Science.gov

Sample records for regional analysis

  1. Regional flood frequency analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, V.P.

    1987-01-01

    This book, the fourth of a four volume set, contains five sections encompassing major aspects of regional flood frequency analysis. Each section starts usually with an invited state-of-the-art paper followed by contributed papers. The first section provides an assessment of regional flood frequency analysis. Methods for performing regional frequency analysis for ungaged watersheds are presented in Section 2. More discussion on regional frequency analysis is provided in Section 3. Selection and comparison of regional frequency methods are dealt with in Section 4; these are of great interest to the user. Increasing attention is being focused these days on paleohydrologic flood analysis. This topic is covered in Section 5.

  2. Regional Shelter Analysis Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, Michael B.; Dennison, Deborah; Kane, Jave; Walker, Hoyt; Miller, Paul

    2015-08-01

    The fallout from a nuclear explosion has the potential to injure or kill 100,000 or more people through exposure to external gamma (fallout) radiation. Existing buildings can reduce radiation exposure by placing material between fallout particles and exposed people. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was tasked with developing an operationally feasible methodology that could improve fallout casualty estimates. The methodology, called a Regional Shelter Analysis, combines the fallout protection that existing buildings provide civilian populations with the distribution of people in various locations. The Regional Shelter Analysis method allows the consideration of (a) multiple building types and locations within buildings, (b) country specific estimates, (c) population posture (e.g., unwarned vs. minimally warned), and (d) the time of day (e.g., night vs. day). The protection estimates can be combined with fallout predictions (or measurements) to (a) provide a more accurate assessment of exposure and injury and (b) evaluate the effectiveness of various casualty mitigation strategies. This report describes the Regional Shelter Analysis methodology, highlights key operational aspects (including demonstrating that the methodology is compatible with current tools), illustrates how to implement the methodology, and provides suggestions for future work.

  3. USArray Regional Phase Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buehler, J. S.; Shearer, P. M.

    2014-12-01

    The regional Pn and Sn phases, which are typically described as headwaves that propagate in the uppermost mantle, are sensitive to heterogeneities in the mantle lid and complement other seismic studies with poorer vertical resolution at this depth. We have experimented with a variety of approaches to image the velocity structure and anisotropy in the western U.S., starting with separate Pn and Sn time-term tomographies, but also localized cross-correlation and stacking approaches that benefit from the regular USArray station arrangement. Later we combined the data sets for joint Pn-Sn inversions and the resulting Vp/Vs maps provide further insight into the nature of the seismic anomalies. Now that USArray has reached the east coast, we are updating our models to include the cumulative station footprint. The sparser source distribution in the eastern U.S., and the resulting longer ray paths, provide new challenges and justify the inclusion of additional parameters that account for the velocity gradient in the mantle lid. Our results show generally higher Pn velocities in the eastern U.S., but we observe patches of lower velocities around the New Madrid seismic zone and below the eastern Appalachians. We find that the Pn fast axes generally do not agree with SKS splitting orientations, suggesting significant vertical changes in anisotropy in the upper mantle. For example, the circular pattern of the fast polarization direction of SKS in the western U.S. is much less pronounced in the Pn results, and in the eastern U.S. the dominant Pn fast direction is approximately north-south, whereas the SKS fast polarizations are oriented roughly parallel to the absolute plate motion direction. Since Pn and Sn travel through the crust, they can provide additional information on crustal thickness. In several regions our results and estimates from receiver function studies are inconsistent. For example, beneath the Colorado Plateau our crustal thickness estimates are about 35-40 km

  4. Regional Needs Analysis Report. 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Higher Education Coordinating Board, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The Higher Education Coordinating Board (HECB) is required to develop a comprehensive and ongoing needs assessment process to analyze demand for additional degrees and programs [RCW 28B.76.230 (1)]. This report fulfills a portion of that mandate by focusing on employer demand on the regional level, but also includes additional information on…

  5. Assessment of homogeneity of regions for regional flood frequency analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeong Eun; Kim, Nam Won

    2016-04-01

    This paper analyzed the effect of rainfall on hydrological similarity, which is an important step for regional flood frequency analysis (RFFA). For the RFFA, storage function method (SFM) using spatial extension technique was applied for the 22 sub-catchments that are partitioned from Chungju dam watershed in Republic of Korea. We used the SFM to generate the annual maximum floods for 22 sub-catchments using annual maximum storm events (1986~2010) as input data. Then the quantiles of rainfall and flood were estimated using the annual maximum series for the 22 sub-catchments. Finally, spatial variations in terms of two quantiles were analyzed. As a result, there were significant correlation between spatial variations of the two quantiles. This result demonstrates that spatial variation of rainfall is an important factor to explain the homogeneity of regions when applying RFFA. Acknowledgements: This research was supported by a grant (11-TI-C06) from Advanced Water Management Research Program funded by Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport of Korean government.

  6. Regional Slip Tendency Analysis of the Great Basin Region

    DOE Data Explorer

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-09-30

    are shown on Figure 3. For faults within the Great Basin proper, we applied a normal faulting stress regime, where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax), which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin). Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin, we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46. These values are consistent with stress magnitude data at both Dixie Valley (Hickman et al., 2000) and Yucca Mountain (Stock et al., 1985). For faults within the Walker Lane/Eastern California Shear Zone, we applied a strike‐slip faulting stress, where shmax > sv > shmin. Upon visual inspection of limited stress magnitude data from the Walker Lane and Eastern California Shear zone, we chose values such that SHmin/SHmax = .46 and Shmin/Sv= .527 representative of the region. Results: The results of our slip and dilation tendency analysis are shown in Figures 4 (dilation tendency), 5 (slip tendency) and 6 (slip tendency + dilation tendency). Shmin varies from northwest to east‐west trending throughout much of the Great Basin. As such, north‐ to northeast‐striking faults have the highest tendency to slip and to dilate, depending on the local trend of shmin. These results provide a first order filter on faults and fault systems in the Great Basin, affording focusing of local‐scale exploration efforts for blind or hidden geothermal resources.

  7. Regional frequency analysis of extreme groundwater levels.

    PubMed

    Fürst, Josef; Bichler, Andrea; Konecny, Franz

    2015-01-01

    Flood risk is generally perceived as being a consequence of surface water inundation. However, large damage is also caused by high groundwater levels. In surface hydrology, statistical frequency analysis is a standard tool to estimate discharge with a given return period or exceedance probability. First, a suitable probability distribution is fit to a series of annual maximum peaks. Second, this distribution is used to determine the discharge corresponding to the desired return period. Where only short series of recorded data are available, the estimates can often be improved by regional frequency analysis (RFA). Unfortunately, there is little information in the literature on analogous approaches for the estimation of extreme groundwater levels. In this contribution, the applicability of l-moments-based RFA for the estimation of extreme groundwater levels is investigated. The main issues specific to groundwater levels are (1) appropriate transformation of the data, (2) criteria for identification of statistically homogeneous regions, (3) consideration of correlation between sites, and (4) choice of distribution function. This study is based on data from more than 1100 observation sites in four shallow Austrian Aquifers with a record length of 10 to 50 years. Results show that homogeneous regions for l-moments-based RFA can be identified covering about one half of the total area of the aquifers. The confidence intervals for the 30- and 100-year return levels can be significantly reduced by RFA. Out of the four investigated distribution functions, none is to be preferred generally. PMID:24903411

  8. D0 regional analysis center concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Lee Lueking et al.

    2003-08-12

    The D0 experiment is facing many exciting challenges providing a computing environment for its worldwide collaboration. Transparent access to data for processing and analysis has been enabled through deployment of its SAM system to collaborating sites and additional functionality will be provided soon with SAMGrid components. In order to maximize access to global storage, computational and intellectual resources, and to enable the system to scale to the large demands soon to be realized, several strategic sites have been identified as Regional Analysis Centers (RAC's). These sites play an expanded role within the system. The philosophy and function of these centers is discussed and details of their composition and operation are outlined. The plan for future additional centers is also addressed.

  9. Regional Frequency Analysis of Ocean Hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardara, Pietro; Weiss, Jerome; Benoit, Michel; Andreewsky, Marc

    2015-04-01

    The estimation of the extreme return level (up to 10-4 annual probability of exceedence) of natural phenomena is a very uncertain exercise, when extrapolating using the information and the measure collected in a single site. The aim of the Regional Frequency Analysis (RFA) is to benefit from the information contained in observations and data collected not only on the site of interested but in a larger set of sites, located in the same region of the site of interest or sharing with it similar characteristics. This technique was introduced in the '60 and widely used in various domains including hydrology and meteorology. The RFA was recently acknowledge as a potential choice for the estimation of flooding hazard in the Methodological Guide for flooding hazard estimation [1], published in 2013 by the French Nuclear Safety Autority. The aim of this presentation is to bring in the main concepts of the RFA and illustrate the latest innovation on its application, delivered by EDF R&D. They concerns the statistical definition of storms, the formation of homogeneous regions and a new approach for filtering the redundant information linked to the spatial correlation of natural phenomena. Application to skew surges and waves will be shown 1. ASN, Guide pour la Protection des installations nucléaires de base contre les inondations externes. 2013, ASN. p. 44.

  10. Incorporating spatial dependence in regional frequency analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhuo; Yan, Jun; Zhang, Xuebin

    2014-01-01

    The efficiency of regional frequency analysis (RFA) is undermined by intersite dependence, which is usually ignored in parameter estimation. We propose a spatial index flood model where marginal generalized extreme value distributions are joined by an extreme-value copula characterized by a max-stable process for the spatial dependence. The parameters are estimated with a pairwise likelihood constructed from bivariate marginal generalized extreme value distributions. The estimators of model parameters and return levels can be more efficient than those from the traditional index flood model when the max-stable process fits the intersite dependence well. Through simulation, we compared the pairwise likelihood method with an L-moment method and an independence likelihood method under various spatial dependence models and dependence levels. The pairwise likelihood method was found to be the most efficient in mean squared error if the dependence model was correctly specified. When the dependence model was misspecified within the max-stable models, the pairwise likelihood method was still competitive relative to the other two methods. When the dependence model was not a max-stable model, the pairwise likelihood method led to serious bias in estimating the shape parameter and return levels, especially when the dependence was strong. In an illustration with annual maximum precipitation data from Switzerland, the pairwise likelihood method yielded remarkable reduction in the standard errors of return level estimates in comparison to the L-moment method. PMID:25745273

  11. Regional Analysis of Ground-Water Recharge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flint, Lorraine E.; Flint, Alan L.

    2007-01-01

    A modeling analysis of runoff and ground-water recharge for the arid and semiarid southwestern United States was performed to investigate the interactions of climate and other controlling factors and to place the eight study-site investigations into a regional context. A distributed-parameter water-balance model (the Basin Characterization Model, or BCM) was used in the analysis. Data requirements of the BCM included digital representations of topography, soils, geology, and vegetation, together with monthly time-series of precipitation and air-temperature data. Time-series of potential evapotranspiration were generated by using a submodel for solar radiation, taking into account topographic shading, cloudiness, and vegetation density. Snowpack accumulation and melting were modeled using precipitation and air-temperature data. Amounts of water available for runoff and ground-water recharge were calculated on the basis of water-budget considerations by using measured- and generated-meteorologic time series together with estimates of soil-water storage and saturated hydraulic conductivity of subsoil geologic units. Calculations were made on a computational grid with a horizontal resolution of about 270 meters for the entire 1,033,840 square-kilometer study area. The modeling analysis was composed of 194 basins, including the eight basins containing ground-water recharge-site investigations. For each grid cell, the BCM computed monthly values of potential evapotranspiration, soil-water storage, in-place ground-water recharge, and runoff (potential stream flow). A fixed percentage of runoff was assumed to become recharge beneath channels operating at a finer resolution than the computational grid of the BCM. Monthly precipitation and temperature data from 1941 to 2004 were used to explore climatic variability in runoff and ground-water recharge. The selected approach provided a framework for classifying study-site basins with respect to climate and dominant recharge

  12. Regional analysis of energy facility siting

    SciTech Connect

    Lipfert, F W; Meier, P M; Kleinman, L I

    1980-01-01

    This paper has examined some of the regional environmental parameters of energy facility siting, with emphasis on air quality impacts. An example of a siting optimization study was presented, and it was shown how difficult it presently is to specify an environmental objective function that is universally applicable. The importance of regional background effects was discussed, and long-range transport models were used to analyze the relative importance of local and long-range impacts.

  13. Southeast Regional Clean Energy Policy Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    McLaren, Joyce

    2011-04-01

    More than half of the electricity produced in the southeastern states is fuelled by coal. Although the region produces some coal, most of the states depend heavily on coal imports. Many of the region's aging coal power facilities are planned for retirement within the next 20 years. However, estimates indicate that a 20% increase in capacity is needed over that time to meet the rapidly growing demand. The most common incentives for energy efficiency in the Southeast are loans and rebates; however, total public spending on energy efficiency is limited. The most common state-level policies to support renewable energy development are personal and corporate tax incentives and loans. The region produced 1.8% of the electricity from renewable resources other than conventional hydroelectricity in 2009, half of the national average. There is significant potential for development of a biomass market in the region, as well as use of local wind, solar, methane-to-energy, small hydro, and combined heat and power resources. Options are offered for expanding and strengthening state-level policies such as decoupling, integrated resource planning, building codes, net metering, and interconnection standards to support further clean energy development. Benefits would include energy security, job creation, insurance against price fluctuations, increased value of marginal lands, and local and global environmental paybacks.

  14. Southeast Regional Clean Energy Policy Analysis (Revised)

    SciTech Connect

    McLaren, J.

    2011-04-01

    More than half of the electricity produced in the southeastern states is fuelled by coal. Although the region produces some coal, most of the states depend heavily on coal imports. Many of the region's aging coal power facilities are planned for retirement within the next 20 years. However, estimates indicate that a 20% increase in capacity is needed over that time to meet the rapidly growing demand. The most common incentives for energy efficiency in the Southeast are loans and rebates; however, total public spending on energy efficiency is limited. The most common state-level policies to support renewable energy development are personal and corporate tax incentives and loans. The region produced 1.8% of the electricity from renewable resources other than conventional hydroelectricity in 2009, half of the national average. There is significant potential for development of a biomass market in the region, as well as use of local wind, solar, methane-to-energy, small hydro, and combined heat and power resources. Options are offered for expanding and strengthening state-level policies such as decoupling, integrated resource planning, building codes, net metering, and interconnection standards to support further clean energy development. Benefits would include energy security, job creation, insurance against price fluctuations, increased value of marginal lands, and local and global environmental paybacks.

  15. Regional environmental analysis and management: New techniques for current problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honea, R. B.; Paludan, C. T. N.

    1974-01-01

    Advances in data acquisition and processing procedures for regional environmental analysis are discussed. Automated and semi-automated techniques employing Earth Resources Technology Satellite data and conventional data sources are presented. Experiences are summarized. The ERTS computer compatible tapes provide a very complete and flexible record of earth resources data and represent a viable medium to enhance regional environmental analysis research.

  16. Regional dissociated heterochrony in multivariate analysis.

    PubMed

    Mitteroecker, P; Gunz, P; Weber, G W; Bookstein, F L

    2004-12-01

    Heterochrony, the classic framework to study ontogeny and phylogeny, in essence relies on a univariate concept of shape. Though principal component plots of multivariate shape data seem to resemble classical bivariate allometric plots, the language of heterochrony cannot be translated directly into general multivariate methodology. We simulate idealized multivariate ontogenetic trajectories and demonstrate their behavior in principal component plots in shape space and in size-shape space. The concept of "dissociation", which is conventionally regarded as a change in the relationship between shape change and size change, appears to be algebraically the same as regional dissociation - the variation of apparent heterochrony by region. Only if the trajectories of two related species lie along exactly the same path in shape space can the classic terminology of heterochrony apply so that pure dissociation of size change against shape change can be detected. We demonstrate a geometric morphometric approach to these issues using adult and subadult crania of 48 Pan paniscus and 47 P. troglodytes. On each specimen we digitized 47 landmarks and 144 semilandmarks on ridge curves and the external neurocranial surface. The relation between these two species' growth trajectories is too complex for a simple summary in terms of global heterochrony. PMID:15646279

  17. An Ecological Regional Analysis of South Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Frank W.; Robinson, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    This study of the counties of South Carolina introduces a limited purpose, modifiable technology that is designed to reproduce the rapid discovery strategy of the natural sciences. It uses factor analysis to identify types of communities and the threats they face, and evaluates their success in dealing with these by comparisons based on…

  18. Topographic Analysis for the Prairie Pothole Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martz, L.; Shaw, D.; Pietroniro, A.

    2008-12-01

    The unique topography of the pothole region of the North American prairies creates challenges for properly determining basin contributing area. Retreating Pleistocene continental glaciers deposited a glacial till that produced a hummocky terrain with numerous depressions or potholes within the landscape that impound runoff. These potholes impound a great deal of runoff and display intermittent 'fill and spill' behaviour which can produce large step-functional shifts in the land surface area contributing to stream flow. Both the storage capacity and the topological relationships between potholes determines the nature of the shifts in basin contributing area and runoff. Most currently available automated methods such as TOPAZ or ArcGIS treat depressions as artefacts that are removed by depression-filling and subsequent routing of flow across the resulting flat areas. This effectively defines the threshold storage value, that when satisfied, allows 100% of the basin to contribute runoff to the basin mouth. However, most runoff events in the prairie pothole region are sub-threshold events that allow only a portion of the watershed to contribute surface runoff to the outlet. We propose an automated method for determining contributing area that incorporates the dynamic fill-and- spill behaviour of prairie potholes. We apply the algorithm in prairie pothole basins both to demonstrate their efficacy and to test the potential for using conceptual curves to describe a hypothesized non-linear relationship between decreasing potential storage in the landscape and contributing area. Results indicate that the proposed conceptual curves represent the relationship between potential storage and contributing area in the test basins very well.

  19. Analysis of body calcium (regional changes in body calcium by in vivo neutron activation analysis)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suki, W.; Johnson, P. C.; Leblanc, A.; Evans, H. J.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of space flight on urine and fecal calcium loss was documented during the three long-term Skylab flights. Neutron activation analysis was used to determine regional calcium loss. Various designs for regional analysis were investigated.

  20. Electrophysiologic analysis of regional cortical maturation.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, H G

    1975-10-01

    Some issues in the study of human neurobehavioral development are briefly set forth. Attention is called to the limitations of strictly structural and behavioral approaches. The value of correlative morphophysiological and psychophysiological investigations is emphasized. By averaging brain activity with respect to stimuli and motor responses, event-related cortical potentials (ERP) can be reliably detected in the scalp EEG. Longitudinal topographic studies of ERP permit the definition of a sequence of regional cortical maturation during infancy and childhood. We have found that evoked potentials in the three major sensory modalities arise from both primary and secondary projection areas by 30 weeks of conceptional age. Frontocentral responses appear shortly thereafter. Thus, cortical mechanisms show a precocious development of electrogenesis which indicates the possibility for an early environmental impact on brain maturation. In contrast to the evoked potentials, association cortex potentials (ACP) do not seem to appear until early childhood. The behavioral significance of these neuroelectric phenomena is being sought in studies employing techniques which permit the concurrent recording of brain activity and behavioral responses in the waking infant and child. Some of the problems confronting the application of these methods to studies of infants are outlined. PMID:1203402

  1. Statistical Analysis of Acoustic Wave Parameters Near Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabello-Soares, M. Cristina; Bogart, Richard S.; Scherrer, Philip H.

    2016-08-01

    In order to quantify the influence of magnetic fields on acoustic mode parameters and flows in and around active regions, we analyze the differences in the parameters in magnetically quiet regions nearby an active region (which we call “nearby regions”), compared with those of quiet regions at the same disk locations for which there are no neighboring active regions. We also compare the mode parameters in active regions with those in comparably located quiet regions. Our analysis is based on ring-diagram analysis of all active regions observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) during almost five years. We find that the frequency at which the mode amplitude changes from attenuation to amplification in the quiet nearby regions is around 4.2 mHz, in contrast to the active regions, for which it is about 5.1 mHz. This amplitude enhacement (the “acoustic halo effect”) is as large as that observed in the active regions, and has a very weak dependence on the wave propagation direction. The mode energy difference in nearby regions also changes from a deficit to an excess at around 4.2 mHz, but averages to zero over all modes. The frequency difference in nearby regions increases with increasing frequency until a point at which the frequency shifts turn over sharply, as in active regions. However, this turnover occurs around 4.9 mHz, which is significantly below the acoustic cutoff frequency. Inverting the horizontal flow parameters in the direction of the neigboring active regions, we find flows that are consistent with a model of the thermal energy flow being blocked directly below the active region.

  2. The Significance of Regional Analysis in Applied Geography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sommers, Lawrence M.

    Regional analysis is central to applied geographic research, contributing to better planning and policy development for a variety of societal problems facing the United States. The development of energy policy serves as an illustration of the capabilities of this type of analysis. The United States has had little success in formulating a national…

  3. Spatial analysis on China's regional air pollutants and CO2 emissions: emission pattern and regional disparity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Liang; Liang, Hanwei

    2014-08-01

    China has suffered from serious air pollution and CO2 emission. Challenges of emission reduction policy not only come from technology advancement, but also generate from the fact that, China has pronounced disparity between regions, in geographical and socioeconomic. How to deal with regional disparity is important to achieve the reduction target effectively and efficiently. This research conducts a spatial analysis on the emission patterns of three air pollutants named SO2, NOx and PM2.5, and CO2, in China's 30 provinces, applied with spatial auto-correlation and multi regression modeling. We further analyze the regional disparity and inequity issues with the approach of Lorenz curve and Gini coefficient. Results highlight that: there is evident cluster effect for the regional air pollutants and CO2 emissions. While emission amount increases from western regions to eastern regions, the emission per GDP is in inverse trend. The Lorenz curve shows an even larger unequal distribution of GDP/emissions than GDP/capita in 30 regions. Certain middle and western regions suffers from a higher emission with lower GDP, which reveal the critical issue of emission leakage. Future policy making to address such regional disparity is critical so as to promote the emission control policy under the “equity and efficiency” principle.

  4. Region-based Statistical Analysis of 2D PAGE Images

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feng; Seillier-Moiseiwitsch, Françoise; Korostyshevskiy, Valeriy R.

    2011-01-01

    A new comprehensive procedure for statistical analysis of two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D PAGE) images is proposed, including protein region quantification, normalization and statistical analysis. Protein regions are defined by the master watershed map that is obtained from the mean gel. By working with these protein regions, the approach bypasses the current bottleneck in the analysis of 2D PAGE images: it does not require spot matching. Background correction is implemented in each protein region by local segmentation. Two-dimensional locally weighted smoothing (LOESS) is proposed to remove any systematic bias after quantification of protein regions. Proteins are separated into mutually independent sets based on detected correlations, and a multivariate analysis is used on each set to detect the group effect. A strategy for multiple hypothesis testing based on this multivariate approach combined with the usual Benjamini-Hochberg FDR procedure is formulated and applied to the differential analysis of 2D PAGE images. Each step in the analytical protocol is shown by using an actual dataset. The effectiveness of the proposed methodology is shown using simulated gels in comparison with the commercial software packages PDQuest and Dymension. We also introduce a new procedure for simulating gel images. PMID:21850152

  5. Using cluster analysis to organize and explore regional GPS velocities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpson, Robert W.; Thatcher, Wayne; Savage, James C.

    2012-01-01

    Cluster analysis offers a simple visual exploratory tool for the initial investigation of regional Global Positioning System (GPS) velocity observations, which are providing increasingly precise mappings of actively deforming continental lithosphere. The deformation fields from dense regional GPS networks can often be concisely described in terms of relatively coherent blocks bounded by active faults, although the choice of blocks, their number and size, can be subjective and is often guided by the distribution of known faults. To illustrate our method, we apply cluster analysis to GPS velocities from the San Francisco Bay Region, California, to search for spatially coherent patterns of deformation, including evidence of block-like behavior. The clustering process identifies four robust groupings of velocities that we identify with four crustal blocks. Although the analysis uses no prior geologic information other than the GPS velocities, the cluster/block boundaries track three major faults, both locked and creeping.

  6. Quantitative analysis of regional myocardial performance in coronary artery disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, D. K.; Dodge, H. T.; Frimer, M.

    1975-01-01

    Findings from a group of subjects with significant coronary artery stenosis are given. A group of controls determined by use of a quantitative method for the study of regional myocardial performance based on the frame-by-frame analysis of biplane left ventricular angiograms are presented. Particular emphasis was placed upon the analysis of wall motion in terms of normalized segment dimensions, timing and velocity of contraction. The results were compared with the method of subjective assessment used clinically.

  7. A Novel Analysis of Acoustic Oscillations in Chromospheric Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monsue, Teresa; Hill, Frank; Stassun, Keivan G.

    2015-04-01

    A helioseismic analysis of the chromosphere is employed in H-alpha to study how solar flares around active regions affect the behavior of acoustic oscillations. Our analysis deals with flares directly over sunspots, where the region is highly magnetized. In our current study of analyzing these oscillations in the chromosphere we study the temporal evolution of the oscillatory behavior from data taken from the Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) H-alpha detectors. We investigate the wave behavior across different frequency bands (1 < ν < 8.33 mHz). In order to analyze the frequency bands of the oscillations, our analysis utilizes time series data to create Fourier power spectra of individual pixels spatially resolved and temporally evolved around the flare region; thereby creating a movie of each frequency band. This study entails three active regions, directly over sunspots, in which flaring activity is taking place from two solar flares, which occurred on June 13th and July 12th, 2012. We found that the intensity of the flare has an effect on the oscillations within different frequency bands. A suppression of power was observed in dark anomalous structures across the total frequency bands and in other regions there was an observed boost in power due to flaring activity. We find that, in the heart of all three regions, the low-frequency power (˜1-2 mHz) is substantially enhanced immediately prior to and after the flare, and that power at all frequencies up to 8 mHz is depleted at flare maximum. This depletion is both frequency and time dependent, which probably reflects the changing depths visible during the flare in the bandpass of the filter. These variations are not observed outside the flaring region. The depletion may indicate that acoustic energy is being converted into thermal energy at flare maximum, while the low-frequency enhancement may arise from an instability in the chromosphere and provide an early warning of the flare onset.

  8. Analysis of MAGSAT and surface data of the Indian region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agarwal, G. C. (Principal Investigator)

    1983-01-01

    Techniques and significant results of an analysis of MAGSAT and surface data of the Indian region are described. Specific investigative tasks included: (1) use of the multilevel data at different altitudes to develop a model for variation of magnetic anomaly with altitude; (2) development of the regional model for the description of main geomagnetic field for the Indian sub-continent using MAGSAT and observatory data; (3) development of regional mathematical model of secular variations over the Indian sub-continent; and (4) downward continuation of the anomaly field obtained from MAGSAT and its combination with the existing observatory data to produce a regional anomaly map for elucidating tectonic features of the Indian sub-continent.

  9. Regional frequency analysis of extreme precipitation for Sicily (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forestieri, Angelo; Blenkinsop, Stephen; Fowler, Hayley; Lo Conti, Francesco; Noto, Leonardo

    2016-04-01

    The analysis of extreme precipitation has always been included among most relevant hydrological applications because of the several important activities linked to the availability of tools for the estimation of extreme rainfall quantiles. These activities include the design of hydraulic civil structures and the evaluation and management of hydraulic and hydrological risk. In this study a frequency analysis of annual maxima precipitation measurements has been carried out for the area of Sicily (Italy). A typical hierarchical regional approach has been adopted for the parameter estimation procedure based on the L-moments method. The identification of homogeneous regions within the procedure has been pursued with a data driven procedure constituted by a principal component analysis of an ensemble of selected auxiliary variables, and a K-means cluster analysis algorithm. Auxiliary variables comprise meteo-climatic information and a representation of the average seasonal distribution of intense events. Results have been evaluated by means of a Monte Carlo experiment based on the comparison between at-site and regional fitted frequency distributions. Moreover, results have been compared with previous analyses performed for the same area. The study provides an updated tool for the modelling of extreme precipitation for the area of Sicily (Italy), with different features respect to previous tools both in terms of definition of homogeneous zones and in terms of parameters of the frequency distribution. Meteo-climatic information and the seasonality of extreme events retrieved from the dataset has been proficuously exploited in the analysis.

  10. Regional Analysis of Energy, Water, Land and Climate Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tidwell, V. C.; Averyt, K.; Harriss, R. C.; Hibbard, K. A.; Newmark, R. L.; Rose, S. K.; Shevliakova, E.; Wilson, T.

    2014-12-01

    Energy, water, and land systems interact in many ways and are impacted by management and climate change. These systems and their interactions often differ in significant ways from region-to-region. To explore the coupled energy-water-land system and its relation to climate change and management a simple conceptual model of demand, endowment and technology (DET) is proposed. A consistent and comparable analysis framework is needed as climate change and resource management practices have the potential to impact each DET element, resource, and region differently. These linkages are further complicated by policy and trade agreements where endowments of one region are used to meet demands in another. This paper reviews the unique DET characteristics of land, energy and water resources across the United States. Analyses are conducted according to the eight geographic regions defined in the 2014 National Climate Assessment. Evident from the analyses are regional differences in resources endowments in land (strong East-West gradient in forest, cropland and desert), water (similar East-West gradient), and energy. Demands likewise vary regionally reflecting differences in population density and endowment (e.g., higher water use in West reflecting insufficient precipitation to support dryland farming). The effect of technology and policy are particularly evident in differences in the energy portfolios across the eight regions. Integrated analyses that account for the various spatial and temporal differences in regional energy, water and land systems are critical to informing effective policy requirements for future energy, climate and resource management. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  11. Helioseismology of pre-emerging active regions. III. Statistical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, G.; Leka, K. D.; Braun, D. C.; Birch, A. C.

    2014-05-01

    The subsurface properties of active regions (ARs) prior to their appearance at the solar surface may shed light on the process of AR formation. Helioseismic holography has been applied to samples taken from two populations of regions on the Sun (pre-emergence and without emergence), each sample having over 100 members, that were selected to minimize systematic bias, as described in Paper I. Paper II showed that there are statistically significant signatures in the average helioseismic properties that precede the formation of an AR. This paper describes a more detailed analysis of the samples of pre-emergence regions and regions without emergence based on discriminant analysis. The property that is best able to distinguish the populations is found to be the surface magnetic field, even a day before the emergence time. However, after accounting for the correlations between the surface field and the quantities derived from helioseismology, there is still evidence of a helioseismic precursor to AR emergence that is present for at least a day prior to emergence, although the analysis presented cannot definitively determine the subsurface properties prior to emergence due to the small sample sizes.

  12. Multi-regional input-output analysis for China's regional CH4 emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo; Li, Jiashuo; Peng, Beihua

    2014-03-01

    China is the largest CH4 emitter in the world. Given the importance of CH4 in greenhouse gas emission inventories, the characteristics of China's CH4 emissions at different scales deserve to be fully understood. Presented in this paper is an interprovincial input-output embodiment analysis of China's regional CH4 emissions in 2007, based on the most recently available multi-regional input-output table, and relevant CH4 emissions data. The results show that the eastern, central and western areas contribute to 48.2%, 28.6%, and 23.3% of the national total embodied emissions, respectively. Guangdong has the highest level of embodied CH4 emissions among all of the 30 regions. The Agriculture sector produces the most embodied CH4 emissions in final demand, followed by the Construction, Food Production and Tobacco Processing, and Other Service Activities sectors. Significant net transfers of embodied CH4 emission flows are identified from the central and western areas to the eastern area via interregional trade. Shanxi is the largest interregional exporter of embodied CH4 emissions. In contrast, Guangdong is the largest interregional importer. Energy activities, agricultural activities, and waste management comprise 65.6%, 30.7%, and 3.7% of the total embodied CH4 emissions in interregional trade, respectively. By using consumption-based accounting principles, the emission magnitudes, per capita emissions, and emission intensities of most eastern regions increase remarkably, while those of some central and western regions decrease largely. To achieve regional CH4 emission mitigation, comprehensive mitigation measures should be designed under consideration of regional transfer of emission responsibility.

  13. Seismicity analysis in Indonesia region from high precision hypocenter location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugraha, Andri; Shiddiqi, Hasbi; Widiyantoro, Sri; Ramdhan, Mohamad; Wandono, Wandono

    2015-04-01

    As a complex tectonic region, Indonesia has a high seismicity rate which is related to subduction and collision as well as strike-slip fault. High-precision earthquake locations with adequate relocation method and proper velocity model are necessary for seismicity analysis. We used nearly 25,000 earthquakes that were relocated using double-difference method. In our relocation process, we employed teleseismic, regional, and local P-wave arrival times. Furthermore, we employed regional-global nested velocity models that take into account the subduction slab in the study region by using a 3D model for area inside and a 1D model for area outside Indonesia. Relocation results show shifted hypocenters that are generally perpendicular to the trench. Beneath western Sunda arc, the Wadati-Benioff Zone (WBZ) extents to a depth of about 300 km and depicts a gently dipping slab. The WBZ beneath eastern Sunda arc extends deeper to about 500 km and depicts a steep slab geometry. In the Sunda-Banda transition zone, we found anomalously low seismicity beneath the oceanic-continental transition region. The WBZ of the severely curved Banda arc extends to a depth of about 600 km and depicts a two-slab model. In the Molucca collision zone, seismicity clearly depicts two opposing slabs of the Molucca sea plate, i.e. to the east and to the west. Around Sulawesi region, most earthquakes are related to the north Sulawesi trench and depict subducted slab beneath the northern part of the island. In Sumatra region, we identified a seismic gap in the WBZ between 70 km and 150 km. Seismicity gaps are also detected beneath particular regions, e.g. Mentawai region, and several parts along the subducted slab. Similar to the Sumatra region, beneath eastern Sunda arc, seismic gap in WBZ is also detected but deeper, i.e. at depths of 150 km to 250 km. Furthermore, we used global centroid moment tensor catalog data available for earthquakes with magnitude 5.0 or greater. In general, focal mechanism

  14. Regional Frequency Analysis of extreme rainfall events, Tuscany (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caporali, E.; Chiarello, V.; Rossi, G.

    2014-12-01

    The assessment of extreme hydrological events at sites characterized by short time series or where no data record exists has been mainly obtained by regional models. Regional frequency analysis based on the index variable procedure is implemented here to describe the annual maximum of rainfall depth of short durations in Tuscany region. The probability distribution TCEV - Two Component Extreme Value is used in the frame of the procedure for the parameters estimation based on a three levels hierarchical approach. The methodology deal with the delineation of homogeneous regions, the identification of a robust regional frequency distribution and the assessment of the scale factor, i.e. the index rainfall. The data set includes the annual maximum of daily rainfall of 351 gauge stations with at least 30 years of records, in the period 1916 - 2012, and the extreme rainfalls of short duration, 1 hour and 3, 6, 12, 24 hours. Different subdivisions hypotheses have been verified. A four regions subdivision, coincident with four subregions, which takes into account the orography, the geomorphological and climatic peculiarities of the Tuscany region, has been adopted. Particularly, for testing the regional homogeneity, the cumulate frequency distributions of the observed skewness and variation coefficients of the recorded times series, are compared with the theoretical frequency distribution obtained through a Monte Carlo technique. The related L-skewness and L-variation coefficients are also examined. The application of the Student t -test and the Wilcoxon test for the mean, as well as the χ2 was also performed. Further tests of subdivision hypotheses have been made through the application of discordancy D and heterogeneity H tests and the analysis of the observed and the theoretical TCEV model growth curves. For each region the daily rainfall growth curve has been estimated. The growth curves for the hourly duration have been estimated when the daily rainfall growth curve

  15. Process analysis of regional aerosol pollution during spring in the Pearl River Delta region, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Qi; Lan, Jing; Liu, Yiming; Wang, Xuemei; Chan, Pakwai; Hong, Yingying; Feng, Yerong; Liu, Yexin; Zeng, Yanjun; Liang, Guixiong

    2015-12-01

    A numerical simulation analysis was performed for three air pollution episodes in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region during March 2012 using the third-generation air quality modeling system Models-3/CMAQ. The results demonstrated that particulate matter was the primary pollutant for all three pollution episodes and was accompanied by relatively low visibility in the first two episodes. Weather maps indicate that the first two episodes occurred under the influence of warm, wet southerly air flow systems that led to high humidity throughout the region. The liquid phase reaction of gaseous pollutants resulted in the generation of fine secondary particles, which were identified as the primary source of pollution in the first two episodes. The third pollution episode occurred during a warming period following a cold front. Relative humidity was lower during this episode, and coarse particles were the major pollution contributor. Results of process analysis indicated that emissions sources, horizontal transport and vertical transport were the primary factors affecting pollutant concentrations within the near-surface layer during all three episodes, while aerosol processes, cloud processes, horizontal transport and vertical transport had greater influence at approximately 900 m above ground. Cloud processes had a greater impact during the first two pollution episodes because of the higher relative humidity. In addition, by comparing pollution processes from different cities (Guangzhou and Zhongshan), the study revealed that the first two pollution episodes were the result of local emissions within the PRD region and transport between surrounding cities, while the third episode exhibited prominent regional pollution characteristics and was the result of regional pollutant transport.

  16. Geophysical Analysis of an Urban Region in Southwestern Pennsylvania.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harbert, W.; Lipinski, B.; Kaminski, V.; Ackman, T. E.

    2006-12-01

    The goal of this project was to categorize the subsurface beneath an urban region of southwestern Pennsylvania and to determine geological structure and attempt to image pathways for gas migration in this area. Natural gas had been commercially produced from this region at the turn of the century but this field, with more than 100 wells drilled, was closed approximately eighty years ago. There are surface expressions of gas migration visible in the study region. We applied geophysical methods to determine geological structure in this region, which included multi frequency electromagnetic survey performed using Geophex Gem-2 system, portable reflection seismic and a System I/O-based reflection seismic survey. Processing and interpretation of EM data included filtering 10 raw channels (inphase and quadrature components measured at 5 frequencies), inverting the data for apparent conductivity using EM1DFM software by University of British Columbia, Canada and further interpretation in terms of nearsurface features at a maximum depth of up to 20 meters. Analysis of the collected seismic data included standard seismic processing and the use of the SurfSeis software package developed by the Kansas Geological Survey. Standard reflection processing of these data were completed using the LandMark ProMAX 2D/3D and Parallel Geoscience Corporations software. Final stacked sections were then imported into a Seismic Micro Technologies Kingdom Suite+ geodatabase for visualization and analysis. Interpretation of these data was successful in identifying and confirming a region of unmined Freeport coal, determining regional stratigraphic structure and identifying possible S-wave lower velocity anomalies in the shallow subsurface.

  17. Regional analysis of wet deposition for effects research. Project report

    SciTech Connect

    Vong, R.; Cline, S.; Reams, G.; Bernert, J.; Charles, D.

