation cushion. (a) Identification. A flotation...

  17. Geothermal energy for the increased recovery of copper by flotation enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.H.; Goldstone, L.A.

    1982-08-01

    The possible use of geothermal energy (a) to speed the recovery of copper from ore flotation and/or leaching of flotation tailings and (b) to utilize geothermal brines to replace valuable fresh water in copper flotation operations was evaluated. Geothermal energy could be used to enhance copper and molybdenum recovery in mineral flotation by increasing the kinetics of the flotation process. In another approach, geothermal energy could be used to heat the leaching solution which might permit greater copper recovery using the same residence time in a tailings leach facility. Since there is no restriction on the temperature of the leaching fluid, revenues generated from the additional copper recovered would be greater for tailings leach operations than for other types of leach operations (for example, dump leaching operation) for which temperature restrictions exist. The estimated increase in total revenues resulting from two percent increase copper recovery in a 50,000 tons ore/day plant was estimated to be over $2,000,000 annually. It would require an estimated geothermal investment of about $2,130,000 for a geothermal well and pumping system. Thus, the capital investment would be paid out in about one year. Furthermore, considerable savings of fresh waters and process equipment are possible if the geothermal waters can be used directly in the mine-mill operations, which is believed to be practical.

  18. Effect of reverse flotation on magnetic separation concentrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bada, S. O.; Afolabi, A. S.; Makhula, M. J.

    2012-08-01

    Reverse flotation studies on magnetite samples have revealed that the use of starch as a depressant of Fe-oxides has a hydrophilic effect on the surface of Fe-bearing silicates and significantly decreases Fe in the silica-rich stream when used in combination with an amine (Lilaflot D817M). In this study, the effect of reverse flotation on the optimization of products obtained from magnetic separation was investigated. Two different magnetic samples, zones 1 and 2, were milled to <75 ?m and then subjected to low intensity magnetic separation (LIMS). The LIMS test conducted on the <75 ?m shown an upgrade of 46.40wt% Fe, 28.40wt% SiO2 and 2.61wt% MnO for zone 1 and 47.60wt% Fe, 29.17wt% SiO2 and 0.50wt% MnO for zone 2. Further milling of the ore to <25 ?m resulted in a higher magnetic-rich product after magnetic separation. Reverse flotation tests were conducted on the agitated magnetic concentrate feed, and the result shows a significant upgrade of Fe compared to that obtained from the non-agitated feed. Iron concentrations greater than 69%, and SiO2 concentrations less than 2% with overall magnetite recoveries greater than 67% and 71% were obtained for zones 1 and 2, respectively.

  19. 21 CFR 890.3175 - Flotation cushion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3175 Flotation cushion. (a) Identification. A flotation cushion is a device intended...

  20. 33 CFR 183.322 - Flotation materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Flotation materials. 183.322 Section 183.322 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED... of 2 Horsepower or Less General § 183.322 Flotation materials. (a) Flotation materials must meet...

  1. Selective flotation of inorganic sulfides from coal

    DOEpatents

    Miller, K.J.; Wen, Wu-Wey

    1988-05-31

    Pyritic sulfur is removed from coal or other carbonaceous material through the use of humic acid as a coal flotation depressant. Following the removal of coarse pyrite, the carbonaceous material is blended with humic acid, a pyrite flotation collector and a frothing agent within a flotation cell to selectively float pyritic sulfur leaving clean coal as an underflow. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  2. Selective flotation of inorganic sulfides from coal

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Kenneth J. (Floreffe, PA); Wen, Wu-Wey (Murrysville, PA)

    1989-01-01

    Pyritic sulfur is removed from coal or other carbonaceous material through the use of humic acid as a coal flotation depressant. Following the removal of coarse pyrite, the carbonaceous material is blended with humic acid, a pyrite flotation collector and a frothing agent within a flotation cell to selectively float pyritic sulfur leaving clean coal as an underflow.

  3. 33 CFR 183.114 - Test of flotation materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Flotation Requirements for Inboard Boats, Inboard/Outdrive Boats, and Airboats § 183.114 Test of flotation materials. (a) Vapor test. The flotation...

  4. 33 CFR 183.114 - Test of flotation materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Flotation Requirements for Inboard Boats, Inboard/Outdrive Boats, and Airboats § 183.114 Test of flotation materials. (a) Vapor test. The flotation...

  5. 33 CFR 183.114 - Test of flotation materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Flotation Requirements for Inboard Boats, Inboard/Outdrive Boats, and Airboats § 183.114 Test of flotation materials. (a) Vapor test. The flotation...

  6. Comparison of column flotation cells

    SciTech Connect

    Honaker, R.Q.; Mohanty, M.K.; Ho, K.

    1995-08-01

    Six commercial column flotation technologies, i.e., Canadian, Flotaire, Jameson, Microcel, Packed-Column, and Turbo-air, were tested for the treatment of Illinois Basin fine coal and the results from each column compared based on separation performance and throughout capacity. The separation performance achieved by each cell approached and, in some cases, exceeded the ultimate performance predicted by release analysis. A comparison of the test results indicates differences in the selectivity obtained by each flotation column on the basis of both ash and sulfur rejection. This finding may be due to variations in cell hydrodynamics and the ability to support a deep froth phase among the different column cells. In addition, throughput capacity of each cell was found to differ, apparently due to the differences in the bubble-particle attachment environment, bubble size, and bubble population. Variations in the operating characteristics, such as reagent additions, aeration rate and wash water rate, were also noted and summarized in this publication.

  7. Sewage treatment-flotation apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Hines, D.A.; Jones, R.T.; Roesler, F.C.

    1981-03-03

    Solids-liquid separation, wherein a solids-liquid mixture containing dissolved oxygen-containing gas is circulated around a circulatory system comprising a downcomer and a riser, part of the mixture in the riser being introduced into a flotation chamber in which the hydrostatic pressure gradually decreases as the mixture flows upwards, with consequent release from solution of gas bubbles which carry solid particles to the top of the mixture.

  8. 33 CFR 183.112 - Flotation material and air chambers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Flotation Requirements for Inboard Boats, Inboard/Outdrive Boats, and Airboats § 183.112 Flotation material and air chambers. (a)...

  9. 33 CFR 183.112 - Flotation material and air chambers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Flotation Requirements for Inboard Boats, Inboard/Outdrive Boats, and Airboats § 183.112 Flotation material and air chambers. (a)...

  10. 33 CFR 183.112 - Flotation material and air chambers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Flotation Requirements for Inboard Boats, Inboard/Outdrive Boats, and Airboats § 183.112 Flotation material and air chambers. (a)...

  11. 33 CFR 183.112 - Flotation material and air chambers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Flotation Requirements for Inboard Boats, Inboard/Outdrive Boats, and Airboats § 183.112 Flotation material and air chambers. (a)...

  12. Selective flotation of phosphate minerals with hydroxamate collectors

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Jan D. (Salt Lake City, UT); Wang, Xuming (Salt Lake City, UT); Li, Minhua (Salt Lake City, UT)

    2002-01-01

    A method is disclosed for separating phosphate minerals from a mineral mixture, particularly from high-dolomite containing phosphate ores. The method involves conditioning the mineral mixture by contacting in an aqueous in environment with a collector in an amount sufficient for promoting flotation of phosphate minerals. The collector is a hydroxamate compound of the formula; ##STR1## wherein R is generally hydrophobic and chosen such that the collector has solubility or dispersion properties it can be distributed in the mineral mixture, typically an alkyl, aryl, or alkylaryl group having 6 to 18 carbon atoms. M is a cation, typically hydrogen, an alkali metal or an alkaline earth metal. Preferably, the collector also comprises an alcohol of the formula, R'--OH wherein R' is generally hydrophobic and chosen such that the collector has solubility or dispersion properties so that it can be distributed in the mineral mixture, typically an alkyl, aryl, or alkylaryl group having 6 to 18 carbon atoms.

  13. 77 FR 19937 - Inflatable Personal Flotation Devices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-03

    ... Personal Flotation Devices'' in the Federal Register. 76 FR 17561. We received three submissions in... Personal Flotation Devices); 60 FR 32836 (June 23, 1995). Subpart 160.076 incorporates by reference three... notice of withdrawal. 76 FR 56294. On September 29, 2011, the Coast Guard issued a notice of...

  14. 21 CFR 890.3175 - Flotation cushion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Flotation cushion. 890.3175 Section 890.3175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3175 Flotation cushion....

  15. 21 CFR 890.3175 - Flotation cushion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Flotation cushion. 890.3175 Section 890.3175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3175 Flotation cushion....

  16. 21 CFR 890.3175 - Flotation cushion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Flotation cushion. 890.3175 Section 890.3175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3175 Flotation cushion....

  17. 21 CFR 890.3175 - Flotation cushion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Flotation cushion. 890.3175 Section 890.3175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3175 Flotation cushion....

  18. 21 CFR 890.3175 - Flotation cushion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Flotation cushion. 890.3175 Section 890.3175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3175 Flotation cushion....

  19. N-(6-(hydroxyamino)-6-oxohexyl) decanamide collector: Flotation performance and adsorption mechanism to diaspore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Lanqing; Wang, Shuai; Zhong, Hong; Liu, Guangyi

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, a novel surfactant, N-(6-(hydroxyamino)-6-oxohexyl)decanamide (NHOD) was synthesized and used as a collector for flotation separation of diaspore and aluminosilicate minerals. The adsorption mechanism of NHOD onto diaspore was also investigated by FTIR spectra, zeta potential measurement and XPS. The flotation results demonstrated that NHOD exhibited superior collecting power to diaspore and selectivity against kaolinite and illite and could effectively realize flotation recovery of diaspore from bauxite ores contained aluminosilicate minerals under neutral conditions. The results of XPS, FTIR spectra and zeta potential illustrated that at around pH 7.0, NHOD might chemisorb on diaspore surfaces through Alsbnd O coordination bonds formed by binding its sbnd C(dbnd O)NHOH or sbnd C(dbnd O)NHsbnd chelate groups with aluminum atoms on diaspore surfaces. NHOD's unique properties, such as characteristic bond patterns onto diaspore surfaces, two hydrophobic groups, and intermolecular hydrogen bonds between neighboring NHOD molecules coated on diaspore surfaces, rendered it to be a superior flotation collector for diaspore.

  20. New influence factor inducing difficulty in selective flotation separation of Cu-Zn mixed sulfide minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Jiu-shuai; Mao, Ying-bo; Wen, Shu-ming; Liu, Jian; Xian, Yong-jun; Feng, Qi-cheng

    2015-02-01

    Selective flotation separation of Cu-Zn mixed sulfides has been proven to be difficult. Thus far, researchers have found no satisfactory way to separate Cu-Zn mixed sulfides by selective flotation, mainly because of the complex surface and interface interaction mechanisms in the flotation solution. Undesired activation occurs between copper ions and the sphalerite surfaces. In addition to recycled water and mineral dissolution, ancient fluids in the minerals are observed to be a new source of metal ions. In this study, significant amounts of ancient fluids were found to exist in Cu-Zn sulfide and gangue minerals, mostly as gas-liquid fluid inclusions. The concentration of copper ions released from the ancient fluids reached 1.02 × 10-6 mol/L, whereas, in the cases of sphalerite and quartz, this concentration was 0.62 × 10-6 mol/L and 0.44 × 10-6 mol/L, respectively. As a result, the ancient fluid is a significant source of copper ions compared to mineral dissolution under the same experimental conditions, which promotes the unwanted activation of sphalerite. Therefore, the ancient fluid is considered to be a new factor that affects the selective flotation separation of Cu-Zn mixed sulfide ores.

  1. Applications of surface ligand design to flotation 

    E-print Network

    Rio Echevarria, Iria M.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis involves the design, synthesis and testing of organic hydrophobic ligands. They would act as co-collectors in froth flotation processes to enhance the recovery of sulfidic minerals which have undergone some ...

  2. Flotation selectivity of novel alkyl dicarboxylate reagents for apatite-calcite separation.

    PubMed

    Karlkvist, Tommy; Patra, Anuttam; Rao, Kota Hanumantha; Bordes, Romain; Holmberg, Krister

    2015-05-01

    The investigation aims to demonstrate the conceptual thoughts behind developing mineral specific reagents for use in flotation of calcium containing ores. For this purpose, a series of dicarboxylate-based surfactants with varying distance between the carboxylate groups (one, two or three methylene groups) was synthesized. A surfactant with the same alkyl chain length but with only one carboxylate group was also synthesized and evaluated. The adsorption behavior of these new reagents on pure apatite and pure calcite surfaces was studied using Hallimond tube flotation, FTIR and ? potential measurements. The relation between the adsorption behavior of a given surfactant at a specific mineral surface and its molecular structure over a range of concentrations and pH values, as well as the region of maximum recovery, was established. It was found that one of the reagents, with a specific distance between the carboxylate groups, was much more selective for a particular mineral surface than the other homologues. For example, out of the four compounds synthesized, only the one where the carboxylate groups were separated by a single methylene group floated apatite but not calcite, whereas calcite was efficiently floated with the monocarboxylic reagent, but not with the other reagents synthesized. This selective adsorption of a given surfactant to a particular mineral surface relative to other mineral surfaces as evidenced in the flotation studies was substantiated by ? potential and infra-red spectroscopy data. PMID:25596367

  3. 21 CFR 880.5550 - Alternating pressure air flotation mattress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... § 880.5550 Alternating pressure air flotation mattress. ...Identification. An alternating pressure air flotation mattress...in the distribution of body pressure. The device is used to prevent...treat decubitus ulcers (bed sores). (b)...

  4. 21 CFR 880.5550 - Alternating pressure air flotation mattress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... § 880.5550 Alternating pressure air flotation mattress. ...Identification. An alternating pressure air flotation mattress...in the distribution of body pressure. The device is used to prevent...treat decubitus ulcers (bed sores). (b)...

  5. 21 CFR 880.5550 - Alternating pressure air flotation mattress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... § 880.5550 Alternating pressure air flotation mattress. ...Identification. An alternating pressure air flotation mattress...in the distribution of body pressure. The device is used to prevent...treat decubitus ulcers (bed sores). (b)...

  6. 21 CFR 880.5550 - Alternating pressure air flotation mattress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... § 880.5550 Alternating pressure air flotation mattress. ...Identification. An alternating pressure air flotation mattress...in the distribution of body pressure. The device is used to prevent...treat decubitus ulcers (bed sores). (b)...

  7. 21 CFR 880.5550 - Alternating pressure air flotation mattress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... § 880.5550 Alternating pressure air flotation mattress. ...Identification. An alternating pressure air flotation mattress...in the distribution of body pressure. The device is used to prevent...treat decubitus ulcers (bed sores). (b)...

  8. Vitrification of copper flotation waste.

    PubMed

    Karamanov, Alexander; Aloisi, Mirko; Pelino, Mario

    2007-02-01

    The vitrification of an hazardous iron-rich waste (W), arising from slag flotation of copper production, was studied. Two glasses, containing 30wt% W were melted for 30min at 1400 degrees C. The first batch, labeled WSZ, was obtained by mixing W, blast furnace slag (S) and zeolite tuff (Z), whereas the second, labeled WG, was prepared by mixing W, glass cullet (G), sand and limestone. The glass frits showed high chemical durability, measured by the TCLP test. The crystallization of the glasses was evaluated by DTA. The crystal phases formed were identified by XRD resulting to be pyroxene and wollastonite solid solutions, magnetite and hematite. The morphology of the glass-ceramics was observed by optical and scanning electron microscopy. WSZ composition showed a high rate of bulk crystallization and resulted to be suitable for producing glass-ceramics by a short crystallization heat-treatment. WG composition showed a low crystallization rate and good sinterability; glass-ceramics were obtained by sinter-crystallization of the glass frit. PMID:17064848

  9. 33 CFR 183.105 - Quantity of flotation required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Flotation Requirements for Inboard Boats, Inboard/Outdrive Boats, and Airboats § 183.105 Quantity of flotation required. (a) Each boat must have enough flotation to keep any portion of the boat above the surface of the water when the boat has been submerged...

  10. 33 CFR 183.105 - Quantity of flotation required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Flotation Requirements for Inboard Boats, Inboard/Outdrive Boats, and Airboats § 183.105 Quantity of flotation required. (a) Each boat must have enough flotation to keep any portion of the boat above the surface of the water when the boat has been submerged...

  11. 33 CFR 183.105 - Quantity of flotation required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Flotation Requirements for Inboard Boats, Inboard/Outdrive Boats, and Airboats § 183.105 Quantity of flotation required. (a) Each boat must have enough flotation to keep any portion of the boat above the surface of the water when the boat has been submerged...

  12. 33 CFR 183.105 - Quantity of flotation required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Flotation Requirements for Inboard Boats, Inboard/Outdrive Boats, and Airboats § 183.105 Quantity of flotation required. (a) Each boat must have enough flotation to keep any portion of the boat above the surface of the water when the boat has been submerged...

  13. 21 CFR 880.5550 - Alternating pressure air flotation mattress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Alternating pressure air flotation mattress. 880... Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5550 Alternating pressure air flotation mattress. (a) Identification. An alternating pressure air flotation mattress is a device intended for medical purposes...

  14. 21 CFR 880.5550 - Alternating pressure air flotation mattress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Alternating pressure air flotation mattress. 880... Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5550 Alternating pressure air flotation mattress. (a) Identification. An alternating pressure air flotation mattress is a device intended for medical purposes...

  15. 46 CFR 25.25-13 - Personal flotation device lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Personal flotation device lights. 25.25-13 Section 25.25... Preservers and Other Lifesaving Equipment § 25.25-13 Personal flotation device lights. (a) This section... device intended to be worn, and each buoyant vest must have a personal flotation device light that...

  16. 46 CFR 25.25-13 - Personal flotation device lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Personal flotation device lights. 25.25-13 Section 25.25... Preservers and Other Lifesaving Equipment § 25.25-13 Personal flotation device lights. (a) This section... device intended to be worn, and each buoyant vest must have a personal flotation device light that...

  17. 21 CFR 880.5550 - Alternating pressure air flotation mattress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Alternating pressure air flotation mattress. 880... Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5550 Alternating pressure air flotation mattress. (a) Identification. An alternating pressure air flotation mattress is a device intended for medical purposes...

  18. Physically absorbable reagents-collectors in elementary flotation

    SciTech Connect

    S.A. Kondrat'ev; I.G. Bochkarev

    2007-09-15

    Based on the reviewed researches held at the Institute of Mining, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, the effect of physically absorbable reagents-collectors on formation of a flotation complex and its stability in turbulent pulp flows in flotation machines of basic types is considered. The basic requirements for physically absorbable reagents-collectors at different flotation stages are established.

  19. Utilization of flotation wastes of copper slag as raw material in cement production.

    PubMed

    Alp, I; Deveci, H; Süngün, H

    2008-11-30

    Copper slag wastes, even if treated via processes such as flotation for metal recovery, still contain heavy metals with hazardous properties posing environmental risks for disposal. This study reports the potential use of flotation waste of a copper slag (FWCS) as iron source in the production of Portland cement clinker. The FWCS appears a suitable raw material as iron source containing >59% Fe(2)O(3) mainly in the form of fayalite (Fe(2)SiO(4)) and magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)). The clinker products obtained using the FWCS from the industrial scale trial operations over a 4-month period were characterised for the conformity of its chemical composition and the physico-mechanical performance of the resultant cement products was evaluated. The data collected for the clinker products produced using an iron ore, which is currently used as the cement raw material were also included for comparison. The results have shown that the chemical compositions of all the clinker products including those of FWCS are typical of a Portland cement clinker. The mechanical performance of the standard mortars prepared from the FWCS clinkers were found to be similar to those from the iron ore clinkers with the desired specifications for the industrial cements e.g. CEM I type cements. Furthermore, the leachability tests (TCLP and SPLP) have revealed that the mortar samples obtained from the FWCS clinkers present no environmental problems while the FWCS could act as the potential source of heavy metal contamination. These findings suggest that flotation wastes of copper slag (FWCS) can be readily utilised as cement raw material due to its availability in large quantities at low cost with the further significant benefits for waste management/environmental practices of the FWCS and the reduced production and processing costs for cement raw materials. PMID:18384950

  20. Effect of microwave radiation on coal flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Ozbayoglu, G.; Depci, T.; Ataman, N.

    2009-07-01

    Most low-rank coals are high in moisture and acid functional groups, therefore showing poor floatability. Drying, which removes the water molecules trapped in the pores and adsorbed at the surface of coal, decreases the hydrophilic character and improves the floatability. Microwave heating, whose simplest application is drying, was applied at 0.9 kW power level for 60 sec exposure time in the experiments to decrease the moisture content of coal in order to enhance the hydrophobicity. The flotation tests of microwave-treated coal by using heptanol and octanol lead to a higher flotation yield and ash removal than original coal.

  1. Reducibility of laterite ores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahara, M.; Toguri, J. M.; Bergman, R. A.

    1988-04-01

    The reducibility of several types of lateritic nickel bearing ores was investigated. The ores were reduced with hydrogen over a temperature range of 673 to 1273 K and reaction times from 5 to 80 minutes. The fraction of nickel, iron, and cobalt reduced to the metallic state was determined by leaching the reacted samples with a bromine-methanol solution followed by atomic absorption analysis for the individual elements. The reducibility of nickel increased with increasing iron concentration of the ore. Increased reduction temperature greatly raised the amount of nickel reduced for ores with high iron concentrations. The cobalt reducibility decreased with increasing iron concentration of the ore. Changes in reduction temperature affected cobalt reduction less than nickel reduction. The observed changes in reducibility have been attributed to the formation of phases which incorporate nickel and cobalt. The major ore components were plotted on the ternary phase diagram of the SiO2+(Al2O3)-MgO-FeO system. It is shown how this plot can be used to predict the reducibility of different types of lateritic ores.

  2. Shale-oil-recovery systems incorporating ore beneficiation. Final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, M.A.; Klumpar, I.V.; Peterson, C.R.; Ring, T.A.

    1982-10-01

    This study analyzed the recovery of oil from oil shale by use of proposed systems which incorporate beneficiation of the shale ore (that is concentration of the kerogen before the oil-recovery step). The objective was to identify systems which could be more attractive than conventional surface retorting of ore. No experimental work was carried out. The systems analyzed consisted of beneficiation methods which could increase kerogen concentrations by at least four-fold. Potentially attractive low-enrichment methods such as density separation were not examined. The technical alternatives considered were bounded by the secondary crusher as input and raw shale oil as output. A sequence of ball milling, froth flotation, and retorting concentrate is not attractive for Western shales compared to conventional ore retorting; transporting the concentrate to another location for retorting reduces air emissions in the ore region but cost reduction is questionable. The high capital and energy cost s results largely from the ball milling step which is very inefficient. Major improvements in comminution seem achievable through research and such improvements, plus confirmation of other assumptions, could make high-enrichment beneficiation competitive with conventional processing. 27 figures, 23 tables.

  3. Improved Algal Harvesting Using Suspended Air Flotation

    E-print Network

    Jacobson, Arne

    and expensive. This study characterized algae contained within a wastewater oxidation pond and sought the study period. Results demonstrated that suspended air flotation (SAF) could harvest algae with a lower treatment facilities from meeting TSS standards outlined in Federal Water Pollution Control Amendments

  4. 76 FR 60405 - Inflatable Personal Flotation Devices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-29

    ... addressing the population for which inflatable recreational PFDs are approved (76 FR 17561). As discussed... Act notice regarding our public dockets in the January 17, 2008 issue of the Federal Register (73 FR... Flotation Devices'' in the Federal Register (76 FR 17561). The Coast Guard received three submissions...

  5. 76 FR 56294 - Inflatable Personal Flotation Devices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-13

    ... issues in a notice of proposed rulemaking. DATES: The direct final rule published March 30, 2011, (76 FR... rule entitled ``Inflatable Personal Flotation Devices'' in the Federal Register (76 FR 17561). That..., or why it would be ineffective or unacceptable without a change (76 FR 17563). This...

  6. Great Barrier Reef

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... reef, but a vast maze of reefs, passages, and coral cays (islands that are part of the reef). This nadir true-color image was acquired by ... visible in this image is Whitsunday Island, with smaller islands and reefs extending southeast, parallel to the coast. These include ...

  7. Pyrite Flotation With Xanthate Under Alkaline Conditions --Application to Environmental Desulfurisation

    E-print Network

    Aubertin, Michel

    Pyrite Flotation With Xanthate Under Alkaline Conditions -- Application to Environmental,3 and M Aubertin4 ABSTRACT The extensive literature on sulfide flotation indicates that pyrite poorly floats under alkaline condition. Xanthate concentration has a positive effect on pyrite flotation

  8. 33 CFR 149.331 - What are the requirements for hybrid personal flotation devices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... false What are the requirements for hybrid personal flotation devices? 149.331...331 What are the requirements for hybrid personal flotation devices? (a...that the use and stowage of all commercial hybrid personal flotation devices...

  9. Flotation of marine microalgae: effect of algal hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Garg, Sourabh; Li, Yan; Wang, Liguang; Schenk, Peer M

    2012-10-01

    This study aims to understand the underlying reasons for the poor flotation response of marine microalgae. The flotation performance and hydrophobicity of a freshwater microalga (Chlorella sp. BR2) were compared to those of a marine microalga (Tetraselmis sp. M8) at different salinities in the presence of a cationic collector, tetradecyl trimethylammonium bromide. It was found that microalgal hydrophobicity played a more important role than salinity in determining the flotation performance. PMID:22858117

  10. [Bacterial destruction of synthetic organic flotation agents].

    PubMed

    Ilialetdinov, A N; Mendeshev, A

    1979-01-01

    Microorganisms that use the flotation agent T-66 as the sole source of carbon have been isolated from soil enriched with this agent. A mixture of bacterial cultures belonging to the genus Pseudomonas (Ps. fluorescens, Ps. desmolyticum, Ps. rathonis, Ps. cyanoides viscosa, and Ps. aeruginosa) oxidized, after adaptation, at a high rate, components of the flotation agent T-66. Aeration of the medium accelerated the destruction. About 90% of the foltation agent components were oxidized within four months. The highest activity was observed during the first two months. The bacteria also decomposed, actively, oxidized kerosene and oxidized recycle stock added as the sole source of carbon to a mineral medium. Introduction of glucose to the medium accelerated destruction of oxidized recycle stock by the microorganisms, but inhibited destruction of oxidized kerosene. PMID:470638

  11. Elk Valley coal implements smartcell flotation technology

    SciTech Connect

    Stirling, J.C.

    2008-06-15

    In anticipation of future raw coal containing higher fines content, Elk Valley Coal Corp.'s Greenhills Operations upgraded their fines circuit to include Wemco SmartCells in March 2007. Positive results were immediately achieved increasing the average flotation tailings ash by 16%. With this increase in yield the SmartCells project paid for itself in less than eight months. 2 figs., 1 tab., 1 photo.

  12. Flotation machine and process for removing impurities from coals

    DOEpatents

    Szymocha, K.; Ignasiak, B.; Pawlak, W.; Kulik, C.; Lebowitz, H.E.

    1995-12-05

    The present invention is directed to a type of flotation machine that combines three separate operations in a single unit. The flotation machine is a hydraulic separator that is capable of reducing the pyrite and other mineral matter content of a coal. When the hydraulic separator is used with a flotation system, the pyrite and certain other mineral particles that may have been entrained by hydrodynamic forces associated with conventional flotation machines and/or by the attachment forces associated with the formation of microagglomerates are washed and separated from the coal. 4 figs.

  13. 21 CFR 890.5170 - Powered flotation therapy bed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5170 Powered flotation therapy bed. (a) Identification....

  14. 21 CFR 890.5170 - Powered flotation therapy bed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5170 Powered flotation therapy bed. (a) Identification....

  15. 21 CFR 890.5170 - Powered flotation therapy bed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5170 Powered flotation therapy bed. (a) Identification....

  16. 21 CFR 890.5170 - Powered flotation therapy bed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5170 Powered flotation therapy bed. (a) Identification....

  17. Flotation machine and process for removing impurities from coals

    DOEpatents

    Szymocha, K.; Ignasiak, B.; Pawlak, W.; Kulik, C.; Lebowitz, H.E.

    1997-02-11

    The present invention is directed to a type of flotation machine that combines three separate operations in a single unit. The flotation machine is a hydraulic separator that is capable of reducing the pyrite and other mineral matter content of a coal. When the hydraulic separator is used with a flotation system, the pyrite and certain other minerals particles that may have been entrained by hydrodynamic forces associated with conventional flotation machines and/or by the attachment forces associated with the formation of microagglomerates are washed and separated from the coal. 4 figs.

  18. Flotation machine and process for removing impurities from coals

    DOEpatents

    Szymocha, Kazimierz (Edmonton, CA); Ignasiak, Boleslaw (Edmonton, CA); Pawlak, Wanda (Edmonton, CA); Kulik, Conrad (Newark, CA); Lebowitz, Howard E. (Mountain View, CA)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a type of flotation machine that combines three separate operations in a single unit. The flotation machine is a hydraulic separator that is capable of reducing the pyrite and other mineral matter content of a coal. When the hydraulic separator is used with a flotation system, the pyrite and certain other minerals particles that may have been entrained by hydrodynamic forces associated with conventional flotation machines and/or by the attachment forces associated with the formation of microagglomerates are washed and separated from the coal.

  19. Flotation machine and process for removing impurities from coals

    DOEpatents

    Szymocha, Kazimierz (Edmonton, CA); Ignasiak, Boleslaw (Edmonton, CA); Pawlak, Wanda (Edmonton, CA); Kulik, Conrad (Newark, CA); Lebowitz, Howard E. (Mountain View, CA)

    1995-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a type of flotation machine that combines three separate operations in a single unit. The flotation machine is a hydraulic separator that is capable of reducing the pyrite and other mineral matter content of a coal. When the hydraulic separator is used with a flotation system, the pyrite and certain other minerals particles that may have been entrained by hydrodynamic forces associated with conventional flotation machines and/or by the attachment forces associated with the formation of microagglomerates are washed and separated from the coal.

  20. 26. NORTHERN VIEW OF ORE YARD WITH ORE BRIDGES IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. NORTHERN VIEW OF ORE YARD WITH ORE BRIDGES IN THE BACKGROUND. BLAST FURNACES ALONG THE RIGHT SIDE. (Martin Stupich) - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Blast Furnace Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  1. Introduction to ore geology

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    This textbook on ore geology is for second and third year undergraduates and closely parallels the undergraduate course given in this subject at England's University of Leicester. The volume covers three major areas: (1) principles of ore geology, (2) examples of the most important types of ore deposits, and (3) mineralization in space and time. Many chapters have been thoroughly revised for this edition and a chapter on diamonds has been added. Chapters on greisen and pegmatite have also been added, the former in response to the changing situation in tin mining following the recent tin crisis, and the latter in response to suggestions from geologists in a number of overseas countries. Some chapters have been considerably expanded and new sections added, including disseminated gold deposits and unconformity-associated uranium deposits. The author also expands on the importance of viewing mineral deposits from an economic standpoint.

  2. A preliminary investigation into the effect of pressure on flotation performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Courtney A.

    2007-10-01

    In a previous study, various pyrite depressants were examined to improve the flotation performance of a copper-sulfide ore containing tetrahedrite (Cu12Sb4S13). Optimal results from this study were used to examine the effect of elevation on recovery and grade. Tests were conducted at elevations of 3,350 meters, 1,735 meters, 610 meters, and-760 meters, consisting of five repetitive experiments for statistical analysis. The experiments were performed both with and without airflow control. Tests were also performed in a glove box at Montana Tech of The University of Montana to mimic the pressure conditions. Results indicate that both recovery and grade are dependent on pressure via bubble size and airflow, suggesting that pressurized fl otation cells should be considered for operations, particularly those at high elevation. Economics are extremely favorable for implementation because ensuing capital expenses are inconsequential with minimal time for return-on-investment.

  3. 14. HULETT ORE UNLOADERS IN MOTION; UNLOADING CANADIAN RED ORE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. HULETT ORE UNLOADERS IN MOTION; UNLOADING CANADIAN RED ORE FROM THE 'GEORGE M. CAR.' VIEW LOOKING EAST. (Also see OH-18-38, OH-18-39, and OH-18-40.) - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  4. 38. HULETT ORE UNLOADERS IN MOTION; UNLOADING CANADIAN RED ORE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. HULETT ORE UNLOADERS IN MOTION; UNLOADING CANADIAN RED ORE FROM THE GEORGE M. CARL.' VIEW LOOKING EAST. (Also see OH-18-14, OH-18-39, and OH-18-40) - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  5. 33 CFR 183.202 - Flotation and certification requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Flotation Requirements for Outboard Boats Rated for Engines of More Than 2 Horsepower General § 183.202 Flotation and certification requirements. Each boat to which this subpart applies must be manufactured, constructed, or assembled to...

  6. 33 CFR 183.202 - Flotation and certification requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Flotation Requirements for Outboard Boats Rated for Engines of More Than 2 Horsepower General § 183.202 Flotation and certification requirements. Each boat to which this subpart applies must be manufactured, constructed, or assembled to...

  7. 33 CFR 142.45 - Personal flotation devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Personal flotation devices. 142.45 Section 142.45 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES WORKPLACE SAFETY AND HEALTH Personal Protective Equipment § 142.45 Personal flotation devices....

  8. FOAM FLOTATION TREATMENT OF INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATERS: LABORATORY AND PILOT SCALE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A floc foam flotation pilot plant reduced lead and zinc in dilute solution to very low concentrations. The results suggest a number of design improvements. A simple diffusion model does not adequately describe axial dispersion at high column leadings. The floc foam flotation of z...

  9. 33 CFR 183.225 - Flotation test for persons capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Flotation test for persons capacity. 183.225 Section 183.225 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Boats Rated for Engines of More Than 2 Horsepower Tests § 183.225 Flotation test for persons...

  10. 33 CFR 183.325 - Flotation test for persons capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Flotation test for persons capacity. 183.325 Section 183.325 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Boats Rated for Engines of 2 Horsepower or Less Tests § 183.325 Flotation test for persons...

  11. Journey to the Reef

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryson, Linda

    2010-01-01

    Despite their experiences with a cartoon sponge, most elementary students know little about the diverse inhabitants of coral reefs. Therefore, with vivid photography and video, diverse coral reef inhabitants were brought to life for the author's fifth-grade students. Students shared their knowledge in language arts and even explored coral reefs in…

  12. The Role of High Molecular Weight Polyethylene Oxide in Reducing Quartz Gangue Entrainment in Chalcopyrite Flotation by Xanthate Collectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Jihua

    Fine particles pose two challenging problems to all mineral processors around the world today. The problems are the inefficient collection of hydrophobic particles (low recovery), and mechanical/hydraulic entrainment of hydrophilic gangue particles (low concentrate grade). Extensive research has been conducted to improve the flotation recovery of fine hydrophobic particles. However, much less effort was made to lower the mechanical/hydraulic entrainment of fine gangue mineral particles. In this study, polyethylene oxide (PEO) was used to flocculate and depress fine quartz particles. Batch flotation results indicated that the addition of low dosages of PEO improved value mineral recovery and concentrate grade in the flotation of artificial mixtures of chalcopyrite/quartz and a commercial Au-Cu sulfide ore sample. It was found that PEO adsorbed on both minerals mainly through hydrogen bonding and caused non-selective flocculation of quartz and chalcopyrite, forming large hetero-aggregates. However, the addition of potassium amyl xanthate (KAX), a specific sulfide mineral collector, adsorbed on chalcopyrite through chemical interaction, replaced PEO and caused the chalcopyrite particles to break away from the hetero-aggregates, forming separate homo-aggregates of quartz and chalcopyrite. The flotation of the chalcopyrite and the depression of the quartz were thus both improved due to the larger sizes of the homo-aggregates compared to the discrete particles. It was also observed that a completely solubilized PEO solution could not flocculate quartz, while a partially solubilized PEO solution was most effective. This was attributed to the better “bridging” functions of the undissolved PEO aggregates when it was partially solubilized. When the PEO was fully solubilized, the individual PEO molecules were probably too flexible and tended to flatten on the adsorbed solid surface and thus could not function as an effective bridging flocculant. Furthermore, it was found that PEO could function as a “collector” for quartz due to its affinity to air-water interface and quartz, and it could increase quartz entrainment when used at high dosages. Selective flocculation and depression of the quartz gangue during chalcopyrite flotation could only be achieved at low PEO dosages. The implication of these observations on how to utilize the polyethylene oxide in industrial flotation was discussed.

  13. Possible lunar ores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillett, Stephen L.

    1991-01-01

    Despite the conventional wisdom that there are no lunar ores, geochemical considerations suggest that local concentrations of useful rare elements exist on the Moon in spite of its extreme dryness. The Moon underwent protracted igneous activity in its history, and certain magmatic processes can concentrate incompatible elements even if anhydrous. Such processes include: (1) separation of a magma into immiscible liquid phases (depending on composition, these could be silicate-silicate, silicate-oxide, silicate-sulfide, or silicate-salt); (2) cumulate deposits in layered igneous intrusions; and (3) concentrations of rare, refractory, lithophile elements (e.g., Be, Li, Zr) in highly differentiated, silica-rich magmas, as in the lunar granites. Terrestrial mining experience indicates that the single most important characteristic of a potential ore is its concentration of the desire element. The utility of a planet as a resource base is that the welter of interacting processes over geologic time can concentrate rare element automatically. This advantage is squandered if adequate exploration for ores is not first carried out.

  14. ORE CONVEYANCE SYSTEM AND ADIT. LOOKING WEST. ORE FROM THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ORE CONVEYANCE SYSTEM AND ADIT. LOOKING WEST. ORE FROM THE MINES ABOVE AT THE RIDGELINE AND TO THE RIGHT WAS CONVEYED TO THIS AREA AND DUMPED INTO THE SHAFT AT CENTER. THIS SHAFT OPENS INTO THE ADIT AT BOTTOM CENTER. THERE IS ANOTHER SHAFT OPENING INTO THE ADIT JUST ABOVE THE ADIT BEHIND THE STONE WALL. THE ORE WAS LOADED INTO TRAM CARS INSIDE THE ADIT AND CONVEYED ON TRACKS TO THE TRESTLE LEADING TO THE PRIMARY ORE BIN AT THE TRAM TERMINAL. TRACKS CAN BE SEEN LEADING FROM THE ADIT AND TO THE LEFT. THE ORE WAS THEN DUMPED INTO A CHUTE AT THE END OF THE TRESTLE CARRYING IT INTO THE ORE BIN AT THE TRAM TERMINAL(SEE CHUTE ON CA-291-30). - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  15. SURFACTANT SPRAY: A NOVEL TECHNOLOGY TO IMPROVE FLOTATION DEINKING PERFORMANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Yulin Deng; Junyong Zhu

    2004-01-31

    Based on the fundamental understanding of ink removal and fiber loss mechanism in flotation deinking process, we developed this innovative technology using surfactant spray to improve the ink removal efficiency, reduce the water and fiber loss, reduce the chemical consumption and carry over in the flotation deinking. The innovative flotation deinking process uses a spray to deliver the frothing agent during flotation deinking to control several key process variables. The spray can control the foam stability and structure and modify the fluid dynamics to reduce the fibers entrapped in the froth layer. The froth formed at the top part of the flotation column will act as a physical filter to prevent the penetration of frothing agent into the pulp suspension to eliminate fiber contamination and unfavorable deinking surface chemistry modification due to surfactant adsorption on the fiber surface. Because of the filter effect, frothing agents will be better utilized. Under the sponsorships of the US Dept. of Energy (DOE) and the member companies of the Institute of Paper Science and Technology, we studied the chem-mechanical mechanism of surfactant spray for flotation deinking using different furnishes, chemicals, and flotation devices in the past four years. In the final year of the project, we successfully conducted mill trials at Abitibi-Consolidated, Inc., Snowflake paper recycling operation of 100% mixture of ONP/OMG. Results from laboratory, pilot-plant and mill trials indicated that surfactant spray technology can significantly reduce fiber loss in flotation deinking. It can be concluded that paper industry can profit greatly when this technology is commercialized in flotation deinking mills.

  16. FLOTATION ROOM, LOOKING SOUTHWEST, WITH LEAD ROUGHER CELLS AT RIGHT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FLOTATION ROOM, LOOKING SOUTHWEST, WITH LEAD ROUGHER CELLS AT RIGHT AND LEAD CLEANER CELLS AT LEFT. NOTE SUNNYSIDE GOLD CORP. "SG" LOGO ON ROUGHER CELL LAUNDER. - Shenandoah-Dives Mill, 135 County Road 2, Silverton, San Juan County, CO

  17. Separation of algal cells from water by column flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.C.; Chen, Y.M.; Ju, Y.H.

    1999-08-01

    The dispersed air flotation (DiAF) process was utilized to separate algal cells (Chlorella sp.) from water. Two types of collector, cationic N-cetyl-N,N,N-trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and anionic sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS), were used. It was observed that 20% of cell removal was achieved in the presence of 40 mg/L of SDS, and ca. 86% of the cells were removed at 40 mg/L of CTAB. Upon the addition of 10 mg/L of chitosan, over 90% of the cells were removed when SDS (20 mg/L) was used as the collector. Air flow rate affected cell flotation slightly. Optimum pH values for cell flotation were from 4.0 to 5.0. Flotation efficiency decreased at high ionic strength. The electrostatic interaction between collector and cell surface plays a critical role in the separation processes.

  18. Signalling and Excess Returns from Venture Capital Backed Flotations 

    E-print Network

    Strang, J

    2001-01-01

    This paper examines the UK Venture Capital market with particular focus on the experiences of venture capitalist backed flotations. Management buy outs are focused upon, in particular to attempt to determine if recent ...

  19. Towards high throughput screening of nanoparticle flotation collectors.

    PubMed

    Abarca, Carla; Yang, Songtao; Pelton, Robert H

    2015-12-15

    To function as flotation collectors for mineral processing, polymeric nanoparticles require a delicate balance of surface properties to give mineral-specific deposition and colloidal stability in high ionic strength alkaline media, while remaining sufficiently hydrophobic to promote flotation. Combinatorial nanoparticle surface modification, in conjunction with high throughput screening, is a promising approach for nanoparticle development. However, efficient automated screening assays are required to reject ineffective particles without having to undergo time consuming flotation testing. Herein we demonstrate that determining critical coagulation concentrations of sodium carbonate in combination with measuring the advancing water contact angle of nanoparticle-saturated glass surfaces can be used to screen ineffective nanoparticles. Finally, none of our first nanoparticle library based on poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEG-methacrylate) were effective flotation collectors because the nanoparticles were too hydrophilic. PMID:26319325

  20. Application of Hydrodynamics in Design of Flotation Deinking Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, R. G.; Xie, X. F.; Wang, A. L.; Chen, K. F.

