Science.gov

Sample records for reflex receptive fields

  1. Development of a data acquisition and analysis system for nociceptive withdrawal reflex and reflex receptive fields in humans.

    PubMed

    Biurrun Manresa, Jose A; Hansen, John; Andersen, Ole K

    2010-01-01

    A system for data acquisition and analysis of nociceptive withdrawal reflex (NWR) and reflex receptive field (RRF) is introduced. The system is constituted by hardware and software components. The hardware consists of devices commonly used for electrical stimulation and electromyographic and kinematic data recording. The software comprises two different programs: Wirex, a stand-alone program developed in LabView for data acquisition, and Reflex Lab, a Matlab-based toolbox for data analysis. These programs were developed to maximize the potential of the hardware, turning it into a complete stimulation system capable of automatic quantification of NWR and RRF. In this article, a brief review of NWR and RRF analysis is presented, the system features are described in detail and its present and future applications are discussed. PMID:21096727

  2. A new objective method for acquisition and quantification of reflex receptive fields.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Michael Brun; Manresa, José Biurrun; Andersen, Ole Kæseler

    2015-03-01

    The nociceptive withdrawal reflex (NWR) is a polysynaptic spinal reflex correlated with pain perception. Assessment of this objective physiological measure constitutes the core of existing methods for quantification of reflex receptive fields (RRFs), which however still suffer from a certain degree of subjective involvement. This article proposes a strictly objective methodology for RRF quantification based on automated identification of NWR thresholds (NWR-Ts). Nociceptive withdrawal reflex thresholds were determined for 10 individual stimulation sites using an interleaved up-down staircase method. Reflexes were detected from electromyography by evaluation of interval peak z scores and application of conduction velocity analysis. Reflex receptive field areas were quantified from interpolated mappings of NWR-Ts and compared with existing RRF quantifications. A total of 3 repeated measures were performed in 2 different sessions to evaluate the test-retest reliability of the various quantifications, using coefficients of repeatability (CRs) and hypothetical sample sizes. The novel quantifications based on identification of NWR-Ts showed a similar level of reliability within and between sessions, whereas existing quantifications all demonstrated worse between-session than within-session reliability. The NWR-T-based quantifications required a smaller sample size than any of the existing RRF measures to detect a clinically relevant effect in a crossover study design involving more than 1 session. Of all measures, quantification from mapping of inversed NWR-Ts demonstrated superior reliability both within (CR, 0.25) and between sessions (CR, 0.28). The study presents a more reliable and robust quantification of the RRF to be used as biomarker of pain hypersensitivity in clinical and experimental research. PMID:25599237

  3. An imaging system for monitoring receptive field dynamics.

    PubMed

    Petersson, P; Holmer, M; Breslin, T; Granmo, M; Schouenborg, J

    2001-01-15

    The paper describes a computerized method, termed receptive field imaging (RFI), for the rapid mapping of multiple receptive fields and their respective sensitivity distributions. RFI uses random stimulation of multiple sites, in combination with an averaging procedure, to extract the relative contribution from each of the stimulated sites. Automated multi-electrode stimulation and recording, with spike detection and counting, are performed on-line by the RFI programme. Direct user interpretation of receptive field changes is made possible by a user-friendly graphic interface. A series of imaging experiments was carried out to evaluate the functional capacity of the system. RFI was tested on the receptive fields in the nociceptive withdrawal reflex (NWR) system in the rat. RFI replicates the results obtained with conventional methods and allows the display of receptive field dynamics induced by topical spinal cord application of morphine and naloxone on a minute-to-minute time scale. Data variance was estimated, and proved to be small enough to yield a stable representation of the receptive field, thereby achieving a high sensitivity in dynamic imaging experiments. The large number of stimulation and registration sites that can be monitored in parallel permits detailed network analysis of synaptic sets, corresponding to 'connection weights' between individual neurones. PMID:11164238

  4. Central auditory neurons have composite receptive fields.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, Andrei S; Gentner, Timothy Q

    2016-02-01

    High-level neurons processing complex, behaviorally relevant signals are sensitive to conjunctions of features. Characterizing the receptive fields of such neurons is difficult with standard statistical tools, however, and the principles governing their organization remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate multiple distinct receptive-field features in individual high-level auditory neurons in a songbird, European starling, in response to natural vocal signals (songs). We then show that receptive fields with similar characteristics can be reproduced by an unsupervised neural network trained to represent starling songs with a single learning rule that enforces sparseness and divisive normalization. We conclude that central auditory neurons have composite receptive fields that can arise through a combination of sparseness and normalization in neural circuits. Our results, along with descriptions of random, discontinuous receptive fields in the central olfactory neurons in mammals and insects, suggest general principles of neural computation across sensory systems and animal classes. PMID:26787894

  5. Central auditory neurons have composite receptive fields

    PubMed Central

    Kozlov, Andrei S.; Gentner, Timothy Q.

    2016-01-01

    High-level neurons processing complex, behaviorally relevant signals are sensitive to conjunctions of features. Characterizing the receptive fields of such neurons is difficult with standard statistical tools, however, and the principles governing their organization remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate multiple distinct receptive-field features in individual high-level auditory neurons in a songbird, European starling, in response to natural vocal signals (songs). We then show that receptive fields with similar characteristics can be reproduced by an unsupervised neural network trained to represent starling songs with a single learning rule that enforces sparseness and divisive normalization. We conclude that central auditory neurons have composite receptive fields that can arise through a combination of sparseness and normalization in neural circuits. Our results, along with descriptions of random, discontinuous receptive fields in the central olfactory neurons in mammals and insects, suggest general principles of neural computation across sensory systems and animal classes. PMID:26787894

  6. Idealized computational models for auditory receptive fields.

    PubMed

    Lindeberg, Tony; Friberg, Anders

    2015-01-01

    We present a theory by which idealized models of auditory receptive fields can be derived in a principled axiomatic manner, from a set of structural properties to (i) enable invariance of receptive field responses under natural sound transformations and (ii) ensure internal consistency between spectro-temporal receptive fields at different temporal and spectral scales. For defining a time-frequency transformation of a purely temporal sound signal, it is shown that the framework allows for a new way of deriving the Gabor and Gammatone filters as well as a novel family of generalized Gammatone filters, with additional degrees of freedom to obtain different trade-offs between the spectral selectivity and the temporal delay of time-causal temporal window functions. When applied to the definition of a second-layer of receptive fields from a spectrogram, it is shown that the framework leads to two canonical families of spectro-temporal receptive fields, in terms of spectro-temporal derivatives of either spectro-temporal Gaussian kernels for non-causal time or a cascade of time-causal first-order integrators over the temporal domain and a Gaussian filter over the logspectral domain. For each filter family, the spectro-temporal receptive fields can be either separable over the time-frequency domain or be adapted to local glissando transformations that represent variations in logarithmic frequencies over time. Within each domain of either non-causal or time-causal time, these receptive field families are derived by uniqueness from the assumptions. It is demonstrated how the presented framework allows for computation of basic auditory features for audio processing and that it leads to predictions about auditory receptive fields with good qualitative similarity to biological receptive fields measured in the inferior colliculus (ICC) and primary auditory cortex (A1) of mammals. PMID:25822973

  7. Idealized Computational Models for Auditory Receptive Fields

    PubMed Central

    Lindeberg, Tony; Friberg, Anders

    2015-01-01

    We present a theory by which idealized models of auditory receptive fields can be derived in a principled axiomatic manner, from a set of structural properties to (i) enable invariance of receptive field responses under natural sound transformations and (ii) ensure internal consistency between spectro-temporal receptive fields at different temporal and spectral scales. For defining a time-frequency transformation of a purely temporal sound signal, it is shown that the framework allows for a new way of deriving the Gabor and Gammatone filters as well as a novel family of generalized Gammatone filters, with additional degrees of freedom to obtain different trade-offs between the spectral selectivity and the temporal delay of time-causal temporal window functions. When applied to the definition of a second-layer of receptive fields from a spectrogram, it is shown that the framework leads to two canonical families of spectro-temporal receptive fields, in terms of spectro-temporal derivatives of either spectro-temporal Gaussian kernels for non-causal time or a cascade of time-causal first-order integrators over the temporal domain and a Gaussian filter over the logspectral domain. For each filter family, the spectro-temporal receptive fields can be either separable over the time-frequency domain or be adapted to local glissando transformations that represent variations in logarithmic frequencies over time. Within each domain of either non-causal or time-causal time, these receptive field families are derived by uniqueness from the assumptions. It is demonstrated how the presented framework allows for computation of basic auditory features for audio processing and that it leads to predictions about auditory receptive fields with good qualitative similarity to biological receptive fields measured in the inferior colliculus (ICC) and primary auditory cortex (A1) of mammals. PMID:25822973

  8. Receptive Field Inference with Localized Priors

    PubMed Central

    Park, Mijung; Pillow, Jonathan W.

    2011-01-01

    The linear receptive field describes a mapping from sensory stimuli to a one-dimensional variable governing a neuron's spike response. However, traditional receptive field estimators such as the spike-triggered average converge slowly and often require large amounts of data. Bayesian methods seek to overcome this problem by biasing estimates towards solutions that are more likely a priori, typically those with small, smooth, or sparse coefficients. Here we introduce a novel Bayesian receptive field estimator designed to incorporate locality, a powerful form of prior information about receptive field structure. The key to our approach is a hierarchical receptive field model that flexibly adapts to localized structure in both spacetime and spatiotemporal frequency, using an inference method known as empirical Bayes. We refer to our method as automatic locality determination (ALD), and show that it can accurately recover various types of smooth, sparse, and localized receptive fields. We apply ALD to neural data from retinal ganglion cells and V1 simple cells, and find it achieves error rates several times lower than standard estimators. Thus, estimates of comparable accuracy can be achieved with substantially less data. Finally, we introduce a computationally efficient Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm for fully Bayesian inference under the ALD prior, yielding accurate Bayesian confidence intervals for small or noisy datasets. PMID:22046110

  9. A computational theory of visual receptive fields.

    PubMed

    Lindeberg, Tony

    2013-12-01

    A receptive field constitutes a region in the visual field where a visual cell or a visual operator responds to visual stimuli. This paper presents a theory for what types of receptive field profiles can be regarded as natural for an idealized vision system, given a set of structural requirements on the first stages of visual processing that reflect symmetry properties of the surrounding world. These symmetry properties include (i) covariance properties under scale changes, affine image deformations, and Galilean transformations of space-time as occur for real-world image data as well as specific requirements of (ii) temporal causality implying that the future cannot be accessed and (iii) a time-recursive updating mechanism of a limited temporal buffer of the past as is necessary for a genuine real-time system. Fundamental structural requirements are also imposed to ensure (iv) mutual consistency and a proper handling of internal representations at different spatial and temporal scales. It is shown how a set of families of idealized receptive field profiles can be derived by necessity regarding spatial, spatio-chromatic, and spatio-temporal receptive fields in terms of Gaussian kernels, Gaussian derivatives, or closely related operators. Such image filters have been successfully used as a basis for expressing a large number of visual operations in computer vision, regarding feature detection, feature classification, motion estimation, object recognition, spatio-temporal recognition, and shape estimation. Hence, the associated so-called scale-space theory constitutes a both theoretically well-founded and general framework for expressing visual operations. There are very close similarities between receptive field profiles predicted from this scale-space theory and receptive field profiles found by cell recordings in biological vision. Among the family of receptive field profiles derived by necessity from the assumptions, idealized models with very good qualitative

  10. Perisaccadic Receptive Field Expansion in the Lateral Intraparietal Area.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolan; Fung, C C Alan; Guan, Shaobo; Wu, Si; Goldberg, Michael E; Zhang, Mingsha

    2016-04-20

    Humans and monkeys have access to an accurate representation of visual space despite a constantly moving eye. One mechanism by which the brain accomplishes this is by remapping visual receptive fields around the time of a saccade. In this process a neuron can be excited by a probe stimulus in the current receptive field, and also simultaneously by a probe stimulus in the location that will be brought into the neuron's receptive field by the saccade (the future receptive field), even before saccade begins. Here we show that perisaccadic neuronal excitability is not limited to the current and future receptive fields but encompasses the entire region of visual space across which the current receptive field will be swept by the saccade. A computational model shows that this receptive field expansion is consistent with the propagation of a wave of activity across the cerebral cortex as saccade planning and remapping proceed. PMID:27041502

  11. Computational neuroimaging and population receptive fields.

    PubMed

    Wandell, Brian A; Winawer, Jonathan

    2015-06-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) noninvasively measures human brain activity at millimeter resolution. Scientists use different approaches to take advantage of the remarkable opportunities presented by fMRI. Here, we describe progress using the computational neuroimaging approach in human visual cortex, which aims to build models that predict the neural responses from the stimulus and task. We focus on a particularly active area of research, the use of population receptive field (pRF) models to characterize human visual cortex responses to a range of stimuli, in a variety of tasks and different subject populations. PMID:25850730

  12. Invariance of visual operations at the level of receptive fields.

    PubMed

    Lindeberg, Tony

    2013-01-01

    The brain is able to maintain a stable perception although the visual stimuli vary substantially on the retina due to geometric transformations and lighting variations in the environment. This paper presents a theory for achieving basic invariance properties already at the level of receptive fields. Specifically, the presented framework comprises (i) local scaling transformations caused by objects of different size and at different distances to the observer, (ii) locally linearized image deformations caused by variations in the viewing direction in relation to the object, (iii) locally linearized relative motions between the object and the observer and (iv) local multiplicative intensity transformations caused by illumination variations. The receptive field model can be derived by necessity from symmetry properties of the environment and leads to predictions about receptive field profiles in good agreement with receptive field profiles measured by cell recordings in mammalian vision. Indeed, the receptive field profiles in the retina, LGN and V1 are close to ideal to what is motivated by the idealized requirements. By complementing receptive field measurements with selection mechanisms over the parameters in the receptive field families, it is shown how true invariance of receptive field responses can be obtained under scaling transformations, affine transformations and Galilean transformations. Thereby, the framework provides a mathematically well-founded and biologically plausible model for how basic invariance properties can be achieved already at the level of receptive fields and support invariant recognition of objects and events under variations in viewpoint, retinal size, object motion and illumination. The theory can explain the different shapes of receptive field profiles found in biological vision, which are tuned to different sizes and orientations in the image domain as well as to different image velocities in space-time, from a requirement that the

  13. The Essential Complexity of Auditory Receptive Fields.

    PubMed

    Thorson, Ivar L; Liénard, Jean; David, Stephen V

    2015-12-01

    Encoding properties of sensory neurons are commonly modeled using linear finite impulse response (FIR) filters. For the auditory system, the FIR filter is instantiated in the spectro-temporal receptive field (STRF), often in the framework of the generalized linear model. Despite widespread use of the FIR STRF, numerous formulations for linear filters are possible that require many fewer parameters, potentially permitting more efficient and accurate model estimates. To explore these alternative STRF architectures, we recorded single-unit neural activity from auditory cortex of awake ferrets during presentation of natural sound stimuli. We compared performance of > 1000 linear STRF architectures, evaluating their ability to predict neural responses to a novel natural stimulus. Many were able to outperform the FIR filter. Two basic constraints on the architecture lead to the improved performance: (1) factorization of the STRF matrix into a small number of spectral and temporal filters and (2) low-dimensional parameterization of the factorized filters. The best parameterized model was able to outperform the full FIR filter in both primary and secondary auditory cortex, despite requiring fewer than 30 parameters, about 10% of the number required by the FIR filter. After accounting for noise from finite data sampling, these STRFs were able to explain an average of 40% of A1 response variance. The simpler models permitted more straightforward interpretation of sensory tuning properties. They also showed greater benefit from incorporating nonlinear terms, such as short term plasticity, that provide theoretical advances over the linear model. Architectures that minimize parameter count while maintaining maximum predictive power provide insight into the essential degrees of freedom governing auditory cortical function. They also maximize statistical power available for characterizing additional nonlinear properties that limit current auditory models. PMID:26683490

  14. The Essential Complexity of Auditory Receptive Fields

    PubMed Central

    Thorson, Ivar L.; Liénard, Jean; David, Stephen V.

    2015-01-01

    Encoding properties of sensory neurons are commonly modeled using linear finite impulse response (FIR) filters. For the auditory system, the FIR filter is instantiated in the spectro-temporal receptive field (STRF), often in the framework of the generalized linear model. Despite widespread use of the FIR STRF, numerous formulations for linear filters are possible that require many fewer parameters, potentially permitting more efficient and accurate model estimates. To explore these alternative STRF architectures, we recorded single-unit neural activity from auditory cortex of awake ferrets during presentation of natural sound stimuli. We compared performance of > 1000 linear STRF architectures, evaluating their ability to predict neural responses to a novel natural stimulus. Many were able to outperform the FIR filter. Two basic constraints on the architecture lead to the improved performance: (1) factorization of the STRF matrix into a small number of spectral and temporal filters and (2) low-dimensional parameterization of the factorized filters. The best parameterized model was able to outperform the full FIR filter in both primary and secondary auditory cortex, despite requiring fewer than 30 parameters, about 10% of the number required by the FIR filter. After accounting for noise from finite data sampling, these STRFs were able to explain an average of 40% of A1 response variance. The simpler models permitted more straightforward interpretation of sensory tuning properties. They also showed greater benefit from incorporating nonlinear terms, such as short term plasticity, that provide theoretical advances over the linear model. Architectures that minimize parameter count while maintaining maximum predictive power provide insight into the essential degrees of freedom governing auditory cortical function. They also maximize statistical power available for characterizing additional nonlinear properties that limit current auditory models. PMID:26683490

  15. Mechanisms Underlying Development of Visual Maps and Receptive Fields

    PubMed Central

    Huberman, Andrew D.; Feller, Marla B.; Chapman, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Patterns of synaptic connections in the visual system are remarkably precise. These connections dictate the receptive field properties of individual visual neurons and ultimately determine the quality of visual perception. Spontaneous neural activity is necessary for the development of various receptive field properties and visual feature maps. In recent years, attention has shifted to understanding the mechanisms by which spontaneous activity in the developing retina, lateral geniculate nucleus, and visual cortex instruct the axonal and dendritic refinements that give rise to orderly connections in the visual system. Axon guidance cues and a growing list of other molecules, including immune system factors, have also recently been implicated in visual circuit wiring. A major goal now is to determine how these molecules cooperate with spontaneous and visually evoked activity to give rise to the circuits underlying precise receptive field tuning and orderly visual maps. PMID:18558864

  16. Receptive fields of simple cells in the cat striate cortex

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, P. O.; Coombs, J. S.; Henry, G. H.

    1973-01-01

    1. The excitatory and inhibitory components in the receptive fields of unimodal simple cells in the striate cortex of the cat anaesthetized with nitrous oxide have been described using slits of light and single light-dark edges as stimuli. 2. There is a small excitatory region (excitatory complex) centrally located in the receptive field that is made up of various combinations and spatial arrangements of subliminal excitatory and discharge subregions or centres. 3. The subliminal excitatory centres were revealed by a binocular facilitation technique. The excitability of the cell was raised by repeated stimulation via one eye while the neurone was tested with single edges via the other eye. 4. The subliminal excitatory and discharge centres are each specifically activated by only one type of edge, light-dark or dark-light, and then only in one direction of motion. All the subregions in the excitatory complex have the same optimal stimulus orientation. 5. Inhibitory components in the receptive field were identified by stimulating the cell with bars of light and single edges against an artificial background discharge produced by repeated stimulation separately applied either to the same eye (monocular conditioning) or to the other eye (binocular conditioning). There are powerful inhibitory sidebands to either side of the excitatory complex and these inhibitory regions merge to include the excitatory complex when stimulus orientation is angled away from the optimal. 6. Excitation is highly stimulus specific whereas inhibition is non-specific. 7. The organization of the two receptive fields of a binocularly discharged cell can be closely similar. 8. The attempt is made to translate the concept of subliminal excitatory and discharge centres into specific neural mechanisms involving both the geniculo-cortical input and various intracortical circuits. 9. These new developments call for only minor modifications to the model we have proposed for the organization of the

  17. The spatial structure of a nonlinear receptive field

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Gregory W.; Okawa, Haruhisa; Dunn, Felice A.; Morgan, Josh L.; Kerschensteiner, Daniel; Wong, Rachel O.; Rieke, Fred

    2012-01-01

    Understanding a sensory system implies the ability to predict responses to a variety of inputs from a common model. In the retina, this includes predicting how the integration of signals across visual space shapes the outputs of retinal ganglion cells. Existing models of this process generalize poorly to predict responses to novel stimuli. This failure arises in part from properties of the ganglion cell response that are not well captured by standard receptive field mapping techniques: nonlinear spatial integration and fine-scale heterogeneities in spatial sampling. Here, we characterize a ganglion cell’s spatial receptive field using a mechanistic model based on measurements of the physiological properties and connectivity of only the primary excitatory circuitry of the retina. The resulting simplified circuit model successfully predicts ganglion cell responses to a variety of spatial patterns and thus provides a direct correspondence between circuit connectivity and retinal output. PMID:23001060

  18. Saccades and shifting receptive fields: anticipating consequences or selecting targets?

    PubMed Central

    Zirnsak, Marc; Moore, Tirin

    2014-01-01

    Saccadic eye movements cause frequent and substantial displacements of the retinal image, but those displacements go unnoticed. It has been widely assumed that this perceived stability emerges from the shifting of visual receptive fields from their current, presaccadic locations to their future, postsaccadic locations in anticipation of the retinal consequences of saccades. Although evidence consistent with this anticipatory remapping has accumulated over the years, more recent work suggests an alternative view. In this opinion article, we examine the evidence of presaccadic receptive field shifts and their relationship to the perceptual changes that accompany saccades. We argue that both reflect the selection of targets for saccades rather than the anticipation of a displaced retinal image. PMID:25455690

  19. Synaptic rewiring for topographic mapping and receptive field development.

    PubMed

    Bamford, Simeon A; Murray, Alan F; Willshaw, David J

    2010-05-01

    A model of topographic map refinement is presented which combines both weight plasticity and the formation and elimination of synapses, as well as both activity-dependent and activity-independent processes. The question of whether an activity-dependent process can refine a mapping created by an activity-independent process is addressed statistically. A new method of evaluating the quality of topographic projections is presented which allows independent consideration of the development of the centres and spatial variances of receptive fields for a projection. Synapse formation and elimination embed in the network topology changes in the weight distributions of synapses due to the activity-dependent learning rule used (spike-timing-dependent plasticity). In this model, the spatial variance of receptive fields can be reduced by an activity-dependent mechanism with or without spatially correlated inputs, but the accuracy of receptive field centres will not necessarily improve when synapses are formed based on distributions with on-average perfect topography. PMID:20176460

  20. Ontogenesis of receptive fields in the rabbit striate cortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathers, L. H.; Chow, K. L.; Spear, P. D.; Grobstein, P.

    1974-01-01

    The development of receptive fields in rabbit pups was investigated by measuring their responses to various light stimuli and to electric shock delivered to the optic nerve head. The pups ranged in age from three to twenty-five days, allowing correlation of findings with maturation. The data, classified according to relation with symmetric or asymmetric field types, strongly suggest that retina maturation is the key factor in the rate of development in central visual pathways, and that central synaptic connections are made before the onset of retinal activity.

  1. Mapping of Visual Receptive Fields by Tomographic Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Pipa, Gordon; Chen, Zhe; Neuenschwander, Sergio; Lima, Bruss; Brown, Emery N.

    2014-01-01

    The moving bar experiment is a classic paradigm for characterizing the receptive field (RF) properties of neurons in primary visual cortex (V1). Current approaches for analyzing neural spiking activity recorded from these experiments do not take into account the point process nature of these data and the circular geometry of the stimulus presentation. We present a novel analysis approach to mapping V1 receptive fields that combines point process generalized linear models (PPGLM) with tomographic reconstruction computed by filtered-back projection. We use the method to map the RF sizes and orientations of 251 V1 neurons recorded from two macaque monkeys during a moving bar experiment. Our cross-validated goodness-of-fit analyses show that the PPGLM provides a more accurate characterization of spike train data than analyses based on rate functions computed by the methods of spike triggered averages or first-order Wiener-Volterra kernel. Our analysis leads to a new definition of RF size as the spatial area over which the spiking activity is significantly greater than baseline activity. Our approach yields larger RF sizes and sharper orientation tuning estimates. The tomographic reconstruction paradigm further suggests an efficient approach to choosing the number of directions and the number of trials per direction in designing moving bar experiments. Our results demonstrate that standard tomographic principles for image reconstruction can be adapted to characterize V1 RFs and that two fundamental properties, size and orientation, may be substantially different from what is currently reported. PMID:22734491

  2. On the organization of receptive fields of orientation-selective units recorded in the fish tectum.

    PubMed

    Damjanović, Ilija; Maximova, Elena; Maximov, Vadim

    2009-09-01

    Responses from two types of orientation-selective units of retinal origin (detectors of horizontal lines and detectors of vertical lines) were recorded extracellularly from their axon terminals in the medial sublamina of tectal retinorecipient layer of immobilized cyprinid fish Carassius gibelio. Excitatory and inhibitory influences across receptive fields of orientation-selective units were evaluated. Positions, sizes and forms of the responsive parts of the receptive field were estimated by moving edges and flashing narrow light and dark stripes. It was shown that the orientation-selective units in fish are characterized by small responsive receptive fields with mean width of 4.8 +/- 1.6 degrees (n = 176). The comparison of different types of orientation-selective units revealed that the responsive receptive fields of detectors of vertical lines are significantly wider (13%) than those of detectors of horizontal lines. Statistically significant difference was also found between sizes of responsive receptive fields evaluated by light and dark edges. Mean responsive receptive field width, estimated for light edges (ON responses) were wider than those evaluated for dark edges (OFF responses). Inhibition in the receptive field of orientation-selective units was evaluated on the basis of two experimental methods. Evidence that signals are not linearly summed across the receptive field was derived from experimental results. Inhibitory influences, recorded in the receptive field of orientation-selective units, always initiated inside the responsive receptive field area and spread towards the periphery. Results of the study indicate that receptive fields cannot be defined as homogeneous sensory zone driven by a linear mechanism of response generation. The receptive fields of orientation-selective units, in fish appear to be composed of subunits sensitive to the appropriately oriented stimuli. PMID:19938209

  3. Population receptive field estimates of human auditory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Jessica M.; Huber, Elizabeth; Stecker, G. Christopher; Boynton, Geoffrey M.; Saenz, Melissa; Fine, Ione

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe a method for measuring tonotopic maps and estimating bandwidth for voxels in human primary auditory cortex (PAC) using a modification of the population Receptive Field (pRF) model, developed for retinotopic mapping in visual cortex by Dumoulin and Wandell (2008). The pRF method reliably estimates tonotopic maps in the presence of acoustic scanner noise, and has two advantages over phase-encoding techniques. First, the stimulus design is flexible and need not be a frequency progression, thereby reducing biases due to habituation, expectation, and estimation artifacts, as well as reducing the effects of spatio-temporal BOLD nonlinearities. Second, the pRF method can provide estimates of bandwidth as a function of frequency. We find that bandwidth estimates are narrower for voxels within the PAC than in surrounding auditory responsive regions (non-PAC). PMID:25449742

  4. Population receptive field estimates of human auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jessica M; Huber, Elizabeth; Stecker, G Christopher; Boynton, Geoffrey M; Saenz, Melissa; Fine, Ione

    2015-01-15

    Here we describe a method for measuring tonotopic maps and estimating bandwidth for voxels in human primary auditory cortex (PAC) using a modification of the population Receptive Field (pRF) model, developed for retinotopic mapping in visual cortex by Dumoulin and Wandell (2008). The pRF method reliably estimates tonotopic maps in the presence of acoustic scanner noise, and has two advantages over phase-encoding techniques. First, the stimulus design is flexible and need not be a frequency progression, thereby reducing biases due to habituation, expectation, and estimation artifacts, as well as reducing the effects of spatio-temporal BOLD nonlinearities. Second, the pRF method can provide estimates of bandwidth as a function of frequency. We find that bandwidth estimates are narrower for voxels within the PAC than in surrounding auditory responsive regions (non-PAC). PMID:25449742

  5. Simple Cell Response Properties Imply Receptive Field Structure: Balanced Gabor and/or Bandlimited Field Functions

    PubMed Central

    Cope, Davis; Blakeslee, Barbara; McCourt, Mark E.

    2011-01-01

    The classical receptive fields of simple cells in mammalian primary visual cortex demonstrate three cardinal response properties: 1) they do not respond to stimuli which are spatially homogeneous; 2) they respond best to stimuli in a preferred orientation (direction); and 3) they do not respond to stimuli in other, non-preferred orientations (directions). We refer to these as the Balanced Field Property, the Maximum Response Direction Property, and the Zero Response Direction Property, respectively. These empirically-determined response properties are used to derive a complete characterization of elementary receptive field functions (of cosine- and mixed-type) defined as products of a circularly symmetric weight function and a simple periodic carrier. Two disjoint classes of elementary receptive field functions result: the balanced Gabor class, a generalization of the traditional Gabor filter, and a bandlimited class whose Fourier transforms have compact support (i.e., are zero-valued outside of a bounded range). The detailed specification of these two classes of receptive field functions from empirically-based postulates may prove useful to neurophysiologists seeking to test alternative theories of simple cell receptive field structure, and to computational neuroscientists seeking basis functions with which to model human vision. PMID:19721693

  6. Spatiotemporal structure of visual receptive fields in macaque superior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Churan, Jan; Guitton, Daniel; Pack, Christopher C

    2012-11-01

    Saccades are useful for directing the high-acuity fovea to visual targets that are of behavioral relevance. The selection of visual targets for eye movements involves the superior colliculus (SC), where many neurons respond to visual stimuli. Many of these neurons are also activated before and during saccades of specific directions and amplitudes. Although the role of the SC in controlling eye movements has been thoroughly examined, far less is known about the nature of the visual responses in this area. We have, therefore, recorded from neurons in the intermediate layers of the macaque SC, while using a sparse-noise mapping procedure to obtain a detailed characterization of the spatiotemporal structure of visual receptive fields. We find that SC responses to flashed visual stimuli start roughly 50 ms after the onset of the stimulus and last for on average ~70 ms. About 50% of these neurons are strongly suppressed by visual stimuli flashed at certain locations flanking the excitatory center, and the spatiotemporal pattern of suppression exerts a predictable influence on the timing of saccades. This suppression may, therefore, contribute to the filtering of distractor stimuli during target selection. We also find that saccades affect the processing of visual stimuli by SC neurons in a manner that is quite similar to the saccadic suppression and postsaccadic enhancement that has been observed in the cortex and in perception. However, in contrast to what has been observed in the cortex, decreased visual sensitivity was generally associated with increased firing rates, while increased sensitivity was associated with decreased firing rates. Overall, these results suggest that the processing of visual stimuli by SC receptive fields can influence oculomotor behavior and that oculomotor signals originating in the SC can shape perisaccadic visual perception. PMID:22933722

  7. Efficient Receptive Field Tiling in Primate V1.

    PubMed

    Nauhaus, Ian; Nielsen, Kristina J; Callaway, Edward M

    2016-08-17

    The primary visual cortex (V1) encodes a diverse set of visual features, including orientation, ocular dominance (OD), and spatial frequency (SF), whose joint organization must be precisely structured to optimize coverage within the retinotopic map. Prior experiments have only identified efficient coverage based on orthogonal maps. Here we used two-photon calcium imaging to reveal an alternative arrangement for OD and SF maps in macaque V1; their gradients run parallel but with unique spatial periods, whereby low-SF regions coincide with monocular regions. Next we mapped receptive fields and found surprisingly precise micro-retinotopy that yields a smaller point-image and requires more efficient inter-map geometry, thus underscoring the significance of map relationships. While smooth retinotopy is constraining, studies suggest that it improves both wiring economy and the V1 population code read downstream. Altogether, these data indicate that connectivity within V1 is finely tuned and precise at the level of individual neurons. PMID:27499086

  8. Categorically distinct types of receptive fields in early visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Talebi, Vargha; Baker, Curtis L

    2016-05-01

    In the visual cortex, distinct types of neurons have been identified based on cellular morphology, response to injected current, or expression of specific markers, but neurophysiological studies have revealed visual receptive field (RF) properties that appear to be on a continuum, with only two generally recognized classes: simple and complex. Most previous studies have characterized visual responses of neurons using stereotyped stimuli such as bars, gratings, or white noise and simple system identification approaches (e.g., reverse correlation). Here we estimate visual RF models of cortical neurons using visually rich natural image stimuli and regularized regression system identification methods and characterize their spatial tuning, temporal dynamics, spatiotemporal behavior, and spiking properties. We quantitatively demonstrate the existence of three functionally distinct categories of simple cells, distinguished by their degree of orientation selectivity (isotropic or oriented) and the nature of their output nonlinearity (expansive or compressive). In addition, these three types have differing average values of several other properties. Cells with nonoriented RFs tend to have smaller RFs, shorter response durations, no direction selectivity, and high reliability. Orientation-selective neurons with an expansive output nonlinearity have Gabor-like RFs, lower spontaneous activity and responsivity, and spiking responses with higher sparseness. Oriented RFs with a compressive nonlinearity are spatially nondescript and tend to show longer response latency. Our findings indicate multiple physiologically defined types of RFs beyond the simple/complex dichotomy, suggesting that cortical neurons may have more specialized functional roles rather than lying on a multidimensional continuum. PMID:26936978

  9. Spatial invariance of visual receptive fields in parietal cortex neurons.

    PubMed

    Duhamel, J R; Bremmer, F; Ben Hamed, S; Graf, W

    1997-10-23

    Spatial information is conveyed to the primary visual cortex in retinal coordinates. Movement trajectory programming, however, requires a transformation from this sensory frame of reference into a frame appropriate for the selected part of the body, such as the eye, head or arms. To achieve this transformation, visual information must be combined with information from other sources: for instance, the location of an object of interest can be defined with respect to the observer's head if the position of the eyes in the orbit is known and is added to the object's retinal coordinates. Here we show that in a subdivision of the monkey parietal lobe, the ventral intraparietal area (VIP), the activity of visual neurons is modulated by eye-position signals, as in many other areas of the cortical visual system. We find that individual receptive fields of a population of VIP neurons are organized along a continuum, from eye to head coordinates. In the latter case, neurons encode the azimuth and/or elevation of a visual stimulus, independently of the direction in which the eyes are looking, thus representing spatial locations explicitly in at least a head-centred frame of reference. PMID:9349815

  10. Modeling attention-driven plasticity in auditory cortical receptive fields.

    PubMed

    Carlin, Michael A; Elhilali, Mounya

    2015-01-01

    To navigate complex acoustic environments, listeners adapt neural processes to focus on behaviorally relevant sounds in the acoustic foreground while minimizing the impact of distractors in the background, an ability referred to as top-down selective attention. Particularly striking examples of attention-driven plasticity have been reported in primary auditory cortex via dynamic reshaping of spectro-temporal receptive fields (STRFs). By enhancing the neural response to features of the foreground while suppressing those to the background, STRFs can act as adaptive contrast matched filters that directly contribute to an improved cognitive segregation between behaviorally relevant and irrelevant sounds. In this study, we propose a novel discriminative framework for modeling attention-driven plasticity of STRFs in primary auditory cortex. The model describes a general strategy for cortical plasticity via an optimization that maximizes discriminability between the foreground and distractors while maintaining a degree of stability in the cortical representation. The first instantiation of the model describes a form of feature-based attention and yields STRF adaptation patterns consistent with a contrast matched filter previously reported in neurophysiological studies. An extension of the model captures a form of object-based attention, where top-down signals act on an abstracted representation of the sensory input characterized in the modulation domain. The object-based model makes explicit predictions in line with limited neurophysiological data currently available but can be readily evaluated experimentally. Finally, we draw parallels between the model and anatomical circuits reported to be engaged during active attention. The proposed model strongly suggests an interpretation of attention-driven plasticity as a discriminative adaptation operating at the level of sensory cortex, in line with similar strategies previously described across different sensory modalities

  11. Multiplied functions unify shapes of ganglion-cell receptive fields in retina of turtle.

    PubMed

    Dearworth, James R; Granda, A M

    2002-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cells in the turtle were extracellularly recorded to define the shapes of their receptive fields by small moving light spots. To better define the geometries, spectral-light adaptations and vitreal injections of 2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid (APB) were used to disrupt balances in field organization along dimensions of wavelength, ON and OFF responses, and center/surround areas. Three-dimensional data plots were fit by Gaussian, Gabor, and cardioid functions to show that the shapes of receptive fields are predicted by combinations of these multiplied functions. Results indicate that Gaussian functions describe simple symmetrical receptive fields that are center-only; Gabor functions describe center/surround color-opponent receptive fields that have a ring of spike activity in the periphery; and directionally selective receptive fields, in contrast, which are asymmetrical, are described by cardioid functions adjoined to Gaussian or Gabor functions. The advantage of linking multiplied functions is that receptive fields are unified by a model that predicts progressively more complex field geometries derived from particular stimulating conditions. PMID:12678583

  12. State-space receptive fields of semicircular canal afferent neurons in the bullfrog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulin, M. G.; Hoffman, L. F.

    2001-01-01

    Receptive fields are commonly used to describe spatial characteristics of sensory neuron responses. They can be extended to characterize temporal or dynamical aspects by mapping neural responses in dynamical state spaces. The state-space receptive field of a neuron is the probability distribution of the dynamical state of the stimulus-generating system conditioned upon the occurrence of a spike. We have computed state-space receptive fields for semicircular canal afferent neurons in the bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana). We recorded spike times during broad-band Gaussian noise rotational velocity stimuli, computed the frequency distribution of head states at spike times, and normalized these to obtain conditional pdfs for the state. These state-space receptive fields quantify what the brain can deduce about the dynamical state of the head when a single spike arrives from the periphery. c2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Increasing Spontaneous Retinal Activity before Eye Opening Accelerates the Development of Geniculate Receptive Fields.

    PubMed

    Davis, Zachary W; Chapman, Barbara; Cheng, Hwai-Jong

    2015-10-28

    Visually evoked activity is necessary for the normal development of the visual system. However, little is known about the capacity for patterned spontaneous activity to drive the maturation of receptive fields before visual experience. Retinal waves provide instructive retinotopic information for the anatomical organization of the visual thalamus. To determine whether retinal waves also drive the maturation of functional responses, we increased the frequency of retinal waves pharmacologically in the ferret (Mustela putorius furo) during a period of retinogeniculate development before eye opening. The development of geniculate receptive fields after receiving these increased neural activities was measured using single-unit electrophysiology. We found that increased retinal waves accelerate the developmental reduction of geniculate receptive field sizes. This reduction is due to a decrease in receptive field center size rather than an increase in inhibitory surround strength. This work reveals an instructive role for patterned spontaneous activity in guiding the functional development of neural circuits. PMID:26511250

  14. Extra-classical tuning predicts stimulus-dependent receptive fields in auditory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, David M.; Woolley, Sarah M. N.

    2011-01-01

    The receptive fields of many sensory neurons are sensitive to statistical differences among classes of complex stimuli. For example, excitatory spectral bandwidths of midbrain auditory neurons and the spatial extent of cortical visual neurons differ during the processing of natural stimuli compared to the processing of artificial stimuli. Experimentally characterizing neuronal non-linearities that contribute to stimulus-dependent receptive fields is important for understanding how neurons respond to different stimulus classes in multiple sensory modalities. Here we show that in the zebra finch, many auditory midbrain neurons have extra-classical receptive fields, consisting of sideband excitation and sideband inhibition. We also show that the presence, degree and asymmetry of stimulus-dependent receptive fields during the processing of complex sounds are predicted by the presence, valence and asymmetry of extra-classical tuning. Neurons for which excitatory bandwidth expands during the processing of song have extra-classical excitation. Neurons for which frequency tuning is static and for which excitatory bandwidth contracts during the processing of song have extra-classical inhibition. Simulation experiments further demonstrate that stimulus-dependent receptive fields can arise from extra-classical tuning with a static spike-threshold non-linearity. These findings demonstrate that a common neuronal non-linearity can account for the stimulus-dependence of receptive fields estimated from the responses of auditory neurons to stimuli with natural and non-natural statistics. PMID:21849547

  15. Receptive fields of retinal bipolar cells are mediated by heterogeneous synaptic circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ai-Jun; Wu, Samuel M.

    2009-01-01

    Center-surround antagonistic receptive field (CSARF) organization is the basic synaptic circuit that serves as elementary building blocks for spatial information processing in the visual system. Cells with such receptive fields converge into higher-order visual neurons to form more complex receptive fields. Retinal bipolar cells (BCs) are the first neurons along the visual pathway that exhibit CSARF organization. BCs have been classified according to their response polarities and rod/cone inputs, and they project signals to target cells at different sublaminae of the inner plexiform layer. On the other hand, CSARFs of various types of BCs have been assumed be organized the same way. Here we examined center and surround responses of over 250 salamander BCs, and demonstrated that different types of BCs exhibit different patterns of dye coupling, receptive field center size, surround response strength, and conductance changes associated with center and surround responses. We show that BC receptive field center sizes varied with the degree of BC-BC coupling, and that surround responses of different BCs are mediated by different combinations of five lateral synaptic pathways mediated by the horizontal cells and amacrine cells. The finding of heterogeneous receptive field circuitry fundamentally challenges the common assumption that CSARFs of different subtypes of visual neurons are mediated by the same synaptic pathways. BCs carrying different visual signals use different synaptic circuits to process spatial information, allowing shape and contrast computation be differentially modulated by various lighting and adaptation conditions. PMID:19158304

  16. Chromatic sensitivity and spatial organization of LGN neurone receptive fields in cat: cone-rod interaction

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, P.

    1972-01-01

    1. The results described are for detailed analyses of fifty-four isolated LGN units, in response to monochromatic stimuli presented against achromatic, mid-mesopic backgrounds. Forty-seven were positively identified cells from the A-laminae; the remaining seven were fibres from the optic radiation. 2. Cells are classified according to firing pattern. Phasic cells respond almost exclusively with a discharge transient. Tonic cells, by contrast, give a maintained component in addition. In general, tonic cells possess higher spontaneous firing frequencies than phasic cells and the antagonistic surrounds of their receptive fields are more potent. In other respects the two classes appear to be functionally similar. 3. All cells within the A-laminae receive input involving both rods and 556 nm cones. 4. The spatial organization of geniculate receptive fields, unlike retinal fields, is little different for cone and rod vision. In the infrequent instances where a change is apparent, it is small and can go in either direction: rod fields are then on balance slightly larger than cone fields. 5. The locus of maximum sensitivity for the receptive field surround is described by a circle, concentric with the field centre; it is invariant with respect to stimulus geometry, or changeover from cone to rod vision. 6. This result implies that the receptive field surround mechanism does not extend through the field centre. It supports the notion that the centre and surround of each geniculate cell receptive field are mediated by discrete retinal inputs. PMID:4561483

  17. Effects of spike-triggered negative feedback on receptive-field properties.

    PubMed

    Urdapilleta, Eugenio; Samengo, Inés

    2015-04-01

    Sensory neurons are often described in terms of a receptive field, that is, a linear kernel through which stimuli are filtered before they are further processed. If information transmission is assumed to proceed in a feedforward cascade, the receptive field may be interpreted as the external stimulus' profile maximizing neuronal output. The nervous system, however, contains many feedback loops, and sensory neurons filter more currents than the ones representing the transduced external stimulus. Some of the additional currents are generated by the output activity of the neuron itself, and therefore constitute feedback signals. By means of a time-frequency analysis of the input/output transformation, here we show how feedback modifies the receptive field. The model is applicable to various types of feedback processes, from spike-triggered intrinsic conductances to inhibitory synaptic inputs from nearby neurons. We distinguish between the intrinsic receptive field (filtering all input currents) and the effective receptive field (filtering only external stimuli). Whereas the intrinsic receptive field summarizes the biophysical properties of the neuron associated to subthreshold integration and spike generation, only the effective receptive field can be interpreted as the external stimulus' profile maximizing neuronal output. We demonstrate that spike-triggered feedback shifts low-pass filtering towards band-pass processing, transforming integrator neurons into resonators. For strong feedback, a sharp resonance in the spectral neuronal selectivity may appear. Our results provide a unified framework to interpret a collection of previous experimental studies where specific feedback mechanisms were shown to modify the filtering properties of neurons. PMID:25601482

  18. Temporal variability of spectro-temporal receptive fields in the anesthetized auditory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Arne F.; Diepenbrock, Jan-Philipp; Ohl, Frank W.; Anemüller, Jörn

    2014-01-01

    Temporal variability of neuronal response characteristics during sensory stimulation is a ubiquitous phenomenon that may reflect processes such as stimulus-driven adaptation, top-down modulation or spontaneous fluctuations. It poses a challenge to functional characterization methods such as the receptive field, since these often assume stationarity. We propose a novel method for estimation of sensory neurons' receptive fields that extends the classic static linear receptive field model to the time-varying case. Here, the long-term estimate of the static receptive field serves as the mean of a probabilistic prior distribution from which the short-term temporally localized receptive field may deviate stochastically with time-varying standard deviation. The derived corresponding generalized linear model permits robust characterization of temporal variability in receptive field structure also for highly non-Gaussian stimulus ensembles. We computed and analyzed short-term auditory spectro-temporal receptive field (STRF) estimates with characteristic temporal resolution 5–30 s based on model simulations and responses from in total 60 single-unit recordings in anesthetized Mongolian gerbil auditory midbrain and cortex. Stimulation was performed with short (100 ms) overlapping frequency-modulated tones. Results demonstrate identification of time-varying STRFs, with obtained predictive model likelihoods exceeding those from baseline static STRF estimation. Quantitative characterization of STRF variability reveals a higher degree thereof in auditory cortex compared to midbrain. Cluster analysis indicates that significant deviations from the long-term static STRF are brief, but reliably estimated. We hypothesize that the observed variability more likely reflects spontaneous or state-dependent internal fluctuations that interact with stimulus-induced processing, rather than experimental or stimulus design. PMID:25566049

  19. Crossed receptive field components and crossed dendrites in cat sacrocaudal dorsal horn.

    PubMed

    Gladfelter, W E; Millecchia, R J; Pubols, L M; Sonty, R V; Ritz, L A; Covalt-Dunning, D; Culberson, J; Brown, P B

    1993-10-01

    The hypothesis that sacrocaudal dorsal horn neurons with crossed receptive field components on the tail have dendrites which cross to the contralateral dorsal horn was tested in a combined electrophysiological and morphological study. Dorsal horn cells in the sacrocaudal spinal cord of anesthetized cats were penetrated with horseradish peroxidase-filled microelectrodes. After mapping their low threshold mechanoreceptive fields, cells were iontophoretically injected with horseradish peroxidase. A sample of 16 well-stained cells was obtained in laminae III and IV. Cells with receptive fields crossing the dorsal midline of the tail (n = 8) had somata in the lateral ipsilateral dorsal horn, and some of these cells (5/8) had dendrites which crossed to the lateral contralateral dorsal horn. Cells with receptive fields spanning the ventral midline (n = 2) were located near the center of the fused dorsal horn, and one of these had bilateral dendrites in this region. Cells with receptive fields on the lateral tail, crossing neither the dorsal nor the ventral midline (n = 6), had cell bodies in the middle of the ipsilateral dorsal horn; half had only ipsilateral dendrites, and half had crossed dendritic branches. Although the relationship between cell receptive field (RF) location (RF center, expressed as distance from tips of toes) and mediolateral location of the cell body was statistically significant, the correlation between crossed RF components and crossed dendritic branches was not significant. PMID:8254116

  20. Adaptation of the simple or complex nature of V1 receptive fields to visual statistics.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Julien; Monier, Cyril; Pananceau, Marc; Frégnac, Yves

    2011-08-01

    Receptive fields in primary visual cortex (V1) are categorized as simple or complex, depending on their spatial selectivity to stimulus contrast polarity. We studied the dependence of this classification on visual context by comparing, in the same cell, the synaptic responses to three classical receptive field mapping protocols: sparse noise, ternary dense noise and flashed Gabor noise. Intracellular recordings revealed that the relative weights of simple-like and complex-like receptive field components were scaled so as to make the same receptive field more simple-like with dense noise stimulation and more complex-like with sparse or Gabor noise stimulations. However, once these context-dependent receptive fields were convolved with the corresponding stimulus, the balance between simple-like and complex-like contributions to the synaptic responses appeared to be invariant across input statistics. This normalization of the linear/nonlinear input ratio suggests a previously unknown form of homeostatic control of V1 functional properties, optimizing the network nonlinearities to the statistical structure of the visual input. PMID:21765424

  1. Receptive field organization of complex cells in the cat's striate cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Movshon, J A; Thompson, I D; Tolhurst, D J

    1978-01-01

    1. All complex cells in the cat's striate cortex exhibit gross non-linearities of spatial summation when tested with sinusoidal grating stimuli. Their responses to moving gratings of all but the lowest spatial frequencies are usually dominated by a component that is not modulated by the passage of the bars of the grating across the receptive field. They give responses to temporally modulated stationary gratings that consist mostly of even harmonics of the stimulus frequency and that vary little in amplitude or wave form as the spatial phase of the grating is varied. 2. We compared complex cells' receptive fields with their sensitivity to sinusoidal gratings of different spatial frequencies. Qualitatively, the receptive fields are usually two to five times wider than the bars of the gratings that stimulate them most effectively. Quantitatively, the receptive field profiles of complex cells are invariably broader than those predicted by Fourier synthesis of their spatial frequency tuning curves, and in particular lack predicted spatially antagonistic regions. 3. We further examined the receptive field organization of these cells, using pairs of stationary lines flashed synchronously on their receptive fields. If both lines are of the same polarity (bright or dark), complex cells respond to the paired stimulus much less well than they do to either of its component bars, unless the bars are separated by less than about one quarter of the width of the receptive field. If the lines are of opposite polarity, one bright and one dark, the opposite situation obtains: closely spaced bars elicit small responses, while paired bars of larger separation are much more effective. In either case, the results are independent in general character of the absolute positions of the stimuli within the receptive field; rather, they depend in a manner characteristic of each cell on the relative positions of the two bars. 4. The two-line interaction profile that plots the change in a complex

  2. Complex somatosensory receptive fields of cells in the deep laminae of the hamster's superior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Rhoades, R W; Mooney, R D; Jacquin, M F

    1983-07-01

    Responses to separate and simultaneous application of noxious and innocuous tactile stimuli were examined for neurons recorded from the deep layers of the hamster's superior colliculus. Forty-four percent of the units isolated were responsive only to innocuous, primarily cutaneous, stimuli; 10% were activated only by noxious stimulation; and 15% were characterized as having a wide dynamic range. The remaining 31% of the somatosensory cells recorded had complex receptive field properties which have not heretofore been described for tectal neurons in any species. Ten percent of all somatosensory cells had no excitatory receptive fields, but their spontaneous discharges could be suppressed by low threshold and/or noxious stimulation of discrete portions of the body. In 18% of the units which we recorded, innocuous and noxious stimuli had opposing effects upon cellular activity. Most of these neurons had small receptive fields in which innocuous tactile stimuli yielded excitation and larger fields, often including most of the body surface, where noxious stimulation suppressed both spontaneous activity and the responses normally elicited by appropriate tactile stimulation. Finally, a very small number of units (3% of all somatosensory cells recorded) had multiple receptive fields in which low threshold stimulation produced opposing effects on spontaneous activity. Somatosensory units were recorded in all of the deep laminae, but cells with complex response characteristics were isolated primarily in stratum griseum profundum. PMID:6864251

  3. Increasing Spontaneous Retinal Activity before Eye Opening Accelerates the Development of Geniculate Receptive Fields

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Zachary W.; Chapman, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Visually evoked activity is necessary for the normal development of the visual system. However, little is known about the capacity for patterned spontaneous activity to drive the maturation of receptive fields before visual experience. Retinal waves provide instructive retinotopic information for the anatomical organization of the visual thalamus. To determine whether retinal waves also drive the maturation of functional responses, we increased the frequency of retinal waves pharmacologically in the ferret (Mustela putorius furo) during a period of retinogeniculate development before eye opening. The development of geniculate receptive fields after receiving these increased neural activities was measured using single-unit electrophysiology. We found that increased retinal waves accelerate the developmental reduction of geniculate receptive field sizes. This reduction is due to a decrease in receptive field center size rather than an increase in inhibitory surround strength. This work reveals an instructive role for patterned spontaneous activity in guiding the functional development of neural circuits. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Patterned spontaneous neural activity that occurs during development is known to be necessary for the proper formation of neural circuits. However, it is unknown whether the spontaneous activity alone is sufficient to drive the maturation of the functional properties of neurons. Our work demonstrates for the first time an acceleration in the maturation of neural function as a consequence of driving patterned spontaneous activity during development. This work has implications for our understanding of how neural circuits can be modified actively to improve function prematurely or to recover from injury with guided interventions of patterned neural activity. PMID:26511250

  4. Receptive field properties of neurons in the primary visual cortex under photopic and scotopic lighting conditions

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, Kevin R.; Hubel, David H.

    2009-01-01

    Knowledge of the physiology of the primate visual cortex (area V-1) comes mostly from studies done in photopic conditions, in which retinal cones are active and rods play little or no part. Conflicting results have come from research into the effects of dark adaptation on receptive field organization of cells in the retina and the lateral geniculate nucleus. These studies claim either that the effect of the surround disappears with dark adaptation or that it does not. The current study has as its objective a comparison of responses of V-1 cells in awake-alert macaque monkeys under conditions of light and dark adaptation. We reasoned that basic receptive field properties of V-1 cells such as orientation selectivity, direction selectivity, and end-stopping should be preserved in scotopic conditions if the receptive field organization of antecedent cells is maintained in dim light. Our results indicate that dark adaptation does not alter basic V-1 receptive field characteristics such as selectivity for orientation, direction, and bar length. PMID:17688906

  5. A Novel Nonparametric Approach for Neural Encoding and Decoding Models of Multimodal Receptive Fields.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rahul; Chen, Zhe; Kloosterman, Fabian; Wilson, Matthew A; Sarma, Sridevi V

    2016-07-01

    Pyramidal neurons recorded from the rat hippocampus and entorhinal cortex, such as place and grid cells, have diverse receptive fields, which are either unimodal or multimodal. Spiking activity from these cells encodes information about the spatial position of a freely foraging rat. At fine timescales, a neuron's spike activity also depends significantly on its own spike history. However, due to limitations of current parametric modeling approaches, it remains a challenge to estimate complex, multimodal neuronal receptive fields while incorporating spike history dependence. Furthermore, efforts to decode the rat's trajectory in one- or two-dimensional space from hippocampal ensemble spiking activity have mainly focused on spike history-independent neuronal encoding models. In this letter, we address these two important issues by extending a recently introduced nonparametric neural encoding framework that allows modeling both complex spatial receptive fields and spike history dependencies. Using this extended nonparametric approach, we develop novel algorithms for decoding a rat's trajectory based on recordings of hippocampal place cells and entorhinal grid cells. Results show that both encoding and decoding models derived from our new method performed significantly better than state-of-the-art encoding and decoding models on 6 minutes of test data. In addition, our model's performance remains invariant to the apparent modality of the neuron's receptive field. PMID:27172447

  6. Attention reshapes center-surround receptive field structure in macaque cortical area MT.

    PubMed

    Anton-Erxleben, Katharina; Stephan, Valeska M; Treue, Stefan

    2009-10-01

    Directing spatial attention to a location inside the classical receptive field (cRF) of a neuron in macaque medial temporal area (MT) shifts the center of the cRF toward the attended location. Here we investigate the influence of spatial attention on the profile of the inhibitory surround present in many MT neurons. Two monkeys attended to the fixation point or to 1 of 2 random dot patterns (RDPs) placed inside or next to the cRF, whereas a third RDP (the probe) was briefly presented in quick succession across the cRF and surround. The probe presentation responses were used to compute a map of the excitatory receptive field and its inhibitory surround. Attention systematically reshapes the receptive field profile, independently shifting both center and surround toward the attended location. Furthermore, cRF size is changed as a function of relative distance to the attentional focus: attention inside the cRF shrinks it, whereas directing attention next to the cRF expands it. In addition, we find systematic changes in surround inhibition and cRF amplitude. This nonmultiplicative push-pull modulation of the receptive field's center-surround structure optimizes processing at and near the attentional focus to strengthen the representation of the attended stimulus while reducing influences from distractors. PMID:19211660

  7. Comparison of receptive-field organization of the superior colliculus in Siamese and normal cats

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Nancy; Cynader, Max

    1972-01-01

    1. The superior colliculus has been studied in Siamese and normal cats by recording the responses of single tectal units to visual stimuli. 2. The retinotopic organization of the superior colliculus has been compared in the two breeds. In the normal cat, the contralateral half-field is represented in the central and caudal part of the colliculus, and a vertical strip of the ipsilateral half-field, 15-20° wide, is represented at the anterior tip. The Siamese cat superior colliculus receives an abnormally large projection from the ipsilateral half-field so that units with visual receptive fields which extend as far as 40° into the ipsilateral half-field can be found. The area of the tectal surface devoted to the representation of the ipsilateral half-field is about twice as large in Siamese cats as in normal cats. The enhanced representation of the ipsilateral half-field in Siamese cats is reflected in a displacement of the vertical meridian and the area centralis on the tectal surface. 3. The area centralis in the Siamese cat is located at about the same point on the tectal surface as would be occupied by a point in the visual field about 6-7° contralateral to the area centralis in the normal cat. The smallest receptive fields in both breeds are located near the area centralis. The size of the receptive field for a tectal unit seems to be determined by the retinal location of the receptive field and not by the absolute position of the unit on the tectal surface. 4. The receptive-field characteristics of tectal units show many similarities in the two breeds. The receptive fields of individual units consist of activating regions flanked by suppressive surrounds. Units respond well to stimuli of different shapes and orientation provided they are moving. The optimum stimulus for a given unit can be much smaller than the size of the activating region. About two thirds of the units studied in both breeds show directional selectivity. Most of the units studied in normal

  8. Reception and learning of electric fields in bees

    PubMed Central

    Greggers, Uwe; Koch, Gesche; Schmidt, Viola; Dürr, Aron; Floriou-Servou, Amalia; Piepenbrock, David; Göpfert, Martin C.; Menzel, Randolf

    2013-01-01

    Honeybees, like other insects, accumulate electric charge in flight, and when their body parts are moved or rubbed together. We report that bees emit constant and modulated electric fields when flying, landing, walking and during the waggle dance. The electric fields emitted by dancing bees consist of low- and high-frequency components. Both components induce passive antennal movements in stationary bees according to Coulomb's law. Bees learn both the constant and the modulated electric field components in the context of appetitive proboscis extension response conditioning. Using this paradigm, we identify mechanoreceptors in both joints of the antennae as sensors. Other mechanoreceptors on the bee body are potentially involved but are less sensitive. Using laser vibrometry, we show that the electrically charged flagellum is moved by constant and modulated electric fields and more strongly so if sound and electric fields interact. Recordings from axons of the Johnston organ document its sensitivity to electric field stimuli. Our analyses identify electric fields emanating from the surface charge of bees as stimuli for mechanoreceptors, and as biologically relevant stimuli, which may play a role in social communication. PMID:23536603

  9. Teaching Critical Reflexivity in Short-Term International Field Courses: Practices and Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    This study critiques the use of critical reflexivity in short-term international field courses. Critical reflexivity's benefits include preparing students for professional research, deepening their learning, and giving the chance to see how student perspectives on fieldwork sites are influenced by their own identity and positionality. I use an…

  10. Position-specific adaptation in complex cell receptive fields of the cat striate cortex.

    PubMed

    Marlin, S; Douglas, R; Cynader, M

    1993-06-01

    1. Responses of complex cells in cat striate cortex were studied with flashed light slit stimuli. The responses to slits flashed in different positions in the receptive field were assessed quantitatively before and after periods of prolonged stimulation of one small region of the receptive field. This type of prolonged stimulation resulted in reduced responsivity over a limited zone within the complex cell receptive field. 2. The adaptation-induced responsivity decrement was generally observed in both the ON and OFF response profiles but could also be restricted to one or the other. In general, the magnitude of the response decrements was greatest in the ON response profiles. The adaptation-induced response decrement did not necessarily spread throughout the receptive field but was restricted to a small region surrounding the adapted receptive field position (RFP). Adaptation spread equally widely across the ON and OFF response profiles despite the smaller adaptation effects in the OFF profile. 3. The adaptation effects from repeated stimulation at a single RFP did not spread symmetrically across the receptive field, and a given cell's preferred direction of motion indicated the direction of the asymmetric spread of the adaptation. RFPs that would be stimulated by a light slit originating at the point of adaptation and moving in the preferred direction (preferred side) showed greater adaptation-induced response decrements than did RFPs that would be stimulated by a light slit moving in the opposite direction from the point of adaptation (nonpreferred side). There was significant enhancement of responses at some RFPs on the non-preferred side of the point of adaptation. This asymmetric spread of adaptation could be caused by adaptation of inhibitory connections that contribute to complex cell direction selectivity. 4. The asymmetry of adaptation was significantly different for the ON and OFF response profiles. The asymmetric spread of adaptation for the ON response

  11. Receptive fields for smooth pursuit eye movements and motion perception.

    PubMed

    Debono, Kurt; Schütz, Alexander C; Spering, Miriam; Gegenfurtner, Karl R

    2010-12-01

    Humans use smooth pursuit eye movements to track moving objects of interest. In order to track an object accurately, motion signals from the target have to be integrated and segmented from motion signals in the visual context. Most studies on pursuit eye movements used small visual targets against a featureless background, disregarding the requirements of our natural visual environment. Here, we tested the ability of the pursuit and the perceptual system to integrate motion signals across larger areas of the visual field. Stimuli were random-dot kinematograms containing a horizontal motion signal, which was perturbed by a spatially localized, peripheral motion signal. Perturbations appeared in a gaze-contingent coordinate system and had a different direction than the main motion including a vertical component. We measured pursuit and perceptual direction discrimination decisions and found that both steady-state pursuit and perception were influenced most by perturbation angles close to that of the main motion signal and only in regions close to the center of gaze. The narrow direction bandwidth (26 angular degrees full width at half height) and small spatial extent (8 degrees of visual angle standard deviation) correspond closely to tuning parameters of neurons in the middle temporal area (MT). PMID:20932990

  12. Distinctive receptive field and physiological properties of a wide-field amacrine cell in the macaque monkey retina

    PubMed Central

    Puller, Christian; Rieke, Fred; Neitz, Jay; Neitz, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    At early stages of visual processing, receptive fields are typically described as subtending local regions of space and thus performing computations on a narrow spatial scale. Nevertheless, stimulation well outside of the classical receptive field can exert clear and significant effects on visual processing. Given the distances over which they occur, the retinal mechanisms responsible for these long-range effects would certainly require signal propagation via active membrane properties. Here the physiology of a wide-field amacrine cell—the wiry cell—in macaque monkey retina is explored, revealing receptive fields that represent a striking departure from the classic structure. A single wiry cell integrates signals over wide regions of retina, 5–10 times larger than the classic receptive fields of most retinal ganglion cells. Wiry cells integrate signals over space much more effectively than predicted from passive signal propagation, and spatial integration is strongly attenuated during blockade of NMDA spikes but integration is insensitive to blockade of NaV channels with TTX. Thus these cells appear well suited for contributing to the long-range interactions of visual signals that characterize many aspects of visual perception. PMID:26133804

  13. Contour detection based on the contextual modulation of non-classical receptive field facilitation and suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Jie; Guo, Zhaoli; Cai, Chao

    2013-10-01

    Outside the classical receptive field (CRF), there exists a broad non-classical receptive field (NCRF). The response of the central neuron is affected not only by the stimulus inside the CRF, but also modulated by the stimulus surrounding it. The contextual modulation is mediated by horizontal connections across the visual cortex. In this paper, a contour detection method inspired by the visual mechanism in the primary visual cortex (V1) is proposed. The method is divided in three steps. Firstly, the response of every single visual neuron in V1 is computed by local energy. Secondly, the facilitation and suppression (the contextual influence) on a neuron through horizontal interactions are obtained by constructing a two neighbor modulating functions. Finally, the total output response of one neuron to complex visual stimuli is acquired by combing the influence of local visual context on the neuron and energy response by itself. We tested it on natural image and encouraging results were acquired.