    1989-02-01

    The basis for regional analysis of precipitation amount, concentration and deposition is investigated. When performing such a spatial analysis, key issues are the data selection, data compositing, the interpolation technique, and the uncertainty of the results. Sources of data on precipitation amount and chemical composition are presented along with procedures for screening the chemical data. A review of recent work reveals that different scientists select different data sets and that data selection plays an important role in the resulting maps. Important issues in data preprocessing include temporal resolution, data stratification into geographic regions, and choosing between direct and indirect methods for interpolating wet deposition. Available spatial interpolation techniques are discussed. The geostatistical technique, kriging, is discussed in detail to allow other researchers the benefit of previous applications to precipitation chemistry. Procedures for generating and checking uncertainty estimates are discussed.

  18. Analysis of tropospheric propagation characteristics based on regional meteorological data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Junho; Melton, Mara; Donohue, John; Fryland, Albert

    1995-02-01

    Meteorological data has been processed to investigate RF (radio frequency) propagation efforts of the tropospheric region from ground to 28 km in space. A data base has been developed to provide enough information for analyzing many different phenomena of the troposphere in terms of lapse rate, refractivity, range error, angle error, slant range, and interrelationships among these parameters. Based on preliminary analysis, the results are very distinguishable from the values arrived at through the application of conventional data for analysis of RF propagation patterns. This implies that the seasonal average value provides better indications of the current atmospheric variation than the annual global average value which most users have adopted for convenience.

  19. Analysis of supersonic combustion flow fields with embedded subsonic regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dash, S.; Delguidice, P.

    1972-01-01

    The viscous characteristic analysis for supersonic chemically reacting flows was extended to include provisions for analyzing embedded subsonic regions. The numerical method developed to analyze this mixed subsonic-supersonic flow fields is described. The boundary conditions are discussed related to the supersonic-subsonic and subsonic-supersonic transition, as well as a heuristic description of several other numerical schemes for analyzing this problem. An analysis of shock waves generated either by pressure mismatch between the injected fluid and surrounding flow or by chemical heat release is also described.

  20. CRITICA: coding region identification tool invoking comparative analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badger, J. H.; Olsen, G. J.; Woese, C. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Gene recognition is essential to understanding existing and future DNA sequence data. CRITICA (Coding Region Identification Tool Invoking Comparative Analysis) is a suite of programs for identifying likely protein-coding sequences in DNA by combining comparative analysis of DNA sequences with more common noncomparative methods. In the comparative component of the analysis, regions of DNA are aligned with related sequences from the DNA databases; if the translation of the aligned sequences has greater amino acid identity than expected for the observed percentage nucleotide identity, this is interpreted as evidence for coding. CRITICA also incorporates noncomparative information derived from the relative frequencies of hexanucleotides in coding frames versus other contexts (i.e., dicodon bias). The dicodon usage information is derived by iterative analysis of the data, such that CRITICA is not dependent on the existence or accuracy of coding sequence annotations in the databases. This independence makes the method particularly well suited for the analysis of novel genomes. CRITICA was tested by analyzing the available Salmonella typhimurium DNA sequences. Its predictions were compared with the DNA sequence annotations and with the predictions of GenMark. CRITICA proved to be more accurate than GenMark, and moreover, many of its predictions that would seem to be errors instead reflect problems in the sequence databases. The source code of CRITICA is freely available by anonymous FTP (rdp.life.uiuc.edu in/pub/critica) and on the World Wide Web (http:/(/)rdpwww.life.uiuc.edu).

  1. An Analysis of Japanese Hotel Plan Availability ---Regionality and Seasonality---

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, M.; Sato, A.

    This paper investigates regionality and seasonality of room planavailability in Japan. We employ the singular spectrum analysis to the daily plan availability and extract the trends. We examine the coefficient of a linear relation between a normalized trend at each prefecture and a normalized trend of the whole of Japan. It is concluded that the coefficients, with respect to the four seasons, characterize properties of the prefectures.

  2. Knowledge base navigator facilitating regional analysis inter-tool communication.

    SciTech Connect

    Hampton, Jeffery Wade; Chael, Eric Paul; Hart, Darren M.; Merchant, Bion John; Chown, Matthew N.

    2004-08-01

    To make use of some portions of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Knowledge Base (KB) for which no current operational monitoring applications were available, Sandia National Laboratories have developed a set of prototype regional analysis tools (MatSeis, EventID Tool, CodaMag Tool, PhaseMatch Tool, Dendro Tool, Infra Tool, etc.), and we continue to maintain and improve these. Individually, these tools have proven effective in addressing specific monitoring tasks, but collectively their number and variety tend to overwhelm KB users, so we developed another application - the KB Navigator - to launch the tools and facilitate their use for real monitoring tasks. The KB Navigator is a flexible, extensible java application that includes a browser for KB data content, as well as support to launch any of the regional analysis tools. In this paper, we will discuss the latest versions of KB Navigator and the regional analysis tools, with special emphasis on the new overarching inter-tool communication methodology that we have developed to make the KB Navigator and the tools function together seamlessly. We use a peer-to-peer communication model, which allows any tool to communicate with any other. The messages themselves are passed as serialized XML, and the conversion from Java to XML (and vice versa) is done using Java Architecture for XML Binding (JAXB).

  3. Regional analysis of ground and above-ground climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-12-01

    The regional suitability of underground construction as a climate control technique is discussed with reference to (1) a bioclimatic analysis of long term weather data for 29 locations in the United States to determine appropriate above ground climate control techniques, (2) a data base of synthesized ground temperatures for the coterminous United States, and (3) monthly dew point ground temperature comparisons for identifying the relative likelihood of condensation from one region to another. It is concluded that the suitability of Earth tempering as a practice and of specific Earth sheltered design stereotypes varies geographically; while the subsurface almost always provides a thermal advantage on its own terms when compared to above ground climatic data, it can, nonetheless, compromise the effectiveness of other, regionally more important climate control techniques. Reviews of above and below ground climate mapping schemes related to human comfort and architectural design, and detailed description of a theoretical model of ground temperature, heat flow, and heat storage in the ground are included. Strategies of passive climate control are presented in a discussion of the building bioclimatic analysis procedure which has been applied in a computer analysis of 30 years of weather data for each of 20 locations in the United States.

  4. Regional analysis of ground and above-ground climate

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-12-01

    The regional suitability of underground construction as a climate control technique is discussed with reference to (1) a bioclimatic analysis of long-term weather data for 29 locations in the United States to determine appropriate above ground climate control techniques, (2) a data base of synthesized ground temperatures for the coterminous United States, and (3) monthly dew point ground temperature comparisons for identifying the relative likelihood of condensation from one region to another. It is concluded that the suitability of earth tempering as a practice and of specific earth-sheltered design stereotypes varies geographically; while the subsurface almost always provides a thermal advantage on its own terms when compared to above ground climatic data, it can, nonetheless, compromise the effectiveness of other, regionally more important climate control techniques. Also contained in the report are reviews of above and below ground climate mapping schemes related to human comfort and architectural design, and detailed description of a theoretical model of ground temperature, heat flow, and heat storage in the ground. Strategies of passive climate control are presented in a discussion of the building bioclimatic analysis procedure which has been applied in a computer analysis of 30 years of weather data for each of 29 locations in the United States.

  5. Bioinformatics analysis of the epitope regions for norovirus capsid protein

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Norovirus is the major cause of nonbacterial epidemic gastroenteritis, being highly prevalent in both developing and developed countries. Despite of the available monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) for different sub-genogroups, a comprehensive epitope analysis based on various bioinformatics technology is highly desired for future potential antibody development in clinical diagonosis and treatment. Methods A total of 18 full-length human norovirus capsid protein sequences were downloaded from GenBank. Protein modeling was performed with program Modeller 9.9. The modeled 3D structures of capsid protein of norovirus were submitted to the protein antigen spatial epitope prediction webserver (SEPPA) for predicting the possible spatial epitopes with the default threshold. The results were processed using the Biosoftware. Results Compared with GI, we found that the GII genogroup had four deletions and two special insertions in the VP1 region. The predicted conformational epitope regions mainly concentrated on N-terminal (1~96), Middle Part (298~305, 355~375) and C-terminal (560~570). We find two common epitope regions on sequences for GI and GII genogroup, and also found an exclusive epitope region for GII genogroup. Conclusions The predicted conformational epitope regions of norovirus VP1 mainly concentrated on N-terminal, Middle Part and C-terminal. We find two common epitope regions on sequences for GI and GII genogroup, and also found an exclusive epitope region for GII genogroup. The overlapping with experimental epitopes indicates the important role of latest computational technologies. With the fast development of computational immunology tools, the bioinformatics pipeline will be more and more critical to vaccine design. PMID:23514273

  6. Land Use Adaptation Strategies Analysis in Landslide Risk Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu-Ching; Chang, Chin-Hsin; Chen, Ying-Tung

    2013-04-01

    In order to respond to the impact of climate and environmental change on Taiwanese mountain region, this study used GTZ (2004) Risk analysis guidelines to assess the landslide risk for 178 Taiwanese mountain towns. This study used 7 indicators to assess landslide risk, which are rainfall distribution, natural environment vulnerability (e.g., rainfall threshold criterion for debris flow, historical disaster frequency, landslide ratio, and road density), physicality vulnerability (e.g., population density) and socio-economic vulnerability (e.g., population with higher education, death rate and income). The landslide risk map can be obtained by multiplying 7 indicators together and ranking the product. The map had 5 risk ranges, and towns within the range of 4 to 5, which are high landslide risk regions, and have high priority in reducing risk. This study collected the regions with high landslide risk regions and analyzed the difference after Typhoon Morakot (2009). The spatial distribution showed that after significant environmental damage high landslide risk regions moved from central to south Taiwan. The changeable pattern of risk regions pointed out the necessity of updating the risk map periodically. Based on the landslide risk map and the land use investigation data which was provided by the National Land Surveying and Mapping Center in 2007, this study calculated the size of the land use area with landslide disaster risk. According to the above results and discussion, this study can be used to suggest appropriate land use adaptation strategies provided for reducing landslide risk under the impact of climate and environmental change.

  7. Spatial data analysis for exploration of regional scale geothermal resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghaddam, Majid Kiavarz; Noorollahi, Younes; Samadzadegan, Farhad; Sharifi, Mohammad Ali; Itoi, Ryuichi

    2013-10-01

    Defining a comprehensive conceptual model of the resources sought is one of the most important steps in geothermal potential mapping. In this study, Fry analysis as a spatial distribution method and 5% well existence, distance distribution, weights of evidence (WofE), and evidential belief function (EBFs) methods as spatial association methods were applied comparatively to known geothermal occurrences, and to publicly-available regional-scale geoscience data in Akita and Iwate provinces within the Tohoku volcanic arc, in northern Japan. Fry analysis and rose diagrams revealed similar directional patterns of geothermal wells and volcanoes, NNW-, NNE-, NE-trending faults, hotsprings and fumaroles. Among the spatial association methods, WofE defined a conceptual model correspondent with the real world situations, approved with the aid of expert opinion. The results of the spatial association analyses quantitatively indicated that the known geothermal occurrences are strongly spatially-associated with geological features such as volcanoes, craters, NNW-, NNE-, NE-direction faults and geochemical features such as hotsprings, hydrothermal alteration zones and fumaroles. Geophysical data contains temperature gradients over 100 °C/km and heat flow over 100 mW/m2. In general, geochemical and geophysical data were better evidence layers than geological data for exploring geothermal resources. The spatial analyses of the case study area suggested that quantitative knowledge from hydrothermal geothermal resources was significantly useful for further exploration and for geothermal potential mapping in the case study region. The results can also be extended to the regions with nearly similar characteristics.

  8. Heart deformation analysis: measuring regional myocardial velocity with MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kai; Collins, Jeremy D; Chowdhary, Varun; Markl, Michael; Carr, James C

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that heart deformation analysis (HDA) may serve as an alternative for the quantification of regional myocardial velocity. Nineteen healthy volunteers (14 male and 5 female) without documented cardiovascular diseases were recruited following the approval of the institutional review board (IRB). For each participant, cine images (at base, mid and apex levels of the left ventricle [LV]) and tissue phase mapping (TPM, at same short-axis slices of the LV) were acquired within a single magnetic resonance (MR) scan. Regional myocardial velocities in radial and circumferential directions acquired with HDA (Vrr and Vcc) and TPM (Vr and VФ) were measured during the cardiac cycle. HDA required shorter processing time compared to TPM (2.3 ± 1.1 min/case vs. 9.5 ± 3.7 min/case, p < 0.001). Moderate to good correlations between velocity components measured with HDA and TPM could be found on multiple myocardial segments (r = 0.460-0.774) and slices (r = 0.409-0.814) with statistical significance (p < 0.05). However, significant biases of velocity measures at regional myocardial areas between HDA and TPM were also noticed. By providing comparable velocity measures as TPM does, HDA may serve as an alternative for measuring regional myocardial velocity with a faster image processing procedure. PMID:27076222

  9. GSLIB-style programs for discriminant analysis and regionalized classification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bohling, G.C.

    1997-01-01

    Discriminant analysis is a statistical technique used to predict the group membership of a set of multivariate observations, each of which is assumed to arise from one of a set of distinct classes or groups. Each group is characterized by a certain distribution in multivariate space, and group allocations are based on the similarity of each sample to each group. Assuming multivariate normality, generalized distance measures based on the squared Mahalanobis distance from each sample to each group centroid arise as the natural measure of similarity. One can allocate samples to groups either on the basis of minimum generalized distance or, equivalently, maximum posterior probability of group membership. In earth science applications samples are often associated with geographic locations. In this situation regionalized classification can be used to produce a map representing group membership throughout the sampled domain. This can be accomplished by interpolating either generalized distances or membership probabilities from sample locations to regularly spaced grid nodes and comparing resulting grids to produce a classification map. This paper presents a set of GSLIB-style FORTRAN programs for performing discriminant analysis and regionalized classification. The program disco performs discriminant analysis and the programs xmd2cls and prb2cls combine interpolated distances and probabilities, respectively, to create a grid of predicted classifications. In addition, the utility program colbind allows the user to combine selected columns from different GSLIB-style data files into one file. ?? 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  10. Phylogeny of Porphyromonas gingivalis by Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Region Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rumpf, Robert W.; Griffen, Ann L.; Leys, Eugene J.

    2000-01-01

    Periodontitis has been associated with the presence of Porphyromonas gingivalis, and previous studies have shown phenotypic differences in the pathogenicities of strains of P. gingivalis. An accurate and comprehensive phylogeny of strains of P. gingivalis would be useful in determining if there is an evolutionary basis to pathogenicity in this species. Previous phylogenies of P. gingivalis strains based on random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis and multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE) show little agreement. While the 16S ribosomal gene is the standard for phylogenetic reconstruction among bacterial species, it is insufficiently variable for this purpose. In the present study, the phylogeny of P. gingivalis was constructed on the basis of the sequence of the most variable region of the ribosomal operon, the intergenic spacer region (ISR). Heteroduplex analysis of the ISR has been used to study the variability of P. gingivalis strains in periodontitis. In the present study, typing by heteroduplex analysis was compared to ISR sequence-based phylogeny and close agreement was observed. The two strains of P. gingivalis whose heteroduplex types are strongly associated with periodontitis were found to be closely related and were well separated from strains whose heteroduplex types are less strongly associated with disease, suggesting a relationship between pathogenicity and phylogeny. PMID:10790104

  11. Regional Frequency Analysis of Annual Maximum Streamflow in Gipuzkoa (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erro, J.; López, J. J.

    2012-04-01

    Extreme streamflow events have been an important cause of recent flooding in Gipuzkoa, and any change in the magnitude of such events may have severe impacts upon urban structures such as dams, urban drainage systems and flood defences, and cause failures to occur. So a regional frequency analysis of annual maximum streamflow was developed for Gipuzkoa, using the well known L-moments approach together with the index-flood procedure, and following the four steps that characterize it: initial screening of the data, identification of homogeneous regions, choice of the appropriate frequency distribution and estimation of quantiles for different return periods. The preliminary study, completed in 2009, was based on the observations recorded at 22 stations distributed throughout the area. A primary filtering of the data revealed the absence of jumps, inconsistencies and changes in trends within the series, and the discordancy measures showed that none of the sites used in the analysis had to be considered discordant with the others. Regionalization was performed by cluster analysis, grouping the stations according to eight physical site characteristics: latitude, longitude, drainage basin area, elevation, main channel length of the basin, slope, annual mean rainfall and annual maximum rainfall. It resulted in two groups - one cluster with the 18 sites of small-medium basin area, and a second cluster with the 4 remaining sites of major basin area - in which the homogeneity criteria were tested and satisfied. However, the short lenght of the series together with the introduction of the observations of 2010 and the inclusion of a historic extreme streamflow event occurred in northern Spain in November 2011, completely changed the results. With this consideration and adjustment, all Gipuzkoa could be treated as a homogeneus region. The goodness-of-fit measures indicated that Generalized Logistic (GLO) is the only suitable distribution to characterize Gipuzkoa. Using the

  12. Multifractal analysis of forest fires in complex regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega Orozco, C. D.; Kanevski, M.; Golay, J.; Tonini, M.; Conedera, M.

    2012-04-01

    Forest fires can be studied as point processes where the ignition points represent the set of locations of the observed events in a defined study region. Their spatial and temporal patterns can be characterized by their fractal properties; which quantify the global aspect of the geometry of the support data. However, a monofractal dimension can not completely describe the pattern structure and related scaling properties. Enhancements in fractal theory had developed the multifractal concept which describes the measures from which interlinked fractal sets can be retrieved and characterized by their fractal dimension and singularity strength [1, 2]. The spatial variability of forest fires is conditioned by an intermixture of human, topographic, meteorological and vegetation factors. This heterogeneity makes fire patterns complex scale-invariant processes difficult to be depicted by a single scale. Therefore, this study proposes an exploratory data analysis through a multifractal formalism to characterize and quantify the multiscaling behaviour of the spatial distribution pattern of this phenomenon in a complex region like the Swiss Alps. The studied dataset is represented by 2,401 georeferenced forest fire ignition points in canton Ticino, Switzerland, in a 40-years period from 1969 to 2008. Three multifractal analyses are performed: one assesses the multiscaling behaviour of fire occurrence probability of the support data (raw data) and four random patterns simulated within three different support domains; second analysis studies the multifractal behavior of patterns from anthropogenic and natural ignited fires (arson-, accident- and lightning-caused fires); and third analysis aims at detecting scale-dependency of the size of burned area. To calculate the generalized dimensions, Dq, a generalization of the box counting methods is carried out based on the generalization of Rényi information of the qth order moment of the probability distribution. For q > 0, Dq

  13. Metagenomic analysis of fungal taxa inhabiting Mecca region, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Moussa, Tarek A A; Al-Zahrani, Hassan S; Almaghrabi, Omar A; Sabry, Nevien M; Fuller, Michael P

    2016-09-01

    The data presented contains the sequences of fungal Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) and 18S rRNA gene from a metagenome of the Mecca region, Saudi Arabia. Sequences were amplified using fungal specific primers, which amplified the amplicon aligned between the 18S and 28S rRNA genes. A total of 460 fungal species belonging to 133 genera, 58 families, 33 orders, 13 classes and 4 phyla were identified in four contrasting locations. The raw sequencing data used to perform this analysis along with FASTQ file are located in the NCBI Sequence Read Archive (SRA) under accession numbers: SRR3150823, SRR3144873, SRR3150825 and SRR3150846. PMID:27508121

  14. Source-Type Identification Analysis Using Regional Seismic Moment Tensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, A.; Dreger, D. S.; Ford, S. R.; Walter, W. R.

    2012-12-01

    Waveform inversion to determine the seismic moment tensor is a standard approach in determining the source mechanism of natural and manmade seismicity, and may be used to identify, or discriminate different types of seismic sources. The successful applications of the regional moment tensor method at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and the 2006 and 2009 North Korean nuclear tests (Ford et al., 2009a, 2009b, 2010) show that the method is robust and capable for source-type discrimination at regional distances. The well-separated populations of explosions, earthquakes and collapses on a Hudson et al., (1989) source-type diagram enables source-type discrimination; however the question remains whether or not the separation of events is universal in other regions, where we have limited station coverage and knowledge of Earth structure. Ford et al., (2012) have shown that combining regional waveform data and P-wave first motions removes the CLVD-isotropic tradeoff and uniquely discriminating the 2009 North Korean test as an explosion. Therefore, including additional constraints from regional and teleseismic P-wave first motions enables source-type discrimination at regions with limited station coverage. We present moment tensor analysis of earthquakes and explosions (M6) from Lop Nor and Semipalatinsk test sites for station paths crossing Kazakhstan and Western China. We also present analyses of smaller events from industrial sites. In these sparse coverage situations we combine regional long-period waveforms, and high-frequency P-wave polarity from the same stations, as well as from teleseismic arrays to constrain the source type. Discrimination capability with respect to velocity model and station coverage is examined, and additionally we investigate the velocity model dependence of vanishing free-surface traction effects on seismic moment tensor inversion of shallow sources and recovery of explosive scalar moment. Our synthetic data tests indicate that biases in scalar

  15. Portable real time analysis system for regional cerebral blood flow

    SciTech Connect

    Tiernan, T.; Entine, G.; Stump, D.A.; Prough, D.S.

    1988-02-01

    A very portable, regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) analysis instrument system suitable for use in the operating theater during surgery is under development. Cadmium telluride (CdTe) solid state radiation detectors, an 8086 based data acquisition and communications module and a DEC Microvax computer are used so that the instrument is very compact, yet has the computational power to provide real time data analysis in the clinical environment. The instrument is currently being used at Bowman Gray School of Medicine to study rCBF during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery (CPB). Preliminary studies indicate that monitoring rCBF during this surgical procedure may provide insights into the mechanism that causes a significant fraction of these patients to suffer post operative neuropsychological deficit.

  16. High fertility regions in Bangladesh: a marriage cohort analysis.

    PubMed

    Islam, Sabina; Islam, Mohammad Amirul; Padmadas, Sabu S

    2010-11-01

    Bangladesh represents one of the few countries in south Asia where the pace of fertility decline has been unprecedented over the last three decades. Although there has been significant reduction in fertility levels at the national level, regional variations continue to persist, especially in Sylhet and Chittagong where the total fertility rates are well above the country average. Using data from three consecutive Bangladesh Demographic and Health Surveys (BDHSs) this paper assesses how fertility patterns in Sylhet and Chittagong differ from the rest of Bangladesh through a marriage cohort analysis of the parity progression ratios, and examines the factors determining the transition rates to higher parity in these two regions. Three cohorts of women are identified: those married during 1965-1974, 1975-84 and 1985-94. The results show that the probability that a woman from the recent cohort in Sylhet or Chittagong who had a third birth will have a fourth birth is nearly twice that of her counterpart in other regions. Social characteristics such as education, occupation, religion and residence have no effect on fertility in Sylhet and Chittagong. Additional period-specific analyses using the 2007 BDHS data show that women in Sylhet are considerably more likely to have a third or fourth birth sooner than those in other divisions, especially Khulna. The findings call for specific family planning policy interventions in Sylhet and Chittagong ensuring gender equity, promoting female education and delaying entry into marriage and childbearing. PMID:20868540

  17. Analysis of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis 85A antigen promoter region.

    PubMed Central

    Kremer, L; Baulard, A; Estaquier, J; Content, J; Capron, A; Locht, C

    1995-01-01

    A mycobacterial expression-secretion vector was constructed in which the Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase (phoA) reporter gene was placed under the control of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis 85A promoter and secretion signal sequences. In recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium bovis BCG, PhoA activity could readily be detected on the mycobacterial cell surface and in the culture supernatant, indicating that the 85A signals can drive heterologous expression and secretion in both species. In contrast to the mycobacteria, the 85A promoter did not function in E. coli. We mapped the promoter region by progressive deletions using BAL 31 exonuclease and by primer extension analysis. Insertion and deletion mutations within the promoter region indicated that, unlike most E. coli promoters but similar to Streptomyces promoters, the position of the putative -35 region was not critical for efficient promoter activity. In addition, we investigated the ability of the identified signals to drive the production and secretion in BCG of recombinant Schistosoma mansoni glutathione S-transferase (Sm28GST), a protective antigen against schistosomiasis. BALB/c mice immunized with the recombinant BCG by a single dose exhibited a weak but specific T-cell response to Sm28GST. PMID:7836298

  18. Alcohol policy in a Russian region: a stakeholder analysis

    PubMed Central

    Polikina, Olga; Koroleva, Natalia; Leon, David A.; McKee, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Background: Male life expectancy in the Russian Federation, at 60 years, is the lowest in Europe. Several factors contribute to this situation, but hazardous consumption of alcohol is especially a key factor. Methods: We undertook a stakeholder analysis in a typical Russian region located on the western side of the Urals. Organizations with a stake in alcohol policy in the region were identified by snowball sampling and information on their position and influence on alcohol policy was elicited from interviews with key informants. Their interests and influence were mapped and their relationships plotted. Results: Twenty-nine stakeholder organizations were identified and 43 interviews were conducted with their staff. The most influential actors were the Federal and regional governments, large beer producers and manufacturers of strong alcohols. However, the majority of organizations that might be expected to play a role in developing or implementing alcohol control policies were almost entirely disengaged and fragmented. No evidence was found of an existing or emerging multi-sectoral coalition for developing alcohol policy to improve health. Organizations that might be expected to contribute to tackling hazardous drinking had little understanding of what might be effective. Conclusions: While stakeholders with an interest in maintaining or increasing alcohol consumption are engaged and influential, those who might seek to reduce it either take a very narrow perspective or are disengaged from the policy agenda. There is a need to mobilize actors who might contribute to effective policies while challenging those who can block them. PMID:20350932

  19. A Preliminary Tsunami Vulnerability Analysis for Yenikapi Region in Istanbul

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceren Cankaya, Zeynep; Suzen, Lutfi; Cevdet Yalciner, Ahmet; Kolat, Cagil; Aytore, Betul; Zaytsev, Andrey

    2015-04-01

    One of the main requirements during post disaster recovery operations is to maintain proper transportation and fluent communication at the disaster areas. Ports and harbors are the main transportation hubs which must work with proper performance at all times especially after the disasters. Resilience of coastal utilities after earthquakes and tsunamis have major importance for efficient and proper rescue and recovery operations soon after the disasters. Istanbul is a mega city with its various coastal utilities located at the north coast of the Sea of Marmara. At Yenikapi region of Istanbul, there are critical coastal utilities and vulnerable coastal structures and critical activities occur daily. Fishery ports, commercial ports, small craft harbors, passenger terminals of intercity maritime transportation, water front commercial and/or recreational structures are some of the examples of coastal utilization which are vulnerable against marine disasters. Therefore their vulnerability under tsunami or any other marine hazard to Yenikapi region of Istanbul is an important issue. In this study, a methodology of vulnerability analysis under tsunami attack is proposed with the applications to Yenikapi region. In the study, high resolution (1m) GIS database of Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality (IMM) is used and analyzed by using GIS implementation. The bathymetry and topography database and the vector dataset containing all buildings/structures/infrastructures in the study area are obtained for tsunami numerical modeling for the study area. GIS based tsunami vulnerability assessment is conducted by applying the Multi-criteria Decision Making Analysis (MCDA). The tsunami parameters from deterministically defined worst case scenarios are computed from the simulations using tsunami numerical model NAMI DANCE. The vulnerability parameters in the region due to two different classifications i) vulnerability of buildings/structures and ii) vulnerability of (human) evacuation

  20. Analysis of national and regional landslide inventories in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervás, J.; Van Den Eeckhaut, M.

    2012-04-01

    methods only occasionally included advanced technologies such as remote sensing. With regard to the inventory maps of most databases, the analysis illustrates the high variability of scales (between 1:10 000 and 1:1 M for national inventories, and from 1:10 000 to 1:25 000 for regional inventories), landslide classification systems and representation symbology. It also shows the difficulties to precisely locate landslides referred to in historical documents only. In addition, information on landslide magnitude, geometrical characteristics and age reported in national and regional databases greatly differs, even within the same database, as it strongly depends on the objectives of the database, the data collection methods used, the resources employed and the remaining landslide expression. In particular, landslide initiation and/or reactivation dates are generally estimated in less than 25% of records, thus making hazard and hence risk assessment difficult. In most databases, scarce information on landslide impact (damage and casualties) further hinders risk assessment at regional and national scales. Estimated landslide activity, which is very relevant to early warning and emergency management, is only included in half of the national databases and restricted to part of the landslides registered. Moreover, the availability of this information is not substantially higher in regional databases than in national ones. Most landslide databases further included information on geo-environmental characteristics at the landslide site, which is very important for modelling landslide zoning. Although a number of national and regional agencies provide free web-GIS visualisation services, the potential of existing landslide databases is often not fully exploited as, in many cases, access by the general public and external researchers is restricted. Additionally, the availability of information only in the national or local language is common to most national and regional databases

  1. regioneR: an R/Bioconductor package for the association analysis of genomic regions based on permutation tests

    PubMed Central

    Gel, Bernat; Díez-Villanueva, Anna; Serra, Eduard; Buschbeck, Marcus; Peinado, Miguel A.; Malinverni, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Statistically assessing the relation between a set of genomic regions and other genomic features is a common challenging task in genomic and epigenomic analyses. Randomization based approaches implicitly take into account the complexity of the genome without the need of assuming an underlying statistical model. Summary: regioneR is an R package that implements a permutation test framework specifically designed to work with genomic regions. In addition to the predefined randomization and evaluation strategies, regioneR is fully customizable allowing the use of custom strategies to adapt it to specific questions. Finally, it also implements a novel function to evaluate the local specificity of the detected association. Availability and implementation: regioneR is an R package released under Artistic-2.0 License. The source code and documents are freely available through Bioconductor (http://www.bioconductor.org/packages/regioneR). Contact: rmalinverni@carrerasresearch.org PMID:26424858

  2. Automatic selection of region of interest for radiographic texture analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Li; Giger, Maryellen L.; Wilkie, Joel R.; Vokes, Tamara J.; Chen, Weijie; Li, Hui; Lyons, Tracy; Chinander, Michael R.; Pham, Ann

    2007-03-01

    We have been developing radiographic texture analysis (RTA) for assessing osteoporosis and the related risk of fracture. Currently, analyses are performed on heel images obtained from a digital imaging device, the GE/Lunar PIXI, that yields both the bone mineral density (BMD) and digital images (0.2-mm pixels; 12-bit quantization). RTA is performed on the image data in a region-of-interest (ROI) placed just below the talus in order to include the trabecular structure in the analysis. We have found that variations occur from manually selecting this ROI for RTA. To reduce the variations, we present an automatic method involving an optimized Canny edge detection technique and parameterized bone segmentation, to define bone edges for the placement of an ROI within the predominantly calcaneus portion of the radiographic heel image. The technique was developed using 1158 heel images and then tested on an independent set of 176 heel images. Results from a subjective analysis noted that 87.5% of ROI placements were rated as "good". In addition, an objective overlap measure showed that 98.3% of images had successful ROI placements as compared to placement by an experienced observer at an overlap threshold of 0.4. In conclusion, our proposed method for automatic ROI selection on radiographic heel images yields promising results and the method has the potential to reduce intra- and inter-observer variations in selecting ROIs for radiographic texture analysis.

  3. [Microbiological analysis of terrestrial biotopes of the Antarctic region].

    PubMed

    Tashirev, A B; Romanovskaia, V A; Rokitko, P V; Shilin, S O; Chernaia, N A; Tashireva, A A

    2010-01-01

    Microbiological analysis has been made of 120 samples from biotopes of the western coast of the Antarctic peninsula (Rasmussen cope, Tuxen cope, Waugh mountain), Argentine archipelago islands (Galindez, Skua, Corner, Barchans, Irizar, Uruguay, Cluls, Three Little Pigs, King-George), as well as neighbouring islands (Petermann--on the north, a group of Jalour islands--on the east, Berthelot--on the south-east); and more remote islands (Darboux, Lippmann, Booth). It was found out that the total number of chemoorganotrophic aerobic microorganisms was 10(6) - 10(8) cells/g of soil, that was by 2-3 orders lower than in the regions with temperate climate. One can observe a tendency of decreasing the quantity of chemoorganotrophic microorganisms in the Antartic biotopes (cells/g of a sample) in the following order: soil (1 x 10(7) - 8 x 10(8)), underground part of moss (1 x 10(6) - 5 x 10(7)), grass Deschampsia antarctica (10(6) - 10(8), slit of fresh-water reservoir (10(5) - 10(7)), ground part of moss (10(3) - 10(6)), lichens (10(3) - 10(6)). Representatives of several phylogenetic lines: Proteobacteria (genera Pseudomonas, Methylobacterium, Enterobacter), Firmicutes (genera Bacillus, Staphylococcus), Actinobacteria (genera Brevibacterium, Actinomyces, Streptomyces) have been found in the Antarctic samples. As a rule, genera of bacteria found in the Antarctic Region are widely distributed in different regions of the Earth with temperate climate. Microorganisms similar to the species Exophiala nigra (Issatsch.) Haats et de Hoog 1999, which was first detected 100 years ago by Academician B.L. Isachenko in the Arctic region water, were also isolated from biofilms on vertical rocks of the Galindez Island as well as from the soil of the Irizar Island. PMID:20455435

  4. Geophysical analysis for the Ada Tepe region (Bulgaria) - case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifonova, Petya; Metodiev, Metodi; Solakov, Dimcho; Simeonova, Stela; Vatseva, Rumiana

    2013-04-01

    According to the current archeological investigations Ada Tepe is the oldest gold mine in Europe with Late Bronze and Early Iron age. It is a typical low-sulfidation epithermal gold deposit and is hosted in Maastrichtian-Paleocene sedimentary rocks above a detachment fault contact with underlying Paleozoic metamorphic rocks. Ada Tepe (25o.39'E; 41o.25'N) is located in the Eastern Rhodope unit. The region is highly segmented despite the low altitude (470-750 m) due to widespread volcanic and sediment rocks susceptible to torrential erosion during the cold season. Besides the thorough geological exploration focused on identifying cost-effective stocks of mineral resources, a detailed geophysical analysis concernig diferent stages of the gold extraction project was accomplished. We present the main results from the geophysical investigation aimed to clarify the complex seismotectonic setting of the Ada Tepe site region. The overall study methodology consists of collecting, reviewing and estimating geophysical and seismological information to constrain the model used for seismic hazard assessment of the area. Geophysical information used in the present work consists of gravity, geomagnetic and seismological data. Interpretation of gravity data is applied to outline the axes of steep gravity transitions marked as potential axes of faults, flexures and other structures of dislocation. Direct inverse techniques are also utilized to estimate the form and depth of anomalous sources. For the purposes of seismological investigation of the Ada Tepe site region an earthquake catalogue is compiled for the time period 510BC - 2011AD. Statistical parameters of seismicity - annual seismic rate parameter, ?, and the b-value of the Gutenberg-Richter exponential relation for Ada Tepe site region, are estimated. All geophysical datasets and derived results are integrated using GIS techniques ensuring interoperability of data when combining, processing and visualizing obtained

  5. Regional Scale Analysis of Extremes in an SRM Geoengineering Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthyala, R.; Bala, G.

    2014-12-01

    Only a few studies in the past have investigated the statistics of extreme events under geoengineering. In this study, a global climate model is used to investigate the impact of solar radiation management on extreme precipitation events on regional scale. Solar constant was reduced by 2.25% to counteract the global mean surface temperature change caused by a doubling of CO2 (2XCO2) from its preindustrial control value. Using daily precipitation rates, extreme events are defined as those which exceed 99.9th percentile precipitation threshold. Extremes are substantially reduced in geoengineering simulation: the magnitude of change is much smaller than those that occur in a simulation with doubled CO2. Regional analysis over 22 Giorgi land regions is also performed. Doubling of CO2 leads to an increase in intensity of extreme (99.9th percentile) precipitation by 17.7% on global-mean basis with maximum increase in intensity over South Asian region by 37%. In the geoengineering simulation, there is a global-mean reduction in intensity of 3.8%, with a maximum reduction over Tropical Ocean by 8.9%. Further, we find that the doubled CO2 simulation shows an increase in the frequency of extremes (>50 mm/day) by 50-200% with a global mean increase of 80%. In contrast, in geo-engineering climate there is a decrease in frequency of extreme events by 20% globally with a larger decrease over Tropical Ocean by 30%. In both the climate states (2XCO2 and geo-engineering) change in "extremes" is always greater than change in "means" over large domains. We conclude that changes in precipitation extremes are larger in 2XCO2 scenario compared to preindustrial climate while extremes decline slightly in the geoengineered climate. We are also investigating the changes in extreme statistics for daily maximum and minimum temperature, evapotranspiration and vegetation productivity. Results will be presented at the meeting.

  6. Regional price targets appropriate for advanced coal extraction. [Forecasting to 1985 and 2000; USA; Regional analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Terasawa, K.L.; Whipple, D.W.

    1980-12-01

    The object of the study is to provide a methodology for predicting coal prices in regional markets for the target time frames 1985 and 2000 that could subsequently be used to guide the development of an advanced coal extraction system. The model constructed for the study is a supply and demand model that focuses on underground mining, since the advanced technology is expected to be developed for these reserves by the target years. The supply side of the model is based on coal reserve data generated by Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc. (EEA). Given this data and the cost of operating a mine (data from US Department of Energy and Bureau of Mines), the Minimum Acceptable Selling Price (MASP) is obtained. The MASP is defined as the smallest price that would induce the producer to bring the mine into production, and is sensitive to the current technology and to assumptions concerning miner productivity. Based on this information, market supply curves can then be generated. On the demand side of the model, demand by region is calculated based on an EEA methodology that emphasizes demand by electric utilities and demand by industry. The demand and supply curves are then used to obtain the price targets. This last step is accomplished by allocating the demands among the suppliers so that the combined cost of producing and transporting coal is minimized.

  7. Analysis of Regional GPS Networks in Eastern Ontario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samadi Alinia, H.; Tiampo, K. F.