    Recovery and recycling of waste paper has become increasingly important with demand for paper products sharply growing. The flotation process is the predominant technology for the removal of inks from waste paper because of its advantages. Flotation cells may be very different in size and shape, but the key elements ensuring aeration, ink collection and bubble separation are always present. Different aeration systems have been developed by the equipment suppliers. The hydrodynamic method, based on the self suction and mixing of air according to the Venturi principle has become the most common aeration technique. Injectors of various sizes and designs have been investigated and constantly improved and adapted to different designs of flotation units. Step diffuser is a common and predominant injector used in the flotation deinking cell.

  1. DISSOLVED AIR FLOTATION TREATMENT OF GULF SHRIMP CANNERY WASTEWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study reports on the operation of a plant scale dissolved air flotation system installed to define and evaluate attainable shrimp cannery wastewater treatment levels. The system was operated in all three modes of DAF pressurization. Destabilizing coagulants investigation inc...

  2. Cross flow flotation column for coal and minerals beneficiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Ralph W.; Patton, Robert A.

    1997-12-01

    An apparatus and process are disclosed for the separation of coal from pyritic impurities using a modified froth flotation system. The froth flotation column incorporates a helical track about the inner wall of the column in a region intermediate between the top and base of the column. A standard impeller located about the central axis of the column is used to generate a centrifugal force thereby increasing the separation efficiency of coal from the pyritic particles and hydrophilic tailings.

  3. Coal surface control for advanced fine coal flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerstenau, D.W.; Sastry, K.V.; Hanson, J.S.; Harris, G.; Sotillo, F.; Diao, J.; De, A. ); Somasundaran, P.; Harris, C.C.; Vasudevan, T.; Liu, D.; Li, C. ); Hu, Weibai; Zou, Y.; Chen, W. ); Choudhry, V.; Sehgal, R.; Ghosh, A. )

    1991-03-22

    The main goal of the project is to characterize the surface and control the behavior of coal during advanced flotation processing in order to achieve an overall objective of near-total pyritic sulfur removal with a high Btu recovery. Also, investigation of the effects of weathering on the surface characteristics of coal is another important aspect of this project. The effect of butanol, dodecane, lime, calcium cyanide, hydrogen peroxide, and ph on flotation performance is discussed. 2 refs., 26 figs., 18 tabs.

  4. Cross flow cyclonic flotation column for coal and minerals beneficiation

    DOEpatents

    Lai, Ralph W. (Upper St. Clair, PA); Patton, Robert A. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and process for the separation of coal from pyritic impurities using a modified froth flotation system. The froth flotation column incorporates a helical track about the inner wall of the column in a region intermediate between the top and base of the column. A standard impeller located about the central axis of the column is used to generate a centrifugal force thereby increasing the separation efficiency of coal from the pyritic particles and hydrophillic tailings.

  5. Coal desulfurization by bacterial treatment and column flotation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kawatra, S.K.

    1994-06-01

    A review of the literature showed that bacterial leaching, using the microorganism Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, was a very effective technique for removing pyrite from coal, as it could dissolve even the finest pyrite particles without the need for expensive reagents or extreme processing conditions. Unfortunately, bacterial leaching is also rather slow, and so the initial goal of this research was to decrease the leaching time as much as possible. However, this still left the bacteria needing approximately a week to remove half of the pyritic sulfur, and so a faster technique was sought. Since it had been reported in the literature that T. ferrooxidans could be used to depress the flotation of pyrite during froth flotation of coal, this was investigated further. By studying the recovery mechanisms of coal-pyrite in froth flotation, it was found that pyrite was being recovered by entrainment and by locking to coal particles, not by true flotation of hydrophobic pyrite. Therefore, no pyrite depressant could be of any significant benefit for keeping pyrite out of the coal froth product, and it was much more important to prevent entrainment from occurring. Countercurrent flotation columns were invented to essentially eliminate entrainment effects, by washing the froth and reducing mixing of the froth and tailings products. Existing flotation columns tend to be quite simple, and in order to give reasonable product quality they must be very tall (typically 30--45 feet). As a result, they have difficulty in handling the high froth volumes which occur in coal flotation, and are awkward to install in existing plants. The bulk of this project therefore concentrated on developing an improved coal flotation column, and testing it under actual plant conditions.

  6. Interfacial interactions between plastic particles in plastics flotation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong-Qing; Wang, Hui; Gu, Guo-Hua; Fu, Jian-Gang; Lin, Qing-Quan; Liu, You-Nian

    2015-12-01

    Plastics flotation used for recycling of plastic wastes receives increasing attention for its industrial application. In order to study the mechanism of plastics flotation, the interfacial interactions between plastic particles in flotation system were investigated through calculation of Lifshitz-van der Waals (LW) function, Lewis acid-base (AB) Gibbs function, and the extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek potential energy profiles. The results showed that van der Waals force between plastic particles is attraction force in flotation system. The large hydrophobic attraction, caused by the AB Gibbs function, is the dominant interparticle force. Wetting agents present significant effects on the interfacial interactions between plastic particles. It is found that adsorption of wetting agents promotes dispersion of plastic particles and decreases the floatability. Pneumatic flotation may improve the recovery and purity of separated plastics through selective adsorption of wetting agents on plastic surface. The relationships between hydrophobic attraction and surface properties were also examined. It is revealed that there exists a three-order polynomial relationship between the AB Gibbs function and Lewis base component. Our finding provides some insights into mechanism of plastics flotation. PMID:26337962

  7. Optimization of Cu-Zn Massive Sulphide Flotation by Selective Reagents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltani, F.; Koleini, S. M. J.; Abdollahy, M.

    2014-10-01

    Selective floatation of base metal sulphide minerals can be achieved by using selective reagents. Sequential floatation of chalcopyrite-sphalerite from Taknar (Iran) massive sulphide ore with 3.5 % Zn and 1.26 % Cu was studied. D-optimal design of response surface methodology was used. Four mixed collector types (Aer238 + SIPX, Aero3477 + SIPX, TC1000 + SIPX and X231 + SIPX), two depressant systems (CuCN-ZnSO4 and dextrin-ZnSO4), pH and ZnSO4 dosage were considered as operational factors in the first stage of flotation. Different conditions of pH, CuSO4 dosage and SIPX dosage were studied for sphalerite flotation from first stage tailings. Aero238 + SIPX induced better selectivity for chalcopyrite against pyrite and sphalerite. Dextrin-ZnSO4 was as effective as CuCN-ZnSO4 in sphalerite-pyrite depression. Under optimum conditions, Cu recovery, Zn recovery and pyrite content in Cu concentrate were 88.99, 33.49 and 1.34 % by using Aero238 + SIPX as mixed collector, CuCN-ZnSO4 as depressant system, at ZnSO4 dosage of 200 g/t and pH 10.54. When CuCN was used at the first stage, CuSO4 consumption increased and Zn recovery decreased during the second stage. Maximum Zn recovery was 72.19 % by using 343.66 g/t of CuSO4, 22.22 g/t of SIPX and pH 9.99 at the second stage.

  8. Reef Education Evaluation: Environmental Knowledge and Reef Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stepath, Carl M.

    2005-01-01

    Background: The Reef education evaluation: environmental knowledge and reef experience report concerns PhD research about marine education, and the investigation of learning with high school students and the effect of coral reef monitoring marine experiential education interventions. The effectiveness of classroom learning and reef trips were…

  9. Removal of Wax and Stickies from OCC by Flotation

    SciTech Connect

    M. R. Doshi; J. Dyer

    2000-01-31

    Laboratory research indicates that wax is amenable to removal by froth flotation provided it is free or detached from the fiber. The only effective means, at this time, of maximizing detachment of wax is through the use of low consistency pulping at temperatures above the melting point of wax. Wax removal from WCC through washing, flotation, or a combination of both was approximately 90% in these laboratory studies, indicating that not all of the wax is detached from fibers. These results were summarized in Annual Report 1, December 1, 1997 to November 30, 1998. Pilot trials were conducted in which the authors simulated a conventional OCC repulping process with and without flotation. Additional aggressive washing and water clarification were also examined during the study. The inclusion of flotation in the OCC stock preparation system significantly improved the removal of wax spots and extractable material from the furnish. Based on this study, the authors predict that a compact flotation system with 2 lb surfactant/ton of fiber would improve the OCC pulp quality with regard to wax spots by 60% and would not negatively affect strength properties. Flotation losses would be in the 2-5% range. Two mill trials were conducted during the last quarter of the project. One trial was carried out at Green Bay Packaging, Green Bay, WI, and a second trial was conducted at Menasha Corporation, Otsego, MI. A 250-liter Voith Sulzer Ecocell was used to evaluate the removal of wax and stickies from the OCC processing systems at these two mills. The inclusion of flotation in the OCC stock preparation system significantly improved the removal of wax spots from the furnish. The data indicate that flotation was more effective in removing wax and stickies than reverse cleaners. The mill trials have demonstrated that flotation can be substituted for or replace existing reverse cleaning systems and, in some cases, can replace dispersion systems. In this manner, the use of flotation can provide significant energy savings when compared to reverse cleaning or dispersion.

  10. Capitol Reef Panorama

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A panorama of some of the sandstone formations within Capitol Reef National Park. Capitol Reef is primarily made up of sandstone formations within the Waterpocket Fold, monocline that extends nearly 100 miles. A monocline is a step-like fold in rock strata that can resemble an enormous wrinkle in th...

  11. Capitol Reef Cliff

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A sandstone cliff near the entrance of Capitol Reef National Park. Capitol Reef is primarily made up of sandstone formations within the Waterpocket Fold, monocline that extends nearly 100 miles. A monocline is a step-like fold in rock strata that can resemble an enormous wrinkle in the earth.&n...

  12. Capitol Reef Sandstone Monolith

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A sandstone monolith within Capitol Reef National Park. Capitol Reef is primarily made up of sandstone formations within the Waterpocket Fold, monocline that extends nearly 100 miles. A monocline is a step-like fold in rock strata that can resemble an enormous wrinkle in the earth....

  13. Capitol Reef Sandstone Cliff

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A sandstone cliff within Capitol Reef National Park. Capitol Reef is primarily made up of sandstone formations within the Waterpocket Fold, monocline that extends nearly 100 miles. A monocline is a step-like fold in rock strata that can resemble an enormous wrinkle in the earth....

  14. Capitol Reef Cliff

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A sandstone cliff near the entrance of Capitol Reef National Park. Capitol Reef is primarily made up of sandstone formations within the Waterpocket Fold, monocline that extends nearly 100 miles. A monocline is a step-like fold in rock strata that can resemble an enormous wrinkle in the earth. This l...

  15. Capitol Reef Cliff

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A sandstone cliff near the entrance of Capitol Reef National Park. Capitol Reef is primarily made up of sandstone formations within the Waterpocket Fold, monocline that extends nearly 100 miles. A monocline is a step-like fold in rock strata that can resemble an enormous wrinkle in the earth. The tr...

  16. Great Barrier Reef

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A better than average view of the Great Barrier Reef was captured by SeaWiFS on a recent overpass. There is sunglint northeast of the reef and there appears to be some sort of filamentous bloom in the Capricorn Channel.

  17. Role of the collecting agent sorption forms in the elementary act of flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Abramov, A.A.

    2005-02-01

    A new hypothesis of flotation is substantiated based on the well-known hypotheses, theoretical analysis of the elementary act, and experimental results. The hypothesis presented allows the processes of flotation activation, depression, and intensification to be explained and optimized.

  18. [A simple flotation and McMaster method (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Henriksen, S A; Aagaard, K

    1976-01-01

    A simple and hygienic flotation and McMaster method is described (cf. Fig. 1): The faeces sample (3-5 gm) is mixed with flotation fluid (40-60 ml) in a disposable plastic cup (cup I) and a circular piece of gauze, with a diameter equivalent to twice the height of the cup plus the diameter of its base, is placed over the cup. By a similar cup (cup II), with the bottom cut off and slits made in the side, the gauze is pressed down in cup I. By this procedure the faeces suspension will be filtered through the gauze and appear in cup II. After 10 minutes some drops after transferred from the surface of the filtrate to a slide by means of a test tube, which is dipped to the bottom of the filtrate and quickly moved over to the slide. The optimal procedure was worked out with faeces containing faeces containing eggs of Ostertagia ostertagi. Saturated sodium chloride with 50 g glucose per 100 ml was found to be a suitable flotation fluid for demonstrating eggs of commonly occurring parasites, e.g., trichostronglyids and ascarids. The described flotation technique is more efficacious than the one hitherto employed. The technique is usable also in connection with a McMaster method: 4 gm. faeces are suspended in 56 ml flotation fluid. Immediately following filtration, filtrate is transferred to a McMaster counting chamber by means of a Pasteur pipette. PMID:958869

  19. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning technolgies: Froth flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The Task 6 effort involves three main elements including column cell development, flotation circuit testing and flotation cell modeling. The work outlined is to research column designs and operation parameters in developing an optimized column flotation cell (OCFC) to meet the overall program objectives. Any design parameters that were not evaluated as part of the optimized column development work will be reviewed and tested so as to incorporate all possible scenarios in presenting DOE with the best available flotation process for use in the 2 to 3 ton per hour POC. Following development of the OCFC, various flotation circuit configurations will be evaluated determine the best'' circuit design for the 2 to 3 ton per hour POC. Single and multiple stage flotation, grab and run, rougher/scavenger/cleaner, etc., test circuits will be tested as part of this effort. Upon completion of this test work, the best'' possible flotation cell will have been tested in a number of possible flotation circuit designs to possibly provide the best'' flotation approach in meeting the design criteria. In conjunction with the flotation test effort, model development work will be conducted to provide a tool in evaluating the various flotation circuit configurations and in predicting flotation performance. The model will be useful in selecting operating conditions in the POC and in evaluating the performance of the POC.

  20. Microbial reduction of iron ore

    DOEpatents

    Hoffmann, Michael R. (Pasadena, CA); Arnold, Robert G. (Pasadena, CA); Stephanopoulos, Gregory (Pasadena, CA)

    1989-01-01

    A process is provided for reducing iron ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of iron ore, microorganisms operable for reducing the ferric iron of the iron ore to ferrous iron, and a substrate operable as an energy source for the microbial reduction; and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the reduction of the ore. Preferably the microorganism is Pseudomonas sp. 200 and the reduction conducted anaerobically with a domestic wastewater as the substrate. An aqueous solution containing soluble ferrous iron can be separated from the reacted mixture, treated with a base to precipitate ferrous hydroxide which can then be recovered as a concentrated slurry.

  1. Microbial reduction of iron ore

    DOEpatents

    Hoffmann, M.R.; Arnold, R.G.; Stephanopoulos, G.

    1989-11-14

    A process is provided for reducing iron ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of iron ore, microorganisms operable for reducing the ferric iron of the iron ore to ferrous iron, and a substrate operable as an energy source for the microbial reduction; and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the reduction of the ore. Preferably the microorganism is Pseudomonas sp. 200 and the reduction conducted anaerobically with a domestic wastewater as the substrate. An aqueous solution containing soluble ferrous iron can be separated from the reacted mixture, treated with a base to precipitate ferrous hydroxide which can then be recovered as a concentrated slurry. 11 figs.

  2. StORe Business Analysis 

    E-print Network

    Miller, Ken

    2006-12-15

    The StORe project is multidisciplinary in scope, embracing the seven scientific domains of archaeology, astronomy, biochemistry, biosciences, chemistry, physics and the social sciences (originally described in the project ...

  3. Selective flotation of PVC using gelatin and lignin alkali.

    PubMed

    Yenial, Unzile; Kangal, Olgaç; Güney, Ali

    2013-06-01

    Recycling has become one of the most important issues as a result of increasing waste mass in present day. This is especially important for polymer wastes as they are hard to degenerate in nature. Today, most of the practical methods used for the recycling of waste mass, such as hand sorting, gravity separation, etc., cannot be performed successfully owing to close densities of polymers. Froth flotation can be used successfully and economically for this purpose. The main objective of this study was to investigate the effect of plasticizer reagents and the success of froth flotation at plastic recycling. In this study, lignin alkali and gelatin were used as plasticizer reagents. The effect of these reagents was searched with the parameters of pH, concentration, conditioning and flotation time. In the case of post-consumed polyethylene terephthalate and polyvinyl chloride (PVC), 98.9% purity of PVC was obtained at optimum conditions. PMID:23439876

  4. Preparation and utilization of slurry fuel with flotation tailing

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Shixin; Jiang Qiyun; Lui Qing; Shao Peozao; Wang Zuna; Guo Baoxin

    1993-12-31

    Most coal preparation plants treating metallurgical coal employ flotation process for recovering concentrate from -0.5mm fraction. For full utilization of combustibles, the common practice of flotation operation is to give a relatively low ash concentrate while leaving a medium ash tailing as an inferior fuel. In this case, the dilute flotation tailing is thickened and dewatered, giving a filtering cake containing about 20-30% moisture as the final product. Difficulties are confronted in handling of this sticky mass. Besides, combustion of such high-moisture inferior fuel would be less efficient and more pollutant. Ways have been sought to solve these problems. Conversion of such dewatered flotation tailing into slurry fuel is one of possible options in view of its good handleability and high efficiency of carbon burnout in combustion even in small outfits. In Chinese situation, a coal mine area always includes population points and associate utilities and consumes about 5% of coal produced, some of which should be of good quality. Clean and efficient usage of such coal sludge in-situ will be of benefit to the mine in that locally consumed coal could be substituted, which can be in turns loaded out as regular commodity or joining with the main stream to coal preparation plant for production of more premium coal. Datun Coal Preparation Plant employs jig-flotation process and produces concentrate for coking plants. It has a designed annual capacity of treating 1.8 Mt feed coal and the highest record of operation was 2.1 Mt. Average yield of flotation tailing in recent years is 3.5%. Economy would be the prime importance to be considered for converting this sludge into slurry fuel, as preparation of coal slurry is usually considered to be expensive.

  5. Physicochemical laws of the atmospheric sulfuric acid leaching of the copper—nickel concentrates from the beneficiation of disseminated ores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'yachenko, V. T.; Bryukvin, V. A.; Vinetskaya, T. N.; Makarenkova, T. A.; Kitai, A. G.; Bol'shikh, A. O.

    2012-07-01

    A physicochemical substantiation is performed for the organization of a combined flotation hydrometallurgical technology for the processing of the copper—nickel concentrates from the beneficiation of disseminated ores. This technology is used instead of the traditional pyrometallurgical technology providing the production of a sulfide concentrate with a total nickel, copper, and cobalt content of 14.64% for the through extraction of (wt %) 92.2 Ni, 74.0 Cu, 95.3 Co, 91.9 Pt, 95.9 Pd, and 96 Rh to the concentrate.

  6. Australia's Great Barrier Reef

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Great Barrier Reef extends for 2,000 kilometers along the northeastern coast of Australia. It is not a single reef, but a vast maze of reefs, passages, and coral cays (islands that are part of the reef). This nadir true-color image was acquired by the MISR instrument on August 26, 2000 (Terra orbit 3679), and shows part of the southern portion of the reef adjacent to the central Queensland coast. The width of the MISR swath is approximately 380 kilometers, with the reef clearly visible up to approximately 200 kilometers from the coast. It may be difficult to see the myriad details in the browse image, but if you retrieve the higher resolution version, a zoomed display reveals the spectacular structure of the many reefs.

    The more northerly coastal area in this image shows the vast extent of sugar cane cultivation, this being the largest sugar producing area in Australia, centered on the city of Mackay. Other industries in the area include coal, cattle, dairying, timber, grain, seafood, and fruit. The large island off the most northerly part of the coast visible in this image is Whitsunday Island, with smaller islands and reefs extending southeast, parallel to the coast. These include some of the better known resort islands such as Hayman, Lindeman, Hamilton, and Brampton Islands.

    Further south, just inland of the small semicircular bay near the right of the image, is Rockhampton, the largest city along the central Queensland coast, and the regional center for much of central Queensland. Rockhampton is just north of the Tropic of Capricorn. Its hinterland is a rich pastoral, agricultural, and mining region.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  7. Relative flotation response of zinc sulfide: Mineral and precipitate

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, S.R.; Finch, J.A.; Zhou, Z.; Xu, Z.

    1998-04-01

    Flotation continues to extend to nonmineral applications, including recycling of materials, soil remediation, and effluent treatment. A study has been conducted to compare the floatability of fine zinc sulfide (ZnS) precipitates and sphalerite particles. The floatability of the precipitates was significantly poorer compared to sphalerite particles when xanthate was used as the collector. The floatability was improved by using dodecylamine as the collector, and the difference in floatability between the precipitates was further improved significantly by incorporating a hydrodynamic cavitation tube in a conventional (mechanical) flotation cell. The improved kinetics was attributed to in-situ gas nucleation on the precipitates.

  8. Enhanced column flotation of fine and ultrafine coal

    SciTech Connect

    Slomka, B.J.; Buttermore, W.H.; Birlingmair, D.H.; Dawson, M.R.; Pollard, J.L.; Enustun, B.V.

    1992-12-01

    A 2-inch diameter, twenty-foot tall, glass laboratory flotation column was modified to incorporate digital control of critical operating parameters. Different column control strategies were explored including location of the froth interface, and manipulation of volumetric flow ratios. Column flotation tests were performed with both fine (-250{mu}m) and ultrafine (-5{mu}m) Pittsburgh seam coal. Both moisture- and ash-free (MAF) recovery, and ash rejection were improved when the partition of the column`s liquid content into froth and tailings was directly controlled. MAF recovery and ash rejection were also enhanced by brief exposure of the coarser feed to pulsed sonic energy.

  9. Enhanced column flotation of fine and ultrafine coal

    SciTech Connect

    Slomka, B.J.; Buttermore, W.H.; Birlingmair, D.H.; Dawson, M.R.; Pollard, J.L.; Enustun, B.V.

    1992-01-01

    A 2-inch diameter, twenty-foot tall, glass laboratory flotation column was modified to incorporate digital control of critical operating parameters. Different column control strategies were explored including location of the froth interface, and manipulation of volumetric flow ratios. Column flotation tests were performed with both fine (-250[mu]m) and ultrafine (-5[mu]m) Pittsburgh seam coal. Both moisture- and ash-free (MAF) recovery, and ash rejection were improved when the partition of the column's liquid content into froth and tailings was directly controlled. MAF recovery and ash rejection were also enhanced by brief exposure of the coarser feed to pulsed sonic energy.

  10. Gold-bearing reefs of the Witwatersrand Basin: A model of synsedimentation hydrothermal formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safonov, Yu. G.; Prokof'ev, V. Yu.

    2006-12-01

    The current concepts concerning the genesis of the unique ore-bearing reefs of the Witwatersrand Basin and its gold resource potential are considered. The results of microscopic examination of ore from the Black, Ventersdorp Contact, Carbon Leader, and Vaal reefs, as well as of thermobarometric study of quartz, are presented. A model of synsedimentation hydrothermal origin of the reefs in the process of evolution of primary colloidal-disperse systems is substantiated on the basis of these results and the data published by other authors. The formation of these systems is related to the periodic gain of deep ore-bearing gas-saturated fluids. The gold mineralization was formed under conditions of partially closed systems, where various mineral-forming processes developed (metasomatism, crystallization of true solutions and gels, gel metasomatism, dispersion of crystalline phases, segregation of mineral particles, formation of early minerals, etc.). New data on REE specialization of ore-bearing fluids are discussed. The specific features of the gold, carbonic, and uranium mineralization of the intracratonic basin are emphasized.

  11. Coral Reef Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yap, Helen T.

    Coral reefs are geological structures of significant dimensions, constructed over millions of years by calcifying organisms. The present day reef-builders are hard corals belonging to the order Scleractinia, phylum Cnidaria. The greatest concentrations of coral reefs are in the tropics, with highest levels of biodiversity situated in reefs of the Indo-West Pacific region. These ecosystems have provided coastal protection and livelihood to human populations over the millennia. Human activities have caused destruction of these habitats, the intensity of which has increased alarmingly since the latter decades of the twentieth century. The severity of this impact is directly related to exponential growth rates of human populations especially in the coastal areas of the developing world. However, a more recently recognized phenomenon concerns disturbances brought about by the changing climate, manifested mainly as rising sea surface temperatures, and increasing acidification of ocean waters due to greater drawdown of higher concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide. Management efforts have so far not kept pace with the rates of degradation, so that the spatial extent of damaged reefs and the incidences of localized extinction of reef species are increasing year after year. The major management efforts to date consist of establishing marine protected areas and promoting the active restoration of coral habitats.

  12. Coral reefs in crisis.

    PubMed

    Hinrichsen, D

    1997-01-01

    This article reports on the crisis facing reefs throughout the world and the struggle to save them. Coral reefs, one of the biological wonders of the world, are among the largest and oldest living communities of plants and animals on earth, having been evolved between 200 and 450 million years ago. Located mostly in the Pacific region, most established coral reefs are now dead and only the upper layer is covered by a thin changeable skin of living coral. Reefs, over the years, have been the main source of animal protein for over 1 billion people in Asia. Countries near the coastlines, which relied on the seas, have resorted to dynamite fishing, poisoning and other illegal and dangerous techniques. Overpopulation and pollution has caused the deteriorating conditions of the 600,000 sq. km of coral reefs worldwide. Despite these conditions, the government has ignored this problem as they struggle to develop their economies at the expense of common resources. In addition, this article narrates the efforts that are exerted by governments in promoting coral reef protection and management of these coastal resources, setting the Apo Island in the Philippines as an example of good management and sustainability. PMID:12295817

  13. Method for enhancing selectivity and recovery in the fractional flotation of particles in a flotation column

    DOEpatents

    Klunder, Edgar B. (Bethel Park, PA)

    2011-08-09

    The method relates to particle separation from a feed stream. The feed stream is injected directly into the froth zone of a vertical flotation column in the presence of a counter-current reflux stream. A froth breaker generates a reflux stream and a concentrate stream, and the reflux stream is injected into the froth zone to mix with the interstitial liquid between bubbles in the froth zone. Counter-current flow between the plurality of bubbles and the interstitial liquid facilitates the attachment of higher hydrophobicity particles to bubble surfaces as lower hydrophobicity particles detach. The height of the feed stream injection and the reflux ratio may be varied in order to optimize the concentrate or tailing stream recoveries desired based on existing operating conditions.

  14. A Study of the Optimal Model of the Flotation Kinetics of Copper Slag from Copper Mine BOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanojlovi?, Rodoljub D.; Sokolovi?, Jovica M.

    2014-10-01

    In this study the effect of mixtures of copper slag and flotation tailings from copper mine Bor, Serbia on the flotation results of copper recovery and flotation kinetics parameters in a batch flotation cell has been investigated. By simultaneous adding old flotation tailings in the ball mill at the rate of 9%, it is possible to increase copper recovery for about 20%. These results are compared with obtained copper recovery of pure copper slag. The results of batch flotation test were fitted by MatLab software for modeling the first-order flotation kinetics in order to determine kinetics parameters and define an optimal model of the flotation kinetics. Six kinetic models are tested on the batch flotation copper recovery against flotation time. All models showed good correlation, however the modified Kelsall model provided the best fit.

  15. An overview of Miocene reefs

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, C.F. Jr. ); Colgan, M.W. ); Frost, S.H. ); Glenn, E.C. ); Bosence, D. ); Esteban, M. )

    1990-05-01

    Miocene reefs lived approximately within the latitudes of 27{degree}S to 48{degree}N compared with 25{degree}S and 32{degree}N for Holocene reefs. This expansion of reef-growing environments was the result of warm Miocene climates, aided by a eustatic sea level rise and tectonic styles that provided numerous foundations for reef development. The majority of Miocene reefs are found in three main areas: (1) Southeast Asia and the western Pacific, (2) the Mediterranean-Middle East, and (3) Middle America and the Caribbean. These regions, with their distinctive suites of coral and foramineral species, formed three biological provinces; respectively, they are the Indo-Pacific, Tethyan, and Western Atlantic provinces. Miocene reefs in Southeast Asia occur in several foreland basins as patch reef complexes on paleohighs and as barrier reefs in back-arc basins. Those reefs in the Mediterranean occur as fringing reefs, middle-shelf patch reefs, or as barrier reefs on the edges of tectonic blocks associated with Alpine thrust belts. Most reefs in the Caribbean grew on isolated open-ocean highs of volcanic origin. Miocene reefs display a diversity of framework types: (1) coral-encrusting, red algal boundstones with diverse coral faunas, (2) branching coral-encrusting, red algal boundstones with a limited Poritid fauna, (3) encrusting red algal boundstones. Barrier reef systems are especially rich in encrusting red algae and robust corals; grainstones are common as interbedded sediment. Patch reef complexes, however, display muddy carbonate textures, may have less diverse coral faunas, and commonly have larger foraminifera. The global distribution of Miocene reefs is important because (1) it provides insight into a paleoclimatic view of the earth during a major greenhouse stage and (2) Miocene buildups, such as the Arun (EUR of 14 tcf) and Bima fields (EUR of about 100 MMBO), are exploration targets.

  16. REMOVAL OF HUMICSUBSTANCES AND ALGAE BY DISSOLVED AIR FLOTATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dissolved air flotation (DAF) is used in place of conventional gravity settling as a means to separate low density floc particles from water. The following objectives were: (1) to compare DAF to conventional water treatment of coagulation-flocculation followed by gravity settling...

  17. Engineering development of advanced froth flotation. Volume 2, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ferris, D.D.; Bencho, J.R.; Torak, E.R.

    1995-03-01

    This report is an account of findings related to the Engineering and Development of Advanced Froth Flotation project. The results from benchscale and proof-of-concept (POC) level testing are presented and the important results from this testing are used to refine a conceptual design and cost estimate for a 20 TPH Semi-Works Facility incorporating the final proposed technology.

  18. 21 CFR 890.5170 - Powered flotation therapy bed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Powered flotation therapy bed. 890.5170 Section 890.5170 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices §...

  19. 21 CFR 890.5170 - Powered flotation therapy bed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Powered flotation therapy bed. 890.5170 Section 890.5170 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices §...

  20. 21 CFR 890.5170 - Powered flotation therapy bed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Powered flotation therapy bed. 890.5170 Section 890.5170 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices §...

  1. 21 CFR 890.5170 - Powered flotation therapy bed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Powered flotation therapy bed. 890.5170 Section 890.5170 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices §...

  2. 21 CFR 890.5170 - Powered flotation therapy bed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Powered flotation therapy bed. 890.5170 Section 890.5170 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices §...

  3. Surface chemistry control for selective fossil resin flotation

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Jan D. (1886 Atkin Ave., Salt Lake City, UT 84106); Yi, Ye (2875 E. Wander Way, Salt Lake City, UT 84117); Yu, Qiang (224 University Village, Salt Lake City, UT 84108)

    1994-01-01

    A froth flotation method is disclosed for separating fine particles of fossil resin from by use of frothing reagents which include an aliphatic organic compound having a polar group and containing not more than four carbon atoms. Butanol is an effective frothing reagent in this method.

  4. Surface chemistry control for selective fossil resin flotation

    DOEpatents

    Miller, J.D.; Yi, Y.; Yu, Q.

    1994-06-07

    A froth flotation method is disclosed for separating fine particles of fossil resin by use of frothing reagents which include an aliphatic organic compound having a polar group and containing not more than four carbon atoms. Butanol is an effective frothing reagent in this method. 12 figs.

  5. Frogmen on Apollo command module boilerplate flotation collar during recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Apollo command module boilerplate floats in the Atlantic Ocean during a practice recovery exercise. Frogmen in a liferaft and on the flotation collar secure the command module boilerplate for hoisting onto a nearby recovery ship. The exercise was conducted in preparation for the forthcoming Apollo-Saturn 201 (AS-201) mission.

  6. The effect of coal desulfurization on flotation through ultrasonic treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Jun; Chen Jianqi

    1997-12-31

    This paper carries out a study on the influence of ultrasonic treatment upon the changes of these aspects: pulp particle granularity, dissolving oxygen, pulp pH, surface potential (x), pulp potential (Eh) and conductivity rate, through the introduction of primary application and functional mechanism of ultrasonic wave such as ultrasonic comminution, ultrasonic cleaning and ultrasonic atomization. The effect of ultrasonic pretreatment on the size composition of the feeds and the floatability of coal and pyrite is examined. The tests affected the size composition of raw coal distinctively and caused the removal of sulfur from coals. It has been found that ultrasonic pretreatment of slurry enhances the differences in physico-chemical surface properties of coal and pyrite. In this case it is possible to obtain low-sulfur coals from high-sulfur coals. This may be explained by the different effects of ultrasonic vibrations on coal and pyrite which cause some improvement of the selectivity of their flotation separation. According to the authors` research, it explores the feasibility of flotation desulfurization by means of ultrasonic reinforcement, and puts forward that ultrasonic treatment of a slurry under the appropriate period of time, sonic frequency and energy density, along with appropriate flotation process and coal pyrite depression method, can achieve the best effect of flotation desulfurization. It offers a new method or means to gain abstraction of the clean coal.

  7. Measuring turbulence in a flotation cell using electrical resistance tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Jun; Xie, Weiguo; Runge, Kym; Bradshaw, Dee

    2015-11-01

    Measuring turbulence in an industrial flotation environment has long been problematic due to the opaque, aggressive, and abrasive three-phase environment in a flotation cell. One of the promising measurement techniques is electrical resistance tomography (ERT). By measuring the conductivity distribution across a measurement area, ERT has been adopted by many researchers to monitor and investigate many processes involving multiphase flows. In the research outlined in this paper, a compact ERT probe was built and then used to measure the conductivity distribution within a 60 l flotation cell operated with water and air. Two approaches were then developed to process the ERT data and estimate turbulence-related parameters. One is a conductivity variance method and the other is based on the Green-Kubo relations. Both rely on and use the fluctuation in the ERT measurement caused by bubbles moving through the measurement area changing the density of the fluid. The results from both approaches were validated by comparing the results produced by the ERT probe in a 60l flotation cell operated at different air rates and impeller speeds to that measured using an alternative turbulence measurement device. The second approach is considered superior to the first as the first requires the development of auxiliary information which would not usually be known for a new system.

  8. Coral reef hydrogeology

    SciTech Connect

    Buddemeier, R.W.; Oberdorfer, J.A.

    1985-05-21

    Knowledge of internal flow velocities and pore water residence time is important in understanding pore water geochemistry, nutrient fluxes at the benthic boundary, reef diagenesis, and fresh water resources in reef islands. Hydrogeologic studies of Pacific and Indian Ocean reef and atoll islands indicate a dual aquifer systems; the major Pleistocene aquifer has hydraulic conductivities on the order of 1000 m/d, while the overlying Holocene aquifer of unconsolidated sediments is at least an order of magnitude less permeable. The high permeability in the Pleistocene formation is the result of large voids, both constructional and from subaerial solution during low stands of the sea. Wind, wave and tide induced head differences ranging from a few centimeters to several tens of centimeters provide the driving force for internal flow. Pore water residence times and geochemistry will vary greatly, depending on whether the water is in a major flow channel or in more restricted pores. Studies of both submerged reefs and atoll islands give bulk pore water residence times on the order of months to a few years. Chemical analyses of pore water indicate that both carbonate solution and precipitation are taking place, which will alter porosity and permeability with time. The dual aquifer model also suggests that the Ghyben-Herzberg lens approach to reef island fresh water resources is inaccurate and can lead to a gross overestimation of the potable resource. 18 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Two types of ore-bearing mafic complexes of the Early Proterozoic East-Scandinavian LIP and their ore potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrofanov, Felix; Zhirov, Dmitry; Bayanova, Tamara; Korchagin, Alexey; Chaschin, Victor

    2015-04-01

    Two types of the ore-bearing mafic complexes are allotted in the East-Scandinavian large igneous province (LIP). They differ in geodynamic setting, structure, isotope geochemistry, petrology and mineralogy. The PGE-bearing mafic-ultramafic layered intrusions are associated with the first complex. They have been formed at an initial (pre-rift) stage of LIP. Features of origin of this complex are: 1) large-scale, protracted, and multiple episodes of deep mantle plume or asthenosphere upwelling; 2) the vast non-subduction-type basaltic magma in an intraplate continental setting; 3) low-sulfide Pt-Pd (with Ni, Cu, Au, Co and Rh) mineralization in different geological setting (reef- and contact type etc.); 4) anomalously high concentrations of PGEs in the bulk sulfides, inferred platinum distribution coefficient between silicate and sulfide melts of >100000. Deep mantle magma source is enriched in ore components (fertile source) and lithophile elements. It is reflected in the isotope indicators such as ?Nd(T) from -1 to -3, ISr(87Sr/86Sr) from 0.702 to 0.704, 3??/4?? = (10 ^-5 ÷ 10 ^-6). Magma and ore sources differ from those of Mid-Ocean Ridge basalts (MORB), subduction-related magma but are similar to EM-I. Ore-bearing mafic complexes formed during a long period of time and by different episodes (2490±10 Ma; 2470±10 Ma; 2450±10 Ma; 2400±10 Ma), and by mixing between the boninitic an anorthositic magmas. It is known about 10 deposits and occurrences in Kola region with total reserves and resources about 2000 tons in palladium equivalent (with an average content ?2-3 ppm). Intrusions with the rich sulfide Ni-Cu ore (with Co and poor PGE) are associated with the second mafic complex. Ore-controlling mafic-ultramafic intrusions are formed at a final stage of the intracontinental rifting of the Transitional period (2200-1980 Ma). Initial magma is depleted and similar to the MORB in terms of rare earths distribution. Enriched ferropicritic Fe-Ti derivatives of magma generate single volcano-plutonic rock series. For intrusive ore bodies rock differentiation with the formation of syngenetic wehrlite-clinopyroxenite-gabbro- orthoclase gabbro sequence is typical. Upper mantle source of the depleted magma is characterized by the following isotope indicators: ?Nd(T) +0.5 to +4, ISr= 87Sr/86Sr 0.703-0.704. Ore-bearing intrusive bodies are injected in the upper part of the Early Palaeoproterozoic volcano-sedimentary cross-section. Ores are located in the basement of intrusions and in the redeposited veined bodies, including offset setting. Numerous Ni-Cu deposits with total reserves and resources of several million tons of Nickel equivalent (with an average grade ? 0,3%) have been explored, and some of them now is mining. As a result of our research, the complex of indicators and criteria is suggested for predicting the occurrence, for regional exploration target selection and for regional resource evaluation of PGE and base metals. The studies are supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (project nos. 13-05-12055).

  10. Postglacial Fringing-Reef to Barrier-Reef conversion on Tahiti links Darwin's reef types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchon, Paul; Granados-Corea, Marian; Abbey, Elizabeth; Braga, Juan C.; Braithwaite, Colin; Kennedy, David M.; Spencer, Tom; Webster, Jody M.; Woodroffe, Colin D.

    2014-05-01

    In 1842 Charles Darwin claimed that vertical growth on a subsiding foundation caused fringing reefs to transform into barrier reefs then atolls. Yet historically no transition between reef types has been discovered and they are widely considered to develop independently from antecedent foundations during glacio-eustatic sea-level rise. Here we reconstruct reef development from cores recovered by IODP Expedition 310 to Tahiti, and show that a fringing reef retreated upslope during postglacial sea-level rise and transformed into a barrier reef when it encountered a Pleistocene reef-flat platform. The reef became stranded on the platform edge, creating a lagoon that isolated it from coastal sediment and facilitated a switch to a faster-growing coral assemblage dominated by acroporids. The switch increased the reef's accretion rate, allowing it to keep pace with rising sea level, and transform into a barrier reef. This retreat mechanism not only links Darwin's reef types, but explains the re-occupation of reefs during Pleistocene glacio-eustacy.

  11. Postglacial fringing-reef to barrier-reef conversion on Tahiti links Darwin's reef types.

    PubMed

    Blanchon, Paul; Granados-Corea, Marian; Abbey, Elizabeth; Braga, Juan C; Braithwaite, Colin; Kennedy, David M; Spencer, Tom; Webster, Jody M; Woodroffe, Colin D

    2014-01-01

    In 1842 Charles Darwin claimed that vertical growth on a subsiding foundation caused fringing reefs to transform into barrier reefs then atolls. Yet historically no transition between reef types has been discovered and they are widely considered to develop independently from antecedent foundations during glacio-eustatic sea-level rise. Here we reconstruct reef development from cores recovered by IODP Expedition 310 to Tahiti, and show that a fringing reef retreated upslope during postglacial sea-level rise and transformed into a barrier reef when it encountered a Pleistocene reef-flat platform. The reef became stranded on the platform edge, creating a lagoon that isolated it from coastal sediment and facilitated a switch to a faster-growing coral assemblage dominated by acroporids. The switch increased the reef's accretion rate, allowing it to keep pace with rising sea level, and transform into a barrier reef. This retreat mechanism not only links Darwin's reef types, but explains the re-occupation of reefs during Pleistocene glacio-eustacy. PMID:24845540

  12. Postglacial Fringing-Reef to Barrier-Reef conversion on Tahiti links Darwin's reef types

    PubMed Central

    Blanchon, Paul; Granados-Corea, Marian; Abbey, Elizabeth; Braga, Juan C.; Braithwaite, Colin; Kennedy, David M.; Spencer, Tom; Webster, Jody M.; Woodroffe, Colin D.

    2014-01-01

    In 1842 Charles Darwin claimed that vertical growth on a subsiding foundation caused fringing reefs to transform into barrier reefs then atolls. Yet historically no transition between reef types has been discovered and they are widely considered to develop independently from antecedent foundations during glacio-eustatic sea-level rise. Here we reconstruct reef development from cores recovered by IODP Expedition 310 to Tahiti, and show that a fringing reef retreated upslope during postglacial sea-level rise and transformed into a barrier reef when it encountered a Pleistocene reef-flat platform. The reef became stranded on the platform edge, creating a lagoon that isolated it from coastal sediment and facilitated a switch to a faster-growing coral assemblage dominated by acroporids. The switch increased the reef's accretion rate, allowing it to keep pace with rising sea level, and transform into a barrier reef. This retreat mechanism not only links Darwin's reef types, but explains the re-occupation of reefs during Pleistocene glacio-eustacy. PMID:24845540

  13. O-ring gasket test fixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, James Eric (inventor); Mccluney, Donald Scott (inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus is presented for testing O-ring gaskets under a variety of temperature, pressure, and dynamic loading conditions. Specifically, this apparatus has the ability to simulate a dynamic loading condition where the sealing surface in contact with the O-ring moves both away from and axially along the face of the O-ring.