  14. Spontaneous Retinal Activity Mediates Development of Ocular Dominance Columns and Binocular Receptive Fields in V1

    PubMed Central

    Huberman, Andrew D.; Speer, Colenso M.; Chapman, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Summary The mechanisms that give rise to ocular dominance columns (ODCs) during development are controversial. Early experiments indicated a key role for retinal activity in ODC formation. However, later studies showed that in those early experiments, the retinal activity perturbation was initiated after ODCs had already formed. Moreover, recent studies concluded that early eye removals do not impact ODC segregation. Here we blocked spontaneous retinal activity during the very early stages of ODC development. This permanently disrupted the anatomical organization of ODCs and led to a dramatic increase in receptive field size for binocular cells in primary visual cortex. Our data suggest that early spontaneous retinal activity conveys crucial information about whether thalamocortical axons represent one or the other eye and that this activity mediates binocular competition important for shaping receptive fields in primary visual cortex. PMID:17046688

  15. Receptive field size, chemical and thermal responses, and fiber conduction velocity of rat chorda tympani geniculate ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Yusuke; Bradley, Robert M

    2016-06-01

    Afferent chorda tympani (CT) fibers innervating taste and somatosensory receptors in fungiform papillae have neuron cell bodies in the geniculate ganglion (GG). The GG/CT fibers branch in the tongue to innervate taste buds in several fungiform papillae. To investigate receptive field characteristics of GG/CT neurons, we recorded extracellular responses from GG cells to application of chemical and thermal stimuli. Receptive field size was mapped by electrical stimulation of individual fungiform papillae. Response latency to electrical stimulation was used to determine fiber conduction velocity. Responses of GG neurons to lingual application of stimuli representing four taste qualities, and water at 4°C, were used to classify neuron response properties. Neurons classified as SALT, responding only to NaCl and NH4Cl, had a mean receptive field size of six papillae. Neurons classified as OTHER responded to salts and other chemical stimuli and had smaller mean receptive fields of four papillae. Neurons that responded to salts and cold stimuli, classified as SALT/THERMAL, and neurons responding to salts, other chemical stimuli and cold, classified as OTHER/THERMAL, had mean receptive field sizes of six and five papillae, respectively. Neurons responding only to cold stimuli, categorized as THERMAL, had receptive fields of one to two papillae located at the tongue tip. Based on conduction velocity most of the neurons were classified as C fibers. Neurons with large receptive fields had higher conduction velocities than neurons with small receptive fields. These results demonstrate that GG neurons can be distinguished by receptive field size, response properties and afferent fiber conduction velocity derived from convergent input of multiple taste organs. PMID:27030734

  16. From sensors to spikes: evolving receptive fields to enhance sensorimotor information in a robot-arm.

    PubMed

    Luque, Niceto R; Garrido, Jesús A; Ralli, Jarno; Laredo, Juanlu J; Ros, Eduardo

    2012-08-01

    In biological systems, instead of actual encoders at different joints, proprioception signals are acquired through distributed receptive fields. In robotics, a single and accurate sensor output per link (encoder) is commonly used to track the position and the velocity. Interfacing bio-inspired control systems with spiking neural networks emulating the cerebellum with conventional robots is not a straight forward task. Therefore, it is necessary to adapt this one-dimensional measure (encoder output) into a multidimensional space (inputs for a spiking neural network) to connect, for instance, the spiking cerebellar architecture; i.e. a translation from an analog space into a distributed population coding in terms of spikes. This paper analyzes how evolved receptive fields (optimized towards information transmission) can efficiently generate a sensorimotor representation that facilitates its discrimination from other "sensorimotor states". This can be seen as an abstraction of the Cuneate Nucleus (CN) functionality in a robot-arm scenario. We model the CN as a spiking neuron population coding in time according to the response of mechanoreceptors during a multi-joint movement in a robot joint space. An encoding scheme that takes into account the relative spiking time of the signals propagating from peripheral nerve fibers to second-order somatosensory neurons is proposed. Due to the enormous number of possible encodings, we have applied an evolutionary algorithm to evolve the sensory receptive field representation from random to optimized encoding. Following the nature-inspired analogy, evolved configurations have shown to outperform simple hand-tuned configurations and other homogenized configurations based on the solution provided by the optimization engine (evolutionary algorithm). We have used artificial evolutionary engines as the optimization tool to circumvent nonlinearity responses in receptive fields. PMID:22830963

  17. A Probabilistic Approach to Receptive Field Mapping in the Frontal Eye Fields

    PubMed Central

    Mayo, J. Patrick; Morrison, Robert M.; Smith, Matthew A.

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the neuronal mechanisms of perisaccadic vision often lack the resolution needed to determine important changes in receptive field (RF) structure. Such limited analytical power can lead to inaccurate descriptions of visuomotor processing. To address this issue, we developed a precise, probabilistic technique that uses a generalized linear model (GLM) for mapping the visual RFs of frontal eye field (FEF) neurons during stable fixation (Mayo et al., 2015). We previously found that full-field RF maps could be obtained using 1–8 dot stimuli presented at frame rates of 10–150 ms. FEF responses were generally robust to changes in the number of stimuli presented or the rate of presentation, which allowed us to visualize RFs over a range of spatial and temporal resolutions. Here, we compare the quality of RFs obtained over different stimulus and GLM parameters to facilitate future work on the detailed mapping of FEF RFs. We first evaluate the interactions between the number of stimuli presented per trial, the total number of trials, and the quality of RF mapping. Next, we vary the spatial resolution of our approach to illustrate the tradeoff between visualizing RF sub-structure and sampling at high resolutions. We then evaluate local smoothing as a possible correction for situations where under-sampling occurs. Finally, we provide a preliminary demonstration of the usefulness of a probabilistic approach for visualizing full-field perisaccadic RF shifts. Our results present a powerful, and perhaps necessary, framework for studying perisaccadic vision that is applicable to FEF and possibly other visuomotor regions of the brain. PMID:27047352

  18. Spatial summation in the receptive fields of simple cells in the cat's striate cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Movshon, J A; Thompson, I D; Tolhurst, D J

    1978-01-01

    1. We have examined the responses of simple cells in the cat's atriate cortex to visual patterns that were designed to reveal the extent to which these cells may be considered to sum light-evoked influences linearly across their receptive fields. We used one-dimensional luminance-modulated bars and grating as stimuli; their orientation was always the same as the preferred orientation of the neurone under study. The stimuli were presented on an oscilloscope screen by a digital computer, which also accumulated neuronal responses and controlled a randomized sequence of stimulus presentations. 2. The majority of simple cells respond to sinusoidal gratings that are moving or whose contrast is modulated in time in a manner consistent with the hypothesis that they have linear spatial summation. Their responses to moving gratings of all spatial frequencies are modulated in synchrony with the passage of the gratings' bars across their receptive fields, and they do not produce unmodulated responses even at the highest spatial frequencies. Many of these cells respond to temporally modulated stationary gratings simply by changing their response amplitude sinusoidally as the spatial phase of the grating the grating is varied. Nonetheless, their behavior appears to indicate linear spatial summation, since we show in an Appendix that the absence of a 'null' phase in a visual neurone need not indicate non-linear spatial summation, and further that a linear neurone lacking a 'null' phase should give responses of the form that we have observed in this type of simple cell. 3. A minority of simple cells appears to have significant non-linearities of spatial summation. These neurones respond to moving gratings of high spatial frequency with a partially or totally unmodulated elevation of firing rate. They have no 'null' phases when tested with stationary gratings, and reveal their non-linearity by giving responses to gratings of some spatial phases that are composed partly or wholly of

  19. Division of labor in frontal eye field neurons during presaccadic remapping of visual receptive fields

    PubMed Central

    Shin, SooYoon

    2012-01-01

    Our percept of visual stability across saccadic eye movements may be mediated by presaccadic remapping. Just before a saccade, neurons that remap become visually responsive at a future field (FF), which anticipates the saccade vector. Hence, the neurons use corollary discharge of saccades. Many of the neurons also decrease their response at the receptive field (RF). Presaccadic remapping occurs in several brain areas including the frontal eye field (FEF), which receives corollary discharge of saccades in its layer IV from a collicular-thalamic pathway. We studied, at two levels, the microcircuitry of remapping in the FEF. At the laminar level, we compared remapping between layers IV and V. At the cellular level, we compared remapping between different neuron types of layer IV. In the FEF in four monkeys (Macaca mulatta), we identified 27 layer IV neurons with orthodromic stimulation and 57 layer V neurons with antidromic stimulation from the superior colliculus. With the use of established criteria, we classified the layer IV neurons as putative excitatory (n = 11), putative inhibitory (n = 12), or ambiguous (n = 4). We found that just before a saccade, putative excitatory neurons increased their visual response at the RF, putative inhibitory neurons showed no change, and ambiguous neurons increased their visual response at the FF. None of the neurons showed presaccadic visual changes at both RF and FF. In contrast, neurons in layer V showed full remapping (at both the RF and FF). Our data suggest that elemental signals for remapping are distributed across neuron types in early cortical processing and combined in later stages of cortical microcircuitry. PMID:22815407

  20. Visual cortex in aging and Alzheimer's disease: changes in visual field maps and population receptive fields

    PubMed Central

    Brewer, Alyssa A.; Barton, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Although several studies have suggested that cortical alterations underlie such age-related visual deficits as decreased acuity, little is known about what changes actually occur in visual cortex during healthy aging. Two recent studies showed changes in primary visual cortex (V1) during normal aging; however, no studies have characterized the effects of aging on visual cortex beyond V1, important measurements both for understanding the aging process and for comparison to changes in age-related diseases. Similarly, there is almost no information about changes in visual cortex in Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common form of dementia. Because visual deficits are often reported as one of the first symptoms of AD, measurements of such changes in the visual cortex of AD patients might improve our understanding of how the visual system is affected by neurodegeneration as well as aid early detection, accurate diagnosis and timely treatment of AD. Here we use fMRI to first compare the visual field map (VFM) organization and population receptive fields (pRFs) between young adults and healthy aging subjects for occipital VFMs V1, V2, V3, and hV4. Healthy aging subjects do not show major VFM organizational deficits, but do have reduced surface area and increased pRF sizes in the foveal representations of V1, V2, and hV4 relative to healthy young control subjects. These measurements are consistent with behavioral deficits seen in healthy aging. We then demonstrate the feasibility and first characterization of these measurements in two patients with mild AD, which reveal potential changes in visual cortex as part of the pathophysiology of AD. Our data aid in our understanding of the changes in the visual processing pathways in normal aging and provide the foundation for future research into earlier and more definitive detection of AD. PMID:24570669

  1. Laminar differences in receptive field properties of cells in cat primary visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Charles D.

    1977-01-01

    1. Cells in area 17 of the cat visual cortex were studied with a view towards correlating receptive field properties with layering. A number of receptive field parameters were measured for all units, and nearly every unit was marked with a microlesion to determine accurately the layer in which it was found. 2. Cells were defined as simple or complex by mapping with stationary stimuli, using the criteria of Hubel & Wiesel (1962). Complex cells fell into two groups: those that showed summation for increased slit length (standard complex) and those that did not (special complex). 3. The simple cells were located in the deep part of layer 3, in layer 4, and in layer 6. This corresponds to the distribution of afferents from the dorsal layers of the lateral geniculate nucleus. In these cortical layers the simple cells differed primarily with respect to their receptive field size, cells in layer 4 having the smallest, layer 3 intermediate, and layer 6 the largest fields. Layer 4 was the only layer in which simple cells showed end-inhibition (a reduction in response to slits extending beyond the excitatory portion of the receptive field). 4. The standard complex cells were found in all layers, but were quite scarce in layer 4. As with the simple cells, field size varied with layer: in layer 2+3 they had small to intermediate field sizes, in layer 5 intermediate, and in layer 6 very large. Layer 6 cells showed summation for slits of increased length up to very large values, and responded best when the slits were centred in the receptive field. The only standard complex cells that showed end-inhibition were those in layer 2+3, and these were similar to the layer 4 simple cells in terms of proportion of end-inhibited units and degree of end-inhibition. 5. The special complex cells, originally described by Palmer & Rosenquist (1974), were found in two tiers: the upper one at the layer 3/layer 4 border and the lower one in layer 5. They were different from the standard complex

  2. 3-D components of a biological neural network visualized in computer generated imagery. I - Macular receptive field organization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Muriel D.; Cutler, Lynn; Meyer, Glenn; Lam, Tony; Vaziri, Parshaw

    1990-01-01

    Computer-assisted, 3-dimensional reconstructions of macular receptive fields and of their linkages into a neural network have revealed new information about macular functional organization. Both type I and type II hair cells are included in the receptive fields. The fields are rounded, oblong, or elongated, but gradations between categories are common. Cell polarizations are divergent. Morphologically, each calyx of oblong and elongated fields appears to be an information processing site. Intrinsic modulation of information processing is extensive and varies with the kind of field. Each reconstructed field differs in detail from every other, suggesting that an element of randomness is introduced developmentally and contributes to endorgan adaptability.

  3. Receptive field organization of 'sustained' and 'transient' retinal ganglion cells which subserve different function roles.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, H; Wright, M J

    1972-12-01

    1. Post-stimulus histograms were obtained from ;sustained' and ;transient' retinal ganglion cells for receptive field plots using a light spot with square-wave modulation of intensity, and of variable intensity and area. Fundamental differences in their receptive field organization in time and space were revealed.2. In ;sustained' cells, excitation consists of ;transient' and ;sustained' components and the ratio of transient/sustained components remains constant at a given retinal locus for a wide range of intensities. The transient component becomes proportionally larger towards the periphery of the receptive field. This rule is also applicable for the inhibitory and disinhibitory surround. In ;transient' cells, however, there is no true ;sustained' component, but some cells produce a double peaked transient post-stimulus histogram at the R.F. centre when high flux stimuli are used, while others show a single peak transient response. The magnitude and shape of transient responses changes with intensity as well as with location in the receptive field.3. The sensitivity gradients of ;sustained' and ;transient' cells show consistent differences in shape. The mean slope of the sensitivity gradients of a sample of ;sustained' cells was 10 times that of a sample of ;transient' cells. The sensitivity gradient of ;sustained' cells shows a distinct surround region where the inhibitory mechanism is more sensitive, while that of ;transient' cells usually does not, owing to an extensive ;tail' on the sensitivity gradient of the centre mechanism, which overlaps the surround.4. Ricco's Law also holds for the centre mechanism of ;transient' cells. Non-linear summation occurs at supra-threshold levels, and when the surround mechanisms are involved.5. Supra-optimal stimuli give a saturation of the response in both ;transient and ;sustained' cells. This saturation is associated with a decrease of latency in ;transient' cells, but not in ;sustained' cells.6. The latency of retinal

  4. A competition-based mechanism mediates developmental refinement of tectal neuron receptive fields

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Wei; Aizenman, Carlos D.

    2012-01-01

    Neural activity plays an important role in development and maturation of visual circuits in the brain. Activity can be instructive in refining visual projections by directly mediating formation and elimination of specific synaptic contacts through competition-based mechanisms. Alternatively, activity could be permissive – regulating production of factors which create a favorable environment for circuit refinement. Here we used the Xenopus laevis tadpole visual system to test whether activity is instructive or permissive for shaping development of the retinotectal circuit. In vivo spike output was dampened in a small subgroup of tectal neurons, starting from developmental stages 44–46, by overexpressing Shaker-like Xenopus Kv1.1 potassium channels using electroporation. Tadpoles were then reared until stage 49, a time period when significant refinement of the retinotectal map occurs. Kv1.1 expressing neurons had significantly decreased spike output in response to both current injection and visual stimuli, compared to untransfected controls, with spiking occurring during a more limited time interval. We found that Kv1.1 expressing neurons had larger visual receptive fields, decreased receptive field sharpness and more persistent recurrent excitation than control neurons, all of which are characteristics of immature neurons. Transfected cells, however had normal spontaneous excitatory synaptic currents and dendritic arbors. These results suggest that spike output of a tectal neuron plays an important instructive role in development of its receptive field properties and refinement of local circuits. However, other activity dependent processes, such as synaptogenesis and dendritic growth, remain unaffected due to the permissive environment created by otherwise normal network activity. PMID:23175839

  5. Rapid Task-Related Plasticity of Spectrotemporal Receptive Fields in the Auditory Midbrain.

    PubMed

    Slee, Sean J; David, Stephen V

    2015-09-23

    Previous research has demonstrated that auditory cortical neurons can modify their receptive fields when animals engage in auditory detection tasks. We tested for this form of task-related plasticity in the inferior colliculus (IC) of ferrets trained to detect a pure tone target in a sequence of noise distractors that did not overlap in time. During behavior, responses were suppressed at the target tone frequency in approximately half of IC neurons relative to the passive state. This suppression often resulted from a combination of a local tuning change and a global change in overall excitability. Local and global suppression were stronger when the target frequency was aligned to neuronal best frequency. Local suppression in the IC was indistinguishable from that described previously in auditory cortex, while global suppression was unique to the IC. The results demonstrate that engaging in an auditory task can change selectivity for task-relevant features in the midbrain, an area where these effects have not been reported previously. Significance statement: Previous studies have demonstrated that the receptive fields of cortical neurons are modified when animals engage in auditory behaviors, a process that is hypothesized to provide the basis for segregating sound sources in an auditory scene. This study demonstrates for the first time that receptive fields of neurons in the midbrain inferior colliculus are also modified during behavior. The magnitude of the tuning changes is similar to previous reports in cortex. These results support a hierarchical model of behaviorally driven sound segregation that begins in the subcortical auditory network. PMID:26400939

  6. Rapid Task-Related Plasticity of Spectrotemporal Receptive Fields in the Auditory Midbrain

    PubMed Central

    David, Stephen V.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that auditory cortical neurons can modify their receptive fields when animals engage in auditory detection tasks. We tested for this form of task-related plasticity in the inferior colliculus (IC) of ferrets trained to detect a pure tone target in a sequence of noise distractors that did not overlap in time. During behavior, responses were suppressed at the target tone frequency in approximately half of IC neurons relative to the passive state. This suppression often resulted from a combination of a local tuning change and a global change in overall excitability. Local and global suppression were stronger when the target frequency was aligned to neuronal best frequency. Local suppression in the IC was indistinguishable from that described previously in auditory cortex, while global suppression was unique to the IC. The results demonstrate that engaging in an auditory task can change selectivity for task-relevant features in the midbrain, an area where these effects have not been reported previously. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Previous studies have demonstrated that the receptive fields of cortical neurons are modified when animals engage in auditory behaviors, a process that is hypothesized to provide the basis for segregating sound sources in an auditory scene. This study demonstrates for the first time that receptive fields of neurons in the midbrain inferior colliculus are also modified during behavior. The magnitude of the tuning changes is similar to previous reports in cortex. These results support a hierarchical model of behaviorally driven sound segregation that begins in the subcortical auditory network. PMID:26400939

  7. Context dependence of spectro-temporal receptive fields with implications for neural coding.

    PubMed

    Eggermont, Jos J

    2011-01-01

    The spectro-temporal receptive field (STRF) is frequently used to characterize the linear frequency-time filter properties of the auditory system up to the neuron recorded from. STRFs are extremely stimulus dependent, reflecting the strong non-linearities in the auditory system. Changes in the STRF with stimulus type (tonal, noise-like, vocalizations), sound level and spectro-temporal sound density are reviewed here. Effects on STRF shape of task and attention are also briefly reviewed. Models to account for these changes, potential improvements to STRF analysis, and implications for neural coding are discussed. PMID:20123121

  8. Factors forming the edge of a receptive field: the presence of relatively ineffective afferent terminals.

    PubMed

    Merrill, E G; Wall, P D

    1972-11-01

    A specialized type of spinal cord cell has its cell body in lamina IV and has a small low threshold cutaneous receptive field which is remarkable for its abrupt edge. No signs could be found of a subliminal fringe to this field since its size remains fixed during wide excursions of the cell's excitability. Reversible blocking of peripheral nerves and dorsal roots showed that the afferents responsible for exciting these cells following natural stimuli, run in a restricted area of peripheral nerve and dorsal root. When the fibres necessary to sustain the natural stimulus receptive field were blocked, it was shown that other large myelinated fibres in neighbouring roots were still capable of firing the cell monosynaptically following electrical stimulation of the root or periphery although no natural stimuli were able to change the cell's excitability. It is necessary to divide the afferent synapses on such cells into a class which is highly effective in firing the cell on natural stimulation and a second class which has no effect yet detected following natural stimuli but which can fire the cell monosynaptically if synchronously activated by electrical stimulation. Suggestions are made for possible presynaptic and post-synaptic mechanisms which might divide the effect of arriving impulses into two such classes. PMID:4637631

  9. Color-opponent receptive fields derived from independent component analysis of natural images.

    PubMed

    Tailor, D R; Finkel, L H; Buchsbaum, G

    2000-01-01

    Independent Component Analysis (ICA) of images of natural scenes has been shown to generate basis functions, or filters, which resemble spatial [Bell & Sejnowski (1997). Vision Research, 37, 3327-3338; van Hateren & van der Schaaf (1998). Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B, 265, 359-366] and spatiotemporal [van Hateren & Ruderman (1998) Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B, 265, 2315-2320] receptive fields of simple cells of the striate cortex. ICA yields statistically independent components which provide for a redundancy-reduced representation of the data. Using one of several published algorithms [Lee (1998). Independent component analysis: theory and applications. Boston; Kluwer Academic], we applied linear ICA to color images of natural scenes. The resulting independent component filters (ICFs) separate into either luminance or color filters. The luminance filters are localized and oriented edge detectors as reported previously. The color filters resemble either blue-yellow or red-green double-opponent receptive fields with various orientations. An equal number of each type of filter (luminance, red-green, and blue-yellow) is obtained. Thus, ICA predicts that spatiochromatic information is coded in statistically independent luminance, blue-yellow, and red-green opponent pathways with a relatively equal representation and specific spatial profiles at the cortical level. PMID:10958917

  10. Comparing different stimulus configurations for population receptive field mapping in human fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Ivan; de Haas, Benjamin; Clark, Chris A.; Rees, Geraint; Schwarzkopf, D. Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Population receptive field (pRF) mapping is a widely used approach to measuring aggregate human visual receptive field properties by recording non-invasive signals using functional MRI. Despite growing interest, no study to date has systematically investigated the effects of different stimulus configurations on pRF estimates from human visual cortex. Here we compared the effects of three different stimulus configurations on a model-based approach to pRF estimation: size-invariant bars and eccentricity-scaled bars defined in Cartesian coordinates and traveling along the cardinal axes, and a novel simultaneous “wedge and ring” stimulus defined in polar coordinates, systematically covering polar and eccentricity axes. We found that the presence or absence of eccentricity scaling had a significant effect on goodness of fit and pRF size estimates. Further, variability in pRF size estimates was directly influenced by stimulus configuration, particularly for higher visual areas including V5/MT+. Finally, we compared eccentricity estimation between phase-encoded and model-based pRF approaches. We observed a tendency for more peripheral eccentricity estimates using phase-encoded methods, independent of stimulus size. We conclude that both eccentricity scaling and polar rather than Cartesian stimulus configuration are important considerations for optimal experimental design in pRF mapping. While all stimulus configurations produce adequate estimates, simultaneous wedge and ring stimulation produced higher fit reliability, with a significant advantage in reduced acquisition time. PMID:25750620

  11. Inner retinal inhibition shapes the receptive field of retinal ganglion cells in primate

    PubMed Central

    Protti, D A; Di Marco, S; Huang, J Y; Vonhoff, C R; Nguyen, V; Solomon, S G

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The centre–surround organisation of receptive fields is a feature of most retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and is critical for spatial discrimination and contrast detection. Although lateral inhibitory processes are known to be important in generating the receptive field surround, the contribution of each of the two synaptic layers in the primate retina remains unclear. Here we studied the spatial organisation of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs onto ON and OFF ganglion cells in the primate retina. All RGCs showed an increase in excitation in response to stimulus of preferred polarity. Inhibition onto RGCs comprised two types of responses to preferred polarity: some RGCs showed an increase in inhibition whilst others showed removal of tonic inhibition. Excitatory inputs were strongly spatially tuned but inhibitory inputs showed more variable organisation: in some neurons they were as strongly tuned as excitation, and in others inhibitory inputs showed no spatial tuning. We targeted one source of inner retinal inhibition by functionally ablating spiking amacrine cells with bath application of tetrodotoxin (TTX). TTX significantly reduced the spatial tuning of excitatory inputs. In addition, TTX reduced inhibition onto those RGCs where a stimulus of preferred polarity increased inhibition. Reconstruction of the spatial tuning properties by somatic injection of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic conductances verified that TTX-mediated inhibition onto bipolar cells increases the strength of the surround in RGC spiking output. These results indicate that in the primate retina inhibitory mechanisms in the inner plexiform layer sharpen the spatial tuning of ganglion cells. PMID:24042496

  12. Subspace mapping of the three-dimensional spectral receptive field of macaque MT neurons.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Mikio; Sasaki, Kota S; Hashimoto, Hajime; Ohzawa, Izumi

    2016-08-01

    Neurons in the middle temporal (MT) visual area are thought to represent the velocity (direction and speed) of motion. Previous studies suggest the importance of both excitation and suppression for creating velocity representation in MT; however, details of the organization of excitation and suppression at the MT stage are not understood fully. In this article, we examine how excitatory and suppressive inputs are pooled in individual MT neurons by measuring their receptive fields in a three-dimensional (3-D) spatiotemporal frequency domain. We recorded the activity of single MT neurons from anesthetized macaque monkeys. To achieve both quality and resolution of the receptive field estimations, we applied a subspace reverse correlation technique in which a stimulus sequence of superimposed multiple drifting gratings was cross-correlated with the spiking activity of neurons. Excitatory responses tended to be organized in a manner representing a specific velocity independent of the spatial pattern of the stimuli. Conversely, suppressive responses tended to be distributed broadly over the 3-D frequency domain, supporting a hypothesis of response normalization. Despite the nonspecific distributed profile, the total summed strength of suppression was comparable to that of excitation in many MT neurons. Furthermore, suppressive responses reduced the bandwidth of velocity tuning, indicating that suppression improves the reliability of velocity representation. Our results suggest that both well-organized excitatory inputs and broad suppressive inputs contribute significantly to the invariant and reliable representation of velocity in MT. PMID:27193321

  13. Receptive Field Properties of the Macaque Second Somatosensory Cortex: Nonlinear Mechanisms Underlying the Representation of Orientation Within a Finger Pad

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Pramodsingh H.; Fitzgerald, Paul J.; Lane, John W.; Hsiao, Steven S.

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the position invariant receptive field properties of neurons in the macaque second somatosensory (SII) cortical region. Previously we reported that many SII region neurons show orientation tuning in the center of multiple finger pads of the hand and further that the tuning is similar on different pads, which can be interpreted as position invariance. Here we study the receptive field properties of a single finger pad for a subset (n = 61) of those 928 neurons, using a motorized oriented bar that we positioned at multiple locations across the pad. We calculate both vector fields and linear receptive fields of the finger pad to characterize the receptive field properties that give rise to the tuning, and we perform an additional regression analysis to quantify linearity, invariance, or both in individual neurons. We show that orientation tuning of SII region neurons is based on a variety of mechanisms. For some neurons, the tuning is explained by simple excitatory regions, simple inhibitory regions, or some combination of these structures. However, a large fraction of the neurons (n = 20 of 61, 33%) show position invariance that is not explained well by their linear receptive fields. Finding invariance within a finger pad, coupled with the previous result of similar tuning on different pads, indicates that some SII region neurons may exhibit similar tuning throughout large regions of the hand. We hypothesize that invariant neurons play an important role in tactile form recognition. PMID:17192440

  14. Infant reflexes

    MedlinePlus

    ... neck reflex; Galant reflex; Truncal incurvation; Rooting reflex; Parachute reflex; Grasp reflex ... was stroked and begin to make sucking motions. PARACHUTE REFLEX This reflex occurs in slightly older infants ...

  15. Experience-dependent specialization of receptive field surround for selective coding of natural scenes.

    PubMed

    Pecka, Michael; Han, Yunyun; Sader, Elie; Mrsic-Flogel, Thomas D

    2014-10-22

    At eye opening, neurons in primary visual cortex (V1) are selective for stimulus features, but circuits continue to refine in an experience-dependent manner for some weeks thereafter. How these changes contribute to the coding of visual features embedded in complex natural scenes remains unknown. Here we show that normal visual experience after eye opening is required for V1 neurons to develop a sensitivity for the statistical structure of natural stimuli extending beyond the boundaries of their receptive fields (RFs), which leads to improvements in coding efficiency for full-field natural scenes (increased selectivity and information rate). These improvements are mediated by an experience-dependent increase in the effectiveness of natural surround stimuli to hyperpolarize the membrane potential specifically during RF-stimulus epochs triggering action potentials. We suggest that neural circuits underlying surround modulation are shaped by the statistical structure of visual input, which leads to more selective coding of features in natural scenes. PMID:25263755

  16. Spinal reflex evoked by a pair of opposing pulsed magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, S.; Hiwaki, O.

    1991-04-01

    A noninvasive method of magnetic stimulation of the spinal roots was designed. The basic idea is to concentrate induced eddy currents in a target by a pair of opposing pulsed magnetic fields. A figure-eight coil was positioned outside the median of the back so that time varying magnetic fields pass through the body in opposite directions around the target. Magnetic stimulation of the spinal roots of human and a rabbit was carried out. It was found that each spine level can be stimulated selectively, producing electromyographic waves related to both the H-reflex and M-wave. The results indicate that the M-wave can be produced by currents flowing either in the rostral or caudal direction, whereas the H-reflex is only generated by currents flowing in the caudal direction. The H-reflex elicited by magnetic stimulation of nerves in the vicinity of the spine becomes a new tool in diagnosis of neuromuscular system diseases.

  17. A Feedback Model of Attention Explains the Diverse Effects of Attention on Neural Firing Rates and Receptive Field Structure

    PubMed Central

    Miconi, Thomas; VanRullen, Rufin

    2016-01-01

    Visual attention has many effects on neural responses, producing complex changes in firing rates, as well as modifying the structure and size of receptive fields, both in topological and feature space. Several existing models of attention suggest that these effects arise from selective modulation of neural inputs. However, anatomical and physiological observations suggest that attentional modulation targets higher levels of the visual system (such as V4 or MT) rather than input areas (such as V1). Here we propose a simple mechanism that explains how a top-down attentional modulation, falling on higher visual areas, can produce the observed effects of attention on neural responses. Our model requires only the existence of modulatory feedback connections between areas, and short-range lateral inhibition within each area. Feedback connections redistribute the top-down modulation to lower areas, which in turn alters the inputs of other higher-area cells, including those that did not receive the initial modulation. This produces firing rate modulations and receptive field shifts. Simultaneously, short-range lateral inhibition between neighboring cells produce competitive effects that are automatically scaled to receptive field size in any given area. Our model reproduces the observed attentional effects on response rates (response gain, input gain, biased competition automatically scaled to receptive field size) and receptive field structure (shifts and resizing of receptive fields both spatially and in complex feature space), without modifying model parameters. Our model also makes the novel prediction that attentional effects on response curves should shift from response gain to contrast gain as the spatial focus of attention drifts away from the studied cell. PMID:26890584

  18. Spatiotemporal profiles of receptive fields of neurons in the lateral posterior nucleus of the cat LP-pulvinar complex.

    PubMed

    Piché, Marilyse; Thomas, Sébastien; Casanova, Christian

    2015-10-01

    The pulvinar is the largest extrageniculate thalamic visual nucleus in mammals. It establishes reciprocal connections with virtually all visual cortexes and likely plays a role in transthalamic cortico-cortical communication. In cats, the lateral posterior nucleus (LP) of the LP-pulvinar complex can be subdivided in two subregions, the lateral (LPl) and medial (LPm) parts, which receive a predominant input from the striate cortex and the superior colliculus, respectively. Here, we revisit the receptive field structure of LPl and LPm cells in anesthetized cats by determining their first-order spatiotemporal profiles through reverse correlation analysis following sparse noise stimulation. Our data reveal the existence of previously unidentified receptive field profiles in the LP nucleus both in space and time domains. While some cells responded to only one stimulus polarity, the majority of neurons had receptive fields comprised of bright and dark responsive subfields. For these neurons, dark subfields' size was larger than that of bright subfields. A variety of receptive field spatial organization types were identified, ranging from totally overlapped to segregated bright and dark subfields. In the time domain, a large spectrum of activity overlap was found, from cells with temporally coinciding subfield activity to neurons with distinct, time-dissociated subfield peak activity windows. We also found LP neurons with space-time inseparable receptive fields and neurons with multiple activity periods. Finally, a substantial degree of homology was found between LPl and LPm first-order receptive field spatiotemporal profiles, suggesting a high integration of cortical and subcortical inputs within the LP-pulvinar complex. PMID:26289469

  19. A Feedback Model of Attention Explains the Diverse Effects of Attention on Neural Firing Rates and Receptive Field Structure.

    PubMed

    Miconi, Thomas; VanRullen, Rufin

    2016-02-01

    Visual attention has many effects on neural responses, producing complex changes in firing rates, as well as modifying the structure and size of receptive fields, both in topological and feature space. Several existing models of attention suggest that these effects arise from selective modulation of neural inputs. However, anatomical and physiological observations suggest that attentional modulation targets higher levels of the visual system (such as V4 or MT) rather than input areas (such as V1). Here we propose a simple mechanism that explains how a top-down attentional modulation, falling on higher visual areas, can produce the observed effects of attention on neural responses. Our model requires only the existence of modulatory feedback connections between areas, and short-range lateral inhibition within each area. Feedback connections redistribute the top-down modulation to lower areas, which in turn alters the inputs of other higher-area cells, including those that did not receive the initial modulation. This produces firing rate modulations and receptive field shifts. Simultaneously, short-range lateral inhibition between neighboring cells produce competitive effects that are automatically scaled to receptive field size in any given area. Our model reproduces the observed attentional effects on response rates (response gain, input gain, biased competition automatically scaled to receptive field size) and receptive field structure (shifts and resizing of receptive fields both spatially and in complex feature space), without modifying model parameters. Our model also makes the novel prediction that attentional effects on response curves should shift from response gain to contrast gain as the spatial focus of attention drifts away from the studied cell. PMID:26890584

  20. Motoneuron Intrinsic Properties, but Not Their Receptive Fields, Recover in Chronic Spinal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kajtaz, Elma; Cain, Charlette M.; Heckman, C.J.

    2013-01-01

    Proper movement execution relies on precise input processing by spinal motoneurons (MNs). Spinal MNs are activated by limb joint rotations. Typically, their movement-related receptive fields (MRRFs) are sharply focused and joint-specific. After acute spinal transection MRRFs become wide, but their manifestation is not apparent, as intrinsic excitability, primarily resulting from the loss of persistent inward currents (PICs), dramatically decreases. PICs undergo a remarkable recovery with time after injury. Here we investigate whether MRRFs undergo a recovery that parallels that of the PIC. Using the chronic spinal cat in acute terminal decerebrate preparations, we found that MRRFs remain expanded 1 month after spinal transaction, whereas PICs recovered to >80% of their preinjury amplitudes. These recovered PICs substantially amplified the expanded inputs underlying the MRRFs. As a result, we show that single joint rotations lead to the activation of muscles across the entire limb. These results provide a potential mechanism for the propagation of spasms throughout the limb. PMID:24285887

  1. Postnatal development of the nociceptive withdrawal reflexes in the rat: a behavioural and electromyographic study.

    PubMed Central

    Holmberg, H; Schouenborg, J

    1996-01-01

    1. The postnatal development of nociceptive withdrawal reflexes was studied. In awake intact rats, forelimb, hindlimb and tail reflexes were recorded on videotape. In decerebrate spinal rats, electromyography (EMG) was used to record nociceptive withdrawal reflexes in musculi extensor digitorum longus (EDL), peronei, gastrocnemius-soleus (G-S) and biceps posterior-semitendinosus (BP-ST). Thermal (short-lasting CO2 laser pulses) and mechanical stimulation were used. 2. In adults, nociceptive withdrawal reflexes were typically well directed and reflex pathways to single hindlimb muscles had functionally adapted receptive fields. By contrast, at postnatal day (P) 1-7, the nociceptive withdrawal reflexes were often inappropriate, sometimes producing movements towards the stimulation, and EMG recordings revealed unadapted variable receptive fields. With increasing age, the nociceptive withdrawal reflexes progressively became well directed, thus producing localized withdrawal. Both withdrawal movements and spatial organization of the receptive fields were adult-like at P20-25. 3. Up to P25, reflex thresholds were more or less constant in both intact awake rats and spinal decerebrate rats, except in G-S in which no nociceptive withdrawal reflexes were evoked from P20 on. After P25, mechanical, but not thermal, thresholds increased dramatically. 4. EMG recordings revealed that during the first three postnatal weeks, the latency of the CO2 laser-evoked nociceptive withdrawal reflexes decreased significantly in peronei and BP-ST, but not in EDL, and thereafter increased significantly in peronei, BP-ST and EDL. The magnitude of the nociceptive withdrawal reflexes in these muscles increased markedly between P7 and P20 and showed little change thereafter. 5. Possible mechanisms underlying the postnatal tuning of the nociceptive withdrawal reflexes are discussed. PMID:8735709

  2. Comparison of visual receptive field properties of the superior colliculus and primary visual cortex in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoyuan; Sun, Chaokui; Shi, Li

    2015-08-01

    The rat visual system comprises cortical and subcortical pathways. The receptive field properties of cells in the visual cortex have been extensively studied; however, the fundamental roles of the two circuits in visual information processing are not well understood. To address this question, we have applied quantitative methods to compare and characterize the spatiotemporal receptive field (RF) properties of neurons in primary visual cortex (V1) cells and superficial layers of the superior colliculus (SC) in rats by means of extracellular recordings. An analysis of visual stimulus processing revealed distinct functional characteristics of the two visual circuits. RF diameters of SC neurons were significantly larger than those of V1 cells. Most cells in both regions had high orientation selectivity, but the mean orientation bandwidth of the SC was broader than that of V1 cells (101.5° vs. 60.2°). The mean optimal spatial frequency (SF) of SC cells was lower but had a broader bandwidth than that of V1 cells (0.03 vs. 0.068 cpd). The majority of SC and V1 cells (70% and 68%, respectively) had RFs with band-pass temporal frequency (TF) tuning profiles and similar optimal TFs. However, temporal band-pass profiles of the SC showed narrower mean temporal bandwidths than those of V1 cells (1.42 vs. 2.36 octaves). The majority of neurons in visual cortical and subcortical structures were activated in response to high-contrast, drifting gratings in the preferred orientation. The percentage of V1 neurons with a low-contrast threshold was larger than the proportion of SC neurons (45.6% vs. 30%), indicating that the former adapt better to contrast. The substantial overlap in latency distributions between SC and V1 areas suggests that the two visual systems process and analyze visual signals in parallel. However, the two areas use different neural encoding mechanisms based on different latency distribution trends. These results indicate that SC cells have poor spatial acuity

  3. Experience-Dependent Specialization of Receptive Field Surround for Selective Coding of Natural Scenes

    PubMed Central

    Pecka, Michael; Han, Yunyun; Sader, Elie; Mrsic-Flogel, Thomas D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary At eye opening, neurons in primary visual cortex (V1) are selective for stimulus features, but circuits continue to refine in an experience-dependent manner for some weeks thereafter. How these changes contribute to the coding of visual features embedded in complex natural scenes remains unknown. Here we show that normal visual experience after eye opening is required for V1 neurons to develop a sensitivity for the statistical structure of natural stimuli extending beyond the boundaries of their receptive fields (RFs), which leads to improvements in coding efficiency for full-field natural scenes (increased selectivity and information rate). These improvements are mediated by an experience-dependent increase in the effectiveness of natural surround stimuli to hyperpolarize the membrane potential specifically during RF-stimulus epochs triggering action potentials. We suggest that neural circuits underlying surround modulation are shaped by the statistical structure of visual input, which leads to more selective coding of features in natural scenes. PMID:25263755

  4. Emulating the Visual Receptive Field Properties of MST Neurons with a Template Model of Heading Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perrone, John A.; Stone, Leland S.

    1997-01-01

    We have previously proposed a computational neural-network model by which the complex patterns of retinal image motion generated during locomotion (optic flow) can be processed by specialized detectors acting as templates for specific instances of self-motion. The detectors in this template model respond to global optic flow by sampling image motion over a large portion of the visual field through networks of local motion sensors with properties similar to neurons found in the middle temporal (MT) area of primate extrastriate visual cortex. The model detectors were designed to extract self-translation (heading), self-rotation, as well as the scene layout (relative distances) ahead of a moving observer, and are arranged in cortical-like heading maps to perform this function. Heading estimation from optic flow has been postulated by some to be implemented within the medial superior temporal (MST) area. Others have questioned whether MST neurons can fulfill this role because some of their receptive-field properties appear inconsistent with a role in heading estimation. To resolve this issue, we systematically compared MST single-unit responses with the outputs of model detectors under matched stimulus conditions. We found that the basic physiological properties of MST neurons can be explained by the template model. We conclude that MST neurons are well suited to support heading estimation and that the template model provides an explicit set of testable hypotheses which can guide future exploration of MST and adjacent areas within the primate superior temporal sulcus.

  5. Spectrotemporal receptive fields during spindling and non-spindling epochs in cat primary auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Britvina, T; Eggermont, J J

    2008-07-17

    It was often thought that synchronized rhythmic epochs of spindle waves disconnect thalamo-cortical system from incoming sensory signals. The present study addresses this issue by simultaneous extracellular action potential and local field potential (LFP) recordings from primary auditory cortex of ketamine-anesthetized cats during spindling activity. We compared cortical spectrotemporal receptive fields (STRF) obtained during spindling and non-spindling epochs. The basic spectro-temporal parameters of "spindling" and "non-spindling" STRFs were similar. However, the peak-firing rate at the best frequency was significantly enhanced during spindling epochs. This enhancement was mainly caused by the increased probability of a stimulus to evoke spikes (effectiveness of stimuli) during spindling as compared with non-spindling epochs. Augmented LFPs associated with effective stimuli and increased single-unit pair correlations during spindling epochs suggested higher synchrony of thalamo-cortical inputs during spindling that resulted in increased effectiveness of stimuli presented during spindling activity. The neuronal firing rate, both stimulus-driven and spontaneous, was higher during spindling as compared with non-spindling epochs. Overall, our results suggests that thalamic cells during spindling respond to incoming stimuli-related inputs and, moreover, cause more powerful stimulus-related or spontaneous activation of the cortex. PMID:18515012

  6. Generation of the receptive fields of subpial cells in turtle visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenxue; Luo, Sean; Ghosh, Bijoy K; Ulinski, Philip S

    2006-12-01

    The visual cortex of turtles contains cells with at least two different receptive field properties. Superficial units are located immediately below the pial surface. They fire in response to moving bars located anywhere in binocular visual space and to two spots of light presented with different spatiotemporal separations. Their location in the cortex suggests that superficial units correspond to a distinct class of inhibitory interneurons, the subpial cells, that are embedded in geniculocortical axons as they cross the visual cortex of turtles. This study used a detailed compartmental model of a subpial cell and a large-scale model of visual cortex to examine the cellular mechanisms that underlie the formation of superficial units on the assumption that they are subpial cells. Simulations with the detailed model indicated that the biophysical properties of subpial cells allow them to respond strongly to activation by geniculate inputs, but the presence of dendritic beads on the subpial cells decreases their sensitivity and allows them to integrate the inputs from many geniculate afferents. Simulations with the large-scale model indicated that the responses of subpial cells to simulated visual stimuli consist of two phases. A fast phase is mediated by direct geniculate inputs. A slow phase is mediated by recurrent excitation from pyramidal cells. It appears that subpial cells play a major role in controlling the information content of visual responses. PMID:17245823

  7. Differential Receptive Field Properties of Parvalbumin and Somatostatin Inhibitory Neurons in Mouse Auditory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ling-yun; Xiong, Xiaorui R.; Ibrahim, Leena A.; Yuan, Wei; Tao, Huizhong W.; Zhang, Li I.

    2015-01-01

    Cortical inhibitory circuits play important roles in shaping sensory processing. In auditory cortex, however, functional properties of genetically identified inhibitory neurons are poorly characterized. By two-photon imaging-guided recordings, we specifically targeted 2 major types of cortical inhibitory neuron, parvalbumin (PV) and somatostatin (SOM) expressing neurons, in superficial layers of mouse auditory cortex. We found that PV cells exhibited broader tonal receptive fields with lower intensity thresholds and stronger tone-evoked spike responses compared with SOM neurons. The latter exhibited similar frequency selectivity as excitatory neurons. The broader/weaker frequency tuning of PV neurons was attributed to a broader range of synaptic inputs and stronger subthreshold responses elicited, which resulted in a higher efficiency in the conversion of input to output. In addition, onsets of both the input and spike responses of SOM neurons were significantly delayed compared with PV and excitatory cells. Our results suggest that PV and SOM neurons engage in auditory cortical circuits in different manners: while PV neurons may provide broadly tuned feedforward inhibition for a rapid control of ascending inputs to excitatory neurons, the delayed and more selective inhibition from SOM neurons may provide a specific modulation of feedback inputs on their distal dendrites. PMID:24425250

  8. Experience-Dependent and Independent Binocular Correspondence of Receptive Field Subregions in Mouse Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Sarnaik, Rashmi; Wang, Bor-Shuen; Cang, Jianhua

    2014-01-01

    The convergence of eye-specific thalamic inputs to visual cortical neurons forms the basis of binocular vision. Inputs from the same eye that signal light increment (On) and decrement (Off) are spatially segregated into subregions, giving rise to cortical receptive fields (RFs) that are selective for stimulus orientation. Here we map RFs of binocular neurons in the mouse primary visual cortex using spike-triggered average. We find that subregions of the same sign (On–On and Off–Off) preferentially overlap between the 2 monocular RFs, leading to binocularly matched orientation tuning. We further demonstrate that such subregion correspondence and the consequent matching of RF orientation are disrupted in mice reared in darkness during development. Surprisingly, despite the lack of all postnatal visual experience, a substantial degree of subregion correspondence still remains. In addition, dark-reared mice show normal monocular RF structures and binocular overlap. These results thus reveal the specific roles of experience-dependent and -independent processes in binocular convergence and refinement of On and Off inputs onto single cortical neurons. PMID:23389996

  9. Receptive-field Properties of V1 and V2 Neurons in Mice and Macaque monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Van den Bergh, Gert; Zhang, Bin; Arckens, Lutgarde; Chino, Yuzo M.

    2010-01-01

    We report the results of extracellular single-unit recording experiments where we quantitatively analyzed the receptive-field (RF) properties of neurons in V1 and an adjacent extrastriate visual area (V2L) of anesthetized mice with emphasis on the RF center-surround organization. We compared the results with the RF center-surround organization of V1 and V2 neurons in macaque monkeys. If species differences in spatial scale are taken into consideration, mouse V1 and V2L neurons had remarkably fine stimulus selectivity, and the majority of response properties in V2L were not different from those in V1. The RF center-surround organization of mouse V1 neurons was qualitatively similar to that for macaque monkeys (i.e., the RF center is surrounded by extended suppressive regions). However, unlike in monkey V2, a significant proportion of cortical neurons, largely complex cells in V2L, did not exhibit quantifiable RF surround suppression. Simple cells had smaller RF centers than complex cells, and the prevalence and strength of surround suppression were greater in simple cells than in complex cells. These findings, particularly on the RF center-surround organization of visual cortical neurons, give new insights into the principles governing cortical circuits in the mouse visual cortex and should provide further impetus for the use of mice in studies on the genetic and molecular basis of RF development and synaptic plasticity. PMID:20394058

  10. Substructure of direction-selective receptive fields in macaque V1.

    PubMed

    Livingstone, Margaret S; Conway, Bevil R

    2003-05-01

    We used two-dimensional (2-D) sparse noise to map simultaneous and sequential two-spot interactions in simple and complex direction-selective cells in macaque V1. Sequential-interaction maps for both simple and complex cells showed preferred-direction facilitation and null-direction suppression for same-contrast stimulus sequences and the reverse for inverting-contrast sequences, although the magnitudes of the interactions were weaker for the simple cells. Contrast-sign selectivity in complex cells indicates that direction-selective interactions in these cells must occur in antecedent simple cells or in simple-cell-like dendritic compartments. Our maps suggest that direction selectivity, and on and off segregation perpendicular to the orientation axis, can occur prior to receptive-field elongation along the orientation axis. 2-D interaction maps for some complex cells showed elongated alternating facilitatory and suppressive interactions as predicted if their inputs were orientation-selective simple cells. The negative interactions, however, were less elongated than the positive interactions, and there was an inflection at the origin in the positive interactions, so the interactions were chevron-shaped rather than band-like. Other complex cells showed only two round interaction regions, one negative and one positive. Several explanations for the map shapes are considered, including the possibility that directional interactions are generated directly from unoriented inputs. PMID:12740412

  11. Testing the flexibility of the modified receptive field (MRF) theory: evidence from an unspaced orthography (Thai).

    PubMed

    Winskel, Heather; Perea, Manuel; Peart, Emma

    2014-07-01

    In the current study, we tested the generality of the modified receptive field (MRF) theory (Tydgat & Grainger, 2009) with English native speakers (Experiment 1) and Thai native speakers (Experiment 2). Thai has a distinctive alphabetic orthography with visually complex letters (ฝ ฟ or ผ พ) and nonlinear characteristics and lacks interword spaces. We used a two-alternative forced choice (2AFC) procedure to measure identification accuracy for all positions in a string of five characters, which consisted of Roman script letters, Thai letters, or symbols. For the English speakers, we found a similar pattern of results as in previous studies (i.e., a dissociation between letters and symbols). In contrast, for the Thai participants, we found that the pattern for Thai letters, Roman letters and symbols displayed a remarkably similar linear trend. Thus, while we observed qualified support for the MRF theory, in that we found an advantage for initial position, this effect also applied to symbols (i.e., our data revealed a language-specific effect). We propose that this pattern for letters and symbols in Thai has developed as a specialized adaptive mechanism for reading in this visually complex and crowded nonlinear script without interword spaces. PMID:24818534

  12. Receptive fields of locust brain neurons are matched to polarization patterns of the sky.

    PubMed

    Bech, Miklós; Homberg, Uwe; Pfeiffer, Keram

    2014-09-22

    Many animals, including insects, are able to use celestial cues as a reference for spatial orientation and long-distance navigation [1]. In addition to direct sunlight, the chromatic gradient of the sky and its polarization pattern are suited to serve as orientation cues [2-5]. Atmospheric scattering of sunlight causes a regular pattern of E vectors in the sky, which are arranged along concentric circles around the sun [5, 6]. Although certain insects rely predominantly on sky polarization for spatial orientation [7], it has been argued that detection of celestial E vector orientation may not suffice to differentiate between solar and antisolar directions [8, 9]. We show here that polarization-sensitive (POL) neurons in the brain of the desert locust Schistocerca gregaria can overcome this ambiguity. Extracellular recordings from POL units in the central complex and lateral accessory lobes revealed E vector tunings arranged in concentric circles within large receptive fields, matching the sky polarization pattern at certain solar positions. Modeling of neuronal responses under an idealized sky polarization pattern (Rayleigh sky) suggests that these "matched filter" properties allow locusts to unambiguously determine the solar azimuth by relying solely on the sky polarization pattern for compass navigation. PMID:25201687

  13. Full-reference quality assessment of stereoscopic images by learning binocular receptive field properties.

    PubMed

    Shao, Feng; Li, Kemeng; Lin, Weisi; Jiang, Gangyi; Yu, Mei; Dai, Qionghai

    2015-10-01

    Quality assessment of 3D images encounters more challenges than its 2D counterparts. Directly applying 2D image quality metrics is not the solution. In this paper, we propose a new full-reference quality assessment for stereoscopic images by learning binocular receptive field properties to be more in line with human visual perception. To be more specific, in the training phase, we learn a multiscale dictionary from the training database, so that the latent structure of images can be represented as a set of basis vectors. In the quality estimation phase, we compute sparse feature similarity index based on the estimated sparse coefficient vectors by considering their phase difference and amplitude difference, and compute global luminance similarity index by considering luminance changes. The final quality score is obtained by incorporating binocular combination based on sparse energy and sparse complexity. Experimental results on five public 3D image quality assessment databases demonstrate that in comparison with the most related existing methods, the devised algorithm achieves high consistency with subjective assessment. PMID:26011880

  14. Spatial structure of neuronal receptive field in awake monkey secondary visual cortex (V2).

    PubMed

    Liu, Lu; She, Liang; Chen, Ming; Liu, Tianyi; Lu, Haidong D; Dan, Yang; Poo, Mu-ming

    2016-02-16

    Visual processing depends critically on the receptive field (RF) properties of visual neurons. However, comprehensive characterization of RFs beyond the primary visual cortex (V1) remains a challenge. Here we report fine RF structures in secondary visual cortex (V2) of awake macaque monkeys, identified through a projection pursuit regression analysis of neuronal responses to natural images. We found that V2 RFs could be broadly classified as V1-like (typical Gabor-shaped subunits), ultralong (subunits with high aspect ratios), or complex-shaped (subunits with multiple oriented components). Furthermore, single-unit recordings from functional domains identified by intrinsic optical imaging showed that neurons with ultralong RFs were primarily localized within pale stripes, whereas neurons with complex-shaped RFs were more concentrated in thin stripes. Thus, by combining single-unit recording with optical imaging and a computational approach, we identified RF subunits underlying spatial feature selectivity of V2 neurons and demonstrated the functional organization of these RF properties. PMID:26839410

  15. [The role of the Basal Ganglia in Creating Receptive Fields in the Primary Auditory Cortex and Mechanisms of their Plasticity].

    PubMed

    Silkis, I G

    2015-01-01

    We suggest a mechanism for creating receptive fields of neurons in the primary auditory cortex (A1) and ventral part of the medial geniculate body (MGBv) in which the "direct" pathway through the basal ganglia participates. Dopamine released in the striatum in response to appearance of a sound tone promotes the induction of LTP of the efficacy of "strong" inputs and LTD of "weak" inputs from A1 to striatonigral cells due to activation of D1 receptors on these cells. Subsequent reorganization of neuronal activity in the network A1 field--basal ganglia--MGBv--A1 field results in a disinhibition of MGBv neuron activity, contrasting amplification of neural representation of a sound tone in MGBv and A1 field, and sharpening the receptive fields. Plastic shift of neuronal receptive fields is based on modification of efficacy of synaptic transmissions between the neocortex and striatum, and between all units of thalamocortical loop. Synaptic modification could be promoted by synchronization of activity of neurons which is based on the high-frequency oscillations relying on interdependent functioning of inhibitory cells in the considered loops. PMID:26506643

  16. Automatic mapping of visual cortex receptive fields: a fast and precise algorithm.

    PubMed

    Fiorani, Mario; Azzi, João C B; Soares, Juliana G M; Gattass, Ricardo

    2014-01-15

    An important issue for neurophysiological studies of the visual system is the definition of the region of the visual field that can modify a neuron's activity (i.e., the neuron's receptive field - RF). Usually a trade-off exists between precision and the time required to map a RF. Manual methods (qualitative) are fast but impose a variable degree of imprecision, while quantitative methods are more precise but usually require more time. We describe a rapid quantitative method for mapping visual RFs that is derived from computerized tomography and named back-projection. This method finds the intersection of responsive regions of the visual field based on spike density functions that are generated over time in response to long bars moving in different directions. An algorithm corrects the response profiles for latencies and allows for the conversion of the time domain into a 2D-space domain. The final product is an RF map that shows the distribution of the neuronal activity in visual-spatial coordinates. In addition to mapping the RF, this method also provides functional properties, such as latency, orientation and direction preference indexes. This method exhibits the following beneficial properties: (a) speed; (b) ease of implementation; (c) precise RF localization; (d) sensitivity (this method can map RFs based on few responses); (e) reliability (this method provides consistent information about RF shapes and sizes, which will allow for comparative studies); (f) comprehensiveness (this method can scan for RFs over an extensive area of the visual field); (g) informativeness (it provides functional quantitative data about the RF); and (h) usefulness (this method can map RFs in regions without direct retinal inputs, such as the cortical representations of the optic disc and of retinal lesions, which should allow for studies of functional connectivity, reorganization and neural plasticity). Furthermore, our method allows for precise mapping of RFs in a 30° by 30

  17. A self-organizing model of perisaccadic visual receptive field dynamics in primate visual and oculomotor system

    PubMed Central

    Mender, Bedeho M. W.; Stringer, Simon M.