    2014-12-01

    Although stable, intraplate region of eastern Canada is considered low rate deformation area in the North American plate, the retreat of large ice sheets during deglaciation in the last 20 ka has resulted in horizontal and vertical deformation of the Earth's in eastern Ontario. Present-day glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) uplift rates approach 10 mm/yr or more at Hudson Bay and decrease with distance southeastward. Current GIA models forecast that the hinge line between uplift to the northwest and subsidence to the southeast lies somewhere near the Saint Lawrence valley in eastern Canada [Tushingham and Peltier, 1991; Peltier, 2002]. Employing continuous Global Positioning System (cGPS) observations and high precision tools for processing and then analyzing each component of derived time series are important tools to monitor the associated regional crustal deformation with good accuracies. Here we describe the analysis of coordinate time series of cGPS stations scattered sparsely throughout southeastern Ontario and between Ottawa and the east coast of Hudson Bay. Here, the two most reliable local networks, each including 4 to 6 reference stations, were selected for analysis. Data for period of approximately five years, 2008-2012.9, was processed with Bernese 5.0 over several campaigns. Individual cGPS coordinate time series were generated for each station and basic parameters, such as mean, variance and repeatability, were estimated. The time series are corrected with respect to the rigid plate motion and seasonal variations and advanced time series analysis techniques, including spectral analysis and principal component analysis were implemented. Post-processing of the time series reproduces the general GIA spatial pattern. Results also show that the vertical velocities of all stations in the solution are consistent with the GIA model uplift rate and are consistent with other cGPS sites in eastern Canada and increases from north of lake of Ontario (approximately

  8. Soft tissue cephalometric analysis applied to regional Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Jay S.; Maheshwari, Sandhya; Verma, Sanjeev K.; Zahid, Syed Naved

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Importance of soft tissue consideration in establishing treatment goals for orthodontics and orthognathic surgery has been recognized and various cephalometric analysis incorporating soft tissue parameters have evolved. The great variance in soft tissue drape of the human face and perception of esthetics exists and normative data based on one population group cannot be applied to all. The study was conducted to compare the standard soft tissue cephalometric analysis (STCA) norms with norms derived for population of western Uttar Pradesh region of India. Materials and Methods: The sample consisted of lateral cephalograms taken in natural head position of 33 normal subjects (16 males, 17 females). The cephalograms were analyzed with soft tissue cephalometric analysis for orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning, and the Student's t test was used to compare the difference in means between study population and standard STCA norms. Results: Compared with established STCA norms, females in our study had steeper maxillary occlusal plane, more proclined mandibular incisors, and less protrusive lips. Both males and females showed an overall decrease in facial lengths, less prominent midface and mandibular structures and more convex profile compared with established norms for the White population. Conclusions: Statistically significant differences were found in certain key parameters of STCA for western Uttar Pradesh population when compared with established norms. PMID:24665169

  9. Regional climate network analysis from irregularly sampled satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedermann, Marc; Sykioti, Olga; Papadimitriou, Constantinos; Balasis, George; Kurths, Jürgen; Donner, Reik V.

    2016-04-01

    With the increasing availability of remote sensing data Earth System Analysis has taken a great step forward. This type of data, however, also harbors a variety of conceptual complications. First, depending on whether the satellite is orbiting on an ascending or descending path systematic biases are induced into the data, and both measurements cannot be evaluated simultaneously without an appropriate preprocessing. Second, remote sensing data are usually not produced with equidistant temporal sampling, but might contain huge gaps and irregular time steps. Third, the time period covered by the data is often too short to perform an appropriate seasonal detrending. Here, we propose a general framework to create homogeneous anomalized time series for a (multivariate) satellite data set by combining time series from ascending and descending satellite paths or even different missions using principal component and singular spectrum analysis. We then exemplarily apply our method to sea surface temperature data obtained from the SMOS satellite mission to study small-scale regional correlative patterns covering different parts of the Aegean Sea. To address the issue of irregular temporal sampling we utilize a kernel weighted version of the linear cross-correlation function to compute lagged correlations between all pairs of grid points in the data set. By binarizing the thus obtained matrices, we obtain a network representation of the system's similarity structure. Ultimately, we use tools from complex network theory to study regional interdependencies in the study area for different time lags of up to forty days. We find that the obtained networks represent well the observed average wind directions and speeds and display interaction structures between small regions in the Aegean Sea, which are in good agreement with earlier observations. In a second step, we extend the study area to the whole Mediterranean and Black Sea and investigate lagged interactions between these two

  10. Multi - Region Analysis of a New Climate Extremes Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittus, A. J.; Karoly, D. J.; Lewis, S. C.; Alexander, L. V.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, a new Climate Extremes Index (CEI) is introduced, extending the earlier combined CEI proposed by Karl et al. (1996). It is based on the use of standard extreme indices derived from daily meteorological station data, facilitating the computation of this index and making use of two global gridded extreme indices datasets. The index combines the fraction of area experiencing extreme conditions in daily temperature and daily and annual precipitation, therefore representing a combined measure of extremes. The analysis of this index at the global scale is limited by data availability. In this study, the four continental-scale regions analysed are Europe, North America, Asia and Australia over the period from 1951 to 2010. Additionally, the index is also computed for the entire Northern Hemisphere, corresponding to the first CEI results at the hemispheric scale. Results show statistically significant increases in the percentage area experiencing much above average warm days and nights and much below average cool days and nights for all regions, with the exception of North America for maximum temperature extremes. Increases in the area affected by precipitation extremes are also found for the Northern Hemisphere regions, particularly Europe. This study shows the potential of this new index for climate monitoring and other applications by documenting large-scale changes in the areas experiencing climate extremes. Preliminary detection and attribution results will also be presented using extreme indices computed for the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 climate model simulations (Sillmann et al., 2013). Karl, T. R., R. W. Knight, D. R. Easterling, and R. G. Quayle, 1996: Indices of climate change for the United States. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 77, 279-292. Sillmann, J., V. V. Kharin, X. Zhang, F. W. Zwiers, and D. Bronaugh (2013), Climate extremes indices in the CMIP5 multimodel ensemble: Part 1. Model evaluation in the present climate, J. Geophys

  11. Regional Frequency and Uncertainty Analysis of Extreme Precipitation in Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortuza, M. R.; Demissie, Y.; Li, H. Y.

    2014-12-01

    Increased frequency of extreme precipitations, especially those with multiday durations, are responsible for recent urban floods and associated significant losses of lives and infrastructures in Bangladesh. Reliable and routinely updated estimation of the frequency of occurrence of such extreme precipitation events are thus important for developing up-to-date hydraulic structures and stormwater drainage system that can effectively minimize future risk from similar events. In this study, we have updated the intensity-duration-frequency (IDF) curves for Bangladesh using daily precipitation data from 1961 to 2010 and quantified associated uncertainties. Regional frequency analysis based on L-moments is applied on 1-day, 2-day and 5-day annual maximum precipitation series due to its advantages over at-site estimation. The regional frequency approach pools the information from climatologically similar sites to make reliable estimates of quantiles given that the pooling group is homogeneous and of reasonable size. We have used Region of influence (ROI) approach along with homogeneity measure based on L-moments to identify the homogenous pooling groups for each site. Five 3-parameter distributions (i.e., Generalized Logistic, Generalized Extreme value, Generalized Normal, Pearson Type Three, and Generalized Pareto) are used for a thorough selection of appropriate models that fit the sample data. Uncertainties related to the selection of the distributions and historical data are quantified using the Bayesian Model Averaging and Balanced Bootstrap approaches respectively. The results from this study can be used to update the current design and management of hydraulic structures as well as in exploring spatio-temporal variations of extreme precipitation and associated risk.

  12. Evaluation of Regional Storage-Discharge Parameters from Recession Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, B. F.; Famiglietti, J. S.

    2014-12-01

    Subsurface storage and discharge are important components of watershed behaviors to rainfall-runoff responses. The current representations of subsurface-surface relationships are poor in land surface models; such poor representation limits the application of land surface models to evaluate current and future conjunctive water management scenarios. The aim of this research is to derive storage-discharge relationships using streamflow recession hydrograph analysis for watersheds located throughout California. Regression analyses are performed to evaluate empirical storage-discharge parameters as a function of physical watershed parameters and catchment hydrologic characteristics. We illustrate how such regional empirical evaluations provide functional relationships consistent with historic literature to develop parameters for surface-subsurface interaction in fine-resolution land surface models for California.

  13. Barcode localization with region based gradient statistical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhiyuan; Zhao, Yuming

    2015-03-01

    Barcode, as a kind of data representation method, has been adopted in a wide range of areas. Especially with the rise of the smart phone and the hand-held device equipped with high resolution camera and great computation power, barcode technique has found itself more extensive applications. In industrial field, barcode reading system is highly demanded to be robust to blur, illumination change, pitch, rotation, and scale change. This paper gives a new idea in localizing barcode under a region-based gradient statistical analysis. Making this idea as the basis, four algorithms have been developed for dealing with Linear, PDF417, Stacked 1D1D and Stacked 1D2D barcodes respectively. After being evaluated on our challenging dataset with more than 17000 images, the result shows that our methods can achieve an average localization accuracy of 82.17% with respect to 8 kinds of distortions and within an average time of 12 ms.

  14. Regionalized Lunar South Pole Surface Navigation System Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Bryan W.

    2008-01-01

    Apollo missions utilized Earth-based assets for navigation because the landings took place at lunar locations in constant view from the Earth. The new exploration campaign to the lunar south pole region will have limited Earth visibility, but the extent to which a navigation system comprised solely of Earth-based tracking stations will provide adequate navigation solutions in this region is unknown. This report presents a dilution-of-precision (DoP)-based, stationary surface navigation analysis of the performance of multiple lunar satellite constellations, Earth-based deep space network assets, and combinations thereof. Results show that kinematic and integrated solutions cannot be provided by the Earth-based deep space network stations. Also, the stationary surface navigation system needs to be operated either as a two-way navigation system or as a one-way navigation system with local terrain information, while the position solution is integrated over a short duration of time with navigation signals being provided by a lunar satellite constellation.

  15. Attainable region analysis for continuous production of second generation bioethanol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite its semi-commercial status, ethanol production from lignocellulosics presents many complexities not yet fully solved. Since the pretreatment stage has been recognized as a complex and yield-determining step, it has been extensively studied. However, economic success of the production process also requires optimization of the biochemical conversion stage. This work addresses the search of bioreactor configurations with improved residence times for continuous enzymatic saccharification and fermentation operations. Instead of analyzing each possible configuration through simulation, we apply graphical methods to optimize the residence time of reactor networks composed of steady-state reactors. Although this can be easily made for processes described by a single kinetic expression, reactions under analysis do not exhibit this feature. Hence, the attainable region method, able to handle multiple species and its reactions, was applied for continuous reactors. Additionally, the effects of the sugars contained in the pretreatment liquor over the enzymatic hydrolysis and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) were assessed. Results We obtained candidate attainable regions for separate enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation (SHF) and SSF operations, both fed with pretreated corn stover. Results show that, despite the complexity of the reaction networks and underlying kinetics, the reactor networks that minimize the residence time can be constructed by using plug flow reactors and continuous stirred tank reactors. Regarding the effect of soluble solids in the feed stream to the reactor network, for SHF higher glucose concentration and yield are achieved for enzymatic hydrolysis with washed solids. Similarly, for SSF, higher yields and bioethanol titers are obtained using this substrate. Conclusions In this work, we demonstrated the capabilities of the attainable region analysis as a tool to assess the optimal reactor network with minimum

  16. Aerosol analysis for the regional air pollution study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Jaklevic, J.M.; Gatti, R.C.; Goulding, F.S.; Loo, B.W.; Thompson, A.C.

    1980-05-01

    The design and operation of an aerosol sampling and analysis program implemented during the 1975 to 1977 St. Louis Regional Air Pollution Study is described. A network of ten samplers were operated at selected sites in the St. Louis area and the total mass and elemental composition of the collected particulates were determined. Sampling periods of 2 to 24 hours were employed. The samplers were capable of collecting aerosol particles in two distinct size ranges corresponding to fine (< 2.4 ..mu..m diameter) and coarse (> 2.4 ..mu..m diameter) particles. This unique feature allowed the separation of the particulate samples into two distinct fractions with differing chemical origins and health effects. The analysis methods were also newly developed for use in the St. Louis RAPS study. Total particulate mass was measured by a beta-particle attenuation method in which a precision of +- 5 ..mu..m/cm/sup 2/ could be obtained in a one minute measurement time. Elemental compositions of the samples were determined using an energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence method in which detectable limits of 5 ng/cm/sup 2/ or less were routinely achieved for elements ranging in atomic number from Al to Pb. The advantages of these analytical methods over more conventional techniques arise from the ability to automate the measurements. During the course of the two year study, a total of more than 35,000 individual samples were processed and a total of 28 concentrations measured for each sample.

  17. Uncertainty analysis for regional-scale reserve selection.

    PubMed

    Moilanen, Atte; Wintle, Brendan A; Elith, Jane; Burgman, Mark

    2006-12-01

    Methods for reserve selection and conservation planning often ignore uncertainty. For example, presence-absence observations and predictions of habitat models are used as inputs but commonly assumed to be without error. We applied information-gap decision theory to develop uncertainty analysis methods for reserve selection. Our proposed method seeks a solution that is robust in achieving a given conservation target, despite uncertainty in the data. We maximized robustness in reserve selection through a novel method, "distribution discounting," in which the site- and species-specific measure of conservation value (related to species-specific occupancy probabilities) was penalized by an error measure (in our study, related to accuracy of statistical prediction). Because distribution discounting can be implemented as a modification of input files, it is a computationally efficient solution for implementing uncertainty analysis into reserve selection. Thus, the method is particularly useful for high-dimensional decision problems characteristic of regional conservation assessment. We implemented distribution discounting in the zonation reserve-selection algorithm that produces a hierarchy of conservation priorities throughout the landscape. We applied it to reserve selection for seven priority fauna in a landscape in New South Wales, Australia. The distribution discounting method can be easily adapted for use with different kinds of data (e.g., probability of occurrence or abundance) and different landscape descriptions (grid or patch based) and incorporated into other reserve-selection algorithms and software. PMID:17181804

  18. A geographical analysis of air pollution in the Tucson region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diem, Jeremy Everett

    This dissertation presents a geographical analysis of air pollution in the Tucson region. Image processing, geographic information system (GIS), climatological, and statistical tools are used to develop and analyze air pollution-related databases. These databases are then used in conjunction with a limited number of spatial measurements of ozone concentrations to create accurate and theoretically sound ground-level ozone maps. High spatial resolution, gridded, multi-temporal, atmospheric emissions inventories (EIs) of ozone precursor chemical (i.e. volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and nitrogen oxides (NOx)) emissions are initially developed. GIS-driven "top-down" and "bottom-up" methods are employed to create anthropogenic VOC and NOx emissions inventories while satellite imagery and field surveys are employed to create biogenic VOC (BVOC) emissions inventories. Accounting for approximately 50% of the anthropogenic emissions, on-road vehicles are the dominant anthropogenic source. The forest and desert lands emit nearly all of the BVOCs within the entire Tucson region while exotic trees such as eucalyptus, pine, and palm emit most of the BVOCs within the City of Tucson. Relationships between VOC and NOx emissions, atmospheric conditions, and ambient ozone levels are determined by examining spatio-temporal variations in ozone levels, temporal variations in VOC and NOx emissions and atmospheric conditions, atmospheric conditions which are conducive to elevated ozone levels. In addition, the likelihood of ozone transport from Phoenix to Tucson is assessed. The highest ozone levels occur at "rural," downwind monitors, occur in August, and occur during the early afternoon hours. Atmospheric conditions conducive to elevated concentrations differ between the months while inter-city ozone transport is most likely to occur in June. Pooled, cross-sectional, times series, regression models are developed with the aid of cluster analysis and principal components analysis to

  19. Regionalization of subsurface stormflow parameters of hydrologic models: Derivation from regional analysis of streamflow recession curves

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Sheng; Li, Hongyi; Huang, Maoyi; Ali, Melkamu; Leng, Guoyong; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Wang, Shaowen; Sivapalan, Murugesu

    2014-07-21

    Subsurface stormflow is an important component of the rainfall–runoff response, especially in steep terrain. Its contribution to total runoff is, however, poorly represented in the current generation of land surface models. The lack of physical basis of these common parameterizations precludes a priori estimation of the stormflow (i.e. without calibration), which is a major drawback for prediction in ungauged basins, or for use in global land surface models. This paper is aimed at deriving regionalized parameterizations of the storage–discharge relationship relating to subsurface stormflow from a top–down empirical data analysis of streamflow recession curves extracted from 50 eastern United States catchments. Detailed regression analyses were performed between parameters of the empirical storage–discharge relationships and the controlling climate, soil and topographic characteristics. The regression analyses performed on empirical recession curves at catchment scale indicated that the coefficient of the power-law form storage–discharge relationship is closely related to the catchment hydrologic characteristics, which is consistent with the hydraulic theory derived mainly at the hillslope scale. As for the exponent, besides the role of field scale soil hydraulic properties as suggested by hydraulic theory, it is found to be more strongly affected by climate (aridity) at the catchment scale. At a fundamental level these results point to the need for more detailed exploration of the co-dependence of soil, vegetation and topography with climate.

  20. Regionalization of subsurface stormflow parameters of hydrologic models: Derivation from regional analysis of streamflow recession curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Sheng; Li, Hong-Yi; Huang, Maoyi; Ali, Melkamu; Leng, Guoyong; Leung, L. Ruby; Wang, Shao-wen; Sivapalan, Murugesu

    2014-11-01

    Subsurface stormflow is an important component of the rainfall-runoff response, especially in steep terrain. Its contribution to total runoff is, however, poorly represented in the current generation of land surface models. The lack of physical basis of these common parameterizations precludes a priori estimation of the stormflow (i.e. without calibration), which is a major drawback for prediction in ungauged basins, or for use in global land surface models. This paper is aimed at deriving regionalized parameterizations of the storage-discharge relationship relating to subsurface stormflow from a top-down empirical data analysis of streamflow recession curves extracted from 50 eastern United States catchments. Detailed regression analyses were performed between parameters of the empirical storage-discharge relationships and the controlling climate, soil and topographic characteristics. The regression analyses performed on empirical recession curves at catchment scale indicated that the coefficient of the power-law form storage-discharge relationship is closely related to the catchment hydrologic characteristics, which is consistent with the hydraulic theory derived mainly at the hillslope scale. As for the exponent, besides the role of field scale soil hydraulic properties as suggested by hydraulic theory, it is found to be more strongly affected by climate (aridity) at the catchment scale. At a fundamental level these results point to the need for more detailed exploration of the co-dependence of soil, vegetation and topography with climate.

  1. Interactive retinal blood flow analysis of the macular region.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jing; Somfai, Gábor Márk; Campagnoli, Thalmon R; Smiddy, William E; Debuc, Delia Cabrera

    2016-03-01

    The study of retinal hemodynamics plays an important role to understand the onset and progression of diabetic retinopathy. In this work, we developed an interactive retinal analysis tool to quantitatively measure the blood flow velocity (BFV) and blood flow rate (BFR) in the macular region using the Retinal Function Imager (RFI). By employing a high definition stroboscopic fundus camera, the RFI device is able to assess retinal blood flow characteristics in vivo. However, the measurements of BFV using a user-guided vessel segmentation tool may induce significant inter-observer differences and BFR is not provided in the built-in software. In this work, we have developed an interactive tool to assess the retinal BFV and BFR in the macular region. Optical coherence tomography data was registered with the RFI image to locate the fovea accurately. The boundaries of the vessels were delineated on a motion contrast enhanced image and BFV was computed by maximizing the cross-correlation of pixel intensities in a ratio video. Furthermore, we were able to calculate the BFR in absolute values (μl/s). Experiments were conducted on 122 vessels from 5 healthy and 5 mild non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) subjects. The Pearson's correlation of the vessel diameter measurements between our method and manual labeling on 40 vessels was 0.984. The intraclass correlation (ICC) of BFV between our proposed method and built-in software was 0.924 and 0.830 for vessels from healthy and NPDR subjects, respectively. The coefficient of variation between repeated sessions was reduced significantly from 22.5% to 15.9% in our proposed method (p<0.001). PMID:26569349

  2. High beta and second stability region transport and stability analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, M.H.; Phillps, M.W.; Todd, A.M.M.; Krishnaswami, J.; Hartley, R.

    1992-09-01

    This report describes ideal and resistive studies of high-beta plasmas and of the second stability region. Emphasis is focused on supershot'' plasmas in TFIR where MHD instabilities are frequently observed and which spoil their confinement properties. Substantial results are described from the analysis of these high beta poloidal plasmas. During these studies, initial pressure and safety factor profiles were obtained from the TRANSP code, which is used extensively to analyze experimental data. Resistive MBD stability studies of supershot equilibria show that finite pressure stabilization of tearing modes is very strong in these high {beta}p plasmas. This has prompted a detailed re-examination of linear tearing mode theory in which we participated in collaboration with Columbia University and General Atomics. This finite pressure effect is shown to be highly sensitive to small scale details of the pressure profile. Even when an ad hoc method of removing this stabilizing mechanism is implemented, however, it is shown that there is only superficial agreement between resistive MBD stability computation and the experimental data. While the mode structures observed experimentally can be found computationally, there is no convincing correlation with the experimental observations when the computed results are compared with a large set of supershot data. We also describe both the ideal and resistive stability properties of TFIR equilibria near the transition to the second region. It is shown that the highest {beta} plasmas, although stable to infinite-n ideal ballooning modes, can be unstable to the so called infernal'' modes associated with small shear. The sensitivity of these results to the assumed pressure and current density profiles is discussed. Finally, we describe results from two collaborative studies with PPPL. The first involves exploratory studies of the role of the 1/1 mode in tokamaks and, secondly, a study of sawtooth stabilization using ICRF.

  3. Regional analysis of changes in snow pack in mountainous basins in the central Danube region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balint, Gabor; Juričeková, Katarina; Gauzer, Balazs; Hlavčová, Kamila; Kohnová, Silvia; Szolgay, Jan; Zsideková, Beata

    2013-04-01

    investigated period also were analyses. The consistency of modelled spatial distribution of snow water equivalent also was checked by the Modis sow satellite data. The results showed a decrease in snow water equivalent and snow depth, and snow duration from the past to the present. The paper also deals with the analysis of changes in depths, duration and spatial distribution of snow cover. Daily snow cover depth observations and weekly snow water equivalent data were available at 6 climatic stations for the period 1961-2010 for the upper Hron while the last two decade sporadic observations and simulated snow depths and snow water equivalent for the entire central Danube region. It is concluded that simulated qualitative information on snow pack across the Alpine-Carpathian region can provide more information on appropriate values of melt parameters than quantitative data on snow water equivalent at a single station location. These simulations appear to provide an adequate representation of snow climatology.

  4. Analysis of Landmine Fatalities and Injuries in the Kurdistan Region.

    PubMed

    Heshmati, Almas; Khayyat, Nabaz T

    2015-09-01

    This study analyzes landmine victim data in the Kurdistan Region during the period 1960 to 2005. A regression analysis is used to identify the determinants and impact of the probability of getting killed by mines and unexploded ordnances. The rates of killed/injured victims are explained using a set of socioeconomic variables. As the data are a repeated cross-section in which the individuals are observed when they are subjected to landmine incidents, and to account for the dynamic aspect of the process and heterogeneity by location as well as to control for unobserved location and time effects, a pseudo panel data are created where districts are observed over the entire time period forming a panel data. The results show that (a) males, children, and the elderly are more susceptible to a higher level of landmine risks; (b) landmine training and awareness programs do not reduce the rate of landmine mortality; and (c) the rate of incidents are declining over time. This result can be used in the planning, monitoring, and resource allocation for mine action, as well as labor market programs and rehabilitation activities. PMID:25315481

  5. A Multispectral Analysis of the Flamsteed Region of Oceanus Procellarum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heather, D. J.; Dunkin, S. K.; Spudis, P. D.; Bussey, D. B. J.

    1999-01-01

    The Flamsteed area of Oceanus Procellarum is representative of basalts that have yet to be sampled. They studied the area in detail using telescopic data to identify seven distinct mare flows. This diversity makes the Flamsteed region an ideal candidate for Clementine multispectral studies. The region studied here is far smaller than that covered, but the higher spatial resolution of the Clementine data will allow us to make a fresh interpretation of the nature of our restricted area before expanding to encompass the surrounding regions. The primary aim of this work is to use Clementine UV-VIS data to analyze flows on a smaller scale and determine the stratigraphy of the mare, using impact craters as probes to measure the thickness of mare lavas wherever possible. We used the Clementine UV-VIS data to produce a multispectral image of the Flamsteed area from 0.60N to 16.06S and 308.34E to 317.12E. The data were processed at a resolution of 200 m/pixel using the ISIS software program (available through the USGS), and the photometric coefficients tabulated. In addition to the multispectral image, a "true color" image, FeO map using the algorithms, and a Ti02 map using the algorithms were generated. In conjunction with a 750-nm Clementine mosaic and Lunar Orbiter photographs, these images formed the dataset used for this analysis. For more details on the data-reduction procedure used, please contact the authors. The area studied here lies in the southeastern portion of Oceanus Procellarum, and covers approximately 134,500 square km, extending from the mare-highland boundary (to the south) up to and including the Flamsteed P ring. The number of spectrally distinct flows in the area is striking in the Clementine mosaics, ranging from high-Ti flows in and around Flamsteed P to low-Ti flows at the edges of the mare-highland boundaries. From a preliminary analysis, we have identified at least five flows in the multispectral image alone. Sunshine and Pieters found three

  6. Educational Computer Trends in the CEMREL Region Analysis and Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohlman, Herbert

    Central Midwestern Regional Educational Laboratory, Inc. (CEMREL) analyzed educational computer trends in the CEMREL region. Between 1967-68 and 1968-69, there was roughly a 50% increase in electronic data processing (EDP) installations. Computer and remote terminal installations also increased 50%, but the proportion of computers under school…

  7. Chromosome region-specific libraries for human genome analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Fa-Ten.

    1992-08-01

    During the grant period progress has been made in the successful demonstration of regional mapping of microclones derived from microdissection libraries; successful demonstration of the feasibility of converting microclones with short inserts into yeast artificial chromosome clones with very large inserts for high resolution physical mapping of the dissected region; Successful demonstration of the usefulness of region-specific microclones to isolate region-specific cDNA clones as candidate genes to facilitate search for the crucial genes underlying genetic diseases assigned to the dissected region; and the successful construction of four region-specific microdissection libraries for human chromosome 2, including 2q35-q37, 2q33-q35, 2p23-p25 and 2p2l-p23. The 2q35-q37 library has been characterized in detail. The characterization of the other three libraries is in progress. These region-specific microdissection libraries and the unique sequence microclones derived from the libraries will be valuable resources for investigators engaged in high resolution physical mapping and isolation of disease-related genes residing in these chromosomal regions.

  8. California Migrant Student Movement Study--Region 3 Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Benjamin G.

    The five counties of Madera, Merced, Contra Costa, San Joaquin and Stanislaus constitute Region 3 of the California Migrant Education Program. A study to evaluate movement patterns of migrant students from, to and within the state was conducted using data from the Migrant Student Record Transfer System. It indicates that in 1977 Region 3 ranked…

  9. Regional analysis of earthquake occurrence and seismic energy release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. C.

    1980-01-01

    The historic temporal variation in earthquake occurrence and seismic energy release on a regional basis throughtout the world were studied. The regionalization scheme employed divided the world into large areas based either on seismic and tectonic considerations (Flinn-Engdahl Scheme) or geographic (longitude and latitude) criteria. The data set is the wide earthquake catalog of the National Geophysical Solar-Terrestrial Data Center. An apparent relationship exists between the maximum energy released in a limited time within a seismic region and the average or background energy per year averaged over a long time period. In terms of average or peak energy release, the most seismic regions of the world during the 50 to 81 year period ending in 1977 were Japanese, Andean South American, and the Alaska-Aleutian Arc regions. The year to year fluctuations in regional seismic energy release are greater, by orders of magnitude, than the corresponding variations in the world-wide seismic energy release. The b values of seismic regions range from 0.7 to 1.4 where earthquake magnitude is in the range 6.0 to 7.5.

  10. Analysis of ac Surface Photovoltages in Accumulation Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munakata, Chusuke

    1988-05-01

    Equations for ac surface photovoltages (SPVs) excited with a chopped photon beam (PB) in the accumulation region are proposed for such semiconductors as silicon and germanium. Following the previously reported half-sided junction model for the depleted or inverted region, equations for photocurrent density and surface impedance per unit area have been newly deduced. When the surface potential is highly negative in p-type semiconductors, the maximum ac SPV in the accumulation region is limited by the conductance due to majority carrier diffusion flow. This is compared with the strong inversion region, where the mathematically maximum SPV depends upon the minority carrier diffusion flow. The voltage ratio between the two maximum ac SPVs is the same as that previously reported using the different models for dc SPVs excited with a continuous PB.

  11. National Geo-Database for Biofuel Simulations and Regional Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Zhang, Xuesong; Sahajpal, Ritvik; Manowitz, David H.

    2012-04-01

    The goal of this project undertaken by GLBRC (Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center) Area 4 (Sustainability) modelers is to develop a national capability to model feedstock supply, ethanol production, and biogeochemical impacts of cellulosic biofuels. The results of this project contribute to sustainability goals of the GLBRC; i.e. to contribute to developing a sustainable bioenergy economy: one that is profitable to farmers and refiners, acceptable to society, and environmentally sound. A sustainable bioenergy economy will also contribute, in a fundamental way, to meeting national objectives on energy security and climate mitigation. The specific objectives of this study are to: (1) develop a spatially explicit national geodatabase for conducting biofuel simulation studies; (2) model biomass productivity and associated environmental impacts of annual cellulosic feedstocks; (3) simulate production of perennial biomass feedstocks grown on marginal lands; and (4) locate possible sites for the establishment of cellulosic ethanol biorefineries. To address the first objective, we developed SENGBEM (Spatially Explicit National Geodatabase for Biofuel and Environmental Modeling), a 60-m resolution geodatabase of the conterminous USA containing data on: (1) climate, (2) soils, (3) topography, (4) hydrography, (5) land cover/ land use (LCLU), and (6) ancillary data (e.g., road networks, federal and state lands, national and state parks, etc.). A unique feature of SENGBEM is its 2008-2010 crop rotation data, a crucially important component for simulating productivity and biogeochemical cycles as well as land-use changes associated with biofuel cropping. We used the EPIC (Environmental Policy Integrated Climate) model to simulate biomass productivity and environmental impacts of annual and perennial cellulosic feedstocks across much of the USA on both croplands and marginal lands. We used data from LTER and eddy-covariance experiments within the study region to test the

  12. Frequency analysis of multispectral photoacoustic images for differentiating malignant region from normal region in excised human prostate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Saugata; Rao, Navalgund A.; Valluru, Keerthi S.; Chinni, Bhargava K.; Dogra, Vikram S.; Helguera, Maria

    2014-03-01

    Frequency domain analysis of the photoacoustic (PA) radio frequency signals can potentially be used as a tool for characterizing microstructure of absorbers in tissue. This study investigates the feasibility of analyzing the spectrum of multiwavelength PA signals generated by excised human prostate tissue samples to differentiate between malignant and normal prostate regions. Photoacoustic imaging at five different wavelengths, corresponding to peak absorption coefficients of deoxyhemoglobin, whole blood, oxyhemoglobin, water and lipid in the near infrared (NIR) (700 nm - 1000 nm) region, was performed on freshly excised prostate specimens taken from patients undergoing prostatectomy for biopsy confirmed prostate cancer. The PA images were co-registered with the histopathology images of the prostate specimens to determine the region of interest (ROI) corresponding to malignant and normal tissue. The calibrated power spectrum of each PA signal from a selected ROI was fit to a linear model to extract the corresponding slope, midband fit and intercept parameters. The mean value of each parameter corresponding to malignant and adjacent normal prostate ROI was calculated for each of the five wavelengths. The results obtained for 9 different human prostate specimens, show that the mean values of midband fit and intercept are significantly different between malignant and normal regions. In addition, the average midband fit and intercept values show a decreasing trend with increasing wavelength. These preliminary results suggest that frequency analysis of multispectral PA signals can be used to differentiate malignant region from the adjacent normal region in human prostate tissue.

  13. Mutational analysis of the pseudoknot region in the 3' noncoding region of tobacco mosaic virus RNA.

    PubMed

    Takamatsu, N; Watanabe, Y; Meshi, T; Okada, Y

    1990-08-01

    The approximately 200-nucleotide-long 3'-terminal noncoding region of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) RNA contains a tRNA-like structure and, in its immediate upstream region, three consecutive pseudoknots, each of which is composed of two double-helical segments. To elucidate the biological functions of the pseudoknot region, we constructed several deletion mutant TMV-L (a tomato strain) RNAs by using an in vitro transcription system and tested their ability to multiply in both tobacco plants and protoplasts. When deletions were introduced just downstream of the termination codon of the coat protein gene in the 5'-to-3' direction progressively, five of six double-helical segments were dispensable for viral multiplication, indicating that the pseudoknot structures are not essential for multiplication. However, extension of the deletion into the central pseudoknot region resulted in reduction in viral multiplication, accompanied by loss of development of mosaic symptoms on systemic tobacco plants. Cessation of multiplication was observed when the sequence involved in formation of double-helical segment I just upstream of the tRNA-like structure was deleted irrespective of the start point and extent of deletion. Point mutations that destabilized double-helical segment I resulted in a loss or great reduction of viral multiplication, whereas the double mutants in which the double helix was restored by additional compensating base substitutions restored multiplication to nearly the wild-type level. Thus, double-helical segment I just upstream of the tRNA-like structure is a structural feature essential for viral multiplication. PMID:2370679

  14. Analysis of Food Pairing in Regional Cuisines of India

    PubMed Central

    Bagler, Ganesh

    2015-01-01

    Any national cuisine is a sum total of its variety of regional cuisines, which are the cultural and historical identifiers of their respective regions. India is home to a number of regional cuisines that showcase its culinary diversity. Here, we study recipes from eight different regional cuisines of India spanning various geographies and climates. We investigate the phenomenon of food pairing which examines compatibility of two ingredients in a recipe in terms of their shared flavor compounds. Food pairing was enumerated at the level of cuisine, recipes as well as ingredient pairs by quantifying flavor sharing between pairs of ingredients. Our results indicate that each regional cuisine follows negative food pairing pattern; more the extent of flavor sharing between two ingredients, lesser their co-occurrence in that cuisine. We find that frequency of ingredient usage is central in rendering the characteristic food pairing in each of these cuisines. Spice and dairy emerged as the most significant ingredient classes responsible for the biased pattern of food pairing. Interestingly while individual spices contribute to negative food pairing, dairy products on the other hand tend to deviate food pairing towards positive side. Our data analytical study highlighting statistical properties of the regional cuisines, brings out their culinary fingerprints that could be used to design algorithms for generating novel recipes and recipe recommender systems. It forms a basis for exploring possible causal connection between diet and health as well as prospection of therapeutic molecules from food ingredients. Our study also provides insights as to how big data can change the way we look at food. PMID:26430895

  15. Analysis of Food Pairing in Regional Cuisines of India.

    PubMed

    Jain, Anupam; N K, Rakhi; Bagler, Ganesh

    2015-01-01

    Any national cuisine is a sum total of its variety of regional cuisines, which are the cultural and historical identifiers of their respective regions. India is home to a number of regional cuisines that showcase its culinary diversity. Here, we study recipes from eight different regional cuisines of India spanning various geographies and climates. We investigate the phenomenon of food pairing which examines compatibility of two ingredients in a recipe in terms of their shared flavor compounds. Food pairing was enumerated at the level of cuisine, recipes as well as ingredient pairs by quantifying flavor sharing between pairs of ingredients. Our results indicate that each regional cuisine follows negative food pairing pattern; more the extent of flavor sharing between two ingredients, lesser their co-occurrence in that cuisine. We find that frequency of ingredient usage is central in rendering the characteristic food pairing in each of these cuisines. Spice and dairy emerged as the most significant ingredient classes responsible for the biased pattern of food pairing. Interestingly while individual spices contribute to negative food pairing, dairy products on the other hand tend to deviate food pairing towards positive side. Our data analytical study highlighting statistical properties of the regional cuisines, brings out their culinary fingerprints that could be used to design algorithms for generating novel recipes and recipe recommender systems. It forms a basis for exploring possible causal connection between diet and health as well as prospection of therapeutic molecules from food ingredients. Our study also provides insights as to how big data can change the way we look at food. PMID:26430895

  16. A Cytogenetic Analysis of Chromosomal Region 31 of Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Clegg, N. J.; Whitehead, I. P.; Brock, J. K.; Sinclair, D. A.; Mottus, R.; Stromotich, G.; Harrington, M. J.; Grigliatti, T. A.

    1993-01-01

    Cytogenetic region 31 of the second chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster was screened for recessive lethal mutations. One hundred and thirty nine new recessive lethal alleles were isolated that fail to complement Df(2L)J2 (31A-32A). These new alleles, combined with preexisting mutations in the region, define 52 complementation groups, 35 of which have not previously been described. Among the new mutations were alleles of the cdc2 and mfs(2)31 genes. Six new deficiencies were also isolated and characterized identifying 16 deficiency subintervals within region 31. The new deficiencies were used to further localize three loci believed to encode non-histone chromosomal proteins. Suvar(2)1/Su(var)214, a dominant suppressor of position-effect variegation (PEV), maps to 31A-B, while the recessive suppressors of PEV mfs(2)31 and wdl were localized to regions 31E and 31F-32A, respectively. In addition, the cytological position of several mutations that interact with heterochromatin were more precisely defined. PMID:8514131

  17. Analysis of Projected Changes in Precipitation Regions of Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbas, Abdullah; Turp, M. Tufan; Ozturk, Tugba; Kurnaz, M. Levent

    2016-04-01

    Classification and clustering are important issues in climatology studies for water management. In this study, we examine the precipitation regions of Turkey with combination of the regional climate model outputs with a hierarchical cluster technique. Therefore, the outputs of the HadGEM2-ES global climate model of the Met Office Hadley Centre were downscaled to 50 km for Turkey via Regional Climate Model (RegCM4.4) of the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) for the period of 2070 - 2100 with respect to the present period of 1970 - 2000 under two distinct case scenarios (i.e. RCP4.5 and RCP8.5). Thereafter, Ward's method, which is commonly used in climate research, was also performed in order to cluster the precipitation data. In this context, spatial variations in precipitation regions of Turkey were determined for different climate change pathways. This research has been supported by Boǧaziçi University Research Fund Grant Number 10421.

  18. Transportation analysis for the concept of regional repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Joy, D.S.; Hudson, B.J.

    1980-06-01

    Over the past several years, planning associated with the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) program assumed the use of one or two large, centrally located repository facilities. Recently, an alternative approach has been proposed which consists of the use of multiple, smaller regional repositories. In this report, several regional concepts were studied and the transportation requirements for the shipment of spent fuel to the regional repositories were estimated. In general, the transportation requirements decrease as the number of repositories increase. However, as far as transportation is concerned, the point of diminishing returns is reached at approximately one repository in each of three to four regions. Additional savings beyond this point are small. A series of sensitivity studies is also included to demonstrate the impact on the total transportation requirements of varying cask capacity, rail speed, or truck speed. Since most of the projected fuel shipments are to be made by rail, varying the capacity of the rail cask or varying average rail transport speed will have a major effect on overall transportation requirements.

  19. Statistical Analysis of Regional Surface Water Quality in Southeastern Ontario.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodo, Byron A.

    1992-01-01

    Historical records from Ontario's Provincial Water Quality Monitoring Network for rivers and streams were analyzed to assess the feasibility of mapping regional water quality patterns in southeastern Ontario, spanning the Precambrian Shield and the St. Lawrence Lowlands. The study served as a model for much of Ontario. (54 references) (Author/MDH)

  20. Findings of the Mars Special Regions Science Analysis Group

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beaty, D.W.; Buxbaum, K.L.; Meyer, M.A.; Barlow, N.; Boynton, W.; Clark, B.; Deming, J.; Doran, P.T.; Edgett, K.; Hancock, S.; Head, J.; Hecht, M.; Hipkin, V.; Kieft, T.; Mancinelli, R.; McDonald, E.; McKay, C.; Mellon, M.; Newsom, H.; Ori, G.; Paige, D.; Schuerger, A.C.; Sogin, M.; Spry, J.A.; Steele, A.; Tanaka, K.; Voytek, M.

