Sample records for reef ore flotation

  1. Calculation of the flotation rate constant of chalcopyrite particles in an ore

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Duan; D. Fornasiero; J. Ralston

    2003-01-01

    The flotation recovery of chalcopyrite particles in a complex sulfide ore was measured in a Rushton turbine flotation cell as a function of particle size. The experimental flotation rate constants of these particles were compared to those calculated using a recently developed flotation model that incorporates contributions from the efficiencies of collision, attachment and stability between particles and bubbles, as

  2. Direct Flotation of Niobium Oxide Minerals from Carbonatite Niobium Ores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Xiao

    Currently the recovery of niobium oxide minerals from carbonatite niobium ores relies on the use of non-selective cationic collectors. This leads to complicated process flowsheets involving multiple desliming and multiple reverse flotation stages, and low niobium recovery. In this research, anionic collectors that are capable of strong chemisorption on the niobium minerals were studied with the objective of directly floating the niobium oxide minerals from the carbonatite ores. In the flotation of both high purity minerals and Niobec ores, it was shown that the combination of hydroxamic acid and sodium metaphosphate was an effective reagent scheme for the direct flotation of niobium oxide from its ores. Batch flotation on the Niobec Mill Feed showed that over 95% of niobium oxide was recovered into a rougher concentrate that was less than 47% of the original feed mass. Preliminary cleaning tests showed that the reagent scheme could also be used to upgrade the rougher concentrate, although the depression of iron oxide minerals required further study. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) measurement results confirm that OHA (octyl hydroxamic acid) could chemisorb on pyrochlore surface while only physically adsorb on calcite, judging by the chemical shifts of electron binding energies in the elements in both OHA and the mineral surfaces. When hydroxamic acid was adsorbed on calcite surface, the binding energies of the N 1s electrons, at 400.3 eV, did not shift. However, after adsorption on pyrochlore, the N 1s binding energy peak split into two peaks, one at a binding energy of around 399 eV, representing chemically adsorbed OHA, the other at between 400 and 401 eV. The experimental data suggested a strong chemisorption of the OHA on pyrochlore surface in the form of a vertical head-on orientation of the OHA molecules so that the pyrochlore was strongly hydrophobized even at low OHA concentrations, followed by possibly randomly oriented physisorbed OHA molecules. On the other hand, OHA only physisorbed on calcite forming a horizontally oriented monolayer of OHA. The results explain the observed selectivity of hydroxamic acid in the flotation of niobium oxide minerals from carbonatite niobium ores.

  3. Beneficiation of flotation tailing from Polish copper sulfide ores

    SciTech Connect

    Luszczkiewicz, A. [Technical Univ. of Wroclaw (Poland); Sztaba, K.S. [Univ. of Mining and Metallurgy, Krakow (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    Flotation tailing of Polish copper sulfide ores represents more than 90% of the mass of run-of-mine ore. The tailing contains mainly quartz, dolomite, clay minerals, traces of sulfides, and some accessory minerals. Almost all minerals of the tailing are well liberated and, therefore, any further beneficiation process applied to the tailing is expected to be inexpensive. In this work, results of investigations on utilization of flotation tailing using classification and gravity concentration are presented. It is shown that due to classification of flotation tailing in hydrocyclones, the coarse fraction becomes suitable material for gravity separation providing backfill material for underground mines as well as heavy minerals, a source of valuable rare elements. It was also found that heavy minerals separated by gravity methods contain a significant amount of rare elements such as zirconium, titanium, silver, rare earth metals, and uranium. The light fraction of the gravity separation contains well deslimed quartz particles and meets strict requirements for hydraulic filling material used for structural support in underground mines. Evaluation of the cost of the proposed technology indicated that investment to implement the method would provide a return within 2--4 years.

  4. Estimated water requirements for the conventional flotation of copper ores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bleiwas, Donald I.

    2012-01-01

    This report provides a perspective on the amount of water used by a conventional copper flotation plant. Water is required for many activities at a mine-mill site, including ore production and beneficiation, dust and fire suppression, drinking and sanitation, and minesite reclamation. The water required to operate a flotation plant may outweigh all of the other uses of water at a mine site, [however,] and the need to maintain a water balance is critical for the plant to operate efficiently. Process water may be irretrievably lost or not immediately available for reuse in the beneficiation plant because it has been used in the production of backfill slurry from tailings to provide underground mine support; because it has been entrapped in the tailings stored in the TSF, evaporated from the TSF, or leaked from pipes and (or) the TSF; and because it has been retained as moisture in the concentrate. Water retained in the interstices of the tailings and the evaporation of water from the surface of the TSF are the two most significant contributors to water loss at a conventional flotation circuit facility.

  5. Modified reagent mode in porphyry copper-molybdenum ore flotation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. A. Bocharov; L. S. Khachatryan; V. A. Ignatkina; Zh. Baatarkhuu

    2008-01-01

    Test data on the selective reagent modes at bulk flotation cycle and modified carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) at a selection\\u000a cycle for the bulk copper-molybdenum concentrate. The selected reagent mode at a bulk flotation cycle with industrial kerosene\\u000a and Beraflot as collectors and OPSB as a frother made it possible to recover 87 % of copper and 82 % of molybdenum into

  6. The impact of bacteria of circulating water on apatite-nepheline ore flotation.

    PubMed

    Evdokimova, G A; Gershenkop, A Sh; Fokina, N V

    2012-01-01

    A new phenomenon has been identified and studied-the impact of bacteria on the benefication process of non-sulphide ores using circulating water supply-a case study of apatite-nepheline ore. It is shown that bacteria deteriorate the floatability of apatite due to their interaction with active centres of calcium-containing minerals and intense flocculation, resulting in a decrease of the flotation process selectivity thus deteriorating the quality of concentrate. Based on the comparative analysis of primary sequences of 16S rRNA genes, there have been identified dominating bacteria species, recovered from the circulating water used at apatite-nepheline concentrating mills, and their phylogenetic position has been determined. All the bacteria were related to ?-Proteobacteria, including the Acinetobacter species, Pseudomonas alcaliphila, Ps. plecoglossicida, Stenotrophomonas rhizophila. A method of non-sulphide ores flotation has been developed with consideration of the bacterial factor. It consists in use of small concentrations of sodium hypochlorite, which inhibits the development of bacteria in the flotation of apatite-nepheline ores. PMID:22320692

  7. Water leaching of titanium from ore flotation residue

    SciTech Connect

    Jaworska, Malgorzata M.; Guibal, Eric

    2003-07-01

    Copper ore tailings were tested for the stability of titanium submitted to water leaching in three different reactor systems (agitated vessel, bioreactor and percolated fixed-bed column). For each of these systems, titanium extraction did not exceed 1% of the available metal. Biomass removed from ore residue adsorbed a small part of the titanium with sorption capacities below 20-30 mg g{sup -1}, but most of this biomass was sequestered in the ore residue. Oxygen and carbon dioxide concentrations were monitored and changes in concentration correlated with bacteria development at the initial stage of the process and to fungal development in the latter stages.

  8. Studies on the influence of a flotation collector reagent on iron ore green pellet properties

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. P. E. Forsmo; B. M. T. Björkman; P.-O. Samskog

    2008-01-01

    The properties of iron ore green pellets with varying additions of a surface-active flotation collector reagent (Atrac) were studied by small-scale balling. The compression strength and plasticity were measured with a semi-automatic measuring device and the pressure curves were saved and subjected to further mathematical treatment. The green pellet breakage was also filmed with a high-speed camera. Adding Atrac to

  9. Optimization of flotation variables for the recovery of hematite particles from BHQ ore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rath, Swagat S.; Sahoo, Hrushikesh; Das, B.

    2013-07-01

    The technology for beneficiation of banded iron ores containing low iron value is a challenging task due to increasing demand of quality iron ore in India. A flotation process has been developed to treat one such ore, namely banded hematite quartzite (BHQ) containing 41.8wt% Fe and 41.5wt% SiO2, by using oleic acid, methyl isobutyl carbinol (MIBC), and sodium silicate as the collector, frother, and dispersant, respectively. The relative effects of these variables have been evaluated in half-normal plots and Pareto charts using central composite rotatable design. A quadratic response model has been developed for both Fe grade and recovery and optimized within the experimental range. The optimum reagent dosages are found to be as follows: collector concentration of 243.58 g/t, dispersant concentration of 195.67 g/t, pH 8.69, and conditioning time of 4.8 min to achieve the maximum Fe grade of 64.25% with 67.33% recovery. The predictions of the model with regard to iron grade and recovery are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  10. NANOPARTICLE FLOTATION COLLECTORS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Songtao Yang

    2012-01-01

    Flotation is a critical operation in the isolation of valuable minerals from natural ore. Before flotation, chemical collectors are routinely added to ground ore slurries. Collectors selectively bind to mineral-rich particles, increasing their hydrophobicity thus promoting selective flotation. Conventional collectors are small surfactants with a short hydrocarbon tail (2-6 carbons) and a head group, such as xanthate. In this work,

  11. Effects of aluminosilicate minerals on copper–molybdenum flotation from Sarcheshmeh porphyry ores

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Jorjani; H. R. Barkhordari; M. Tayebi Khorami; A. Fazeli

    2011-01-01

    The presence of aluminosilicate minerals adversely affects the floatability of copper during processing of Sarcheshmeh porphyry ores. In this work, ores containing different types and quantities of aluminosilicate minerals, as well as copper sulfides (i.e., chalcopyrite and chalcocite), were examined in the laboratory to determine how aluminosilicate minerals affect the floatability of copper and to find ways to decrease their

  12. Froth flotation process

    SciTech Connect

    Burdick, C.L.

    1985-04-30

    The froth flotation of ore and coal is significantly improved in recovery and grade of valuable minerals and coal when a depressant combination of an inorganic sulfite and the salts of certain sulfonated compounds are employed.

  13. Separation of waste plastics by froth flotation––a review, part I

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Fraunholcz

    2004-01-01

    The application of flotation for the separation of plastic mixtures derived from post-consumer waste is relatively new, the earliest publications on this subject date back to the late seventies. Flotation was originally developed for ore separation about a century ago. Early research studies on plastics flotation were concerned with testing surfactants known from ore flotation. While searching for suitable wetting

  14. Flotation separation of waste plastics for recycling-A review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong-Qing; Wang, Hui; Fu, Jian-Gang; Liu, You-Nian

    2015-07-01

    The sharp increase of plastic wastes results in great social and environmental pressures, and recycling, as an effective way currently available to reduce the negative impacts of plastic wastes, represents one of the most dynamic areas in the plastics industry today. Froth flotation is a promising method to solve the key problem of recycling process, namely separation of plastic mixtures. This review surveys recent literature on plastics flotation, focusing on specific features compared to ores flotation, strategies, methods and principles, flotation equipments, and current challenges. In terms of separation methods, plastics flotation is divided into gamma flotation, adsorption of reagents, surface modification and physical regulation. PMID:25869841

  15. Magmatic ore deposits in layered intrusions - Descriptive model for reef-type PGE and contact-type Cu-Ni-PGE deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zientek, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    Layered, ultramafic to mafic intrusions are uncommon in the geologic record, but host magmatic ore deposits containing most of the world's economic concentrations of platinum-group elements (PGE) (figs. 1 and 2). These deposits are mined primarily for their platinum, palladium, and rhodium contents (table 1). Magmatic ore deposits are derived from accumulations of crystals of metallic oxides, or immiscible sulfide, or oxide liquids that formed during the cooling and crystallization of magma, typically with mafic to ultramafic compositions. "PGE reefs" are stratabound PGE-enriched lode mineralization in mafic to ultramafic layered intrusions. The term "reef" is derived from Australian and South African literature for this style of mineralization and used to refer to (1) the rock layer that is mineralized and has distinctive texture or mineralogy (Naldrett, 2004), or (2) the PGE-enriched sulfide mineralization that occurs within the rock layer. For example, Viljoen (1999) broadly defined the Merensky Reef as "a mineralized zone within or closely associated with an unconformity surface in the ultramafic cumulate at the base of the Merensky Cyclic Unit." In this report, we will use the term PGE reef to refer to the PGE-enriched mineralization, not the host rock layer. Within a layered igneous intrusion, reef-type mineralization is laterally persistent along strike, extending for the length of the intrusion, typically tens to hundreds of kilometers. However, the mineralized interval is thin, generally centimeters to meters thick, relative to the stratigraphic thickness of layers in an intrusion that vary from hundreds to thousands of meters. PGE-enriched sulfide mineralization is also found near the contacts or margins of layered mafic to ultramafic intrusions (Iljina and Lee, 2005). This contact-type mineralization consists of disseminated to massive concentrations of iron-copper-nickel-PGE-enriched sulfide mineral concentrations in zones that can be tens to hundreds of meters thick. The modes and textures of the igneous rocks hosting the mineralization vary irregularly on the scale of centimeters to meters; autoliths and xenoliths are common. Mineralization occurs in the igneous intrusion and in the surrounding country rocks. Mineralization can be preferentially localized along contact with country rocks that are enriched in sulfur-, iron-, or CO2-bearing lithologies. Reef-type and contact-type deposits, in particular those in the Bushveld Complex, South Africa, are the world's primary source of platinum and rhodium (tables 2 and 3; fig. 2). Reef-type PGE deposits are mined only in the Bushveld Complex (Merensky Reef and UG2), the Stillwater Complex (J-M Reef), and the Great Dyke (Main Sulphide Layer). PGE-enriched contact-type deposits are only mined in the Bushveld Complex. The other deposits in tables 2 and 3 are undeveloped; some are still under exploration.

  16. Recovery of sulfur from native ores

    SciTech Connect

    Womack, J.T.; Wiewiorowski, T.K.; Astley, V.C.; Perez, J.W.; Headington, T.A.

    1992-03-17

    This patent describes a process for removing elemental sulfur from ores containing elemental sulfur. It comprises crushing a sulfur-containing ore to a coarse particle size wherein ore particles produced during crushing enable substantially all of the sulfur to be liberated during a heating step and to produce an ore gangue that is substantially not susceptible to flotation: forming an aqueous ore slurry containing about 50-80% by weight of solids from the crushed ore and adjusting the pH to at least a pH of about 8.0; heating the aqueous ore slurry formed in step (b) under elevated pressure to a temperature of about 240{degrees} - 315{degrees} F. for sufficient time to melt and liberate elemental sulfur contained in the ore to produce liberated molten sulfur and ore gangue, wherein the slurry is heated while agitating the slurry at sufficient velocity to substantially maintain the ore, ore gangue and liberated molten sulfur in suspension; cooling the heated slurry sufficiently to resolidify the liberated molten sulfur; conditioning the aqueous slurry of step (d) with a flotation aid; separating the condition aqueous slurry of ore gangue and resolidified sulfur in a flotation unit to produce a sulfur-rich flotation concentrate overstream; and recovering the sulfur-rich flotation concentrate and separating the sulfur therefrom.

  17. Desulfurization of coal by microbial column flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Ohmura, Naoya; Saiki, Hiroshi (Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Chiba (Japan). Dept. of Biotechnology)

    1994-06-05

    Twenty-three strains capable of oxidizing iron were isolated from coal and ore storage sites as well as coal and ore mines, volcanic areas, and hot spring. Four strains were found to have high iron-oxidizing activity. One strain (T-4) was selected for this experiment since the strain showed the fastest leaching rate of iron and sulfate from pyrite among the four strains. The T-4 strain was assigned for Thiobacillus ferrooxidans from its cultural and morphological characteristics. Bacterial treatment was applied to column flotation. An increase of cell density in the microbial column flotation resulted in the increase of pyrite removal from a coal-pyrite mixture with corresponding decrease of coal recovery. The addition of kerosene into the microbial column flotation increased the recovery of the imitated coal from 55% (without kerosene) to 81% (with 50 [mu]L/L kerosene) with the reduction of pyrite sulfur content from11% (feed coal) to 3.9% (product coal). An excellent separation was obtained by the microbial flotation using a long column which had a length-diameter (L/D) ratio of 12.7.

  18. Modeling of column flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Luttrell, G.H.; Adel, G.T.; Yoon, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    Many investigators believe that column flotation cells offer significant advantages over standard mechanical machines for the flotation of fine particles. However, because of their unique design and operation, conventional techniques for flotation cell scale-up and design cannot be applied to columns. In an attempt to help alleviate this problem, a population balance model based on first principles has been developed for fine particle flotation in a column. Two different terms have been considered in the model, i.e., transport and rate. Transport terms, incorporating fluid flow and buoyancy, are used to describe the movement of air bubbles, unattached particles and bubble-particle aggregates along the length of the column. Rate terms, which describe the bubble-particle attachment process, have been derived from first principle considerations. Because the model is based on first principles, it can be useful for the design, control, optimization and scale-up of column flotation cells. 9 refs., 12 figs.

  19. Ore Minerals

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Dexter Perkins

    This three part lab introduces sulfides and other ore minerals. Part one - Ore Minerals: Students fill in a table giving the metal, formula, and mineral group of several ore minerals. Part two - Box of Rocks: Students examine trays of ore minerals and record their physical properties, composition, habit, occurence, economic value, and use and answer questions about color, luster, density, transparency, and availability. Part three - Famous Digs: Students answer a series of questions related to famous ore deposits.

  20. Ore and coal beneficiation method

    SciTech Connect

    Abadi, K.

    1987-10-27

    This patent describes a method for the separation of iron pyrite from a pulverized mineral ore comprising iron pyrites as a first constituent and a second constituent selected from the group consisting of coal and non-ferrous metal ores by air froth flotation of an aqueous pulp of the pulverized mineral ore. The improvement comprises incorporating in the pulp from about 0.02 to about 1 pound per ton of mineral of a composition comprising hydroxyacetic acid, xanthan gum, sodium silicate, and water wherein the acid content of the composition is from about 0.1 to about 69 percent by weight of the composition, the xanthan gum is from about 0.01 to about 10 percent by weight of the composition; and the ratio by weight of sodium silicate to hydroxyacetic acid is in the range of from about 0 to about 0.5.

  1. Coral Reefs

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    dramsden

    2009-11-19

    This page offers information on coral reefs. Coral reefs are often refered to as the rainforest of the oceans. This exploration will help you to see why that is. Follow these links to learn about coral reefs. This link will take you to Florida where a girl will take guide you over a coral reef. Coral Kid This site ...

  2. 76 FR 56294 - Inflatable Personal Flotation Devices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-13

    ...USCG-2011-0076] RIN 1625-AB60 Inflatable Personal Flotation Devices AGENCY: Coast Guard...standards for inflatable recreational personal flotation devices (PFDs) with current...direct final rule entitled ``Inflatable Personal Flotation Devices'' in the...

  3. 77 FR 19937 - Inflatable Personal Flotation Devices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-03

    ...USCG-2011-0076] RIN 1625-AB60 Inflatable Personal Flotation Devices AGENCY: Coast Guard...standards for inflatable recreational personal flotation devices (PFDs) with current...OMB Office of Management and Budget PFD Personal flotation device STP Standards...

  4. Reef ED

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority's resource and activity center for teachers and students. Find teaching units for K-12 on: coral reef habitats and marine life; human dependence and impacts on the reef; biodiversity and threatened species; coastal zone and reef management. Lesson plans offer objectives, inquiry learning focus activities, resources, class or field activities. Student pages contain: marine life profiles; reef conservation projects; role playing activities; web investigations. Excellent image library (stills and video).

  5. 21 CFR 890.3175 - Flotation cushion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3175 Flotation cushion. (a) Identification. A flotation...

  6. 21 CFR 890.3175 - Flotation cushion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3175 Flotation cushion. (a) Identification. A flotation...

  7. The scientific basis of flotation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ives

    1984-01-01

    The practical art of flotation, used for about 100 years in mineral processing, has an underlying science. This book describes this scientific basis, by commencing with the surface properties of fine particles in water, and the physical and hydrodynamic behaviour of bubbles. The book integrates the physical, chemical, hydrodynamic and process engineering aspects of flotation, which is not found in

  8. Geothermal energy for the increased recovery of copper by flotation enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.H.; Goldstone, L.A.

    1982-08-01

    The possible use of geothermal energy (a) to speed the recovery of copper from ore flotation and/or leaching of flotation tailings and (b) to utilize geothermal brines to replace valuable fresh water in copper flotation operations was evaluated. Geothermal energy could be used to enhance copper and molybdenum recovery in mineral flotation by increasing the kinetics of the flotation process. In another approach, geothermal energy could be used to heat the leaching solution which might permit greater copper recovery using the same residence time in a tailings leach facility. Since there is no restriction on the temperature of the leaching fluid, revenues generated from the additional copper recovered would be greater for tailings leach operations than for other types of leach operations (for example, dump leaching operation) for which temperature restrictions exist. The estimated increase in total revenues resulting from two percent increase copper recovery in a 50,000 tons ore/day plant was estimated to be over $2,000,000 annually. It would require an estimated geothermal investment of about $2,130,000 for a geothermal well and pumping system. Thus, the capital investment would be paid out in about one year. Furthermore, considerable savings of fresh waters and process equipment are possible if the geothermal waters can be used directly in the mine-mill operations, which is believed to be practical.

  9. Hydrogen bubble flotation of silica

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. W. Donne; G. M. Evans

    2010-01-01

    In this study the flotation recovery of silica using air, and molecular and electrolytically-generated hydrogen was investigated. For comparison of air and molecular hydrogen recoveries, a laboratory Denver, type D12, flotation machine was used. For both gases, pH of the suspension, gas flow rate, concentration of collector and frother, solids concentration, particle size and speed of impeller were kept constant.

  10. Dispersed ozone flotation of Chlorella vulgaris

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ya-Ling Cheng; Yu-Chuan Juang; Guan-Yu Liao; Shih-Hsin Ho; Kuei-Ling Yeh; Chun-Yen Chen; Jo-Shu Chang; Jhy-Chern Liu; Duu-Jong Lee

    2010-01-01

    Flotation separation of Chlorella vulgaris, a species with excellent potential for CO2 capture and lipid production, was studied using dispersed ozone gas. Pure oxygen aeration did not yield flotation. Conversely, applying ozone effectively separation algae from broth through flotation. The ozone dose applied for sufficient algal flotation is <0.05mg\\/g biomass, much lower than those used in practical drinking waterworks (0.1–0.3mg\\/g

  11. PDU-scale testing of microbubble flotation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. H. Yoon; G. T. Adel; G. H. Luttrell

    1989-01-01

    Work during this past quarter focused primarily on Tasks 1.2.5 (Coarse Coal Flotation) and 1.2.7 (Refuse Pond Flotation). The performance comparison between microbubble column flotation and conventional flotation was continued using minus-28-mesh Pittsburgh No. 8 seam coal. For an equivalent recovery, the microbubble column reduced the final ash content of the product by more than 25% over that obtained using

  12. Coral Reefs

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Description of coral reef environment for high school level and higher. Page is chock full of fantastic photographs each featuring a descriptive caption. Topics discussed include ecology, symbiosis, and predator defense. The site features many different species and stages of coral from all over the globe, and also many of the fishes that are associated with coral reefs.

  13. Selective flotation of inorganic sulfides from coal

    DOEpatents

    Miller, K.J.; Wen, Wu-Wey

    1988-05-31

    Pyritic sulfur is removed from coal or other carbonaceous material through the use of humic acid as a coal flotation depressant. Following the removal of coarse pyrite, the carbonaceous material is blended with humic acid, a pyrite flotation collector and a frothing agent within a flotation cell to selectively float pyritic sulfur leaving clean coal as an underflow. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  14. Selective flotation of inorganic sulfides from coal

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Kenneth J. (Floreffe, PA); Wen, Wu-Wey (Murrysville, PA)

    1989-01-01

    Pyritic sulfur is removed from coal or other carbonaceous material through the use of humic acid as a coal flotation depressant. Following the removal of coarse pyrite, the carbonaceous material is blended with humic acid, a pyrite flotation collector and a frothing agent within a flotation cell to selectively float pyritic sulfur leaving clean coal as an underflow.

  15. Coral Reefs

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-08-03

    This problem-based learning (PBL) module prompts students to address coral reef destruction and think about biodiversity worldwide. Students identify possible sources of coral reef destruction, examine conflicting evidence, evaluate possible courses of action, and make recommendations. As they do this, students look at man's impact on the global environment. Two versions of the PBL module are provided. The middle school scenario focuses on the question: is the cumulative weight of human activities changing the environment and destroying coral reefs—one of Earth’s last great areas of biodiversity? The high school scenario focuses on the question: what are the pros and cons of artificial reefs—are they effective in preserving biodiversity that can be lost when natural coral reefs are destroyed? This module is part of Exploring the Environment.

  16. Double reverse flotation of a very low grade sedimentary phosphate rock, rich in carbonate and silicate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Mohammadkhani; M. Noaparast; S. Z. Shafaei; A. Amini; E. Amini; H. Abdollahi

    2011-01-01

    In this study, reverse flotation was applied to recover phosphate from a very low grade (5.01% of P2O5) sedimentary ore. Sodium silicate, starch, tannic acid, aluminum sulfate, (Na,K)Tartarat, sodium tripolyphosphate, H3PO4, and H2SO4 were used as phosphate mineral depressants in acidic and alkaline conditions. Oleic acid and Armac-T were added as carbonate and silicate collectors respectively, while pine oil was

  17. Coral Reefs

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-10-20

    In this video, Jonathan examines the biology of coral reefs and their importance to the marine ecosystem. Please see the accompanying lesson plan that discusses pH and ocean acidification for educational objectives, discussion points and classroom activities.

  18. Coral Reefs

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    NBC Learn

    2010-10-07

    Scientists are studying coral reefs around the world to discover the impact that warmer temperatures and increased carbon dioxide may have on the life cycle of corals. "Changing Planet" is produced in partnership with the National Science Foundation.

  19. PDU-scale testing of microbubble flotation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. H. Yoon; G. T. Adel; G. H. Luttrell

    1990-01-01

    During this past quarter the performance comparison between the microbubble column and conventional flotation cells (Task 1.2.5 -- Coarse Coal Flotation) continued using minus-28-mesh Upper Freeport seam coal. For an equivalent recovery, the microbubble column reduced the final ash content of the product by more than 50% of that obtained for conventional flotation. It was found that the 14-inch microbubble

  20. PDU-scale testing of microbubble flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Adel, G.T.; Luttrell, G.H.

    1990-04-20

    During this past quarter the performance comparison between the microbubble column and conventional flotation cells (Task 1.2.5 -- Coarse Coal Flotation) continued using minus-28-mesh Upper Freeport seam coal. For an equivalent recovery, the microbubble column reduced the final ash content of the product by more than 50% of that obtained for conventional flotation. It was found that the 14-inch microbubble column could produce a 10% ash product with combustible recoveries greater than 90%, as compared to a 20% ash conventional flotation product. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  1. 21 CFR 890.3175 - Flotation cushion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3175 Flotation cushion. (a) Identification. A...

  2. 21 CFR 890.3175 - Flotation cushion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3175 Flotation cushion. (a) Identification. A...

  3. 21 CFR 890.3175 - Flotation cushion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3175 Flotation cushion. (a) Identification. A...

  4. Principles of Air Flotation Technology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nazih K. Shammas; Gary F. Bennett

    \\u000a Air flotation, in all its variations, is an efficient way to separate light particulates and oils from wastewater. Particulates\\u000a that adhere to an air bubble, either by adsorption or absorption, can be floated from the liquid phase. Polymers may be added\\u000a to improve the attachment of the particle to the bubble. Agglomerization of colloids into floc particles with the aid

  5. Sewage treatment-flotation apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Hines, D.A.; Jones, R.T.; Roesler, F.C.

    1981-03-03

    Solids-liquid separation, wherein a solids-liquid mixture containing dissolved oxygen-containing gas is circulated around a circulatory system comprising a downcomer and a riser, part of the mixture in the riser being introduced into a flotation chamber in which the hydrostatic pressure gradually decreases as the mixture flows upwards, with consequent release from solution of gas bubbles which carry solid particles to the top of the mixture.

  6. Microbubble flotation of fine coal. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R. H.

    1984-03-01

    Fine coal flotation has been a longstanding problem in industry. Coal particles below approximately 38 microns in diameter are difficult to float, and the process consumes large amounts of reagents. Hydrodynamic analyses have shown, however, that the use of air bubbles smaller than those that are generated in conventional flotation machines (0.2 to 3 mm diameter) can improve the flotation rate and, hence, the coal recovery. Theoretically, a tenfold reduction in average bubble size should result in a thousandfold increase in the flotation rate constant at a given gas flow rate. Therefore, work has been done to use microbubbles less than 100 microns in diameter for the flotation of fine coal particles. Seven different U.S. coal samples have been tested in the present work. The feed size varies from -100 mesh to -500 mesh. Flotation kinetics tests have been conducted on some of these coal samples as a function of bubble size at a constant gas flow rate. The results show a drastic improvement in flotation rate with the use of microbubbles, which may account for the improved recoveries obtained with the microbubble flotation technique. In addition, test results obtained with ultrafine coal samples (-20 microns) indicate that the microbubble flotation process is more selective than conventional flotation. This improved selectivity has been explained tentatively by the increased bubble loading and the reduced turbulence around the microbubbles. Various techniques have been employed to further enhance the selectivity of the process by minimizing the ash entrapment problem. To better understand the mechanisms of microbubble flotation, basic information regarding surface tension, contact angle, viscosity, streaming currents of microbubbles, electrophoretic mobilities of coal and mineral matter, and stability of microbubble suspensions has been obtained. 50 references, 42 figures, 9 tables.

  7. Jurassic Reef Park

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Dr. Reinhold Leinfelder of the University of Stuttgart, Germany created this interesting site in English and German, offering a "virtual trip to the reefs of the Jurassic Period." In the Introduction, viewers will find background material and comparisons of modern and ancient reefs. Further information is provided in the sections on reef architecture, reef formation, Jurassic reefs, and reefs and global climate change. Although the English language is slightly quirky, the content and images more than compensate, making this a worthwhile site.

  8. Web Reef Advisory System

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Web Reef Advisory System (WRAS) was developed by ReefBase and Reef Check, in collaboration with the Coastal Resources Center at the University of Rhode Island and the Department of Biological Sciences at the University of Southern California, as "an online application to input, view, and analyse Reef Check survey data. It calculates indicators of how good or bad a shape a particular reef is in, and what the underlying causes may be, based on Reef Check surveys." WRAS allows users to view, analyze, and add (registration required) data. Please note that site users must complete a free and brief registration process before they are granted full access to the Reef Check website. Other site offerings include an interactive Reef Check GIS feature (see website for browser requirements), and The Reef Check Barometer of Global Reef Condition which provides assessments of different regions based on Reef Check Indicators.

  9. Hydrophobic flocculation flotation for beneficiating fine coal and minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Song, S.; Valdivieso, A.L. [Univ. Autonoma de San Luis Potosi (Mexico). Inst. de Metalurgia

    1998-06-01

    It is shown that hydrophobic flocculation flotation (HFF) is an effective process to treat finely ground ores and slimes so as to concentrate coal and mineral values at a fine size range. The process is based on first dispersing the fine particles suspension, followed by flocculation of fine mineral values or coal in the form of hydrophobic surfaces either induced by specifically adsorbed surfactants or from nature at the conditioning of the slurry with the shear field of sufficient magnitude. The flocculation is intensified by the addition of a small amount of nonpolar oil. finely ground coals, ilmenite slimes, and gold finely disseminated in a slag have been treated by this process. Results are presented indicating that cleaned coal with low ash and sulfur remaining and high Btu recovery can be obtained, and the refractory ores of ilmenite slimes and fine gold-bearing slag can be reasonably concentrated, leading to better beneficiation results than other separation techniques. In addition, the main operating parameters affecting the HFF process are discussed.

  10. First finding of merenskyite (Pd,Pt)Te 2 in porphyry Cu-Mo ores in Russia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. N. Berzina; V. I. Sotnikov; M. Economoueliopoulos; D. G. Eliopoulos

    2007-01-01

    Contents of Pt and Pd were determined in weakly mineralized rocks, ores, and flotation concentrates of the Aksug porphyry Cu-Mo deposit, northeastern Tuva. In all studied samples they are above the detection limits: Pt = 17–96 ppb and Pd = 9–924 ppb. These elements are unevenly distributed throughout the rocks and ores, with Pd\\/Pt varying from 0.5 to 37. Study

  11. NOAA's Coral Reef

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Portal to NOAA programs on coral reef research, management, protection. Online booklet describes corals, importance of reefs as habitat, value to humans, natural and human impacts. Site offers outreach and online educational materials, including lesson plans and list of things you can do. Search coral reef data and publications, find funding opportunities, review state of U.S. reefs, local and national action plans. Provides links to related sites, including coral reef photo library, international initiatives.

  12. Improved Algal Harvesting Using Suspended Air Flotation

    E-print Network

    Jacobson, Arne

    ; Mulaku and Nyanchaga, 2004; Koopman and Lincoln, 1983; Folkman, 1970). These characteristics make to harvest algae from wastewater. The DAF units use a compressor to supersaturate flotation water with air

  13. Applications of surface ligand design to flotation 

    E-print Network

    Rio Echevarria, Iria M.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis involves the design, synthesis and testing of organic hydrophobic ligands. They would act as co-collectors in froth flotation processes to enhance the recovery of sulfidic minerals which have undergone some ...

  14. Pilot-scale testing of microbubble flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Adel, G.T.; Luttrell, G.H.

    1991-01-01

    Fundamental investigations into the effect of bubble size on coal flotation have established that the use of microbubbles can improve the recovery of fine coal during flotation while, at the same time, increasing the rejection of ash-forming mineral matter. When used in conjunction with the quiescent conditions provided by a column, the microbubble flotation process has been demonstrated on a laboratory scale to be capable of producing superclean coal containing less than 1 or 2% ash and very little pyritic sulfur. The main objective of this project is to demonstrate the microbubble column flotation process on a pilot-scale. A 500 lb/hr pilot plant is being constructed for the purpose of: 910 demonstrating the feasibility of the microbubble flotation process for producing superclean coal, (2) collecting scale-up data for designing commercial-scale microbubble flotation columns, and (3) collecting cost data for an economic evaluation of the process. In addition to micronized coal, the process is also being tested on coarse coal and refuse pond material. 20 figs.

  15. PDU-scale testing of microbubble flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Adel, G.T.; Luttrell, G.H.

    1989-01-01

    Work during this past quarter focused primarily on Tasks 1.2.5 (Coarse Coal Flotation) and 1.2.7 (Refuse Pond Flotation). The performance comparison between microbubble column flotation and conventional flotation was continued using minus-28-mesh Pittsburgh No. 8 seam coal. For an equivalent recovery, the microbubble column reduced the final ash content of the product by more than 25% over that obtained using conventional flotation. It was found that the 14-inch diameter microbubble column could produce a 4.5% ash product from a 11% ash feed with combustible recoveries in excess of 95% at a feed rate of 300 lb/hr. In addition, flotation tests were conducted on a minus-325-mesh, high-ash (45--50%) classifying cyclone overflow stream in order to study the feasibility of the microbubble process for producing a clean coal product from what is normally considered refuse material. Results indicate that the column is capable of reducing the ash content to a range of 4.5 to 11% with corresponding combustible recoveries of 57 to 85%, respectively. 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. FLOCCULATION-FLOTATION AIDS FOR TREATMENT OF COMBINED SEWER OVERFLOWS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the flocculation/flotation characteristics of combined sewer overflow through laboratory and field testing. The concept involves the introduction of chemicals and buoyant flotation aids into the overflow and the subsequent cofloccu...

  17. 33 CFR 183.325 - Flotation test for persons capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Flotation test for persons capacity. 183...GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY...Engines of 2 Horsepower or Less Tests § 183.325 Flotation test for persons capacity....

  18. 33 CFR 183.325 - Flotation test for persons capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Flotation test for persons capacity. 183...GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY...Engines of 2 Horsepower or Less Tests § 183.325 Flotation test for persons capacity....

  19. 33 CFR 183.325 - Flotation test for persons capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Flotation test for persons capacity. 183...GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY...Engines of 2 Horsepower or Less Tests § 183.325 Flotation test for persons capacity....

  20. 33 CFR 183.225 - Flotation test for persons capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Flotation test for persons capacity. 183...GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY...Engines of More Than 2 Horsepower Tests § 183.225 Flotation test for persons capacity....

  1. 33 CFR 183.225 - Flotation test for persons capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Flotation test for persons capacity. 183...GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY...Engines of More Than 2 Horsepower Tests § 183.225 Flotation test for persons capacity....

  2. 33 CFR 183.325 - Flotation test for persons capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Flotation test for persons capacity. 183...GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY...Engines of 2 Horsepower or Less Tests § 183.325 Flotation test for persons capacity....

  3. 33 CFR 183.225 - Flotation test for persons capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Flotation test for persons capacity. 183...GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY...Engines of More Than 2 Horsepower Tests § 183.225 Flotation test for persons capacity....

  4. 33 CFR 183.225 - Flotation test for persons capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Flotation test for persons capacity. 183...GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY...Engines of More Than 2 Horsepower Tests § 183.225 Flotation test for persons capacity....

  5. 33 CFR 183.325 - Flotation test for persons capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Flotation test for persons capacity. 183...GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY...Engines of 2 Horsepower or Less Tests § 183.325 Flotation test for persons capacity....

  6. 33 CFR 183.225 - Flotation test for persons capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Flotation test for persons capacity. 183...GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY...Engines of More Than 2 Horsepower Tests § 183.225 Flotation test for persons capacity....

  7. Oil flotation processes for cleaning oil field produced water

    SciTech Connect

    Leech, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    The 1974 report on a study conducted for the Offshore Operators Committee concluded: ''flotation units and loose media coalescers were found to produce the lowest means effluent oil concentration of the processes studied.'' Severe operating problems reported with loose media coalescers resulted in flotation processes being recommended as the final step in cleaning oil from produced water. The ''traditional methods,'' which include flotation, appear to have solved the insoluble oil problem in all offshore areas where water is openly discharged. Two basic flotation processes are used for treating oil field produced water, dissolved gas flotation (DGF) and induced gas flotation (IGF). Flotation units unite gas bubbles with insoluble substances to reduce their apparent specific gravity, thus greatly accelerating rise velocity and separation. They can remove soluble components only if insolubilized. Thus, the ability of flotation units to remove total organics from produced water is limited by soluble components.

  8. Coral Reef Ecosystems: The Living Reef

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    National Science Teachers Association (NSTA)

    2006-11-01

    This Science Object is the first of four Science Objects in the Coral Reef Ecosystems SciPack. It explores the unique and diverse ecosystem of the coral reef. Coral reefs are very complex systems that create one of the largest structures on Earth of biological origins. Thousands of coral species exist in oceans worldwide. Reef-building corals remain on the same spot of the sea floor through their entire lives and have developed reproductive, feeding, and social behaviors suited to their situation. As they grow, reefs provide structural habitats for hundreds to thousands of different organisms. Learning Outcomes:? Identify coral polyp structures and describe their functions.? Describe photosynthesis in the coral environment.? Describe the evolution of a typical reef system.? Use the shape of an individual coral to identify its common name, and classify entire coral reef ecosystems based on shape and location. ? Describe the process of coral polyp reproduction and growth.? Identify how the features and/or behavioral strategies of coral reef inhabitants enable them to survive in coral reef environments.

  9. Dissolved air flotation and me.

    PubMed

    Edzwald, James K

    2010-04-01

    This paper is mainly a critical review of the literature and an assessment of what we know about dissolved air flotation (DAF). A few remarks are made at the outset about the author's personal journey in DAF research, his start and its progression. DAF has been used for several decades in drinking water treatment as an alternative clarification method to sedimentation. DAF is particularly effective in treating reservoir water supplies; those supplies containing algae, natural color or natural organic matter; and those with low mineral turbidity. It is more efficient than sedimentation in removing turbidity and particles for these type supplies. Furthermore, it is more efficient in removing Giardia cysts and Cryptosporidium oocysts. In the last 20 years, fundamental models were developed that provide a basis for understanding the process, optimizing it, and integrating it into water treatment plants. The theories were tested through laboratory and pilot-plant studies. Consequently, there have been trends in which DAF pretreatment has been optimized resulting in better coagulation and a decrease in the size of flocculation tanks. In addition, the hydraulic loading rates have increased reducing the size of DAF processes. While DAF has been used mainly in conventional type water plants, there is now interest in the technology as a pretreatment step in ultrafiltration membrane plants and in desalination reverse osmosis plants. PMID:20096437

  10. Vitrification of copper flotation waste.

    PubMed

    Karamanov, Alexander; Aloisi, Mirko; Pelino, Mario

    2007-02-01

    The vitrification of an hazardous iron-rich waste (W), arising from slag flotation of copper production, was studied. Two glasses, containing 30wt% W were melted for 30min at 1400 degrees C. The first batch, labeled WSZ, was obtained by mixing W, blast furnace slag (S) and zeolite tuff (Z), whereas the second, labeled WG, was prepared by mixing W, glass cullet (G), sand and limestone. The glass frits showed high chemical durability, measured by the TCLP test. The crystallization of the glasses was evaluated by DTA. The crystal phases formed were identified by XRD resulting to be pyroxene and wollastonite solid solutions, magnetite and hematite. The morphology of the glass-ceramics was observed by optical and scanning electron microscopy. WSZ composition showed a high rate of bulk crystallization and resulted to be suitable for producing glass-ceramics by a short crystallization heat-treatment. WG composition showed a low crystallization rate and good sinterability; glass-ceramics were obtained by sinter-crystallization of the glass frit. PMID:17064848

  11. NOAA's Coral Reef

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In an effort to centralize information on Coral Reefs, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has launched this site on Coral Reefs. The site serves both as a news resource (see the frequently updated News Releases section) as well as a basic information resource (see Year of the Reef 1997 and Coral Reef Photos) on coral reefs. For information on current research (scientific and citizen), see the Coral Health and Monitoring Program, the Great American Fish Count, or the Coral Reef Initiative sections. Additionally, a dozen Coral Reef Links point users to further resources. For the pure enthusiast or beginning college student, this site serves as a fine entry-way into learning about Coral Reefs.

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF CFD MODELS OF MINERAL FLOTATION CELLS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. T. L. KOH; Y. ZHU; P. BOURKE; R. PEAKER; J. P. FRANZIDIS

    Work in the AMIRA P9M project involves developing Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) models of commercial flotation cells used in the mineral processing industry. CFD models provide detailed understanding of the hydrodynamics of flotation cells and are very useful for progressing knowledge of the flotation process and improving operations. Comparisons of the CFD predictions against measured velocities show very good agreement

  13. An Evaluation of the Entrainment Modelling Approaches in Flotation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Özcan Y. GÜLSOY

    There are two important mechanisms for the recovery of particles in flotation: True flotation and entrainment. True flotation deals with only hydrophobic mineral recovery. Entrainment has an effective role on the recovery of not only hydrophilic but also hydrophobic mineral recoveries. Hydrophilic entrainment could be modelled by relating water recovery with solids recovery. However, direct measurement of the hydrophobic entrainment

  14. Jurassic Reef Park

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Reinhold Leinfelder

    This is a bilingual, educational website from Munich, Germany. The main feature is a virtual field trip to the reefs of the Jurassic period. Besides a view of the Jurassic reefs, their builders, and their ecological settings, there is also an emphasis on the importance of modern reefs as indicators of the state-of-health of the globe and evidence of how some changes in the composition of reefs may represent the forerunners of catastrophic, regional or global, environmental change.

  15. Coral Reef Connections

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Coral Reef Connections explores the different reef zones of the Great Barrier Reef in Australia, the biodiversity that has evolved there, and the interactions between the many species, their environment, and each other. Users can navigate through a virtual "dive" on the reef, select various organisms, and view the types of relationships they have with each other. Links to related topics and web activities are included.