    2015-01-01

    We propose and examine a model for how perisaccadic visual receptive field dynamics, observed in a range of primate brain areas such as LIP, FEF, SC, V3, V3A, V2, and V1, may develop through a biologically plausible process of unsupervised visually guided learning. These dynamics are associated with remapping, which is the phenomenon where receptive fields anticipate the consequences of saccadic eye movements. We find that a neural network model using a local associative synaptic learning rule, when exposed to visual scenes in conjunction with saccades, can account for a range of associated phenomena. In particular, our model demonstrates predictive and pre-saccadic remapping, responsiveness shifts around the time of saccades, and remapping from multiple directions. PMID:25717301

  18. Splanchnic slowly adapting mechanoreceptors with punctate receptive fields in the mesentery and gastrointestinal tract of the cat

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, J. F. B.

    1973-01-01

    1. A class of slowly adapting mechanoreceptors with A-delta and C fibres running in the splanchnic nerves of cats is described. 2. The mechanoreceptors have punctate regions of mechanical sensitivity at macroscopic vascular branching points and have been found in the lesser omentum, the mesentery of the gall-bladder, porta hepatis, portal vein, pancreas, spleen and the duodenum, jejunum, ileum, colon and their mesenteries. 3. The receptive fields of these mechanoreceptors vary considerably in size in the different regions. The largest receptive fields were found in the small intestinal mesentery and consisted of up to seven points of mechanical sensitivity at vascular divisions, each separated by distances of a few up to about 40 mm. The smallest receptive fields were single or double points of mechanical sensitivity which were most commonly found in relation to the portal vein in the root of the mesentery. 4. Maintained stretch of the receptive field elicited a train of impulses which had phasic and tonic components. The tonic discharge was sometimes maintained for more than 1 min. 5. Distension of a neighbouring viscus often caused a discharge which had a phasic component and a variable tonic component. The occurrence of the latter appeared to depend on the relative positions of the bowel and mesentery, and was probably associated with a change in tension on the mesentery. 6. Occlusion of the portal vein resulted in some units in a discharge which began soon after the start of the occlusion. 7. The receptors do not appear to be affected by acid, hypoxia or hypercapnia. PMID:4747231

  19. Primate area V1: largest response gain for receptive fields in the straight-ahead direction.

    PubMed

    Przybyszewski, Andrzej W; Kagan, Igor; Snodderly, D Max

    2014-10-01

    Although neuronal responses in behaving monkeys are typically studied while the monkey fixates straight ahead, it is known that eye position modulates responses of visual neurons. The modulation has been found to enhance neuronal responses when the receptive field is placed in the straight-ahead position for neurons receiving input from the peripheral but not the central retina. We studied the effect of eye position on the responses of V1 complex cells receiving input from the central retina (1.1-5.7° eccentricity) while minimizing the effect of fixational eye movements. Contrast response functions were obtained separately with drifting light and dark bars. Data were fit with the Naka-Rushton equation: r(c)=Rmax×c/(c+c50)+s, where r(c) is mean spike rate at contrast c, Rmax is the maximum response, c50 is the contrast that elicits half of Rmax, and s is the spontaneous activity. Contrast sensitivity as measured by c50 was not affected by eye position. For dark bars, there was a statistically significant decline in the normalized Rmax with increasing deviation from straight ahead. Data for bright bars showed a similar trend with a less rapid decline. Our results indicate that neurons representing the central retina show a bias for the straight-ahead position resulting from modulation of the response gain without an accompanying modulation of contrast sensitivity. The modulation is especially obvious for dark stimuli, which might be useful for directing attention to hazardous situations such as dark holes or shadows concealing important objects (Supplement 1: Video Abstract, Supplemental digital content 1, http://links.lww.com/WNR/A295). PMID:25055141

  20. Expansion of MT neurons excitatory receptive fields during covert attentive tracking.

    PubMed

    Niebergall, Robert; Khayat, Paul S; Treue, Stefan; Martinez-Trujillo, Julio C

    2011-10-26

    Primates can attentively track moving objects while keeping gaze stationary. The neural mechanisms underlying this ability are poorly understood. We investigated this issue by recording responses of neurons in area MT of two rhesus monkeys while they performed two different tasks. During the Attend-Fixation task, two moving random dot patterns (RDPs) translated across a screen at the same speed and in the same direction while the animals directed gaze to a fixation spot and detected a change in its luminance. During the Tracking task, the animals kept gaze on the fixation spot and attentively tracked the two RDPs to report a change in the local speed of one of the patterns' dots. In both conditions, neuronal responses progressively increased as the RDPs entered the neurons' receptive field (RF), peaked when they reached its center, and decreased as they translated away. This response profile was well described by a Gaussian function with its center of gravity indicating the RF center and its flanks the RF excitatory borders. During Tracking, responses were increased relative to Attend-Fixation, causing the Gaussian profiles to expand. Such increases were proportionally larger in the RF periphery than at its center, and were accompanied by a decrease in the trial-to-trial response variability (Fano factor) relative to Attend-Fixation. These changes resulted in an increase in the neurons' performance at detecting targets at longer distances from the RF center. Our results show that attentive tracking dynamically changes MT neurons' RF profiles, ultimately improving the neurons' ability to encode the tracked stimulus features. PMID:22031896

  1. The post-natal development of cutaneous afferent fibre input and receptive field organization in the rat dorsal horn.

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, M

    1985-01-01

    The responses evoked in lumbar dorsal horn cells by both natural and electrical hind-limb skin stimulation were recorded in the spinal cord of rat pups aged 0-15 days under urethane anaesthesia. The input volley was recorded on the L4 dorsal root and consisted of two separate waves from birth. Latency and threshold measurements were consistent with these two waves being immature A (myelinated fibre) waves and C (non-myelinated fibre) waves. On the first 3 days of life background activity of cells in the dorsal horn was low and evoked discharges were sluggish. On electrical stimulation of the skin, neonatal dorsal horn cells frequently responded with only 1 or 2 impulses per input volley with long central delays of up to 20 ms. Synaptic linkage appeared weak and many cells failed to follow stimulation rates of 5 Hz. Natural skin stimulation showed that the majority of cells at days 0-3 responded to pinching the skin only. The development of responses evoked by C fibres in the dorsal horn was delayed compared to that of responses evoked by A fibres. Short and long latency responses corresponding to the early A and late C afferent input volleys could be recorded in the superficial laminae (I, II and III) of the dorsal horn from day 0, but in the deeper laminae only early short latency A responses were evoked until the age of day 7-8. After this time, a long latency C response also appeared and increased in strength with age. Convergence of low and high threshold inputs onto dorsal horn cells was rare at birth but increased gradually over the following two weeks. Receptive field areas, mapped by natural mechanical stimulation of skin, were large at birth and decreased in size with age. At birth the mean receptive field area was 14.2% of the total hind-limb area whereas at day 15 it was 3.6%. This fall in size was particularly marked in cells of the deep dorsal horn. Pinching or brushing the receptive field of many neonatal dorsal horn cells resulted in long

  2. Visual Receptive Field Properties of Neurons in the Mouse Lateral Geniculate Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Subhojit; Schultz, Simon R.

    2016-01-01

    The lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) is increasingly regarded as a “smart-gating” operator for processing visual information. Therefore, characterizing the response properties of LGN neurons will enable us to better understand how neurons encode and transfer visual signals. Efforts have been devoted to study its anatomical and functional features, and recent advances have highlighted the existence in rodents of complex features such as direction/orientation selectivity. However, unlike well-researched higher-order mammals such as primates, the full array of response characteristics vis-à-vis its morphological features have remained relatively unexplored in the mouse LGN. To address the issue, we recorded from mouse LGN neurons using multisite-electrode-arrays (MEAs) and analysed their discharge patterns in relation to their location under a series of visual stimulation paradigms. Several response properties paralleled results from earlier studies in the field and these include centre-surround organization, size of receptive field, spontaneous firing rate and linearity of spatial summation. However, our results also revealed “high-pass” and “low-pass” features in the temporal frequency tuning of some cells, and greater average contrast gain than reported by earlier studies. In addition, a small proportion of cells had direction/orientation selectivity. Both “high-pass” and “low-pass” cells, as well as direction and orientation selective cells, were found only in small numbers, supporting the notion that these properties emerge in the cortex. ON- and OFF-cells showed distinct contrast sensitivity and temporal frequency tuning properties, suggesting parallel projections from the retina. Incorporating a novel histological technique, we created a 3-D LGN volume model explicitly capturing the morphological features of mouse LGN and localising individual cells into anterior/middle/posterior LGN. Based on this categorization, we show that the ON

  3. Activity-dependent regulation of 'on' and 'off' responses in cat visual cortical receptive fields.

    PubMed

    Debanne, D; Shulz, D E; Fregnac, Y

    1998-04-15

    1. A supervised learning procedure was applied to individual cat area 17 neurons to test the possible role of neuronal co-activity in controlling the plasticity of the spatial 'on-off' organization of visual cortical receptive fields (RFs). 2. Differential pairing between visual input evoked in a fixed position of the RF and preset levels of postsynaptic firing (imposed iontophoretically) were used alternately to boost the 'on' (or 'off') response to a 'high' level of firing (S+ pairing), and to reduce the opponent response (respectively 'off' or 'on') in the same position to a 'low' level (S- pairing). This associative procedure was repeated 50-100 times at a low temporal frequency (0.1-0.15 s-1). 3. Long-lasting modifications of the ratio of 'on-off' responses, measured in the paired position or integrated across the whole RF, were found in 44 % of the conditioned neurons (17/39), and in most cases this favoured the S+ paired characteristic. The amplitude change was on average half of that imposed during pairing. Comparable proportions of modified cells were obtained in 'simple' (13/27) and 'complex' (4/12) RFs, both in adult cats (4/11) and in kittens within the critical period (13/28). 4. The spatial selectivity of the pairing effects was studied by pseudorandomly stimulating both paired and spatially distinct unpaired positions within the RF. Most modifications were observed in the paired position (for 88 % of successful pairings). 5. In some cells (n = 13), a fixed delay pairing procedure was applied, in which the temporal phase of the onset of the current pulse was shifted by a few hundred milliseconds from the presentation or offset of the visual stimulus. Consecutive effects were observed in 4/13 cells, which retained the temporal pattern of activity imposed during pairing for 5-40 min. They were expressed in the paired region only. 6. The demonstration of long-lasting adaptive changes in the ratio of 'on' and 'off' responses, expressed in localized

  4. Nonlinear and extra-classical receptive field properties and the statistics of natural scenes.

    PubMed

    Zetzsche, C; Röhrbein, F

    2001-08-01

    -stopping, complex-cell properties and extra-classical receptive field properties, but the 'ideal' complex cells seem only to occur with PCA. Thus, a combination of ON/OFF nonlinearities with an integrated PCA-ICA strategy seems necessary to exploit the statistical properties of natural images. PMID:11563533

  5. Population receptive field analysis of the primary visual cortex complements perimetry in patients with homonymous visual field defects

    PubMed Central

    Papanikolaou, Amalia; Keliris, Georgios A.; Papageorgiou, T. Dorina; Shao, Yibin; Krapp, Elke; Papageorgiou, Eleni; Stingl, Katarina; Bruckmann, Anna; Schiefer, Ulrich; Logothetis, Nikos K.; Smirnakis, Stelios M.

    2014-01-01

    Injury to the primary visual cortex (V1) typically leads to loss of conscious vision in the corresponding, homonymous region of the contralateral visual hemifield (scotoma). Several studies suggest that V1 is highly plastic after injury to the visual pathways, whereas others have called this conclusion into question. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to measure area V1 population receptive field (pRF) properties in five patients with partial or complete quadrantic visual field loss as a result of partial V1+ or optic radiation lesions. Comparisons were made with healthy controls deprived of visual stimulation in one quadrant [“artificial scotoma” (AS)]. We observed no large-scale changes in spared-V1 topography as the V1/V2 border remained stable, and pRF eccentricity versus cortical-distance plots were similar to those of controls. Interestingly, three observations suggest limited reorganization: (i) the distribution of pRF centers in spared-V1 was shifted slightly toward the scotoma border in 2 of 5 patients compared with AS controls; (ii) pRF size in spared-V1 was slightly increased in patients near the scotoma border; and (iii) pRF size in the contralesional hemisphere was slightly increased compared with AS controls. Importantly, pRF measurements yield information about the functional properties of spared-V1 cortex not provided by standard perimetry mapping. In three patients, spared-V1 pRF maps overlapped significantly with dense regions of the perimetric scotoma, suggesting that pRF analysis may help identify visual field locations amenable to rehabilitation. Conversely, in the remaining two patients, spared-V1 pRF maps failed to cover sighted locations in the perimetric map, indicating the existence of V1-bypassing pathways able to mediate useful vision. PMID:24706881

  6. Does Attention Play a Role in Dynamic Receptive Field Adaptation to Changing Acoustic Salience in A1?

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Jonathan; Elhilali, Mounya; David, Stephen; Shamma, Shihab

    2007-01-01

    Acoustic filter properties of A1 neurons can dynamically adapt to stimulus statistics, classical conditioning, instrumental learning and the changing auditory attentional focus. We have recently developed an experimental paradigm that allows us to view cortical receptive field plasticity on-line as the animal meets different behavioral challenges by attending to salient acoustic cues and changing its cortical filters to enhance performance. We propose that attention is the key trigger that initiates a cascade of events leading to the dynamic receptive field changes that we observe. In our paradigm, ferrets were initially trained, using conditioned avoidance training techniques, to discriminate between background noise stimuli (temporally orthogonal ripple combinations) and foreground tonal target stimuli. They learned to generalize the task for a wide variety of distinct background and foreground target stimuli. We recorded cortical activity in the awake behaving animal and computed on-line spectrotemporal receptive fields (STRFs) of single neurons in A1. We observed clear, predictable task-related changes in STRF shape while the animal performed spectral tasks (including single tone and multi-tone detection, and two-tone discrimination) with different tonal targets. A different set of task-related changes occurred when the animal performed temporal tasks (including gap detection and click-rate discrimination). Distinctive cortical STRF changes may constitute a “task-specific signature”. These spectral and temporal changes in cortical filters occur quite rapidly, within 2 minutes of task onset, and fade just as quickly after task completion, or in some cases, persisted for hours. The same cell could multiplex by differentially changing its receptive field in different task conditions. On-line dynamic task-related changes, as well as persistent plastic changes, were observed at a single-unit, multi-unit and population level. Auditory attention is likely to be

  7. Möbius-strip-like columnar functional connections are revealed in somato-sensory receptive field centroids

    PubMed Central

    Wright, James Joseph; Bourke, Paul David; Favorov, Oleg Vyachesslavovich

    2014-01-01

    Receptive fields of neurons in the forelimb region of areas 3b and 1 of primary somatosensory cortex, in cats and monkeys, were mapped using extracellular recordings obtained sequentially from nearly radial penetrations. Locations of the field centroids indicated the presence of a functional system in which cortical homotypic representations of the limb surfaces are entwined in three-dimensional Möbius-strip-like patterns of synaptic connections. Boundaries of somatosensory receptive field in nested groups irregularly overlie the centroid order, and are interpreted as arising from the superposition of learned connections upon the embryonic order. Since the theory of embryonic synaptic self-organization used to model these results was devised and earlier used to explain findings in primary visual cortex, the present findings suggest the theory may be of general application throughout cortex and may reveal a modular functional synaptic system, which, only in some parts of the cortex, and in some species, is manifest as anatomical ordering into columns. PMID:25400552

  8. Reversible deactivation of higher-order posterior parietal areas. I. Alterations of receptive field characteristics in early stages of neocortical processing

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, Dylan F.; Goldring, Adam B.; Baldwin, Mary K. L.; Recanzone, Gregg H.; Chen, Arnold; Pan, Tingrui; Simon, Scott I.

    2014-01-01

    Somatosensory processing in the anesthetized macaque monkey was examined by reversibly deactivating posterior parietal areas 5L and 7b and motor/premotor cortex (M1/PM) with microfluidic thermal regulators developed by our laboratories. We examined changes in receptive field size and configuration for neurons in areas 1 and 2 that occurred during and after cooling deactivation. Together the deactivated fields and areas 1 and 2 form part of a network for reaching and grasping in human and nonhuman primates. Cooling area 7b had a dramatic effect on receptive field size for neurons in areas 1 and 2, while cooling area 5 had moderate effects and cooling M1/PM had little effect. Specifically, cooling discrete locations in 7b resulted in expansions of the receptive fields for neurons in areas 1 and 2 that were greater in magnitude and occurred in a higher proportion of sites than similar changes evoked by cooling the other fields. At some sites, the neural receptive field returned to the precooling configuration within 5–22 min of rewarming, but at other sites changes in receptive fields persisted. These results indicate that there are profound top-down influences on sensory processing of early cortical areas in the somatosensory cortex. PMID:25143546

  9. Functional Characterization of the Extra-Classical Receptive Field in Macaque V1: Contrast, Orientation, and Temporal Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Christopher A.; Joshi, Siddhartha; Xing, Dajun; Shapley, Robert M.; Hawken, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Neurons in primary visual cortex, V1, very often have extra-classical receptive fields (eCRFs). The eCRF is defined as the region of visual space where stimuli cannot elicit a spiking response but can modulate the response of a stimulus in the classical receptive field (CRF). We investigated the dependence of the eCRF on stimulus contrast and orientation in macaque V1 cells for which the laminar location was determined. The eCRF was more sensitive to contrast than the CRF across the whole population of V1 cells with the greatest contrast differential in layer 2/3. We confirmed that many V1 cells experience stronger suppression for collinear than orthogonal stimuli in the eCRF. Laminar analysis revealed that the predominant bias for collinear suppression was found in layers 2/3 and 4b. The laminar pattern of contrast and orientation dependence suggests that eCRF suppression may derive from different neural circuits in different layers, and may be comprised of two distinct components: orientation-tuned and untuned suppression. On average tuned suppression was delayed by about 25 milliseconds compared to the onset of untuned suppression. Therefore, response modulation by the eCRF develops dynamically and rapidly in time. PMID:23554504

  10. The spatial summation characteristics of three categories of V1 neurons differing in non-classical receptive field modulation properties.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ke; Song, Xue-Mei; Dai, Zheng-Qiang; Yin, Jiao-Jiao; Xu, Xing-Zhen; Li, Chao-Yi

    2014-03-01

    The spatial summation of excitation and inhibition determines the final output of neurons in the cat V1. To characterize the spatial extent of the excitatory classical receptive field (CRF) and inhibitory non-classical receptive field (nCRF) areas, we examined the spatial summation properties of 169 neurons in cat V1 at high (20-90%) and low (5-15%) stimulus contrasts. Three categories were classified based on the difference in the contrast dependency of the surround suppression. We discovered that the three categories significantly differed in CRF size, peak firing rate, and the proportion of simple/complex cell number. The classification of simple and complex cells was determined at both high and low contrasts. While the majority of V1 neurons had stable modulation ratios in their responses, 10 cells (6.2%) in our sample crossed the classification boundary under different stimulus contrasts. No significant difference was found in the size of the CRF between simple and complex cells. Further comparisons in each category determined that the CRFs for complex cells were significantly larger than those for simple cells in category type I neurons, with no significant differences between simple and complex cells in category type II and type III neurons. In addition, complex cells have higher peak firing rates than simple cells. PMID:24508921

  11. Skin incision-induced receptive field responses of mechanosensitive peripheral neurons are developmentally regulated in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Silvia; Giffear, Kelly; Eisenach, James C.; Ririe, Douglas G.

    2012-01-01

    Maturation of the nervous system results in changes in both central and peripheral processing. To better understand responses to injury in the young, developmental differences in the acute response to incision were investigated in both tactile and nociceptive myelinated peripheral mechanosensitive afferent neurons in vivo. Neuronal intrasomal recordings were performed in juvenile and infant rats in 34 L5 dorsal root ganglia, and each neuron was phenotypically defined. Neurons had a mechanosensitive receptive field in the glabrous skin on the plantar surface of the hind paw, which was characterized at baseline and for up to 45 min after incision. Fundamental maturational differences in the effect of incision were clear: in high-threshold nociceptive mechanoreceptors, the mechanical threshold decreased immediately and the receptive field size increased rapidly in juvenile rats but not in infant rats. Additionally, a divergence in changes in the instantaneous response frequency of tactile afferents occurred between the two ages. These differences may help explain maturational differences in responses to peripheral injury and suggest that differences in central nervous system responses may be partially mitigated by spatially confined and frequency-dependent differences resulting from tactile and nociceptive mechanosensitive input. PMID:22673323

  12. Photoreceptor projections and receptive fields in the dorsal rim area and main retina of the locust eye.

    PubMed

    Schmeling, Fabian; Tegtmeier, Jennifer; Kinoshita, Michiyo; Homberg, Uwe

    2015-05-01

    In many insect species, photoreceptors of a small dorsal rim area of the eye are specialized for sensitivity to the oscillation plane of polarized skylight and, thus, serve a role in sky compass orientation. To further understand peripheral mechanisms of polarized-light processing in the optic lobe, we have studied the projections of photoreceptors and their receptive fields in the main eye and dorsal rim area of the desert locust, a model system for polarization vision analysis. In both eye regions, one photoreceptor per ommatidium, R7, has a long visual fiber projecting through the lamina to the medulla. Axonal fibers from R7 receptors of the dorsal rim area have short side branches throughout the depth of the dorsal lamina and maintain retinotopic projections to the dorsal medulla following the first optic chiasma. Receptive fields of dorsal rim photoreceptors are considerably larger (average acceptance angle 33°) than those of the main eye (average acceptance angle 2.04°) and, taken together, cover almost the entire sky. The data challenge previous reports of two long visual fibers per ommatidium in the main eye of the locust and provide data for future analysis of peripheral networks underlying polarization opponency in the locust brain. PMID:25715758

  13. Visual projections routed to the auditory pathway in ferrets: receptive fields of visual neurons in primary auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Roe, A W; Pallas, S L; Kwon, Y H; Sur, M

    1992-09-01

    How does cortex that normally processes inputs from one sensory modality respond when provided with input from a different modality? We have addressed such a question with an experimental preparation in which retinal input is routed to the auditory pathway in ferrets. Following neonatal surgical manipulations, a specific population of retinal ganglion cells is induced to innervate the auditory thalamus and provides visual input to cells in auditory cortex (Sur et al., 1988). We have now examined in detail the visual response properties of single cells in primary auditory cortex (A1) of these rewired animals and compared the responses to those in primary visual cortex (V1) of normal animals. Cells in A1 of rewired animals differed from cells in normal V1: they exhibited larger receptive field sizes and poorer visual responsivity, and responded with longer latencies to electrical stimulation of their inputs. However, striking similarities were also found. Like cells in normal V1, A1 cells in rewired animals exhibited orientation and direction selectivity and had simple and complex receptive field organizations. Furthermore, the degree of orientation and directional selectivity as well as the proportions of simple, complex, and nonoriented cells found in A1 and V1 were very similar. These results have significant implications for possible commonalities in intracortical processing circuits between sensory cortices, and for the role of inputs in specifying intracortical circuitry. PMID:1527604

  14. Infant reflexes

    MedlinePlus

    ... or her hips toward the touch in a dancing movement. Grasp reflex . This reflex occurs if you ... reflex occurs in slightly older infants when the child is held upright and the baby’s body is ...

  15. Parallel ON and OFF cone bipolar inputs establish spatially-coextensive receptive field structure of blue-yellow ganglion cells in primate retina

    PubMed Central

    Crook, Joanna D.; Davenport, Christopher M.; Peterson, Beth B.; Packer, Orin S.; Detwiler, Peter B.; Dacey, Dennis M.

    2009-01-01

    In the primate retina the small bistratified, ‘blue-yellow’ color-opponent ganglion cell receives parallel ON-depolarizing and OFF-hyperpolarizing inputs from short (S) wavelength sensitive and combined long (L) and middle (M) wavelength sensitive cone photoreceptors respectively. However the synaptic pathways that create S vs LM cone-opponent receptive field structure remain controversial. Here we show in the macaque monkey retina in vitro that at photopic light levels, when an identified rod input is excluded, the small bistratified cell displays a spatially coextensive receptive field in which the S-ON-input is in spatial, temporal and chromatic balance with the LM-OFF-input. ON pathway block with L-AP-4, the mGluR6 receptor agonist, abolished the SON response but spared the LM-OFF response. The isolated LM component showed a center-surround receptive field structure consistent with an input from OFF-center, ON-surround ‘diffuse’ cone bipolar cells. Increasing retinal buffering capacity with HEPES attenuated the LM-ON surround component, consistent with a non-GABAergic outer retina feedback mechanism for the bipolar surround. The GABAa/c receptor antagonist picrotoxin and the glycine receptor antagonist strychnine did not affect chromatic balance or the basic coextensive receptive field structure suggesting that the LM-OFF field is not generated by an inner retinal inhibitory pathway. We conclude that the opponent S-ON and LM-OFF responses originate from the excitatory receptive field centers of S-ON and LM-OFF cone bipolar cells and that the LM-OFF- and ON-surrounds of these parallel bipolar inputs largely cancel, explaining the small, spatially coextensive but spectrally antagonistic receptive field structure of the blue-ON ganglion cell. PMID:19571128

  16. Chronic recordings from single sites of kitten striate cortex during experience-dependent modifications of receptive-field properties.

    PubMed

    Mioche, L; Singer, W

    1989-07-01

    1. With the use of chronically implanted floating microelectrodes, we obtained simultaneous single-unit recordings from multiple sites in the kitten striate cortex and followed experience-dependent modifications of receptive-field properties. For induction of experimental modifications, we used the paradigm of monocular deprivation and reverse occlusion. Kittens were implanted when 4-5 wk old. During the following 2 days, receptive-field properties of the recorded units were determined once under light ketamine anesthesia and repeatedly while the kittens were awake and only lightly restrained. Subsequently, one eye was patched, and the resulting changes in neuronal eye preference were followed by repeated measurements of response properties. For investigation of the effects of reverse occlusion, the deprived eye was opened and the previously open eye closed when the neurons had become unresponsive to the initially deprived eye. Alternatively, kittens were monocularly deprived for 1 wk by lid suture before implantation. The closed eye was then opened, the other eye patched, and the effects of reverse occlusion were studied for up to 1 wk by repeated measurements of receptive-field properties. 2. The earliest effect of monocular deprivation was the disappearance of binocular summation, i.e., binocular responses ceased to be superior over monocular responses. Overt changes of ocular dominance were observed as early as 6 h after the beginning of monocular deprivation. These consisted of a gradual decrease of the excitatory response to deprived eye stimulation and, on occasions, of an additional moderate increase of responses to the normal eye. A complete loss of excitatory responses to deprived-eye stimulation was seen as early as 12 h after occlusion. In numerous cells, however, stimulation of the deprived eye continued to evoke inhibitory responses even after excitatory responses had vanished completely. During this shift in ocularity, neurons preserved their

  17. Movement-sensitive and direction and orientation-selective cutaneous receptive fields in the hand area of the post-central gyrus in monkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Hyvärinen, J; Poranen, A

    1978-01-01

    1. In the hand area of the post-central gyrus of three alert Macaca speciosa monkeys neurones related to cutaneous receptors but not activated by simple touch on the receptive field were recorded using the transdural micro-electrode recording technique. Thirty-six cells were found to have complex cutaneous receptive field properties. These neurones were subdivided into the following three groups. 2. Nine neurones were not activated by punctate stimuli on the receptive fields but responded well to movement along the skin. The activity of these neurones was not affected by the direction of movement; nor was it sensitive to different textures of the moving surface. 3. Eighteen neurones responded to cutaneous movement along the skin surface in a particular direction giving no response to stimulation in the opposite direction and intermediate responses to intermediate directions. Similar responses were evoked from different subparts of the receptive field. 4. Nine neurones responded well to an edge placed on the skin in an optimal orientation or moved along the skin in a direction perpendicular to the edge. A maximal response was produced by stimuli of the same optimal orientation in different parts of the receptive field. The significance of the stimuli to the monkey had only a minor influence on the magnitude of the responses of these neurones and no influence on the receptive field properties. 5. The occurrence of the complex cutaneous cells increased from anterior to posterior within the post-central gyrus and most of them were found in Brodmann's area 2. Thus we postulate that the complex receptive field properties arise as a consequence of cortical processing in a network in which postsynaptic one-way lateral inhibition generates the directional properties of the neurones. 6. The complex cutaneous neurones constituted only 6% of the neurones studied in the hand area of the post-central gyrus. Thus the prevalence of neurones with elongated and direction

  18. Space-time codependence of retinal ganglion cells can be explained by novel and separable components of their receptive fields.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Cameron S; Sabharwal, Jasdeep; Wu, Samuel M

    2016-09-01

    Reverse correlation methods such as spike-triggered averaging consistently identify the spatial center in the linear receptive fields (RFs) of retinal ganglion cells (GCs). However, the spatial antagonistic surround observed in classical experiments has proven more elusive. Tests for the antagonistic surround have heretofore relied on models that make questionable simplifying assumptions such as space-time separability and radial homogeneity/symmetry. We circumvented these, along with other common assumptions, and observed a linear antagonistic surround in 754 of 805 mouse GCs. By characterizing the RF's space-time structure, we found the overall linear RF's inseparability could be accounted for both by tuning differences between the center and surround and differences within the surround. Finally, we applied this approach to characterize spatial asymmetry in the RF surround. These results shed new light on the spatiotemporal organization of GC linear RFs and highlight a major contributor to its inseparability. PMID:27604400

  19. Responses of Leaky Integrate-and-Fire Neurons to a Plurality of Stimuli in Their Receptive Fields.

    PubMed

    Li, Kang; Bundesen, Claus; Ditlevsen, Susanne

    2016-12-01

    A fundamental question concerning the way the visual world is represented in our brain is how a cortical cell responds when its classical receptive field contains a plurality of stimuli. Two opposing models have been proposed. In the response-averaging model, the neuron responds with a weighted average of all individual stimuli. By contrast, in the probability-mixing model, the cell responds to a plurality of stimuli as if only one of the stimuli were present. Here we apply the probability-mixing and the response-averaging model to leaky integrate-and-fire neurons, to describe neuronal behavior based on observed spike trains. We first estimate the parameters of either model using numerical methods, and then test which model is most likely to have generated the observed data. Results show that the parameters can be successfully estimated and the two models are distinguishable using model selection. PMID:27215548

  20. Receptive field properties of bipolar cell axon terminals in direction-selective sublaminas of the mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Chen, Minggang; Lee, Seunghoon; Park, Silvia J H; Looger, Loren L; Zhou, Z Jimmy

    2014-10-15

    Retinal bipolar cells (BCs) transmit visual signals in parallel channels from the outer to the inner retina, where they provide glutamatergic inputs to specific networks of amacrine and ganglion cells. Intricate network computation at BC axon terminals has been proposed as a mechanism for complex network computation, such as direction selectivity, but direct knowledge of the receptive field property and the synaptic connectivity of the axon terminals of various BC types is required in order to understand the role of axonal computation by BCs. The present study tested the essential assumptions of the presynaptic model of direction selectivity at axon terminals of three functionally distinct BC types that ramify in the direction-selective strata of the mouse retina. Results from two-photon Ca(2+) imaging, optogenetic stimulation, and dual patch-clamp recording demonstrated that 1) CB5 cells do not receive fast GABAergic synaptic feedback from starburst amacrine cells (SACs); 2) light-evoked and spontaneous Ca(2+) responses are well coordinated among various local regions of CB5 axon terminals; 3) CB5 axon terminals are not directionally selective; 4) CB5 cells consist of two novel functional subtypes with distinct receptive field structures; 5) CB7 cells provide direct excitatory synaptic inputs to, but receive no direct GABAergic synaptic feedback from, SACs; and 6) CB7 axon terminals are not directionally selective, either. These findings help to simplify models of direction selectivity by ruling out complex computation at BC terminals. They also show that CB5 comprises two functional subclasses of BCs. PMID:25031256

  1. Spatial receptive fields in the retina and dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus of mice lacking rods and cones.

    PubMed

    Procyk, Christopher A; Eleftheriou, Cyril G; Storchi, Riccardo; Allen, Annette E; Milosavljevic, Nina; Brown, Timothy M; Lucas, Robert J

    2015-08-01

    In advanced retinal degeneration loss of rods and cones leaves melanopsin-expressing intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) as the only source of visual information. ipRGCs drive non-image-forming responses (e.g., circadian photoentrainment) under such conditions but, despite projecting to the primary visual thalamus [dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN)], do not support form vision. We wished to determine what precludes ipRGCs supporting spatial discrimination after photoreceptor loss, using a mouse model (rd/rd cl) lacking rods and cones. Using multielectrode arrays, we found that both RGCs and neurons in the dLGN of this animal have clearly delineated spatial receptive fields. In the retina, they are typically symmetrical, lack inhibitory surrounds, and have diameters in the range of 10-30° of visual space. Receptive fields in the dLGN were larger (diameters typically 30-70°) but matched the retinotopic map of the mouse dLGN. Injections of a neuroanatomical tracer (cholera toxin β-subunit) into the dLGN confirmed that retinotopic order of ganglion cell projections to the dLGN and thalamic projections to the cortex is at least superficially intact in rd/rd cl mice. However, as previously reported for deafferented ipRGCs, onset and offset of light responses have long latencies in the rd/rd cl retina and dLGN. Accordingly, dLGN neurons failed to track dynamic changes in light intensity in this animal. Our data reveal that ipRGCs can convey spatial information in advanced retinal degeneration and identify their poor temporal fidelity as the major limitation in their ability to provide information about spatial patterns under natural viewing conditions. PMID:26084909

  2. Receptive field properties of bipolar cell axon terminals in direction-selective sublaminas of the mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Minggang; Lee, Seunghoon; Park, Silvia J. H.; Looger, Loren L.

    2014-01-01

    Retinal bipolar cells (BCs) transmit visual signals in parallel channels from the outer to the inner retina, where they provide glutamatergic inputs to specific networks of amacrine and ganglion cells. Intricate network computation at BC axon terminals has been proposed as a mechanism for complex network computation, such as direction selectivity, but direct knowledge of the receptive field property and the synaptic connectivity of the axon terminals of various BC types is required in order to understand the role of axonal computation by BCs. The present study tested the essential assumptions of the presynaptic model of direction selectivity at axon terminals of three functionally distinct BC types that ramify in the direction-selective strata of the mouse retina. Results from two-photon Ca2+ imaging, optogenetic stimulation, and dual patch-clamp recording demonstrated that 1) CB5 cells do not receive fast GABAergic synaptic feedback from starburst amacrine cells (SACs); 2) light-evoked and spontaneous Ca2+ responses are well coordinated among various local regions of CB5 axon terminals; 3) CB5 axon terminals are not directionally selective; 4) CB5 cells consist of two novel functional subtypes with distinct receptive field structures; 5) CB7 cells provide direct excitatory synaptic inputs to, but receive no direct GABAergic synaptic feedback from, SACs; and 6) CB7 axon terminals are not directionally selective, either. These findings help to simplify models of direction selectivity by ruling out complex computation at BC terminals. They also show that CB5 comprises two functional subclasses of BCs. PMID:25031256

  3. Receptive Field Vectors of Genetically-Identified Retinal Ganglion Cells Reveal Cell-Type-Dependent Visual Functions

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Matthew L.; Viney, Tim J.; Nikolic, Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    Sensory stimuli are encoded by diverse kinds of neurons but the identities of the recorded neurons that are studied are often unknown. We explored in detail the firing patterns of eight previously defined genetically-identified retinal ganglion cell (RGC) types from a single transgenic mouse line. We first introduce a new technique of deriving receptive field vectors (RFVs) which utilises a modified form of mutual information (“Quadratic Mutual Information”). We analysed the firing patterns of RGCs during presentation of short duration (~10 second) complex visual scenes (natural movies). We probed the high dimensional space formed by the visual input for a much smaller dimensional subspace of RFVs that give the most information about the response of each cell. The new technique is very efficient and fast and the derivation of novel types of RFVs formed by the natural scene visual input was possible even with limited numbers of spikes per cell. This approach enabled us to estimate the 'visual memory' of each cell type and the corresponding receptive field area by calculating Mutual Information as a function of the number of frames and radius. Finally, we made predictions of biologically relevant functions based on the RFVs of each cell type. RGC class analysis was complemented with results for the cells’ response to simple visual input in the form of black and white spot stimulation, and their classification on several key physiological metrics. Thus RFVs lead to predictions of biological roles based on limited data and facilitate analysis of sensory-evoked spiking data from defined cell types. PMID:26845435

  4. Receptive Field Vectors of Genetically-Identified Retinal Ganglion Cells Reveal Cell-Type-Dependent Visual Functions.

    PubMed

    Katz, Matthew L; Viney, Tim J; Nikolic, Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    Sensory stimuli are encoded by diverse kinds of neurons but the identities of the recorded neurons that are studied are often unknown. We explored in detail the firing patterns of eight previously defined genetically-identified retinal ganglion cell (RGC) types from a single transgenic mouse line. We first introduce a new technique of deriving receptive field vectors (RFVs) which utilises a modified form of mutual information ("Quadratic Mutual Information"). We analysed the firing patterns of RGCs during presentation of short duration (~10 second) complex visual scenes (natural movies). We probed the high dimensional space formed by the visual input for a much smaller dimensional subspace of RFVs that give the most information about the response of each cell. The new technique is very efficient and fast and the derivation of novel types of RFVs formed by the natural scene visual input was possible even with limited numbers of spikes per cell. This approach enabled us to estimate the 'visual memory' of each cell type and the corresponding receptive field area by calculating Mutual Information as a function of the number of frames and radius. Finally, we made predictions of biologically relevant functions based on the RFVs of each cell type. RGC class analysis was complemented with results for the cells' response to simple visual input in the form of black and white spot stimulation, and their classification on several key physiological metrics. Thus RFVs lead to predictions of biological roles based on limited data and facilitate analysis of sensory-evoked spiking data from defined cell types. PMID:26845435

  5. Single Canonical Model of Reflexive Memory and Spatial Attention

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Saumil S.; Red, Stuart; Lin, Eric; Sereno, Anne B.

    2015-01-01

    Many neurons in the dorsal and ventral visual stream have the property that after a brief visual stimulus presentation in their receptive field, the spiking activity in these neurons persists above their baseline levels for several seconds. This maintained activity is not always correlated with the monkey’s task and its origin is unknown. We have previously proposed a simple neural network model, based on shape selective neurons in monkey lateral intraparietal cortex, which predicts the valence and time course of reflexive (bottom-up) spatial attention. In the same simple model, we demonstrate here that passive maintained activity or short-term memory of specific visual events can result without need for an external or top-down modulatory signal. Mutual inhibition and neuronal adaptation play distinct roles in reflexive attention and memory. This modest 4-cell model provides the first simple and unified physiologically plausible mechanism of reflexive spatial attention and passive short-term memory processes. PMID:26493949

  6. [Reflexes, instincts, emotions and passions].

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Alberto Portera

    2008-01-01

    In animals of the same species, the reflexes, having evolved similarly, in a few milliseconds, automatically activate the corresponding reflex arch and without the intervention of the animal generate the adequate response: medullary, mesencephalic or trans-hemispheric. These neurophysiological functions have allowed the animals to be free from predators and increasy their longevity and, as a consequence, the appearance of numerous species during millions of years. A further step in the reflexes evolution, the instincts emerged and their activity, a result of neuro-hormonal functions, stimulates the male's sexual appetite when the females are receptive for their copulation and fecundation. PMID:18924359

  7. Push-Pull Receptive Field Organization and Synaptic Depression: Mechanisms for Reliably Encoding Naturalistic Stimuli in V1.

    PubMed

    Kremkow, Jens; Perrinet, Laurent U; Monier, Cyril; Alonso, Jose-Manuel; Aertsen, Ad; Frégnac, Yves; Masson, Guillaume S

    2016-01-01

    Neurons in the primary visual cortex are known for responding vigorously but with high variability to classical stimuli such as drifting bars or gratings. By contrast, natural scenes are encoded more efficiently by sparse and temporal precise spiking responses. We used a conductance-based model of the visual system in higher mammals to investigate how two specific features of the thalamo-cortical pathway, namely push-pull receptive field organization and fast synaptic depression, can contribute to this contextual reshaping of V1 responses. By comparing cortical dynamics evoked respectively by natural vs. artificial stimuli in a comprehensive parametric space analysis, we demonstrate that the reliability and sparseness of the spiking responses during natural vision is not a mere consequence of the increased bandwidth in the sensory input spectrum. Rather, it results from the combined impacts of fast synaptic depression and push-pull inhibition, the later acting for natural scenes as a form of "effective" feed-forward inhibition as demonstrated in other sensory systems. Thus, the combination of feedforward-like inhibition with fast thalamo-cortical synaptic depression by simple cells receiving a direct structured input from thalamus composes a generic computational mechanism for generating a sparse and reliable encoding of natural sensory events. PMID:27242445

  8. Push-Pull Receptive Field Organization and Synaptic Depression: Mechanisms for Reliably Encoding Naturalistic Stimuli in V1

    PubMed Central

    Kremkow, Jens; Perrinet, Laurent U.; Monier, Cyril; Alonso, Jose-Manuel; Aertsen, Ad; Frégnac, Yves; Masson, Guillaume S.

    2016-01-01

    Neurons in the primary visual cortex are known for responding vigorously but with high variability to classical stimuli such as drifting bars or gratings. By contrast, natural scenes are encoded more efficiently by sparse and temporal precise spiking responses. We used a conductance-based model of the visual system in higher mammals to investigate how two specific features of the thalamo-cortical pathway, namely push-pull receptive field organization and fast synaptic depression, can contribute to this contextual reshaping of V1 responses. By comparing cortical dynamics evoked respectively by natural vs. artificial stimuli in a comprehensive parametric space analysis, we demonstrate that the reliability and sparseness of the spiking responses during natural vision is not a mere consequence of the increased bandwidth in the sensory input spectrum. Rather, it results from the combined impacts of fast synaptic depression and push-pull inhibition, the later acting for natural scenes as a form of “effective” feed-forward inhibition as demonstrated in other sensory systems. Thus, the combination of feedforward-like inhibition with fast thalamo-cortical synaptic depression by simple cells receiving a direct structured input from thalamus composes a generic computational mechanism for generating a sparse and reliable encoding of natural sensory events. PMID:27242445

  9. Weak edge enhancement based on contextual modulation of non-classical receptive field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Jie; Cai, Chao

    2015-12-01

    Edges and contours of an object contain a lot of information, so the detection and extraction of saliency edges and contours in the image become one of the most active issues in the research field of automatic target recognition. Weak edge enhancement plays an important role in contour detection. Based on psychophysical and physiological findings, a contour detection method which focuses on weak edge enhancement and inspired by the visual mechanism in the primary visual cortex (V1) is proposed in this paper. The method is divided in three steps. Firstly, the response of every single visual neuron in V1 is computed by local energy. Secondly, the local contrast which corresponds to the CRF is computed. If the local contrast in the image is below the low contrast threshold, expand NCRF to change the spatially modulatory range by increasing the NCRF radius. Thirdly, the facilitation and suppression (the contextual influence) on a neuron through horizontal interactions are obtained by using a spatially unified modulating function. We tested it on synthetic images and encouraging results were acquired.

  10. Rapid mapping of visual receptive fields by filtered back projection: application to multi-neuronal electrophysiology and imaging.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Jamie; Ding, Huayu; Seibel, Sofie H; Esposti, Federico; Lagnado, Leon

    2014-11-15

    Neurons in the visual system vary widely in the spatiotemporal properties of their receptive fields (RFs), and understanding these variations is key to elucidating how visual information is processed. We present a new approach for mapping RFs based on the filtered back projection (FBP), an algorithm used for tomographic reconstructions. To estimate RFs, a series of bars were flashed across the retina at pseudo-random positions and at a minimum of five orientations. We apply this method to retinal neurons and show that it can accurately recover the spatial RF and impulse response of ganglion cells recorded on a multi-electrode array. We also demonstrate its utility for in vivo imaging by mapping the RFs of an array of bipolar cell synapses expressing a genetically encoded Ca(2+) indicator. We find that FBP offers several advantages over the commonly used spike-triggered average (STA): (i) ON and OFF components of a RF can be separated; (ii) the impulse response can be reconstructed at sample rates of 125 Hz, rather than the refresh rate of a monitor; (iii) FBP reveals the response properties of neurons that are not evident using STA, including those that display orientation selectivity, or fire at low mean spike rates; and (iv) the FBP method is fast, allowing the RFs of all the bipolar cell synaptic terminals in a field of view to be reconstructed in under 4 min. Use of the FBP will benefit investigations of the visual system that employ electrophysiology or optical reporters to measure activity across populations of neurons. PMID:25172952

  11. Rapid mapping of visual receptive fields by filtered back projection: application to multi-neuronal electrophysiology and imaging

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Jamie; Ding, Huayu; Seibel, Sofie H; Esposti, Federico; Lagnado, Leon

    2014-01-01

    Neurons in the visual system vary widely in the spatiotemporal properties of their receptive fields (RFs), and understanding these variations is key to elucidating how visual information is processed. We present a new approach for mapping RFs based on the filtered back projection (FBP), an algorithm used for tomographic reconstructions. To estimate RFs, a series of bars were flashed across the retina at pseudo-random positions and at a minimum of five orientations. We apply this method to retinal neurons and show that it can accurately recover the spatial RF and impulse response of ganglion cells recorded on a multi-electrode array. We also demonstrate its utility for in vivo imaging by mapping the RFs of an array of bipolar cell synapses expressing a genetically encoded Ca2+ indicator. We find that FBP offers several advantages over the commonly used spike-triggered average (STA): (i) ON and OFF components of a RF can be separated; (ii) the impulse response can be reconstructed at sample rates of 125 Hz, rather than the refresh rate of a monitor; (iii) FBP reveals the response properties of neurons that are not evident using STA, including those that display orientation selectivity, or fire at low mean spike rates; and (iv) the FBP method is fast, allowing the RFs of all the bipolar cell synaptic terminals in a field of view to be reconstructed in under 4 min. Use of the FBP will benefit investigations of the visual system that employ electrophysiology or optical reporters to measure activity across populations of neurons. PMID:25172952

  12. Emulating the visual receptive-field properties of MST neurons with a template model of heading estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perrone, J. A.; Stone, L. S.

    1998-01-01

    We have proposed previously a computational neural-network model by which the complex patterns of retinal image motion generated during locomotion (optic flow) can be processed by specialized detectors acting as templates for specific instances of self-motion. The detectors in this template model respond to global optic flow by sampling image motion over a large portion of the visual field through networks of local motion sensors with properties similar to those of neurons found in the middle temporal (MT) area of primate extrastriate visual cortex. These detectors, arranged within cortical-like maps, were designed to extract self-translation (heading) and self-rotation, as well as the scene layout (relative distances) ahead of a moving observer. We then postulated that heading from optic flow is directly encoded by individual neurons acting as heading detectors within the medial superior temporal (MST) area. Others have questioned whether individual MST neurons can perform this function because some of their receptive-field properties seem inconsistent with this role. To resolve this issue, we systematically compared MST responses with those of detectors from two different configurations of the model under matched stimulus conditions. We found that the characteristic physiological properties of MST neurons can be explained by the template model. We conclude that MST neurons are well suited to support self-motion estimation via a direct encoding of heading and that the template model provides an explicit set of testable hypotheses that can guide future exploration of MST and adjacent areas within the superior temporal sulcus.

  13. Binocular Neurons in Parastriate Cortex: Interocular ‘Matching’ of Receptive Field Properties, Eye Dominance and Strength of Silent Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chun; Dreher, Bogdan

    2014-01-01

    Spike-responses of single binocular neurons were recorded from a distinct part of primary visual cortex, the parastriate cortex (cytoarchitectonic area 18) of anaesthetized and immobilized domestic cats. Functional identification of neurons was based on the ratios of phase-variant (F1) component to the mean firing rate (F0) of their spike-responses to optimized (orientation, direction, spatial and temporal frequencies and size) sine-wave-luminance-modulated drifting grating patches presented separately via each eye. In over 95% of neurons, the interocular differences in the phase-sensitivities (differences in F1/F0 spike-response ratios) were small (≤0.3) and in over 80% of neurons, the interocular differences in preferred orientations were ≤10°. The interocular correlations of the direction selectivity indices and optimal spatial frequencies, like those of the phase sensitivies and optimal orientations, were also strong (coefficients of correlation r ≥0.7005). By contrast, the interocular correlations of the optimal temporal frequencies, the diameters of summation areas of the excitatory responses and suppression indices were weak (coefficients of correlation r ≤0.4585). In cells with high eye dominance indices (HEDI cells), the mean magnitudes of suppressions evoked by stimulation of silent, extra-classical receptive fields via the non-dominant eyes, were significantly greater than those when the stimuli were presented via the dominant eyes. We argue that the well documented ‘eye-origin specific’ segregation of the lateral geniculate inputs underpinning distinct eye dominance columns in primary visual cortices of mammals with frontally positioned eyes (distinct eye dominance columns), combined with significant interocular differences in the strength of silent suppressive fields, putatively contribute to binocular stereoscopic vision. PMID:24927276

  14. Feedback to distal dendrites links fMRI signals to neural receptive fields in a spiking network model of the visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Heikkinen, Hanna; Sharifian, Fariba; Vigario, Ricardo; Vanni, Simo

    2015-07-01

    The blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) response has been strongly associated with neuronal activity in the brain. However, some neuronal tuning properties are consistently different from the BOLD response. We studied the spatial extent of neural and hemodynamic responses in the primary visual cortex, where the BOLD responses spread and interact over much longer distances than the small receptive fields of individual neurons would predict. Our model shows that a feedforward-feedback loop between V1 and a higher visual area can account for the observed spread of the BOLD response. In particular, anisotropic landing of inputs to compartmental neurons were necessary to account for the BOLD signal spread, while retaining realistic spiking responses. Our work shows that simple dendrites can separate tuning at the synapses and at the action potential output, thus bridging the BOLD signal to the neural receptive fields with high fidelity. PMID:25925319

  15. Color opponent receptive fields self-organize in a biophysical model of visual cortex via spike-timing dependent plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Eguchi, Akihiro; Neymotin, Samuel A.; Stringer, Simon M.

    2014-01-01

    Although many computational models have been proposed to explain orientation maps in primary visual cortex (V1), it is not yet known how similar clusters of color-selective neurons in macaque V1/V2 are connected and develop. In this work, we address the problem of understanding the cortical processing of color information with a possible mechanism of the development of the patchy distribution of color selectivity via computational modeling. Each color input is decomposed into a red, green, and blue representation and transmitted to the visual cortex via a simulated optic nerve in a luminance channel and red–green and blue–yellow opponent color channels. Our model of the early visual system consists of multiple topographically-arranged layers of excitatory and inhibitory neurons, with sparse intra-layer connectivity and feed-forward connectivity between layers. Layers are arranged based on anatomy of early visual pathways, and include a retina, lateral geniculate nucleus, and layered neocortex. Each neuron in the V1 output layer makes synaptic connections to neighboring neurons and receives the three types of signals in the different channels from the corresponding photoreceptor position. Synaptic weights are randomized and learned using spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP). After training with natural images, the neurons display heightened sensitivity to specific colors. Information-theoretic analysis reveals mutual information between particular stimuli and responses, and that the information reaches a maximum with fewer neurons in the higher layers, indicating that estimations of the input colors can be done using the output of fewer cells in the later stages of cortical processing. In addition, cells with similar color receptive fields form clusters. Analysis of spiking activity reveals increased firing synchrony between neurons when particular color inputs are presented or removed (ON-cell/OFF-cell). PMID:24659956

  16. GlyRα2, not GlyRα3, modulates the receptive field surround of OFF retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chi; Nobles, Regina D; McCall, Maureen A

    2015-01-01

    Receptive fields (RFs) of most retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) consist of an excitatory center and suppressive surround. The RF center arises from the summation of excitatory bipolar cell glutamatergic inputs, whereas the surround arises from lateral inhibitory inputs. In the retina, both gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) and glycine are inhibitory neurotransmitters. A clear role for GABAergic inhibition modulating the RGC RF surround has been demonstrated across species. Glycinergic inhibition is more commonly associated with RF center modulation, although there is some evidence that it may contribute to the RF surround. The synaptic glycinergic chloride channels are formed by three homomeric β and two homomeric α subunits that can be glycine receptor (GlyR) α1, α2, α3, or α4. GlyRα composition is responsible for currents with distinct decay kinetics. Their expression within the inner plexiform laminae and neuronal subtypes also differ. We studied the role of GlyR subunit selective modulation of RGC RF surrounds, using mice lacking GlyRα2 (Glra2 -/-), GlyRα3 (Glra3 -/-), or both (Glra2/3 -/-). We chose this molecular genetic approach instead of pharmacological manipulation because there are no subunit selective antagonists and strychnine blocks all GlyRs. Comparisons of annulus-evoked responses among wild type (WT) and GlyRα knockouts (Glra2 -/-, Glra3 -/- and Glra2/3 -/-) show that GlyRα2 inhibition enhances RF surround suppression and post-stimulus excitation in only WT OFF RGCs. Similarities in the responses in Glra2 -/- and Glra2/3 -/- RGCs verify these conclusions. Based on previous and current data, we propose that GlyRα2-mediated input uses a crossover inhibitory circuit. Further, we suggest that GlyRα2 modulates the OFF RGC RF center and surround independently. In summary, our results define a selective GlyR subunit-specific control of RF surround suppression in OFF RGCs. PMID:26923349

  17. Temporally advanced dynamic change of receptive field of lateral geniculate neurons during brief visual stimulation: Effects of brainstem peribrachial stimulation.

    PubMed

    Jurkus, P; Ruksenas, O; Heggelund, P

    2013-07-01

    Processing of visual information in the brain seems to proceed from initial fast but coarse to subsequent detailed processing. Such coarse-to-fine changes appear also in the response of single neurons in the visual pathway. In the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN), there is a dynamic change in the receptive field (RF) properties of neurons during visual stimulation. During a stimulus flash centered on the RF, the width of the RF-center, presumably related to spatial resolution, changes rapidly from large to small in an initial transient response component. In a subsequent sustained component, the RF-center width is rather stable apart from an initial slight widening. Several brainstem nuclei modulate the geniculocortical transmission in a state-dependent manner. Thus, modulatory input from cholinergic neurons in the peribrachial brainstem region (PBR) enhances the geniculocortical transmission during arousal. We studied whether such input also influences the dynamic RF-changes during visual stimulation. We compared dynamic changes of RF-center width of dLGN neurons during brief stimulus presentation in a control condition, with changes during combined presentation of the visual stimulus and electrical PBR-stimulation. The major finding was that PBR-stimulation gave an advancement of the dynamic change of the RF-center width such that the different response components occurred earlier. Consistent with previous studies, we also found that PBR-stimulation increased the gain of firing rate during the sustained response component. However, this increase of gain was particularly strong in the transition from the transient to the sustained component at the time when the center width was minimal. The results suggest that increased modulatory PBR-input not only increase the gain of the geniculocortical transmission, but also contributes to faster dynamics of transmission. We discuss implications for possible effects on visual spatial resolution. PMID:23542736

  18. Subthreshold receptive fields and baseline excitability of "silent" S1 callosal neurons in awake rabbits: contributions of AMPA/kainate and NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Swadlow, H A; Hicks, T P

    1997-07-01

    The contribution of NMDA and non-NMDA receptors to excitatory subthreshold receptive fields was examined in callosal efferent neurons (CC neurons) in primary somatosensory cortex of the fully awake rabbit. Only neurons showing no traditional (suprathreshold) receptive fields were examined. Subthreshold responses were examined by monitoring the thresholds of efferent neurons to juxtasomal current pulses (JSCPs) delivered through the recording microelectrode. Changes in threshold following a peripheral conditioning stimulus signify a subthreshold response. Using this method, excitatory postsynaptic potentials and inhibitory postsynaptic potentials are manifested as decreases and increases in JSCP threshold, respectively. NMDA and non-NMDA agonists and antagonists were administered iontophoretically via a multibarrel micropipette assembly attached to the recording/stimulating microelectrode. Receptor-selective doses of both AMPA/kainate and NMDA antagonists decreased the excitability of CC neurons in the absence of any peripheral stimulation. Threshold to JSCPs rose by a mean of 20% for both classes of antagonist. Despite the similar effects of NMDA and non-NMDA antagonists on baseline excitability, these antagonists had dramatically different effects on the subthreshold excitatory response to activation of the receptive field. Whereas receptor-selective doses of AMPA/kainate antagonists either eliminated or severely attenuated the subthreshold excitatory responses to peripheral stimulation, NMDA antagonists had little or no effect on the subthreshold evoked response. PMID:9262195

  19. Somatosensory cortical efferent neurons of the awake rabbit: latencies to activation via supra--and subthreshold receptive fields.

    PubMed

    Swadlow, H A; Hicks, T P

    1996-04-01

    1. Latencies to peripheral sensory stimulation were examined in four classes of antidromically identified efferent neurons in the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) of awake rabbits. Both suprathreshold responses (action potentials) and subthreshold responses were examined. Subthreshold responses were examined by monitoring the thresholds of efferent neurons to juxtasomal current pulses (JSCPs) delivered through the recording microelectrode (usually 1-3 microA). Through the use of this method, excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) and inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) were manifested as decreases and increases in threshold, respectively. Efferent populations examined included callosal (CC) neurons, ipsilateral corticocortical (C-IC) neurons, and descending corticofugal neurons of layer 5 (CF-5) and layer 6 (CF-6). Very brief air puffs (rise and fall times 0.6 ms) were delivered to the receptor periphery via a high-speed solenoid valve. 2. Whereas all CF-5 neurons had demonstrable suprathreshold excitatory and/or inhibitory responses to peripheral stimulation, most CC, C-IC, and CF-6 neurons did not. CC and CF-6 neurons that yielded no suprathreshold response to the stimulus had lower axonal conduction velocities than those that did respond (P < 0.0001 in both cases). However, subthreshold receptive fields could be demonstrated in many of the otherwise unresponsive CC (81%), C-IC (88%), and CF-6 (43%) neurons. The subthreshold responses usually consisted of an initial excitatory component (a decrease in the threshold to the JSCP) and a subsequent long-duration (> 80 ms) inhibitory component. A few neurons (1 CC, 1 C-IC, and 5 CF-6) showed an initial short latency inhibitory response in the absence of any excitatory component. 3. Some CC and C-IC neurons yielded supra- and/or subthreshold responses to peripheral stimulation at latencies of 6.1-7 ms. All such neurons were found at intermediate cortical depths (thought to correspond to deep layer 2

  20. Moro reflex

    MedlinePlus

    ... area into the arm may be present (these nerves are called brachial plexus). A Moro reflex in an older infant, child, or adult is ... be done to examine the child's muscles and nerves. Diagnostic ... absent reflex, may include: Shoulder x-ray Tests for disorders ...