    2006-01-01

    In summary, within the upper 5 m most of Mars is either too cold or too dry to support the propagation of terrestrial life. However, there are regions that are in disequilibrium, naturally or induced, and could be classified as "special" or, if enough uncertainty exist, could not be declared as "non-special." ?? Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

  1. DURABILILTY ANALYSIS OF POTHOLE PATCHING MIXTURE IN SNOWY REGIONS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Kiyoshi; Kaito, Kiyoyuki; Fujiwara, Eigo; Mori, Hisashi; Yamamoto, Shingo; Fujioka, Yoshiyuki; Yamada, Masaru

    On the pavement in snowy regions, water spray is carried out as a snow removal activity in winter. Therefore in most cases, pavement surface is in water-soaked condition, and it causes the occurrence of a lot of potholes. Usually, for the potholes, urgent repair is immediately conducted using patching mixtures. However under these circumstances, the patching mixture falls away soon due to the constraint in the construction works. Consequently, as for the maintenance in snowy regions, it is important to develop the optimal repair method or patching mixture material for such regions. In order to provide the basic investigation of this issue, this study statistically evaluates the durability of the patching mixtures of potholes. Concretely, the occurrence process of potholes are modeled by the Weibull hazard model, and the durability performance of the patching mixtures is veried by estimating the hazard model based on the inspection data of actual potholes on the national road in snowy regions and monitoring data after repairing them.

  2. Analysis of the cathodic region of atmospheric pressure discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, H.; Riemann, K.-U.

    2002-07-01

    The cathodic region of atmospheric pressure arcs is dominated by a number of different mechanisms. This makes a theoretical model extremely difficult. A description of this region based on fundamental physical principles is given. Using a previously published model of the inhomogeneous boundary layer of a Saha plasma (Schmitz H and Riemann K-U 2001 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 34 1193), the description is set on a firm theoretical basis. A number of equations including the energy balances of plasma boundary and cathode body lead to a maximum closure of the system. The values for the boundary conditions toward the plasma column could be motivated by a simple minimum principle argument thus eliminating all arbitrary fitting parameters. Results are given for a variety of external parameters and three different discharge gases. The comparison with experimental results shows excellent agreement.

  3. Curie Depth Analysis of the Salton Sea Region, Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickus, Kevin; Hussein, Musa

    2016-02-01

    Aeromagnetic data were analyzed to determine the bottom of magnetic bodies that might be related to the Curie point depth (CPD) by 2D spectral and 3D inversion methods within the Salton Trough and the surrounding region in southern California. The bottom of the magnetic bodies for 55 × 55 km windows varied in depth between 11 and 23 km in depth using 2D spectral methods. Since the 55 × 55 km square window may include both shallow and deep source, a 3D inversion method was used to provide better resolution of the bottom of the magnetic bodies. The 3D models indicate the depth to the bottom of the magnetic bodies varied between 5 and 23 km. Even though both methods produced similar results, the 3D inversion method produced higher resolution of the CPD depths. The shallowest depths (5-8 km) occur along and west of the Brawley Seismic Zone and the southwestern portion of the Imperial Valley. The source of these shallow CPD values may be related to geothermal systems including hydrothermal circulation and/or partially molten material. Additionally, shallow CPD depths (7-12 km) were found in a northwest-trending zone in the center of the Salton Trough. These depths coincide with previous seismic analyses that indicated a lower crustal low velocity region which is believed to be caused by partially molten material. Lower velocity zones in several regions may be related to fracturing and/or hydrothermal fluids. If the majority of these shallow depths are related to temperature, they are likely associated with the CPD, and the partially molten material extends over a wider zone than previously known. Greater depths within the Salton Trough coincide with the base of basaltic material and/or regions of intense metamorphism intruded by mafic material in the middle/lower crust.

  4. Analysis of human accelerated DNA regions using archaic hominin genomes.

    PubMed

    Burbano, Hernán A; Green, Richard E; Maricic, Tomislav; Lalueza-Fox, Carles; de la Rasilla, Marco; Rosas, Antonio; Kelso, Janet; Pollard, Katherine S; Lachmann, Michael; Pääbo, Svante

    2012-01-01

    Several previous comparisons of the human genome with other primate and vertebrate genomes identified genomic regions that are highly conserved in vertebrate evolution but fast-evolving on the human lineage. These human accelerated regions (HARs) may be regions of past adaptive evolution in humans. Alternatively, they may be the result of non-adaptive processes, such as biased gene conversion. We captured and sequenced DNA from a collection of previously published HARs using DNA from an Iberian Neandertal. Combining these new data with shotgun sequence from the Neandertal and Denisova draft genomes, we determine at least one archaic hominin allele for 84% of all positions within HARs. We find that 8% of HAR substitutions are not observed in the archaic hominins and are thus recent in the sense that the derived allele had not come to fixation in the common ancestor of modern humans and archaic hominins. Further, we find that recent substitutions in HARs tend to have come to fixation faster than substitutions elsewhere in the genome and that substitutions in HARs tend to cluster in time, consistent with an episodic rather than a clock-like process underlying HAR evolution. Our catalog of sequence changes in HARs will help prioritize them for functional studies of genomic elements potentially responsible for modern human adaptations. PMID:22412940

  5. Development of a Regional Routing Model for Strategic Waterway Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Southworth, Frank; Peterson, Bruce E; Lambert, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    The NETS (Navigation Economics Technologies) suite of models is being developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to bring new analytic tools to the process of evaluating and planning navigation investments. A hierarchical and potentially iterative approach consisting of three levels, or tiers, has been proposed, one that moves from a broad regional and global geography in Tier 1, down to a detailed, project and facility specific level of detail in Tier 3. This paper describes the construction a commodity flows database to support Tier 2 modeling. Called the Regional Routing Model, it takes spatial disaggregations of broad regionally forecasts of commodity flows to a point where they can be assigned to specific modes and routes over the U.S. transportation network. The paper describes the model structure and how it is being tied closely to a multi-source database constructed to support base year model calibration. A goal for the model is to be able to measure the effects on flows and transportation costs of changes to either the capacity of the transportation network or to the volumes of goods produced and consumed. Some preliminary results are shown.

  6. Analysis of pumping-induced unsaturated regions beneath aperennial river

    SciTech Connect

    Su, G.W.; Jasperse, J.; Seymour, D.; Constantz, J.; Zhou, Q.

    2007-05-15

    The presence of an unsaturated region beneath a streambedduring groundwater pumping near streams reduces the pumping capacity whenit reaches the well screens, changes flow paths, and alters the types ofbiological transformations in the streambed sediments. Athree-dimensional, multi-phase flow model of two horizontal collectorwells along the Russian River near Forestville, California was developedto investigate the impact of varying the ratio of the aquifer tostreambed permeability on (1) the formation of an unsaturated regionbeneath the stream, (2) the pumping capacity, (3) stream-water fluxesthrough the streambed, and (4) stream-water travel times to the collectorwells. The aquifer to streambed permeability ratio at which theunsaturated region was initially observed ranged from 10 to 100. The sizeof the unsaturated region beneath the streambed increased as the aquiferto streambed permeability ratio increased. The simulations also indicatedthat for a particular aquifer permeability, decreasing the streambedpermeability by only a factor of 2-3 from the permeability wheredesaturation initially occurred resulted in reducing the pumpingcapacity. In some cases, the stream-water fluxes increased as thestreambed permeability decreased. However, the stream water residencetimes increased and the fraction of stream water that reached that thewells decreased as the streambed permeability decreased, indicating thata higher streambed flux does not necessarily correlate to greaterrecharge of stream water around the wells.

  7. Analysis of Human Accelerated DNA Regions Using Archaic Hominin Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Burbano, Hernán A.; Green, Richard E.; Maricic, Tomislav; Lalueza-Fox, Carles; de la Rasilla, Marco; Rosas, Antonio; Kelso, Janet; Pollard, Katherine S.; Lachmann, Michael; Pääbo, Svante

    2012-01-01

    Several previous comparisons of the human genome with other primate and vertebrate genomes identified genomic regions that are highly conserved in vertebrate evolution but fast-evolving on the human lineage. These human accelerated regions (HARs) may be regions of past adaptive evolution in humans. Alternatively, they may be the result of non-adaptive processes, such as biased gene conversion. We captured and sequenced DNA from a collection of previously published HARs using DNA from an Iberian Neandertal. Combining these new data with shotgun sequence from the Neandertal and Denisova draft genomes, we determine at least one archaic hominin allele for 84% of all positions within HARs. We find that 8% of HAR substitutions are not observed in the archaic hominins and are thus recent in the sense that the derived allele had not come to fixation in the common ancestor of modern humans and archaic hominins. Further, we find that recent substitutions in HARs tend to have come to fixation faster than substitutions elsewhere in the genome and that substitutions in HARs tend to cluster in time, consistent with an episodic rather than a clock-like process underlying HAR evolution. Our catalog of sequence changes in HARs will help prioritize them for functional studies of genomic elements potentially responsible for modern human adaptations. PMID:22412940

  8. Analysis methods for Thematic Mapper data of urban regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, S. C.

    1984-01-01

    Studies have indicated the difficulty in deriving a detailed land-use/land-cover classification for heterogeneous metropolitan areas with Landsat MSS and TM data. The major methodological issues of digital analysis which possibly have effected the results of classification are examined. In response to these methodological issues, a multichannel hierarchical clustering algorithm has been developed and tested for a more complete analysis of the data for urban areas.

  9. a Multivariate Statistical Analysis of Visibility at California Regions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motallebi, Nehzat

    This study summarizes the results of a comprehensive study of visibility in California. California is one of the few states that has promulgated air quality standards for visibility. The study was concerned not only with major metropolitan areas such as Los Angeles, but also with deterioration of visibility in the less urbanized areas of California. The relationships among visibility reduction, atmospheric pollutants, and meteorological conditions were examined by using the multivariate statistical techniques of principal component analysis and multiple linear regression analysis. The primary concern of this work was to find which of the many atmospheric constituents most effectively reduce visibility, and to determine the role of the different meteorological variables on these relationships. Another objective was to identify the major pollutant sources and transport routes which contribute to visibility degradation. In order to establish the relationship between the light scattering coefficient and particulate data, both the size distribution and the elemental composition of particulate aerosols were considered. Meanwhile, including meteorological parameters in the principal component analysis made it possible to investigate meteorological effects on the observed pollution patterns. The associations among wind direction, elemental concentration, and additional meteorological parameters were considered by using a special modification of principal component analysis. This technique can identify all of the main features, and provides reasonable source direction for particular elements. It is appropriate to note that there appeared to be no published accounts of a principal component analysis for a data set similar to that analyzed in this work. Finally, the results of the multivariate statistical analyses, multiple linear regression analysis and principal component analysis, indicate that intermediate size sulfur containing aerosols, sulfur size mode 0.6 (mu)m < D

  10. Anthropogenic Aerosol Dimming Over Oceans: A Regional Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallafior, T. N.; Folini, D.; Knutti, R.; Wild, M.

    2015-12-01

    The role of anthropogenic aerosols in shaping 20th century SSTs through alteration of surface solar radiation (SSR) is still subject to debate. Identifying and quantifying the relationship between aerosol-induced changes in SSR and the corresponding SST response is difficult due to the masking effect of numerous feedback mechanisms and general variability of the atmosphere-ocean system. We therefore analysed potential anthropogenic aerosol effects on SST with a cascade of experiments of increasing complexity: From atmosphere-only over mixed-layer ocean (MLO) experiments, to fully coupled transient ocean-atmosphere simulations, with and without greenhouse gases and / or aerosols, using the general circulation model ECHAM with explicit aerosol representation. We find anthropogenic aerosols to be crucial to obtain realistic SSR and SST patterns, although co-location of changes in individual variables (aerosol optical depth, SSR, SST) is weak. The effect of greenhouse gases and aerosols in the MLO simulations is essentially additive on global and regional scales, an assumption frequently made in the literature. With atmosphere-only simulations we identified regions most prone to anthropogenic aerosol dimming throughout the 20th century using a strict criterion. From MLO equilibria representative of different decades throughout the 20th century, we identified ocean regions, whose SSTs are most sensitive to changing anthropogenic aerosol emissions. The surface temperature response patterns in our MLO simulations are more sensitive towards the choice of prescribed deep-ocean heat flux if anthropogenic aerosols were included as compared to greenhouse gas only simulations. This implies that ocean dynamics might mask some of the response and cautions against the use of just one set of deep-ocean heat fluxes in MLO studies. Our results corroborate not only the relevance of anthropogenic aerosols for SST responses, but also highlight the complexity and non-locality of the

  11. Surface Texture Analysis of Enceladus' South Polar Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, J. P.; Buratti, B. J.; Hicks, M.; Mosher, J.; Landry, B.

    2009-12-01

    The Cassini spacecraft's discovery of active plumes at the south pole of Enceladus on its July 2006 flyby has sparked greater interest in both its internal and external physical and chemical properties. We choose to investigate the macroscopic surface texture of this active south polar region by implementing a surface roughness model developed by Buratti and Veverka (1985). The model requires intensity scans of Enceladus's surface and two unknown parameters: a scattering parameter A that indicates whether single or diffuse scattering is occurring, and a surface phase function f (α) that reflects changes in intensity due to various factors such as the single scattering albedo and the single particle phase function. The output is a quantitative description of surface roughness through a depth-to-radius ratio q. After fitting the model to the data, we find that plains north of the “tiger stripes” are fairly smooth, with preliminary values for q of around 0.08. Meanwhile, the stripes themselves are only slightly more rough, with preliminary values for q of around 0.10. These results strongly suggest in-filled coating of craters with water-ice throughout the entire south polar region of Enceladus. Furthermore, the model surface roughness of Enceladus does not appear to be sensitive to the choice of our photometric function, as changing A has little effect on q.

  12. Turbulence in the Earth's cusp region: k-filtering analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T.; Cao, J.; Fu, H.; Liu, W.

    2013-12-01

    On April 13 2002, four Cluster spacecraft with separation up to 127 km measured similar turbulence in the Earth's mid-altitude cusp region during southward IMF Bz. Using the k-filtering technique, we obtain the propagation angle and dispersion relation of the turbulence. The propagation angle is quite large and ranges from 80° to 92°, meaning that the turbulence propagates perpendicularly to the background magnetic field. By comparing the dispersion relationship with the linear solution of the Vlasov kinetic theory obtained by WHAMP, we conclude that the turbulence is Kinetic Alfvén mode (KAWs). The regions of KAWs are located within an inhomogeneous high density plasma background, suggesting that it is the ion drift, not field aligned ion beam that plays an important role in the wave generation. The magnetic flied fluctuation spectrum resembles the classical Kolmogorov power law under the proton gyrofrequency ωci, but breaks and steepens near ωci, indicating that the KAW may be powered by a turbulent cascade transverse to the magnetic field from large MHD scales to proton gyroradius scales.

  13. Chromosome region-specific libraries for human genome analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Fa-Ten.

    1991-01-01

    We have made important progress since the beginning of the current grant year. We have further developed the microdissection and PCR- assisted microcloning techniques using the linker-adaptor method. We have critically evaluated the microdissection libraries constructed by this microtechnology and proved that they are of high quality. We further demonstrated that these microdissection clones are useful in identifying corresponding YAC clones for a thousand-fold expansion of the genomic coverage and for contig construction. We are also improving the technique of cloning the dissected fragments in test tube by the TDT method. We are applying both of these PCR cloning technique to human chromosomes 2 and 5 to construct region-specific libraries for physical mapping purposes of LLNL and LANL. Finally, we are exploring efficient procedures to use unique sequence microclones to isolate cDNA clones from defined chromosomal regions as valuable resources for identifying expressed gene sequences in the human genome. We believe that we are making important progress under the auspices of this DOE human genome program grant and we will continue to make significant contributions in the coming year. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Regional analysis of convective systems during the West African monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guy, Bradley Nicholas

    characteristics (e.g. total precipitation and vertical reflectivity profiles) at the inland and maritime sites. The wave regime also resulted in an increased population of the largest observed mesoscale convective systems observed near the coast, which led to an increase in stratiform precipitation. Despite this increase, differentiation of convective strength characteristics was less obvious between wave and no-wave regimes at the coast. Due to the propagating nature of these advecting mesoscale convective systems, interaction with the regional thermodynamic and dynamic environment appears to result in more variability than enhancements due to the wave regime, independent of location. A 13-year (1998-2010) climatology of mesoscale convective characteristics associated with the West African monsoon are also investigated using precipitation radar and passive microwave data from the NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite. Seven regions defined as continental northeast and northwest, southeast and southwest, coastal, and maritime north and south are compared to analyze zonal and meridional differences. Data are categorized according to identified African easterly wave (AEW) phase and when no wave is present. While some enhancements are observed in association with AEW regimes, regional differences were generally more apparent than wave vs. no-wave differences. Convective intensity metrics confirm that land-based systems exhibit stronger characteristics, such as higher storm top and maximum 30-dBZ heights and significant 85-GHz brightness temperature depressions. Continental systems also contain a lower fraction of points identified as stratiform. Results suggest that precipitation processes also varied depending upon region and AEW regime, with warm-rain processes more apparent over the ocean and the southwest continental region and ice-based microphysics more dominant over land, including mixed-phase processes. AEW regimes did show variability in stratiform fraction and

  15. Statistical analysis of geodetic networks for detecting regional events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Granat, Robert

    2004-01-01

    We present an application of hidden Markov models (HMMs) to analysis of geodetic time series in Southern California. Our model fitting method uses a regularized version of the deterministic annealing expectation-maximization algorithm to ensure that model solutions are both robust and of high quality.

  16. The Environment Analysis in the CE-3 Landing Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, L.; Liu, J.; Zeng, X.; Gao, X.; Yan, W.; Zou, X.; Li, C.

    2014-12-01

    To understand the environment and select detecting objects for the Yutu Rover, NAOC used the DEM and DOM data obtained by CE-2, geological data released by USGS, and high resolution image captured by CE-3 and LRO-NAC to analyze the topographical characteristic, geologic age, Geomorphological feathers and new dust distribution in two scale levels. The first level is 45km×75km, and another one is 4km×4km. The center of the study region is the CE-3 landing site (19.51°W, 44.12°N). The following is the initial conclusions: (1) CE-3 landed on a relatively flat region in the Mare Imbrium with an elevation of -2615m. The geological age of the landing site belongs to young Eratoshenian. 10km to the north of the landing site is the older Mare Imbrium stratum, and the location of the landing site is just on the intersection area of these two stratums. (2) The landing site lies on the edge of a lunar mountain with a decline tendency from west to east, and the topographic slope and roughness of the landing region is low, which is the typical characteristic of lunar mare. There is a big crater with diameter of 430 meters in the west of the landing site, and lots of stones in different colors on the rim of this crater, shown in the Figure2. (3) By comparing the images captured by LRO-NAC before and after the landing, much lunar dust was blown away by the engine plume during the landing of CE-3. The change scope is about 60m with from east-west and 135m length from south-north. The direction of landing is from south-north, so the length is larger than the width, shown in the figure 3. (4) In the initial stage, the Yutu Rover was suggested to move in south direction and late in north direction, which would get more scientific data and result.

  17. Updating our understanding of "Special Regions" on Mars: The second MEPAG Special Regions Science Analysis Group (SR-SAG2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rummel, J. D.; Beaty, D. W.; Jones, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    A committee of the Mars Exploration Planning and Analysis Group (MEPAG) has reviewed and updated the description of Special Regions on Mars, defined in the COSPAR Planetary Protection Policy as places where Earth organisms might replicate (the basis of this study), or that have a high potential for the existence of extant martian life forms (not the basis of this study). The review and update was conducted by an international team, drawn from both the biological science and Mars exploration communities, to understand when and where Special Regions could, and likely do, occur. The study applied recently available data about Mars environments and about Earth organisms, building on a previous analysis of Mars Special Regions (2006) undertaken by a similar team. Since then, a large new body of highly relevant data has been generated from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (launched 2005), Phoenix (2007), and from Mars Express and the twin MER landers (all 2003). Additional results were also gleaned from the Mars Science Laboratory (2011). In addition to Mars data, there is a considerable body of new data regarding the known environmental limits to life on Earth—including the potential for terrestrial microbial life to survive and replicate under martian environmental conditions. The analysis of Mars Special Regions included: 1. An extensive analysis of both new and previously unavailable data regarding the environmental limits of life on Earth, including both experimental results and environmental observations; 2. An examination of extensive post-2006 observational data sets, including high spacial and temporal resolution data from orbit and new data from landed spacecraft; 3. New models of Mars relevant to natural environmental variation in water activity and temperature; 4. Review and reconsideration of the current parameters used to define Special Regions; and 5. Updated maps and descriptions of the Mars environments that are recommended for treatment as "uncertain

  18. [Preliminary analysis of smoking habit in firefighters of Wielkopolska region].

    PubMed

    Witt, Magdalena; Romańczukiewicz, Joanna

    2006-01-01

    Professional performance of firefighters causes high level of stress. This results in certain activities meant to lower a stress level, some of which are harmful to individuals health per se--smoking is a classical example here. This work was aimed at assessment of prevalence and style of smoking in the group of 69 professional firefighters of Wielkopolska region. Parameters studied were: prevalence, awareness of health-hazard, extent of nicotin addiction, motivation to quit with habit. Motivation to start smoking and further development of smoking habit as well as influence of environment was also studied. Since smoking presents a medical and social problem in this group of professionals, educative measures aimed at reduction of stress level and bad habit fighting should be undertaken. PMID:17288226

  19. Seismotectonic Analysis for the KZN region of South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, M.

    2012-04-01

    Recently, devastating earthquakes and tsunamis have shocked the modern world (Japan [April 7 2011, Mw 9.0, loss of life and destruction of infrastructure, 15,457 deaths 5,389 injured, US300billion loss (Japanese National Police Agency 2011)], New Zealand [21 February 2011, Mw 6.3, 148 killed], Haiti [12 January 2010, Mw 7.0, estimated 316 000 killed and 300 000 injured]. These earthquakes have caused large scale damage to the built environment not to mention the high number of fatalities. The KZN coastal region is also fast developing especially towards the north of Durban CBD (Cornubia [New development near Umhlanga, 25 Billion Rands investment], Gateway/Umhlanga Business District, Moses Mabida Stadium (cost of R3.4 billion ), King Shaka International Airport at a cost of R6.8 billion, Dube Tradeport to be developed next to the airport at a cost of R5 billion, as well as the development of the Richards Bay Industrial Development Zone . The KZN is home to 10 million inhabitants with a relatively denser population distribution around the Durban and Pietermaritzburg CBDs. With the increasing amount of investment towards the north coast of Durban, the population distribution will migrate to these areas. These areas now become 'vulnerable' to rare, infrequent and potentially devastating natural disasters like earthquakes. One of the first steps to understand and plan for an earthquake occurrence is through a seismic hazard and risk assessment. The seismic hazard and risk method has well been established since 1968 (see Cornell (1968); Veneziano et al., (1984); Bender and Perkins (1993); McGuire (1993); McGuire and Toro (2008); Kijko and Graham (1998); Kijko and Sellevoll, (1989, 1992)). The components of a seismic risk assessment (SRA) include several building blocks namely: the development of the earthquake catalogue, seismotectonic model, attenuation models, seismic hazard assessment (SHA), vulnerability assessment and seismic risk computations. The seismotectonic

  20. Segmentation of thin section images for grain size analysis using region competition and edge-weighted region merging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungmann, Matthias; Pape, Hansgeorg; Wißkirchen, Peter; Clauser, Christoph; Berlage, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    Microscopic thin section images are a major source of information on physical properties, crystallization processes, and the evolution of rocks. Extracting the boundaries of grains is of special interest for estimating the volumetric structure of sandstone. To deal with large datasets and to relieve the geologist from a manual analysis of images, automated methods are needed for the segmentation task. This paper evaluates the region competition framework, which also includes region merging. The procedure minimizes an energy functional based on the Minimum Description Length (MDL) principle. To overcome some known drawbacks of current algorithms, we present an extension of MDL-based region merging by integrating edge information between adjacent regions. In addition, we introduce a modified implementation for region competition for overcoming computational complexities when dealing with multiple competing regions. Commonly used methods are based on solving differential equations for describing the movement of boundaries, whereas our approach implements a simple updating scheme. Furthermore, we propose intensity features for reducing the amount of data. They are derived by comparing theoretical values obtained from a model function describing the intensity inside uniaxial crystals with measured data. Error, standard deviation, and phase shift between the model and intensity measurements preserve sufficient information for a proper segmentation. Additionally, identified objects are classified into quartz grains, anhydrite, and reaction fringes by these features. This grouping is, in turn, used to improve the segmentation process further. We illustrate the benefits of this approach by four samples of microscopic thin sections and quantify them in a comparison of a segmentation result and a manually obtained one.

  1. Analysis of urban regions using AVHRR thermal infrared data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Bruce

    1993-01-01

    Using 1-km AVHRR satellite data, relative temperature difference caused by conductivity and inertia were used to distinguish urban and non urban land covers. AVHRR data that were composited on a biweekly basis and distributed by the EROS Data Center in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, were used for the classification process. These composited images are based on the maximum normalized different vegetation index (NDVI) of each pixel during the 2-week period using channels 1 and 2. The resultant images are nearly cloud-free and reduce the need for extensive reclassification processing. Because of the physiographic differences between the Eastern and Western United States, the initial study was limited to the eastern half of the United States. In the East, the time of maximum difference between the urban surfaces and the vegetated non urban areas is the peak greenness period in late summer. A composite image of the Eastern United States for the 2-weel time period from August 30-Septmeber 16, 1991, was used for the extraction of the urban areas. Two channels of thermal data (channels 3 and 4) normalized for regional temperature differences and a composited NDVI image were classified using conventional image processing techniques. The results compare favorably with other large-scale urban area delineations.

  2. The 2003 Boumerdes, Algeria earthquake: Regional moment tensor analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braunmiller, Jochen; Bernardi, Fabrizio

    2005-03-01

    We used regional broadband seismograms to determine seismic moment tensors for the destructive May 21, 2003 Boumerdes (Algeria) Mw = 7.0 earthquake and its larger aftershocks. Fully automatic inversions using near-real time data provided solutions for seven Mw >= 4.7 events within 90 minutes after event occurrence. After adding off-line data, we manually obtained 30 solutions (Mw >= 3.8) from May 2003 to January 2004. All have shallow source depths (6-21 km). The median P-axis orientation (338°) of 24 thrust and four strike-slip events is consistent with Africa-Eurasia plate motion (330°). The main shock hypocenter at 8-10 km depth at the coastline and its shallow southward dip (25° +/- 5°) puts the fault surface trace 15-20 km offshore, consistent with documented seafloor deformation at the base of the continental slope. A main shock rupture length of about 50 km is deduced from first day aftershocks and location of strike-slip events. The strike-slip events probably define the western rupture end and indicate a left-step of main convergence. Fault strike variability of thrust events suggests fault orientation changes and possibly fault segmentation.

  3. Regional Dynamic Simulation Modeling and Analysis of Integrated Energy Futures

    SciTech Connect

    MALCZYNSKI, LEONARD A.; BEYELER, WALTER E.; CONRAD, STEPHEN H.; HARRIS, DAVID B; REXROTH, PAUL E.; BAKER, ARNOLD B.

    2002-11-01

    The Global Energy Futures Model (GEFM) is a demand-based, gross domestic product (GDP)-driven, dynamic simulation tool that provides an integrated framework to model key aspects of energy, nuclear-materials storage and disposition, environmental effluents from fossil and non fossil energy and global nuclear-materials management. Based entirely on public source data, it links oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear and renewable energy dynamically to greenhouse-gas emissions and 12 other measures of environmental impact. It includes historical data from 1990 to 2000, is benchmarked to the DOE/EIA/IEO 2001 [5] Reference Case for 2000 to 2020, and extrapolates energy demand through the year 2050. The GEFM is globally integrated, and breaks out five regions of the world: United States of America (USA), the Peoples Republic of China (China), the former Soviet Union (FSU), the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) nations excluding the USA (other industrialized countries), and the rest of the world (ROW) (essentially the developing world). The GEFM allows the user to examine a very wide range of ''what if'' scenarios through 2050 and to view the potential effects across widely dispersed, but interrelated areas. The authors believe that this high-level learning tool will help to stimulate public policy debate on energy, environment, economic and national security issues.

  4. Regional Aquifer-System Analysis Program of the US Geological Survey; bibliography, 1978-86

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weeks, J.B.; Sun, Ren Jen

    1987-01-01

    The Regional Aquifer-System Analysis Program of the U.S. Geological Survey was initiated in 1978. The purpose of this program is to define the regional geohydrology and establish a framework of background information on geology, hydrology, and geochemistry of the Nation 's important aquifer systems. This information is needed to develop an understanding of the Nation 's major groundwater flow systems and to support better groundwater resources management. As of 1986, investigations of 28 regional aquifer systems were planned, investigations of 9 regional aquifer systems were completed, and 11 regional aquifer systems were being studied. This report is a bibliography of reports completed under the Regional Aquifer-System Analysis Program from 1978 through 1986. The reports resulting from each regional aquifer-system study are listed after an introduction to the study. During 1978-86, 488 reports were completed under the Regional Aquifer-System Analysis Program, and 168 reports which were partially funded by the Regional Aquifer-System Analysis Program were completed under the National Research Program. (Author 's abstract)

  5. Evaluation of the Analysis Influence on Transport in Reanalysis Regional Water Cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosilovich, M. G.; Chen, J.; Robertson, F. R.

    2011-01-01

    Regional water cycles of reanalyses do not follow theoretical assumptions applicable to pure simulated budgets. The data analysis changes the wind, temperature and moisture, perturbing the theoretical balance. Of course, the analysis is correcting the model forecast error, so that the state fields should be more aligned with observations. Recently, it has been reported that the moisture convergence over continental regions, even those with significant quantities of radiosonde profiles present, can produce long term values not consistent with theoretical bounds. Specifically, long averages over continents produce some regions of moisture divergence. This implies that the observational analysis leads to a source of water in the region. One such region is the Unite States Great Plains, which many radiosonde and lidar wind observations are assimilated. We will utilize a new ancillary data set from the MERRA reanalysis called the Gridded Innovations and Observations (GIO) which provides the assimilated observations on MERRA's native grid allowing more thorough consideration of their impact on regional and global climatology. Included with the GIO data are the observation minus forecast (OmF) and observation minus analysis (OmA). Using OmF and OmA, we can identify the bias of the analysis against each observing system and gain a better understanding of the observations that are controlling the regional analysis. In this study we will focus on the wind and moisture assimilation.

  6. Climate change and vector-borne diseases: a regional analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Githeko, A. K.; Lindsay, S. W.; Confalonieri, U. E.; Patz, J. A.

    2000-01-01

    Current evidence suggests that inter-annual and inter-decadal climate variability have a direct influence on the epidemiology of vector-borne diseases. This evidence has been assessed at the continental level in order to determine the possible consequences of the expected future climate change. By 2100 it is estimated that average global temperatures will have risen by 1.0-3.5 degrees C, increasing the likelihood of many vector-borne diseases in new areas. The greatest effect of climate change on transmission is likely to be observed at the extremes of the range of temperatures at which transmission occurs. For many diseases these lie in the range 14-18 degrees C at the lower end and about 35-40 degrees C at the upper end. Malaria and dengue fever are among the most important vector-borne diseases in the tropics and subtropics; Lyme disease is the most common vector-borne disease in the USA and Europe. Encephalitis is also becoming a public health concern. Health risks due to climatic changes will differ between countries that have developed health infrastructures and those that do not. Human settlement patterns in the different regions will influence disease trends. While 70% of the population in South America is urbanized, the proportion in sub-Saharan Africa is less than 45%. Climatic anomalies associated with the El Niño-Southern Oscillation phenomenon and resulting in drought and floods are expected to increase in frequency and intensity. They have been linked to outbreaks of malaria in Africa, Asia and South America. Climate change has far-reaching consequences and touches on all life-support systems. It is therefore a factor that should be placed high among those that affect human health and survival. PMID:11019462

  7. Modeling intersite dependence for regional frequency analysis of extreme marine events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Jérôme; Bernardara, Pietro; Benoit, Michel

    2014-07-01

    The duration of observation at a site of interest is generally too low to reliably estimate marine extremes. Regional frequency analysis (RFA), by exploiting the similarity between sites, can help to reduce uncertainties inherent to local analyses. Extreme observations in a homogeneous region are especially assumed to follow a common regional distribution, up to a local index. The regional pooling method, by gathering observations from different sites into a regional sample, can be employed to estimate the regional distribution. However, such a procedure may be highly affected by intersite dependence in the regional sample. This paper derives a theoretical model of intersite dependence, dedicated to the regional pooling method in a "peaks over threshold" framework. This model expresses the tendency of sites to display a similar behavior during a storm generating extreme observations, by describing both the storm propagation in the region and the storm intensity. The proposed model allows the assessment of (i) the regional effective duration of the regional sample and (ii) different regional hazards, e.g., return periods of storms. An application to the estimation of extreme significant wave heights from the numerical sea-state database ANEMOC-2 is provided, where different patterns of regional dependence are highlighted.

  8. Regional Transport Versus Local Production of Ground Level Tropospheric Ozone in the Baltimore Region: a Statistical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, R. D.; Nguyen, D.

    2006-05-01

    Significant levels of ozone in the lowest 2000 m of the atmosphere, often above the planetary boundary layer, have been measured from aircraft flights over the eastern US. These elevated amounts of ozone can be mixed down to the ground as the nocturnal inversion breaks down at about 10.00 am. We have observed this downward insertion of ozone in the daily ground based measurements made by the Maryland Department of the Environment. There is a strong correlation between the amount of ozone brought down and the direction of the winds above the boundary layer, agreeing with previous studies of regional transport. The ozone data from seven measurement sites in the Baltimore region over the period 1994 to 2005 has been examined. There is a distinct change in the amount of ozone mixed down between 2002 and 2003. The implications of the results of the analysis to local pollution controls will be discussed.

  9. Statistical Analysis of Seismicity in the Sumatra Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, A.; Main, I.

    2007-12-01

    We examine the effect of the great M=9.0 Boxing day 2004 earthquake on the statistics of seismicity in the Sumatra region by dividing data from the NEIC catalogue into two time windows before and after the earthquake. First we determine a completeness threshold of magnitude 4.5 for the whole dataset from the stability of the maximum likelihood b-value with respect to changes in the threshold. The split data sets have similar statistical sampling, with 2563 events before and 3701 after the event. Temporal clustering is first quantified broadly by the fractal dimension of the time series to be respectively 0.137, 0.259 and 0.222 before, after and for the whole dataset, compared to a Poisson null hypothesis of 0, indicating a significant increase in temporal clustering after the event associated with aftershocks. To quantify this further we apply the Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS) model. The background random seismicity rate £g and the coefficient Ñ, a measure of an efficiency of a magnitude of an earthquake in generating its aftershocks, do not change significantly when averaged over the two time periods. In contrast the amplitude A of aftershock generation changes by a factor 4 or so, and there is a small but statistically significant increase in the Omori decay exponent p, indicating a faster decay rate of the aftershocks after the Sumatra earthquake. The ETAS model parameters are calculated for different magnitude threshold (i.e. 4.5, 5.0, 5.5) with similar results for the different magnitude thresholds. The Ñ values increases from near 1 to near 1.5, possibly reflecting known changes in the scaling exponent between scalar moment and magnitude with increasing magnitude. A simple relation of magnitude and span of aftershock activity indicates that detectable aftershock activity of the Sumatra earthquake may last up to 8.7 years. Earthquakes are predominantly in the depth range 30-40 km before 20-30 km after the mainshock, compared to a CMT centroid

  10. A Study on Regional Rainfall Frequency Analysis for Flood Simulation Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Younghun; Ahn, Hyunjun; Joo, Kyungwon; Heo, Jun-Haeng

    2014-05-01

    Recently, climate change has been observed in Korea as well as in the entire world. The rainstorm has been gradually increased and then the damage has been grown. It is very important to manage the flood control facilities because of increasing the frequency and magnitude of severe rain storm. For managing flood control facilities in risky regions, data sets such as elevation, gradient, channel, land use and soil data should be filed up. Using this information, the disaster situations can be simulated to secure evacuation routes for various rainfall scenarios. The aim of this study is to investigate and determine extreme rainfall quantile estimates in Uijeongbu City using index flood method with L-moments parameter estimation. Regional frequency analysis trades space for time by using annual maximum rainfall data from nearby or similar sites to derive estimates for any given site in a homogeneous region. Regional frequency analysis based on pooled data is recommended for estimation of rainfall quantiles at sites with record lengths less than 5T, where T is return period of interest. Many variables relevant to precipitation can be used for grouping a region in regional frequency analysis. For regionalization of Han River basin, the k-means method is applied for grouping regions by variables of meteorology and geomorphology. The results from the k-means method are compared for each region using various probability distributions. In the final step of the regionalization analysis, goodness-of-fit measure is used to evaluate the accuracy of a set of candidate distributions. And rainfall quantiles by index flood method are obtained based on the appropriate distribution. And then, rainfall quantiles based on various scenarios are used as input data for disaster simulations. Keywords: Regional Frequency Analysis; Scenarios of Rainfall Quantile Acknowledgements This research was supported by a grant 'Establishing Active Disaster Management System of Flood Control Structures

  11. Bayesian WLS/GLS regression for regional skewness analysis for regions with large crest stage gage networks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Veilleux, Andrea G.; Stedinger, Jery R.; Eash, David A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarizes methodological advances in regional log-space skewness analyses that support flood-frequency analysis with the log Pearson Type III (LP3) distribution. A Bayesian Weighted Least Squares/Generalized Least Squares (B-WLS/B-GLS) methodology that relates observed skewness coefficient estimators to basin characteristics in conjunction with diagnostic statistics represents an extension of the previously developed B-GLS methodology. B-WLS/B-GLS has been shown to be effective in two California studies. B-WLS/B-GLS uses B-WLS to generate stable estimators of model parameters and B-GLS to estimate the precision of those B-WLS regression parameters, as well as the precision of the model. The study described here employs this methodology to develop a regional skewness model for the State of Iowa. To provide cost effective peak-flow data for smaller drainage basins in Iowa, the U.S. Geological Survey operates a large network of crest stage gages (CSGs) that only record flow values above an identified recording threshold (thus producing a censored data record). CSGs are different from continuous-record gages, which record almost all flow values and have been used in previous B-GLS and B-WLS/B-GLS regional skewness studies. The complexity of analyzing a large CSG network is addressed by using the B-WLS/B-GLS framework along with the Expected Moments Algorithm (EMA). Because EMA allows for the censoring of low outliers, as well as the use of estimated interval discharges for missing, censored, and historic data, it complicates the calculations of effective record length (and effective concurrent record length) used to describe the precision of sample estimators because the peak discharges are no longer solely represented by single values. Thus new record length calculations were developed. The regional skewness analysis for the State of Iowa illustrates the value of the new B-WLS/BGLS methodology with these new extensions.