  14. Conical O-ring seal

    DOEpatents

    Chalfant, Jr., Gordon G. (North Augusta, SC)

    1984-01-01

    A shipping container for radioactive or other hazardous materials which has a conical-shaped closure containing grooves in the conical surface thereof and an O-ring seal incorporated in each of such grooves. The closure and seal provide a much stronger, tighter and compact containment than with a conventional flanged joint.

  15. Coral reef resilience through biodiversity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rogers, Caroline S.

    2013-01-01

    Irrefutable evidence of coral reef degradation worldwide and increasing pressure from rising seawater temperatures and ocean acidification associated with climate change have led to a focus on reef resilience and a call to “manage” coral reefs for resilience. Ideally, global action to reduce emission of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases will be accompanied by local action. Effective management requires reduction of local stressors, identification of the characteristics of resilient reefs, and design of marine protected area networks that include potentially resilient reefs. Future research is needed on how stressors interact, on how climate change will affect corals, fish, and other reef organisms as well as overall biodiversity, and on basic ecological processes such as connectivity. Not all reef species and reefs will respond similarly to local and global stressors. Because reef-building corals and other organisms have some potential to adapt to environmental changes, coral reefs will likely persist in spite of the unprecedented combination of stressors currently affecting them. The biodiversity of coral reefs is the basis for their remarkable beauty and for the benefits they provide to society. The extraordinary complexity of these ecosystems makes it both more difficult to predict their future and more likely they will have a future.

  16. The evolution of reef communities

    SciTech Connect

    Fagerstrom, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    This book discusses the composition, structure, occurrence, and changes in reefs during the past 2 billion years. It emphasizes the functional roles of major groups (guilds) of reef-building, reef-destroying, and reed-dwelling organisms in the most complex of all marine communities. A structural model, based on modern reef guilds, is developed. Then the functional roles of each major reef-building higher biologic taxon (algae, sponges, coral, etc.) is determined, and, on this basis, each such taxon is assigned to a reef community guild. Next, the authors traces the geologic history and guild assignment of each major taxon through geologic time. The final chapter establishes a succession of ten major reef community types, and considers their extinction and recovery in the light of modern theories of cosmic and earthly events.

  17. Coral Reef Biological Criteria

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coral reefs worldwide are experiencing decline from a variety of stressors. Some important stressors are land-based sources of pollution and human activities in the coastal zone. However, few tools are available to offset the impact of these stressors. The Clean Water Act (CWA...

  18. Castle in Capitol Reef

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A view of the Castle, a prominent sandstone formation in Capitol Reef National Park. This area, known as the Fruita, is made up of three primary layers. The bottom sandstone layer is known as the Moenkopi Formation and is about 245 million years old. The middle gray-green layer is known as the Chinl...

  19. Capitol Reef's Castle

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A view of the Castle, a prominent sandstone formation in Capitol Reef National Park. This area, known as the Fruita, is made up of three primary layers. The bottom sandstone layer is known as the Moenkopi Formation and is about 245 million years old. The middle gray-green layer is known as the Chinl...

  20. Petroglyphs in Captiol Reef

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    From about 300-1300 CE, ancestors of the Hopi Tribe, Pueblo of Zuni, and Paiute Tribe lived in Capitol Reef. They are known by various names-archeologists call them the Fremont Culture; the Hopi Tribe calls them the Hisatsinom, or the

  1. Capitol Reef Petroglyphs

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    From about 300-1300 CE, ancestors of the Hopi Tribe, Pueblo of Zuni, and Paiute Tribe lived in Capitol Reef. They are known by various names-archeologists call them the Fremont Culture; the Hopi Tribe calls them the Hisatsinom, or the

  2. An overview of oil-water separation using gas flotation systems.

    PubMed

    Saththasivam, Jayaprakash; Loganathan, Kavithaa; Sarp, Sarper

    2016-02-01

    Oil concentration levels in municipal waste water effluent streams are stringently regulated in most parts of the world. Apart from municipal waste, stricter oil/grease discharge limits are also enforced in oil and gas sectors as large volumes of produced water is being discharged to open ocean. One of the feasible, practical and established methods to remove oil substances from waste water sources is by gas flotation. In this overview, gas flotation technologies, namely dissolved and induced flotation systems, are discussed. Physico-chemical interaction between oil-water-gas during flotation is also summarized. In addition to a brief review on design advancements in flotation systems, enhancement of flotation efficiency by using pre-treatment methods, particularly coagulation-flocculation, is also presented. PMID:26408973

  3. Ordovician reef-hosted Jiaodingshan Mn-Co deposit and Dawashan Mn deposit, Sichuan Province, China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fan, Delian; Hein, James R.; Ye, Jie

    1999-01-01

    The Jiaodingshan Mn-Co and Dawashan Mn deposits are located in the approximately 2-m thick Daduhe unit of the Wufengian strata of Late Ordovician (Ashgill) age. Paleogeographic reconstruction places the deposits at the time of their formation in a gulf between Chengdu submarine rise and the Kangdian continent. The Jiaodingshan and Dawashan deposits occur in algal-reef facies, the former in an atoll-like structure and the latter in a pinnacle reef. Ores are mainly composed of rhodochrosite, kutnahorite, hausmannite, braunite, manganosite, and bementite. Dark red, yellowish-pink, brown, green-gray, and black ores are massive, banded, laminated, spheroidal, and cryptalgal (oncolite, stromatolite, algal filaments) boundstones. Blue, green, and red algal fossils show in situ growth positions. Samples of high-grade Jiaodingshan and Dawashan ores assay as much as 66.7% MnO. Jiaodingshan Mn carbonate ores have mean contents of Ba, Co, and Pb somewhat higher than in Dawashan ores. Cobalt is widely distributed and strongly enriched in all rock types as compared to its crustal mean content. Cobalt is correlated with Cu, Ni, and MgO in both deposits and additionally with Ba and Zn in the Dawashan deposit. The ?13C(PDB) values of Mn carbonate ores (-7.8 to -16.3‰) indicate contributions of carbon from both seawater bicarbonate and the bacterial degradation of organic matter, the latter being 33% to 68%, assuming about -24‰ for the ?13C(PDB) of the organic matter. Host limestones derived carbon predominantly from seawater bicarbonate ?1313C(PDB) of +0.2 to -7‰). NW-trending fault zones controlled development of lithofacies, whereas NE-trending fault zones provided pathways for movement of fluids. The source of Co, Ni, and Cu was mainly from weathering of mafic and ultramafic rocks on the Kangdian continent, whereas contemporaneous volcanic eruptions were of secondary importance. The reefs were likely mineralized during early diagenesis under shallow burial. The reefs were highly porous and acted as the locus for metasomatic replacement by Mn that combined with CO2 produced during oxidation of organic matter in the zone of sulfate reduction and seawater bicarbonate. That metasomatic replacement formed the rhodochrosite ores.

  4. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies: Froth flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The Task 6 effort involves three main elements including column cell development, flotation circuit testing and flotation cell modeling. The work outlined is to research column designs and operation parameters in developing an optimized column flotation cell (OCFC) to meet the overall program objectives. The test results obtained through this effort will be evaluated against the results obtained from the round-robin test program in Task 5. Any design parameters or operating conditions that are unique with the round-robin test winner that were not evaluated as part of the optimized column developments work will be reviewed and tested so as to incorporate all possible scenarios in presenting DOE with the best available flotation process for use in the 2 to 3 ton per hour POC. Following development of the OCFC, various flotation circuit configurations will be evaluated determine the best'' circuit design for the 2 to 3 ton per hour POC. Single and multiple stage flotation, grab and run,rougher/scavenger/cleaner, etc., test circuits will be tested as part of this effort. Upon completion of this test work, the best'' possible flotation cell will have been tested in a number of possible flotation circuit designs to possibly provide the best'' flotation approach in meeting the design criteria. In conjunction with the flotation test effort, model development work will be conducted to provide a tool in evaluating the various flotation circuit configurations and in predicting flotation performance. The model will be useful in selecting operating conditions in the POC and in evaluating the performance of the POC.

  5. In-plant testing of microbubble column flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Luttrell, G.H.; Adel, G.T.; Mankosa, M.J.

    1991-07-31

    Microbubble column flotation (MCF) was developed at the Virginia Center for Coal and Minerals Processing (VCCMP) for the selective recovery of fine particles. Bench-scale test work conducted at VCCMP, largely under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), showed that the technology worked well for both coal and mineral applications. For the technology to be commercially successful, however, a full-scale demonstration of the MCF technology was deemed necessary. This report summarizes the results of work performed under the DOE project entitled In-plant Testing of Microbubble Column Flotation.'' The objectives of this research and development effort were to duplicate the bench-scale performance of the MCF process in a full-scale unit, to verify the scale-up procedure developed in an earlier project, and to demonstrate the applicability of the MCF technology to the coal industry.

  6. In-plant testing of microbubble column flotation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Luttrell, G.H.; Adel, G.T.; Mankosa, M.J.

    1991-07-31

    Microbubble column flotation (MCF) was developed at the Virginia Center for Coal and Minerals Processing (VCCMP) for the selective recovery of fine particles. Bench-scale test work conducted at VCCMP, largely under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), showed that the technology worked well for both coal and mineral applications. For the technology to be commercially successful, however, a full-scale demonstration of the MCF technology was deemed necessary. This report summarizes the results of work performed under the DOE project entitled ``In-plant Testing of Microbubble Column Flotation.`` The objectives of this research and development effort were to duplicate the bench-scale performance of the MCF process in a full-scale unit, to verify the scale-up procedure developed in an earlier project, and to demonstrate the applicability of the MCF technology to the coal industry.

  7. Flotation of Heterocoagulated Particulates in Ulexite/SDS/Electrolyte System.

    PubMed

    Celik; Yasar; El-Shall

    1998-07-15

    Salt-type minerals can be usually floated with either anionic or cationic collectors. In a number of systems, flotation has been reported to remarkably increase above the concentrations where precipitation of the collector salt is initiated. Some studies attribute this phenomenon to heterocoagulation of oppositely charged colloidal precipitate and mineral particles. In this study, ulexite, a semisoluble boron mineral, in the presence of various multivalent ions, i.e. Ba2+, Mg2+, Ca2+, and Al3+, was found to exhibit excellent flotation even when particles, colloidal precipitates, and bubbles acquire a similar charge, which indicates that attractive structural forces exceed the forces of electrostatic repulsion. Copyright 1998 Academic Press. PMID:9705762

  8. Miocene reefs in western Mediterranean

    SciTech Connect

    Esteban, M.

    1988-01-01

    Coral reefs were particularly abundant and well developed during the late Tortonian and Messinian in southeastern Spain, the Balearic Islands, Italy, Sicily, Algeria, and Morocco. These reefs occurred just before and during the deposition of the thick Messinian evaporite units in the basinal areas and disappeared completely from Mediteranean during the early Pliocene. Most of the coral reefs are fringing terrigenous coastal fan complexes with very small lagoons and show progradation of less than 2 km. Some of the reefs occur on, or are intercalated with, Neogene volcanics or Messinian evaporites. Barrier-reef complexes are less common, have extensive lagoons behind them, and show complex progradational geometries more than 10 km wide. Excellent outcrops allow detailed reconstruction of paleogeography and sea level changes. Progradation predominated during phases of relative sea level drops and stillsands, while significant retrogradation occurred during sea level rises. The coral reef wall framework is commonly less than 20 m thick and is dominated by Porites and, locally, Tarbellastrae. Older Miocene reefs are less well developed, but show greater diversity of corals and reef organisms. Younger Miocene reef complexes occurring in open ocean settings are formed by only one branching coral genus (Porites or, locally, Tarbellastraea) with branching colonies up to 7 m high. Halimeda sands are particularly abundant in the upper reef slopes with occasional intercalations of red algae pavements that most likely coincide with episodes of terrigenous influx.

  9. Flotation and flocculation chemistry of coal and oxidized coals

    SciTech Connect

    Somasundaran, P.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this research project is to understand the fundamentals involved in the flotation and flocculation of coal and oxidized coals and elucidate mechanisms by which surface interactions between coal and various reagents enhance coal beneficiation. An understanding of the nature of the heterogeneity of coal surfaces arising from the intrinsic distribution of chemical moieties is fundamental to the elucidation of mechanism of coal surface modification and its role in interfacial processes such as flotation, flocculation and agglomeration. A new approach for determining the distribution in surface properties of coal particles was developed in this study and various techniques capable of providing such information were identified. Distributions in surface energy, contact angle and wettability were obtained using novel techniques such as centrifugal immersion and film flotation. Changes in these distributions upon oxidation and surface modifications were monitored and discussed. An approach to the modelling of coal surface site distributions based on thermodynamic information obtained from gas adsorption and immersion calorimetry is proposed. Polyacrylamide and dodecane was used to alter the coal surface. Methanol adsorption was also studied. 62 figs.

  10. Coal surface control for advanced fine coal flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerstenau, D.W.; Sastry, K.V.S.; Hanson, J.S.; Diao, J.; De, A.; Sotillo, F.; Harris, G. ); Somasundaran, P.; Harris, C.C.; Vasudevan, T.; Liu, D.; Li, C. ); Hu, Weibai; Zou, Y.; Chen, W. ); Choudhry, V.; Sehgal, R.; Ghosh, A. (Praxis Engineers, Inc., Milpitas, CA (United

    1991-07-30

    The primary objective in the scope of this research project is to develop advanced flotation methods for coal cleaning in order to achieve near total pyritic-sulfur removal at 90% Btu recovery, using coal samples procured from three major US coal seams. Concomitantly, the ash content of these coals is to be reduced to 6% or less. Investigation of mechanisms for the control of coal and pyrite surfaces prior to fine coal flotation is the main aspect of the project objectives. The results of this research are to be made available to ICF Kaiser Engineers who are currently working on the Engineering Development of Advanced Flotation under a separate contract with DOE under the Acid Rain Control Initiative program. A second major objective is to investigate factors involved in the progressive weathering and oxidation of coal that had been exposed to varying degrees of weathering, namely, open to the atmosphere, covered and in an argon-inerted'' atmosphere, over a period of twelve months. After regular intervals of weathering, samples of the three base coals (Illinois No. 6, Pittsburgh No. 8 and Upper Freeport PA) were collected and shipped to both the University of Pittsburgh and the University of California at Berkeley for characterization studies of the weathered material. 29 figs., 29 tabs.

  11. Application of Odor Sensors to Ore Sorting and Mill Feed Control

    SciTech Connect

    Michael G. Nelson

    2005-08-01

    Control of the feed provided to mineral processing facilities is a continuing challenge. Much effort is currently being devoted to overcoming these problems. These projects are usually described under the general headings of Mine-to-Mill Integration or Mine-Mill Optimization. It should be possible to combine the knowledge of ore type, mineralogy, and other characteristics (located in the mine modeling system), with the advanced capabilities of state-of-the-art mill control systems, to achieve an improved level of control in mineral processing that will allow optimization of the mill processes on an almost real-time basis. This is not happening because mill feed it is often treated as a uniform material, when in reality it varies in composition and characteristics. An investigation was conducted to assess the suitability of odor sensors for maintaining traceability in ore production and processing. Commercially available sensors are now used in food processing, environmental monitoring, and other applications and can detect the presence of very small amounts (0.1-500 ppm) of some molecules. An assortment of such molecules could be used to ''tag'' blocks of ore as they are mined, according to their respective characteristics. Then, as the ore came into the mill, an array of ''electronic noses'' could be used to assess its characteristics in real time. It was found that the Cyranose 320{trademark}, a commercially available odor sensor, can easily distinguish among samples of rock marked with almond, cinnamon, citronella, lemon, and orange oils. Further, the sensor could detect mixtures of rocks marked with various combinations of these oils. Treatment of mixtures of galena and silica with odorant compounds showed no detrimental effects on flotation response in laboratory tests. Additional work is recommended to determine how this concept can be extended to the marking of large volumes of materials.

  12. Ecological intereactions of reef building corals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coral reefs are very important marine ecosystems because they support tremendous biodiversity and reefs are critical economic resources many coastal nations. Tropical reef structures are largely built by stony corals. This presentation provides background on basic coral biology t...

  13. An observational heat budget analysis of a coral reef, Heron Reef, Great Barrier Reef, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKellar, Mellissa C.; McGowan, Hamish A.; Phinn, Stuart R.

    2013-03-01

    Measurements of the surface energy balance, the structure and evolution of the convective atmospheric reef layer (CARL), and local meteorology and hydrodynamics were made during June 2009 and February 2010 at Heron Reef, Australia, to establish the relative partitioning of heating within the water and atmosphere. Horizontal advection was shown to moderate temperature in the CARL and the water, having a cooling influence on the atmosphere, and providing an additional source or sink of energy to the water overlying the reef, depending on tide. The key driver of atmospheric heating was surface sensible heat flux, while heating of the reef water was primarily due to solar radiation, and thermal conduction and convection from the reef substrate. Heating and cooling processes were more defined during winter due to higher sensible and latent heat fluxes and strong diurnal evolution of the CARL. Sudden increases in water temperature were associated with inundation of warmer oceanic water during the flood tide, particularly in winter due to enhanced nocturnal cooling of water overlying the reef. Similarly, cooling of the water over the reef occurred during the ebb tide as heat was transported off the reef to the surrounding ocean. While these results are the first to shed light on the heat budget of a coral reef and overlying CARL, longer-term, systematic measurements of reef thermal budgets are needed under a range of meteorological and hydrodynamic conditions, and across various reef types to elucidate the influence on larger-scale oceanic and atmospheric processes. This is essential for understanding the role of coral reefs in tropical and sub-tropical meteorology; the physical processes that take place during coral bleaching events, and coral and algal community dynamics on coral reefs.

  14. Oceanic forcing of coral reefs.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Ryan J; Falter, James L

    2015-01-01

    Although the oceans play a fundamental role in shaping the distribution and function of coral reefs worldwide, a modern understanding of the complex interactions between ocean and reef processes is still only emerging. These dynamics are especially challenging owing to both the broad range of spatial scales (less than a meter to hundreds of kilometers) and the complex physical and biological feedbacks involved. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of these processes, ranging from the small-scale mechanics of flow around coral communities and their influence on nutrient exchange to larger, reef-scale patterns of wave- and tide-driven circulation and their effects on reef water quality and perceived rates of metabolism. We also examine regional-scale drivers of reefs such as coastal upwelling, internal waves, and extreme disturbances such as cyclones. Our goal is to show how a wide range of ocean-driven processes ultimately shape the growth and metabolism of coral reefs. PMID:25251270

  15. Selective flotation of fossil resin from Western coal. Final report, July 1, 1990--May 25, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, G.F.; Miller, J.D.

    1992-05-25

    The proof-of-concept test program was designed to clarify a number of concerns that have been raised by coal companies who own the valuable resin resource. First, from laboratory bench-scale flotation experiments, a froth product from cleaner flotation containing more than 80% hexane-extractable resin at higher than 80% recovery can be produced. Pilot-plant testing was initiated to demonstrate the selective flotation of fossil resin and to establish a better confidence level in the new technology. Second, pilot-plant testing was designed to evaluate the effect and impact of random variation in slurry solids concentration and feed grade on this new selective fossil resin flotation technology. The flotation performance obtained under these industrial conditions is more realistic for process evaluation. Third, more accurate operating cost data was to be obtained for economic analysis. Fourth, sufficient quantities of the fossil resin concentrate were to be produced from the test program for evaluation by potential industrial users. Fifth, and finally, optimum levels for the operating variables were to be established. Such information was required for eventual scale-up and design of a fossil resin flotation plant. The pilot-plant proof-of-concept testing of selective resinate flotation has demonstrated that: (1) technically, the new flotation technologies discovered at the University of Utah and then improved upon by Advanced Processing Technologies, Inc. provide a highly efficient means to selectively recover fossil resin from coal. The proof-of-concept continuous flotation circuit (about 0.1 tph) resulted in fossil resin recovery with the same separation efficiency as was obtained from laboratory bench-scale testing (more than 80% recovery at about 80% concentrate grade); and (2) economically, the selective flotation process has been shown to be sufficiently profitable to justify the development of a fossil resin industry based on this new flotation process.

  16. Digital reef rugosity estimates coral reef habitat complexity.

    PubMed

    Dustan, Phillip; Doherty, Orla; Pardede, Shinta

    2013-01-01

    Ecological habitats with greater structural complexity contain more species due to increased niche diversity. This is especially apparent on coral reefs where individual coral colonies aggregate to give a reef its morphology, species zonation, and three dimensionality. Structural complexity is classically measured with a reef rugosity index, which is the ratio of a straight line transect to the distance a flexible chain of equal length travels when draped over the reef substrate; yet, other techniques from visual categories to remote sensing have been used to characterize structural complexity at scales from microhabitats to reefscapes. Reef-scale methods either lack quantitative precision or are too time consuming to be routinely practical, while remotely sensed indices are mismatched to the finer scale morphology of coral colonies and reef habitats. In this communication a new digital technique, Digital Reef Rugosity (DRR) is described which utilizes a self-contained water level gauge enabling a diver to quickly and accurately characterize rugosity with non-invasive millimeter scale measurements of coral reef surface height at decimeter intervals along meter scale transects. The precise measurements require very little post-processing and are easily imported into a spreadsheet for statistical analyses and modeling. To assess its applicability we investigated the relationship between DRR and fish community structure at four coral reef sites on Menjangan Island off the northwest corner of Bali, Indonesia and one on mainland Bali to the west of Menjangan Island; our findings show a positive relationship between DRR and fish diversity. Since structural complexity drives key ecological processes on coral reefs, we consider that DRR may become a useful quantitative community-level descriptor to characterize reef complexity. PMID:23437380

  17. Digital Reef Rugosity Estimates Coral Reef Habitat Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Dustan, Phillip; Doherty, Orla; Pardede, Shinta

    2013-01-01

    Ecological habitats with greater structural complexity contain more species due to increased niche diversity. This is especially apparent on coral reefs where individual coral colonies aggregate to give a reef its morphology, species zonation, and three dimensionality. Structural complexity is classically measured with a reef rugosity index, which is the ratio of a straight line transect to the distance a flexible chain of equal length travels when draped over the reef substrate; yet, other techniques from visual categories to remote sensing have been used to characterize structural complexity at scales from microhabitats to reefscapes. Reef-scale methods either lack quantitative precision or are too time consuming to be routinely practical, while remotely sensed indices are mismatched to the finer scale morphology of coral colonies and reef habitats. In this communication a new digital technique, Digital Reef Rugosity (DRR) is described which utilizes a self-contained water level gauge enabling a diver to quickly and accurately characterize rugosity with non-invasive millimeter scale measurements of coral reef surface height at decimeter intervals along meter scale transects. The precise measurements require very little post-processing and are easily imported into a spreadsheet for statistical analyses and modeling. To assess its applicability we investigated the relationship between DRR and fish community structure at four coral reef sites on Menjangan Island off the northwest corner of Bali, Indonesia and one on mainland Bali to the west of Menjangan Island; our findings show a positive relationship between DRR and fish diversity. Since structural complexity drives key ecological processes on coral reefs, we consider that DRR may become a useful quantitative community-level descriptor to characterize reef complexity. PMID:23437380

  18. Coral Reefs on the Edge? Carbon Chemistry on Inshore Reefs of the Great Barrier Reef

    PubMed Central

    Uthicke, Sven; Furnas, Miles; Lønborg, Christian

    2014-01-01

    While increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration alters global water chemistry (Ocean Acidification; OA), the degree of changes vary on local and regional spatial scales. Inshore fringing coral reefs of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) are subjected to a variety of local pressures, and some sites may already be marginal habitats for corals. The spatial and temporal variation in directly measured parameters: Total Alkalinity (TA) and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentration, and derived parameters: partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2); pH and aragonite saturation state (?ar) were measured at 14 inshore reefs over a two year period in the GBR region. Total Alkalinity varied between 2069 and 2364 µmol kg?1 and DIC concentrations ranged from 1846 to 2099 µmol kg?1. This resulted in pCO2 concentrations from 340 to 554 µatm, with higher values during the wet seasons and pCO2 on inshore reefs distinctly above atmospheric values. However, due to temperature effects, ?ar was not further reduced in the wet season. Aragonite saturation on inshore reefs was consistently lower and pCO2 higher than on GBR reefs further offshore. Thermodynamic effects contribute to this, and anthropogenic runoff may also contribute by altering productivity (P), respiration (R) and P/R ratios. Compared to surveys 18 and 30 years ago, pCO2 on GBR mid- and outer-shelf reefs has risen at the same rate as atmospheric values (?1.7 µatm yr?1) over 30 years. By contrast, values on inshore reefs have increased at 2.5 to 3 times higher rates. Thus, pCO2 levels on inshore reefs have disproportionately increased compared to atmospheric levels. Our study suggests that inshore GBR reefs are more vulnerable to OA and have less buffering capacity compared to offshore reefs. This may be caused by anthropogenically induced trophic changes in the water column and benthos of inshore reefs subjected to land runoff. PMID:25295864

  19. Evolution of ore deposits on terrestrial planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, R. G.

    1991-01-01

    Ore deposits on terrestrial planets materialized after core formation, mantle evolution, crustal development, interactions of surface rocks with the hydrosphere and atmosphere, and, where life exists on a planet, the involvement of biological activity. Core formation removed most of the siderophilic and chalcophilic elements, leaving mantles depleted in many of the strategic and noble metals relative to their chondritic abundances. Basaltic magma derived from partial melting of the mantle transported to the surface several metals contained in immiscible silicate and sulfide melts. Magmatic ore deposits were formed during cooling, fractional crystallization and density stratification from the basaltic melts. Such ore deposits found in earth's Archean rocks were probably generated during early histories of all terrestrial planets and may be the only types of igneous ores on Mars. Where plate tectonic activity was prevalent on a terrestrial planet, temporal evolution of ore deposits took place. Repetitive episodes of subduction modified the chemical compositions of the crust and upper mantles, leading to porphyry copper and molybdenum ores in calc-alkaline igneous rocks and granite-hosted tin and tungsten deposits. Such plate tectonic-induced mineralization in relatively young igneous rocks on earth may also have produced hydrothermal ore deposits on Venus in addition to the massive sulfide and cumulate chromite ores associated with Venusian mafic igneous rock. Sedimentary ore deposits resulting from mechanical and chemical weathering in reducing atmospheres in Archean earth included placer deposits (e.g., uraninite, gold, pyrite ores). Chromite, ilmenite, and other dense unreactive minerals could also be present on channel floors and in valley networks on Mars, while banded iron formations might underlie the Martian northern plains regions. As oxygen evolved in earth's atmosphere, so too did oxide ores. By analogy, gossans above sulfide ores probably occur on Mars, but not submarine ferromanganese nodules and crusts which have precipitated in oxygenated seawater on earth.

  20. Softened-Stainless-Steel O-Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marquis, G. A.; Waters, William I.

    1993-01-01

    In fabrication of O-ring of new type, tube of 304 stainless steel bent around mandril into circle and welded closed into ring. Ring annealed in furnace to make it soft and highly ductile. In this condition, used as crushable, deformable O-ring seal. O-ring replacements used in variety of atmospheres and temperatures, relatively inexpensive, fabricated with minimum amount of work, amenable to one-of-a-kind production, reusable, and environmentally benign.

  1. 18 CFR 1304.400 - Flotation devices and material, all floating structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... structures. (a) All flotation for docks, boat mooring buoys, and other water-use structures and facilities..., at which time it shall be replaced with approved flotation upon notification from TVA. For any float..., boat hulls, or other buoyancy devices made of steel, aluminum, fiberglass, or plastic foam, as...

  2. 18 CFR 1304.400 - Flotation devices and material, all floating structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... structures. (a) All flotation for docks, boat mooring buoys, and other water-use structures and facilities..., at which time it shall be replaced with approved flotation upon notification from TVA. For any float..., boat hulls, or other buoyancy devices made of steel, aluminum, fiberglass, or plastic foam, as...

  3. 18 CFR 1304.400 - Flotation devices and material, all floating structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... structures. (a) All flotation for docks, boat mooring buoys, and other water-use structures and facilities..., at which time it shall be replaced with approved flotation upon notification from TVA. For any float..., boat hulls, or other buoyancy devices made of steel, aluminum, fiberglass, or plastic foam, as...

  4. 18 CFR 1304.400 - Flotation devices and material, all floating structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... structures. (a) All flotation for docks, boat mooring buoys, and other water-use structures and facilities..., at which time it shall be replaced with approved flotation upon notification from TVA. For any float..., boat hulls, or other buoyancy devices made of steel, aluminum, fiberglass, or plastic foam, as...

  5. 18 CFR 1304.400 - Flotation devices and material, all floating structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... structures. (a) All flotation for docks, boat mooring buoys, and other water-use structures and facilities..., at which time it shall be replaced with approved flotation upon notification from TVA. For any float..., boat hulls, or other buoyancy devices made of steel, aluminum, fiberglass, or plastic foam, as...

  6. 46 CFR 169.741 - Personal flotation devices and ring life buoys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Personal flotation devices and ring life buoys. 169.741 Section 169.741 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING... devices and ring life buoys. Each personal flotation device and ring life buoy must be marked with...

  7. 33 CFR 175.25 - Enforcement of State requirements for children to wear personal flotation devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Enforcement of State requirements for children to wear personal flotation devices. 175.25...Enforcement of State requirements for children to wear personal flotation devices. (a...requirement for children of a certain age to wear an appropriate PFD approved by the...

  8. 33 CFR 175.25 - Enforcement of State requirements for children to wear personal flotation devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Enforcement of State requirements for children to wear personal flotation devices. 175.25...Enforcement of State requirements for children to wear personal flotation devices. (a...requirement for children of a certain age to wear an appropriate PFD approved by the...

  9. 33 CFR 175.25 - Enforcement of State requirements for children to wear personal flotation devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Enforcement of State requirements for children to wear personal flotation devices. 175.25...Enforcement of State requirements for children to wear personal flotation devices. (a...requirement for children of a certain age to wear an appropriate PFD approved by the...

  10. 33 CFR 175.25 - Enforcement of State requirements for children to wear personal flotation devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Enforcement of State requirements for children to wear personal flotation devices. 175.25...Enforcement of State requirements for children to wear personal flotation devices. (a...requirement for children of a certain age to wear an appropriate PFD approved by the...

  11. 33 CFR 175.25 - Enforcement of State requirements for children to wear personal flotation devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Enforcement of State requirements for children to wear personal flotation devices. 175.25...Enforcement of State requirements for children to wear personal flotation devices. (a...requirement for children of a certain age to wear an appropriate PFD approved by the...

  12. 46 CFR 28.110 - Life preservers or other personal flotation devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... be equipped with at least one immersion suit, exposure suit, or wearable personal flotation device of.... Table 28.110—Personal Flotation Devices and Immersion Suits Applicable waters Vessel type Devices... Superior Documented Vessel Immersion suit or exposure suit. 28.135; 25.25-9(a); 25.25-13; 25.25-15....

  13. 46 CFR 28.110 - Life preservers or other personal flotation devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... be equipped with at least one immersion suit, exposure suit, or wearable personal flotation device of.... Table 28.110—Personal Flotation Devices and Immersion Suits Applicable waters Vessel type Devices... Superior Documented Vessel Immersion suit or exposure suit. 28.135; 25.25-9(a); 25.25-13; 25.25-15....

  14. 46 CFR 28.110 - Life preservers or other personal flotation devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... be equipped with at least one immersion suit, exposure suit, or wearable personal flotation device of.... Table 28.110—Personal Flotation Devices and Immersion Suits Applicable waters Vessel type Devices... Superior Documented Vessel Immersion suit or exposure suit. 28.135; 25.25-9(a); 25.25-13; 25.25-15....

  15. 46 CFR 28.110 - Life preservers or other personal flotation devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... be equipped with at least one immersion suit, exposure suit, or wearable personal flotation device of.... Table 28.110—Personal Flotation Devices and Immersion Suits Applicable waters Vessel type Devices... Superior Documented Vessel Immersion suit or exposure suit. 28.135; 25.25-9(a); 25.25-13; 25.25-15....

  16. 46 CFR 28.110 - Life preservers or other personal flotation devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... be equipped with at least one immersion suit, exposure suit, or wearable personal flotation device of.... Table 28.110—Personal Flotation Devices and Immersion Suits Applicable waters Vessel type Devices... Superior Documented Vessel Immersion suit or exposure suit. 28.135; 25.25-9(a); 25.25-13; 25.25-15....

  17. 33 CFR 149.331 - What are the requirements for hybrid personal flotation devices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... for them in 46 CFR 160.077-29, and all limitations, if any, marked on them. (b) All commercial hybrid... hybrid personal flotation devices? 149.331 Section 149.331 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... hybrid personal flotation devices? (a) The operator must ensure that the use and stowage of...

  18. Black reefs: iron-induced phase shifts on coral reefs

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Linda Wegley; Barott, Katie L; Dinsdale, Elizabeth; Friedlander, Alan M; Nosrat, Bahador; Obura, David; Sala, Enric; Sandin, Stuart A; Smith, Jennifer E; Vermeij, Mark J A; Williams, Gareth J; Willner, Dana; Rohwer, Forest

    2012-01-01

    The Line Islands are calcium carbonate coral reef platforms located in iron-poor regions of the central Pacific. Natural terrestrial run-off of iron is non-existent and aerial deposition is extremely low. However, a number of ship groundings have occurred on these atolls. The reefs surrounding the shipwreck debris are characterized by high benthic cover of turf algae, macroalgae, cyanobacterial mats and corallimorphs, as well as particulate-laden, cloudy water. These sites also have very low coral and crustose coralline algal cover and are call black reefs because of the dark-colored benthic community and reduced clarity of the overlying water column. Here we use a combination of benthic surveys, chemistry, metagenomics and microcosms to investigate if and how shipwrecks initiate and maintain black reefs. Comparative surveys show that the live coral cover was reduced from 40 to 60% to <10% on black reefs on Millennium, Tabuaeran and Kingman. These three sites are relatively large (>0.75?km2). The phase shift occurs rapidly; the Kingman black reef formed within 3 years of the ship grounding. Iron concentrations in algae tissue from the Millennium black reef site were six times higher than in algae collected from reference sites. Metagenomic sequencing of the Millennium Atoll black reef-associated microbial community was enriched in iron-associated virulence genes and known pathogens. Microcosm experiments showed that corals were killed by black reef rubble through microbial activity. Together these results demonstrate that shipwrecks and their associated iron pose significant threats to coral reefs in iron-limited regions. PMID:21881615

  19. Black reefs: iron-induced phase shifts on coral reefs.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Linda Wegley; Barott, Katie L; Dinsdale, Elizabeth; Friedlander, Alan M; Nosrat, Bahador; Obura, David; Sala, Enric; Sandin, Stuart A; Smith, Jennifer E; Vermeij, Mark J A; Williams, Gareth J; Willner, Dana; Rohwer, Forest

    2012-03-01

    The Line Islands are calcium carbonate coral reef platforms located in iron-poor regions of the central Pacific. Natural terrestrial run-off of iron is non-existent and aerial deposition is extremely low. However, a number of ship groundings have occurred on these atolls. The reefs surrounding the shipwreck debris are characterized by high benthic cover of turf algae, macroalgae, cyanobacterial mats and corallimorphs, as well as particulate-laden, cloudy water. These sites also have very low coral and crustose coralline algal cover and are call black reefs because of the dark-colored benthic community and reduced clarity of the overlying water column. Here we use a combination of benthic surveys, chemistry, metagenomics and microcosms to investigate if and how shipwrecks initiate and maintain black reefs. Comparative surveys show that the live coral cover was reduced from 40 to 60% to <10% on black reefs on Millennium, Tabuaeran and Kingman. These three sites are relatively large (>0.75 km(2)). The phase shift occurs rapidly; the Kingman black reef formed within 3 years of the ship grounding. Iron concentrations in algae tissue from the Millennium black reef site were six times higher than in algae collected from reference sites. Metagenomic sequencing of the Millennium Atoll black reef-associated microbial community was enriched in iron-associated virulence genes and known pathogens. Microcosm experiments showed that corals were killed by black reef rubble through microbial activity. Together these results demonstrate that shipwrecks and their associated iron pose significant threats to coral reefs in iron-limited regions. PMID:21881615

  20. Effective harvesting of low surface-hydrophobicity microalgae by froth flotation.

    PubMed

    Garg, Sourabh; Wang, Liguang; Schenk, Peer M

    2014-05-01

    Microalgae harvesting by air flotation is a promising technology for large-scale production of biofuel, feed and nutraceuticals from algae. With an adherence-to-hydrocarbon method and two different types of flotation cells (mechanically agitated cell and Jameson cell), microalgal surface hydrophobicity and bubble size were identified to be critical for effective froth flotation of microalgae. Freshwater alga Chlorella sp. BR2 showed naturally a high hydrophobicity and an ideal response to flotation. However, many marine microalgae possess a low surface hydrophobicity and are thus difficult to harvest. This paper shows that a step-wise optimization approach can substantially improve the flotation of a low surface hydrophobicity marine microalga, Tetraselmis sp. M8, to near full recovery with an enrichment ratio of 11.4. PMID:24690467

  1. Perspectives in coral reef hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearn, Clifford J.

    2011-06-01

    Some developments in coral reef hydrodynamics over the last decade are reviewed with an overview of papers in this special issue. Advances in hydrodynamics based on improved understanding of topographic complexity are illustrated for the reef at Kilo Nalu Observatory and Kaneohe Bay (both in Hawaii). Models of the roughness layer are discussed as a background to numerical models of reef hydrodynamics for Molokai and Guam. Topographic complexity produces spatial temperature variability over reefs creating thermal microclimates which are reported in this issue for the Red Sea. Uptake of ocean nutrients by reefs is controlled by hydrodynamics, and papers in this issue show its critical role in the ecology of a fringing reef at La Réunion Island; nutrient uptake rates are discussed here using new data for Hearn Roughness and Decadal Rugosity. The role of upwelled water by large amplitude internal waves on reefs is reported for the Similan Islands, providing major new evidence for the role of hydrodynamics in the ecology of reefs and its importance to climate change. The review suggests some important areas for new research including simulated corals used in flumes and the field. Major new modeling based on measured roughness maps combined with small scale lattice Boltzmann simulations should be possible in the next decade.

  2. Coral reefs and carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Buddemeier, R.W.

    1996-03-01

    This commentary argues the conclusion from a previous article, which investigates diurnal changes in carbon dioxide partial pressure and community metabolism on coral reefs, that coral `reefs might serve as a sink, not a source, for atmospheric carbon dioxide.` Commentaries from two groups are given along with the response by the original authors, Kayanne et al. 27 refs.

  3. Sandstone Cliff in Capitol Reef

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A sandstone cliff in Capitol Reef National Park. Capitol Reef is primarily made up of sandstone formations within the Waterpocket Fold, monocline that extends nearly 100 miles. A monocline is a step-like fold in rock strata that can resemble an enormous wrinkle in the earth....

  4. Sandstone Cliffs in Capitol Reef

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Sandstone cliffs in Capitol Reef National Park. Capitol Reef is primarily made up of sandstone formations within the Waterpocket Fold, monocline that extends nearly 100 miles. A monocline is a step-like fold in rock strata that can resemble an enormous wrinkle in the earth....

  5. Sandstone Monolith in Capitol Reef

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A sandstone monolith in Capitol Reef National Park. Capitol Reef is primarily made up of sandstone formations within the Waterpocket Fold, monocline that extends nearly 100 miles. A monocline is a step-like fold in rock strata that can resemble an enormous wrinkle in the earth....

  6. AAAS Feb `04 Frontiers in Coral Reef Research Climate Change and Coral Reefs

    E-print Network

    Kleypas, Joanie

    AAAS Feb `04 Frontiers in Coral Reef Research Climate Change and Coral Reefs Joan A. Kleypas University of Kansas Lawrence, KS EARTH SeaWiFS image from: Orbimage #12;AAAS Feb `04 Frontiers in Coral Reef Feb `04 Frontiers in Coral Reef Research Effects of CO2 on Coral Reefs Reduced [CO3 2-] Increased

  7. NaturalChangetotheMolokaiReef Ground Water and its Influence on Reef Evolution

    E-print Network

    Paytan, Adina

    NaturalChangetotheMolokaÿiReef CHAPTER 13 Ground Water and its Influence on Reef Evolution Eric E for dissolving coral reefs on many scales: on the microscopic scale, submillimeter cements form within coral-poor coastal waters surrounding coral reefs therefore can have significant ecosystem impacts. In many reef

  8. Coal surface control for advanced fine coal flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerstenau, D.W.; Hanson, J.S.; Diao, J.; Harris, G.H.; De, A.; Sotillo, F. ); Somasundaran, P.; Harris, C.C.; Vasudevan, T.; Liu, D.; Li, C. ); Hu, W.; Zou, Y.; Chen, W. ); Choudhry, V.; Shea, S.; Ghosh, A.; Sehgal, R. )

    1992-03-01

    The initial goal of the research project was to develop methods of coal surface control in advanced froth flotation to achieve 90% pyritic sulfur rejection, while operating at Btu recoveries above 90% based on run-of-mine quality coal. Moreover, the technology is to concomitantly reduce the ash content significantly (to six percent or less) to provide a high-quality fuel to the boiler (ash removal also increases Btu content, which in turn decreases a coal's emission potential in terms of lbs SO{sub 2}/million Btu). (VC)

  9. Analyzing Protein-Phosphoinositide Interactions with Liposome Flotation Assays.

    PubMed

    Busse, Ricarda A; Scacioc, Andreea; Schalk, Amanda M; Krick, Roswitha; Thumm, Michael; Kühnel, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Liposome flotation assays are a convenient tool to study protein-phosphoinositide interactions. Working with liposomes resembles physiological conditions more than protein-lipid overlay assays, which makes this method less prone to detect false positive interactions. However, liposome lipid composition must be well-considered in order to prevent nonspecific binding of the protein through electrostatic interactions with negatively charged lipids like phosphatidylserine. In this protocol we use the PROPPIN Hsv2 (homologous with swollen vacuole phenotype 2) as an example to demonstrate the influence of liposome lipid composition on binding and show how phosphoinositide binding specificities of a protein can be characterized with this method. PMID:26552682

  10. Confronting the coral reef crisis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellwood, D. R.; Hughes, T. P.; Folke, C.; Nyström, M.