  1. Effect of electrical water bath stunning on physical reflexes of broilers: evaluation of stunning efficacy under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Girasole, M; Marrone, R; Anastasio, A; Chianese, Antonio; Mercogliano, R; Cortesi, M L

    2016-05-01

    The effects of different amounts and frequencies of stunning sine wave alternating current were investigated under field conditions. Seven hundred and fifty broilers were stunned in an electrical water bath with an average root mean square (RMS) current of 150, 200, and 250 mA and frequencies of 200, 400, 600, 800, and 1,200 Hz. The occurrence of corneal reflex, spontaneous eye blinking, and a positive response to a painful stimulus were monitored and recorded immediately after the stunning and at 20 s post-stun. Statistical analysis showed that the electrical stunning frequency (P=0.0004), the stunning RMS current (P<0.0001) and the interaction between stunning frequency and stunning current (P<0.0001) had a significant effect on the occurrence of animals experiencing an abolition of corneal reflex at 20 s post-stun.At a current of 150 mA, the probability of a successful stun was over 90% at 200 Hz, approximately 40% at 400 Hz, and below 5% for frequencies greater than 600 Hz. So, stunning at frequencies greater than 600 Hz cannot be recommended when a RMS current of 150 mA is applied. The maximum probability of a successful stun was obtained for a current level of 200 mA at 400 Hz and for a current level of 250 mA at 400 and 600 Hz, whereas the stunning treatments at 1,200 Hz provided the lowest probability of a successful stun. Assessment of spontaneous eye blinking and responses to comb pinching confirmed the indications coming from the analysis of corneal reflex. PMID:26957628

  2. Serotonin 5-HT2 Receptors Induce a Long-Lasting Facilitation of Spinal Reflexes Independent of Ionotropic Receptor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Shay, Barbara L.; Sawchuk, Michael; Machacek, David W.; Hochman, Shawn

    2009-01-01

    Dorsal root-evoked stimulation of sensory afferents in the hemisected in vitro rat spinal cord produces reflex output, recorded on the ventral roots. Transient spinal 5-HT2C receptor activation induces a long-lasting facilitation of these reflexes (LLFR) by largely unknown mechanisms. Two Sprague-Dawley substrains were used to characterize network properties involved in this serotonin (5-HT) receptor-mediated reflex plasticity. Serotonin more easily produced LLFR in one substrain and a long-lasting depression of reflexes (LLDR) in the other. Interestingly, LLFR and LLDR were bidirectionally interconvertible using 5-HT2A/2C and 5-HT1A receptor agonists, respectively, regardless of substrain. LLFR was predominantly Aβ afferent fiber mediated, consistent with prominent 5-HT2C receptor expression in the Aβ fiber projection territories (deeper spinal laminae). Reflex facilitation involved an unmasking of polysynaptic pathways and an increased receptive field size. LLFR emerged even when reflexes were evoked three to five times/h, indicating an activity independent induction. Both the NMDA and AMPA/kainate receptor-mediated components of the reflex could be facilitated, and facilitation was dependent on 5-HT receptor activation alone, not on coincident reflex activation in the presence of 5-HT. Selective blockade of GABAA and/or glycine receptors also did not prevent reflex amplification and so are not required for LLFR. Indeed, a more robust response was seen after blockade of spinal inhibition, indicating that inhibitory processes serve to limit reflex amplification. Overall we demonstrate that the serotonergic system has the capacity to induce long-lasting bidirectional changes in reflex strength in a manner that is nonassociative and independent of evoked activity or activation of ionotropic excitatory and inhibitory receptors. PMID:16033939

  3. Feasibility analysis of digital single lens reflex applied in the field of aerospace measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xinghao; Li, Manliang; Tang, Xuehai

    2015-10-01

    The mainstrean digital single lens reflex (DSLR) image has the characteristics of true color and high quality, this paper proposes apply DSLR to probe spacecraft in order to obtain better quality Color images. Firstly, the performance parameters of mainstream DSLR and industrial-grade optical detector are analysed and compared detailedly; Secondly, the performance and positioning ways etc. of optical detector and DSLR system integrated special telephoto lens are analysed and compared. Furthermore, some experiments have been done in different conditions. The experiments indicate that the performances of DSLR and optical detector are similar. In addition, DSLR has the advantage of small size, low cost and Easy positioning, which can be used to obtain the scene of spacecraft in the takeoff phase and part of reentry phase.

  4. Central V4 Receptive Fields Are Scaled by the V1 Cortical Magnification and Correspond to a Constant Sized Sampling of the V1 Surface

    PubMed Central

    Motter, Brad C.

    2009-01-01

    The mapping of the topographic representation of the visual field onto cortical areas changes throughout the hierarchy of cortical visual areas. The changes are believed to reflect the establishment of modules with different spatial processing emphasis. The receptive fields (RFs) of neurons within these modules, however, may not be governed by the same spatial topographic map parameters. Here it is shown that the RFs of area V4 neurons (centered 1–12 degs in eccentricity) are based on a circularly symmetric sampling of the primary visual cortical retinotopic map. No eccentricity dependent magnification beyond that observed in V1 is apparent in the V4 neurons. The size and shape of V4 RFs can be explained by a simple, constant sized, 2D Gaussian sample of visual input from the retinotopic map laid out across the surface of V1. Inferences about the spatial scale of interactions within the receptive fields of neurons cannot be based on a visual area’s apparent cortical magnification derived from topographic mapping. PMID:19420243

  5. Differences in the time course of short-term depression across receptive fields are correlated with directional selectivity in electrosensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Chacron, Maurice J; Toporikova, Natalia; Fortune, Eric S

    2009-12-01

    Directional selectivity, in which neurons respond preferentially to one direction of movement ("preferred") over the opposite direction ("null"), is a critical computation that is found in the nervous systems of many animals. Here we show the first experimental evidence for a correlation between differences in short-term depression and direction-selective responses to moving objects. As predicted by quantitative models, the observed differences in the time courses of short-term depression at different locations within receptive fields were correlated with measures of direction selectivity in awake, behaving weakly electric fish (Apteronotus leptorhynchus). Because short-term depression is ubiquitous in the central nervous systems of vertebrate animals, it may be a common mechanism used for the generation of directional selectivity and other spatiotemporal computations. PMID:19793877

  6. Developmental Differences in Peripheral Glabrous Skin Mechanosensory Nerve Receptive Field and Intracellular Electrophysiologic Properties: Phenotypic Characterization in Infant and Juvenile Rats

    PubMed Central

    Boada, M. Danilo; Gutierrez, Silvia; Houle, Timothy; Eisenach, James C.; Ririe, Douglas G.

    2011-01-01

    Developmental differences in peripheral neuron characteristics and functionality exist. Direct measurement of active and passive electrophysiologic and receptive field characteristics of single mechanosensitive neurons in glabrous skin was performed and phenotypic characterization of fiber subtypes was applied to analyze developmental differences in peripheral mechanosensitive afferents. After Institutional approval, male Sprague-Dawley infant (P7: postnatal day 7) and juvenile (P28) rats were anesthetized and single cell intracellular electrophysiology was performed in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) soma of mechanosensitive cells with receptive field (RF) in the glabrous skin of the hindpaw. Passive and active electrical properties of the cells and RF size and characteristics determined. Fiber subtype classification was performed and developmental differences in fiber subtype properties analyzed. RF size was smaller at P7 for both low and high threshold mechanoreceptor (LTMR and HTMR) with no differences between A- and C-HTMR (AHTMR and CHTMR). The RF size was also correlated to anatomic location on glabrous skin, toes having smaller RF. Conduction velocity (CV) was adequate at P28 for AHTMR and CHTMR classification, but not at P7. Only width of the action potential at half height (D50) was significantly different between HTMR at P7, while D50, CV and Amplitude of the AP were significant for HTMR at P28. RF size is determined in part by the RF distribution of the peripheral neuron. Developmental differences in RF size occur with larger RF sizes occurring in younger animals. This is consistent with RF size differences determined by measuring RF in the spinal cord, except the peripheral RF is much smaller, more refined, and in some cases pinpoint. Developmental differences make CV alone unreliable for neuron classification. Utilizing integration of all measured parameters allows classification of neurons into subtypes even at the younger ages. This will prove

  7. Brain activations evoked by tactile stimulation varies with the intensity and not with number of receptive fields stimulated: An fMRI study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez Garzón, Y. T.; Pasaye, E. H.; Barrios, F. A.

    2014-11-01

    Using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) it is possible to study the functional anatomy of primary cortices. Cortical representations in the primary somatosensory cortex have shown discrepancies between activations related to the same body region in some studies; these differences have been more pronounced for lower limb representations. The aim of this study was to observe the influence of the tactile stimulus intensity in somatosensory cortical responses using fMRI. Based in the sensitivity and pain threshold of each subject, we used Von Frey filaments for stimulate 12 control subject in three receptive fields on the right thigh. One filament near to sensitivity threshold (VFS), other close to pain threshold (VFP) and one intermediate filament between the two previous thresholds (VFI). The tactile stimulation with VFS produced no activation on SI, while that the contralateral SI was activated by stimulation with VFI in 5 subjects and with the stimulation of VFP in all subjects. Second level statistical analysis showed significant differences between SI activations related to the stimulation with VFP and VFI (VFP > VFI), in the comparison between the applied different intensities, a small cluster of activation was observed on SI for the unique possible contrast (VFP > VFI). The time course per trial for each subject was extracted and averaged to extract the activation in the contralateral SI and compared across the stimulus modalities, between the sites of field receptive stimulated and the intensities used. The time course of tactile stimulus responses revealed a consistent single peak of activity per cycle (30 s), approximately 12 s after the onset of the stimulus, with exception of the VFI stimulation,_which showed the peak at 10 s. Thus, our results indicate that the cortical representation of a tactile stimulus with fMRI is modulated for the intensity of the stimulus applied.

  8. Simulation of motion on the skin. I. Receptive fields and temporal frequency coding by cutaneous mechanoreceptors of OPTACON pulses delivered to the hand.

    PubMed

    Gardner, E P; Palmer, C I

    1989-12-01

    1. Tactile discrimination of form requires motion of the hand across the object scanned. To dissociate lateral distortion of the skin from neuronal processing mechanisms involving multiple receptor classes and parallel central networks, we have simulated motion of bar patterns across the fingers and palm by the use of a computer-controlled grid of sequentially activated probes (OPTACON stimulator). Horizontal bar patterns have been swept across the hand at speeds of 30-120 mm/s to quantitatively characterize responses of cutaneous mechanoreceptive afferents recorded in the median and ulnar nerves. 2. Mechanoreceptors with phasic responses to pressure are activated by spatial patterns on the OPTACON, whereas those with tonic pressure responses are not; moving-bar patterns strongly excite both Meissner's afferents [rapidly adapting (RA) mechanoreceptors] and Pacinian corpuscles (PCs) but fail to excite slowly adapting (SA) afferents. OPTACON-type stimulators thus allow selective activation of phasic mechanoreceptor channels with spatially complex stimuli. 3. RA afferents respond in an all-or-none fashion to activation of two to five adjacent rows spanning 1-5 mm on the finger, with nearly identical latencies on all trials; response profiles are remarkable for their regularity and reproducibility. PCs have larger fields (4-13 rows) and stronger but more irregular responses than RAs. 4. Uniform sensitivity throughout the receptive field is a consistent feature of RA responses. Individual mechanoreceptor terminals appear to have equal access to the spike initiation zone and provide the same amplitude input as the fiber discharges 1 spike/pulse at each field location in 75% of the RAs tested. Uniform sensitivity allows each afferent to transmit a repetitive signal of the parameter of interest such as object speed, contour, or texture. 5. One-quarter of RAs fire two spikes to probe indentation and retraction at the field center. Such graded responses are usually observed

  9. Reflexives in Mohawk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonvillain, Nancy

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the meanings and uses of two reflexive morphemes in the Mohawk language. Reflexive "atat" is shown to have both reflexive and reciprocal meanings. It is also realized in kinship terms and in the transitive pronominal prefix "yutat." Semi-reflexive "at" has some reflexive functions, and can mark middle voice and…

  10. Covariation between Spike and LFP Modulations Revealed with Focal and Asynchronous Stimulation of Receptive Field Surround in Monkey Primary Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kayeon; Kim, Taekjun; Yoon, Taehwan; Lee, Choongkil

    2015-01-01

    A focal visual stimulus outside the classical receptive field (RF) of a V1 neuron does not evoke a spike response by itself, and yet evokes robust changes in the local field potential (LFP). This subthreshold LFP provides a unique opportunity to investigate how changes induced by surround stimulation leads to modulation of spike activity. In the current study, two identical Gabor stimuli were sequentially presented with a variable stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) ranging from 0 to 100 ms: the first (S1) outside the RF and the second (S2) over the RF of primary visual cortex neurons, while trained monkeys performed a fixation task. This focal and asynchronous stimulation of the RF surround enabled us to analyze the modulation of S2-evoked spike activity and covariation between spike and LFP modulation across SOA. In this condition, the modulation of S2-evoked spike response was dominantly facilitative and was correlated with the change in LFP amplitude, which was pronounced for the cells recorded in the upper cortical layers. The time course of covariation between the SOA-dependent spike modulation and LFP amplitude suggested that the subthreshold LFP evoked by the S1 can predict the magnitude of upcoming spike modulation. PMID:26670337

  11. Anatomical evidence for classical and extra-classical receptive field completion across the discontinuous horizontal meridian representation of primate area V2.

    PubMed

    Jeffs, Janelle; Ichida, Jennifer M; Federer, Frederick; Angelucci, Alessandra

    2009-04-01

    In primates, a split of the horizontal meridian (HM) representation at the V2 rostral border divides this area into dorsal (V2d) and ventral (V2v) halves (representing lower and upper visual quadrants, respectively), causing retinotopically neighboring loci across the HM to be distant within V2. How is perceptual continuity maintained across this discontinuous HM representation? Injections of neuroanatomical tracers in marmoset V2d demonstrated that cells near the V2d rostral border can maintain retinotopic continuity within their classical and extra-classical receptive field (RF), by making both local and long-range intra- and interareal connections with ventral cortex representing the upper visual quadrant. V2d neurons located <0.9-1.3 mm from the V2d rostral border, whose RFs presumably do not cross the HM, make nonretinotopic horizontal connections with V2v neurons in the supra- and infragranular layers. V2d neurons located <0.6-0.9 mm from the border, whose RFs presumably cross the HM, in addition make retinotopic local connections with V2v neurons in layer 4. V2d neurons also make interareal connections with upper visual field regions of extrastriate cortex, but not of MT or MTc outside the foveal representation. Labeled connections in ventral cortex appear to represent the "missing" portion of the connectional fields in V2d across the HM. We conclude that connections between dorsal and ventral cortex can create visual field continuity within a second-order discontinuous visual topography. PMID:18755777

  12. The visual development of hand-centered receptive fields in a neural network model of the primate visual system trained with experimentally recorded human gaze changes.

    PubMed

    Galeazzi, Juan M; Navajas, Joaquín; Mender, Bedeho M W; Quian Quiroga, Rodrigo; Minini, Loredana; Stringer, Simon M

    2016-01-01

    Neurons have been found in the primate brain that respond to objects in specific locations in hand-centered coordinates. A key theoretical challenge is to explain how such hand-centered neuronal responses may develop through visual experience. In this paper we show how hand-centered visual receptive fields can develop using an artificial neural network model, VisNet, of the primate visual system when driven by gaze changes recorded from human test subjects as they completed a jigsaw. A camera mounted on the head captured images of the hand and jigsaw, while eye movements were recorded using an eye-tracking device. This combination of data allowed us to reconstruct the retinal images seen as humans undertook the jigsaw task. These retinal images were then fed into the neural network model during self-organization of its synaptic connectivity using a biologically plausible trace learning rule. A trace learning mechanism encourages neurons in the model to learn to respond to input images that tend to occur in close temporal proximity. In the data recorded from human subjects, we found that the participant's gaze often shifted through a sequence of locations around a fixed spatial configuration of the hand and one of the jigsaw pieces. In this case, trace learning should bind these retinal images together onto the same subset of output neurons. The simulation results consequently confirmed that some cells learned to respond selectively to the hand and a jigsaw piece in a fixed spatial configuration across different retinal views. PMID:27253452

  13. Lateral spike conduction velocity in the visual cortex affects spatial range of synchronization and receptive field size without visual experience: a learning model with spiking neurons.

    PubMed

    Saam, M; Eckhorn, R

    2000-07-01

    Classical receptive fields (cRF) increase in size from the retina to higher visual centers. The present work shows how temporal properties, in particular lateral spike velocity and spike input correlation, can affect cRF size and position without visual experience. We demonstrate how these properties are related to the spatial range of cortical synchronization if Hebbian learning dominates early development. For this, a largely reduced model of two successive levels of the visual cortex is developed (e.g., areas V1 and V2). It consists of retinotopic networks of spiking neurons with constant spike velocity in lateral connections. Feedforward connections between level 1 and 2 are additive and determine cRF size and shape, while lateral connections within level 1 are modulatory and affect the cortical range of synchronization. Input during development is mimicked by spike trains with spatially homogeneous properties and a confined temporal correlation width. During learning, the homogeneous lateral coupling shrinks to limited coupling structures defining synchronization and related association fields (AF). The size of level-1 synchronization fields determines the lateral coupling range of developing level-1-to-2 connections and, thus, the size of level-2 cRFs, even if the feedforward connections have distance-independent delays. AFs and cRFs increase with spike velocity in the lateral network and temporal correlation width of the input. Our results suggest that AF size of V1 and cRF size of V2 neurons are confined during learning by the temporal width of input correlations and the spike velocity in lateral connections without the need of visual experience. During learning from visual experience, a similar influence of AF size on the cRF size may be operative at successive levels of processing, including other parts of the visual system. PMID:10933233

  14. Reflexives in Japanese

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kishida, Maki

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation is to reconsider reflexives in Japanese through the following three steps: (a) separation of genuine reflexive elements from elements that are confounded as reflexives, (b) classification of reflexive anaphors into subtypes based on their semantic difference, and (c) classification of predicates that occur with…

  15. Reflexives in Veracruz Huastec.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Constable, Peter G.

    A study examines various Huastec clause types that are reflexive in some sense, including ordinary reflexives, which involve co-reference. Two mutually exclusive morphosyntactic devices are used in Huastec: reflexive pronouns and verbal morphology. In this way, Huastec is like various European languages. Clauses involving reflexive pronouns and…

  16. Diversity Networking Reception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-03-01

    Join us at the APS Diversity Reception to relax, network with colleagues, and learn about programs and initiatives for women, underrepresented minorities, and LGBT physicists. You'll have a great time meeting friends in a supportive environment and making connections.

  17. Supersonic Leading Edge Receptivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maslov, Anatoly A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes experimental studies of leading edge boundary layer receptivity for imposed stream disturbances. Studies were conducted in the supersonic T-325 facility at ITAM and include data for both sharp and blunt leading edges. The data are in agreement with existing theory and should provide guidance for the development of more complete theories and numerical computations of this phenomena.

  18. Quantitative characterization reveals three types of dry-sensitive corneal afferents: pattern of discharge, receptive field, and thermal and chemical sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Fried, Nathan; Oshinsky, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    This study reveals that the cold-sensitive (CS) + dry-sensitive (DS) corneal afferents reported in a previous study consist of two types: 1) low threshold (LT)-CS + DS neurons with <1°C cooling sensitivity, and 2) high threshold (HT)-CS + DS neurons with a wide range of cooling sensitivities (∼1–10°C cooling). We also found DS neurons with no cooling sensitivity down to 19°C [cold-insensitive (CI) + DS neurons]. LT-CS + DS neurons showed highly irregular discharge patterns during the dry cornea characterized by numerous spiking bursts, reflecting small temperature changes in the cornea. Their receptive fields (RFs) were mainly located in the cornea's center, the first place for tears to ebb from the surface and be susceptible to external temperature fluctuations. HT-CS and CI + DS neurons showed a gradual rise in firing rate to a stable level over ∼60 s after the dry stimulus onset. Their RFs were located mostly in the cornea's periphery, the last place for tears to evaporate. The exquisite sensitivity to cooling in LT-CS + DS neurons was highly correlated with heat sensitivity (∼45°C). There was a perfect correlation between noxious heat sensitivity and capsaicin responsiveness in each neuron type. The high sensitivity to noxious osmotic stress was a defining property of the HT-CS and CI + DS neurons, while high sensitivity to menthol was a major characteristic of the LT-CS + DS neurons. These observations suggest that three types of DS neurons serve different innocuous and nociceptive functions related to corneal dryness. PMID:22914652

  19. More Gamma More Predictions: Gamma-Synchronization as a Key Mechanism for Efficient Integration of Classical Receptive Field Inputs with Surround Predictions

    PubMed Central

    Vinck, Martin; Bosman, Conrado A.

    2016-01-01

    During visual stimulation, neurons in visual cortex often exhibit rhythmic and synchronous firing in the gamma-frequency (30–90 Hz) band. Whether this phenomenon plays a functional role during visual processing is not fully clear and remains heavily debated. In this article, we explore the function of gamma-synchronization in the context of predictive and efficient coding theories. These theories hold that sensory neurons utilize the statistical regularities in the natural world in order to improve the efficiency of the neural code, and to optimize the inference of the stimulus causes of the sensory data. In visual cortex, this relies on the integration of classical receptive field (CRF) data with predictions from the surround. Here we outline two main hypotheses about gamma-synchronization in visual cortex. First, we hypothesize that the precision of gamma-synchronization reflects the extent to which CRF data can be accurately predicted by the surround. Second, we hypothesize that different cortical columns synchronize to the extent that they accurately predict each other’s CRF visual input. We argue that these two hypotheses can account for a large number of empirical observations made on the stimulus dependencies of gamma-synchronization. Furthermore, we show that they are consistent with the known laminar dependencies of gamma-synchronization and the spatial profile of intercolumnar gamma-synchronization, as well as the dependence of gamma-synchronization on experience and development. Based on our two main hypotheses, we outline two additional hypotheses. First, we hypothesize that the precision of gamma-synchronization shows, in general, a negative dependence on RF size. In support, we review evidence showing that gamma-synchronization decreases in strength along the visual hierarchy, and tends to be more prominent in species with small V1 RFs. Second, we hypothesize that gamma-synchronized network dynamics facilitate the emergence of spiking output that

  20. Coarse-to-fine changes of receptive fields in lateral geniculate nucleus have a transient and a sustained component that depend on distinct mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Einevoll, Gaute T; Jurkus, Paulius; Heggelund, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Visual processing in the brain seems to provide fast but coarse information before information about fine details. Such dynamics occur also in single neurons at several levels of the visual system. In the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN), neurons have a receptive field (RF) with antagonistic center-surround organization, and temporal changes in center-surround organization are generally assumed to be due to a time-lag of the surround activity relative to center activity. Spatial resolution may be measured as the inverse of center size, and in LGN neurons RF-center width changes during static stimulation with durations in the range of normal fixation periods (250-500 ms) between saccadic eye-movements. The RF-center is initially large, but rapidly shrinks during the first ~100 ms to a rather sustained size. We studied such dynamics in anesthetized cats during presentation (250 ms) of static spots centered on the RF with main focus on the transition from the first transient and highly dynamic component to the second more sustained component. The results suggest that the two components depend on different neuronal mechanisms that operate in parallel and with partial temporal overlap rather than on a continuously changing center-surround balance. Results from mathematical modeling further supported this conclusion. We found that existing models for the spatiotemporal RF of LGN neurons failed to account for our experimental results. The modeling demonstrated that a new model, in which the response is given by a sum of an early transient component and a partially overlapping sustained component, adequately accounts for our experimental data. PMID:21931739

  1. More Gamma More Predictions: Gamma-Synchronization as a Key Mechanism for Efficient Integration of Classical Receptive Field Inputs with Surround Predictions.

    PubMed

    Vinck, Martin; Bosman, Conrado A

    2016-01-01

    During visual stimulation, neurons in visual cortex often exhibit rhythmic and synchronous firing in the gamma-frequency (30-90 Hz) band. Whether this phenomenon plays a functional role during visual processing is not fully clear and remains heavily debated. In this article, we explore the function of gamma-synchronization in the context of predictive and efficient coding theories. These theories hold that sensory neurons utilize the statistical regularities in the natural world in order to improve the efficiency of the neural code, and to optimize the inference of the stimulus causes of the sensory data. In visual cortex, this relies on the integration of classical receptive field (CRF) data with predictions from the surround. Here we outline two main hypotheses about gamma-synchronization in visual cortex. First, we hypothesize that the precision of gamma-synchronization reflects the extent to which CRF data can be accurately predicted by the surround. Second, we hypothesize that different cortical columns synchronize to the extent that they accurately predict each other's CRF visual input. We argue that these two hypotheses can account for a large number of empirical observations made on the stimulus dependencies of gamma-synchronization. Furthermore, we show that they are consistent with the known laminar dependencies of gamma-synchronization and the spatial profile of intercolumnar gamma-synchronization, as well as the dependence of gamma-synchronization on experience and development. Based on our two main hypotheses, we outline two additional hypotheses. First, we hypothesize that the precision of gamma-synchronization shows, in general, a negative dependence on RF size. In support, we review evidence showing that gamma-synchronization decreases in strength along the visual hierarchy, and tends to be more prominent in species with small V1 RFs. Second, we hypothesize that gamma-synchronized network dynamics facilitate the emergence of spiking output that is

  2. The visual development of hand-centered receptive fields in a neural network model of the primate visual system trained with experimentally recorded human gaze changes

    PubMed Central

    Galeazzi, Juan M.; Navajas, Joaquín; Mender, Bedeho M. W.; Quian Quiroga, Rodrigo; Minini, Loredana; Stringer, Simon M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Neurons have been found in the primate brain that respond to objects in specific locations in hand-centered coordinates. A key theoretical challenge is to explain how such hand-centered neuronal responses may develop through visual experience. In this paper we show how hand-centered visual receptive fields can develop using an artificial neural network model, VisNet, of the primate visual system when driven by gaze changes recorded from human test subjects as they completed a jigsaw. A camera mounted on the head captured images of the hand and jigsaw, while eye movements were recorded using an eye-tracking device. This combination of data allowed us to reconstruct the retinal images seen as humans undertook the jigsaw task. These retinal images were then fed into the neural network model during self-organization of its synaptic connectivity using a biologically plausible trace learning rule. A trace learning mechanism encourages neurons in the model to learn to respond to input images that tend to occur in close temporal proximity. In the data recorded from human subjects, we found that the participant’s gaze often shifted through a sequence of locations around a fixed spatial configuration of the hand and one of the jigsaw pieces. In this case, trace learning should bind these retinal images together onto the same subset of output neurons. The simulation results consequently confirmed that some cells learned to respond selectively to the hand and a jigsaw piece in a fixed spatial configuration across different retinal views. PMID:27253452

  3. Computational Identification of Receptive Fields

    PubMed Central

    Sharpee, Tatyana O.

    2013-01-01

    Natural stimuli elicit robust responses of neurons throughout sensory pathways, and therefore their use provides unique opportunities for understanding sensory coding. This review describes statistical methods that can be used to characterize neural feature selectivity, focusing on the case of natural stimuli. First, we will discuss how such classic methods as reverse correlation/spike-triggered average and spike-triggered covariance can be generalized for use with natural stimuli to find the multiple “relevant” stimulus features that affect the responses of a given neuron. Second, ways to characterize neural feature selectivity while assuming that the neural responses exhibit a certain type of invariance, such as position invariance for visual neurons will be discussed. Finally, we discuss methods do not require one to make an assumption of invariance, and instead can determine the type of invariance by analyzing relationship between the multiple stimulus features that affect the neural responses. PMID:23841838

  4. Portraying Reflexivity in Health Services Research.

    PubMed

    Rae, John; Green, Bill

    2016-09-01

    A model is proposed for supporting reflexivity in qualitative health research, informed by arguments from Bourdieu and Finlay. Bourdieu refers to mastering the subjective relation to the object at three levels-the overall social space, the field of specialists, and the scholastic universe. The model overlays Bourdieu's levels of objectivation with Finlay's three stages of research (pre-research, data collection, and data analysis). The intersections of these two ways of considering reflexivity, displayed as cells of a matrix, pose questions and offer prompts to productively challenge health researchers' reflexivity. Portraiture is used to show how these challenges and prompts can facilitate such reflexivity, as illustrated in a research project. PMID:26935721

  5. Comparison of LFP-based and spike-based spectro-temporal receptive fields and cross-correlation in cat primary auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Eggermont, Jos J; Munguia, Raymundo; Pienkowski, Martin; Shaw, Greg

    2011-01-01

    Multi-electrode array recordings of spike and local field potential (LFP) activity were made from primary auditory cortex of 12 normal hearing, ketamine-anesthetized cats. We evaluated 259 spectro-temporal receptive fields (STRFs) and 492 frequency-tuning curves (FTCs) based on LFPs and spikes simultaneously recorded on the same electrode. We compared their characteristic frequency (CF) gradients and their cross-correlation distances. The CF gradient for spike-based FTCs was about twice that for 2-40 Hz-filtered LFP-based FTCs, indicating greatly reduced frequency selectivity for LFPs. We also present comparisons for LFPs band-pass filtered between 4-8 Hz, 8-16 Hz and 16-40 Hz, with spike-based STRFs, on the basis of their marginal frequency distributions. We find on average a significantly larger correlation between the spike based marginal frequency distributions and those based on the 16-40 Hz filtered LFP, compared to those based on the 4-8 Hz, 8-16 Hz and 2-40 Hz filtered LFP. This suggests greater frequency specificity for the 16-40 Hz LFPs compared to those of lower frequency content. For spontaneous LFP and spike activity we evaluated 1373 pair correlations for pairs with >200 spikes in 900 s per electrode. Peak correlation-coefficient space constants were similar for the 2-40 Hz filtered LFP (5.5 mm) and the 16-40 Hz LFP (7.4 mm), whereas for spike-pair correlations it was about half that, at 3.2 mm. Comparing spike-pairs with 2-40 Hz (and 16-40 Hz) LFP-pair correlations showed that about 16% (9%) of the variance in the spike-pair correlations could be explained from LFP-pair correlations recorded on the same electrodes within the same electrode array. This larger correlation distance combined with the reduced CF gradient and much broader frequency selectivity suggests that LFPs are not a substitute for spike activity in primary auditory cortex. PMID:21625385

  6. Education & Diversity Reception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-03-01

    Join us to relax, unwind, and recognize new fellows and award winners at the Education & Diversity Reception sponsored by the Forum on Education, the Committee on Minorities, and the Committee on the Status of Women in Physics. We will recognize new Forum on Education Fellows, recipients of the Committee on Education's Award for Improving Undergraduate Physics Education, as well as women and minority physicists who have received APS prizes, awards, and fellowships. Light refreshments will be served. All are welcome; no registration required.

  7. Embodied Self-Reflexivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagis, Michal

    2009-01-01

    Drawing on G. H. Mead and Merleau-Ponty, this paper aims to extend our understanding of self-reflexivity beyond the notion of a discursive, abstract, and symbolic process. It offers a framework for embodied self-reflexivity, which anchors the self in the reflexive capacity of bodily sensations. The data consist of two years of ethnographic…

  8. Reception of Aversive Taste.

    PubMed

    Lunceford, Blair E; Kubanek, Julia

    2015-09-01

    Many organisms encounter noxious or unpalatable compounds in their diets. Thus, a robust reception-system for aversive taste is necessary for an individual's survival; however, mechanisms for perceiving aversive taste vary among organisms. Possession of a system sensitive to aversive taste allows for recognition of a vast array of noxious molecules via membrane-bound receptors, co-receptors, and ion channels. These receptor-ligand interactions trigger signal transduction pathways resulting in activation of nerves and in neural processing, which in turn dictates behavior, including rejection of the noxious item. The impacts of these molecular processes on behavior differ among species, and these differences have impacts at the ecosystem level by driving feeding-behavior, organization of communities, and ultimately, speciation. For example, when comparing mammalian carnivores and herbivores, it is not surprising that herbivores that encounter a variety of toxic plants in their diets express a larger number of aversive taste receptors than carnivores. Comparing the molecular mechanisms and ecological consequences of aversive-taste reception among organisms in a variety of types of ecosystems and ecological niches will illuminate the role of taste in ecology and evolution. PMID:26025470

  9. Interior view of Gold Star Mothers' reception room from northwest. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view of Gold Star Mothers' reception room from northwest. Note c. 1935 furniture and fireplace with early electric grate. - Flanders Field American Cemetery & Memorial, Superintendent's Quarters, Wortegemseweg 117, Waregem, West Flanders (Belgium)

  10. What is a reflex?

    PubMed Central

    Truog, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    Uncertainty in diagnosing disorders of consciousness, and specifically in determining whether consciousness has been lost or retained, poses challenging scientific and ethical questions. Recent neuroimaging-based tests for consciousness have cast doubt on the reliability of behavioral criteria in assessing states of consciousness and generate new questions about the assumptions used in formulating coherent diagnostic criteria. The reflex, a foundational diagnostic tool, offers unique insight into these disorders; behaviors produced by unconscious patients are thought to be purely reflexive, whereas those produced by conscious patients can be volitional. Further investigation, however, reveals that reflexes cannot be reliably distinguished from conscious behaviors on the basis of any generalizable empirical characteristics. Ambiguity between reflexive and conscious behaviors undermines the capacity of the reflex to distinguish between disorders of consciousness and has implications for how these disorders should be conceptualized in future diagnostic criteria. PMID:26085602

  11. Bourdieu and Science Studies: Toward a Reflexive Sociology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Two of Bourdieu's fundamental contributions to science studies--the reflexive analysis of the social and human sciences and the concept of an intellectual field--are used to frame a reflexive study of the history and social studies of science and technology as an intellectual field in the United States. The universe of large, Ph.D.-granting…

  12. On Reflexive Data Models

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, S.

    2000-08-20

    An information system is reflexive if it stores a description of its current structure in the body of stored information and is acting on the base of this information. A data model is reflexive, if its language is meta-closed and can be used to build such a system. The need for reflexive data models in new areas of information technology applications is argued. An attempt to express basic notions related to information systems is made in the case when the system supports and uses meta-closed representation of the data.

  13. Boundary layer receptivity and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, D. C.

    1993-01-01

    Receptivity processes initiate natural instabilities in a boundary layer. The instabilities grow and eventually break down to turbulence. Consequently, receptivity questions are a critical element of the analysis of the transition process. Success in modeling the physics of receptivity processes thus has a direct bearing on technological issues of drag reduction. The means by which transitional flows can be controlled is also a major concern: questions of control are tied inevitably to those of receptivity. Adjoint systems provide a highly effective mathematical method for approaching many of the questions associated with both receptivity and control. The long term objective is to develop adjoint methods to handle increasingly complex receptivity questions, and to find systematic procedures for deducing effective control strategies. The most elementary receptivity problem is that in which a parallel boundary layer is forced by time-harmonic sources of various types. The characteristics of the response to such forcing form the building blocks for more complex receptivity mechanisms. The first objective of this year's research effort was to investigate how a parallel Blasius boundary layer responds to general direct forcing. Acoustic disturbances in the freestream can be scattered by flow non-uniformities to produce Tollmien-Schlichting waves. For example, scattering by surface roughness is known to provide an efficient receptivity path. The present effort is directed towards finding a solution by a simple adjoint analysis, because adjoint methods can be extended to more complex problems. In practice, flows are non-parallel and often three-dimensional. Compressibility may also be significant in some cases. Recent developments in the use of Parabolized Stability Equations (PSE) offer a promising possibility. By formulating and solving a set of adjoint parabolized equations, a method for mapping the efficiency with which external forcing excites the three

  14. [The endonasopalpebral reflex].

    PubMed

    Vinnitskiĭ, A R; Vinnitskaia, N V

    1989-06-01

    The authors describe the endonasopalpebral reflex which is evoked from the nasal mucosa. Reduction of this reflex may be used as a fine index of involvement of the trigeminus in patients with acoustic neuromas. This makes it possible to differentiate this tumour at early stages of its development from neuritis of the acoustic nerve. This is of great importance for this pathological situation. PMID:2781776

  15. Reflex operculoinsular seizures.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Handsun; Tran, Thi Phuoc Yen; Pétrin, Myriam; Boucher, Olivier; Mohamed, Ismail; Bouthillier, Alain; Nguyen, Dang Khoa

    2016-03-01

    Activation of specific cortical territories by certain stimuli is known to trigger focal seizures. We report three cases of well documented operculo-insular reflex seizures, triggered by somatosensory stimuli in two and loud noises in the third. Limited operculoinsular resection resulted in an excellent outcome for all. We discuss these observations in regard to the literature on reflex epilepsy and known functions of the insula. [Published with video sequences online]. PMID:26892245

  16. Endometrial receptivity array: Clinical application.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Nalini

    2015-01-01

    Human implantation is a complex process requiring synchrony between a healthy embryo and a functionally competent or receptive endometrium. Diagnosis of endometrial receptivity (ER) has posed a challenge and so far most available tests have been subjective and lack accuracy and a predictive value. Microarray technology has allowed identification of the transcriptomic signature of the window of receptivity window of implantation (WOI). This technology has led to the development of a molecular diagnostic tool, the ER array (ERA) for diagnosis of ER. Use of this test in patients with recurrent implantation failure (RIF) has shown that the WOI is displaced in a quarter of these patients and use of a personalized embryo transfer (pET) on the day designated by ERA improves reproductive performance. Our results in the Indian population revealed an endometrial factor in 27.5% RIF patients, which was significantly greater than the non-RIF group 15% (P = 0.04). After pET, the overall ongoing pregnancy rate was 42.4% and implantation rate was 33%, which was at par with our in-vitro fertilization results over 1-year. We also performed ERA in patients with persistently thin endometrium, and it was reassuring to find that the endometrium in 75% of these patients was receptive despite being 6 mm or less. A pregnancy rate of 66.7% was achieved in this group. Though larger studies are required to validate these results ERA has become a useful tool in our diagnostic armamentarium for ER. PMID:26538853

  17. Endometrial receptivity array: Clinical application

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Nalini

    2015-01-01

    Human implantation is a complex process requiring synchrony between a healthy embryo and a functionally competent or receptive endometrium. Diagnosis of endometrial receptivity (ER) has posed a challenge and so far most available tests have been subjective and lack accuracy and a predictive value. Microarray technology has allowed identification of the transcriptomic signature of the window of receptivity window of implantation (WOI). This technology has led to the development of a molecular diagnostic tool, the ER array (ERA) for diagnosis of ER. Use of this test in patients with recurrent implantation failure (RIF) has shown that the WOI is displaced in a quarter of these patients and use of a personalized embryo transfer (pET) on the day designated by ERA improves reproductive performance. Our results in the Indian population revealed an endometrial factor in 27.5% RIF patients, which was significantly greater than the non-RIF group 15% (P = 0.04). After pET, the overall ongoing pregnancy rate was 42.4% and implantation rate was 33%, which was at par with our in-vitro fertilization results over 1-year. We also performed ERA in patients with persistently thin endometrium, and it was reassuring to find that the endometrium in 75% of these patients was receptive despite being 6 mm or less. A pregnancy rate of 66.7% was achieved in this group. Though larger studies are required to validate these results ERA has become a useful tool in our diagnostic armamentarium for ER. PMID:26538853

  18. The Receptive Side of Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hruska, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    When observing teachers in action, one is likely to witness explaining, modeling, managing, guiding, and encouraging. These expressive behaviors constitute a directive force moving outward from teacher to students. Though less visible to an outside observer, teaching also requires receptive skills, the ability to take in information by being fully…

  19. Human flexor reflexes

    PubMed Central

    Shahani, Bhagwan T.; Young, Robert R.

    1971-01-01

    One type of flexor reflex, that recorded from the tibialis anterior muscle in response to electrical stimulation of the sole of the foot, was studied in normal subjects and patients with several neurological disorders. Normally this reflex consists of two components, the second of which is related to the actual withdrawal. The first component, normally of lower threshold, is difficult to evoke in patients with chronic spinal cord or discrete cerebral lesions, whereas it has an unusually low threshold and is very clearly seen in those with Parkinson's disease. In patients with spinal cord disease, the exaggerated flexor reflexes are seen at long latencies after relatively small stimuli. During the early phase of recovery from spinal transection, both components may be seen and are, therefore, spinal in origin. Studies of patients with the sensory neuropathy of Friedreich's ataxia suggest that the afferent fibres responsible for these flexor reflexes are the small myelinated fibres. Recovery curves demonstrate very long-lasting changes in flexor reflex excitability in normal subjects and patients with `spasticity' from spinal lesions. This differs in patients with `spasticity' from lesions rostral to the brain-stem. Examples in man of such physiological phenomena as reciprocal inhibition, local sign, habituation, temporal and spatial summation are discussed. Images PMID:5122389

  20. Corneomandibular reflex: Anatomical basis

    PubMed Central

    Pistacchi, Michele; Gioulis, Manuela; Mazzon, Davide; Marsala, Sandro Zambito

    2015-01-01

    Corneomandibular reflex is a pathological phenomenon evident in cases of severe brainstem damage. It is considered to be a pathological exteroceptive reflex, associated with precentro bulbar tract lesions. The sign is useful in distinguishing central neurological injuries to metabolic disorders in acutely comatose patients, localizing lesions to the upper brainstem area, determining the depth of coma and its evolution, providing evidence of uncal or transtentorial herniation in acute cerebral hemisphere lesions, and it is a marker of supraspinal level impairment in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and multiple sclerosis. This sign was evident in a patient with severe brain damage. We discuss the literature findings and its relevance in prognosis establishment. PMID:26752910

  1. Experimenting With Baroreceptor Reflexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckberg, Dwain L.; Goble, Ross L.

    1988-01-01

    Carotid arteries stimulated by pressure or suction on neck. Baro-Cuff is silicone-rubber chamber that fits on front of subject's neck. Electronic system, stepping motor, bellows, and umbilical tube furnish controlled pressure to chamber. Pressure sensor provides feedback to microprocessor in electronic system. Developed to study blood-pressure-reflex responses of astronauts in outer space. Useful for terrestrial studies of patients with congestive heart failure, chronic diabetes mellitus, and other conditions in which blood-pressure-reflex controls behave abnormally.

  2. Reflexivity in Pigeons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeney, Mary M.; Urcuioli, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    A recent theory of pigeons' equivalence-class formation (Urcuioli, 2008) predicts that reflexivity, an untrained ability to match a stimulus to itself, should be observed after training on two "mirror-image" symbolic successive matching tasks plus identity successive matching using some of the symbolic matching stimuli. One group of pigeons was…

  3. Measuring bilingual children's receptive vocabularies.

    PubMed

    Umbel, V M; Pearson, B Z; Fernández, M C; Oller, D K

    1992-08-01

    Receptive vocabulary of Hispanic children in Miami was tested in both English and Spanish with complementary standardized tests, the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT-R) and the Test de Vocabulario en Imágenes Peabody (TVIP-H). 105 bilingual first graders, of middle to high socioeconomic status relative to national norms, were divided according to the language(s) spoken in their homes. Both groups, whether they spoke only Spanish in the home (OSH) or both English and Spanish in the home (ESH), performed near the mean of 100 in Spanish receptive vocabulary (TVIP-H means 97.0 and 96.5); in contrast, ESH group children scored more than 1 SD higher in English than OSH group children (PPVT-R means 88.0 and 69.7, respectively). It appears, therefore, that learning 2 languages at once does not harm receptive language development in the language of origin, while it does lay the groundwork for superior performance in the majority language. Furthermore, an analysis of translation equivalents, items shared by both tests, shows that a statistically significant portion of bilingual children's lexical knowledge does not overlap in their 2 languages and is therefore not reflected in single-language scores. PMID:1505238

  4. Nonlocalized receptivity of boundary layers to three-dimensional disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouch, J. D.; Bertolotti, F. P.

    1992-01-01

    The nonlocalized receptivity of the Blasius boundary layer over a wavy surface is analyzed using two different approaches. First, a mode-interaction theory is employed to unveil basic mechanisms and to explore the interplay between different components of the disturbance field. The second approach is derived from the parabolized stability equations. These nonlinear equations incorporate the effects of the stream-wise divergence of the boundary layer. The analysis provides results for three-dimensional disturbances and also considers nonparallel effects. Results for two-dimensional disturbances demonstrate that nonparallel effects are negligible and substantiates the mechanism described by the mode-interaction theory. Nonparallel effects become significant with increasing three-dimensionality. Receptivity amplitudes are shown to be large over a broad range of surface wave numbers. When operative, this mechanism is likely to dominate the boundary-layer receptivity.

  5. Sensory nerve crush and regeneration and the receptive fields and response properties of neurons in the primary somatosensory cerebral cortex of cats.

    PubMed

    Brandenberg, G A; Mann, M D

    1989-03-01

    Extracellular recordings were made of activity evoked in neurons of the forepaw focus of somatosensory cerebral cortex by electrical stimulation of each paw in control cats and cats that had undergone crush injury of all cutaneous sensory nerves to the contralateral forepaw 31 to 63 days previously. Neurons responding only to stimulation of the contralateral forepaw were classified as sa; neurons responding to stimulation of both forepaws were classified as sb; neurons responding to stimulation of both contralateral paws were classified as sc; and neurons responding to stimulation of at least three paws were classified as m. The ratio sa:sb:sc:m neurons was 46:3:0:0 in control cats and 104:15:3:26 in cats that had undergone nerve crush 1-2 months prior to study. sa neurons from experimental cats had depth distributions similar to those in controls and responded to contralateral forepaw stimulation with more spikes per discharge, longer latency, and higher threshold than sa neurons in control cats. m neurons from experimental cats were distributed deeper in the cortex than sa neurons, and, when compared to experimental sa neurons, they responded with longer latency and poorer frequency-following ability; however, the number of spikes per discharge and threshold were not significantly different. The appearance of wide-field neurons in this tissue may be explained in terms of strengthening of previously sub-threshold inputs to neurons in the somatosensory system. If the neurons in sensory cortex play a requisite role in cutaneous sensations and if changes similar to those reported here occur and persist in human cortex after nerve crush, then "complete" recovery of sensation in such patients may occur against a background of changed cortical neuronal responsiveness. PMID:2920791

  6. Mentalis muscle related reflexes.

    PubMed

    Gündüz, Ayşegül; Uyanık, Özlem; Ertürk, Özdem; Sohtaoğlu, Melis; Kızıltan, Meral Erdemir

    2016-05-01

    The mentalis muscle (MM) arises from the incisive fossa of the mandible, raises and protrudes the lower lip. Here, we aim to characterize responses obtained from MM by supraorbital and median electrical as well as auditory stimuli in a group of 16 healthy volunteers who did not have clinical palmomental reflex. Reflex activities were recorded from the MM and orbicularis oculi (O.oc) after supraorbital and median electrical as well as auditory stimuli. Response rates over MM were consistent after each stimulus, however, mean latencies of MM response were longer than O.oc responses by all stimulation modalities. Shapes and amplitudes of responses from O.oc and MM were similar. Based on our findings, we may say that MM motoneurons have connections with trigeminal, vestibulocochlear and lemniscal pathways similar to other facial muscles and electrophysiological recording of MM responses after electrical and auditory stimulation is possible in healthy subjects. PMID:26721248

  7. Corporeal reflexivity and autism.

    PubMed

    Ochs, Elinor

    2015-06-01

    Ethnographic video recordings of high functioning children with autism or Aspergers Syndrome in everyday social encounters evidence their first person perspectives. High quality visual and audio data allow detailed analysis of children's bodies and talk as loci of reflexivity. Corporeal reflexivity involves displays of awareness of one's body as an experiencing subject and a physical object accessible to the gaze of others. Gaze, demeanor, actions, and sotto voce commentaries on unfolding situations indicate a range of moment-by-moment reflexive responses to social situations. Autism is associated with neurologically based motor problems (e.g. delayed action-goal coordination, clumsiness) and highly repetitive movements to self-soothe. These behaviors can provoke derision among classmates at school. Focusing on a 9-year-old girl's encounters with peers on the playground, this study documents precisely how autistic children can become enmeshed as unwitting objects of stigma and how they reflect upon their social rejection as it transpires. Children with autism spectrum disorders in laboratory settings manifest diminished understandings of social emotions such as embarrassment, as part of a more general impairment in social perspective-taking. Video ethnography, however, takes us further, into discovering autistic children's subjective sense of vulnerability to the gaze of classmates. PMID:25939529

  8. [Principle of least action, physiology of vision, and conditioned reflexes theory].

    PubMed

    Shelepin, Iu E; Krasil'nikov, N N

    2003-06-01

    The variation principles such as principle of least action by Maupertuis (1740) and Fermat principle (1660) are fundamental for physics. They permit to establish a property by which the actual state is differing from all possible states of the system. The variation approach permits to establish equation of motion and equilibrium of a material system on the basis of one common rule which reduces to the search of the function extremes, describes this property of the system. So for the optical systems, crucial is the time and not the length of the way. According to Fermat principles, the light "choosen" from all possible ways connects two dots in the way which needs the least time. Generality of the variation principles guarantees success of their use in brain function investigations. Between different attempts to apply the variation principles to psychology and linguistics, the Zipf principle of least effort must be distinguished. Zipf (1949) demonstrated that languages and some artificial codes satisfied the least principle. For the brain physiology, classical conditioned reflex theory is the ideal area of variation principles application. According to this approach, conditioning leads to finding the extreme during fixation of the temporal link. In vision, physiological investigations are difficult because the signal has many dimensions. For example, during perception of spatial properties of surrounding world, in vision is realized minimization (reduction) of spatial-frequency spectrum of the scene. The receptive fields provide optimal accumulation of the signal. In ontogenesis, signal--noise ratio becomes optimal as receptive fields minimized the internal noise spectrum. According to the theory of match filtration, in the visual system recognition is carryied out by minimal differences between the image description in the visual system and storage in the human memory template of that image. The variation principles help to discover the physical property of

  9. [Laryngeal and larynx-associated reflexes].

    PubMed

    Ptok, M; Kühn, D; Miller, S; Jungheim, M; Schroeter, S

    2016-06-01

    The laryngeal adductor reflex and the pharyngoglottal closure reflex protect the trachea and lower respiratory tract against the entrance of foreign material. The laryngeal expiration reflex and the cough reflex serve to propel foreign material, which has penetrated in the cranial direction. The inspiration reflex, the sniff reflex, and the swallowing reflex are further larynx-associated reflexes. In patients with dysphagia the laryngeal adductor reflex can be clinically tested with air pulses. The water swallow test serves to show the integrity of the cough reflex. The sniff reflex is useful to test the abduction function of the vocal folds. Future studies should address laryngeal reflexes more specifically, both for a better understanding of these life-supporting mechanisms and to improve diagnostic procedures in patients with impaired laryngeal function. PMID:27240793

  10. Analysing responses to climate change through the lens of reflexivity.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Debra

    2012-12-01

    Sociologists are increasingly directing attention toward social responses to climate change. As is true of any new field of inquiry, theoretical frameworks guiding the research to date have room for improvement. One advance could be achieved through closer engagement with Reflexivity Theory, particularly the work of Margaret Archer, who asks just how individuals come to give attention to certain problems, and formulate responses to them. Individuals vary significantly in regard to their understanding of and concern for anthropogenic climate change, and these standpoints in turn influence commitment to mitigation and adaptation. The emergent social interactions among all such agents in turn influence the morphogenetic trajectories through which social structures will evolve, but the role of 'meta-reflexives' is particularly crucial. Identifying pathways of individual climate change reflexivity can make a valuable contribution to our understanding of the potential for and nature of collective responses. In this paper, I explore climate change reflexivity, with particular attention to climate change meta-reflexives, through a qualitative analysis of personal interviews with residents of two small communities in Alberta, Canada. Applying Reflexivity Theory to this context articulates dimensions of reflexive processing not elaborated in current theoretical treatments, including future outlook and comfort with uncertainty, among others. PMID:23240835

  11. Patterning of somatosympathetic reflexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerman, I. A.; Yates, B. J.

    1999-01-01

    In a previous study, we reported that vestibular nerve stimulation in the cat elicits a specific pattern of sympathetic nerve activation, such that responses are particularly large in the renal nerve. This patterning of vestibulosympathetic reflexes was the same in anesthetized and decerebrate preparations. In the present study, we report that inputs from skin and muscle also elicit a specific patterning of sympathetic outflow, which is distinct from that produced by vestibular stimulation. Renal, superior mesenteric, and lumbar colonic nerves respond most strongly to forelimb and hindlimb nerve stimulation (approximately 60% of maximal nerve activation), whereas external carotid and hypogastric nerves were least sensitive to these inputs (approximately 20% of maximal nerve activation). In contrast to vestibulosympathetic reflexes, the expression of responses to skin and muscle afferent activation differs in decerebrate and anesthetized animals. In baroreceptor-intact animals, somatosympathetic responses were strongly attenuated (to <20% of control in every nerve) by increasing blood pressure levels to >150 mmHg. These findings demonstrate that different types of somatic inputs elicit specific patterns of sympathetic nerve activation, presumably generated through distinct neural circuits.

  12. Brain lesions affect penile reflexes.

    PubMed

    Monaghan, E P; Arjomand, J; Breedlove, S M

    1993-03-01

    Electrolytic lesions of several potential brain afferents to the spinal nucleus of the bulbocavernosus (SNB) affect the display of penile reflexes. Ablation of the median and pontine raphe areas significantly potentiates the expression of cups and flips. Animals with a bilateral lesion of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus have a shorter latency to the first erection but otherwise display normal reflex behavior. Although bilateral destruction of the lateral vestibular nucleus (LVN) completely eliminated penile reflex activity, it also caused significant motor impairment thus clouding conclusions concerning the normal role of the LVN in penile reflex behavior. These and other results support the hypothesis that these brain regions which project to the SNB region normally modulate spinal reflex behavior of the rat penis. PMID:8440513

  13. [Reflex seizures, cinema and television].

    PubMed

    Olivares-Romero, Jesús

    2015-12-16

    In movies and television series are few references to seizures or reflex epilepsy even though in real life are an important subgroup of total epileptic syndromes. It has performed a search on the topic, identified 25 films in which they appear reflex seizures. Most seizures observed are tonic-clonic and visual stimuli are the most numerous, corresponding all with flashing lights. The emotions are the main stimuli in higher level processes. In most cases it is not possible to know if a character suffers a reflex epilepsy or suffer reflex seizures in the context of another epileptic syndrome. The main conclusion is that, in the movies, the reflex seizures are merely a visual reinforcing and anecdotal element without significant influence on the plot. PMID:26662874

  14. Encouraging Reflexivity in Urban Geography Fieldwork: Study Abroad Experiences in Singapore and Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Fieldwork in urban geography courses can encourage reflexivity among students regarding the cities they encounter. This article outlines how student reflexivity was encouraged within a new international field research course in Singapore and Malaysia. Drawing on examples from students' field exercises written during an intensive and…

  15. ["Reflex--in a strict sense". Ivan Michajlovic Secenov and the founding myths of the 'Russian reflex empire'].

    PubMed

    Wurm, Barbara

    2009-03-01

    This paper aims to reconstruct Ivan Michajlovik Secenov's impact on reflex theory by looking at the different narratives which constitute his specific position in the history of science, where he is considered the Russian founder of a purely materialist framing of consciousness and behaviour, the father figure of objective psychology, and the predecessor of the 'great' Ivan Pavlov. I argue that Secenov himself was very much aware of the symbolic significance of the term "reflex" and that the rhetorical strategies in his opus magnum, The Reflexes of the Brain (1863), deliberately enforce the precarious twofold potential of reflexological conceptions as psycho-physiological structures as well as social programs. Also within the cultural and political settings of the 19th and 20th century, Secenov's comprehensive and multifaceted research work in the field of nerve physiology was gradually reduced to a strong, ideologically interpretable message: "All movements bearing the name of voluntary in physiology are reflex in a strict sense". PMID:19824305

  16. The vestibulosympathetic reflex in humans: neural interactions between cardiovascular reflexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Chester A.; Monahan, Kevin D.

    2002-01-01

    1. Over the past 5 years, there has been emerging evidence that the vestibular system regulates sympathetic nerve activity in humans. We have studied this issue in humans by using head-down rotation (HDR) in the prone position. 2. These studies have clearly demonstrated increases in muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and calf vascular resistance during HDR. These responses are mediated by engagement of the otolith organs and not the semicircular canals. 3. However, differential activation of sympathetic nerve activity has been observed during HDR. Unlike MSNA, skin sympathetic nerve activity does not increase with HDR. 4. Examination of the vestibulosympathetic reflex with other cardiovascular reflexes (i.e. barorereflexes and skeletal muscle reflexes) has shown an additive interaction for MSNA. 5. The additive interaction between the baroreflexes and vestibulosympathetic reflex suggests that the vestibular system may assist in defending against orthostatic challenges in humans by elevating MSNA beyond that of the baroreflexes. 6. In addition, the further increase in MSNA via otolith stimulation during isometric handgrip, when arterial pressure is elevated markedly, indicates that the vestibulosympathetic reflex is a powerful activator of MSNA and may contribute to blood pressure and flow regulation during dynamic exercise. 7. Future studies will help evaluate the importance of the vestibulosympathetic reflex in clinical conditions associated with orthostatic hypotension.

  17. Managerial Receptivity and Implementation of Policies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, John M.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Managerial receptivity to new policy, perceived emphasis by top level management, organizational size, work overload, perceptions of the importance of performance for promotion, and the manager's attitude toward change were important predictors for successful implementation. (Author)

  18. Solar Power Satellite Microwave Transmission and Reception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietz, R. H.

    1980-01-01

    Numerous analytical and experimental investigations related to SPS microwave power transmission and reception are reported. Aspects discussed include system performance, phase control, power amplifiers, radiating elements, rectenna, solid state configurations, and planned program activities.

  19. Satellite sound broadcasting system, portable reception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golshan, Nasser; Vaisnys, Arvydas

    1990-01-01

    Studies are underway at JPL in the emerging area of Satellite Sound Broadcast Service (SSBS) for direct reception by low cost portable, semi portable, mobile and fixed radio receivers. This paper addresses the portable reception of digital broadcasting of monophonic audio with source material band limited to 5 KHz (source audio comparable to commercial AM broadcasting). The proposed system provides transmission robustness, uniformity of performance over the coverage area and excellent frequency reuse. Propagation problems associated with indoor portable reception are considered in detail and innovative antenna concepts are suggested to mitigate these problems. It is shown that, with the marriage of proper technologies a single medium power satellite can provide substantial direct satellite audio broadcast capability to CONUS in UHF or L Bands, for high quality portable indoor reception by low cost radio receivers.

  20. Leading-edge receptivity for blunt-nose bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerschen, Edward J.

    1991-01-01

    This research program investigates boundary-layer receptivity in the leading-edge region for bodies with blunt leading edges. Receptivity theory provides the link between the unsteady distrubance environment in the free stream and the initial amplitudes of the instability waves in the boundary layer. This is a critical problem which must be addressed in order to develop more accurate prediction methods for boundary-layer transition. The first phase of this project examines the effects of leading-edge bluntness and aerodynamic loading for low Mach number flows. In the second phase of the project, the investigation is extended to supersonic Mach numbers. Singular perturbation techniques are utilized to develop an asymptotic theory for high Reynolds numbers. In the first year, the asymptotic theory was developed for leading-edge receptivity in low Mach number flows. The case of a parabolic nose is considered. Substantial progress was made on the Navier-Sotkes computations. Analytical solutions for the steady and unsteady potential flow fields were incorporated into the code, greatly expanding the types of free-stream disturbances that can be considered while also significantly reducing the the computational requirements. The time-stepping algorithm was modified so that the potential flow perturbations induced by the unsteady pressure field are directly introduced throughout the computational domain, avoiding an artificial 'numerical diffusion' of these from the outer boundary. In addition, the start-up process was modified by introducing the transient Stokes wave solution into the downstream boundary conditions.

  1. 33 CFR 158.420 - Reception facilities: Capacity and exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reception facilities: Capacity... HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION RECEPTION FACILITIES FOR OIL, NOXIOUS LIQUID SUBSTANCES, AND GARBAGE Criteria for Adequacy of Reception Facilities: Garbage § 158.420 Reception facilities:...

  2. 33 CFR 158.420 - Reception facilities: Capacity and exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reception facilities: Capacity... HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION RECEPTION FACILITIES FOR OIL, NOXIOUS LIQUID SUBSTANCES, AND GARBAGE Criteria for Adequacy of Reception Facilities: Garbage § 158.420 Reception facilities:...

  3. 33 CFR 158.420 - Reception facilities: Capacity and exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reception facilities: Capacity... HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION RECEPTION FACILITIES FOR OIL, NOXIOUS LIQUID SUBSTANCES, AND GARBAGE Criteria for Adequacy of Reception Facilities: Garbage § 158.420 Reception facilities:...

  4. 33 CFR 158.420 - Reception facilities: Capacity and exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reception facilities: Capacity... HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION RECEPTION FACILITIES FOR OIL, NOXIOUS LIQUID SUBSTANCES, AND GARBAGE Criteria for Adequacy of Reception Facilities: Garbage § 158.420 Reception facilities:...

  5. 33 CFR 158.420 - Reception facilities: Capacity and exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reception facilities: Capacity... HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION RECEPTION FACILITIES FOR OIL, NOXIOUS LIQUID SUBSTANCES, AND GARBAGE Criteria for Adequacy of Reception Facilities: Garbage § 158.420 Reception facilities:...