  16. Utilization of flotation wastes of copper slag as raw material in cement production.

    PubMed

    Alp, I; Deveci, H; Süngün, H

    2008-11-30

    Copper slag wastes, even if treated via processes such as flotation for metal recovery, still contain heavy metals with hazardous properties posing environmental risks for disposal. This study reports the potential use of flotation waste of a copper slag (FWCS) as iron source in the production of Portland cement clinker. The FWCS appears a suitable raw material as iron source containing >59% Fe(2)O(3) mainly in the form of fayalite (Fe(2)SiO(4)) and magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)). The clinker products obtained using the FWCS from the industrial scale trial operations over a 4-month period were characterised for the conformity of its chemical composition and the physico-mechanical performance of the resultant cement products was evaluated. The data collected for the clinker products produced using an iron ore, which is currently used as the cement raw material were also included for comparison. The results have shown that the chemical compositions of all the clinker products including those of FWCS are typical of a Portland cement clinker. The mechanical performance of the standard mortars prepared from the FWCS clinkers were found to be similar to those from the iron ore clinkers with the desired specifications for the industrial cements e.g. CEM I type cements. Furthermore, the leachability tests (TCLP and SPLP) have revealed that the mortar samples obtained from the FWCS clinkers present no environmental problems while the FWCS could act as the potential source of heavy metal contamination. These findings suggest that flotation wastes of copper slag (FWCS) can be readily utilised as cement raw material due to its availability in large quantities at low cost with the further significant benefits for waste management/environmental practices of the FWCS and the reduced production and processing costs for cement raw materials. PMID:18384950

  17. Planetary Coral Reef Foundation

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Planetary Coral Reef Foundation was founded in 1991 to address the growing crisis of destruction of coral reefs. Topics include the PCRF's mission, its research activities at sea and in space, wastewater recycling, conservation tips that can help preserve reefs, and the organization's ship, R.V. Heraclitus.

  18. Coral Reefs Under Stress

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Peter Mumby (University of Exeter; )

    2009-10-05

    Coral reefs are more critical to an oceanâ??s health than you might think, and the effects of climate change and ocean acidification are effectively damaging and destroying most reefs in the world. Coral reefs provide many important ecosystem services, including: providing food, shelter, and meeting places for thousands of animals; anchoring sand for recreational beaches; and supplying building materials for remote peoples.

  19. Journey to the Reef

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryson, Linda

    2010-01-01

    Despite their experiences with a cartoon sponge, most elementary students know little about the diverse inhabitants of coral reefs. Therefore, with vivid photography and video, diverse coral reef inhabitants were brought to life for the author's fifth-grade students. Students shared their knowledge in language arts and even explored coral reefs in…

  20. Effect of microwave radiation on coal flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Ozbayoglu, G.; Depci, T.; Ataman, N. [Middle East Technical University, Ankara (Turkey). Mining Engineering Department

    2009-07-01

    Most low-rank coals are high in moisture and acid functional groups, therefore showing poor floatability. Drying, which removes the water molecules trapped in the pores and adsorbed at the surface of coal, decreases the hydrophilic character and improves the floatability. Microwave heating, whose simplest application is drying, was applied at 0.9 kW power level for 60 sec exposure time in the experiments to decrease the moisture content of coal in order to enhance the hydrophobicity. The flotation tests of microwave-treated coal by using heptanol and octanol lead to a higher flotation yield and ash removal than original coal.

  1. PDU-scale testing of microbubble flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Adel, G.T.; Luttrell, G.H.

    1989-01-01

    The current goal is to determine what additional changes need to be made to complete the grinding circuit and to begin preliminary testing of the 8- and 14-inch columns. Initial steps are underway to begin installation of the pilot plant sensor equipment, including the gamma density gauges and the liquid flow meter. Work has begun on the construction of the 14-inch flotation column. Research is continuing on a fundamental model which accurately describes the behavior of the air phase in column flotation. Several versions of the simulator have been developed and analyzed. Extensive laboratory data are being collected in order to validate the appropriate model. 8 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Coral Reef Adventure

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    MacGillivray Freeman

    This site from MacGillivray Freeman Films presents information about the movie "Coral Reef Adventure," as well as an assortment of links about coral reefs. In particular, the section on Learning About Reefs features a virtual dive that highlights marine life at various depths. This section also provides educational resources including a teacher's guide and learning activities. The site also includes links to many organizations that provide support for reversing the current worldwide decline in coral reef ecosystems and to finding new and sustainable solutions for managing the world's coral reefs.

  3. Mineral processing and extraction of rare earth elements from the Wadi Khamal Nelsonite Ore, Northwestern Saudi Arabia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hesham M. Harbi; Abdelmonem A. Eldougdoug; M. S. El-Shahawi

    2011-01-01

    A technological sample (50 kg) from Wadi Khamal Nelsonite ore was subjected to magnetic and flotation concentration techniques.\\u000a Excellent recovery percentages of 72.95% and 71.22% were achieved by the dry\\/wet magnetic and flotation concentration techniques,\\u000a respectively. The weight of the apatite concentrate reached a reasonable percentage of approximately 23.5% with an overall\\u000a 40.23% P2O5 total content. Analytical data of the apatite

  4. Dioramas: Andros Coral Reef

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In the shallow waters off the coast of Andros Island in the Caribbean, corals of all shapes and sizes form the Andros Reef, one of the largest barrier reefs in the world. Like other coral reefs, Andros was created by massive colonies of coral polyps, which are small, soft-bodied animals. These creatures have hard skeletons that form much of the structure of a coral reef. The once thriving Andros Reef is now threatened. In the past, antler-shaped elkhorn coral dominated the reef, with multiple colonies extending continuously for long stretches. Throughout the Caribbean today, this species exists primarily in isolated colonies and scientists estimate that in certain places, up to 95 percent of elkhorn coral has died. This site describes the formation of the reef along with the present problems.

  5. Pilot-scale testing of microbubble flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Adel, G.T.; Luttrell, G.H.; Mankosa, M.J.

    1990-08-01

    The main objective of this project was to demonstrate the microbubble column flotation process in a process development unit (PDU). The project was divided into several different stages. The first involved continuous bench-scale testing in order to identify the operating parameters which most strongly influence column performance. These included feed rate, countercurrent wash water rate, aeration rate, frother addition, collector addition and froth depth. Several tests were also conducted using different feed particle size distributions. Based on the results from these tests, several PDU-scale columns were designed and constructed. These cells ranged from 6 to 14 inches in diameter and were approximately 15 feet high. The second stage consisted of testing of the PDU-scale columns for the purpose of: (1) demonstrating the feasibility of the microbubble flotation process for producing superclean coal, (2) demonstrating the ability of the microbubble column to process refuse streams (i.e., cyclone overflow material), (3) comparison with conventional techniques for coarse coal flotation, (4) collecting scale-up data for the design of commercial-scale columns. In the final stage, a comprehensive scale-up procedure was developed based on the fundamental principles of flotation. Expressions were developed which describe the flotation rate constant, mean retention time, fractional air hold-up and column mixing. These relationships were incorporated into a scale-up procedure based on known principles of chemical engineering reactor design. PDU-scale test results were used to validate the scale-up procedure. 95 refs., 141 figs., 23 tabs.

  6. Pilot-scale testing of microbubble flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Adel, G.T.; Luttrell, G.H.; Mankosa, M.J.

    1990-08-01

    The main objective of this project was to demonstrate the microbubble column flotation process in a process development unit (PDU). In order to accomplish this task, the project was divided into several different stages. The first involved continuous bench-scale testing in order to identify the operating parameters which most strongly influence column performance. These included feed rate, countercurrent wash water rate, aeration rate, frother addition, collector addition and froth depth. Several tests were also conducted using different feed particle size distributions. Based on the results from these tests, several PDU-scale columns were designed and constructed. The second stage consisted of testing of the PDU-scale columns for the purpose of: (i) demonstrating the feasibility of the microbubble flotation process for producing superclean coal, (ii) demonstrating the ability of the microbubble column to process refuse streams (i.e., cyclone overflow material), (iii) comparison with conventional techniques for coarse coal flotation, and (iv) collecting scale-up data for the design of commercial-scale columns. Detailed results from each of these series of tests are presented. In the final stage of this work a comprehensive scale-up procedure was developed based on the fundamental principles of flotation. Expressions were developed which describe the flotation rate constant, mean retention time, fractional air hold-up and column mixing. These relationships were incorporated into a scale-up procedure based on known principles of chemical engineering reactor design. PDU-scale test results were used to validate the scale-up procedure. 95 refs., 141 figs., 23 tabs.

  7. Coral Reef Ecosystems

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    National Science Teachers Association (NSTA)

    2007-03-28

    The Coral Reef Ecosystems SciPack explores the unique and diverse ecosystem of the coral reef. The focus is on Standards and Benchmarks related to populations and ecosystems using coral reefs and their immediate environment as an example. Because the Standards and Benchmarks present the concepts of populations and ecosystems generically, without reference to a specific ecosystem or the organisms in the system, coral reefs are used to provide the context through which concepts in a marine ecosystem are explored.In addition to comprehensive inquiry-based learning materials tied to Science Education Standards and Benchmarks, the SciPack includes the following additional components:? Pedagogical Implications section addressing common misconceptions, teaching resources and strand maps linking grade band appropriate content to standards. ? Access to one-on-one support via e-mail to content "Wizards".? Final Assessment which can be used to certify mastery of the concepts.Learning Outcomes:Coral Reef Ecosystems: The Living Reef? Identify coral polyp structures and describe their functions.? Describe photosynthesis in the coral environment.? Describe the evolution of a typical reef system.? Use the shape of an individual coral to identify its common name, and classify entire coral reef ecosystems based on shape and location. ? Describe the process of coral polyp reproduction and growth.? Identify how the features and/or behavioral strategies of coral reef inhabitants enable them to survive in coral reef environments.Coral Reef Ecosystems: The Abiotic Setting? Identify the characteristics of an ecosystem, and describe the interdependence between biotic and abiotic features in an ecosystem.? Describe how the following abiotic factors provide coral with the energy needed to survive and grow within their ecosystem: sunlight, water, oxygen, and carbon dioxide.? Describe the optimal environmental conditions for coral reef growth, and explain the process of coral reef development (including the role of available sunlight and calcium).? Explain how the following environmental factors might affect coral ecosystems: increase in dissolved CO2, changes in global temperatures, increase in ocean water turbidity through water pollution.Coral Reef Ecosystems: Interdependence? Identify and label key components of food chains and food webs in a coral reef ecosystem.? Describe key relationships among plants and animals in the coral reef ecosystem: predator and prey relationships, producer and consumer relationships, and symbiotic relationships (mutualism, commensalisms, parasitism).? Recognize the direction that energy travels through food chains and food webs.? Explain that materials (chemical elements) and natural resources are recycled in coral reef ecosystems and reappear in different forms.? Describe the primary ecological succession events within a typical coral reef ecosystem.Coral Reef Ecosystems: Ecosystems in Crisis? Describe ways in which human activities directly impact coral reef ecosystems (resource and recreational uses).? Describe ways in which human activities indirectly impact coral reef ecosystems (by changing the physical conditions, pollution, changes in the water chemistry, etc.).? Explain how human activity may decrease the reefs ability to recover from natural occurrences. ? Explain the effects of increased predation or disease on a reef ecosystem.? Describe the effect of habitat loss on the reef ecosystem.? Describe the effects of weather and climate change on a healthy and weakened reef ecosystem.

  8. Shale-oil-recovery systems incorporating ore beneficiation. Final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, M.A.; Klumpar, I.V.; Peterson, C.R.; Ring, T.A.

    1982-10-01

    This study analyzed the recovery of oil from oil shale by use of proposed systems which incorporate beneficiation of the shale ore (that is concentration of the kerogen before the oil-recovery step). The objective was to identify systems which could be more attractive than conventional surface retorting of ore. No experimental work was carried out. The systems analyzed consisted of beneficiation methods which could increase kerogen concentrations by at least four-fold. Potentially attractive low-enrichment methods such as density separation were not examined. The technical alternatives considered were bounded by the secondary crusher as input and raw shale oil as output. A sequence of ball milling, froth flotation, and retorting concentrate is not attractive for Western shales compared to conventional ore retorting; transporting the concentrate to another location for retorting reduces air emissions in the ore region but cost reduction is questionable. The high capital and energy cost s results largely from the ball milling step which is very inefficient. Major improvements in comminution seem achievable through research and such improvements, plus confirmation of other assumptions, could make high-enrichment beneficiation competitive with conventional processing. 27 figures, 23 tables.

  9. Microwave enhanced recovery of nickel-copper ore: communition and floatability aspects.

    PubMed

    Henda, R; Hermas, A; Gedye, R; Islam, M R

    2005-01-01

    A study describing the effect of microwave radiation, at a frequency of 2450 MHz, on the processes of communication and flotation of a complex sulphide nickel-copper ore is presented. Ore communication has been investigated under standard radiation-free conditions and after ore treatment in a radiated environment as a function of ore size, exposure time to radiation, and microwave power. The findings show that communication is tremendously improved by microwave radiation with values of the relative work index as low as 23% at a microwave power of 1.406 kW and after 10 s of exposure time. Communication is affected by exposure time and microwave power in a nontrivial manner. In terms of ore floatability, the experimental tests have been carried out on a sample of 75 microm in size under different exposure times. The results show that both ore concentrate recoveries and grades of nickel and copper are significantly enhanced after microwave treatment of the ore with relative increases in recovered concentrate, grade of nickel, and grade of copper of 26 wt%, 15 wt%, and 27%, respectively, at a microwave power of 1330 kW and after 30 s of exposure time. PMID:16673830

  10. Ocean World: Coral Reefs

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Texas A&M University presents Ocean World, a Web-based educational resource for oceanography. The feature on coral reefs has the most direct life sciences application, with easy-to-navigate sections about the coral animal, coral reefs as the rainforests of the sea, symbiosis, ecosystem services, and coral reef threats and conservation. The Web site also includes a handy hypertext glossary, an interactive quiz, and annotated links to interesting Web sites, including sites that provide real-time reef images and data. While no formal lesson plans are provided, this Web site could be easily incorporated to a related classroom module for a range of grade levels.

  11. The Virtual Silurian Reef

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This virtual museum exhibit features an interactive diorama highlighting a variety of sea creatures from reef ecosystems of the Silurian period in Wisconsin and Illinois. Topics include an overview of the geology and geologic history, fossil preservation, and plate tectonics. There are maps of the distribution of the reefs; a graphic analysis of biodiversity in these ecosystems; a discussion of the relation between environmental factors, reef size, and growth; and information on the museum's laboratory study of the reef samples and how they constructed the diorama.

  12. Laboratory study of electro-coagulation–flotation for water treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jia-Qian Jiang; Nigel Graham; Cecile André; Geoff H. Kelsall; Nigel Brandon

    2002-01-01

    An electro-coagulation–flotation process has been developed for water treatment. This involved an electrolytic reactor with aluminium electrodes and a separation\\/flotation tank. The water to be treated passed through the reactor and was subjected to coagulation\\/flotation, by Al(III) ions dissolved from the electrodes, the resulting flocs floating after being captured by hydrogen gas bubbles generated at cathode surfaces. Apparent current efficiencies

  13. Enhanced pyrite rejection in coal flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, D.P.; Lu, M.X.; Richardson, P.E.; Luttrell, G.H.; Adel, G.T.; Yoon, R.H. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Center for Coal and Minerals Processing

    1994-12-31

    Difficulties in rejecting pyrite from coal by flotation primarily result from two mechanisms of particle recovery: attachment and middlings. Attachment of pyrite is the consequence of surface hydrophobicity induced by superficial oxidation; middlings that can float readily are caused by incomplete liberation of pyrite from coal. New flotation schemes have been developed to enhance pyrite rejection. They are referred to as Electrochemically-Enhanced Sulfur Rejection (EESR) and Polymer-Enhanced Sulfur Rejection (PESR) processes. In the EESR process, the formation of hydrophobic products is prevented by electrochemical techniques in which active metals are used as sacrificial anodes to cathodically protect pyrite from oxidation; in the PESR process, hydrophilic polymers is used to mask coal in middlings by specific adsorption on pyrite, and thus depress coal-pyrite middlings.

  14. Improved algal harvesting using suspended air flotation.

    PubMed

    Wiley, Patrick E; Brenneman, Kristine J; Jacobson, Arne E

    2009-07-01

    Current methods to remove algae from a liquid medium are energy intensive and expensive. This study characterized algae contained within a wastewater oxidation pond and sought to identify a more efficient harvesting technique. Analysis of oxidation pond wastewater revealed that algae, consisting primarily of Chlorella and Scenedesmus, composed approximately 80% of the solids inventory during the study period. Results demonstrated that suspended air flotation (SAF) could harvest algae with a lower air:solids (A/S) ratio, lower energy requirements, and higher loading rates compared to dissolved air flotation (DAF) (P < 0.001). Identification of a more efficient algal harvesting system may benefit wastewater treatment plants by enabling cost effective means to reduce solids content of the final effluent. Furthermore, use of SAF to harvest commercially grown Chlorella and Scenedesmus may reduce manufacturing costs of algal-based products such as fuel, fertilizer, and fish food. PMID:19691251

  15. U.S. Coral Reef Taskforce

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Government task force created in 1998 to research, monitor and conserve coral reefs. Site includes: background on coral reef habitats; reef ecology and environmental requirements; environmental requirements of reefs; reef functions and significance; natural and human threats to reefs. Also covered are: Task Force actions; policies and partnerships; and the National Action Plan for Coral Reef Conservation.

  16. 21 CFR 890.5170 - Powered flotation therapy bed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5170 Powered flotation therapy bed. (a) Identification....

  17. 21 CFR 890.5170 - Powered flotation therapy bed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5170 Powered flotation therapy bed. (a)...

  18. 21 CFR 890.5170 - Powered flotation therapy bed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5170 Powered flotation therapy bed. (a)...

  19. 21 CFR 890.5170 - Powered flotation therapy bed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5170 Powered flotation therapy bed. (a)...

  20. Flotation machine and process for removing impurities from coals

    DOEpatents

    Szymocha, Kazimierz (Edmonton, CA); Ignasiak, Boleslaw (Edmonton, CA); Pawlak, Wanda (Edmonton, CA); Kulik, Conrad (Newark, CA); Lebowitz, Howard E. (Mountain View, CA)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a type of flotation machine that combines three separate operations in a single unit. The flotation machine is a hydraulic separator that is capable of reducing the pyrite and other mineral matter content of a coal. When the hydraulic separator is used with a flotation system, the pyrite and certain other minerals particles that may have been entrained by hydrodynamic forces associated with conventional flotation machines and/or by the attachment forces associated with the formation of microagglomerates are washed and separated from the coal.

  1. Flotation machine and process for removing impurities from coals

    DOEpatents

    Szymocha, Kazimierz (Edmonton, CA); Ignasiak, Boleslaw (Edmonton, CA); Pawlak, Wanda (Edmonton, CA); Kulik, Conrad (Newark, CA); Lebowitz, Howard E. (Mountain View, CA)

    1995-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a type of flotation machine that combines three separate operations in a single unit. The flotation machine is a hydraulic separator that is capable of reducing the pyrite and other mineral matter content of a coal. When the hydraulic separator is used with a flotation system, the pyrite and certain other minerals particles that may have been entrained by hydrodynamic forces associated with conventional flotation machines and/or by the attachment forces associated with the formation of microagglomerates are washed and separated from the coal.

  2. Reef Education Evaluation: Environmental Knowledge and Reef Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stepath, Carl M.

    2005-01-01

    Background: The Reef education evaluation: environmental knowledge and reef experience report concerns PhD research about marine education, and the investigation of learning with high school students and the effect of coral reef monitoring marine experiential education interventions. The effectiveness of classroom learning and reef trips were…

  3. Optimizing dissolved air flotation design and saturation.

    PubMed

    Féris, L A; Gallina, C W; Rodrigues, R T; Rubio, J

    2001-01-01

    Dissolved air flotation (DAF) of iron hydroxide precipitates at working pressures lower than 3 atm, using modified flotation units to improve the collection of fragile coagula, was studied. Conventional DAF flotation was studied as a function of saturation pressure in the absence and presence of surfactants in the saturator. Without surfactants, the minimum saturation pressure required for DAF to occur was found to be 3 atm. But, by lowering the air/water surface tension in the saturator, DAF was possible at a saturation pressure of 2 atm. This behavior was found to occur in both batch and pilot DAF operation tests and almost complete recovery of the precipitates was attained. Results are explained in terms of the minimum "energy" which has to be transferred to the liquid phase to form bubbles by a cavity phenomenon. Further, studies were conducted changing equipment design and feed bubbles size distribution (mixing micro and "mid-sized" bubbles). Thus, bubbles entrance position in the collision-adhesion zone ("capture" zone) was compared to bubble entrance position in the water flow inlet below the floating bed. A "mushroom" type diffuser was used for the "capture zone" experiment and better performance was obtained. Results are explained in terms of different mass transfer phenomena in the collection zone and in the separation zone. Finally, results obtained with the use of a column flotation cell working as normal DAF and with a wide bubble size range are presented. Results indicate good performance and some gains in process kinetics with middle size bubbles. PMID:11394267

  4. PDU-scale testing of microbubble flotation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. H. Yoon; G. T. Adel; G. H. Luttrell

    1989-01-01

    Work during this past quarter was focused primarily on Task 1.1.4 (Modeling), Task 1.2.4 (Scale-Up Validation) and Task 1.2.5. (Coarse Coal Flotation). A mathematical model was developed to relate air hold-up and bubble diameter within the column to superficial gas and liquid flows. This model was then incorporated into an iterative scale-up procedure which is being validated as part of

  5. Capitol Reef Sandstone Cliff

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A sandstone cliff within Capitol Reef National Park. Capitol Reef is primarily made up of sandstone formations within the Waterpocket Fold, monocline that extends nearly 100 miles. A monocline is a step-like fold in rock strata that can resemble an enormous wrinkle in the earth....

  6. Capitol Reef Cliff

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A sandstone cliff near the entrance of Capitol Reef National Park. Capitol Reef is primarily made up of sandstone formations within the Waterpocket Fold, monocline that extends nearly 100 miles. A monocline is a step-like fold in rock strata that can resemble an enormous wrinkle in the earth. The tr...

  7. Capitol Reef Panorama

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A panorama of some of the sandstone formations within Capitol Reef National Park. Capitol Reef is primarily made up of sandstone formations within the Waterpocket Fold, monocline that extends nearly 100 miles. A monocline is a step-like fold in rock strata that can resemble an enormous wrinkle in th...

  8. Capitol Reef Sandstone Monolith

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A sandstone monolith within Capitol Reef National Park. Capitol Reef is primarily made up of sandstone formations within the Waterpocket Fold, monocline that extends nearly 100 miles. A monocline is a step-like fold in rock strata that can resemble an enormous wrinkle in the earth....

  9. Capitol Reef Cliff

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A sandstone cliff near the entrance of Capitol Reef National Park. Capitol Reef is primarily made up of sandstone formations within the Waterpocket Fold, monocline that extends nearly 100 miles. A monocline is a step-like fold in rock strata that can resemble an enormous wrinkle in the earth. This l...

  10. Capitol Reef Cliff

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A sandstone cliff near the entrance of Capitol Reef National Park. Capitol Reef is primarily made up of sandstone formations within the Waterpocket Fold, monocline that extends nearly 100 miles. A monocline is a step-like fold in rock strata that can resemble an enormous wrinkle in the earth.&n...

  11. Reefs in Crisis

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This online article, from "The Biodiversity Crisis: Losing What Counts", walks students through the risks humans pose to the survival of coral reefs and conservation efforts. It discusses the forces behind damage to the reefs and recent protection efforts, including the creation of sanctuaries, good land management, and public awareness campaigns.

  12. Create a Coral Reef

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In this hands-on OLogy activity, kids learn about coral reefs by building a diorama. Students are introduced to coral polyps and reefs and given illustrated, step-by-step directions that show how to construct a diorama containing models of a brain coral, a sea fan, a sponge, and sea anemones.

  13. ReefBase, A Global Information System on Coarl Reefs

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    ReefBase

    ReefBase is an online information system dedicated to coral reefs. The site aims to facilitate sustainable management of coral reefs and related coastal/marine environments. Included are data and information on the location, status, threats, monitoring, legislation, and management of coral reefs in 131 countries, extensive data on coral bleaching, a state-of-the-art online mapping-system that allows custom-made maps of coral reefs and related datasets, and an extensive bibliography of publications.

  14. Life on the Reef

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This Expeditions Web site takes an in-depth look at life on one of the world's largest barrier reefs. The site begins with a brief explanation of the expedition and what its participants were looking to find. Dive the Reef is an interactive feature that allows students to learn what separates a lagoon from a reef from a shelf. Meet the Scientists has brief biographies of the 14 team members who participated in the expedition. At the Museum is an article that discusses the selection of the barrier reef system of Andros Island as well as the AMNH's long history of Bahamian research. The Reef from Space explains how NASA's computer-enhanced pictures from space contributed to the expedition's findings. The site also includes 12 dispatches written during the expedition, which can be found in the Today from the Bahamas section.

  15. The use of dissolved air flotation in municipal wastewater treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Řdegaard

    2001-01-01

    Flotation can be used in municipal wastewater treatment plants in different ways. Since the pollutants in wastewater to such a large extent are associated with particles, a very substantial treatment efficiency can be reached at a very small space, by using flotation in a chemical (or enhanced primary) treatment scheme. This is demonstrated in this paper with reference to results

  16. Effect of oxidation on the collectorless flotation of chalcopyrite

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G Fairthorne; D Fornasiero; J Ralston

    1997-01-01

    The effects of conditioning gas and pH on the collectorless flotation of chalcopyrite have been studied. To explain the changes in flotation performance during mineral oxidation, a study of the oxidation species produced in solution and on the mineral surface has been performed. Results of mineral dissolution, zeta potential measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy have shown that iron and, to

  17. 33 CFR 183.222 - Flotation material and air chambers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    (a) Flotation materials must meet the requirements in § 183.114 as listed in Table 183.114 when used in the bilge, unless located in a sealed compartment. (b) Air chambers used to meet the flotation requirements of this subpart must not be integral with the...

  18. Coral Reef Ecosystems: Interdependence

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    National Science Teachers Association (NSTA)

    2006-11-01

    This Science Object is the third of four Science Objects in the Coral Reef Ecosystems SciPack. It explores the interdependent relationships between species in the coral reef ecosystem. All populations in the reef ecosystem are a part of and depend on a global food web (a connected set of food chains) through which energy flows in one direction, from the sun into organism and eventually dissipating into the environment as heat. This food web includes ocean plants, the animals that feed on them, and the animals that feed on those animals. Energy is transferred between organisms and their environment along the way. Energy concentration diminishes at each step. The cycles of life continue indefinitely because organisms decompose after death and return food materials to the environment. Learning Outcomes:? Identify and label key components of food chains and food webs in a coral reef ecosystem.? Describe key relationships among plants and animals in the coral reef ecosystem: predator and prey relationships, producer and consumer relationships, and symbiotic relationships (mutualism, commensalisms, parasitism).? Recognize the direction that energy travels through food chains and food webs.? Explain that materials (chemical elements) and natural resources are recycled in coral reef ecosystems and reappear in different forms.? Describe the primary ecological succession events within a typical coral reef ecosystem.

  19. ReefBase: A Global Information System on Coral Reefs

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Noordeloos, Machiel E.

    ReefBase, a comprehensive Web portal for information on coral reefs, is presented by the World Fish Center based in Malaysia. Intended for use by reef managers, scientists, and the general public, ReefBase aims to "facilitate better understanding of the interdependence between humans and coral reefs, in order to benefit management and conservation efforts of these important resources." ReefBase provides information on coastal and marine resources, coral reef threats, resource management practices, maps and photos, references, and more. Users can quickly search for information organized by country or territory using a convenient dropdown menu. ReefBase is frequently updated; one recent addition is a status report for coral reefs of the southwestern Indian Ocean.

  20. An Advanced Control System for Fine Coal Flotation. Sixth quarter, technical progress report, July 1-September 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Adel, G.T.; Luttrell, G.H.

    1997-10-27

    Over the past thirty years, process control has spread from the chemical industry into the fields of mineral and coal processing. Today, process control computers, combined with improved instrumentation, are capable of effective control in many modem flotation circuits. Unfortunately, the classical methods used in most control strategies have severe limitations when used in froth flotation. For example, the nonlinear nature of the flotation process can cause single-input, single-output lines to battle each other in attempts to achieve a given objective. Other problems experienced in classical control schemes include noisy signals from sensors and the inability to measure certain process variables. For example, factors related to ore type or water chemistry, such as liberation, froth stability, and floatability, cannot be measured by conventional means. The purpose of this project is to demonstrate an advanced control system for fine coal flotation. The demonstration is being carried out at an existing coal preparation plant by a team consisting of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (VPI&SU) as the prime contractor and J.A. Herbst and Associates as a subcontractor. The objectives of this work are: (1) to identify through sampling, analysis, and simulation those variables which can be manipulated to maintain grades, recoveries, and throughput rates at levels set by management; (2) to develop and implement a model-based computer control strategy that continuously adjusts those variables to maximize revenue subject to various metallurgical, economic, and environmental constraints; and (3) to employ a video-based optical analyzer for on-line analysis of ash content in fine coal slurries.

  1. 14. HULETT ORE UNLOADERS IN MOTION; UNLOADING CANADIAN RED ORE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. HULETT ORE UNLOADERS IN MOTION; UNLOADING CANADIAN RED ORE FROM THE 'GEORGE M. CAR.' VIEW LOOKING EAST. (Also see OH-18-38, OH-18-39, and OH-18-40.) - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  2. 38. HULETT ORE UNLOADERS IN MOTION; UNLOADING CANADIAN RED ORE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. HULETT ORE UNLOADERS IN MOTION; UNLOADING CANADIAN RED ORE FROM THE GEORGE M. CARL.' VIEW LOOKING EAST. (Also see OH-18-14, OH-18-39, and OH-18-40) - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  3. The Effects of Pretreatment on the Flotation Kinetics of Waste Coal

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jovica M. Sokolovi?; Rodoljub D. Stanojlovi?; Zoran S. Markovi?

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the effect of attrition of fine waste coal from anthracite mine “Vrška ?uka, Serbia on the flotation results and flotation kinetics parameters in a batch flotation cell. Waste coal was generally stored into settling ponds and old tailing ponds as a waste material. Floatability of oxidized coal can be improved by attrition. The flotation tests were performed

  4. Flotation process for purification of waste water

    SciTech Connect

    Julke, E.

    1982-01-19

    In a flotation method for purification of industrial or municipal waste water, waste water comes in contact with electrodes having an electrical potential capable of electrolytically decomposing a portion of the waste water, thereby creating an ascending stream of gas bubbles. The waste water is mixed before or during the electrolytic decomposition with wettable particles of polymer material which are practically insoluble in water and have an absolute density of 1.3 g/cm3 at the most. Polymeric materials, especially polyalkane fibrids, are suitable for use as particles. This process makes it possible to purify oil-containing waste water by electroflotation without forming an oil film on the electrodes.

  5. Coral Reef Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yap, Helen T.

    Coral reefs are geological structures of significant dimensions, constructed over millions of years by calcifying organisms. The present day reef-builders are hard corals belonging to the order Scleractinia, phylum Cnidaria. The greatest concentrations of coral reefs are in the tropics, with highest levels of biodiversity situated in reefs of the Indo-West Pacific region. These ecosystems have provided coastal protection and livelihood to human populations over the millennia. Human activities have caused destruction of these habitats, the intensity of which has increased alarmingly since the latter decades of the twentieth century. The severity of this impact is directly related to exponential growth rates of human populations especially in the coastal areas of the developing world. However, a more recently recognized phenomenon concerns disturbances brought about by the changing climate, manifested mainly as rising sea surface temperatures, and increasing acidification of ocean waters due to greater drawdown of higher concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide. Management efforts have so far not kept pace with the rates of degradation, so that the spatial extent of damaged reefs and the incidences of localized extinction of reef species are increasing year after year. The major management efforts to date consist of establishing marine protected areas and promoting the active restoration of coral habitats.

  6. Computer finds ore

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter M. Bell

    1982-01-01

    Artificial intelligence techniques are being used for the first time to evaluate geophysical, geochemical, and geologic data and theory in order to locate ore deposits. After several years of development, an intelligent computer code has been formulated and applied to the Mount Tolman area in Washington state. In a project funded by the United States Geological Survey and the National

  7. The Barrier Reef sediment apron: Tobacco Reef, Belize

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ian G. Macintyre; Richard R. Graus; Peter N. Reinthal; Mark M. Littler; Diane S. Littler

    1987-01-01

    Sedimentological and biological surveys of the back-reef sediment apron of Tobacco Reef, a continuous segment of the Belizean Barrier Reef, reveal five distinct biogeological zones: (1) coralline-coral-Dictyota pavement, (2) Turbinaria-Sargassum rubble, (3) Laurencia-Acanthophora sand and gravel, (4) bare sand and 95 Thalassia sand. These zones parallel the entire 9-km reef. The distribution of these zones is related to the spatial

  8. SURFACTANT SPRAY: A NOVEL TECHNOLOGY TO IMPROVE FLOTATION DEINKING PERFORMANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Yulin Deng; Junyong Zhu

    2004-01-31

    Based on the fundamental understanding of ink removal and fiber loss mechanism in flotation deinking process, we developed this innovative technology using surfactant spray to improve the ink removal efficiency, reduce the water and fiber loss, reduce the chemical consumption and carry over in the flotation deinking. The innovative flotation deinking process uses a spray to deliver the frothing agent during flotation deinking to control several key process variables. The spray can control the foam stability and structure and modify the fluid dynamics to reduce the fibers entrapped in the froth layer. The froth formed at the top part of the flotation column will act as a physical filter to prevent the penetration of frothing agent into the pulp suspension to eliminate fiber contamination and unfavorable deinking surface chemistry modification due to surfactant adsorption on the fiber surface. Because of the filter effect, frothing agents will be better utilized. Under the sponsorships of the US Dept. of Energy (DOE) and the member companies of the Institute of Paper Science and Technology, we studied the chem-mechanical mechanism of surfactant spray for flotation deinking using different furnishes, chemicals, and flotation devices in the past four years. In the final year of the project, we successfully conducted mill trials at Abitibi-Consolidated, Inc., Snowflake paper recycling operation of 100% mixture of ONP/OMG. Results from laboratory, pilot-plant and mill trials indicated that surfactant spray technology can significantly reduce fiber loss in flotation deinking. It can be concluded that paper industry can profit greatly when this technology is commercialized in flotation deinking mills.

  9. Contradicting Barrier Reef relationships for Darwin's Evolution of reef types

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Edward G. Purdy; Edward L. Winterer

    2006-01-01

    The Darwinian progressive subsidence model for the evolution of fringing reefs, barrier reefs and atolls has been generally accepted following the indisputable proof of subsidence provided by drilling results in the Pacific. Nonetheless, there are data that do not fit the expectations of the model, such as the similar lagoon depths of barrier reefs and atolls as opposed to the

  10. Private development of artificial reefs 

    E-print Network

    Burns, Arthur Allen

    1978-01-01

    of fish caught in these locations and the rela- tionship of angler hours fished over reef sites and nonreef sites. The catch over these new fishing reefs is usually more than ten-fold the catch over the areas surrounding these reefs. 2 Although...

  11. Signalling and Excess Returns from Venture Capital Backed Flotations 

    E-print Network

    Strang, J

    2001-01-01

    This paper examines the UK Venture Capital market with particular focus on the experiences of venture capitalist backed flotations. Management buy outs are focused upon, in particular to attempt to determine if recent ...

  12. Process development unit testing of microbubble flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Adel, G.T.; Luttrell, G.H.; Boron, D.J.; Yoon, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    Scale-up testing and modeling were the major efforts reported in the fourth Technical Progress Report. Work this past quarter focused primarily on modeling and preparation for Process Development Unit (PDU) operation. In addition, preliminary scale-up calculations were conducted along with a literature search for pertinent scale-up information in initiating work on the characterization of the PDU bubble generator. Much of the work remaining in this project now awaits completion of the PDU facility. Modeling work conducted this quarter involved modifications to the steady-state population balance model to include middlings particles and to account for bubble loading. Middlings particles were incorporated by expanding the model to include a third particle type that was one-half coal and one-half mineral matter. Bubble loading was included through changes in the flotation rate constant. 6 figs.

  13. Zircon-rutile-ilmenite froth flotation process

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, R.; Denham, D.L. Jr.

    1992-04-21

    This patent describes a method for separating a mixture of minerals comprising at least zircon, ilmenite and rutile. It comprises adding an acid solution to the mixture to acidify to a pH of between about 2.0 and 6.0; adding starch to the mixture to depress the ilmenite and the rutile; adding a source of fluoride ions to the mixture to provide a negative surface charge on the zircon surface to activate the zircon; adding an amine cationic collector to the mixture to float the activated zircon; subjecting the mixture containing the added acid solution, the fluoride ions, the starch and the cationic collector, to froth flotation; and withdrawing a float product comprising the zircon and a sink product comprising the ilmenite and rutile.

  14. ORE CONVEYANCE SYSTEM AND ADIT. LOOKING WEST. ORE FROM THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ORE CONVEYANCE SYSTEM AND ADIT. LOOKING WEST. ORE FROM THE MINES ABOVE AT THE RIDGELINE AND TO THE RIGHT WAS CONVEYED TO THIS AREA AND DUMPED INTO THE SHAFT AT CENTER. THIS SHAFT OPENS INTO THE ADIT AT BOTTOM CENTER. THERE IS ANOTHER SHAFT OPENING INTO THE ADIT JUST ABOVE THE ADIT BEHIND THE STONE WALL. THE ORE WAS LOADED INTO TRAM CARS INSIDE THE ADIT AND CONVEYED ON TRACKS TO THE TRESTLE LEADING TO THE PRIMARY ORE BIN AT THE TRAM TERMINAL. TRACKS CAN BE SEEN LEADING FROM THE ADIT AND TO THE LEFT. THE ORE WAS THEN DUMPED INTO A CHUTE AT THE END OF THE TRESTLE CARRYING IT INTO THE ORE BIN AT THE TRAM TERMINAL(SEE CHUTE ON CA-291-30). - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  15. Computer finds ore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    Artificial intelligence techniques are being used for the first time to evaluate geophysical, geochemical, and geologic data and theory in order to locate ore deposits. After several years of development, an intelligent computer code has been formulated and applied to the Mount Tolman area in Washington state. In a project funded by the United States Geological Survey and the National Science Foundation a set of computer programs, under the general title Prospector, was used successfully to locate a previously unknown ore-grade porphyry molybdenum deposit in the vicinity of Mount Tolman (Science, Sept. 3, 1982).The general area of the deposit had been known to contain exposures of porphyry mineralization. Between 1964 and 1978, exploration surveys had been run by the Bear Creek Mining Company, and later exploration was done in the area by the Amax Corporation. Some of the geophysical data and geochemical and other prospecting surveys were incorporated into the programs, and mine exploration specialists contributed to a set of rules for Prospector. The rules were encoded as ‘inference networks’ to form the ‘expert system’ on which the artificial intelligence codes were based. The molybdenum ore deposit discovered by the test is large, located subsurface, and has an areal extent of more than 18 km2.

  16. Postglacial fringing-reef to barrier-reef conversion on Tahiti links Darwin's reef types.

    PubMed

    Blanchon, Paul; Granados-Corea, Marian; Abbey, Elizabeth; Braga, Juan C; Braithwaite, Colin; Kennedy, David M; Spencer, Tom; Webster, Jody M; Woodroffe, Colin D

    2014-01-01

    In 1842 Charles Darwin claimed that vertical growth on a subsiding foundation caused fringing reefs to transform into barrier reefs then atolls. Yet historically no transition between reef types has been discovered and they are widely considered to develop independently from antecedent foundations during glacio-eustatic sea-level rise. Here we reconstruct reef development from cores recovered by IODP Expedition 310 to Tahiti, and show that a fringing reef retreated upslope during postglacial sea-level rise and transformed into a barrier reef when it encountered a Pleistocene reef-flat platform. The reef became stranded on the platform edge, creating a lagoon that isolated it from coastal sediment and facilitated a switch to a faster-growing coral assemblage dominated by acroporids. The switch increased the reef's accretion rate, allowing it to keep pace with rising sea level, and transform into a barrier reef. This retreat mechanism not only links Darwin's reef types, but explains the re-occupation of reefs during Pleistocene glacio-eustacy. PMID:24845540

  17. Kinetics of pyrochlore flotation from Araxá mineral deposits

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. F. Oliveira; S. M. Saraiva; J. S. Pimenta; A. P. A. Oliveira

    2001-01-01

    The niobium mineral deposits in Brazil account for more than 70% of the world's known reserves. Currently flotation of pyrochlore is carried out in the Araxá plant using amines as collector at low pH, in the presence of NaF as an activator and with the addition of a modifier.In the present work bench scale flotation kinetic testwork was conducted, aimed

  18. Cross flow cyclonic flotation column for coal and minerals beneficiation

    DOEpatents

    Lai, Ralph W. (Upper St. Clair, PA); Patton, Robert A. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and process for the separation of coal from pyritic impurities using a modified froth flotation system. The froth flotation column incorporates a helical track about the inner wall of the column in a region intermediate between the top and base of the column. A standard impeller located about the central axis of the column is used to generate a centrifugal force thereby increasing the separation efficiency of coal from the pyritic particles and hydrophillic tailings.

  19. Coal desulfurization by bacterial treatment and column flotation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kawatra, S.K. [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States)

    1994-06-01

    A review of the literature showed that bacterial leaching, using the microorganism Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, was a very effective technique for removing pyrite from coal, as it could dissolve even the finest pyrite particles without the need for expensive reagents or extreme processing conditions. Unfortunately, bacterial leaching is also rather slow, and so the initial goal of this research was to decrease the leaching time as much as possible. However, this still left the bacteria needing approximately a week to remove half of the pyritic sulfur, and so a faster technique was sought. Since it had been reported in the literature that T. ferrooxidans could be used to depress the flotation of pyrite during froth flotation of coal, this was investigated further. By studying the recovery mechanisms of coal-pyrite in froth flotation, it was found that pyrite was being recovered by entrainment and by locking to coal particles, not by true flotation of hydrophobic pyrite. Therefore, no pyrite depressant could be of any significant benefit for keeping pyrite out of the coal froth product, and it was much more important to prevent entrainment from occurring. Countercurrent flotation columns were invented to essentially eliminate entrainment effects, by washing the froth and reducing mixing of the froth and tailings products. Existing flotation columns tend to be quite simple, and in order to give reasonable product quality they must be very tall (typically 30--45 feet). As a result, they have difficulty in handling the high froth volumes which occur in coal flotation, and are awkward to install in existing plants. The bulk of this project therefore concentrated on developing an improved coal flotation column, and testing it under actual plant conditions.

  20. Flotation of blue-green algae using methylated egg ovalbumin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hideo Maruyama; Hideshi Seki; Akira Suzuki

    2009-01-01

    The removal of blue-green algae by dispersed gas flotation was conducted. Methylated ovalbumin (MeOA) was used as frother and flocculant, which is a biodegradable substance. The continuous flotation experiments were conducted at different feed mass flow rate of the blue-green algae cells and MeOA. The operating variables were the mass flow rate of blue-green algae cell and MeOA, the initial

  1. Investigation of foam flotation and phase partitioning techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currin, B. L.

    1985-01-01

    The present status of foam flotation as a separation process is evaluated and limitations for cells and proteins are determined. Possible applications of foam flotation to separations in microgravity are discussed. Application of the fluid mechanical aspects of foam separation techniques is made to phase partitioning in order to investigate the viscous drag forces that may effect the partitioning of cells in a two phase poly(ethylene glycol) and dextran system.

  2. Application of electrochemical investigation methods in high sulfur coal flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Hong; Ou Zeshen; Shi Xiuping; Shen Yanchun [China Univ. of Mining and Technology (China)

    1997-12-31

    More and more attention has been paid to sulfur dioxide pollution caused by coal burning. It is important that sulfur in coal should be reduced before combustion. Flotation is an important method for the removal of pyrite from high sulfur coal. Many chemicals have been tested as a pyrite depressant. In recent years many tests have been done in the laboratory on the flotation behavior of pyrite, and the results have confirmed that the hydrophobicity of the pyrite surface is dependent on the redox potential of the pulp. The mechanism and the reaction products on the pyrite surface are discussed under various conditions. And pyrite depression in coal flotation by electrochemical control are further studied on the basis of what has been achieved. There are two methods in electrochemical control: chemical reagent and control potential by electrochemical instrument (``control potential`` for short). This paper studies pyrite depression in coal flotation by electrochemical control. The influence of sulfur removal in coal flotation has been probed by chemical reagent and control potential. Experiment shows that at low pulp potential the pyrite flotation is generally suppressed. This is new, efficient and simple method of pyrite depression without environmental pollution. The following main conclusions can be drawn from this study: (1) The control of pulp potential can regulate and lead to electrochemical reaction of the hydrophobicity or hydrophilicity on the pyrite surface; and (2) The characteristics of electrochemical methods are normal atmospheric temperature, simple technological process and strong selection.