    2004-06-01

    The worldwide decline of coral reefs calls for an urgent reassessment of current management practices. Confronting large-scale crises requires a major scaling-up of management efforts based on an improved understanding of the ecological processes that underlie reef resilience. Managing for improved resilience, incorporating the role of human activity in shaping ecosystems, provides a basis for coping with uncertainty, future changes and ecological surprises. Here we review the ecological roles of critical functional groups (for both corals and reef fishes) that are fundamental to understanding resilience and avoiding phase shifts from coral dominance to less desirable, degraded ecosystems. We identify striking biogeographic differences in the species richness and composition of functional groups, which highlight the vulnerability of Caribbean reef ecosystems. These findings have profound implications for restoration of degraded reefs, management of fisheries, and the focus on marine protected areas and biodiversity hotspots as priorities for conservation.

  11. Confronting the coral reef crisis.

    PubMed

    Bellwood, D R; Hughes, T P; Folke, C; Nyström, M

    2004-06-24

    The worldwide decline of coral reefs calls for an urgent reassessment of current management practices. Confronting large-scale crises requires a major scaling-up of management efforts based on an improved understanding of the ecological processes that underlie reef resilience. Managing for improved resilience, incorporating the role of human activity in shaping ecosystems, provides a basis for coping with uncertainty, future changes and ecological surprises. Here we review the ecological roles of critical functional groups (for both corals and reef fishes) that are fundamental to understanding resilience and avoiding phase shifts from coral dominance to less desirable, degraded ecosystems. We identify striking biogeographic differences in the species richness and composition of functional groups, which highlight the vulnerability of Caribbean reef ecosystems. These findings have profound implications for restoration of degraded reefs, management of fisheries, and the focus on marine protected areas and biodiversity hotspots as priorities for conservation. PMID:15215854

  12. Quantitative mineralogical characterization of chrome ore beneficiation plant tailing and its beneficiated products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, S. K.

    2015-04-01

    Mineralogical characterization and liberation of valuable minerals are primary concerns in mineral processing industries. The present investigation focuses on quantitative mineralogy, elemental deportment, and locking-liberation characteristics of the beneficiation of tailings from a chrome ore beneficiation plant in the Sukinda region, Odisha; methods used for the study of the beneficiated tailings are QEMSCAN®, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and mineral chemistry by a scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy-dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS). The tailing sample was fine grained (69.48wt% below 45 ?m size), containing 20.25wt% Cr2O3 and 39.19wt% Fe2O3, with a Cr:Fe mass ratio of 0.51. Mineralogical investigations using QEMSCAN studies revealed that chromite, goethite, and gibbsite are the dominant mineral phases with minor amounts of hematite, kaolinite, and quartz. The sample contained 34.22wt% chromite, and chromite liberation is more than 80% for grains smaller than 250 ?m in size. Based on these results, it was predicted that liberated chromite and high-grade middling chromite particles could be separated from the gangue by various concentration techniques. The tailing sample was beneficiated by hydrocyclone, tabling, wet high-intensity magnetic separation (WHIMS), and flotation in order to recover the chromite. A chromite concentrate with 45.29wt% Cr2O3 and a Cr:Fe mass ratio of 1.85 can be produced from these low-grade chromite ore beneficiation plant rejects.

  13. A new reef marine reserve in the

    E-print Network

    and 77 reef fish species counted to date. Corals grow on subtidal hardgrounds, but do not form true reefs Korrûbel J, Riegl B (1998) A new coral disease from the southern Arabian Gulf. Coral Reefs 17: 22. Riegl B, Korrûbel J (1995) Factual and interpretative report on the ecological survey of Jebel Ali coral reefs

  14. Coral Reefs Journal of the International

    E-print Network

    Osenberg, Craig W.

    1 23 Coral Reefs Journal of the International Society for Reef Studies ISSN 0722-4028 Volume 29 Number 4 Coral Reefs (2010) 29:1019-1022 DOI 10.1007/ s00338-010-0663-9 Guard crabs alleviate deleterious the ecological goods and services (e.g., food and shelter) that these corals may provide to other reef

  15. Reef Water Quality Protection Plan First Report

    E-print Network

    Hilderbrand, Robert H.

    Baseline 2 1 Executive summary The Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area is renowned internationally in the world (Great Barrier Reef Outlook Report 2009) there is a very real risk of damage to the reef from) 3225 8050 or at www.reefplan.qld.gov.au #12;1 Reef Water Quality Protection Plan Foreword The Great

  16. Continuous Steelmaking Directly from Ore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Noel A.

    2014-12-01

    In-line continuous processing of high-grade hematite ore (crushed ore or fines) with a pure hydrogen reductant is assessed. An appraisal is made of the rate controlling mechanisms involved in the reduction of a pure layer of molten wustite being transported by floating on a molten carrier iron carbon-free medium at temperatures just in excess of the iron melting point. Published research clearly indicates that under these conditions the kinetics are principally controlled by molecular gaseous diffusion. Thus, the rate is essentially not influenced by total gas pressure above 1 atmosphere. Accordingly, on safety grounds it is recommended that high pressure should not be used for hydrogen steelmaking in the future, but the operation should be conducted close to atmospheric pressure with low pressure steam encapsulation of the plant items involved. Using hydrogen as the reductant means that sub-surface nucleation of CO bubbles cannot disrupt continuous processing. The operation is then no different to processing a normal liquid phase. The off-gases from the reduction zone of a melt circulation loop are super-clean and only contaminated with iron vapor. Accordingly, the best available technology becomes available for energy conservation without risk of non-fusible solids deposition. The net result is that the energy requirements are expected to be superior to other potential processes.

  17. Estimating gold-ore mineralization potential within Topolninsk ore field (Gorny Altai)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timkin, T.; Voroshilov, V.; Askanakova, O.; Cherkasova, T.; Chernyshov, A.; Korotchenko, T.

    2015-11-01

    Based on the results of ore and near-ore metasomatite composition analysis, the factors and indicators of gold-ore mineralization potential were proposed. Integration of the obtained data made it possible to outline magmatic, structural, and lithological factors, as well as direct and indirect indicators of gold-ore mineralization. Applying multidimensional analysis inherent to geochemical data, the spatial structure was investigated, as well as the potential mineralization was identified. Based on the developed and newly-identified mineralization, small (up to medium-sized) mineable gold-ore deposits in skarns characterized by complex geological setting was identified.

  18. Iron ore: energy, labor, and capital changes with technology.

    PubMed

    Kakela, P J

    1978-12-15

    Resource gathering is depending on leaner crude ores. Iron ore mining typifies this trend. To make lean taconite iron ores useful required a technologic breakthrough-pelletization. The shift to iron ore pellets has the advantage that they require less energy and labor per ton of molten iron than high-grade naturally concentrated ores. Increased reliance on pellets causes a geographic shift of some jobs and environmental effects from blast furnaces to iron ore mines. PMID:17735387

  19. Inclusion flotation-driven channel segregation in solidifying steels

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dianzhong; Chen, Xing-Qiu; Fu, Paixian; Ma, Xiaoping; Liu, Hongwei; Chen, Yun; Cao, Yanfei; Luan, Yikun; Li, Yiyi

    2014-01-01

    Channel segregation, which is featured by the strip-like shape with compositional variation in cast materials due to density contrast-induced flow during solidification, frequently causes the severe destruction of homogeneity and some fatal damage. An investigation of its mechanism sheds light on the understanding and control of the channel segregation formation in solidifying metals, such as steels. Until now, it still remains controversial what composes the density contrasts and, to what extent, how it affects channel segregation. Here we discover a new force of inclusion flotation that drives the occurrence of channel segregation. It originates from oxide-based inclusions (Al2O3/MnS) and their sufficient volume fraction-driven flotation becomes stronger than the traditionally recognized inter-dendritic thermosolutal buoyancy, inducing the destabilization of the mushy zone and dominating the formation of channels. This study uncovers the mystery of oxygen in steels, extends the classical macro-segregation theory and highlights a significant technological breakthrough to control macrosegregation. PMID:25422943

  20. Self-generated morphology in lagoon reefs

    PubMed Central

    Hamblin, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    The three-dimensional form of a coral reef develops through interactions and feedbacks between its constituent organisms and their environment. Reef morphology therefore contains a potential wealth of ecological information, accessible if the relationships between morphology and ecology can be decoded. Traditionally, reef morphology has been attributed to external controls such as substrate topography or hydrodynamic influences. Little is known about inherent reef morphology in the absence of external control. Here we use reef growth simulations, based on observations in the cellular reefs of Western Australia’s Houtman Abrolhos Islands, to show that reef morphology is fundamentally determined by the mechanical behaviour of the reef-building organisms themselves—specifically their tendency to either remain in place or to collapse. Reef-building organisms that tend to remain in place, such as massive and encrusting corals or coralline algae, produce nodular reefs, whereas those that tend to collapse, such as branching Acropora, produce cellular reefs. The purest reef growth forms arise in sheltered lagoons dominated by a single type of reef builder, as in the branching Acropora-dominated lagoons of the Abrolhos. In these situations reef morphology can be considered a phenotype of the predominant reef building organism. The capacity to infer coral type from reef morphology can potentially be used to identify and map specific coral habitat in remotely sensed images. More generally, identifying ecological mechanisms underlying other examples of self-generated reef morphology can potentially improve our understanding of present-day reef ecology, because any ecological process capable of shaping a reef will almost invariably be an important process in real time on the living reef. PMID:26175962

  1. Self-generated morphology in lagoon reefs.

    PubMed

    Blakeway, David; Hamblin, Michael G

    2015-01-01

    The three-dimensional form of a coral reef develops through interactions and feedbacks between its constituent organisms and their environment. Reef morphology therefore contains a potential wealth of ecological information, accessible if the relationships between morphology and ecology can be decoded. Traditionally, reef morphology has been attributed to external controls such as substrate topography or hydrodynamic influences. Little is known about inherent reef morphology in the absence of external control. Here we use reef growth simulations, based on observations in the cellular reefs of Western Australia's Houtman Abrolhos Islands, to show that reef morphology is fundamentally determined by the mechanical behaviour of the reef-building organisms themselves-specifically their tendency to either remain in place or to collapse. Reef-building organisms that tend to remain in place, such as massive and encrusting corals or coralline algae, produce nodular reefs, whereas those that tend to collapse, such as branching Acropora, produce cellular reefs. The purest reef growth forms arise in sheltered lagoons dominated by a single type of reef builder, as in the branching Acropora-dominated lagoons of the Abrolhos. In these situations reef morphology can be considered a phenotype of the predominant reef building organism. The capacity to infer coral type from reef morphology can potentially be used to identify and map specific coral habitat in remotely sensed images. More generally, identifying ecological mechanisms underlying other examples of self-generated reef morphology can potentially improve our understanding of present-day reef ecology, because any ecological process capable of shaping a reef will almost invariably be an important process in real time on the living reef. PMID:26175962

  2. Removal of cadmium (II) from simulated wastewater by ion flotation technique

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A separation technique which has recently received a sharp increase in research activities is “ion flotation”. This technique has four important advantages for treating wastewaters: low energy consumption, small space requirements, small volume of sludge and acting selectively. The present study aims to optimize parameters of ion flotation for cadmium removal in simulated wastewater at laboratory scale. It was obtained on the reaction between Cd2+ and sodium dodecylesulfate (SDS) collector followed by flotation with ethanol as frother. Test solution was prepared by combining the required amount of cadmium ion, SDS and necessary frother or sodium sulfate solution. All experiments were carried out in a flotation column at laboratory temperature (27°C), adjusted pH = 4 and 120 minutes. The different parameters (namely: flow rate, cadmium, SDS and frother concentrations and ionic strength) influencing the flotation process were examined. The best removal efficiency obtained at a collector-metal ratio of 3:1 in 60 min with flow rate of 150 mL/min was 84%. The maximum cadmium removal was 92.1% where ethanol was introduced at a concentration 0.4% to flotation column with above conditions. The obtained results were promising, as both cadmium and collector were effectively removed from wastewater. Hence, the application of ion flotation for metal ions removal from effluents seems to be efficient. PMID:23388386

  3. Miocene reef corals: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, S.H.

    1988-01-01

    Tectonic blockage in the Middle East of westward-flowing Tethys surface circulation during the latest Oligocene led to creation in the earliest Miocene of endemic Mediterranean, Western Atlantic-Caribbean, and Indo-Pacific realms. A great reduction in reef coral diversity from 60-80 Oligocene species to 25-35 early Miocene species occurred in the Western Atlantic-Caribbean and Mediterranean areas accompanied by a decrease in reef growth. A slower and less drastic change apparently occurred in the Indo-Pacific area. Early Miocene reef corals of the Western Atlantic-Caribbean comprise a transition between the cosmopolitan Oligocene fauna and its endemic mid-Miocene to modern counterpart. Although early Miocene reefs were dominated by a Porites-Montastrea assemblage, eastward flow of Pacific circulation brought with it ''exotic'' corals such as Coscinaraea and Pseudocolumnastrea. Also, many cosmopolitan genera persisted from the Oligocene. During the middle to late Miocene, most of the species still living on Holocene reefs evolved. As the Mediterranean basin became more restricted, there was a slow decline in reef corals from 20 - 25 species in the Aquitainian to less than five species in the Messinian. Eustatic lowstand led to the extinction of reef-building corals in the late Messinian. In the Indo-Pacific, Neogene evolution of reef corals was conservative. Excluding the Acroporidae and Seriatoporidae, most Holocene framework species had evolved by the middle Miocene. Interplay between regional tectonics and eustatic sea level changes led to extensive development of middle to late Miocene pinnacle reefs over the southwestern Pacific.

  4. NOAA's hydrolab conducts reef studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    This summer, scuba-diving scientists operating from Hydrolab, NOAA's undersea laboratory, are carrying out four experiments aimed at producing better management of coral reefs and their fishery resources. Hydrolab is located at a depth of 50 feet, near the mouth of the Salt River, off St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands. The lab houses four scientists for up to 2 weeks at a time, permitting them to swim out into the water to conduct research. The projects make use of both the natural coral reef near Hydrolab and the nearby artificial reef constructed for comparison studies.

  5. Hydrophobic Agglomeration of Mineral Fines in Aqueous Suspensions and its Application in Flotation: a Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bingqiao; Song, Shaoxian

    2014-05-01

    Hydrophobic agglomeration is originated from the hydrophobic attraction between particles, which is essentially different from electrolyte coagulation and polymer flocculation. It is applied to mineral processing in floc-flotation process to improve the recovery of mineral fines. In this paper, the applications of this phenomenon in mineral fines were summarized, including the origin of hydrophobic agglomeration, the main factors affect hydrophobic agglomeration (particle hydrophobicity, shear rate and duration, nonpolar oil and tank geometry), as well as hydrophobic agglomeration based separation processes (carrier flotation and floc-flotation).

  6. Home Reef, South Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    In the South Pacific, south of Late Island along the Tofua volcanic arc in Tonga, a new volcanic island Home Reef is being re-born. The island is thought to have emerged after a volcanic eruption in mid-August that has also spewed large amounts of floating pumice into Tongan waters and sweeping across to Fiji about 350 km (220 miles) to the west of where the new island has formed. In 2004 a similar eruption created an ephemeral island about 0.5 by 1.5 km (0.3 by 0.9 miles) in size; it was no longer visible in an ASTER image acquired November 2005. This simulated natural color image shows the vegetation-covered stratovolcanic island of Late in the upper right. Home Reef is found in the lower left. The two bluish plumes are hot seawater that is laden with volcanic ash and chemicals; the larger one can be traced for more than 14 km (8.4 miles) to the east. The image was acquired October 10, 2006 and covers an area of 24.3 by 30.2 km. It is located at 18.9 degrees South latitude, 174.7 degrees west longitude.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

    Size: 24.3 by 30.2 kilometers (15 by 18.6 miles) Location: 18.9 degrees South latitude, 174.7 degrees West longitude Orientation: North at top Image Data: ASTER bands 3, 2, and 1 Original Data Resolution: 15 meters (49.2 feet) Dates Acquired: October 4, 2006

  7. Commencement on a Coral Reef

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, Steven K.

    1973-01-01

    Describes an environmental program in which sixteen students and three biology teachers from Northfield Mount Hermon School in Massachusetts spent two weeks examining the ecology of a Caribbean reef.. (JR)

  8. Sandstone Formations in Capitol Reef

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Capitol Reef is primarily made up of sandstone formations within the Waterpocket Fold, monocline that extends nearly 100 miles. A monocline is a step-like fold in rock strata that can resemble an enormous wrinkle in the earth....

  9. Artificial Reefs and Ocean Dumping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glueck, Richard D.

    1983-01-01

    Activities and instructional strategies for two multigrade lessons are provided. Activity objectives include describing an artificial reef (such as a sunken ocean liner) as an ecosystem, knowing animal types in the ecosystem, and describing a food web. (JN)

  10. Reduction Mechanisms in Manganese Ore Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coetsee, Theresa; Reinke, Christian; Nell, Johannes; Pistorius, Petrus Christiaan

    2015-12-01

    Manganese ores are highly heterogeneous and contain various minerals with different levels of contained manganese and iron and therefore the ore reduction behavior is not uniform. Both phase chemistry and phase morphology at the reaction interface, at micron scale, must be investigated to understand the reaction mechanism effects in manganese ore reduction. This approach is applied here to reacted material mixture samples taken from the AlloyStream pilot plant furnace over a period of 4 months. The mineralogical features are reported and discussed. Deductions are made on the likely dominant reduction mechanism in this reaction system, given the phase morphology observations presented.

  11. The Geohydrology of MVT-Ore Genesis in the Canning Basin, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garven, G.; Wallace, M. M.

    2009-05-01

    In the Lennard Shelf, Western Australia, epigenetic MVT-type Pb-Zn mineralization occurs in Middle Devonian evaporitic dolomites which were part of a barrier reef system (Hurley & Lohmann, 1989). Ore mineralization exhibits a strong structural control at the basin scale and normal faults probably controlled pathways for brine and petroleum migration that affected ore deposition (Wallace et al., 1999). For the Canning basin, finite element simulations show that compaction was the most important process for creating overpressures and driving basinal fluids in this thick extensional basin. Basinal fluids are shown to have been driven across the Fitzroy Trough through permeable and deeply buried Silurian-Ordovician aquifer units. The fluids then migrated upwards at rates of m/yr up during periods of episodic extension (Braun, 1992) where fluid flow was channeled by major normal fault zones like the Cadjebut and Pinnacles Faults. Reactive flow simulations test a petroleum-reservoir model for mineralization whereby metal-bearing brines mix with accumulated hydrocarbons (Anderson & Garven, 1987). The results show that compaction-driven flow, as proposed by Beales & Jackson (1966) and Jackson & Beales (1967), works rather well in this ore district--other mechanisms such as sealevel tidal pumping (Cathles, 1988) or topographic drive (Solomon & Groves, 1994) are more tenuous and really unnecessary from a mass transport or geohydrologic basis.

  12. Benthic community composition on submerged reefs in the central Great Barrier Reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, T. E.; Moloney, J. M.; Sweatman, H. P. A.; Bridge, T. C. L.

    2015-06-01

    Community dynamics on coral reefs are often examined only in relatively shallow waters, which are most vulnerable to many disturbances. The Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area (GBRWHA) includes extensive submerged reefs that do not approach sea level and are within depths that support many coral reef taxa that also occur in shallow water. However, the composition of benthic communities on submerged reefs in the GBRWHA is virtually unknown. We examined spatial patterns in benthic community composition on 13 submerged reefs in the central Great Barrier Reef (GBR) at depths of 10-30 m. We show that benthic communities on submerged reefs include similar species groups to those on neighbouring emergent reefs. The spatial distribution of species groups was well explained by depth and cross-shelf gradients that are well-known determinants of community composition on emergent reefs. Many equivalent species groups occurred at greater depths on submerged reefs, likely due to variability in the hydrodynamic environment among reef morphologies. Hard coral cover and species richness were lowest at the shallowest depth (6 m) on emergent reefs and were consistently higher on submerged reefs for any given depth. These results suggest that disturbances are less frequent on submerged reefs, but evidence that a severe tropical cyclone in 2011 caused significant damage to shallow regions of more exposed submerged reefs demonstrates that they are not immune. Our results confirm that submerged reefs in the central GBR support extensive and diverse coral assemblages that deserve greater attention in ecosystem assessments and management decisions.

  13. 25. FRONT END LOADERS MOMENTARILY IN REPOSE IN THE ORE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. FRONT END LOADERS MOMENTARILY IN REPOSE IN THE ORE STORAGE YARD. AN ORE BRIDGE THAT FORMERLY TRANSFERRED ORE WITHIN THE STORAGE YARD WAS DESTROYED BY A BLIZZARD IN 1978. - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  14. 36. ORE DOCK, LOOKING WEST. HULETT UNLOADERS AWAIT THE NEXT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. ORE DOCK, LOOKING WEST. HULETT UNLOADERS AWAIT THE NEXT ORE BOAT. BY LATE WINTER, THE ORE STORAGE YARD SEEN AT LEFT WILL BE DEPLETED. - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  15. Fish Assemblages on Estuarine Artificial Reefs: Natural Rocky-Reef Mimics or Discrete Assemblages?

    PubMed Central

    Folpp, Heath; Lowry, Michael; Gregson, Marcus; Suthers, Iain M.

    2013-01-01

    If the primary goal of artificial reef construction is the creation of additional reef habitat that is comparable to adjacent natural rocky-reef, then performance should be evaluated using simultaneous comparisons with adjacent natural habitats. Using baited remote underwater video (BRUV) fish assemblages on purpose-built estuarine artificial reefs and adjacent natural rocky-reef and sand-flat were assessed 18 months post-deployment in three south-east Australian estuaries. Fish abundance, species richness and diversity were found to be greater on the artificial reefs than on either naturally occurring reef or sand-flat in all estuaries. Comparisons within each estuary identified significant differences in the species composition between the artificial and natural rocky-reefs. The artificial reef assemblage was dominated by sparid species including Acanthopagrus australis and Rhabdosargus sarba. The preference for a range of habitats by theses sparid species is evident by their detection on sand-flat, natural rocky reef and artificial reef habitats. The fish assemblage identified on the artificial reefs remained distinct from the adjacent rocky-reef, comprising a range of species drawn from naturally occurring rocky-reef and sand-flat. In addition, some mid-water schooling species including Trachurus novaezelandiae and Pseudocaranx georgianus were only identified on the artificial reef community; presumably as result of the reef's isolated location in open-water. We concluded that estuarine artificial reef assemblages are likely to differ significantly from adjacent rocky-reef, potentially as a result of physical factors such as reef isolation, coupled with species specific behavioural traits such as the ability of some species to traverse large sand flats in order to locate reef structure, and feeding preferences. Artificial reefs should not be viewed as direct surrogates for natural reef. The assemblages are likely to remain distinct from naturally occurring habitat comprised of species that reside on a range of adjacent natural habitats. PMID:23755106

  16. Froth flotation of oil-bearing metal sulfide wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.L.; Atwood, R.L.; Ye, Yi

    1991-12-01

    An industrial wastewater, including plating wastes, is treated with sodium sulfide and ferrous sulfate to form a sulfide-oxide precipitate containing chromium and other toxic metals. Hydrocarbons, in the water, coat the sulfide-oxide particles, impeding metal recovery. Froth flotation, without reagent addition, was found to recover 93.9% of the solids from the sludge with simultaneous rejection of 89% of the water. Methyl isobutyl carbinol (MIBC) improved recovery and potassium amyl xanthate improved both recovery and grade. The process design has wastewater feed (without MIBC) to the rougher circuit. The rougher concentrate is conditioned with MIBC and fed to a cleaner circuit to achieve a high grade concentrate. About 95% of the water is recirculated to the waste treatment plant. 3 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Froth flotation of oil-bearing metal sulfide wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.L. ); Atwood, R.L.; Ye, Yi )

    1991-01-01

    An industrial wastewater, including plating wastes, is treated with sodium sulfide and ferrous sulfate to form a sulfide-oxide precipitate containing chromium and other toxic metals. Hydrocarbons, in the water, coat the sulfide-oxide particles, impeding metal recovery. Froth flotation, without reagent addition, was found to recover 93.9% of the solids from the sludge with simultaneous rejection of 89% of the water. Methyl isobutyl carbinol (MIBC) improved recovery and potassium amyl xanthate improved both recovery and grade. The process design has wastewater feed (without MIBC) to the rougher circuit. The rougher concentrate is conditioned with MIBC and fed to a cleaner circuit to achieve a high grade concentrate. About 95% of the water is recirculated to the waste treatment plant. 3 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Comparative evaluation of a modified zinc sulfate flotation technique.

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, M S; Harper, K; Smith, N; Verbanac, P; Smith, J W

    1978-01-01

    A modified zinc sulfate flotation technique using Formalinized fecal specimens (F-ZnSO4) was compared to the Formalin-ether (FE) concentration method for the laboratory diagnosis of intestinal parasites. Many laboratories have difficulty storing, using, and disposing of either and need a procedure for concentrating fecal specimens which does not require ether. Comparative data were obtained for the recovery of protozoan cysts and helminth eggs and larvae from feces preserved in Formalin less than and longer than 1 month. Whereas the FE method was found generally to be more efficient, F-ZnSO4 was apparently more effective for the recovery of some species of parasites. F-ZnSO4 was not satisfactory for recovery of schistosome eggs. We conclude that, except for schistosomes, F-ZnSO4 compares favorably to the FE method for detecting infections of clinical significance. PMID:566767

  19. An investigation of variables in a fecal flotation technique.

    PubMed

    O'Grady, M R; Slocombe, J O

    1980-04-01

    Several variables in a standard vial fecal gravitational flotation technique were investigated. These were the specific gravity of the sodium nitrate flotation solution, duration of flotation and mesh sizes of strainers. The number of eggs which floated and adhered to a coverslip were counted and estimates of the number of eggs remaining in the strained fecal suspension and in the feces trapped on the strainer were made. Eggs from hookworms, Trichuris vulpis and Toxocara canis in feces from dogs, Nematodirus spp. from sheep and Parascaris equorum from horses floated equally well in solutions with specific gravities (SpGr) ranging from 1.22-1.38. Taenia spp. from dogs had a slightly narrower range (SpGr 1.27-1.38) for best recovery. Eggs from Haemonchus contortus from sheep appeared to float best between SpGr 1.22- 1.32. Strongyles from one horse floated best with SpGr 1.27-1.32 and from another with SpGr 1.11-1.38. Coccidial oocysts from sheep floated best in a narrow range of SpGr from 1.22-1.27. However, as the SpGr of the solution was increased the recognition of eggs under the coverslip was increasingly difficult and especially so at SpGr 1.38 with sheep feces. This was due to the increasing amount of debris and the more rapid formation of crystals with evaporation with solutions of higher SpGr. It appeared, therefore, that solutions with SpGr of 1.22-1.35 would be best for routine laboratory use. At specific gravity 1.27, there appeared to be no difference in the number of eggs recovered for a four, eight and 12 min flotation period. Only 3-7% of the eggs in 4 g of feces were counted under the coverslip. This poor efficacy resulted first because approximately 50% of the eggs were trapped in the feces and retained on the strainer. Secondly, only one half of the strained fecal suspension, containing approximately 25% of the eggs, was placed in the vial for examination. Thirdly, of those eggs in the vial only 16-29% were counted under the coverslip. When the second half of the strained fecal suspension was placed in another vial, the amount of debris and air bubbles adhering to the coverslip was much less than that for the first vial. Egg counts for both vials appeared similar and it may be that when debris is excessive the fecal examination should involve counts from a second vial. The use of strainers finer than the standard tea strainer and the addition of minimal amounts of detergent did not increase the egg count. PMID:7190861

  20. Ecology of the south Florida coral reefs: a community profile

    SciTech Connect

    Jaap, W.C.

    1984-08-01

    An overview of coral reef research in southern Florida is provided as a prelude to a genuine description of the coral reef ecosystem in the Florida Keys and surrounding environments. Coral reef community types, reef benthos, plankton and reef fish are given specific treatment. Coral reef ecology and management are described. 27 figs., 31 tabs.

  1. Dual effects of sodium sulfide on the flotation behavior of chalcopyrite: I. Effect of pulp potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taheri, Bijan; Abdollahy, Mahmoud; Tonkaboni, Sied Ziaedin Shafaei; Javadian, Soheyla; Yarahmadi, Mohammadreza

    2014-05-01

    This study explores the flotation behavior of chalcopyrite in the presence of different concentrations of sodium sulfide (Na2S·9H2O) at pH 12 under controlled potential conditions. It was observed that the flotation of chalcopyrite is not depressed completely when the pulp potential is low, even at high concentrations of sodium sulfide, i.e., 10-1-10-2 mol/L. However, a partial and controlled oxidation of pulp does enhance the effectiveness of sodium sulfide on the depression of chalcopyrite. Characterization of the chalcopyrite particle surface by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy allowed the identification of hydrophilic and hydrophobic surface species, which are responsible for the depression and flotation of chalcopyrite. Changes in pulp potential were found to be an effective float controlling parameter, by which Na2S can be used to initiate or depress the flotation behavior of chalcopyrite.

  2. 46 CFR 169.741 - Personal flotation devices and ring life buoys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...169.741 Section 169.741 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Vessel Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment Markings § 169.741 Personal flotation...

  3. 46 CFR 169.741 - Personal flotation devices and ring life buoys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...169.741 Section 169.741 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Vessel Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment Markings § 169.741 Personal flotation...

  4. 46 CFR 169.741 - Personal flotation devices and ring life buoys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...169.741 Section 169.741 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Vessel Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment Markings § 169.741 Personal flotation...

  5. 46 CFR 169.741 - Personal flotation devices and ring life buoys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...169.741 Section 169.741 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Vessel Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment Markings § 169.741 Personal flotation...

  6. FOAM FLOTATION TREATMENT OF HEAVY METALS AND FLUORIDE-BEARING INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory studies demonstrated that the floc foam flotation techniques are effective in removing lead, cadmium, mercury, copper, zinc, arsenic, and fluoride from dilute wastewaters to very low levels. Simulated as well as real industrial wastewaters were studied. Industrial wast...

  7. Statistical Evaluation and Optimization of Factors Affecting the Leaching Performance of Copper Flotation Waste

    PubMed Central

    Çoruh, Semra; Elevli, Sermin; Geyikçi, Feza

    2012-01-01

    Copper flotation waste is an industrial by-product material produced from the process of manufacturing copper. The main concern with respect to landfilling of copper flotation waste is the release of elements (e.g., salts and heavy metals) when in contact with water, that is, leaching. Copper flotation waste generally contains a significant amount of Cu together with trace elements of other toxic metals, such as Zn, Co, and Pb. The release of heavy metals into the environment has resulted in a number of environmental problems. The aim of this study is to investigate the leaching characteristics of copper flotation waste by use of the Box-Behnken experimental design approach. In order to obtain the optimized condition of leachability, a second-order model was examined. The best leaching conditions achieved were as follows: pH = 9, stirring time = 5?min, and temperature = 41.5°C. PMID:22629194

  8. Characterisation and Processing of Some Iron Ores of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, S. J. G.; Patil, M. R.; Rudrappa, C.; Kumar, S. P.; Ravi, B. P.

    2013-10-01

    Lack of process characterization data of the ores based on the granulometry, texture, mineralogy, physical, chemical, properties, merits and limitations of process, market and local conditions may mislead the mineral processing entrepreneur. The proper implementation of process characterization and geotechnical map data will result in optimized sustainable utilization of resource by processing. A few case studies of process characterization of some Indian iron ores are dealt with. The tentative ascending order of process refractoriness of iron ores is massive hematite/magnetite < marine black iron oxide sands < laminated soft friable siliceous ore fines < massive banded magnetite quartzite < laminated soft friable clayey aluminous ore fines < massive banded hematite quartzite/jasper < massive clayey hydrated iron oxide ore < manganese bearing iron ores massive < Ti-V bearing magnetite magmatic ore < ferruginous cherty quartzite. Based on diagnostic process characterization, the ores have been classified and generic process have been adopted for some Indian iron ores.

  9. The sources of our iron ores. II

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burchard, E.F.

    1933-01-01

    In this instalment** the iron ore deposits of the Lake Superior States, which normally furnish about 80 per cent, of the annual output of the United States, are described together with historical notes on discovery and transportation of ore. Deposits in the Mississippi Valley and Western States are likewise outlined and the sources of imported ore are given. Reviewing the whole field, it is indicated that the great producing deposits of the Lake Superior and southern Appalachian regions are of hematite in basin areas of sedimentary rocks, that hydrated iron oxides and iron carbonates are generally found in undisturbed comparatively recent sediments, and that magnetite occurs in metamorphic and igneous rocks; also that numerical abundance of deposits is not a criterion as to their real importance as a source of supply. Statistics of production of iron ore and estimates of reserves of present grade conclude the paper.

  10. Project StORe: Social Science report 

    E-print Network

    Burton, Guy

    There was widespread support across the social science research community regarding the aims of the StORe Project Nearly half of social science respondents claimed that both source-to-output and out-put-to source repositories ...

  11. Project StORe: Biosciences report 

    E-print Network

    Biegon, Dagmar

    2006-09-15

    This report was written as part of the first phase of the national higher education research project StORe (Source-to-Output Repositories). The project included a large scale analysis of repository user behaviour, with ...

  12. Project StORe: Biosciences interviews 

    E-print Network

    Biegon, Dagmar

    2006-11-08

    This report was written as part of the first phase of the national higher education research project StORe (Source-to-Output Repositories). Data was acquired through a series of individual interviews which are presented ...

  13. Project StORe: Chemistry Report 

    E-print Network

    Polydoratou, Panayiota

    The StORe project (http://jiscstore.jot.com/WikiHome) is a collaboration of seven universities across the UK and the Johns Hopkins University in the USA and under funding from the Joint Information Systems Committee ...

  14. Project StORe: Biochemistry report 

    E-print Network

    Tonkin, Suzanne

    2006-01-01

    Biochemistry departments at UK universities were invited to take part in the Project StORe questionnaire. Potential sites were identified by using the list of departments submitting to the 1996 Research Assessment Exercise ...

  15. Open Scholarship 2006 StORe poster 

    E-print Network

    Pryor, Graham

    2006-01-01

    StORe is a project within the JISC digital repositories programme. It has a declared mission to enhance the value of academic research output by enabling direct interaction between source and output repositories...

  16. Project StORe: Physics Report 

    E-print Network

    Bull, Stephen

    Results are presented on the Physics Survey of Researcher Use of Repositories which constitutes the culmination of Work Package 2 (in Physics) of Project StORe (Source to Output Repositories). The data were obtained by ...

  17. Miocene precursors to Great Barrier Reef

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, P.J.; Symonds, P.A.; Feary, D.A.; Pigram, C.

    1988-01-01

    Huge reefs of Miocene age are present in the Gulf of Papua north of the present-day Great Barrier Reef and to the east on the Marion and Queensland Plateaus. In the Gulf of Papua, Miocene barrier reefs formed the northern forerunner of the Great Barrier Reef, extending for many hundreds of kilometers along the eastern and northern margin of the Australian craton within a developing foreland basin. Barrier reefs, slope pinnacle reefs, and platform reefs are seen in seismic sections and drill holes. Leeside talus deposits testify to the high energy impinging on the eastern margin of these Miocene reefs. The Queensland Plateau is a marginal plateau east of the central Great Barrier Reef and separated from it by a rift trough. Miocene reefs occupied an area of about 50,000 km/sup 2/ and grew on salt-controlled highs on the western margin of the plateau and on a regional basement high extending from the platform interior to its southern margin. Reef growth has continued to the present day, although two major contractions in the area covered by reefs occurred during the Miocene. The Marion Plateau is present directly east of the Great Barrier Reef and during the Micoene formed a 30,000-km/sup 2/ platform with barrier reefs along its northern margin and huge platform reefs and laggons on the platform interior. These reefs grew on a flat peneplained surface, the whole area forming a large shallow epicontinental sea. In all three areas, the middle Miocene formed the acme of reef expansion in the region.

  18. Biomining: metal recovery from ores with microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Schippers, Axel; Hedrich, Sabrina; Vasters, Jürgen; Drobe, Malte; Sand, Wolfgang; Willscher, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    Biomining is an increasingly applied biotechnological procedure for processing of ores in the mining industry (biohydrometallurgy). Nowadays the production of copper from low-grade ores is the most important industrial application and a significant part of world copper production already originates from heap or dump/stockpile bioleaching. Conceptual differences exist between the industrial processes of bioleaching and biooxidation. Bioleaching is a conversion of an insoluble valuable metal into a soluble form by means of microorganisms. In biooxidation, on the other hand, gold is predominantly unlocked from refractory ores in large-scale stirred-tank biooxidation arrangements for further processing steps. In addition to copper and gold production, biomining is also used to produce cobalt, nickel, zinc, and uranium. Up to now, biomining has merely been used as a procedure in the processing of sulfide ores and uranium ore, but laboratory and pilot procedures already exist for the processing of silicate and oxide ores (e.g., laterites), for leaching of processing residues or mine waste dumps (mine tailings), as well as for the extraction of metals from industrial residues and waste (recycling). This chapter estimates the world production of copper, gold, and other metals by means of biomining and chemical leaching (bio-/hydrometallurgy) compared with metal production by pyrometallurgical procedures, and describes new developments in biomining. In addition, an overview is given about metal sulfide oxidizing microorganisms, fundamentals of biomining including bioleaching mechanisms and interface processes, as well as anaerobic bioleaching and bioleaching with heterotrophic microorganisms. PMID:23793914

  19. The use of ion flotation for detoxification of metal-contaminated waters and process effluents

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, F.M.; Duyvesteyn, S.; Sreenivasarao, K.

    1995-12-31

    Toxic metals entering surface or ground water from sources such as metal finishing shop spills and abandoned mines can pose a significant threat to public health and the environment. Ion flotation and similar foam separation techniques show great promise for treating dilute, metal-contaminated solutions, and could also be used to treat effluents from many minerals and metallurgical processing operations prior to discharge. In ion flotation, an appropriate collector is added to the solution to form hydrophobic complexes with the metal ions. These metal-bearing species are then removed by flotation, usually with trace addition of a frother to stabilize the foam. In an effort to better understand the underlying scientific and engineering principles that determine the performance of ion flotation, the removal of Cu(II), Pb(II), Cd(II), Cr(III) and Cr(VI) has been studied using laboratory scale flotation columns in batch mode. The effects of the superficial air velocity, solution and froth height, nature of the collector, collector:metal-ion ratio, ionic strength and several frothers at low concentrations on the flotation kinetics are reported. Finally, results are presented on methods that might allow regeneration of collector and recovery of by-product metal from the foam product.

  20. Flotation separation of polyvinyl chloride and polyethylene terephthalate plastics combined with surface modification for recycling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chongqing; Wang, Hui; Fu, Jiangang; Zhang, Lingling; Luo, Chengcheng; Liu, Younian

    2015-11-01

    Surface modification with potassium permanganate (KMnO4) solution was developed for separation of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) waste plastics. The floatability of PVC decreases with increasing of KMnO4 concentration, treatment time, temperature and stirring rate, while that of PET is unaffected. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) analysis confirms that mechanism of surface modification may be due to oxidization reactions occurred on PVC surface. The optimum conditions are KMnO4 concentration 1.25mM/L, treatment time 50min, temperature 60°C, stirring rate 300r/min, frother concentration 17.5g/L and flotation time 1min. PVC and PET with different particle sizes were separated efficiently through two-stage flotation. Additionally, after ultrasonic assisted surface modification, separation of PVC and PET with different mass ratios was obtained efficiently through one-stage flotation. The purity and the recovery of the obtained products after flotation separation are up to 99.30% and 99.73%, respectively. A flotation process was designed for flotation separation of PVC and PET plastics combined with surface modification. This study provides technical insights into physical separation of plastic wastes for recycling industry. PMID:26253330

  1. General Coral Reef Facts Healthy coral reefs are among the most biologically diverse and economically valuable

    E-print Network

    General Coral Reef Facts Healthy coral reefs are among the most biologically diverse on current estimates, shallow water coral reefs occupy approximately 284,300 square kilometers (110,000 square miles) of the sea floor. If all of the world's shallow water coral reefs were placed side

  2. Reef Odor: A wake up call for navigation in reef fish larvae --Manuscript Draft--

    E-print Network

    Paris-Limouzy, Claire B.

    -ocean; swimming speed; orientation; behavioral arena; chemical cues; tidal current; Great Barrier Reef; drifting, were observed in the two water masses around One Tree Island, southern Great Barrier Reef. The studyPLOS ONE Reef Odor: A wake up call for navigation in reef fish larvae --Manuscript Draft

  3. Ores and Climate Change - Primary Shareholders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Holly J.; Hannah, Judith L.

    2015-04-01

    Many in the economic geology community concern themselves with details of ore formation at the deposit scale, whether tallying fluid inclusion data to get at changes in ore-forming fluids or defining structures that aid and abet mineralization. These compilations are generally aimed at interpretation of events at the site of ore formation, with the goal being assignment of the deposit to a sanctioned ore deposit model. While providing useful data, this approach is incomplete and does not, by itself, serve present-day requirements for true interdisciplinary science. The ore-forming environment is one of chaos and disequilibrium at nearly all scales (Stein, 2014). Chaos and complexity are documented by variably altered rocks, veins or disseminated mineralization with multi-generational fluid histories, erratic and unusual textures in host rocks, and the bitumen or other hydrocarbon products entwined within many ore deposits. This should give pause to our drive for more data as a means to find "the answer". The answer lies in the kind of data collected and more importantly, in the way we interpret those data. Rather than constructing an ever-increasing catalog of descriptive mutations on sanctioned ore deposit models (e.g., IOGC or Iron-Oxide Copper Gold deposits), the way forward is to link source and transport of metals, sulfur, and organic material with regional and ultimately whole Earth chemical evolution. Important experimental work provides chemical constraints in controlled and behaved environments. To these data, we add imagination and interpretation, always tying back to field observations. In this paper, several key points are made by way of ore deposit examples: (1) many IOCG deposits are outcomes of profound changes in the chemistry of the Earth's surface, in the interplay of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, and lithosphere; (2) the redox history of Fe in deep earth may be ultimately expressed in the ore-forming sequence; and (3) the formation of many giant Cu-Mo-Au ore deposits may be arrested when the surface is catastrophically breached, as multiple km-scale breccia pipes empty their volatile and metal contents into the atmosphere. The new equation for studying ore geology should be one that reconstructs ore formation from beginning to end, that is, from source, release, and transport, to breach. Of course, detailed measurements and mapping of ore bodies remains essential, but a full understanding of metal migration and budgets can only be achieved if we model what might have been left behind in deeper Earth, and what may have been lost to the atmosphere. To do this, we need to understand much more than the geology at our ore deposit of interest. Stein, H.J. (2014) Dating and Tracing the History of Ore Formation. Treatise on Geochemistry 13: 87-118. Elsevier. Support for time to think - CHRONOS, funded by a consortium of Norwegian petroleum companies.