  6. Soleus stretch reflex during cycling.

    PubMed

    Grey, M J; Pierce, C W; Milner, T E; Sinkjaer, T

    2001-01-01

    The modulation and strength of the human soleus short latency stretch reflex was investigated by mechanically perturbing the ankle during an unconstrained pedaling task. Eight subjects pedaled at 60 rpm against a preload of 10 Nm. A torque pulse was applied to the crank at various positions during the crank cycle, producing ankle dorsiflexion perturbations of similar trajectory. The stretch reflex was greatest during the power phase of the crank cycle and was decreased to the level of background EMG during recovery. Matched perturbations were induced under static conditions at the same crank angle and background soleus EMG as recorded during the power phase of active pedaling. The magnitude of the stretch reflex was not statistically different from that during the static condition throughout the power phase of the movement. The results of this study indicate that the stretch reflex is not depressed during active cycling as has been shown with the H-reflex. This lack of depression may reflect a decreased susceptibility of the stretch reflex to inhibition, possibly originating from presynaptic mechanisms. PMID:11232549

  7. Vestibulo-spinal reflex mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, M. F.

    1981-01-01

    The specific objectives of experiments designed to investigate postural reflex behavior during sustained weightlessness are discussed. The first is to investigate, during prolonged weightlessness with Hoffmann response (H-reflex) measurement procedures, vestibulo-spinal reflexes associated with vestibular (otolith) responses evoked during an applied linear acceleration. This objective includes not only an evaluation of otolith-induced changes in a major postural muscle but also an investigation with this technique of the adaptive process of the vestibular system and spinal reflex mechanisms to this unique environment. The second objective is to relate space motion sickness to the results of this investigation. Finally, a return to the vestibulo-spinal and postural reflexes to normal values following the flight will be examined. The flight experiment involves activation of nerve tissue (tibial N) with electrical shock and the recording of resulting muscle activity (soleus) with surface electrodes. Soleus/spinal H-reflex testing procedures will be used in conjuction with linear acceleration through the subject's X-axis.

  8. [Reflex sympathetic dystrophy].

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marta; Manuela, Manuela; Cantinho, Guilhermina

    2011-01-01

    Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy is rare in pediatrics. It is a complex regional pain syndrome, of unknown etiology, usually post-traumatic, characterized by dysfunctions of the musculoskeletal, vascular and skin systems: severe persistent pain of a limb, sensory and vascular alterations, associated disability and psychosocial dysfunction. The diagnosis is based in high clinical suspection. In children and adolescents there are aspects that are different from the adult ones. Excessive tests may result in worsening of the clinical symptoms. Bone scintigraphy can help. Pain treatment is difficult, not specific. Physical therapies and relaxation technics give some relief. Depression must be treated. This syndrome includes fibromyalgia and complex regional pain syndrome type I. We present a clinical report of an adolescent girl, referred for pain, cold temperature, pallor and functional disability of an inferior limb, all signals disclosed by a minor trauma. She had been diagnosed depression the year before. The bone scintigraphy was a decisive test. The treatment with gabapentin, C vitamin, physiotherapy and pshycotherapy has been effective. PMID:22713207

  9. Stigmatic receptivity determines the seed set in Indian mustard, rice and wheat crops

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ramwant; Sutradhar, Hrishikesh; Chakrabarty, S K; Ansari, Mohhammed Wahid; Singh, Yogendra

    2015-01-01

    Stigmatic receptivity restricts the successful pollination in cereal crops. The present study deals with the biochemical test for enzymes producing in stigma of field crops such as Indian mustard, rice and wheat. The alcohol dehydrogenase and hydrogen peroxide assays revealed stigmatic receptivity as a violet color and oxygen bubbles released by the chemical reaction. Therefore, the 2 quick tests are in conformity to each other and supported the seed set data, which was utmost at blooming stage of flower ranged between 2–4 d All the 3 crops showed variation in stigmatic receptivity with respect to different time periods of blooming stages and hence, it may affects simultaneous pollen germination and tube growth, fertilization and seed set. The present finding suggests that the growth of pollen tube and stigma receptivity could be influenced by specific enzymes on stigma surface after 2–4 d of blooming stage, which contributes to proper seed set. PMID:27066163

  10. Stigmatic receptivity determines the seed set in Indian mustard, rice and wheat crops.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ramwant; Sutradhar, Hrishikesh; Chakrabarty, S K; Ansari, Mohhammed Wahid; Singh, Yogendra

    2015-01-01

    Stigmatic receptivity restricts the successful pollination in cereal crops. The present study deals with the biochemical test for enzymes producing in stigma of field crops such as Indian mustard, rice and wheat. The alcohol dehydrogenase and hydrogen peroxide assays revealed stigmatic receptivity as a violet color and oxygen bubbles released by the chemical reaction. Therefore, the 2 quick tests are in conformity to each other and supported the seed set data, which was utmost at blooming stage of flower ranged between 2-4 d All the 3 crops showed variation in stigmatic receptivity with respect to different time periods of blooming stages and hence, it may affects simultaneous pollen germination and tube growth, fertilization and seed set. The present finding suggests that the growth of pollen tube and stigma receptivity could be influenced by specific enzymes on stigma surface after 2-4 d of blooming stage, which contributes to proper seed set. PMID:27066163

  11. Learning reflexively from a health promotion professional development program in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Marie-Claude; Richard, Lucie; Brousselle, Astrid; Beaudet, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades, reflexivity has received much attention in the professional education and training literature, especially in the public health and health promotion fields. Despite general agreement on the importance of reflexivity, there appears to be no consensus on how to assess reflexivity or to conceptualize the different forms developed among professionals and participants of training programs. This paper presents an analysis of the reflexivity outcomes of the Health Promotion Laboratory, an innovative professional development program aimed at supporting practice changes among health professionals by fostering competency development and reflexivity. More specifically, this paper explores the difference between two levels of reflexivity (formative and critical) and highlights some implications of each for practice. Data were collected through qualitative interviews with participants from two intervention sites. Results showed that involvement in the Health Promotion Laboratory prompted many participants to modify their vision of their practice and professional role, indicating an impact on reflexivity. In many cases, new understandings seem to have played a formative function in enabling participants to improve their practice and their role as health promoters. The reflective process also served a critical function culminating in a social and moral understanding of the impacts on society of the professionals' practices and roles. This type of outcome is greatly desired in health promotion, given the social justice and equity concerns of this field of practice. By redefining the theoretical concept of reflexivity on two levels and discussing their impacts on practice, this study supports the usefulness of both levels of reflexivity. PMID:23996539

  12. Reflexivity and the Politics of Knowledge: Researchers as "Brokers" and "Translators" of Educational Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sriprakash, Arathi; Mukhopadhyay, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    This paper interrogates the ways in which "reflexivity" has proliferated as a normative methodological discourse in the field of international and comparative education. We argue that the dominant approach to reflexivity foregrounds the standpoints of researchers and their subjects in a way that does not attend to the situated,…

  13. Leading-edge receptivity to free-stream disturbance waves for hypersonic flow over a parabola

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Xiaolin

    2001-08-01

    The receptivity of hypersonic boundary layers to free-stream disturbances, which is the process of environmental disturbances initially entering the boundary layers and generating disturbance waves, is altered considerably by the presence of bow shocks in hypersonic flow fields. This paper presents a numerical simulation study of the generation of boundary layer disturbance waves due to free-stream waves, for a two-dimensional Mach 15 viscous flow over a parabola. Both steady and unsteady flow solutions of the receptivity problem are obtained by computing the full Navier Stokes equations using a high-order-accurate shock-fitting finite difference scheme. The effects of bow-shock/free-stream-sound interactions on the receptivity process are accurately taken into account by treating the shock as a discontinuity surface, governed by the Rankine-Hugoniot relations. The results show that the disturbance waves generated and developed in the hypersonic boundary layer contain both first-, second-, and third-mode waves. A parametric study is carried out on the receptivity characteristics for different free-stream waves, frequencies, nose bluntness characterized by Strouhal numbers, Reynolds numbers, Mach numbers, and wall cooling. In this paper, the hypersonic boundary-layer receptivity is characterized by a receptivity parameter defined as the ratio of the maximum induced wave amplitude in the first-mode-dominated region to the amplitude of the free-stream forcing wave. It is found that the receptivity parameter decreases when the forcing frequency or nose bluntness increase. The results also show that the generation of boundary layer waves is mainly due to the interaction of the boundary layer with the acoustic wave field behind the bow shock, rather than interactions with the entropy and vorticity wave fields.

  14. Acoustic receptivity of compressible boundary layers: Receptivity by way of surface-temperature variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhari, Meelan

    1994-01-01

    The Goldstein-Ruban theory has been extended within the framework of Zavol'skii et al. to study the acoustic receptivity of compressible boundary layers. We consider the receptivity produced in a region of localized, small-amplitude variation in the surface temperature and compare it with the receptivity that is induced through a similar mechanism by a variation in the suction velocity at the surface. It is found that the orientation of the acoustic wave can have a significant impact on the receptivity process, with the maximum receptivity at a given sound-pressure level being produced by upstream oriented acoustic waves. At sufficiently low Mach numbers, the variation of receptivity with the acoustic-wave orientation can be predicted analytically and is the same for both surface suction and surface heating. However, as a result of the acoustic refraction across the mean boundary layer, the above dependence can become rather complex and, also, dependent on the type of surface nonuniformity. The results also suggest that the receptivity caused by temperature nonuniformities may turn out to be more significant than that produced by the mean-flow perturbations associated with strip suction.

  15. Asthma as an axon reflex.

    PubMed

    Barnes, P J

    1986-02-01

    In asthma, damage to airway epithelium, possibly caused by eosinophil products, exposes C-fibre afferent nerve endings. Stimulation of these endings by inflammatory mediators such as bradykinin may result in an axon (local) reflex with antidromic conduction down afferent nerve collaterals and release of sensory neuropeptides such as substance P, neurokinin A, and calcitonin gene-related peptide. These peptides are potent inducers of airway smooth muscle contraction, bronchial oedema, extravasation of plasma, mucus hypersecretion, and possibly inflammatory cell infiltration and secretion. Thus, axon reflexes could account for at least some of the pathophysiology of asthma and this concept might lead to new strategies for treatment. PMID:2418322

  16. Implementation of reflex loops in a biomechanical finite element model.

    PubMed

    Salin, Dorian; Arnoux, Pierre-Jean; Kayvantash, Kambiz; Behr, Michel

    2016-11-01

    In the field of biomechanics, the offer of models which are more and more realistic requires to integrate a physiological response, in particular, the controlled muscle bracing and the reflexes. The following work aims to suggest a unique methodology which couples together a sensory and motor loop with a finite element model. Our method is applied to the study of the oscillation of the elbow in the case of a biceps brachial stretch reflex. The results obtained are promising in the purpose of the development of reactive human body models. PMID:27108871

  17. Operating characteristics of a magnetically insulated reflex ion diode

    SciTech Connect

    Strobel, G.L.

    1982-08-01

    Steady-state space charge limited-flow calculations have been carried out for an applied B/sub theta/ magnetically insulated reflexing ion diode. Reflex ion energy spectra characteristic of a thin foil cathode and of a transparent mesh have been used. A one-dimensional calculation shows higher ion current densities with a mesh cathode, and that the emission electron current density increases with the applied B/sub theta/ magnetic field. The ion current density is calculated to increase slightly with radius.

  18. Poor Reception for Broadcast Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlisle, Robert D. B.

    1976-01-01

    Noting reports of 17,251 college juniors and seniors majoring in radio-television broadcasting and only 141,500 employees now working in the field, the author discusses the causes and implications including the value of the radio-TV degree and the cost of broadcast education. (JT)

  19. Caught in Uncertain Futures, Now: A Reflexive Moment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyes, Reynaldo, III

    2016-01-01

    This reflexive vignette reveals the emotional risks of ethnographic work by a Chicano researcher, educator, and advocate doing work in the Texas-Mexico Borderlands, caught at the intersection of vulnerable Latina/o youth and their possible futures. Data in this creative piece are derived from field notes of one classroom observation from an…

  20. Interrelating Reception and Expression in Speechreading Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Uden, Antoine M. J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper identifies characteristics of poor speechreaders, defines developmental dyspraxia in profoundly hearing-impaired children, and outlines the speechreading process. An active training method is described in which expressive and receptive skills are integrated, by having hearing-impaired people speechread their own speech via videotape…

  1. Rethinking Role Play in the Reception Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Sue; Evans, Julie

    2007-01-01

    Background: In 2000 the so-called "Reception" class was re-conceived (in curricular terms, at least) as the second and final year of the Foundation Stage, a distinctive educational phase for children aged 3 until entry to key stage 1 at 5 or 6 years old. The "Curriculum guidance for the Foundation Stage" endorses a play-based, informal curriculum…

  2. Language, gay pornography, and audience reception.

    PubMed

    Leap, William L

    2011-01-01

    Erotic imagery is an important component of gay pornographic cinema, particularly, where work of audience reception is concerned. However, to assume the audience engagement with the films is limited solely to the erotic realm is to underestimate the workings of ideological power in the context and aftermath of reception. For example, the director of the film under discussion here (Men of Israel; Lucas, 2009b) intended to present an erotic celebration of the nation-state. Yet, most viewers ignore the particulars of context in their comments about audience reception, placing the "Israeli" narrative within a broader framework, using transnational rather than film-specific criteria to guide their "reading" of the Israeli-centered narrative. This article uses as its entry point the language that viewers employ when describing their reactions to Men of Israel on a gay video club's Web site; this article shows how the work of audience reception may draw attention to a film's erotic details while invoking social and political messages that completely reframe the film's erotic narrative. PMID:21740219

  3. Receptive Multilingualism in the Swiss Army

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berthele, Raphael; Wittlin, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    In this paper a particular context where receptive multilingualism at work can be observed is discussed. The Swiss armed forces underwent a series of quite dramatic downsizing measures, which lead to a situation with increased amount of mixed groups and linguistically mixed situations regarding the first/native language of officers and the…

  4. An integral sunshade for optical reception antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, E. L.

    1988-01-01

    Optical reception antennas (telescopes) must be capable of receiving communications even when the deep-space laser source is located within a small angle of the Sun. Direst sunlight must not be allowed to shine on the primary reflector of an optical reception antenna, because too much light would be scattered into the signal detectors. A conventional sunshade that does not obstruct the antenna aperture would have to be about five times longer than its diameter in order to receive optical communications at a solar elongation of 12 degrees without interference. Such a long sunshade could not be accommodated within the dome of any existing large-aperture astronomical facility, and providing a new dome large enough would be prohibitively expensive. It is also desirable to reduce the amount of energy a space-based large-aperture optical reception facility would expend orienting a structure with such a sizable moment of inertia. Since a large aperture optical reception antenna will probably have a hexagonally segmented primary reflector, a sunshade consisting of hexagonal tubes can be mounted in alignment with the segmentation without producing any additional geometric obstruction. An analysis of the duration and recurrence of solar-conjunction communications outages (caused when a deep-space probe near an outer planet appears to be closer to the Sun than a given minimum solar elongation), and the design equations for the integral sunshade are appended.

  5. Ibotenic acid-induced lesion of the peripeduncular area does not impair the lordosis reflex in the cyclic female rat.

    PubMed

    Arnault, P; Roger, M

    1990-12-01

    In the ovariectomized, hormone-primed rat the peripeduncular area (PPA) has been reported to play a key role in sexual receptivity by integrating the sensory and endocrine inputs necessary for the elicitation of the lordosis reflex. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of bilateral peripeduncular lesions induced by ibotenic acid on the lordosis behavior of the normal, cyclic rat. Sexually unexperienced females received a bilateral microinjection of either ibotenic acid (n = 14; lesion group) or phosphate buffer (n = 8; sham-operated group) in the PPA. Following recovery, the receptivity expressed as the lordosis quotient was controlled in the presence of a sexually active male. The results indicate that in both groups the females display a high lordosis quotient (LQ greater than 90%). Therefore, in the cyclic female rat, the manifestation of sexual receptivity does not seem to be affected following bilateral destruction of the PPA. PMID:2073353

  6. Receptivity in parallel flows: An adjoint approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, D. Christopher

    1993-01-01

    Linear receptivity studies in parallel flows are aimed at understanding how external forcing couples to the natural unstable motions which a flow can support. The vibrating ribbon problem models the original Schubauer and Skramstad boundary layer experiment and represents the classic boundary layer receptivity problem. The process by which disturbances are initiated in convectively-unstable jets and shear layers has also received attention. Gaster was the first to handle the boundary layer analysis with the recognition that spatial modes, rather than temporal modes, were relevant when studying convectively-unstable flows that are driven by a time-harmonic source. The amplitude of the least stable spatial mode, far downstream of the source, is related to the source strength by a coupling coefficient. The determination of this coefficient is at the heart of this type of linear receptivity study. The first objective of the present study was to determine whether the various wave number derivative factors, appearing in the coupling coefficients for linear receptivity problems, could be reexpressed in a simpler form involving adjoint eigensolutions. Secondly, it was hoped that the general nature of this simplification could be shown; indeed, a rather elegant characterization of the receptivity properties of spatial instabilities does emerge. The analysis is quite distinct from the usual Fourier-inversion procedures, although a detailed knowledge of the spectrum of the Orr-Sommerfeld equation is still required. Since the cylinder wake analysis proved very useful in addressing control considerations, the final objective was to provide a foundation upon which boundary layer control theory may be developed.

  7. Receptive and Productive Vocabulary Sizes of L2 Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Stuart

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between receptive and productive vocabulary size. The experimental design expanded upon earlier methodologies by using equivalent receptive and productive test formats with different receptive and productive target words to provide more accurate results. Translation tests were scored at two levels of…

  8. 33 CFR 158.320 - Reception facilities: Capacity, and exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reception facilities: Capacity... HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION RECEPTION FACILITIES FOR OIL, NOXIOUS LIQUID SUBSTANCES, AND... Residue § 158.320 Reception facilities: Capacity, and exceptions. (a) Except as allowed in paragraph...

  9. 33 CFR 158.320 - Reception facilities: Capacity, and exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reception facilities: Capacity... HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION RECEPTION FACILITIES FOR OIL, NOXIOUS LIQUID SUBSTANCES, AND... Residue § 158.320 Reception facilities: Capacity, and exceptions. (a) Except as allowed in paragraph...

  10. 33 CFR 158.320 - Reception facilities: Capacity, and exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reception facilities: Capacity... HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION RECEPTION FACILITIES FOR OIL, NOXIOUS LIQUID SUBSTANCES, AND... Residue § 158.320 Reception facilities: Capacity, and exceptions. (a) Except as allowed in paragraph...

  11. 33 CFR 158.320 - Reception facilities: Capacity, and exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reception facilities: Capacity... HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION RECEPTION FACILITIES FOR OIL, NOXIOUS LIQUID SUBSTANCES, AND... Residue § 158.320 Reception facilities: Capacity, and exceptions. (a) Except as allowed in paragraph...

  12. 33 CFR 158.320 - Reception facilities: Capacity, and exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reception facilities: Capacity... HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION RECEPTION FACILITIES FOR OIL, NOXIOUS LIQUID SUBSTANCES, AND... Residue § 158.320 Reception facilities: Capacity, and exceptions. (a) Except as allowed in paragraph...

  13. 33 CFR 158.410 - Reception facilities: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reception facilities: General. 158.410 Section 158.410 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION RECEPTION FACILITIES FOR OIL, NOXIOUS LIQUID SUBSTANCES, AND GARBAGE Criteria for Adequacy of Reception Facilities: Garbage §...

  14. Researching Reflexively With Patients and Families: Two Studies Using Video-Reflexive Ethnography to Collaborate With Patients and Families in Patient Safety Research.

    PubMed

    Collier, Aileen; Wyer, Mary

    2016-06-01

    Patient safety research has to date offered few opportunities for patients and families to be actively involved in the research process. This article describes our collaboration with patients and families in two separate studies, involving end-of-life care and infection control in acute care. We used the collaborative methodology of video-reflexive ethnography, which has been primarily used with clinicians, to involve patients and families as active participants and collaborators in our research. The purpose of this article is to share our experiences and findings that iterative researcher reflexivity in the field was critical to the progress and success of each study. We present and analyze the complexities of reflexivity-in-the-field through a framework of multilayered reflexivity. We share our lessons here for other researchers seeking to actively involve patients and families in patient safety research using collaborative visual methods. PMID:26658233

  15. Toward reflexive climate adaptation research

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Preston, Benjamin L.; Rickards, Lauren; Fünfgeld, Hartmut; Keenan, Rodney J.

    2015-06-22

    Climate adaptation research is expanding very quickly within an increasingly reflexive society where the relationship between academia and other social institutions is in a state of flux. Tensions exist between the two dominant research orientations of research about and research for adaptation. In particular, the research community is challenged to develop processes for successfully executing transdisciplinary research for adaptation when academic institutions and researchers are largely structured around traditional, disciplinary expertise and funding models. One tool for helping to manage this tension is a third, more reflexive, orientation toward adaptation research that is emerging in the literature. Finally, this newmore » ‘research on adaptation research’ promises to help enhance understanding of the research enterprise itself and how it can become more adaptive.« less

  16. Toward reflexive climate adaptation research

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, Benjamin L.; Rickards, Lauren; Fünfgeld, Hartmut; Keenan, Rodney J.

    2015-06-22

    Climate adaptation research is expanding very quickly within an increasingly reflexive society where the relationship between academia and other social institutions is in a state of flux. Tensions exist between the two dominant research orientations of research about and research for adaptation. In particular, the research community is challenged to develop processes for successfully executing transdisciplinary research for adaptation when academic institutions and researchers are largely structured around traditional, disciplinary expertise and funding models. One tool for helping to manage this tension is a third, more reflexive, orientation toward adaptation research that is emerging in the literature. Finally, this new ‘research on adaptation research’ promises to help enhance understanding of the research enterprise itself and how it can become more adaptive.

  17. Vestibular reflexes of otolith origin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Victor J.

    1988-01-01

    The vestibular system and its role in the maintenance of posture and in motion sickness is investigated using cats as experimental subjects. The assumption is that better understanding of the physiology of vestibular pathways is not only of intrinsic value, but will help to explain and eventually alleviate the disturbances caused by vestibular malfunction, or by exposure to an unusual environment such as space. The first project deals with the influence on the spinal cord of stimulation of the vestibular labyrinth, particularly the otoliths. A second was concerned with the properties and neural basis of the tonic neck reflex. These two projects are related, because vestibulospinal and tonic neck reflexes interact in the maintenance of normal posture. The third project began with an interest in mechanisms of motion sickness, and eventually shifted to a study of central control of respiratory muscles involved in vomiting.

  18. Human stretch reflex pathways reexamined

    PubMed Central

    Yavuz, Ş. Utku; Mrachacz-Kersting, Natalie; Sebik, Oğuz; Berna Ünver, M.; Farina, Dario

    2013-01-01

    Reflex responses of tibialis anterior motor units to stretch stimuli were investigated in human subjects. Three types of stretch stimuli were applied (tap-like, ramp-and-hold, and half-sine stretch). Stimulus-induced responses in single motor units were analyzed using the classical technique, which involved building average surface electromyogram (SEMG) and peristimulus time histograms (PSTH) from the discharge times of motor units and peristimulus frequencygrams (PSF) from the instantaneous discharge rates of single motor units. With the use of SEMG and PSTH, the tap-like stretch stimulus induced five separate reflex responses, on average. With the same single motor unit data, the PSF technique indicated that the tap stimulus induced only three reflex responses. Similar to the finding using the tap-like stretch stimuli, ramp-and-hold stimuli induced several peaks and troughs in the SEMG and PSTH. The PSF analyses displayed genuine increases in discharge rates underlying the peaks but not underlying the troughs. Half-sine stretch stimuli induced a long-lasting excitation followed by a long-lasting silent period in SEMG and PSTH. The increase in the discharge rate, however, lasted for the entire duration of the stimulus and continued during the silent period. The results are discussed in the light of the fact that the discharge rate of a motoneuron has a strong positive linear association with the effective synaptic current it receives and hence represents changes in the membrane potential more directly and accurately than the other indirect measures. This study suggests that the neuronal pathway of the human stretch reflex does not include inhibitory pathways. PMID:24225537

  19. Receptive vocabulary analysis in Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Loveall, Susan J; Channell, Marie Moore; Phillips, B Allyson; Abbeduto, Leonard; Conners, Frances A

    2016-08-01

    The present study is an in-depth examination of receptive vocabulary in individuals with Down syndrome (DS) in comparison to control groups of individuals of similar nonverbal ability with typical development (TD) and non-specific etiology intellectual disability (ID). Verb knowledge was of particular interest, as it is known to be a predictor of later syntactic development. Fifty participants with DS, aged 10-21 years, 29 participants with ID, 10-21 years, and 29 participants with TD, 4-9 years, completed measures of receptive vocabulary (PPVT-4), nonverbal ability (Leiter-R), and phonological memory (Nonword Repetition subtest of the CTOPP). Groups were compared on percentage correct of noun, verb and attribute items on the PPVT-4. Results revealed that on verb items, the participants with ID performed significantly better than both participants with DS and TD, even when overall receptive vocabulary ability and phonological memory were held constant. Groups with DS and TD showed the same pattern of lexical knowledge, performing better on nouns than both verbs and attributes. In contrast, the group with ID performed similarly on nouns and verbs, but worse on attributes. PMID:27084992

  20. Characterization of the Transcriptional Complexity of the Receptive and Pre-receptive Endometria of Dairy Goats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; An, Xiao-Peng; Liu, Xiao-Rui; Fu, Ming-Zhe; Han, Peng; Peng, Jia-Yin; Hou, Jing-Xing; Zhou, Zhan-Qin; Cao, Bin-Yun; Song, Yu-Xuan

    2015-01-01

    Endometrium receptivity is essential for successful embryo implantation in mammals. However, the lack of genetic information remains an obstacle to understanding the mechanisms underlying the development of a receptive endometrium from the pre-receptive phase in dairy goats. In this study, more than 4 billion high-quality reads were generated and de novo assembled into 102,441 unigenes; these unigenes were annotated using published databases. A total of 3,255 unigenes that were differentially expressed (DEGs) between the PE and RE were discovered in this study (P-values < 0.05). In addition, 76,729–77,102 putative SNPs and 12,837 SSRs were discovered in this study. Bioinformatics analysis of the DEGs revealed a number of biological processes and pathways that are potentially involved in the establishment of the RE, notably including the GO terms proteolysis, apoptosis, and cell adhesion and the KEGG pathways Cell cycle and extracellular matrix (ECM)-receptor interaction. We speculated that ADCY8, VCAN, SPOCK1, THBS1, and THBS2 may play important roles in the development of endometrial receptivity. The de novo assembly provided a good starting point and will serve as a valuable resource for further investigations into endometrium receptivity in dairy goats and future studies on the genomes of goats and other related mammals. PMID:26373443

  1. [Reflexivity: a critical issue in qualitative research].

    PubMed

    de la Cuesta-Benjumea, Carmen

    2011-01-01

    Reflexivity is an English term that Spanish speaking people have to assign a technical meaning. Reflexivity expresses the conscience of researchers conscience and refers to their connection with the study's situation. It is a process by which researchers step back to critically exam the effect they have on the study and the impact of their interactions with participants. The reflexive process is embedded in all research levels and is present in all the research phases, from the research question to fieldwork, from data analysis to writing the final report. Nevertheless, the question is not so much to engage in reflective activities but to be a reflexive researcher. Reflexivity is a human ability that is present during social interactions. For this reason it is present in qualitative research. A self inquirer can be addressed as it is constructed by the relationships and interactions that are established with study participants. Reflexivity has an educational character that continues after the study is completed. PMID:21531602

  2. Generalized versus partial reflex seizures: a review.

    PubMed

    Italiano, Domenico; Ferlazzo, Edoardo; Gasparini, Sara; Spina, Edoardo; Mondello, Stefania; Labate, Angelo; Gambardella, Antonio; Aguglia, Umberto

    2014-08-01

    In this review we assess our currently available knowledge about reflex seizures with special emphasis on the difference between "generalized" reflex seizures induced by visual stimuli, thinking, praxis and language tasks, and "focal" seizures induced by startle, eating, music, hot water, somatosensory stimuli and orgasm. We discuss in particular evidence from animal, clinical, neurophysiological and neuroimaging studies supporting the concept that "generalized" reflex seizures, usually occurring in the setting of IGE, should be considered as focal seizures with quick secondary generalization. We also review recent advances in genetic and therapeutic approach of reflex seizures. PMID:24766826

  3. Development of the Stretch Reflex in the Newborn: Reciprocal Excitation and Reflex Irradiation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myklebust, Barbara M.; Gottlieb, Gerald L.

    1993-01-01

    When tendon jerk reflexes were tested in seven newborns from one- to three-days old, stretch reflex responses in all major muscle groups of the lower limb were elicited. This "irradiation of reflexes" is a normal phenomenon in newborns, with the pathway becoming suppressed during normal maturation. In individuals with cerebral palsy, however, the…

  4. A method of reflexive balancing in a pragmatic, interdisciplinary and reflexive bioethics.

    PubMed

    Ives, Jonathan

    2014-07-01

    In recent years there has been a wealth of literature arguing the need for empirical and interdisciplinary approaches to bioethics, based on the premise that an empirically informed ethical analysis is more grounded, contextually sensitive and therefore more relevant to clinical practice than an 'abstract' philosophical analysis. Bioethics has (arguably) always been an interdisciplinary field, and the rise of 'empirical' (bio)ethics need not be seen as an attempt to give a new name to the longstanding practice of interdisciplinary collaboration, but can perhaps best be understood as a substantive attempt to engage with the nature of that interdisciplinarity and to articulate the relationship between the many different disciplines (some of them empirical) that contribute to the field. It can also be described as an endeavour to explain how different disciplinary approaches can be integrated to effectively answer normative questions in bioethics, and fundamental to that endeavour is the need to think about how a robust methodology can be articulated that successfully marries apparently divergent epistemological and metaethical perspectives with method. This paper proposes 'Reflexive Bioethics' (RB) as a methodology for interdisciplinary and empirical bioethics, which utilizes a method of 'Reflexive Balancing' (RBL). RBL has been developed in response to criticisms of various forms of reflective equilibrium, and is built upon a pragmatic characterization of Bioethics and a 'quasi-moral foundationalism', which allows RBL to avoid some of the difficulties associated with RE and yet retain the flexible egalitarianism that makes it intuitively appealing to many. PMID:23444909

  5. Front Office and Reception; An Approach to Front Office and Reception Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hotel and Catering Industry Training Board, Wembley (England).

    This manual is concerned with the tasks and training needs of front office personnel in hotels. After discussion of selection and qualifications of such personnel, the perfect receptionist is described in terms of personality, appearance, and deportment. Then follows a detailed listing of tasks--basic tasks, such as reception, bookkeeping, cash,…

  6. MR imaging with remote reception using a coil array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez, F.; Marrufo, O.; Martin, R.; Rodriguez, A. O.

    2012-10-01

    A strategy for imaging a large field-of-view has recently been proposed applying remote detection with a waveguide and single loop coils. RF coils produce a traveling-wave propagating through the bore of the magnet, which is large enough so the cutoff frequency is below the Larmor frequency. This assumption also considers that a human subject inside the magnet bore. We applied the travelling-wave concept to generate images of a human leg at 3 Tesla. Two circular-shaped coils were used as the reception device and a whole-body coil was used for transmission. Images showed a good signal-to-noise ratio along the entire leg. This experimental results contradict the assumption that a whole-body 7T/65cm imager or higher was necessary to generate images with this approach.

  7. Receptivity to Bariatric Surgery in Qualified Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Michael; Wharton, Sean; Macpherson, Alison

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Bariatric surgery has been shown to be an effective intervention for weight loss and diabetes management. Despite this, many patients qualified for bariatric surgery are not interested in undergoing the procedure. The objective of this study is to determine the factors influencing receptivity to bariatric surgery among those who qualify for the procedure. Methods. Patients attending a publicly funded weight management clinic who qualified for bariatric surgery were asked to complete an elective questionnaire between February 2013 and April 2014. Results. A total of 371 patients (72% female) completed the questionnaire. Only 87 of 371 (23%) participants were interested in bariatric surgery. Individuals interested in bariatric surgery had a higher BMI (48.0 versus 46.2 kg/m2, P = 0.03) and believed that they would lose more weight with surgery (51 versus 44 kg, P = 0.0069). Those who scored highly on past weight loss success and financial concerns were less likely to be interested in bariatric surgery, whereas those who scored highly on high receptivity to surgery and positive social support were more likely to be interested in bariatric surgery. Conclusion. Although participants overestimated the effect of bariatric surgery on weight loss, most were still not interested in bariatric surgery. PMID:27516900

  8. Reflexivity: Towards a Theory of Lifelong Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Richard; Ranson, Stewart; Strain, Michael

    2002-01-01

    The current notion of lifelong learning in policy and practice is dominated by behaviorist, adaptive accumulation of skills and qualifications. An alternative is reflexive lifelong learning, developed through social learning networks within the context of dislocation and uncertainty. It involves the reflexive practices of metacognitive analysis…

  9. Creating a Complex Schedule with "REFLEX."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kren, George M.; Christakes, George

    1991-01-01

    Discusses "REFLEX," a software package for scheduling. Explores the program's applications in preparing a departmental class schedule. Explains that "REFLEX" includes a filter function and some attributes of a spreadsheet but lacks the ability to interact with other databases. Concludes that the program can make scheduling easier and more…

  10. Voluntary modulation of human stretch reflexes.

    PubMed

    Ludvig, Daniel; Cathers, Ian; Kearney, Robert E

    2007-11-01

    It has been postulated that the central nervous system (CNS) can tune the mechanical behavior of a joint by altering reflex stiffness in a task-dependant manner. However, most of the evidence supporting this hypothesis has come from the analysis of H-reflexes or electromyogram (EMG) responses. Changes in overall stiffness have been documented but, as yet, there is no direct evidence that the CNS can control reflex stiffness independently of the intrinsic stiffness. We have used a novel identification algorithm to estimate intrinsic and reflex stiffness and feed it back to subjects in real-time. Using this biofeedback, subjects could learn to control reflex stiffness independently of intrinsic stiffness. At low torque levels, subjects could vary their reflex stiffness gain by a factor of 4, while maintaining elastic stiffness and torque constant. EMG measurements confirmed that the contraction levels of the ankle muscles remained constant. Further experiments showed that subjects could change their reflexes rapidly on command. Thus, we conclude that the CNS can control reflex stiffness independently and so has great flexibility in adjusting the mechanical properties of a joint to meet functional requirements. PMID:17628793

  11. [Complex profile of the reflex diving response].

    PubMed

    Wierzba, Tomasz H; Ropiak, Arkadiusz

    2011-01-01

    Breath-holding coupled with face cooling triggers a set of the reflex cardiovascular responses, defined as a diving reflex. The major reflex responses include a decrease in heart rate and peripheral vasoconstriction with an increase of arterial pressure to evoke central blood pooling with preferential provision of the brain and heart perfusion. Due to high individual variability and situational dependence the individual course of the reflex response is hardly predictable. Heart rhythm disturbances are the major, sometimes fatal complications of the response. This review is an outline of causing factors, circumstances, mechanisms and the effects of the diving reflex and their practical implications, including risk factors of the critical arrhythmias occurred in diving. PMID:22125213

  12. The Anion Paradox in Sodium Taste Reception: Resolution by Voltage-Clamp Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Qing; Heck, Gerard L.; Desimone, John A.

    1991-11-01

    Sodium salts are potent taste stimuli, but their effectiveness is markedly dependent on the anion, with chloride yielding the greatest response. The cellular mechanisms that mediate this phenomenon are not known. This "anion paradox" has been resolved by considering the field potential that is generated by restricted electrodiffusion of the anion through paracellular shunts between taste-bud cells. Neural responses to sodium chloride, sodium acetate, and sodium gluconate were studied while the field potential was voltage-clamped. Clamping at electronegative values eliminated the anion effect, whereas clamping at electropositive potentials exaggerated it. Thus, field potentials across the lingual epithelium modulate taste reception, indicating that the functional unit of taste reception includes the taste cell and its paracellular microenvironment.

  13. Toward a critical ethical reflexivity: phenomenology and language in Maurice Merleau-Ponty.

    PubMed

    Murray, Stuart J; Holmes, Dave

    2013-07-01

    Working within the tradition of continental philosophy, this article argues in favour of a phenomenological understanding of language as a crucial component of bioethical inquiry. The authors challenge the 'commonsense' view of language, in which thinking appears as prior to speaking, and speech the straightforward vehicle of pre-existing thoughts. Drawing on Maurice Merleau-Ponty's (1908-1961) phenomenology of language, the authors claim that thinking takes place in and through the spoken word, in and through embodied language. This view resituates bioethics as a matter of bodies that speak. It also refigures the meaning of ethical self-reflexion, and in so doing offers an alternative view on reflexivity and critique. Referring to the Kantian critical tradition and its reception by Hannah Arendt and Michel Foucault, we advance a position we call 'critical ethical reflexivity'. We contend that Merleau-Ponty's phenomenology of language offers valuable insight into ethical reflexivity and subject formation. Moreover, his understanding of language may foster new qualitative empirical research in bioethics, lead to more nuanced methods for interpreting personal narratives, and promote critical self-reflexion as necessary for bioethical inquiry. PMID:23718744

  14. Pyramidal tract neurons receptive to different forelimb joints act differently during locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Stout, Erik E.

    2012-01-01

    During locomotion, motor cortical neurons projecting to the pyramidal tract (PTNs) discharge in close relation to strides. How their discharges vary based on the part of the body they influence is not well understood. We addressed this question with regard to joints of the forelimb in the cat. During simple and ladder locomotion, we compared the activity of four groups of PTNs with somatosensory receptive fields involving different forelimb joints: 1) 45 PTNs receptive to movements of shoulder, 2) 30 PTNs receptive to movements of elbow, 3) 40 PTNs receptive to movements of wrist, and 4) 30 nonresponsive PTNs. In the motor cortex, a relationship exists between the location of the source of afferent input and the target for motor output. On the basis of this relationship, we inferred the forelimb joint that a PTN influences from its somatosensory receptive field. We found that different PTNs tended to discharge differently during locomotion. During simple locomotion shoulder-related PTNs were most active during late stance/early swing, and upon transition from simple to ladder locomotion they often increased activity and stride-related modulation while reducing discharge duration. Elbow-related PTNs were most active during late swing/early stance and typically did not change activity, modulation, or discharge duration on the ladder. Wrist-related PTNs were most active during swing and upon transition to the ladder often decreased activity and increased modulation while reducing discharge duration. These data suggest that during locomotion the motor cortex uses distinct mechanisms to control the shoulder, elbow, and wrist. PMID:22236716

  15. Achilles tendon reflex measuring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szebeszczyk, Janina; Straszecka, Joanna

    1995-06-01

    The examination of Achilles tendon reflex is widely used as a simple, noninvasive clinical test in diagnosis and pharmacological therapy monitoring in such diseases as: hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, diabetic neuropathy, the lower limbs obstructive angiopathies and intermittent claudication. Presented Achilles tendon reflect measuring system is based on the piezoresistive sensor connected with the cylinder-piston system. To determinate the moment of Achilles tendon stimulation a detecting circuit was used. The outputs of the measuring system are connected to the PC-based data acquisition board. Experimental results showed that the measurement accuracy and repeatability is good enough for diagnostics and therapy monitoring purposes. A user friendly, easy-to-operate measurement system fulfills all the requirements related to recording, presentation and storing of the patients' reflexograms.

  16. Multi-reception strategy with improved SNR for multichannel MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bing; Li, Ye; Wang, Chunsheng; Vigneron, Daniel B; Zhang, Xiaoliang

    2012-01-01

    A multi-reception strategy with extended GRAPPA is proposed in this work to improve MR imaging performance at ultra-high field MR systems with limited receiver channels. In this method, coil elements are separated to two or more groups under appropriate grouping criteria. Those groups are enabled in sequence for imaging first, and then parallel acquisition is performed to compensate for the redundant scan time caused by the multiple receptions. To efficiently reconstruct the data acquired from elements of each group, a specific extended GRAPPA was developed. This approach was evaluated by using a 16-element head array on a 7 Tesla whole-body MRI scanner with 8 receive channels. The in-vivo experiments demonstrate that with the same scan time, the 16-element array with twice receptions and acceleration rate of 2 can achieve significant SNR gain in the periphery area of the brain and keep nearly the same SNR in the center area over an eight-element array, which indicates the proposed multi-reception strategy and extended GRAPPA are feasible to improve image quality for MRI systems with limited receive channels. This study also suggests that it is advantageous for a MR system with N receiver channels to utilize a coil array with more than N elements if an appropriate acquisition strategy is applied. PMID:22879921

  17. Cutaneous reflex modulation and self-induced reflex attenuation in cerebellar patients

    PubMed Central

    Van Calenbergh, Frank; Swinnen, Stephan P.; Duysens, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Modulation of cutaneous reflexes is important in the neural control of walking, yet knowledge about underlying neural pathways is still incomplete. Recent studies have suggested that the cerebellum is involved. Here we evaluated the possible roles of the cerebellum in cutaneous reflex modulation and in attenuation of self-induced reflexes. First we checked whether leg muscle activity during walking was similar in patients with focal cerebellar lesions and in healthy control subjects. We then recorded cutaneous reflex activity in leg muscles during walking. Additionally, we compared reflexes after standard (computer triggered) stimuli with reflexes after self-induced stimuli for both groups. Biceps femoris and gastrocnemius medialis muscle activity was increased in the patient group compared with the control subjects, suggesting a coactivation strategy to reduce instability of gait. Cutaneous reflex modulation was similar between healthy control subjects and cerebellar patients, but the latter appeared less able to attenuate reflexes to self-induced stimuli. This suggests that the cerebellum is not primarily involved in cutaneous reflex modulation but that it could act in attenuation of self-induced reflex responses. The latter role in locomotion would be consistent with the common view that the cerebellum predicts sensory consequences of movement. PMID:25392164

  18. Cutaneous reflex modulation and self-induced reflex attenuation in cerebellar patients.

    PubMed

    Hoogkamer, Wouter; Van Calenbergh, Frank; Swinnen, Stephan P; Duysens, Jacques

    2015-02-01

    Modulation of cutaneous reflexes is important in the neural control of walking, yet knowledge about underlying neural pathways is still incomplete. Recent studies have suggested that the cerebellum is involved. Here we evaluated the possible roles of the cerebellum in cutaneous reflex modulation and in attenuation of self-induced reflexes. First we checked whether leg muscle activity during walking was similar in patients with focal cerebellar lesions and in healthy control subjects. We then recorded cutaneous reflex activity in leg muscles during walking. Additionally, we compared reflexes after standard (computer triggered) stimuli with reflexes after self-induced stimuli for both groups. Biceps femoris and gastrocnemius medialis muscle activity was increased in the patient group compared with the control subjects, suggesting a coactivation strategy to reduce instability of gait. Cutaneous reflex modulation was similar between healthy control subjects and cerebellar patients, but the latter appeared less able to attenuate reflexes to self-induced stimuli. This suggests that the cerebellum is not primarily involved in cutaneous reflex modulation but that it could act in attenuation of self-induced reflex responses. The latter role in locomotion would be consistent with the common view that the cerebellum predicts sensory consequences of movement. PMID:25392164

  19. Bone conduction reception: head sensitivity mapping.

    PubMed

    McBride, Maranda; Letowski, Tomasz; Tran, Phuong

    2008-05-01

    This study sought to identify skull locations that are highly sensitive to bone conduction (BC) auditory signal reception and could be used in the design of military radio communication headsets. In Experiment 1, pure tone signals were transmitted via BC to 11 skull locations of 14 volunteers seated in a quiet environment. In Experiment 2, the same signals were transmitted via BC to nine skull locations of 12 volunteers seated in an environment with 60 decibels of white background noise. Hearing threshold levels for each signal per location were measured. In the quiet condition, the condyle had the lowest mean threshold for all signals followed by the jaw angle, mastoid and vertex. In the white noise condition, the condyle also had the lowest mean threshold followed by the mastoid, vertex and temple. Overall results of both experiments were very similar and implicated the condyle as the most effective location. PMID:18432447

  20. Discerning lived spirituality: the reception of otherness.

    PubMed

    Walton, Martin Neal

    2013-06-01

    A previous article focused on an analysis of prominent conceptualizations of spirituality in health care. The encompassing character of those approaches was viewed as problematic because too little attention is paid to the distinctiveness and particularities of spiritual experience. This article argues that the criteria gleaned from the prior analysis provide an impetus for a constructive discernment proposal of lived spirituality. The experience of otherness is provides a central clue to an understanding of spirituality particularly by two key terms, receptivity and transformation, as central characterizations of lived spirituality. These terms are investigated as they embrace operational potential for chaplaincy care. The article concludes with a reflection on chaplaincy care as it relates to spiritual practice. PMID:24040742

  1. Developmental Stages in Receptive Grammar Acquisition: A Processability Theory Account

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buyl, Aafke; Housen, Alex

    2015-01-01

    This study takes a new look at the topic of developmental stages in the second language (L2) acquisition of morphosyntax by analysing receptive learner data, a language mode that has hitherto received very little attention within this strand of research (for a recent and rare study, see Spinner, 2013). Looking at both the receptive and productive…

  2. 33 CFR 158.167 - Reporting inadequate reception facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting inadequate reception facilities. 158.167 Section 158.167 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION RECEPTION FACILITIES FOR OIL, NOXIOUS LIQUID SUBSTANCES, AND GARBAGE...

  3. 33 CFR 158.167 - Reporting inadequate reception facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reporting inadequate reception facilities. 158.167 Section 158.167 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION RECEPTION FACILITIES FOR OIL, NOXIOUS LIQUID SUBSTANCES, AND GARBAGE...

  4. Cross-National Policy Borrowing: Understanding Reception and Translation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steiner-Khamsi, Gita

    2014-01-01

    The article examines two key concepts in research on policy borrowing and lending that are often used to explain why and how educational reforms travel across national boundaries: reception and translation. The studies on reception analyse the political, economic, and cultural reasons that account for the attractiveness of a reform from elsewhere.…

  5. The Comparative Reception of Darwinism: A Brief History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glick, Thomas F.

    2010-01-01

    The subfield of Darwin studies devoted to comparative reception coalesced around 1971 with the planning of a conference on the subject, at the University of Texas at Austin held in April 1972. The original focus was western Europe, Russia and the United States. Subsequently a spate of studies on the Italian reception added to the Eurocentric…

  6. Teacher Empowerment and Receptivity in Curriculum Reform in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, John Chi-Kin; Yin, Hong-Biao; Zhang, Zhong-Hua; Jin, Yu-Le

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the relationships between teacher empowerment, teacher receptivity toward, and perceived outcomes of, a system-wide curriculum change, particularly national curriculum reform in basic education in China. The results of a survey of 1,646 teachers from six provinces indicate that teachers were positive in their receptivity and…

  7. 33 CFR 158.167 - Reporting inadequate reception facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reporting inadequate reception facilities. 158.167 Section 158.167 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION RECEPTION FACILITIES FOR OIL, NOXIOUS LIQUID SUBSTANCES, AND GARBAGE...

  8. 33 CFR 158.167 - Reporting inadequate reception facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reporting inadequate reception facilities. 158.167 Section 158.167 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION RECEPTION FACILITIES FOR OIL, NOXIOUS LIQUID SUBSTANCES, AND GARBAGE...

  9. 33 CFR 158.167 - Reporting inadequate reception facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reporting inadequate reception facilities. 158.167 Section 158.167 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION RECEPTION FACILITIES FOR OIL, NOXIOUS LIQUID SUBSTANCES, AND GARBAGE...

  10. Astronomical Data Reduction Workflows with Reflex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballester, P.; Bramich, D.; Forchi, V.; Freudling, W.; Garcia-Dabó, C. E.; klein Gebbinck, M.; Modigliani, A.; Moehler, S.; Romaniello, M.

    2014-05-01

    Reflex (http://www.eso.org/reflex) is an environment that provides an easy and flexible way to reduce VLT/VLTI science data using the ESO. Its top-level functionalities are: (1) Reflex allows to graphically specify the sequence in which the data reduction steps are executed, including conditional stops, loops and conditional branches, (2) Reflex makes it easy to inspect the intermediate and final data products and to repeat selected processing steps to optimize the data reduction, (3) the data organization necessary to reduce the data is built into the system and is fully automatic, (4) advanced users can plug-in their own Python or IDL modules and steps into the data reduction sequence, and (5) Reflex supports the development of data reduction workflows based on the ESO Common Pipeline Library. Reflex is based on the concept of a scientific workflow, whereby the data reduction cascade is rendered graphically and data seamlessly flow from one processing step to the next. It is distributed with a number of complete test datasets so that users can immediately start experimenting and familiarize themselves with the system (http://www.eso.org/pipelines). In this demo, we present the latest version of Reflex and its applications for astronomical data reduction processes.

  11. The Pupillary Light Reflex in Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jason C.; Moss, Heather E.; McAnany, J. Jason

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effects of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) on rod-, cone-, and melanopsin-mediated pupillary light reflexes (PLRs). Methods Pupillary light reflexes elicited by full-field, brief-flash stimuli were recorded in 13 IIH patients and 13 normal controls. Subjects were dark-adapted for 10 minutes and the PLR was recorded in response to short-wavelength flashes (0.001 cd/m2: rod condition; 450 cd/m2: melanopsin condition). Subjects were then exposed to a rod-suppressing field and 10 cd/m2 long-wavelength flashes were presented (cone condition). Pupillary light reflexes were quantified as the maximum transient constriction (rod and cone conditions) and the post-illumination pupil constriction (melanopsin condition), relative to the baseline pupil size. Diagnostic power was evaluated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Results The IIH patients had significantly smaller PLRs under the melanopsin (P < 0.001) and rod (P = 0.04) paradigms; a trend for reduced cone-mediated PLRs was also found (P = 0.08). Receiver operating characteristic analysis indicated areas under the curves (AUC) of 0.83 (melanopsin-meditated; P = 0.001), 0.71 (rod-mediated; P = 0.07), and 0.77 (cone-mediated; P = 0.02). The AUC (0.90, P < 0.001), sensitivity (85%), and specificity (85%) were high for ROC analysis performed on the mean of the rod, cone, and melanopsin PLRs. Conclusions Pupillary light reflex reductions in IIH patients indicate compromised RGC function. PLR measurement, particularly under rod- and melanopsin-mediated conditions, may be a useful adjunct to standard clinical measures of visual function in IIH. PMID:26746015

  12. [Research progress of rectoanal inhibitory reflex].

    PubMed

    Yin, Shuhui; Zhao, Ke

    2015-12-01

    The understanding of rectoanal inhibitory reflex (RAIR) is progressing for the latest 100 years. From the discovery of its important role in diagnosis of Hirschsprung's disease to all aspects of its development, reflex pathways, neural regulation and physiological functions, there have been more in-depth explorations. It is now recognized that a number of other diseases also have a more specific performance of RAIR. It has become an important and indispensable part to anorectal manometry. Research progress of rectoanal inhibitory reflex is reviewed in this article. PMID:26704013

  13. The Development of the Text Reception Threshold Test: A Visual Analogue of the Speech Reception Threshold Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zekveld, Adriana A.; George, Erwin L. J.; Kramer, Sophia E.; Goverts, S. Theo; Houtgast, Tammo

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors aimed to develop a visual analogue of the widely used Speech Reception Threshold (SRT; R. Plomp & A. M. Mimpen, 1979b) test. The Text Reception Threshold (TRT) test, in which visually presented sentences are masked by a bar pattern, enables the quantification of modality-aspecific variance in speech-in-noise…

  14. Changes in the Achilles tendon reflexes following Skylab missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, J. T.; Nicogossian, A. E.; Hoffler, G. W.; Johnson, R. L.; Hordinsky, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    Postflight measurements of Achilles tendon reflex duration on Skylab crewmen indicate a state of disequilibrium between the flexor and extensor muscle groups with an initial decrease in reflex duration. As the muscles regain strength and mass there occurs an overcompensation reflected by increased reflex duration. Finally, when a normal neuromuscular state is reached the reflex duration returns to baseline value.

  15. Receptivity to Roughness, Acoustic, and Vortical Disturbances in Supersonic Boundary Layers Over Swept Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, Ponnampalam; King, Rudolph A.

    2011-01-01

    The receptivity and interaction of stationary and traveling crossflow instability of three-dimensional supersonic boundary layers over a swept biconvex wing with a blunt leading edge are numerically investigated for a freestream Mach number of 3. The steady and unsteady flow fields are obtained by solving the full Navier-Stokes equations. The receptivity of the boundary layer to surface roughness, freestream acoustic waves, and freestream vorticity waves are numerically investigated. The initial amplitudes of the stationary vortices generated by 1 micron roughness elements is about 2000 times larger than the initial amplitudes of the traveling disturbances generated by vortical disturbances. The interaction of stationary and traveling disturbances was investigated by solving the equations with both surface roughness and vortical disturbances. When the initial amplitudes of the stationary disturbances are large compared to the traveling disturbances, the stationary vortex dominates the perturbation field. When the amplitudes are comparable, the traveling vortex prevails and the stationary vortex is suppressed.

  16. Axon reflexes in human cold exposed fingers.

    PubMed

    Daanen, H A; Ducharme, M B

    2000-02-01

    Exposure of fingers to severe cold induces cold induced vasodilatation (CIVD). The mechanism of CIVD is still debated. The original theory states that an axon reflex causes CIVD. To test this hypothesis, axon reflexes were evoked by electrical stimulation of the middle fingers of hands immersed in water at either 5 degrees C or 35 degrees C. Axon reflexes were pronounced in the middle finger of the hand in warm water, but absent from the hand in cold water, even though the stimulation was rated as "rather painful" to "painful". These results showed that axon reflexes do not occur in a cold-exposed hand and thus are unlikely to explain the CIVD phenomenon. PMID:10638384

  17. The legacy of care as reflexive learning

    PubMed Central

    García, Marta Rodríguez; Moya, Jose Luis Medina

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to analyze whether the tutor's use of reflexive strategies encourages the students to reflect. The goal is to discover what type of strategies can help to achieve this and how tutors and students behave in the practical context. Method: a qualitative and ethnographic focus was adopted. Twenty-seven students and 15 tutors from three health centers participated. The latter had received specific training on reflexive clinical tutoring. The analysis was developed through constant comparisons of the categories. Results: the results demonstrate that the tutors' use of reflexive strategies such as didactic questioning, didactic empathy and pedagogical silence contributes to encourage the students' reflection and significant learning. Conclusions: reflexive practice is key to tutors' training and students' learning. PMID:27305180

  18. Stretch reflex oscillations and essential tremor.

    PubMed Central

    Elble, R J; Higgins, C; Moody, C J

    1987-01-01

    Using a computer-controlled torque motor and manipulandum, 50 ms torque pulses and 70 second trains of binary pseudorandom torque disturbances were applied to the wrists of 10 adult controls and 22 patients with essential tremor in order to study the interaction between mechanically-induced stretch-reflex oscillations and essential tremor. These two oscillations were separated by applying inertial and spring loads to the wrist. There was no evidence of increased or unstable stretch-reflex activity in the essential tremor patients, and stretch-reflex latencies did not correlate with the frequency of essential tremor. Essential tremor and mechanically-induced stretch-reflex oscillations are separate phenomena capable of complex interaction. PMID:3612149

  19. On the Second Language Acquisition of Spanish Reflexive Passives and Reflexive Impersonals by French- and English-Speaking Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tremblay, Annie

    2006-01-01

    This study, a partial replication of Bruhn de Garavito (1999a; 1999b), investigates the second language (L2) acquisition of Spanish reflexive passives and reflexive impersonals by French- and English-speaking adults at an advanced level of proficiency. The L2 acquisition of Spanish reflexive passives and reflexive impersonals by native French and…

  20. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy following traumatic myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Wainapel, S F

    1984-04-01

    Two cases of reflex sympathetic dystrophy in the upper extremity of patients with traumatic cervical spinal cord injuries are reported. Both patients had very incomplete lesions with early neurological recovery, suggesting an underlying central cord syndrome. Although reflex sympathetic dystrophy is often seen following stroke, it has only rarely been documented in traumatic myelopathy, and it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of unexplained pain syndromes in the extremities of paraplegic or quadriplegic patients. PMID:6728500

  1. Sexual reflexes in male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Chung, S K; McVary, K T; McKenna, K E

    1988-12-01

    A novel preparation for the study of male and female sexual function in anesthetized, acutely spinalized rats is reported. In both sexes, the coitus reflex (the neuromuscular concomitants of sexual climax) could be elicited by mechanical stimulation of the distal urethra. It is concluded that the spinal sexual circuitry is essentially similar in both sexes and that the coitus reflex is generated by a hormone-insensitive spinal pattern generator and is triggered by a simple peripheral stimulus. PMID:3205410

  2. The pupillary light reflex in normal subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, C J

    1981-01-01

    In 19 normal subjects the pupillary reflex to light was studied over a range of stimulus intensities by infrared electronic pupillography and analysed by a computer technique. Increasing stimulus intensity was associated with an increase in direct light reflex amplitude and maximum rate of constriction and redilatation. Latency from stimulus to onset of response-decreased with increasing stimulus intensity. The normal range for each of these parameters is given and the significance of these results in clinical pupillary assessment discussed. PMID:7326222

  3. Distributed acoustic receptivity in laminar flow control configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhari, Meelan

    1992-01-01

    A model problem related to distributed receptivity to free-stream acoustic waves in laminar flow control (LFC) configurations is studied, within the Orr-Sommerfield framework, by a suitable extension of the Goldstein-Ruban theory for receptivity due to localized disturbances on the airfoil surface. The results, thus, complement the earlier work on the receptivity produced by local variations in the surface suction and/or surface admittance. In particular, we show that the cumulative effect of the distributed receptivity can be substantially larger than that of a single, isolated suction strip or slot. Furthermore, even if the receptivity is spread out over very large distances, the most effective contributions come from a relatively short region in vicinity of the lower branch of the neutral stability curve. The length scale of this region is intermediate to that of the mean of these two length scales. Finally, it is found that the receptivity is effectively dominated by a narrow band of Fourier components from the wall-suction and admittance distributions, roughly corresponding to a detuning of less than ten percent with respect to the neutral instability wavenumber at the frequency under consideration. The results suggest that the drop-off in receptivity magnitudes away from the resonant wavenumber is nearly independent of the frequency parameter.

  4. The Reflexes of the Fundus Oculi

    PubMed Central

    Ballantyne, A. J.

    1940-01-01

    The fundus reflexes reveal, in a manner not yet completely understood, the texture and contour of the reflecting surfaces and the condition of the underlying tissues. In this way they may play an important part in the biomicroscopy of the eye. The physiological reflexes are seen at their best in the eyes of young subjects, in well-pigmented eyes, with undilated pupils and with emmetropic refraction. Their absence during the first two decades, or their presence after the forties, their occurrence in one eye only, their appearance, disappearance or change of character should suggest the possibility of some pathological state. The investigation and interpretation of the reflexes are notably assisted by comparing the appearances seen with long and short wave lights such as those of the sodium and mercury vapour lamps, in addition to the usual ophthalmoscopic lights. Most of the surface reflexes disappear in the light of the sodium lamp, sometimes revealing important changes in the deeper layers of the retina and choroid. The physiological reflexes, chiefly formed on the surface of the internal limiting membrane, take the forms of the familiar watered silk or patchy reflexes, the peri-macular halo, the fan reflex in the macular depression and the reflex from the foveal pit. The watered silk or patchy reflexes often show a delicate striation which follows the pattern of the nerve-fibre layer, or there may be a granular or criss-cross texture. Reflexes which entirely lack these indications of “texture” should be considered as possibly pathological. This applies to the “beaten metal” reflexes and to those formed on the so-called hyaloid membrane. The occurrence of physiological reflexes in linear form is doubtful, and the only admittedly physiological punctate reflexes are the so-called Gunn's dots. Surface reflexes which are broken up into small points or flakes are pathological, and are most frequently seen in the central area of the fundus in cases of pigmentary

  5. Reflex ring laser amplifier system

    DOEpatents

    Summers, M.A.

    1983-08-31

    The invention is a method and apparatus for providing a reflex ring laser system for amplifying an input laser pulse. The invention is particularly useful in laser fusion experiments where efficient production of high-energy and high power laser pulses is required. The invention comprises a large aperture laser amplifier in an unstable ring resonator which includes a combination spatial filter and beam expander having a magnification greater than unity. An input pulse is injected into the resonator, e.g., through an aperture in an input mirror. The injected pulse passes through the amplifier and spatial filter/expander components on each pass around the ring. The unstable resonator is designed to permit only a predetermined number of passes before the amplified pulse exits the resonator. On the first pass through the amplifier, the beam fills only a small central region of the gain medium. On each successive pass, the beam has been expanded to fill the next concentric non-overlapping region of the gain medium.