  3. Coral reef resilience through biodiversity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rogers, Caroline S.

    2013-01-01

    Irrefutable evidence of coral reef degradation worldwide and increasing pressure from rising seawater temperatures and ocean acidification associated with climate change have led to a focus on reef resilience and a call to “manage” coral reefs for resilience. Ideally, global action to reduce emission of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases will be accompanied by local action. Effective management requires reduction of local stressors, identification of the characteristics of resilient reefs, and design of marine protected area networks that include potentially resilient reefs. Future research is needed on how stressors interact, on how climate change will affect corals, fish, and other reef organisms as well as overall biodiversity, and on basic ecological processes such as connectivity. Not all reef species and reefs will respond similarly to local and global stressors. Because reef-building corals and other organisms have some potential to adapt to environmental changes, coral reefs will likely persist in spite of the unprecedented combination of stressors currently affecting them. The biodiversity of coral reefs is the basis for their remarkable beauty and for the benefits they provide to society. The extraordinary complexity of these ecosystems makes it both more difficult to predict their future and more likely they will have a future.

  4. Capitol Reef Petroglyphs

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    From about 300-1300 CE, ancestors of the Hopi Tribe, Pueblo of Zuni, and Paiute Tribe lived in Capitol Reef. They are known by various names-archeologists call them the Fremont Culture; the Hopi Tribe calls them the Hisatsinom, or the

  5. Castle in Capitol Reef

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A view of the Castle, a prominent sandstone formation in Capitol Reef National Park. This area, known as the Fruita, is made up of three primary layers. The bottom sandstone layer is known as the Moenkopi Formation and is about 245 million years old. The middle gray-green layer is known as the Chinl...

  6. Capitol Reef's Castle

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A view of the Castle, a prominent sandstone formation in Capitol Reef National Park. This area, known as the Fruita, is made up of three primary layers. The bottom sandstone layer is known as the Moenkopi Formation and is about 245 million years old. The middle gray-green layer is known as the Chinl...

  7. Petroglyphs in Captiol Reef

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    From about 300-1300 CE, ancestors of the Hopi Tribe, Pueblo of Zuni, and Paiute Tribe lived in Capitol Reef. They are known by various names-archeologists call them the Fremont Culture; the Hopi Tribe calls them the Hisatsinom, or the

  8. The Coral Reef Ecosystem

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2007-04-19

    Students examine a coral reef ecosystem to learn about its living and non-living parts and how they interact. They apply what they have learned to explore the world's biomes, including how the animals in each are adapted to their environment.

  9. Create a Coral Reef

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-06-26

    Educator Amy O'Donnell from the American Museum of Natural History guides learners to create a diorama of a coral reef. Learners will use craft skills to transform household materials into simulated brain coral, sea fans, sea anemones, and a sponge. This resource contains background information about coral and the use of dioramas in museums. Also includes extension ideas.

  10. Coral Reef Biological Criteria

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coral reefs worldwide are experiencing decline from a variety of stressors. Some important stressors are land-based sources of pollution and human activities in the coastal zone. However, few tools are available to offset the impact of these stressors. The Clean Water Act (CWA...

  11. CORAL REEF BIOCRITERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coral reefs worldwide are experiencing the greatest decline of their known existence and few tools are available to offset the growing impacts of human coastal and watershed activities. Biocriteria are a potentially effective means to evaluate and restore impaired waters, but are...

  12. 46 CFR 180.72 - Personal flotation devices carried in addition to life jackets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Personal flotation devices carried in addition to life jackets. 180.72 Section 180.72 Shipping...TONS) LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT AND ARRANGEMENTS Ring Life Buoys and Life Jackets § 180.72 Personal flotation devices...

  13. Role of the collecting agent sorption forms in the elementary act of flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Abramov, A.A. [Moscow State Mining University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2005-02-01

    A new hypothesis of flotation is substantiated based on the well-known hypotheses, theoretical analysis of the elementary act, and experimental results. The hypothesis presented allows the processes of flotation activation, depression, and intensification to be explained and optimized.

  14. 33 CFR 183.235 - Level flotation test without weights for persons capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Level flotation test without weights for persons...GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY...of More Than 2 Horsepower Tests § 183.235 Level flotation test without weights for...

  15. 33 CFR 183.335 - Level flotation test without weights for persons capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Level flotation test without weights for persons...GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY...Engines of 2 Horsepower or Less Tests § 183.335 Level flotation test without weights for...

  16. 33 CFR 183.335 - Level flotation test without weights for persons capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Level flotation test without weights for persons...GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY...Engines of 2 Horsepower or Less Tests § 183.335 Level flotation test without weights for...

  17. 33 CFR 183.235 - Level flotation test without weights for persons capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Level flotation test without weights for persons...GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY...of More Than 2 Horsepower Tests § 183.235 Level flotation test without weights for...

  18. 33 CFR 183.335 - Level flotation test without weights for persons capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Level flotation test without weights for persons...GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY...Engines of 2 Horsepower or Less Tests § 183.335 Level flotation test without weights for...

  19. 33 CFR 183.235 - Level flotation test without weights for persons capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Level flotation test without weights for persons...GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY...of More Than 2 Horsepower Tests § 183.235 Level flotation test without weights for...

  20. 33 CFR 183.235 - Level flotation test without weights for persons capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Level flotation test without weights for persons...GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY...of More Than 2 Horsepower Tests § 183.235 Level flotation test without weights for...

  1. 33 CFR 183.235 - Level flotation test without weights for persons capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Level flotation test without weights for persons...GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY...of More Than 2 Horsepower Tests § 183.235 Level flotation test without weights for...

  2. 33 CFR 183.335 - Level flotation test without weights for persons capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Level flotation test without weights for persons...GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY...Engines of 2 Horsepower or Less Tests § 183.335 Level flotation test without weights for...

  3. 33 CFR 183.335 - Level flotation test without weights for persons capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Level flotation test without weights for persons...GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY...Engines of 2 Horsepower or Less Tests § 183.335 Level flotation test without weights for...

  4. 46 CFR 117.72 - Personal flotation devices carried in addition to life jackets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Personal flotation devices carried in addition to life jackets. 117.72 Section 117.72 Shipping...PASSENGERS LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT AND ARRANGEMENTS Ring Life Buoys and Life Jackets § 117.72 Personal flotation devices...

  5. 46 CFR 180.72 - Personal flotation devices carried in addition to life jackets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Personal flotation devices carried in addition to life jackets. 180.72 Section 180.72 Shipping...TONS) LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT AND ARRANGEMENTS Ring Life Buoys and Life Jackets § 180.72 Personal flotation devices...

  6. Uranium Ore Uranium is extracted

    E-print Network

    Milling of Uranium Ore Uranium is extracted from ore with strong acids or bases. The uranium is concentrated in a solid substance called"yellowcake." Chemical Conversion Plants convert the uranium in yellowcake to uranium hexafluoride (UF6 ), a compound that can be made into nuclear fuel. Enrichment

  7. Coral Reef Protection: A Watershed Approach

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    EPA's home page on coral reef protection activities, including The International Coral Reef Initiative, and The Coral Reef Symposium. A tremendous resource for educators interested in coral reef basics through advanced topics such as coral reef ecology and legislation. Site includes peer-reviewed journal articles, factsheets, maps, and video. The Links section is packed with extensive coral reef information sites covering international and domestic initiatives, research, and even a section for kids and teachers.

  8. O-ring insertion tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zannini, Frank

    1991-09-01

    A tool for installing an O-ring in an inwardly facing O-ring groove in an electrical connection includes a guide shaft and a contact member slidably and rotatably received in the guide shaft. The guide shaft includes an elongated cylindrical shaft portion and a flared end portion on the shaft portion. The contact member includes an attachment portion for slidably and rotatably securing the contact member on the shaft portion and a contact finger on the attachment portion which extends in a direction toward the flared end portion of the guide shaft. The tool is operable by assembling an O-ring on the shaft portion between the flared end portion and the contact finger, inserting the flared end portion into a connection and then manipulating the contact member to advance the O-ring into an O-ring groove in the connector with the contact finger.

  9. An observational heat budget analysis of a coral reef, Heron Reef, Great Barrier Reef, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKellar, Mellissa C.; McGowan, Hamish A.; Phinn, Stuart R.

    2013-03-01

    Measurements of the surface energy balance, the structure and evolution of the convective atmospheric reef layer (CARL), and local meteorology and hydrodynamics were made during June 2009 and February 2010 at Heron Reef, Australia, to establish the relative partitioning of heating within the water and atmosphere. Horizontal advection was shown to moderate temperature in the CARL and the water, having a cooling influence on the atmosphere, and providing an additional source or sink of energy to the water overlying the reef, depending on tide. The key driver of atmospheric heating was surface sensible heat flux, while heating of the reef water was primarily due to solar radiation, and thermal conduction and convection from the reef substrate. Heating and cooling processes were more defined during winter due to higher sensible and latent heat fluxes and strong diurnal evolution of the CARL. Sudden increases in water temperature were associated with inundation of warmer oceanic water during the flood tide, particularly in winter due to enhanced nocturnal cooling of water overlying the reef. Similarly, cooling of the water over the reef occurred during the ebb tide as heat was transported off the reef to the surrounding ocean. While these results are the first to shed light on the heat budget of a coral reef and overlying CARL, longer-term, systematic measurements of reef thermal budgets are needed under a range of meteorological and hydrodynamic conditions, and across various reef types to elucidate the influence on larger-scale oceanic and atmospheric processes. This is essential for understanding the role of coral reefs in tropical and sub-tropical meteorology; the physical processes that take place during coral bleaching events, and coral and algal community dynamics on coral reefs.

  10. USGS Pacific Coral Reefs Website

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This gateway provides access to United States Geological Survey (USGS) studies of coral reefs in the Pacific Ocean, especially in the Hawaiian Islands where efforts are are focused on mapping, monitoring, remote sensing, sediment transport studies, and collection of tide, wave, and current data from remote stations. Materials include basic facts about coral reefs, an overview of the risks and threats to reefs, news items, and links to publications and other related organizations. Separate pages describe the individual projects, including mapping of the reefs, efforts to monitor changes on the reefs (the Coral Reef Assessment and Monitoring Program (CRAMP)), and studies of sedimentation and sediment transport. There is also an interactive map showing the locations of the study areas.

  11. Oceanic forcing of coral reefs.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Ryan J; Falter, James L

    2015-01-01

    Although the oceans play a fundamental role in shaping the distribution and function of coral reefs worldwide, a modern understanding of the complex interactions between ocean and reef processes is still only emerging. These dynamics are especially challenging owing to both the broad range of spatial scales (less than a meter to hundreds of kilometers) and the complex physical and biological feedbacks involved. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of these processes, ranging from the small-scale mechanics of flow around coral communities and their influence on nutrient exchange to larger, reef-scale patterns of wave- and tide-driven circulation and their effects on reef water quality and perceived rates of metabolism. We also examine regional-scale drivers of reefs such as coastal upwelling, internal waves, and extreme disturbances such as cyclones. Our goal is to show how a wide range of ocean-driven processes ultimately shape the growth and metabolism of coral reefs. PMID:25251270

  12. Evaluation of reef shell embankment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melancon, J. L.; Bokun, S. G.

    1980-12-01

    A method of constructing an embankment over marshland soils by end-dumping reef shell directly onto the marshland with no other major subgrade preparation is discussed. The dumped reef shell is then spread out to form a 'floating' embankment over the soft marshland. The subsidence characteristics of a reef shell embankment are compared with those of a clam shell embankment to determine if such a reef shell embankment would provide adequate structural support for traffic. Results show it is physically and economically feasible to construct a reef shell embankment on soft organic marshland soils. A properly constructed reef shell embankment develops into a homogeneous floating slab of substantial stability and strength capable of supporting allowable traffic loads.

  13. The Effect of Copper Bearing Particles Liberation on Copper Recovery from Smelter Slag by Flotation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zoran M. Stirbanovic; Zoran S. Markovic

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we have presented the results of our study. We have investigated the impact of liberation of copper bearing particles on recovery of copper in the flotation process. Tests have shown that grinding of material highly impacts the recovery rate in the flotation process. Results of flotation of smelter slag samples with different contents of grain size fraction

  14. Use of RO and NF for treatment of copper containing wastewaters in combination with flotation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. S. Sudilovskiy; G. G. Kagramanov; V. A. Kolesnikov

    2008-01-01

    The process of so-called membrane flotation can be used in combination with NF\\/RO techniques for treatment of wastewaters containing copper and other heavy metals to decrease the environmental risks. Microporous inorganic membranes are used in membrane flotation process as diffusers for air sparging. Various ways of combination of flotation and membrane filtration in cationic wastewater treatment practice are discussed. With

  15. Coral Reefs in Hot Water

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-08-03

    In this activity, student teams identify the locations of coral reefs around the world, examine infrared satellite images of the Earth, and research the impacts that are threatening the survival of coral reefs. Each team creates a short oral presentation describing the coral reef they have researched. Students then plot on a composite map the locations where coral bleaching is occurring. Student worksheets, a teacher guide, and assessment rubric are included. This activity is part of Coastal Areas: Coral Reefs in Hot Water, part of the lesson series, The Potential Consequences of Climate Variability and Change.

  16. Millenium Coral Reefs Landsat Archive

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Users can access remote imagery of coral reefs by clicking on an interactive world map. The imagery consists of tiled mosaics which can be zoomed, panned, and downloaded. This archive of coral reef images is part of a project whose purpose is to develop global reef maps as a base for future research. It was created in a partnership with NASA, international agencies, universities and other organizations to provide natural resource managers a comprehensive world data resource on coral reefs and adjacent land areas.

  17. Digital Reef Rugosity Estimates Coral Reef Habitat Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Dustan, Phillip; Doherty, Orla; Pardede, Shinta

    2013-01-01

    Ecological habitats with greater structural complexity contain more species due to increased niche diversity. This is especially apparent on coral reefs where individual coral colonies aggregate to give a reef its morphology, species zonation, and three dimensionality. Structural complexity is classically measured with a reef rugosity index, which is the ratio of a straight line transect to the distance a flexible chain of equal length travels when draped over the reef substrate; yet, other techniques from visual categories to remote sensing have been used to characterize structural complexity at scales from microhabitats to reefscapes. Reef-scale methods either lack quantitative precision or are too time consuming to be routinely practical, while remotely sensed indices are mismatched to the finer scale morphology of coral colonies and reef habitats. In this communication a new digital technique, Digital Reef Rugosity (DRR) is described which utilizes a self-contained water level gauge enabling a diver to quickly and accurately characterize rugosity with non-invasive millimeter scale measurements of coral reef surface height at decimeter intervals along meter scale transects. The precise measurements require very little post-processing and are easily imported into a spreadsheet for statistical analyses and modeling. To assess its applicability we investigated the relationship between DRR and fish community structure at four coral reef sites on Menjangan Island off the northwest corner of Bali, Indonesia and one on mainland Bali to the west of Menjangan Island; our findings show a positive relationship between DRR and fish diversity. Since structural complexity drives key ecological processes on coral reefs, we consider that DRR may become a useful quantitative community-level descriptor to characterize reef complexity. PMID:23437380

  18. Intensification of flotation treatment by exposure to vibration.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, M V; Ksenofontov, B S

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, an intensification of wastewater flotation treatment by exposure to vibration is studied. Exposure to vibration results in the decrease of air bubble size, increase of air flow through the aerator and more even dispersion of air bubbles in water. This intensifies the aeration process, thus significantly improving the treatment efficiency. A multistage model of flotation kinetics has been applied in order to take into consideration the effects of vibration. The model gives a thorough explanation of the flotation process with consideration of 'air bubble - contaminant particle' aggregate formation. A large series of experiments was conducted with paint and varnish industry wastewaters. It is shown that vibroflotation results in an increase of treatment efficiency by up to three times. A comparison of the experimental data with the results of mathematical modeling is presented, showing a good correlation of theoretical and experimental results. PMID:24718333

  19. Coral Reefs on the Edge? Carbon Chemistry on Inshore Reefs of the Great Barrier Reef

    PubMed Central

    Uthicke, Sven; Furnas, Miles; Lřnborg, Christian

    2014-01-01

    While increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration alters global water chemistry (Ocean Acidification; OA), the degree of changes vary on local and regional spatial scales. Inshore fringing coral reefs of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) are subjected to a variety of local pressures, and some sites may already be marginal habitats for corals. The spatial and temporal variation in directly measured parameters: Total Alkalinity (TA) and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentration, and derived parameters: partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2); pH and aragonite saturation state (?ar) were measured at 14 inshore reefs over a two year period in the GBR region. Total Alkalinity varied between 2069 and 2364 µmol kg?1 and DIC concentrations ranged from 1846 to 2099 µmol kg?1. This resulted in pCO2 concentrations from 340 to 554 µatm, with higher values during the wet seasons and pCO2 on inshore reefs distinctly above atmospheric values. However, due to temperature effects, ?ar was not further reduced in the wet season. Aragonite saturation on inshore reefs was consistently lower and pCO2 higher than on GBR reefs further offshore. Thermodynamic effects contribute to this, and anthropogenic runoff may also contribute by altering productivity (P), respiration (R) and P/R ratios. Compared to surveys 18 and 30 years ago, pCO2 on GBR mid- and outer-shelf reefs has risen at the same rate as atmospheric values (?1.7 µatm yr?1) over 30 years. By contrast, values on inshore reefs have increased at 2.5 to 3 times higher rates. Thus, pCO2 levels on inshore reefs have disproportionately increased compared to atmospheric levels. Our study suggests that inshore GBR reefs are more vulnerable to OA and have less buffering capacity compared to offshore reefs. This may be caused by anthropogenically induced trophic changes in the water column and benthos of inshore reefs subjected to land runoff. PMID:25295864

  20. In-plant testing of microbubble column flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Luttrell, G.H.; Adel, G.T.; Mankosa, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    During the past year, a joint project between the US Department of Energy (DOE), the Virginia Center for Coal and Minerals Processing (VCCMP) and the Shell Mining Corporation (SMC) was initiated to implement the testing of a full-scale microbubble flotation column. The work is being carried out at the Marrowbone Preparation Plant, located near Naugatuck in southwestern West Virginia. The primary objective of this effort was to determine the feasibility of using microbubble column flotation for the recovery of coal fines from a classifying cyclone overflow stream that is presently being discarded as refuse.

  1. Separation of germanium from lead in solutions by flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Zoumboulis, A.I.; Matis, K.A.; Lazaridis, N.K. (Univ. of Thessaloniki (Greece))

    1990-04-01

    Flotation of lead as the hydroxide by dodecylamine (in ethanolic solution) proved to be an effective separation method from germanium ions. The experiments were carried out in dilute aqueous solutions of pH 10, on a laboratory scale, and at different concentration ratios. Germanium was further concentrated as a second stage by flotation by using pyrogallol as the activator and dodecylamine as the collector at pH 7. The latter technique was found to float both germanium and lead ions from solution. Germanium separation and its scale-up is discussed.

  2. Ore metals through geologic history.

    PubMed

    Meyer, C

    1985-03-22

    The ores of chromite, nickel, copper, and zinc show a wide distribution over geologic time, but those of iron, titanium, lead, uranium, gold, silver, molybdenum, tungsten, and tin are more restricted. Many of the limitations to specific time intervals are probably imposed by the evolving tectonic history of Earth interacting with the effects of the biomass on the evolution of the earth's s surface chemistry. Photosynthetic generation of free oxygen and "carbon" contributes significantlly to the diversity of redox potentials in both sedimentary and igneous-related processes of ore formation, influencing the selection of metals at the source, during transport, and at the site of ore deposition. PMID:17777763

  3. Method for enhancing selectivity and recovery in the fractional flotation of particles in a flotation column

    DOEpatents

    Klunder, Edgar B. (Bethel Park, PA)

    2011-08-09

    The method relates to particle separation from a feed stream. The feed stream is injected directly into the froth zone of a vertical flotation column in the presence of a counter-current reflux stream. A froth breaker generates a reflux stream and a concentrate stream, and the reflux stream is injected into the froth zone to mix with the interstitial liquid between bubbles in the froth zone. Counter-current flow between the plurality of bubbles and the interstitial liquid facilitates the attachment of higher hydrophobicity particles to bubble surfaces as lower hydrophobicity particles detach. The height of the feed stream injection and the reflux ratio may be varied in order to optimize the concentrate or tailing stream recoveries desired based on existing operating conditions.

  4. Sandstone Cliffs in Capitol Reef

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Sandstone cliffs in Capitol Reef National Park. Capitol Reef is primarily made up of sandstone formations within the Waterpocket Fold, monocline that extends nearly 100 miles. A monocline is a step-like fold in rock strata that can resemble an enormous wrinkle in the earth....

  5. Sandstone Cliff in Capitol Reef

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A sandstone cliff in Capitol Reef National Park. Capitol Reef is primarily made up of sandstone formations within the Waterpocket Fold, monocline that extends nearly 100 miles. A monocline is a step-like fold in rock strata that can resemble an enormous wrinkle in the earth....

  6. Sandstone Monolith in Capitol Reef

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A sandstone monolith in Capitol Reef National Park. Capitol Reef is primarily made up of sandstone formations within the Waterpocket Fold, monocline that extends nearly 100 miles. A monocline is a step-like fold in rock strata that can resemble an enormous wrinkle in the earth....

  7. Perspectives in coral reef hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearn, Clifford J.

    2011-06-01

    Some developments in coral reef hydrodynamics over the last decade are reviewed with an overview of papers in this special issue. Advances in hydrodynamics based on improved understanding of topographic complexity are illustrated for the reef at Kilo Nalu Observatory and Kaneohe Bay (both in Hawaii). Models of the roughness layer are discussed as a background to numerical models of reef hydrodynamics for Molokai and Guam. Topographic complexity produces spatial temperature variability over reefs creating thermal microclimates which are reported in this issue for the Red Sea. Uptake of ocean nutrients by reefs is controlled by hydrodynamics, and papers in this issue show its critical role in the ecology of a fringing reef at La Réunion Island; nutrient uptake rates are discussed here using new data for Hearn Roughness and Decadal Rugosity. The role of upwelled water by large amplitude internal waves on reefs is reported for the Similan Islands, providing major new evidence for the role of hydrodynamics in the ecology of reefs and its importance to climate change. The review suggests some important areas for new research including simulated corals used in flumes and the field. Major new modeling based on measured roughness maps combined with small scale lattice Boltzmann simulations should be possible in the next decade.

  8. Keeping Watch on Coral Reefs

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    NOAA Ocean Service Education

    This activity identifies and explains the benefits of and threats to coral reef systems. Students read tutorials, describe the role of satellites, analyze oceanographic data and identify actions that can be undertaken to reduce or eliminate threats to coral reefs. As a culminating activity, students prepare a public education program.

  9. Coral reefs and carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Buddemeier, R.W. [Kansas Geological Survey, Lawrence, KS (United States)

    1996-03-01

    This commentary argues the conclusion from a previous article, which investigates diurnal changes in carbon dioxide partial pressure and community metabolism on coral reefs, that coral `reefs might serve as a sink, not a source, for atmospheric carbon dioxide.` Commentaries from two groups are given along with the response by the original authors, Kayanne et al. 27 refs.

  10. Microbial reduction of iron ore

    DOEpatents

    Hoffmann, M.R.; Arnold, R.G.; Stephanopoulos, G.

    1989-11-14

    A process is provided for reducing iron ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of iron ore, microorganisms operable for reducing the ferric iron of the iron ore to ferrous iron, and a substrate operable as an energy source for the microbial reduction; and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the reduction of the ore. Preferably the microorganism is Pseudomonas sp. 200 and the reduction conducted anaerobically with a domestic wastewater as the substrate. An aqueous solution containing soluble ferrous iron can be separated from the reacted mixture, treated with a base to precipitate ferrous hydroxide which can then be recovered as a concentrated slurry. 11 figs.

  11. Microbial reduction of iron ore

    DOEpatents

    Hoffmann, Michael R. (Pasadena, CA); Arnold, Robert G. (Pasadena, CA); Stephanopoulos, Gregory (Pasadena, CA)

    1989-01-01

    A process is provided for reducing iron ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of iron ore, microorganisms operable for reducing the ferric iron of the iron ore to ferrous iron, and a substrate operable as an energy source for the microbial reduction; and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the reduction of the ore. Preferably the microorganism is Pseudomonas sp. 200 and the reduction conducted anaerobically with a domestic wastewater as the substrate. An aqueous solution containing soluble ferrous iron can be separated from the reacted mixture, treated with a base to precipitate ferrous hydroxide which can then be recovered as a concentrated slurry.

  12. Functional versatility supports coral reef biodiversity

    E-print Network

    Wainwright, Peter C.

    Functional versatility supports coral reef biodiversity D. R. Bellwood1,*, P. C. Wainwright2 , C. J. Fulton1 and A. S. Hoey1 1 Department of Marine Biology, Centre for Coral Reef Biodiversity, James Cook of high biodiversity on coral reefs. Keywords: coral reef fishes; specialist; generalist; functional

  13. REMOVAL OF HUMICSUBSTANCES AND ALGAE BY DISSOLVED AIR FLOTATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dissolved air flotation (DAF) is used in place of conventional gravity settling as a means to separate low density floc particles from water. The following objectives were: (1) to compare DAF to conventional water treatment of coagulation-flocculation followed by gravity settling...

  14. Froth mean residence time measurement in industrial flotation cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Yianatos; L. Bergh; K. Tello; F. Díaz; A. Villanueva

    2008-01-01

    Froth plays an important role in flotation processes preventing the pulp transport to the concentrate (short-circuit). Thus, it contributes to increasing the concentrate grade by gravity drainage of entrained particles, back into the pulp. Key parameters affecting the froth performance are the mean residence times of solids, liquid and gas in the froth. The froth mean residence time depends on

  15. Coal surface control for advanced fine coal flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerstenau, D.W.; Sastry, K.V.S.; Hanson, J.S.; Harris, G.; Sotillo, F.; Diao, J. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA)); Somasundaran, P.; Harris, C.C.; Vasudevan, T.; Liu, D.; Li, C. (Columbia Univ., New York, NY (USA)); Hu, Weibai; Zou, Y.; Chen, W. (Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (USA)); Choudhry, V.; Sehgal, R.; Ghosh, A. (Praxis Engineers, Inc., Milpitas, CA (USA))

    1990-08-15

    The primary objective of this research project is to develop advanced flotation methods for coal cleaning in order to achieve near total pyritic-sulfur removal at 90% Btu recovery, using coal samples procured from six major US coal seams. Concomitantly, the ash content of these coals is to be reduced to 6% or less. Work this quarter concentrated on the following: washability studies, which included particle size distribution of the washability samples, and chemical analysis of washability test samples; characterization studies of induction time measurements, correlation between yield, combustible-material recovery (CMR), and heating-value recovery (HVR), and QA/QC for standard flotation tests and coal analyses; surface modification and control including testing of surface-modifying reagents, restoration of hydrophobicity to lab-oxidized coals, pH effects on coal flotation, and depression of pyritic sulfur in which pyrite depression with calcium cyanide and pyrite depression with xanthated reagents was investigated; flotation optimization and circuitry included staged reagent addition, cleaning and scavenging, and scavenging and middling recycling. Weathering studies are also discussed. 19 figs., 28 tabs.

  16. 33 CFR 183.105 - Quantity of flotation required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2) A weight that, when submerged, equals 25 percent of the dead weight; and (3) A weight in pounds that, when submerged...used for flotation. (b) For the purpose of this section, “dead weight” means the maximum weight capacity marked on the...

  17. 33 CFR 183.105 - Quantity of flotation required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2) A weight that, when submerged, equals 25 percent of the dead weight; and (3) A weight in pounds that, when submerged...used for flotation. (b) For the purpose of this section, “dead weight” means the maximum weight capacity marked on the...

  18. 33 CFR 183.105 - Quantity of flotation required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2) A weight that, when submerged, equals 25 percent of the dead weight; and (3) A weight in pounds that, when submerged...used for flotation. (b) For the purpose of this section, “dead weight” means the maximum weight capacity marked on the...

  19. Overview of flotation as a wastewater treatment technique

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J Rubio; M. L Souza; R. W Smith

    2002-01-01

    The treatment of aqueous or oily effluents is one of the most serious environmental issues faced by the minerals and metallurgy industries. Main pollutants are residual reagents, powders, chemicals, metal ions, oils, organic and some may be valuable (Au, Pt, Ag). The use of flotation is showing a great potential due to the high throughput of modern equipment, low sludge

  20. Removal of metal ions from dilute solutions by sorptive flotation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. I. Zouboulis; K. A. Matis

    1997-01-01

    The removal of soluble ionic species, such as toxic metal cations or oxyanions, from dilute aqueous solutions, as most waste waters are, was investigated in laboratory?scale experiments (batch and continuous mode) by applying the sorptive flotation process. This method involves the preliminary abstraction or scavenging of metal ions using proper “sorbents”, which exist at the fine or ultrafine particle?size range,

  1. Studies of inorganic nanoparticles as collectors for flotation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Behnam Naderizand

    2011-01-01

    The goal of my work was to synthesize an appropriate inorganic nanoparticle as a collector for flotation of glass beads and also to prepare thin films of nickel sulfide. The first step was preparing a very uniform thin layer of nickel sulfide for model adhesion studies. The method employed was successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR). The characterization experiments

  2. Alternative Flotation Techniques for Wastewater Treatment: Focus on Electroflotation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. A. Matis; E. N. Peleka

    2010-01-01

    During the last decades (dissolved-air) flotation has found several applications in water and wastewater treatment. Flocculation is generally required in advance for a satisfactory separation and a membrane process is often applied downstream. Examples from the literature given in the present review include heavy metals, textile dyes, food, paper industry, oily effluents, laundry wastewaters, sludge etc. and are accompanied by

  3. Engineering development of advanced froth flotation. Volume 2, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ferris, D.D.; Bencho, J.R.; Torak, E.R. [ICF Kaiser Engineers, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    This report is an account of findings related to the Engineering and Development of Advanced Froth Flotation project. The results from benchscale and proof-of-concept (POC) level testing are presented and the important results from this testing are used to refine a conceptual design and cost estimate for a 20 TPH Semi-Works Facility incorporating the final proposed technology.

  4. Selective flotation of fossil resin from western coal

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, G.F.; Miller, J.D.

    1992-03-20

    The test program has demonstrated that: (1) technically, the new flotation technologies discovered at the University of Utah and then improved upon by Advanced Processing Technologies, Inc. provide a highly efficient means to selectively recover fossil resin from coal. The proof-of-concept continuous flotation circuit resulted in fossil resin recovery with the same separation efficiency as was obtained from laboratory bench-scale testing (more than 80% recovery at about 80% concentrate grade); and (2) economically, the selective flotation process has been shown to be sufficiently profitable to justify the development of a fossil resin industry based on this new flotation process. The proof-of-concept testing has resulted in significant interest from several coal mining companies and has sparked the desire of local and state government to establish a fossil resin industry in the Wasatch Plateau coal field. In this view, the results from the current proof-of-concept testing program have been successful. This special report provides theoretical and analytical data on some surface chemistry work pertinent to fossil resin characterization, and other efforts carried out during the past months.

  5. Surface chemistry control for selective fossil resin flotation

    DOEpatents

    Miller, J.D.; Yi, Y.; Yu, Q.

    1994-06-07

    A froth flotation method is disclosed for separating fine particles of fossil resin by use of frothing reagents which include an aliphatic organic compound having a polar group and containing not more than four carbon atoms. Butanol is an effective frothing reagent in this method. 12 figs.

  6. Preparation of clean coal by flotation following ultra fine liberation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ljudmilla Bokányi; Barnabás Csöke

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports the results of current fundamental research at the Department of Process Engineering, University of Miskolc on the processing of clean coal from Mecsek bituminous coal, Southern Hungary. The theoretical possibility of the separation of different petrographic components was proven experimentally and their liberation degree was determined based on the petrographic composition, flotation kinetic study of isolated components

  7. Self-generated morphology in lagoon reefs

    PubMed Central

    Hamblin, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    The three-dimensional form of a coral reef develops through interactions and feedbacks between its constituent organisms and their environment. Reef morphology therefore contains a potential wealth of ecological information, accessible if the relationships between morphology and ecology can be decoded. Traditionally, reef morphology has been attributed to external controls such as substrate topography or hydrodynamic influences. Little is known about inherent reef morphology in the absence of external control. Here we use reef growth simulations, based on observations in the cellular reefs of Western Australia’s Houtman Abrolhos Islands, to show that reef morphology is fundamentally determined by the mechanical behaviour of the reef-building organisms themselves—specifically their tendency to either remain in place or to collapse. Reef-building organisms that tend to remain in place, such as massive and encrusting corals or coralline algae, produce nodular reefs, whereas those that tend to collapse, such as branching Acropora, produce cellular reefs. The purest reef growth forms arise in sheltered lagoons dominated by a single type of reef builder, as in the branching Acropora-dominated lagoons of the Abrolhos. In these situations reef morphology can be considered a phenotype of the predominant reef building organism. The capacity to infer coral type from reef morphology can potentially be used to identify and map specific coral habitat in remotely sensed images. More generally, identifying ecological mechanisms underlying other examples of self-generated reef morphology can potentially improve our understanding of present-day reef ecology, because any ecological process capable of shaping a reef will almost invariably be an important process in real time on the living reef. PMID:26175962

  8. Self-generated morphology in lagoon reefs.

    PubMed

    Blakeway, David; Hamblin, Michael G

    2015-01-01

    The three-dimensional form of a coral reef develops through interactions and feedbacks between its constituent organisms and their environment. Reef morphology therefore contains a potential wealth of ecological information, accessible if the relationships between morphology and ecology can be decoded. Traditionally, reef morphology has been attributed to external controls such as substrate topography or hydrodynamic influences. Little is known about inherent reef morphology in the absence of external control. Here we use reef growth simulations, based on observations in the cellular reefs of Western Australia's Houtman Abrolhos Islands, to show that reef morphology is fundamentally determined by the mechanical behaviour of the reef-building organisms themselves-specifically their tendency to either remain in place or to collapse. Reef-building organisms that tend to remain in place, such as massive and encrusting corals or coralline algae, produce nodular reefs, whereas those that tend to collapse, such as branching Acropora, produce cellular reefs. The purest reef growth forms arise in sheltered lagoons dominated by a single type of reef builder, as in the branching Acropora-dominated lagoons of the Abrolhos. In these situations reef morphology can be considered a phenotype of the predominant reef building organism. The capacity to infer coral type from reef morphology can potentially be used to identify and map specific coral habitat in remotely sensed images. More generally, identifying ecological mechanisms underlying other examples of self-generated reef morphology can potentially improve our understanding of present-day reef ecology, because any ecological process capable of shaping a reef will almost invariably be an important process in real time on the living reef. PMID:26175962

  9. The International Coral Reef Information Network

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    International Coral Reef Action Network (ICRAN)

    This extensive site was originally created to support coral reef conservation by the International Coral Reef Initiative (ICRI). The site serves to provide general coral reef information, tools and resources, and a central coral reef communications and network hub. The site also provides a library which houses descriptions of brochures, books, videos and other items suitable for coral reef awareness and education efforts. Some publications are available for download directly from this site, while others are available for purchase.

  10. An Advanced Control System For Fine Coal Flotation

    SciTech Connect

    G. H. Luttrell; G. T. Adel

    1998-08-25

    A model-based flotation control scheme is being implemented to achieve optimal performance in the handling and treatment of fine coal. The control scheme monitors flotation performance through on-line analysis of ash content. Then, based on the economic and metallurgical performance of the circuit, variables such as collector dosage, frother dosage, and pulp level are adjusted using model-based control algorithms to compensate for feed variations and other process disturbances. Recent developments in sensor technology are being applied for on-line determination of slurry ash content. During the ninth quarter of this project, Task 3 (Model Building and Computer Simulation) and Task 4 (Sensor Testing) were nearly completed, and Task 6 (Equipment Procurement and Installation) was initiated. Previously, data collected from the plant sampling campaign (Task 2) were used to construct a population balance model to describe the steady-state and dynamic behavior of the flotation circuit. The details of this model were presented in the Eighth Quarterly Technical Progress Report. During the past quarter, a flotation circuit simulator was designed and used to evaluate control strategies. As a result of this work, a model-based control strategy has been conceived which will allow manipulated variables to be adjusted in response to disturbances to achieve a target incremental ash value in the last cell of the bank. This will, in effect, maximize yield at an acceptable product quality. During this same period, a video-based ash analyzer was installed on the flotation tailings stream at the Moss No. 3 preparation plant. A preliminary calibration curve was established, and data are continuing to be collected in order to improve the calibration of the analyzer.

  11. Two types of ore-bearing mafic complexes of the Early Proterozoic East-Scandinavian LIP and their ore potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrofanov, Felix; Zhirov, Dmitry; Bayanova, Tamara; Korchagin, Alexey; Chaschin, Victor

    2015-04-01

    Two types of the ore-bearing mafic complexes are allotted in the East-Scandinavian large igneous province (LIP). They differ in geodynamic setting, structure, isotope geochemistry, petrology and mineralogy. The PGE-bearing mafic-ultramafic layered intrusions are associated with the first complex. They have been formed at an initial (pre-rift) stage of LIP. Features of origin of this complex are: 1) large-scale, protracted, and multiple episodes of deep mantle plume or asthenosphere upwelling; 2) the vast non-subduction-type basaltic magma in an intraplate continental setting; 3) low-sulfide Pt-Pd (with Ni, Cu, Au, Co and Rh) mineralization in different geological setting (reef- and contact type etc.); 4) anomalously high concentrations of PGEs in the bulk sulfides, inferred platinum distribution coefficient between silicate and sulfide melts of >100000. Deep mantle magma source is enriched in ore components (fertile source) and lithophile elements. It is reflected in the isotope indicators such as ?Nd(T) from -1 to -3, ISr(87Sr/86Sr) from 0.702 to 0.704, 3??/4?? = (10 ^-5 ÷ 10 ^-6). Magma and ore sources differ from those of Mid-Ocean Ridge basalts (MORB), subduction-related magma but are similar to EM-I. Ore-bearing mafic complexes formed during a long period of time and by different episodes (2490±10 Ma; 2470±10 Ma; 2450±10 Ma; 2400±10 Ma), and by mixing between the boninitic an anorthositic magmas. It is known about 10 deposits and occurrences in Kola region with total reserves and resources about 2000 tons in palladium equivalent (with an average content ?2-3 ppm). Intrusions with the rich sulfide Ni-Cu ore (with Co and poor PGE) are associated with the second mafic complex. Ore-controlling mafic-ultramafic intrusions are formed at a final stage of the intracontinental rifting of the Transitional period (2200-1980 Ma). Initial magma is depleted and similar to the MORB in terms of rare earths distribution. Enriched ferropicritic Fe-Ti derivatives of magma generate single volcano-plutonic rock series. For intrusive ore bodies rock differentiation with the formation of syngenetic wehrlite-clinopyroxenite-gabbro- orthoclase gabbro sequence is typical. Upper mantle source of the depleted magma is characterized by the following isotope indicators: ?Nd(T) +0.5 to +4, ISr= 87Sr/86Sr 0.703-0.704. Ore-bearing intrusive bodies are injected in the upper part of the Early Palaeoproterozoic volcano-sedimentary cross-section. Ores are located in the basement of intrusions and in the redeposited veined bodies, including offset setting. Numerous Ni-Cu deposits with total reserves and resources of several million tons of Nickel equivalent (with an average grade ? 0,3%) have been explored, and some of them now is mining. As a result of our research, the complex of indicators and criteria is suggested for predicting the occurrence, for regional exploration target selection and for regional resource evaluation of PGE and base metals. The studies are supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (project nos. 13-05-12055).

  12. Benthic community composition on submerged reefs in the central Great Barrier Reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, T. E.; Moloney, J. M.; Sweatman, H. P. A.; Bridge, T. C. L.

    2015-06-01

    Community dynamics on coral reefs are often examined only in relatively shallow waters, which are most vulnerable to many disturbances. The Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area (GBRWHA) includes extensive submerged reefs that do not approach sea level and are within depths that support many coral reef taxa that also occur in shallow water. However, the composition of benthic communities on submerged reefs in the GBRWHA is virtually unknown. We examined spatial patterns in benthic community composition on 13 submerged reefs in the central Great Barrier Reef (GBR) at depths of 10-30 m. We show that benthic communities on submerged reefs include similar species groups to those on neighbouring emergent reefs. The spatial distribution of species groups was well explained by depth and cross-shelf gradients that are well-known determinants of community composition on emergent reefs. Many equivalent species groups occurred at greater depths on submerged reefs, likely due to variability in the hydrodynamic environment among reef morphologies. Hard coral cover and species richness were lowest at the shallowest depth (6 m) on emergent reefs and were consistently higher on submerged reefs for any given depth. These results suggest that disturbances are less frequent on submerged reefs, but evidence that a severe tropical cyclone in 2011 caused significant damage to shallow regions of more exposed submerged reefs demonstrates that they are not immune. Our results confirm that submerged reefs in the central GBR support extensive and diverse coral assemblages that deserve greater attention in ecosystem assessments and management decisions.

  13. Mooring tension and motion characteristics of a submerged fish reef with net in waves and currents using numerical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae Ho; Fredriksson, David W.; DeCew, Judson

    2012-06-01

    A numerical model was used to analyze the motion response and mooring tension of a submerged fish reef system. The system included a net attached to a rigid structure suspended up from the bottom with a single, high tension mooring by fixed flotation. The analysis was performed by using a Morison equation type finite element model configured with truss elements. Input forcing parameters into the model consisted of both regular and irregular waves, with and without a steady current. Heave, surge and pitch dynamic calculations of the reef structure were made. Tension response results of the attached mooring line were also computed. Results were analyzed in both the time and frequency domain in which appropriate, linear transfer functions were calculated. The influence of the current was more evident in the tension and heave motion response data. This is most likely the result of the large buoyancy characteristics of the reef structure and the length of the mooring cable. Maximum mooring component tension was found to be 13.9 kN and occurred when the reef was subjected to irregular waves with a co-linear current of 1.0 m/s velocity. The results also showed that the system had little damping (in heave) with damped natural periods of 2.8 s. This combination of system characteristics promotes a possible resonating situation in typical open sea conditions with similar wave periods.

  14. Sandstone Formations in Capitol Reef

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Capitol Reef is primarily made up of sandstone formations within the Waterpocket Fold, monocline that extends nearly 100 miles. A monocline is a step-like fold in rock strata that can resemble an enormous wrinkle in the earth....

  15. Artificial Reefs and Ocean Dumping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glueck, Richard D.

    1983-01-01

    Activities and instructional strategies for two multigrade lessons are provided. Activity objectives include describing an artificial reef (such as a sunken ocean liner) as an ecosystem, knowing animal types in the ecosystem, and describing a food web. (JN)

  16. Fish assemblages on estuarine artificial reefs: natural rocky-reef mimics or discrete assemblages?

    PubMed

    Folpp, Heath; Lowry, Michael; Gregson, Marcus; Suthers, Iain M

    2014-01-01

    If the primary goal of artificial reef construction is the creation of additional reef habitat that is comparable to adjacent natural rocky-reef, then performance should be evaluated using simultaneous comparisons with adjacent natural habitats. Using baited remote underwater video (BRUV) fish assemblages on purpose-built estuarine artificial reefs and adjacent natural rocky-reef and sand-flat were assessed 18 months post-deployment in three south-east Australian estuaries. Fish abundance, species richness and diversity were found to be greater on the artificial reefs than on either naturally occurring reef or sand-flat in all estuaries. Comparisons within each estuary identified significant differences in the species composition between the artificial and natural rocky-reefs. The artificial reef assemblage was dominated by sparid species including Acanthopagrus australis and Rhabdosargus sarba. The preference for a range of habitats by theses sparid species is evident by their detection on sand-flat, natural rocky reef and artificial reef habitats. The fish assemblage identified on the artificial reefs remained distinct from the adjacent rocky-reef, comprising a range of species drawn from naturally occurring rocky-reef and sand-flat. In addition, some mid-water schooling species including Trachurus novaezelandiae and Pseudocaranx georgianus were only identified on the artificial reef community; presumably as result of the reef's isolated location in open-water. We concluded that estuarine artificial reef assemblages are likely to differ significantly from adjacent rocky-reef, potentially as a result of physical factors such as reef isolation, coupled with species specific behavioural traits such as the ability of some species to traverse large sand flats in order to locate reef structure, and feeding preferences. Artificial reefs should not be viewed as direct surrogates for natural reef. The assemblages are likely to remain distinct from naturally occurring habitat comprised of species that reside on a range of adjacent natural habitats. PMID:23755106

  17. Home Reef, South Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    In the South Pacific, south of Late Island along the Tofua volcanic arc in Tonga, a new volcanic island Home Reef is being re-born. The island is thought to have emerged after a volcanic eruption in mid-August that has also spewed large amounts of floating pumice into Tongan waters and sweeping across to Fiji about 350 km (220 miles) to the west of where the new island has formed. In 2004 a similar eruption created an ephemeral island about 0.5 by 1.5 km (0.3 by 0.9 miles) in size; it was no longer visible in an ASTER image acquired November 2005. This simulated natural color image shows the vegetation-covered stratovolcanic island of Late in the upper right. Home Reef is found in the lower left. The two bluish plumes are hot seawater that is laden with volcanic ash and chemicals; the larger one can be traced for more than 14 km (8.4 miles) to the east. The image was acquired October 10, 2006 and covers an area of 24.3 by 30.2 km. It is located at 18.9 degrees South latitude, 174.7 degrees west longitude.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

    Size: 24.3 by 30.2 kilometers (15 by 18.6 miles) Location: 18.9 degrees South latitude, 174.7 degrees West longitude Orientation: North at top Image Data: ASTER bands 3, 2, and 1 Original Data Resolution: 15 meters (49.2 feet) Dates Acquired: October 4, 2006

  18. Florida Keys NMS: Coral Reefs

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary's page with information on coral reefs and links to information on research, restoration and monitoring. Wealth of information on the protection of Florida's coral reefs and the Florida Keys as a whole. Includes an in-class activity for grades K-5, as well as information on a Keys field experience and teacher workshops. Information on safe diving and snorkeling. Education materials available for purchase, including the Seagrass Toolbox.