  4. 40 CFR 230.44 - Coral reefs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... OCEAN DUMPING SECTION 404(b)(1) GUIDELINES FOR SPECIFICATION OF DISPOSAL SITES FOR DREDGED OR FILL MATERIAL Potential Impacts on Special Aquatic Sites § 230.44 Coral reefs. (a) Coral reefs consist of the skeletal deposit,...

  5. Reef Squid at USGS Monitoring Station

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A curious reef squid hovers over a calcification-monitoring station used to measure calcification rates to determine impact of ocean acidification on coral growth at Fowey Rocks Light Reef in Biscayne National Park.  ...

  6. Miocene reefs of Dominican Republic

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, C.C.

    1988-01-01

    The reefs are overlain by conglomeratic strata. The stratigraphic setting of these reefs suggests that they have developed along the stalled portions of rapidly prograding fan deltas. Thickets and layers of coral debris are found seaward and stratigraphically above the well-developed reef. The matrix sediments are exclusively fine-grained sand to mud, and the fauna are suggestive of more open shelf conditions. In thickets, branched (porites spp., Pocillopora spp.), small massive (Montastrea spp., Siderastrea spp.), and foliose or plate like (Agaricia spp.) corals are found upright in the muddy sediment. Similarities in coral species and areal proximity suggest that thickets are the source of most layers of coralline debris. The association of coral debris with graded bedding and cross-bedding suggests that coral debris has been reworked by storms. The growth of corals and development of coral reefs in the Miocene-Pliocene Yaque Group is limited only by opportunities created by the slowing of siliciclastic sedimentation. Soft, muddy, terrigenous substrates and a continuing supply of terrigenous mud exert only a limited, indirect effect on reef growth.

  7. Antimony ore in the Fairbanks district, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Killeen, Pemberton Lewis; Mertie, John B., Jr.

    1951-01-01

    Antimony-bearing ores in the Fairbanks district, Alaska, are found principally in two areas, the extremities of which are at points 10 miles west and 23 miles northeast of Fairbanks; and one of two minor areas lies along this same trend 30 miles farther to the northeast. These areas are probably only local manifestations of mineralization that affected a much broader area and formed antimony-bearing deposits in neighboring districts, the closest of which is 50 miles away. The ores were exposed largely as a result of lode gold mining, but at two periods in the past, high prices for antimony ore warranted an independent production and about 2500 tons of stibnite ore was shipped. The sulfide deposits occupy the same fractures along which a gold-quartz mineralization of greater economic importance occurred; and both are probably genetically related to igneous rocks which intrude the schistose country rock. The sulfide is in part contemporaneous with some late-stage quartz in which it occurs as disseminated crystals; and in part the latest filling in the mineralized zones where it forms kidney-shaped masses of essentially solid sulfide. One extremely long mass must have contained nearly 100 tons of ore, but the average of the larger kidneys is closer to several tons. Much of the ore is stibnite, with quartz as a minor impurity, and assays show the tenor to vary from 40 to 65 percent antimony. Sulphantimonites are less abundant but likewise occur as disseminated crystals and as kidney-shaped bodies. Antimony oxides appear on the weathered surface and along fractures within the sulfide ore. Deposits containing either stibnite or sulphantimonite are known at more than 50 localities, but only eighteen have produced ore and the bulk of this came from the mines. The geology of the deposit, and the nature, extent, and period of the workings are covered in the detailed descriptions of individual occurrences. Several geologic and economic factors, which greatly affect prospecting and mining for stibnite ore in the area, are outlined. The principal available ore and reserves are considered to be ores earlier mined but never shipped, ore minable from near-surface deposits, and ores recoverable as a by-product of future gold mining. The outlook for stibnite production in the district is very uncertain. Apparently the greater portion of stibnite ore has already been recovered and present operations will strip the two principal areas of the district. This conclusion is based on the scanty discoveries since the last war and the fact that the areas are so pock-marked with prospects that there is little likelihood that any other large near-surface bodies remain to be discovered. Future prospecting would essentially be limited to attempts to seek the continuation of lodes previously having high yields of stibnite.

  8. MFR PAPER 1183 Helen Reef's large tridacnid

    E-print Network

    of Giant Clam Stocks (Tridacnidae) on Helen Reef, Palau, Western Caroline Islands, April 1975 Philippines species is allributed to human explOitation. Tridacna maxima and T. crocea did not appear to have been and lagoon reefs (patch reefs) harbored. until recently. considerable popu- lations of tridacnid clams (giant

  9. PHOSPHATE METABOLISM OF CORAL REEF FLATS

    E-print Network

    Qiu, Bo

    PHOSPHATE METABOLISM OF CORAL REEF FLATS A DISSERTATION SUBMITTED TO THE GRADUATE DIVISION. Chave Edward A. Laws David M. Karl Robert L. Fox #12;iv ABSTRACT Ihe present dogma on coral reef overlying that community. The reef's nutritional requirements supposedly are met by cycling or retention

  10. Artificial Reefs off Murrells Inlet, South Carolina

    E-print Network

    Artificial Reefs off Murrells Inlet, South Carolina R. O. PARKER, Jr., R. B. STONE, and C. C. BUCHANAN - Introduction In recent years, many State fishery agencies have constructed artificial reefs to enhance recreational fishing. There are approximately 500 artificial reefs off the coasts of the United

  11. 40 CFR 230.44 - Coral reefs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Coral reefs. 230.44 Section 230.44 Protection of...Impacts on Special Aquatic Sites § 230.44 Coral reefs. (a) Coral reefs consist of the skeletal deposit, usually...

  12. 40 CFR 230.44 - Coral reefs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Coral reefs. 230.44 Section 230.44 Protection of...Impacts on Special Aquatic Sites § 230.44 Coral reefs. (a) Coral reefs consist of the skeletal deposit, usually...

  13. 40 CFR 230.44 - Coral reefs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coral reefs. 230.44 Section 230.44 Protection of...Impacts on Special Aquatic Sites § 230.44 Coral reefs. (a) Coral reefs consist of the skeletal deposit, usually...

  14. 40 CFR 230.44 - Coral reefs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Coral reefs. 230.44 Section 230.44 Protection of...Impacts on Special Aquatic Sites § 230.44 Coral reefs. (a) Coral reefs consist of the skeletal deposit, usually...

  15. How many ore-bearing asteroids?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elvis, Martin

    2014-02-01

    A simple formalism is presented to assess how many asteroids contain ore, i.e., commercially profitable material, and not merely a high concentration of a resource. I apply this formalism to two resource cases: platinum group metals (PGMs) and water. Assuming for now that only Ni-Fe asteroids are of interest for PGMs, then 1% of NEOs are rich in PGMs. The dearth of ultra-low delta-v (<4.5 km s-1) NEOs larger than 100 m diameter reduces the ore-bearing fraction to only 1 in 2000 NEOs. As 100 m diameter NEOs are needed to have a value ?US$1B and the population of near-Earth objects (NEOs) larger than 100 m diameter is 20,000 (Mainzer et al., 2011) the total population of PGM ore-bearing NEOs is roughly 10. I stress that this is a conservative and highly uncertain value. For example, an order of magnitude increase in PGM ore-bearing NEOs occurs if delta-v can be as large as 5.7 km s-1. Water ore for utilization in space is likely to be found in 1/1100 NEOs. NEOs as small as 18 m diameter can be water-ore-bodies because of the high richness of water ( 20%) expected in 25% of carbonaceous asteroids, bringing the number of water-ore-bearing NEOs to 9000 out of the 10 million NEOs of this size. These small NEOs are, however, hard to find with present surveys. There will be 18 water-ore-bearing NEOs >100 m diameter. These estimates are at present highly imprecise and sensitive to small changes, especially in the maximum delta-v allowed. Nonetheless the low values found here mean that much improved determinations of each of the terms of the formalism are urgently needed. If better estimates still find small numbers of ore-bearing NEOs then thorough surveys for NEA discovery and, especially, characterization are needed. Strategies for the two classes are likely to be different.

  16. Contamination of soils near a tailing pond at the Zlate Hory polymetallic ore deposit

    SciTech Connect

    Raclavska, H.; Raclavska, K.

    1994-12-31

    The relationship between concentrations of trace elements in soils and their content in plants has became a frequently discussed issue. Attention also focuses on the effects of trace element concentrations on the healthy development of vegetation. The Zlate Hory Mining District (in the northern part of the Jeseniky Mountains, 14 km east of Jesenik) with its polymetallic mineral deposits represents an important geochemical source area. It provides opportunities for the study of trace element distributions in the soil horizons and vegetation of a forest comprising mainly Norway spruce, Picea abies (L.) Karsten. Conditions of geochemical migration vary widely from geochemical background to the anomalous areas affected by a high level of mining activity. Trace element distribution in soil horizons was studied in the flood plain of Prudnik Creek. The study area was delineated using basic square units, 10 x 10 m, alternated regularly with free squares. Soil sampling was performed inside the basic square units simultaneously with geobotanical mapping. The study area was located where soils of the flood plain are influenced by waters discharged from a tailing pond and by the highly contaminated waters of Prudnik Creek. The tailing pond is situated above the study area, on the western slope of the Prudnik valley. The mine and mineral dressing plant is located two kilometers upstream to the south. Flotation technology is used to produce chalcopyrite concentrate from ore of the disseminated type. Stratiform ore bodies formed by chalcopyrite and pyrite, with some admixtures of galena and sphalerite, are deposited in metamorphosed Devonian series with quartzite and phyllites predominant.

  17. A deep reef in deep trouble

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Menza, Charles; Kendall, M.; Rogers, C.; Miller, J.

    2007-01-01

    The well-documented degradation of shallower reefs which are often closer to land and more vulnerable to pollution, sewage and other human-related stressors has led to the suggestion that deeper, more remote offshore reefs could possibly serve as sources of coral and fish larvae to replenish the shallower reefs. Yet, the distribution, status, and ecological roles of deep (>30 m) Caribbean reefs are not well known. In this report, an observation of a deep reef which has undergone a recent extensive loss of coral cover is presented. In stark contrast to the typical pattern of coral loss in shallow reefs, the deeper corals were most affected. This report is the first description of such a pattern of coral loss on a deep reef.

  18. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies: Froth flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The design criteria for each unit operation have been developed based upon a number of variables. These variables, at this time, are based upon the best engineering design information available to industry. A number of assumptions utilized in the design criteria are uncertain. The uncertainties of inert atmospheres for grinding and flotation as well as pyrite depressants were answered by the Surface Control Project. It was determined that inerting was not required and no new'' reagents were presented that improved the flotation results. In addition, Tasks 5 and 6 results indicated the required reagent dosage for conventional flotation and advanced flotation. Task 5 results also indicated the need for a clean coal,thickener, the flocculent dosages for both the clean coal and refuse thickeners, and final dewatering requirements. The results from Tasks 5 and 6 and summarized in Task 7 indicate several uncertainties that require continuous long duration testing. The first is the possibility of producing a grab product for both the Pittsburgh and Illinois No. 6 coals in conventional flotation. Second what does long-term recirculation of clarified water do to the product quality The verification process and real data obtained from Tasks 5 and 6 greatly reduced the capital and operating costs for the process. This was anticipated and the test work indeed provided confirming data.

  19. Method for extraction of uranium from ores

    SciTech Connect

    Bings, H.; Fischer, P.; Kampf, F.; Pietsch, H.; Thome, R.; Turke, W.; Wargalla, G.; Winkhaus, G.

    1982-11-30

    A method for continuously extracting uranium from ores comprises the steps of: forming a slurry of ore in a leaching solution; heating the slurry while pumping it through a tube reactor at high turbulences characterized by Reynolds numbers in excess of 50,000; supplying gaseous oxygen at high pressures into the tube reactor such that the uranium is substantially completely oxidized in a soluble form but impurities in the slurry are substantially kept from becoming soluble; recovering the uranium oxide solute which is substantially free of impurities.

  20. Processing of Goethitic Iron Ore Fines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, J.; Sharma, T.; Mandre, N. R.

    2015-10-01

    In the present investigation an attempt has been made to beneficiate goethitic iron ore containing 59.02 % Iron, 6.51 % Alumina, 4.79 % Silica, 0.089 % Phosphorus with 7.11 % loss on ignition. For this purpose, different beneficiation techniques such as gravity and magnetic separation processes have been employed. During the process two conceptual flow sheets were also developed for the beneficiation of goethite iron ore fines. In the prsent work it was possible to enhance grade of iron to 63.35, 63.18, and 65.35 % from Jigging, Multi Gravity Separation (MGS) and Wet High Intensity Magnetic Separator (WHIMS) respectively.

  1. 40 CFR 440.20 - Applicability; description of the aluminum ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... aluminum ore subcategory. 440.20 Section 440.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Aluminum Ore Subcategory § 440.20 Applicability; description of the aluminum ore subcategory. The... an aluminum ore....

  2. 40 CFR 440.20 - Applicability; description of the aluminum ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... aluminum ore subcategory. 440.20 Section 440.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Aluminum Ore Subcategory § 440.20 Applicability; description of the aluminum ore subcategory. The... an aluminum ore....

  3. 40 CFR 440.20 - Applicability; description of the aluminum ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... aluminum ore subcategory. 440.20 Section 440.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Aluminum Ore Subcategory § 440.20 Applicability; description of the aluminum ore subcategory. The... an aluminum ore....

  4. Sandstone Spire in Capitol Reef

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A view of a sandstone spire in Capitol Reef National Park. This area, known as the Fruita, is made up of three primary layers. The bottom sandstone layer is known as the Moenkopi Formation and is about 245 million years old. The middle gray-green layer is known as the Chinle Formation and was laid d...

  5. The future of coral reefs

    PubMed Central

    Knowlton, Nancy

    2001-01-01

    Coral reefs, with their millions of species, have changed profoundly because of the effects of people, and will continue to do so for the foreseeable future. Reefs are subject to many of the same processes that affect other human-dominated ecosystems, but some special features merit emphasis: (i) Many dominant reef builders spawn eggs and sperm into the water column, where fertilization occurs. They are thus particularly vulnerable to Allee effects, including potential extinction associated with chronic reproductive failure. (ii) The corals likely to be most resistant to the effects of habitat degradation are small, short-lived “weedy” corals that have limited dispersal capabilities at the larval stage. Habitat degradation, together with habitat fragmentation, will therefore lead to the establishment of genetically isolated clusters of inbreeding corals. (iii) Increases in average sea temperatures by as little as 1°C, a likely result of global climate change, can cause coral “bleaching” (the breakdown of coral–algal symbiosis), changes in symbiont communities, and coral death. (iv) The activities of people near reefs increase both fishing pressure and nutrient inputs. In general, these processes favor more rapidly growing competitors, often fleshy seaweeds, and may also result in explosions of predator populations. (v) Combinations of stress appear to be associated with threshold responses and ecological surprises, including devastating pathogen outbreaks. (vi) The fossil record suggests that corals as a group are more likely to suffer extinctions than some of the groups that associate with them, whose habitat requirements may be less stringent. PMID:11344288

  6. Quantifying Coral Reef Ecosystem Services

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coral reefs have been declining during the last four decades as a result of both local and global anthropogenic stresses. Numerous research efforts to elucidate the nature, causes, magnitude, and potential remedies for the decline have led to the widely held belief that the recov...

  7. Mid-late Holocene Reef Growth and Sedimentation History at Inshore Fringing Reefs in the Central Great Barrier Reef, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, E.; Smithers, S.; Lewis, S.; Zhao, J. X.; Clark, T.

    2014-12-01

    Inshore coral reefs of Australia's Great Barrier Reef (GBR) are threatened by terrestrial sediment loads that are argued to have increased by five to six times since coastal catchments were settled by Europeans in the mid-1850s. Nutrient and contaminant delivery to the inshore GBR has also increased over this period. However, direct evidence that European colonisation has changed the ecology of inshore reefs on the GBR remains limited, partly due to a lack of baseline historical data on coral reef growth. Coral reefs have been growing in inshore areas of the GBR since 6 or 7 ky BP, and have experienced natural fluctuations in terrestrial sediment loads over this period. For example, floods associated with episodic cyclones and major rainfall events often deliver pulses of sediment, especially if they follow prolonged dry spells. To better understand this history of sediment influx and reef development, we have examined in detail the chronostratigraphy of several inshore GBR reefs that have grown since the mid-Holocene. Here, we report on eight percussion cores collected at Bramston Reef (148°15'E, 20°03'S). Two cores terminate in the pre-Holocene substrate and therefore capture the entire Holocene sequence of both reef framework and terrigenous sediment matrix. Results from detailed core analyses indicate variable sedimentation patterns throughout the period of reef development. Furthermore, reef ecological condition and variability through the mid-late Holocene is described using palaeoecological analyses. We explore the impacts of sedimentation variability on reef growth and ecology, and compare reef ecological condition pre- and post-European colonisation.

  8. SABATO 24 OTTOBRE SALA KODAK | ORE 15.00

    E-print Network

    Di Pillo, Gianni

    NOVEMBRE SALA DELUXE | ORE 11.00 Conversazioni a porte aperte nuovi scenari: America e Russia Incontro con scrittore) SALA KODAK | ORE 16.00 The African Queen (La regina d'Africa) di Howard Hawks USA, Gran Bretagna

  9. 3. DETAIL OF ORE RECEIVING PLATFORM AND GRIZZLY, VIEW TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. DETAIL OF ORE RECEIVING PLATFORM AND GRIZZLY, VIEW TO WEST. - Vanadium Corporation of America (VCA) Naturita Mill, Sampling Building & Ore Receiving Platform, 3 miles Northwest of Naturita, between Highway 141 & San Miguel River, Naturita, Montrose County, CO

  10. 2. VIEW TO NORTHEAST (ORE RECEIVING PLATFORM OUT OF VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW TO NORTHEAST (ORE RECEIVING PLATFORM OUT OF VIEW TO RIGHT). - Vanadium Corporation of America (VCA) Naturita Mill, Sampling Building & Ore Receiving Platform, 3 miles Northwest of Naturita, between Highway 141 & San Miguel River, Naturita, Montrose County, CO

  11. 4. DETAIL OF ORE RECEIVING PLATFORM AND GRIZZLY, VIEW TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. DETAIL OF ORE RECEIVING PLATFORM AND GRIZZLY, VIEW TO EAST. - Vanadium Corporation of America (VCA) Naturita Mill, Sampling Building & Ore Receiving Platform, 3 miles Northwest of Naturita, between Highway 141 & San Miguel River, Naturita, Montrose County, CO

  12. 1. VIEW TO SOUTH (RETAINING WALL OF ORE RECEIVING PLATFORM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW TO SOUTH (RETAINING WALL OF ORE RECEIVING PLATFORM TO LEFT). - Vanadium Corporation of America (VCA) Naturita Mill, Sampling Building & Ore Receiving Platform, 3 miles Northwest of Naturita, between Highway 141 & San Miguel River, Naturita, Montrose County, CO

  13. CONTEXT VIEW ACROSS ORE YARD AT MODERN SELFUNLOADING SHIP UNLOADING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONTEXT VIEW ACROSS ORE YARD AT MODERN SELF-UNLOADING SHIP UNLOADING IN FRONT OF HULETTS. LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  14. CONTEXT VIEW SHOWING MODERN TRACKS PASSING UNDER HULETTS AND ORE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONTEXT VIEW SHOWING MODERN TRACKS PASSING UNDER HULETTS AND ORE YARD. LOOKING NORTHEAST. - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  15. CONTEXT VIEW ACROSS ORE YARD AT MODERN SELFUNLOADING BOOM IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONTEXT VIEW ACROSS ORE YARD AT MODERN SELF-UNLOADING BOOM IN FRONT OF HULETTS. LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  16. CONTEXT VIEW ALONG EXISTING PERIMETER TRACKS LOOKING OVER IRON ORE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONTEXT VIEW ALONG EXISTING PERIMETER TRACKS LOOKING OVER IRON ORE CARS TOWARDS CLEVELAND BULK TERMINAL BUILDINGS. LOOKING SOUTH. - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  17. AERIAL OVERVIEW, LOOKING NORTH, WITH FORMER TCIUS STEEL ORE MINE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    AERIAL OVERVIEW, LOOKING NORTH, WITH FORMER TCI-US STEEL ORE MINE HEADQUARTERS (BOTTOM) AND SUPERINTENDENT'S AND FOREMAN HOUSING ALONG MINNESOTA AVENUE AT CREST OF RED MOUNTAIN (TOP LEFT). - Muscoda Red Ore Mining Community, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  18. 24. OVERHEAD VIEW OF MARISCAL WORKS ORE BIN FOUNDATION AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. OVERHEAD VIEW OF MARISCAL WORKS ORE BIN FOUNDATION AND CONDENSERS, TOWARD WHERE ORE DELIVERY TRACK WOULD HAVE RUN, LOOKING NORTHEAST. - Mariscal Quicksilver Mine & Reduction Works, Terlingua, Brewster County, TX

  19. OVERHEAD VIEW OF MARISCAL WORKS ORE BIN FOUNDATION AND CONDENSERS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERHEAD VIEW OF MARISCAL WORKS ORE BIN FOUNDATION AND CONDENSERS, TOWARD WHERE ORE DELIVERY TRACK WOULD HAVE RUN, LOOKING NORTHEAST. - Mariscal Quicksilver Mine & Reduction Works, Terlingua, Brewster County, TX

  20. images courtesy Simon Donner Why study coral reef ecosystems?

    E-print Network

    Keeling, Patrick

    images courtesy Simon Donner Why study coral reef ecosystems? Coral reefs are more sensitive on coral reefs for shoreline protection, for food, and for their livelihoods. By understanding how corals for a warmer future. How does climate change affect coral reefs? The health of coral reefs ecosystems, the most

  1. Great Barrier Reef First Report Card 2009 Baseline

    E-print Network

    Hilderbrand, Robert H.

    Great Barrier Reef First Report Card 2009 Baseline Reef Water Quality Protection Plan #12;Taking for the protection of the Great Barrier Reef. Reef Plan focuses on the threat posed by diffuse source agricultural, catchment indicators, catchment loads and the health of the Great Barrier Reef. © The State of Queensland

  2. Catchment to Reef: Water Quality Issues in the

    E-print Network

    Marsh, Helene

    Catchment to Reef: Water Quality Issues in the Great Barrier Reef Region. 9-11 March 2004, Townsville. Conference abstracts. Edited by: David Haynes1,3 and Britta Schaffelke2, 3 1 Great Barrier Reef, Australian Institute of Marine Science, Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority, Great Barrier Reef Research

  3. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning technolgies: Froth flotation. Quarterly technical progress report No. 10, January 1, 1991--March 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    The Task 6 effort involves three main elements including column cell development, flotation circuit testing and flotation cell modeling. The work outlined is to research column designs and operation parameters in developing an optimized column flotation cell (OCFC) to meet the overall program objectives. Any design parameters that were not evaluated as part of the optimized column development work will be reviewed and tested so as to incorporate all possible scenarios in presenting DOE with the best available flotation process for use in the 2 to 3 ton per hour POC. Following development of the OCFC, various flotation circuit configurations will be evaluated determine the ``best`` circuit design for the 2 to 3 ton per hour POC. Single and multiple stage flotation, grab and run, rougher/scavenger/cleaner, etc., test circuits will be tested as part of this effort. Upon completion of this test work, the ``best`` possible flotation cell will have been tested in a number of possible flotation circuit designs to possibly provide the ``best`` flotation approach in meeting the design criteria. In conjunction with the flotation test effort, model development work will be conducted to provide a tool in evaluating the various flotation circuit configurations and in predicting flotation performance. The model will be useful in selecting operating conditions in the POC and in evaluating the performance of the POC.

  4. Sewage sludge and fly ash mixture as an alternative for decontaminating lead and zinc ore regions.

    PubMed

    Pogrzeba, M; Galimska-Stypa, R; Krzy?ak, J; Sas-Nowosielska, A

    2015-01-01

    Many years of heavy industrial processes in the Upper Silesian Industrial Region in Poland (ore flotation, metal smelting and battery scrap processing) have resulted in lead, zinc and cadmium pollution of the air and soil. The most significant issues stem not only from elevated levels of these metals in environmental compartments, but also from the uneven pattern of their distribution. Point sources of local metal concentration are to be found dispersed over areas of contaminated soil. Such distribution is a challenge for remediation technology, as it precludes the introduction of standard procedures. Metals present in the soil pose a constant risk for living organisms. One of the most effective ways of limiting their ecological impact is by decreasing their mobility. In this study, the effect of introducing sewage sludge and fly ash mixtures (sluash material) into contaminated soil was evaluated. We tested the mixture in terms of the probability of its ecotoxicological impact on plant growth and development. The data obtained have shown that even low doses (3%) of sluash are effective in reducing the bioavailability of lead, cadmium and zinc, resulting in a decrease of their concentration in plants. The application of sluash also led to stabilize soil pH. It also had a positive impact on the total number of soil bacteria and soil fungi. PMID:25381583

  5. 32. INTERIOR VIEW LOOKING NORTH ON THE ORE BREAKER LEVEL. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. INTERIOR VIEW LOOKING NORTH ON THE ORE BREAKER LEVEL. THE ORE BREAKER, A BLAKE JAW CRUSHER, IS IN THE BOX IN THE LEFT OF THE PHOTOGRAPH, THE ORE TO BE BROKEN IS FED INTO THE OPENING ON THE FLOOR AND NEXT TO ORE BREAKER BOX. THE GRIZZLY BARS ARE ON THE RIGHT AND THE PULLEYS FROM THE POWER SYSTEM ARE OVERHEAD. - Standard Gold Mill, East of Bodie Creek, Northeast of Bodie, Bodie, Mono County, CA

  6. Cognome e nome . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ALGA 14 novembre 2011 Compitino (2 ore)

    E-print Network

    Robbiano, Lorenzo

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ALGA 14 novembre 2011­ Compitino (2 ore) Giustificare ogni affermazione Salvare il file CoCoA come

  7. Cognome e nome . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ALGA 2 febbraio 2012 Compitino (2 ore)

    E-print Network

    Robbiano, Lorenzo

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ALGA 2 febbraio 2012­ Compitino (2 ore) Giustificare ogni affermazione Salvare il file CoCoA come

  8. New evidence for the barrier reef model, Permian Capitan Reef complex, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkland, B.L.; Moore, C.H. Jr. )

    1990-05-01

    Recent paleontologic and petrologic observations suggest that the Capitan Formation was deposited as an organic or ecologic reef that acted as an emergent barrier to incoming wave energy. In outcrops in the Guadalupe Mountains and within Carlsbad Caverns, massive reef boundstone contains a highly diverse assemblage of frame-building and binding organisms. In modern reefs, diversity among frame builders decreases dramatically with depth. Marine cement is abundant in reef boundstone, but limited in back-reef grainstone and packstone. This cementation pattern is similar to that observed in modern emergent barrier reef systems. Based on comparison with modern analogs, these dasycladrominated back-reef sediments and their associated biota are indicative of shallow, hypersaline conditions. Few of these dasyclads exhibit broken or abraded segments and some thallus sections are still articulated suggesting that low-energy, hypersaline conditions occurred immediately shelfward of the reef. In addition, large-scale topographic features, such as possible spur and groove structures between Walnut Canyon and Rattlesnake Canyon, and facies geometries, such as the reef to shelf transition, resemble those found in modern shallow-water reefs. The organisms that formed the Capitan Reef appear to have lived in, and responded to, physical and chemical conditions similar to those that control the geometry of modern shallow-water reefs. Like their modern counterparts, they seem to have strongly influenced adjacent environments. In light of this evidence, consideration should be given to either modifying or abandoning the marginal mound model in favor of the originally proposed barrier reef model.

  9. Utilization of starch graft copolymers as selective depressants for lizardite in the flotation of pentlandite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jian; Luo, Yong-Chun; Xu, Guo-Qiang; Qi, Li; Hu, Xiu-Qin; Xu, Peng-Fei; Zhang, Liu-Yi; Cheng, Shao-Yi

    2015-05-01

    This paper investigates the detrimental effect of lizardite surface characteristics on pentlandite flotation. To reduce the effect, two different starch graft copolymers, starch-graft-polyacrylamide (S-g-PAM) and starch-graft-polyacrylic acid (S-g-PAA) were synthesized as depressants for lizardite. The flotation results show that at pH value of 8, where the flotation of lizardite and pentlandite are routinely performed, S-g-PAM and S-g-PAA improve pentlandite recovery efficiently, compared with the traditional depressant carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC). Experimental results demonstrate that S-g-PAM and S-g-PAA disperse the hydrophilic lizardite particles from the pentlandite surface and also flocculate lizardite particles.

  10. Separation of packaging plastics by froth flotation in a continuous pilot plant

    SciTech Connect

    Carvalho, Teresa; Durao, Fernando; Ferreira, Celia

    2010-11-15

    The objective of the research was to apply froth flotation to separate post-consumer PET (Polyethylene Terephthalate) from other packaging plastics with similar density, in a continuously operated pilot plant. A representative sample composed of 85% PET, 2.5% PVC (Polyvinyl Chloride) and 11.9% PS (Polystyrene) was subjected to a combination of alkaline treatment and surfactant adsorption followed by froth flotation. A mineral processing pilot plant, owned by a Portuguese mining company, was adapted for this purpose. The experimentation showed that it is possible to produce an almost pure concentrate of PET, containing 83% of the PET in feed, in a single bank of mechanical flotation cells. The concentrate grade attained was 97.2% PET, 1.1% PVC and 1.1% PS. By simulation it was shown that the Portuguese recycling industry specifications can be attained if one cleaning and one scavenger stages are added to the circuit.

  11. Direct recovery of cyclodextringlycosyltransferase from Bacillus cereus using aqueous two-phase flotation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu Kiat; Show, Pau Loke; Yap, Yee Jiun; Tan, Chin Ping; Ng, Eng-Poh; Ariff, Arbakariya B; Mohamad Annuar, Mohamad Suffian B; Ling, Tau Chuan

    2015-12-01

    Purification of cyclodextrin glycosyl transferase (CGTase) from Bacillus cereus using polyethylene glycol (PEG)-potassium phosphates aqueous two-phase flotation (ATPF) system was studied in this paper. The effects of varying PEG molecular weight, tie-line length (TLL) value, volume ratio (VR), pH value, crude concentration and gas nitrogen flotation time were investigated. The optimal condition for purification of CGTase was attained at 18.0% (w/w) PEG 8000, 7.0% (w/w) potassium phosphates, VR of 3.0, 20% (w/w) crude load at pH 7, and 80 min nitrogen flotation time at a flow rate of 5 L/min. With this optimal condition, purification factor (PFT) of 21.8 and a yield (YT) of 97.1% were attained. CGTase was successfully purified in a single downstream processing step using the ATPF. PMID:26111602

  12. 18. VIEW OF CRUDE ORE BINS FROM WEST. WEST CRUDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. VIEW OF CRUDE ORE BINS FROM WEST. WEST CRUDE ORE BIN AND TRESTLE FROM TWO JOHNS TRAMLINE TO SOUTH, CRUDE ORE BIN IN FOREGROUND. MACHINE SHOP IN BACKGROUND. THE TRAM TO PORTLAND PASSED TO NORTH OF MACHINE SHOP. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  13. 3. EAGLE MILL, DETAIL OF CRUDE ORE BIN FROM NORTH, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. EAGLE MILL, DETAIL OF CRUDE ORE BIN FROM NORTH, c. 1908-10. SHOWS EXPOSED CRUSHER HOUSE IN FRONT OF (SOUTH) CRUDE ORE BIN AND SNOW SHED ADDED OVER TRAM TRACKS. NOTE LACK OF EAST OR WEST CRUDE ORE BINS. CREDIT JW. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  14. 17. ORE DOCK, LOOKING EAST FROM HULETT NO. 1. WHEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. ORE DOCK, LOOKING EAST FROM HULETT NO. 1. WHEN BUILT IN 1911-1912, THIS WAS THE LARGEST ORE-UNLOADING DOCK ON THE GREAT LAKES. - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  15. 29. ORE DOCK, LOOKING WEST; AT WORK UNLOADING THE 'GEORGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. ORE DOCK, LOOKING WEST; AT WORK UNLOADING THE 'GEORGE M. HUMPHREY'S' CARGO OF 25,000. TONS OF ORE. - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  16. CONTEXT VIEW ALONG EXISTING PERIMETER TRACKS LOOKING OVER IRON ORE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONTEXT VIEW ALONG EXISTING PERIMETER TRACKS LOOKING OVER IRON ORE CARS TOWARDS WESTERN SIDE OF CLEVELAND BULK TERMINAL BUILDINGS AND A SELF-UNLOADING IRON ORE SHIP AT DOCK. LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  17. Adding OAI-ORE Support to Repository Platforms 

    E-print Network

    Maslov, Alexey; Mikeal, Adam; Phillips, Scott; Leggett, John; McFarland, Mark

    2009-05-17

    ?OAI?ORE?Support?to? Repository?Pla8orms? Alexey?Maslov,?Adam?Mikeal,?Sco3?Phillips,?? John?Legge3,?Mark?McFarland? Texas?Digital?Library? OR?09? Overview? ?? Texas?Digital?Library? Use?Case?for?OAI?ORE? ?? Mapping?ORE?model?to? DSpace?architecture? ?? ImplementaJon?? ?? Results...

  18. Biological models for Mesozoic reef evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Kauffman, E.G. )

    1990-11-01

    Throughout the Mesozoic, shallow-water carbonate ramps and platforms of the circumequatorial Tethyan Ocean were characterized by extensive development of reef ecosystems, especially during times of eustatic highstand, expansion of the Tropics, and warm equable global climates. The greatest reef development was north of the paleoequator in the Caribbean and Indo-Mediterranean provinces. These reefs and associated debris facies comprise major petroleum reservoirs, in some cases with remarkable porosity and permeability normally attributed to a combination of sedimentologic, tectonic, and diagenetic factors. The biological evolution of Mesozoic reefs also has had an important, and in some cases dominant, role in determining reservoir quality. Three major biological factors are critical to mesozoic reef-associated reservoir development: (1) the replacement/competitive displacement of coral-algal dominated, highly integrated reef ecosystems by loosely packed rudistid bivalve-dominated reef ecosystems in the Barremian-Albian; (2) the evolution of dominantly aragonitic, highly porous shells among framework-building rudistids in the middle and Late Cretaceous; and (3) competitive strategies among rudistids that effectively prevented widespread biological binding of Cretaceous reefs, leading to the production of large marginal fans that comprise major carbonate reservoirs. Detailed studies of these evolutionary trends in reef/framework development and of the distribution of different groups of bioconstructors on reefs lead to predictive modeling for primary and secondary porosity development in mesozoic carbonate reservoirs. The competitive displacement of coral-algal communities by rudistids on Cretaceous reefs was so effective that, even after Maastrichtian mass extinction of rudistids and other important groups comprising Mesozoic reef/carbonate platform ecosystems, coral-algal reef-building communities did not evolve again until the late Eocene.

  19. Battelle developing reefs to ease habitat losses

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    Artificial reefs may be the answer to solving a worldwide problem of declining fish habitats, or they may only be good for creating fishing spots. Researchers at Battelle's Ocean Sciences Laboratory in Duxbury, Massachusetts, are studying artificial reefs in the Delaware River to determine if they are a solution to habitat losses in estuaries and coastal regions. [open quotes]Right now, we don't know if the fish are using the reefs simply as a grazing land, and then moving on, or if they're using the areas to colonize,[close quotes] said researcher Karen Foster. [open quotes]Ultimately, we hope to find they are colonizing.[close quotes] In 1989, Battelle researchers placed 16 prefabricated concrete reefs 45 feet deep in Delaware Bay. The reefs were placed in clusters of four, and monitoring began the following year. The federal government ordered the reefs placed in the bay as a mitigation technique for fish habitat that was lost when the river was dredged for navigational purposes. Researchers examined the reefs twice last summer. It will take five years, Foster said, before researchers can determine if the reefs are increasing the fish population. Early tests show, however, the populations of mussels, sponges, corals, and anemones increased by up to 150 percent over an area of bay bottom where the reefs were placed. Divers take crustacean samples from the reefs, and fish are caught near the reefs for examination. Researchers dissect the fish stomachs and analyze the contents to determine if they have been feeding at the reefs. [open quotes]If we find blue mussels in the stomach of the fish, that's great because we know that blue mussels are growing on the reef,[close quotes] Foster said.

  20. Mineral chemical study of U-bearing minerals from the Dominion Reefs, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rantzsch, Ulrike; Gauert, Christoph D. K.; van der Westhuizen, Willem A.; Duhamel, Isabelle; Cuney, Michel; Beukes, Gerhard J.

    2011-02-01

    The Neo-Archean Dominion Reefs (~3.06 Ga) are thin meta-conglomerate layers with concentrations of U- and Th-bearing heavy minerals higher than in the overlying Witwatersrand Reefs. Ore samples from Uranium One Africa's Rietkuil and Dominion exploration areas near Klerksdorp, South Africa, were investigated for their mineral paragenesis, texture and mineral chemical composition. The ore and heavy mineral assemblages consist of uraninite, other uraniferous minerals, Fe sulphides, Ni-Co sulfarsenides, garnet, pyrite, pyrrhotite, monazite, zircon, chromite, magnetite and minor gold. Sub-rounded uraninite grains occur associated with the primary detrital heavy mineral paragenesis. U-Ti, U-Th minerals, pitchblende (colloform uraninite) and coffinite are of secondary, re-mobilised origin as evidenced by crystal shape and texture. Most of the uranium mineralisation is represented by detrital uraninite with up to 70.2 wt.% UO2 and up to 9.3 wt.% ThO2. Re-crystallised phases such as secondary pitchblende (without Th), coffinite, U-Ti and U-Th phases are related to hydrothermal overprint during low-grade metamorphism and are of minor abundance.

  1. Sources of ores of the ferroalloy metals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burchard, E.F.

    1933-01-01

    Since all steel is made with the addition of alloying elements, the record of the metallic raw materials contributory to the steel industry would be far from complete without reference to the ferroalloy metals. This paper, therefore, supplements two preceding arvicles on the sources of our iron ores. The photographs, with the exception of those relating to molybdenum and vanadium, are by the author.

  2. In brief: Project StORe 

    E-print Network

    Pryor, Graham

    Project StORe is one of twenty-five projects supported in the UK by the JISC (http://www.jisc.ac.uk) Digital Repositories Programme, which aims to bring together people and practices from across the domains of research, learning, information...

  3. Refining of fossil resin flotation concentrate from western coal. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, G.F.; Miller, J.D.

    1995-02-16

    During the past several years, significant research efforts have been made to develop process technology for the selective flotation of fossil resin from western coals. As a result of these efforts, several new flotation technologies have been developed. Operation of a proof-of-concept continuous flotation circuit showed the selective flotation process to be sufficiently profitable to justify the development of a fossil resin industry. However, little attention has been given to the refining of the fossil resin flotation concentrate although solvent refining is a critical step for the fossil resin to become a marketable product. In view of this situation, DOE funded this two-year project to evaluate the following aspects of the fossil resin refining technology: 1) Characterization of the fossil resin flotation concentrate and its refined products; 2) Kinetics of fossil resin extraction; 3) Effects of operating variables on solvent extraction; 4) Extraction solvents; 5) Proof-of-concept continuous refining tests; and 6) Technical and economic analysis. The results from this research effort have led to the following conclusions: Hexane- or heptane-refined fossil resin has a light-yellow color, a melting point of 140 - 142{degrees}C, a density of 1.034 gram/cm, and good solubility in nonpolar solvents. Among the four solvents evaluated (hexane, heptane, toluene and ethyl acetate), hexane is the most appropriate solvent based on overall technical and economic considerations. Batch extraction tests and kinetic studies suggest that the main interaction between the resin and the solvent is expected to be the forces associated with solvation phenomena. Temperature has the most significant effect on extraction rate. With hexane as the solvent, a recovery of 90% cam be achieved at 50{degrees}C and 10% solids concentration with moderate agitation for 1 hour.

  4. Coal froth flotation: effects of reagent adsorption on the froth structure

    SciTech Connect

    Meryem Ozmak; Zeki Aktas

    2006-05-15

    The amount and quality of concentrate obtained from froth flotation of a coal are very important to determine the efficiency of the separation process. The shape and size of the bubbles in the froth directly affect the amount and purity of the concentrate overflowed during the froth flotation of the coal. The froth structure is significantly dependent on parameters such as the size of the solid particles, the surface properties of the particles, the chemical structure of surface active agents, the reagents adsorbed onto solid particles, and the reagents remaining in water. This work was performed to determine the relationship between the reagents adsorbed on the solid particles, froth structure, and froth flotation performance. The -53 {mu}m size fraction of a bituminous coal was used to perform froth flotation experiments. The froth flotation of the coal used was performed in the presence of two nonionic surfactants, Triton x-100 (poly(ethylene glycol) tert-octylphenyl ether) and MIBC (methyl isobutyl carbinol), and an anionic surfactant, SDS (sodium dodecyl sulfate). The results showed that the adsorption of a high amount of reagent on the particles decreased the ability of separation, thus a substantial amount of mineral particles overflowed along with the hydrophobic coal particles. The use of MIBC with Triton x-100 or SDS as mixture increased solid recovery, and it was concluded that MIBC selectively adsorbed on solids acting as collector as well as a frother. Reagent adsorption has a crucial effect on the froth structure, which is strongly related to flotation performance. 33 refs., 18 figs.