  6. The Savannah hypotheses: origin, reception and impact on paleoanthropology.

    PubMed

    Bender, Renato; Tobias, Phillip V; Bender, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    The reconstruction of the human past is a complex task characterized by a high level of interdisciplinarity. How do scientists from different fields reach consensus on crucial aspects of paleoanthropological research? The present paper explores this question through an historical analysis of the origin, development, and reception of the savannah hypotheses (SHs). We show that this model neglected to investigate crucial biological aspects which appeared to be irrelevant in scenarios depicting early hominins evolving in arid or semi-arid open plains. For instance, the exploitation of aquatic food resources and other aspects of hominin interaction with water were largely ignored in classical paleoanthropology. These topics became central to alternative ideas on human evolution known as aquatic hypotheses. Since the aquatic model is commonly regarded as highly controversial, its rejection led to a stigmatization of the whole spectrum of topics around water use in non-human hominoids and hominins. We argue that this bias represents a serious hindrance to a comprehensive reconstruction of the human past. Progress in this field depends on clear differentiation between hypotheses proposed to contextualize early hominin evolution in specific environmental settings and research topics which demand the investigation of all relevant facets of early hominins' interaction with complex landscapes. PMID:23272598

  7. Paper and people: the work of the casualty reception clerk.

    PubMed

    Hughes, D

    1989-12-01

    This paper examines the exercise of discretion by casualty reception staff, focussing on the problems of accountability that arise when their judgements help shape the process of patient categorization that culminates in clinical diagnosis. Rules and guidelines which ostensibly relate to bureaucratic objectives, are applied in ways which reflect situational exigencies of reception work, and values embedded in organisational culture. But reception staff are reluctant to acknowledge the importance of their decisions, and, particularly where judgements relate to patient condition, present rule-use as a straightforward and certain activity in which interpretation plays little part. PMID:10304220

  8. Whole-body vibration-induced muscular reflex: Is it a stretch-induced reflex?

    PubMed Central

    Cakar, Halil Ibrahim; Cidem, Muharrem; Sebik, Oguz; Yilmaz, Gizem; Karamehmetoglu, Safak Sahir; Kara, Sadik; Karacan, Ilhan; Türker, Kemal Sıtkı

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Whole-body vibration (WBV) can induce reflex responses in muscles. A number of studies have reported that the physiological mechanisms underlying this type of reflex activity can be explained by reference to a stretch-induced reflex. Thus, the primary objective of this study was to test whether the WBV-induced muscular reflex (WBV-IMR) can be explained as a stretch-induced reflex. [Subjects and Methods] The present study assessed 20 healthy males using surface electrodes placed on their right soleus muscle. The latency of the tendon reflex (T-reflex) as a stretch-induced reflex was compared with the reflex latency of the WBV-IMR. In addition, simulations were performed at 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, and 50 Hz to determine the stretch frequency of the muscle during WBV. [Results] WBV-IMR latency (40.5 ± 0.8 ms; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 39.0–41.9 ms) was significantly longer than T-reflex latency (34.6 ± 0.5 ms; 95% CI: 33.6–35.5 ms) and the mean difference was 6.2 ms (95% CI of the difference: 4.7–7.7 ms). The simulations performed in the present study demonstrated that the frequency of the stretch signal would be twice the frequency of the vibration. [Conclusion] These findings do not support the notion that WBV-IMR can be explained by reference to a stretch-induced reflex. PMID:26310784

  9. Numerical Studies of Boundary-Layer Receptivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Helen L.

    1995-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of the acoustic receptivity process on a semi-infinite flat plate with a modified-super-elliptic (MSE) leading edge are performed. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved in stream-function/vorticity form in a general curvilinear coordinate system. The steady basic-state solution is found by solving the governing equations using an alternating direction implicit (ADI) procedure which takes advantage of the parallelism present in line-splitting techniques. Time-harmonic oscillations of the farfield velocity are applied as unsteady boundary conditions to the unsteady disturbance equations. An efficient time-harmonic scheme is used to produce the disturbance solutions. Buffer-zone techniques have been applied to eliminate wave reflection from the outflow boundary. The spatial evolution of Tollmien-Schlichting (T-S) waves is analyzed and compared with experiment and theory. The effects of nose-radius, frequency, Reynolds number, angle of attack, and amplitude of the acoustic wave are investigated. This work is being performed in conjunction with the experiments at the Arizona State University Unsteady Wind Tunnel under the direction of Professor William Saric. The simulations are of the same configuration and parameters used in the wind-tunnel experiments.

  10. Variability in Hoffmann and tendon reflexes in healthy male subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, E.; Do, S.; Jaweed, M.

    1992-01-01

    There is a time dependent decrease in amplitude of H- and T-reflexes during Zero-G exposure and subsequently an increase in the amplitude of the H-reflex 2-4 hours after return to a 1-G environment. These alterations have been attributed to the adaptation of the human neurosensory system to gravity. The Hoffman reflex (H-reflex) is an acknowledged method to determine the integrity of the monosynaptic reflex arc. However deep tendon reflexes (DTR's or T-reflexes), elicited by striking the tendon also utilize the entire reflex arc. The objective of this study was to compare the variability in latency and amplitude of the two reflexes in healthy subjects. Methods: Nine healthy male subjects, 27-43 years in age, 161-175 cm in height plus 60-86 Kg in weight, underwent weekly testing for four weeks with a Dan-Tec EMG counterpoint EMG system. Subjects were studied prone and surface EMG electrodes were placed on the right and left soleus muscles. The H-reflex was obtained by stimulating the tibial nerve in the politeal fossa with a 0.2 msec square wave pulse delivered at 2 Hz until the maximum H-reflex was obtained. The T-reflex was invoked by tapping the achilles tendon with a self triggering reflex hammer connected to the EMG system. The latencies and amplitudes for the H- and T-reflexes were measured. Results: These data indicate that the amplitudes of these reflexes varied considerably. However, latencies to invoked responses were consistent. The latency of the T-reflex was approximately 3-5 msec longer than the H-reflex. Conclusion: The T-reflex is easily obtained, requires less time, and is more comfortable to perform. Qualitative data can be obtained by deploying self triggering, force plated reflex hammers both in the 1-G and Zero-G environment.

  11. Jaw, blink and corneal reflex latencies in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, E A; Ongerboer de Visser, B W; Barendswaard, E C; Arts, R J

    1985-01-01

    Jaw, blink and corneal reflexes, which all involve the trigeminal system, were recorded in 54 patients with multiple sclerosis; thirty-seven of these patients were classified as having definite multiple sclerosis and 17 as indefinite multiple sclerosis, according to Schumacher's criteria. The jaw reflex was abnormal less frequently than either of the other two reflexes, but in four cases it was the only abnormal reflex found. Testing a combination of two or three trigeminal reflexes did not yield a higher incidence of abnormalities than testing the blink or corneal reflex alone. Nine patients showed abnormal reflexes which were unexpected on the basis of clinical symptoms. The combined recordings demonstrate at least one abnormal reflex in 74% of the patients. The various types of reflex abnormalities reflect major damage to different parts of the trigeminal system and may therefore make an important contribution to the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. PMID:4087004

  12. 10. INTERIOR, SHOWING RECEPTION ROOM IN CENTER SECTION, WITH MAIN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. INTERIOR, SHOWING RECEPTION ROOM IN CENTER SECTION, WITH MAIN ENTRANCE AT RIGHT. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Fort David A. Russell, Red Cross Building, Third Street between Randall Avenue & Tenth Cavalry Avenue, Cheyenne, Laramie County, WY

  13. 12. INTERIOR, SHOWING PART OF RECEPTION ROOM IN CENTER SECTION. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. INTERIOR, SHOWING PART OF RECEPTION ROOM IN CENTER SECTION. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Fort David A. Russell, Red Cross Building, Third Street between Randall Avenue & Tenth Cavalry Avenue, Cheyenne, Laramie County, WY

  14. 33 CFR 158.163 - Reception facility operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... required to have an Operations Manual under this chapter or 46 CFR Chapter 1 must have a copy of the... (CONTINUED) POLLUTION RECEPTION FACILITIES FOR OIL, NOXIOUS LIQUID SUBSTANCES, AND GARBAGE General §...

  15. 33 CFR 158.163 - Reception facility operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... required to have an Operations Manual under this chapter or 46 CFR Chapter 1 must have a copy of the... (CONTINUED) POLLUTION RECEPTION FACILITIES FOR OIL, NOXIOUS LIQUID SUBSTANCES, AND GARBAGE General §...

  16. 115. INTERIOR, SIXTH FLOOR, WING 6100 WEST, SUITE 6000, RECEPTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    115. INTERIOR, SIXTH FLOOR, WING 6100 WEST, SUITE 6000, RECEPTION AREA, DETAIL OF GRAINED RADIATOR CABINET - U.S. Department of the Interior, Eighteenth & C Streets Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  17. Receptivity of Librarians to Optical Information Technologies and Products.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, Nancy

    1986-01-01

    Examines factors which may affect the receptivity of librarians to the use of optical disk technologies, including hardware and software issues, the content of currently available databases, and the integration of optical technologies into existing library services. (CLB)

  18. Reception of longitudinal vector potential radiation with a plasma antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, Robert K. Jr.

    2013-07-28

    To help resolve the long-running debate between physicists and engineers regarding the existence of the magnetic vector potential, herewith we describe an experiment demonstrating reception of time-harmonic vector potential radiation at 1.3 GHz.

  19. Views of the Apollo 11 Twentieth Anniversary Black Tie reception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    View from the Apollo 11 Twentieth Anniversary Black Tie reception at the downtown Houston Hyatt Regency Hotel. Scene show NASA/JSC Director Aaron Cohen talking with NASA Administrator Richard H. Truly and his wife, Cody.

  20. 45. Everett, Weinreb, photographer DETAIL, CEMENT TILE PATTERN FROM RECEPTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. Everett, Weinreb, photographer DETAIL, CEMENT TILE PATTERN FROM RECEPTION HALL LOOKING EAST ACROSS ARRIVAL LOBBY FLOOR - Los Angeles Union Passenger Terminal, Tracks & Shed, 800 North Alameda Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  1. Interior view, anteroom of the postmaster general's reception hall; shown ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view, anteroom of the postmaster general's reception hall; shown here are two of the six aluminum statues of postal delivery men - New Post Office Building, Twelfth Street and Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  2. 33 CFR 158.163 - Reception facility operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... required to have an Operations Manual under this chapter or 46 CFR Chapter 1 must have a copy of the... (CONTINUED) POLLUTION RECEPTION FACILITIES FOR OIL, NOXIOUS LIQUID SUBSTANCES, AND GARBAGE General §...

  3. 33 CFR 158.163 - Reception facility operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... required to have an Operations Manual under this chapter or 46 CFR Chapter 1 must have a copy of the... (CONTINUED) POLLUTION RECEPTION FACILITIES FOR OIL, NOXIOUS LIQUID SUBSTANCES, AND GARBAGE General §...

  4. 33 CFR 158.163 - Reception facility operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... required to have an Operations Manual under this chapter or 46 CFR Chapter 1 must have a copy of the... (CONTINUED) POLLUTION RECEPTION FACILITIES FOR OIL, NOXIOUS LIQUID SUBSTANCES, AND GARBAGE General §...

  5. Audiogenic reflex seizures in cats

    PubMed Central

    Lowrie, Mark; Bessant, Claire; Harvey, Robert J; Sparkes, Andrew; Garosi, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to characterise feline audiogenic reflex seizures (FARS). Methods An online questionnaire was developed to capture information from owners with cats suffering from FARS. This was collated with the medical records from the primary veterinarian. Ninety-six cats were included. Results Myoclonic seizures were one of the cardinal signs of this syndrome (90/96), frequently occurring prior to generalised tonic–clonic seizures (GTCSs) in this population. Other features include a late onset (median 15 years) and absence seizures (6/96), with most seizures triggered by high-frequency sounds amid occasional spontaneous seizures (up to 20%). Half the population (48/96) had hearing impairment or were deaf. One-third of cats (35/96) had concurrent diseases, most likely reflecting the age distribution. Birmans were strongly represented (30/96). Levetiracetam gave good seizure control. The course of the epilepsy was non-progressive in the majority (68/96), with an improvement over time in some (23/96). Only 33/96 and 11/90 owners, respectively, felt the GTCSs and myoclonic seizures affected their cat’s quality of life (QoL). Despite this, many owners (50/96) reported a slow decline in their cat’s health, becoming less responsive (43/50), not jumping (41/50), becoming uncoordinated or weak in the pelvic limbs (24/50) and exhibiting dramatic weight loss (39/50). These signs were exclusively reported in cats experiencing seizures for >2 years, with 42/50 owners stating these signs affected their cat’s QoL. Conclusions and relevance In gathering data on audiogenic seizures in cats, we have identified a new epilepsy syndrome named FARS with a geriatric onset. Further studies are warranted to investigate potential genetic predispositions to this condition. PMID:25916687

  6. The trigeminocardiac reflex – a comparison with the diving reflex in humans

    PubMed Central

    Lemaitre, Frederic; Schaller, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    The trigeminocardiac reflex (TCR) has previously been described in the literature as a reflexive response of bradycardia, hypotension, and gastric hypermotility seen upon mechanical stimulation in the distribution of the trigeminal nerve. The diving reflex (DR) in humans is characterized by breath-holding, slowing of the heart rate, reduction of limb blood flow and a gradual rise in the mean arterial blood pressure. Although the two reflexes share many similarities, their relationship and especially their functional purpose in humans have yet to be fully elucidated. In the present review, we have tried to integrate and elaborate these two phenomena into a unified physiological concept. Assuming that the TCR and the DR are closely linked functionally and phylogenetically, we have also highlighted the significance of these reflexes in humans. PMID:25995761

  7. The Relationship between Receptive and Expressive Subskills of Academic L2 Proficiency in Nonnative Speakers of English: A Multigroup Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pae, Hye K.; Greenberg, Daphne

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between receptive and expressive language skills characterized by the performance of nonnative speakers (NNSs) of English in the academic context. Test scores of 585 adult NNSs were selected from Form 2 of the Pearson Test of English Academic's field-test database. A correlated…

  8. Support for non-locking parallel reception of packets belonging to a single memory reception FIFO

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Dong; Heidelberger, Philip; Salapura, Valentina; Senger, Robert M.; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard; Sugawara, Yutaka

    2011-01-27

    A method and apparatus for distributed parallel messaging in a parallel computing system. A plurality of DMA engine units are configured in a multiprocessor system to operate in parallel, one DMA engine unit for transferring a current packet received at a network reception queue to a memory location in a memory FIFO (rmFIFO) region of a memory. A control unit implements logic to determine whether any prior received packet destined for that rmFIFO is still in a process of being stored in the associated memory by another DMA engine unit of the plurality, and prevent the one DMA engine unit from indicating completion of storing the current received packet in the reception memory FIFO (rmFIFO) until all prior received packets destined for that rmFIFO are completely stored by the other DMA engine units. Thus, there is provided non-locking support so that multiple packets destined for a single rmFIFO are transferred and stored in parallel to predetermined locations in a memory.

  9. Receptivity of Hypersonic Boundary Layers to Acoustic and Vortical Disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakamar, P.; Kegerise, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    Boundary layer receptivity to two-dimensional acoustic disturbances at different incidence angles and to vortical disturbances is investigated by solving the Navier-Stokes equations for Mach 6 flow over a 7deg half-angle sharp-tipped wedge and a cone. Higher order spatial and temporal schemes are employed to obtain the solution. The results show that the instability waves are generated in the leading edge region and that the boundary layer is much more receptive to slow acoustic waves as compared to the fast waves. It is found that the receptivity of the boundary layer on the windward side (with respect to the acoustic forcing) decreases when the incidence angle is increased from 0 to 30 degrees. However, the receptivity coefficient for the leeward side is found to vary relatively weakly with the incidence angle. The maximum receptivity is obtained when the wave incident angle is about 20 degrees. Vortical disturbances also generate unstable second modes, however the receptivity coefficients are smaller than that for the acoustic waves. Vortical disturbances first generate the fast acoustic modes and they switch to the slow mode near the continuous spectrum.

  10. Numerical Simulation of Receptivity for a Transition Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collis, S. Scott; Joslin, R. D. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The cost of fuel to overcome turbulence induced viscous drag on a commercial airplane constitutes a significant fraction of the operating cost of an airline. Achieving laminar flow and maintaining it over a large portion of the wing can significantly reduce the viscous drag, and hence the cost. Design of such laminar-flow-control wings and their practical operation requires the ability to accurately and reliably predict the transition from laminar to turbulent flow. The transition process begins with the conversion of environmental and surface disturbances into the instability waves of the flow by a process called receptivity. The goal of the current research project has been to improve the prediction of transition through a better understanding of the physics of receptivity. The initial objective of this work was to investigate the specific stability and receptivity characteristics of a particular experimental investigation of boundary layer receptivity at NASA Langley. Some simulation results using direct solutions of the linearized Navier-Stokes equations which modeled this experiment where presented in the 1999 APS DFD meeting. However, based on these initial investigations, it became clear that to cover the vast receptivity parameter space required for a practical transition prediction tool, more efficient methods would be required. Thus, the focus of this research was shifted from modeling this particular experiment to formulating and developing new techniques that could efficiently yet accurately predict receptivity for a wide range of disturbance conditions.

  11. Digital neuromorphic processing for a simplified algorithm of ultrasonic reception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Lin; Clarke, Chris

    2001-05-01

    Previously, most mammalian auditory systems research has concentrated on human sensory perception whose frequencies are lower than 20 kHz. The implementations almost always used analog VLSI design. Due to the complexity of the model, it is difficult to implement these algorithms using current digital technology. This paper introduces a simplified model of biosonic reception system in bats and its implementation in the ``Chiroptera Inspired Robotic CEphaloid'' (CIRCE) project. This model consists of bandpass filters, a half-wave rectifier, low-pass filters, automatic gain control, and spike generation with thresholds. Due to the real-time requirements of the system, the system employs Butterworth filters and advanced field programmable gate array (FPGA) architectures to provide a viable solution. The ultrasonic signal processing is implemented on a Xilinx FPGA Virtex II device in real time. In the system, 12-bit input echo signals from receivers are sampled at 1 M samples per second for a signal frequency range from 20 to 200 kHz. The system performs a 704-channel per ear auditory pipeline operating in real time. The output of the system is a coded time series of threshold crossing points. Comparing hardware implementation with fixed-point software, the system shows significant performance gains with no loss of accuracy.

  12. Volume production of negative ions in the reflex type ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Jimbo, K.

    1982-01-01

    The production of negative hydrogen ions is investigated in the reflex-type negative ion source. The extracted negative hydrogen currents of 9.7 mA (100 mA/cm/sup 2/) for H/sup -/ and of 4.1 mA (42 mA/cm/sup 2/) for D/sup -/ are obtained continuously. The impurity is less then 1%. An isotope effect of negative ion production is observed. When anomalous diffusion in the positive column was found by Lehnert and Hoh (1960), it was pointed out that the large particle loss produced by anomalous diffusion is compensated by the large particle production inside the plasma, i.e., the plasma tries to maintain itself. The self-sustaining property of the plasma is applied to the reflex-type negative ion source. Anomalous diffusion was artificially encouraged by changing the radial electric field inside the reflex discharge. The apparent encouragement of negative ion diffusion by the increase of density fluctuation amplitude is observed. Twice as much negative ion current was obtained with the artificial encouragement as without. It is found from the quasilinear theory that the inwardly directed radial electric field destabilizes the plasma in the reflex-type ion source. The nonlinear theory based on Yoshikawa method (1962) is extended, and the anomalous diffusion coefficient in a weakly ionized plasma is obtained. The electrostatic sheath trap, which increases the confinement of negative ions in the reflex-type ion source, is also discussed.

  13. The reflex-diode HPM source on Aurora

    SciTech Connect

    Huttlin, G.A.; Bushell, M.S.; Conrad, D.B.; Davis, D.P.; Litz, M.S.; Ruth, B.G.; Agee, F.J. ); Ebersole, K.L.; Judy, D.C.; Lezcano, P.A.; Pereira, N.R.; Weidenheimer, D.M. )

    1990-06-01

    This paper describes the most recent in a series of experiments to develop the reflex diode as a source of microwaves on the Aurora relativistic electron-beam pulser. The authors have achieved an overall output for radial extraction of {approximately} 400 J in microwave bursts from {approximately} 100 to 150 ns at frequencies below 1 GHz. The diagnostics for radial extraction have included directional couplers, card calorimeters, and free-field sensors. The authors have varied the anode/cathode spacing, downstream microwave reflector, and a second anode foil, but, within the range of variations, no strong trends have been noted.

  14. A Binaural Cochlear Implant Sound Coding Strategy Inspired by the Contralateral Medial Olivocochlear Reflex

    PubMed Central

    Eustaquio-Martín, Almudena; Stohl, Joshua S.; Wolford, Robert D.; Schatzer, Reinhold; Wilson, Blake S.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: In natural hearing, cochlear mechanical compression is dynamically adjusted via the efferent medial olivocochlear reflex (MOCR). These adjustments probably help understanding speech in noisy environments and are not available to the users of current cochlear implants (CIs). The aims of the present study are to: (1) present a binaural CI sound processing strategy inspired by the control of cochlear compression provided by the contralateral MOCR in natural hearing; and (2) assess the benefits of the new strategy for understanding speech presented in competition with steady noise with a speech-like spectrum in various spatial configurations of the speech and noise sources. Design: Pairs of CI sound processors (one per ear) were constructed to mimic or not mimic the effects of the contralateral MOCR on compression. For the nonmimicking condition (standard strategy or STD), the two processors in a pair functioned similarly to standard clinical processors (i.e., with fixed back-end compression and independently of each other). When configured to mimic the effects of the MOCR (MOC strategy), the two processors communicated with each other and the amount of back-end compression in a given frequency channel of each processor in the pair decreased/increased dynamically (so that output levels dropped/increased) with increases/decreases in the output energy from the corresponding frequency channel in the contralateral processor. Speech reception thresholds in speech-shaped noise were measured for 3 bilateral CI users and 2 single-sided deaf unilateral CI users. Thresholds were compared for the STD and MOC strategies in unilateral and bilateral listening conditions and for three spatial configurations of the speech and noise sources in simulated free-field conditions: speech and noise sources colocated in front of the listener, speech on the left ear with noise in front of the listener, and speech on the left ear with noise on the right ear. In both bilateral and

  15. Laryngeal Reflexes: Physiology, Technique and Clinical Use

    PubMed Central

    Ludlow, Christy L.

    2015-01-01

    This review examines the current level of knowledge and techniques available for the study of laryngeal reflexes. Overall, the larynx is under constant control of several systems (including respiration, swallowing and cough) as well as sensory-motor reflex responses involving glossopharyngeal, pharyngeal, laryngeal and tracheobronchial sensory receptors. Techniques for the clinical assessment of these reflexes are emerging and need to be examined for sensitivity and specificity in identifying laryngeal sensory disorders. Quantitative assessment methods for the diagnosis of sensory reductions as well as sensory hypersensitivity may account for laryngeal disorders such as chronic cough, paradoxical vocal fold disorder and muscular tension dysphonia. The development of accurate assessment techniques could improve our understanding of the mechanisms involved in these disorders. PMID:26241237

  16. Reflex: Graphical workflow engine for data reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ESO Reflex development Team

    2014-01-01

    Reflex provides an easy and flexible way to reduce VLT/VLTI science data using the ESO pipelines. It allows graphically specifying the sequence in which the data reduction steps are executed, including conditional stops, loops and conditional branches. It eases inspection of the intermediate and final data products and allows repetition of selected processing steps to optimize the data reduction. The data organization necessary to reduce the data is built into the system and is fully automatic; advanced users can plug their own modules and steps into the data reduction sequence. Reflex supports the development of data reduction workflows based on the ESO Common Pipeline Library. Reflex is based on the concept of a scientific workflow, whereby the data reduction cascade is rendered graphically and data seamlessly flow from one processing step to the next. It is distributed with a number of complete test datasets so users can immediately start experimenting and familiarize themselves with the system.

  17. Sudden infant death triggered by dive reflex.

    PubMed

    Matturri, L; Ottaviani, G; Lavezzi, A M

    2005-01-01

    The dive reflex is the reflex mechanism most frequently considered in the aetiopathogenesis of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). This seems to persist in human beings as an inheritance from diver birds and amphibians. It has been reported that washing the face with cold water or plunging into cold water can provoke cardiac deceleration through the intervention of the ambiguus and the vagal dorsal nuclei. This report describes a case of SIDS that offers a unique insight into the role of the dive reflex in determining a lethal outcome. Examination of the brainstem on serial sections revealed severe bilateral hypoplasia of the arcuate nucleus and gliosis of the other cardiorespiratory medullary nuclei. The coronary and cardiac conduction arteries presented early atherosclerotic lesions. The possible role of parental cigarette smoking in the pathogenesis of arcuate nucleus hypoplasia and early coronary atherosclerotic lesions is also discussed. PMID:15623488

  18. Visual reflex seizures induced by complex stimuli.

    PubMed

    Zifkin, Benjamin G; Inoue, Yushi

    2004-01-01

    Visual reflex seizures induced by complex stimuli may be triggered by patterned and flashing displays that are now ubiquitous. The seizures may be clinically generalized, but unilateral and bilateral myoclonic attacks also may be triggered, especially in patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy, and recently, clearly focal reflex occipital lobe seizures have been described. Some seizure-triggering properties of video displays can be identified, such as perceived brightness, pattern, flicker frequency, and color. Knowledge of these is useful in planning individual treatment and in designing regulations for screen content of television broadcasts or for other video displays. Some subjects will also be sensitive to cognitive or action-programming activation, especially when playing video games, and this can increase the chance of seizure triggering. Nonspecific factors such as sleep deprivation, prolonged exposure, and drug or alcohol use also may play a role in reflex seizure occurrence. PMID:14706042

  19. A reflex resonance model of vocal vibrato

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titze, Ingo R.; Story, Brad; Smith, Marshall; Long, Russel

    2002-05-01

    A reflex mechanism with a long latency (>40 ms) is implicated as a plausible cause of vocal vibrato. At least one pair of agonist-antagonist muscles that can change vocal-fold length is needed, such as the cricothyroid muscle paired with the thyroarytenoid muscle, or the cricothyroid muscle paired with the lateral cricoarytenoid muscle or a strap muscle. Such an agonist-antagonist muscle pair can produce negative feedback instability in vocal-fold length with this long reflex latency, producing oscillations on the order of 5-7 Hz. It is shown that singers appear to increase the gain in the reflex loop to cultivate the vibrato, which grows out of a spectrum of 0-15-Hz physiologic tremors in raw form.

  20. Satb2 Stations Neurons along Reflex Arcs.

    PubMed

    Hantman, Adam W; Kaltschmidt, Julia A

    2016-08-17

    The nociceptive flexor withdrawal reflex has an august place in the history of neuroscience. In this issue of Neuron, Hilde et al. (2016) advance our understanding of this reflex by characterizing the molecular identity and circuit connectivity of component interneurons. They assess how a DNA-binding factor Satb2 controls cell position, molecular identity, pre-and postsynaptic targeting, and function of a population of inhibitory sensory relay interneurons that serve to integrate both proprioceptive and nociceptive afferent information. PMID:27537478

  1. Snout and Visual Rooting Reflexes in Infantile Autism. Brief Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minderaa, Ruud B.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The authors conducted extensive neurological evaluations of 42 autistic individuals and were surprised to discover a consistently positive snout reflex in most of them. Difficulties with assessing the reflex are noted. The authors then reassessed the Ss for a series of primitive reflexes which are interpreted as signs of diffuse cortical brain…

  2. On Reflection: Is Reflexivity Necessarily Beneficial in Intercultural Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blasco, Maribel

    2012-01-01

    This article explores how the concept of reflexivity is used in intercultural education. Reflexivity is often presented as a key learning goal in acquiring intercultural competence (ICC). Yet, reflexivity can be defined in different ways, and take different forms across time and space, depending on the concepts of selfhood that prevail and how…

  3. Experimental research of the pupil light reflex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczepanowska, Wioletta; Kasprzak, Henryk T.; Hachol, Andrzej

    2003-11-01

    This paper reports the method of recording the Pupil Light Reflex with using a CCD linear sensor as a detector. The system allows to obtain a linear resolution 0,005 mm and a temporary resolution 11 ins. The principle of measuring method and example results of PLR study are presented.

  4. Doing Reflexivity: Moments of Unbecoming and Becoming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Alison; Allan, Julie

    2014-01-01

    This paper offers an account of a reflexive "trip" undertaken by a professional doctoral student and her supervisor. It presents a series of vignettes which offer an account of unbecomings and becomings encountered by the student. Making use of a dialogic approach in which the supervisor responds to the student, we suggest this method of…

  5. Dilemmas and Deliberations in Reflexive Ethnographic Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Janean Valerie

    2014-01-01

    This paper traces insights into the challenges and dilemmas experienced whilst researching students' interpretations and understandings of the Behaviour Management in Schools policy in Western Australia. Journal records, supported by student transcripts, are woven together in a reflexive ethnographic journey--from the beginning phase of…

  6. Biological Motion Cues Trigger Reflexive Attentional Orienting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shi, Jinfu; Weng, Xuchu; He, Sheng; Jiang, Yi

    2010-01-01

    The human visual system is extremely sensitive to biological signals around us. In the current study, we demonstrate that biological motion walking direction can induce robust reflexive attentional orienting. Following a brief presentation of a central point-light walker walking towards either the left or right direction, observers' performance…

  7. Taking Control of Reflexive Social Attention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ristic, Jelena; Kingstone, Alan

    2005-01-01

    Attention is shifted reflexively to where other people are looking. It has been argued by a number of investigators that this social attention effect reflects the obligatory bottom-up activation of domain-specific modules within the inferior temporal (IT) cortex that are specialized for processing face and gaze information. However, it is also the…

  8. Reflex Anuria After Renal Tumor Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Kervancioglu, Selim Sirikci, Akif; Erbagci, Ahmet

    2007-04-15

    We report a case of reflex anuria after transarterial embolization of a renal tumor. Anuria developed immediately after embolization and resolved 74 hr following the procedure. We postulate that reflux anuria in our case was related to mechanoreceptors, chemoreceptors, or both, as these are stimulated by the occluded blood vessels, ischemia, and edema of the normal renal tissue of an embolized kidney.

  9. The reflexive self and culture: a critique.

    PubMed

    Adams, Matthew

    2003-06-01

    This article attempts to engage with a tendency in the theorization of social change and self-identity, evident in the work of a number of contemporary social theorists, to place an extended process of reflexivity at the heart of modern identity. As symptomatic of 'neo-modern' accounts of selfhood, critical readings of Giddens, Beck, Castells and some aspects of social theory more generally, and their account of modern reflexivity's relationship to culture, are assessed. In light of these criticisms, ways in which culture might still play an important part in the shaping of identity are considered. The relationship between language, culture and reflexivity, drawing from philosophy, sociology and G. H. Mead's own brand of social psychology, are all utilized in establishing a critique of the role Giddens and others designate for culture in the constitution of the contemporary self. By potentially repositioning self-identity in its connection to culture, the overall bearing of reflexivity upon the processes of self-identity is thus questioned. It is argued that a culturally-situated, yet fluid and multifarious account of self-identity is a necessary analytical and normative alternative. PMID:12945868

  10. The Reflexive Modernization of Australian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pick, David

    2004-01-01

    The profound changes occurring in Australian higher education are viewed here in the context of the social, cultural, political and economic effects of globalization. Particular attention is paid to providing a theoretical foundation for understanding these effects using the reflexive modernization perspective. Highlighted are some of the…

  11. Reflectivity, Reflexivity and Situated Reflective Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malthouse, Richard; Roffey-Barentsen, Jodi; Watts, Mike

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an aspect of reflective practice referred to as situated reflective practice. The overarching theory is derived from social theories of structuration and reflexivity. In particular, from Giddens' theory of structuration, which sees social life as an interplay of agency and structure. Discussion of the research reported…

  12. Plasma quiescence in a reflex discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Jerde, L.; Friedman, S.; Carr, W.; Seidl, M.

    1980-02-01

    A thermionic cathode reflex discharge and the plasma it produces are studied. It is found that extremely quiescent plasmas can be produced when the electron-loss rate due to classical diffusion is equal to the ion-loss rate. Particle and power balances for the quiescent plasma are obtained, and the average electron energy loss per ion produced is determined.

  13. Reception of Multiple Telemetry Signals via One Dish Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukai, Ryan; Vilnrotter, Victor

    2010-01-01

    A microwave aeronautical-telemetry receiver system includes an antenna comprising a seven-element planar array of receiving feed horns centered at the focal point of a paraboloidal dish reflector that is nominally aimed at a single aircraft or at multiple aircraft flying in formation. Through digital processing of the signals received by the seven feed horns, the system implements a method of enhanced cancellation of interference, such that it becomes possible to receive telemetry signals in the same frequency channel simultaneously from either or both of two aircraft at slightly different angular positions within the field of view of the antenna, even in the presence of multipath propagation. The present system is an advanced version of the system described in Spatio- Temporal Equalizer for a Receiving-Antenna Feed Array NPO-43077, NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 34, No. 2 (February 2010), page 32. To recapitulate: The radio-frequency telemetry signals received by the seven elements of the array are digitized, converted to complex baseband form, and sent to a spatio-temporal equalizer that consists mostly of a bank of seven adaptive finite-impulse-response (FIR) filters (one for each element in the array) plus a unit that sums the outputs of the filters. The combination of the spatial diversity of the feedhorn array and the temporal diversity of the filter bank affords better multipath suppression performance than is achievable by means of temporal equalization alone. The FIR filter bank adapts itself in real time to enable reception of telemetry at a low bit error rate, even in the presence of frequency-selective multipath propagation like that commonly found at flight-test ranges. The combination of the array and the filter bank makes it possible to constructively add multipath incoming signals to the corresponding directly arriving signals, thereby enabling reductions in telemetry bit-error rates.

  14. Boundary-layer receptivity of sound with roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saric, William S.; Hoos, Jon A.; Radeztsky, Ronald H.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental study of receptivity was carried out using an acoustical disturbance in the freestream. The receptivity was enhanced by using a uniform two-dimensional roughness strip (tape). The roughness strip generated the local adjustment in the flow needed to couple the long-wavelength sound wave with the short-wavelength T-S wave. The method proved to be highly sensitive, with slight changes in the forcing frequency or in the height of the 2D roughness element having a strong effect on the amplitude of the observed T-S wave.

  15. Theory of optimum radio reception methods in random noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutkin, L. S.

    1982-09-01

    The theory of optimum methods of reception of signals on the background of random noise, widely used in development of any radioelectronic systems and devices based on reception and transmission of information (radar and radio controlled, radio communications, radio telemetry, radio astronomy, television, and other systems), as well as electroacoustical and wire communications sytems, is presented. Optimum linear and nonlinear filtration, binary and comples signal detection and discrimination, estimation of signal parameters, receiver synthesis for incomplete a priori data, special features of synthesis with respect to certain quality indicators, and other problems are examined.

  16. Modulation of the initial light reflex during affective picture viewing.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Robert R; Bradley, Margaret M; Lang, Peter J

    2014-09-01

    An initial reflexive constriction of the pupil to stimulation-the light reflex-is primarily modulated by brightness, but is attenuated when participants are under threat of shock (i.e., fear-inhibited light reflex). The present study assessed whether the light reflex is similarly attenuated when viewing emotional pictures. Pupil diameter was recorded while participants viewed erotic, violent, and neutral scenes that were matched in brightness; scrambled versions identical in brightness were also presented as an additional control. Compared to viewing neutral scenes, the light reflex was reliably modulated by hedonic content, with significant attenuation both when viewing unpleasant as well as pleasant pictures. No differences in the light reflex were found among scrambled versions. Thus, emotional modulation of the initial light reflex is not confined to a context of fear and is not indicative of brightness differences when viewing pictures of natural scenes. PMID:24849784

  17. "May I help you?" – Evaluation of the new student service at the reception desk during the clinical courses at the Department of Operative Dentistry and Periodontology as a part of a longitudinal curriculum of social and communicative competences for dental students

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenstein, Nora; Ensmann, Isabelle; Haak, Rainer; Hallal, Houda; Kupke, Jana; Matthes, Jan; Noack, Michael; Wicht, Michael; Stosch, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Since 2009, the University of Cologne has been developing a longitudinal curriculum for teaching social and communicative skills to dental students (LSK-Dent) based on the recommendations of the Association for Dental Education in Europe (ADEE). As a part of this curriculum it was considered to develop a reception service in the undergraduate treatment courses of the Department of Operative Dentistry and Periodontology involving the organizational and administrative handling of the patients by the students. Students should gain an insight into everyday practice and the reception service should function as a learning environment for social und communicative competences. This article introduces the LSK-Dent project, the implementation of the reception service and presents initial evaluation results. Methods: Patients (n=575) and students (n=53) filled out a questionnaire. Additionally, four semi-structured interviews with students were conducted. Results: The reception service was successfully implemented and endorsed by the students. First indications suggest that the reception service was well received by students as a learning environment for social und communicative competences and viewed as an opportunity to gain an insight into everyday practice. Conclusion: The reception service is an innovative addition to the treatment courses and an example for transforming an already existing reality in a course into a new learning environment for students. To what extent the implementation of reflexive elements can increase the subjectively perceived additional benefit by students, has to be addressed in further studies. PMID:26413169

  18. Communication Based on Receptive Multilingualism: Advantages and Disadvantages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braunmüller, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    This paper tries to give answers for successful receptive multilingualism (RM) but also for its failure. It is mainly based on the results of two projects, one on inter-dialectal communication in the Baltic area during the era of the Hanseatic League and the other analyses inter-Scandinavian communication today. The main purpose of this survey is…

  19. Rigs and Posts: Radio Reception Technology for FLL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crookall, David

    1984-01-01

    Promotes the use of international broadcasting as a rich source of spoken text for foreign language learning. A basic knowledge of this technology is stressed, including types of broadcasts, times, frequency/wavelength, transmission modes, propagation variation, reception techniques, and program schedules. In addition, choice and use of equipment…

  20. Adolescent Weight Status and Receptivity to Food TV Advertisements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adachi-Mejia, Anna M.; Sutherland, Lisa A.; Longacre, Meghan R.; Beach, Michael L.; Titus-Ernstoff, Linda; Gibson, Jennifer J.; Dalton, Madeline A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the relationship between adolescent weight status and food advertisement receptivity. Design: Survey-based evaluation with data collected at baseline (initial and at 2 months), and at follow-up (11 months). Setting: New Hampshire and Vermont. Participants: Students (n = 2,281) aged 10-13 in 2002-2005. Main Outcome…

  1. Boundary-Layer Receptivity and Integrated Transition Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan; Choudhari, Meelan

    2005-01-01

    The adjoint parabold stability equations (PSE) formulation is used to calculate the boundary layer receptivity to localized surface roughness and suction for compressible boundary layers. Receptivity efficiency functions predicted by the adjoint PSE approach agree well with results based on other nonparallel methods including linearized Navier-Stokes equations for both Tollmien-Schlichting waves and crossflow instability in swept wing boundary layers. The receptivity efficiency function can be regarded as the Green's function to the disturbance amplitude evolution in a nonparallel (growing) boundary layer. Given the Fourier transformed geometry factor distribution along the chordwise direction, the linear disturbance amplitude evolution for a finite size, distributed nonuniformity can be computed by evaluating the integral effects of both disturbance generation and linear amplification. The synergistic approach via the linear adjoint PSE for receptivity and nonlinear PSE for disturbance evolution downstream of the leading edge forms the basis for an integrated transition prediction tool. Eventually, such physics-based, high fidelity prediction methods could simulate the transition process from the disturbance generation through the nonlinear breakdown in a holistic manner.

  2. Listen to Your Heart? Calling and Receptivity to Career Advice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobrow, Shoshana R.; Tosti-Kharas, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    This study explores calling in the context of career decision making. Specifically, the authors examine receptivity to advice that discourages individuals from pursuing a professional path in their calling's domain. The authors hypothesize that people with a strong calling will be more likely to ignore negative career advice. In Study 1, a…

  3. [The reception of Vesalius in Spain and England].

    PubMed

    Portmann, Maria

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the depiction of engravings taken from Vesalius's, Valverde de Hamusco's and Casserio 's treatises in portraits during the 16th and the 17th centuries to understand better the reception of the Fabrica in Spain and England. PMID:25962218

  4. Adolescent Understanding of Key Variables Affecting Receptivity to Health Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, D. S. G.; Carter, S. M.

    Adolescents comprise a substantial proportion of the at-risk population for sexually transmissible diseases (STD's) and AIDS. This study examines the link between sexuality education programs and student receptivity in Western Australian secondary schools. The researchers ask the question, "Given the same exposure to similar content and processes…

  5. Recent Research on Measuring Receptive and Productive Vocabulary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tran, Thu Hoang

    2009-01-01

    This paper is concerned with research in measuring receptive and productive vocabulary knowledge in second language (L2) learning, including English as a second language (ESL) learning and English as a foreign language (EFL) learning. The paper will begin with a brief introduction to the role of vocabulary in language learning, and then an…

  6. Receptive Vocabulary Differences in Monolingual and Bilingual Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bialystok, Ellen; Luk, Gigi

    2012-01-01

    English receptive vocabulary scores from 797 monolingual and 808 bilingual participants between the ages of 17 and 89 years old were aggregated from 20 studies to compare standard scores across language groups. The distribution of scores was unimodal for both groups but the mean score was significantly different, with monolinguals obtaining higher…

  7. Making Sense of Science in the Reception Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glauert, Esme

    2005-01-01

    In the context of growing awareness of young children's capabilities, and debates about the nature of their reasoning in science, this study set out to explore the ways in which reception children make sense of classroom experiences in science. A particular challenge of the study was to develop appropriate and productive approaches to…

  8. Boundary-layer receptivity and laminar-flow airfoil design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerschen, Edward J.

    1987-01-01

    Boundary-layer receptivity examines the way in which external disturbances generate instability waves in boundary layers. Receptivity theory is complementary to stability theory, which studies the evolution of disturbances that are already present in the boundary layer. A transition prediction method which combines receptivity with linear stability theory would directly account for the influence of free-stream disturbances and also consider the characteristics of the boundary layer upstream of the neutral stability point. The current e sup N transition prediction methods require empirical correlations for the influence of environmental disturbances, and totally ignore the boundary layer characteristics upstream of the neutral stability point. The regions where boundary-layer receptivity occurs can be separated into two classes, one near the leading edges and the other at the downstream points where the boundary layer undergoes rapid streamwise adjustments. Analyses were developed for both types of regions, and parametric studies which examine the relative importance of different mechanisms were carried out. The work presented here has focused on the low Mach number case. Extensions to high subsonic and supersonic conditions are presently underway.

  9. 33 CFR 158.410 - Reception facilities: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CFR 261.3, unless the port or terminal operator can provide to the master, operator, or person in... sterilized in accordance with their regulations in 7 CFR 330.400 and 9 CFR 94.5. ... (CONTINUED) POLLUTION RECEPTION FACILITIES FOR OIL, NOXIOUS LIQUID SUBSTANCES, AND GARBAGE Criteria...

  10. The Reception of Dewey in the Hispanic World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nubiola, Jaime

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe Dewey's reception in the Spanish-speaking countries that constitute the Hispanic world. Without any doubt, it can be said that in the past century Spain and the countries of South America have been a world apart, lagging far behind the mainstream Western world. It includes a number of names and facts about the…

  11. Intervention for Mixed Receptive-Expressive Language Impairment: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyle, James; McCartney, Elspeth; O'Hare, Anne; Law, James

    2010-01-01

    Studies indicate that language impairment that cannot be accounted for by factors such as below-average non-verbal ability, hearing impairment, behaviour or emotional problems, or neurological impairments affects some 6% of school-age children. Language impairment with a receptive language component is more resistant to intervention than specific…

  12. Views of the Apollo 11 Twentieth Anniversary Black Tie reception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Views of the Apollo 11 Twentieth Anniversary Black Tie reception at the downtown Houston Hyatt Regency Hotel. Views include former JSC Directors Robert Gilruth and Christopher C. Kraft Jr. reminiscing with keynote speaker Walter Cronkite (39934); Apollo astronauts Tom Stafford (left) and Neil Armstrong (right) talk with former Soviet cosmonaut Alexei Leonov (center) at the gala (39935).

  13. 12. Interior view of reception and secretarial space for legal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Interior view of reception and secretarial space for legal offices; showing wall mounted shelving and exterior window; center and south side of main section of building on top floor; view to southwest. - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Group Administration & Secure Storage Building, 2372 Westover Avenue, Blackhawk, Meade County, SD

  14. Joint Book Reading and Receptive Vocabulary: A Parallel Process Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meng, Christine

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to understand the reciprocal, bidirectional longitudinal relation between joint book reading and English receptive vocabulary. To address the research goals, a nationally representative sample of Head Start children, the Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey (2003 cohort), was used for analysis. The…

  15. Ovarian fluid of receptive females enhances sperm velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasparini, Clelia; Andreatta, Gabriele; Pilastro, Andrea

    2012-05-01

    The females of several internal fertilizers are able to store sperm for a long time, reducing the risk of sperm limitation. However, it also means that males can attempt to mate outside females' receptive period, potentially increasing the level of sperm competition and exacerbating sexual conflict over mating. The guppy ( Poecilia reticulata), an internally fertilizing fish, is a model system of such competition and conflict. Female guppies accept courtship and mate consensually only during receptive periods of the ovarian cycle but receive approximately one (mostly forced) mating attempt per minute both during and outside their sexually receptive phase. In addition, females can store viable sperm for months. We expected that guppy females would disfavour sperm received during their unreceptive period, possibly by modulating the quality and/or quantity of the components present in the ovarian fluid (OF) over the breeding cycle. Ovarian fluid has been shown to affect sperm velocity, a determinant of sperm competition success in this and other fishes. We found that in vitro sperm velocity is slower in OF collected from unreceptive females than in OF from receptive females. Visual stimulation with a potential partner prior to collection did not significantly affect in vitro sperm velocity. These results suggest that sperm received by unreceptive females may be disfavoured as sperm velocity likely affects the migration process and the number of sperm that reach storage sites.

  16. Program Description for the Phoenix Reception and Assessment Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Datema, Thea; And Others

    Phoenix Reception and Assessment Center (PRAC) is a non-secure detention and assessment center for up to 15 Wayne County delinquent, adolescent males who have been committed to the Michigan Department of Social Services for care, treatment and supervision. Adolescents, ages 12 through 18, are eligible for placement at Phoenix according to the…

  17. Reception-Conversion Subsystem (RXCV) for microwave power transmission system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    As part of a program to demonstrate the feasibility of power transmission from space, an approximately 25 sq m Reception-Conversion Subsystem was designed and tested. The device collects high power microwave energy, converts it into dc, and dissipates it in an instrumented demonstration load.

  18. Concern About Hunger May Increase Receptivity to GMOs.

    PubMed

    Carter, B Elijah; Conn, Caitlin C; Wiles, Jason R

    2016-07-01

    Due to a phenomenon known as the 'backfire effect', intuition-based opinions can be inadvertently strengthened by evidence-based counterarguments. Students' views on genetically modified organisms (GMOs) may be subject to this effect. We explored the impact of an empathetically accessible topic, world hunger, on receptivity to GMO technology as an alternative to direct evidence-based approaches. PMID:27246454

  19. Integrated Parallel Reception, Excitation, and Shimming (iPRES)

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hui; Song, Allen W.; Truong, Trong-Kha

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To develop a new concept for a hardware platform that enables integrated parallel reception, excitation, and shimming (iPRES). Theory This concept uses a single coil array rather than separate arrays for parallel excitation/reception and B0 shimming. It relies on a novel design that allows a radiofrequency current (for excitation/reception) and a direct current (for B0 shimming) to coexist independently in the same coil. Methods Proof-of-concept B0 shimming experiments were performed with a two-coil array in a phantom, whereas B0 shimming simulations were performed with a 48-coil array in the human brain. Results Our experiments show that individually optimized direct currents applied in each coil can reduce the B0 root-mean-square error by 62–81% and minimize distortions in echo-planar images. The simulations show that dynamic shimming with the 48-coil iPRES array can reduce the B0 root-mean-square error in the prefrontal and temporal regions by 66–79% as compared to static 2nd-order spherical harmonic shimming and by 12–23% as compared to dynamic shimming with a 48-coil conventional shim array. Conclusion Our results demonstrate the feasibility of the iPRES concept to perform parallel excitation/reception and B0 shimming with a unified coil system as well as its promise for in vivo applications. PMID:23629974

  20. Ovarian fluid of receptive females enhances sperm velocity.

    PubMed

    Gasparini, Clelia; Andreatta, Gabriele; Pilastro, Andrea

    2012-05-01

    The females of several internal fertilizers are able to store sperm for a long time, reducing the risk of sperm limitation. However, it also means that males can attempt to mate outside females' receptive period, potentially increasing the level of sperm competition and exacerbating sexual conflict over mating. The guppy (Poecilia reticulata), an internally fertilizing fish, is a model system of such competition and conflict. Female guppies accept courtship and mate consensually only during receptive periods of the ovarian cycle but receive approximately one (mostly forced) mating attempt per minute both during and outside their sexually receptive phase. In addition, females can store viable sperm for months. We expected that guppy females would disfavour sperm received during their unreceptive period, possibly by modulating the quality and/or quantity of the components present in the ovarian fluid (OF) over the breeding cycle. Ovarian fluid has been shown to affect sperm velocity, a determinant of sperm competition success in this and other fishes. We found that in vitro sperm velocity is slower in OF collected from unreceptive females than in OF from receptive females. Visual stimulation with a potential partner prior to collection did not significantly affect in vitro sperm velocity. These results suggest that sperm received by unreceptive females may be disfavoured as sperm velocity likely affects the migration process and the number of sperm that reach storage sites. PMID:22430815

  1. Expressive versus Receptive Language Skills in Specific Reading Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stojanovik, Vesna; Riddell, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    Despite ample research into the language skills of children with specific reading disorder no studies so far have investigated whether there may be a difference between expressive and receptive language skills in this population. Yet, neuro-anatomical models would predict that children who have specific reading disorder which is not associated…

  2. On the Reception of Foucauldian Ideas in Pedagogical Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostrowicka, Helena

    2011-01-01

    The article is devoted to the presentation of the reception of Foucauldian ideas in Polish pedagogical research over the past twenty years. This movement of thought is described as an oscillation between heterotopia and utopia, autonomy and heteronomy, emancipation and repression. As results of this analysis indicate, Polish pedagogues are most…

  3. 7. Interior view of main entrance looking into reception space ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Interior view of main entrance looking into reception space of wellness center offices; showing doorway to corridor accessing rehabilitation and testing facilities and small room behind; near center of west side of occupied portion; view to south. - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Mess & Administration Building, 2279 Risner Drive, Blackhawk, Meade County, SD

  4. Categorization Skills and Receptive Language Development in Autistic Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ungerer, Judy A.; Sigman, Marian

    1987-01-01

    Assessment of category knowledge and receptive language skills of 16 autistic (3-6 years old), mentally retarded, and normal children indicated that the autistic children's knowledge of function, form, and color categories was comparable to that of the mental-age-matched mentally retarded and normal comparison groups. (Author/DB)

  5. 33 CFR 158.410 - Reception facilities: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... CFR 261.3, unless the port or terminal operator can provide to the master, operator, or person in... sterilized in accordance with their regulations in 7 CFR 330.400 and 9 CFR 94.5. ... (CONTINUED) POLLUTION RECEPTION FACILITIES FOR OIL, NOXIOUS LIQUID SUBSTANCES, AND GARBAGE Criteria...

  6. 33 CFR 158.410 - Reception facilities: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CFR 261.3, unless the port or terminal operator can provide to the master, operator, or person in... sterilized in accordance with their regulations in 7 CFR 330.400 and 9 CFR 94.5. ... (CONTINUED) POLLUTION RECEPTION FACILITIES FOR OIL, NOXIOUS LIQUID SUBSTANCES, AND GARBAGE Criteria...

  7. Language Production and Reception: A Processability Theory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spinner, Patti

    2013-01-01

    Pienemann's Processability Theory (PT) predicts an order of emergence of morphosyntactic elements in second language (L2) production data. This research investigates whether the same order of emergence can be detected in L2 reception data, specifically, data from a timed audio grammaticality judgment task (GJT). The results from three related…

  8. College Student Receptiveness to Various Alcohol Treatment Options

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epler, Amee J.; Sher, Kenneth J.; Loomis, Tiffany B.; O'Malley, Stephanie S.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Heavy episodic drinking remains a significant problem on college campuses. Although most interventions for college students are behavioral, pharmacological treatments, such as naltrexone, could provide additional options. Participants: The authors evaluated receptivity to various alcohol treatment options in a general population of…

  9. Making Connections through Voice: Teacher Receptivity to Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellencamp, Amy V.

    This study used focused interviews, participant observations, and document review to identify five organizational and personal factors that 40 teachers (general education, special education, and specialists) in a small rural school district reported as affecting their receptivity to change: (1) the degree to which schools are ready for change; (2)…

  10. Light Multi-Reflex Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolonkin, A.

    The purpose of this article is to call attention to the revolutionary idea of multi-reflection. This idea allows the design of new engines, space propulsion systems, storage of a beam and solar energy, transmission of energy over millions of kilometers, a new weapon, etc. This method and its main innovations were offered by the author in 1983 in the former USSR. Now the author shows in a series of articles the huge possibilities of this idea in many fields such as space, aviation, energy, energy transmission, beam amplification, light transformation and so on. This article considers the direct transfer of light beam energy to mechanical energy and back.

  11. Photic sneeze reflex in nephropathic cystinosis.

    PubMed

    Katz, B; Melles, R B; Swenson, M R; Schneider, J A

    1990-12-01

    Photic induced sneeze is a reflex that occurs in certain individuals after exposure to bright light. Cystinosis is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism in which nonprotein cystine accumulates within lysosomes. The pathognomonic ocular manifestation of cystinosis is corneal crystal deposition. We observed photic induced sneezes during ophthalmoscopic examination in five of 19 patients with nephropathic cystinosis (26%). We report on this observation and discuss possible pathophysiological mechanisms for photic induced sneezing in cystinosis. PMID:2275931

  12. Photic sneeze reflex in nephropathic cystinosis.

    PubMed Central

    Katz, B; Melles, R B; Swenson, M R; Schneider, J A

    1990-01-01

    Photic induced sneeze is a reflex that occurs in certain individuals after exposure to bright light. Cystinosis is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism in which nonprotein cystine accumulates within lysosomes. The pathognomonic ocular manifestation of cystinosis is corneal crystal deposition. We observed photic induced sneezes during ophthalmoscopic examination in five of 19 patients with nephropathic cystinosis (26%). We report on this observation and discuss possible pathophysiological mechanisms for photic induced sneezing in cystinosis. PMID:2275931

  13. The spinal reflex cannot be perceptually separated from voluntary movements.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Arko; Haggard, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Both voluntary and involuntary movements activate sensors in the muscles, skin, tendon and joints. As limb movement can result from a mixture of spinal reflexes and voluntary motor commands, the cortical centres underlying conscious proprioception might either aggregate or separate the sensory inputs generated by voluntary movements from those generated by involuntary movements such as spinal reflexes. We addressed whether healthy volunteers could perceive the contribution of a spinal reflex during movements that combined both reflexive and voluntary contributions. Volunteers reported the reflexive contribution in leg movements that were partly driven by the knee-jerk reflex induced by a patellar tendon tap and partly by voluntary motor control. In one condition, participants were instructed to kick back in response to a tendon tap. The results were compared to reflexes in a resting baseline condition without voluntary movement. In a further condition, participants were instructed to kick forwards after a tap. Volunteers reported the perceived reflex contribution by repositioning the leg to the perceived maximum displacement to which the reflex moved the leg after each tendon tap. In the resting baseline condition, the reflex was accurately perceived. We found a near-unity slope of linear regressions of perceived on actual reflexive displacement. Both the slope value and the quality of regression fit in individual volunteers were significantly reduced when volunteers were instructed to generate voluntary backward kicks as soon as they detected the tap. In the kick forward condition, kinematic analysis showed continuity of reflex and voluntary movements, but the reflex contribution could be estimated from electromyography (EMG) recording on each trial. Again, participants' judgements of reflexes showed a poor relation to reflex EMG, in contrast to the baseline condition. In sum, we show that reflexes can be accurately perceived from afferent information. However

  14. The effect of distraction strategies on pain perception and the nociceptive flexor reflex (RIII reflex).

    PubMed

    Ruscheweyh, Ruth; Kreusch, Annette; Albers, Christoph; Sommer, Jens; Marziniak, Martin

    2011-11-01

    Distraction from pain reduces pain perception, and imaging studies have suggested that this may at least partially be mediated by activation of descending pain inhibitory systems. Here, we used the nociceptive flexor reflex (RIII reflex) to directly quantify the effects of different distraction strategies on basal spinal nociception and its temporal summation. Twenty-seven healthy subjects participated in 3 distraction tasks (mental imagery, listening to preferred music, spatial discrimination of brush stimuli) and, in a fourth task, concentrated on the painful stimulus. Results show that all 3 distraction tasks reduced pain perception, but only the brush task also reduced the RIII reflex. The concentration-on-pain task increased both pain perception and the RIII reflex. The extent of temporal summation of pain perception and the extent of temporal summation of the RIII reflex were not affected by any of the tasks. These results suggest that some, but not all, forms of pain reduction by distraction rely on descending pain inhibition. In addition, pain reduction by distraction seems to preferentially affect mechanisms of basal nociceptive transmission, not of temporal summation. PMID:21925793

  15. A Review of Recommendations for Sequencing Receptive and Expressive Language Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petursdottir, Anna Ingeborg; Carr, James E.

    2011-01-01

    We review recommendations for sequencing instruction in receptive and expressive language objectives in early and intensive behavioral intervention (EIBI) programs. Several books recommend completing receptive protocols before introducing corresponding expressive protocols. However, this recommendation has little empirical support, and some…

  16. Basic Gravitational Reflexes in the Larval Frog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, Stephen L.

    1996-01-01

    This investigation was designed to determine how a primitive vertebrate, the bullfrog tadpole, is able to sense and process gravitational stimuli. Because of the phylogenetic similarities of the vestibular systems in all vertebrates, the understanding of the gravitational reflexes in this relatively simple vertebrate should elucidate a skeletal framework on a elementary level, upon which the more elaborate reflexes of higher vertebrates may be constructed. The purpose of this study was to understand how the nervous system of the larval amphibian processes gravitational information. This study involved predominantly electrophysiological investigations of the isolated, alert (forebrain removed) bullfrog tadpole head. The focus of these experiments is threefold: (1) to understand from whole extraocular nerve recordings the signals sent to the eye following static gravitational tilt of the head; (2) to localize neuronal centers responsible for generating these signals through reversible pharmacological ablation of these centers; and (3) to record intracellularly from neurons within these centers in order to determine the single neuron's role in the overall processing of the center. This study has provided information on the mechanisms by which a primitive vertebrate processes gravitational reflexes.

  17. Deaf Students' Receptive and Expressive American Sign Language Skills: Comparisons and Relations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beal-Alvarez, Jennifer S.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents receptive and expressive American Sign Language skills of 85 students, 6 through 22 years of age at a residential school for the deaf using the American Sign Language Receptive Skills Test and the Ozcaliskan Motion Stimuli. Results are presented by ages and indicate that students' receptive skills increased with age and…

  18. Receptivity of Flat-Plate Boundary Layer in a Non-Uniform Free Stream (Vorticity Normal to the Plate)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogan, M. N.; Shumilkin, V. G.; Ustinov, M. V.; Zhigulev, S. V.

    1999-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies of low speed leading edge boundary layer receptivity to free-stream vorticity produced by upstream wires normal to the leading edge are discussed. Data include parametric variations in leading edge configuration and details of the incident disturbance field including single and multiple wakes. The induced disturbance amplitude increases with increases in the leading edge diameter and wake interactions. Measurements agree with the theory of M. E. Goldstein.