  19. Fundamental study on talc–ink adhesion for talc-assisted flotation deinking of wastepaper

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Liu; J. Vandenberghe; J. Masliyah; Z. Xu; J. Yordan

    2007-01-01

    Effective removal of ink particles by froth flotation is of up-most importance in paper recycling. In this study, the potential use of talc particles as carriers of difficult-to-float fine ink particles is investigated. In order to facilitate ink particle removal by carrier flotation, the interactions between talc and oily-ink particles in aqueous solutions containing flotation chemicals are studied by zeta

  20. On the Methodology of Nematode Extraction from Field Samples: Density Flotation Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Viglierchio, David R.; Yamashita, Tom T.

    1983-01-01

    Density flotation has been frequently used for the extraction of nematodes from field samples. Density flotation curves for four nematode species and five solutes have been prepared. The curves confirm that flotation was governed by several factors: solute density, solute osmotic activity, and physiological properties of the nematode species. Nematode viability and function can be adversely affected by improper selection of solute for density extraction of nematodes; nevertheless, some nematode species can be enriched from mixtures by density and solute selection. PMID:19295831

  1. Use of membranes for heavy metal cationic wastewater treatment: flotation and membrane filtration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. S. Sudilovskiy; G. G. Kagramanov; A. M. Trushin; V. A. Kolesnikov

    2007-01-01

    A new water treatment process—membrane flotation—is presented. The hydrodynamics of air sparging with the use of microporous\\u000a membranes was studied as well as the membrane flotation efficacy for cationic wastewater treatment. The performance of membrane\\u000a filtration processes was evaluated. Ways of integration of flotation and membrane filtration in cationic wastewater treatment\\u000a practice are discussed.

  2. In-plant testing of microbubble column flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Luttrell, G.H.; Adel, G.T.; Mankosa, M.J.

    1991-07-31

    Microbubble column flotation (MCF) was developed at the Virginia Center for Coal and Minerals Processing (VCCMP) for the selective recovery of fine particles. Bench-scale test work conducted at VCCMP, largely under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), showed that the technology worked well for both coal and mineral applications. For the technology to be commercially successful, however, a full-scale demonstration of the MCF technology was deemed necessary. This report summarizes the results of work performed under the DOE project entitled In-plant Testing of Microbubble Column Flotation.'' The objectives of this research and development effort were to duplicate the bench-scale performance of the MCF process in a full-scale unit, to verify the scale-up procedure developed in an earlier project, and to demonstrate the applicability of the MCF technology to the coal industry.

  3. In-plant testing of microbubble column flotation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Luttrell, G.H.; Adel, G.T.; Mankosa, M.J.

    1991-07-31

    Microbubble column flotation (MCF) was developed at the Virginia Center for Coal and Minerals Processing (VCCMP) for the selective recovery of fine particles. Bench-scale test work conducted at VCCMP, largely under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), showed that the technology worked well for both coal and mineral applications. For the technology to be commercially successful, however, a full-scale demonstration of the MCF technology was deemed necessary. This report summarizes the results of work performed under the DOE project entitled ``In-plant Testing of Microbubble Column Flotation.`` The objectives of this research and development effort were to duplicate the bench-scale performance of the MCF process in a full-scale unit, to verify the scale-up procedure developed in an earlier project, and to demonstrate the applicability of the MCF technology to the coal industry.

  4. In-plant testing of microbubble column flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Luttrell, G.H.; Adel, G.T.

    1990-01-01

    During the past year, a joint project between the US Department of Energy (DOE), the Virginia Center for Coal and Minerals Processing (VCCMP) and the Shell Mining Corporation (SMC) was initiated to implement the testing of a full-scale microbubble flotation column. The work is being carried out at the Marrowbone Preparation Plant, located near Naugatuck in southwestern West Virginia. The primary objective of this effort was to determine the feasibility of using microbubble column flotation for the recovery of coal fines from a classifying cyclone overflow stream that is presently being discarded as refuse. During the past quarter, results obtained using a 30-inch diameter test unit were reviewed, flowsheet layouts and preliminary scale-up projections were generated and design, engineering, fabrication and installation of the full-scale test unit was completed. Preliminary results were also obtained with the full-scale test unit and are presented in this report. 5 figs., 7 tabs.

  5. Miocene precursors to Great Barrier Reef

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, P.J.; Symonds, P.A.; Feary, D.A.; Pigram, C.

    1988-01-01

    Huge reefs of Miocene age are present in the Gulf of Papua north of the present-day Great Barrier Reef and to the east on the Marion and Queensland Plateaus. In the Gulf of Papua, Miocene barrier reefs formed the northern forerunner of the Great Barrier Reef, extending for many hundreds of kilometers along the eastern and northern margin of the Australian craton within a developing foreland basin. Barrier reefs, slope pinnacle reefs, and platform reefs are seen in seismic sections and drill holes. Leeside talus deposits testify to the high energy impinging on the eastern margin of these Miocene reefs. The Queensland Plateau is a marginal plateau east of the central Great Barrier Reef and separated from it by a rift trough. Miocene reefs occupied an area of about 50,000 km/sup 2/ and grew on salt-controlled highs on the western margin of the plateau and on a regional basement high extending from the platform interior to its southern margin. Reef growth has continued to the present day, although two major contractions in the area covered by reefs occurred during the Miocene. The Marion Plateau is present directly east of the Great Barrier Reef and during the Micoene formed a 30,000-km/sup 2/ platform with barrier reefs along its northern margin and huge platform reefs and laggons on the platform interior. These reefs grew on a flat peneplained surface, the whole area forming a large shallow epicontinental sea. In all three areas, the middle Miocene formed the acme of reef expansion in the region.

  6. ORE POLYNOMIALS IN SAGE MANUEL KAUERS

    E-print Network

    Schneider, Carsten

    ORE POLYNOMIALS IN SAGE MANUEL KAUERS , MAXIMILIAN JAROSCHEK , FREDRIK JOHANSSON Abstract. We present a Sage implementation of Ore algebras. The main features for the most common instances include an implementation of a collection of algorithms related to Ore algebras for the computer algebra system Sage [14

  7. O-ring gasket test fixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, James Eric (inventor); Mccluney, Donald Scott (inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus is presented for testing O-ring gaskets under a variety of temperature, pressure, and dynamic loading conditions. Specifically, this apparatus has the ability to simulate a dynamic loading condition where the sealing surface in contact with the O-ring moves both away from and axially along the face of the O-ring.

  8. Distribution, abundance, and substrate preferences of demersal reef zooplankton at Lizard Island Lagoon, Great Barrier Reef

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. L. Alldredge; J. M. King

    1977-01-01

    Demersal zooplankton, those plankton which hide within reef sediments during the day but emerge to swim freely over the reef at night, were sampled quantitatively using emergence traps planced over the substrate at Lizard Island Lagoon, Great Barrier Reef. Densities of zooplankton emerging at night from 6 substrate types (fine, medium, and coarse sand, rubble, living coral and reef rock)

  9. INSTRUCTIONS FOR AUTHORS Coral Reefs Journal of the International Society for Reef Studies

    E-print Network

    van Woesik, Robert

    INSTRUCTIONS FOR AUTHORS Coral Reefs Journal of the International Society for Reef Studies 1. #12;INSTRUCTIONS FOR AUTHORS Coral Reefs Journal of the International Society for Reef Studies 2 Published by Springer Careful adherence to these journal instructions will avoid delays and extra work

  10. AN ADVANCED CONTROL SYSTEM FOR FINE COAL FLOTATION

    SciTech Connect

    G.H. Luttrell; G.T. Adel

    1999-01-11

    A model-based flotation control scheme is being implemented to achieve optimal performance in the handling and treatment of fine coal. The control scheme monitors flotation performance through on-line analysis of tailings ash content. Then, based on an on-line estimate of incremental ash, the pulp level is adjusted using a model-based control algorithm to compensate for feed variations and other process disturbances. Recent developments in sensor technology are being applied for on-line determination of slurry ash content. During the eleventh quarter of this project, Task 7 (Operation and Testing) was nearly completed through the efforts of J.A. Herbst and Associates, Virginia Tech, and Pittston Coal Company. As a result of this work, a model-based control system has now been installed which can predict incremental ash based on tailings ash content and general plant data, and adjust pulp level accordingly to maintain a target incremental ash. The system has gone through a shake-down period, training has been carried out for plant operators, and the bulk of the control logic testing has been completed with the results of these tests awaiting analysis under Task 8 (System Evaluation). The flotation model has been shown to predict incremental ash quite successfully, implying that this approach may provide the basis for a useful ''soft sensor'' for on-line incremental ash analysis.

  11. Coal surface control for advanced fine coal flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerstenau, D.W.; Sastry, K.V.S.; Hanson, J.S.; Diao, J.; De, A.; Sotillo, F.; Harris, G. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States)); Somasundaran, P.; Harris, C.C.; Vasudevan, T.; Liu, D.; Li, C. (Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)); Hu, Weibai; Zou, Y.; Chen, W. (Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)); Choudhry, V.; Sehgal, R.; Ghosh, A. (Praxis Engineers, Inc., Milpitas, CA (United

    1991-07-30

    The primary objective in the scope of this research project is to develop advanced flotation methods for coal cleaning in order to achieve near total pyritic-sulfur removal at 90% Btu recovery, using coal samples procured from three major US coal seams. Concomitantly, the ash content of these coals is to be reduced to 6% or less. Investigation of mechanisms for the control of coal and pyrite surfaces prior to fine coal flotation is the main aspect of the project objectives. The results of this research are to be made available to ICF Kaiser Engineers who are currently working on the Engineering Development of Advanced Flotation under a separate contract with DOE under the Acid Rain Control Initiative program. A second major objective is to investigate factors involved in the progressive weathering and oxidation of coal that had been exposed to varying degrees of weathering, namely, open to the atmosphere, covered and in an argon-inerted'' atmosphere, over a period of twelve months. After regular intervals of weathering, samples of the three base coals (Illinois No. 6, Pittsburgh No. 8 and Upper Freeport PA) were collected and shipped to both the University of Pittsburgh and the University of California at Berkeley for characterization studies of the weathered material. 29 figs., 29 tabs.

  12. Selective flotation of fossil resin from Western coal. Final report, July 1, 1990--May 25, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, G.F.; Miller, J.D.

    1992-05-25

    The proof-of-concept test program was designed to clarify a number of concerns that have been raised by coal companies who own the valuable resin resource. First, from laboratory bench-scale flotation experiments, a froth product from cleaner flotation containing more than 80% hexane-extractable resin at higher than 80% recovery can be produced. Pilot-plant testing was initiated to demonstrate the selective flotation of fossil resin and to establish a better confidence level in the new technology. Second, pilot-plant testing was designed to evaluate the effect and impact of random variation in slurry solids concentration and feed grade on this new selective fossil resin flotation technology. The flotation performance obtained under these industrial conditions is more realistic for process evaluation. Third, more accurate operating cost data was to be obtained for economic analysis. Fourth, sufficient quantities of the fossil resin concentrate were to be produced from the test program for evaluation by potential industrial users. Fifth, and finally, optimum levels for the operating variables were to be established. Such information was required for eventual scale-up and design of a fossil resin flotation plant. The pilot-plant proof-of-concept testing of selective resinate flotation has demonstrated that: (1) technically, the new flotation technologies discovered at the University of Utah and then improved upon by Advanced Processing Technologies, Inc. provide a highly efficient means to selectively recover fossil resin from coal. The proof-of-concept continuous flotation circuit (about 0.1 tph) resulted in fossil resin recovery with the same separation efficiency as was obtained from laboratory bench-scale testing (more than 80% recovery at about 80% concentrate grade); and (2) economically, the selective flotation process has been shown to be sufficiently profitable to justify the development of a fossil resin industry based on this new flotation process.

  13. Coral Reefs Journal of the International

    E-print Network

    Shima, Jeff

    1 23 Coral Reefs Journal of the International Society for Reef Studies ISSN 0722-4028 Volume 29 Number 4 Coral Reefs (2010) 29:1019-1022 DOI 10.1007/ s00338-010-0663-9 Guard crabs alleviate deleterious effects of vermetid snails on a branching coral #12;1 23 Your article is protected by copyright and all

  14. Lab 1: Coral Reefs, the Human View

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Students are introduced to coral reef ecosystems and the importance of corals to humans. Students watch the IMAX film Coral Reef Adventure to experience the human view of coral reefs through the eyes of ocean explorers and underwater filmmakers Howard and Michele Hall. The students then use microscopes to examine coral and identify its features.

  15. 33 CFR 175.25 - Enforcement of State requirements for children to wear personal flotation devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Enforcement of State requirements for children to wear personal flotation devices. 175.25...Enforcement of State requirements for children to wear personal flotation devices. (a...requirement for children of a certain age to wear an appropriate PFD approved by the...

  16. 33 CFR 175.25 - Enforcement of State requirements for children to wear personal flotation devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Enforcement of State requirements for children to wear personal flotation devices. 175.25...Enforcement of State requirements for children to wear personal flotation devices. (a...requirement for children of a certain age to wear an appropriate PFD approved by the...

  17. Development of a Froth Flotation Process for Recovery of Used Emulsifiable Oil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. I. Nabih; A. M. A. Omar; F. I. Kenawi

    2003-01-01

    The separation behavior of the lubricating oil from wastewater was studied using the technique; electroflotation. The optimum conditions for oil flotation were determined and the results were discussed according to a kinetic model. Further, the surface properties of the cationic collector were investigated. Cement kiln dust was used as an adsorbent applied to the flotation solution to investigate the kinetic

  18. Fat removal from process waters of the fish meal industry. A study of three flotation methods

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Cristina Marti; Marlene Roeckel; Estrella Aspe; Manuel Novoa

    1994-01-01

    Dissolved air flotation (DAF), column flotation and electroflotation were assayed as methods for fat removal from process waters (condensates) produced during fish meal manufacture. DAF of the effluent was carried out in both batch and continuous modes at bench scale. The DAF method exhibited low efficiency in floating emulsified fat. Only a 34% of fat removal was attained. However, upon

  19. Surface modifications in the chalcopyrite-sulphite ion system. I. collectorless flotation, XPS and dissolution study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. R. Grano; M. Sollaart; W. Skinner; C. A. Prestidge; J. Ralston

    1997-01-01

    The effect of sulphite on the collectorless flotation of chalcopyrite has been studied, while the mechanism of interaction between sulphite and chalcopyrite surfaces has been investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) and dissolution kinetic studies.The effect of sulphite on the collectorless flotation of chalcopyrite strongly depends on the state of the chalcopyrite surface prior to sulphite conditioning. In the case

  20. Flocculation and flotation of coal by adhesion of hydrophobic Mycobacterium phlei

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. M. Raichur; M. Misra; K. Bukka; R. W. Smith

    1996-01-01

    Separation of fine coal particles from the associated mineral matter is achieved either by flotation or flocculation. Such a separation process relies on the surface modification of the components involved. Flotation is mainly accomplished with the addition of a suitable collector molecule to the coal slurry and flocculation makes use of synthetic flocculants such as polyacrylamide and polyethylene oxides. In

  1. IMPROVED FLOTATION TECHNIQUE FOR MICROSCOPY OF 'IN SITU' SOIL AND SEDIMENT MICROORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An improved flotation method for microscopical examination of in situ soil and sediment microorganisms was developed. Microbial cells were released into gel-like flotation films that were stripped from soil and sediment aggregates as these aggregates were submerged in 0.5% soluti...

  2. The Mississippi Valley-type fluorite ore at Jebel Stah (Zaghouan district, north-eastern Tunisia): Contribution of REE and Sr isotope geochemistries to the genetic model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fouad Souissi; Radhia Souissi; Jean-Louis Dandurand

    2010-01-01

    The fluorite district of Zaghouan, north-eastern Tunisia, is characterized by F-(Ba–Pb–Zn) ore deposits. Mineralization occurs within stratabound to stratiform bodies, either within Jurassic back-reef limestone uplifted blocks, or along unconformity surfaces that separate them from the overlying sequence. Fluorite mineralization also occurs within fractures crosscutting the uplifted limestone blocks and their overburden. Despite the similarity of the Liassic series throughout

  3. NOAA Coral Reef Watch: Remote Sensing and Coral Reefs

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Developed by a fifth grade teacher, the Remote Sensing and Coral Reefs curriculum includes lesson plans, which feature links to additional information, and PowerPoint presentations. Topics discussed include altimetry, phytoplankton and ocean color, symbiosis and coral anatomy, sea surface temperature and coral bleaching, and conservation. The lesson plans can be used in sequence or by themselves.

  4. Dissolved air flotation of polishing wastewater from semiconductor manufacturer.

    PubMed

    Liu, J C; Lien, C Y

    2006-01-01

    The feasibility of the dissolved air flotation (DAF) process in treating chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) wastewater was evaluated in this study. Wastewater from a local semiconductor manufacturer was sampled and characterised. Nano-sized silica (77.6 nm) with turbidity of 130 +/- 3 NTU was found in the slightly alkaline wastewater with traces of other pollutants. Experimental results indicated removal efficiency of particles, measured as suspended particle or turbidity, increased with increasing concentration of cationic collector cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB). When CTAB concentration was 30 mg/L, pH of 6.5 +/- 0.1 and recycle ratio of 30%, very effective removal of particles (> 98%) was observed in saturation pressure range of 4 to 6 kg/cm2, and the reaction proceeded faster under higher pressure. Similarly, the reaction was faster under the higher recycle ratio, while final removal efficiency improved slightly as the recycle ratio increased from 20 to 40%. An insignificant effect of pH on treatment efficiency was found as pH varied from 4.5 to 8.5. The presence of activator, Al3+ and Fe3+, enhanced the system performance. It is proposed that CTAB adsorbs on silica particles in polishing wastewater through electrostatic interaction and makes particles more hydrophobic. The increase in hydrophobicity results in more effective bubble-particle collisions. In addition, flocculation of silica particles through bridging effect of collector was found; it is believed that flocculation of particles also contributed to flotation. Better attachment between gas bubble and solid, higher buoyancy and higher air to solid ratio all lead to effective flotation. PMID:16752774

  5. In-plant testing of microbubble column flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Luttrell, G.H.; Mankosa, M.J.; Adel, G.T.; Yoon, R.H.

    1990-01-01

    This report describes progress in two areas: advanced instrumentation and column installation. The project is working with both 30-inch and 8-foot columns for coal flotation. The paper describes installation of the instrument package, the control loops, and the data acquisition system. Under the second area of study, a test plan was developed for a parametric study of the 8-foot column operating conditions (feed flow rate, gas flow rate, wash water flow rate, and froth addition) that were determined to influence separation efficiency on the 30-inch column. Results to date are discussed. 7 refs., 4 tabs. (CK)

  6. Mid-late Holocene Reef Growth and Sedimentation History at Inshore Fringing Reefs in the Central Great Barrier Reef, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, E.; Smithers, S.; Lewis, S.; Zhao, J. X.; Clark, T.

    2014-12-01

    Inshore coral reefs of Australia's Great Barrier Reef (GBR) are threatened by terrestrial sediment loads that are argued to have increased by five to six times since coastal catchments were settled by Europeans in the mid-1850s. Nutrient and contaminant delivery to the inshore GBR has also increased over this period. However, direct evidence that European colonisation has changed the ecology of inshore reefs on the GBR remains limited, partly due to a lack of baseline historical data on coral reef growth. Coral reefs have been growing in inshore areas of the GBR since 6 or 7 ky BP, and have experienced natural fluctuations in terrestrial sediment loads over this period. For example, floods associated with episodic cyclones and major rainfall events often deliver pulses of sediment, especially if they follow prolonged dry spells. To better understand this history of sediment influx and reef development, we have examined in detail the chronostratigraphy of several inshore GBR reefs that have grown since the mid-Holocene. Here, we report on eight percussion cores collected at Bramston Reef (148°15'E, 20°03'S). Two cores terminate in the pre-Holocene substrate and therefore capture the entire Holocene sequence of both reef framework and terrigenous sediment matrix. Results from detailed core analyses indicate variable sedimentation patterns throughout the period of reef development. Furthermore, reef ecological condition and variability through the mid-late Holocene is described using palaeoecological analyses. We explore the impacts of sedimentation variability on reef growth and ecology, and compare reef ecological condition pre- and post-European colonisation.

  7. The seal reliability analysis of oring seals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Faguo Sun; Tianxiang Yu; Weimin Cui; Xiao Zong

    2009-01-01

    First, the seal reliability function of the O-ring, that is the maximum contact stress between O-ring and plunger must be greater than the fluid pressure, is established, then on the basis of the nonlinear constitutive equation Mooney-Rivlin of rubber material, the finite element model of the O-ring is built using commercial software ABAQUS, according to the finite element model, the

  8. Tourmaline in the central Swedish ore district

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. H. Hellingwerf; K. Gatedal; V. Gallagher; J. H. Baker

    1994-01-01

    More than 40 recently discovered tourmaline occurrences have been investigated in the Mid-Proterozoic Bergslagen ore district of central Sweden. Some are spatially associated with ores, others with zones of leaching, remobilization and migmatization. Among the tourmaline-bearing ore deposits are the Dammberg ZnPb-Fe sulphide deposit, the Sala Pb-Zn-Ag deposit, the Dalkarlsberg, Pershyttan and Hĺksberg Fe oxide deposits, the Leja Cu deposit,

  9. Sandstone Spire in Capitol Reef

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A view of a sandstone spire in Capitol Reef National Park. This area, known as the Fruita, is made up of three primary layers. The bottom sandstone layer is known as the Moenkopi Formation and is about 245 million years old. The middle gray-green layer is known as the Chinle Formation and was laid d...

  10. The future of coral reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowlton, Nancy

    2001-05-01

    Coral reefs, with their millions of species, have changed profoundly because of the effects of people, and will continue to do so for the foreseeable future. Reefs are subject to many of the same processes that affect other human-dominated ecosystems, but some special features merit emphasis: (i) Many dominant reef builders spawn eggs and sperm into the water column, where fertilization occurs. They are thus particularly vulnerable to Allee effects, including potential extinction associated with chronic reproductive failure. (ii) The corals likely to be most resistant to the effects of habitat degradation are small, short-lived "weedy" corals that have limited dispersal capabilities at the larval stage. Habitat degradation, together with habitat fragmentation, will therefore lead to the establishment of genetically isolated clusters of inbreeding corals. (iii) Increases in average sea temperatures by as little as 1°C, a likely result of global climate change, can cause coral "bleaching" (the breakdown of coral-algal symbiosis), changes in symbiont communities, and coral death. (iv) The activities of people near reefs increase both fishing pressure and nutrient inputs. In general, these processes favor more rapidly growing competitors, often fleshy seaweeds, and may also result in explosions of predator populations. (v) Combinations of stress appear to be associated with threshold responses and ecological surprises, including devastating pathogen outbreaks. (vi) The fossil record suggests that corals as a group are more likely to suffer extinctions than some of the groups that associate with them, whose habitat requirements may be less stringent.

  11. Reef tanks, public aquariums and

    E-print Network

    Watson, Andrew

    have modified, spooned-shaped chelae to feed on both fleshy and filamentous algae. However, such as the glass-anemone (Aiptasia pallida), the fireworm (Hermodice carunculata) and the bubble algae (Valonia spp (Decapoda: Brachyura: Majidae) are utilized in reef aquaria to control nuisance algae, particularly bubble

  12. Environmental impact of mining activity in the Rud?any Ore Field, Slovak Ore Mountains

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Bajtoš

    The Rud?any Ore Field is known by the long-run underground exploitation of Fe, Cu, BaSO4 and Hg ore fixed on the ore veins. Mining activity caused a significant intervention on environmental conditions in this area. The worked-out spoils were stacked near the shafts, where make the expressive morphological elements - pit tips. Through blows the mined-out parts of ore veins

  13. Quantitative mineralogical characterization of chrome ore beneficiation plant tailing and its beneficiated products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, S. K.

    2015-04-01

    Mineralogical characterization and liberation of valuable minerals are primary concerns in mineral processing industries. The present investigation focuses on quantitative mineralogy, elemental deportment, and locking-liberation characteristics of the beneficiation of tailings from a chrome ore beneficiation plant in the Sukinda region, Odisha; methods used for the study of the beneficiated tailings are QEMSCAN®, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and mineral chemistry by a scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy-dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS). The tailing sample was fine grained (69.48wt% below 45 ?m size), containing 20.25wt% Cr2O3 and 39.19wt% Fe2O3, with a Cr:Fe mass ratio of 0.51. Mineralogical investigations using QEMSCAN studies revealed that chromite, goethite, and gibbsite are the dominant mineral phases with minor amounts of hematite, kaolinite, and quartz. The sample contained 34.22wt% chromite, and chromite liberation is more than 80% for grains smaller than 250 ?m in size. Based on these results, it was predicted that liberated chromite and high-grade middling chromite particles could be separated from the gangue by various concentration techniques. The tailing sample was beneficiated by hydrocyclone, tabling, wet high-intensity magnetic separation (WHIMS), and flotation in order to recover the chromite. A chromite concentrate with 45.29wt% Cr2O3 and a Cr:Fe mass ratio of 1.85 can be produced from these low-grade chromite ore beneficiation plant rejects.

  14. Coral Reef Ecosystems: Ecosystems in Crisis

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    National Science Teachers Association (NSTA)

    2007-03-28

    This Science Object is the fourth of four Science Objects in the Coral Reef Ecosystems SciPack. It explores the natural and human causes of ecosystem stress. Human beings live near coral ecosystems and use them in a variety of ways. Increasing amounts of stress is brought on these ecosystems as humans continue to modify the surrounding environment as a result of population growth, technology, and consumption. Human destruction of habitats through direct harvesting, pollution, atmospheric changes, and other factors is threatening the stability and overall health of many coral reefs. Human activities may also exacerbate the impact of natural disturbances on coral reefs or compromise the ability of the reef to recover from events such as hurricanes, tsunamis, or disease. Learning Outcomes:? Describe ways in which human activities directly impact coral reef ecosystems (resource and recreational uses).? Describe ways in which human activities indirectly impact coral reef ecosystems (by changing the physical conditions, pollution, changes in the water chemistry, etc.).? Explain how human activity may decrease the reefs ability to recover from natural occurrences. ? Explain the effects of increased predation or disease on a reef ecosystem.? Describe the effect of habitat loss on the reef ecosystem.? Describe the effects of weather and climate change on a healthy and weakened reef ecosystem.

  15. Battelle developing reefs to ease habitat losses

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    Artificial reefs may be the answer to solving a worldwide problem of declining fish habitats, or they may only be good for creating fishing spots. Researchers at Battelle's Ocean Sciences Laboratory in Duxbury, Massachusetts, are studying artificial reefs in the Delaware River to determine if they are a solution to habitat losses in estuaries and coastal regions. [open quotes]Right now, we don't know if the fish are using the reefs simply as a grazing land, and then moving on, or if they're using the areas to colonize,[close quotes] said researcher Karen Foster. [open quotes]Ultimately, we hope to find they are colonizing.[close quotes] In 1989, Battelle researchers placed 16 prefabricated concrete reefs 45 feet deep in Delaware Bay. The reefs were placed in clusters of four, and monitoring began the following year. The federal government ordered the reefs placed in the bay as a mitigation technique for fish habitat that was lost when the river was dredged for navigational purposes. Researchers examined the reefs twice last summer. It will take five years, Foster said, before researchers can determine if the reefs are increasing the fish population. Early tests show, however, the populations of mussels, sponges, corals, and anemones increased by up to 150 percent over an area of bay bottom where the reefs were placed. Divers take crustacean samples from the reefs, and fish are caught near the reefs for examination. Researchers dissect the fish stomachs and analyze the contents to determine if they have been feeding at the reefs. [open quotes]If we find blue mussels in the stomach of the fish, that's great because we know that blue mussels are growing on the reef,[close quotes] Foster said.

  16. Winter operation of nation's largest potable flotation plant. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Krofta, M.; Wang, L.K.

    1987-09-20

    The heart of the Pittsfield (Massachusetts) water-supply system is two potable flotation plants: Ashley Plant (2 Sandfloats) and Cleveland Plant (4 Sandfloats). Each sandfloat unit has a capacity of 6.25 MGD (million gallons per day). Sandfloat is a package clarifier consisting of flocculation, flotation, and filtration. Complete chronological testing of Pittsfield's two plants in the winter period, December 1986 through March 1987, is documented. The technical and economical feasibilities of Sandfloat are presented. Cleveland raw water having sufficient alkalinity and low temperature in winter was treated satisfactorily by Sandfloat at 6.25 MGD per unit using the chemical combination of sodium aluminate, polymer, and alum at a cost of $0.02458/1000 gal. At Ashley Plant, the mixture of 28% Ashley raw water and 72% Farnham raw water, having moderate alkalinity and low winter temperature was treated adequately by Sandfloat at 5.5-5.8 MGD per unit using the same chemicals. When 100% Farnham raw water with extremely low alkalinity and low pH was treated at Ashley Plant, PAC, sodium aluminate and polymer 1849A was found to be the best chemical combination for clarification.

  17. Enhanced desulfurizing flotation of coal using sonoelectrochemical method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Xi; Hou, Xiao-Yang; Xu, Shi-Xun; Li, Zhi-Long; Yu, Hai-Feng; Shen, Xue-Hua

    2013-09-01

    Enhanced desulfurizing flotation of low sulfur coal was investigated using sonoelectrochemical method. The supporting electrolyte used in this process was sodium chloride and the additive was anhydrous ethanol. The effects of treatment conditions on desulfurization were studied by a single-factor method. The conditions include anhydrous ethanol concentration, sodium chloride concentration, sonoelectrolytic voltage, sonoelectrolytic temperature, sonoelectrolytic time and coal sample granulometry. The optimal experimental conditions achieved for anhydrous ethanol concentration, sodium chloride concentration, sonoelectrolytic voltage, sonoelectrolytic temperature and sonoelectrolytic time are 1.7 mol L(-1), 5.1×10(-3) mol L(-1), 10 V, 70 °C, 50 min achieved for a -0.18 mm coal sample. Optimal conditions cause a sulfur reduction of up to 69.4%. The raw and treated coals were analyzed by infrared spectroscopy and a chemical method. Pyritic sulfur, organic sulfur, ash as well as moisture are partially removed. The combination of high sulfur reduction, high yield, as well as high ash reduction was obtained in the newly developed method of enhanced flotation by sonoelectrochemistry. Ultrasound irradiation promotes electron transfer efficiency and increases clean coal yield. PMID:23558374

  18. Nanoparticle flotation collectors--the influence of particle softness.

    PubMed

    Yang, Songtao; Razavizadeh, Bi Bi Marzieh; Pelton, Robert; Bruin, Gerard

    2013-06-12

    The ability of polymeric nanoparticles to promote glass bead and pentlandite (Pn, nickel sulfide mineral) attachment to air bubbles in flotation was measured as a function of the nanoparticle glass transition temperature using six types of nanoparticles based on styrene/N-butylacrylate copolymers. Nanoparticle size, surface charge density, and hydrophobicity were approximately constant over the series. The ability of the nanoparticles to promote air bubble attachment and perform as flotation collectors was significantly greater for softer nanoparticles. We propose that softer nanoparticles were more firmly attached to the glass beads or mineral surface because the softer particles had a greater glass/polymer contact areas and thus stronger overall adhesion. The diameters of the contact areas between polymeric nanoparticles and glass surfaces were estimated with the Young-Laplace equation for soft, liquidlike particles, whereas JKR adhesion theory was applied to the harder polystyrene particles. The diameters of the contact areas were estimated to be more than an order of magnitude greater for the soft particles compared to harder polystyrene particles. PMID:23692163

  19. 78 FR 67128 - Coral Reef Conservation Program; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-08

    ...National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Coral Reef Conservation Program; Meeting AGENCY: Coral Reef Conservation Program, Office of Ocean...hereby given of a public meeting of the U.S. Coral Reef Task Force (USCRTF). The meeting...

  20. 75 FR 48934 - Coral Reef Conservation Program Implementation Guidelines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-12

    ...100726313-0313-01] RIN 0648-ZC19 Coral Reef Conservation Program Implementation...Final Implementation Guidelines for the Coral Reef Conservation Program...Implementation Guidelines (Guidelines) for the Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP or...

  1. Removal of cadmium (II) from simulated wastewater by ion flotation technique

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A separation technique which has recently received a sharp increase in research activities is “ion flotation”. This technique has four important advantages for treating wastewaters: low energy consumption, small space requirements, small volume of sludge and acting selectively. The present study aims to optimize parameters of ion flotation for cadmium removal in simulated wastewater at laboratory scale. It was obtained on the reaction between Cd2+ and sodium dodecylesulfate (SDS) collector followed by flotation with ethanol as frother. Test solution was prepared by combining the required amount of cadmium ion, SDS and necessary frother or sodium sulfate solution. All experiments were carried out in a flotation column at laboratory temperature (27°C), adjusted pH = 4 and 120 minutes. The different parameters (namely: flow rate, cadmium, SDS and frother concentrations and ionic strength) influencing the flotation process were examined. The best removal efficiency obtained at a collector-metal ratio of 3:1 in 60 min with flow rate of 150 mL/min was 84%. The maximum cadmium removal was 92.1% where ethanol was introduced at a concentration 0.4% to flotation column with above conditions. The obtained results were promising, as both cadmium and collector were effectively removed from wastewater. Hence, the application of ion flotation for metal ions removal from effluents seems to be efficient. PMID:23388386

  2. Delineating optimal settlement areas of juvenile reef fish in Ngederrak Reef, Koror state, Republic of Palau.

    PubMed

    Ticzon, Victor S; Foster, Greg; David, Laura T; Mumby, Peter J; Samaniego, Badi R; Madrid, Val Randolf

    2015-01-01

    Establishing the effectiveness of habitat features to act as surrogate measures of diversity and abundance of juvenile reef fish provides information that is critical to coral reef management. When accurately set on a broader spatial context, microhabitat information becomes more meaningful and its management application becomes more explicit. The goal of the study is to identify coral reef areas potentially important to juvenile fishes in Ngederrak Reef, Republic of Palau, across different spatial scales. To achieve this, the study requires the accomplishment of the following tasks: (1) structurally differentiate the general microhabitat types using acoustics; (2) quantify microhabitat association with juvenile reef fish community structure; and (3) conduct spatial analysis of the reef-wide data and locate areas optimal for juvenile reef fish settlement. The results strongly suggest the importance of branching structures in determining species count and abundance of juvenile reef fish at the outer reef slope of Ngederrak Reef. In the acoustic map, the accurate delineation of these features allowed us to identify reef areas with the highest potential to harbor a rich aggregation of juvenile reef fish. Using a developed spatial analysis tool that ranks pixel groups based on user-defined parameters, the reef area near the Western channel of Ngederrak is predicted to have the most robust aggregation of juvenile reef fish. The results have important implications not only in management, but also in modeling the impacts of habitat loss on reef fish community. At least for Ngederrak Reef, the results advanced the utility of acoustic systems in predicting spatial distribution of juvenile fish. PMID:25394769

  3. 76 FR 59377 - Amendments to the Reef Fish, Spiny Lobster, Queen Conch and Coral and Reef Associated Plants and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-26

    ...Fish, Spiny Lobster, Queen Conch and Coral and Reef Associated Plants and Invertebrates...Resources, Spiny Lobster, Queen Conch, and Coral and Reef Associated Plants and Invertebrates...framework procedures for spiny lobster and coral and reef associated plants and...

  4. FLOTASYON KOLONLARI-BÖLÜM 2 KAR?ILA?TIRMALI ÇALI?MALAR, UYGULAMALARDA • KAR?ILA?ILAN SORUNLAR VE ALTERNAT?F KOLON TASARIMLARI Flotation Columns-Part 2 Comparative Studies, Application Problems and Alternative Column Designs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bahadir AKSANI

    In this study flotation columns and mechanical flotation machines that were used as standard flotation equipment in mineral processing industry were compared with the theoretical ones and studies in the literature were presented. Problems faced in the design and industrial applications of flotation column were briefly summarised and alternative flotation column designs and their features were presented.

  5. Hydrophobic Agglomeration of Mineral Fines in Aqueous Suspensions and its Application in Flotation: a Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bingqiao; Song, Shaoxian

    2014-05-01

    Hydrophobic agglomeration is originated from the hydrophobic attraction between particles, which is essentially different from electrolyte coagulation and polymer flocculation. It is applied to mineral processing in floc-flotation process to improve the recovery of mineral fines. In this paper, the applications of this phenomenon in mineral fines were summarized, including the origin of hydrophobic agglomeration, the main factors affect hydrophobic agglomeration (particle hydrophobicity, shear rate and duration, nonpolar oil and tank geometry), as well as hydrophobic agglomeration based separation processes (carrier flotation and floc-flotation).

  6. The effects of surfactant concentration on grease removal by air flotation in municipal sewage treatment 

    E-print Network

    Perry, Larry Eugene

    1978-01-01

    efficiencies in air flotation systems are greatly 1nfluenced by bubble size. In a d1spersed air system, bubble size is largely a funct1on of the type of diffuser used to introduce the air 1nto the water and varies considerably from one type of system... to another. Bubble s1ze 1n d1ssolved a1r flotation, on the other hand, is controlled primarily by the recycle pressure and method of introducing the d1ssolved air stream 1nto the flotation unit. Typical bubble s1zes 1n dissolved air systems...

  7. Uptake of picophytoplankton, bacterioplankton and virioplankton by a fringing coral reef community (Ningaloo Reef, Australia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patten, N. L.; Wyatt, A. S. J.; Lowe, R. J.; Waite, A. M.

    2011-09-01

    We examined the importance of picoplankton and virioplankton to reef trophodynamics at Ningaloo Reef, (north-western Australia), in May and November 2008. Picophytoplankton ( Prochlorococcus, Synechococcus and picoeukaryotes), bacterioplankton (inclusive of bacteria and Archaea), virioplankton and chlorophyll a (Chl a) were measured at five stations following the consistent wave-driven unidirectional mean flow path of seawater across the reef and into the lagoon. Prochlorococcus, Synechococcus, picoeukaryotes and bacterioplankton were depleted to similar levels (~40% on average) over the fore reef, reef crest and reef flat (=`active reef'), with negligible uptake occurring over the sandy bottom lagoon. Depletion of virioplankton also occurred but to more variable levels. Highest uptake rates, m, of picoplankton occurred over the reef crest, while uptake coefficients, S (independent of cell concentration), were similarly scaled over the reef zones, indicating no preferential uptake of any one group. Collectively, picophytoplankton, bacterioplankton and virioplankton accounted for the uptake of 29 mmol C m-2 day-1, with Synechococcus contributing the highest proportion of the removed C. Picoplankton and virioplankton accounted for 1-5 mmol N m-2 day-1 of the removed N, with bacterioplankton estimated to be a highly rich source of N. Results indicate the importance of ocean-reef interactions and the dependence of certain reef organisms on picoplanktonic supply for reef-level biogeochemistry processes.

  8. Contradictions to Darwin's Evolution of Reef Types in Barrier Reef Relationships

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Purdy; E. L. Winterer

    2004-01-01

    The Darwinian progressive subsidence model for the evolution of fringing reefs, barrier reefs and atolls has been generally accepted following the indisputable proof of subsidence provided by drilling results in the Pacific. Nonetheless, there are data that do not fit the expectations of the model, such as the similar lagoon depths of barrier reefs and atolls as opposed to the

  9. Coral reefs. Limited scope for latitudinal extension of reef corals.

    PubMed

    Muir, Paul R; Wallace, Carden C; Done, Terence; Aguirre, J David

    2015-06-01

    An analysis of present-day global depth distributions of reef-building corals and underlying environmental drivers contradicts a commonly held belief that ocean warming will promote tropical coral expansion into temperate latitudes. Using a global data set of a major group of reef corals, we found that corals were confined to shallower depths at higher latitudes (up to 0.6 meters of predicted shallowing per additional degree of latitude). Latitudinal attenuation of the most important driver of this phenomenon-the dose of photosynthetically available radiation over winter-would severely constrain latitudinal coral range extension in response to ocean warming. Latitudinal gradients in species richness for the group also suggest that higher winter irradiance at depth in low latitudes allowed a deep-water fauna that was not viable at higher latitudes. PMID:26045436

  10. Holocene development of the Belize Barrier Reef

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eberhard Gischler; J. Harold Hudson

    2004-01-01

    Previously, knowledge of the Holocene development of the Belize Barrier Reef (BBR)—the largest reef system in the Atlantic Ocean—was limited to one location (Carrie Bow Cay). We present new data from 11 rotary drill cores taken at 9 locations and 36 radiometric ages that indicate that the BBR was established from >8.26 to 6.68 ky BP on Pleistocene reef limestones,

  11. Who invented the O-ring?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Allan A. Mills

    1996-01-01

    As a commercial product the O-ring is ideal: simple, effective, and easily mass-produced; yet hard to make oneself on a one-off basis. With so many millions in past and present use the inventor of the O-ring deserves to be both rich and famous, but in fact the origin of the device is far from clear.

  12. Determining impact routes for sulfide ore transportation

    E-print Network

    Chow, Tzeekiu Edwin

    Determining impact routes for sulfide ore transportation Objective: To identify least cost/impact routes based on given parameters (population, federal land, wild life preserves) for transport of sulfide to the Kirtland's Warbler and a rare breeding population of brook trout. Sulfide ores exposed to the air

  13. Coral Reef Protection: A Watershed Approach

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    United States. Environmental Protection Agency. Office of Water.

    1998-01-01

    This colorful, straightforward site from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)'s Oceans and Coastal Protection division (described in the November 25, 1998 Scout Report for Science & Engineering) outlines coral reef basic ecology and protection. About Coral Reefs provides background ecological information on coral reefs; Initiatives and Activities highlights EPA's activities but includes other US initiatives and links to symposia preceedings, factsheets, and other resources; and Related Links provides additional information on coral reef protection from the international, non-governmental (as well as federal), and educational sectors. A selection of recent news items (on the front page) rounds out the site.