  12. Investigating the atmospheric energy spectra using ECMWF analysis: Regional dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, P.; Zhang, M.

    2010-12-01

    The atmospheric turbulence energy spectrum has been a subject of active research for a long time. Beginning with Kolmogorov’s theory of three-dimensional turbulence, to Kraichnan’s two-dimensional turbulence and its extension to the quasi-geostrophic case by Charney, various theoretical models and hypothesis have tried to explain the energy spectrum slope. However, the success or failure of a theory can only be gauged by comparing its output with actual observational data. Nastrom and Gage were able to do just that by analyzing thousands of flight observation data and plotting the wave number spectra of wind and temperature in 1980’s. But, the flight data was confined only to the upper atmosphere and mostly mid-latitudes of northern hemisphere. We use the high-resolution ECMWF analysis data, as a part of Year of Tropical Convection (YOTC) to study the atmospheric energy spectra over a wide range of conditions. We compared and interpreted the differences of the atmospheric energy spectra in the tropics and mid-latitudes, in the winter (DJF) and summer (JJA), at the surface and in the upper troposphere. Our results conform to the previously observed -3 power law for mid-latitude data in the upper troposphere, but the slope of the energy spectrum from the surface wind data and for the tropics exhibited quite different shapes. The causes of these differences are discussed.

  13. Multivariate analysis of regional differentials of nuptiality in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, A A; Islam, M A

    1981-01-01

    The importance of socioeconomics differentials in nuptiality has occupied a very important position in recent demographic research. An effort has been made in this paper to find out the nature and extent of the causal relationship between the dependent variable--nuptiality, and its determinants. Our findings suggest that education may play a vital role in raising mean age at marriage. This may be done by extending free and compulsory mass and primary education throughout the country. It has further been observed that urbanization through economic development is a precondition to increase the literacy rate and hence female labor force participation in the country's economy. Thus proper education will increase the female employment rate which in turn will raise the age at marriage. Equal distribution of population and insurance schemes for childless couples may also indirectly put a positive effect on nuptiality. Finally, this paper provides a guideline for using the path analysis technique in determining the factors causing the changes and the effects of these factors on nuptiality in Bangladesh. However, caution should be made in taking into account the causal ordering of the indices. Different ordering may give different results. PMID:12312786

  14. Structural analysis of airborne flux estimates over a region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caramori, Paulo; Schuepp, Peter; Desjardins, Raymond; Macpherson, Ian

    1994-01-01

    Aircraft-based observations of turbulence fields of velocity, moisture, and temperature are used to study coherent turbulent structures that dominate turbulent transfer of moisture and heat above three different eco-systems. Flux traces are defragmented, to reconstruct the presumed full size (along the sampled transect) of these structures, and flux traces are simplified by elimination of those that contribute negligibly to the flux estimate. Structures are analyzed in terms of size, spatial distribution, and contribution to the flux, in the four 'quadrant' modes of eddy-covariance transfer (excess up/down and deficit up/down). The effect of nonlinear detrending of moisture and temperature data on this 'structural analysis,' over surfaces with heterogeneous surface wetness, is also examined. Results over grassland, wetland, and moist and dry agricultural land, show that nonlinear detrending may provide a more physically realistic description of structures. Significant differences are observed between structure size and associated relative flux contribution, between moist and dry areas, with smaller structures playing a more important role over the moist areas. Structure size generally increases with height, as spatial reorganization from smaller structures into larger ones takes place. This coincides with a gradual loss of surface 'signature' (position and clustering of plumes above localized source areas). The data are expected to provide a basis for an eventual statistical description of boundary-layer transfer events , and help to interpret the link between boundary-layer transfer and hydrological surface conditions.

  15. FUNGAL-SPECIFIC PCR PRIMERS DEVELOPED FOR ANALYSIS OF THE ITS REGION OF ENVIRONMENTAL DNA EXTRACTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background The Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) regions of fungal ribosomal DNA (rDNA) are highly variable sequences of great importance in distinguishing fungal species by PCR analysis. Previously published PCR primers available for amplifying these sequences from environmenta...

  16. 78 FR 68463 - Notice of Emergency Approval of an Information Collection: Regional Analysis of Impediments...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-14

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Notice of Emergency Approval of an Information Collection: Regional Analysis of Impediments Guidance for Sustainable Communities Grantees AGENCY: Office of the Chief Information Officer, HUD... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Lynnette McRae, Grants Management Specialist, Office of Sustainable...

  17. Genetic characterization of Phytophthora nicotianae by the analysis of polymorphic regions of the mitochondrial DNA.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new method based on the analysis of mitochondrial intergenic regions characterized by intraspecific variation in DNA sequences was developed and applied to the study of the plant pathogen Phytophthora nicotianae. Two regions flanked by genes trny and rns and trnw and cox2 were identified by compa...

  18. A Bayesian Hierarchical Approach to Regional Frequency Analysis of Extremes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, B.

    2010-12-01

    Rainfall and runoff frequency analysis is a major issue for the hydrological community. The distribution of hydrological extremes varies in space and possibly in time. Describing and understanding this spatiotemporal variability are primary challenges to improve hazard quantification and risk assessment. This presentation proposes a general approach based on a Bayesian hierarchical model, following previous work by Cooley et al. [2007], Micevski [2007], Aryal et al. [2009] or Lima and Lall [2009; 2010]. Such a hierarchical model is made up of two levels: (1) a data level modeling the distribution of observations, and (2) a process level describing the fluctuation of the distribution parameters in space and possibly in time. At the first level of the model, at-site data (e.g., annual maxima series) are modeled with a chosen distribution (e.g., a GEV distribution). Since data from several sites are considered, the joint distribution of a vector of (spatial) observations needs to be derived. This is challenging because data are in general not spatially independent, especially for nearby sites. An elliptical copula is therefore used to formally account for spatial dependence between at-site data. This choice might be questionable in the context of extreme value distributions. However, it is motivated by its applicability in spatial highly dimensional problems, where the joint pdf of a vector of n observations is required to derive the likelihood function (with n possibly amounting to hundreds of sites). At the second level of the model, parameters of the chosen at-site distribution are then modeled by a Gaussian spatial process, whose mean may depend on covariates (e.g. elevation, distance to sea, weather pattern, time). In particular, this spatial process allows estimating parameters at ungauged sites, and deriving the predictive distribution of rainfall/runoff at every pixel/catchment of the studied domain. An application to extreme rainfall series from the French

  19. Seismic Hazard analysis of Adjaria Region in Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorjiashvili, Nato; Elashvili, Mikheil

    2014-05-01

    The most commonly used approach to determining seismic-design loads for engineering projects is probabilistic seismic-hazard analysis (PSHA). The primary output from a PSHA is a hazard curve showing the variation of a selected ground-motion parameter, such as peak ground acceleration (PGA) or spectral acceleration (SA), against the annual frequency of exceedance (or its reciprocal, return period). The design value is the ground-motion level that corresponds to a preselected design return period. For many engineering projects, such as standard buildings and typical bridges, the seismic loading is taken from the appropriate seismic-design code, the basis of which is usually a PSHA. For more important engineering projects— where the consequences of failure are more serious, such as dams and chemical plants—it is more usual to obtain the seismic-design loads from a site-specific PSHA, in general, using much longer return periods than those governing code based design. Calculation of Probabilistic Seismic Hazard was performed using Software CRISIS2007 by Ordaz, M., Aguilar, A., and Arboleda, J., Instituto de Ingeniería, UNAM, Mexico. CRISIS implements a classical probabilistic seismic hazard methodology where seismic sources can be modelled as points, lines and areas. In the case of area sources, the software offers an integration procedure that takes advantage of a triangulation algorithm used for seismic source discretization. This solution improves calculation efficiency while maintaining a reliable description of source geometry and seismicity. Additionally, supplementary filters (e.g. fix a sitesource distance that excludes from calculation sources at great distance) allow the program to balance precision and efficiency during hazard calculation. Earthquake temporal occurrence is assumed to follow a Poisson process, and the code facilitates two types of MFDs: a truncated exponential Gutenberg-Richter [1944] magnitude distribution and a characteristic magnitude

  20. A new analysis of Mars "Special Regions": findings of the second MEPAG Special Regions Science Analysis Group (SR-SAG2).

    PubMed

    Rummel, John D; Beaty, David W; Jones, Melissa A; Bakermans, Corien; Barlow, Nadine G; Boston, Penelope J; Chevrier, Vincent F; Clark, Benton C; de Vera, Jean-Pierre P; Gough, Raina V; Hallsworth, John E; Head, James W; Hipkin, Victoria J; Kieft, Thomas L; McEwen, Alfred S; Mellon, Michael T; Mikucki, Jill A; Nicholson, Wayne L; Omelon, Christopher R; Peterson, Ronald; Roden, Eric E; Sherwood Lollar, Barbara; Tanaka, Kenneth L; Viola, Donna; Wray, James J

    2014-11-01

    A committee of the Mars Exploration Program Analysis Group (MEPAG) has reviewed and updated the description of Special Regions on Mars as places where terrestrial organisms might replicate (per the COSPAR Planetary Protection Policy). This review and update was conducted by an international team (SR-SAG2) drawn from both the biological science and Mars exploration communities, focused on understanding when and where Special Regions could occur. The study applied recently available data about martian environments and about terrestrial organisms, building on a previous analysis of Mars Special Regions (2006) undertaken by a similar team. Since then, a new body of highly relevant information has been generated from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (launched in 2005) and Phoenix (2007) and data from Mars Express and the twin Mars Exploration Rovers (all 2003). Results have also been gleaned from the Mars Science Laboratory (launched in 2011). In addition to Mars data, there is a considerable body of new data regarding the known environmental limits to life on Earth-including the potential for terrestrial microbial life to survive and replicate under martian environmental conditions. The SR-SAG2 analysis has included an examination of new Mars models relevant to natural environmental variation in water activity and temperature; a review and reconsideration of the current parameters used to define Special Regions; and updated maps and descriptions of the martian environments recommended for treatment as "Uncertain" or "Special" as natural features or those potentially formed by the influence of future landed spacecraft. Significant changes in our knowledge of the capabilities of terrestrial organisms and the existence of possibly habitable martian environments have led to a new appreciation of where Mars Special Regions may be identified and protected. The SR-SAG also considered the impact of Special Regions on potential future human missions to Mars, both as locations of

  1. A new analysis of Mars "Special Regions": findings of the Second MEPAG Special Regions Science Analysis Group (SR-SAG2)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rummel, John D.; Beaty, David W.; Jones, Melissa A.; Bakermans, Corien; Barlow, Nadine G.; Boston, Penelope J.; Chevrier, Vincent F.; Clark, Benton C.; de Vera, Jean-Pierre P.; Gough, Raina V.; Hallsworth, John E.; Head, James W.; Hipkin, Victoria J.; Kieft, Thomas L.; McEwen, Alfred S.; Mellon, Michael T.; Mikucki, Jill A.; Nicholson, Wayne L.; Omelon, Christopher R.; Peterson, Ronald; Roden, Eric E.; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood; Tanaka, Kenneth L.; Viola, Donna; Wray, James J.

    2014-01-01

    A committee of the Mars Exploration Program Analysis Group (MEPAG) has reviewed and updated the description of Special Regions on Mars as places where terrestrial organisms might replicate (per the COSPAR Planetary Protection Policy). This review and update was conducted by an international team (SR-SAG2) drawn from both the biological science and Mars exploration communities, focused on understanding when and where Special Regions could occur. The study applied recently available data about martian environments and about terrestrial organisms, building on a previous analysis of Mars Special Regions (2006) undertaken by a similar team. Since then, a new body of highly relevant information has been generated from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (launched in 2005) and Phoenix (2007) and data from Mars Express and the twin Mars Exploration Rovers (all 2003). Results have also been gleaned from the Mars Science Laboratory (launched in 2011). In addition to Mars data, there is a considerable body of new data regarding the known environmental limits to life on Earth—including the potential for terrestrial microbial life to survive and replicate under martian environmental conditions. The SR-SAG2 analysis has included an examination of new Mars models relevant to natural environmental variation in water activity and temperature; a review and reconsideration of the current parameters used to define Special Regions; and updated maps and descriptions of the martian environments recommended for treatment as "Uncertain" or "Special" as natural features or those potentially formed by the influence of future landed spacecraft. Significant changes in our knowledge of the capabilities of terrestrial organisms and the existence of possibly habitable martian environments have led to a new appreciation of where Mars Special Regions may be identified and protected. The SR-SAG also considered the impact of Special Regions on potential future human missions to Mars, both as locations

  2. Erythrocyte membrane analysis for type II diabetes detection using Raman spectroscopy in high-wavenumber region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jinyong; Zeng, Yongyi; Lin, Juqiang; Wang, Jing; Li, Ling; Huang, Zufang; Li, Buhong; Zeng, Haishan; Chen, Rong

    2014-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy was employed to detect lipid variation occurring in type II diabetic erythrocyte membrane (EM) without using exogenous reagents. In high-wavenumber (HW) region, significant Raman spectral differences between diabetic and normal EM are observed at 2850, 2873, 2885, 2935, and 2965 cm-1, which are mainly related to lipid in EM. Based on principal component analysis, the diagnostic accuracy of HW region for diabetes detection is 98.8%, which is much higher than that of low-wavenumber region (82.9%). The results suggest that EM HW Raman region has great promise for the reagent-free and non-invasive detection of type II diabetes.

  3. Characterization of Sugarcane Mosaic Virus Scmv1 and Scmv2 Resistance Regions by Regional Association Analysis in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Rania; Pan, Guangtang; Xu, Mingliang; Lübberstedt, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Sugarcane Mosaic Virus (SCMV) causes one of the most severe virus diseases in maize worldwide, resulting in reduced grain and forage yield in susceptible cultivars. In this study, two association panels consisting of 94 inbred lines each, from China and the U.S., were characterized for resistance to two isolates: SCMV-Seehausen and SCMV-BJ. The population structure of both association panels was analyzed using 3072 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers. The Chinese and the U.S. panel were both subdivided into two sub-populations, the latter comprised of Stiff Stalk Synthetic (SS) lines and Non Stiff Stalk Synthetic (NSS). The relative kinships were calculated using informative 2947 SNPs with minor allele frequency ≥ 5% and missing data ≤ 20% for the Chinese panel and 2841 SNPs with the same characteristics were used for the U.S. panel. The Scmv1 region was genotyped using 7 single sequence repeat (SSR) and sequence-tagged site (STS) markers, and 12 SSR markers were used for the Scmv2 region in the U.S. panel, while 5 of them were used for the Chinese panel. For all traits, a MLM (Mix Linear Model) controlling both population structure and relative kinship (Q + K) was used for association analysis. Three markers Trx-1, STS-11, and STS-12 located in the Scmv1 region were strongly associated (P = 0.001) with SCMV resistance, and explained more than 16.0%, 10.6%, and 19.7% of phenotypic variation, respectively. 207FG003 located in the Scmv2 region was significantly associated (P = 0.001) with SCMV resistance, and explained around 18.5% of phenotypic variation. PMID:26488483

  4. Characterization of Sugarcane Mosaic Virus Scmv1 and Scmv2 Resistance Regions by Regional Association Analysis in Maize.

    PubMed

    Leng, Pengfei; Ji, Qing; Tao, Yongfu; Ibrahim, Rania; Pan, Guangtang; Xu, Mingliang; Lübberstedt, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Sugarcane Mosaic Virus (SCMV) causes one of the most severe virus diseases in maize worldwide, resulting in reduced grain and forage yield in susceptible cultivars. In this study, two association panels consisting of 94 inbred lines each, from China and the U.S., were characterized for resistance to two isolates: SCMV-Seehausen and SCMV-BJ. The population structure of both association panels was analyzed using 3072 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers. The Chinese and the U.S. panel were both subdivided into two sub-populations, the latter comprised of Stiff Stalk Synthetic (SS) lines and Non Stiff Stalk Synthetic (NSS). The relative kinships were calculated using informative 2947 SNPs with minor allele frequency ≥ 5% and missing data ≤ 20% for the Chinese panel and 2841 SNPs with the same characteristics were used for the U.S. panel. The Scmv1 region was genotyped using 7 single sequence repeat (SSR) and sequence-tagged site (STS) markers, and 12 SSR markers were used for the Scmv2 region in the U.S. panel, while 5 of them were used for the Chinese panel. For all traits, a MLM (Mix Linear Model) controlling both population structure and relative kinship (Q + K) was used for association analysis. Three markers Trx-1, STS-11, and STS-12 located in the Scmv1 region were strongly associated (P = 0.001) with SCMV resistance, and explained more than 16.0%, 10.6%, and 19.7% of phenotypic variation, respectively. 207FG003 located in the Scmv2 region was significantly associated (P = 0.001) with SCMV resistance, and explained around 18.5% of phenotypic variation. PMID:26488483

  5. The significance analysis of FY-2E split window data for "clear region" AMVs derivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenhui; Zhan, Yizhe; Zhang, Zhiguo; Yang, Lu

    2013-05-01

    The current cloud-tracing technique for atmospheric motion vector derivation would fail in "clear" regions in IR window imagery. This paper makes analysis on brightness temperature sensitivity in thermal IR window channels with respect to water vapor and aerosol contents which might be used as tracers for deriving atmospheric motion vectors in cloud free regions. The data for sensitivity analysis based on the radiation transfer model MODTRAN includes MODIS Atmospheric Aerosol products and FY-2E Atmospheric Total Precipitation Water products. The results from the analysis show that water vapor and aerosol signals greater than the TB sensitivity threshold of FY-2E-borne IR radiometer exist under certain conditions in clear region, and therefore the possibility significantly exists to derive atmospheric motion vectors in clear regions from thermal infrared images obtained with FY-2E satellite.

  6. Regional analysis of wind climatic erosivity factor: a case study in fars province, southwest Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouyan, S.; Ganji, A.; Behnia, P.

    2011-10-01

    Wind erosion climatic erosivity is a measure of the climatic tendency to produce conditions conducive to wind erosion. This research develops a method to determine the regional climate's tendency to cause wind erosion on the basis of a physically based climatic factor (CE) and linear moment analysis (L-moments) in Fars province, southwest Iran. CE is calculable from wind speed quantiles and other available meteorological data. The wind quantiles can be estimated by a frequency analysis of the available wind data. Wind speed data are often either not available or are of short record length, and thus, CE estimates from such data have large standard errors. In such a situation, data from several sites can be used to estimate wind speed quantiles at each site based on a regional frequency analysis. Monthly averages of maximum daily wind speed of 19 meteorological stations in Fars province were used for regional analysis. Based on L-moment analysis, two homogeneous regions were determined. Regional wind speed quantiles were calculated, and the results were used to calculate CE values for two 6-month wet and dry periods for each homogeneous region. Furthermore, CE values were estimated for each station in the study area using a Weibull distribution, and the results were compared with the regional-based CE values. It showed that CE values estimated using the regional-based approach have smaller sampling variance compared to those obtained from the Weibull method. The proposed method can be used to evaluate the regional risk of wind erosion in arid and semi-arid environments.

  7. Employing SWOT Analysis in Coursework on the Geographies of Regional Economic Development and Trade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalafsky, Ronald V.; Sonnichsen, Tyler

    2015-01-01

    The use of SWOT analysis is a means through which geography students can investigate key concepts in economic geography and essential topics in regional economic development. This article discusses the results of a course project where economic geography students employed SWOT analysis to explore medium-sized metropolitan areas across the southern…

  8. Analysis of the sexual development-promoting region of Schizophyllum commune TRP1 gene.

    PubMed

    Sen, Kikuo; Kinoshita, Hideki; Tazuke, Kazuyuki; Maki, Yoshinori; Yoshiura, Yumi; Yakushi, Toshiharu; Shibai, Hiroshiro; Kurosawa, Shin-Ichi

    2016-10-01

    This study aims to elucidate the mechanism of sexual development of basidiomycetous mushrooms from mating to fruit body formation. Sequencing analysis showed the TRP1 gene of basidiomycete Schizophyllum commune encoded an enzyme with three catalytic regions of GAT (glutamine amidotransferase), IGPS (indole-3-glycerol phosphate synthase), and PRAI (5-phosphoribosyl anthranilate isomerase); among these three regions, the trp1 mutant (Trp(-)) had a missense mutation (L→F) of a 338th amino acid residue of the TRP1 protein within the IGPS region. To investigate the function of IGPS region related to sexual development, dikaryons with high, usual, and no expression of the IGPS region of TRP1 gene were made. The dikaryotic mycelia with high expression of the IGPS formed mature fruit bodies earlier than those with usual and no expression of the IGPS. These results showed that the IGPS region in TRP1 gene promoted sexual development of S. commune. PMID:27296855

  9. Predicting groundwater redox status on a regional scale using linear discriminant analysis.

    PubMed

    Close, M E; Abraham, P; Humphries, B; Lilburne, L; Cuthill, T; Wilson, S

    2016-08-01

    Reducing conditions are necessary for denitrification, thus the groundwater redox status can be used to identify subsurface zones where potentially significant nitrate reduction can occur. Groundwater chemistry in two contrasting regions of New Zealand was classified with respect to redox status and related to mappable factors, such as geology, topography and soil characteristics using discriminant analysis. Redox assignment was carried out for water sampled from 568 and 2223 wells in the Waikato and Canterbury regions, respectively. For the Waikato region 64% of wells sampled indicated oxic conditions in the water; 18% indicated reduced conditions and 18% had attributes indicating both reducing and oxic conditions termed "mixed". In Canterbury 84% of wells indicated oxic conditions; 10% were mixed; and only 5% indicated reduced conditions. The analysis was performed over three different well depths, <25m, 25 to 100 and >100m. For both regions, the percentage of oxidised groundwater decreased with increasing well depth. Linear discriminant analysis was used to develop models to differentiate between the three redox states. Models were derived for each depth and region using 67% of the data, and then subsequently validated on the remaining 33%. The average agreement between predicted and measured redox status was 63% and 70% for the Waikato and Canterbury regions, respectively. The models were incorporated into GIS and the prediction of redox status was extended over the whole region, excluding mountainous land. This knowledge improves spatial prediction of reduced groundwater zones, and therefore, when combined with groundwater flow paths, improves estimates of denitrification. PMID:27182792

  10. Predicting groundwater redox status on a regional scale using linear discriminant analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, M. E.; Abraham, P.; Humphries, B.; Lilburne, L.; Cuthill, T.; Wilson, S.

    2016-08-01

    Reducing conditions are necessary for denitrification, thus the groundwater redox status can be used to identify subsurface zones where potentially significant nitrate reduction can occur. Groundwater chemistry in two contrasting regions of New Zealand was classified with respect to redox status and related to mappable factors, such as geology, topography and soil characteristics using discriminant analysis. Redox assignment was carried out for water sampled from 568 and 2223 wells in the Waikato and Canterbury regions, respectively. For the Waikato region 64% of wells sampled indicated oxic conditions in the water; 18% indicated reduced conditions and 18% had attributes indicating both reducing and oxic conditions termed "mixed". In Canterbury 84% of wells indicated oxic conditions; 10% were mixed; and only 5% indicated reduced conditions. The analysis was performed over three different well depths, < 25 m, 25 to 100 and > 100 m. For both regions, the percentage of oxidised groundwater decreased with increasing well depth. Linear discriminant analysis was used to develop models to differentiate between the three redox states. Models were derived for each depth and region using 67% of the data, and then subsequently validated on the remaining 33%. The average agreement between predicted and measured redox status was 63% and 70% for the Waikato and Canterbury regions, respectively. The models were incorporated into GIS and the prediction of redox status was extended over the whole region, excluding mountainous land. This knowledge improves spatial prediction of reduced groundwater zones, and therefore, when combined with groundwater flow paths, improves estimates of denitrification.

  11. An annular gas seal analysis using empirical entrance and exit region friction factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrod, D. A.; Childs, D. W.; Nelson, C. C.

    1990-01-01

    Wall shear stress results from stationary-rotor flow tests of five annular gas seals are used to develop entrance and exit region friction factor models. The friction factor models are used in a bulk-flow seal analysis which predicts leakage and rotor-dynamic coefficients. The predictions of the analysis are compared to experimental results and to the predictions of Nelson's analysis (1985). The comparisons are for smooth-rotor seals with smooth and honeycomb-stators. The present analysis predicts the destabilizing cross-coupled stiffness of a seal better than Nelson's analysis. Both analyses predict direct damping well and direct stiffness poorly.

  12. Regional flood frequency analysis for the Gan-Ming River basin in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jingyi, Zhang; Hall, M. J.

    2004-08-01

    A regionalised relationship to estimate flood magnitudes for ungauged and poorly gauged catchments can be established using regional flood frequency analysis. The geographical approach (Residuals method), Ward's cluster method, the Fuzzy c-means method and a Kohonen neural network were applied to 86 sites in the Gan River Basin of Jiangxi Province and the Ming River Basin of Fujian Province in the southeast of China to delineate homogeneous regions based on site characteristics. Similar groupings of sites into sub-regions were obtained from all but the Residuals method. Since the Kohonen neural network can be employed to identify the number of sub-regions as well as the allocation of sites to sub-regions, this method is to be preferred over Ward's method and the Fuzzy c-means approach. For each sub-region, growth curves must be constructed and the value of an index flood must be related to catchment characteristics. The regional L-moment algorithm may be used to advantage both to identify an appropriate underlying frequency distribution and to construct sub-regional growth curves. However, the membership levels produced by the Fuzzy c-means method may also be used as weights to derive a regional at-site growth curve from those of all the sub-regions. The latter method is likely to be most useful where the sub-regional growth curves are of strongly contrasting shape. An index flood may be related to catchment characteristics using Multiple Linear Regression Analysis, but application to the Gan-Ming data demonstrates that estimates with lower standard errors of estimate can be produced using an artificial neural network (ANN). However, in order to apply such ANNs, sufficient sites must be available so that enough processing elements can be employed without impairing the ability of the network to generalise outside the training data set.

  13. Involvement of Sensory Regions in Affective Experience: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Satpute, Ajay B.; Kang, Jian; Bickart, Kevin C.; Yardley, Helena; Wager, Tor D.; Barrett, Lisa F.

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of work suggests that sensory processes may also contribute to affective experience. In this study, we performed a meta-analysis of affective experiences driven through visual, auditory, olfactory, gustatory, and somatosensory stimulus modalities including study contrasts that compared affective stimuli to matched neutral control stimuli. We found, first, that limbic and paralimbic regions, including the amygdala, anterior insula, pre-supplementary motor area, and portions of orbitofrontal cortex were consistently engaged across two or more modalities. Second, early sensory input regions in occipital, temporal, piriform, mid-insular, and primary sensory cortex were frequently engaged during affective experiences driven by visual, auditory, olfactory, gustatory, and somatosensory inputs. A classification analysis demonstrated that the pattern of neural activity across a contrast map diagnosed the stimulus modality driving the affective experience. These findings suggest that affective experiences are constructed from activity that is distributed across limbic and paralimbic brain regions and also activity in sensory cortical regions. PMID:26696928

  14. Nonlinear analysis of the dynamics in the Mexican Pacific seismic region by using visual recurrence plots.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez-Rojas, Alejandro; Moreno-Torres, Lucía; Flores-Márquez, Elsa

    2013-04-01

    The subduction in the Mexican South Pacific coast might be approximated as a subhorizontal slab bounded at the edge by the steep subduction geometry of the Cocos plate beneath the Caribbean plate to the east and of the Rivera plate beneath North America to the west. It has been reported a study that takes into account the geometry of the subducted Rivera and Cocos plates beneath the North American lithosphere defining, according their geometry, four regions: Jalisco, Michoacán, Guerrero and Oaxaca. By means of the visual recurrence analysis (VRA), in this work we study some dynamical features of the seismicity occurred for each region, Our analysis shows interesting differences among the recurrence plots of each region indicating a possible correlation between the subduction geometry and the nonlinear dynamical properties of each region.

  15. Entrance and exit region friction factor models for annular seal analysis. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrod, David Alan

    1988-01-01

    The Mach number definition and boundary conditions in Nelson's nominally-centered, annular gas seal analysis are revised. A method is described for determining the wall shear stress characteristics of an annular gas seal experimentally. Two friction factor models are developed for annular seal analysis; one model is based on flat-plate flow theory; the other uses empirical entrance and exit region friction factors. The friction factor predictions of the models are compared to experimental results. Each friction model is used in an annular gas seal analysis. The seal characteristics predicted by the two seal analyses are compared to experimental results and to the predictions of Nelson's analysis. The comparisons are for smooth-rotor seals with smooth and honeycomb stators. The comparisons show that the analysis which uses empirical entrance and exit region shear stress models predicts the static and stability characteristics of annular gas seals better than the other analyses. The analyses predict direct stiffness poorly.

  16. Sequence analysis and compositional properties of untranslated regions of human mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Pesole, G; Fiormarino, G; Saccone, C

    1994-03-25

    A detailed computer analysis of the untranslated regions, 5'-UTR and 3'-UTR, of human mRNA sequences is reported. The compositional properties of these regions, compared with those of the corresponding coding regions, indicate that 5'-UTR and 3'-UTR are less affected by the isochore compartmentalization than the corresponding third codon positions of mRNAs. The presence of higher functional constraints in 5'-UTR is also reported. Dinucleotide analysis shows a depletion of CpG and TpA in both sequences. A search for significant sequence motifs using the WORDUP algorithm reveals the patterns already known to have a functional role in the mRNA UTR, and several other motifs whose functional roles remain to be demonstrated. This type of analysis may be particularly useful for guiding site-directed mutagenesis experiments. In addition, it can be used for assessing the nature of anonymous sequences now produced in large amounts in megabase sequencing projects. PMID:8144029

  17. Regional Scale Meteorological Analysis and Prediction Using GPS Occultation and EOS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bromwich, David H.; Shum, C. K.; Zhao, Changyin; Kuo, Bill; Rocken, Chris

    2004-01-01

    The main objective of the research under this award is to improve regional meteorological analysis and prediction for traditionally data limited regions, particularly over the Southern Ocean and Antarctica, using the remote sensing observations from current and upcoming GPS radio occultation missions and the EOS instrument suite. The major components of this project are: 1.Develop and improve the methods for retrieving temperature, moisture, and pressure profiles from GPS radio occultation data and EOS radiometer data. 2. Develop and improve a regional scale data assimilation system (MM5 4DVAR). 3. Perform case studies involving data analysis and numerical modeling to investigate the impact of different data for regional meteorological analysis and the importance of data assimilation for regional meteorological simulation over the Antarctic region. 4. Apply the findings and improvements from the above studies to weather forecasting experiments. 5. In the third year of the award we made significant progress toward the remaining goals of the project. The work included carefully evaluating the performance of an atmospheric mesoscale model, the Polar MM5 in Antarctic applications and improving the upper boundary condition.

  18. Sequence analysis of mitochondrial DNA hypervariable regions using infrared fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Steffens, D L; Roy, R

    1998-06-01

    The non-coding region of the mitochondrial genome provides an attractive target for human forensic identification studies. Two hypervariable (HV) regions, each approximately 250-350 bp in length, contain the majority of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence variability among different individuals. Various approaches to determine mtDNA sequence were evaluated utilizing highly sensitive infrared (IR) fluorescence detection. HV regions were amplified either together or separately and cycle-sequenced using a Thermo Sequenase protocol. An M13 universal primer sequence tail covalently attached to the 5' terminus of an amplification primer facilitated electrophoretic analysis and direct sequencing of the amplification products using IR detection. PMID:9631201

  19. Analysis of the economic impacts from ethanol production in three New York State regions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Batista, J.C.; Boisvert, R.N.; Kalter, R.J.

    1982-11-01

    This report describes the potential local economic impact of ethanol production industries for three multi-county regions of New York State. The study's input-output analysis suggests that investment in a small cheese whey-ethanol plant would generate far more local employment, per gallon of annual capacity, than a large corn-based plant which would rely more heavily on feedstocks from the outside region. In addition, a cheese whey ethanol plant's impact on dairies in the region would have a greater effect on the local economy than the ethanol plant itself.

  20. Analysis of the regions flanking the human insulin gene and sequence of an Alu family member.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, G I; Pictet, R; Rutter, W J

    1980-01-01

    The regions around the human insulin gene have been studied by heteroduplex, hybridization and sequence analysis. These studies indicated that there is a region of heterogeneous length located approximately 700 bp before the 5' end of the gene; and that the 19 kb of cloned DNA which includes the 1430 bp insulin gene as well as 5650 bp before and 11,500 bp after the gene is single copy sequence except for 500 bp located 6000 bp from the 3' end of the gene. This 500 bp segment contains a member of the Alu family of dispersed middle repetitive sequences as well as another less highly repeated homopolymeric segment. The sequence of this region was determined. This Alu repeat is bordered by 19 bp direct repeats and also contains an 83 bp sequence which is present twice. The regions flanking the human and rat I insulin genes were compared by heteroduplex analysis to localize homologous sequences in the flanking regions which could be involved in the regulation of insulin biosynthesis. The homology between the two genes is restricted to the region encoding preproinsulin and a short region of approximately 60 bp flanking the 5' side of the genes. Images PMID:6253909

  1. Regional Disparities in Obesity Prevalence in the United States: A Spatial Regime Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Candice A.; Slack, Tim; Martin, Corby K.; Broyles, Stephanie T.; Heymsfield, Steven B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Significant clusters of high and low obesity counties have been demonstrated across the United States (U.S.). This study examined regional disparities in obesity prevalence and differences in the related structural characteristics across regions of the U.S. Design and Methods Drawing on model-based estimates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, regional differences in county-level adult obesity prevalence (percent of the adult population [≥ 20 years] that was obese [BMI≥30kg/m2] within a county, 2009) were assessed with a LISA (Local Indicators of Spatial Association) analysis to identify geographic concentrations of high and low obesity levels. We utilized regional regime analysis to identify factors that were differentially associated with obesity prevalence between regions of the U.S. Results High and low obesity county clusters and the effect of a number of county-level characteristics on obesity prevalence differed significantly by region. These included the positive effect of African American populations in the South, the negative effect of Hispanic populations in the Northeast, and the positive effect of unemployed workers in the Midwest and West. Conclusions Our findings suggest the need for public health policies and interventions that account for different regional characteristics underlying obesity prevalence variation across the U.S. PMID:25521074

  2. LOLA: enrichment analysis for genomic region sets and regulatory elements in R and Bioconductor

    PubMed Central

    Sheffield, Nathan C.; Bock, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Genomic datasets are often interpreted in the context of large-scale reference databases. One approach is to identify significantly overlapping gene sets, which works well for gene-centric data. However, many types of high-throughput data are based on genomic regions. Locus Overlap Analysis (LOLA) provides easy and automatable enrichment analysis for genomic region sets, thus facilitating the interpretation of functional genomics and epigenomics data. Availability and Implementation: R package available in Bioconductor and on the following website: http://lola.computational-epigenetics.org. Contact: nsheffield@cemm.oeaw.ac.at or cbock@cemm.oeaw.ac.at PMID:26508757

  3. A systematic intercomparison of regional flood frequency analysis models in a simulation framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganora, Daniele; Laio, Francesco; Claps, Pierluigi

    2015-04-01

    Regional frequency analysis (RFA) is a well-established methodology to provide an estimate of the flood frequency curve (or other discharge-related variables), based on the fundamental concept of substituting temporal information at a site (no data or short time series) by exploiting observations at other sites (spatial information). Different RFA paradigms exist, depending on the way the information is transferred to the site of interest. Despite the wide use of such methodology, a systematic comparison between these paradigms has not been performed. The aim of this study is to provide a framework wherein carrying out the intercomparison: we thus synthetically generate data through Monte Carlo simulations for a number of (virtual) stations, following a GEV parent distribution; different scenarios can be created to represent different spatial heterogeneity patterns by manipulating the parameters of the parent distribution at each station (e.g. with a linear variation in space of the shape parameter of the GEV). A special case is the homogeneous scenario where each station record is sampled from the same parent distribution. For each scenario and each simulation, different regional models are applied to evaluate the 200-year growth factor at each station. Results are than compared to the exact growth factor of each station, which is known in our virtual world. Considered regional approaches include: (i) a single growth curve for the whole region; (ii) a multiple-region model based on cluster analysis which search for an adequate number of homogeneous subregions; (iii) a Region-of-Influence model which defines a homogeneous subregion for each site; (iv) a spatially-smooth estimation procedure based on linear regressions.. A further benchmark model is the at-site estimate based on the analysis of the local record. A comprehensive analysis of the results of the simulations shows that, if the scenario is homogeneous (no spatial variability), all the regional approaches

  4. Analysis of Seismic Activity of the last 15 Years Nearby Puerto Rico and Caribbean Region.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerta-Lopez, C. I.; Torres-Ortíz, D. M.; Fernández-Heredia, A. I.; Martínez-Cruzado, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    An earthquake catalog of the seismicity occurred during the last 15 years in the Caribbean region, nearby the vicinity of Puerto Rico Island (PRI) was compiled in order to capture the big picture of the regional seismic activity ratio and in particular at the epicentral regions of several historical and instrumentally recorded (during 2008-20015) large to moderate magnitude earthquakes occurred nearby PRI in onshore and offshore, which include the M6.4 earthquake of 01/13/2014, the largest earthquake recorded instrumentally nearby PRI. From the point of view of joint temporal-spatial distribution of epicenters, episodic temporal-spatial seismic activity is clearly seen as temporal-spatial concentrations during certain time intervals in different regions. These localized concentrations of epicenters that occur during certain time intervals in well localized/concentrated regions may suggest "seismic gaps" that shows no regular time interval, neither spatial pattern. In the epicentral region of the M6.4 01/13/2014 earthquake and the historical Mona Passage M7.5 earthquake of 10/11/1918, episodic concentrations in time and space of small magnitude earthquakes epicenters is evident, however do not show temporal pattern. Preliminary results of statistical analysis of an ongoing research in terms of the parameter b (Gutenberg-Richter relationship), and the Omori's law with the aim to relate the tectonic framework of the region (or sub-regions) such as structural heterogeneity stress are here presented/discussed.

  5. Coding region SNP analysis to enhance dog mtDNA discrimination power in forensic casework.

    PubMed

    Verscheure, Sophie; Backeljau, Thierry; Desmyter, Stijn

    2015-01-01

    The high population frequencies of three control region haplotypes contribute to the low discrimination power of the dog mtDNA control region. It also diminishes the evidential power of a match with one of these haplotypes in forensic casework. A mitochondrial genome study of 214 Belgian dogs suggested 26 polymorphic coding region sites that successfully resolved dogs with the three most frequent control region haplotypes. In this study, three SNP assays were developed to determine the identity of the 26 informative sites. The control region of 132 newly sampled dogs was sequenced and added to the study of 214 dogs. The assays were applied to 58 dogs of the haplotypes of interest, which confirmed their suitability for enhancing dog mtDNA discrimination power. In the Belgian population study of 346 dogs, the set of 26 sites divided the dogs into 25 clusters of mtGenome sequences with substantially lower population frequency estimates than their control region sequences. In case of a match with one of the three control region haplotypes, using these three SNP assays in conjunction with control region sequencing would augment the exclusion probability of dog mtDNA analysis from 92.9% to 97.0%. PMID:25299153

  6. Comparative Analysis Of 226Ra Soil-To-Plant Transfer In Cabbage Grown In Various Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madruga, M. J.; Carvalho, F. P.; Silva, L.; Gouveia, J.