  19. Ethical reflections: examining reflexivity through the narrative paradigm.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Emily C; Shepherd, Marie L

    2011-09-01

    Being reflexive and providing these reflections for public scrutiny is often considered a key element of ethical, rigorous qualitative research. Prevalent conceptualizations of reflexivity, however, need interrogating and sharpening. We aim to contribute to this by examining reflexive practice, and in particular researchers' reflexive accounts, through the lens of the narrative paradigm. Our aim is to demonstrate that acknowledging the role of narrative reconstruction in reflexivity creates more ethical research, and that it is therefore crucial for researchers to more explicitly recognize this. Both authors present an analysis of one particular exchange between interviewer and participant. This analysis highlights that despite our best efforts at "doing reflexivity," both immediately following and when reflecting back on an interview, there are influential factors that escape our gaze. Reflections of the past are particularly imperfect. Without fully recognizing this, we are not utilizing all the tools available for ensuring honest, ethical research. PMID:21508253

  20. Assessment of Hyperactive Reflexes in Patients with Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chung-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Hyperactive reflexes are commonly observed in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) but there is a lack of convenient and quantitative characterizations. Patellar tendon reflexes were examined in nine SCI patients and ten healthy control subjects by tapping the tendon using a hand-held instrumented hammer at various knee flexion angles, and the tapping force, quadriceps EMG, and knee extension torque were measured to characterize patellar tendon reflexes quantitatively in terms of the tendon reflex gain (Gtr), contraction rate (Rc), and reflex loop time delay (td). It was found that there are significant increases in Gtr and Rc and decrease in td in patients with spinal cord injury as compared to the controls (P < 0.05). This study presented a convenient and quantitative method to evaluate reflex excitability and muscle contraction dynamics. With proper simplifications, it can potentially be used for quantitative diagnosis and outcome evaluations of hyperreflexia in clinical settings. PMID:25654084

  1. Enhanced magnetic ionization in hydrogen reflex discharge plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Toader, E.I.; Covlea, V.N.

    2005-03-01

    The effect of enhanced magnetic ionization on the external and internal parameters of a high-density, low pressure reflex plasma source operating in hydrogen is studied. The Langmuir probe method and Druyvesteyn procedure coupled with suitable software are used to measure the internal parameters. The bulk plasma region is free of an electric field and presents a high degree of uniformity. The electron energy distribution function is bi-Maxwellian with a dip/shoulder structure around 5.5 eV, independent of external parameters and radial position. Due to the enhanced hollow cathode effect by the magnetic trapping of electrons, the electron density n{sub e} is as high as 10{sup 18} m{sup -3}, and the electron temperature T{sub e} is as low as a few tens of an electron volt, for dissipated energy of tens of Watts. The bulk plasma density scales with the dissipated power.

  2. The tripartite origins of the tonic neck reflex: Gesell, Gerstmann, and Magnus.

    PubMed

    Shevell, Michael

    2009-03-01

    The standard neurologic examination of the newborn and infant includes the elicitation of the tonic neck reflex. Normally present, its persistence is suggestive of neurologic dysfunction and a prognostic marker highly suggestive of an adverse outcome. Working in different fields, with different approaches and largely independently, three leaders of early 20th century neurosciences (Rudolf Magnus, Josef Gerstmann, and Arnold Gesell) elaborated different aspects of this primitive reflex. Magnus provided the first description in an animal model utilizing a meticulously prepared decerebrate cat correctly identifying the reflex's reliance on proprioceptors in the neck and processing in the upper cervical segment. Gerstmann first described its occurrence in the setting of neurologic disease, providing a meticulous written description in an early description of the index case of what would later be eponymously designated Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker syndrome. Gesell initially described the reflex's fundamental occurrence in normal young infants, highlighting its adaptive role in early development and its persistence as a hallmark of neurologic pathology. PMID:19255413

  3. Reflex Seizures Triggered by Diaper Change in Dravet Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Subki, Ahmed H; Alasmari, Aishah S; Jan, Fadi M; Moria, Feras A; Jan, Mohammed M

    2016-07-01

    Dravet syndrome (DS) is a severe epilepsy syndrome characterized by early onset of multiple types of seizures. We report the first case of reflex seizures triggered by diaper change in a girl at 9 months old and 2 years old with a mutation in the SCN1A gene causing DS. Reflex seizures have been reported in patients with DS provoked by increased body temperature or visual stimulation. The case we report widens the spectrum of triggers causing reflex seizures in children with DS. Cortical hyperexcitability resulting from the genetic defect explains the tendency to experience such reflex seizures. PMID:26889571

  4. Direct broadcast satellite-audio, portable and mobile reception tradeoffs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golshan, Nasser

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on the findings of a systems tradeoffs study on direct broadcast satellite-radio (DBS-R). Based on emerging advanced subband and transform audio coding systems, four ranges of bit rates: 16-32 kbps, 48-64 kbps, 96-128 kbps and 196-256 kbps are identified for DBS-R. The corresponding grades of audio quality will be subjectively comparable to AM broadcasting, monophonic FM, stereophonic FM, and CD quality audio, respectively. The satellite EIRP's needed for mobile DBS-R reception in suburban areas are sufficient for portable reception in most single family houses when allowance is made for the higher G/T of portable table-top receivers. As an example, the variation of the space segment cost as a function of frequency, audio quality, coverage capacity, and beam size is explored for a typical DBS-R system.

  5. The Comparative Reception of Darwinism: A Brief History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glick, Thomas F.

    2010-06-01

    The subfield of Darwin studies devoted to comparative reception coalesced around 1971 with the planning of a conference on the subject, at the University of Texas at Austin held in April 1972. The original focus was western Europe, Russia and the United States. Subsequently a spate of studies on the Italian reception added to the Eurocentric focus. The center of activity then switched to Latin America where a group of scholars coalesced in the mid 1990s, seemingly related to the maturation of the history of science as a discrete discipline there somewhat earlier. When interest in Europe revived during the last decade, the center of gravity had moved both eastward, to the former Society bloc countries (a reflection of the institutionalization of the history of science there), and north to Scandinavia. Recently, interest in the topic has emerged in the Islamic World. The subtext of the expansion of this topic is modernization.

  6. Effects of Wall Cooling on Hypersonic Boundary Layer Receptivity Over a Cone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kara, K.; Balakumar, P.; Kandil, O. A.

    2008-01-01

    Effects of wall cooling on the receptivity process induced by the interaction of slow acoustic disturbances in the free-stream are numerically investigated for a boundary layer flow over a 5-degrees straight cone. The free-stream Mach number is 6.0 and the Reynolds number is 7.8x10(exp 6)/ft. Both the steady and unsteady solutions are obtained by solving the full Navier-Stokes equations using 5th-order accurate weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme for space discretization and using 3rd-order total variation diminishing (T VD) Runge-K utta scheme for time integration. Computations are performed for a cone with nose radius of 0.001 inch for adiabatic wall temperature (T(sub aw)), 0.75*T(sub aw), 0.5*T(sub aw), 0.40*T(sub aw), 0.30*T(sub aw), and 0.20*T(sub aw). Once the mean flow field is computed, disturbances are introduced at the upstream end of the computational domain. Generation of instability waves from leading edge region and receptivity of boundary layer to slow acoustic waves are investigated. Computations showed that wall cooling has strong stabilization effect on the first mode disturbances as was observed in the experiments. T ransition location moved to upstream when wall cooling was applied It is also found that the boundary layer is much more receptive to fast acoustic wave (by almost a factor of 50). When simulations performed using the same forcing frequency growth of the second mode disturbances are delayed with wall cooling and they attained values two times higher than that of adiabatic case. In 0.20*T(sub aw) case the transition Reynolds number is doubled compared to adiabatic conditions. The receptivity coefficient for adiabatic wall case (804 R) is 1.5225 and for highly cooled cones (241, and 161 R); they are in the order of 10(exp -3).

  7. Taking control of reflexive social attention.

    PubMed

    Ristic, Jelena; Kingstone, Alan

    2005-01-01

    Attention is shifted reflexively to where other people are looking. It has been argued by a number of investigators that this social attention effect reflects the obligatory bottom-up activation of domain-specific modules within the inferior temporal (IT) cortex that are specialized for processing face and gaze information. However, it is also the case that top-down factors may modulate the activation of IT cells. Here we examined behaviorally whether reflexive social orienting is purely automatic or sensitive to top-down modulation. Participants were shown an ambiguous stimulus that could be perceived either as representing EYES or a CAR. In we demonstrated between groups that an automatic shift of attention, equivalent to that triggered by a schematic FACE, occurred only when the stimulus was referred to as possessing EYES. In all participants received the EYES and CAR conditions. When the stimulus was first referred to as a CAR and then as EYES, an attentional shift was only present for the EYES condition. However, when the stimulus was first referred to as possessing EYES, and then later as a CAR, attentional shifts were observed for both conditions. These data indicate that the emergence of a reflexive social attention effect is influenced by top-down mechanisms but in an asymmetrical manner. Top-down processes appear to be effective for triggering IT involvement, that is, for perceiving a stimulus as a face, which produces the social attention effect. But top-down mechanisms are ineffective once IT involvement has been triggered. That is, once a stimulus has been seen as having eyes, it continues to be seen that way, and accordingly, the social attention effect persists. PMID:15617667

  8. Clinical investigations of receptive and expressive musical functions after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Rosslau, Ken; Steinwede, Daniel; Schröder, C.; Herholz, Sibylle C.; Lappe, Claudia; Dobel, Christian; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2015-01-01

    There is a long tradition of investigating various disorders of musical abilities after stroke. These impairments, associated with acquired amusia, can be highly selective, affecting only music perception (i.e., receptive abilities/functions) or expression (music production abilities), and some patients report that these may dramatically influence their emotional state. The aim of this study was to systematically test both the melodic and rhythmic domains of music perception and expression in left- and right-sided stroke patients compared to healthy subjects. Music perception was assessed using rhythmic and melodic discrimination tasks, while tests of expressive function involved the vocal or instrumental reproduction of rhythms and melodies. Our approach revealed deficits in receptive and expressive functions in stroke patients, mediated by musical expertise. Those patients who had experienced a short period of musical training in childhood and adolescence performed better in the receptive and expressive subtests compared to those without any previous musical training. While discrimination of specific musical patterns was unimpaired after a left-sided stroke, patients with a right-sided stroke had worse results for fine melodic and rhythmic analysis. In terms of expressive testing, the most consistent results were obtained from a test that required patients to reproduce sung melodies. This implies that the means of investigating production abilities can impact the identification of deficits. PMID:26124731

  9. Clinical investigations of receptive and expressive musical functions after stroke.

    PubMed

    Rosslau, Ken; Steinwede, Daniel; Schröder, C; Herholz, Sibylle C; Lappe, Claudia; Dobel, Christian; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2015-01-01

    There is a long tradition of investigating various disorders of musical abilities after stroke. These impairments, associated with acquired amusia, can be highly selective, affecting only music perception (i.e., receptive abilities/functions) or expression (music production abilities), and some patients report that these may dramatically influence their emotional state. The aim of this study was to systematically test both the melodic and rhythmic domains of music perception and expression in left- and right-sided stroke patients compared to healthy subjects. Music perception was assessed using rhythmic and melodic discrimination tasks, while tests of expressive function involved the vocal or instrumental reproduction of rhythms and melodies. Our approach revealed deficits in receptive and expressive functions in stroke patients, mediated by musical expertise. Those patients who had experienced a short period of musical training in childhood and adolescence performed better in the receptive and expressive subtests compared to those without any previous musical training. While discrimination of specific musical patterns was unimpaired after a left-sided stroke, patients with a right-sided stroke had worse results for fine melodic and rhythmic analysis. In terms of expressive testing, the most consistent results were obtained from a test that required patients to reproduce sung melodies. This implies that the means of investigating production abilities can impact the identification of deficits. PMID:26124731

  10. An Enabling Framework for Reflexive Learning: Experiential Learning and Reflexivity in Contemporary Modernity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyke, Martin

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents an enabling framework for experiential learning that connects with reflexive modernity. This framework places an emphasis on learning with others and on the role of theory, practice and reflection. A sociological argument is constructed for an alternative framework for experiential learning that derives from social theory. It is…

  11. Bourdieu's Reflexive Sociology and "Spaces of Points of View": Whose Reflexivity, Which Perspective?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenway, Jane; McLeod, Julie

    2004-01-01

    This paper considers Bourdieu's concepts of perspectivism and reflexivity, looking particularly at how he develops arguments about these in his recent work, The Weight of the World (1999) and Pascalian Meditations (2000b). We explicate Bourdieu's distinctive purposes and deployment of these terms and approaches, and discuss how this compares with…

  12. Multi-MA reflex triode research.

    SciTech Connect

    Swanekamp, Stephen Brian; Commisso, Robert J.; Weber, Bruce V.; Riordan, John C.; Allen, Raymond J.; Goyer, John R.; Murphy, Donald P.; Mikkelson, Kenneth A.; Harper-Slaboszewicz, Victor Jozef

    2010-08-01

    The Reflex Triode can efficiently produce and transmit medium energy (10-100 keV) x-rays. Perfect reflexing through thin converter can increase transmission of 10-100 keV x-rays. Gamble II experiment at 1 MV, 1 MA, 60 ns - maximum dose with 25 micron tantalum. Electron orbits depend on the foil thickness. Electron orbits from LSP used to calculate path length inside tantalum. A simple formula predicts the optimum foil thickness for reflexing converters. The I(V) characteristics of the diode can be understood using simple models. Critical current dominates high voltage triodes, bipolar current is more important at low voltage. Higher current (2.5 MA), lower voltage (250 kV) triodes are being tested on Saturn at Sandia. Small, precise, anode-cathode gaps enable low impedance operation. Sample Saturn results at 2.5 MA, 250 kV. Saturn dose rate could be about two times greater. Cylindrical triode may improve x-ray transmission. Cylindrical triode design will be tested at 1/2 scale on Gamble II. For higher current on Saturn, could use two cylindrical triodes in parallel. 3 triodes in parallel require positive polarity operation. 'Triodes in series' would improve matching low impedance triodes to generator. Conclusions of this presentation are: (1) Physics of reflex triodes from Gamble II experiments (1 MA, 1 MV) - (a) Converter thickness 1/20 of CSDA range optimizes x-ray dose; (b) Simple model based on electron orbits predicts optimum thickness from LSP/ITS calculations and experiment; (c) I(V) analysis: beam dynamics different between 1 MV and 250 kV; (2) Multi-MA triode experiments on Saturn (2.5 MA, 250 kV) - (a) Polarity inversion in vacuum, (b) No-convolute configuration, accurate gap settings, (c) About half of current produces useful x-rays, (d) Cylindrical triode one option to increase x-ray transmission; and (3) Potential to increase Saturn current toward 10 MA, maintaining voltage and outer diameter - (a) 2 (or 3) cylindrical triodes in parallel, (b) Triodes

  13. Superposition of H reflexes on steady contractions in man.

    PubMed Central

    Rüegg, D G; Krauer, R; Drews, H

    1990-01-01

    1. The aim of the investigation was to study the influence of steady isometric contractions on H reflexes of human soleus muscle. 2. Stimulating and recording conditions were hardly affected by plantar flexions which subjects maintained in a force matching task. 3. If the interval between a preceding control and the test stimulus was less than 8 s the test H reflex was depressed in the relaxed subject. The depression was diminished or removed if the test reflex was superimposed on a background activity. The interval between control and test H reflex was at least 8 s in the following experiments. 4. H reflexes were nearly independent of steady plantar flexions on which they were superimposed. In some subjects, there was a slight increase with increasing torque. During dorsal flexions, H reflexes in all subjects were inhibited with increasing torque. 5. The relationship between test H reflexes, control H reflexes and background activity was evaluated by varying pseudo-randomly stimulus intensity and steady flexion torque. The surface defined by this three-dimensional relation approximated a plane suggesting linear properties of the H reflex. In some subjects threshold intensity decreased slightly with torque, in others it was constant. 6. In response to a warning signal, human subjects initiated steady plantar or dorsal flexions in both feet and, at the same time, they started to concentrate on a light at the onset of which they performed a unilateral ballistic plantar contraction as fast as possible. The relations between H reflex and maintained flexion force during the warning period of the reaction time task were identical to those during force matching, showing that the behavioural context did not modulate the relations. 7. The relations were also the same if reflexes were evoked bi- or unilaterally, illustrating the absence of a mutual modification of simultaneously evoked H reflexes. 8. The relation was the same with ipsilateral matching and relaxed

  14. Monitoring of head injury by myotatic reflex evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Cozens, J; Miller, S.; Chambers, I.; Mendelow, A

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—(1) To establish the feasibility of myotatic reflex measurement in patients with head injury. (2) To test the hypothesis that cerebral dysfunction after head injury causes myotatic reflex abnormalities through disordered descending control. These objectives arise from a proposal to use reflex measurements in monitoring patients with head injury.
METHODS—The phasic stretch reflex of biceps brachii was elicited by a servo-positioned tendon hammer. Antagonist inhibition was evoked by vibration to the triceps. Using surface EMG, the amplitude of the unconditioned biceps reflex and percentage antagonist inhibition were measured. After standardisation in 16 normal adult subjects, the technique was applied to 36 patients with head injury across the range of severity. Objective (1) was addressed by attempting a measurement on each patient without therapeutic paralysis; three patients were also measured under partial paralysis. Objective (2) was addressed by preceding each of the 36 unparalysed measurements with an assessment of cerebral function using the Glasgow coma scale (GCS); rank correlation was employed to test a null hypothesis that GCS and reflex indices are unrelated.
RESULTS—In normal subjects, unconditioned reflex amplitude exhibited a positive skew requiring logarithmic transformation. Antagonist inhibition had a prolonged time course suggesting presynaptic mechanisms; subsequent measurements were standardised at 80 ms conditioning test interval (index termed "TI80").
 Measurements were obtained on all patients, even under therapeutic paralysis (objective (1)). The unconditioned reflex was absent in most patients with GCS less than 5; otherwise it varied little across the patient group. TI80 fell progressively with lower GCS, although patients' individual GCS could not be inferred from single measurements. Both reflex indices correlated with GCS (p<0.01), thereby dismissing the null hypothesis (objective (2)).

  15. Wh-filler-gap dependency formation guides reflexive antecedent search

    PubMed Central

    Frazier, Michael; Ackerman, Lauren; Baumann, Peter; Potter, David; Yoshida, Masaya

    2015-01-01

    Prior studies on online sentence processing have shown that the parser can resolve non-local dependencies rapidly and accurately. This study investigates the interaction between the processing of two such non-local dependencies: wh-filler-gap dependencies (WhFGD) and reflexive-antecedent dependencies. We show that reflexive-antecedent dependency resolution is sensitive to the presence of a WhFGD, and argue that the filler-gap dependency established by WhFGD resolution is selected online as the antecedent of a reflexive dependency. We investigate the processing of constructions like (1), where two NPs might be possible antecedents for the reflexive, namely which cowgirl and Mary. Even though Mary is linearly closer to the reflexive, the only grammatically licit antecedent for the reflexive is the more distant wh-NP, which cowgirl. (1). Which cowgirl did Mary expect to have injured herself due to negligence? Four eye-tracking text-reading experiments were conducted on examples like (1), differing in whether the embedded clause was non-finite (1 and 3) or finite (2 and 4), and in whether the tail of the wh-dependency intervened between the reflexive and its closest overt antecedent (1 and 2) or the wh-dependency was associated with a position earlier in the sentence (3 and 4). The results of Experiments 1 and 2 indicate the parser accesses the result of WhFGD formation during reflexive antecedent search. The resolution of a wh-dependency alters the representation that reflexive antecedent search operates over, allowing the grammatical but linearly distant antecedent to be accessed rapidly. In the absence of a long-distance WhFGD (Experiments 3 and 4), wh-NPs were not found to impact reading times of the reflexive, indicating that the parser's ability to select distant wh-NPs as reflexive antecedents crucially involves syntactic structure. PMID:26500579

  16. Effects of Nose Bluntness on Hypersonic Boundary-Layer Receptivity and Stability Over Cones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kara, Kursat; Balakumar, Ponnampalam; Kandil, Osama A.

    2011-01-01

    The receptivity to freestream acoustic disturbances and the stability properties of hypersonic boundary layers are numerically investigated for boundary-layer flows over a 5 straight cone at a freestream Mach number of 6.0. To compute the shock and the interaction of the shock with the instability waves, the Navier-Stokes equations in axisymmetric coordinates were solved. In the governing equations, inviscid and viscous flux vectors are discretized using a fifth-order accurate weighted-essentially-non-oscillatory scheme. A third-order accurate total-variation-diminishing Runge-Kutta scheme is employed for time integration. After the mean flow field is computed, disturbances are introduced at the upstream end of the computational domain. The appearance of instability waves near the nose region and the receptivity of the boundary layer with respect to slow mode acoustic waves are investigated. Computations confirm the stabilizing effect of nose bluntness and the role of the entropy layer in the delay of boundary-layer transition. The current solutions, compared with experimental observations and other computational results, exhibit good agreement.

  17. Receptivity and Forced Response to Acoustic Disturbances in High-Speed Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, P.; King, Rudolph A.; Chou, Amanda; Owens, Lewis R.; Kegerise, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Supersonic boundary-layer receptivity to freestream acoustic disturbances is investigated by solving the Navier-Stokes equations for Mach 3.5 flow over a sharp flat plate and a 7-deg half-angle cone. The freestream disturbances are generated from a wavy wall placed at the nozzle wall. The freestream acoustic disturbances radiated by the wavy wall are obtained by solving the linearized Euler equations. The results for the flat plate show that instability modes are generated at all the incident angles ranging from zero to highly oblique. However, the receptivity coefficient decreases by about 20 times when the incident angle increases from zero to a highly oblique angle of 68 degrees. The results for the cone show that no instability modes are generated when the acoustic disturbances impinge the cone obliquely. The results show that the perturbations generated inside the boundary layer by the acoustic disturbances are the response of the boundary layer to the external forcing. The amplitude of the forced disturbances inside the boundary layer are about 2.5 times larger than the incoming field for zero azimuthal wavenumber and they are about 1.5 times for large azimuthal wavenumbers.

  18. Receptivity of Hypersonic Boundary Layers Due to Acoustic Disturbances over Blunt Cone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kara, K.; Balakumar, P.; Kandil, O. A.

    2007-01-01

    The transition process induced by the interaction of acoustic disturbances in the free-stream with boundary layers over a 5-degree straight cone and a wedge with blunt tips is numerically investigated at a free-stream Mach number of 6.0. To compute the shock and the interaction of shock with the instability waves the Navier-Stokes equations are solved in axisymmetric coordinates. The governing equations are solved using the 5th -order accurate weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme for space discretization and using third-order total-variation-diminishing (TVD) Runge-Kutta scheme for time integration. After the mean flow field is computed, acoustic disturbances are introduced at the outer boundary of the computational domain and unsteady simulations are performed. Generation and evolution of instability waves and the receptivity of boundary layer to slow and fast acoustic waves are investigated. The mean flow data are compared with the experimental results. The results show that the instability waves are generated near the leading edge and the non-parallel effects are stronger near the nose region for the flow over the cone than that over a wedge. It is also found that the boundary layer is much more receptive to slow acoustic wave (by almost a factor of 67) as compared to the fast wave.

  19. On the receptivity and non-parallel stability of travelling disturbances in rotating disk flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, P.; Hall, P.; Malik, M. R.

    1990-01-01

    The generation and evolution of small amplitude wavelength traveling disturbances in rotating disk flow is discussed. The steady rotational speed of the disk is perturbed so as to introduce high frequency oscillations in the flow field. Secondly, surface imperfections are introduced on the disk such as roughness elements. The interaction of these two disturbances will generate the instability waves whose evolution is governed by parabolic partial differential equations that are solved numerically. For the class of disturbances considered (wavelength on the order of Reynolds number), it is found that eigensolutions exist which decay or grow algebraically in the radial direction. However, these solutions grow only for frequencies larger than 4.58 times the steady rotational speed of the disk. The computed receptivity coefficient shows that there is an optimum size of roughness for which these modes are excited the most. The width of these roughness elements in the radial direction is about .1 r(sub 0) where r(sub 0) is the radial location of the roughness. It is also found that the receptivity coefficient is larger for a negative spanwise wavenumber than for a positive one. Typical wave angles found for these disturbances are about -26 degrees.

  20. Molecular tracking of Salmonella spp. in chicken meat chain: from slaughterhouse reception to end cuts.

    PubMed

    Dias, Mariane Rezende; Cavicchioli, Valéria Quintana; Camargo, Anderson Carlos; Lanna, Frederico Germano Piscitelli Alvarenga; Pinto, Paulo Sérgio de Arruda; Bersot, Luciano Dos Santos; Nero, Luís Augusto

    2016-02-01

    Due to the importance of Salmonella spp. in poultry products, this study aimed to track its main contamination routes since slaughtering reception to processing of chicken end cuts. Samples from different steps of slaughtering and processing (n = 277) were collected from two chicken slaughterhouses (Sl1 and Sl2) located in Minas Gerais state, Brazil, and subjected to Salmonella spp. detection. The obtained isolates were subjected to serological identification and tested by PCR for specific Salmonella spp. genes (ompC and sifB). Also, Salmonella spp. isolates were subjected to XbaI macrorestriction and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Sixty-eight samples were positive for Salmonella spp. and 172 isolates were obtained. Sl1 and Sl2 presented similar frequencies of Salmonella spp. positive samples during reception, slaughtering and processing (p > 0.05), except for higher frequencies in Sl1 for chicken carcasses after de-feathering and evisceration (p < 0.05). PFGE allowed the identification of cross contamination and persistence of Salmonella spp. strains in Sl1. The results highlighted the relevance of the initial steps of chicken slaughtering for Salmonella spp. contamination, and the pre-chilling of carcasses as an important controlling tool. In addition, the presence of Salmonella spp. in chicken end cuts samples represents a public health concern. PMID:27162388

  1. Context-Specific Adaptation of Gravity-Dependent Vestibular Reflex Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelhamer, Mark J.

    1999-01-01

    Stabilization of the eyes and head during body movements is important for maintaining balance and keeping the images of objects stationary on our retinas. Impairment of this ability can lead to disorientation and reduced performance in sensorimotor tasks such as piloting of spacecraft. In the absence of a normal earth gravity field, the dynamics of head stabilization, and the interpretation of vestibular signals that sense gravity and linear acceleration, are subject to change. Transitions between different gravitoinertial force environments - as during different phases of space flight - provide an extreme test of the adaptive mechanisms that maintain these reflexive abilities. It is vitally important to determine human adaptive capabilities in such a circumstance, so that we can know to what extent the sensorimotor skills acquired in one gravity environment will transfer to others. Our work lays the foundation for understanding these capabilities, and for determining how we can aid the processes of adaptation and readaptation. An integrated set of experiments addresses this issue. We use the general approach of adapting some type of reflexive eye movement (saccades, the angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (AVOR), the linear vestibulo-ocular reflex (LVOR)), or the vestibulo-collic reflex (VCR), to a particular change in gain or phase in one condition of gravitoiner-tial force, and adapting to a different gain or phase (or asking for no change) in a second gravitoinertial force condition, and then seeing if the gravitoinertial force itself - the context cue - can recall the previously learned adapted responses. The majority of the experiments in the laboratory use the direction of vertical gaze or the direction of gravity (head tilt) as the context cue. This allows us to study context-specificity in a ground-based setting. One set of experiments, to be performed in parabolic flight, specifically uses the magnitude of gravitoinertial force as a context cue. This is a

  2. Airway reflexes, autonomic function, and cardiovascular responses.

    PubMed Central

    Widdicombe, J; Lee, L Y

    2001-01-01

    In this article, we review the cardiovascular responses to the inhalation of irritants and pollutants. Many sensory receptors in the respiratory system, from nose to alveoli, respond to these irritants and set up powerful reflex changes, including those in the cardiovascular system. Systemic hypotension or hypertension, pulmonary hypertension, bradycardia, tachycardia, and dysrhythmias have all been described previously. Most of the experiments have been acute and have been performed on anesthetized experimental animals. Experiments on humans suggest we have similar sensory systems and reflex responses. However, we must use caution when applying the animal results to humans. Most animal experiments, unlike those with humans, have been performed using general anesthesia, with irritants administered in high concentrations, and often to a restricted part of the respiratory tract. Species differences in the response to irritants are well established. We must be even more careful when applying the results of acute experiments in animals to the pathophysiologic changes observed in prolonged exposure to environmental pollution in humans. PMID:11544167

  3. Electrically induced blink reflex in horses.

    PubMed

    Añor, S; Espadaler, J M; Monreal, L; Mayhew, I G

    The electrically induced blink reflex was studied electromyographically in 21 healthy adult, detomidine-sedated horses. Using surface electrodes, the supraorbital nerve was electrically stimulated at the supraorbital foramen. The responses were recorded from the ipsilateral and contralateral orbicularis oculi muscles with concentric needle electrodes inserted in the lateral aspect of the ventral eyelids. Ipsilateral and contralateral recordings were made on successive stimulations of the same side of the face, maintaining a constant stimulus intensity. The electromyographically recorded responses consisted of an early R1 response in the orbicularis oculi muscle ipsilateral to the side of stimulation, a bilateral late response (ipsilateral R2 and contralateral Rc) and a third, R3 response, in the ipsilateral orbicularis oculi muscle. All the responses were polyphasic muscle potentials of variable duration and peak to peak amplitudes. The reflex latency of the R1 response was, as in man, fairly stable. The R2 response showed greater variability both within and between individual horses. The Rc response was recorded in only 13 of the 21 horses and showed a slightly longer latency than the corresponding R2. The R3 response, which is significantly related to pain sensation in man, appeared in 19 horses and showed the greatest variability in latency. PMID:9123787

  4. A Movement Account of Long-Distance Reflexives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKeown, Rebecca Katherine

    2013-01-01

    This thesis examines reflexive pronouns, such as Icelandic "sig" (Cf. Thrainsson 2007), which may be bound from outside of an infinitive clause (which I call MD "medium distance" binding) in addition to being bound locally. I propose that such reflexives are linked to their antecedents via sisterhood followed by movement: the…

  5. Reflexive Management Learning: An Integrative Review and a Conceptual Typology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotter, Richard J.; Cullen, John G.

    2012-01-01

    The scale and reach of the recent global financial has created a fresh wave of interest in exploring more sustainable forms of management. A central thrust behind this trend in the practice of management development and education has been the accentuation of reflexivity. There are many variations in how reflexivity is understood, and this article…

  6. Iris Pigmentation and Fractionated Reaction and Reflex Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Bruce D.; And Others

    Behavioral measures, fractionated reaction and reflex times by means of electromyography, were used to determine if the eye color differences are found in the central or peripheral regions of the nervous system. The purpose of this research was to determine the truth of the hypothesis that dark-eyed individuals have faster reflex and reaction time…

  7. [The development of I. P. Pavlov's conditioned reflex theory].

    PubMed

    Kim, O J

    1992-01-01

    This paper deals with the theory of Ivan Petrovich Pavlov (1849-1936), a Russian physiologist who presented for the first time the systematic theory of the function of the brain that controls the whole behavior of animals, i.e. higher nervous activity through experimental studies. This paper, principally based on Lectures on Conditioned Reflexes (1928), investigates the development of conditioned reflex theory from its beginning by dividing it into three periods. First, during the period from 1898 to 1906, the fundamental concept of conditioned reflex was established and the study of conditioned reflex became an independent discipline. From 1907 to 1916, the second period, Pavlov theorized on higher nervous activity on the basis of extensive data from his laboratory experiments of conditioned reflex. And Pavlov complemented conditioned reflex theory, during the third period from 1916 to 1928, and extended the boundaries of it through applications of conditioned reflex theory to psychopathology and typology. The study contributes to the understanding that conditioned reflex theory was historically developed, and not presented as a complete form from the beginning, and that Pavlov intended to study the higher nervous activity through the method of neurophysiology. PMID:11618531

  8. Role of stretch reflex in voluntary movements. [of human foot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gottlieb, G. L.; Agarwal, G. C.

    1975-01-01

    The stretch reflex is often described as a spinal servomechanism, a device for assisting in the regulation of muscle length. Observation of the EMG response to mechanical interruption of voluntary movements fails to demonstrate a significant role for spinal reflexes at 40 msec latency. Two functional responses with latencies of 120 msec and 200 msec, implying supraspinal mediation, are observed.

  9. The proboscis extension reflex not elicited in Magachilid bees

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) will reflexively extend their proboscis in response to antennal stimulation with sucrose solution. For decades, the proboscis extension reflex (PER) of honey bees has been used as a tool to further the understanding of their cognitive processes, such as learning and m...

  10. Efficient Estimation of Time-Varying Intrinsic and Reflex Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Ludvig, Daniel; Perreault, Eric J.; Kearney, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic joint stiffness defines the dynamic relationship between the position of the joint and the torque acting about it; hence it is important in the control of movement and posture. Joint stiffness consists of two components: intrinsic stiffness and reflex stiffness. Measuring intrinsic and reflex torques directly is not possible, thus estimating intrinsic and reflex stiffness is challenging. A further complication is that both intrinsic and reflex stiffness vary with joint position and torque. Thus, the measurement of dynamic joint stiffness during movement requires a time-varying algorithm. Recently we described an algorithm to estimate time-varying intrinsic and reflex stiffness and demonstrated its application. This paper describes modifications to that algorithm that significantly improves the accuracy of the estimates it generates while increasing its computational efficiency by a factor of seven. PMID:22255247

  11. Resuscitation and auto resuscitation by airway reflexes in animals.

    PubMed

    Tomori, Zoltan; Donic, Viliam; Benacka, Roman; Jakus, Jan; Gresova, Sona

    2013-01-01

    Various diseases often result in decompensation requiring resuscitation. In infants moderate hypoxia evokes a compensatory augmented breath - sigh and more severe hypoxia results in a solitary gasp. Progressive asphyxia provokes gasping respiration saving the healthy infant - autoresuscitation by gasping. A neonate with sudden infant death syndrome, however, usually will not survive. Our systematic research in animals indicated that airway reflexes have similar resuscitation potential as gasping respiration. Nasopharyngeal stimulation in cats and most mammals evokes the aspiration reflex, characterized by spasmodic inspiration followed by passive expiration. On the contrary, expiration reflex from the larynx, or cough reflex from the pharynx and lower airways manifest by a forced expiration, which in cough is preceded by deep inspiration. These reflexes of distinct character activate the brainstem rhythm generators for inspiration and expiration strongly, but differently. They secondarily modulate the control mechanisms of various vital functions of the organism. During severe asphyxia the progressive respiratory insufficiency may induce a life-threatening cardio-respiratory failure. The sniff- and gasp-like aspiration reflex and similar spasmodic inspirations, accompanied by strong sympatho-adrenergic activation, can interrupt a severe asphyxia and reverse the developing dangerous cardiovascular and vasomotor dysfunctions, threatening with imminent loss of consciousness and death. During progressive asphyxia the reversal of gradually developing bradycardia and excessive hypotension by airway reflexes starts with reflex tachycardia and vasoconstriction, resulting in prompt hypertensive reaction, followed by renewal of cortical activity and gradual normalization of breathing. A combination of the aspiration reflex supporting venous return and the expiration or cough reflex increasing the cerebral perfusion by strong expirations, provides a powerful resuscitation and

  12. Crossed linguo-buccal reflex in post-stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Nagumo, K; Hirayama, K; Nakajima, Y; Takahashi, M

    2000-12-15

    A pathological crossed orofacial reflex, called crossed linguo-buccal reflex in the present study, was observed in approximately 1/3 of post-stroke patients with central facial palsy. Stroking with pressure two or three times with a split wooden tongue-blade to the tongue or palate contralateral to the central facial palsy elicited a reflex movement consisting of retraction of the angle of mouth and medio-posterior withdrawal of the buccal mucosa on the paretic side. Seventy-seven patients with central hemifacial palsy caused by a unilateral cerebral lesion were examined clinically, electromyographically and by computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In addition, three men with bilateral cerebral lesions and bilateral crossed linguo-buccal reflexes were electromyographically examined. Twenty-two patients with unilateral cerebral lesions had this reflex. It was found that this reflex was most frequently observed in patients with a capsulo-caudate lesion involving the head of the caudate nucleus, the anterior limb and genu of the internal capsule. The electromyogram of the reflex showed increased activity in the orbicularis oris, depressor anguli oris, risorius, zygomaticus major and buccinator muscles on the paretic side with a long latency (254-856 ms), and a prolonged after-discharge after the stimulation. Reciprocal inhibition was observed in patients with bilateral positive reflexes. These findings suggest that liberation of the polysynaptic brainstem reflex in the medulla oblongata and pons from the indirect corticobulbar inhibition may underlie the occurrence of the crossed linguo-buccal reflex in post-stroke patients. PMID:11102639

  13. Resuscitation and auto resuscitation by airway reflexes in animals

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Various diseases often result in decompensation requiring resuscitation. In infants moderate hypoxia evokes a compensatory augmented breath – sigh and more severe hypoxia results in a solitary gasp. Progressive asphyxia provokes gasping respiration saving the healthy infant – autoresuscitation by gasping. A neonate with sudden infant death syndrome, however, usually will not survive. Our systematic research in animals indicated that airway reflexes have similar resuscitation potential as gasping respiration. Nasopharyngeal stimulation in cats and most mammals evokes the aspiration reflex, characterized by spasmodic inspiration followed by passive expiration. On the contrary, expiration reflex from the larynx, or cough reflex from the pharynx and lower airways manifest by a forced expiration, which in cough is preceded by deep inspiration. These reflexes of distinct character activate the brainstem rhythm generators for inspiration and expiration strongly, but differently. They secondarily modulate the control mechanisms of various vital functions of the organism. During severe asphyxia the progressive respiratory insufficiency may induce a life-threatening cardio-respiratory failure. The sniff- and gasp-like aspiration reflex and similar spasmodic inspirations, accompanied by strong sympatho-adrenergic activation, can interrupt a severe asphyxia and reverse the developing dangerous cardiovascular and vasomotor dysfunctions, threatening with imminent loss of consciousness and death. During progressive asphyxia the reversal of gradually developing bradycardia and excessive hypotension by airway reflexes starts with reflex tachycardia and vasoconstriction, resulting in prompt hypertensive reaction, followed by renewal of cortical activity and gradual normalization of breathing. A combination of the aspiration reflex supporting venous return and the expiration or cough reflex increasing the cerebral perfusion by strong expirations, provides a powerful resuscitation

  14. Second-Wave White Teacher Identity Studies: Toward Complexity and Reflexivity in the Racial Conscientization of White Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jupp, James C.; Lensmire, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we introduce our special issue, "Second-Wave White Teacher Identity Studies: Toward Complexity and Reflexivity in the Racial Conscientization of White Teachers." We characterize white teacher identity studies as a developing field with important implications for education research and teacher education. Early work in…

  15. Pollen Dispersion, Pollen Viability and Pistil Receptivity in Leymus chinensis

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, ZEHAO; ZHU, JINMAO; MU, XIJIN; LIN, JINXING

    2004-01-01

    • Background and Aims Leymus chinensis is an economically and ecologically important grass that is widely distributed across eastern areas of the Eurasian steppe. A major problem facing its propagation by man is its low sexual reproductivity. The causes of low fecundity are uncertain, largely because many aspects of the reproductive biology of this species remained unknown or incomplete. This study aims to address some of these issues. • Methods Pollen dispersion, pollen viability, pollen longevity and pistil receptivity were studied in a representative, natural population of L. chinensis growing in Inner Mongolia. • Key Results Flowering of L. chinensis occurred at the end of June and lasted for 5 d. Pollination peaked between 1600 h and 1700 h, and about 56·1 % of the total pollen grains were released at this time. Pollen density was highest towards the middle of flowering spikes and lowest at the bottom over the 5 d measurement period. Pollen viability (62·4 %) assessed using TTC was more accurate than using IKI (85·6 %); 50 % of pollen arriving on stigmas germinated. Pollen remained viable for only 3 h and the pollen : ovule ratio was 79 333 : 1. Pistil receptivity lasted for only 3 h and, overall, 86·7 % of pistils were pollinated. Within the spike, the relative fecundity of different positions was middle > lower > upper throughout the period of pollination; daily variation of fecundity was similar to that of the pollen flow. The spikes that opened on the day of highest pollen density exhibited the highest fecundity (36·0 %). No seeds were produced by self‐pollination. • Conclusions The data suggest that low pollen viability, short pollen longevity and short pistil receptivity all appear to contribute to the low seed production typical of this important forage crop. PMID:14744707

  16. Reception of the stethoscope and Laënnec's book.

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, P J

    1981-01-01

    A study of contemporary book reviews and other notices enables us to trace the reception of the stethoscope and Laënnec's book between 1816 and 1826. It is quite clear from these that the stethoscope was welcomed with enthusiasm by most people who saw it as the first major diagnostic tool medicine had ever had. Laënnec's book was recognised as being the most important, interesting, accurate, and complete work on diseases of the chest that had ever been published. PMID:7031968

  17. Personal suicidality in reception and identification with suicidal film characters.

    PubMed

    Till, Benedikt; Vitouch, Peter; Herberth, Arno; Sonneck, Gernot; Niederkrotenthaler, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    The authors investigated the impact of suicidality on identity work during film exposure. Adults with low suicidality (n = 150) watched either It's My Party or The Fire Within, censored versions of these films not depicting the suicide, or the control film that concluded with a non-suicidal death. Baseline suicidality was measured with questionnaires before the movie. Identity work and identification with the protagonist were measured after the movie. Suicidality was directly associated with identity work during film dramas depicting suicide methods. The reception of suicide-related media content seems to partially depend on personal suicidality. Potential implications for suicide prevention are discussed. PMID:24520893

  18. The Effect of Helicopter Rotors on GPS Signal Reception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodin, Gary; Cooper, John; Walsh, David; Stevens, Jeff

    2005-09-01

    This paper presents the results of an experiment to investigate the impact of helicopter rotor blades on GPS signal reception. An offshore transport helicopter was equipped with a measurement system including a TSO-C129 compliant receiver and a custom research receiver. GPS signals passing through rotor discs of this aircraft were found to suffer a reduction in received signal strength, leading to potential navigation and RAIM availability concerns. The phenomenon will vary between installations and receiver types. Test procedures to identify the occurrence of the phenomenon in operational GPS installations are presented, together with possible in-service monitoring programs to assess the impact on the navigation function.

  19. First direct exposure to lunar material for Crew Reception personnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The first direct exposure to lunar material for Crew Reception personnel probably happened late Friday, July 25, 1969. Terry Slezak (displaying moon dust on his left hand fingers), Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) photographic technician, was removing film magazines from the first of two containers when the incident occurred. As he removed the plastic seal from Magazine S, one of the 70mm magazines taken during Apollo 11 Extravehicular Activity (EVA), it was apparent that the exterior of the cassette displayed traces of a black powdery substance. Apollo 11 Commander Neil Armstrong reported during the mission that he had retrieved a 70mm cassette which had dropped to the lunar surface.

  20. Receptive vocabulary differences in monolingual and bilingual children*

    PubMed Central

    Bialystok, Ellen; Luk, Gigi; Peets, Kathleen F.; Yang, Sujin

    2015-01-01

    Studies often report that bilingual participants possess a smaller vocabulary in the language of testing than monolinguals, especially in research with children. However, each study is based on a small sample so it is difficult to determine whether the vocabulary difference is due to sampling error. We report the results of an analysis of 1,738 children between 3 and 10 years old and demonstrate a consistent difference in receptive vocabulary between the two groups. Two preliminary analyses suggest that this difference does not change with different language pairs and is largely confined to words relevant to a home context rather than a school context. PMID:25750580

  1. Cultural Reflexivity in Health Research and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Aronowitz, Robert; Deener, Andrew; Keene, Danya; Schnittker, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Recent public health movements have invoked cultural change to improve health and reduce health disparities. We argue that these cultural discourses have sometimes justified and maintained health inequalities when those with power and authority designated their own social practices as legitimate and healthy while labeling the practices of marginalized groups as illegitimate or unhealthy. This “misrecognition,” which creates seemingly objective knowledge without understanding historical and social conditions, sustains unequal power dynamics and obscures the fact that what is deemed legitimate and healthy can be temporally, geographically, and socially relative. We use examples from research across multiple disciplines to illustrate the potential consequences of cultural misrecognition, highlight instances in which culture was invoked in ways that overcame misrecognition, and discuss how cultural reflexivity can be used to improve health research and practice. PMID:25905833

  2. [Uncommon reflex automatisms after brain death].

    PubMed

    Awada, A

    1995-10-01

    Two cases of unusual complex movements observed in brain dead patients are described. Rapid and sustained flexion of the neck induced slow abduction of the arms with flexion of the elbows, wrists and fingers over 5 to 10 seconds. These movements have been rarely described and although they have similar clinical patterns, they are pathophysiologically different from the Lazarus sign which is observed few minutes after respiratory support cessation. While Lazarus sign is supposed to be due to an agonal discharge of anoxic spinal neurons, the movements described in this article result probably from complex reflexes generated in a disinhibited spinal cord. It is however surprising that they have never been described in patients with high cervical spinal injuries. PMID:8594654

  3. Modeling of deep breath vasoconstriction reflex.

    PubMed

    Chalacheva, Patjanaporn; Khoo, Michael C K

    2015-08-01

    Deep breaths akin to sighs have been reported to cause peripheral vasoconstriction. Our previous simulation studies have shown that this phenomenon cannot be reproduced in existing circulatory control models without inclusion of a respiratory-vascular coupling mechanism. To better understand this "sigh-vasoconstriction reflex", we investigated the effect of spontaneous and passively induced sighs as well as spontaneous breathing on peripheral vasoconstriction during wakefulness and non-rapid eye movement sleep in human subjects. We found that both spontaneous and induced sighs caused vasoconstriction during wakefulness and sleep. The coupling between respiration and vasoconstriction is also present even in an absence of deep breaths. The coupling mechanism is largely linear with increased nonlinearity during induced sighs. Since peripheral vascular resistance modulation is known to be sympathetically mediated, investigation of this coupling could potentially allow us to assess sympathetic function through non-invasive measurements and simple interventions. PMID:26738099

  4. The Chinchilla's vestibulo-ocular reflex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merwin, W. H., Jr.; Wall, Conrad, III; Tomko, D. L.

    1989-01-01

    The horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) was measured and characterized in seven adult chinchillas using 0.01 to 1.0 Hz angular velocity sinusoids. Gains were less than compensatory, and were variable from day to day, but phases were highly repeatable both within and between animals. The best fitting transfer function to the average data of all animals had a dominant time constant of 7.5 sec, and an adaptation operator with a time constant of 24.0 sec. There were certain nonlinearities in the horizontal VOR of this animal, and it was difficult to elicit a robust optokinetic response. Results are discussed in relation to similar measurements in other species.

  5. Vestibulospinal reflexes as a function of microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, M. F.; Homick, J. L.; Anderson, D. J.

    1984-01-01

    Data from previous manned space flights suggest that an exposure to microgravity produces significant alterations in vestibular, neuromuscular, and related sensory system functions. It is possible that the observed changes are a function of adaptation induced by altered otolith input. An experiment in Spacelab 1 was conducted with the aim to study this adaptation as it occurred in flight and after flight, and to relate the observed changes to mechanisms underlying space motion sickness. The concept was explored by making use of the anatomic pathway which links the otolith organs and spinal motoneurons. The overall sensitivity of the spinal motoneurons was tested by two related methods. One method involves the electrical excitation of neural tissue and the recording of vestibulospinal reflexes in conjunction with a brief linear acceleration. The second method is concerned with measurements of dynamic postural ataxia. Results suggest that more than a single time constant may be involved in man's ability to return to baseline values.

  6. Vestibular-ocular accommodation reflex in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, B.; Randle, R. J.; Stewart, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    Stimulation of the vestibular system by angular acceleration produces widespread sensory and motor effects. The present paper studies a motor effect which has not been reported in the literature, i.e., the influence of rotary acceleration of the body on ocular accommodation. The accommodation of 10 young men was recorded before and after a high-level deceleration to zero velocity following 30 sec of rotating. Accommodation was recorded continuously on an infrared optometer for 110 sec under two conditions: while the subjects observed a target set at the far point, and while they viewed the same target through a 0.3-mm pinhole. Stimulation by high-level rotary deceleration produced positive accommodation or a pseudomyopia under both conditions, but the positive accommodation was substantially greater and lasted much longer during fixation through the pinhole. It is hypothesized that this increase in accommodation is a result of a vestibular-ocular accommodation reflex.

  7. Bremsstrahlung target optimization for reflex triodes

    SciTech Connect

    Swanekamp, S. B.; Weber, B. V.; Stephanakis, S. J.; Mosher, D.; Commisso, R. J.

    2008-08-15

    The anode (tantalum) foil thickness in a reflex triode was varied from 2.5 to 250 {mu}m to maximize the dose from bremsstrahlung produced by a 1 MV, 1 MA, 100 ns electron beam. Experiments and computer simulations show that the dose is maximized for a foil thickness of about 25 {mu}m, 1/18th of the electron range computed from the continuous slowing down approximation. For foils thicker than optimum, self-absorption in the foil attenuates 10-100 keV photons, reducing the dose. For foils thinner than optimum, the dose decreases as a result of electron migration to large radius. A simple formula that predicts the optimum thickness as a function of the beam current and voltage is derived that should be applicable to a large range of experimental parameters.

  8. A functional analysis of receptive language and productive speech: acquisition of the plural morpheme1

    PubMed Central

    Guess, Doug

    1969-01-01

    Operant conditioning procedures were applied to two retardates to establish receptive auditory plurals: correct pointing to single or paired objects was reinforced after hearing singular or plural labels. This training proceeded until an errorless (generative) criterion of correct performance was achieved. Unreinforced probes measuring expressive use of singulars and plurals were interspersed in this receptive training. Neither subject generalized from this receptive training to expressive plurals, in that each used singulars when labeling pairs. Then, both subjects were directly trained in conventional expressive plurals to an errorless (generative) criterion. The previous design was then repeated, but the receptive repertoire was reversed: pointing at pairs in response to singular labels was reinforced, and vice-versa. Unreinforced probes of expressive plural usage again showed its independence of the current receptive repertoire in that conventional (unreversed) plural usage was displayed. Thus, the independence of the expressive repertoire (even when unreinforced) from the reinforced patterns of the receptive repertoire was demonstrated. PMID:16795203

  9. Particular functions of estrogen and progesterone in establishment of uterine receptivity and embryo implantation.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Saffet; Demir, Ramazan

    2010-09-01

    The process of embryo implantation requires synchronized development of blastocyst and timely establishment of uterine receptivity. Establishment of uterine receptivity, preimplantation embryo development and embryo implantation events are mainly regulated by certain factors, including cytokines, chemokines, growth factors and steroid hormones. Recent studies suggest that steroid hormones, especially estrogen and progesterone, play important roles in supporting endometrial preparations to establish endometrial receptivity. Timely establishment of endometrial receptivity is a crucial process for providing successful embryo implantation. Although many investigations until now have been performed to precisely understand the effects of estrogen and progesterone on acquiring uterine receptivity and embryo implantation in humans and rodents, there are limited numbers of studies that largely focus on this subject. Therefore, in this article we discuss the studies associated with significant functions of estrogen and progesterone in establishing receptive endometrium and the process of embryo implantation in humans and rodents. PMID:20607663

  10. Sudomotor function in sympathetic reflex dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Birklein, F; Sittl, R; Spitzer, A; Claus, D; Neundörfer, B; Handwerker, H O

    1997-01-01

    Sudomotor functions were studied in 27 patients suffering from reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) according to the criteria established by Bonica (18 women, 9 men; mean age 50 +/- 12.3 years; median duration of disease 8 weeks, range 2-468 weeks). To measure local sweating rates, two small chambers (5 cm2) were affixed to corresponding areas of hairy skin on the affected and unaffected limbs. Dry nitrogen gas was passed through the chambers (270 ml/min) and evaporation was recorded at both devices with hygrometers. Thermoregulatory sweating (TST) was induced by raising body temperature (intake of 0.5 1 hot tea and infra-red irradiation). Local sweating was also induced through an axon reflex (QSART) by transcutaneous iontophoretic application of carbachol (5 min, 1 mA). In addition, skin temperature was measured on the affected and unaffected side by infra-red thermography. Mean skin temperature was significantly higher on the affected side (P < 0.003). In spite of the temperature differences, there was no difference in basal sweating on the affected and unaffected side. However, both methods of sudomotor stimulation lead to significantly greater sweating responses on the affected compared to the unaffected side (TST: P < 0.05, QSART: P < 0.004). Latency to onset of sweating was significantly shorter on the affected side under both test conditions (P < 0.04 and P < 0.003, respectively). Sweat responses were not correlated to absolute skin temperature but were probably related to the increased blood flow on the affected side. Our findings imply a differential disturbance of vasomotor and sudomotor mechanisms in affected skin. Whereas vasoconstrictor activity is apparently lowered, sudomotor output is either unaltered or may even be enhanced. PMID:9060012

  11. Aerial righting reflexes in flightless animals.

    PubMed

    Jusufi, Ardian; Zeng, Yu; Full, Robert J; Dudley, Robert

    2011-12-01

    Animals that fall upside down typically engage in an aerial righting response so as to reorient dorsoventrally. This behavior can be preparatory to gliding or other controlled aerial behaviors and is ultimately necessary for a successful landing. Aerial righting reflexes have been described historically in various mammals such as cats, guinea pigs, rabbits, rats, and primates. The mechanisms whereby such righting can be accomplished depend on the size of the animal and on anatomical features associated with motion of the limbs and body. Here we apply a comparative approach to the study of aerial righting to explore the diverse strategies used for reorientation in midair. We discuss data for two species of lizards, the gecko Hemidactylus platyurus and the anole Anolis carolinensis, as well as for the first instar of the stick insect Extatosoma tiaratum, to illustrate size-dependence of this phenomenon and its relevance to subsequent aerial performance in parachuting and gliding animals. Geckos can use rotation of their large tails to reorient their bodies via conservation of angular momentum. Lizards with tails well exceeding snout-vent length, and correspondingly large tail inertia to body inertia ratios, are more effective at creating midair reorientation maneuvers. Moreover, experiments with stick insects, weighing an order of magnitude less than the lizards, suggest that aerodynamic torques acting on the limbs and body may play a dominant role in the righting process for small invertebrates. Both inertial and aerodynamic effects, therefore, can play a role in the control of aerial righting. We propose that aerial righting reflexes are widespread among arboreal vertebrates and arthropods and that they represent an important initial adaptation in the evolution of controlled aerial behavior. PMID:21930662

  12. Complexity and reflexivity: two important issues for economic evaluation in health care.

    PubMed

    Lessard, Chantale

    2007-04-01

    Economic evaluations are analytic techniques to assess the relative costs and consequences of health care programmes and technologies. Their role is to provide rigorous data to inform the health care decision-making process. Economic evaluation may oversimplify complex health care decisions. These analyses often ignore important health consequences, contextual elements, relationships or other relevant modifying factors, which might not be appropriate in a multi-objective, multi-stakeholder issue. One solution would be to develop a new paradigm based on the issues of perspective and context. Complexity theory may provide a useful conceptual framework for economic evaluation in health care. Complexity thinking develops an awareness of issues including uncertainty, contextual issues, multiple perspectives, broader societal involvement, and transdisciplinarity. This points the economic evaluation field towards an accountability and epistemology based on pluralism and uncertainty, requiring new forms of lay-expert engagement and roles of lay knowledge into decision-making processes. This highlights the issue of reflexivity in economic evaluation in health care. A reflexive approach would allow economic evaluators to analyze how objective structures and subjective elements influence their practices. In return, this would point increase the integrity and reliability of economic evaluations. Reflexivity provides opportunities for critically thinking about the organization and activities of the intellectual field, and perhaps the potential of moving in new, creative directions. This paper argues for economic evaluators to have a less positivist attitude towards what is useful knowledge, and to use more imagination about the data and methodologies they use. PMID:17258367

  13. Characteristics of Glottic Closure Reflex in a Canine Model

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ju Wan; Kim, Kwang-Moon

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The most important function of the larynx is airway protection which is provided through a polysynaptic reflex closure triggered by the receptors in the glottic and supraglottic mucosa, evoking the reflex contraction of the laryngeal muscles especially by strong adduction of vocal cords. Based on the hypotheses that central facilitation is essential for this bilateral adductor reflex and that its disturbance can result in weakened laryngeal closure, we designed this study to elucidate the effect of central facilitation on this protective reflex. Materials and Methods Seven adult, 20 kg mongrel dogs underwent evoked response laryngeal electromyography under 0.5 to 1.0 MAC (minimum alveolar concentration) isoflurane anesthesia. The internal branch of the superior laryngeal nerve was stimulated through bipolar platinum-iridium electrodes, and recording electrodes were positioned in the ipsilateral and contralateral thyroarytenoid muscles. Results Ipsilateral reflex closure was consistantly recorded regardless of anesthetic levels. However, contralateral reflex responses disappeared as anesthetic levels were deepened. Additionally, late responses (R2) were detected in one animal at lower level of anesthesia. Conclusions Deepened level of anesthesia affects central facilitation and results in the loss of the crossed adductor reflex, predisposing to a weakened glottic closure response. Precise understanding of this effect may possibly provide a way to prevent aspiration in unconscious patients. PMID:19568600

  14. Perceptual rivalry: reflexes reveal the gradual nature of visual awareness.

    PubMed

    Naber, Marnix; Frässle, Stefan; Einhäuser, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Rivalry is a common tool to probe visual awareness: a constant physical stimulus evokes multiple, distinct perceptual interpretations ("percepts") that alternate over time. Percepts are typically described as mutually exclusive, suggesting that a discrete (all-or-none) process underlies changes in visual awareness. Here we follow two strategies to address whether rivalry is an all-or-none process: first, we introduce two reflexes as objective measures of rivalry, pupil dilation and optokinetic nystagmus (OKN); second, we use a continuous input device (analog joystick) to allow observers a gradual subjective report. We find that the "reflexes" reflect the percept rather than the physical stimulus. Both reflexes show a gradual dependence on the time relative to perceptual transitions. Similarly, observers' joystick deflections, which are highly correlated with the reflex measures, indicate gradual transitions. Physically simulating wave-like transitions between percepts suggest piece-meal rivalry (i.e., different regions of space belonging to distinct percepts) as one possible explanation for the gradual transitions. Furthermore, the reflexes show that dominance durations depend on whether or not the percept is actively reported. In addition, reflexes respond to transitions with shorter latencies than the subjective report and show an abundance of short dominance durations. This failure to report fast changes in dominance may result from limited access of introspection to rivalry dynamics. In sum, reflexes reveal that rivalry is a gradual process, rivalry's dynamics is modulated by the required action (response mode), and that rapid transitions in perceptual dominance can slip away from awareness. PMID:21677786

  15. On the receptive prosodic loss in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Pell, M D

    1996-12-01

    To comprehensively explore how the processing of linguistic and affective prosodic cues is affected by idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD), a battery of receptive tests was presented to eleven PD patients without intellectual or language impairment and eleven control subjects (NC) matched for age, gender, and educational attainment. Receptive abilities for both low-level (discrimination) and higher-level (identification) prosodic processing were explored; moreover, the identification of prosodic feature was tested at both the lexical level (phonemic stress perception) and over the sentential domain (prosodic pattern identification). The results obtained demonstrated a general reduction in the ability of the PD patients to identify the linguistic- and affective-prosodic meaning of utterances relative to NC subjects, without a concurrent loss in the ability to perceive phonemic stress contrasts or discriminate prosodic patterns. However, the qualitative pattern of the PD and NC groups' performance across the various identification conditions tested was remarkably uniform, indicating that only quantitative differences in comprehension abilities may have characterized the two groups. It is hypothesized that the basal ganglia form part of a functional network dedicated to prosodic processing (Blonder et al., 1989) and that the processes required to map prosodic features onto their communicative representations at the sentence level are rendered less efficient by the degenerative course of PD. PMID:8954247

  16. Receptivity to thermal noise in real airfoil configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luchini, Paolo

    2014-11-01

    Thermal noise, the macroscopic manifestation of microscopic particle agitation, is present in fluid flow just as in electron flow in conductors or in other physical transport phenomena. When the flow acts as an amplifier, typically during transition to turbulence, the transition position can be influenced by the amplitude of external disturbances through the so called receptivity of the flow instabilities; internally generated thermal noise represents a thermodynamically enforced lower bound to how much disturbances can be reduced. In a previous paper (Seventh IUTAM Symposium on Laminar-Turbulent Transition, IUTAM Bookseries Volume 18, Springer, 2010, pp. 11-18), the present author showed that the maximum transition distance in a Blasius boundary layer corresponds to a Reynolds number little above 6 .106 and to an N-factor of the order of 13. Results to be exhibited at this conference show that in a real airfoil configuration the maximum transition Reynolds number imposed by thermal noise is even lower than on a flat wall, and not far from the actually observed transition position. It follows that thermal noise might actually have a role in natural transition; and that even a perfectly silenced laboratory environment cannot push the transition position much farther. Work supported by the European Community through the RECEPT grant.