  14. Impacts of Artificial Reefs on Surrounding Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoukian, Sarine

    Artificial reefs are becoming a popular biological and management component in shallow water environments characterized by soft seabed, representing both important marine habitats and tools to manage coastal fisheries and resources. An artificial reef in the marine environment acts as an open system with exchange of material and energy, altering the physical and biological characteristics of the surrounding area. Reef stability will depend on the balance of scour, settlement, and burial resulting from ocean conditions over time. Because of the unstable nature of sediments, they require a detailed and systematic investigation. Acoustic systems like high-frequency multibeam sonar are efficient tools in monitoring the environmental evolution around artificial reefs, whereas water turbidity can limit visual dive and ROV inspections. A high-frequency multibeam echo sounder offers the potential of detecting fine-scale distribution of reef units, providing an unprecedented level of resolution, coverage, and spatial definition. How do artificial reefs change over time in relation to the coastal processes? How accurately does multibeam technology map different typologies of artificial modules of known size and shape? How do artificial reefs affect fish school behavior? What are the limitations of multibeam technology for investigating fish school distribution as well as spatial and temporal changes? This study addresses the above questions and presents results of a new approach for artificial reef seafloor mapping over time, based upon an integrated analysis of multibeam swath bathymetry data and geoscientific information (backscatter data analysis, SCUBA observations, physical oceanographic data, and previous findings on the geology and sedimentation processes, integrated with unpublished data) from Senigallia artificial reef, northwestern Adriatic Sea (Italy) and St. Petersburg Beach Reef, west-central Florida continental shelf. A new approach for observation of fish aggregations associated with Senigallia reef based on the analysis of multibeam backscatter data in the water column is also explored. The settlement of the reefs and any terrain change are investigated over time providing a useful description of the local hydrodynamics and geological processes. All the artificial structures (made up by water-based concrete for Senigallia reef and mainly steel for St. Petersburg Beach reef) are identified and those showing substantial horizontal and/or vertical movements are analyzed in detail. Most artificial modules of Senigallia reef are not intact and scour signatures are well depicted around them, indicating reversals of the local current. This is due to both the wind pattern and to the quite close arrangement of the reef units that tend to deflect the bottom flow. As regards to the St. Petersburg Beach reef, all the man-made steel units are still in their upright position. Only a large barge shows a gradual collapse of its south side, and presents well-developed scouring at its east-northeast side, indicating dominant bottom flow from west-southwest to east-northeast. While an overall seafloor depth shallowing of about 0.30 m from down-current deposits was observed for Senigallia reef, an overall deepening of about 0.08 m due to scour was observed at the St. Petersburg Beach reef. Based on the backscatter data interpretation, surficial sediments are coarser in the vicinities of both artificial reefs than corresponding surrounding sediments. Scouring reveals this coarser layer underneath the prevalent mud sediment at Senigallia reef, and the predominant silt sediment at St. Petersburg Beach reef. In the ten years of Senigalia reef study, large-scale variations between clay and silt appear to be directly linked to large flood events that have occurred just prior to the change. As regards the water column investigation, acoustic backscatter from fish aggregations gives detailed information on their morphology and spatial distribution. In addition, relative fish biomass estimates can be extrapolated. Results suggest that most of

  15. Mineral chemical study of U-bearing minerals from the Dominion Reefs, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rantzsch, Ulrike; Gauert, Christoph D. K.; van der Westhuizen, Willem A.; Duhamel, Isabelle; Cuney, Michel; Beukes, Gerhard J.

    2011-02-01

    The Neo-Archean Dominion Reefs (~3.06 Ga) are thin meta-conglomerate layers with concentrations of U- and Th-bearing heavy minerals higher than in the overlying Witwatersrand Reefs. Ore samples from Uranium One Africa's Rietkuil and Dominion exploration areas near Klerksdorp, South Africa, were investigated for their mineral paragenesis, texture and mineral chemical composition. The ore and heavy mineral assemblages consist of uraninite, other uraniferous minerals, Fe sulphides, Ni-Co sulfarsenides, garnet, pyrite, pyrrhotite, monazite, zircon, chromite, magnetite and minor gold. Sub-rounded uraninite grains occur associated with the primary detrital heavy mineral paragenesis. U-Ti, U-Th minerals, pitchblende (colloform uraninite) and coffinite are of secondary, re-mobilised origin as evidenced by crystal shape and texture. Most of the uranium mineralisation is represented by detrital uraninite with up to 70.2 wt.% UO2 and up to 9.3 wt.% ThO2. Re-crystallised phases such as secondary pitchblende (without Th), coffinite, U-Ti and U-Th phases are related to hydrothermal overprint during low-grade metamorphism and are of minor abundance.

  16. Conservation, precaution, and Caribbean reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aronson, Richard B.; Precht, William F.

    2006-08-01

    Some authors argue that overfishing is an important reason that reef corals have declined in recent decades. Their reasoning is that overfishing removes herbivores, releasing macroalgae to overgrow and kill the corals. The evidence suggests, however, that global climate change and emergent marine diseases make a far greater contribution to coral mortality, and that macroalgae generally grow on the exposed skeletal surfaces of corals that are already dead. Macroalgal dominance, therefore, is an effect rather than a cause of coral mortality. Marine protected areas (MPAs), which are usually established to protect stocks of reef fish, foster populations of herbivorous fish under at least some circumstances. Increased herbivory can reduce algal cover, potentially accelerating the recovery of coral populations inside MPAs; however, establishing MPAs will have only a limited impact on coral recovery unless policymakers confront the accelerating negative effects of the global-scale sources of coral mortality.

  17. Great Barrier Reef, Queensland, Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Along the coast of Queensland, Australia (18.0S, 147.5E), timbered foothills of the Great Dividing Range separate the semi-arid interior of Queensland from the farmlands of the coastal plains. Prominent cleared areas in the forest indicate deforestation for farm and pasture lands. Offshore, islands and the Great Barrier Reef display sand banks along the southern sides of the structures indicating a dominant southerly wind and current direction.

  18. 46 CFR 180.72 - Personal flotation devices carried in addition to life jackets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Commandant, may be carried as additional equipment...d) Commercial hybrid personal flotation...Commandant, may be carried as additional equipment...Each commercial hybrid PFD must be: ...operation as each other hybrid PFD carried on...

  19. 46 CFR 117.72 - Personal flotation devices carried in addition to life jackets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Commandant, may be carried as additional equipment...d) Commercial hybrid personal flotation...Commandant, may be carried as additional equipment...Each commercial hybrid PFD must be: ...operation as each other hybrid PFD carried on...

  20. 46 CFR 117.72 - Personal flotation devices carried in addition to life jackets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Commandant, may be carried as additional equipment...d) Commercial hybrid personal flotation...Commandant, may be carried as additional equipment...Each commercial hybrid PFD must be: ...operation as each other hybrid PFD carried on...

  1. 46 CFR 117.72 - Personal flotation devices carried in addition to life jackets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Commandant, may be carried as additional equipment...d) Commercial hybrid personal flotation...Commandant, may be carried as additional equipment...Each commercial hybrid PFD must be: ...operation as each other hybrid PFD carried on...

  2. 46 CFR 180.72 - Personal flotation devices carried in addition to life jackets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Commandant, may be carried as additional equipment...d) Commercial hybrid personal flotation...Commandant, may be carried as additional equipment...Each commercial hybrid PFD must be: ...operation as each other hybrid PFD carried on...

  3. Dual effects of sodium sulfide on the flotation behavior of chalcopyrite: I. Effect of pulp potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taheri, Bijan; Abdollahy, Mahmoud; Tonkaboni, Sied Ziaedin Shafaei; Javadian, Soheyla; Yarahmadi, Mohammadreza

    2014-05-01

    This study explores the flotation behavior of chalcopyrite in the presence of different concentrations of sodium sulfide (Na2S·9H2O) at pH 12 under controlled potential conditions. It was observed that the flotation of chalcopyrite is not depressed completely when the pulp potential is low, even at high concentrations of sodium sulfide, i.e., 10-1-10-2 mol/L. However, a partial and controlled oxidation of pulp does enhance the effectiveness of sodium sulfide on the depression of chalcopyrite. Characterization of the chalcopyrite particle surface by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy allowed the identification of hydrophilic and hydrophobic surface species, which are responsible for the depression and flotation of chalcopyrite. Changes in pulp potential were found to be an effective float controlling parameter, by which Na2S can be used to initiate or depress the flotation behavior of chalcopyrite.

  4. 18 CFR 1304.400 - Flotation devices and material, all floating structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...animals, and fire. Any flotation within 40 feet of a line carrying fuel shall be 100 percent impervious to water and fuel. Styrofoam floatation must be fully encased. Reuse of plastic, metal, or other previously used drums or containers for...

  5. 18 CFR 1304.400 - Flotation devices and material, all floating structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...animals, and fire. Any flotation within 40 feet of a line carrying fuel shall be 100 percent impervious to water and fuel. Styrofoam floatation must be fully encased. Reuse of plastic, metal, or other previously used drums or containers for...

  6. 18 CFR 1304.400 - Flotation devices and material, all floating structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...animals, and fire. Any flotation within 40 feet of a line carrying fuel shall be 100 percent impervious to water and fuel. Styrofoam floatation must be fully encased. Reuse of plastic, metal, or other previously used drums or containers for...

  7. 18 CFR 1304.400 - Flotation devices and material, all floating structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...animals, and fire. Any flotation within 40 feet of a line carrying fuel shall be 100 percent impervious to water and fuel. Styrofoam floatation must be fully encased. Reuse of plastic, metal, or other previously used drums or containers for...

  8. 18 CFR 1304.400 - Flotation devices and material, all floating structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...animals, and fire. Any flotation within 40 feet of a line carrying fuel shall be 100 percent impervious to water and fuel. Styrofoam floatation must be fully encased. Reuse of plastic, metal, or other previously used drums or containers for...

  9. In-plant testing of microbubble column flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Luttrell, G.H.; Mankosa, M.J.; Adel, G.T.; Yoon, R.H.

    1991-01-01

    Testing of micro-bubble column flotation continued. Work during this time frame was concentrated on completion of the automated control and data acquisition system and the factorial test plan for evaluating the performance of the 8-foot column (Tasks 2.5 and 3.3). Preliminary results obtained from the factorial test program indicate that higher frother addition and aeration rates result in a higher separation efficiency. Furthermore, an increase in collector dosage results in higher column yields under most conditions. The Allen-Bradley PLC has been installed and program development completed for control of the 8-foot column. A completely automated start-up and shut-down sequence has been developed. This sequence can be initiated by the operator from a plant floor industrial interface. Instrumentation of the 30-inch column has also been completed. Testing of this instrumentation is currently underway. 11 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Froth flotation of oil-bearing metal sulfide wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.L. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Atwood, R.L.; Ye, Yi [Advanced Processing Technologies, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1991-12-01

    An industrial wastewater, including plating wastes, is treated with sodium sulfide and ferrous sulfate to form a sulfide-oxide precipitate containing chromium and other toxic metals. Hydrocarbons, in the water, coat the sulfide-oxide particles, impeding metal recovery. Froth flotation, without reagent addition, was found to recover 93.9% of the solids from the sludge with simultaneous rejection of 89% of the water. Methyl isobutyl carbinol (MIBC) improved recovery and potassium amyl xanthate improved both recovery and grade. The process design has wastewater feed (without MIBC) to the rougher circuit. The rougher concentrate is conditioned with MIBC and fed to a cleaner circuit to achieve a high grade concentrate. About 95% of the water is recirculated to the waste treatment plant. 3 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Froth flotation of oil-bearing metal sulfide wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.L. (Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Atwood, R.L.; Ye, Yi (Advanced Processing Technologies, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United States))

    1991-01-01

    An industrial wastewater, including plating wastes, is treated with sodium sulfide and ferrous sulfate to form a sulfide-oxide precipitate containing chromium and other toxic metals. Hydrocarbons, in the water, coat the sulfide-oxide particles, impeding metal recovery. Froth flotation, without reagent addition, was found to recover 93.9% of the solids from the sludge with simultaneous rejection of 89% of the water. Methyl isobutyl carbinol (MIBC) improved recovery and potassium amyl xanthate improved both recovery and grade. The process design has wastewater feed (without MIBC) to the rougher circuit. The rougher concentrate is conditioned with MIBC and fed to a cleaner circuit to achieve a high grade concentrate. About 95% of the water is recirculated to the waste treatment plant. 3 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Effects of particle size and chain length on flotation of quaternary ammonium salts onto kaolinite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longhua, Xu; Yuehua, Hu; Faqin, Dong; Hao, Jiang; Houqin, Wu; Zhen, Wang; Ruohua, Liu

    2015-06-01

    Effects of particle size and chain length on flotation of quaternary ammonium salts (QAS) onto kaolinite have been investigated by flotation tests. Dodecyltrimethylammonium chloride (DTAC) and cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTAC) were used as collectors for kaolinite in different particle size fractions (0.075 ~ 0.01 mm, 0.045 ~ 0.075 mm, 0 ~ 0.045 mm). The anomalous flotation behavior of kaolinite have been further explained based on crystal structure considerations by adsorption tests and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The results show that the flotation recovery of kaolinite in all different particle size fractions decreases with an increase in pH. As the concentration of collectors increases, the flotation recovery increases. The longer the carbon chain of QAS is, the higher the recoveries of coarse kaolinite (0.075 ~ 0.01 mm and 0.045 ~ 0.075 mm) are. But the flotation recovery of the finest kaolinite (0 ~ 0.045 mm) decreases with chain lengths of QAS collectors increasing, which is consistent with the flotation results of unscreened kaolinite (0 ~ 0.075 mm). It is explained by the froth stability related to the residual concentration of QAS collector in mineral pulp. In lower residual concentration, the froth stability becomes worse. Within the range of flotation collector concentration, it's easy of CTAC to be completely adsorbed by kaolinite in the particle size fraction (0-0.045 mm), which led to lower flotation recovery. Moreover, it is interesting that the coarser particle size of kaolinite is, the higher flotation recovery is. The anomalous flotation behavior of kaolinite is rationalized based on crystal structure considerations. The results of MD simulations show that the (001) kaolinite surface has the strongest interaction with DTAC, compared with the (00 1) face, (010) and (110) edges. On the other hand, when particle size of kaolinite is altered, the number of basal planes and edge planes is changed. It is observed that the finer kaolinite particles size become, the greater relative surface area of edges and the more the number of edges are. It means that fine kaolinite particles have more edges to adsorb fewer cationic colletors than that of coarse kaolinite particles, which is responsible for the poorer floatability of fine kaolinite.

  13. Mapping Oyster Reef Habitats in Mobile Bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolte, Danielle

    2011-01-01

    Oyster reefs around the world are declining rapidly, and although they haven t received as much attention as coral reefs, they are just as important to their local ecosystems and economies. Oyster reefs provide habitats for many species of fish, invertebrates, and crustaceans, as well as the next generations of oysters. Oysters are also harvested from many of these reefs and are an important segment of many local economies, including that of Mobile Bay, where oysters rank in the top five commercial marine species both by landed weight and by dollar value. Although the remaining Mobile Bay oyster reefs are some of the least degraded in the world, projected climate change could have dramatic effects on the health of these important ecosystems. The viability of oyster reefs depends on water depth and temperature, appropriate pH and salinity levels, and the amount of dissolved oxygen in the water. Projected increases in sea level, changes in precipitation and runoff patterns, and changes in pH resulting from increases in the amount of carbon dioxide dissolved in the oceans could all affect the viability of oyster reefs in the future. Human activities such as dredging and unsustainable harvesting practices are also adversely impacting the oyster reefs. Fortunately, several projects are already under way to help rebuild or support existing or previously existing oyster reefs. The success of these projects will depend on the local effects of climate change on the current and potential habitats and man s ability to recognize and halt unsustainable harvesting practices. As the extent and health of the reefs changes, it will have impacts on the Mobile Bay ecosystem and economy, changing the resources available to the people who live there and to the rest of the country, since Mobile Bay is an important national source of seafood. This project identified potential climate change impacts on the oyster reefs of Mobile Bay, including the possible addition of newly viable habitats in the southeastern regions of the Bay.

  14. Coral reef evolution on rapidly subsiding margins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Webster, J.M.; Braga, J.C.; Clague, D.A.; Gallup, C.; Hein, J.R.; Potts, D.C.; Renema, W.; Riding, R.; Riker-Coleman, K.; Silver, E.; Wallace, L.M.

    2009-01-01

    A series of well-developed submerged coral reefs are preserved in the Huon Gulf (Papua New Guinea) and around Hawaii. Despite different tectonics settings, both regions have experienced rapid subsidence (2-6??m/ka) over the last 500??ka. Rapid subsidence, combined with eustatic sea-level changes, is responsible for repeated drowning and backstepping of coral reefs over this period. Because we can place quantitative constraints on these systems (i.e., reef drowning age, eustatic sea-level changes, subsidence rates, accretion rates, basement substrates, and paleobathymetry), these areas represent unique natural laboratories for exploring the roles of tectonics, reef accretion, and eustatic sea-level changes in controlling the evolution of individual reefs, as well as backstepping of the entire system. A review of new and existing bathymetric, radiometric, sedimentary facies and numerical modeling data indicate that these reefs have had long, complex growth histories and that they are highly sensitive, recording drowning not only during major deglaciations, but also during high-frequency, small-amplitude interstadial and deglacial meltwater pulse events. Analysis of five generalized sedimentary facies shows that reef drowning is characterized by a distinct biological and sedimentary sequence. Observational and numerical modeling data indicate that on precessional (20??ka) and sub-orbital timescales, the rate and amplitude of eustatic sea-level changes are critical in controlling initiation, growth, drowning or sub-aerial exposure, subsequent re-initiation, and final drowning. However, over longer timescales (> 100-500??ka) continued tectonic subsidence and basement substrate morphology influence broad scale reef morphology and backstepping geometries. Drilling of these reefs will yield greatly expanded stratigraphic sections compared with similar reefs on slowly subsiding, stable and uplifting margins, and thus they represent a unique archive of sea-level and climate changes, as well as a record of the response of coral reefs to these changes over the last six glacial cycles. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The effects of surfactant concentration on grease removal by air flotation in municipal sewage treatment

    E-print Network

    Perry, Larry Eugene

    1978-01-01

    THE EFFECTS OF SURFACTANT CONCENTRATION ON GREASE REMOVAL BY AIR FLOTATION IN MUNICIPAL SEWAGE TREATMENT A Thesis by LARRY EUGENE PERRY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 'l97B Major Subject: Civil Engineering THE EFFECTS OF SURFACTANT CONCENTRATION ON GREASE REMOVAL BY AIR FLOTATION IN MUNI'CIPAL SEWAGE TREATMENT A Thesis LARPY EUGENE PERRY Approved as to styie and content by...

  16. Coral reef community composition in the context of disturbance history on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia.

    PubMed

    Graham, Nicholas A J; Chong-Seng, Karen M; Huchery, Cindy; Januchowski-Hartley, Fraser A; Nash, Kirsty L

    2014-01-01

    Much research on coral reefs has documented differential declines in coral and associated organisms. In order to contextualise this general degradation, research on community composition is necessary in the context of varied disturbance histories and the biological processes and physical features thought to retard or promote recovery. We conducted a spatial assessment of coral reef communities across five reefs of the central Great Barrier Reef, Australia, with known disturbance histories, and assessed patterns of coral cover and community composition related to a range of other variables thought to be important for reef dynamics. Two of the reefs had not been extensively disturbed for at least 15 years prior to the surveys. Three of the reefs had been severely impacted by crown-of-thorns starfish outbreaks and coral bleaching approximately a decade before the surveys, from which only one of them was showing signs of recovery based on independent surveys. We incorporated wave exposure (sheltered and exposed) and reef zone (slope, crest and flat) into our design, providing a comprehensive assessment of the spatial patterns in community composition on these reefs. Categorising corals into life history groupings, we document major coral community differences in the unrecovered reefs, compared to the composition and covers found on the undisturbed reefs. The recovered reef, despite having similar coral cover, had a different community composition from the undisturbed reefs, which may indicate slow successional processes, or a different natural community dominance pattern due to hydrology and other oceanographic factors. The variables that best correlated with patterns in the coral community among sites included the density of juvenile corals, herbivore fish biomass, fish species richness and the cover of macroalgae. Given increasing impacts to the Great Barrier Reef, efforts to mitigate local stressors will be imperative to encouraging coral communities to persist into the future. PMID:24983747

  17. Project O.R.B (Operation Reef Ball): Creating Artificial Reefs, Educating the Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phipps, A.

    2012-04-01

    The Project O.R.B. (Operation Reef Ball) team at South Plantation High School's Everglades Restoration & Environmental Science Magnet Program is trying to help our ailing south Florida coral reefs by constructing, deploying, and monitoring designed artificial reefs. Students partnered with the Reef Ball Foundation, local concrete companies, state parks, Girl Scouts, Sea Scouts, local universities and environmental agencies to construct concrete reef balls, each weighing approximately 500 lbs (227 kg). Students then deployed two artificial reefs consisting of over 30 concrete reef balls in two sites previously permitted for artificial reef deployment. One artificial reef was placed approximately 1.5 miles (2.4 km) offshore of Golden Beach in Miami-Dade County with the assistance of Florida Atlantic University and their research vessel. A twin reef was deployed at the mouth of the river in Oleta River State Park in Miami. Monitoring and maintenance of the sites is ongoing with semi-annual reports due to the Reef Ball Foundation and DERM (Department of Environmental Resource Management) of Miami-Dade County. A second goal of Project O.R.B. is aligned with the Florida Local Action Strategy, the Southeast Florida Coral Reef Initiative, and the U.S. Coral Reef Task Force, all of which point out the importance of awareness and education as key components to the health of our coral reefs. Project O.R.B. team members developed and published an activity book targeting elementary school students. Outreach events incorporate cascade learning where high school students teach elementary and middle school students about various aspects of coral reefs through interactive "edu-tainment" modules. Attendees learn about water sampling, salinity, beach erosion, surface runoff, water cycle, ocean zones, anatomy of coral, human impact on corals, and characteristics of a well-designed artificial reef. Middle school students snorkel on the artificial reef to witness first-hand the success of this artificial reef. Over 3,000 students have been reached through the educational outreach endeavors of Project O.R.B. This successful STEM project models the benefits of partnerships with universities, local K-12 public schools and community conservation organizations and provides students with authentic learning experiences. Students are able to have a positive impact on their local coral reef environment, their peers and their community through this comprehensive service-learning project.

  18. Sandstone Strata in Capitol Reef National Park

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A detail view of some sandstone strata within Capitol Reef National Park. Capitol Reef is primarily made up of sandstone formations within the Waterpocket Fold, monocline that extends nearly 100 miles. A monocline is a step-like fold in rock strata that can resemble an enormous wrinkle in the earth....

  19. Along-Track Reef Imaging System (ATRIS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brock, John; Zawada, Dave

    2006-01-01

    "Along-Track Reef Imaging System (ATRIS)" describes the U.S. Geological Survey's Along-Track Reef Imaging System, a boat-based sensor package for rapidly mapping shallow water benthic environments. ATRIS acquires high resolution, color digital images that are accurately geo-located in real-time.

  20. Ancient reef ecosystem expansion and collapse

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Copper

    1994-01-01

    Platform carbonate and, particularly, reef ecosystem development (with reefs representing the acme of carbonate platform growth) were highly cyclical in early to mid Paleozoic time, especially in relation to known or postulated times of global warming or cooling. These cycles do not appear to correspond to postulated 26 Ma rhythms seen in diversity patterns, nor were they regular. There were

  1. Artificial Reefs--A Coastal Classroom Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dindo, John J.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the construction of artificial reefs for such uses as commercial fishing and recreational boating. Describes a class project in which students construct a small artificial reef and observe the changes over time in terms of temperature, salinity, flora and fauna. (TW)

  2. Reefs and Learning: Education Evaluation Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stepath, Carl M.

    2006-01-01

    Marine education research designs are discussed, and student learning outcomes while monitoring a coral reef is evaluated. Changes in environmental knowledge and attitudes, ecological intention to act, and direct reef experience were investigated. Differences between student pre-test and the post-test responses were observed, and analysis is…

  3. Northwestern Hawaiian Islands Coral Reef Ecosystem Reserve

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Describes the unique Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (NWHI) Ecosystem Reserve. Provides resources focused on NWHI coral reef ecosystems, and introductions to reef research, management and protection activities. Educational outreach includes: teacher workshops; student activities, and a Discovery Center in Hilo, Hawaii that features exhibits and activities for schools and the public.

  4. Subtropical Biotic Fringing Reefs as Ecological Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Jeffrey W.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a 16-week course in marine biology involving a class-coordinated investigation of a subtropical biotic fringing reef of Hawaii. Describes in detail the development of preliminary hypotheses regarding general cause-effect relationships on the reef, and the exploration of specific areas, such as chemical or physical factors. (CS)

  5. Preliminary legal considerations in developing artificial reefs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John L. Seymour

    1975-01-01

    Artificial reefs have been shown to be effective for attracting large concentrations of fish to distinct and readily located sites where fishermen are able to increase catches with reduced effort. These man?made reefs, constructed of materials ranging from sunken surplus Liberty ships to worn out tires, may become effective tools in fisheries and coastal zone management programs. There are numerous

  6. 36. ORE DOCK, LOOKING WEST. HULETT UNLOADERS AWAIT THE NEXT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. ORE DOCK, LOOKING WEST. HULETT UNLOADERS AWAIT THE NEXT ORE BOAT. BY LATE WINTER, THE ORE STORAGE YARD SEEN AT LEFT WILL BE DEPLETED. - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  7. A Global Estimate of the Number of Coral Reef Fishers.

    PubMed

    Teh, Louise S L; Teh, Lydia C L; Sumaila, U Rashid

    2013-01-01

    Overfishing threatens coral reefs worldwide, yet there is no reliable estimate on the number of reef fishers globally. We address this data gap by quantifying the number of reef fishers on a global scale, using two approaches - the first estimates reef fishers as a proportion of the total number of marine fishers in a country, based on the ratio of reef-related to total marine fish landed values. The second estimates reef fishers as a function of coral reef area, rural coastal population, and fishing pressure. In total, we find that there are 6 million reef fishers in 99 reef countries and territories worldwide, of which at least 25% are reef gleaners. Our estimates are an improvement over most existing fisher population statistics, which tend to omit accounting for gleaners and reef fishers. Our results suggest that slightly over a quarter of the world's small-scale fishers fish on coral reefs, and half of all coral reef fishers are in Southeast Asia. Coral reefs evidently support the socio-economic well-being of numerous coastal communities. By quantifying the number of people who are employed as reef fishers, we provide decision-makers with an important input into planning for sustainable coral reef fisheries at the appropriate scale. PMID:23840327

  8. A Global Estimate of the Number of Coral Reef Fishers

    PubMed Central

    Teh, Louise S. L.; Teh, Lydia C. L.; Sumaila, U. Rashid

    2013-01-01

    Overfishing threatens coral reefs worldwide, yet there is no reliable estimate on the number of reef fishers globally. We address this data gap by quantifying the number of reef fishers on a global scale, using two approaches - the first estimates reef fishers as a proportion of the total number of marine fishers in a country, based on the ratio of reef-related to total marine fish landed values. The second estimates reef fishers as a function of coral reef area, rural coastal population, and fishing pressure. In total, we find that there are 6 million reef fishers in 99 reef countries and territories worldwide, of which at least 25% are reef gleaners. Our estimates are an improvement over most existing fisher population statistics, which tend to omit accounting for gleaners and reef fishers. Our results suggest that slightly over a quarter of the world’s small-scale fishers fish on coral reefs, and half of all coral reef fishers are in Southeast Asia. Coral reefs evidently support the socio-economic well-being of numerous coastal communities. By quantifying the number of people who are employed as reef fishers, we provide decision-makers with an important input into planning for sustainable coral reef fisheries at the appropriate scale. PMID:23840327

  9. Shifting the paradigm of coral-reef ‘health’ assessment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Craig A. Downs; Cheryl M. Woodley; Robert H. Richmond; Lynda L. Lanning; Richard Owen

    2005-01-01

    Coral reefs are in crisis. Globally, our reefs are degrading at an accelerating rate and present methodologies for coral-reef ‘health’ assessment, although providing important information in describing these global declines, have been unable to halt these declines. These assessments are usually employed with no clear purpose and using uncorrelated methods resulting in a failure to prevent or mitigate coral reef

  10. A large coral reef in the Pennsylvanian of Ziyun County, Guizhou (South China): The substrate and initial colonization environment of reef-building corals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yong-Li Zhang; En-Pu Gong; Mark A. Wilson; Chang-Qing Guan; Bao-Liang Sun

    2010-01-01

    Studies of Pennsylvanian reefs are mainly focused on algal reefs; research on non-algal framework reefs is relatively uncommon. The Bianping coral reef is the largest Pennsylvanian framework reef in China. The main builders of the reef were the rugose corals Fomitchevella. Some paleontological phenomena indicate that the coral Fomitchevella colonized a hard substrate which included encrusting tubular organisms, microbial carbonate,

  11. National Center for Caribbean Coral Reef Research

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    A number of research centers are concerned with the state of the world's coral reefs, and the National Center for Caribbean Coral Reef Research (NCORE) is one such center of scholarly excellence. Located at the University of Miami, NCORE is primarily concerned with "the analysis and predication of coral reef resilience". On their site, visitors can learn about some of their primary research initiatives, such as their work on the Florida reef tract and on tracking the effects of climate change on the reef communities. The general public will also find their digital map series quite useful as well. In this section, users can examine a number of complex digital maps and images that provide information about the state of coral cover around Puerto Rico, South Florida, and the Bahamas.

  12. Coral Reef Information System: Discover NOAA's Data

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Coral Reef Information System (CoRIS), this Web site is "designed to be a single point of access to NOAA coral reef information and data products, especially those derived from NOAA's Coral Reef Initiative Program." With Discover NOAA's Data, users can access information by a text search of metadata records, or by a spatial search using an Arc IMS application. The two approaches share many of the same data sets. With the text search, users may search NOAA coral reef information by title, author, keyword, etc. The map program includes "over 19,000 aerial photos, 400 preview navigational charts, tide stations, paleoclimatological studies, photo mosaics, coral reef monitoring, bleaching reports, and more." The site provides numerous help features for both search methods.

  13. Satellite tracking of Harbour Seals on Horns Reef Use of the Horns Reef wind farm area and the North Sea

    E-print Network

    Satellite tracking of Harbour Seals on Horns Reef Use of the Horns Reef wind farm area. : Harbour seals on Horns Reef. Summary Ten harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) caught on the Danish Wadden Sea Reef. Based on previous studies using VHF- transmitters, it was expected that the seals would spend

  14. Connectivity of reef fish between mangroves and coral reefs: Algorithms for the design of marine reserves at seascape scales

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter J. Mumby

    2005-01-01

    Many species of coral reef fish undertake ontogenetic migrations between seagrass beds, mangroves, and coral reefs. A recent study from the Caribbean found that the availability of mangrove nursery habitat had a striking impact on the community structure and bio- mass of reef fish in their adult, coral reef habitat. The biomass of several species more than doubled when the

  15. 8. EAST ELEVATION OF SKIDOO MILL AND UPPER ORE BIN, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. EAST ELEVATION OF SKIDOO MILL AND UPPER ORE BIN, LOOKING WEST FROM ACCESS ROAD. THE ROADWAY ON THIS LEVEL (CENTER) WAS USED FOR UNLOADING ORE BROUGHT ON BURROWS INTO THE ORE BIN AT THE TOP LEVEL OF THE MILL. THE ORE BIN IN THE UPPER LEFT WAS ADDED LATER WHEN ORE WAS BROUGHT TO THE MILL BY TRUCKS. - Skidoo Mine, Park Route 38 (Skidoo Road), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  16. The sources of our iron ores. II

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burchard, E.F.

    1933-01-01

    In this instalment** the iron ore deposits of the Lake Superior States, which normally furnish about 80 per cent, of the annual output of the United States, are described together with historical notes on discovery and transportation of ore. Deposits in the Mississippi Valley and Western States are likewise outlined and the sources of imported ore are given. Reviewing the whole field, it is indicated that the great producing deposits of the Lake Superior and southern Appalachian regions are of hematite in basin areas of sedimentary rocks, that hydrated iron oxides and iron carbonates are generally found in undisturbed comparatively recent sediments, and that magnetite occurs in metamorphic and igneous rocks; also that numerical abundance of deposits is not a criterion as to their real importance as a source of supply. Statistics of production of iron ore and estimates of reserves of present grade conclude the paper.

  17. Project StORe: Social Science report 

    E-print Network

    Burton, Guy

    There was widespread support across the social science research community regarding the aims of the StORe Project Nearly half of social science respondents claimed that both source-to-output and out-put-to source repositories ...

  18. Open Scholarship 2006 StORe poster 

    E-print Network

    Pryor, Graham

    2006-01-01

    StORe is a project within the JISC digital repositories programme. It has a declared mission to enhance the value of academic research output by enabling direct interaction between source and output repositories

  19. Project StORe: Biosciences report 

    E-print Network

    Biegon, Dagmar

    2006-09-15

    This report was written as part of the first phase of the national higher education research project StORe (Source-to-Output Repositories). The project included a large scale analysis of repository user behaviour, with ...

  20. Geomorphology and sediment transport on a submerged back-reef sand apron: One Tree Reef, Great Barrier Reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Daniel L.; Vila-Concejo, Ana; Webster, Jody M.

    2014-10-01

    Back-reef sand aprons are conspicuous and dynamic sedimentary features in coral reef systems. The development of these features influences the evolution and defines the maturity of coral reefs. However, the hydrodynamic processes that drive changes on sand aprons are poorly understood with only a few studies directly assessing sediment entrainment and transport. Current and wave conditions on a back-reef sand apron were measured during this study and a digital elevation model was developed through topographic and bathymetric surveying of the sand apron, reef flats and lagoon. The current and wave processes that may entrain and transport sediment were assessed using second order small amplitude (Stokes) wave theory and Shields equations. The morphodynamic interactions between current flow and geomorphology were also examined. The results showed that sediment transport occurs under modal hydrodynamic conditions with waves the main force entraining sediment rather than average currents. A morphodynamic relationship between current flow and geomorphology was also observed with current flow primarily towards the lagoon in shallow areas of the sand apron and deeper channel-like areas directing current off the sand apron towards the lagoon or the reef crest. These results show that the short-term mutual interaction of hydrodynamics and geomorphology in coral reefs can result in morphodynamic equilibrium.

  1. Wave transformation across coral reefs under changing sea levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Daniel; Power, Hannah; Vila Conejo, Ana; Webster, Jody

    2015-04-01

    The transformation of swell waves from deep water across reef flats is the primary process regulating energy regimes in coral reef systems. Coral reefs are effective barriers removing up to 99% of wave energy during breaking and propagation across reef flats. Consequently back-reef environments are often considered low energy with only limited sediment transport and geomorphic change during modal conditions. Coral reefs, and specifically reef flats, therefore provide important protection to tropical coastlines from coastal erosion and recession. However, changes in sea level could lead to significant changes in the dissipation of swell wave energy in coral reef systems with wave heights dependent on the depth over the reef flat. This suggests that a rise in sea level would also lead to significantly higher energy conditions exacerbating the transgressive effects of sea level rise on tropical beaches and reef islands. This study examines the potential implications of different sea level scenarios on the transformation of waves across the windward reef flats of One Tree Reef, southern Great Barrier Reef. Waves were measured on the reef flats and back-reef sand apron of One Tree Reef. A one-dimensional wave model was calibrated and used to investigate wave processes on the reef flats under different mean sea level (MSL) scenarios (present MSL, +1 m MSL, and +2 m MSL). These scenarios represent both potential future sea level states and also the paleo sea level of the late Holocene in the southern Great Barrier Reef. Wave heights were shown to increase under sea level rise, with greater wave induced orbital velocities affecting the bed under higher sea levels. In general waves were more likely to entrain and transport sediment both on the reef flat and in the back reef environment under higher sea levels which has implications for not only forecasted climate change scenarios but also for interpreting geological changes during the late Holocene when sea levels were 1-2 m higher than present.

  2. A novel reef coral symbiosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantos, O.; Bythell, J. C.

    2010-09-01

    Reef building corals form close associations with unicellular microalgae, fungi, bacteria and archaea, some of which are symbiotic and which together form the coral holobiont. Associations with multicellular eukaryotes such as polychaete worms, bivalves and sponges are not generally considered to be symbiotic as the host responds to their presence by forming physical barriers with an active growth edge in the exoskeleton isolating the invader and, at a subcellular level, activating innate immune responses such as melanin deposition. This study describes a novel symbiosis between a newly described hydrozoan ( Zanclea margaritae sp. nov.) and the reef building coral Acropora muricata (= A. formosa), with the hydrozoan hydrorhiza ramifying throughout the coral tissues with no evidence of isolation or activation of the immune systems of the host. The hydrorhiza lacks a perisarc, which is typical of symbiotic species of this and related genera, including species that associate with other cnidarians such as octocorals. The symbiosis was observed at all sites investigated from two distant locations on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia, and appears to be host species specific, being found only in A. muricata and in none of 30 other species investigated at these sites. Not all colonies of A. muricata host the hydrozoans and both the prevalence within the coral population (mean = 66%) and density of emergent hydrozoan hydranths on the surface of the coral (mean = 4.3 cm-2, but up to 52 cm-2) vary between sites. The form of the symbiosis in terms of the mutualism-parasitism continuum is not known, although the hydrozoan possesses large stenotele nematocysts, which may be important for defence from predators and protozoan pathogens. This finding expands the known A. muricata holobiont and the association must be taken into account in future when determining the corals’ abilities to defend against predators and withstand stress.

  3. Friction Forces in O-ring Sealing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    In the present study the focus was on developing a relationship as practical and convenient option for computing the friction force in O-ring sealing elements as used in the hydraulic and pneumatic equipments. For low-pressure applications, the developed relationship was applied for a different number of O-ring diameters, by investigating the obtained results, a good agreement has been observed for

  4. The Reef Environmental Education Foundation

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2003-02-17

    The purpose of REEF is to educate and enlist divers in the conservation of marine habitats. The main focus of this site is the Fish Survey Project, in which volunteer scuba divers and snorkelers collect and report information on marine fish populations. The data is accessible through this website, and users can both contribute data they gather and generate reports from the database. A variety of reports can be created, including lists of all species found within a specific geographic area or the distribution of a fish species or family. There is an excellent explanation of how the data can be interpreted and what the parameters in the reports represent.

  5. Biomining: metal recovery from ores with microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Schippers, Axel; Hedrich, Sabrina; Vasters, Jürgen; Drobe, Malte; Sand, Wolfgang; Willscher, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    Biomining is an increasingly applied biotechnological procedure for processing of ores in the mining industry (biohydrometallurgy). Nowadays the production of copper from low-grade ores is the most important industrial application and a significant part of world copper production already originates from heap or dump/stockpile bioleaching. Conceptual differences exist between the industrial processes of bioleaching and biooxidation. Bioleaching is a conversion of an insoluble valuable metal into a soluble form by means of microorganisms. In biooxidation, on the other hand, gold is predominantly unlocked from refractory ores in large-scale stirred-tank biooxidation arrangements for further processing steps. In addition to copper and gold production, biomining is also used to produce cobalt, nickel, zinc, and uranium. Up to now, biomining has merely been used as a procedure in the processing of sulfide ores and uranium ore, but laboratory and pilot procedures already exist for the processing of silicate and oxide ores (e.g., laterites), for leaching of processing residues or mine waste dumps (mine tailings), as well as for the extraction of metals from industrial residues and waste (recycling). This chapter estimates the world production of copper, gold, and other metals by means of biomining and chemical leaching (bio-/hydrometallurgy) compared with metal production by pyrometallurgical procedures, and describes new developments in biomining. In addition, an overview is given about metal sulfide oxidizing microorganisms, fundamentals of biomining including bioleaching mechanisms and interface processes, as well as anaerobic bioleaching and bioleaching with heterotrophic microorganisms. PMID:23793914

  6. Ores and Climate Change - Primary Shareholders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Holly J.; Hannah, Judith L.

    2015-04-01

    Many in the economic geology community concern themselves with details of ore formation at the deposit scale, whether tallying fluid inclusion data to get at changes in ore-forming fluids or defining structures that aid and abet mineralization. These compilations are generally aimed at interpretation of events at the site of ore formation, with the goal being assignment of the deposit to a sanctioned ore deposit model. While providing useful data, this approach is incomplete and does not, by itself, serve present-day requirements for true interdisciplinary science. The ore-forming environment is one of chaos and disequilibrium at nearly all scales (Stein, 2014). Chaos and complexity are documented by variably altered rocks, veins or disseminated mineralization with multi-generational fluid histories, erratic and unusual textures in host rocks, and the bitumen or other hydrocarbon products entwined within many ore deposits. This should give pause to our drive for more data as a means to find "the answer". The answer lies in the kind of data collected and more importantly, in the way we interpret those data. Rather than constructing an ever-increasing catalog of descriptive mutations on sanctioned ore deposit models (e.g., IOGC or Iron-Oxide Copper Gold deposits), the way forward is to link source and transport of metals, sulfur, and organic material with regional and ultimately whole Earth chemical evolution. Important experimental work provides chemical constraints in controlled and behaved environments. To these data, we add imagination and interpretation, always tying back to field observations. In this paper, several key points are made by way of ore deposit examples: (1) many IOCG deposits are outcomes of profound changes in the chemistry of the Earth's surface, in the interplay of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, and lithosphere; (2) the redox history of Fe in deep earth may be ultimately expressed in the ore-forming sequence; and (3) the formation of many giant Cu-Mo-Au ore deposits may be arrested when the surface is catastrophically breached, as multiple km-scale breccia pipes empty their volatile and metal contents into the atmosphere. The new equation for studying ore geology should be one that reconstructs ore formation from beginning to end, that is, from source, release, and transport, to breach. Of course, detailed measurements and mapping of ore bodies remains essential, but a full understanding of metal migration and budgets can only be achieved if we model what might have been left behind in deeper Earth, and what may have been lost to the atmosphere. To do this, we need to understand much more than the geology at our ore deposit of interest. Stein, H.J. (2014) Dating and Tracing the History of Ore Formation. Treatise on Geochemistry 13: 87-118. Elsevier. Support for time to think - CHRONOS, funded by a consortium of Norwegian petroleum companies.

  7. Coral Reef Adventure Fun Zone

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Science NetLinks (AAAS; )

    2007-04-29

    The Memory Game beginner is the best game for students of all ages to play unless there is a student who knows an unusual amount of information about coral reefs. In this case, that student can play the expert level where he/she will match the name or phrase with a picture.To begin, students should click on the GO! icon on the Memory Game and then again on the GO! icon on the pop-up screen. The beginner version requires students to match alike pictures. Students should click on the images to find the matching pairs. As they click on an image and then click on another, the previous image goes away if it's not a match.so students need to remember where they clicked on each image.Once students find a matching pair, they need to click on one image and then click on its matching image to keep the matching pair on the screen. Students should continue this process until all the images are found. On the bottom left of this screen there is a Move counter that keeps track of how many times students click on an image. If students want to try again to achieve a better score, then they can start the game over on a new screen. As noted below, there are other games that would be suitable for playing after students learn more about coral reefs.

  8. 76 FR 63904 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Coral Reef Conservation Program Administration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-14

    ...Information Collection; Comment Request; Coral Reef Conservation Program Administration...SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Abstract The Coral Reef Conservation Act of 2000 (Act) was...enacted to provide a framework for conserving coral reefs. The Coral Reef Conservation...

  9. Demography of the ecosystem engineer Crassostrea gigas, related to vertical reef accretion and reef persistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walles, Brenda; Mann, Roger; Ysebaert, Tom; Troost, Karin; Herman, Peter M. J.; Smaal, Aad C.

    2015-03-01

    Marine species characterized as structure building, autogenic ecosystem engineers are recognized worldwide as potential tools for coastal adaptation efforts in the face of sea level rise. Successful employment of ecosystem engineers in coastal protection largely depends on long-term persistence of their structure, which is in turn dependent on the population dynamics of the individual species. Oysters, such as the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas), are recognized as ecosystem engineers with potential for use in coastal protection. Persistence of oyster reefs is strongly determined by recruitment and shell production (growth), processes facilitated by gregarious settlement on extant shell substrate. Although the Pacific oyster has been introduced world-wide, and has formed dense reefs in the receiving coastal waters, the population biology of live oysters and the quantitative mechanisms maintaining these reefs has rarely been studied, hence the aim of the present work. This study had two objectives: (1) to describe the demographics of extant C. gigas reefs, and (2) to estimate vertical reef accretion rates and carbonate production in these oyster reefs. Three long-living oyster reefs (>30 years old), which have not been exploited since their first occurrence, were examined in the Oosterschelde estuary in the Netherlands. A positive reef accretion rate (7.0-16.9 mm year-1 shell material) was observed, consistent with self-maintenance and persistent structure. We provide a framework to predict reef accretion and population persistence under varying recruitment, growth and mortality scenarios.

  10. In-plant testing of microbubble column flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Luttrell, G.H.; Adel, G.T.

    1989-01-01

    A project to evaluate the performance of the Virginia Tech Microbubble Column Flotation (MCF) process in an operating coal preparation plant was initiated during this past quarter. The project is concerned with the collection of process operating data using a 30-inch diameter column, and using this data to scale-up to a prototype, full-scale plant column. The work is being carried out at the Marrowbone Preparation Plant owned by the Shell Mining Corporation. Work has primarily concentrated on finalizing the project work plan (Task 2.1 -- Project Planning), instrumenting the 30-inch diameter column (Task 2.2 -- Advanced Instrumentation) and conducting a preliminary parametric study to evaluate the performance of the column (Task 2.3 -- Detailed Testing). To date, the column has been consistently capable of producing a 9.5% ash product at a 61% combustible recovery from a -150 mesh classifying cyclone overflow containing 55--60% ash at 3--5% solids. Tests conducted over an extended period of time indicate that the column consistently maintains grade in spite of fluctuations in the feed characteristics. 12 figs.