    2008-08-01

    The transfer of 226Ra from soil to cabbage was compared amongst regions, namely the surroundings of Urgeiriça uranium milling tailings (GE), regions with past uranium mining activities (GN1), and regions with no uranium mining activities and no uranium deposits (GN2). Results show a slight increase of the concentration ratio values at low radium concentration in soils. Statistical analysis of the mean 226Ra activity concentrations in soil and cabbage for the three regions was carried out. The comparison of 226Ra activity concentrations in soils indicated no difference (p>0.05), between GE and GN2 and significant differences (p<0.05) between GE and GN1 and between GN1 and GN2. Similar statistical results were obtained for 226Ra activity concentrations in cabbage from the same regions. It was concluded that radium Concentration Ratio (CR) for cabbage grown in the region of the main uranium milling site (GE) is of the same order of magnitude of CR in cabagge grown in background regions (GN2). However, 226Ra CR was higher in cabagge from the region with past uranium mining activities (GN1).

  7. Modeling and Analysis of Global and Regional Climate Change in Relation to Atmospheric Hydrologic Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Donald R.

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this research is the continued development and application of global isentropic modeling and analysis capabilities to describe hydrologic processes and energy exchange in the climate system, and discern regional climate change. This work involves a combination of modeling and analysis efforts involving 4DDA datasets and simulations from the University of Wisconsin (UW) hybrid isentropic-sigma (theta-sigma) coordinate model and the GEOS GCM.

  8. AN APPROACH FOR DETERMINING REGIONAL LAND COVER AND SPECIES HABITAT DISTRIBUTIONS IN THE AMERICAN SOUTHWEST: THE SOUTHWEST REGIONAL GAP ANALYSIS PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Southwest Regional Gap Analysis Project (SWReGAP) is developing seamless digital coverages for land cover, vertebrate animal habitat, and land management status for the 5-state region of Nevada, Arizona, Utah, New Mexico, and Colorado. The project is a second generation effor...

  9. Comparative analysis of marine paleogene sections and biota from West Siberia and the Arctic Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmet'ev, M. A.; Zaporozhets, N. I.; Iakovleva, A. I.; Aleksandrova, G. N.; Beniamovsky, V. N.; Oreshkina, T. V.; Gnibidenko, Z. N.; Dolya, Zh. A.

    2010-12-01

    The analysis of the main biospheric events that took place in West Siberia and the Arctic region during the Early Paleogene revealed the paleogeographic and paleobiogeographic unity of marine sedimentation basins and close biogeographic relations between their separate parts. Most biotic and abiotic events of the first half of the Paleogene in the Arctic region and West Siberia were synchronous, unidirectional, and interrelated. Shelf settings, sedimentation breaks, and microfaunal assemblages characteristic of these basins during the Paleogene are compared. The comparative analysis primarily concerned events of the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM) and beds with Azolla (aquatic fern). The formation of the Eocene Azolla Beds in the Arctic region and West Siberia was asynchronous, although it proceeded in line with a common scenario related to the development of a system of estuarine-type currents in a sea basin partly isolated from the World Ocean.

  10. Utilizing ERTS-A imagery for tectonic analysis through study of the Bighorn Mountains Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppin, R. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Preliminary vegetation analysis has been undertaken on MSS scene 1085-17294, Oct. 16, 1973 in the Bighorn region. Forest Service maps showing detailed distribution of dominant forest types have been compared with MSS bands 5 and 7 positive transparencies, enlarged positive prints, and color imagery produced on an Addcol viewer. Patterns on the ERTS imagery match those on the Forest Service maps quite well. A tectonic map ovearlay of MSS band 7 of the Bighorn region reveals a strong concentration of linears in the uplift as compared to basins. Folds in the Bighorn Basin are visible where not covered by post-Paleocene deposits. In regions where far less is known of the geology than in this area, it might be possible to predict the subsurface occurrence of folds and lineaments on the basis of imagery analysis and more confidently explore covered areas for concealed oil structures and mineral deposits.

  11. Technology Outlook for Australian Tertiary Education 2013-2018: An NMC Horizon Project Regional Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, L.; Adams Becker, S.; Cummins, M.; Freeman, A.; Ifenthaler, D.; Vardaxis, N.

    2013-01-01

    The "Technology Outlook Australian Tertiary Education 2013-2018: An NMC Horizon Project Regional Analysis" reflects a collaborative research effort between the New Media Consortium (NMC) and Open Universities Australia to help inform Australian educational leaders about significant developments in technologies supporting teaching,…

  12. EMAP-WEST COMMUNICATIONS: DATA ANALYSIS WORKSHOPS TRANSFER STATISTICAL TECHNOLOGY TO REGIONS, STATES, AND TRIBES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Transferring monitoring technology is a key component of EMAP-West. The Coastal Team has begun that process with respect to data analyses with a series of workshops to train Regional/State/Tribal cooperators in how to conduct the statistical analysis of EMAP data. The three coast...

  13. Regional analysis of annual maximum rainfall using TL-moments method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabri, Ani Bin; Daud, Zalina Mohd; Ariff, Noratiqah Mohd

    2011-06-01

    Information related to distributions of rainfall amounts are of great importance for designs of water-related structures. One of the concerns of hydrologists and engineers is the probability distribution for modeling of regional data. In this study, a novel approach to regional frequency analysis using L-moments is revisited. Subsequently, an alternative regional frequency analysis using the TL-moments method is employed. The results from both methods were then compared. The analysis was based on daily annual maximum rainfall data from 40 stations in Selangor Malaysia. TL-moments for the generalized extreme value (GEV) and generalized logistic (GLO) distributions were derived and used to develop the regional frequency analysis procedure. TL-moment ratio diagram and Z-test were employed in determining the best-fit distribution. Comparison between the two approaches showed that the L-moments and TL-moments produced equivalent results. GLO and GEV distributions were identified as the most suitable distributions for representing the statistical properties of extreme rainfall in Selangor. Monte Carlo simulation was used for performance evaluation, and it showed that the method of TL-moments was more efficient for lower quantile estimation compared with the L-moments.

  14. Distance Education and the Six Regional Accrediting Commissions: A Comparative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, Scott L.; Baker, Katherine; Zuehl, Jennett; Johansen, Justin

    2007-01-01

    Background: The last comparative analysis of how the six regional accrediting commissions review distance education programs was conducted in 2000. A few months later in March 2001 all six accrediting bodies did something that they hadn't done before, they adopted common standards for reviewing distance education programs. Purpose: The purpose was…

  15. Method for Extraction and Multielement Analysis of Hypogymnia Physodes Samples from the Athabasca Oil Sands Region

    EPA Science Inventory

    A microwave-assisted digestion technique followed by ICPMS (inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry) analysis was used to measure concentrations of 43 elements in Hypogymnia physodes samples collected in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region (AOSR) of northern Alberta, Canad...

  16. 43 CFR 3420.3-4 - Regional tract ranking, selection, environmental analysis and scheduling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Regional tract ranking, selection, environmental analysis and scheduling. 3420.3-4 Section 3420.3-4 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) COMPETITIVE LEASING Competitive...

  17. THE NEVADA GEOSPATIAL DATA BROWSER: A SPATIAL DATA ARCHIVE FOR THE SOUTHWEST REGIONAL GAP ANALYSIS PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Southwest Regional Gap Analysis project (SWReGAP) is a 5-state (Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, and Utah) inter-agency program that maps the distribution of plant communities and selected animal species and compares these distributions with land stewardship to identify...

  18. AN OBJECTIVE ANALYSIS TECHNIQUE FOR THE REGIONAL AIR POLLUTION STUDY. PART I

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents the development of an objective analysis program for the mesoscale gridding of wind and temperature for the Regional Air Pollution Study being conducted in St. Louis by the Environmental Protection Agency. The program is designed to produce a 5-km spaced hor...

  19. AN OBJECTIVE ANALYSIS TECHNIQUE FOR THE REGIONAL AIR POLLUTION STUDY. PART II

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report discusses the application of objective analysis techniques to the computation of trajectories from surface wind observations of the Regional Air Pollution Study in St. Louis. Trajectories were computed over a 100-kilometer square grid centered on St. Louis for two 5-h...

  20. Clinical applications of a quantitative analysis of regional lift ventricular wall motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leighton, R. F.; Rich, J. M.; Pollack, M. E.; Altieri, P. I.

    1975-01-01

    Observations were summarized which may have clinical application. These were obtained from a quantitative analysis of wall motion that was used to detect both hypokinesis and tardokinesis in left ventricular cineangiograms. The method was based on statistical comparisons with normal values for regional wall motion derived from the cineangiograms of patients who were found not to have heart disease.

  1. 3D intrathoracic region definition and its application to PET-CT analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheirsilp, Ronnarit; Bascom, Rebecca; Allen, Thomas W.; Higgins, William E.

    2014-03-01

    Recently developed integrated PET-CT scanners give co-registered multimodal data sets that offer complementary three-dimensional (3D) digital images of the chest. PET (positron emission tomography) imaging gives highly specific functional information of suspect cancer sites, while CT (X-ray computed tomography) gives associated anatomical detail. Because the 3D CT and PET scans generally span the body from the eyes to the knees, accurate definition of the intrathoracic region is vital for focusing attention to the central-chest region. In this way, diagnostically important regions of interest (ROIs), such as central-chest lymph nodes and cancer nodules, can be more efficiently isolated. We propose a method for automatic segmentation of the intrathoracic region from a given co-registered 3D PET-CT study. Using the 3D CT scan as input, the method begins by finding an initial intrathoracic region boundary for a given 2D CT section. Next, active contour analysis, driven by a cost function depending on local image gradient, gradient-direction, and contour shape features, iteratively estimates the contours spanning the intrathoracic region on neighboring 2D CT sections. This process continues until the complete region is defined. We next present an interactive system that employs the segmentation method for focused 3D PET-CT chest image analysis. A validation study over a series of PET-CT studies reveals that the segmentation method gives a Dice index accuracy of less than 98%. In addition, further results demonstrate the utility of the method for focused 3D PET-CT chest image analysis, ROI definition, and visualization.

  2. Selection Signature Analysis Implicates the PC1/PCSK1 Region for Chicken Abdominal Fat Content

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhipeng; Zhang, Yuandan; Wang, Shouzhi; Wang, Ning; Ma, Li; Leng, Li; Wang, Shengwen; Wang, Qigui; Wang, Yuxiang; Tang, Zhiquan; Li, Ning; Da, Yang; Li, Hui

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a selection signature analysis using the chicken 60k SNP chip in two chicken lines that had been divergently selected for abdominal fat content (AFC) for 11 generations. The selection signature analysis used multiple signals of selection, including long-range allele frequency differences between the lean and fat lines, long-range heterozygosity changes, linkage disequilibrium, haplotype frequencies, and extended haplotype homozygosity. Multiple signals of selection identified ten signatures on chromosomes 1, 2, 4, 5, 11, 15, 20, 26 and Z. The 0.73 Mb PC1/PCSK1 region of the Z chromosome at 55.43-56.16 Mb was the most heavily selected region. This region had 26 SNP markers and seven genes, Mar-03, SLC12A2, FBN2, ERAP1, CAST, PC1/PCSK1 and ELL2, where PC1/PCSK1 are the chicken/human names for the same gene. The lean and fat lines had two main haplotypes with completely opposite SNP alleles for the 26 SNP markers and were virtually line-specific, and had a recombinant haplotype with nearly equal frequency (0.193 and 0.196) in both lines. Other haplotypes in this region had negligible frequencies. Nine other regions with selection signatures were PAH-IGF1, TRPC4, GJD4-CCNY, NDST4, NOVA1, GALNT9, the ESRP2-GALR1 region with five genes, the SYCP2-CADH4 with six genes, and the TULP1-KIF21B with 14 genes. Genome-wide association analysis showed that nearly all regions with evidence of selection signature had SNP effects with genome-wide significance (P<10–6) on abdominal fat weight and percentage. The results of this study provide specific gene targets for the control of chicken AFC and a potential model of AFC in human obesity. PMID:22792402

  3. Is there room for containing healthcare costs? An analysis of regional spending differentials in Italy.

    PubMed

    Francese, Maura; Romanelli, Marzia

    2014-03-01

    This work aims at identifying the determinants of health spending differentials among Italian regions and at highlighting potential margins for savings. The analysis exploits a data set for the 21 Italian regions and autonomous provinces starting in the early 1990s and ending in 2006. After controlling for standard healthcare demand indicators, remaining spending differentials are found to be significant, and they appear to be associated with differences in the degree of appropriateness of treatments, health sector supply structure and social capital indicators. In general, higher regional expenditure does not appear to be associated with better reported or perceived quality in health services. In the regions that display poorer performances, inefficiencies appear not to be uniformly distributed among expenditure items. Overall, results suggest that savings could be achieved without reducing the amount of services provided to citizens. This seems particularly important given the expected rise in spending associated with the forecasted demographic developments. PMID:23512733

  4. MR Analysis of Regional Brain Volume in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis: Neurological Manifestation of a Systemic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tianming; Chu, Winnie C.W.; Young, Geoffrey; Li, Kaiming; Yeung, Benson H.Y.; Guo, Lei; Man, Gene C.W.; Lam, Wynnie W.M.; Wong, Stephen T.C.; Cheng, Jack C.Y.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To investigate whether regional brain volumes in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) patients differ from matched control subjects as AIS subjects are reported to have poor performance on combined visual and proprioceptive testing and impaired postural balance in previous studies. Materials and Methods Twenty AIS female patients with typical right-convex thoracic curve (age range,11−18 years; mean, 14.1 years) and 26 female controls (mean age, 14.8 years) underwent three-dimensional magnetization prepared rapid acquisition gradient echo (3D-MPRAGE) MR imaging. Volumes of 99 preselected neuroanatomical regions were compared by statistical parametric mapping and atlas-based hybrid warping. Results Analysis of variance statistics revealed significant mean volumetric differences in 22 brain regions between AIS and controls. Ten regions were larger in AIS including the left frontal gyri and white matter in left frontal, parietal, and temporal regions, corpus callosum and brainstem. Twelve regions were smaller in AIS, including right-sided descending white matter tracts (anterior and posterior limbs of the right internal capsule and the cerebral peduncle) and deep nucleus (caudate), bilateral perirhinal cortices, left hippocampus and amygdala, bilateral precuneus gyri, and left middle and inferior occipital gyri. Conclusion Regional brain volume difference in AIS subjects may help to explain neurological abnormalities in this group. PMID:18302230

  5. ECOREGIONAL GAP ANALYSIS OF THE SOUTHWESTERN UNITED STATES: THE SOUTHWEST REGIONAL GAP ANALYSIS PROJECT FINAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Gap Analysis Program is a national program with the mission of developing key datasets needed to assess biological diversity across the nation. The primary objectives of the Gap Analysis Program are: (1) Land Cover Mapping – to map the distributions of natural communities; (2...

  6. A Comprehensive Analysis of Groundwater Quality in The Barnett Shale Region.

    PubMed

    Hildenbrand, Zacariah L; Carlton, Doug D; Fontenot, Brian E; Meik, Jesse M; Walton, Jayme L; Taylor, Josh T; Thacker, Jonathan B; Korlie, Stephanie; Shelor, C Phillip; Henderson, Drew; Kadjo, Akinde F; Roelke, Corey E; Hudak, Paul F; Burton, Taylour; Rifai, Hanadi S; Schug, Kevin A

    2015-07-01

    The exploration of unconventional shale energy reserves and the extensive use of hydraulic fracturing during well stimulation have raised concerns about the potential effects of unconventional oil and gas extraction (UOG) on the environment. Most accounts of groundwater contamination have focused primarily on the compositional analysis of dissolved gases to address whether UOG activities have had deleterious effects on overlying aquifers. Here, we present an analysis of 550 groundwater samples collected from private and public supply water wells drawing from aquifers overlying the Barnett shale formation of Texas. We detected multiple volatile organic carbon compounds throughout the region, including various alcohols, the BTEX family of compounds, and several chlorinated compounds. These data do not necessarily identify UOG activities as the source of contamination; however, they do provide a strong impetus for further monitoring and analysis of groundwater quality in this region as many of the compounds we detected are known to be associated with UOG techniques. PMID:26079990

  7. Adulteration and cultivation region identification of American ginseng using HPLC coupled with multivariate analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chunhao; Wang, Chong-Zhi; Zhou, Chun-Jie; Wang, Bin; Han, Lide; Zhang, Chun-Feng; Wu, Xiao-Hui; Yuan, Chun-Su

    2014-01-01

    American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius) is originally grown in North America. Due to price difference and supply shortage, American ginseng recently has been cultivated in northern China. Further, in the market, some Asian ginsengs are labeled as American ginseng. In this study, forty-three American ginseng samples cultivated in the USA, Canada or China were collected and 14 ginseng saponins were determined using HPLC. HPLC coupled with hierarchical cluster analysis and principal component analysis was developed to identify the species. Subsequently, an HPLC-linear discriminant analysis was established to discriminate cultivation regions of American ginseng. This method was successfully applied to identify the sources of 6 commercial American ginseng samples. Two of them were identified as Asian ginseng, while 4 others were identified as American ginseng, which were cultivated in the USA (3) and China (1). Our newly developed method can be used to identify American ginseng with different cultivation regions. PMID:25044150

  8. Adulteration and cultivation region identification of American ginseng using HPLC coupled with multivariate analysis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chunhao; Wang, Chong-Zhi; Zhou, Chun-Jie; Wang, Bin; Han, Lide; Zhang, Chun-Feng; Wu, Xiao-Hui; Yuan, Chun-Su

    2014-10-01

    American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius) is originally grown in North America. Due to price difference and supply shortage, American ginseng recently has been cultivated in northern China. Further, in the market, some Asian ginsengs are labeled as American ginseng. In this study, forty-three American ginseng samples cultivated in the USA, Canada or China were collected and 14 ginseng saponins were determined using HPLC. HPLC coupled with hierarchical cluster analysis and principal component analysis was developed to identify the species. Subsequently, an HPLC-linear discriminant analysis was established to discriminate cultivation regions of American ginseng. This method was successfully applied to identify the sources of 6 commercial American ginseng samples. Two of them were identified as Asian ginseng, while 4 others were identified as American ginseng, which were cultivated in the USA (3) and China (1). Our newly developed method can be used to identify American ginseng with different cultivation regions. PMID:25044150

  9. Genetic Analysis of the Adenosine3 (Gart) Region of the Second Chromosome of Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Tiong, SYK.; Nash, D.

    1990-01-01

    The Gart gene of Drosophila melanogaster is known, from molecular biological evidence, to encode a polypeptide that serves three enzymatic functions in purine biosynthesis. It is located in polytene chromosome region 27D. One mutation in the gene (ade3(1)) has been described previously. We report here forty new ethyl methanesulfonate-induced mutations selected against a synthetic deficiency of the region from 27C2-9 to 28B3-4. The mutations were characterized cytogenetically and by complementation analysis. The analysis apparently identifies 12 simple complementation groups. In addition, two segments of the chromosome exhibit complex complementation behavior. The first, the 28A region, gave three recessive lethals and also contains three known visible mutants, spade (spd), Sternopleural (sp) and wingless (wg); a complex pattern of genetic interaction in the region incorporates both the new and the previously known mutants. The second region is at 27D, where seven extreme semilethal mutations give a complex complementation pattern that also incorporates ade3(1). Since ade3(1) is defective in one of the enzymatic functions encoded in the Gart gene, we assume the other seven also affect the gene. The complexity of the complementation pattern presumably reflects the functional complexity of the gene product. The phenotypic effects of the mutants at 27D are very similar to those described for ade2 mutations, which also interrupt purine biosynthesis. PMID:2108904

  10. DNA barcode analysis of butterfly species from Pakistan points towards regional endemism

    PubMed Central

    Ashfaq, Muhammad; Akhtar, Saleem; Khan, Arif M; Adamowicz, Sarah J; Hebert, Paul D N

    2013-01-01

    DNA barcodes were obtained for 81 butterfly species belonging to 52 genera from sites in north-central Pakistan to test the utility of barcoding for their identification and to gain a better understanding of regional barcode variation. These species represent 25% of the butterfly fauna of Pakistan and belong to five families, although the Nymphalidae were dominant, comprising 38% of the total specimens. Barcode analysis showed that maximum conspecific divergence was 1.6%, while there was 1.7–14.3% divergence from the nearest neighbour species. Barcode records for 55 species showed <2% sequence divergence to records in the Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD), but only 26 of these cases involved specimens from neighbouring India and Central Asia. Analysis revealed that most species showed little incremental sequence variation when specimens from other regions were considered, but a threefold increase was noted in a few cases. There was a clear gap between maximum intraspecific and minimum nearest neighbour distance for all 81 species. Neighbour-joining cluster analysis showed that members of each species formed a monophyletic cluster with strong bootstrap support. The barcode results revealed two provisional species that could not be clearly linked to known taxa, while 24 other species gained their first coverage. Future work should extend the barcode reference library to include all butterfly species from Pakistan as well as neighbouring countries to gain a better understanding of regional variation in barcode sequences in this topographically and climatically complex region. PMID:23789612

  11. Regional frequency analysis for mapping drought events in north-central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Núñez, J. H.; Verbist, K.; Wallis, J. R.; Schaefer, M. G.; Morales, L.; Cornelis, W. M.

    2011-08-01

    SummaryDroughts are among the most important natural disasters, particularly in the arid and semiarid regions of the world. Proper management of droughts requires knowledge of the expected frequency of specific low magnitude precipitation totals for a variety of durations. Probabilistic approaches have often been used to estimate the average recurrence period of a given drought event. However, probabilistic model fitting by conventional methods, such as product moment or maximum likelihood in areas with low availability of long records often produces highly unreliable estimates. Recognizing the need for adequate estimates of return periods of severe droughts in the arid and semiarid region of Chile, a regional frequency analysis method based on L-moments (RFA-LM) was used for estimating and mapping drought frequency. Some adaptations to the existing procedures for forming homogeneous regions were found necessary. In addition, a new 3-parameter distribution, the Gaucho, which is a special case of the 4-parameter Kappa distribution, was introduced, and the analysis procedure was improved by the developments of two new software tools named L-RAP, to perform the RFA-LM analysis, and L-MAP, to map the resulting drought maps. Eight homogeneous sub-regions were delineated using the Gaucho distribution and used to construct return period maps for drought events with 80% and 40% precipitation of the normal. The study confirms the importance of a sub-regional homogeneity test, and the usefulness of the Gaucho distribution. The RFA-LM showed that droughts with a 40% precipitation of the normal have return periods that range from 4 years at the northern arid boundary of the study area to 22 years at the southern sub-humid boundary. The results demonstrate the need for different thresholds for declaring a drought than those currently in use for drought characterization in north-central Chile.

  12. Drought analysis according to shifting of climate zones to arid climate zone over Asia monsoon region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Kyung-Hwan; Bae, Deg-Hyo

    2015-10-01

    When a humid region is affected by arid climate, significant changes in drought characteristics occur due to imbalance of water budget. In this study, change in drought characteristics according to shift of different climates i.e. tropical, warm temperate, cold and polar to Arid Climate (SAC) was analyzed over the Asia monsoon region. Climate zones and the SAC regions were identified by applying the Köppen climate classification on hydro-meteorological data for the period of 1963-2006. The analysis of hydro-meteorological parameters revealed that the annual precipitation and runoff in the SAC regions appeared to decrease about 12.1% and 27.3%, respectively, while annual average temperature increased about 0.5 °C. Standardized runoff index (SRI) was calculated using model-driven runoff data. The trend and change point analyses of SRI were performed to evaluate the changes in drought characteristics (frequency, duration, severity) before and after shifting of the different climates to arid climate. The results revealed strong decreasing trend of SRI and hence intensified drought conditions for the SAC regions. A change point year of drought occurred about 3-5 years earlier than the shifting time of the SAC region. Frequency and duration of droughts in the SAC regions were observed to increase about 9.2 and 1.5 months, respectively, and drought severity index intensified to about -0.15. It can be concluded that analysis of shifting to arid climate zones should be considered together with changes in drought characteristics, because the drought characteristics and changing arid climate zones are closely related to each other.

  13. An exploratory spatial analysis of soil organic carbon distribution in Canadian eco-regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, S.-Y.; Li, J.

    2014-11-01

    As the largest carbon reservoir in ecosystems, soil accounts for more than twice as much carbon storage as that of vegetation biomass or the atmosphere. This paper examines spatial patterns of soil organic carbon (SOC) in Canadian forest areas at an eco-region scale of analysis. The goal is to explore the relationship of SOC levels with various climatological variables, including temperature and precipitation. The first Canadian forest soil database published in 1997 by the Canada Forest Service was analyzed along with other long-term eco-climatic data (1961 to 1991) including precipitation, air temperature, slope, aspect, elevation, and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) derived from remote sensing imagery. In addition, the existing eco-region framework established by Environment Canada was evaluated for mapping SOC distribution. Exploratory spatial data analysis techniques, including spatial autocorrelation analysis, were employed to examine how forest SOC is spatially distributed in Canada. Correlation analysis and spatial regression modelling were applied to determine the dominant ecological factors influencing SOC patterns at the eco-region level. At the national scale, a spatial error regression model was developed to account for spatial dependency and to estimate SOC patterns based on ecological and ecosystem factors. Based on the significant variables derived from the spatial error model, a predictive SOC map in Canadian forest areas was generated. Although overall SOC distribution is influenced by climatic and topographic variables, distribution patterns are shown to differ significantly between eco-regions. These findings help to validate the eco-region classification framework for SOC zonation mapping in Canada.

  14. Detecting Anomaly Regions in Satellite Image Time Series Based on Sesaonal Autocorrelation Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Z.-G.; Tang, P.; Zhou, M.

    2016-06-01

    Anomaly regions in satellite images can reflect unexpected changes of land cover caused by flood, fire, landslide, etc. Detecting anomaly regions in satellite image time series is important for studying the dynamic processes of land cover changes as well as for disaster monitoring. Although several methods have been developed to detect land cover changes using satellite image time series, they are generally designed for detecting inter-annual or abrupt land cover changes, but are not focusing on detecting spatial-temporal changes in continuous images. In order to identify spatial-temporal dynamic processes of unexpected changes of land cover, this study proposes a method for detecting anomaly regions in each image of satellite image time series based on seasonal autocorrelation analysis. The method was validated with a case study to detect spatial-temporal processes of a severe flooding using Terra/MODIS image time series. Experiments demonstrated the advantages of the method that (1) it can effectively detect anomaly regions in each of satellite image time series, showing spatial-temporal varying process of anomaly regions, (2) it is flexible to meet some requirement (e.g., z-value or significance level) of detection accuracies with overall accuracy being up to 89% and precision above than 90%, and (3) it does not need time series smoothing and can detect anomaly regions in noisy satellite images with a high reliability.

  15. Regional maximum rainfall analysis using L-moments at the Titicaca Lake drainage, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Palomino, Carlos Antonio; Lavado-Casimiro, Waldo Sven

    2016-07-01

    The present study investigates the application of the index flood L-moments-based regional frequency analysis procedure (RFA-LM) to the annual maximum 24-h rainfall (AM) of 33 rainfall gauge stations (RGs) to estimate rainfall quantiles at the Titicaca Lake drainage (TL). The study region was chosen because it is characterised by common floods that affect agricultural production and infrastructure. First, detailed quality analyses and verification of the RFA-LM assumptions were conducted. For this purpose, different tests for outlier verification, homogeneity, stationarity, and serial independence were employed. Then, the application of RFA-LM procedure allowed us to consider the TL as a single, hydrologically homogeneous region, in terms of its maximum rainfall frequency. That is, this region can be modelled by a generalised normal (GNO) distribution, chosen according to the Z test for goodness-of-fit, L-moments (LM) ratio diagram, and an additional evaluation of the precision of the regional growth curve. Due to the low density of RG in the TL, it was important to produce maps of the AM design quantiles estimated using RFA-LM. Therefore, the ordinary Kriging interpolation (OK) technique was used. These maps will be a useful tool for determining the different AM quantiles at any point of interest for hydrologists in the region.

  16. Global and regional analysis of climate and human drivers of wildfire.

    PubMed

    Aldersley, Andrew; Murray, Steven J; Cornell, Sarah E

    2011-08-15

    Identifying and quantifying the statistical relationships between climate and anthropogenic drivers of fire is important for global biophysical modelling of wildfire and other Earth system processes. This study used regression tree and random forest analysis on global data for various climatic and human variables to establish their relative importance. The main interactions found at the global scale also apply regionally: greatest wildfire burned area is associated with high temperature (> 28 °C), intermediate annual rainfall (350-1100 mm), and prolonged dry periods (which varies by region). However, the regions of highest fire incidence do not show clear and systematic behaviour. Thresholds seen in the regression tree split conditions vary, as do the interplay between climatic and anthropogenic variables, so challenges remain in developing robust predictive insight for the most wildfire-threatened regions. Anthropogenic activities alter the spatial extent of wildfires. Gross domestic product (GDP) density is the most important human predictor variable at the regional scale, and burned area is always greater when GDP density is minimised. South America is identified as a region of concern, as anthropogenic factors (notably land conversions) outweigh climatic drivers of wildfire burned area. PMID:21689843

  17. Preserved pontine glucose metabolism in Alzheimer disease: A reference region for functional brain image (PET) analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Minoshima, Satoshi; Frey, K.A.; Foster, N.L.; Kuhl, D.W.

    1995-07-01

    Our goal was to examine regional preservation of energy metabolism in Alzheimer disease (AD) and to evaluate effects of PET data normalization to reference regions. Regional metabolic rates in the pons, thalamus, putamen, sensorimotor cortex, visual cortex, and cerebellum (reference regions) were determined stereotaxically and examined in 37 patients with probable AD and 22 normal controls based on quantitative {sup 18}FDG-PET measurements. Following normalization of metabolic rates of the parietotemporal association cortex and whole brain to each reference region, distinctions of the two groups were assessed. The pons showed the best preservation of glucose metabolism in AD. Other reference regions showed relatively preserved metabolism compared with the parietotemporal association cortex and whole brain, but had significant metabolic reduction. Data normalization to the pons not only enhanced statistical significance of metabolic reduction in the parietotemporal association cortex, but also preserved the presence of global cerebral metabolic reduction indicated in analysis of the quantitative data. Energy metabolism in the pons in probable AD is well preserved. The pons is a reliable reference for data normalization and will enhance diagnostic accuracy and efficiency of quantitative and nonquantitative functional brain imaging. 39 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Regional frequency analysis of extreme rainfalls using partial L moments method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakaria, Zahrahtul Amani; Shabri, Ani

    2013-07-01

    An approach based on regional frequency analysis using L moments and LH moments are revisited in this study. Subsequently, an alternative regional frequency analysis using the partial L moments (PL moments) method is employed, and a new relationship for homogeneity analysis is developed. The results were then compared with those obtained using the method of L moments and LH moments of order two. The Selangor catchment, consisting of 37 sites and located on the west coast of Peninsular Malaysia, is chosen as a case study. PL moments for the generalized extreme value (GEV), generalized logistic (GLO), and generalized Pareto distributions were derived and used to develop the regional frequency analysis procedure. PL moment ratio diagram and Z test were employed in determining the best-fit distribution. Comparison between the three approaches showed that GLO and GEV distributions were identified as the suitable distributions for representing the statistical properties of extreme rainfall in Selangor. Monte Carlo simulation used for performance evaluation shows that the method of PL moments would outperform L and LH moments methods for estimation of large return period events.

  19. Analysis of rice Act1 5' region activity in transgenic rice plants.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, W; McElroy, D; Wu, R

    1991-01-01

    The 5' region of the rice actin 1 gene (Act1) has been developed as an efficient regulator of foreign gene expression in transgenic rice plants. To determine the pattern and level of rice Act1 5' region activity, transgenic rice plants containing the Act1 5' region fused to a bacterial beta-glucuronidase (Gus) coding sequence were generated. Two independent clonal lines of transgenic rice plants were analyzed in detail. Quantitative analysis showed that tissue from these transgenic rice plants have a level of GUS protein that represents as much as 3% of total soluble protein. We were able to demonstrate that Act1-Gus gene expression is constitutive throughout the sporophytic and gametophytic tissues of these transgenic rice plants. Plants from one transgenic line were analyzed for the segregation of GUS activity in pollen by in situ histochemical staining, and the inheritance and stability of Act1-Gus expression were assayed in subsequently derived progeny plants. PMID:1821763

  20. Analysis of tissue-specific region in sericin 1 gene promoter of Bombyx mori

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yan; Yu Lian; Guo Xiuyang; Guo Tingqing; Wang Shengpeng; Lu Changde . E-mail: cdlu@sibs.ac.cn

    2006-03-31

    The gene encoding sericin 1 (Ser1) of silkworm (Bombyx mori) is specifically expressed in the middle silk gland cells. To identify element involved in this transcription-dependent spatial restriction, truncation of the 5' terminal from the sericin 1 (Ser1) promoter is studied in vivo. A 209 bp DNA sequence upstream of the transcriptional start site (-586 to -378) is found to be responsible for promoting tissue-specific transcription. Analysis of this 209 bp region by overlapping deletion studies showed that a 25 bp region (-500 to -476) suppresses the ectopic expression of the Ser1 promoter. An unknown factor abundant in fat body nuclear extracts is shown to bind to this 25 bp fragment. These results suggest that this 25 bp region and the unknown factor are necessary for determining the tissue-specificity of the Ser1 promoter.

  1. Genetic heterogeneity in five Italian regions: analysis of PAH mutations and minihaplotypes.

    PubMed

    Giannattasio, S; Dianzani, I; Lattanzio, P; Spada, M; Romano, V; Calì, F; Andria, G; Ponzone, A; Marra, E; Piazza, A

    2001-01-01

    Molecular analysis of 289 chromosomes has been performed in a cohort of phenylketonuria (PKU) patients whose ancestors lived in five Italian regions, Calabria, Campania, Piemonte, Puglia/Basilicata and Sicilia. Phenylalaninehydroxylase (PAH) gene mutations and minihaplotypes (combinations of PAH gene STR and VNTR systems) have been determined for 78.5 and 64%, respectively, of the chromosomes studied. 21 different minihaplotypes and 24 PKU mutations were found. Heterogeneity tests carried out for the frequencies of mutations and minihaplotypes show that the distribution of eight mutations and four minihaplotypes is statistically heterogeneous in the five Italian regions. Although the evolutionary rate of microsatellites or the age of these mutations is difficult to estimate with accuracy, our findings taken together show a genetic stratification of the Italian population. These results rule out allelic homogeneity of PKU at the molecular level between regions of Italy, yet minihaplotype data may be of practical use for a multistep approach to PAH gene genotyping. PMID:11588399

  2. Functional analysis of the upstream regulatory region of chicken miR-17-92 cluster.

    PubMed

    Min, Cheng; Wenjian, Zhang; Tianyu, Xing; Xiaohong, Yan; Yumao, Li; Hui, Li; Ning, Wang

    2016-08-01

    miR-17-92 cluster plays important roles in cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, animal development and tumorigenesis. The transcriptional regulation of miR-17-92 cluster has been extensively studied in mammals, but not in birds. To date, avian miR-17-92 cluster genomic structure has not been fully determined. The promoter location and sequence of miR-17-92 cluster have not been determined, due to the existence of a genomic gap sequence upstream of miR-17-92 cluster in all the birds whose genomes have been sequenced. In this study, genome walking was used to close the genomic gap upstream of chicken miR-17-92 cluster. In addition, bioinformatics analysis, reporter gene assay and truncation mutagenesis were used to investigate functional role of the genomic gap sequence. Genome walking analysis showed that the gap region was 1704 bp long, and its GC content was 80.11%. Bioinformatics analysis showed that in the gap region, there was a 200 bp conserved sequence among the tested 10 species (Gallus gallus, Homo sapiens, Pan troglodytes, Bos taurus, Sus scrofa, Rattus norvegicus, Mus musculus, Possum, Danio rerio, Rana nigromaculata), which is core promoter region of mammalian miR-17-92 host gene (MIR17HG). Promoter luciferase reporter gene vector of the gap region was constructed and reporter assay was performed. The result showed that the promoter activity of pGL3-cMIR17HG (-4228/-2506) was 417 times than that of negative control (empty pGL3 basic vector), suggesting that chicken miR-17-92 cluster promoter exists in the gap region. To further gain insight into the promoter structure, two different truncations for the cloned gap sequence were generated by PCR. One had a truncation of 448 bp at the 5'-end and the other had a truncation of 894 bp at the 3'-end. Further reporter analysis showed that compared with the promoter activity of pGL3-cMIR17HG (-4228/-2506), the reporter activities of the 5'-end truncation and the 3'-end truncation were reduced by 19

  3. MGS/TES-Odyssey/THEMIS-IR Analysis of Localized Low Albedo Regions in Valles Marineris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    NoeDobrea, E. Z.; Bell, J. F., III; Wolff, M. J.; Snook, K. J.