  5. Microhydrodynamics of flotation processes in the sea surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grammatika, Marianne; Zimmerman, William B.

    2001-10-01

    The uppermost surface of the ocean forms a peculiarly important ecosystem, the sea surface microlayer (SML). Comprising the top 1-1000 ?m of the ocean surface, the SML concentrates many chemical substances, particularly those that are surface active. Important economically as a nursery for fish eggs and larvae, the SML unfortunately is also especially vulnerable to pollution. Contaminants that settle out from the air, have low solubility, or attach to floatable matter tend to accumulate in the SML. Bubbles contribute prominently to the dynamics of air-sea exchanges, playing an important role in geochemical cycling of material in the upper ocean and SML. In addition to the movement of bubbles, the development of a bubble cloud interrelates with the single particle dynamics of all other bubbles and particles. In the early sixties, several in situ oceanographic techniques revealed an "unbelievably immense" number of coastal bubbles of radius 15-300 ?m. The spatial and temporal variation of bubble numbers were studied; acoustical oceanographers now use bubbles as tracers to determine ocean processes near the ocean surface. Sea state and rain noises have both been definitively ascribed to the radiation from huge numbers of infant micro bubbles [The Acoustic Bubble. Academic Press, San Diego]. Our research programme aims at constructing a hydrodynamic model for particle transport processes occurring at the microscale, in multi-phase flotation suspensions. Current research addresses bubble and floc microhydrodynamics as building blocks for a microscale transport model. This paper reviews sea surface transport processes in the microlayer and the lower atmosphere, and identifies those amenable to microhydrodynamic modelling and simulation. It presents preliminary simulation results including the multi-body hydrodynamic mobility functions for the modelling of "dynamic bubble filters" and floc suspensions. Hydrodynamic interactions versus spatial anisotropy and size of particle clouds are investigated.

  6. A saltwater flotation technique to identify unincubated eggs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Devney, C.A.; Kondrad, S.L.; Stebbins, K.R.; Brittingham, K.D.; Hoffman, D.J.; Heinz, G.H.

    2009-01-01

    Field studies on nesting birds sometimes involve questions related to nest initiation dates, length of the incubation period, or changes in parental incubation behavior during various stages of incubation. Some of this information can be best assessed when a nest is discovered before the eggs have undergone any incubation, and this has traditionally been assessed by floating eggs in freshwater. However, because the freshwater method is not particularly accurate in identifying unincubated eggs, we developed a more reliable saltwater flotation method. The saltwater method involves diluting a saturated saltwater solution with freshwater until a salt concentration is reached where unincubated eggs sink to the bottom and incubated eggs float to the surface. For Laughing Gulls (Leucophaeus atricilla), floating eggs in freshwater failed to identify 39.0% (N = 251) of eggs that were subsequently found by candling to have undergone incubation prior to collection. By contrast, in a separate collection of gull eggs, no eggs that passed the saltwater test (N = 225) were found by a later candling to have been incubated prior to collection. For Double-crested Cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus), floating eggs in freshwater failed to identify 15.6% (N = 250) of eggs that had undergone incubation prior to collection, whereas in a separate collection, none of the eggs that passed the saltwater test (N = 85) were found by a later candling to have been incubated prior to collection. Immersion of eggs in saltwater did not affect embryo survival. Although use of the saltwater method is likely limited to colonial species and requires calibrating a saltwater solution, it is a faster and more accurate method of identifying unincubated eggs than the traditional method of floating eggs in freshwater.

  7. Secrets from a deep reef: structure, biogeography and palaeoclimate reconstruction from Mingulay Reef complex sediment cores 

    E-print Network

    Douarin, Melanie Amelie Laetitia

    2013-07-01

    A multi-disciplinary study of sediment core records from the Mingulay Reef Complex, a cold-water coral reefs system off western Scotland, highlights the potential of cold-water corals from which detailed centennial-scale ...

  8. Coral reefs. Limited scope for latitudinal extension of reef corals.

    PubMed

    Muir, Paul R; Wallace, Carden C; Done, Terence; Aguirre, J David

    2015-06-01

    An analysis of present-day global depth distributions of reef-building corals and underlying environmental drivers contradicts a commonly held belief that ocean warming will promote tropical coral expansion into temperate latitudes. Using a global data set of a major group of reef corals, we found that corals were confined to shallower depths at higher latitudes (up to 0.6 meters of predicted shallowing per additional degree of latitude). Latitudinal attenuation of the most important driver of this phenomenon-the dose of photosynthetically available radiation over winter-would severely constrain latitudinal coral range extension in response to ocean warming. Latitudinal gradients in species richness for the group also suggest that higher winter irradiance at depth in low latitudes allowed a deep-water fauna that was not viable at higher latitudes. PMID:26045436

  9. Chemical conditioning of fine coal for improved flotation and pyrite rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.D.; Ye, Y.

    1991-04-16

    This patent describes a method for separating ash and sulfur contaminants from feed coal in a flotation process. It comprises grinding the feed coal to a particulate size; forming a slurry of the ground coal with water; mixing the slurry of coal with at least one compound selected from the group consisting of inorganic peroxy compounds, unorganic peroxides and inorganic superoxides in the absence of polymerization, the at least one compound being present in an amount sufficient to depress the sulfur and ash contaminants; the steps being followed by the froth flotation of the coal wherein cleaned coal is collected with froth and sulfur and ash contaminants report to underflow.

  10. Laboratory and in situ flotation rates of lecithotrophic eggs from the bathyal echinoid Phormosoma placenta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Craig M.; Cameron, J. Lane

    1987-09-01

    The large, lecithotrophic eggs of the bathyal echinothuriid echinoid Phormosoma placenta are positively buoyant both in vitro and in situ to depths of at least 608 m. Eggs attain terminal velocity in less than 5 cm. At constant salinity, flotation rate is related linearly to temperature; eggs move more slowly at lower temperatures. This effect is attributed to increased water viscosity at lower temperatures, not differential changes in egg and water density. Based on an average flotation velocity of 0.42 cm s -1, it is predicted that eggs produced at bathyal depths will reach the surface in approximately 2 days.

  11. 78 FR 67128 - Coral Reef Conservation Program; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-08

    ...National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Coral Reef Conservation Program; Meeting AGENCY: Coral Reef Conservation Program, Office of Ocean...hereby given of a public meeting of the U.S. Coral Reef Task Force (USCRTF). The meeting...

  12. Microbial photosynthesis in coral reef sediments (Heron Reef, Australia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Ursula; Blazejak, Anna; Bird, Paul; Eickert, Gabriele; Schoon, Raphaela; Abed, Raeid M. M.; Bissett, Andrew; de Beer, Dirk

    2008-03-01

    We investigated microphytobenthic photosynthesis at four stations in the coral reef sediments at Heron Reef, Australia. The microphytobenthos was dominated by diatoms, dinoflagellates and cyanobacteria, as indicated by biomarker pigment analysis. Conspicuous algae firmly attached to the sand grains (ca. 100 ?m in diameter, surrounded by a hard transparent wall) were rich in peridinin, a marker pigment for dinoflagellates, but also showed a high diversity based on cyanobacterial 16S rDNA gene sequence analysis. Specimens of these algae that were buried below the photic zone exhibited an unexpected stimulation of respiration by light, resulting in an increase of local oxygen concentrations upon darkening. Net photosynthesis of the sediments varied between 1.9 and 8.5 mmol O 2 m -2 h -1 and was strongly correlated with Chl a content, which lay between 31 and 84 mg m -2. An estimate based on our spatially limited dataset indicates that the microphytobenthic production for the entire reef is in the order of magnitude of the production estimated for corals. Photosynthesis stimulated calcification at all investigated sites (0.2-1.0 mmol Ca 2+ m -2 h -1). The sediments of at least three stations were net calcifying. Sedimentary N 2-fixation rates (measured by acetylene reduction assays at two sites) ranged between 0.9 to 3.9 mmol N 2 m -2 h -1 and were highest in the light, indicating the importance of heterocystous cyanobacteria. In coral fingers no N 2-fixation was measurable, which stresses the importance of the sediment compartment for reef nitrogen cycling.

  13. Astronaut Photography of Coral Reefs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Julie A.; Noordeloos, Marco

    2001-01-01

    Astronaut photographs of tropical coastal areas may contain information on submerged features, including coral reefs, up to depths of about 15 m in clear waters. Previous research efforts have shown that astronaut photographs can aid in estimating coral reef locations and extent on national, regional and global scales, and allow characterization of major geomorphological rim and lagoon features (Andrefouet et al. 2000, in preparation). They can be combined with traditional satellite data to help distinguish between clouds and lagoon features such as pinnacles (Andrefouet and Robinson, in review). Furthermore, astronaut photographs may provide reef scientists and managers with information on the location and extent of river plumes and sediment run off, or facilitate identification of land cover types, including mangroves (Webb et al., in press). Photographs included in the section were selected based on several criteria. The primary consideration of the editors was that the photographs represent a worldwide distribution of coral reefs, have extremely low visual interference by cloud cover, and display a spatial scale reasonable for examining reef-related features. Once photographs were selected, they were digitized from 2nd generation copies. The color and contrast were hand corrected to an approximation of natural color (required to account for spectral differences between photographs due to the color sensitivities of films used, and differences in sun angle and exposure of the photographs). None of the photographs shown here have been georeferenced to correct them to a map projection and scale. Any distortions in features due to slightly oblique look angles when the photographs were taken through spacecraft windows remain. When feasible, near vertical photographs have been rotated so that north is toward the top. An approximate scale bar and north arrow have added using distinctive features on each photograph with reference to a 1:1,000,000 scale navigation chart. Astronaut photographs provide a unique source of moderate resolution reef remote sensing data because of their global coverage and (immediate) availability in the public domain. The database of photographs can be searched an browsed online and high-resolution digital copies of photographs in this atlas can be accessed via the Website of Earth Science and Image Analysis at NASA's Johnson Space Center:

  14. 13. ORE DOCK, LOOKING EAST FROM HULETT NO. 1. WHEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. ORE DOCK, LOOKING EAST FROM HULETT NO. 1. WHEN BUILT IN 1911-1912, THIS WAS THE LARGEST ORE-UNLOADING DOCK ON THE GREAT LAKES. THE DOCK FEATURED FOUR HULETT UNLOADERS, EACH WITH A BUCKET CAPACITY OF 17 TONS; A 15-TON CAPACITY ORE STOCKING AND REHANDLING BRIDGE; AND A ONE-MILLION-TON CAPACITY ORE STORAGE YARD. THE WILLIAM-SEAVER-MORGAN COMPANY OF CLEVELAND BUILT THE DOCK EQUIPMENT. - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  15. Microfacies and diagenesis of older Pleistocene (pre-last glacial maximum) reef deposits, Great Barrier Reef,

    E-print Network

    Schöne, Bernd R.

    Expedition 325, 34 holes were drilled along five transects in front of the Great Barrier Reef of Australia, Great Barrier Reef Environmental Changes, Integrated Ocean Drilling Program, microfacies, PleistoceneMicrofacies and diagenesis of older Pleistocene (pre-last glacial maximum) reef deposits, Great

  16. Habitat heterogeneity reflected in mesophotic reef sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinstein, D. K.; Klaus, J. S.; Smith, T. B.

    2015-11-01

    Modern reef sediments reflect the physical and chemical characteristics of the environment as well as the local reef fauna. Analysis of sedimentary reef facies can thus provide a powerful tool in interpreting ancient reef deposits. However, few studies have attempted to differentiate sedimentary facies in mesophotic coral ecosystems, low light habitats defined as residing 30-150 m below sea level. The low-angle shelf mesophotic coral ecosystem south of the northern U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI) consists of reefs with different structural characteristics ideal for studying the relationship between habitat variability and sedimentary facies. Textural, compositional, and geochemical analyses of surface sediments were used to identify mesophotic reef subfacies associated with distinct benthic communities and structural habitats. Sediment grain composition and bulk geochemistry were found to broadly record the distribution and abundance of coral and macroalgae communities, foundational mesophotic reef benthic organisms. Overall, sediment composition was found to be a good indicator of specific reef environments in low-angle mesophotic reef habitats. Sedimentological analyses indicate that hydrodynamic forces do not transport a significant amount of allochthonous sediment or potentially harmful terrigenous material to USVI mesophotic reefs. Episodic, maximum current velocities prevented deposition of most silt-size grains and smaller, but biological processes were found to have a greater influence on subfacies partitioning than hydrodynamic processes. Results provide a new analog for studies of ancient mesophotic coral ecosystem geological history and document the relationship between mesophotic reef subfacies, structural complexity, and habitat heterogeneity. They also demonstrate how mesophotic reefs along the same shelf system do not always share similar sedimentary characteristics and thus record a diverse set of ecological and environmental conditions.

  17. Demonstration of a reef knot microfiber resonator.

    PubMed

    Vienne, Guillaume; Coillet, Aurélien; Grelu, Philippe; El Amraoui, Mohammed; Jules, Jean-Charles; Smektala, Frédéric; Tong, Limin

    2009-04-13

    We propose a new way to realize a microfiber optical resonator by implementing the topology of a reef knot using two microfibers. We describe how this structure, which includes 4 ports and can serve as an add-drop filter, can be fabricated. Resonances in an all-silica reef knot are measured and good fits are obtained from a simple resonator model. We also show the feasibility of assembling a hybrid silica-chalcogenide reef knot structure. PMID:19365446

  18. Pearl and Hermes Reef, Hawaiian Island Chain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Pearl and Hermes Reef (28.0N, 176.0W) in the Hawaiian Island Chain, are seen with several small sandy islands, forming an atoll that caps a seamount on the long chain that extends some 1,500 miles northwestward from the more familiar Hawaiian Islands proper. Pearl and Hermes Reef lies about 100 miles southeast of Midway island. A reticulate network of coral patch reefs separates the lagoon into more or less isolated pools.

  19. ReefLink Database: A decision support tool for Linking Coral Reefs and Society Through Systems Thinking

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coral reefs provide the ecological foundation for productive and diverse fish and invertebrate communities that support multibillion dollar reef fishing and tourism industries. Yet reefs are threatened by growing coastal development, climate change, and over-exploitation. A key i...

  20. Conservation, precaution, and Caribbean reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aronson, Richard B.; Precht, William F.

    2006-08-01

    Some authors argue that overfishing is an important reason that reef corals have declined in recent decades. Their reasoning is that overfishing removes herbivores, releasing macroalgae to overgrow and kill the corals. The evidence suggests, however, that global climate change and emergent marine diseases make a far greater contribution to coral mortality, and that macroalgae generally grow on the exposed skeletal surfaces of corals that are already dead. Macroalgal dominance, therefore, is an effect rather than a cause of coral mortality. Marine protected areas (MPAs), which are usually established to protect stocks of reef fish, foster populations of herbivorous fish under at least some circumstances. Increased herbivory can reduce algal cover, potentially accelerating the recovery of coral populations inside MPAs; however, establishing MPAs will have only a limited impact on coral recovery unless policymakers confront the accelerating negative effects of the global-scale sources of coral mortality.

  1. DETAIL VIEW OF LOWER TRAM TERMINAL, SECONDARY ORE BIN, CRUSHER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF LOWER TRAM TERMINAL, SECONDARY ORE BIN, CRUSHER FOUNDATION, AND BALL MILL FOUNDATIONS, LOOKING NORTH NORTHWEST. ORE FROM THE MINES WAS DUMPED FROM THE TRAM BUCKETS INTO THE PRIMARY ORE BIN UNDER THE TRAM TERMINAL. A SLIDING CONTROL DOOR INTRODUCED THE INTO THE JAW CRUSHER (FOUNDATIONS,CENTER). THE CRUSHED ORE WAS THEN CONVEYED INTO THE SECONDARY ORE BIN AT CENTER LEFT. A HOLE IN THE FLOOR OF THE ORE BIN PASSED ORE ONTO ANOTHER CONVEYOR THAT BROUGHT IT OUT TO THE BALL MILL(FOUNDATIONS,CENTER BOTTOM). THIS SYSTEM IS MOST LIKELY NOT THE ORIGINAL SET UP, PROBABLY INSTALLED IN THE MINE'S LAST OCCUPATION IN THE EARLY 1940s. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  2. High-rate behaviour of iron ore pellet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafsson, Gustaf; Häggblad, Hans-Åke; Jonsén, Pär; Nishida, Masahiro

    2015-09-01

    Iron ore pellets are sintered, centimetre-sized spheres of ore with high iron content. Together with carbonized coal, iron ore pellets are used in the production of steel. In the transportation from the pelletizing plants to the customers, the iron ore pellets are exposed to different loading situations, resulting in degradation of strength and in some cases fragmentation. For future reliable numerical simulations of the handling and transportation of iron ore pellets, knowledge about their mechanical properties is needed. This paper describes the experimental work to investigate the dynamic mechanical properties of blast furnace iron ore pellets. To study the dynamic fracture of iron ore pellets a number of split Hopkinson pressure bar tests are carried out and analysed.

  3. 3D numerical modelling of the Holocene evolution of One Tree Reef, Southern Great Barrier Reef: Implications for understanding the growth and architecture of coral reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, S. J.; Webster, J.

    2012-04-01

    The Holocene reefs in the outer Great Barrier Reef (GBR) represent a thin veneer (10-30 m) built upon an older basement substrate reef surface. The morphology, stratigraphy and maturity (i.e. degree of sediment infilling - Hopley, 1982) of the modern reefs is thought to result from the interplay between the shape of the basement substrate, Holocene reef processes such as coralgal accretion, sediment erosion and transport in response to sea level rise. We use the 3D forward stratigraphic model CARBONATE-3D (CARB3D) to quantitatively simulate the Holocene evolution of One Tree Reef. Specifically, we test the influence of different basement substrate surfaces, sea level curves, reef accretion rates, sediment erosion and transport parameters to assess their relative importance in controlling reef evolution - particularly reef growth histories, 3D internal structure and stratigraphy and reef maturity. The range of parameters tested produced the full spectrum of reef maturities from unfilled "juvenile" buckets to planar "senile" reefs with sediment filled lagoons. We find that the shape and depth of the basement substrate and the sea level curve have the strongest influence - significantly impacting reef evolution and final maturity including the shape of the "bucket", size of the reef margins and internal reef structure. In contrast, variations in sediment production, erosion and transport mainly controlled the degree of lagoonal sediment filling. This study has implications for better understanding the past evolution of the GBR but also constraining the possible trajectories of the reef in the face of future environmental changes.

  4. Eventbased Control for Wirelessly Networked Systemsy y

    E-print Network

    Johansson, Karl Henrik

    Froth flotation process · Froth flotation process concentrates the metalbearing mineral in the oreMinerals Ore and control performance? · How handle communication imperfections: loss, conflicts, delays? · How move

  5. Onondage pinnacle reefs in New York State

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, G.M.

    1995-09-01

    Onondaga pinnacle reefs, part of the Onondaga Formation, developed in an epeiric setting of the lowermost Middle Devonian (Eifelian). The reefs were initiated as coral-crinoidal mounds in the Edgecliff Member of the formation. Whereas most Devonian reefs are composed of rugose corals. Coral is the predominant kind of fossil, followed by crinoids, brachiopods, mollusks, undifferentiated skeletal debris, and possible sponges. The initial mineralogy of the corals is inferred to have been calcite. The porosity of these reefs is almost unique among reef reservoirs. most reefs produce from secondary or diagenetic porosity; by contrast Onondaga reefs display primary intracoralline or framework porosity. Between framework builders and/or skeletal particles cryptocrystalline/microcrystalline cement fills pores. As observed in modern reefs this kind of cement resembles micrite, but probable formed as high-magnesian calcite in a high-energy setting. Syntaxial or rim cement common lines crinoid particles. Some of these pinnacle reefs, formerly gas producers, are presently under development as gas-storage reservoirs.

  6. Studies on the Great Barrier Reef

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, S.

    1985-01-01

    Proposals to drill for oil on Australia's Great Barrier Reef have led to the appointment of a royal commission to study the environmental impact of such activities. The Australian Institute of Marine Science has developed a 5-part research plant which covers the Australian mangrove environment; nearshore habitat; processes and interactions, energy flows, resource cycling and their consequences within the reef ecosystems; patterns, abundances and relationships within the reef; and the continental shelf of the Great Barrier Reef region. Research in each of these areas is described.

  7. Geological Approaches to Coral Reef Ecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kench, Paul

    2008-09-01

    Tropical coral reef systems cover an estimated 284,300 square kilometers of the Earth's surface and are considered among the most valuable ecosystems on Earth. The reef systems are zones of high biological diversity, habitat for about one quarter of all known marine species, and important components of the global carbon cycle. In addition, they provide the physical foundation for a number of mid-ocean nation states. Coral reefs worldwide are considered to be in serious ecological decline due to anthropogenic impacts, natural stresses, and climate change. However, these gloomy projections for coral reefs are based largely on analysis of short-term changes in their ecological condition.

  8. Impacts of Artificial Reefs on Surrounding Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoukian, Sarine

    Artificial reefs are becoming a popular biological and management component in shallow water environments characterized by soft seabed, representing both important marine habitats and tools to manage coastal fisheries and resources. An artificial reef in the marine environment acts as an open system with exchange of material and energy, altering the physical and biological characteristics of the surrounding area. Reef stability will depend on the balance of scour, settlement, and burial resulting from ocean conditions over time. Because of the unstable nature of sediments, they require a detailed and systematic investigation. Acoustic systems like high-frequency multibeam sonar are efficient tools in monitoring the environmental evolution around artificial reefs, whereas water turbidity can limit visual dive and ROV inspections. A high-frequency multibeam echo sounder offers the potential of detecting fine-scale distribution of reef units, providing an unprecedented level of resolution, coverage, and spatial definition. How do artificial reefs change over time in relation to the coastal processes? How accurately does multibeam technology map different typologies of artificial modules of known size and shape? How do artificial reefs affect fish school behavior? What are the limitations of multibeam technology for investigating fish school distribution as well as spatial and temporal changes? This study addresses the above questions and presents results of a new approach for artificial reef seafloor mapping over time, based upon an integrated analysis of multibeam swath bathymetry data and geoscientific information (backscatter data analysis, SCUBA observations, physical oceanographic data, and previous findings on the geology and sedimentation processes, integrated with unpublished data) from Senigallia artificial reef, northwestern Adriatic Sea (Italy) and St. Petersburg Beach Reef, west-central Florida continental shelf. A new approach for observation of fish aggregations associated with Senigallia reef based on the analysis of multibeam backscatter data in the water column is also explored. The settlement of the reefs and any terrain change are investigated over time providing a useful description of the local hydrodynamics and geological processes. All the artificial structures (made up by water-based concrete for Senigallia reef and mainly steel for St. Petersburg Beach reef) are identified and those showing substantial horizontal and/or vertical movements are analyzed in detail. Most artificial modules of Senigallia reef are not intact and scour signatures are well depicted around them, indicating reversals of the local current. This is due to both the wind pattern and to the quite close arrangement of the reef units that tend to deflect the bottom flow. As regards to the St. Petersburg Beach reef, all the man-made steel units are still in their upright position. Only a large barge shows a gradual collapse of its south side, and presents well-developed scouring at its east-northeast side, indicating dominant bottom flow from west-southwest to east-northeast. While an overall seafloor depth shallowing of about 0.30 m from down-current deposits was observed for Senigallia reef, an overall deepening of about 0.08 m due to scour was observed at the St. Petersburg Beach reef. Based on the backscatter data interpretation, surficial sediments are coarser in the vicinities of both artificial reefs than corresponding surrounding sediments. Scouring reveals this coarser layer underneath the prevalent mud sediment at Senigallia reef, and the predominant silt sediment at St. Petersburg Beach reef. In the ten years of Senigalia reef study, large-scale variations between clay and silt appear to be directly linked to large flood events that have occurred just prior to the change. As regards the water column investigation, acoustic backscatter from fish aggregations gives detailed information on their morphology and spatial distribution. In addition, relative fish biomass estimates can be extrapolated. Results suggest that most of

  9. Great Barrier Reef, Queensland, Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Along the coast of Queensland, Australia (18.0S, 147.5E), timbered foothills of the Great Dividing Range separate the semi-arid interior of Queensland from the farmlands of the coastal plains. Prominent cleared areas in the forest indicate deforestation for farm and pasture lands. Offshore, islands and the Great Barrier Reef display sand banks along the southern sides of the structures indicating a dominant southerly wind and current direction.

  10. Influence of reef geometry on wave attenuation on a Brazilian coral reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Mirella B. S. F.; Araújo, Moacyr; Araújo, Tereza C. M.; Siegle, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    This study presents data from field experiments that focus on the influence of coral reef geometry on wave transformation in the Metropolitan Area of Recife (MAR) on the northeast coast of Brazil. First, a detailed bathymetric survey was conducted, revealing a submerged reef bank, measuring 18 km long by 1 km wide, parallel to the coastline with a quasi-horizontal top that varies from 0.5 m to 4 m in depth at low tide. Cluster similarity between 180 reef profiles indicates that in 75% of the area, the reef geometry has a configuration similar to a platform reef, whereas in 25% of the area it resembles a fringing reef. Measurements of wave pressure fluctuations were made at two stations (experiments E1 and E2) across the reef profile. The results indicate that wave height was tidally modulated at both experimental sites. Up to 67% (E1) and 99.9% (E2) of the incident wave height is attenuated by the reef top at low tide. This tidal modulation is most apparent at E2 due to reef geometry. At this location, the reef top is only approximately 0.5 m deep during mean low spring water, and almost all incident waves break on the outer reef edge. At E1, the reef top depth is 4 m, and waves with height ratios smaller than the critical breaking limit are free to pass onto the reef and are primarily attenuated by bottom friction. These results highlight the importance of reef geometry in controlling wave characteristics of the MAR beaches and demonstrate its effect on the morphology of the adjacent coast. Implications of differences in wave attenuation and the level of protection provided by the reefs to the adjacent shoreline are discussed.

  11. Seed flotation and germination of salt marsh plants: The effects of stratification, salinity, and/or inundation regime

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elsey-Quirk, T.; Middleton, B.A.; Proffitt, C.E.

    2009-01-01

    We examined the effects of cold stratification and salinity on seed flotation of eight salt marsh species. Four of the eight species were tested for germination success under different stratification, salinity, and flooding conditions. Species were separated into two groups, four species received wet stratification and four dry stratification and fresh seeds of all species were tested for flotation and germination. Fresh seeds of seven out of eight species had flotation times independent of salinity, six of which had average flotation times of at least 50 d. Seeds of Spartina alterniflora and Spartina patens had the shortest flotation times, averaging 24 and 26 d, respectively. Following wet stratification, the flotation time of S. alterniflora seeds in higher salinity water (15 and 36 ppt) was reduced by over 75% and germination declined by more than 90%. Wet stratification reduced the flotation time of Distichlis spicata seeds in fresh water but increased seed germination from 2 to 16% in a fluctuating inundation regime. Fresh seeds of Iva frutescens and S. alternflora were capable of germination and therefore are non-dormant during dispersal. Fresh seeds of I. frutescens had similar germination to dry stratified seeds ranging 25-30%. Salinity reduced seed germination for all species except for S. alterniflora. A fluctuating inundation regime was important for seed germination of the low marsh species and for germination following cold stratification. The conditions that resulted in seeds sinking faster were similar to the conditions that resulted in higher germination for two of four species. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  12. Flotation characteristics of two different types of ilmenite with sodium oleate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jie, Zhang; Weijun, Liu; Weiqing, Wang; shuqing, Xiong; dezhi, Wang; Wu, Yan; Jie, Deng

    2015-06-01

    The flotation characteristics of native ilmenite (IL-N) and beach placer ilmenite (IL-BP) with sodium oleate (NaOL) were investigated through micro-flotation tests, zeta-potential measurements, absorbed amount measurements, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic (FT-IR) analysis. The results show that IL-N can float well at the pH region of 4.5 to 7.5, whereas IL-BP floats well at pH 4.5 to pH 6. The flotation recovery of IL-N is invariably higher than that of IL-BP in alkaline solution. In the presence of NaOL, the zeta-potentials of both minerals are negative in the pH range. The absorbed amount of NaOL increased rapidly with the increase in the pH value in acid solution and decreased rapidly with the increase in the pH value in alkaline solution. In weak alkaline conditions, the ions of Ca (II) and Mg (II) become important activated sites for the adsorption of NaOL onto the ilmenite surface. The FT-IR analysis and absorbed amount measurements verified that the adsorption of calcium oleate and magnesium oleate on IL-N more than on IL-BP at the same pH value. A larger amount of Ca (II) and Mg (II) in IL-N than IL-BP results in good floatability as exhibited in the flotation tests.

  13. Psychotherapeutic Treatment in Combination with Relaxation in a Flotation Tank: Effects on "Burn-Out Syndrome"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kjellgren, Anette; Buhrkall, Hanne; Norlander, Torsten

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this study was to investigate experiences gained from treatment combining relaxation in flotation tank with psychotherapy for sufferers from "burn-out syndrome". Six people participated in a ten week program. They were all interviewed; the data were analyzed using the Empirical Phenomenological Psychological method. Five themes…

  14. Synergistic mechanism between SDBS and oleic acid in anionic flotation of rhodochrosite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Yong-jie; Liu, Run-qing; Sun, Wei; Hu, Yue-hua

    2015-05-01

    Pure mineral flotation experiments, zeta potential testing, and infrared spectroscopy were employed to investigate the interfacial reactions of oleic acid (collector), sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS, synergist), and rhodochrosite in an anionic system. The pure mineral test shows that oleic acid has a strong ability to collect products on rhodochrosite. Under neutral to moderately alkaline conditions, low temperature (e.g., 10°C) adversely affects the flotation performance of oleic acid; the addition of SDBS significantly improves the dispersion and solubility of oleic acid, enhancing its collecting ability and flotation recovery. The zeta potential test shows that rhodochrosite interacts with oleic acid and SDBS, resulting in a more negative zeta potential and the co-adsorption of the collector and synergist at the mineral surface. Infrared spectroscopy demonstrated that when oleic acid and SDBS are used as a mixed collector, oleates along with -COO- and -COOH functional groups are formed on the mineral surface, indicating chemical adsorption on rhodochrosite. The results demonstrate that oleic acid and SDBS co-adsorb chemically on the surface of rhodochrosite, thereby improving the flotation performance of the collector.

  15. A Simple Flotation De-Linking Experiment for the Recycling of Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venditti, Richard A.

    2004-01-01

    A laboratory exercise for the flotation de-linking of wastepaper is described, which consists of disintegrating printed wastepaper in a blender and then removing the ink or toner contaminants by pumping air bubbles through suspension using an aquarium pump or other source of air bubbles. The exercise has proven extremely reliable and consistent in…

  16. Sensory Isolation in Flotation Tanks: Altered States of Consciousness and Effects on Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kjellgren, Anette; Lyden, Francisca; Norlander, Torsten

    2008-01-01

    A qualitative analysis (The Empirical Phenomenological Psychological method) of interviews involving eight patients (depression, burn-out syndrome, and chronic pain) was carried out in order to obtain knowledge regarding the effects of flotation tank therapy. This knowledge might be helpful for both professionals and potential floaters. The…

  17. Flotation properties of some oxygen-containing compounds of the acyclic series

    SciTech Connect

    Shreider, E.M.; Para, S.F.; Galanov, M.E.; Trachik, T.L.; Lagutina, L.V.

    1981-01-01

    In the monatomic alcohols series, maximum flotation activity is reached at 6 to 8 carbon atoms in the radical. It was decided to investigate the reagent properties of some other substances containing hydroxyl radicals which have not previously been considered. Oxygen-containing compounds in the acyclic series were examined, including alcohols: I - ethanol, ethylene-glycol, glycerol, pentaerythrytol, D-mannitol; II - dulcitol, D-sorbitol, D-mannitol, xylitol; glycols - monoethyleneglycol, diethyleneglycol, triethyleneglycol, polyethyleneglycol; and ethanolamines - ethanolamine, triethanolamine. The flotation properties of the reagents were determined in a Mekhanobr laboratory flotation machine with a chamber volume of 1.5 liter and an impeller speed of 1800 rpm. The materials tested were the <1 mm size fractions from run-of-plant charge and slurry from the radial thickeners. The samples were first dried and averaged. The pulp density was 200 g/l. The reagent conditions were kept constant throughout (50% of the total added at the start of a test, 25% after 2 min and 25% after 4 min from the start). The reagent additions were 1.0 to 1.4 kg/ton. All of these compounds had a very weak flotation activity.

  18. 33 CFR 183.235 - Level flotation test without weights for persons capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Level flotation test without weights for persons capacity. 183.235 Section 183.235 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... test without weights for persons capacity. When the conditions prescribed in § 183.220 (a) and...

  19. 33 CFR 183.335 - Level flotation test without weights for persons capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Level flotation test without weights for persons capacity. 183.335 Section 183.335 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... without weights for persons capacity. When the conditions prescribed in § 183.320 (a) and (d) through...

  20. 33 CFR 183.335 - Level flotation test without weights for persons capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Level flotation test without weights for persons capacity. 183.335 Section 183.335 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... without weights for persons capacity. When the conditions prescribed in § 183.320 (a) and (d) through...

  1. 33 CFR 183.235 - Level flotation test without weights for persons capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Level flotation test without weights for persons capacity. 183.235 Section 183.235 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... test without weights for persons capacity. When the conditions prescribed in § 183.220 (a) and...

  2. Mining and beneficiation of lunar ores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunch, T. E.; Williams, R. J.; Mckay, D. S.; Giles, D.

    1979-01-01

    The beneficiation of lunar plagioclase and ilmenite ores to feedstock grade permits a rapid growth of the space manufacturing economy by maximizing the production rate of metals and oxygen. A beneficiation scheme based on electrostatic and magnetic separation is preferred over conventional schemes, but such a scheme cannot be completely modeled because beneficiation processes are empirical and because some properties of lunar minerals have not been measured. To meet anticipated shipping and processing needs, the peak lunar mining rate will exceed 1000 tons/hr by the fifth year of operation. Such capabilities will be best obtained by automated mining vehicles and conveyor systems rather than trucks. It may be possible to extract about 40 kg of volatiles (60 percent H2O) by thermally processing the less than 20 micron ilmenite concentrate extracted from 130 tons of ilmenite ore. A thermodynamic analysis of an extraction process is presented.

  3. Mapping Oyster Reef Habitats in Mobile Bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolte, Danielle

    2011-01-01

    Oyster reefs around the world are declining rapidly, and although they haven t received as much attention as coral reefs, they are just as important to their local ecosystems and economies. Oyster reefs provide habitats for many species of fish, invertebrates, and crustaceans, as well as the next generations of oysters. Oysters are also harvested from many of these reefs and are an important segment of many local economies, including that of Mobile Bay, where oysters rank in the top five commercial marine species both by landed weight and by dollar value. Although the remaining Mobile Bay oyster reefs are some of the least degraded in the world, projected climate change could have dramatic effects on the health of these important ecosystems. The viability of oyster reefs depends on water depth and temperature, appropriate pH and salinity levels, and the amount of dissolved oxygen in the water. Projected increases in sea level, changes in precipitation and runoff patterns, and changes in pH resulting from increases in the amount of carbon dioxide dissolved in the oceans could all affect the viability of oyster reefs in the future. Human activities such as dredging and unsustainable harvesting practices are also adversely impacting the oyster reefs. Fortunately, several projects are already under way to help rebuild or support existing or previously existing oyster reefs. The success of these projects will depend on the local effects of climate change on the current and potential habitats and man s ability to recognize and halt unsustainable harvesting practices. As the extent and health of the reefs changes, it will have impacts on the Mobile Bay ecosystem and economy, changing the resources available to the people who live there and to the rest of the country, since Mobile Bay is an important national source of seafood. This project identified potential climate change impacts on the oyster reefs of Mobile Bay, including the possible addition of newly viable habitats in the southeastern regions of the Bay.

  4. Coral reef evolution on rapidly subsiding margins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Webster, J.M.; Braga, J.C.; Clague, D.A.; Gallup, C.; Hein, J.R.; Potts, D.C.; Renema, W.; Riding, R.; Riker-Coleman, K.; Silver, E.; Wallace, L.M.

    2009-01-01

    A series of well-developed submerged coral reefs are preserved in the Huon Gulf (Papua New Guinea) and around Hawaii. Despite different tectonics settings, both regions have experienced rapid subsidence (2-6??m/ka) over the last 500??ka. Rapid subsidence, combined with eustatic sea-level changes, is responsible for repeated drowning and backstepping of coral reefs over this period. Because we can place quantitative constraints on these systems (i.e., reef drowning age, eustatic sea-level changes, subsidence rates, accretion rates, basement substrates, and paleobathymetry), these areas represent unique natural laboratories for exploring the roles of tectonics, reef accretion, and eustatic sea-level changes in controlling the evolution of individual reefs, as well as backstepping of the entire system. A review of new and existing bathymetric, radiometric, sedimentary facies and numerical modeling data indicate that these reefs have had long, complex growth histories and that they are highly sensitive, recording drowning not only during major deglaciations, but also during high-frequency, small-amplitude interstadial and deglacial meltwater pulse events. Analysis of five generalized sedimentary facies shows that reef drowning is characterized by a distinct biological and sedimentary sequence. Observational and numerical modeling data indicate that on precessional (20??ka) and sub-orbital timescales, the rate and amplitude of eustatic sea-level changes are critical in controlling initiation, growth, drowning or sub-aerial exposure, subsequent re-initiation, and final drowning. However, over longer timescales (> 100-500??ka) continued tectonic subsidence and basement substrate morphology influence broad scale reef morphology and backstepping geometries. Drilling of these reefs will yield greatly expanded stratigraphic sections compared with similar reefs on slowly subsiding, stable and uplifting margins, and thus they represent a unique archive of sea-level and climate changes, as well as a record of the response of coral reefs to these changes over the last six glacial cycles. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Pressure leaching las cruces copper ore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezowsky, R. M.; Xue, T.; Collins, M. J.; Makwana, M.; Barton-Jones, I.; Southgate, M.; Maclean, J. K.

    1999-12-01

    A hydrometallurgical process was developed for treating the Las Cruces massive sulfide-ore deposit located near Seville, Spain. A two-stage countercurrent leach process, consisting of an atmospheric leach and a pressure leach, was developed to effectively leach copper from the copper-bearing minerals and to generate a solution suitable for the subsequent solvent-extraction and copper-electrowinning operations. The results of batch and continuous miniplant tests are presented.

  6. Process and apparatus for separating fine particles by microbubble flotation together with a process and apparatus for generation of microbubbles

    DOEpatents

    Yoon, Roe-Hoan (Blacksburg, VA); Adel, Gregory T. (Blacksburg, VA); Luttrell, Gerald H. (Blacksburg, VA)

    1991-01-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for the microbubble flotation separation of very fine particles, especially coal, so as to produce a high purity and large recovery efficiently. This is accomplished through the use of a high aspect ratio flotation column, microbubbles, and a countercurrent use of wash water to gently wash the froth. Also, disclosed are unique processes and apparatus for generating microbubbles for flotation in a high efficient and inexpensive manner using either a porous tube or an in-line static generator.

  7. Process and apparatus for separating fine particles by microbubble flotation together with a process and apparatus for generation of microbubbles

    DOEpatents

    Yoon, R.H.; Adel, G.T.; Luttrell, G.H.

    1991-01-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for the microbubble flotation separation of very fine particles, especially coal, so as to produce a high purity and large recovery efficiently. This is accomplished through the use of a high aspect ratio flotation column, microbubbles, and a countercurrent use of wash water to gently wash the froth. Also, disclosed are unique processes and apparatus for generating microbubbles for flotation in a high efficient and inexpensive manner using either a porous tube or an in-line static generator. 23 figures.

  8. Sensitivity of double centrifugation sugar fecal flotation for detecting intestinal helminths in coyotes (Canis latrans).

    PubMed

    Liccioli, Stefano; Catalano, Stefano; Kutz, Susan J; Lejeune, Manigandan; Verocai, Guilherme G; Duignan, Padraig J; Fuentealba, Carmen; Ruckstuhl, Kathreen E; Massolo, Alessandro

    2012-07-01

    Fecal analysis is commonly used to estimate prevalence and intensity of intestinal helminths in wild carnivores, but few studies have assessed the reliability of fecal flotation compared to analysis of intestinal tracts. We investigated sensitivity of the double centrifugation sugar fecal flotation and kappa agreement between fecal flotation and postmortem examination of intestines for helminths of coyotes (Canis latrans). We analyzed 57 coyote carcasses that were collected between October 2010 and March 2011 in the metropolitan area of Calgary and Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Before analyses, intestines and feces were frozen at -80 C for 72 hr to inactivate Echinococcus eggs, protecting operators from potential exposure. Five species of helminths were found by postmortem examination, including Toxascaris leonina, Uncinaria stenocephala, Ancylostoma caninum, Taenia sp., and Echinococcus multilocularis. Sensitivity of fecal flotation was high (0.84) for detection of T. leonina but low for Taenia sp. (0.27), E. multilocularis (0.46), and U. stenocephala (0.00). Good kappa agreement between techniques was observed only for T. leonina (0.64), for which we detected also a significant correlation between adult female parasite intensity and fecal egg counts (R(s)=0.53, P=0.01). Differences in sensitivity may be related to parasite characteristics that affect recovery of eggs on flotation. Fecal parasitologic analyses are highly applicable to study the disease ecology of urban carnivores, and they often provide important information on environmental contamination and potential of zoonotic risks. However, fecal-based parasitologic surveys should first assess the sensitivity of the techniques to understand their biases and limitations. PMID:22740537

  9. Coral reef community composition in the context of disturbance history on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia.