  11. Electro-coagulation-flotation process for algae removal.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shanshan; Yang, Jixian; Tian, Jiayu; Ma, Fang; Tu, Gang; Du, Maoan

    2010-05-15

    Algae in surface water have been a long-term issue all over the world, due to their adverse influence on drinking water treatment process as well as drinking water quality. The algae removal by electro-coagulation-flotation (ECF) technology was investigated in this paper. The results indicated that aluminum was an excellent electrode material for algae removal as compared with iron. The optimal parameters determined were: current density=1 mA/cm(2), pH=4-7, water temperature=18-36 degrees C, algae density=0.55 x 10(9)-1.55 x 10(9) cells/L. Under the optimal conditions, 100% of algae removal was achieved with the energy consumption as low as 0.4 kWh/m(3). The ECF performed well in acid and neutral conditions. At low initial pH of 4-7, the cell density of algae was effectively removed in the ECF, mainly through the charge neutralization mechanism; while the algae removal worsened when the pH increased (7-10), and the main mechanism shifted to sweeping flocculation and enmeshment. The mechanisms for algae removal at different pH were also confirmed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis. Furthermore, initial cell density and water temperature could also influence the algae removal. Overall, the results indicated that the ECF technology was effective for algae removal, from both the technical and economical points of view. PMID:20042280

  12. Antimony ore in the Fairbanks district, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Killeen, Pemberton Lewis; Mertie, John B., Jr.

    1951-01-01

    Antimony-bearing ores in the Fairbanks district, Alaska, are found principally in two areas, the extremities of which are at points 10 miles west and 23 miles northeast of Fairbanks; and one of two minor areas lies along this same trend 30 miles farther to the northeast. These areas are probably only local manifestations of mineralization that affected a much broader area and formed antimony-bearing deposits in neighboring districts, the closest of which is 50 miles away. The ores were exposed largely as a result of lode gold mining, but at two periods in the past, high prices for antimony ore warranted an independent production and about 2500 tons of stibnite ore was shipped. The sulfide deposits occupy the same fractures along which a gold-quartz mineralization of greater economic importance occurred; and both are probably genetically related to igneous rocks which intrude the schistose country rock. The sulfide is in part contemporaneous with some late-stage quartz in which it occurs as disseminated crystals; and in part the latest filling in the mineralized zones where it forms kidney-shaped masses of essentially solid sulfide. One extremely long mass must have contained nearly 100 tons of ore, but the average of the larger kidneys is closer to several tons. Much of the ore is stibnite, with quartz as a minor impurity, and assays show the tenor to vary from 40 to 65 percent antimony. Sulphantimonites are less abundant but likewise occur as disseminated crystals and as kidney-shaped bodies. Antimony oxides appear on the weathered surface and along fractures within the sulfide ore. Deposits containing either stibnite or sulphantimonite are known at more than 50 localities, but only eighteen have produced ore and the bulk of this came from the mines. The geology of the deposit, and the nature, extent, and period of the workings are covered in the detailed descriptions of individual occurrences. Several geologic and economic factors, which greatly affect prospecting and mining for stibnite ore in the area, are outlined. The principal available ore and reserves are considered to be ores earlier mined but never shipped, ore minable from near-surface deposits, and ores recoverable as a by-product of future gold mining. The outlook for stibnite production in the district is very uncertain. Apparently the greater portion of stibnite ore has already been recovered and present operations will strip the two principal areas of the district. This conclusion is based on the scanty discoveries since the last war and the fact that the areas are so pock-marked with prospects that there is little likelihood that any other large near-surface bodies remain to be discovered. Future prospecting would essentially be limited to attempts to seek the continuation of lodes previously having high yields of stibnite.

  13. Treatment of municipal wastewater UASB reactor effluent by unconventional flotation and UV disinfection.

    PubMed

    Tessele, F; Monteggia, L O; Rubio, J

    2005-01-01

    Post-treatment of an UASB reactor effluent, fed with domestic sewage, was conducted using two-stage flotation and UV disinfection. Results were compared to those obtained in a parallel stabilisation pond. The first flotation stage employed 5 - 7.5 mg L(-1) cationic flocculant to separate off more than 99% of the suspended solids. Then, phosphate ions were completely recovered using carrier flotation with 5-25 mg L(-1) of Fe (FeCl3) at pH 6.3-7.0. This staged flotation led to high recoveries of water and allowed us to separate organic matter and phosphate bearing sludge. The water still contained about 1 x 10(2) NMP/100 mL total coliforms, which were removed using UV radiation to below detection levels. Final water turbidity was < 1.0 NTU, COD < 20 mg L(-1) O2 and 71 mNm(-1), the liquid/air interfacial tension. This flotation-UV flowsheet was found to be more efficient than the treatment in the stabilisation pond and appears to have some potential for water reuse. Results were discussed in terms of the biological, chemical and physicochemical mechanisms involved. PMID:16180444

  14. Evaluation of flotation for purification of pyrite for use in thermal batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidotti, R. A.; Reinhardt, F. W.

    1992-07-01

    The purification of pyrite (FeS2) used in Li-alloy/FeS2 thermal batteries by the physical process of flotation was evaluated for reduction of the quartz impurity. The process was compared to the standard process of leaching with concentrated hydrofluoric acid. Flotation was an attractive alternative because it avoided many of the safety and environmental concerns posed by the use of concentrated HF. The effects of particle size and initial purity of the pyrite feed material upon the final purity and yield of the product concentrate were examined for batch sizes from 3.5 to 921 kg. Feed materials as coarse as 8 mm and as fine as -325 mesh were treated; the coarse pyrite was ground wet in a rod mill or dry in a vibratory mill to -230 mesh prior to flotation. Both the HF-leached and the flotation-treated pyrite were leached with HCI (1:1 v/v) to remove acid-soluble impurities. The flotation-purified pyrite concentrates were formulated into catholytes; their electrochemical performance was evaluated in both single cells and 5-cell batteries for comparison to data generated under the same discharge conditions for catholytes formulated with HF/HCI purified pyrite.

  15. Evaluation of flotation for purification of pyrite for use in thermal batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Guidotti, R.A.; Reinhardt, F.W.

    1992-07-01

    The purification of pyrite (FeS{sub 2}) used in Li-alloy/FeS{sub 2} thermal batteries by the physical process of flotation was evaluated for reduction of the quartz impurity. The process was compared to the standard process of leaching with concentrated hydrofluoric acid. Flotation was an attractive alternative because it avoided many of the safety and environmental concerns posed by the use of concentrated HF. The effects of particle size and initial purity of the pyrite feed material upon the final purity and yield of the product concentrate were examined for batch sizes from 3.5 kg to 921 kg. Feed materials as coarse as 8 mm and as fine as -325 mesh were treated; the coarse pyrite was ground wet in a rod mill or dry in a vibratory mill to -230 mesh prior to flotation. Both the HF-leached and the flotation-treated pyrite were leached with HCI (1:1 v/v) to remove acid-soluble impurities. The flotation-purified pyrite concentrates were formulated into catholytes; their electrochemical performance was evaluated in both single cells and 5-cell batteries for comparison to data generated under the same discharge conditions for catholytes formulated with HF/HCI-purified pyrite.

  16. A fine coal circuitry study using column flotation and gravity separation. Quarterly report, 1 March 1995--31 May 1995

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Q. Honaker; S. Reed

    1995-01-01

    Column flotation provides excellent recovery of ultrafine coal while producing low ash content concentrates. However, column flotation is not efficient for treating fine coal containing significant amounts of mixed-phase particles. Fortunately, enhanced gravity separation has proved to have the ability to treat the mixed-phased particles more effectively. A disadvantage of gravity separation is that ultrafine clay particles are not easily

  17. ?IRNAK ASFALT?TLER?NDEN KÜLÜN FLOTASYON YÖNTEM? ?LE UZAKLA?TIRILMASI Deashing of Sirnak Asphaltites by Froth Flotation Method

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fatma Deniz AYHAN; Fikri KAHRAMAN

    In this study, the possibility of cleaning Sirnak asphaltite by froth flotation was investigated. For this purpose, laboratory tests were carried out in order to investigate the effects of grinding time, pulp density, pH, collector amount, depressant amount, frother amount on the overall performance of the flotation process. The best conditions determined were as follows: pulp density: 5 %, pH:

  18. Oysters and Oyster Reef Communities in Florida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Jean; Bly, Joe

    1989-01-01

    The habitat, life history, feeding, classification, anatomy and pearl production of the American oyster (Crassostrea virginica) are presented. A list of other oyster reef inhabitants and predators is provided. Harvest and habitat loss are discussed. (CW)

  19. Quaternary coral reef refugia preserved fish diversity.

    PubMed

    Pellissier, Loďc; Leprieur, Fabien; Parravicini, Valeriano; Cowman, Peter F; Kulbicki, Michel; Litsios, Glenn; Olsen, Steffen M; Wisz, Mary S; Bellwood, David R; Mouillot, David

    2014-05-30

    The most prominent pattern in global marine biogeography is the biodiversity peak in the Indo-Australian Archipelago. Yet the processes that underpin this pattern are still actively debated. By reconstructing global marine paleoenvironments over the past 3 million years on the basis of sediment cores, we assessed the extent to which Quaternary climate fluctuations can explain global variation in current reef fish richness. Comparing global historical coral reef habitat availability with the present-day distribution of 6316 reef fish species, we find that distance from stable coral reef habitats during historical periods of habitat loss explains 62% of the variation in fish richness, outweighing present-day environmental factors. Our results highlight the importance of habitat persistence during periods of climate change for preserving marine biodiversity. PMID:24876495

  20. 40 CFR 230.44 - Coral reefs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...skeletal deposit, usually of calcareous or silicaceous materials, produced by the vital activities of anthozoan polyps or other invertebrate organisms present in growing portions of the reef. (b) Possible loss of values: The discharge of dredged or fill...

  1. EPA Field Manual for Coral Reef Assessments

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Water Quality Research Program (WQRP) supports development of coral reef biological criteria. Research is focused on developing methods and tools to support implementation of legally defensible biological standards for maintaining biological integrity, which is protected by ...

  2. Explore coral reefs around the world

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    TERC

    This interactive map shows examples of coral reef locations in the Pacific, Caribbean, and Indian oceans. By clicking on a location, you can see the environmental conditions necessary for growth in terms of both ocean depth and sea surface tempature.

  3. Ocean acidification impairs vermetid reef recruitment.

    PubMed

    Milazzo, Marco; Rodolfo-Metalpa, Riccardo; Chan, Vera Bin San; Fine, Maoz; Alessi, Cinzia; Thiyagarajan, Vengatesen; Hall-Spencer, Jason M; Chemello, Renato

    2014-01-01

    Vermetids form reefs in sub-tropical and warm-temperate waters that protect coasts from erosion, regulate sediment transport and accumulation, serve as carbon sinks and provide habitat for other species. The gastropods that form these reefs brood encapsulated larvae; they are threatened by rapid environmental changes since their ability to disperse is very limited. We used transplant experiments along a natural CO2 gradient to assess ocean acidification effects on the reef-building gastropod Dendropoma petraeum. We found that although D. petraeum were able to reproduce and brood at elevated levels of CO2, recruitment success was adversely affected. Long-term exposure to acidified conditions predicted for the year 2100 and beyond caused shell dissolution and a significant increase in shell Mg content. Unless CO2 emissions are reduced and conservation measures taken, our results suggest these reefs are in danger of extinction within this century, with significant ecological and socioeconomic ramifications for coastal systems. PMID:24577050

  4. Machine vision system for ore sizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichelberger, Christopher L.; Blair, Steven M.; Khorana, Brij M.

    1991-03-01

    A machine vision systelu has been developed to size and count ore as it passes down a conveyor belt. The imaging system consists of a line scan camera a zoom lens and a structured lighting arrangenient. The structured lighting produces a line of light which is projected onto the conveyor belt at an angle with respect to the caniera. When a piece of ore is present the line of light covering the piece is displaced out of the field of view of the camera. This method is used to overcome the poor contrast between the ore and the conveyor belt. Iniages are acquired using an iiaage processor which performs real-tiiae thresholding of the iraage before it is passed to a frame buffer. A coniputer progrant locates the ore pieces in the image and identifies the boundaries between those pieces which are touching. Chords corresponding to the approximate major and minor axes of each piece are calculated. Using these measurements the size distribution for a population of ore is determined. 1.

  5. Comparing the invasibility of experimental "reefs" with field observations of natural reefs and artificial structures.

    PubMed

    Dafforn, Katherine A; Glasby, Tim M; Johnston, Emma L

    2012-01-01

    Natural systems are increasingly being modified by the addition of artificial habitats which may facilitate invasion. Where invaders are able to disperse from artificial habitats, their impact may spread to surrounding natural communities and therefore it is important to investigate potential factors that reduce or enhance invasibility. We surveyed the distribution of non-indigenous and native invertebrates and algae between artificial habitats and natural reefs in a marine subtidal system. We also deployed sandstone plates as experimental 'reefs' and manipulated the orientation, starting assemblage and degree of shading. Invertebrates (non-indigenous and native) appeared to be responding to similar environmental factors (e.g. orientation) and occupied most space on artificial structures and to a lesser extent reef walls. Non-indigenous invertebrates are less successful than native invertebrates on horizontal reefs despite functional similarities. Manipulative experiments revealed that even when non-indigenous invertebrates invade vertical "reefs", they are unlikely to gain a foothold and never exceed covers of native invertebrates (regardless of space availability). Community ecology suggests that invertebrates will dominate reef walls and algae horizontal reefs due to functional differences, however our surveys revealed that native algae dominate both vertical and horizontal reefs in shallow estuarine systems. Few non-indigenous algae were sampled in the study, however where invasive algal species are present in a system, they may present a threat to reef communities. Our findings suggest that non-indigenous species are less successful at occupying space on reef compared to artificial structures, and manipulations of biotic and abiotic conditions (primarily orientation and to a lesser extent biotic resistance) on experimental "reefs" explained a large portion of this variation, however they could not fully explain the magnitude of differences. PMID:22666459

  6. Remote Sensing of Coral Reef Processes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eric J. Hochberg

    \\u000a Digital remote sensing of coral reefs dates to the first Landsat mission of the mid-1970s. Early studies utilized moderate-spatial-resolution\\u000a satellite broadband multispectral image data and focused on reef geomorphology. Technological advances have since led to development\\u000a of airborne narrow-band hyperspectral sensors, airborne hydrographic lidar systems, and commercial high-spatial-resolution\\u000a satellite broadband multispectral imagers. High quality remote sensing data have become widely

  7. Coral reefs and the World Bank.

    PubMed

    Hatziolos, M

    1997-01-01

    The World Bankżs involvement in coral reef conservation is part of a larger effort to promote the sound management of coastal and marine resources. This involves three major thrusts: partnerships, investments, networks and knowledge. As an initial partner and early supporter of the International Coral Reef Initiative (ICRI), the Bank serves as the executive planning committee of ICRI. In partnership with the World Conservation Union and the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority, the Bank promotes the efforts towards the establishment and maintenance of a globally representative system of marine protected areas. In addition, the Bank invested over $120 million in coral reef rehabilitation and protection programs in several countries. Furthermore, the Bank developed a żKnowledge Bankż that would market ideas and knowledge to its clients along with investment projects. This aimed to put the best global knowledge on environmentally sustainable development in the hands of its staff and clients. During the celebration of 1997, as the International Year of the Reef, the Bank planned to cosponsor an associated event that would highlight the significance of coral reefs and encourage immediate action to halt their degradation to conserve this unique ecosystem. PMID:12295815

  8. Coral Reef Ecosystems: The Abiotic Setting

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    National Science Teachers Association (NSTA)

    2006-11-01

    This Science Object is the second of four Science Objects in the Coral Reef Ecosystems SciPack. It investigates the abiotic characteristics that affect the coral reef ecosystem. The number and kinds of organisms found along each reef depend on the physical conditions of the environment and resources available, including food, light, water quality, temperature, and other organisms living in the reef. If conditions change significantly due to changes in climate, loss of food sources, excessive predation, or loss of habitat, the health and stability of the ecosystem will be affected. Like many complex systems, coral ecosystems tend to have cyclic fluctuations around a state of rough equilibrium. In the long run, if conditions remain reasonably constant a coral ecosystem can be stable for hundreds of years. Learning Outcomes:? Identify the characteristics of an ecosystem, and describe the interdependence between biotic and abiotic features in an ecosystem.? Describe how the following abiotic factors provide coral with the energy needed to survive and grow within their ecosystem: sunlight, water, oxygen, and carbon dioxide.? Describe the optimal environmental conditions for coral reef growth, and explain the process of coral reef development (including the role of available sunlight and calcium).? Explain how the following environmental factors might affect coral ecosystems: increase in dissolved CO2, changes in global temperatures, increase in ocean water turbidity through water pollution.

  9. ReefSAM - Reef Sedimentary Accretion Model: A new 3D coral reef evolution model/simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Samuel; Webster, Jody

    2013-04-01

    Coral reefs show characteristic morphological patterns (e.g. coral dominated margins with detrital carbonate dominated lagoons/back-reef) and temporal development (e.g. Hopley et al. 2007). While the processes which lead to predictable patterns on a range of scales have been discussed qualitatively, a full quantitative understanding of the range of processes and parameters involved requires modelling. Previous attempts to model complex Holocene reef systems (i.e. One Tree Reef, GBR - Barrett and Webster 2012) using a carbonate stratigraphic forward model (Carbonate3D - Warrlich et al. 2002) identified a number of important but unsimulated processes and potential model improvements. ReefSAM has been written from scratch in Matlab using these findings and experiences from using Carbonate3D. It simulates coralgal accretion and carbonate sand production and transport. Specific improvements include: 1. a more complex hydrodynamic model based on wave refraction and incorporating vertical (depth) and lateral (substrate dependent) variations in transport energy and erosion. 2. a complex reef growth model incorporating depth, wave energy/turbidity and substrate composition. 3. Paleo-water depth, paleo-wave energy and bio-zone (combination of paleo-water depth and wave energy) model outputs allowing coralgal habitat changes through time and space to be simulated and compared to observational data. The model is compared to the well studied One Tree Reef - tests similar to those undertaken in Barrett and Webster 2012 with Carbonate3D are presented. Model development coincides with plans for further intensive drilling at One Tree Reef (mid 2013) providing an opportunity to test the model predictively. The model is still in active development. References: Barrett, S.J., Webster, J.M.,2012. Holocene evolution of the Great Barrier Reef: Insights from 3D numerical modelling. Sedimentary Geology 265-266, 56-71. Warrlich, G.M.D., Waltham, D.A., Bosence D.W.J., 2002. Quantifying the sequence stratigraphy and drowning mechanisms of atolls using a new 3-D forward modelling program (CARBONATE 3D). Basin Research 14, 379-400. Hopley, D., Smithers, S.G., Parnell, K.E., 2007. The geomorphology of the Great Barrier Reef. Cambridge.

  10. Refining of fossil resin flotation concentrate from western coal. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, G.F.; Miller, J.D.

    1995-02-16

    During the past several years, significant research efforts have been made to develop process technology for the selective flotation of fossil resin from western coals. As a result of these efforts, several new flotation technologies have been developed. Operation of a proof-of-concept continuous flotation circuit showed the selective flotation process to be sufficiently profitable to justify the development of a fossil resin industry. However, little attention has been given to the refining of the fossil resin flotation concentrate although solvent refining is a critical step for the fossil resin to become a marketable product. In view of this situation, DOE funded this two-year project to evaluate the following aspects of the fossil resin refining technology: 1) Characterization of the fossil resin flotation concentrate and its refined products; 2) Kinetics of fossil resin extraction; 3) Effects of operating variables on solvent extraction; 4) Extraction solvents; 5) Proof-of-concept continuous refining tests; and 6) Technical and economic analysis. The results from this research effort have led to the following conclusions: Hexane- or heptane-refined fossil resin has a light-yellow color, a melting point of 140 - 142{degrees}C, a density of 1.034 gram/cm, and good solubility in nonpolar solvents. Among the four solvents evaluated (hexane, heptane, toluene and ethyl acetate), hexane is the most appropriate solvent based on overall technical and economic considerations. Batch extraction tests and kinetic studies suggest that the main interaction between the resin and the solvent is expected to be the forces associated with solvation phenomena. Temperature has the most significant effect on extraction rate. With hexane as the solvent, a recovery of 90% cam be achieved at 50{degrees}C and 10% solids concentration with moderate agitation for 1 hour.

  11. A saltwater flotation technique to identify unincubated eggs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Devney, C.A.; Kondrad, S.L.; Stebbins, K.R.; Brittingham, K.D.; Hoffman, D.J.; Heinz, G.H.

    2009-01-01

    Field studies on nesting birds sometimes involve questions related to nest initiation dates, length of the incubation period, or changes in parental incubation behavior during various stages of incubation. Some of this information can be best assessed when a nest is discovered before the eggs have undergone any incubation, and this has traditionally been assessed by floating eggs in freshwater. However, because the freshwater method is not particularly accurate in identifying unincubated eggs, we developed a more reliable saltwater flotation method. The saltwater method involves diluting a saturated saltwater solution with freshwater until a salt concentration is reached where unincubated eggs sink to the bottom and incubated eggs float to the surface. For Laughing Gulls (Leucophaeus atricilla), floating eggs in freshwater failed to identify 39.0% (N = 251) of eggs that were subsequently found by candling to have undergone incubation prior to collection. By contrast, in a separate collection of gull eggs, no eggs that passed the saltwater test (N = 225) were found by a later candling to have been incubated prior to collection. For Double-crested Cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus), floating eggs in freshwater failed to identify 15.6% (N = 250) of eggs that had undergone incubation prior to collection, whereas in a separate collection, none of the eggs that passed the saltwater test (N = 85) were found by a later candling to have been incubated prior to collection. Immersion of eggs in saltwater did not affect embryo survival. Although use of the saltwater method is likely limited to colonial species and requires calibrating a saltwater solution, it is a faster and more accurate method of identifying unincubated eggs than the traditional method of floating eggs in freshwater.

  12. Internal structure and Holocene evolution of One Tree Reef, southern Great Barrier Reef

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. F. Marshall; P. J. Davies

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of core from six drill holes and ten vibrocores from One Tree Reef has delineated five major biosedimentological facies: algal pavement, coral head facies, branching coral facies, reef flat rubble facies and sand facies. Holocene growth began around 8,000 years B.P. with a high energy coral head facies on windward margins and a lower energy branching coral facies on

  13. Video-monitored predation by Caribbean reef fishes on an array of mangrove and reef sponges

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Dunlap; J. R. Pawlik

    1996-01-01

    Although predation by fishes is thought to structure benthic invertebrate communities on coral reefs, evidence to support this claim has been difficult to obtain. We deployed an array of eight sponge species on Conch Reef (16 m depth) off Key Largo, Florida, USA, and used a remote video-camera to record fish activity near the array continuously during five daylight periods

  14. Suspensions in the hot water flotation process for Canadian oil sands

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, R.C.; Czarnecki, J. [Edmonton Research Centre, Alberta (Canada); Schramm, L.L. [Petroleum Recovery Inst., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

    1996-12-31

    Suspensions are created and must be processed during the application of the hot water flotation process to Canada`s Athabasca oil sands, a large-scale commercial application of mined oil sands technology. These suspensions are more than just two-phase dispersions, being comprised of not only solids and water but also dispersed oil and gas. As such, they form interesting petroleum industry suspensions. A review of the hot water flotation process is presented with an emphasis on the occurrence, nature, and properties of suspensions. 94 refs., 25 figs., 1 tab.

  15. The significance of froth stability in mineral flotation--a review.

    PubMed

    Farrokhpay, Saeed

    2011-08-10

    This paper presents a review of the published articles related to froth stability and its importance in mineral flotation. Froth structure and froth stability are known to play a significant role in determining the mineral grade and recovery achieved in a flotation operation. Froth stability is depending not only on the type and concentration of the frother but also on the nature and amount of the particles present in the system. To date, there is no specific criterion to quantify froth stability although a number of parameters are used as indicators of froth stability. Linking froth stability to the metallurgical performance is also challenged. PMID:21470589

  16. Estimation of photosynthesis and calcification rates at a fringing reef by accounting for diurnal variations and the zonation of coral reef communities on reef flat and slope: a case study for the Shiraho reef, Ishigaki Island, southwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, T.; Nakamori, T.

    2009-03-01

    Seven coral reef communities were defined on Shiraho fringing reef, Ishigaki Island, Japan. Net photosynthesis and calcification rates were measured by in situ incubations at 10 sites that included six of the defined communities, and which occupied most of the area on the reef flat and slope. Net photosynthesis on the reef flat was positive overall, but the reef flat acts as a source for atmospheric CO2, because the measured calcification/photosynthesis ratio of 2.5 is greater than the critical ratio of 1.67. Net photosynthesis on the reef slope was negative. Almost all excess organic production from the reef flat is expected to be effused to the outer reef and consumed by the communities there. Therefore, the total net organic production of the whole reef system is probably almost zero and the whole reef system also acts as a source for atmospheric CO2. Net calcification rates of the reef slope corals were much lower than those of the branching corals. The accumulation rate of the former was approximately 0.5 m kyr-1 and of the latter was ~0.7-5 m kyr-1. Consequently, reef slope corals could not grow fast enough to keep up with or catch up to rising sea levels during the Holocene. On the other hand, the branching corals grow fast enough to keep up with this rising sea level. Therefore, a transition between early Holocene and present-day reef communities is expected. Branching coral communities would have dominated while reef growth kept pace with sea level rise, and the reef was constructed with a branching coral framework. Then, the outside of this framework was covered and built up by reef slope corals and present-day reefs were constructed.

  17. 4. DETAIL OF ORE RECEIVING PLATFORM AND GRIZZLY, VIEW TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. DETAIL OF ORE RECEIVING PLATFORM AND GRIZZLY, VIEW TO EAST. - Vanadium Corporation of America (VCA) Naturita Mill, Sampling Building & Ore Receiving Platform, 3 miles Northwest of Naturita, between Highway 141 & San Miguel River, Naturita, Montrose County, CO

  18. 3. DETAIL OF ORE RECEIVING PLATFORM AND GRIZZLY, VIEW TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. DETAIL OF ORE RECEIVING PLATFORM AND GRIZZLY, VIEW TO WEST. - Vanadium Corporation of America (VCA) Naturita Mill, Sampling Building & Ore Receiving Platform, 3 miles Northwest of Naturita, between Highway 141 & San Miguel River, Naturita, Montrose County, CO

  19. 1. VIEW TO SOUTH (RETAINING WALL OF ORE RECEIVING PLATFORM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW TO SOUTH (RETAINING WALL OF ORE RECEIVING PLATFORM TO LEFT). - Vanadium Corporation of America (VCA) Naturita Mill, Sampling Building & Ore Receiving Platform, 3 miles Northwest of Naturita, between Highway 141 & San Miguel River, Naturita, Montrose County, CO

  20. 2. VIEW TO NORTHEAST (ORE RECEIVING PLATFORM OUT OF VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW TO NORTHEAST (ORE RECEIVING PLATFORM OUT OF VIEW TO RIGHT). - Vanadium Corporation of America (VCA) Naturita Mill, Sampling Building & Ore Receiving Platform, 3 miles Northwest of Naturita, between Highway 141 & San Miguel River, Naturita, Montrose County, CO

  1. CONTEXT VIEW ACROSS ORE YARD AT MODERN SELFUNLOADING BOOM IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONTEXT VIEW ACROSS ORE YARD AT MODERN SELF-UNLOADING BOOM IN FRONT OF HULETTS. LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  2. 4. From west side of boat slip; ore piles, unloaders, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. From west side of boat slip; ore piles, unloaders, blast furnaces, tube conveyors, ore conveyors, stock house, powerhouse. Looking north/northeast - Rouge Steel Company, 3001 Miller Road, Dearborn, Wayne County, MI

  3. CONTEXT VIEW ACROSS ORE YARD AT MODERN SELFUNLOADING SHIP UNLOADING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONTEXT VIEW ACROSS ORE YARD AT MODERN SELF-UNLOADING SHIP UNLOADING IN FRONT OF HULETTS. LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  4. AERIAL OVERVIEW, LOOKING NORTH, WITH FORMER TCIUS STEEL ORE MINE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    AERIAL OVERVIEW, LOOKING NORTH, WITH FORMER TCI-US STEEL ORE MINE HEADQUARTERS (BOTTOM) AND SUPERINTENDENT'S AND FOREMAN HOUSING ALONG MINNESOTA AVENUE AT CREST OF RED MOUNTAIN (TOP LEFT). - Muscoda Red Ore Mining Community, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  5. Processing of Goethitic Iron Ore Fines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, J.; Sharma, T.; Mandre, N. R.

    2015-05-01

    In the present investigation an attempt has been made to beneficiate goethitic iron ore containing 59.02 % Iron, 6.51 % Alumina, 4.79 % Silica, 0.089 % Phosphorus with 7.11 % loss on ignition. For this purpose, different beneficiation techniques such as gravity and magnetic separation processes have been employed. During the process two conceptual flow sheets were also developed for the beneficiation of goethite iron ore fines. In the prsent work it was possible to enhance grade of iron to 63.35, 63.18, and 65.35 % from Jigging, Multi Gravity Separation (MGS) and Wet High Intensity Magnetic Separator (WHIMS) respectively.

  6. Biologic response to environmental stress in tropical reefs: Lessons from modern Polynesian coralgal atolls and Middle Permian sponge and Shamovella microbe reefs (Capitan Limestone USA)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. A. Fagerstrom; O. Weidlich

    2005-01-01

    Despite prejudices that comparisons of paleoecological patterns in modern and fossil reef communities are of doubtful validity, we compare the biologic response of living coralgal reefs in French Polynesia to environmental stress with an exceptionally well exposed Middle Permian sponge reef and Shamovella-microbial reef of the Capitan Limestone in New Mexico. In the western Tuamotu Archipelago, reef margins are characterized

  7. Process for recovering hydrocarbons from a diatomite-type ore

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, B.W.

    1983-02-15

    A process for recovering hydrocarbons from a diatomite-type ore which comprises contacting the diatomite ore with a C/sub 4/-C/sub 10/ alcohol and thereafter contacting the diatomite ore-alcohol mixture with an aqueous alkaline solution to separate a hydrocarbon-alcohol phase and an alkaline aqueous phase containing the stripped diatomite ore. Thereafter, the alcohol is distilled off from the hydrocarbon phase and recycled back into the initial process.

  8. Cognome e nome . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ALGA 2 febbraio 2012 Compitino (2 ore)

    E-print Network

    Robbiano, Lorenzo

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ALGA 2 febbraio 2012­ Compitino (2 ore) Giustificare ogni affermazione Salvare il file CoCoA come

  9. Cognome e nome . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ALGA 14 novembre 2011 Compitino (2 ore)

    E-print Network

    Robbiano, Lorenzo

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ALGA 14 novembre 2011­ Compitino (2 ore) Giustificare ogni affermazione Salvare il file CoCoA come

  10. Biologically induced iron ore at Gunma iron mine, Japan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JUNJI AKAI; KURUMI AKAI; MAKOTO ITO; SATOSHI NAKANO; YONOSUKE MAKI; ICHIRO SASAGAWA

    1999-01-01

    The mineralogy of sedimentary iron ores from the Gunma iron mine are described to evaluate the role of microorganisms and plants in ore formation. The iron ore is composed of nanocrystalline goethite, well-crystallized jarosite and very small amounts of strengite. The ore characteristically occurs as thick-bands of alternating goethite and jarosite bands, thin-bands of different goethite grain sizes, and fossil-aggregate

  11. Placement Of O-Rings In Solid Rocket Booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Charles

    1991-01-01

    Brief report proposes to modify placement of O-ring seals in joints of Solid Rocket Booster of Space Shuttle. Modified joint and seal essentially "inside-out" version of old joint and seal. O-rings placed between outer side of tang and clevis. Joint rotation pushes tang harder against O-rings, thereby making even tighter seal. Proposal derived from analysis of Space Shuttle Challenger disaster, attributed to failure of these O-ring seals.

  12. Reef Odor: A Wake Up Call for Navigation in Reef Fish Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Paris, Claire B.; Kingsford, Michael; Gerlach, Gabriele; Guigand, Cedric M.

    2013-01-01

    The behavior of reef fish larvae, equipped with a complex toolbox of sensory apparatus, has become a central issue in understanding their transport in the ocean. In this study pelagic reef fish larvae were monitored using an unmanned open-ocean tracking device, the drifting in-situ chamber (DISC), deployed sequentially in oceanic waters and in reef-born odor plumes propagating offshore with the ebb flow. A total of 83 larvae of two taxonomic groups of the families Pomacentridae and Apogonidae were observed in the two water masses around One Tree Island, southern Great Barrier Reef. The study provides the first in-situ evidence that pelagic reef fish larvae discriminate reef odor and respond by changing their swimming speed and direction. It concludes that reef fish larvae smell the presence of coral reefs from several kilometers offshore and this odor is a primary component of their navigational system and activates other directional sensory cues. The two families expressed differences in their response that could be adapted to maintain a position close to the reef. In particular, damselfish larvae embedded in the odor plume detected the location of the reef crest and swam westward and parallel to shore on both sides of the island. This study underlines the critical importance of in situ Lagrangian observations to provide unique information on larval fish behavioral decisions. From an ecological perspective the central role of olfactory signals in marine population connectivity raises concerns about the effects of pollution and acidification of oceans, which can alter chemical cues and olfactory responses. PMID:24015278

  13. Sun Compass Orientation Helps Coral Reef Fish Larvae Return to Their Natal Reef

    PubMed Central

    Mouritsen, Henrik; Atema, Jelle; Kingsford, Michael J.; Gerlach, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    Reef fish sustain populations on isolated reefs and show genetic diversity between nearby reefs even though larvae of many species are swept away from the natal site during pelagic dispersal. Retention or recruitment to natal reefs requires orientation capabilities that enable larvae to find their way. Although olfactory and acoustically based orientation has been implicated in homing when larvae are in the reef’s vicinity, it is still unclear how they cope with greater distances. Here we show evidence for a sun compass mechanism that can bring the larvae to the vicinity of their natal reef. In a circular arena, pre-settlement larvae and early settlers (<24 hours) of the cardinal fish, Ostorhinchus doederleini, showed a strong SSE directional swimming response, which most likely has evolved to compensate for the locally prevailing large scale NNW current drift. When fish were clock-shifted 6 hours, they changed their orientation by ca. 180° as predicted by the tropical sun curve at One Tree Island, i.e. they used a time-compensated sun compass. Furthermore, the fish oriented most consistently at times of the day when the sun azimuth is easy to determine. Microsatellite markers showed that the larvae that had just arrived at One Tree Island genetically belonged to either the local reef population or to Fitzroy Reef located 12 kilometers to the SSE. The use of a sun compass adds a missing long-distance link to the hierarchy of other sensory abilities that can direct larvae to the region of origin, including their natal reef. Predominant local recruitment, in turn, can contribute to genetic isolation and potential speciation. PMID:23840396

  14. 17. ORE DOCK, LOOKING EAST FROM HULETT NO. 1. WHEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. ORE DOCK, LOOKING EAST FROM HULETT NO. 1. WHEN BUILT IN 1911-1912, THIS WAS THE LARGEST ORE-UNLOADING DOCK ON THE GREAT LAKES. - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  15. 29. ORE DOCK, LOOKING WEST; AT WORK UNLOADING THE 'GEORGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. ORE DOCK, LOOKING WEST; AT WORK UNLOADING THE 'GEORGE M. HUMPHREY'S' CARGO OF 25,000. TONS OF ORE. - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  16. CONTEXT VIEW ALONG EXISTING PERIMETER TRACKS LOOKING OVER IRON ORE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONTEXT VIEW ALONG EXISTING PERIMETER TRACKS LOOKING OVER IRON ORE CARS TOWARDS WESTERN SIDE OF CLEVELAND BULK TERMINAL BUILDINGS AND A SELF-UNLOADING IRON ORE SHIP AT DOCK. LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  17. 18. VIEW OF CRUDE ORE BINS FROM WEST. WEST CRUDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. VIEW OF CRUDE ORE BINS FROM WEST. WEST CRUDE ORE BIN AND TRESTLE FROM TWO JOHNS TRAMLINE TO SOUTH, CRUDE ORE BIN IN FOREGROUND. MACHINE SHOP IN BACKGROUND. THE TRAM TO PORTLAND PASSED TO NORTH OF MACHINE SHOP. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  18. Coralline reefs classification in Banco Chinchorro, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras-Silva, Ameris I.; López-Caloca, Alejandra A.

    2009-09-01

    The coralline reefs in Banco Chinchorro, Mexico, are part of the great reef belt of the western Atlantic. This reef complex is formed by an extensive coralline structure with great biological richness and diversity of species. These colonies are considered highly valuable ecologically, economically, socially and culturally, and they also inherently provide biological services. Fishing and scuba diving have been the main economic activities in this area for decades. However, in recent years, there has been a bleaching process and a decrease of the coral colonies in Quintana Roo, Mexico. This drop is caused mainly by the production activities performed in the oil platforms and the presence of hurricanes among other climatic events. The deterioration of the reef system can be analyzed synoptically using remote sensing. Thanks to this type of analysis, it is possible to have updated information of the reef conditions. In this paper, satellite imagery in Landsat TM and SPOT 5 is applied in the coralline reefs classification in the 1980- 2006 time period. Thus, an integral analysis of the optical components of the water surrounding the coralline reefs, such as on phytoplankton, sediments, yellow substance and even on the same water adjacent to the coral colonies, is performed. The use of a texture algorithm (Markov Random Field) was a key tool for their identification. This algorithm, does not limit itself to image segmentation, but also works on edge detection. In future work the multitemporal analysis of the results will determine the deterioration degree of these habitats and the conservation status of the coralline areas.

  19. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Coral Reef Conservation Program

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This NOAA program supports effective management and sound science to preserve, sustain and restore valuable coral reef ecosystems. Students can read about the U.S. Coral Reef Task Force, learn more about local and national coral reef action strategies, and find links to more information on coral reefs. The site also offers a search for publications and data and a general search of the site.

  20. A comparison study of column flotation technologies for cleaning Illinois coal. [Quarterly] technical report, December 1, 1993--February 28, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Honaker, R.Q.; Paul, B.C. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States). Dept. of Mining Engineering

    1994-06-01

    The objectives of this research project are to optimize the performance of six commercially available column technologies for the treatment of Illinois Basin coal fines and to compare their performance on the basis of the recovery-grade curve and column throughput capacity. A statistically-designed, experimental program will be conducted to optimize the critical operating performance values of each flotation column. During the previous reporting period, construction and installation of the six flotation columns were completed. The flotation feed sample that will be used for the tests in this investigation was collected from a coal preparation plant treating the Illinois No. 5 seam coal. During this reporting period, the flotation feed sample was characterized on a size-by-size basis for its ash, total sulfur, and BTU content. A release analysis was also conducted to obtain the best possible recovery versus product grade curve that can be achieved by a froth flotation process for the treatment of the Illinois No. 5 flotation feed sample. Experiments were initiated on the Jameson Cell. The preliminary results indicate that the Jameson Cell achieves a separation performance that is close to the release data. The experimental program on the Jameson Cell and the other flotation technologies will be performed during the next reporting period.

  1. Seed flotation and germination of salt marsh plants: The effects of stratification, salinity, and/or inundation regime

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elsey-Quirk, T.; Middleton, B.A.; Proffitt, C.E.

    2009-01-01

    We examined the effects of cold stratification and salinity on seed flotation of eight salt marsh species. Four of the eight species were tested for germination success under different stratification, salinity, and flooding conditions. Species were separated into two groups, four species received wet stratification and four dry stratification and fresh seeds of all species were tested for flotation and germination. Fresh seeds of seven out of eight species had flotation times independent of salinity, six of which had average flotation times of at least 50 d. Seeds of Spartina alterniflora and Spartina patens had the shortest flotation times, averaging 24 and 26 d, respectively. Following wet stratification, the flotation time of S. alterniflora seeds in higher salinity water (15 and 36 ppt) was reduced by over 75% and germination declined by more than 90%. Wet stratification reduced the flotation time of Distichlis spicata seeds in fresh water but increased seed germination from 2 to 16% in a fluctuating inundation regime. Fresh seeds of Iva frutescens and S. alternflora were capable of germination and therefore are non-dormant during dispersal. Fresh seeds of I. frutescens had similar germination to dry stratified seeds ranging 25-30%. Salinity reduced seed germination for all species except for S. alterniflora. A fluctuating inundation regime was important for seed germination of the low marsh species and for germination following cold stratification. The conditions that resulted in seeds sinking faster were similar to the conditions that resulted in higher germination for two of four species. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  2. High performance O-ring sealed joints

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Metcalfe; R. Wensel

    1994-01-01

    An integrated engineering approach to high performance sealing with O-rings is described. Sealing principles are explained, then used to illustrate the advantages of non-conventional geometries over handbook designs. The selection and qualification of optimal elastomer material for space shuttle applications is described, along with detection methods and rejection criteria for defects. The effects of lubrication, surface finish, squeeze, stretch and

  3. Sources of ores of the ferroalloy metals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burchard, E.F.

    1933-01-01

    Since all steel is made with the addition of alloying elements, the record of the metallic raw materials contributory to the steel industry would be far from complete without reference to the ferroalloy metals. This paper, therefore, supplements two preceding arvicles on the sources of our iron ores. The photographs, with the exception of those relating to molybdenum and vanadium, are by the author.

  4. In brief: Project StORe 

    E-print Network

    Pryor, Graham

    Project StORe is one of twenty-five projects supported in the UK by the JISC (http://www.jisc.ac.uk) Digital Repositories Programme, which aims to bring together people and practices from across the domains of research, learning, information...

  5. Project StORe: Biosciences interviews 

    E-print Network

    Biegon, Dagmar

    2006-11-08

    This report was written as part of the first phase of the national higher education research project StORe (Source-to-Output Repositories). Data was acquired through a series of individual interviews which are presented here in full. The anonymous...

  6. Ore Melting and Reduction in Silicomanganese Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringdalen, Eli; Gaal, Sean; Tangstad, Merete; Ostrovski, Oleg

    2010-12-01

    The charge for silicomangansese production consists of manganese ore (often mixed with ferromanganese slag) dolomite or calcite, quartz, and in some cases, other additions. These materials have different melting properties, which have a strong effect on reduction and smelting reactions in the production of a silicomanganese alloy. This article discusses properties of Assman, Gabonese, and Companhia Vale do Rio Doce (CVRD) ores, CVRD sinter and high-carbon ferromanganese (HC FeMn) slag, and their change during silicomanganese production. The melting and reduction temperatures of these manganese sources were measured in a carbon monoxide atmosphere, using the sessile drop method and a differential thermal analysis/thermogravimetric analysis. Equilibrium phases were analyzed using FACTSage (CRCT, Montreal, Canada and GTT, Aachen, Germany) software. Experimental investigations and an analysis of equilibrium phases revealed significant differences in the melting behavior and reduction of different manganese sources. The difference in smelting of CVRD ore and CVRD sinter was attributed to a faster reduction of sinter by the graphite substrate and carbon monoxide. The calculation of equilibrium phases in the reduction process of manganese ores using FACTSage correctly reflects the trends in the production of manganese alloys. The temperature at which the manganese oxide concentration in the slag was reduced below 10 wt pct can be assigned to the top of the coke bed in the silicomanganese furnace. This temperature was in the range 1823 K to 1883 K (1550 °C to 1610 °C).