  17. Mach's phenomenalism and the British reception of Mendelism.

    PubMed

    Sloan, P R

    2000-12-01

    The assimilation of Mendel's paper into Britain took place in an Edwardian social context. This paper concentrates on the interplay of empirical and philosophical issues in this reception. A feature of the British reception of mendelism, not duplicated elsewhere, was the role of phenomenalist philosophies of science as developed by the physicist-mathematician and scientific methodologist Karl Pearson from the philosophical positions of Austrian physicist Ernst Mach and British mathematician William Clifford. Pearson's philosophy of science forms the background to his subsequent collaboration with the zoologist W.F.R. Weldon. In this collaborative work, Pearson developed powerful statistical techniques for analyzing Weldon's empirical data on organic variation. Pearson's statistical analysis of causation and his rejection of hidden entities and causes in the explanation of evolutionary change formed the philosophical component of this program. The arguments of Pearson and Weldon were first brought to bear against the pre-Mendel 'discontinuist' analyses of variation of William Bateson. The introduction of Mendel's paper into these empirical and methodological debates consequently resulted in mathematically sophisticated attacks on Mendel's claims by Pearson and Weldon. This paper summarizes this history and argues for the creative importance of this biometrical resistance to Mendelism. PMID:11147093

  18. Training generalized receptive prepositions in retarded children1

    PubMed Central

    Frisch, Sue Ann; Schumaker, Jean B.

    1974-01-01

    Three retarded children were trained, using prompting and reinforcement procedures, to respond correctly to three categories of prepositional requests: “put the—next to the—”, “put the—under the—”, and “put the—on top of the—”. Training sessions were alternated with probe sessions throughout the study. During training, a child was trained to respond to one request (e.g., “put the doll next to the cup”); during probing, the child was tested for generalization of this training to untrained requests. Responses to untrained requests were never prompted nor reinforced. The results showed that, as requests from one category were trained, the children's responses to the untrained requests of that category became increasingly correct. As discriminations among two or more categories were trained, the children's responses to the untrained requests of those categories also became increasingly correct. Thus, the methods employed appear to be successful in training generalized receptive discrimination among prepositional categories and possibly can be utilized in training other generalized receptive language skills. PMID:4443328

  19. Reversible abnormalities of the Hering Breuer reflex in acrylamide neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Satchell, P

    1985-01-01

    The sensitivity of the Hering Breuer reflex was compared in anaesthetised rabbits before, during and after the induction of acrylamide neuropathy, and was measured as the tracheal pressure which produced 30 seconds of apnoea. After four weeks of acrylamide (400 mg/kg total dose) there was ataxia and the conduction velocity of hindlimb motor nerves was significantly reduced. At this time there was a marked and reproducible reduction in the sensitivity of the Hering Breuer reflex. The ataxia resolved within a month of stopping acrylamide administration. Three months after the cessation of acrylamide the sensitivity of the Hering Breuer reflex had increased significantly but had not returned to normal. PMID:2993526

  20. Airborne Antenna System for Minimum-Cycle-Slip GPS Reception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, C. Wayne

    2009-01-01

    A system that includes a Global Positioning System (GPS) antenna and associated apparatus for keeping the antenna aimed upward has been developed for use aboard a remote-sensing-survey airplane. The purpose served by the system is to enable minimum- cycle-slip reception of GPS signals used in precise computation of the trajectory of the airplane, without having to restrict the airplane to maneuvers that increase the flight time needed to perform a survey. Cycle slip signifies loss of continuous track of the phase of a signal. Minimum-cycle-slip reception is desirable because maintaining constant track of the phase of the carrier signal from each available GPS satellite is necessary for surveying to centimeter or subcentimeter precision. Even a loss of signal for as short a time as a nanosecond can cause cycle slip. Cycle slips degrade the quality and precision of survey data acquired during a flight. The two principal causes of cycle slip are weakness of signals and multipath propagation. Heretofore, it has been standard practice to mount a GPS antenna rigidly on top of an airplane, and the radiation pattern of the antenna is typically hemispherical, so that all GPS satellites above the horizon are viewed by the antenna during level flight. When the airplane must be banked for a turn or other maneuver, the reception hemisphere becomes correspondingly tilted; hence, the antenna no longer views satellites that may still be above the Earth horizon but are now below the equatorial plane of the tilted reception hemisphere. Moreover, part of the reception hemisphere (typically, on the inside of a turn) becomes pointed toward ground, with a consequent increase in received noise and, therefore, degradation of GPS measurements. To minimize the likelihood of loss of signal and cycle slip, bank angles of remote-sensing survey airplanes have generally been limited to 10 or less, resulting in skidding or slipping uncoordinated turns. An airplane must be banked in order to make

  1. The receptive-expressive gap in the vocabulary of young second-language learners: Robustness and possible mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Todd A.; Oller, D. Kimbrough; Jarmulowicz, Linda; Ethington, Corinna A.

    2010-01-01

    Adults and children learning a second language show difficulty accessing expressive vocabulary that appears accessible receptively in their first language (L1). We call this discrepancy the receptive-expressive gap. Kindergarten Spanish (L1) - English (L2) sequential bilinguals were given standardized tests of receptive and expressive vocabulary in both Spanish and English. We found a small receptive-expressive gap in English but a large receptive-expressive gap in Spanish. We categorized children as having had high or low levels of English exposure based on demographic variables and found that the receptive-expressive gap persisted across both levels of English exposure. Regression analyses revealed that variables predicting both receptive and expressive vocabulary scores failed to predict the receptive-expressive gap. The results suggest that the onset of the receptive-expressive gap in L1 must have been abrupt. We discuss possible mechanisms underlying the phenomenon. PMID:22247648

  2. Primitive Reflexes and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: Developmental Origins of Classroom Dysfunction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Myra; Houghton, Stephen; Chapman, Elaine

    2004-01-01

    The present research studied the symptomatologic overlap of AD/HD behaviours and retention of four primitive reflexes (Moro, Tonic Labyrinthine Reflex [TLR], Asymmetrical Tonic Neck Reflex [ATNR], Symmetrical Tonic Neck Reflex [STNR]) in 109 boys aged 7-10 years. Of these, 54 were diagnosed with AD/HD, 34 manifested sub-syndromal coordination,…

  3. REFLEX MODIFICATION AND THE ASSESSMENT OF SENSORY DYSFUNCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    In summary, reflex modification of the startle response is a technique that can provide rapid, objective, and quantitative assessments of sensorimotor function. dvantages of this technique involve the ability to test animals rapidly, test without prior training, test without util...

  4. Reconsidering reflexivity: introducing the case for intellectual entrepreneurship.

    PubMed

    Cutcliffe, John R

    2003-01-01

    In this article, the author reconsiders reflexivity and attempts to examine some unresolved issues by drawing particular attention to the relationship between reflexivity and certain related phenomena/processes: the researcher's a priori knowledge, values, beliefs; empathy within qualitative research; the presence and influence of the researcher's tacit knowledge, and May's "magic" in method. Given the limitations of some reflexive activity identified in this article, the author introduces the case for greater intellectual entrepreneurship within the context of qualitative research. He suggests that excessive emphasis on reflexive activity might inhibit intellectual entrepreneurship. Wherein intellectual entrepreneurship implies a conscious and deliberate attempt on the part of academics to explore the world of ideas boldly; to take more risks in theory development and to move away from being timid researchers. PMID:12564268

  5. Spinal Reflexes During Postural Control Under Psychological Pressure.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoshifumi

    2015-07-01

    This study investigated the effect of psychological pressure on spinal reflex excitability. Thirteen participants performed a balancing task by standing on a balance disk with one foot. After six practice trials, they performed one nonpressure and one pressure trial involving a performance-contingent cash reward or punishment. Stress responses were successfully induced; state anxiety, mental effort, and heart rates all increased under pressure. Soleus Hoffmann reflex amplitude in the pressure trial was significantly smaller than in the nonpressure trial. This modification of spinal reflexes may be caused by presynaptic inhibition under the control of higher central nerve excitation under pressure. This change did not prevent 12 of the 13 participants from successfully completing the postural control task under pressure. These results suggest that Hoffmann reflex inhibition would contribute to optimal postural control under stressful situations. PMID:25587695

  6. Nasal reflexes: implications for exercise, breathing, and sex.

    PubMed

    Baraniuk, James N; Merck, Samantha J

    2008-04-01

    Nasal patency, with both congestion and decongestion, is affected in a wide variety of reflexes. Stimuli leading to nasal reflexes include exercise; alterations of body position, pressure, and temperature; neurologic syndromes; and dentistry. As anticipated, the vagal and trigeminal systems are closely integrated through nasobronchial and bronchonasal reflexes. However, perhaps of greater pathophysiologic importance are the naso-hypopharyngeal-laryngeal reflexes that become aggravated during sinusitis. None other than Sigmund Freud saw deeply beyond the facial adornment and recognized the deeper sexual tensions that can regulate nasal functions and psychoanalytical status. Wine, women, and song are linked with airflow through the nose-the nose, which by any other name would still smell as sweetly. PMID:18417057

  7. Reflexive Research Ethics in Fetal Tissue Xenotransplantation Research

    PubMed Central

    Panikkar, Bindu; Smith, Natasha; Brown, Phil

    2013-01-01

    For biomedical research in which the only involvement of the human subject is the provision of tissue or organ samples, a blanket consent, i.e. consent to use the tissue for anything researchers wish to do, is considered by many to be adequate for legal and IRB requirements. Alternatively, a detailed informed consent provides patients or study participants with more thorough information about the research topic. We document here the beliefs and opinions of the research staff on informed consent and the discussion-based reflexive research ethics process that we employed in our fetal tissue xenotransplantion research on the impact of environmental exposures on fetal development. Reflexive research ethics entails the continued adjustment of research practice according to relational and reflexive understandings of what might be beneficent or harmful. Such reflexivity is not solely an individual endeavor, but rather a collective relationship between all actors in the research process. PMID:23074992

  8. Speech Performance, Dysphagia and Oral Reflexes in Cerebral Palsy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Russell J.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The adequacy of biting, sucking, swallowing, and chewing as well as the presence or absence of nine infantile oral reflexes were assessed in 60 cerebral palsied individuals (ages 3 to 23). (Author/PHR)

  9. Response characteristics of the human torsional vestibuloocular reflex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterka, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    The characteristics of the response dynamics of the human torsional vestibuloocular reflex were studied during controlled rotations about an earth-horizontal axis. The results extended the frequency range to 2 Hz and identified the nonlinearity of the amplitude response.

  10. Nasal Reflexes: Implications for Exercise, Breathing, and Sex

    PubMed Central

    Baraniuk, James N.; Merck, Samantha J.

    2014-01-01

    Nasal patency, with both congestion and decongestion, is affected in a wide variety of reflexes. Stimuli that lead to nasal reflexes include exercise, alterations of body position, pressure, and temperature, neurological syndromes, and dentists. As anticipated, the vagal and trigeminal systems are closely integrated through nasobronchial and bronchonasal reflexes. However, perhaps of greater pathophysiological importance are the naso-hypopharyngea-laryngeal reflexes that become aggravated during sinusitis. None other than Sigmund Freud saw deeply beyond the facial adornment and recognized the deeper sexual tensions that can regulate nasal functions and psychoanalytical status. Wine, women and song are linked with airflow through the nose, the nose, that by any other name would still smell as sweetly. PMID:18417057

  11. Human flexor reflex modulation during cycling.

    PubMed

    Brown, D A; Kukulka, C G

    1993-04-01

    1. Human flexor reflex (HFR) responses were elicited during ergometer cycling in neurologically intact humans with the objective of understanding the influence of lower limb muscle activity on phase-dependent reflex modulation during movement. The experimental setup permitted control over background muscle activity and stimulus intensity without significantly interfering with the cycling motion. 2. All experiments involved cycling on an ergometer at a set rate and workload. A 333-Hz, 15-ms pulse train of electrical stimulation was randomly delivered to the skin over the tibial nerve at the ankle at selected lower limb positions. In the first group of experiments, subjects were stimulated at six cycling phases while pedaling with normal, phasic ankle activity (free-form cycling). The second and third group of experiments involved stimulation under static limb positioning conditions and during active pedaling while subjects were asked to maintain a consistent background level of isolated tibialis anterior (TA) or soleus (SOL) electromyographic (EMG) activity. 3. Control criteria were established to assure similar isolated muscle EMG levels and sensory stimulation intensities throughout the experiments. With the aid of the application of a lower extremity brace and visual EMG feedback, SOL and TA activity were confined by the subject to a narrow range during the task of cycling. Stimulus consistency was achieved through maintenance of flexor hallucis brevis M-waves to within an envelope encompassing the mean value +/- 5% of the maximum M-wave amplitude in all experimental conditions. 4. When the subject's limb was statically positioned, the HFR responses in the SOL muscle showed no significant changes in pattern when compared at various limb positions. During cycling with consistent SOL activity, a response waveform pattern of early-latency-long-duration depression was followed by a later-latency facilitation response in all positions except the initial power phase

  12. Nasocardiac reflex during aspiration and injection through a nasogastric tube: An infrequent occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Haldar, Rudrashish; Kaur, Jasleen; Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh

    2015-01-01

    Nasocardiac reflex is a relatively less discussed variant of trigeminovagal reflex where the afferent arc of the reflex is represented by any of the branches of the trigeminal nerves, and the efferent arc is via the vagus nerve. Elicitation of this reflex is commonly seen during surgical manipulation and is manifested as bradycardia or even asystole. We report a case where nasocardiac reflex was unusually observed in a patient when aspiration and injection were done through a nasogastric tube. PMID:25878434

  13. Central Pupillary Light Reflex Circuits in the Cat: I. The Olivary Pretectal Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wensi; May, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    The central pathways subserving the feline pupillary light reflex were examined by defining retinal input to the olivary pretectal nucleus (OPt), the midbrain projections of this nucleus, and the premotor neurons within it. Unilateral intravitreal wheat germ agglutinin conjugated horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) injections revealed differences in the pattern of retinal OPt termination on the two sides. Injections of WGA-HRP into OPt labeled terminals bilaterally in the anteromedian nucleus, and to a lesser extent in the supraoculomotor area, centrally projecting Edinger-Westphal nucleus and nucleus of the posterior commissure. Labeled terminals, as well as retrogradely labeled multipolar cells, were present in the contralateral OPt, indicating a commissural pathway. Injections of WGA-HRP into the anteromedian nucleus labeled fusiform premotor neurons within the OPt, as well as multipolar cells in the nucleus of the posterior commissure. Connections between retinal terminals and the pretectal premotor neurons were characterized by combining vitreous chamber and anteromedian nucleus injections of WGA-HRP in the same animal. Fusiform shaped, retrogradely labeled cells fell within the anterogradely labeled retinal terminal field in OPt. Ultrastructural analysis revealed labeled retinal terminals containing clear spherical vesicles. They contacted labeled pretectal premotor neurons via asymmetric synaptic densities. These results provide an anatomical substrate for the pupillary light reflex in the cat. Pretectal premotor neurons receive direct retinal input via synapses suggestive of an excitatory drive, and project directly to nuclei containing preganglionic motoneurons. These projections are concentrated in the anteromedian nucleus, indicating its involvement in the pupillary light reflex. PMID:24706328

  14. An electronic device to record consensual reflex in human pupil.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, H M; Costa, R M; Camilo, E N R; Gang, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Examination of the pupil offers an objective evaluation of visual function as well as the vegetative pathways to the eye. This work proposes the development of an effective method and a portable device to test the consensual pupillary reflex. The first results demonstrate the success of a new device construction and methodology to record the consensual reflex with different stimulus, in a situation of complete blockage of light. PMID:26262208

  15. [Long loop reflexes--a clinically relevant method].

    PubMed

    Claus, D

    1986-02-01

    Late reflex potentials have been know for a long time. On the upper limb it has been proven that these potentials have a transcortical pathway. The electrical stimulation of nerve trunks is easily applicable in clinical practice and produces clear long-loop responses. The typical results can be reproduced for extrapyramidal, cerebellar and pyramidal lesions by this method. The long-loop reflex is sensitive to lesions in the course of the pyramidal tract. PMID:3007315

  16. Experimental study of displays in contralateral acoustic reflex auditory stimulation.

    PubMed

    Dragan, S P; Bogomolov, A V; Kotlyar-Shapirov, A D; Kondrat'eva, E A

    2016-05-01

    The results of an experimental study of manifestations of the acoustic reflex with contralateral auditory stimulation at a frequency of 1 kHz are presented, and the principal possibility and informativeness of its use for diagnosing the diseases of the organ of hearing are demonstrated. The principal difference of the developed approach is the use of polyharmonic signal for measuring acoustic reflex manifestations during contralateral stimulation, which allows accelerating the examination procedure. PMID:27417727

  17. Mechanical Characteristics of Reflex Durign Upright Posture in Paralyzed Subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yongchul; Youm, Youngil; Lee, Bumsuk; Kim, Youngho; Choi, Hyeonki

    The characteristics of flexor reflexes have been investigated in the previous studies with human subjects who were seated or supine position. However, researchers did not describe how the spinal circuits are used in different hip angles for paralyzed subjects, such as the standing position with walker or cane. In upright posture the compatibility between a flexor reflex of leg and body balance is a special problem for lower limb injured subjects. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of hip angle change on the flexor reflex evoked in standing paralyzed subjects supported by walker. In this study, six spinal cord injured and four stroke subjects were recruited through the inpatient physical therapy clinics of Korea national rehabilitation hospital. A single axis electronic goniometer was mounted on the lateral side of the hip joint of the impaired limb to record movements in the sagittal plane at this joint. The electronic goniometer was connected to a data acquisition system, through amplifiers to a computer. Since subject' posture influenced characteristics of the flexion reflex response, the subjects were supported in an upright posture by the help of parallelogram walder. Two series of tests were performed on each leg. The first series of the tests investigated the influence of hip angle during stationary standing posture on flexion reflex response. The hip angle was adjusted by the foot plate. The second examined the effect of the voluntary action of subject on swing motion during the gait. The electrically induced flexion reflex simultaneously produced the flexion of the hip, knee and dorsiflexion of the ankle enabling the swing phase of walking. Form the experimental results we observed that the reflex response of hip joint was largerwith the hip in the extended position than in the flexed position during standing posture. Under voluntary movement on flexion reflex during gaint, the peak hip angle induced by stimulation was

  18. On the receptivity problem for Goertler vortices: Vortex motions induced by wall roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denier, James P.; Hall, Philip; Seddougui, Sharon

    1990-01-01

    The receptivity problem for Goertler vortices induced by wall roughness is investigated. The roughness is modelled by small amplitude perturbations to the curved wall over which the flow takes place. The amplitude of these perturbations is taken to be sufficiently small for the induced Goertler vortices to be described by linear theory. The roughness is assumed to vary in the spanwise direction on the boundary layer lengthscale, while in the flow direction the corresponding variation is on the lengthscale over which the wall curvature varies. In fact the latter condition can be relaxed to allow for a faster streamwise roughness variation so long as the variation does not become as fast as that in the spanwise direction. The function which describes the roughness is assumed to be such that its spanwise and streamwise dependences can be separated; this enables progress by taking Fourier or Laplace transforms where appropriate. The cases of isolated and distributed roughness elements are investigated and the coupling coefficient which relates the amplitude of the forcing and the induced vortex amplitude is found asymptotically in the small wavelength limit. It is shown that this coefficient is exponentially small in the latter limit so that it is unlikely that this mode can be stimulated directly by wall roughness. The situation at 0(1) wavelengths is quite different and this is investigated numerically for different forcing functions. It is found that an isolated roughness element induces a vortex field which grows within a wedge at a finite distance downstream of the element. However, immediately downstream of the obstacle the disturbed flow produced by the element decays in amplitude. The receptivity problem at larger Goertler numbers appropriate to relatively large wall curvature is discussed in detail.

  19. In vitro receptivity of carbonate rocks to endolithic lichen-forming aposymbionts.

    PubMed

    Favero-Longo, Sergio E; Borghi, Alessandro; Tretiach, Mauro; Piervittori, Rosanna

    2009-10-01

    Sterile cultured isolates of lichen-forming aposymbionts have not yet been used to investigate lichen-rock interactions under controlled conditions. In this study mycobionts and photobiont of the endolithic lichens Bagliettoa baldensis and Bagliettoa marmorea were isolated and inoculated with coupons of one limestone and four marbles commonly employed in the Cultural Heritage framework. After one year of incubation, microscopic observations of polished cross-sections were performed to verify if the typical colonization patterns observed in the field may be reproduced in vitro and to evaluate the receptivity of the five lithotypes to endolithic lichens. The mycobionts of the two species developed both on the surface of and within all the lithotypes, showing different penetration pathways which depend on mineralogical and structural features and highlight different receptivity. By contrast, algae inoculated with the coupons did not penetrate them. Observations suggest that the hyphal penetration along intrinsic discontinuities of rocks is a relatively fast phenomenon when these organisms are generally considered as slow-growing. Samples from limestone outcrops and abandoned marble quarries, colonized by the same species or other representatives of Verrucariaceae, showed penetration pathways intriguingly similar to those reproduced in vitro and highlighted that lichen-driven erosion processes only increase the availability of hyphal passageways after a long-term colonization. These results show that in vitro incubation of sterile cultured lichen-forming ascomycetes with rock coupons is a practicable experimental system to investigate the lichen-rock interactions under controlled conditions and, together with analysis in situ, may support decisions on conservative treatments of historical and cultural significant stone substrata. PMID:19683572

  20. THE ACTION OF SODIUM 4-HYDROXYBUTYRATE ON SPINAL REFLEXES.

    PubMed

    BASIL, B; BLAIR, A M; HOLMES, S W

    1964-04-01

    The actions of sodium 4-hydroxybutyrate, gamma-aminobutyric acid and meprobamate have been studied in unanaesthetized animals, in local anaesthetic tests, on isolated organ preparations, on convulsions induced by picrotoxin and strychnine, and on monosynaptic (patellar) and polysynaptic (plantar) reflexes of the spinal cord. Sodium 4-hydroxybutyrate induced a sleep-like state with three unusual features: the righting reflex was remarkably persistent, respiration was good throughout and recovery was abrupt. gamma-Aminobutyric acid was inactive and meprobamate caused flaccid paralysis with loss of the righting reflex. None of the agents affected the responses of the rat diaphragm either to direct stimulation of the muscle or to indirect stimulation through the phrenic nerve. Only meprobamate reduced the responses of theguinea-pig isolated ileum preparation, showed local anaesthetic action and had an anticonvulsant action. All three compounds were capable, after intravenous or topical application, of blocking plantar reflexes in doses which did not affect the patellar reflex. The spinal animal responded in the same way, to the same dose of sodium 4-hydroxybutyrate, as the decerebrate preparation. Topical application to the motor cortex had no effect on spinal reflexes. We conclude that sodium 4-hydroxybutyrate acts preferentially on the internuncial neurones in the spinal cord but differs from meprobamate in its other actions. The similarity between the actions of sodium 4-hydroxybutyrate and of gamma-aminobutyric acid provides furtherevidence in support of the hypothesis that sodium 4-hydroxybutyrate is involved in the gamma-aminobutyric acid metabolic pathways. PMID:14190466

  1. Measurement of the lateral thoracic reflex latency in ponies.

    PubMed

    Hahn, C N; Mayhew, I G; Washbourne, J R

    1998-01-01

    Lateral thoracic nerve reflex latencies values were measured in ponies using a simple, non-invasive technique. The reflex was elicited using an external triggering hammer attached to an electrodiagnostic unit. The resulting evoked, compound muscle action potentials were recorded with electrodes, which were placed over the 6th ribs or 11th rib level with the axilla. Two superimposed repeats of 4 signal-averaged sweeps of 50 or 100 milliseconds were recorded and the estimated reflex pathway was measured for each subject in order to calculate the reflex latencies and latency velocities. Mean left and right 6th rib peak latencies were not significantly different from each other (P = .609), but left 6th rib latencies were shorter than those recorded from the 11th rib (P < .0001), substantiating the existence of an indirect (central) pathway to the reflex. The calculated left and right 6th rib latency velocities were not significantly different from each other (P = .58) but left 6th rib latency velocities were different from left 11th rib (P = .009). The calculated latency velocities were within the broad range for corticospinal tract motor conduction velocities and comparable to magnetic motor evoked latency velocities. The use of lateral thoracic reflex latency measurements to objectively identify the site of spinal cord lesions is discussed. PMID:9686392

  2. Auditory Brainstem Circuits That Mediate the Middle Ear Muscle Reflex

    PubMed Central

    Mukerji, Sudeep; Windsor, Alanna Marie; Lee, Daniel J.

    2010-01-01

    The middle ear muscle (MEM) reflex is one of two major descending systems to the auditory periphery. There are two middle ear muscles (MEMs): the stapedius and the tensor tympani. In man, the stapedius contracts in response to intense low frequency acoustic stimuli, exerting forces perpendicular to the stapes superstructure, increasing middle ear impedance and attenuating the intensity of sound energy reaching the inner ear (cochlea). The tensor tympani is believed to contract in response to self-generated noise (chewing, swallowing) and nonauditory stimuli. The MEM reflex pathways begin with sound presented to the ear. Transduction of sound occurs in the cochlea, resulting in an action potential that is transmitted along the auditory nerve to the cochlear nucleus in the brainstem (the first relay station for all ascending sound information originating in the ear). Unknown interneurons in the ventral cochlear nucleus project either directly or indirectly to MEM motoneurons located elsewhere in the brainstem. Motoneurons provide efferent innervation to the MEMs. Although the ascending and descending limbs of these reflex pathways have been well characterized, the identity of the reflex interneurons is not known, as are the source of modulatory inputs to these pathways. The aim of this article is to (a) provide an overview of MEM reflex anatomy and physiology, (b) present new data on MEM reflex anatomy and physiology from our laboratory and others, and (c) describe the clinical implications of our research. PMID:20870664

  3. H-reflex changes following spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Little, J W; Halar, E M

    1985-01-01

    Changes in both central synaptic excitability (CSE) and peripheral sensitivity of muscle spindle stretch receptors have been hypothesized to contribute to hyperactive stretch reflexes of spasticity. To assess CSE, the monosynaptic H-reflex to the triceps surae muscles was tested serially over the first six months after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). Six clinically complete SCI patients were compared to age-matched control subjects. As a measure of H-reflex excitability, H/M ratios were calculated by dividing maximum H-reflex by maximum M-response amplitude. Analysis of variance over the testing trials showed significant change in H/M ratios for SCI patients (p less than 0.01). T-tests comparing mean H/M ratios at different time periods after SCI revealed a significant increment after three months (p less than 0.01). H-reflex amplitude also increased significantly over this time period (p less than 0.04), but M-response amplitude did not change significantly. These increases in H/M ratio and H-reflex amplitude suggest that an increase in CSE may contribute to the appearance of hyperreflexia after SCI. PMID:3966862

  4. Achilles Tendon Reflex in Accidental Hypothermia and Hypothermic Myxoedema

    PubMed Central

    Maclean, D.; Taig, D. R.; Emslie-Smith, D.

    1973-01-01

    The photomotogram (P.M.G.) of the Achilles tendon reflex was studied in 26 patients with hypothermia (rectal temperature 33·3°C or less), 10 of whom also had myxoedema (serum protein bound iodine 2·8 μg/100 ml or less). No reflex could be elicited in eight (31%) of these patients, including three of those with myxoedema. Hypothermia increases both the contraction and the relaxation times of the reflex, the relaxation phase being particularly prolonged in those with myxoedema. In those patients from whom the reflex was elicited the ratio of the contraction time to the “half-relaxation time” in the P.M.G. was less than unity in six of the seven with myxoedema, and considerably greater than unity in eight of the 11 (73%) who were euthyroid. Thus, analysis of the Achilles tendon reflex P.M.G. correctly predicted the thyroid status in 14 of the 18 hypothermic patients in whom the Achilles tendon reflex was present (78%). The wider use of this rapid test of thyroid function would allow a more rational use of thyroid hormones in hypothermic patients and so lead to a better assessment of their value. PMID:4121692

  5. Lipopolysaccharide does not affect acoustic startle reflex in mice.

    PubMed

    Juszczak, Grzegorz R; Blaszczyk, Janusz; Sadowski, Bogdan; Sliwa, Adam T; Wolak, Patrycja; Tymosiak-Zielinska, Agnieszka; Lisowski, Pawel; Swiergiel, Artur H

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide; LPS) evokes in rodents an adaptive sickness behavior. It also produces changes in stress hormones secretion and activity of brain serotonergic and noradrenergic systems that have been implicated in stress responses, fear, and anxiety. Acoustic startle reflex (ASR) is regarded as a protective behavioral response that is enhanced in threatening situations or following an aversive event, and it can be modulated by physiological and emotional state of an animal. Effects of intraperitoneal injections of LPS on ASR, prepulse inhibition (PPI), locomotor activity in open field, and blood plasma corticosterone concentration were studied in lines of mice that display high (HA line) or low (LA line) swim stress-induced analgesia and also differ in emotional behaviors, including the magnitude of ASR. In both lines LPS produced robust sickness behavior, as evidenced by a decrease in locomotion and body weight, and an increase in corticosterone concentration. However, in neither line LPS injections affected responses to acoustic stimuli as assessed by the ASR and PPI magnitudes. The findings suggest that in sickness behavior induced by LPS the protective responses to salient environmental stimuli are not impaired. The significance of this finding for the concept of sickness behavior is discussed. PMID:17651939

  6. Pupil Light Reflex Produced by Glare under Mesopic Adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombo, Elisa; Comastri, Silvia Ana; Issolio, Luis; Echarri, Rodolfo

    The amount of light captured by the eye depends on pupil size. Moreover, one of the factors determining the steady-state pupil size is ambient illumination and sudden increments of light reaching the retina cause a brisk and transient pupil constriction described as the dynamic Pupil Light Reflex response. In experiments where a glare source acts as transient conditioning field, a methodology to measure pupil diameter is required. In the present paper pupil diameter, in steady (0.5 cd/m2) and dynamic adaptation conditions, is measured. The dynamic state is originated by a transient peripheral glare source with three different illuminance levels (15, 30 and 60 lx). Ten eyes of 5 subjects (19, 36, 50, 53 and 52 years old) are considered. The measurements are made by means of a video of the pupil captured with a CCD while the sight is fixated in a chart. In the steady condition, the average pupil diameter for each subject varies between 4.8 and 7.2 mm from one subject to another. In the dynamic condition, latency time results to be independent both of the subject and of the glare level, adding evidence to the robustness of this parameter when radiation is not incident centrally.

  7. [Mechanisms of sound reception and conduction in a dolphin].

    PubMed

    Riabov, V A

    2014-01-01

    Morphology of a lower jaw, model and behavioral experiments are discussed with the aim of exploring the mechanisms of sound reception and conduction to the dolphin's lower jaw canals taking into account known concepts of acoustics and a theory of group antennas. It is shown that the left and right row of mental foramens with the respective mandibular canal and tissues of the canals are forming the new outer ear and the new external auditory canal by which the sound (in frequency band of 0.1-160 kHz) is transmitted into the middle ear, in contrast to the dolphin's non-functional outer ear. This new external ear is created by nature as a receiving array of the traveling wave antenna located in the throat of the acoustical horn (a corresponding mandibular canal). The results give reason to assume the presence of similar new outer ear in Odontoceti. PMID:25715603

  8. Onset of turbulence from the receptivity stage of fluid flows.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, T K; Bhaumik, S

    2011-10-01

    The traditional viewpoint of fluid flow considers the transition to turbulence to occur by the secondary and nonlinear instability of wave packets, which have been created experimentally by localized harmonic excitation. The boundary layer has been shown theoretically to support spatiotemporal growing wave fronts by Sengupta, Rao, and Venkatasubbaiah [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 224504 (2006)] by a linear mechanism, which is shown here to grow continuously, causing the transition to turbulence. Here, we track spatiotemporal wave fronts to a nonlinear turbulent state by solving the full 2D Navier-Stokes equation, without any limiting assumptions. Thus, this is the only demonstration of deterministic disturbances evolving from a receptivity stage to the full turbulent flow. This is despite the prevalent competing conjectures of the event being three-dimensional and/or stochastic in nature. PMID:22107294

  9. A redefining Wernicke's area: receptive language and discourse semantics.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Dennis C

    2007-01-01

    This report calls for a more exacting definition of Wernicke's area in the discipline of communication sciences and disorders to reflect an accurate view of brain functioning with regard to decoding discourse semantics. Conventional definitions are provided to delineate the general usages of important terms used by many professional dictionaries and glossaries when defining Wernicke's area, receptive aphasia, understanding, and comprehension. Five levels of semantic decoding are described. A stanza from Tennyson's In Memoriam is used to show the dynamics of discourse semantic decoding and to logically establish that "language understanding" can virtually engage the brain as a whole and the totality of a person's mind. A more accurate definition is provided, indicating that Wernicke's area is not the center for oral language understanding, only an important conduit to language comprehension. PMID:17633961

  10. Concept for low-cost chaos radar using coherent reception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blakely, Jonathan N.; Corron, Ned J.

    2011-06-01

    We describe a new approach to random-signal radar based on the recent discovery of analytically solvable chaotic oscillators. These surprising nonlinear systems generate random, aperiodic waveforms that offer an exact analytic representation, allowing the implementation of simple matched filters and coherent reception. Notably, this approach enables nearly optimal detection of noise-like waveforms without need for expensive variable delay lines to store wideband waveforms for correlation. Mathematically, the waveform is expressed as a linear convolution of a bit sequence with a fixed basis function. We realize a simple matched filter for the waveform using a linear filter whose impulse response function is the time reverse of the basis function. Importantly, linear filters matched to finite bit sequences can be defined, enabling pulse compression and spread spectrum radar. We present an example oscillator, its matched filter, and simulation results demonstrating the pulse compression radar concept.

  11. The Reception of German Progressive Education in Russia: On Regularities of International Educational Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mchitarjan, Irina

    2015-01-01

    This article reports a historical case study of extensive educational transfer: the reception, adaptation, and use of German progressive education and German school reform ideas and practices in Russia at the beginning of the twentieth century. The reception of German educational ideas greatly enriched the theory and practice of the Russian school…

  12. A Language Development Program to Improve the Receptive Language Skills of Disadvantaged Kindergarten Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trushin, Barbara Y.

    In a primary school in Dade County, Florida, disadvantaged kindergarten children were entering first grade without the receptive language and listening skills necessary to succeed academically. A practicum attempted to remedy this problem by stimulating kindergarten children's receptive language skills in vocabulary and listening comprehension.…

  13. The Effects of Receptive and Productive Learning of Word Pairs on Vocabulary Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Stuart

    2009-01-01

    English as a foreign language students in Japan learned target words in word pairs receptively and productively. Five aspects of vocabulary knowledge--orthography, association, syntax, grammatical functions, and meaning and form--were each measured by receptive and productive tests. The study uses an innovative methodology in that each target word…

  14. Effective Strategies for Turning Receptive Vocabulary into Productive Vocabulary in EFL Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faraj, Avan Kamal Aziz

    2015-01-01

    Vocabulary acquisition has been a main concern of EFL English teachers and learners. There have been tons of research to examine the student's level of receptive vocabulary and productive vocabulary, but no research has conducted on how turning receptive vocabulary into productive vocabulary. This study has reported the impact of the teaching…

  15. 47 CFR 73.825 - Protection to reception of TV channel 6.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Protection to reception of TV channel 6. 73.825... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Low Power FM Broadcast Stations (LPFM) § 73.825 Protection to reception of TV... separation distances in the following table are met with respect to all full power TV Channel 6 stations....

  16. 47 CFR 73.825 - Protection to reception of TV channel 6.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Protection to reception of TV channel 6. 73.825... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Low Power FM Broadcast Stations (LPFM) § 73.825 Protection to reception of TV... separation distances in the following table are met with respect to all full power TV Channel 6 stations....

  17. 47 CFR 73.825 - Protection to reception of TV channel 6.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Protection to reception of TV channel 6. 73.825... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Low Power FM Broadcast Stations (LPFM) § 73.825 Protection to reception of TV... separation distances in the following table are met with respect to all full power TV Channel 6 stations....

  18. 47 CFR 73.825 - Protection to reception of TV channel 6.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Protection to reception of TV channel 6. 73.825... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Low Power FM Broadcast Stations (LPFM) § 73.825 Protection to reception of TV... separation distances in the following table are met with respect to all full power TV Channel 6 stations....

  19. 47 CFR 73.825 - Protection to reception of TV channel 6.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Protection to reception of TV channel 6. 73.825... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Low Power FM Broadcast Stations (LPFM) § 73.825 Protection to reception of TV... separation distances in the following table are met with respect to all full power TV Channel 6 stations....

  20. Building a Transfer-Receptive Culture at Four-Year Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrera, Alfred; Jain, Dimpal

    2013-01-01

    This chapter reviews a four-year university's role in developing and implementing a transfer-receptive culture. In particular, it focuses on the first element of a transfer-receptive culture by highlighting a series of visits by the chancellor of the University of California, Los Angeles, to community colleges within California. Strengthening…

  1. An Examination of College Students' Receptiveness to Alcohol-Related Information and Advice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leahy, Matthew M.; Jouriles, Ernest N.; Walters, Scott T.

    2013-01-01

    This project examined the reliability and validity of a newly developed measure of college students' receptiveness to alcohol related information and advice. Participants were 116 college students who reported having consumed alcohol at some point in their lifetime. Participants completed a measure of receptiveness to alcohol-related…

  2. Principal Change Facilitator Style, Bureaucratic and Professional Orientations, and Teacher Receptivity to Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chauvin, Sheila W.; Ellett, Chad D.

    Conceptions of principal change facilitator style (PCFS) and bureaucratic and professional role orientations (BPROs) are used to explore the construct of teacher receptivity to change (TRC) and the relationships among teacher perceptions of PCFS and their perceptions of receptivity to change. Part I of the study analyzed and refined the…

  3. Receptivity toward Immigrants in Rural Pennsylvania: Perceptions of Adult English as Second Language Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prins, Esther; Toso, Blaire Willson

    2012-01-01

    This article uses interview and questionnaire data to examine how adult English as a second language (ESL) providers in rural Pennsylvania perceive community receptivity toward immigrants and the factors they believe foster or hinder receptivity and immigrants' integration. ESL providers' depictions of local responses to immigrants ranged from…

  4. Genome-Wide Association Study of Receptive Language Ability of 12-Year-Olds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harlaar, Nicole; Meaburn, Emma L.; Hayiou-Thomas, Marianna E.; Davis, Oliver S. P.; Docherty, Sophia; Hanscombe, Ken B.; Haworth, Claire M. A.; Price, Thomas S.; Trzaskowski, Maciej; Dale, Philip S.; Plomin, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Researchers have previously shown that individual differences in measures of receptive language ability at age 12 are highly heritable. In the current study, the authors attempted to identify some of the genes responsible for the heritability of receptive language ability using a "genome-wide association" approach. Method: The…

  5. The Effects of the Language for Learning Program on the Receptive Language Skills of Kindergarten Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benner, Gregory J.; Trout, Alexandra; Nordness, Philip D.; Nelson, J. Ron; Epstein, Michael H.; Knobel, Maria-Louisa; Epstein, Alice; Maguire, Ken; Birdsell, Rodney

    2002-01-01

    Assesses the effects of the Language for Learning (formerly DISTAR) program on the receptive language skills of a general sample of kindergarten children. Indicates that the Language for Learning program produced both statistically and educationally significant effects on the receptive language skills of children. Discusses results, limitations,…

  6. Receptive Vocabulary in Boys with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Cross-Sectional Developmental Trajectories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kover, Sara T.; McDuffie, Andrea S.; Hagerman, Randi J.; Abbeduto, Leonard

    2013-01-01

    In light of evidence that receptive language may be a relative weakness for individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), this study characterized receptive vocabulary profiles in boys with ASD using cross-sectional developmental trajectories relative to age, nonverbal cognition, and expressive vocabulary. Participants were 49 boys with ASD…

  7. Perceived Context of Reception among Recent Hispanic Immigrants: Conceptualization, Instrument Development, and Preliminary Validation

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Seth J.; Unger, Jennifer B.; Lorenzo-Blanco, Elma I.; Des Rosiers, Sabrina E.; Villamar, Juan A.; Soto, Daniel W.; Pattarroyo, Monica; Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes; Szapocznik, José

    2013-01-01

    Context of reception has been discussed widely in the sociological and anthropological literature, but no measures of this construct exist. We designed a measure of perceived context of reception and provide initial support for the factorial validity, internal consistency reliability, and incremental and discriminant validity of scores generated by this measure. A sample of 302 recent-immigrant Hispanic parent-adolescent dyads from Miami and Los Angeles completed the new perceived context of reception measure, as well as measures of perceived discrimination; Hispanic/American cultural practices, values, and identifications; and depressive symptoms. In Phase 1, exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses extracted a factor for negative perceived context of reception. A subscale corresponding to this factor was used in Phase 2; for parents and adolescents, negative perceived context of reception and perceived discrimination were differentially associated with acculturation-related variables – suggesting discriminant validity between perceived discrimination and negative perceived context of reception. For adolescents at both sites and for parents in Los Angeles only, the negative perceived context of reception dimensions were significantly associated with depressive symptoms six months later, over and above the contribution made by perceived discrimination – suggesting incremental validity. Results are discussed in terms of perceived context of reception as a new and emerging construct. PMID:24099485

  8. Compensatory adrenal growth - A neurally mediated reflex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dallman, M. F.; Engeland, W. C.; Shinsako, J.

    1976-01-01

    The responses of young rats to left adrenalectomy or left adrenal manipulation were compared to surgical sham adrenalectomy in which adrenals were observed but not touched. At 12 h right adrenal wet weight, dry weight, DNA, RNA, and protein content were increased (P less than 0.05) after the first two operations. Left adrenal manipulation resulted in increased right adrenal weight at 12 h but no change in left adrenal weight. Sequential manipulation of the left adrenal at time 0 and the right adrenal at 12 h resulted in an enlarged right adrenal at 12 h (P less than 0.01), and an enlarged left adrenal at 24 h (P less than 0.05), showing that the manipulated gland was capable of response. Bilateral adrenal manipulation of the adrenal glands resulted in bilateral enlargement of 12 h (P less than 0.01). Taken together with previous results, these findings strongly suggest that compensatory adrenal growth is a neurally mediated reflex.

  9. Vestibuloocular reflex of rhesus monkeys after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Bernard; Kozlovskaia, Inessa; Raphan, Theodore; Solomon, David; Helwig, Denice; Cohen, Nathaniel; Sirota, Mikhail; Iakushin, Sergei

    1992-01-01

    The vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) of two rhesus monkeys was recorded before and after 14 days of spaceflight. The gain (eye velocity/head velocity) of the horizontal VOR, tested 15 and 18 h after landing, was approximately equal to preflight values. The dominant time constant of the animal tested 15 h after landing was equivalent to that before flight. During nystagmus induced by off-vertical axis rotation (OVAR), the latency, rising time constant, steady-state eye velocity, and phase of modulation in eye velocity and eye position with respect to head position were similar in both monkeys before and after flight. There were changes in the amplitude of modulation of horizontal eye velocity during steady-state OVAR and in the ability to discharge stored activity rapidly by tilting during postrotatory nystagmus (tilt dumping) after flight: OVAR modulations were larger, and tilt dumping was lost in the one animal tested on the day of landing and for several days thereafter. If the gain and time constant of the horizontal VOR exchange in microgravity, they must revert to normal soon after landing. The changes that were observed suggest that adaptation to microgravity had caused alterations in way that the central nervous system processes otolith input.

  10. Endometrial receptivity defects during IVF cycles with and without letrozole

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Paul B.; Parnell, Brent A.; Bushnell, Greta; Tallman, Nicholas; Forstein, David A.; Higdon, H. Lee; Kitawaki, Jo; Lessey, Bruce A.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Our aim was to study ways to improve IVF success rates in women with suspected endometrial receptivity defects. METHODS We conducted a retrospective cohort study examining the effect of letrozole (aromatase inhibitor) on integrin expression as a marker of endometrial receptivity. We compared IVF outcomes in 97 infertile women who had undergone ανβ3 integrin assessment by immunohistochemistry in mid-luteal endometrial biopsies. Of 79 women undergoing standard IVF, 29 (36.7%) lacked normal integrin expression. Eighteen other women with low integrin were studied after receiving letrozole during early IVF stimulation. An independent set of ανβ3 integrin-negative patients (n = 15) who had undergone repeat endometrial biopsy for integrin testing while taking letrozole were re-evaluated. RESULTS Clinical pregnancy and delivery rates were higher in women with normal ανβ3 integrin expression compared with those who were integrin negative [20/50 (40%) versus 4/29 (13.8%); P = 0.02 and 19/50 (38%) versus 2/29 (7%); P < 0.01, respectively]. In 18 women who received letrozole early in IVF, 11 conceived (61.1%; P < 0.001) compared with integrin-negative patients who did not receive letrozole. In integrin-negative women who were rebiopsied on letrozole, 66.7% reverted to normal integrin expression. Positive endometrial aromatase immunostaining using a polyclonal antibody was a common finding in infertile patients compared with controls. CONCLUSIONS Lack of endometrial ανβ3 integrin expression is associated with a poor prognosis for IVF that might be improved with letrozole co-treatment. Prospective studies are needed to confirm and extend these findings but the data suggest that aromatase expression may contribute to implantation failure in some women. PMID:22246449

  11. Volume Production of Negative Ions in the Reflex Type Ion Source.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimbo, Kouichi

    The production of negative hydrogen ions is investigated in the reflex-type negative ion source. The extracted negative hydrogen currents of 9.7 mA (100 mA/cm('2)) for H('-) and of 4.1 mA (42 mA/cm('2)) for D('-) are obtained continuously. The impurity is less then 1%. An isotope effect of negative ion production is observed. When anomalous diffusion in the positive column was found by Lehnert and Hoh (1960), it was pointed out that the large particle loss produced by anomalous diffusion is compensated by the large particle production inside the plasma; i.e. the plasma tries to maintain itself. "The self-sustaining property of the plasma" is applied to the reflex-type negative ion source. Anomalous diffusion was artificially encouraged by changing the radial electric field inside the reflex discharge. The apparent encouragement of negative ion diffusion by the increase of density fluctuation amplitude is observed. Twice as much negative ion current was obtained with the artificial encouragement as without. It is found from the quasilinear theory that the inwardly directed radial electric field destabilizes the plasma in the reflex-type ion source. The nonlinear theory based on Yoshikawa method (1962) is extended, and the anomalous diffusion coefficient in a weakly ionized plasma is obtained. "The electrostatic sheath trap", which increases the confinement of negative ions in the reflex-type ion source, is also discussed. It has been suggested that the dissociative attachment of electrons to excited molecules might be responsible for the high negative ion production in a hydrogen plasma: Bacal and Hamilton (1979). A recent calculation by Wadehra (1979) showed a significant enhancement of the dissociative attachment rate by the vibrational excitation of the initial molecules. The largest attachment rate was given at an electron temperature of about 1.5 eV. In our experiment, the maximum extracted negative ion current. was obtained at an electron temperature of about

  12. Trigeminocardiac reflex. A clinical phenomenon or a new physiological entity?

    PubMed

    Schaller, B

    2004-06-01

    The trigemino-cardiac reflex (TCR) is defined as the sudden onset of parasympathetic dysrhythmia, sympathetic hypotension, apnea or gastric hypermotility during stimulation of any of the sensory branches of the trigeminal nerve. The sensory nerve endings of the trigeminal nerve send neuronal signals via the Gasserian ganglion to the sensory nucleus of the trigeminal nerve, forming the afferent pathway of the reflex arc. This afferent pathway continues along the short internuncial nerve fibers in the reticular formatio to connect with the efferent pathway in the motor nucleus of the vagus nerve. Clinically, the trigemino-cardiac reflex has been reported to occur during craniofacial surgery, balloon-compression rhizolysis of the trigeminal ganglion, and tumor resection in the cerebellopontine angle. Apart from the few clinical reports, the physiological function of this brainstem-reflex has not yet been fully explored. From experimental findings, it may be suggested that the trigemino-cardiac reflex represents an expression of a central neurogenic reflex leading to rapid cerebrovascular vasodilatation generated from excitation of oxygen-sensitive neurons in the rostral ventrolateral medulla oblongata. By this physiological response, the adjustments of the systemic and cerebral circulations are initiated to divert blood to the brain or to increase blood flow within it. As it is generally accepted that the diving reflex and ischemic tolerance appear to involve at least partially similar physiological mechanisms, the existence of such endogenous neuroprotective strategies may extend the actually known clinical appearance of the TCR and include the prevention of other potentially brain injury states as well. This may be in line with the suggestion that the TCR is a physiological, but not a pathophysiological entity. PMID:15311339

  13. Can Treadmill Perturbations Evoke Stretch Reflexes in the Calf Muscles?

    PubMed Central

    Sloot, Lizeth H.; van den Noort, Josien C.; van der Krogt, Marjolein M.; Bruijn, Sjoerd M.; Harlaar, Jaap

    2015-01-01

    Disinhibition of reflexes is a problem amongst spastic patients, for it limits a smooth and efficient execution of motor functions during gait. Treadmill belt accelerations may potentially be used to measure reflexes during walking, i.e. by dorsal flexing the ankle and stretching the calf muscles, while decelerations show the modulation of reflexes during a reduction of sensory feedback. The aim of the current study was to examine if belt accelerations and decelerations of different intensities applied during the stance phase of treadmill walking can evoke reflexes in the gastrocnemius, soleus and tibialis anterior in healthy subjects. Muscle electromyography and joint kinematics were measured in 10 subjects. To determine whether stretch reflexes occurred, we assessed modelled musculo-tendon length and stretch velocity, the amount of muscle activity, as well as the incidence of bursts or depressions in muscle activity with their time delays, and co-contraction between agonist and antagonist muscle. Although the effect on the ankle angle was small with 2.8±1.0°, the perturbations caused clear changes in muscle length and stretch velocity relative to unperturbed walking. Stretched muscles showed an increasing incidence of bursts in muscle activity, which occurred after a reasonable electrophysiological time delay (163–191 ms). Their amplitude was related to the muscle stretch velocity and not related to co-contraction of the antagonist muscle. These effects increased with perturbation intensity. Shortened muscles showed opposite effects, with a depression in muscle activity of the calf muscles. The perturbations only slightly affected the spatio-temporal parameters, indicating that normal walking was retained. Thus, our findings showed that treadmill perturbations can evoke reflexes in the calf muscles and tibialis anterior. This comprehensive study could form the basis for clinical implementation of treadmill perturbations to functionally measure reflexes during

  14. Aging attenuates the vestibulosympathetic reflex in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Chester A.; Monahan, Kevin D.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The vestibular system contributes to sympathetic activation by engagement of the otolith organs. However, there is a significant loss of vestibular function with aging. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to determine if young and older individuals differ in their cardiovascular and sympathetic responses to otolithic stimulation (ie, head-down rotation, HDR). We hypothesized that responses to otolithic stimulation would be attenuated in older adults because of morphological and physiological alterations that occur in the vestibular system with aging. METHODS AND RESULTS: Arterial blood pressure, heart rate, muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), and head rotation were measured during HDR in 11 young (26 +/- 1 years) and 11 older (64 +/- 1 years) subjects in the prone posture. Five older subjects performed head rotation (chin to chest) in the lateral decubitus position, which simulates HDR but does not alter afferent inputs from the vestibular system. MSNA responses to HDR were significantly attenuated in older as compared with young subjects (P<0.01). MSNA increased in the older subjects by only 12 +/- 5% as compared with 85 +/- 16% in the young. Furthermore, HDR elicited significant reductions in mean arterial blood pressure in older (Delta-6 +/- 1 mm Hg; P<0.01) but not young subjects (Delta1 +/- 1 mm Hg). In contrast to HDR, head rotation performed in the lateral decubitus position did not elicit hypotension. MSNA responses to baroreceptor unloading and the cold pressor test were not different between the age groups. CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate that aging attenuates the vestibulosympathetic reflex in humans and may contribute to the increased prevalence of orthostatic hypotension with age.

  15. Gravity and Development of Cardiopulmonary Reflex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaoka, Shunji; Eno, Yuko; Ohira, Yoshinobu

    Cardio-pulmonary reflex, which our cardiac activity is synchronized to the respiration by autonomic nervous system regulation, is called as "respiratory sinus arrhythmia" and commonly found in adult. The physiological function of the espiratory sinus arrhythmia is considered to maximize the gas exchange during respiration cycle. This respiration induced heart rate variability (RHRV) is only found in mammals and avian showing a remarkable postnatal development, whereas no RHRV in aquatic species such as fish or amphibian. To elucidate our hypothesis that gravity exposure may plays a key role in the postnatal development of RHRV as well as its evolutional origin in these ground animals, we have studied effects of hypergravity (2G) on the postnatal development of RHRV using rat. Pregnant Wister rats were kept in centrifugal cages system for 38 days from 6th days of pregnant mother to have neonates until 23 days old. Electrocardiograph was recorded from the neonates in 2 to 23 days old in 2G group with simultaneous control (1G) group. The RHRV analysis was performed by calculating a component of Fourier power spectral coincide with the respiration frequency. In both groups, averaged resting heart rate gradually increase from 2 to 23 days old. When comparing the heart rate between the two groups, the 2G group indicated significantly lower (240± 8 bpm) than 1G control (326±21 bpm, p¡0.001) in 2 days old, where as no significance in 23 days old. The RHRV of 2 days old neonates in both groups indicated very small magnitude but significantly lower in 2G group than 1G control (p¡0.01). The RHRV gradually increase during the first 2 weeks and then rapid increased to reached 45 fold of magnitude in 1G control, whereas 69 fold in 2G group. The results strongly suggested that the postnatal innervation from respiration to cardiovascular centers was gravity dependent.

  16. Driving a car using reflexive fuzzy behaviors

    SciTech Connect

    Pin, F.G.; Watanabe, Y.

    1992-10-01

    Vehicle control in a-priori unknown, unpredictable, and dynamic environments requires many calculational and reasoning schemes to operate on the basis of very imprecise, incomplete, or unreliable data. For such systems, in which all the uncertainties can not be engineered away, approximate reasoning may provide an alternative to the complexity and computational requirements of conventional uncertainty analysis and propagation techniques. Two types of computer boards including custom-designed VLSI chips have been developed to add a fuzzy inferencing capability to real-time control systems. All inferencing rules on a chip are processed in parallel, allowing execution of the entire rule base in about 30 {mu}sec, and therefore, making control of ``reflex-type`` of motions envisionable. The use of these boards and the approach using superposition of elemental sensor-based behaviors for the development of qualitative reasoning schemes emulating human-like navigation in a-prioii unknown environments are discussed. We describe how the human-like navigation scheme implemented on one of the qualitative inferencing boards was installed on a test-bed platform to investigate two control modes for driving a car in a-priori unknown environments on the basis of sparse and imprecise sensor data. In the first mode, the car navigates autonomously, while in the second mode, the system acts as a driver`s aid providing the driver with linguistic (fuzzy) commands to turn left or right and speed up or slow down depending on the obstacles perceived by the sensors. Experiments with both modes of control are described in which the system uses only three acoustic range (sonar) sensor charmers to perceive the environment. Simulation results as well as indoor and outdoor experiments are discussed to illustrate the feasibility and robustness of autonomous navigation and/or safety enhancing driver`s aid using the new fuzzy inferencing hardware system and some human-like reasoning schemes.

  17. Driving a car using reflexive fuzzy behaviors

    SciTech Connect

    Pin, F.G.; Watanabe, Y.

    1992-01-01

    Vehicle control in a-priori unknown, unpredictable, and dynamic environments requires many calculational and reasoning schemes to operate on the basis of very imprecise, incomplete, or unreliable data. For such systems, in which all the uncertainties can not be engineered away, approximate reasoning may provide an alternative to the complexity and computational requirements of conventional uncertainty analysis and propagation techniques. Two types of computer boards including custom-designed VLSI chips have been developed to add a fuzzy inferencing capability to real-time control systems. All inferencing rules on a chip are processed in parallel, allowing execution of the entire rule base in about 30 [mu]sec, and therefore, making control of reflex-type'' of motions envisionable. The use of these boards and the approach using superposition of elemental sensor-based behaviors for the development of qualitative reasoning schemes emulating human-like navigation in a-prioii unknown environments are discussed. We describe how the human-like navigation scheme implemented on one of the qualitative inferencing boards was installed on a test-bed platform to investigate two control modes for driving a car in a-priori unknown environments on the basis of sparse and imprecise sensor data. In the first mode, the car navigates autonomously, while in the second mode, the system acts as a driver's aid providing the driver with linguistic (fuzzy) commands to turn left or right and speed up or slow down depending on the obstacles perceived by the sensors. Experiments with both modes of control are described in which the system uses only three acoustic range (sonar) sensor charmers to perceive the environment. Simulation results as well as indoor and outdoor experiments are discussed to illustrate the feasibility and robustness of autonomous navigation and/or safety enhancing driver's aid using the new fuzzy inferencing hardware system and some human-like reasoning schemes.

  18. Historical geographies of provincial science: themes in the setting and reception of the British Association for the Advancement of Science in Britain and Ireland, 1831-c.1939.

    PubMed

    Withers, Charles; Higgitt, Rebekah; Finnegan, Diarmid

    2008-09-01

    The British Association for the Advancement of Science sought to promote the understanding of science in various ways, principally by having annual meetings in different towns and cities throughout Britain and Ireland (and, from 1884, in Canada, South Africa and Australia). This paper considers how far the location of its meetings in different urban settings influenced the nature and reception of the association's activities in promoting science, from its foundation in 1831 to the later 1930s. Several themes concerning the production and reception of science--promoting, practising, writing and receiving--are examined in different urban contexts. We consider the ways in which towns were promoted as venues for and centres of science. We consider the role of local field sites, leading local practitioners and provincial institutions for science in attracting the association to different urban locations. The paper pays attention to excursions and to the evolution and content of the BAAS meeting handbook as a 'geographical' guide to the significance of the regional setting and to appropriate scientific venues. The paper considers the reception of BAAS meetings and explores how far the association's intentions for the promotion of science varied by location and by section within the BAAS. In examining these themes--the geographical setting of the association's meetings, the reception of association science in local civic and intellectual context and the importance of place to an understanding of what the BAAS did and how it was received--the paper extends existing knowledge of the association and contributes to recent work within the history of science which has emphasized the 'local' nature of science's making and reception and the mobility of scientific knowledge. PMID:19244850

  19. Restoration of sensory and motor function in earthworm escape reflex pathways following ventral nerve cord transplantation.

    PubMed

    Vining, E P; Drewes, C D

    1985-07-01

    Twelve segments of earthworm ventral nerve cord (VNC) were excised from either segments 10-22 (i.e., within the MGF sensory field) or segments 75-87 (i.e., within the LGF sensory field) in donor worms and heterotopically, or homotopically, transplanted into recipient animals. Morphological evidence indicated that by four days after transplantation, peripheral connections were formed between the transplanted VNC and the body wall of the recipient, many of these connections involving novel pathways projecting ventrally from the transplant. Restoration of giant fiber touch sensitivity in the transplant occurred from 4-14 days after transplantation. Regardless of the site of transplantation, the restored sensitivity (i.e., MGF versus LGF sensory field) always reflected the origin of the donor VNC. Restoration of MGF-mediated motor activity in the transplant occurred approximately 17-22 days after transplantation. In the case of heterotopic transplants (i.e., anterior VNC into posterior segments), the restored MGF-mediated muscle potentials were facilitating, indicating at least some tendency for persistence of this feature after transplantation. Behavioral observations suggested that reconnections involving other reflex pathways (e.g., those controlling setal movements and peristaltic locomotion) were made within the transplant region and that properties of the restored reflexes reflected those of the donor VNC. The rapid restoration of sensory and motor connections, despite heterotopic placement, indicates a significant capacity for peripheral regeneration by the transplanted VNC. On the other hand, the maintenance of various properties of reflex function, despite heterotopic transplantation, suggests a limited capacity for rearrangement of established central connections in the transplanted VNC. PMID:4031850

  20. The Receptive-Expressive Gap in the Vocabulary of Young Second-Language Learners: Robustness and Possible Mechanisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Todd A.; Oller, D. Kimbrough; Jarmulowicz, Linda; Ethington, Corinna A.

    2012-01-01

    Adults and children learning a second language show difficulty accessing expressive vocabulary that appears accessible receptively in their first language (L1). We call this discrepancy the receptive-expressive gap. Kindergarten Spanish (L1)-English (L2) sequential bilinguals were given standardized tests of receptive and expressive vocabulary in…