    PubMed

    Graham, Nicholas A J; Chong-Seng, Karen M; Huchery, Cindy; Januchowski-Hartley, Fraser A; Nash, Kirsty L

    2014-01-01

    Much research on coral reefs has documented differential declines in coral and associated organisms. In order to contextualise this general degradation, research on community composition is necessary in the context of varied disturbance histories and the biological processes and physical features thought to retard or promote recovery. We conducted a spatial assessment of coral reef communities across five reefs of the central Great Barrier Reef, Australia, with known disturbance histories, and assessed patterns of coral cover and community composition related to a range of other variables thought to be important for reef dynamics. Two of the reefs had not been extensively disturbed for at least 15 years prior to the surveys. Three of the reefs had been severely impacted by crown-of-thorns starfish outbreaks and coral bleaching approximately a decade before the surveys, from which only one of them was showing signs of recovery based on independent surveys. We incorporated wave exposure (sheltered and exposed) and reef zone (slope, crest and flat) into our design, providing a comprehensive assessment of the spatial patterns in community composition on these reefs. Categorising corals into life history groupings, we document major coral community differences in the unrecovered reefs, compared to the composition and covers found on the undisturbed reefs. The recovered reef, despite having similar coral cover, had a different community composition from the undisturbed reefs, which may indicate slow successional processes, or a different natural community dominance pattern due to hydrology and other oceanographic factors. The variables that best correlated with patterns in the coral community among sites included the density of juvenile corals, herbivore fish biomass, fish species richness and the cover of macroalgae. Given increasing impacts to the Great Barrier Reef, efforts to mitigate local stressors will be imperative to encouraging coral communities to persist into the future. PMID:24983747

  10. Coral Reef Community Composition in the Context of Disturbance History on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Nicholas A. J.; Chong-Seng, Karen M.; Huchery, Cindy; Januchowski-Hartley, Fraser A.; Nash, Kirsty L.

    2014-01-01

    Much research on coral reefs has documented differential declines in coral and associated organisms. In order to contextualise this general degradation, research on community composition is necessary in the context of varied disturbance histories and the biological processes and physical features thought to retard or promote recovery. We conducted a spatial assessment of coral reef communities across five reefs of the central Great Barrier Reef, Australia, with known disturbance histories, and assessed patterns of coral cover and community composition related to a range of other variables thought to be important for reef dynamics. Two of the reefs had not been extensively disturbed for at least 15 years prior to the surveys. Three of the reefs had been severely impacted by crown-of-thorns starfish outbreaks and coral bleaching approximately a decade before the surveys, from which only one of them was showing signs of recovery based on independent surveys. We incorporated wave exposure (sheltered and exposed) and reef zone (slope, crest and flat) into our design, providing a comprehensive assessment of the spatial patterns in community composition on these reefs. Categorising corals into life history groupings, we document major coral community differences in the unrecovered reefs, compared to the composition and covers found on the undisturbed reefs. The recovered reef, despite having similar coral cover, had a different community composition from the undisturbed reefs, which may indicate slow successional processes, or a different natural community dominance pattern due to hydrology and other oceanographic factors. The variables that best correlated with patterns in the coral community among sites included the density of juvenile corals, herbivore fish biomass, fish species richness and the cover of macroalgae. Given increasing impacts to the Great Barrier Reef, efforts to mitigate local stressors will be imperative to encouraging coral communities to persist into the future. PMID:24983747

  11. Introduction Worldwide reef fish fisheries are in

    E-print Network

    valuable reef fish species such as Nassau grouper, Epinephelus striatus, and goliath grouper, E. itajara and JUAN J. AGAR and Eklund, 1999). Reef fish species, especially groupers, are particularly vulnerable the current Bajo de Sico seasonal closure to afford ad- ditional protection to snapper-grouper spawning

  12. Early Development of Pendleton Artificial Reef

    E-print Network

    of giant kelp, Macrocystis pyrifera and M. angustifolia, to the reef. Establishment of a stand of giant kelp will increase the aspect-ratio of the reef and provide "substrate to surface" habitat for fish. This decision was based upon experience gained in kelp restoration work and dives in nearby kelp forests

  13. Disease of coral and coral reef fishes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Panek, Frank

    2008-01-01

    The Department of the Interior protects sensitive habitats amounting to about 3,600,000 acres of coral reefs and other submerged lands. These reefs are important ecosystems in 13 National Wildlife Refuges, 10 National Parks and in certain territorial waters such as the Wake Atoll.

  14. Silurian pinnacle reefs of the Canadian Arctic

    SciTech Connect

    De Freitas, T.A.; Dixon, O.A. ); Mayr, U. )

    1993-04-01

    Pinnacle reefs are commonly an attractive target for oil exploration because they are usually porous carbonate bodies entombed in impervious, deep-water shales that provide both the source and the seal for hydrocarbons. Silurian pinnacle reefs, the first described in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, are exposed on Ellesmere and Devon Islands. Two main reef trends occur, one of early middle Llandovery to middle Ludlow age and a second of middle Ludlow to Late Silurian or Early Devonian age. Reefs of both phases contain lime mudstone cores: some are stromatactoid-rich and others consist predominantly of microbialite-rich lime mudstone or microbial boundstone. Facies sequences of both reef phases show evidence of upward-shallowing overall, but, in the older reefs, isochronous capping facies are dominated either by coral-mirian or by stromatoporoid boundstone and floatstone. This difference perhaps reflects variation in wave stress and apparent ability of a few corals,thickly encrusted by or associated with microbial boundstone and skeletal algae, to withstand greater wave energy than a stromatoporoid-coral-rich reef community. These reefs constitute one of the bright prospects of hydrocarbon exploration in rocks of the Franklinian succession. 43 refs., 9 figs.

  15. Sandstone Strata in Capitol Reef National Park

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A detail view of some sandstone strata within Capitol Reef National Park. Capitol Reef is primarily made up of sandstone formations within the Waterpocket Fold, monocline that extends nearly 100 miles. A monocline is a step-like fold in rock strata that can resemble an enormous wrinkle in the earth....

  16. REEF MANAGER'S GUIDE TO CORAL BLEACHING

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Reef Manager's Guide to Coral Bleaching is the result of a collaborative effort by over 50 scientists and managers to: (1) engage in information-sharing in the areas of coral reef science and management for climate change and coral bleaching; and (2) compile a management tool ...

  17. Reefs and Learning: Education Evaluation Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stepath, Carl M.

    2006-01-01

    Marine education research designs are discussed, and student learning outcomes while monitoring a coral reef is evaluated. Changes in environmental knowledge and attitudes, ecological intention to act, and direct reef experience were investigated. Differences between student pre-test and the post-test responses were observed, and analysis is…

  18. Artificial Reefs--A Coastal Classroom Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dindo, John J.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the construction of artificial reefs for such uses as commercial fishing and recreational boating. Describes a class project in which students construct a small artificial reef and observe the changes over time in terms of temperature, salinity, flora and fauna. (TW)

  19. Subtropical Biotic Fringing Reefs as Ecological Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Jeffrey W.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a 16-week course in marine biology involving a class-coordinated investigation of a subtropical biotic fringing reef of Hawaii. Describes in detail the development of preliminary hypotheses regarding general cause-effect relationships on the reef, and the exploration of specific areas, such as chemical or physical factors. (CS)

  20. Along-Track Reef Imaging System (ATRIS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brock, John; Zawada, Dave

    2006-01-01

    "Along-Track Reef Imaging System (ATRIS)" describes the U.S. Geological Survey's Along-Track Reef Imaging System, a boat-based sensor package for rapidly mapping shallow water benthic environments. ATRIS acquires high resolution, color digital images that are accurately geo-located in real-time.

  1. Physical-chemical conditions of ore deposition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barton, P.B., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Ore deposits form under a wide range of physical and chemical conditions, but those precipitating from hot, aqueous fluids-i.e. the hydrothermal deposits-form generally below 700??C and at pressures of only 1 or 2 kbar or less. Natural aqueous fluids in rocks may extract metal and sulfur from a variety of rock types or may acquire them as a residual heritage from a crystallizing silicate magma. Ore-forming hydrothermal fluids never appear as hot springs (except in deep, submarine situations) because they boil, mix with surface waters, and cool, thereby losing their ore-bearing ability before reaching the surface. Mineral systems function as chemical buffers and indicators just as buffers and indicators function in a chemical laboratory. By reading the record written in the buffer/indicator assemblages of minerals one can reconstruct many aspects of the former chemical environment. By studying the record of changing conditions one may deduce information regarding the processes functioning to create the succession of chemical environments and the ore deposits they represent. The example of the OH vein at Creede, Colorado, shows a pH buffered by the K-feldspar + muscovite + quartz assemblage and the covariation of S2 and O2 buffered by the assemblage chlorite + pyrite + quartz. Boiling of the ore fluid led to its oxidation to hematite-bearing assemblages and simultaneously produced an intensely altered, sericitic capping over the vein in response to the condensation of vapors bearing acidic components. The solubility of metals as calculated from experimental and theoretical studies of mineral solubility appears too low by at least one or two powers of ten to explain the mineralization at Creede. In contrast to Creede where the mineral stabilities all point to a relatively consistent chemistry, the Mississippi Valley type deposits present a puzzle of conflicting chemical clues that are impossible to reconcile with any single equilibrium situation. Thus we must seriously consider metastable equilibria; those most likely involve redox disequilibrium among the sulfur species in solution and perhaps also involve organic compounds. ?? 1981.

  2. Edgecliff reefs - Devonian temperate water carbonate deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Wolosz, T.H. )

    1991-03-01

    The Middle Devonian Edgecliff Member of the Onondaga Formation in New York and Ontario, Canada, is a coral-rich, reefy,' crinoidal grainstone/packstone. The reefs contain only rare stromatoporoids and are devoid of algae, having been constructed by a fauna of mound and thicket-forming branching colonial rugosans, and large sheet favositids that populated grainstone/packstone flank beds and banks. Despite the restricted fauna, the reefs display a variety of growth patterns. Rugosan mounds range in size from 2-3 m diameter by 1 m thick, up to 230 m diameter by 15 m thick. Composite structures consist of interbedded rugosan buildups and packstone/grainstone flanks, ranging from shield-shaped reefs (240 m diameter by 6 m thick) in which the rugosans occur only as thickets, to pinnacle reefs (up to 3 km diameter by 60 m thick) in which rugosan mounds are interbedded with crinoidal flanks. Geographic distribution of these reef types and analysis of surrounding facies suggests that reef growth pattern was controlled by water depth and local rate of subsidence. Despite superfacial resemblance to modern deep water ahermatypic coral mounds and thickets, abundant coral breakage and overturning, and erosion of at least one reef core during an intermediate stage of reef growth supports a shallow water origin of these reefs. It is suggested that the Edgecliff and its reefs represent an example of Devonian cool water carbonate deposition, a hypothesis supported by a trend of increasing stromatoporoid abundance westwards across New York (in the direction of the paleo-equator).

  3. A novel reef coral symbiosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantos, O.; Bythell, J. C.

    2010-09-01

    Reef building corals form close associations with unicellular microalgae, fungi, bacteria and archaea, some of which are symbiotic and which together form the coral holobiont. Associations with multicellular eukaryotes such as polychaete worms, bivalves and sponges are not generally considered to be symbiotic as the host responds to their presence by forming physical barriers with an active growth edge in the exoskeleton isolating the invader and, at a subcellular level, activating innate immune responses such as melanin deposition. This study describes a novel symbiosis between a newly described hydrozoan ( Zanclea margaritae sp. nov.) and the reef building coral Acropora muricata (= A. formosa), with the hydrozoan hydrorhiza ramifying throughout the coral tissues with no evidence of isolation or activation of the immune systems of the host. The hydrorhiza lacks a perisarc, which is typical of symbiotic species of this and related genera, including species that associate with other cnidarians such as octocorals. The symbiosis was observed at all sites investigated from two distant locations on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia, and appears to be host species specific, being found only in A. muricata and in none of 30 other species investigated at these sites. Not all colonies of A. muricata host the hydrozoans and both the prevalence within the coral population (mean = 66%) and density of emergent hydrozoan hydranths on the surface of the coral (mean = 4.3 cm-2, but up to 52 cm-2) vary between sites. The form of the symbiosis in terms of the mutualism-parasitism continuum is not known, although the hydrozoan possesses large stenotele nematocysts, which may be important for defence from predators and protozoan pathogens. This finding expands the known A. muricata holobiont and the association must be taken into account in future when determining the corals’ abilities to defend against predators and withstand stress.

  4. http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov Coral Reef Evaluation & Monitoring

    E-print Network

    http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov Coral Reef Evaluation & Monitoring Sanctuary Managers Rely on Research to Protect Coral Reef North America's only barrier coral reef lies within the Florida Keys National Marine research and monitoring programs to aid them in protecting and managing this world-renowned coral reef

  5. Parrotfish abundance and selective corallivory on a Belizean coral reef

    E-print Network

    Lewis, Sara

    Parrotfish abundance and selective corallivory on a Belizean coral reef Randi D. Rotjan *, Sara M of coral reef communities because they consume macroalgae that would otherwise outcompete reef grazing by parrotfish on particular coral species, differences in grazing incidence among reef habitats

  6. A Theoretical Model of Pattern Formation in Coral Reefs

    E-print Network

    A Theoretical Model of Pattern Formation in Coral Reefs Susannah Mistr and David Bercovici to flow are qualitatively supported on both a colonial and a regional reef scale. Key words: coral reefs; pattern formation; self- organization; colonial organisms. INTRODUCTION Coral reefs are composed of small

  7. Artificial Reefs: Toward a New Era in Fisheries Enhancement?

    E-print Network

    Artificial Reefs: Toward a New Era in Fisheries Enhancement? RICHARD B. STONE Anglers have used artificial reefs to enhance their fishing opportunities for centuries. Early reef construction in the United earlier. Ino (1974) found written evidence sug- gesting that artificial reefs were already in use in Japan

  8. A Hope for the Reefs John R. Pringle

    E-print Network

    Pringle, John

    A Hope for the Reefs John R. Pringle On coral reefs the world around, Most wondrous creatures do abound. How sad it is to have to say, This spectacle may go away. Reefs are built by coral polyps, Bit. But now the reefs are prone to bleach, No site is safe, beyond man's reach. And those who live upon

  9. Date: November 10, 2006 To: Becky Shortland, Gray's Reef Reserve

    E-print Network

    Radcliffe, David

    , and reef degradation in the Great Barrier Reef. The results of that study, entitled A Report on the Study of Land Based Pollutants and Their Impacts on Water Quality in and adjacent to the Great Barrier ReefMemorandum Date: November 10, 2006 To: Becky Shortland, Gray's Reef Reserve Cc: Laurie Fowler From

  10. SIGHTINGS OF HUMPBACK WHALES IN GREAT BARRIER REEF WATERS

    E-print Network

    Marsh, Helene

    SIGHTINGS OF HUMPBACK WHALES IN GREAT BARRIER REEF WATERS MARK L. SIMMONS* AND HELENE MARSH*+ ABSTRACT Oral J-ristoryintewiews indicate that humpback whales used to winter in Great Barrier Reef waters in the Great Barrier Reef lagoon. Some females "pp"...,ity ."r* before they reach reef waters. Hump6acks

  11. CARBON TURNOVER AND ACCUMULu..TION BY CORAL REEFS

    E-print Network

    Qiu, Bo

    reef systems. One Tree Is. and Lizard Is. in the Austral ian Great Barrier Reef, and Kaneohe Bay the other sites. There is great operational unifor~ity in coral reef metabolism apparentiy re- gardless ism is great, probably at all latitudes at which coral reefs are found. Unperturbed systems

  12. A Global Estimate of the Number of Coral Reef Fishers.

    PubMed

    Teh, Louise S L; Teh, Lydia C L; Sumaila, U Rashid

    2013-01-01

    Overfishing threatens coral reefs worldwide, yet there is no reliable estimate on the number of reef fishers globally. We address this data gap by quantifying the number of reef fishers on a global scale, using two approaches - the first estimates reef fishers as a proportion of the total number of marine fishers in a country, based on the ratio of reef-related to total marine fish landed values. The second estimates reef fishers as a function of coral reef area, rural coastal population, and fishing pressure. In total, we find that there are 6 million reef fishers in 99 reef countries and territories worldwide, of which at least 25% are reef gleaners. Our estimates are an improvement over most existing fisher population statistics, which tend to omit accounting for gleaners and reef fishers. Our results suggest that slightly over a quarter of the world's small-scale fishers fish on coral reefs, and half of all coral reef fishers are in Southeast Asia. Coral reefs evidently support the socio-economic well-being of numerous coastal communities. By quantifying the number of people who are employed as reef fishers, we provide decision-makers with an important input into planning for sustainable coral reef fisheries at the appropriate scale. PMID:23840327

  13. Characterizing megascopic textures in fluorospar ores at Okorusu mine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagni, Richard D.; Shivdasan, Purnima A.

    2000-04-01

    Recent field mapping in two open pits at the Okorusu fluorspar mine in Namibia confirmed the presence of a variety of host rocks that were replaced by fluorite ores. The presence of certain textures in the fluorite ores can be used to identify the original host rock that was replaced. The character of the original host rock prior to fluorite replacement, in turn, has a significant controlling influence upon the beneficiation problems that are experienced for those ores.

  14. 37. VIEW NORTH FROM EAST CRUDE ORE BIN TO CRUSHER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. VIEW NORTH FROM EAST CRUDE ORE BIN TO CRUSHER ADDITION AND CRUSHED OXIDIZED ORE BIN. VISIBLE ARE DINGS MAGNETIC PULLEY (CENTER), THE 100-TON STEEL CRUSHED UNOXIDIZED ORE BIN, AND UPPER PORTION OF THE STEPHENS-ADAMSON 25 TON/HR BUCKET ELEVATOR. THE UPPER TAILINGS POND LIES BEYOND THE MILL WITH THE UPPER TAILINGS DAM UNDER THE GRAVEL ROAD IN THE UPPER RIGHT CORNER. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  15. 40 CFR 440.40 - Applicability; description of the mercury ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... mercury ore subcategory. 440.40 Section 440.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Mercury Ore Subcategory § 440.40 Applicability; description of the mercury ore subcategory. The provisions... produce mercury ores; and (b) mills beneficiating mercury ores by gravity separation methods or by...

  16. 40 CFR 440.40 - Applicability; description of the mercury ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... mercury ore subcategory. 440.40 Section 440.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Mercury Ore Subcategory § 440.40 Applicability; description of the mercury ore subcategory. The provisions... produce mercury ores; and (b) mills beneficiating mercury ores by gravity separation methods or by...

  17. 40 CFR 440.40 - Applicability; description of the mercury ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... mercury ore subcategory. 440.40 Section 440.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Mercury Ore Subcategory § 440.40 Applicability; description of the mercury ore subcategory. The provisions... produce mercury ores; and (b) mills beneficiating mercury ores by gravity separation methods or by...

  18. Geomorphology and sediment transport on a submerged back-reef sand apron: One Tree Reef, Great Barrier Reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Daniel L.; Vila-Concejo, Ana; Webster, Jody M.

    2014-10-01

    Back-reef sand aprons are conspicuous and dynamic sedimentary features in coral reef systems. The development of these features influences the evolution and defines the maturity of coral reefs. However, the hydrodynamic processes that drive changes on sand aprons are poorly understood with only a few studies directly assessing sediment entrainment and transport. Current and wave conditions on a back-reef sand apron were measured during this study and a digital elevation model was developed through topographic and bathymetric surveying of the sand apron, reef flats and lagoon. The current and wave processes that may entrain and transport sediment were assessed using second order small amplitude (Stokes) wave theory and Shields equations. The morphodynamic interactions between current flow and geomorphology were also examined. The results showed that sediment transport occurs under modal hydrodynamic conditions with waves the main force entraining sediment rather than average currents. A morphodynamic relationship between current flow and geomorphology was also observed with current flow primarily towards the lagoon in shallow areas of the sand apron and deeper channel-like areas directing current off the sand apron towards the lagoon or the reef crest. These results show that the short-term mutual interaction of hydrodynamics and geomorphology in coral reefs can result in morphodynamic equilibrium.

  19. 4. TROJAN MILL, DETAIL OF CRUDE ORE BINS FROM NORTH, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. TROJAN MILL, DETAIL OF CRUDE ORE BINS FROM NORTH, c. 1912. SHOWS TIMBER FRAMING UNDER CONSTRUCTION FOR EAST AND WEST CRUDE ORE BINS AT PREVIOUS LOCATION OF CRUSHER HOUSE, AND SNOW SHED PRESENT OVER SOUTH CRUDE ORE BIN WITH PHASE CHANGE IN SNOW SHED CONSTRUCTION INDICATED AT EAST END OF EAST CRUDE ORE BIN. THIS PHOTOGRAPH IS THE FIRST IMAGE OF THE MACHINE SHOP, UPPER LEFT CORNER. CREDIT JW. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  20. The x-ray tomography of a siliceous silver ore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, T. T.; Sasov, A.; Dutrizac, J. E.; Kondos, P.; Poirier, G.

    2006-03-01

    The scanning-electron microscopy and high-resolution x-ray computed tomography of siliceous silver ore fragments revealed that the ore consists almost entirely of porous masses of quartz. The quartz contains numerous pores with sizes ranging from <1 ?m to several millimeters. Silver occurs as <1 ?m sized particles in the micropores or embedded in the quartz matrix adjacent to the micropores. However, the pores have limited connections to one another. The fine pore sizes, together with the limited pore connections, greatly reduce the permeability of the ore. The implication is that very fine grinding of the ore is required to improve silver extractions by hydrometallurgical methods.

  1. Experimenting With Ore: Creating the Taconite Process; flow chart of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Experimenting With Ore: Creating the Taconite Process; flow chart of process - Mines Experiment Station, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities Campus, 56 East River Road, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, MN

  2. Recovery of Cu and Zn from Complex Sulphide Ore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talapaneni, Trinath; Sarkar, S.; Yedla, N.; Reddy, P. L. N., Dr

    2015-02-01

    Complex Sulphide Ores are often found to be a close mutual association with each other and with the nonmetallic gangue. The beneficiation experiments showed that it would be very difficult to recover Cu and Zn from the lean complex Sulphide ores using traditional ore beneficiation methods. In the present work, leaching of complex sulfide ores in sulfuric acid was investigated by the Electro hydrometallurgy process. The lab-scale experiments were conducted to investigate the influences of pulp-density, electrolyte concentration, particle size, current density and time on recovery of Cu and Zn. The leach liquor obtained after electrolysis was subjected to Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy analysis for the recovery of minerals.

  3. QUANTIFYING CORAL REEF CRYPTOFAUNA DIVERSITY OF O`AHU AND KAUA`I ISLANDS USING AUTONOMOUS REEF MONITORING

    E-print Network

    Qiu, Bo

    QUANTIFYING CORAL REEF CRYPTOFAUNA DIVERSITY OF O`AHU AND KAUA`I ISLANDS USING AUTONOMOUS REEF Coral reefs are hugely productive ecosystems supported in large part by the cryptic biota that inhabit dwellers that comprise the majority of coral reef biodiversity. Quantifying biodiversity of cryptofauna

  4. 76 FR 59377 - Amendments to the Reef Fish, Spiny Lobster, Queen Conch and Coral and Reef Associated Plants and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-26

    ..., Spiny Lobster, Queen Conch and Coral and Reef Associated Plants and Invertebrates Fishery Management... Fishery Management Plans (FMPs) for Reef Fish Resources, Spiny Lobster, Queen Conch, and Coral and Reef... and coral and reef associated plants and invertebrates species. The 2011 Caribbean ACL Amendment...

  5. A modified release analysis procedure using advanced froth flotation mechanisms. Final technical report, September 1, 1995--August 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Honaker, R.Q.; Mohanty, M.K.

    1997-05-01

    Recent studies indicate that the optimum separation performances achieved by multiple stage cleaning using various column flotation technologies and single stage cleaning using a Packed-Flotation Column are superior to the performance achieved by the traditional release procedure, especially in terms of pyritic sulfur rejection. This superior performance is believed to be the result of the advanced flotation mechanisms provided by column flotation technologies. Thus, the objective of this study was to develop a suitable process utilizing the advanced froth flotation mechanisms to characterize the true flotation response of a coal sample. This investigation resulted in the development of a modified coal flotation characterization procedure, termed as the Advanced Flotation Washability (AFW) technique. The apparatus used for this procedure is a batch operated Packed-Column device which provides enhanced selectivity due to a plug-flow environment and a deep froth zone. The separation performance achieved by the AFW procedure was found to be superior to those produced by the conventional tree and release procedures for three nominally -100 mesh coal samples and two micronized samples. The largest difference in separation performance was obtained on the basis of product pyritic sulfur content. A comparison conducted between the AFW and the release procedures at an 80% recovery value showed that the AFW technique provided a 19% improvement in the reduction of pyritic sulfur. For an Illinois No. 5 coal sample, this improvement corresponded to a reduction in pyritic sulfur content from 1.38% to 0.70% or a total rejection of 66%. Micronization of the sample improved the pyritic sulfur rejection to 85% while rejecting 92% of the ash-bearing material. In addition, the separation performance provided by the AFW procedure was superior to that obtained from multiple cleaning stages using a continuous Packed-Column under both kinetic and carrying-capacity limiting conditions.

  6. Comparison of the egg flotation and egg candling techniques for estimating incubation day of Canada Goose nests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reiter, M.E.; Andersen, D.E.

    2008-01-01

    Both egg flotation and egg candling have been used to estimate incubation day (often termed nest age) in nesting birds, but little is known about the relative accuracy of these two techniques. We used both egg flotation and egg candling to estimate incubation day for Canada Geese (Branta canadensis interior) nesting near Cape Churchill, Manitoba, from 2000 to 2007. We modeled variation in the difference between estimates of incubation day using each technique as a function of true incubation day, as well as, variation in error rates with each technique as a function of the true incubation day. We also evaluated the effect of error in the estimated incubation day on estimates of daily survival rate (DSR) and nest success using simulations. The mean difference between concurrent estimates of incubation day based on egg flotation minus egg candling at the same nest was 0.85 ?? 0.06 (SE) days. The positive difference in favor of egg flotation and the magnitude of the difference in estimates of incubation day did not vary as a function of true incubation day. Overall, both egg flotation and egg candling overestimated incubation day early in incubation and underestimated incubation day later in incubation. The average difference between true hatch date and estimated hatch date did not differ from zero (days) for egg flotation, but egg candling overestimated true hatch date by about 1 d (true - estimated; days). Our simulations suggested that error associated with estimating the incubation day of nests and subsequently exposure days using either egg candling or egg flotation would have minimal effects on estimates of DSR and nest success. Although egg flotation was slightly less biased, both methods provided comparable and accurate estimates of incubation day and subsequent estimates of hatch date and nest success throughout the entire incubation period. ?? 2008 Association of Field Ornithologists.

  7. Wave transformation across coral reefs under changing sea levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Daniel; Power, Hannah; Vila-Conejo, Ana; Webster, Jody

    2015-04-01

    The transformation of swell waves from deep water across reef flats is the primary process regulating energy regimes in coral reef systems. Coral reefs are effective barriers removing up to 99% of wave energy during breaking and propagation across reef flats. Consequently back-reef environments are often considered low energy with only limited sediment transport and geomorphic change during modal conditions. Coral reefs, and specifically reef flats, therefore provide important protection to tropical coastlines from coastal erosion and recession. However, changes in sea level could lead to significant changes in the dissipation of swell wave energy in coral reef systems with wave heights dependent on the depth over the reef flat. This suggests that a rise in sea level would also lead to significantly higher energy conditions exacerbating the transgressive effects of sea level rise on tropical beaches and reef islands. This study examines the potential implications of different sea level scenarios on the transformation of waves across the windward reef flats of One Tree Reef, southern Great Barrier Reef. Waves were measured on the reef flats and back-reef sand apron of One Tree Reef. A one-dimensional wave model was calibrated and used to investigate wave processes on the reef flats under different mean sea level (MSL) scenarios (present MSL, +1 m MSL, and +2 m MSL). These scenarios represent both potential future sea level states and also the paleo sea level of the late Holocene in the southern Great Barrier Reef. Wave heights were shown to increase under sea level rise, with greater wave induced orbital velocities affecting the bed under higher sea levels. In general waves were more likely to entrain and transport sediment both on the reef flat and in the back reef environment under higher sea levels which has implications for not only forecasted climate change scenarios but also for interpreting geological changes during the late Holocene when sea levels were 1-2 m higher than present.

  8. Ocean Acidification Accelerates Reef Bioerosion

    PubMed Central

    Wisshak, Max; Schönberg, Christine H. L.; Form, Armin; Freiwald, André

    2012-01-01

    In the recent discussion how biotic systems may react to ocean acidification caused by the rapid rise in carbon dioxide partial pressure (pCO2) in the marine realm, substantial research is devoted to calcifiers such as stony corals. The antagonistic process – biologically induced carbonate dissolution via bioerosion – has largely been neglected. Unlike skeletal growth, we expect bioerosion by chemical means to be facilitated in a high-CO2 world. This study focuses on one of the most detrimental bioeroders, the sponge Cliona orientalis, which attacks and kills live corals on Australia’s Great Barrier Reef. Experimental exposure to lowered and elevated levels of pCO2 confirms a significant enforcement of the sponges’ bioerosion capacity with increasing pCO2 under more acidic conditions. Considering the substantial contribution of sponges to carbonate bioerosion, this finding implies that tropical reef ecosystems are facing the combined effects of weakened coral calcification and accelerated bioerosion, resulting in critical pressure on the dynamic balance between biogenic carbonate build-up and degradation. PMID:23028797

  9. Headgroup interactions and ion flotation efficiency in mixtures of a chelating surfactant, different foaming agents, and divalent metal ions.

    PubMed

    Svanedal, Ida; Boija, Susanne; Norgren, Magnus; Edlund, Håkan

    2014-06-10

    The correlation between interaction parameters and ion flotation efficiency in mixtures of chelating surfactant metal complexes and different foaming agents was investigated. We have recently shown that chelating surfactant 2-dodecyldiethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (4-C12-DTPA) forms strong coordination complexes with divalent metal ions, and this can be utilized in ion flotation. Interaction parameters for mixed micelles and mixed monolayer formation for Mg(2+) and Ni(2+) complexes with the chelating surfactant 4-C12-DTPA and different foaming agents were calculated by Rubingh's regular solution theory. Parameters for the calculations were extracted from surface tension measurements and NMR diffusometry. The effects of metal ion coordination on the interactions between 4-C12-DTPA and the foaming agents could be linked to a previously established difference in coordination chemistry between the examined metal ions. As can be expected from mixtures of amphoteric surfactants, the interactions were strongly pH-dependent. Strong correlation was found between interaction parameter ?(?) for mixed monolayer formation and the phase-transfer efficiency of Ni(2+) complexes with 4-C12-DTPA during flotation in a customized flotation cell. In a mixture of Cu(2+) and Zn(2+), the significant difference in conditional stability constants (log K) between the metal complexes was utilized to selectively recover the metal complex with the highest log K (Cu(2+)) by ion flotation. Flotation experiments in an excess concentration of metal ions confirmed the coordination of more than one metal ion to the headgroup of 4-C12-DTPA. PMID:24824327

  10. Miocene reef carbonates of Mariana Islands

    SciTech Connect

    Siegrist, H.G. Jr.

    1988-02-01

    Miocene carbonates in the southern Mariana Islands are impressive for their lithologic diversity, thicknesses (over 250 m), and geographic extent (> 20% combined outcrop coverage over four major high islands: Guam, Rota, Tinian and Saipan). Sections are dominated either by lagoonal algal-foraminiferal wackestones and mudstones with locally abundant high-energy shelly-skeletal facies, or by rubbly to muddy, fore-reef-to-bank deposits of packstones and grainstones with highly diverse and variable biogenic clasts. Fresh to deeply weathered volcaniclastic material may comprise at least 80% of some high-energy fore-reef facies, whereas lagoonal and bank deposits usually contain less than 0.5% terrigenous material. Surprisingly, the Miocene in the Marianas lacks almost completely any reef-core facies. Several poorly developed coral-rich mounds on Saipan and localized laminated red algal buildups on Guam appear to constitute the extant reef-wall facies in the Miocene. The lack of buildups may be a matter of differential survival; it may result from headland erosion and benching associated with emergence of narrow reef tracts as has been postulated by others for south Guam. Alternatively, the authors are proposing that Miocene bathymetry and the volume of terrigenous influx militated against significant reef core formation. Radiometric age dating of these reef carbonates has proven unsuccessful because pervasive diagenesis has transformed the entire Miocene section into low-magnesium calcite with minor and occasional dolomite. Freshwater phreatic diagenesis accounts for the principal porosity variation and trace element distribution.

  11. Bioprocessing of ores: Application to space resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johansson, Karl R.

    1992-01-01

    The role of microorganisms in the oxidation and leaching of various ores (especially those of copper, iron, and uranium) is well known. This role is increasingly being applied by the mining, metallurgy, and sewage industries in the bioconcentration of metal ions from natural receiving waters and from waste waters. It is concluded that bioprocessing using bacteria in closed reactors may be a variable option for the recovery of metals from the lunar regolith. Obviously, considerable research must be done to define the process, specify the appropriate bacteria, determine the necessary conditions and limitations, and evaluate the overall feasibility.

  12. Management of coral reefs: we have gone wrong when neglecting active reef restoration.

    PubMed

    Rinkevich, Baruch

    2008-11-01

    The current best management tools employed in coral reefs worldwide do not achieve conservation objectives as coral reefs continue to degrade. Even improved reef management helps, at best, to reduce the degradation pace, whereas the worsening global changes foretell a dismal fate for coral reefs. The assertion made here is that the prospect for reefs' future is centered on omnipresent acceptance of restoration, an 'active' management instrument. A recent promising such tool is the 'gardening concept', influenced by the well-established scientific discipline of terrestrial forestation. This notion is supported by a two-step protocol. The first step entails rearing coral "seedlings", in specially designed underwater nurseries, to transplantable size, before applying the second step, out-planting into damaged areas of the nursery-farmed coral colonies. Only the establishment of large-scale nurseries and transplantation actions, together with conventional management tools, will be able to cope with extensive reef degradation on the global scale. PMID:18829052

  13. [Infrared Spectra Characteristics of the Silicate Nickel Ores: A Comparison Study on Different Ore Samples from Indonesia and China].

    PubMed

    Yang, Meng-li; Fu, Wei; Wang, Bao-hua; Zhang, Ya-qian; Huang, Xiao-rong; Niu, Hu-jie

    2015-03-01

    The silicate nickel ores developed in the lateritic nickel deposit, from Kolonodale, Sulawesi Island, Indonesia, and Yuanjiang, Yunnan province, China, were selected for the present study. The X-ray diffraction and Fourier infrared spectra were used to analyze the mineralogical attribute of laterite nickel ores from two different places. The results show that these two different silicate nickel ores have unique infrared spectra characteristics individually, which contributes to the ore classification. The silicate nickel ores from Kolonodale deposit, Indonesia, can be classified as the serpentine type, the montmorillonite + serpentine type, and the garnierite type. While, the silicate nickel ores from Yuanjiang deposit, China, can be classified as the serpentine type and the talc + serpentine type. Moreover, the mineral crystallinity of Yuanjiang nickel ores is generally better than Kolonodale nickel ores. According to the advantage of infrared absorption spectra in distinguishing mineral polytypes, it can be determined that lizardite is the main mineral type in the silicate nickel ores of the two deposits, and there is no obvious evidence of chrysotile and antigorite's existence. The characteristic of infrared absorption spectra also shows that frequency change of OH libration indicates Ni (Fe) replacing Mg in the serpentine type nickel-bearing mineral, that is, OH libration of serpentine moves to higher frequency, with the proportion of Ni (Fe) replacing Mg increasing. PMID:26117869

  14. Community structure and coral status across reef fishing intensity gradients in Palk Bay reef, southeast coast of India.

    PubMed

    Manikandan, B; Ravindran, J; Shrinivaasu, S; Marimuthu, N; Paramasivam, K

    2014-10-01

    Coral reef fishes are exploited without the knowledge of their sustainability and their possible effect in altering the community structure of a coral reef ecosystem. Alteration of the community structure could cause a decline in the health of coral reefs and its services. We documented the coral community structure, status of live corals and reef fish assemblages in Palk Bay at the reef fishing hotspots and its nearby reef area with minimum fishing pressure and compared it with a control reef area where reef fishing was banned for more than two decades. The comparison was based on the percent cover of different forms of live corals, their diversity and the density and diversity of reef fishes. The reef fish stock in the reef fishing hotspots and its neighbouring reef was lower by 61 and 38%, respectively compared to the control reef. The herbivore fish Scarus ghobban and Siganus javus were exploited at a rate of 250 and 105 kg month(-1) fishermen(-1), respectively, relatively high comparing the small reef area. Live and dead corals colonized by turf algae were predominant in both the reef fishing hotspots and its nearby coral ecosystems. The percent cover of healthy live corals and live corals colonized by turf algae was <10 and >80%, respectively, in the intensively fished coral ecosystems. The corals were less diverse and the massive Porites and Favia colonies were abundant in the intensive reef fishing sites. Results of this study suggest that the impact of reef fish exploitation was not solely restricted to the intensively fished reefs, but also to the nearby reefs which play a critical role in the resilience of degraded reef ecosystems. PMID:24859909

  15. Numerical modeling of atoll reef harbors

    SciTech Connect

    Mader, C.L.; Vitousek, M.; Lukas, S.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of the shape of a harbor cut through a reef on mitigating waves from the deep ocean was studied using a shallow water, nonlinear, long wave code called SWAN. A significant amount of the wave energy is dissipated over the reef regardless of the design of the harbor. The reef resulted in decreasing the wave height by a factor 3. The wave height at the shore can be further decreased by another factor of 2 by a ''V'' shaped or parabolic bottom design.

  16. 40 CFR 440.50 - Applicability; description of the titanium ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Applicability; description of the titanium ore subcategory. 440.50 Section...AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Titanium Ore Subcategory § 440.50 Applicability; description of the titanium ore subcategory. The...

  17. 40 CFR 440.50 - Applicability; description of the titanium ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Applicability; description of the titanium ore subcategory. 440.50 Section...AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Titanium Ore Subcategory § 440.50 Applicability; description of the titanium ore subcategory. The...

  18. 40 CFR 440.50 - Applicability; description of the titanium ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Applicability; description of the titanium ore subcategory. 440.50 Section...AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Titanium Ore Subcategory § 440.50 Applicability; description of the titanium ore subcategory. The...

  19. 40 CFR 440.50 - Applicability; description of the titanium ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Applicability; description of the titanium ore subcategory. 440.50 Section...AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Titanium Ore Subcategory § 440.50 Applicability; description of the titanium ore subcategory. The...

  20. 40 CFR 440.50 - Applicability; description of the titanium ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Applicability; description of the titanium ore subcategory. 440.50 Section...AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Titanium Ore Subcategory § 440.50 Applicability; description of the titanium ore subcategory. The...

  1. 40 CFR 440.110 - Applicability; description of the platinum ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Applicability; description of the platinum ore subcategory. 440.110 Section...AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Platinum Ores Subcategory § 440.110 Applicability; description of the platinum ore subcategory. The...

  2. 40 CFR 440.110 - Applicability; description of the platinum ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Applicability; description of the platinum ore subcategory. 440.110 Section...AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Platinum Ores Subcategory § 440.110 Applicability; description of the platinum ore subcategory. The...

  3. 40 CFR 440.110 - Applicability; description of the platinum ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Applicability; description of the platinum ore subcategory. 440.110 Section...AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Platinum Ores Subcategory § 440.110 Applicability; description of the platinum ore subcategory. The...

  4. 40 CFR 440.110 - Applicability; description of the platinum ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Applicability; description of the platinum ore subcategory. 440.110 Section...AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Platinum Ores Subcategory § 440.110 Applicability; description of the platinum ore subcategory. The...

  5. 40 CFR 440.110 - Applicability; description of the platinum ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Applicability; description of the platinum ore subcategory. 440.110 Section...AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Platinum Ores Subcategory § 440.110 Applicability; description of the platinum ore subcategory. The...

  6. 40 CFR 440.30 - Applicability; description of the uranium, radium and vanadium ores subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Applicability; description of the uranium, radium and vanadium ores...STANDARDS (CONTINUED) ORE MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Uranium, Radium and Vanadium Ores...Applicability; description of the uranium, radium and vanadium...

  7. 40 CFR 440.30 - Applicability; description of the uranium, radium and vanadium ores subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Applicability; description of the uranium, radium and vanadium ores...GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORE MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Uranium, Radium and Vanadium Ores...Applicability; description of the uranium, radium and vanadium...

  8. 40 CFR 440.30 - Applicability; description of the uranium, radium and vanadium ores subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Applicability; description of the uranium, radium and vanadium ores...STANDARDS (CONTINUED) ORE MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Uranium, Radium and Vanadium Ores...Applicability; description of the uranium, radium and vanadium...

  9. 40 CFR 440.30 - Applicability; description of the uranium, radium and vanadium ores subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Applicability; description of the uranium, radium and vanadium ores...GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORE MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Uranium, Radium and Vanadium Ores...Applicability; description of the uranium, radium and vanadium...

  10. 40 CFR 440.30 - Applicability; description of the uranium, radium and vanadium ores subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Applicability; description of the uranium, radium and vanadium ores...STANDARDS (CONTINUED) ORE MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Uranium, Radium and Vanadium Ores...Applicability; description of the uranium, radium and vanadium...

  11. 40 CFR 440.40 - Applicability; description of the mercury ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Applicability; description of the mercury ore subcategory. 440.40 Section...AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Mercury Ore Subcategory § 440.40 Applicability; description of the mercury ore subcategory. The...

  12. 40 CFR 440.40 - Applicability; description of the mercury ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Applicability; description of the mercury ore subcategory. 440.40 Section...AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Mercury Ore Subcategory § 440.40 Applicability; description of the mercury ore subcategory. The...

  13. 40 CFR 440.40 - Applicability; description of the mercury ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Applicability; description of the mercury ore subcategory. 440.40 Section...AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Mercury Ore Subcategory § 440.40 Applicability; description of the mercury ore subcategory. The...

  14. 40 CFR 440.40 - Applicability; description of the mercury ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Applicability; description of the mercury ore subcategory. 440.40 Section...AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Mercury Ore Subcategory § 440.40 Applicability; description of the mercury ore subcategory. The...

  15. 40 CFR 440.40 - Applicability; description of the mercury ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Applicability; description of the mercury ore subcategory. 440.40 Section...AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Mercury Ore Subcategory § 440.40 Applicability; description of the mercury ore subcategory. The...

  16. 40 CFR 440.10 - Applicability; description of the iron ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...false Applicability; description of the iron ore subcategory. 440.10 Section...MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Iron Ore Subcategory § 440.10 Applicability; description of the iron ore subcategory. The provisions...

  17. 40 CFR 440.10 - Applicability; description of the iron ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...false Applicability; description of the iron ore subcategory. 440.10 Section...MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Iron Ore Subcategory § 440.10 Applicability; description of the iron ore subcategory. The provisions...