  7. Microbial leaching of lateritic nickel ore

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. B. Sukla; V. V. Panchanadikar; R. N. Kar

    1993-01-01

    Lateritic nickel ore from the Sukinda Mines, Orissa, India, was leached using Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, Bacillus circulans, Bacillus licheniformis and Aspergillus niger at 5% (w\\/v) solid: liquid ratio for 5–20 days. Maximum leaching of Ni was achieved with B. circulans (85%) and Aspergillus niger (92%) after 20 days. Bacillus circulans showed significantly higher rate of leaching than the other organisms giving

  8. Production of uranium ore in capitalist countries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. I. Chesnokov; V. G. Ivanov

    1973-01-01

    The uranium deposits of the USA are concentrated in the sedimentary rocks of the Colorado plateau [2, 12]. The ore bodies are adapted to arkosic sandstones, conglomerates, limestones, and argillites. The reserves are distributed into a rather small number of large deposits and a large number of small deposits. Large deposits, each with reserves of from 50 to 100 thousand

  9. Where in the world are Winslow Reef and Amelia Earhart?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. S. Jacobson

    1994-01-01

    Uncharted or doubtful positions of shoals and reefs have played a large role in the history of maritime navigation and oceanography. Two of these shoals, Winslow Reef and Reef and Sand Bank in the central equatorial Pacific, were the subjects of a fruitless 2-day aerial search in 1937 for Amelia Earhart by planes from the battleship USS Colorado.Sightings before and

  10. SCUBA Diver Specialization and Behavior Norms at Coral Reefs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laura E. Anderson; David K. Loomis

    2011-01-01

    SCUBA diving is an increasingly popular activity that provides a number of benefits to coastal communities. However, the sustainability of recreational diving on coral reefs is largely dependent on the health of reef ecosystems. Divers can minimize their impacts to coral reefs through responsible diving behaviors, which are in part guided by social norms. The behavioral obligation and sanction components

  11. Coral Reefs: A Gallery Program, Grades 7-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aquarium in Baltimore, MD. Dept. of Education.

    Gallery classes at the National Aquarium in Baltimore give the opportunity to study specific aquarium exhibits which demonstrate entire natural habitats. The coral reef gallery class features the gigantic western Atlantic coral reef (325,000 gallons) with over 1,000 fish. The exhibit simulates a typical Caribbean coral reef and nearby sandy…

  12. Coral Reef Education and Australian High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stepath, Carl M.

    2004-01-01

    Educational programs that focus on humans and their relationship to coral reefs are becoming necessary, as reef structures along the Queensland coast come under mounting ecological pressure. This paper reports on a PhD research project which investigated marine education and learning with high school students in coral reef environments along the…

  13. EFFECTS OF DRILLING FLUIDS ON REEF CORALS: A REVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter reviews research on the effects of drilling mud on coral reef communities, concentrating on the major reef fauna: the reef-building or hermatypic corals. Drilling mud is an effluent introduced to the marine environment in large quantities during the typical offshore ...

  14. Date: November 10, 2006 To: Becky Shortland, Gray's Reef Reserve

    E-print Network

    Rosemond, Amy Daum

    -making. Given that the effects of land-based pollution on the health of reefs offshore are cause for concern-borne pollution in rivers and streams is the effect that these pollutants and nutrients have on coral reefs and Phosphorous (found commonly from fertilizer runoff) can all have negative effects on the health of reefs

  15. Chemical degradation characteristics of reinforced concrete reefs in South Korea

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. S. Kim; C. G. Kim; W. B. Na; J. K. Kim

    2008-01-01

    The chemical degradation characteristics of reinforced concrete reefs, which had been fully immersed in Tongyeong waters of South Korea for 18–25 years, were studied. In order to investigate the marine environmental impact on the concrete reefs, environmental factors, for example pH, have been observed between 1997 and 2002. Then, four reinforced concrete reefs recovered from different sites in Tongyeong waters

  16. Removal of antimony from antimony mine flotation wastewater by electrocoagulation with aluminum electrodes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jing Zhu; Fengchang Wu; Xiangliang Pan; Jianyang Guo; Dongsheng Wen

    2011-01-01

    Antimony (Sb) has received increasing environmental concerns due to its potential toxic and carcinogenic properties. In the present work, the electrocoagulation technique was used to treat the flotation wastewater from a heavy antimony polluted area, and the mechanism of removing Sb was also investigated. The study focused on the effect of operation parameters such as current density, initial pH and

  17. Potash recovery from process and waste brines by solar evaporation and flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Foot, D.G. Jr.; Huiatt, J.L.; Froisland, L.J.

    1984-01-01

    The Bureau of Mines investigated energy-efficient methods for recovering potash values from process and waste brines. Laboratory pan evaporation of four chloride brines produced crude salts containing predominantly sylvite, halite, and carnallite. Six sulfate-chloride brines produced crude salts containing primarily schoenite, kainite, leonite, sylvite, carnallite, and halite. Potash grades ranged from 7.2 to 22.2% K/sub 2/O, and recoveries from 84 to 99%. Sylvite flotation from chloride evaporites, with amine collector, recovered 90 to 97% of the potash in a concentrate containing 54.3 to 60.3% K/sub 2/O. Fatty acid flotation of the high-sulfate evaporite recovered 78% of the sulfate minerals in a 27.8%-K/sub 2/O concentrate. Flotation of the chloride minerals with amine collector recovered 80% of the potash in a 59.7%-K/sub 2/O concentrate. Solar evaporation of 10,000 gal of brine recovered 99% of the potash in a crude evaporite containing 24.5% schoenite and 20 pct sylvite. Continuous flotation in a 100-lb/h process research unit recovered over 95% of the potash in schoenite and sylvite concentrates containing 28.0 and 62.3% K/sub 2/O, respectively. An economic evaluation suggested a rate of return of 3% for a new facility and 9% if the process is adapted to fit an existing plant.

  18. Sensory Isolation in Flotation Tanks: Altered States of Consciousness and Effects on Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kjellgren, Anette; Lyden, Francisca; Norlander, Torsten

    2008-01-01

    A qualitative analysis (The Empirical Phenomenological Psychological method) of interviews involving eight patients (depression, burn-out syndrome, and chronic pain) was carried out in order to obtain knowledge regarding the effects of flotation tank therapy. This knowledge might be helpful for both professionals and potential floaters. The…

  19. Selective factors involved in oil flotation isolation of black yeasts from the environment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. M. Satow; D. Attili-Angelis; Hoog de G. S; D. F. Angelis; V. A. Vicente

    2008-01-01

    The oil flotation isolation technique has been successfully applied to recover chaetothyrialean black yeasts and relatives from the environment. The selective mechanisms playing a role in isolation are unknown. The fungi concerned are supposed to occupy specialized microniches in nature, taking advantage of (1) oligotrophism. Mineral oil as a main selective agent may be based on (2) hydrophobicity or on

  20. Enhanced efficiency of dissolved air flotation for biodiesel wastewater treatment by acidification and coagulation processes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cheerawit Rattanapan; Aneak Sawain; Thunwadee Suksaroj; Chaisri Suksaroj

    2011-01-01

    A novel approach was developed to enhance the efficiency of the dissolved air flotation (DAF) for biodiesel wastewater by acidification and coagulation. Firstly, Grease & Oil and Chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiencies of biodiesel wastewater using acidification with pure hydrochloric acid and pure sulfuric acid at pH=3 and 1day retention time were more than 80%, and 50%, respectively. Secondly,

  1. Association of dissolved air flotation (DAF) with microfiltration for cyanobacterial removal in water supply

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pauline Aparecida Pera do Amaral; Lucila Adriani Coral; Maria Eliza Nagel-Hassemer; Tiago José Belli; Flávio Rubens Lapolli

    2012-01-01

    The removal of filamentous cyanobacteria in natural water was investigated by a sequential treatment involving dissolved air flotation (DAF) (preceded by coagulation\\/flocculation) and microfiltration (MF) technologies. The combined treatment was considered to evaluate the contribution of the DAF process as a pre-treatment for MF to mitigate the impact on the microfiltration performance caused by the presence of the cells. The

  2. Flotation characteristics of two different types of ilmenite with sodium oleate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jie, Zhang; Weijun, Liu; Weiqing, Wang; shuqing, Xiong; dezhi, Wang; Wu, Yan; Jie, Deng

    2015-06-01

    The flotation characteristics of native ilmenite (IL-N) and beach placer ilmenite (IL-BP) with sodium oleate (NaOL) were investigated through micro-flotation tests, zeta-potential measurements, absorbed amount measurements, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic (FT-IR) analysis. The results show that IL-N can float well at the pH region of 4.5 to 7.5, whereas IL-BP floats well at pH 4.5 to pH 6. The flotation recovery of IL-N is invariably higher than that of IL-BP in alkaline solution. In the presence of NaOL, the zeta-potentials of both minerals are negative in the pH range. The absorbed amount of NaOL increased rapidly with the increase in the pH value in acid solution and decreased rapidly with the increase in the pH value in alkaline solution. In weak alkaline conditions, the ions of Ca (II) and Mg (II) become important activated sites for the adsorption of NaOL onto the ilmenite surface. The FT-IR analysis and absorbed amount measurements verified that the adsorption of calcium oleate and magnesium oleate on IL-N more than on IL-BP at the same pH value. A larger amount of Ca (II) and Mg (II) in IL-N than IL-BP results in good floatability as exhibited in the flotation tests.

  3. Synergistic mechanism between SDBS and oleic acid in anionic flotation of rhodochrosite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Yong-jie; Liu, Run-qing; Sun, Wei; Hu, Yue-hua

    2015-05-01

    Pure mineral flotation experiments, zeta potential testing, and infrared spectroscopy were employed to investigate the interfacial reactions of oleic acid (collector), sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS, synergist), and rhodochrosite in an anionic system. The pure mineral test shows that oleic acid has a strong ability to collect products on rhodochrosite. Under neutral to moderately alkaline conditions, low temperature (e.g., 10°C) adversely affects the flotation performance of oleic acid; the addition of SDBS significantly improves the dispersion and solubility of oleic acid, enhancing its collecting ability and flotation recovery. The zeta potential test shows that rhodochrosite interacts with oleic acid and SDBS, resulting in a more negative zeta potential and the co-adsorption of the collector and synergist at the mineral surface. Infrared spectroscopy demonstrated that when oleic acid and SDBS are used as a mixed collector, oleates along with -COO- and -COOH functional groups are formed on the mineral surface, indicating chemical adsorption on rhodochrosite. The results demonstrate that oleic acid and SDBS co-adsorb chemically on the surface of rhodochrosite, thereby improving the flotation performance of the collector.

  4. Silicone glycol collectors in the beneficiation of fine coal by froth flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, M.J.

    1985-07-02

    A froth flotation process for the beneficiation of fine coal is disclosed which employs as a collector a water-dispersible polyorganosiloxane or a mixture of water-dispersible polyorganosiloxanes which contain organic radicals selected from the group consisting of polyethylene oxide and polypropylene oxide radicals. The process of this invention is especially useful for the beneficiation of difficult-to-float fine coals.

  5. A Simple Flotation De-Linking Experiment for the Recycling of Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venditti, Richard A.

    2004-01-01

    A laboratory exercise for the flotation de-linking of wastepaper is described, which consists of disintegrating printed wastepaper in a blender and then removing the ink or toner contaminants by pumping air bubbles through suspension using an aquarium pump or other source of air bubbles. The exercise has proven extremely reliable and consistent in…

  6. Bubble size estimation using interfacial morphological information for mineral flotation process monitoring

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chun-hua YANG; Can-hui XU; Xue-min MU; Kai-jun ZHOU

    2009-01-01

    To relate froth structural information with mineral flotation performance, segmentation analysis was performed on froth images characterized by fully occupied convex bubbles with white spots effect. An improved valley edge detection method was proposed to extract structural features and overcome fake white spot edges seriously affecting the segmentation performance. After preprocessing, detection template was designed based on the local minimal

  7. Interfacial studies on dissolved gas flotation of oil droplets for water purification

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. C. G Oliveira; G Gonzalez; J. F Oliveira

    1999-01-01

    The removal of emulsified residual oil from water is an important issue due to the increasing concern with the environment. In the present paper various surface chemistry aspects of dissolved gas flotation were studied aiming at a better understanding of the mechanisms of the process. These studies included surface and interfacial tension measurements of a model system composed of n-dodecane

  8. The recovery of plastics from waste with reference to froth flotation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Harvey Alter

    2005-01-01

    Some authors have overstated the problem of plastics wastes accumulating in large quantities. The amounts and types of such wastes must be well understood if recovery methods, such as froth flotation, are to be applied successfully. Not all plastics discards are reasonably recoverable and statistics on gross quantities must be analyzed for those that are. The amount of plastic wastes

  9. Flotation properties of some oxygen-containing compounds of the acyclic series

    SciTech Connect

    Shreider, E.M.; Para, S.F.; Galanov, M.E.; Trachik, T.L.; Lagutina, L.V.

    1981-01-01

    In the monatomic alcohols series, maximum flotation activity is reached at 6 to 8 carbon atoms in the radical. It was decided to investigate the reagent properties of some other substances containing hydroxyl radicals which have not previously been considered. Oxygen-containing compounds in the acyclic series were examined, including alcohols: I - ethanol, ethylene-glycol, glycerol, pentaerythrytol, D-mannitol; II - dulcitol, D-sorbitol, D-mannitol, xylitol; glycols - monoethyleneglycol, diethyleneglycol, triethyleneglycol, polyethyleneglycol; and ethanolamines - ethanolamine, triethanolamine. The flotation properties of the reagents were determined in a Mekhanobr laboratory flotation machine with a chamber volume of 1.5 liter and an impeller speed of 1800 rpm. The materials tested were the <1 mm size fractions from run-of-plant charge and slurry from the radial thickeners. The samples were first dried and averaged. The pulp density was 200 g/l. The reagent conditions were kept constant throughout (50% of the total added at the start of a test, 25% after 2 min and 25% after 4 min from the start). The reagent additions were 1.0 to 1.4 kg/ton. All of these compounds had a very weak flotation activity.

  10. Local Evolution of Seed Flotation in Arabidopsis Susana Saez-Aguayo1,2a

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Local Evolution of Seed Flotation in Arabidopsis Susana Saez-Aguayo1,2¤a , Corinne Rondeau-Mouro3¨nster, Germany Abstract Arabidopsis seeds rapidly release hydrophilic polysaccharides from the seed coat on imbibition. These form a heavy mucilage layer around the seed that makes it sink in water. Fourteen natural

  11. Mechanism of Selective Flotation of Sodium-Calcium Borates with Anionic and Cationic Collectors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. S. Celik; R. Bulut

    1996-01-01

    The major boron minerals, colemanite and ulexite, are frequently found together in boron deposits. Similarities in their chemical compositions create problems in the selective flotation of these minerals. The surface properties of the above boron minerals have been determined by solubility, microflotation, and zeta potential measurements using typical anionic and cationic surfactants. The isoelectric point (iep) of colemanite is 10.5,

  12. Flotation Thickening. Sludge Treatment and Disposal Course #166. Instructor's Guide [and] Student Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klopping, Paul H.

    This lesson describes the process of dissolved air flotation thickening. The material is intended to acquaint students with the fundamental principles of operation, components found on a typical thickener, factors that affect operation, a comparison with other thickening processes, and the calculations and laboratory tests required in establishing…

  13. A hybrid flotation–membrane process for wastewater treatment: an overview

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Al-Zoubi; S. Al-Thyabat; L. Al-Khatib

    2009-01-01

    Wastewater produced from many industries such as dyeing, textile industry, minerals processing\\/ phosphate beneficiation, food processing and deinking is either reused after being treated by conventional treatment methods or pumped to drainage systems without treatment. This represents a serious environmental problem and causes challenges to the countries which face water shortages. A hybrid dissolved air flotation (DAF)-membrane process is a

  14. Efficacy of brown sugar flotation and hot water methods for detecting Rhagoletis indifferens (Dipt., Tephritidae) larvae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The brown sugar flotation and hot water methods are accepted procedures for detecting larval western cherry fruit fly, Rhagoletis indifferens Curran, in sweet cherry [Prunus avium (L.) L.] and could be included in a systems approach for showing the absence of larvae in fruit. The methods require cr...

  15. Psychotherapeutic Treatment in Combination with Relaxation in a Flotation Tank: Effects on "Burn-Out Syndrome"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kjellgren, Anette; Buhrkall, Hanne; Norlander, Torsten

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this study was to investigate experiences gained from treatment combining relaxation in flotation tank with psychotherapy for sufferers from "burn-out syndrome". Six people participated in a ten week program. They were all interviewed; the data were analyzed using the Empirical Phenomenological Psychological method. Five themes…

  16. Patterns in the use of space by benthic communities on two coral reefs of the Great Barrier Reef

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. E. Reichelt; Y. Loya; R. H. Bradbury

    1986-01-01

    A rapid benthic line-transect survey method for use by non-specialist observers is described. At both Davies Reef (mid-continental shelf) and Myrmidon Reef (outer-continental shelf) in the central Great Barrier Reef a set of 6 sites of varying depths on the reef flat, crest and slope were sampled using this method. At least 10 contiguous 10 m transects were made at

  17. The Merensky Reef in the Chineisky Pluton (Siberia)? A myth or a reality?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhitova, L.; Sharapov, V.; Zhukova, I.

    2006-12-01

    It is a dream of each geologist to find a `Merensky Reef' in each layered basic intrusion. Scientists have been trying many various techniques to come this dream to reality. The most perspective way to do so is probably a combination of physicochemical and computer modeling of layered basic intrusion crystallization together with fluid and melt inclusions studies in situ. This combination allows us to do the following: 1. To study boundary conditions for separation of low density gas phase and salt melt from the crystallizing primary basic melt in large magma chamber. 2. To determine correct quantitative parameters for formation of residual fluid-bearing brines extracting high metal concentrations. 3. To compute critical levels for substance differentiation at phase, geochemical and other `barriers' in those basic mantle-crust ore magmatic systems. 4. To model metal extraction, transportation and deposition at these `barriers' for systems of various `silicate melt - residual salt brines' ratios under the conditions of continental lithosphere. Comparison of real and modeled data allows us to conclude if a formation of a narrow zone of high metal concentration is possible at those critical levels (phase and geochemical `barriers'). The above-mentioned algorithm has been used for the Chineisky Pluton (the Transbaikal region, Siberia). Fortunately we have found our own `Merensky Reef', which happened to be a PGE enrichment marginal zone of the Chineisky Pluton due to specific fluid regime of crystallization! This work was supported by the Ministry for Russian Science and Education, Grant #DSP.2.1.1.702.

  18. Detecting ecological change on coral reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dustan, P.

    2011-12-01

    Remote sensing offers the potential to observe the response of coral reef ecosystems to environmental perturbations on a geographical scale not previously accessible. However, coral reef environments are optically, spatially, and temporally complex habitats which all present significant challenges for extracting meaningful information. Virtually every member of the reef community possesses some degree of photosynthetic capability. The community thus generates a matrix of fine scale features with bio-optical signatures that blend as the scale of observation increases. Furthermore, to have any validity, the remotely sensed signal must be "calibrated" to the bio-optics of the reef, a difficult and resource intensive process due to a convergence of photosynthetic light harvesting by green, red, and brown algal pigment systems. To make matters more complex, reefs are overlain by a seawater skin with its own set of hydrological optical challenges. Rather than concentrating on classification, my research has attempted to track change by following the variation in geo-referenced pixel brightness over time with a technique termed temporal texture. Environmental periodicities impart a phenology to the variation in brightness and departures from the norm are easily detected as statistical outliers. This opens the door to using current orbiting technology to efficiently examine large areas of sea for change. If hot spots are detected, higher resolution sensors and field studies can be focused as resources permit. While this technique does not identify the type of change, it is sensitive, simple to compute, easy to automate and grounded in ecological niche theory

  19. Distributions of coral reef macroalgae in a back reef habitat in Moorea, French Polynesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poray, A. K.; Carpenter, R. C.

    2014-03-01

    On tropical reefs where macroalgae are subjected to continuous herbivore pressure, spatial refuges typically are identified as large-scale, landscape interfaces that limit foraging behavior. However, algal distributions and community assemblages may also rely on the availability of smaller scale spatial refuges within the reef. The results of this study demonstrate that the patterns of macroalgal distribution across the back reef of Moorea, French Polynesia, are maintained by herbivores interacting with the small-scale structural complexities of the coral reef landscape. Although the majority of space available for colonization is composed of exposed surfaces, macroalgae rarely are found in the open. Instead, macroalgal occurrence is highest in the protected narrow crevices and hole microhabitats provided by massive Porites spp. coral heads. These distributions are determined initially by post-settlement mortality of young algal recruits in exposed habitats. Rates of consumption for two of the most common macroalgal species found in refuges across the back reef, Halimeda minima and Amansia rhodantha, indicate that algal recruits in exposed habitats are limited by herbivory. While algal abundance and community structure are highly dependent upon herbivore grazing, the availability of small-scale spatial refuges ultimately shapes the distinct community patterns and distributional boundaries of coral reef macroalgae in the back reefs of Moorea.

  20. 13. ORE DOCK, LOOKING EAST FROM HULETT NO. 1. WHEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. ORE DOCK, LOOKING EAST FROM HULETT NO. 1. WHEN BUILT IN 1911-1912, THIS WAS THE LARGEST ORE-UNLOADING DOCK ON THE GREAT LAKES. THE DOCK FEATURED FOUR HULETT UNLOADERS, EACH WITH A BUCKET CAPACITY OF 17 TONS; A 15-TON CAPACITY ORE STOCKING AND REHANDLING BRIDGE; AND A ONE-MILLION-TON CAPACITY ORE STORAGE YARD. THE WILLIAM-SEAVER-MORGAN COMPANY OF CLEVELAND BUILT THE DOCK EQUIPMENT. - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  1. Process and apparatus for separating fine particles by microbubble flotation together with a process and apparatus for generation of microbubbles

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Roe-Hoan (Blacksburg, VA); Adel, Gregory T. (Blacksburg, VA); Luttrell, Gerald H. (Blacksburg, VA)

    1991-01-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for the microbubble flotation separation of very fine particles, especially coal, so as to produce a high purity and large recovery efficiently. This is accomplished through the use of a high aspect ratio flotation column, microbubbles, and a countercurrent use of wash water to gently wash the froth. Also, disclosed are unique processes and apparatus for generating microbubbles for flotation in a high efficient and inexpensive manner using either a porous tube or an in-line static generator.

  2. Process and apparatus for separating fine particles by microbubble flotation together with a process and apparatus for generation of microbubbles

    DOEpatents

    Yoon, R.H.; Adel, G.T.; Luttrell, G.H.

    1991-01-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for the microbubble flotation separation of very fine particles, especially coal, so as to produce a high purity and large recovery efficiently. This is accomplished through the use of a high aspect ratio flotation column, microbubbles, and a countercurrent use of wash water to gently wash the froth. Also, disclosed are unique processes and apparatus for generating microbubbles for flotation in a high efficient and inexpensive manner using either a porous tube or an in-line static generator. 23 figures.

  3. 76 FR 68711 - Amendments to the Reef Fish, Spiny Lobster, Queen Conch and Coral and Reef Associated Plants and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-07

    ...Fish, Spiny Lobster, Queen Conch and Coral and Reef Associated Plants and Invertebrates...Islands, and Amendment 3 to the FMP for Corals and Reef Associated Plants and Invertebrates...procedures for the spiny lobster and Caribbean corals and reef associated plants and...

  4. 76 FR 82413 - Amendments to the Reef Fish, Spiny Lobster, Queen Conch and Coral and Reef Associated Plants and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-30

    ...Fish, Spiny Lobster, Queen Conch and Coral and Reef Associated Plants and Invertebrates...Fish, Spiny Lobster, Queen Conch and Coral and Reef Associated Plants and Invertebrates...FMP), and Amendment 3 to the FMP for Corals and Reef Associated Plants and...

  5. Re-creating missing population baselines for Pacific reef sharks.

    PubMed

    Nadon, Marc O; Baum, Julia K; Williams, Ivor D; McPherson, Jana M; Zgliczynski, Brian J; Richards, Benjamin L; Schroeder, Robert E; Brainard, Russell E

    2012-06-01

    Sharks and other large predators are scarce on most coral reefs, but studies of their historical ecology provide qualitative evidence that predators were once numerous in these ecosystems. Quantifying density of sharks in the absence of humans (baseline) is, however, hindered by a paucity of pertinent time-series data. Recently researchers have used underwater visual surveys, primarily of limited spatial extent or nonstandard design, to infer negative associations between reef shark abundance and human populations. We analyzed data from 1607 towed-diver surveys (>1 ha transects surveyed by observers towed behind a boat) conducted at 46 reefs in the central-western Pacific Ocean, reefs that included some of the world's most pristine coral reefs. Estimates of shark density from towed-diver surveys were substantially lower (<10%) than published estimates from surveys along small transects (<0.02 ha), which is not consistent with inverted biomass pyramids (predator biomass greater than prey biomass) reported by other researchers for pristine reefs. We examined the relation between the density of reef sharks observed in towed-diver surveys and human population in models that accounted for the influence of oceanic primary productivity, sea surface temperature, reef area, and reef physical complexity. We used these models to estimate the density of sharks in the absence of humans. Densities of gray reef sharks (Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos), whitetip reef sharks (Triaenodon obesus), and the group "all reef sharks" increased substantially as human population decreased and as primary productivity and minimum sea surface temperature (or reef area, which was highly correlated with temperature) increased. Simulated baseline densities of reef sharks under the absence of humans were 1.1-2.4/ha for the main Hawaiian Islands, 1.2-2.4/ha for inhabited islands of American Samoa, and 0.9-2.1/ha for inhabited islands in the Mariana Archipelago, which suggests that density of reef sharks has declined to 3-10% of baseline levels in these areas. PMID:22536842

  6. Juvenile coral reef fish use sound to locate habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radford, C. A.; Stanley, J. A.; Simpson, S. D.; Jeffs, A. G.

    2011-06-01

    There is limited knowledge of the orientation cues used by reef fish in their movement among different habitats, especially those cues used during darkness. Although acoustic cues have been found to be important for settlement-stage fish as they seek settlement habitats, only a small number of studies support the possible role of acoustic cues in the orientation of post-settled and adult reef fish. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine whether habitat-specific acoustic cues were involved in the nocturnal movements of juvenile reef fish to small experimental patch reefs that were broadcasting sound previously recorded from different habitats (Fringing Reef, Lagoon, Silent). Juvenile fish arriving at each patch reef were caught the next morning by divers and were identified. There were a greater number of occasions when juvenile fish (from all species together) moved onto the patch reefs broadcasting Fringing Reef and Lagoon sound (43 and 38%, respectively) compared to Silent reefs (19%) (?2 = 33.5; P < 0.05). There were significantly more occasions when juvenile fish from the family Nemipteridae were attracted to the patch reefs broadcasting Lagoon sound (63%) versus those reefs broadcasting either Fringing Reef sound (31%) or Silent (6%). In contrast, there were more occasions when juveniles from the family Pomacentridae were attracted to the patch reefs broadcasting Fringing Reef sound (56%) than either Lagoon (24%) or Silent patch reefs (20%) (?2 = 19.5; P < 0.05). These results indicate that some juvenile fish use specific habitat sounds to guide their nocturnal movements. Therefore, the fish are able to not only use the directional information contained in acoustic cues, but can also interpret the content of the acoustic signals for relevant habitat information which is then used in their decision-making for orientation.

  7. Degradation Characteristics of O-rings on Highly Aged GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minagawa, Tadao; Nagao, Eiichi; Tsuchie, Ei; Yonezawa, Hiroshi; Takayama, Daisuke; Yamakawa, Yutaka

    Owing to increasing number of highly aged GIS, the investigation of the remaining lifetimes of those systems are becoming more important. Because a lot of O-rings are used in GIS, the study of degradation mechanism and lifetime estimation method of O-ring is essential. In this paper, the information about O-ring degradation mechanism is described, and the statistical method for estimating the remaining lifetime of O-ring is proposed. The degradation of O-ring is mainly subject to chemical reactions triggered by oxygen. Because there are many factors influencing those chemical reactions, the dispersion of degradation rates of O-rings in GIS is very large. Consequently the statistical analysis is one of the effective techniques for lifetime estimation of O-rings in GIS.

  8. Process for extracting hydrocarbons from hydrocarbon bearing ores

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, R.H.; Eakin, B.E.

    1986-02-18

    This patent describes a process for recovering hydrocarbons from a diatomite ore consisting of: reducing the size of the ore to less than about 5 mesh to form a reduced ore; combining the reduced ore with liquid to form ore pellets; treating the ore pellets to form extractable ore pellets; contacting a bed of the extractable pellets with extracting solvent in an extraction zone such that the relative velocity of the solvent to the extractable pellets is at least about one-half gallon per square foot per minute or more to thereby extract hydrocarbons from the extractable pellets and form spent pellets and a hydrocarbon rich solvent stream comprising extracting solvent and extracted hydrocarbons. The extracted hydrocarbons have an ash content of about less than 3 weight percent; and recovering extracting solvent from the spent pellets while retaining the spent pellets in pellet form without release of a significant amount of fines.

  9. Extraction process and apparatus for hydrocarbon containing ores

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, R. H.; Eakin, B. E.

    1985-09-03

    There is provided a hydrocarbon extraction process and apparatus for removing hydrocarbons from a hydrocarbon containing ore such as a diatomite ore. The ore is preprocessed to the extent required to produce an extractable ore and subsequently mixed with a carrier to form an ore stream. The carrier may be a nonaqueous solvent and may further comprise a non-porous granular material such as sand. The ore stream is passed in substantially vertical countercurrent flow through a nonaqueous solvent to produce a product-solvent stream and a spent ore stream. The solvent is subsequently separated from the hydrocarbon stream, which may be further upgraded by removal of a heavy portion. This may be accomplished in the presence of a substantial amount of fines.

  10. DETAIL VIEW OF LOWER TRAM TERMINAL, SECONDARY ORE BIN, CRUSHER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF LOWER TRAM TERMINAL, SECONDARY ORE BIN, CRUSHER FOUNDATION, AND BALL MILL FOUNDATIONS, LOOKING NORTH NORTHWEST. ORE FROM THE MINES WAS DUMPED FROM THE TRAM BUCKETS INTO THE PRIMARY ORE BIN UNDER THE TRAM TERMINAL. A SLIDING CONTROL DOOR INTRODUCED THE INTO THE JAW CRUSHER (FOUNDATIONS,CENTER). THE CRUSHED ORE WAS THEN CONVEYED INTO THE SECONDARY ORE BIN AT CENTER LEFT. A HOLE IN THE FLOOR OF THE ORE BIN PASSED ORE ONTO ANOTHER CONVEYOR THAT BROUGHT IT OUT TO THE BALL MILL(FOUNDATIONS,CENTER BOTTOM). THIS SYSTEM IS MOST LIKELY NOT THE ORIGINAL SET UP, PROBABLY INSTALLED IN THE MINE'S LAST OCCUPATION IN THE EARLY 1940s. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  11. Ecology of artificial reefs in the subtropics.

    PubMed

    Shin, Paul K S; Cheung, Siu Gin; Tsang, Tsui Yun; Wai, Ho Yin

    2014-01-01

    The application of artificial reefs (ARs) has a long history, and there is a wealth of information related to the design and performance of ARs in coastal and ocean waters worldwide. However, relatively fewer studies in the literature are focused on the response of benthic communities within the reef areas than those on fish attraction and fish production and on the settlement and colonization of epibiota on the AR structures, especially in the subtropics where seasonal differences and environmental conditions can be large. Recent advances in the understanding of the ecology of ARs in the subtropics are highlighted, with a focus on fish attraction versus fish production, development of epibiota on AR systems and responses of in situ benthic communities in the reef areas. Data are also presented on studies of trophic relationships in subtropical AR systems, and further research areas using analyses of biological traits, stable isotope signatures and fatty acid profiles in investigating the ecology of ARs are proposed. PMID:24981732

  12. Predicting the Location and Spatial Extent of Submerged Coral Reef Habitat in the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Bridge, Tom; Beaman, Robin; Done, Terry; Webster, Jody

    2012-01-01

    Aim Coral reef communities occurring in deeper waters have received little research effort compared to their shallow-water counterparts, and even such basic information as their location and extent are currently unknown throughout most of the world. Using the Great Barrier Reef as a case study, habitat suitability modelling is used to predict the distribution of deep-water coral reef communities on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia. We test the effectiveness of a range of geophysical and environmental variables for predicting the location of deep-water coral reef communities on the Great Barrier Reef. Location Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Methods Maximum entropy modelling is used to identify the spatial extent of two broad communities of habitat-forming megabenthos phototrophs and heterotrophs. Models were generated using combinations of geophysical substrate properties derived from multibeam bathymetry and environmental data derived from Bio-ORACLE, combined with georeferenced occurrence records of mesophotic coral communities from autonomous underwater vehicle, remotely operated vehicle and SCUBA surveys. Model results are used to estimate the total amount of mesophotic coral reef habitat on the GBR. Results Our models predict extensive but previously undocumented coral communities occurring both along the continental shelf-edge of the Great Barrier Reef and also on submerged reefs inside the lagoon. Habitat suitability for phototrophs is highest on submerged reefs along the outer-shelf and the deeper flanks of emergent reefs inside the GBR lagoon, while suitability for heterotrophs is highest in the deep waters along the shelf-edge. Models using only geophysical variables consistently outperformed models incorporating environmental data for both phototrophs and heterotrophs. Main Conclusion Extensive submerged coral reef communities that are currently undocumented are likely to occur throughout the Great Barrier Reef. High-quality bathymetry data can be used to identify these reefs, which may play an important role in resilience of the GBR ecosystem to climate change. PMID:23118952

  13. Fiji's largest marine reserve benefits reef sharks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetze, J. S.; Fullwood, L. A. F.

    2013-03-01

    To provide more information about whether sharks benefit from no-take marine reserves, we quantified the relative abundance and biomass of reef sharks inside and outside of Namena, Fiji's largest reserve (60.6 km2). Using stereo baited remote underwater video systems (stereo-BRUVs), we found that the abundance and biomass of sharks was approximately two and four times greater in shallow and deep locations, respectively, within the Namena reserve compared to adjacent fished areas. The greater abundance and biomass of reef sharks inside Namena is likely a result of greater prey availability rather than protection from fishing. This study demonstrates that marine reserves can benefit sharks.

  14. Reefing Line Tension in CPAS Main Parachute Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Eric S.

    2013-01-01

    Reefing lines are an essential feature to manage inflation loads. During each Engineering Development Unit (EDU) test of the Capsule Parachute Assembly System (CPAS), a chase aircraft is staged to be level with the cluster of Main ringsail parachutes during the initial inflation and reefed stages. This allows for capturing high-quality still photographs of the reefed skirt, suspension line, and canopy geometry. The over-inflation angles are synchronized with measured loads data in order to compute the tension force in the reefing line. The traditional reefing tension equation assumes radial symmetry, but cluster effects cause the reefed skirt of each parachute to elongate to a more elliptical shape. This effect was considered in evaluating multiple parachutes to estimate the semi-major and semi-minor axes. Three flight tests are assessed, including one with a skipped first stage, which had peak reefing line tension over three times higher than the nominal parachute disreef sequence.

  15. Coral reef metabolism and carbon chemistry dynamics of a coral reef flat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albright, Rebecca; Benthuysen, Jessica; Cantin, Neal; Caldeira, Ken; Anthony, Ken

    2015-05-01

    Global carbon emissions continue to acidify the oceans, motivating growing concern for the ability of coral reefs to maintain net positive calcification rates. Efforts to develop robust relationships between coral reef calcification and carbonate parameters such as aragonite saturation state (?arag) aim to facilitate meaningful predictions of how reef calcification will change in the face of ocean acidification. Here we investigate natural trends in carbonate chemistry of a coral reef flat over diel cycles and relate these trends to benthic carbon fluxes by quantifying net community calcification and net community production. We find that, despite an apparent dependence of calcification on ?arag seen in a simple pairwise relationship, if the dependence of net calcification on net photosynthesis is accounted for, knowing ?arag does not add substantial explanatory value. This suggests that, over short time scales, the control of ?arag on net calcification is weak relative to factors governing net photosynthesis.

  16. Conservation and Management Applications of the Reef Volunteer Fish Monitoring Program

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christy V. Pattengill-Semmens; Brice X. Semmens

    2003-01-01

    The REEF Fish Survey Project is a volunteer fish monitoring program developed by the Reef Environmental Education Foundation (REEF). REEF volunteers collect fish distribution and abundance data using a standardized visual method during regular diving and snorkeling activities. Survey data are recorded on preprinted data sheets that are returned to REEF and optically digitized. Data are housed in a publicly

  17. Coral Reefs: An English Compilation of Activities for Middle School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Sharon H.; Newton, R. Amanda; Ortiz, Alida

    This activity book on coral reefs for middle school students is divided into 10 sections. Section 1 contains the introduction. Section 2 describes what coral reefs are while section 3 describes how coral reefs reproduce and grow. Section 4 discusses where coral reefs are found and section 5 describes life on a coral reef. Section 6 discusses the…

  18. Encouraging Proximal Relations: Queensland High School Students Go to the Reef

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stepath, Carl; Whitehouse, Hilary

    2006-01-01

    Background: This article concerns learning with high school students and the effect of snorkeling and coral reef monitoring at the Great Barrier Reef, Australia. The effectiveness of classroom learning, student-reef relationships and reef trips were investigated. Purpose: This paper presents selected student accounts of reef educational…

  19. In Situ Coral Reef Oxygen Metabolism: An Eddy Correlation Study

    PubMed Central

    Long, Matthew H.; Berg, Peter; de Beer, Dirk; Zieman, Joseph C.

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative studies of coral reefs are challenged by the three-dimensional hard structure of reefs and the high spatial variability and temporal dynamics of their metabolism. We used the non-invasive eddy correlation technique to examine respiration and photosynthesis rates, through O2 fluxes, from reef crests and reef slopes in the Florida Keys, USA. We assessed how the photosynthesis and respiration of different reef habitats is controlled by light and hydrodynamics. Numerous fluxes (over a 0.25 h period) were as high as 4500 mmol O2 m?2 d?1, which can only be explained by efficient light utilization by the phototrophic community and the complex canopy structure of the reef, having a many-fold larger surface area than its horizontal projection. Over diel cycles, the reef crest was net autotrophic, whereas on the reef slope oxygen production and respiration were balanced. The autotrophic nature of the shallow reef crests implies that the export of organics is an important source of primary production for the larger area. Net oxygen production on the reef crest was proportional to the light intensity, up to 1750 µmol photons m?2 s?1 and decreased thereafter as respiration was stimulated by high current velocities coincident with peak light levels. Nighttime respiration rates were also stimulated by the current velocity, through enhanced ventilation of the porous framework of the reef. Respiration rates were the highest directly after sunset, and then decreased during the night suggesting that highly labile photosynthates produced during the day fueled early-night respiration. The reef framework was also important to the acquisition of nutrients as the ambient nitrogen stock in the water had sufficient capacity to support these high production rates across the entire reef width. These direct measurements of complex reefs systems yielded high metabolic rates and dynamics that can only be determined through in situ, high temporal resolution measurements. PMID:23536798

  20. Selecting Ore Pass-Finger Raise Configurations in Underground Mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaieli, Kamran; Hadjigeorgiou, John

    2011-05-01

    Material transfer in underground mines often relies on ore and waste pass systems. In mines where ore pass systems transcend multiple production levels, finger raises are used to funnel material into the system. Empirical evidence, from several mines, suggests that the use of finger raises often results in damage in the immediate vicinity of finger raise-ore pass junctions. Of particular concern is damage on the ore pass walls as a result of impact loads generated by material flowing through the fingers on to the ore pass walls. The severity of damage is directly related to the rock mass quality of the excavation walls, material properties of transiting ore and the ore pass-finger raise configuration. This paper examines the influence of different configurations aiming to develop strategies to minimize ore pass wall damage. To these purposes the Particle Flow Code was employed to undertake a series of numerical experiments. This involved dumping a batch of rock fragments, represented by a uniform distribution of disc-shaped particles, into a finger raise and allowed to flow into an ore pass. It has been clearly demonstrated that higher impact loads were generated when the angle of intersection between ore pass and finger raise was 140° to 145°. This configuration results in the most damage. The results of these numerical experiments were collaborated by observations at an underground mine in Canada.

  1. Vertical and horizontal distributions of coral-reef fish larvae in open water immediately prior to reef colonization.

    PubMed

    Lecchini, D; Waqalevu, V P; Holles, S; Lerohellec, M; Brie, C; Simpson, S D

    2013-06-01

    To explore the vertical and horizontal distributions of fish larvae near the end of their pelagic period, six light traps were set up over four lunar months at different depths (sub-surface, midwater and bottom) and different habitat types (reef slope: 50 m horizontal distance from the reef crest; frontier zone: 110 m horizontal distance; sandy zone: 200 m horizontal distance) on the outer reef slope of Moorea Island, French Polynesia. The highest captures were in sub-surface traps on the reef slope and the frontier zone, and in bottom traps on the sandy zone and the frontier zone. It is hypothesized that fish larvae move towards the surface near the reef slope to avoid reef-based planktivores and to get into a favourable position for surfing over the reef crest. PMID:23731158

  2. Atomic Absorption Spectrometry Determination of Cd, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, Zn, and Tl Traces in Seawater Following Flotation Separation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ýkbal Kojuncu; Jožica Majda Bundalevska; Ümit Ay; Katarina ?undeva; Traj?e Stafilov; Göksel Akçin

    2004-01-01

    A fast method for separation of Cd, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, Zn, and Tl from seawater before their determination by atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) is described. The ability of Co(III) hexamethylenedithiocarbamate, Co(HMDTC)3, as a flotation collector for metals from seawater was investigated. The influence of pH of the media, as one of the crucial parameters for effective flotation, as well

  3. Development of dissolved air flotation technology from the first generation to the newest (third) one (DAF in turbulent flow conditions)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. J. Kiuru

    This paper gives a brief description of the development of dissolved air flotation DAF (or so-called high pressure flotation) as an unit operation for removal of solids in water and wastewater treatment during the last 80 years up to this time. The first DAF-systems used in the water industry were the ADKA and Sveen- Pedersen ones from the 1920s. Some

  4. Comparison of the egg flotation and egg candling techniques for estimating incubation day of Canada Goose nests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reiter, M.E.; Andersen, D.E.

    2008-01-01

    Both egg flotation and egg candling have been used to estimate incubation day (often termed nest age) in nesting birds, but little is known about the relative accuracy of these two techniques. We used both egg flotation and egg candling to estimate incubation day for Canada Geese (Branta canadensis interior) nesting near Cape Churchill, Manitoba, from 2000 to 2007. We modeled variation in the difference between estimates of incubation day using each technique as a function of true incubation day, as well as, variation in error rates with each technique as a function of the true incubation day. We also evaluated the effect of error in the estimated incubation day on estimates of daily survival rate (DSR) and nest success using simulations. The mean difference between concurrent estimates of incubation day based on egg flotation minus egg candling at the same nest was 0.85 ?? 0.06 (SE) days. The positive difference in favor of egg flotation and the magnitude of the difference in estimates of incubation day did not vary as a function of true incubation day. Overall, both egg flotation and egg candling overestimated incubation day early in incubation and underestimated incubation day later in incubation. The average difference between true hatch date and estimated hatch date did not differ from zero (days) for egg flotation, but egg candling overestimated true hatch date by about 1 d (true - estimated; days). Our simulations suggested that error associated with estimating the incubation day of nests and subsequently exposure days using either egg candling or egg flotation would have minimal effects on estimates of DSR and nest success. Although egg flotation was slightly less biased, both methods provided comparable and accurate estimates of incubation day and subsequent estimates of hatch date and nest success throughout the entire incubation period. ?? 2008 Association of Field Ornithologists.