    2003-01-01

    We are conducting a systematic analysis of small (approximately 10's of km), localized regions in Valles Marineris that display significant albedo differences relative to their surroundings. This analysis is based on a finding that the locations of the hematite deposits identified by [1] in the interior layered deposits of Valles Marineris typically coincide with regions having a low MGS/TES visible bolometric albedo [1,2]. Until recently, it was difficult to identify the morphology or geologic context of the regions containing the hematite deposits. However, with the recent advent of high-resolution (1/128 /pixel) MOLA grided topography and Mars Odyssey s THEMIS-IR instrument, it has been possible to better understand the morphologic context of TES observations. This analysis combines the use of PDS-released data from the MGS/TES visible bolometer and infrared spectrometer, the Odyssey/THEMIS Infrared imager, and MOLA grided topography. First, the TES infrared bolometer is used to identify regions of interesting albedo variability, and is overlaid on Viking controlled photomosaics for context. THEMIS-IR data, in conjunction with MOLA topography, is then used to: 1) identify the context and morphology of the area; and 2) identify spectrally unique regions at the km scale. In preparation for the latter, all the THEMIS planes are coregistered using an autocorrelation routine, the data are converted to brightness temperature and then each plane is normalized to the brightness temperature of the third plane (1261 cm-1). We then perform a 3-band search for color variations and a Principle Components Analysis (PCA) of the 8 unique bands in the THEMIS-IR dataset. Any variability is then investigated using both THEMIS-IR and TES spectra of the same regions. In both cases, the spectra are ratioed to near-simultaneously acquired spectra of adjacent or "average" regions that do not show this albedo variation, therefore allowing us to identify spectral variability unique to

  4. The Crustal Structure Of The Marmara Region Using Receiver Function Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büyükakpınar, Pınar; Gürbüz, Cemil; Zor, Ekrem

    2016-04-01

    The Marmara region is a rapidly deforming area with high seismic activity in the northwestern Turkey. In order to further understand the crustal structure in the region, we present results from receiver function analysis using the permanent stations in the region by applying H-κ stacking algorithm which gives crustal thickness and Vp/Vs ratio beneath a station. 40 land stations between January of 2008 and April of 2012, and 5 cabled Sea Bottom Observatories which were deployed at the end of 2010 by KOERI located between 40.2°- 41.2° N and 26.5°- 30.5° E were included in the analysis. Approximately 250 teleseismic events from a wide range of epicentral distances with magnitudes greater than Mw 5.5 are used to obtain receiver functions. Furthermore, in order to calculate the receiver functions in time domain using iterative deconvolution technique suggested by Ligorria and Ammon (1999). Consequently, the crustal structure of the region has been reasonably defined and compared with the other studies. As a consequence of the receiver function analysis, the Moho depth variation map and Vp/Vs ratio map were plotted. The Moho depth on average is 31 km. There are no sharp changes in the crustal thickness of the Marmara Region except North Marmara Trough because basin structure of the Marmara Sea where crustal thickness reaches up to 26 km in the same region was not observed. Furthermore, we found overall average Vp/Vs ratio of 1.74, for the region but we obtained low Vp/Vs ratios in the stations located near Çınarcık Basin which varies between 1.64 - 1.74 indicating the effect of basin structure in the area and North Marmara where Vp/Vs ratios vary between 1.60 and 1.70 which is related to the sediment structure of the area. We also acquired higher Vp/Vs ratios which are between 1.86 and 1.96 in the Western Marmara Region. This can be due to increasing mafic content in this area. Additionally, an attempt has been made to invert the radial receiver function of the

  5. Regional gray matter atrophy in relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis: baseline analysis of multi-center data.

    PubMed

    Datta, Sushmita; Staewen, Terrell D; Cofield, Stacy S; Cutter, Gary R; Lublin, Fred D; Wolinsky, Jerry S; Narayana, Ponnada A

    2015-03-01

    Regional gray matter (GM) atrophy in multiple sclerosis (MS) at disease onset and its temporal variation can provide objective information regarding disease evolution. An automated pipeline for estimating atrophy of various GM structures was developed using tensor based morphometry (TBM) and implemented on a multi-center sub-cohort of 1008 relapsing remitting MS (RRMS) patients enrolled in a Phase 3 clinical trial. Four hundred age and gender matched healthy controls were used for comparison. Using the analysis of covariance, atrophy differences between MS patients and healthy controls were assessed on a voxel-by-voxel analysis. Regional GM atrophy was observed in a number of deep GM structures that included thalamus, caudate nucleus, putamen, and cortical GM regions. General linear regression analysis was performed to analyze the effects of age, gender, and scanner field strength, and imaging sequence on the regional atrophy. Correlations between regional GM volumes and expanded disability status scale (EDSS) scores, disease duration (DD), T2 lesion load (T2 LL), T1 lesion load (T1 LL), and normalized cerebrospinal fluid (nCSF) were analyzed using Pearson׳s correlation coefficient. Thalamic atrophy observed in MS patients compared to healthy controls remained consistent within subgroups based on gender and scanner field strength. Weak correlations between thalamic volume and EDSS (r=-0.133; p<0.001) and DD (r=-0.098; p=0.003) were observed. Of all the structures, thalamic volume moderately correlated with T2 LL (r=-0.492; P-value<0.001), T1 LL (r=-0.473; P-value<0.001) and nCSF (r=-0.367; P-value<0.001). PMID:25787188

  6. Regional Gray Matter Atrophy in Relapsing Remitting Multiple Sclerosis: Baseline Analysis of Multi-Center Data

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Sushmita; Staewen, Terrell D.; Cofield, Stacy S.; Cutter, Gary R.; Lublin, Fred D.; Wolinsky, Jerry S.; Narayana, Ponnada A.

    2015-01-01

    Regional gray matter (GM) atrophy in multiple sclerosis (MS) at disease onset and its temporal variation can provide objective information regarding disease evolution. An automated pipeline for estimating atrophy of various GM structures was developed using tensor based morphometry (TBM) and implemented on a multi-center sub-cohort of 1008 relapsing remitting MS (RRMS) patients enrolled in a Phase 3 clinical trial. Four hundred age and gender matched healthy controls were used for comparison. Using the analysis of covariance, atrophy differences between MS patients and healthy controls were assessed on a voxel-by-voxel analysis. Regional GM atrophy was observed in a number of deep GM structures that included thalamus, caudate nucleus, putamen, and cortical GM regions. General linear regression analysis was performed to analyze the effects of age, gender, and scanner field strength, and imaging sequence on the regional atrophy. Correlations between regional GM volumes and expanded disability status scale (EDSS) scores, disease duration (DD), T2 lesion load (T2 LL), T1 lesion load (T1 LL), and normalized cerebrospinal fluid (nCSF) were analyzed using Pearson’s correlation coefficient. Thalamic atrophy observed in MS patients compared to healthy controls remained consistent within subgroups based on gender and scanner field strength. Weak correlations between thalamic volume and EDSS (r = −0.133; p < 0.001) and DD (r = −0.098; p = 0.003) were observed. Of all the structures, thalamic volume moderately correlated with T2 LL (r = −0.492; p-value < 0.001), T1 LL (r = −0.473; p-value < 0.001) and nCSF (r = −0.367; p-value < 0.001). PMID:25787188

  7. Minimax regret optimization analysis for a regional solid waste management system.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ni-Bin; Davila, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Solid waste management (SWM) facilities are crucial for environmental management and public health in urban regions. Due to the waste management hierarchy, one of the greatest challenges that organizations face today is to figure out how to diversify the treatment options, increase the reliability of infrastructure systems, and leverage the redistribution of waste streams among incineration, compost, recycling, and other facilities to their competitive advantage region wide. Systems analysis plays an important role for regionalization assessment of integrated SWM systems, leading to provide decision makers with break-through insights and risk-informed strategies. This paper aims to apply a minimax regret optimization analysis for improving SWM strategies in the Lower Rio Grande Valley (LRGV), an economically fast growing region in the US. Based on different environmental, economic, legal, and social conditions, event-based simulation in the first stage links estimated waste streams in major cities in LRGV with possible solid waste management alternatives. The optimization analysis in the second stage emphasizes the trade-offs and associated regret evaluation with respect to predetermined scenarios. Such optimization analyses with multiple criteria have featured notable successes, either by public or private efforts, in diverting recyclables, green waste, yard waste, and biosolids from the municipal solid waste streams to upcoming waste-to-energy, composting, and recycling facilities. Model outputs may link prescribed regret scenarios in decision making with various scales of regionalization policies. The insights drawn from the system-oriented, forward-looking, and preventative study can eventually help decision-makers and stakeholders gain a scientific understanding of the consequences of short-term and long-term decisions relating to sustainable SWM in the fast-growing US-Mexico borderland. PMID:16793251

  8. The influence of regional deprivation index on personal happiness using multilevel analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kil Hun; Chun, Jin-Ho; Sohn, Hae Sook

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of the present study was to identify the factors that influence the happiness index of community residents, by considering personal and regional aspects, and to use as evidence of efforts for improvement of the happiness index. METHODS: The study was conducted based on information from 16,270 participants who met the data requirement among those who participated in the 2011 South Gyeongsang Community Health Survey. Of the factors that can influence the happiness index, socioeconomic characteristics, health behavior, morbidity, and healthcare use, social contact, and participation in social activities were classified as personal factors; for regional factors, data from the 2010 census were used to extrapolate the regional deprivation indices at the submunicipal-level (eup, myeon, and dong) in South Gyeongsang Province. The happiness index for each characteristic was compared to that for others via t-test and ANOVA, and multilevel analysis was performed, using four models: a basic model for identification of only random effects, model 1 for identification of personal factors, model 2 for identification of regional factors, and model 3 for simultaneous consideration of both personal and regional factors. RESULTS: The mean happiness index was 63.2 points (64.6 points in males and 62.0 points in females), while the mean deprivation index was -1.58 points. In the multilevel analysis, the regional-level variance ratio of the basic model was 10.8%, confirming interregional differences. At the personal level, higher happiness indices were seen in groups consisting of males with high educational level, high income, high degree of physical activity, sufficient sleep, active social contact, and participation in social activities; whereas lower happiness indices were seen in people who frequently skipped breakfast, had unmet healthcare needs, and had accompanying diseases, as well as those with higher deprivation index. CONCLUSIONS: The study confirmed

  9. Statistical analysis of multipole components in the magnetic field of the RHIC arc regions

    SciTech Connect

    Beebe-Wang,J.; Jain, A.

    2009-05-04

    The existence of multipolar components in the dipole and quadrupole magnets is one of the factors limiting the beam stability in the RHIC operations. Therefore, the statistical properties of the non-linear fields are crucial for understanding the beam behavior and for achieving the superior performance in RHIC. In an earlier work [1], the field quality analysis of the RHIC interaction regions (IR) was presented. Furthermore, a procedure for developing non-linear IR models constructed from measured multipolar data of RHIC IR magnets was described. However, the field quality in the regions outside of the RHIC IR had not yet been addressed. In this paper, we present the statistical analysis of multipolar components in the magnetic fields of the RHIC arc regions. The emphasis is on the lower order components, especially the sextupole in the arc dipole and the 12-pole in the quadrupole magnets, since they are shown to have the strongest effects on the beam stability. Finally, the inclusion of the measured multipolar components data of RHIC arc regions and their statistical properties into tracking models is discussed.

  10. Quantitative analysis of raw materials mining of Sverdlovsk region in Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasyev, Alexander M.; Vasilev, Julian; Turygina, Victoria F.

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to show the application of some qualitative methods for the analysis of a dataset for raw materials. The main approaches used are related to the correlation analysis and forecasting with trend lines. It is proved that the future mining of particular ores can be predicted on the basis of mathematical modeling. It is also shown that there exists a strong correlation between the mining of some specific raw materials. Some of the revealed correlations have meaningful explanations, and for others one should look for sophisticated interpretations. The applied approach can be used for forecasting of raw materials exploitation in various regions of Russia and in other countries.

  11. Image segmentation by iterative parallel region growing with application to data compression and image analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, James C.

    1988-01-01

    Image segmentation can be a key step in data compression and image analysis. However, the segmentation results produced by most previous approaches to region growing are suspect because they depend on the order in which portions of the image are processed. An iterative parallel segmentation algorithm avoids this problem by performing globally best merges first. Such a segmentation approach, and two implementations of the approach on NASA's Massively Parallel Processor (MPP) are described. Application of the segmentation approach to data compression and image analysis is then described, and results of such application are given for a LANDSAT Thematic Mapper image.

  12. Phylogeny of sipunculan worms: A combined analysis of four gene regions and morphology.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Anja; Cutler, Edward B; Giribet, Gonzalo

    2007-01-01

    The intra-phyletic relationships of sipunculan worms were analyzed based on DNA sequence data from four gene regions and 58 morphological characters. Initially we analyzed the data under direct optimization using parsimony as optimality criterion. An implied alignment resulting from the direct optimization analysis was subsequently utilized to perform a Bayesian analysis with mixed models for the different data partitions. For this we applied a doublet model for the stem regions of the 18S rRNA. Both analyses support monophyly of Sipuncula and most of the same clades within the phylum. The analyses differ with respect to the relationships among the major groups but whereas the deep nodes in the direct optimization analysis generally show low jackknife support, they are supported by 100% posterior probability in the Bayesian analysis. Direct optimization has been useful for handling sequences of unequal length and generating conservative phylogenetic hypotheses whereas the Bayesian analysis under mixed models provided high resolution in the basal nodes of the tree. PMID:16919974

  13. Modeling and Analysis of Global and Regional Climate Change in Relation to Atmospheric Hydrologic Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Donald R.

    2001-01-01

    This research was directed to the development and application of global isentropic modeling and analysis capabilities to describe hydrologic processes and energy exchange in the climate system, and discern regional climate change. An additional objective was to investigate the accuracy and theoretical limits of global climate predictability which are imposed by the inherent limitations of simulating trace constituent transport and the hydrologic processes of condensation, precipitation and cloud life cycles.

  14. [Comparative analysis of mortality among population of industrial mono-cities in Sverdlovsky region].

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    The article covers comparative analysis of mortality causes and levels, with special consideration of mortality with malignancies, among dwellers of Asbest (enterprise forming company town - Pulbic Corporation "Uralasbest" - world leader in extraction and concentration of chrysotile asbestos) and Kamensk-Uralsky (enterprises forming company town - non-ferrous metallurgy plants), agricultural agea and population of Sverdlovsk region over 10 years (1997-2006). Major attention was paid to influence of dust containing chrysotile asbestos fibers. PMID:21786637

  15. [Regional ecosecurity pattern in urban area based on land use analysis: a case study in Lanzhou].

    PubMed

    Fang, Shubo; Xiao, Dunin; An, Shuqing

    2005-12-01

    Mid-scale regional ecosecurity, which takes practical ecosecurity issues as its priority, should be viewed as the core of the multi-scale concept of ecosecurity. For urban area, a special region taking ecological infrastructure as its core mission, the construction of regional ecosecurity pattern may provide a good chance to realize its sustainable development. Based on land use analysis, a qualitative and quantitative research on the landscape pattern, ecovalue evaluation, and driving force analysis of social economy could provide an effective approach to construct the ecosecurity pattern in urban area. This study showed that in Lanzhou, the ecosecurity pattern consisted of three parts, i.e., eco-safeguarding system, eco-buffering system and eco-percolating system, among which, eco-buffering system was the decisive part determining ecosecurity pattern construction. The quantitative analysis of urban spatial expansion pattern was taken as the decisive function to determine the security level of the ecosecurity pattern, which was divided into low, middle and high levels. PMID:16515173

  16. Structural analysis and physical mapping of a pericentromeric region of chromosome 5 of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Tutois, S; Cloix, C; Cuvillier, C; Espagnol, M C; Lafleuriel, J; Picard, G; Tourmente, S

    1999-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana CIC YAC 2D2, 510 kb long and containing a small block of 180 bp satellite units was subcloned after EcoR1 digestion in the pBluescript plasmid. One of these clones was mapped genetically in the pericentromeric region of chromosome 5. The analysis of 40 subclones of this YAC showed that they all contain repeated sequences with a high proportion of transposable elements. Three new retrotransposons, two Ty-3 Gypsy-like and one Ty-1 Copia, were identified in addition to two new tandem-repeat families. A physical map of the chromosome 5 pericentromeric region was established using CIC YAC clones, spanning around 1000 kb. This contig extends from the CIC YAC 9F5 and 7A2 positioned on the left arm of chromosome 5 to a 5S rDNA genes block localized by in-situ hybridization in the pericentromeric region. Hybridization of the subclones on the CIC YAC library showed that some of them are restricted to the pericentromeric region of chromosome 5 and represent specific markers of this region. PMID:10328626

  17. Spatio-Temporal Pattern Analysis for Regional Climate Change Using Mathematical Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, M.; Ghosh, S. K.

    2015-07-01

    Of late, significant changes in climate with their grave consequences have posed great challenges on humankind. Thus, the detection and assessment of climatic changes on a regional scale is gaining importance, since it helps to adopt adequate mitigation and adaptation measures. In this paper, we have presented a novel approach for detecting spatio-temporal pattern of regional climate change by exploiting the theory of mathematical morphology. At first, the various climatic zones in the region have been identified by using multifractal cross-correlation analysis (MF-DXA) of different climate variables of interest. Then, the directional granulometry with four different structuring elements has been studied to detect the temporal changes in spatial distribution of the identified climatic zones in the region and further insights have been drawn with respect to morphological uncertainty index and Hurst exponent. The approach has been evaluated with the daily time series data of land surface temperature (LST) and precipitation rate, collected from Microsoft Research - Fetch Climate Explorer, to analyze the spatio-temporal climatic pattern-change in the Eastern and North-Eastern regions of India throughout four quarters of the 20th century.

  18. Spatial analysis of future East Asian seasonal temperature using two regional climate model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yura; Jun, Mikyoung; Min, Seung-Ki; Suh, Myoung-Seok; Kang, Hyun-Suk

    2016-05-01

    CORDEX-East Asia, a branch of the coordinated regional climate downscaling experiment (CORDEX) initiative, provides high-resolution climate simulations for the domain covering East Asia. This study analyzes temperature data from regional climate models (RCMs) participating in the CORDEX - East Asia region, accounting for the spatial dependence structure of the data. In particular, we assess similarities and dissimilarities of the outputs from two RCMs, HadGEM3-RA and RegCM4, over the region and over time. A Bayesian functional analysis of variance (ANOVA) approach is used to simultaneously model the temperature patterns from the two RCMs for the current and future climate. We exploit nonstationary spatial models to handle the spatial dependence structure of the temperature variable, which depends heavily on latitude and altitude. For a seasonal comparison, we examine changes in the winter temperature in addition to the summer temperature data. We find that the temperature increase projected by RegCM4 tends to be smaller than the projection of HadGEM3-RA for summers, and that the future warming projected by HadGEM3-RA tends to be weaker for winters. Also, the results show that there will be a warming of 1-3°C over the region in 45 years. More specifically, the warming pattern clearly depends on the latitude, with greater temperature increases in higher latitude areas, which implies that warming may be more severe in the northern part of the domain.

  19. A parametric Bayesian combination of local and regional information in flood frequency analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidou, O.; Ouarda, T. B. M. J.; Barbet, M.; Bruneau, P.; BobéE, B.

    2006-11-01

    Because of their impact on hydraulic structure design as well as on floodplain management, flood quantiles must be estimated with the highest precision given available information. If the site of interest has been monitored for a sufficiently long period (more than 30-40 years), at-site frequency analysis can be used to estimate flood quantiles with a fair precision. Otherwise, regional estimation may be used to mitigate the lack of data, but local information is then ignored. A commonly used approach to combine at-site and regional information is the linear empirical Bayes estimation: Under the assumption that both local and regional flood quantile estimators have a normal distribution, the empirical Bayesian estimator of the true quantile is the weighted average of both estimations. The weighting factor for each estimator is conversely proportional to its variance. We propose in this paper an alternative Bayesian method for combining local and regional information which provides the full probability density of quantiles and parameters. The application of the method is made with the generalized extreme values (GEV) distribution, but it can be extended to other types of extreme value distributions. In this method the prior distributions are obtained using a regional log linear regression model, and then local observations are used within a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm to infer the posterior distributions of parameters and quantiles. Unlike the empirical Bayesian approach the proposed method works even with a single local observation. It also relaxes the hypothesis of normality of the local quantiles probability distribution. The performance of the proposed methodology is compared to that of local, regional, and empirical Bayes estimators on three generated regional data sets with different statistical characteristics. The results show that (1) when the regional log linear model is unbiased, the proposed method gives better estimations of the GEV quantiles and

  20. Crustal and Uppermost Mantle Structure beneath the Western United States from USArray Regional Phase Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buehler, Janine Sylvia

    The aim of this dissertation is to improve our understanding of the crust and uppermost mantle structure in the western United States, profiting from the wealth of regional phase data recorded at USArray stations. USArray, a transportable seismic array of ˜400 seismometers, has greatly increased seismic data coverage across the United States in the past few years, and allows imaging of the lithosphere of the North American continent with better resolution and new methods. The regional phases are often challenging to analyze, especially in a tectonically-active region like the western United States, because of their sensitivities to the heterogeneities of the crust and uppermost mantle. However, knowledge of the seismic structure of the lithosphere is not only essential in order to accurately image the velocity structure at greater depths, but also for constraining geodynamic models that reconstruct the tectonic evolution of the continent, and hence the information that is carried by the regional phases is very valuable. The data set used in this study consists mostly of the regional seismic phases Pn and Sn, which propagate horizontally along the Moho in the mantle lid and constrain the seismic velocity structure at a confined depth. We applied traditional tomographic methods that profit from the improved ray coverage through USArray, but also employed array-based techniques that take advantage of the regular station spacing of the transportable array and don't depend on regularization. In addition, we used stacking methods to image the propagation efficiency of the Sn phase, which is often highly attenuated in tectonically active regions, on a regional scale. The results complement other seismic studies that average over greater depth intervals, such as surface- and body-wave tomographies and anisotropy analysis from shear-wave splitting, to provide information on temperature, composition, and tectonic processes at depth. Comparisons between Pn azimuthal

  1. An exploratory analysis of the regionalization policy for the recruitment of health workers in Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Health personnel retention in remote areas is a key health systems issue wordwide. To deal with this issue, since 2002 the government of Burkina Faso has implemented a staff retention policy, the regionalized health personnel recruitment policy, aimed at front-line workers such as nurses, midwives, and birth attendants. This study aimed to describe the policy’s development, formulation, and implementation process for the regionalization of health worker recruitment in Burkina Faso. Methods We conducted a qualitative study. The unit of analysis is a single case study with several levels of analysis. This study was conducted in three remote areas in Burkina Faso for the implementation portion, and at the central level for the development portion. Indepth interviews were conducted with Ministry of Health officials in charge of human resources, regional directors, regional human resource managers, district chief medical officers, and health workers at primary health centres. In total, 46 indepth interviews were conducted (February 3 - March 16, 2011). Results Development The idea for this policy emerged after finding a highly uneven distribution of health personnel across urban and rural areas, the availability of a large number of health officers in the labour market, and the opportunity given to the Ministry of Health by the government to recruit personnel through a specific budget allocation. Formulation The formulation consisted of a call for job applications from the Ministry of Health, which indicates the number of available posts by region. The respondents interviewed unanimously acknowledged the lack of documents governing the status of this new personnel category. Implementation During the initial years of implementation (2002-2003), this policy was limited to recruiting health workers for the regions with no possibility of transfer. The possibility of job-for-job exchange was then approved for a certain time, then cancelled. Starting in 2005, a

  2. Introduction to an Updated Analysis of Planetary Protection: "Special Regions" on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaty, D. W.; Rummel, J. D.; Viola, D.

    2014-03-01

    Since the beginning of human activity in space science and exploration, there has been an appreciation of the negative consequences of transferring life from one planet to another. Given the unknown consequences of contact between two life forms and the fundamental value of studying a new form life, thoughtfulness and caution are warranted. The "special regions" concept is a component of the International Council for Science's Committee on Space Research (COSPAR) Planetary Protection Policy, as it applies to Mars. These are regions "within which terrestrial organisms are likely to replicate" as well as "any region which is interpreted to have a high potential for the existence of extant martian life." Robotic missions planning to have direct contact with such special regions are given planetary protection categorization (IVc), with stringent cleanliness constraints on the portions of the mission contacting such regions. The current, quantitative definition of "special regions based on temperature and water activity limits was adopted by COSPAR in 2008 after a two-year process that included meetings of the Mars Exploration Planning and Analysis Group's (MEPAG) Special Regions Science Analysis Group (SR-SAG) and COSPAR's Panel on Planetary Protection. In this study, the MEPAG SR-SAG2 will review and update the technical information that underlie NASA's and COSPAR's definition of special regions on Mars, enabling interpretations of when and where they could occur in light of new discoveries since 2007. This will include updates of current understanding in (1) the known physical limits to life on Earth, including low temperature and low water activity, the biological capture/use of vapor-phase water, and survival over long time scales with short periods of growth; (2) observational data sets and new models from Mars that could be relevant to our understanding of the natural variations on Mars of water activity and temperature, including recurring slope lineae (RSL

  3. Analysis of regional bone scan index measurements for the survival of patients with prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A bone scan is a common method for monitoring bone metastases in patients with advanced prostate cancer. The Bone Scan Index (BSI) measures the tumor burden on the skeleton, expressed as a percentage of the total skeletal mass. Previous studies have shown that BSI is associated with survival of prostate cancer patients. The objective in this study was to investigate to what extent regional BSI measurements, as obtained by an automated method, can improve the survival analysis for advanced prostate cancer. Methods The automated method for analyzing bone scan images computed BSI values for twelve skeletal regions, in a study population consisting of 1013 patients diagnosed with prostate cancer. In the survival analysis we used the standard Cox proportional hazards model and a more advanced non-linear method based on artificial neural networks. The concordance index (C-index) was used to measure the performance of the models. Results A Cox model with age and total BSI obtained a C-index of 70.4%. The best Cox model with regional measurements from Costae, Pelvis, Scapula and the Spine, together with age, got a similar C-index (70.5%). The overall best single skeletal localisation, as measured by the C-index, was Costae. The non-linear model performed equally well as the Cox model, ruling out any significant non-linear interactions among the regional BSI measurements. Conclusion The present study showed that the localisation of bone metastases obtained from the bone scans in prostate cancer patients does not improve the performance of the survival models compared to models using the total BSI. However a ranking procedure indicated that some regions are more important than others. PMID:25012268

  4. Regional primitive equation modeling and analysis of the polymode data set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spall, Michael A.

    A regional, hybrid coordinate, primitive equation (PE) model is applied to a 60-day period of the POLYMODE data set. The initialization techniques and open boundary conditions introduced by Spall and Robinson are shown to produce stable, realistic, and reasonably accurate hindcasts for the 2-month data set. Comparisons with quasi-geostrophic (QG) modeling studies indicate that the PE model reproduced the jet formation that dominates the region more accurately than did the QG model. When the PE model used boundary conditions that were partially adjusted by the QG model, the resulting fields were very similar to the QG fields, indicating a rapid degradation of small-scale features near the boundaries in the QG calculation. A local term-by-term primitive equation energy and vorticity analysis package is also introduced. The full vorticity, horizontal divergence, kinetic energy, and available gravitational energy equations are solved diagnostically from the output of the regional PE model. Through the analysis of a time series of horizontal maps, the dominant processes in the flow are illustrated. The individual terms are also integrated over the region of jet formation to highlight the net balances as a function of time. The formation of the deep thermocline jet is shown to be due to horizontal advection through the boundary, baroclinic conversion in the deep thermocline and vertical pressure work, which exports the deep energy to the upper thermocline levels. It is concluded here that the PE model reproduces the observed jet formation better than the QG model because of the increased horizontal advection and stronger vertical pressure work. Although the PE model is shown to be superior to the QG model in this application, it is believed that both PE and QG models can play an important role in the regional study of mid-ocean mesoscale eddies.

  5. Localization of TFIIB binding regions using serial analysis of chromatin occupancy

    PubMed Central

    Yochum, Gregory S; Rajaraman, Veena; Cleland, Ryan; McWeeney, Shannon

    2007-01-01

    Background: RNA Polymerase II (RNAP II) is recruited to core promoters by the pre-initiation complex (PIC) of general transcription factors. Within the PIC, transcription factor for RNA polymerase IIB (TFIIB) determines the start site of transcription. TFIIB binding has not been localized, genome-wide, in metazoans. Serial analysis of chromatin occupancy (SACO) is an unbiased methodology used to empirically identify transcription factor binding regions. In this report, we use TFIIB and SACO to localize TFIIB binding regions across the rat genome. Results: A sample of the TFIIB SACO library was sequenced and 12,968 TFIIB genomic signature tags (GSTs) were assigned to the rat genome. GSTs are 20–22 base pair fragments that are derived from TFIIB bound chromatin. TFIIB localized to both non-protein coding and protein-coding loci. For 21% of the 1783 protein-coding genes in this sample of the SACO library, TFIIB binding mapped near the characterized 5' promoter that is upstream of the transcription start site (TSS). However, internal TFIIB binding positions were identified in 57% of the 1783 protein-coding genes. Internal positions are defined as those within an inclusive region greater than 2.5 kb downstream from the 5' TSS and 2.5 kb upstream from the transcription stop. We demonstrate that both TFIIB and TFIID (an additional component of PICs) bound to internal regions using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). The 5' cap of transcripts associated with internal TFIIB binding positions were identified using a cap-trapping assay. The 5' TSSs for internal transcripts were confirmed by primer extension. Additionally, an analysis of the functional annotation of mouse 3 (FANTOM3) databases indicates that internally initiated transcripts identified by TFIIB SACO in rat are conserved in mouse. Conclusion: Our findings that TFIIB binding is not restricted to the 5' upstream region indicates that the propensity for PIC to contribute to transcript diversity is far greater

  6. Regional enzymatic analysis of UV-B and streptozotocin induced diabetic cataract lens.

    PubMed

    Kojima, M

    1990-01-01

    As the UV-B cataract and early stages of diabetic cataract in rats only touches the epithelium and anterior superficial cortex, a whole lens analysis is not meaningful, but a regional analysis with the freeze-sectioning device has to be performed. Scheimpflug photography with microdensitometric image analysis enables the scientist to discern in vivo single layers along the optical axis of the lens. UV-B cataracts (0.2 J/cm2, every 2nd day) and diabetic cataracts (Streptozotocin (STZ), 70 mg/kg BW) were induced in Brown-Norway rats. The stages of lens opacification were documented by Scheimpflug photography. 8 weeks after start of UV-B treatment and at several dates before onset of visible diabetic cataractous changes, the animals were sacrificed. The lenses were divided reproducibly into 4 or 7 parts such as an equatorial ring and several layers of the central cylinder from anterior to posterior part. The enzyme activity spectrum shows highly region related pattern that would not have been found in a whole lens analysis. Aldose reductase was activated before appearance of visible cataractous changes due to diabetes compared to normal lenses. In contrast Fructose-1,6-biphosphate-aldolase activity was lower before onset of visible changes than in normal lenses, but only within the 1st section where later visible cataractous changes of UV-B cataract could be detected. PMID:1966039

  7. The application of ESDA and GIS in analysis of regional rural economic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Wei-hua; Yang, Hao

    2009-07-01

    This paper introduced basic theory of global and local spatial autocorrelation analysis of Exploratory Spatial Data Analysis(ESDA), and analysis the application of ESDA method for regional rural economic. it is investigated the spatial dynamics of regional disparities at the county (city) level in Guangxi by analyzing rural per capita net income data in 2007, with the support spatial statistical analysis module of ArcGIS. Empirical results show that the overall county(city) level spatial disparities of rural per capita net income in Guangxi is great in 2007, and the global Moran'S I is 0.44051, which indicates that there are significant positive spatial autocorrelation. That is, the relatively high(1ow) developed county tends to be located nearby other high(1ow) developed counties more often than expected due to random chance. Local Moran's I scatterplot and LISA (Local Indicators of Spatial Association) cluster map have been used to test the local pattern of the Guangxi rural economic development.

  8. Analysis of mixtures using next generation sequencing of mitochondrial DNA hypervariable regions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hanna; Erlich, Henry A.; Calloway, Cassandra D.

    2015-01-01

    Aim To apply massively parallel and clonal sequencing (next generation sequencing or NGS) to the analysis of forensic mixed samples. Methods A duplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay targeting the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) hypervariable regions I/II (HVI/HVII) was developed for NGS analysis on the Roche 454 GS Junior instrument. Eight sets of multiplex identifier-tagged 454 fusion primers were used in a combinatorial approach for amplification and deep sequencing of up to 64 samples in parallel. Results This assay was shown to be highly sensitive for sequencing limited DNA amounts ( ~ 100 mtDNA copies) and analyzing contrived and biological mixtures with low level variants ( ~ 1%) as well as “complex” mixtures (≥3 contributors). PCR artifact “hybrid” sequences generated by jumping PCR or template switching were observed at a low level (<2%) in the analysis of mixed samples but could be eliminated by reducing the PCR cycle number. Conclusion This study demonstrates the power of NGS technologies targeting the mtDNA HVI/HVII regions for analysis of challenging forensic samples, such as mixtures and specimens with limited DNA. PMID:26088845

  9. A multi-method analysis of cyclone activity in the Mediterranean Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigo, Isabel F.; Liberato, Margarida L. R.; Nissen, Katrin; Pinto, Joaquim G.; Lionello, Piero; Trigo, Ricardo M.; Ulbrich, Sven; Ulbrich, Uwe; Ordóñez, Paulina

    2013-04-01

    The Mediterranean Basin is a particularly active region in terms of cyclone formation and development. The geographical features of the area, including its location between the mid-latitudes and the sub-tropics, the almost closed sea and the mountain ranges near the coast play an important role determining the dominant meteorological characteristics of the region. This study revisits monthly climatologies of Mediterranean storms through the analysis of databases obtained from multiple methods for cyclone identification and tracking. Within the context of the IMILAST project, these methodologies were all applied to fields provided by ERA-Int reanalysis, available 6-hourly and at 0.75° x 0.75° spatial resolution. They consist of a set of objective criteria to identify cyclone signatures near the surface, through the search for minima in mean sea level pressure or 1000 hPa geopotential height, or for vorticity maxima at 850 hPa. The tracking is then performed through the analysis of centres identified in consecutive time slots and imposing a set of a priory conditions on the maximum velocity admissible for mid-latitude cyclones. The distributions of cyclone characteristics obtained from the different databases are analysed focusing on system duration, intensity and velocity. The spatial distributions and density of cyclone centres are also compared among the different storm-track databases, with particular emphasis on the location of the most active regions in terms of cyclogenesis. These are generally well defined in the Mediterranean region, being mostly determined by orographic features mentioned above and land-sea temperature gradients. As such, methodologies tend to agree in the areas that favour cyclone formation, particularly during winter months, while discrepancies among methods tend to be mostly related to number of detections. Finally, we make a critical analysis of some of the options/criteria within each methodology that favour or not the identification

  10. Uncertainty associated with regional landslide risk analysis - a case study in Buzau County, Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zumpano, Veronica; Ciurean, Roxana; Micu, Mihai; Balteanu, Dan; Glade, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    When analyzing the risk for a region where landslides constitute a threat for the society and the environment, a fully quantitative approach often becomes impracticable. The magnitude, frequency and location of landslides and a reasonably complete inventory of historical events is commonly not available. Likewise, a thorough investigation of the damaged assets and quantification of losses is rarely possible. Nevertheless, an alternative approach can be engaged in areas where information regarding the environmental conditions leading to the occurrence of landslides including their relative location, and the characteristics and distribution of elements at risk are known. This contribution proposes a methodology for a landslide risk analysis applicable at regional scale taking into account the spatial probability and consequences of past damaging events. Since the temporal information used to calculate the detailed hazard probability is missing, a susceptibility analysis is performed by using a data-driven Bayesian method (Weights of Evidence modeling technique) which analyzes the relation between a training set (past landslide events) and multiple predisposing factors (lithology, landuse, slope, aspect, internal relief, altitude), in order to predict areas that are less-to-more susceptible to landslide initiation. The consequence analysis is based on a generalized assessment of vulnerability, exposure and value of the elements at risk (i.e. buildings and roads) using cadastral and statistical data. For both components of the risk analysis (susceptibility analysis and consequence analysis) an estimation of uncertainty is performed by defining a central value (which represents the statistical mean) and a measure of value range (minimum and maximum) of the input parameters. As the procedure operates at a spatial level, the distribution of risk and the annual probability of expected losses are expressed numerically as well as spatially with the use of GIS. The developed

  11. An alternative approach to probabilistic seismic hazard analysis in the Aegean region using Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weatherill, Graeme; Burton, Paul W.

    2010-09-01

    The Aegean is the most seismically active and tectonically complex region in Europe. Damaging earthquakes have occurred here throughout recorded history, often resulting in considerable loss of life. The Monte Carlo method of probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) is used to determine the level of ground motion likely to be exceeded in a given time period. Multiple random simulations of seismicity are generated to calculate, directly, the ground motion for a given site. Within the seismic hazard analysis we explore the impact of different seismic source models, incorporating both uniform zones and distributed seismicity. A new, simplified, seismic source model, derived from seismotectonic interpretation, is presented for the Aegean region. This is combined into the epistemic uncertainty analysis alongside existing source models for the region, and models derived by a K-means cluster analysis approach. Seismic source models derived using the K-means approach offer a degree of objectivity and reproducibility into the otherwise subjective approach of delineating seismic sources using expert judgment. Similar review and analysis is undertaken for the selection of peak ground acceleration (PGA) attenuation models, incorporating into the epistemic analysis Greek-specific models, European models and a Next Generation Attenuation model. Hazard maps for PGA on a "rock" site with a 10% probability of being exceeded in 50 years are produced and different source and attenuation models are compared. These indicate that Greek-specific attenuation models, with their smaller aleatory variability terms, produce lower PGA hazard, whilst recent European models and Next Generation Attenuation (NGA) model produce similar results. The Monte Carlo method is extended further to assimilate epistemic uncertainty into the hazard calculation, thus integrating across several appropriate source and PGA attenuation models. Site condition and fault-type are also integrated into the hazard

  12. Regional analysis of population trajectories from the North American Breeding Bird Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sauer, J.R.; Link, W.A.

    1999-01-01

    The North American Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) was started in 1966, and provides information on population change and distribution for most of the birds in North America. The geographic extent of the survey, and the logistical compromises needed to survey such a large area, present many challenges for estimation from BBS data. In this paper, we describe the survey and discuss some of the limitations of the survey design and implementation. Analysis of the survey has evolved over time as new statistical methods and insights into the analysis of count data are developed. Survey results and analysis tools for the BBS are now available over intemet; we present new methods that use generalized linear models for estimation of population change and empirical Bayes procedures for regional summaries.

  13. Numerical analysis of the plasma-produced region in a plasma spraying system

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuo, T.; Sakata, N.; Kato, S.; Nagayama, T.; Fujita, K.

    1999-07-01

    For this study, the Arcjet Plasmodynamic Analysis Code (APAC) developed by Fujita has been significantly modified in order to investigate the physical phenomena of the plasma-produced region in a plasma spraying system. For self-consistent determination of the heating process of working gas, plasma flow, which contains complicated physical phenomena, is obtained by interconnecting flow field analysis with electric field analysis. The main conclusions obtained are summarized as follows: (1) Discharge voltage decreased with discharge current significantly. On the other hand, it increases slightly with hydrogen flow rate. (2) Current density distribution governs physical phenomena in plasma flow. (3) Temperature and velocity distribution at the nozzle exit depend on the discharge current.