  18. 40 CFR 440.10 - Applicability; description of the iron ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...false Applicability; description of the iron ore subcategory. 440.10 Section...MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Iron Ore Subcategory § 440.10 Applicability; description of the iron ore subcategory. The provisions...

  19. 40 CFR 440.10 - Applicability; description of the iron ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...false Applicability; description of the iron ore subcategory. 440.10 Section...MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Iron Ore Subcategory § 440.10 Applicability; description of the iron ore subcategory. The provisions...

  20. 40 CFR 440.10 - Applicability; description of the iron ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...false Applicability; description of the iron ore subcategory. 440.10 Section...MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Iron Ore Subcategory § 440.10 Applicability; description of the iron ore subcategory. The provisions...

  1. 40 CFR 440.80 - Applicability; description of the vanadium ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Applicability; description of the vanadium ore subcategory. 440.80 Section...MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Vanadium Ore Subcategory (Mined Alone and Not... Applicability; description of the vanadium ore subcategory. The...

  2. 40 CFR 440.80 - Applicability; description of the vanadium ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Applicability; description of the vanadium ore subcategory. 440.80 Section...MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Vanadium Ore Subcategory (Mined Alone and Not... Applicability; description of the vanadium ore subcategory. The...

  3. 40 CFR 440.80 - Applicability; description of the vanadium ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Applicability; description of the vanadium ore subcategory. 440.80 Section...MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Vanadium Ore Subcategory (Mined Alone and Not... Applicability; description of the vanadium ore subcategory. The...

  4. 40 CFR 440.80 - Applicability; description of the vanadium ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Applicability; description of the vanadium ore subcategory. 440.80 Section...MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Vanadium Ore Subcategory (Mined Alone and Not... Applicability; description of the vanadium ore subcategory. The...

  5. 40 CFR 440.80 - Applicability; description of the vanadium ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Applicability; description of the vanadium ore subcategory. 440.80 Section...MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Vanadium Ore Subcategory (Mined Alone and Not... Applicability; description of the vanadium ore subcategory. The...

  6. 40 CFR 440.70 - Applicability; description of the nickel ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Applicability; description of the nickel ore subcategory. 440.70 Section...MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Nickel Ore Subcategory § 440.70 Applicability; description of the nickel ore subcategory. The...

  7. 40 CFR 440.70 - Applicability; description of the nickel ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Applicability; description of the nickel ore subcategory. 440.70 Section...MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Nickel Ore Subcategory § 440.70 Applicability; description of the nickel ore subcategory. The...

  8. 40 CFR 440.70 - Applicability; description of the nickel ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Applicability; description of the nickel ore subcategory. 440.70 Section...MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Nickel Ore Subcategory § 440.70 Applicability; description of the nickel ore subcategory. The...

  9. 40 CFR 440.70 - Applicability; description of the nickel ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Applicability; description of the nickel ore subcategory. 440.70 Section...MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Nickel Ore Subcategory § 440.70 Applicability; description of the nickel ore subcategory. The...

  10. 40 CFR 440.70 - Applicability; description of the nickel ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Applicability; description of the nickel ore subcategory. 440.70 Section...MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Nickel Ore Subcategory § 440.70 Applicability; description of the nickel ore subcategory. The...

  11. 26 CFR 1.272-1 - Expenditures relating to disposal of coal or domestic iron ore.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Expenditures relating to disposal of coal or domestic iron ore. 1.272-1 ...Expenditures relating to disposal of coal or domestic iron ore. (a) Introduction...hereafter sometimes referred to as a “coal royalty contract” or “iron ore...

  12. 26 CFR 1.272-1 - Expenditures relating to disposal of coal or domestic iron ore.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Expenditures relating to disposal of coal or domestic iron ore. 1.272-1 ...Expenditures relating to disposal of coal or domestic iron ore. (a) Introduction...hereafter sometimes referred to as a “coal royalty contract” or “iron ore...

  13. 40 CFR 440.10 - Applicability; description of the iron ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the type of ore or its mode of occurrence; (b) mills beneficiating iron ores by physical (magnetic and nonmagnetic) and/or chemical separation; and (c) mills beneficiating iron ores by magnetic and...

  14. 40 CFR 440.10 - Applicability; description of the iron ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the type of ore or its mode of occurrence; (b) mills beneficiating iron ores by physical (magnetic and nonmagnetic) and/or chemical separation; and (c) mills beneficiating iron ores by magnetic and...

  15. 40 CFR 440.10 - Applicability; description of the iron ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the type of ore or its mode of occurrence; (b) mills beneficiating iron ores by physical (magnetic and nonmagnetic) and/or chemical separation; and (c) mills beneficiating iron ores by magnetic and...

  16. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies: Froth flotation. Quarterly technical progress report No. 9, October 1, 1990--December 31, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    The Task 6 effort involves three main elements including column cell development, flotation circuit testing and flotation cell modeling. The work outlined is to research column designs and operation parameters in developing an optimized column flotation cell (OCFC) to meet the overall program objectives. The test results obtained through this effort will be evaluated against the results obtained from the round-robin test program in Task 5. Any design parameters or operating conditions that are unique with the round-robin test winner that were not evaluated as part of the optimized column developments work will be reviewed and tested so as to incorporate all possible scenarios in presenting DOE with the best available flotation process for use in the 2 to 3 ton per hour POC. Following development of the OCFC, various flotation circuit configurations will be evaluated determine the ``best`` circuit design for the 2 to 3 ton per hour POC. Single and multiple stage flotation, grab and run,rougher/scavenger/cleaner, etc., test circuits will be tested as part of this effort. Upon completion of this test work, the ``best`` possible flotation cell will have been tested in a number of possible flotation circuit designs to possibly provide the ``best`` flotation approach in meeting the design criteria. In conjunction with the flotation test effort, model development work will be conducted to provide a tool in evaluating the various flotation circuit configurations and in predicting flotation performance. The model will be useful in selecting operating conditions in the POC and in evaluating the performance of the POC.

  17. Building a Numerical Model of the Filtration Flow in the ?elazny Most Flotation Tailings Disposal Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strzelecki, Tomasz; Maniecki, ?ukasz; Bartlewska-Urban, Monika

    2015-03-01

    The paper presents results of numerical computations of the filtration flow of liquid contaminated wastes through the ?elazny Most flotation tailings disposal lake. Unlike the preceding papers [5]-[7], it takes the geological structure of the subsoil into account. A three-dimensional numerical model of the lake was created for computing purposes. Data on some of the effective model parameters were acquired from laboratory tests of the material taken from the lake site. The other data were taken from the literature for media of similar properties. The results of the computations carried out using the model can be a basis for future numerical analyses aimed at determining the consolidation of the flotation tailings disposal lake and its subsoil, and the stability of the lake.

  18. Method for simultaneous use of a single additive for coal flotation, dewatering, and reconstitution

    DOEpatents

    Wen, Wu-Wey (Murrysville, PA); Gray, McMahan L. (Pittsburgh, PA); Champagne, Kenneth J. (Finleyville, PA)

    1995-01-01

    A single dose of additive contributes to three consecutive fine coal unit operations, i.e., flotation, dewatering and reconstitution, whereby the fine coal is first combined with water in a predetermined proportion so as to formulate a slurry. The slurry is then mixed with a heavy hydrocarbon-based emulsion in a second predetermined proportion and at a first predetermined mixing speed and for a predetermined period of time. The conditioned slurry is then cleaned by a froth flotation method to form a clean coal froth and then the froth is dewatered by vacuum filtration or a centrifugation process to form reconstituted products that are dried to dust-less clumps prior to combustion.

  19. Effective harvesting of the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris via flocculation-flotation with bioflocculant.

    PubMed

    Lei, Xueqian; Chen, Yao; Shao, Zongze; Chen, Zhangran; Li, Yi; Zhu, Hong; Zhang, Jingyan; Zheng, Wei; Zheng, Tianling

    2015-12-01

    In this study, bioflocculant from Cobetia marina L03 could be used for effective harvesting of the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris via flocculation-flotation. A flotation efficiency of 92.7% was observed when 20mgL(-1) bioflocculant was tested for flocculating the microalgal cells with 5mM CaCl2. The bioflocculant was stable at wide ranges of pH and temperature, which is advantageous for its application under various conditions. Chemical analysis of the bioflocculant indicated that it is composed of 31.6% total sugar and 0.2% protein (w/w). This bioflocculant has potential for the high-efficiency harvesting of microalgae and may be useful in reducing one of the barriers to microalgal biofuel production. PMID:26391967

  20. Method for simultaneous use of a single additive for coal flotation, dewatering and reconstitution

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Wu-Wey; Gray, M.L.; Champagne, K.J.

    1993-11-09

    A single dose of additive contributes to three consecutive fine coal unit operations, i.e., flotation, dewatering and reconstitution, whereby the fine coal is first combined with water in a predetermined proportion so as to formulate a slurry. The slurry is then mixed with a heavy hydrocarbon-based emulsion in a second predetermined proportion and at a first predetermined mixing speed and for a predetermined period of time. The conditioned slurry is then cleaned by a froth flotation method to form a clean coal froth and then the froth is dewatered by vacuum filtration or a centrifugation process to form reconstituted products that are dried to dust-less clumps prior to combustion.

  1. Could some coral reefs become sponge reefs as our climate changes?

    PubMed

    Bell, James J; Davy, Simon K; Jones, Timothy; Taylor, Michael W; Webster, Nicole S

    2013-09-01

    Coral reefs across the world have been seriously degraded and have a bleak future in response to predicted global warming and ocean acidification (OA). However, this is not the first time that biocalcifying organisms, including corals, have faced the threat of extinction. The end-Triassic mass extinction (200 million years ago) was the most severe biotic crisis experienced by modern marine invertebrates, which selected against biocalcifiers; this was followed by the proliferation of another invertebrate group, sponges. The duration of this sponge-dominated period far surpasses that of alternative stable-ecosystem or phase-shift states reported on modern day coral reefs and, as such, a shift to sponge-dominated reefs warrants serious consideration as one future trajectory of coral reefs. We hypothesise that some coral reefs of today may become sponge reefs in the future, as sponges and corals respond differently to changing ocean chemistry and environmental conditions. To support this hypothesis, we discuss: (i) the presence of sponge reefs in the geological record; (ii) reported shifts from coral- to sponge-dominated systems; and (iii) direct and indirect responses of the sponge holobiont and its constituent parts (host and symbionts) to changes in temperature and pH. Based on this evidence, we propose that sponges may be one group to benefit from projected climate change and ocean acidification scenarios, and that increased sponge abundance represents a possible future trajectory for some coral reefs, which would have important implications for overall reef functioning. PMID:23553821

  2. Demography of the ecosystem engineer Crassostrea gigas, related to vertical reef accretion and reef persistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walles, Brenda; Mann, Roger; Ysebaert, Tom; Troost, Karin; Herman, Peter M. J.; Smaal, Aad C.

    2015-03-01

    Marine species characterized as structure building, autogenic ecosystem engineers are recognized worldwide as potential tools for coastal adaptation efforts in the face of sea level rise. Successful employment of ecosystem engineers in coastal protection largely depends on long-term persistence of their structure, which is in turn dependent on the population dynamics of the individual species. Oysters, such as the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas), are recognized as ecosystem engineers with potential for use in coastal protection. Persistence of oyster reefs is strongly determined by recruitment and shell production (growth), processes facilitated by gregarious settlement on extant shell substrate. Although the Pacific oyster has been introduced world-wide, and has formed dense reefs in the receiving coastal waters, the population biology of live oysters and the quantitative mechanisms maintaining these reefs has rarely been studied, hence the aim of the present work. This study had two objectives: (1) to describe the demographics of extant C. gigas reefs, and (2) to estimate vertical reef accretion rates and carbonate production in these oyster reefs. Three long-living oyster reefs (>30 years old), which have not been exploited since their first occurrence, were examined in the Oosterschelde estuary in the Netherlands. A positive reef accretion rate (7.0-16.9 mm year-1 shell material) was observed, consistent with self-maintenance and persistent structure. We provide a framework to predict reef accretion and population persistence under varying recruitment, growth and mortality scenarios.

  3. Wastewater treatment using flocculation, coagulation, and flotation. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the design, development, and evaluation of flocculation coagulation and flotation processes for the treatment of sewage and industrial wastes. Citations examine technology requirements and limitations, activated sludge and anaerobic processes, chlorination, runoff pollution control, wastewater recycling and reuse, and materials recovery.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  4. Wastewater treatment using flocculation, coagulation, and flotation. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the design, development, and evaluation of flocculation coagulation and flotation processes for the treatment of sewage and industrial wastes. Citations examine technology requirements and limitations, activated sludge and anaerobic processes, chlorination, runoff pollution control, wastewater recycling and reuse, and materials recovery.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  5. The first case of Demodex gatoi in Austria, detected with fecal flotation.

    PubMed

    Silbermayr, Katja; Joachim, Anja; Litschauer, Barbara; Panakova, Lucia; Sastre, Natalia; Ferrer, Lluis; Horvath-Ungerboeck, Christa

    2013-08-01

    Feline demodicosis is a rare parasitic condition caused by three different species of mites (Demodex cati, Demodex gatoi, and an unnamed species). D. gatoi inhabits the superficial skin layer (stratum corneum) and is easily transmitted between individual cats. A 2-year-old female spayed Cornish Rex was presented with alopecia and pruritus. The dermatological examination revealed bilateral alopecia and excoriations on trunk, limbs, and belly. The second cat in the household, a 3-year-old female spayed Thai, showed no clinical signs. Superficial and deep skin scrapings were performed and cellophane tapes applied, and living D. gatoi mites could be detected in both cats. Oral ivermectin (0.25 mg/kg every other day) was subscribed. Feces were collected from both cats and fecal flotation with sugar and zinc solutions performed. When compared to skin scrapings and cellophane tapes, D. gatoi was detected more frequently and in higher numbers in fecal samples. Our findings suggest that D. gatoi can be efficiently diagnosed with coproscopy, particularly in asymptomatic carrier animals. DNA was extracted from the flotation liquid, and a PCR protocol for the species verification was designed. A fragment targeting a 325-bp DNA fragment of the D. gatoi mitochondrial 16S rDNA gene was amplified with a 100% similarity to the D. gatoi entry in GenBank® (GI 421920216). We report the first finding of D. gatoi in Austria and propose fecal flotation as a valuable tool for mite detection. Fecal flotation liquid is suitable for DNA extraction and PCR-based species verification of D. gatoi. PMID:23681192

  6. Optimizing the air flotation water treatment process. Final report, May 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, B.

    1998-09-01

    The injection water for the Nelson Project is a combination of produced and make-up water, typical of many Eastern Kansas operations. The make-up water is a low-salinity salt water from the Arbuckle Formation and contains dissolved minerals and sulfides. The produced water contains suspended oil, suspended clay and silt particles, along with a combination of other dissolved minerals. The combination of the two waters causes several undesirable reactions. The suspended solids load contained in the combined waters would plug a 75-micron plant bag filter within one day. Wellhead filters of 75-micron size were also being used on the injection wells. The poor water quality resulted in severe loss of injectivity and frequent wellbore cleaning of the injection wells. Various mechanical and graded-bed filtration methods were considered for cleaning the water. These methods were rejected due to the lack of field equipment and service availability. A number of vendors did not even respond to the author`s request. The air flotation process was selected as offering the best hope for a long-term solution. The objective of this work is to: increase the cost effectiveness of the process through optimizing process design factors and operational parameters. A vastly modified air flotation system is the principal tool for accomplishing the project objective. The air flotation unit, as received from manufacturer Separation Specialist, was primarily designed to remove oil from produced water. The additional requirement for solids removal necessitated major physical changes in the unit. Problems encountered with the air flotation unit and specific modifications are detailed in the body of the report.

  7. Apparatus for the separation of hydrophobic and hydrophilic particles using microbubble column flotation together with a process and apparatus for generation of microbubbles

    DOEpatents

    Yoon, R.H.; Adel, G.T.; Luttrell, G.H.

    1995-03-14

    An apparatus is disclosed for the microbubble flotation separation of very fine and coarse particles, especially coal, and minerals so as to produce high purity and high recovery efficiency. This is accomplished through the use of a flotation column, microbubbles, recycling of the flotation pulp, and countercurrent wash water to gently wash the froth. Also disclosed are unique processes and apparatus for generating microbubbles for flotation in a highly efficient and inexpensive manner using either a porous tube or in-line static generators. 14 figs.

  8. Apparatus and process for the separation of hydrophobic and hydrophilic particles using microbubble column flotation together with a process and apparatus for generation of microbubbles

    DOEpatents

    Yoon, R.H.; Adel, G.T.; Luttrell, G.H.

    1998-09-29

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for the microbubble flotation separation of very fine and coarse particles, especially coal and minerals, so as to produce high purity and high recovery efficiency. This is accomplished through the use of a flotation column, microbubbles, recycling of the flotation pulp, and countercurrent wash water to gently wash the froth. Also disclosed are unique processes and apparatus for generating microbubbles for flotation in a highly efficient and inexpensive manner using either a porous tube or in-line static generators. 14 figs.

  9. Apparatus for the separation of hydrophobic and hydrophilic particles using microbubble column flotation together with a process and apparatus for generation of microbubbles

    DOEpatents

    Yoon, Roe-Hoan (Blacksburg, VA); Adel, Gregory T. (Blacksburg, VA); Luttrell, Gerald H. (Blacksburg, VA)

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus is disclosed for the microbubble flotation separation of very fine and coarse particles, especially coal, and minerals so as to produce high purity and high recovery efficiency. This is accomplished through the use of a flotation column, microbubbles, recycling of the flotation pulp, and countercurrent wash water to gently wash the froth. Also disclosed are unique processes and apparatus for generating microbubbles for flotation in a highly efficient and inexpensive manner using either a porous tube or in-line static generators.

  10. Apparatus and process for the separation of hydrophobic and hydrophilic particles using microbubble column flotation together with a process and apparatus for generation of microbubbles

    DOEpatents

    Yoon, Roe-Hoan (Blacksburg, VA); Adel, Gregory T. (Blacksburg, VA); Luttrell, Gerald H. (Blacksburg, VA)

    1992-01-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for the microbubble flotation separation of very fine and coarse particles, especially coal and minerals, so as to produce high purity and high recovery efficiency. This is accomplished through the use of a flotation column, microbubbles, recycling of the flotation pulp, and countercurrent wash water to gently wash the froth. Also disclosed are unique processes and apparatus for generating microbubbles for flotation in a highly efficient and inexpensive manner using either a porous tube or in-line static generators.

  11. Apparatus and process for the separation of hydrophobic and hydrophilic particles using microbubble column flotation together with a process and apparatus for generation of microbubbles

    DOEpatents

    Yoon, R.H.; Adel, G.T.; Luttrell, G.H.

    1992-12-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for the microbubble flotation separation of very fine and coarse particles, especially coal and minerals, so as to produce high purity and high recovery efficiency. This is accomplished through the use of a flotation column, microbubbles, recycling of the flotation pulp, and countercurrent wash water to gently wash the froth. Also disclosed are unique processes and apparatus for generating microbubbles for flotation in a highly efficient and inexpensive manner using either a porous tube or in-line static generators. 14 figs.

  12. Apparatus and process for the separation of hydrophobic and hydrophilic particles using microbubble column flotation together with a process and apparatus for generation of microbubbles

    DOEpatents

    Yoon, Roe-Hoan (Blacksburg, VA); Adel, Gregory T. (Blacksburg, VA); Luttrell, Gerald H. (Blacksburg, VA)

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for the microbubble flotation separation of very fine and coarse particles, especially coal and minerals, so as to produce high purity and high recovery efficiency. This is accomplished through the use of a flotation column, microbubbles, recycling of the flotation pulp, and countercurrent wash water to gently wash the froth. Also disclosed are unique processes and apparatus for generating microbubbles for flotation in a highly efficient and inexpensive manner using either a porous tube or in-line static generators.

  13. 15. NORTH ELEVATION OF UPPER ORE BIN, CHUTE, AND JAW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. NORTH ELEVATION OF UPPER ORE BIN, CHUTE, AND JAW CRUSHER, LOOKING SOUTH FROM END OF CONVEYOR PLATFORM. NOTICE THE THREE ORE BIN CONTROL DOORS, CORRESPONDING TO SEPARATE COMPARTMENTS OF THE BIN. - Skidoo Mine, Park Route 38 (Skidoo Road), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  14. 39. HULETT ORE UNLOADER IN MOTION. VIEW LOOKING EAST. (Also ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    39. HULETT ORE UNLOADER IN MOTION. VIEW LOOKING EAST. (Also see OH-18-14, OH-18-38, and OH-18-40) - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  15. 40. HULETT ORE UNLOADER IN MOTION. VIEW LOOKING EAST. (Also ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. HULETT ORE UNLOADER IN MOTION. VIEW LOOKING EAST. (Also see OH-18-14, OH-18-38, and OH-18-39) - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  16. 19. VIEW OF CRUDE ORE BINS FROM EAST. EAST CRUDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. VIEW OF CRUDE ORE BINS FROM EAST. EAST CRUDE ORE BIN IN FOREGROUND WITH DISCHARGE TO GRIZZLY AT BOTTOM OF VIEW. CONCRETE RETAINING WALL TO LEFT (SOUTH) AND BOTTOM (EAST EDGE OF EAST BIN). - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  17. 64. NORTH WALL OF CRUSHED OXIDIZED ORE BIN. THE PRIMARY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    64. NORTH WALL OF CRUSHED OXIDIZED ORE BIN. THE PRIMARY MILL FEEDS AT BOTTOM. MILL SOLUTION TANKS WERE TO THE LEFT (EAST) AND BARREN SOLUTION TANK TO THE RIGHT (WEST) OR THE CRUSHED ORE BIN. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  18. 25. INTERIOR VIEW LOOKING SOUTH IN THE ORE RECEIVING LEVEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. INTERIOR VIEW LOOKING SOUTH IN THE ORE RECEIVING LEVEL SHOWING THE TRAMWAY TRACKS IN THE FLOOR, ORE CHUTES IN THE FLOOR, NEWER TRACKS COMING IN FROM THE TRESTLE ON THE EAST SIDE OF THE MILL., AND THE WINDING DRUM THE TRAMWAY IN THE BACKGROUND. - Standard Gold Mill, East of Bodie Creek, Northeast of Bodie, Bodie, Mono County, CA

  19. TRAM HOUSE INTERIOR, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. NOTE DEPARTING ORE BUCKET "12" ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TRAM HOUSE INTERIOR, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. NOTE DEPARTING ORE BUCKET "12" AND SUSPENSION CABLE ANGLING DOWN THROUGH FLOOR AT LOWER LEFT. LARGE LEVER ON SIDE OF BUCKET ALLOWS IT TO BE ROTATED FOR DUMPING ORE. - Shenandoah-Dives Mill, 135 County Road 2, Silverton, San Juan County, CO

  20. 24. REAR ELEVATION, HULETT ORE UNLOADERS. TRACKS CARRYING THE FRONT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. REAR ELEVATION, HULETT ORE UNLOADERS. TRACKS CARRYING THE FRONT END AND REAR LEGS OF THE HULETT UNLOADERS ARE LAID ON THE DOCK AND REAR WALLS, RESPECTIVELY; BOTH WALLS ARE MADE OF REINFORCED CONCRETE SUPPORTED ON CONCRETE PILES. - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  1. 27. HULETT ORE UNLOADERS TEMPORARILY IN REPOSE, AS A NEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. HULETT ORE UNLOADERS TEMPORARILY IN REPOSE, AS A NEW SKIP TIES UP AT DOCK. THE UNLOADERS OPERATE ALMOST CONTINUOUSLY DURING THE SHIPPING SEASON, WHICH USUALLY RUNS FROM APRIL UNTIL LATE DECEMBER OR EARLY JANUARY. VIEW HERE IS LOOKING NORTHEAST. - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  2. Understanding the role of ion interactions in soluble salt flotation with alkylammonium and alkylsulfate collectors.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Orhan; Du, Hao; Karakashev, Stoyan I; Nguyen, Anh V; Celik, M S; Miller, Jan D

    2011-03-15

    There is anecdotal evidence for the significant effects of salt ions on the flotation separation of minerals using process water of high salt content. Examples include flotation of soluble salt minerals such as potash, trona and borax in brine solutions using alkylammonium and alkylsulfate collectors such as dodecylamine hydrochloride and sodium dodecylsulfate. Although some of the effects are expected, some do not seem to be encompassed by classical theories of colloid science. Several experimental and modeling techniques for determining solution viscosity, surface tension, bubble-particle attachment time, contact angle, and molecular dynamics simulation have been used to provide further information on air-solution and solid-solution interfacial phenomena, especially with respect to the interfacial water structure due to the presence of dissolved ions. In addition atomic force microscopy, and sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy have been used to provide further information on surface states. These studies indicate that the ion specificity effect is the most significant factor influencing flotation in brine solutions. PMID:21353193

  3. Hybrid flotation--membrane filtration process for the removal of heavy metal ions from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Blöcher, C; Dorda, J; Mavrov, V; Chmiel, H; Lazaridis, N K; Matis, K A

    2003-09-01

    A promising process for the removal of heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions involves bonding the metals firstly to a special bonding agent and then separating the loaded bonding agents from the wastewater stream by separation processes. For the separation stage, a new hybrid process of flotation and membrane separation has been developed in this work by integrating specially designed submerged microfiltration modules directly into a flotation reactor. This made it possible to combine the advantages of both flotation and membrane separation while overcoming the limitations. The feasibility of this hybrid process was proven using powdered synthetic zeolites as bonding agents. Stable fluxes of up to 80l m(-2)h(-1) were achieved with the ceramic flat-sheet multi-channel membranes applied at low transmembrane pressure (<100 mbar). The process was applied in lab-scale to treat wastewater from the electronics industry. All toxic metals in question, namely copper, nickel and zinc, were reduced from initial concentrations of 474, 3.3 and 167mg x l(-1), respectively, to below 0.05 mg x l(-1), consistently meeting the discharge limits. PMID:12909122

  4. Evaluating coagulation pretreatment on poultry processing wastewater for dissolved air flotation.

    PubMed

    Dassey, Adam J; Theegala, Chandra S

    2012-01-01

    Eleven metal coagulants and one polyelectrolyte were assessed for their suitability in assisting a dissolved air flotation (DAF) system aimed at treating poultry processing wastewater. Preliminary jar tests determined that a combination of 800 mg/L of FeCl(3) (ferric chloride) and 900 mg/L of Floccin 1115 would provide the best treatment by removing at least 98% of the total suspended solids (TSS) and 97% of the volatile suspended solids (VSS), while providing a 97% increase in water clarity. Final flotation tests suggested that the flocculated particles could be carried to the surface with 40% recycle ratio of the DAF. The resulting supernatant indicated 94.7% increase in clarity (± 1.4%), 97.3% reduction in TSS (± 0.5%), 96.6% reduction in VSS (±1.1%), 91% reduction in chemical oxygen demand (COD), and nearly 100% removal of fats, oils, and greases (FOGs). Despite the high removal efficiencies, flotation was found not to be critically necessary for treatment because the high concentration of coagulants caused settling of the flocs to occur just as rapidly. Potential coagulant overdosing is suspected at the higher end of the tested coagulant concentrations due to limited alkalinity in the wastewater. However, lack of residual metal (coagulant) ions in water may be linked to reactions leading to phosphate precipitation. The exact effect of the competing phosphate reaction on treatment efficiency is not clearly evident from this present study. PMID:22871004

  5. Removal of trace levels of aromatic amines from aqueous solution by foam flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Nyssen, G.A.; White, J.S. ); Bibring, P.; Wilson, D.J. )

    1990-04-01

    Aromatic amines, including 4-(t-butyl)pyridine, 4-(n-butyl)-aniline, benzylamine, 4-aminobiphenyl, 1- and 2-aminonaphthalene, and 2,6-xylidine were effectively removed from water by foam flotation with the anionic surfactant sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS). With initial amine concentrations of 10 mg/L or less, residual amine concentrations of less than 0.1 mg/L were generally obtained after 10-30 min of flotation. The SDS concentration and flotation time are directly related to the amount of amine removed. Amine removal is most efficient at pH values low enough so that the amine is protonated (usually about 3), and at low ionic strength. Alcohols up to 10% by volume do not appreciably affect amine removal. The mechanism of removal is dominated by ion-ion attraction between the surfactant and the protonated amine; there is also apparently some contribution from ion-dipole attraction. Benzidine is not removed effectively; evidently it is insufficiently hydrophobic.

  6. Micro-agglomerate flotation for deep cleaning of coal. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chander, S.; Hogg, R.

    1997-01-15

    The development of practical technologies for the deep cleaning of coal has been seriously hampered by the problems of carrying out efficient coal/mineral separations at the very fine sizes (often finer than 10 {micro}m) needed to achieve adequate liberation of the mineral matter from the coal matrix. In this investigation a hybrid process--Micro-agglomerate flotation--which is a combination of oil-agglomeration and froth flotation was studied. The basic concept is to use small quantities of oil to promote the formation of dense micro-agglomerates with minimal entrapment of water and mineral particles and to use froth flotation to separate these micro-agglomerates from the water/dispersed-mineral phase. Since the floating units will be relatively large agglomerates (30--50 {micro}m in size) rather than fine coal particles (1--10 {micro}m) the problems of froth overload and water/mineral carryover should be significantly alleviated. There are, however, complications. The process involves at least five phases: two or more solids (coal and mineral), two liquids (oil and water) and one gas (air). It is demonstrated in this study that the process is very sensitive to fluctuations in operating parameters. It is necessary to maintain precise control over the chemistry of the liquid phases as well as the agitation conditions in order to promote selectivity. Both kinetics as well as thermodynamic factors play a critical role in determining overall system response.

  7. Oxidative Pressure Leaching of Silver from Flotation Concentrates with Ammonium Thiocyanate Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sheng-Hai; Yang, Jian-Guang; Liu, Wei; Chen, Geng-Tao; Tang, Mo-Tang; Qiu, Guan-Zhou

    2010-02-01

    The thermodynamics and technologies of the selective pressure leaching of silver from flotation concentrates were investigated in an ammonium thiocyanate medium. Thermodynamic analyses, which include silver solubility in NH4SCN solution and Eh-pH diagrams of the Me-MeS-NH4SCN-H2O system at 25 °C, were discussed. The effects of several factors, such as temperature, leaching time, oxidant, pH value, flotation concentrates concentration, surfactant concentration, and so on, on the extraction percentages of silver and zinc were investigated. The following optimal leaching conditions were obtained: NH4SCN concentration 1.5 M, lignin concentration 0.5 g/L, Fe3+ concentration 2 g/L, flotation concentrates addition 200 g/L, and oxygen pressure 1.2 MPa at 130 °C for 3 hours. Under these optimum conditions, the average extraction percentage of silver exceeded 94 pct, whereas the average extraction percentage of zinc was less than 3 pct. Only 7 pct of ammonium thiocyanate was consumed after 4 cycles, which indicated that ammonium thiocyanate hardly was oxidized under these oxidative pressure leaching conditions.

  8. 76 FR 63904 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Coral Reef Conservation Program Administration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-14

    ...Information Collection; Comment Request; Coral Reef Conservation Program Administration...SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Abstract The Coral Reef Conservation Act of 2000 (Act) was...enacted to provide a framework for conserving coral reefs. The Coral Reef Conservation...

  9. Introduction Reef fish spawning aggregations have

    E-print Network

    - gations of large grouper and snapper throughout the Caribbean, Gulf, and tropical western Atlantic., 2003). The Nassau grouper (Epinephelus striatus) is a commercially important tropical reef species and Eklund, 1999). Historically, spawning aggregations of Nassau grouper have occurred throughout

  10. Reef Ecosystem Services and Decision Support Database

    EPA Science Inventory

    This scientific and management information database utilizes systems thinking to describe the linkages between decisions, human activities, and provisioning of reef ecosystem goods and services. This database provides: (1) Hierarchy of related topics - Click on topics to navigat...

  11. Ocean acidification impairs vermetid reef recruitment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milazzo, Marco; Rodolfo-Metalpa, Riccardo; Chan, Vera Bin San; Fine, Maoz; Alessi, Cinzia; Thiyagarajan, Vengatesen; Hall-Spencer, Jason M.; Chemello, Renato

    2014-02-01

    Vermetids form reefs in sub-tropical and warm-temperate waters that protect coasts from erosion, regulate sediment transport and accumulation, serve as carbon sinks and provide habitat for other species. The gastropods that form these reefs brood encapsulated larvae; they are threatened by rapid environmental changes since their ability to disperse is very limited. We used transplant experiments along a natural CO2 gradient to assess ocean acidification effects on the reef-building gastropod Dendropoma petraeum. We found that although D. petraeum were able to reproduce and brood at elevated levels of CO2, recruitment success was adversely affected. Long-term exposure to acidified conditions predicted for the year 2100 and beyond caused shell dissolution and a significant increase in shell Mg content. Unless CO2 emissions are reduced and conservation measures taken, our results suggest these reefs are in danger of extinction within this century, with significant ecological and socioeconomic ramifications for coastal systems.

  12. Quaternary coral reef refugia preserved fish diversity.

    PubMed

    Pellissier, Loïc; Leprieur, Fabien; Parravicini, Valeriano; Cowman, Peter F; Kulbicki, Michel; Litsios, Glenn; Olsen, Steffen M; Wisz, Mary S; Bellwood, David R; Mouillot, David

    2014-05-30

    The most prominent pattern in global marine biogeography is the biodiversity peak in the Indo-Australian Archipelago. Yet the processes that underpin this pattern are still actively debated. By reconstructing global marine paleoenvironments over the past 3 million years on the basis of sediment cores, we assessed the extent to which Quaternary climate fluctuations can explain global variation in current reef fish richness. Comparing global historical coral reef habitat availability with the present-day distribution of 6316 reef fish species, we find that distance from stable coral reef habitats during historical periods of habitat loss explains 62% of the variation in fish richness, outweighing present-day environmental factors. Our results highlight the importance of habitat persistence during periods of climate change for preserving marine biodiversity. PMID:24876495

  13. MANGROVE-DERIVED NUTRIENTS AND CORAL REEFS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the consequences of the declining global cover of mangroves due to anthropogenic disturbance necessitates consideration of how mangrove-derived nutrients contribute to threatened coral reef systems. We sampled potential sources of organic matter and a suite of sessi...

  14. EPA Field Manual for Coral Reef Assessments

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Water Quality Research Program (WQRP) supports development of coral reef biological criteria. Research is focused on developing methods and tools to support implementation of legally defensible biological standards for maintaining biological integrity, which is protected by ...

  15. Oysters and Oyster Reef Communities in Florida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Jean; Bly, Joe

    1989-01-01

    The habitat, life history, feeding, classification, anatomy and pearl production of the American oyster (Crassostrea virginica) are presented. A list of other oyster reef inhabitants and predators is provided. Harvest and habitat loss are discussed. (CW)

  16. Room Temperature Aging Study of Butyl O-rings

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Wilson

    2009-08-07

    During testing under the Enhanced Surveillance Campaign in 2001, preliminary data detected a previously unknown and potentially serious concern with recently procured butyl o-rings. All butyl o-rings molded from a proprietary formulation throughout the period circa 1999 through 2001 had less than a full cure. Tests showed that sealing force values for these suspect o-rings were much lower than expected and their physical properties were very sensitive to further post curing at elevated temperatures. Further testing confirmed that these o-rings were approximately 50% cured versus the typical industry standard of > 90% cured. Despite this condition, all suspect o-rings fully conformed to their QC acceptance requirements, including their individual product drawing requirements.

  17. Comparing the Invasibility of Experimental “Reefs” with Field Observations of Natural Reefs and Artificial Structures

    PubMed Central

    Dafforn, Katherine A.; Glasby, Tim M.; Johnston, Emma L.

    2012-01-01

    Natural systems are increasingly being modified by the addition of artificial habitats which may facilitate invasion. Where invaders are able to disperse from artificial habitats, their impact may spread to surrounding natural communities and therefore it is important to investigate potential factors that reduce or enhance invasibility. We surveyed the distribution of non-indigenous and native invertebrates and algae between artificial habitats and natural reefs in a marine subtidal system. We also deployed sandstone plates as experimental ‘reefs’ and manipulated the orientation, starting assemblage and degree of shading. Invertebrates (non-indigenous and native) appeared to be responding to similar environmental factors (e.g. orientation) and occupied most space on artificial structures and to a lesser extent reef walls. Non-indigenous invertebrates are less successful than native invertebrates on horizontal reefs despite functional similarities. Manipulative experiments revealed that even when non-indigenous invertebrates invade vertical “reefs”, they are unlikely to gain a foothold and never exceed covers of native invertebrates (regardless of space availability). Community ecology suggests that invertebrates will dominate reef walls and algae horizontal reefs due to functional differences, however our surveys revealed that native algae dominate both vertical and horizontal reefs in shallow estuarine systems. Few non-indigenous algae were sampled in the study, however where invasive algal species are present in a system, they may present a threat to reef communities. Our findings suggest that non-indigenous species are less successful at occupying space on reef compared to artificial structures, and manipulations of biotic and abiotic conditions (primarily orientation and to a lesser extent biotic resistance) on experimental “reefs” explained a large portion of this variation, however they could not fully explain the magnitude of differences. PMID:22666459

  18. Accuracy of egg flotation throughout incubation to determine embryo age and incubation day in water bird nests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ackerman, J.T.; Eagles-Smith, C. A.

    2010-01-01

    Floating bird eggs to estimate their age is a widely used technique, but few studies have examined its accuracy throughout incubation. We assessed egg flotation for estimating hatch date, day of incubation, and the embryo's developmental age in eggs of the American Avocet (Recurvirostra americana), Black-necked Stilt (Himantopus mexicanus), and Forster's Tern (Sterna forsteri). Predicted hatch dates based on egg flotation during our first visit to a nest were highly correlated with actual hatch dates (r = 0.99) and accurate within 2.3 ?? 1.7 (SD) days. Age estimates based on flotation were correlated with both day of incubation (r = 0.96) and the embryo's developmental age (r = 0.86) and accurate within 1.3 ?? 1.6 days and 1.9 ?? 1.6 days, respectively. However, the technique's accuracy varied substantially throughout incubation. Flotation overestimated the embryo's developmental age between 3 and 9 days, underestimated age between 12 and 21 days, and was most accurate between 0 and 3 days and 9 and 12 days. Age estimates based on egg flotation were generally accurate within 3 days until day 15 but later in incubation were biased progressively lower. Egg flotation was inaccurate and overestimated embryo age in abandoned nests (mean error: 7.5 ?? 6.0 days). The embryo's developmental age and day of incubation were highly correlated (r = 0.94), differed by 2.1 ?? 1.6 days, and resulted in similar assessments of the egg-flotation technique. Floating every egg in the clutch and refloating eggs at subsequent visits to a nest can refine age estimates. ?? The Cooper Ornithological Society 2010.

  19. Miocene reef carbonates of Mariana Islands

    SciTech Connect

    Siegrist, H.G. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Miocene carbonates in the southern Mariana Islands are impressive for their lithologic diversity, thicknesses (over 250 m), and geographic extend (>20% combined outcrop coverage over four major high islands: Guam, Rota, Tinian and Saipan). Sections are dominated either by lagoonal algal-foraminiferal wackestones and mudstones with locally abundant high-energy shelly-skeletal facies, or by rubbly to muddy, fore-reef-to-bank deposits of packstones and grainstones with highly diverse and variable biogenic clasts. Fresh to deeply weathered volcaniclastic material may comprise at least 80% of some high-energy fore-reef facies, whereas lagoonal and bank deposits usually contain less than 0.5% terrigenous material. Surprisingly, the Miocene in the Marianas lacks almost completely any reef-core facies. Several poorly developed coral-rich mounds on Saipan and localized laminated red algal buildups on Guam appear to constitute the extant reef-wall facies in the Miocene. The lack of buildups may be a matter of differential survival; it may result from headland erosion and benching associated with emergency of narrow reef tracts as has been postulated by others for south Guam. Radiometric age dating of these reef carbonates has proven unsuccessful because pervasive diagenesis has transformed the entire Miocene section into low-magnesium calcite with minor and occasional dolomite. Freshwater phreatic diagenesis accounts for the principal porosity variation and trace element distribution.

  20. ReefSAM - Reef Sedimentary Accretion Model: A new 3D coral reef evolution model/simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Samuel; Webster, Jody

    2013-04-01

    Coral reefs show characteristic morphological patterns (e.g. coral dominated margins with detrital carbonate dominated lagoons/back-reef) and temporal development (e.g. Hopley et al. 2007). While the processes which lead to predictable patterns on a range of scales have been discussed qualitatively, a full quantitative understanding of the range of processes and parameters involved requires modelling. Previous attempts to model complex Holocene reef systems (i.e. One Tree Reef, GBR - Barrett and Webster 2012) using a carbonate stratigraphic forward model (Carbonate3D - Warrlich et al. 2002) identified a number of important but unsimulated processes and potential model improvements. ReefSAM has been written from scratch in Matlab using these findings and experiences from using Carbonate3D. It simulates coralgal accretion and carbonate sand production and transport. Specific improvements include: 1. a more complex hydrodynamic model based on wave refraction and incorporating vertical (depth) and lateral (substrate dependent) variations in transport energy and erosion. 2. a complex reef growth model incorporating depth, wave energy/turbidity and substrate composition. 3. Paleo-water depth, paleo-wave energy and bio-zone (combination of paleo-water depth and wave energy) model outputs allowing coralgal habitat changes through time and space to be simulated and compared to observational data. The model is compared to the well studied One Tree Reef - tests similar to those undertaken in Barrett and Webster 2012 with Carbonate3D are presented. Model development coincides with plans for further intensive drilling at One Tree Reef (mid 2013) providing an opportunity to test the model predictively. The model is still in active development. References: Barrett, S.J., Webster, J.M.,2012. Holocene evolution of the Great Barrier Reef: Insights from 3D numerical modelling. Sedimentary Geology 265-266, 56-71. Warrlich, G.M.D., Waltham, D.A., Bosence D.W.J., 2002. Quantifying the sequence stratigraphy and drowning mechanisms of atolls using a new 3-D forward modelling program (CARBONATE 3D). Basin Research 14, 379-400. Hopley, D., Smithers, S.G., Parnell, K.E., 2007. The geomorphology of the Great Barrier Reef. Cambridge.