  5. Nano-bubble flotation technology with coagulation process for the cost-effective treatment of chemical mechanical polishing wastewater

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jen-Chieh Tsai; Mathava Kumar; Shen-Yi Chen; Jih-Gaw Lin

    2007-01-01

    The feasibility of nano-bubble flotation technology (NBFT) with coagulation\\/flocculation process for the enhanced treatment of chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) wastewater was investigated through laboratory and pilot-scale experiments. As a precursor, the effective combination of activator\\/collector was identified using a laboratory-scale flotation reactor. The results showed that polyaluminum chloride (PAC)\\/sodium oleate (NaOl) was the best combination of activator\\/collector, respectively and its

  6. Diving down the reefs? Intensive diving tourism threatens the reefs of the northern Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Hasler, Harald; Ott, Jörg A

    2008-10-01

    Intensive recreational SCUBA diving threatens coral reef ecosystems. The reefs at Dahab, South Sinai, Egypt, are among the world's most dived (>30,000 dives y(-1)). We compared frequently dived sites to sites with no or little diving. Benthic communities and condition of corals were examined by the point intercept sampling method in the reef crest zone (3m) and reef slope zone (12 m). Additionally, the abundance of corallivorous and herbivorous fish was estimated based on the visual census method. Sediments traps recorded the sedimentation rates caused by SCUBA divers. Zones subject to intensive SCUBA diving showed a significantly higher number of broken and damaged corals and significantly lower coral cover. Reef crest coral communities were significantly more affected than those of the reef slope: 95% of the broken colonies were branching ones. No effect of diving on the abundance of corallivorous and herbivorous fish was evident. At heavily used dive sites, diver-related sedimentation rates significantly decreased with increasing distance from the entrance, indicating poor buoyancy regulation at the initial phase of the dive. The results show a high negative impact of current SCUBA diving intensities on coral communities and coral condition. Corallivorous and herbivorous fishes are apparently not yet affected, but are endangered if coral cover decline continues. Reducing the number of dives per year, ecologically sustainable dive plans for individual sites, and reinforcing the environmental education of both dive guides and recreational divers are essential to conserve the ecological and the aesthetic qualities of these dive sites. PMID:18701118

  7. Bioethical Consideration in the Search for Bioactive Compounds from Reef`s Invertebrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukarmi, Ocky; Radjasa, Karna

    The occurrence of large scale of bioactive compounds is not common to all living organisms, but restricted to certain taxonomic groups. Among marine animals, reef`s invertebrates are the most prolific producers of secondary metabolites and have become sources of great interest to natural product chemistry, since they provide a large proportion of bioactive compounds with different biological activities. Perhaps the most significant problem that has hampered the investigation of secondary metabolites is their low concentration. In marine invertebrates many highly active compounds contribute to < 10-6% of the body-wet weight. Providing sufficient amounts of these biologically active substances, hence, may be a difficult task. In addition, it has often proven extremely difficult and some cases impossible, to provide from invertebrates sufficient amounts of many of these substances due to limited amounts found in the producing organism, or to limited quantity of the organism itself, or to geographic, seasonal or sexual variations in the amounts and in the nature of produced secondary metabolites. There has an increasing concerns regarding the collecting reef`s organisms for the discovery and development of pharmaceuticals since it has been perceived variously as sustaining and threatening conservation. There is an urgent need to take into account the bioethical considerations in anticipating the potential consequences of these activities and proposing management options for sustainable use of reef`s invertebrates as the sources of bioactive compounds.

  8. Last interglacial reef growth beneath Belize barrier and isolated platform reefs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gischler, Eberhard; Lomando, Anthony J.; Hudson, J. Harold; Holmes, Charles W.

    2000-01-01

    We report the first radiometric dates (thermal-ionization mass spectrometry) from late Pleistocene reef deposits from offshore Belize, the location of the largest modern reef complex in the Atlantic Ocean. The results presented here can be used to explain significant differences in bathymetry, sedimentary facies, and reef development of this major reef area, and the results are significant because they contribute to the knowledge of the regional geology of the eastern Yucatán. The previously held concept of a neotectonically stable eastern Yucatán is challenged. The dates indicate that Pleistocene reefs and shallow-water limestones, which form the basement of modern reefs in the area, accumulated ca. 125–130 ka. Significant differences in elevation of the samples relative to present sea level (>10 m) have several possible causes. Differential subsidence along a series of continental margin fault blocks in combination with variation in karstification are probably the prime causes. Differential subsidence is presumably related to initial extension and later left-lateral movements along the adjacent active boundary between the North American and Caribbean plates. Increasing dissolution toward the south during Pleistocene sea-level lowstands is probably a consequence of higher precipitation rates in mountainous southern Belize.

  9. Geomorphology and community structure of Middle Reef, central Great Barrier Reef, Australia: an inner-shelf turbid zone reef subject to episodic mortality events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browne, N. K.; Smithers, S. G.; Perry, C. T.

    2010-09-01

    Middle Reef is an inshore turbid zone reef located 4 km offshore from Townsville, Queensland, Australia. The reef consists of four current-aligned, interconnected reef patches that have reached sea level and formed reef flats. It is regularly exposed to high turbidity (up to 50 mg l-1) generated by wave-driven sediment resuspension or by episodic flood plumes. Middle Reef has a high mean hard coral cover (>39%), relatively low mean macro-algal cover (<15%) and a coral community comprising at least 81 hard coral species. Cluster analysis differentiated six benthic communities which were mapped onto the geomorphological structure of the reef to reveal a spatially patchy community mosaic that reflects hydrodynamic and sediment redistribution processes. Coral cover data collected annually from windward slope transects since 1993 show that coral cover has increased over the last ~15 years despite a history of episodic mortality events. Although episodic mortality may be interpreted as an indication of marginality, over decadal timescales, Middle Reef has recovered rapidly following mortality events and is clearly a resilient coral reef.

  10. Modelling Coral Reef Futures to Inform Management: Can Reducing Local-Scale Stressors Conserve Reefs under Climate Change?

    PubMed Central

    Gurney, Georgina G.; Melbourne-Thomas, Jessica; Geronimo, Rollan C.; Alińo, Perry M.; Johnson, Craig R.

    2013-01-01

    Climate change has emerged as a principal threat to coral reefs, and is expected to exacerbate coral reef degradation caused by more localised stressors. Management of local stressors is widely advocated to bolster coral reef resilience, but the extent to which management of local stressors might affect future trajectories of reef state remains unclear. This is in part because of limited understanding of the cumulative impact of multiple stressors. Models are ideal tools to aid understanding of future reef state under alternative management and climatic scenarios, but to date few have been sufficiently developed to be useful as decision support tools for local management of coral reefs subject to multiple stressors. We used a simulation model of coral reefs to investigate the extent to which the management of local stressors (namely poor water quality and fishing) might influence future reef state under varying climatic scenarios relating to coral bleaching. We parameterised the model for Bolinao, the Philippines, and explored how simulation modelling can be used to provide decision support for local management. We found that management of water quality, and to a lesser extent fishing, can have a significant impact on future reef state, including coral recovery following bleaching-induced mortality. The stressors we examined interacted antagonistically to affect reef state, highlighting the importance of considering the combined impact of multiple stressors rather than considering them individually. Further, by providing explicit guidance for management of Bolinao's reef system, such as which course of management action will most likely to be effective over what time scales and at which sites, we demonstrated the utility of simulation models for supporting management. Aside from providing explicit guidance for management of Bolinao's reef system, our study offers insights which could inform reef management more broadly, as well as general understanding of reef systems. PMID:24260347

  11. Headgroup interactions and ion flotation efficiency in mixtures of a chelating surfactant, different foaming agents, and divalent metal ions.

    PubMed

    Svanedal, Ida; Boija, Susanne; Norgren, Magnus; Edlund, Hĺkan

    2014-06-10

    The correlation between interaction parameters and ion flotation efficiency in mixtures of chelating surfactant metal complexes and different foaming agents was investigated. We have recently shown that chelating surfactant 2-dodecyldiethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (4-C12-DTPA) forms strong coordination complexes with divalent metal ions, and this can be utilized in ion flotation. Interaction parameters for mixed micelles and mixed monolayer formation for Mg(2+) and Ni(2+) complexes with the chelating surfactant 4-C12-DTPA and different foaming agents were calculated by Rubingh's regular solution theory. Parameters for the calculations were extracted from surface tension measurements and NMR diffusometry. The effects of metal ion coordination on the interactions between 4-C12-DTPA and the foaming agents could be linked to a previously established difference in coordination chemistry between the examined metal ions. As can be expected from mixtures of amphoteric surfactants, the interactions were strongly pH-dependent. Strong correlation was found between interaction parameter ?(?) for mixed monolayer formation and the phase-transfer efficiency of Ni(2+) complexes with 4-C12-DTPA during flotation in a customized flotation cell. In a mixture of Cu(2+) and Zn(2+), the significant difference in conditional stability constants (log K) between the metal complexes was utilized to selectively recover the metal complex with the highest log K (Cu(2+)) by ion flotation. Flotation experiments in an excess concentration of metal ions confirmed the coordination of more than one metal ion to the headgroup of 4-C12-DTPA. PMID:24824327

  12. CORAL REEF RESPONSES TO GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increased emissions of greenhouse gases and synthetic compounds are related to rising sea temperatures and increased penetration of ultraviolet radiation (UVR), two factors that are consistently linked to bleaching and disease of corals. Coral reefs play a major role in the envir...

  13. Applying MCSST to coral reef bleaching

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. W. Gleeson; A. E. Strong

    1995-01-01

    In the 1980s and early 1990s, coral reef bleaching events of unprecedented frequency and global extent were observed. Elevated water temperature is suspected as the primary causal stress of mass bleaching events from this period. The relationship between sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and coral bleaching events was investigated using National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Multi-Channel Sea Surface Temperature (MCSST)

  14. Introduction Worldwide reef fish fisheries are in

    E-print Network

    and JUAN J. AGAR and Eklund, 1999). Reef fish species, especially groupers, are particularly vulnerable@rsmas.miami.edu), and Juan J. Agar is with the Social Science Research Group, Southeast Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA, Miami, FL 33149 (email: Juan.Agar@noaa.gov). ABSTRACT

  15. Reef Corals of Fanning Island I

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. E. MARAGOS

    Recent surveys indicate that the diversity of reef corals at Fanning Island is greater than previously estimated. Most of the approximately 70 species belonging to 32 genera and subgenera typically are found in one of three environ­ ments. A turbid lagoon fauna has high abundance but lower diversity of pre­ dominantly branching forms. The clear lagoon coral fauna has both

  16. Physical-chemical conditions of ore deposition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barton, P.B., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Ore deposits form under a wide range of physical and chemical conditions, but those precipitating from hot, aqueous fluids-i.e. the hydrothermal deposits-form generally below 700??C and at pressures of only 1 or 2 kbar or less. Natural aqueous fluids in rocks may extract metal and sulfur from a variety of rock types or may acquire them as a residual heritage from a crystallizing silicate magma. Ore-forming hydrothermal fluids never appear as hot springs (except in deep, submarine situations) because they boil, mix with surface waters, and cool, thereby losing their ore-bearing ability before reaching the surface. Mineral systems function as chemical buffers and indicators just as buffers and indicators function in a chemical laboratory. By reading the record written in the buffer/indicator assemblages of minerals one can reconstruct many aspects of the former chemical environment. By studying the record of changing conditions one may deduce information regarding the processes functioning to create the succession of chemical environments and the ore deposits they represent. The example of the OH vein at Creede, Colorado, shows a pH buffered by the K-feldspar + muscovite + quartz assemblage and the covariation of S2 and O2 buffered by the assemblage chlorite + pyrite + quartz. Boiling of the ore fluid led to its oxidation to hematite-bearing assemblages and simultaneously produced an intensely altered, sericitic capping over the vein in response to the condensation of vapors bearing acidic components. The solubility of metals as calculated from experimental and theoretical studies of mineral solubility appears too low by at least one or two powers of ten to explain the mineralization at Creede. In contrast to Creede where the mineral stabilities all point to a relatively consistent chemistry, the Mississippi Valley type deposits present a puzzle of conflicting chemical clues that are impossible to reconcile with any single equilibrium situation. Thus we must seriously consider metastable equilibria; those most likely involve redox disequilibrium among the sulfur species in solution and perhaps also involve organic compounds. ?? 1981.

  17. Calcification by reef-building sclerobionts.

    PubMed

    Mallela, Jennie

    2013-01-01

    It is widely accepted that deteriorating water quality associated with increased sediment stress has reduced calcification rates on coral reefs. However, there is limited information regarding the growth and development of reef building organisms, aside from the corals themselves. This study investigated encruster calcification on five fore-reefs in Tobago subjected to a range of sedimentation rates (1.2 to 15.9 mg cm(-2) d(-1)). Experimental substrates were used to assess rates of calcification in sclerobionts (e.g. crustose coralline algae, bryozoans and barnacles) across key reef microhabitats: cryptic (low-light), exposed (open-horizontal) and vertical topographic settings. Sedimentation negatively impacted calcification by photosynthesising crustose coralline algae in exposed microhabitats and encrusting foram cover (%) in exposed and cryptic substrates. Heterotrophs were not affected by sedimentation. Fore-reef, turbid water encruster assemblages calcified at a mean rate of 757 (SD ±317) g m(-2) y(-1). Different microhabitats were characterised by distinct calcareous encruster assemblages with different rates of calcification. Taxa with rapid lateral growth dominated areal cover but were not responsible for the majority of CaCO3 production. Cryptobiont assemblages were composed of a suite of calcifying taxa which included sciaphilic cheilostome bryozoans and suspension feeding barnacles. These calcified at mean rates of 20.1 (SD ±27) and 4.0 (SD ±3.6) g m(-2) y(-1) respectively. Encruster cover (%) on exposed and vertical substrates was dominated by crustose coralline algae which calcified at rates of 105.3 (SD ±67.7) g m(-2) y(-1) and 56.3 (SD ±8.3) g m(-2) y(-1) respectively. Globally, encrusting organisms contribute significant amounts of carbonate to the reef framework. These results provide experimental evidence that calcification rates, and the importance of different encrusting organisms, vary significantly according to topography and sediment impacts. These findings also highlight the need for caution when modelling reef framework accretion and interpreting results which extrapolate information from limited data. PMID:23555864

  18. Fishing down the largest coral reef fish species.

    PubMed

    Fenner, Douglas

    2014-07-15

    Studies on remote, uninhabited, near-pristine reefs have revealed surprisingly large populations of large reef fish. Locations such as the northwestern Hawaiian Islands, northern Marianas Islands, Line Islands, U.S. remote Pacific Islands, Cocos-Keeling Atoll and Chagos archipelago have much higher reef fish biomass than islands and reefs near people. Much of the high biomass of most remote reef fish communities lies in the largest species, such as sharks, bumphead parrots, giant trevally, and humphead wrasse. Some, such as sharks and giant trevally, are apex predators, but others such as bumphead parrots and humphead wrasse, are not. At many locations, decreases in large reef fish species have been attributed to fishing. Fishing is well known to remove the largest fish first, and a quantitative measure of vulnerability to fishing indicates that large reef fish species are much more vulnerable to fishing than small fish. The removal of large reef fish by fishing parallels the extinction of terrestrial megafauna by early humans. However large reef fish have great value for various ecological roles and for reef tourism. PMID:24889317

  19. The Role of Turtles as Coral Reef Macroherbivores

    PubMed Central

    Goatley, Christopher H. R.; Hoey, Andrew S.; Bellwood, David R.

    2012-01-01

    Herbivory is widely accepted as a vital function on coral reefs. To date, the majority of studies examining herbivory in coral reef environments have focused on the roles of fishes and/or urchins, with relatively few studies considering the potential role of macroherbivores in reef processes. Here, we introduce evidence that highlights the potential role of marine turtles as herbivores on coral reefs. While conducting experimental habitat manipulations to assess the roles of herbivorous reef fishes we observed green turtles (Chelonia mydas) and hawksbill turtles (Eretmochelys imbricata) showing responses that were remarkably similar to those of herbivorous fishes. Reducing the sediment load of the epilithic algal matrix on a coral reef resulted in a forty-fold increase in grazing by green turtles. Hawksbill turtles were also observed to browse transplanted thalli of the macroalga Sargassum swartzii in a coral reef environment. These responses not only show strong parallels to herbivorous reef fishes, but also highlight that marine turtles actively, and intentionally, remove algae from coral reefs. When considering the size and potential historical abundance of marine turtles we suggest that these potentially valuable herbivores may have been lost from many coral reefs before their true importance was understood. PMID:22768189

  20. Status of the glass sponge reefs in the Georgia Basin.

    PubMed

    Cook, Sarah E; Conway, Kim W; Burd, Brenda

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the status and general faunal composition of sponge reefs in the Georgia Basin (GB), British Columbia, Canada. Fourteen distinct deep-water glass sponge (Hexactinellid) reefs have been mapped using multibeam bathymetry and sidescan sonar in the GB. Seven of these have been surveyed visually using video from remotely operated vehicles (ROVs). Analysis of video data indicated that three reefs were undamaged, two were damaged and the other two were damaged but potentially recovering. The nature of the damaged reefs, with large areas of scattered dead sponge skeleton fragments and few live reef-building sponges (Aphrocallistes vastus and Heterochone calyx), as well as video evidence of tracks suggest they were damaged mechanically by mobile fishing gear. Relative abundance of the megafauna associated with the reefs is discussed in the context of oceanographic conditions, such as sediment accumulation and organic flux, as well as overall reef status. Of particular interest for fisheries conservation efforts in the area was the fact that one undamaged reef in the southern GB showed higher taxonomic richness and abundance of rockfish (Sebastes spp.), both adult and juvenile, compared to an adjacent damaged reef. This result suggests that undamaged reefs may act as refugia for these endangered stocks. PMID:18954900

  1. PROVA ORALE 1 MAGNISI RICCARDO 1 Febbraio 2012 ORE 15.00

    E-print Network

    Guidoni, Leonardo

    Febbraio 2012 ORE 15.00 56 TURELLA ENRICO MARIA 7 Febbraio 2012 ORE 15.00 57 VENTURI VANESSA 7 Febbraio 2012 ORE 15.00 #12;58 VENTURI THOMAS 7 Febbraio 2012 ORE 15.00 59 VENUTI ALESSANDRA 7 Febbraio 2012 ORE

  2. The wicked problem of China's disappearing coral reefs.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Terry P; Huang, Hui; Young, Matthew A L

    2013-04-01

    We examined the development of coral reef science and the policies, institutions, and governance frameworks for management of coral reefs in China in order to highlight the wicked problem of preserving reefs while simultaneously promoting human development and nation building. China and other sovereign states in the region are experiencing unprecedented economic expansion, rapid population growth, mass migration, widespread coastal development, and loss of habitat. We analyzed a large, fragmented literature on the condition of coral reefs in China and the disputed territories of the South China Sea. We found that coral abundance has declined by at least 80% over the past 30 years on coastal fringing reefs along the Chinese mainland and adjoining Hainan Island. On offshore atolls and archipelagos claimed by 6 countries in the South China Sea, coral cover has declined from an average of >60% to around 20% within the past 10-15 years. Climate change has affected these reefs far less than coastal development, pollution, overfishing, and destructive fishing practices. Ironically, these widespread declines in the condition of reefs are unfolding as China's research and reef-management capacity are rapidly expanding. Before the loss of corals becomes irreversible, governance of China's coastal reefs could be improved by increasing public awareness of declining ecosystem services, by providing financial support for training of reef scientists and managers, by improving monitoring of coral reef dynamics and condition to better inform policy development, and by enforcing existing regulations that could protect coral reefs. In the South China Sea, changes in policy and legal frameworks, refinement of governance structures, and cooperation among neighboring countries are urgently needed to develop cooperative management of contested offshore reefs. PMID:23140101

  3. ETAAS METHOD FOR COPPER DETERMINATION IN FRESH WATERS FOLLOWING FLOTATION SEPARATION BY COBALT(III) HEPTHYLDITHIOCARBAMATE AND COBALT(III) HEXAMETHYLENEDITHIOCARBAMATE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gorica Pavlovska; Katarina ?undeva; Traj?e Stafilov

    2002-01-01

    Two methods for flotation separation of copper in traces from tap and well waters are proposed. Precipitate flotation with two new precipitate collectors cobalt(III) hepthyldithiocarbamate, Co(HpDTC)3, and cobalt(III) hexamethylenedithiocarbamate, Co(HMDTC)3 was applied as a separation and preconcentration technique. All important parameters for a successful flotation by each collector were studied and optimized. Determination of copper in final 40-fold concentrated solution

  4. Method for simultaneous use of a single additive for coal flotation, dewatering, and reconstitution

    DOEpatents

    Wen, Wu-Wey (Murrysville, PA); Gray, McMahan L. (Pittsburgh, PA); Champagne, Kenneth J. (Finleyville, PA)

    1995-01-01

    A single dose of additive contributes to three consecutive fine coal unit operations, i.e., flotation, dewatering and reconstitution, whereby the fine coal is first combined with water in a predetermined proportion so as to formulate a slurry. The slurry is then mixed with a heavy hydrocarbon-based emulsion in a second predetermined proportion and at a first predetermined mixing speed and for a predetermined period of time. The conditioned slurry is then cleaned by a froth flotation method to form a clean coal froth and then the froth is dewatered by vacuum filtration or a centrifugation process to form reconstituted products that are dried to dust-less clumps prior to combustion.

  5. Review of pollutants removed by electrocoagulation and electrocoagulation/flotation processes.

    PubMed

    Emamjomeh, Mohammad M; Sivakumar, Muttucumaru

    2009-04-01

    The word "electrocoagulation" (EC) will be sometimes used with "electroflotation" (EF) and can be considered as the electrocoagulation/flotation (ECF) process. Through the process of electrolysis, coagulating agents such as metal hydroxides are produced. When aluminium electrodes are used, the aluminium dissolves at the anode and hydrogen gas is released at the cathode. The coagulating agent combines with the pollutants to form large size flocs. As the bubbles rise to the top of the tank they adhere to particles suspended in the water and float them to the surface. In fact, a conceptual framework of the overall ECF process is linked to coagulant generation, pollutant aggregation, and pollutant removal by flotation and settling when it has been applied efficiently to various water and wastewater treatment processes. This review paper considers a significant number of common applications of EC and ECF processes which have been published in journal and conference papers. PMID:19181438

  6. High-pH-induced flocculation-flotation of the hypersaline microalga Dunaliella salina.

    PubMed

    Besson, Alexandre; Guiraud, Pascal

    2013-11-01

    Natural autoflocculation was not observed in a Dunaliella salina hypersaline culture and the microalgae did not float without destabilization of the algal suspension. High-pH-induced flocculation by sodium hydroxide addition was chosen to induce flotation. Recovery efficiencies greater than 90% and concentration factors of around 20 were reached. An autoflocculation mechanism, with precipitation of magnesium hydroxide, is proposed to explain a sweeping flotation of D. salina cells. The influence of the flow rate of sodium hydroxide addition was also studied to anticipate the constraints related to the industrialization of this process. The flow rate of sodium hydroxide addition had no effect on the recovery efficiency and reduced the concentration factor only for abrupt injections. Natural increase of culture pH by photosynthetic activity could reduce the amount of base consumed. Non-harvested cells remained viable during pH increase and could be used as inoculum for a new culture. PMID:24012843

  7. Treating chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) wastewater by electro-coagulation-flotation process with surfactant.

    PubMed

    Hu, C Y; Lo, S L; Li, C M; Kuan, W H

    2005-04-11

    The effect of surfactants on the treatment of chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) wastewater by electro-coagulation-flotation (ECF) process was studied. Two surfactants, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) were employed in this study to compare the effect of cationic (CTAB) and anodic (SDS) surfactants on ECF. The cationic surfactant can enhance the removal of the turbidity, but anodic surfactant cannot. It can be explained by the hetero-coagulation theory. Moreover, the addition of CTAB in CMP wastewater can reduce the sludge volume and the flotation/sedimentation time in ECF process. The residual turbidity and dissolved silicon dropped with the increase of charge loading. No CTAB pollution problem exists after the ECF process. PMID:15811659

  8. Method for simultaneous use of a single additive for coal flotation, dewatering and reconstitution

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Wu-Wey; Gray, M.L.; Champagne, K.J.

    1993-11-09

    A single dose of additive contributes to three consecutive fine coal unit operations, i.e., flotation, dewatering and reconstitution, whereby the fine coal is first combined with water in a predetermined proportion so as to formulate a slurry. The slurry is then mixed with a heavy hydrocarbon-based emulsion in a second predetermined proportion and at a first predetermined mixing speed and for a predetermined period of time. The conditioned slurry is then cleaned by a froth flotation method to form a clean coal froth and then the froth is dewatered by vacuum filtration or a centrifugation process to form reconstituted products that are dried to dust-less clumps prior to combustion.

  9. Two waves of colonization straddling the K–Pg boundary formed the modern reef fish fauna

    E-print Network

    Price, S. A.; Schmitz, L.; Oufiero, C. E.; Eytan, R. I.; Dornburg, A.; Smith, William Leo; Friedman, M.; Near, T. J.; Wainwright, P. C.

    2014-05-22

    reef fishes. We find that reef lineages successively colonized reef habitats throughout the Late Cretaceous and early Palaeogene. Two waves of invasion were accompanied by increasing morphological convergence: one in the Late Cretaceous from 90 to 72 Ma...

  10. 76 FR 24050 - Coral Reef Restoration Plan, Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement, Biscayne National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-29

    ...National Park Service [2310-0003-422] Coral Reef Restoration Plan, Final Programmatic...Environmental Impact Statement for the Coral Reef Restoration Plan, Biscayne National...Environmental Impact Statement for the Coral Reef Restoration Plan (Plan/FEIS)...

  11. 78 FR 66683 - Fisheries in the Western Pacific; Special Coral Reef Ecosystem Fishing Permit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-06

    ...Fisheries in the Western Pacific; Special Coral Reef Ecosystem Fishing Permit AGENCY...significant impact for the issuance of a special coral reef ecosystem fishing permit...SUMMARY: NMFS issued a Special Coral Reef Ecosystem Fishing Permit that...

  12. 75 FR 21650 - Coral Reef Restoration Plan, Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement, Biscayne National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    ...DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Coral Reef Restoration Plan, Draft Programmatic...Environmental Impact Statement for the Coral Reef Restoration Plan, Biscayne National...Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for the Coral Reef Restoration Plan for Biscayne...

  13. 76 FR 77779 - Availability of Seats for the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands Coral Reef Ecosystem Reserve Advisory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-14

    ...Seats for the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands Coral Reef Ecosystem Reserve Advisory Council...seats on the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands Coral Reef Ecosystem Reserve Advisory Council...SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The NWHI Coral Reef Ecosystem Reserve is a [[Page...

  14. 77 FR 48504 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Economic Value of Puerto Rico's Coral Reef...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-14

    ...Request; Economic Value of Puerto Rico's Coral Reef Ecosystems for Recreation-Tourism...non-market economic values of Puerto Rico's coral reef ecosystems. Estimates will be made...recreation-tourism for all of Puerto Rico's coral reef ecosystems. The required...

  15. 77 FR 12567 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Pacific Islands Region Coral Reef Ecosystems...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-01

    ...Comment Request; Pacific Islands Region Coral Reef Ecosystems Logbook and Reporting AGENCY...U.S. citizen issued with, a Special Coral Reef Ecosystem Fishing Permit (authorized under the Fishery Management Plan for Coral Reef Ecosystems of the Western...

  16. 76 FR 38618 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Coral Reef Conservation Program Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-01

    ...Information Collection; Comment Request; Coral Reef Conservation Program Survey AGENCY...States (U.S.) jurisdictions containing coral reefs. Specifically, NOAA is seeking...related to the communities affected by coral reef conservation programs. The...

  17. 77 FR 16211 - Availability of Seats for the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands Coral Reef Ecosystem Reserve Advisory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-20

    ...Seats for the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands Coral Reef Ecosystem Reserve Advisory Council...seats on the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands Coral Reef Ecosystem Reserve Advisory Council...SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The NWHI Coral Reef Ecosystem Reserve is a marine...

  18. Room Temperature Aging Study of Butyl O-rings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark Wilson

    2009-01-01

    During testing under the Enhanced Surveillance Campaign in 2001, preliminary data detected a previously unknown and potentially serious concern with recently procured butyl o-rings. All butyl o-rings molded from a proprietary formulation throughout the period circa 1999 through 2001 had less than a full cure. Tests showed that sealing force values for these suspect o-rings were much lower than expected

  19. Degradation Characteristics of O-rings on Highly Aged GIS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tadao Minagawa; Eiichi Nagao; Ei Tsuchie; Hiroshi Yonezawa; Daisuke Takayama; Yutaka Yamakawa

    2005-01-01

    Owing to increasing number of highly aged GIS, the investigation of the remaining lifetimes of those systems are becoming more important. Because a lot of O-rings are used in GIS, the study of degradation mechanism and lifetime estimation method of O-ring is essential. In this paper, the information about O-ring degradation mechanism is described, and the statistical method for estimating

  20. Apparatus for the separation of hydrophobic and hydrophilic particles using microbubble column flotation together with a process and apparatus for generation of microbubbles

    DOEpatents

    Yoon, Roe-Hoan (Blacksburg, VA); Adel, Gregory T. (Blacksburg, VA); Luttrell, Gerald H. (Blacksburg, VA)

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus is disclosed for the microbubble flotation separation of very fine and coarse particles, especially coal, and minerals so as to produce high purity and high recovery efficiency. This is accomplished through the use of a flotation column, microbubbles, recycling of the flotation pulp, and countercurrent wash water to gently wash the froth. Also disclosed are unique processes and apparatus for generating microbubbles for flotation in a highly efficient and inexpensive manner using either a porous tube or in-line static generators.

  1. Apparatus and process for the separation of hydrophobic and hydrophilic particles using microbubble column flotation together with a process and apparatus for generation of microbubbles

    DOEpatents

    Yoon, Roe-Hoan (Blacksburg, VA); Adel, Gregory T. (Blacksburg, VA); Luttrell, Gerald H. (Blacksburg, VA)

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for the microbubble flotation separation of very fine and coarse particles, especially coal and minerals, so as to produce high purity and high recovery efficiency. This is accomplished through the use of a flotation column, microbubbles, recycling of the flotation pulp, and countercurrent wash water to gently wash the froth. Also disclosed are unique processes and apparatus for generating microbubbles for flotation in a highly efficient and inexpensive manner using either a porous tube or in-line static generators.

  2. Apparatus and process for the separation of hydrophobic and hydrophilic particles using microbubble column flotation together with a process and apparatus for generation of microbubbles

    DOEpatents

    Yoon, Roe-Hoan (Blacksburg, VA); Adel, Gregory T. (Blacksburg, VA); Luttrell, Gerald H. (Blacksburg, VA)

    1992-01-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for the microbubble flotation separation of very fine and coarse particles, especially coal and minerals, so as to produce high purity and high recovery efficiency. This is accomplished through the use of a flotation column, microbubbles, recycling of the flotation pulp, and countercurrent wash water to gently wash the froth. Also disclosed are unique processes and apparatus for generating microbubbles for flotation in a highly efficient and inexpensive manner using either a porous tube or in-line static generators.

  3. Apparatus and process for the separation of hydrophobic and hydrophilic particles using microbubble column flotation together with a process and apparatus for generation of microbubbles

    DOEpatents

    Yoon, R.H.; Adel, G.T.; Luttrell, G.H.

    1992-12-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for the microbubble flotation separation of very fine and coarse particles, especially coal and minerals, so as to produce high purity and high recovery efficiency. This is accomplished through the use of a flotation column, microbubbles, recycling of the flotation pulp, and countercurrent wash water to gently wash the froth. Also disclosed are unique processes and apparatus for generating microbubbles for flotation in a highly efficient and inexpensive manner using either a porous tube or in-line static generators. 14 figs.

  4. Apparatus and process for the separation of hydrophobic and hydrophilic particles using microbubble column flotation together with a process and apparatus for generation of microbubbles

    DOEpatents

    Yoon, R.H.; Adel, G.T.; Luttrell, G.H.

    1998-09-29

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for the microbubble flotation separation of very fine and coarse particles, especially coal and minerals, so as to produce high purity and high recovery efficiency. This is accomplished through the use of a flotation column, microbubbles, recycling of the flotation pulp, and countercurrent wash water to gently wash the froth. Also disclosed are unique processes and apparatus for generating microbubbles for flotation in a highly efficient and inexpensive manner using either a porous tube or in-line static generators. 14 figs.

  5. Apparatus for the separation of hydrophobic and hydrophilic particles using microbubble column flotation together with a process and apparatus for generation of microbubbles

    DOEpatents

    Yoon, R.H.; Adel, G.T.; Luttrell, G.H.

    1995-03-14

    An apparatus is disclosed for the microbubble flotation separation of very fine and coarse particles, especially coal, and minerals so as to produce high purity and high recovery efficiency. This is accomplished through the use of a flotation column, microbubbles, recycling of the flotation pulp, and countercurrent wash water to gently wash the froth. Also disclosed are unique processes and apparatus for generating microbubbles for flotation in a highly efficient and inexpensive manner using either a porous tube or in-line static generators. 14 figs.

  6. Optimizing the air flotation water treatment process. Final report, May 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, B.

    1998-09-01

    The injection water for the Nelson Project is a combination of produced and make-up water, typical of many Eastern Kansas operations. The make-up water is a low-salinity salt water from the Arbuckle Formation and contains dissolved minerals and sulfides. The produced water contains suspended oil, suspended clay and silt particles, along with a combination of other dissolved minerals. The combination of the two waters causes several undesirable reactions. The suspended solids load contained in the combined waters would plug a 75-micron plant bag filter within one day. Wellhead filters of 75-micron size were also being used on the injection wells. The poor water quality resulted in severe loss of injectivity and frequent wellbore cleaning of the injection wells. Various mechanical and graded-bed filtration methods were considered for cleaning the water. These methods were rejected due to the lack of field equipment and service availability. A number of vendors did not even respond to the author`s request. The air flotation process was selected as offering the best hope for a long-term solution. The objective of this work is to: increase the cost effectiveness of the process through optimizing process design factors and operational parameters. A vastly modified air flotation system is the principal tool for accomplishing the project objective. The air flotation unit, as received from manufacturer Separation Specialist, was primarily designed to remove oil from produced water. The additional requirement for solids removal necessitated major physical changes in the unit. Problems encountered with the air flotation unit and specific modifications are detailed in the body of the report.

  7. Coal surface control for advanced fine coal flotation. Final report, October 1, 1988March 31, 1992

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. W. Fuerstenau; J. S. Hanson; J. Diao; G. H. Harris; A. De; F. Sotillo; P. Somasundaran; C. C. Harris; T. Vasudevan; D. Liu; C. Li; W. Hu; Y. Zou; W. Chen; V. Choudhry; S. Shea; A. Ghosh; R. Sehgal

    1992-01-01

    The initial goal of the research project was to develop methods of coal surface control in advanced froth flotation to achieve 90% pyritic sulfur rejection, while operating at Btu recoveries above 90% based on run-of-mine quality coal. Moreover, the technology is to concomitantly reduce the ash content significantly (to six percent or less) to provide a high-quality fuel to the

  8. Separation of mixed post-consumer PET–POM–PVC plastic waste using selective flotation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thongchai Takoungsakdakun; Sangobtip Pongstabodee

    2007-01-01

    The main objective of this research is to separate a mixed post-consumer engineering plastic waste (PET, POM, and PVC) based on type of plastic using selective flotation separation. Depressing effect of wetting agent and aluminium sulfate on plastic is attributed mainly to the separation. POM is separated from the mixture waste when using 500mg\\/l calcium lignosulfonate as a wetting agent

  9. Wastewater treatment using flocculation, coagulation, and flotation. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the design, development, and evaluation of flocculation coagulation and flotation processes for the treatment of sewage and industrial wastes. Citations examine technology requirements and limitations, activated sludge and anaerobic processes, chlorination, runoff pollution control, wastewater recycling and reuse, and materials recovery.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  10. Wastewater treatment using flocculation, coagulation, and flotation. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the design, development, and evaluation of flocculation coagulation and flotation processes for the treatment of sewage and industrial wastes. Citations examine technology requirements and limitations, activated sludge and anaerobic processes, chlorination, runoff pollution control, wastewater recycling and reuse, and materials recovery.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  11. Effects from changes in pulp nature after ultrasonic conditioning on high-sulfur coal flotation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wen-ze KANG; Hai-xin XUN; Xiao-hong KONG; Ming-ming LI

    2009-01-01

    A study of the effects of the pulp nature on desulphurization and de-ashing during high-sulfur coal flotation is described in this paper. Highlighted are the use of a solution oxygen gauge, a pH value gauge and a surface tension gauge to investigate changes in the pulp nature related to changes in the oxygen content, the pH value and the interfacial

  12. Zeta Potential Measurements on Three Clays from Turkey and Effects of Clays on Coal Flotation

    PubMed

    Hussain; Dem&idot;rc&idot;; özbayoğlu

    1996-12-25

    There is a growing trend of characterizing coal and coal wastes in order to study the effect of clays present in them during coal washing. Coarse wastes from the Zonguldak Coal Washery, Turkey, were characterized and found to contain kaolinite, illite, and chlorite. These three clays, obtained in almost pure form from various locations in Turkey, have been subjected to X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis to assess their purity and zeta potential measurements in order to evaluate their properties in terms of their surface charge and point of zero charge (pzc) values. It was found from XRD data that these clays were almost pure and their electrokinetic potential should therefore be representative of their colloidal behavior. All three clay minerals were negatively charged over the range from pH 2.5 to 11. Chlorite and illite have pzc at pH 3 and pH 2.5, respectively, whereas kaolinite has no pzc. The effect of these clays in Zonguldak coal, wastes, and black waters on coal flotation was studied by floating artificial mixtures of Zonguldak clean coal (4.5% ash) and individual clay. The flotation tests on coal/individual clay revealed that each clay influences coal flotation differently according to its type and amount. Illite had the worst effect on coal floated, followed by chlorite and kaolinite. The loss of yield in coal was found to be 18% for kaolinite, 20% for chlorite, and 28% for illite, indicating the worst effect of illite and least for kaolinite during coal flotation. PMID:8978557

  13. Sealing Out-Of-Round Tubes With O-Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shlichta, Paul J.

    1991-01-01

    Glass or ceramic tubes out-of-round sealed effectively by ordinary O-rings in caps of modified hydraulic fittings. In typical connection, O-ring squeezed between two surfaces having inward-opening slants of 5 degrees or 10 degrees. Slanted surfaces force ring inward, compressing it around tube. Connector metal fitting, tightened by hand around O-ring, seals O-ring against tube as much as 1/16 in. out of round. Modified connectors seal glass or ceramic tubes against gas or vacuum leakage in furnaces, vacuum systems, and tubes for glassblowing equipment.

  14. Experimenting With Ore: Creating the Taconite Process; flow chart of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Experimenting With Ore: Creating the Taconite Process; flow chart of process - Mines Experiment Station, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities Campus, 56 East River Road, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, MN

  15. Predation Risk, Resource Quality, and Reef Structural Complexity Shape Territoriality in a Coral Reef Herbivore

    PubMed Central

    Gunn, Bridgette K.; Kelley, Megan C.

    2015-01-01

    For many species securing territories is important for feeding and reproduction. Factors such as competition, habitat availability, and male characteristics can influence an individual’s ability to establish and maintain a territory. The risk of predation can have an important influence on feeding and reproduction; however, few have studied its effect on territoriality. We investigated territoriality in a haremic, polygynous species of coral reef herbivore, Sparisoma aurofrenatum (redband parrotfish), across eight reefs in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary that were either protected or unprotected from fishing of piscivorous fishes. We examined how territory size and quality varied with reef protection status, competition, predation risk, and male size. We then determined how territory size and quality influenced harem size and female size to understand the effect of territoriality on reproductive potential. We found that protected reefs trended towards having more large predatory fishes and that territories there were smaller but had greater algal nutritional quality relative to unprotected reefs. Our data suggest that even though males in protected sites have smaller territories, which support fewer females, they may improve their reproductive potential by choosing nutritionally rich areas, which support larger females. Thus, reef protection appears to shape the trade-off that herbivorous fishes make between territory size and quality. Furthermore, we provide evidence that males in unprotected sites, which are generally less complex than protected sites, choose territories with higher structural complexity, suggesting the importance of this type of habitat for feeding and reproduction in S. aurofrenatum. Our work argues that the loss of corals and the resulting decline in structural complexity, as well as management efforts to protect reefs, could alter the territory dynamics and reproductive potential of important herbivorous fish species. PMID:25714431

  16. Flotability and flotation separation of polymer materials modulated by wetting agents.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Wang, Chong-qing; Fu, Jian-gang; Gu, Guo-hua

    2014-02-01

    The surface free energy, surface tension and contact angles were performed to investigate the properties of wetting agents. Adsorption of wetting agents changes wetting behavior of polymer resins. Flotability of polymer materials modulated by wetting agents was studied, and wetting agents change significantly flotability of polymer materials. The flotability decreases with increasing the concentration of wetting agents, and the wetting ability is lignin sulfonate (LS)>tannic acid (TA)>methylcellulose (MC)>triton X-100 (TX-100) (from strong to weak). There is significant difference in the flotability between polymer resins and plastics due to the presence of additives in the plastics. Flotation separation of two-component and multicomponent plastics was conducted based on the flotability modulated by wetting agents. The two-component mixtures can be efficiently separated using proper wetting agent through simple flotation flowsheet. The multicomponent plastic mixtures can be separated efficiently through multi-stage flotation using TA and LS as wetting agents, and the purity of separated component was above 94%, and the recovery was more than 93%. PMID:24355830

  17. Removal of carbon constituents from hospital solid waste incinerator fly ash by column flotation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hanqiao; Wei, Guoxia; Zhang, Rui

    2013-01-01

    Hospital solid waste incinerator (HSWI) fly ash contains a large number of carbon constituents including powder activated carbon and unburned carbon, which are the major source of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) in fly ash. Therefore, the removal of carbon constituents could reduce PCDD/Fs in fly ash greatly. In this study, the effects of the main flotation parameters on the removal of carbon constituents were investigated, and the characteristics of the final product were evaluated. The results showed that loss on ignition (LOI) of fly ash increased from 11.1% to 31.6% during conditioning process. By optimizing the flotation parameters at slurry concentration 0.05 kg/l, kerosene dosage 12 kg/t, frother dosage 3 kg/t and air flow rate 0.06 m(3)/h, 92.7% of the carbon constituents were removed from the raw fly ash. Under these conditions, the froth product has LOI of 56.35% and calorific values of 12.5 MJ/kg, LOI in the tailings was below 5%, and the total toxic equivalent (TEQ) of PCDD/Fs decreased from 5.61 ng-TEQ/g in the raw fly ash to 1.47 ng-TEQ/g in the tailings. The results show that column flotation is a potential technology for simultaneous separation of carbon constituents and PCDD/Fs from HSWI fly ash. PMID:23046874

  18. The fluid dynamics of crystal settling and flotation in a lunar magma ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suckale, J.; Elkins-Tanton, L. T.

    2011-10-01

    The smoking-gun evidence for a lunar magma ocean is the anorthosite-rich highlands on the Moon, which are thought to have formed by flotation of buoyant plagioclase crystals in a solidifying magma ocean. A puzzling aspect of this idea is that plagioclase only appears in the crystallization sequence during the late stages of solidification, i.e. once the magma ocean is approximately 70-80 % solidified [1], which is difficult to reconcile with the fluid-dynamical constraints on crystal settling. The goal of this study is to gain insights into the differentiation history of the lunar magma ocean by investigating the fluid-dynamical conditions that govern crystal settling or flotation. Our approach complements earlier work [2,3] by employing direct numerical simulations to fully resolve flow at the scale of the crystals and by focusing primarily on the non-turbulent boundary layers of the lunar magma ocean. We find that the relative settling of two mineral phases with different densities is hindered substantially already at low to moderate crystal fractions, because the frequency and duration of crystal collisions increases rapidly with crystal fraction. We hypothesize that tidal heating and cumulate overturn may have been critical in facilitating plagioclase flotation.

  19. Micro-agglomerate flotation for deep cleaning of coal. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chander, S.; Hogg, R.

    1997-01-15

    The development of practical technologies for the deep cleaning of coal has been seriously hampered by the problems of carrying out efficient coal/mineral separations at the very fine sizes (often finer than 10 {micro}m) needed to achieve adequate liberation of the mineral matter from the coal matrix. In this investigation a hybrid process--Micro-agglomerate flotation--which is a combination of oil-agglomeration and froth flotation was studied. The basic concept is to use small quantities of oil to promote the formation of dense micro-agglomerates with minimal entrapment of water and mineral particles and to use froth flotation to separate these micro-agglomerates from the water/dispersed-mineral phase. Since the floating units will be relatively large agglomerates (30--50 {micro}m in size) rather than fine coal particles (1--10 {micro}m) the problems of froth overload and water/mineral carryover should be significantly alleviated. There are, however, complications. The process involves at least five phases: two or more solids (coal and mineral), two liquids (oil and water) and one gas (air). It is demonstrated in this study that the process is very sensitive to fluctuations in operating parameters. It is necessary to maintain precise control over the chemistry of the liquid phases as well as the agitation conditions in order to promote selectivity. Both kinetics as well as thermodynamic factors play a critical role in determining overall system response.

  20. Artificial reef observations from a manned submersible off southeast Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shinn, E.A.; Wicklund, R.I.

    1989-01-01

    Examination of 16 artificial reef structures in depths ranging from 30-120m indicated that the highest numbers of fish are found around reefs in water shallower than 46m. Fewer fish, especially those with tropical coral reef affinities, <46m was probably caused by a thermocline. Algae and reef community encrusters, abundant on shallower structures, were absent below 46m. Structures that penetrated above the thermocline, such as upright oil rigs and a hopper barge, were also effective reefs. The open structure and high profile of the rigs enhance their use as artificial reefs by providing a range of well-aerated habitats. Greatest diversity and numbers of fish were observed at the Miami sewer outfall. -from Authors