  14. Statistical Analysis of the Impacts of Regional Transportation on the Air Quality in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhongwen; Zhang, Huiling; Tong, Lei; Xiao, Hang

    2016-04-01

    From October to December 2015, Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei (BTH) region had experienced several severe haze events. In order to assess the effects of the regional transportation on the air quality in Beijing, the air monitoring data (PM2.5, SO2, NO2 and CO) from that period published by Chinese National Environmental Monitoring Center (CNEMC) was collected and analyzed with various statistical models. The cities within BTH area were clustered into three groups according to the geographical conditions, while the air pollutant concentrations of cities within a group sharing similar variation trends. The Granger causality test results indicate that significant causal relationships exist between the air pollutant data of Beijing and its surrounding cities (Baoding, Chengde, Tianjin and Zhangjiakou) for the reference period. Then, linear regression models were constructed to capture the interdependency among the multiple time series. It shows that the observed air pollutant concentrations in Beijing were well consistent with the model-fitted results. More importantly, further analysis suggests that the air pollutants in Beijing were strongly affected by regional transportation, as the local sources only contributed 17.88%, 27.12%, 14.63% and 31.36% of PM2.5, SO2, NO2 and CO concentrations, respectively. And the major foreign source for Beijing was from Southwest (Baoding) direction, account for more than 42% of all these air pollutants. Thus, by combining various statistical models, it may not only be able to quickly predict the air qualities of any cities on a regional scale, but also to evaluate the local and regional source contributions for a particular city. Key words: regional transportation, air pollution, Granger causality test, statistical models

  15. A meta-analysis of plant facilitation in coastal dune systems: responses, regions, and research gaps

    PubMed Central

    Lortie, Christopher J.; Zaitchik, Benjamin; Prado, Paulo Inácio

    2015-01-01

    Empirical studies in salt marshes, arid, and alpine systems support the hypothesis that facilitation between plants is an important ecological process in severe or ‘stressful’ environments. Coastal dunes are both abiotically stressful and frequently disturbed systems. Facilitation has been documented, but the evidence to date has not been synthesized. We did a systematic review with meta-analysis to highlight general research gaps in the study of plant interactions in coastal dunes and examine if regional and local factors influence the magnitude of facilitation in these systems. The 32 studies included in the systematic review were done in coastal dunes located in 13 countries around the world but the majority was in the temperate zone (63%). Most of the studies adopt only an observational approach to make inferences about facilitative interactions, whereas only 28% of the studies used both observational and experimental approaches. Among the factors we tested, only geographic region mediates the occurrence of facilitation more broadly in coastal dune systems. The presence of a neighbor positively influenced growth and survival in the tropics, whereas in temperate and subartic regions the effect was neutral for both response variables. We found no evidence that climatic and local factors, such as life-form and life stage of interacting plants, affect the magnitude of facilitation in coastal dunes. Overall, conclusions about plant facilitation in coastal dunes depend on the response variable measured and, more broadly, on the geographic region examined. However, the high variability and the limited number of studies, especially in tropical region, indicate we need to be cautious in the generalization of the conclusions. Anyway, coastal dunes provide an important means to explore topical issues in facilitation research including context dependency, local versus regional drivers of community structure, and the importance of gradients in shaping the outcome of net

  16. Analysis of D-Region Absorption via HF Cross-Modulation Experiments at HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, E. M.; Moore, R. C.

    2010-12-01

    Experimental observations performed near the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) HF transmitter in Gakona, Alaska are used to implement a new method quantifying the rate of absorption of HF radio waves in the D-region ionosphere. Quantifying the ambient and HF-modified characteristics of the D-region ionosphere in the vicinity of ionospheric HF heaters has historically proven to be a difficult task. For example, the electron density in the 60-90 km altitude range is typically too low to employ radio-sounding techniques; LIDAR observations typically require significant temporal averaging, precluding the investigation of physical processes that occur on sub-millisecond time scales; ELF/VLF wave generation experiments typically have difficulty providing reliable spatial resolution and also cannot experimentally distinguish between the spatial distribution of the ionospheric conductivity modulation produced by modulated HF heating and that of the current-driving electric fields associated with the auroral electrojet. Yet, the majority of HF signal absorption occurs in this region of the ionosphere, and the ability to characterize HF absorption in this region benefits a wide range of ionospheric HF heating experiments. The technique described and demonstrated in this paper combines ionosonde-style radio sounding with ELF/VLF cross-modulation experiments to identify the altitude of maximum D-region absorption as a function of HF frequency. Observations are presented and compared with the predictions of a theoretical model, demonstrating excellent agreement between experiment and theory and indicating that the technique may be used successfully in practice. Based on the success of this first experiment, another HF cross-modulation experiment has been performed at HAARP and analyzed theoretically. Pulsed-modulation experiments are used to assess the relative absorption as a function of altitude within the D-region ionosphere, and a method to chart the

  17. REGIONAL VARIATIONS IN INFANT AND CHILD MORTALITY IN NIGERIA: A MULTILEVEL ANALYSIS.

    PubMed

    Adedini, Sunday A; Odimegwu, Clifford; Imasiku, Eunice N S; Ononokpono, Dorothy N; Ibisomi, Latifat

    2015-03-01

    There are substantial regional disparities in under-five mortality in Nigeria, and evidence suggests that both individual- and community-level characteristics have an influence on health outcomes. Using 2008 Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey data, this study (1) examines the effects of individual- and community-level characteristics on infant/child mortality in Nigeria and (2) determines the extent to which characteristics at these levels influence regional variations in infant/child mortality in the country. Multilevel Cox proportional hazard analysis was performed on a nationally representative sample of 28,647 children nested within 18,028 mothers of reproductive age, who were also nested within 886 communities. The results indicate that community-level variables (such as region, place of residence, community infrastructure, community hospital delivery and community poverty level) and individual-level factors (including child's sex, birth order, birth interval, maternal education, maternal age and wealth index) are important determinants of infant/child mortality in Nigeria. For instance, the results show a lower risk of death in infancy for children of mothers residing in communities with a high proportion of hospital delivery (HR: 0.70, p < 0.05) and for children whose mothers had secondary or higher education (HR: 0.84, p < 0.05). Although community factors appear to influence the association between individual-level factors and death during infancy and childhood, the findings consistently indicate that community-level characteristics are more important in explaining regional variations in child mortality, while individual-level factors are more important for regional variations in infant mortality. The results of this study underscore the need to look beyond the influence of individual-level factors in addressing regional variations in infant and child mortality in Nigeria. PMID:24411023

  18. A meta-analysis of plant facilitation in coastal dune systems: responses, regions, and research gaps.

    PubMed

    Castanho, Camila de Toledo; Lortie, Christopher J; Zaitchik, Benjamin; Prado, Paulo Inácio

    2015-01-01

    Empirical studies in salt marshes, arid, and alpine systems support the hypothesis that facilitation between plants is an important ecological process in severe or 'stressful' environments. Coastal dunes are both abiotically stressful and frequently disturbed systems. Facilitation has been documented, but the evidence to date has not been synthesized. We did a systematic review with meta-analysis to highlight general research gaps in the study of plant interactions in coastal dunes and examine if regional and local factors influence the magnitude of facilitation in these systems. The 32 studies included in the systematic review were done in coastal dunes located in 13 countries around the world but the majority was in the temperate zone (63%). Most of the studies adopt only an observational approach to make inferences about facilitative interactions, whereas only 28% of the studies used both observational and experimental approaches. Among the factors we tested, only geographic region mediates the occurrence of facilitation more broadly in coastal dune systems. The presence of a neighbor positively influenced growth and survival in the tropics, whereas in temperate and subartic regions the effect was neutral for both response variables. We found no evidence that climatic and local factors, such as life-form and life stage of interacting plants, affect the magnitude of facilitation in coastal dunes. Overall, conclusions about plant facilitation in coastal dunes depend on the response variable measured and, more broadly, on the geographic region examined. However, the high variability and the limited number of studies, especially in tropical region, indicate we need to be cautious in the generalization of the conclusions. Anyway, coastal dunes provide an important means to explore topical issues in facilitation research including context dependency, local versus regional drivers of community structure, and the importance of gradients in shaping the outcome of net

  19. [Analysis of grant of special nephrological help to childrensi in Chernivtsi region].

    PubMed

    Bezruk, V V

    2014-01-01

    Nephrological morbidity is important indicator of the state of the health of children's population. The aim of this study is analysis of the activity of nephrological service care for children's population of the Chernivtsi region. The material for this study is reporting documentation about the condition of the nephrological service care for children's population of the Chernivtsi region in 2008-2012 and the data of The Center of medical statistics of Ministry of Health of Ukraine. The incidence of prevalence of diseases of the urinary system between teenagers of Chernivtsi region during the 2008-2012 period had a wave-like nature and have lower rates comparing general Ukraine rates, with the exception of 2011, when the incidence of child population in the region amounted to 32.60 in 1000 to 29.65 against children 1000 children in Ukraine. The age structure of patients is determined by many factors, including the demographic situation in the region, "continuity" and these primary healthcare units. Value of microbial and inflammatory diseases to nephropathy--2.9:1 (2009), but over the last three years there is a tendency to change its value--3.5-4:1 (2012). Is marked resistance to antibiotic therapy--3/4 of surveyed high school age children and teenagers found mycoplasma pathogens (M. hominis, M. genitalium) and ureaplasma (U. urealyticum) origin, especially against the background of comorbidity of "modern child". Analyzes the main indicators of child nephrology service in Chernivtsi region. The research, carried out by authors, will allow to hold the reasoned medical and rehabilitation events in all stages of rendering of specialized medical care for teenagers with nephrological pathology and to develop the programs, directed on improvement of indicators of health and prevention of disability in children. PMID:25796816

  20. Identification of Medically Important Yeast Species by Sequence Analysis of the Internal Transcribed Spacer Regions

    PubMed Central

    Leaw, Shiang Ning; Chang, Hsien Chang; Sun, Hsiao Fang; Barton, Richard; Bouchara, Jean-Philippe; Chang, Tsung Chain

    2006-01-01

    Infections caused by yeasts have increased in previous decades due primarily to the increasing population of immunocompromised patients. In addition, infections caused by less common species such as Pichia, Rhodotorula, Trichosporon, and Saccharomyces spp. have been widely reported. This study extensively evaluated the feasibility of sequence analysis of the rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions for the identification of yeasts of clinical relevance. Both the ITS1 and ITS2 regions of 373 strains (86 species), including 299 reference strains and 74 clinical isolates, were amplified by PCR and sequenced. The sequences were compared to reference data available at the GenBank database by using BLAST (basic local alignment search tool) to determine if species identification was possible by ITS sequencing. Since the GenBank database currently lacks ITS sequence entries for some yeasts, the ITS sequences of type (or reference) strains of 15 species were submitted to GenBank to facilitate identification of these species. Strains producing discrepant identifications between the conventional methods and ITS sequence analysis were further analyzed by sequencing of the D1-D2 domain of the large-subunit rRNA gene for species clarification. The rates of correct identification by ITS1 and ITS2 sequence analysis were 96.8% (361/373) and 99.7% (372/373), respectively. Of the 373 strains tested, only 1 strain (Rhodotorula glutinis BCRC 20576) could not be identified by ITS2 sequence analysis. In conclusion, identification of medically important yeasts by ITS sequencing, especially using the ITS2 region, is reliable and can be used as an accurate alternative to conventional identification methods. PMID:16517841

  1. Sensitivity analysis of the tidal representation in Singapore Regional Waters in a data assimilation environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurniawan, Alamsyah; Ooi, Seng Keat; Hummel, Stef; Gerritsen, Herman

    2011-08-01

    The Singapore Regional Waters (SRW) is one of the more complex tidal regions in the world. This complexity is caused by various factors including the interaction of the Indian and Pacific oceans with their mainly semi-diurnal and diurnal tide, respectively, complicated coastline geometry, small islands and sharply varying bottom topography. Tidal data analysis is hampered by the lack of reliable coastal stations with long-term water level records while numerical tidal modelling studies suffer from lack of accurate high-resolution bathymetry data and uncertainty in the prescription of the tidal open boundary forcing. The present study combines numerical modelling with available along-track satellite altimetry data and a limited set of reliable coastal stations. It proposes a structured approach to study the sensitivity of tidal propagation and interactions to parameters like the prescription of tidal forcing at the open ocean boundaries, local depth information and seabed roughness. To guide and facilitate this analysis, the open-source software environment OpenDA for sensitivity analysis and simultaneous parameter optimisation is used. In a user-controlled way, the vector difference error in tidal representation could so effectively be reduced by ~50%. The results confirm the benefit of using OpenDA in guiding the systematic exploration of the modelled tide and reducing the parameter uncertainties in different parts of the SRW region. OpenDA is also shown to reduce the repetitive nature of simultaneous parameter variation. Finally, the behaviour of the tide in the region and its sensitivities to changes in tidal boundary forcing and to local depth and friction variation in the narrow regions of the Malacca Strait is now much better understood. With most of the systematic errors reduced in the numerical model as a result of the sensitivity analysis, it is expected that the model can be applied to study tide-surge interaction and is much better suited for later

  2. Regional sensitivity analysis of aleatory and epistemic uncertainties on failure probability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guijie; Lu, Zhenzhou; Lu, Zhaoyan; Xu, Jia

    2014-06-01

    To analyze the effects of specific regions of the aleatory and epistemic uncertain variables on the failure probability, a regional sensitivity analysis (RSA) technique called contribution to failure probability (CFP) plot is developed in this paper. This RSA technique can detect the important aleatory and epistemic uncertain variables, and also measure the contribution of specific regions of these important input variables to failure probability. When computing the proposed CFP, the aleatory and epistemic uncertain variables are modeled by random and interval variables, respectively. Then based on the hybrid probabilistic and interval model (HPIM) and the basic probability assignments in evidence theory, the failure probability of the structure with aleatory and epistemic uncertainties can be obtained through a successive construction of the second-level limit state function and the corresponding reliability analysis. Kriging method is used to establish the surrogate model of the second-level limit state function to improve the computational efficiency. Two practical examples are employed to test the effectiveness of the proposed RSA technique, and the efficiency and accuracy of the established kriging-based solution.

  3. Functional analysis and nucleotide sequence of the promoter region of the murine hck gene.

    PubMed Central

    Lock, P; Stanley, E; Holtzman, D A; Dunn, A R

    1990-01-01

    The structure and function of the promoter region and exon 1 of the murine hck gene have been characterized in detail. RNase protection analysis has established that hck transcripts initiate from heterogeneous start sites located within the hck gene. Fusion gene constructs containing hck 5'-flanking sequences and the bacterial Neor gene have been introduced into the hematopoietic cell lines FDC-P1 and WEHI-265 by using a self-inactivating retroviral vector. The transcriptional start sites of the fusion gene are essentially identical to those of the endogenous hck gene. Analysis of infected WEHI-265 cell lines treated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) reveals a 3- to 5-fold elevation in the levels of endogenous hck mRNA and a 1.4- to 2.6-fold increase in the level of Neor fusion gene transcripts, indicating that hck 5'-flanking sequences are capable of conferring LPS responsiveness on the Neor gene. The 5'-flanking region of the hck gene contains sequences similar to an element which is thought to be involved in the LPS responsiveness of the class II major histocompatibility gene A alpha k. A subset of these sequences are also found in the 5'-flanking regions of other LPS-responsive genes. Moreover, this motif is related to the consensus binding sequence of NF-kappa B, a transcription factor which is known to be regulated by LPS. Images PMID:2388619

  4. Analysis of pressure-broadened ozone spectra in the 3 micron region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prochaska, Eleanor S.

    1991-01-01

    This work involves the analysis of a series of McMath Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectra of ozone broadened by mixing with air (four different pressures), nitrogen (three pressures), or oxygen (three pressures). Each spectrum covers the region from 2396 to 4057 cm(-1). This study focused on the 3 sub nu sub 3 band in t 3000 to 3060 cm(-1). The band is analyzed by first dividing its region into small intervals containing a few well isolated absorption lines of reasonable intensity. Each of these small intervals is fit by multiple iterations of the nonlinear least squares program until residuals (the difference between calculated and observed spectrum, as a percent of the strongest intensity in the interval) are minimized to a reasonable value which corresponds to the noise level of the measured spectrum. Position, intensity, and half-width are recorded for later analysis. From the measured half-widths, a pressure broadening coefficient was determined for each absorption line. Pressure shifts were determined by comparing observed line positions in the spectra of the diluted ozone samples to tabulated line positions determined from spectra of pure gas samples. Comparisons to other work on ozone indicate that the broadening and shift coefficients determined in this study are consistent with those determined in other spectral regions.

  5. Integrated Analysis of Climate, Soil, Topography and Vegetative Growth in Iberian Viticultural Regions

    PubMed Central

    Fraga, Helder; Malheiro, Aureliano C.; Moutinho-Pereira, José; Cardoso, Rita M.; Soares, Pedro M. M.; Cancela, Javier J.; Pinto, Joaquim G.; Santos, João A.

    2014-01-01

    The Iberian viticultural regions are convened according to the Denomination of Origin (DO) and present different climates, soils, topography and management practices. All these elements influence the vegetative growth of different varieties throughout the peninsula, and are tied to grape quality and wine type. In the current study, an integrated analysis of climate, soil, topography and vegetative growth was performed for the Iberian DO regions, using state-of-the-art datasets. For climatic assessment, a categorized index, accounting for phenological/thermal development, water availability and grape ripening conditions was computed. Soil textural classes were established to distinguish soil types. Elevation and aspect (orientation) were also taken into account, as the leading topographic elements. A spectral vegetation index was used to assess grapevine vegetative growth and an integrated analysis of all variables was performed. The results showed that the integrated climate-soil-topography influence on vine performance is evident. Most Iberian vineyards are grown in temperate dry climates with loamy soils, presenting low vegetative growth. Vineyards in temperate humid conditions tend to show higher vegetative growth. Conversely, in cooler/warmer climates, lower vigour vineyards prevail and other factors, such as soil type and precipitation acquire more important roles in driving vigour. Vines in prevailing loamy soils are grown over a wide climatic diversity, suggesting that precipitation is the primary factor influencing vigour. The present assessment of terroir characteristics allows direct comparison among wine regions and may have great value to viticulturists, particularly under a changing climate. PMID:25251495

  6. Bioimpedance Harmonic Analysis as a Diagnostic Tool to Assess Regional Circulation and Neural Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudraya, I. S.; Revenko, S. V.; Khodyreva, L. A.; Markosyan, T. G.; Dudareva, A. A.; Ibragimov, A. R.; Romich, V. V.; Kirpatovsky, V. I.

    2013-04-01

    The novel technique based on harmonic analysis of bioimpedance microvariations with original hard- and software complex incorporating a high-resolution impedance converter was used to assess the neural activity and circulation in human urinary bladder and penis in patients with pelvic pain, erectile dysfunction, and overactive bladder. The therapeutic effects of shock wave therapy and Botulinum toxin detrusor injections were evaluated quantitatively according to the spectral peaks at low 0.1 Hz frequency (M for Mayer wave), respiratory (R) and cardiac (C) rhythms with their harmonics. Enhanced baseline regional neural activity identified according to M and R peaks was found to be presumably sympathetic in pelvic pain patients, and parasympathetic - in patients with overactive bladder. Total pulsatile activity and pulsatile resonances found in the bladder as well as in the penile spectrum characterised regional circulation and vascular tone. The abnormal spectral parameters characteristic of the patients with genitourinary diseases shifted to the norm in the cases of efficient therapy. Bioimpedance harmonic analysis seems to be a potent tool to assess regional peculiarities of circulatory and autonomic nervous activity in the course of patient treatment.

  7. Integrated analysis of climate, soil, topography and vegetative growth in Iberian viticultural regions.

    PubMed

    Fraga, Helder; Malheiro, Aureliano C; Moutinho-Pereira, José; Cardoso, Rita M; Soares, Pedro M M; Cancela, Javier J; Pinto, Joaquim G; Santos, João A

    2014-01-01

    The Iberian viticultural regions are convened according to the Denomination of Origin (DO) and present different climates, soils, topography and management practices. All these elements influence the vegetative growth of different varieties throughout the peninsula, and are tied to grape quality and wine type. In the current study, an integrated analysis of climate, soil, topography and vegetative growth was performed for the Iberian DO regions, using state-of-the-art datasets. For climatic assessment, a categorized index, accounting for phenological/thermal development, water availability and grape ripening conditions was computed. Soil textural classes were established to distinguish soil types. Elevation and aspect (orientation) were also taken into account, as the leading topographic elements. A spectral vegetation index was used to assess grapevine vegetative growth and an integrated analysis of all variables was performed. The results showed that the integrated climate-soil-topography influence on vine performance is evident. Most Iberian vineyards are grown in temperate dry climates with loamy soils, presenting low vegetative growth. Vineyards in temperate humid conditions tend to show higher vegetative growth. Conversely, in cooler/warmer climates, lower vigour vineyards prevail and other factors, such as soil type and precipitation acquire more important roles in driving vigour. Vines in prevailing loamy soils are grown over a wide climatic diversity, suggesting that precipitation is the primary factor influencing vigour. The present assessment of terroir characteristics allows direct comparison among wine regions and may have great value to viticulturists, particularly under a changing climate. PMID:25251495

  8. Integrated Analysis of Climate, Soil, Topography and Vegetative Growth in Iberian Viticultural Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraga, Helder; Malheiro, Aureliano C.; Moutinho-Pereira, José; Cardoso, Rita M.; Soares, Pedro M. M.; Cancela, Javier J.; Pinto, Joaquim G.; Santos, João A.

    2015-04-01

    The Iberian viticultural regions are convened according to the Denomination of Origin (DO) and present different climates, soils, topography and management practices. All these elements influence the vegetative growth of different varieties throughout the peninsula, and are tied to grape quality and wine type. In the current study, an integrated analysis of climate, soil, topography and vegetative growth was performed for the Iberian DO regions, using state-of-the-art datasets. For climatic assessment, a categorized index, accounting for phenological/thermal development, water availability and grape ripening conditions was computed. Soil textural classes were established to distinguish soil types. Elevation and aspect (orientation) were also taken into account, as the leading topographic elements. A spectral vegetation index was used to assess grapevine vegetative growth and an integrated analysis of all variables was performed. The results showed that the integrated climate-soil-topography influence on vine performance is evident. Most Iberian vineyards are grown in temperate dry climates with loamy soils, presenting low vegetative growth. Vineyards in temperate humid conditions tend to show higher vegetative growth. Conversely, in cooler/warmer climates, lower vigour vineyards prevail and other factors, such as soil type and precipitation acquire more important roles in driving vigour. Vines in prevailing loamy soils are grown over a wide climatic diversity, suggesting that precipitation is the primary factor influencing vigour. The present assessment of terroir characteristics allows direct comparison among wine regions and may have great value to viticulturists, particularly under a changing climate.

  9. Spatial analysis of relative humidity during ungauged periods in a mountainous region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Um, Myoung-Jin; Kim, Yeonjoo

    2016-06-01

    Although atmospheric humidity influences environmental and agricultural conditions, thereby influencing plant growth, human health, and air pollution, efforts to develop spatial maps of atmospheric humidity using statistical approaches have thus far been limited. This study therefore aims to develop statistical approaches for inferring the spatial distribution of relative humidity (RH) for a mountainous island, for which data are not uniformly available across the region. A multiple regression analysis based on various mathematical models was used to identify the optimal model for estimating monthly RH by incorporating not only temperature but also location and elevation. Based on the regression analysis, we extended the monthly RH data from weather stations to cover the ungauged periods when no RH observations were available. Then, two different types of station-based data, the observational data and the data extended via the regression model, were used to form grid-based data with a resolution of 100 m. The grid-based data that used the extended station-based data captured the increasing RH trend along an elevation gradient. Furthermore, annual RH values averaged over the regions were examined. Decreasing temporal trends were found in most cases, with magnitudes varying based on the season and region.

  10. Analysis of meteorological variables in the Australasian region using ground- and space-based GPS techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuleshov, Yuriy; Choy, Suelynn; Fu, Erjiang Frank; Chane-Ming, Fabrice; Liou, Yuei-An; Pavelyev, Alexander G.

    2016-07-01

    Results of analysis of meteorological variables (temperature and moisture) in the Australasian region using the global positioning system (GPS) radio occultation (RO) and GPS ground-based observations verified with in situ radiosonde (RS) data are presented. The potential of using ground-based GPS observations for retrieving column integrated precipitable water vapour (PWV) over the Australian continent has been demonstrated using the Australian ground-based GPS reference stations network. Using data from the 15 ground-based GPS stations, the state of the atmosphere over Victoria during a significant weather event, the March 2010 Melbourne storm, has been investigated, and it has been shown that the GPS observations has potential for monitoring the movement of a weather front that has sharp moisture contrast. Temperature and moisture variability in the atmosphere over various climatic regions (the Indian and the Pacific Oceans, the Antarctic and Australia) has been examined using satellite-based GPS RO and in situ RS observations. Investigating recent atmospheric temperature trends over Antarctica, the time series of the collocated GPS RO and RS data were examined, and strong cooling in the lower stratosphere and warming through the troposphere over Antarctica has been identified, in agreement with outputs of climate models. With further expansion of the Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) system, it is expected that GNSS satellite- and ground-based measurements would be able to provide an order of magnitude larger amount of data which in turn could significantly advance weather forecasting services, climate monitoring and analysis in the Australasian region.

  11. Design and analysis of chevrons shaped split ring resonator in the mid-infrared region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandan, N.; Saini, T. S.; Kumar, A.; Sinha, R. K.

    2015-09-01

    The terahertz and mid-infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum is relatively new area of interest and incorporates a wide range of applications from image sensing to spectroscopy and many more yet to be discovered. In the area of metamaterials many new designs have been discovered, but "chevrons" shaped split ring resonators (ch-SRRs) in the mid-infrared region has not been studied to the best of our knowledge. This paper presents the analysis and simulation of ch-SRRs in the mid infrared region. Tunability of SRRs is important for various industrial and scientific applications and hence this paper analyzes the tunability of the ch-SRRs by variation of angle. The device is simulated in two configurations i.e., one with two chevrons shaped SRRs on the same plane of the dielectric substrate and the other with each of the two chevron shaped SRRs on the opposite plane of the substrate. Gold SRRs is used, since we are working in the terahertz region Lorentz-Drude model is employed to incorporate the losses. The ch-SRRs have been embedded upon the silicon substrate. The models are designed and simulated in COMSOL and result is shown in MATLAB. The results obtained for reflectance are of particular interest. The effective medium parameters viz. Impendence, permittivity, permeability and refractive index obtained for the split ring resonator are also evaluated. This design shows sharp results for reflectance which can be used in sensors application.

  12. Using simulation and data envelopment analysis to evaluate Iraqi regions in producing strategic crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaloob, Ibrahim Z.; Ramli, Razamin; Nawawi, Mohd Kamal Mohd

    2014-12-01

    Productivity of the agriculture sector in Iraq has yet to reach an acceptable level. In this paper, we introduce a practical method to help manage Iraqi agriculture sector to control resources and increase production to meet the modern century requirements of good crops. These important resources are identified as water, fertilizer, natural fertilizer, pesticides and labour. The current agricultural patterns in Iraq affect the strategic crops cultivation in the country and lessen agricultural production to some life-threatening limits. Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA), which is a non-parametric tool, is proposed to identify solutions that can maximize farmers' net benefit making an optimal use of the five resources. This model also improves optimal mix of the resources. In reference to the production of each one of the three strategic crops in Iraq, the DEA model is used to find the efficiency of one region among four others in its agriculture sector, with the main problem being the constraint in the number of lands available in the situation. Hence, the simulation technique is used to generate additional regions to the four main regions adopted. This is to resolve the constriction of DEA when the decision making unit is less than the number of variables (outputs and inputs). The result is expected to show the efficiency of each of the evaluated region.

  13. Evolution and comparative analysis of the bat MHC-I region.

    PubMed

    Ng, Justin H J; Tachedjian, Mary; Deakin, Janine; Wynne, James W; Cui, Jie; Haring, Volker; Broz, Ivano; Chen, Honglei; Belov, Katherine; Wang, Lin-Fa; Baker, Michelle L

    2016-01-01

    Bats are natural hosts to numerous viruses and have ancient origins, having diverged from other eutherian mammals early in evolution. These characteristics place them in an important position to provide insights into the evolution of the mammalian immune system and antiviral immunity. We describe the first detailed partial map of a bat (Pteropus alecto) MHC-I region with comparative analysis of the MHC-I region and genes. The bat MHC-I region is highly condensed, yet relatively conserved in organisation, and is unusual in that MHC-I genes are present within only one of the three highly conserved class I duplication blocks. We hypothesise that MHC-I genes first originated in the β duplication block, and subsequently duplicated in a step-wise manner across the MHC-I region during mammalian evolution. Furthermore, bat MHC-I genes contain unique insertions within their peptide-binding grooves potentially affecting the peptide repertoire presented to T cells, which may have implications for the ability of bats to control infection without overt disease. PMID:26876644

  14. Evolution and comparative analysis of the bat MHC-I region

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Justin H. J.; Tachedjian, Mary; Deakin, Janine; Wynne, James W.; Cui, Jie; Haring, Volker; Broz, Ivano; Chen, Honglei; Belov, Katherine; Wang, Lin-Fa; Baker, Michelle L.

    2016-01-01

    Bats are natural hosts to numerous viruses and have ancient origins, having diverged from other eutherian mammals early in evolution. These characteristics place them in an important position to provide insights into the evolution of the mammalian immune system and antiviral immunity. We describe the first detailed partial map of a bat (Pteropus alecto) MHC-I region with comparative analysis of the MHC-I region and genes. The bat MHC-I region is highly condensed, yet relatively conserved in organisation, and is unusual in that MHC-I genes are present within only one of the three highly conserved class I duplication blocks. We hypothesise that MHC-I genes first originated in the β duplication block, and subsequently duplicated in a step-wise manner across the MHC-I region during mammalian evolution. Furthermore, bat MHC-I genes contain unique insertions within their peptide-binding grooves potentially affecting the peptide repertoire presented to T cells, which may have implications for the ability of bats to control infection without overt disease. PMID:26876644

  15. Analysis and simulation of recent climate variability in the high-mountain regions of East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, Emily; Mölg, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Kilimanjaro is the highest free-standing mountain in the world, and the glaciers at its summit represent regionally unique high-altitude sampling points in the troposphere. The region is influenced by, among other phenomena, the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), the Indian Ocean Zonal Mode, and the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation. However, the impacts of these phenomena as well as interactions between them on climate conditions in the high-mountain regions of East Africa are poorly constrained. Here we analyze recent high-altitude climate variability in East Africa using a combination of atmospheric reanalysis data, convection permitting (~1 km grid spacing) numerical simulations with the regional atmospheric model WRF, and multi-year in-situ weather station data at the summits of Mount Kenya and Kilimanjaro. We utilize these datasets to elucidate the impact of modes of internal climate variability, with a particular emphasis on ENSO, on both the large- and local-scale atmospheric conditions. Our analysis is compared with a ten-year record of glacier surface-height-change measurements on Kilimanjaro to elucidate the drivers of recent glacier response in East Africa.

  16. Multi-Satellite Synergy for Aerosol Analysis in the Asian Monsoon Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ichoku, Charles; Petrenko, Maksym

    2012-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols represent one of the greatest uncertainties in environmental and climate research, particularly in tropical monsoon regions such as the Southeast Asian regions, where significant contributions from a variety of aerosol sources and types is complicated by unstable atmospheric dynamics. Although aerosols are now routinely retrieved from multiple satellite Sensors, in trying to answer important science questions about aerosol distribution, properties, and impacts, researchers often rely on retrievals from only one or two sensors, thereby running the risk of incurring biases due to sensor/algorithm peculiarities. We are conducting detailed studies of aerosol retrieval uncertainties from various satellite sensors (including Terra-/ Aqua-MODIS, Terra-MISR, Aura-OMI, Parasol-POLDER, SeaWiFS, and Calipso-CALIOP), based on the collocation of these data products over AERONET and other important ground stations, within the online Multi-sensor Aerosol Products Sampling System (MAPSS) framework that was developed recently. Such analyses are aimed at developing a synthesis of results that can be utilized in building reliable unified aerosol information and climate data records from multiple satellite measurements. In this presentation, we will show preliminary results of. an integrated comparative uncertainly analysis of aerosol products from multiple satellite sensors, particularly focused on the Asian Monsoon region, along with some comparisons from the African Monsoon region.

  17. A comparison of general versus regional anesthesia for hip fracture surgery: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Di; Jin, Chunyu; Shan, Minhong; Zhou, Lijuan; Li, Yanshuang

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to compare the effect of general versus regional anesthesia on postoperative outcomes in patients undergoing surgical repair of hip fracture. Randomized controlled trials, prospective studies and retrospective observational studies were searched in PubMed, Medline and Embase database published between January 2005 and March 2014. The overall outcome was measured by odds ratios (ORs) and risk ratios (RRs) with their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). A total of 7 trials, involving 36448 patients received general anesthesia and 33952 patients received regional anesthesia, were included in present meta-analysis. We found that the 30-day mortality rate was lower in general anesthesia cases than that in regional cases (5.3% vs. 6.3%). Overall, our results demonstrated that there was no significant difference in 30-day mortality between two types of anesthesia in patients with hip fracture surgery (RR=0.98, 95% CI=0.92-1.04, P=0.48), indicating that types of anesthesia might not be a risk factor for hip fracture surgery. No statistically significant difference was observed in other outcome measures (P>0.05). In conclusion, our results suggested that the choice of anesthesia (general or regional) should be made by the anesthesiologist on an individual basis and based on the patient’s medical conditions. Further research is still needed to evaluate the effect of these two anesthesia methods. PMID:26884943

  18. An Exploratory Analysis of Regional Assessment Data in Support of Nutrient Criteria Development for EPA Region 5, 7 and 8

    EPA Science Inventory

    The information in this report was requested by EPA Region 5. Their stated purpose for this information was to use it as "lines of evidence" in discussions with R5 states regarding the establishment of nutrient criteria. The information may also be useful to other states as 1) a...

  19. Inductive analysis about the impact of climate warming on regional geomorphic evolution in arid area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anayit, Mattohti; Abulizi, Mailiya

    2016-04-01

    Climate change on the surface of earth will produce a chain reaction among so many global natural environmental elements. Namely, all the issues will be affected by the climate change, just like the regional water environment, formation and development of landscape, plants and animals living environment, the survival of microorganisms, the human economic environment and health, and the whole social environment changes at well. But because of slow frequency of climate change and it is volatility change, its influence on other factors and the overall environmental performance is not obvious, and its reflection performs slowly. Using regional weather data, we calculated qualitatively and quantitatively and did analysis the impact of climate warming on Xinjiang (a province of China) geomorphic evolution elements, including the ground weather, erosion rate, collapse change, landslide occurrences changes and impact debris flow, combining the field survey and indoor test methods. Key words: climate change; the geomorphic induction; landscape change in river basin; Xinjiang

  20. Multifractal analysis of seismicity observed in the Mexican South Pacific region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Marquez, Leticia; Ramírez Rojas, Alejandro

    2014-05-01

    We investigated the multifractal properties of seismicity monitored on the Mexican Pacific south Coast. Some authors in several seismic regions around the world have investigated multifractality in earthquakes, reveling scaling regimes: non homogeneous and multifraltals at small scales, monofractals and close to Poissonian at large scales. Our analysis consider that the different subduction features, due to the interactions between the La Rivera and Cocos plates with the North America plate is able to describe local particular dynamical properties. The multifractal spectrum, f(α), calculated for four seismic subregions displays specific properties suggesting that such singularities spectrum contains local dynamical information which is able to contribute in the knowledge of the tectonics dynamics in subduction phenomena, in particular the four studied regions show multifractality behavior.

  1. Analysis of a severe prolonged regional haze episode in the Yangtze River Delta, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mengya; Cao, Chunxiang; Li, Guoshuai; Singh, Ramesh P.

    2015-02-01

    A severe prolonged regional haze episode occurred over the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) from 2 to 14 December 2013. In this paper, we have discussed the probable cause of haze episode and aerosol characteristics. Analysis of visibility and meteorological parameters suggest that the meteorological conditions play a very important role in the accumulation of aerosol particles that cause haze. The height of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) is considered as one of the key factors together with other factors in the haze formation. The Principal Component Analysis (PCA) clearly shows accumulation process of air pollutants from vehicular, industrial and anthropogenic sources are major contributors for the haze formation. The aerosol optical properties (aerosol optical depth - AOD, Ångström exponent - α and Ultra Violet Aerosol Index - UVAI) are analyzed to study the temporal and spatial variations of aerosol loadings. The results show concentrations of fine mode particles during the haze episode, the dust could have been also entered in the region from the northwestern China. Analysis of vertical aerosol profiles indicate that dust aerosols concentrated in the lower part of the haze layers.

  2. An analysis of reported cases of leishmaniasis in the southern Ecuadorian Amazon region, 1986-2012.

    PubMed

    Olalla, Hector R; Velez, Lenin N; Kato, Hirotomo; Hashiguchi, Kazue; Caceres, Abraham G; Gomez, Eduardo A; Zambrano, Flavio C; Romero-Álvarez, Daniel A; Guevara, Angel G; Hashiguchi, Yoshihisa

    2015-06-01

    An analysis of reported cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) was performed using the data registered in the southern Ecuadorian Amazon region during 27 years from 1986 to 2012. The cases/subjects with both the suspected CL lesions and the amastigote-positive results were recruited for the analysis. The yearly occurrence of cases showed a markedly higher number during the six years, 1988 and 1993. After 1994 when the insecticide spraying campaign using helicopter in 1993-1994, the number dropped remarkably. Then, the yearly occurrence gradually fluctuated from 101 cases in 1996 to 11 in 2009, maintaining a low number of cases after the campaign. The monthly occurrence of cases showed a markedly high number during March and August, suggesting a correlation to the rainy season (months) in the areas. A statistical significance was found between the monthly average number of the CL case and the average precipitation (p=0.01474). It was suggested that the time of transmission of CL would depend on the rainy seasons at each endemic area of Ecuador, which has a diverse climatic feature depending on the geographic regions. Such information at given leishmaniasis-endemic areas of Ecuador would be important for the future planning of the disease control. Molecular analysis and characterization of clinical samples revealed the presence of Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis. PMID:25796313

  3. Multipoint Linkage Analysis of the Pseudoautosomal Regions, Using Affected Sibling Pairs

    PubMed Central

    Dupuis, Josée; Van Eerdewegh, Paul

    2000-01-01

    Affected sibling pairs are often the design of choice in linkage-analysis studies with the goal of identifying the genes that increase susceptibility to complex diseases. Methods for multipoint analysis based on sibling amount of sharing that is identical by descent are widely available, for both autosomal and X-linked markers. Such methods have the advantage of making few assumptions about the mode of inheritance of the disease. However, with this approach, data from the pseudoautosomal regions on the X chromosome pose special challenges. Same-sex sibling pairs will share, in that region of the genome, more genetic material identical by descent, with and without the presence of a disease-susceptibility gene. This increased sharing will be more pronounced for markers closely linked to the sex-specific region. For the same reason, opposite-sex sibling pairs will share fewer alleles identical by descent. Failure to take this inequality in sharing into account may result in a false declaration of linkage if the study sample contains an excess of sex-concordant pairs, or a linkage may be missed when an excess of sex-discordant pairs is present. We propose a method to take into account this expected increase/decrease in sharing when markers in the pseudoautosomal region are analyzed. For quantitative traits, we demonstrate, using the Haseman-Elston method, (1) the same inflation in type I error, in the absence of an appropriate correction, and (2) the inadequacy of permutation tests to estimate levels of significance when all phenotypic values are permuted, irrespective of gender. The proposed method is illustrated with a genome screen on 350 sibling pairs affected with type I diabetes. PMID:10869236

  4. Housing Archetype Analysis for Home Energy-Efficient Retrofit in the Great Lakes Region

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S. K.; Mrozowski, T.; Harrell-Seyburn, A.; Ehrlich, N.; Hembroff, L.; Bieburn, B.; Mazor, M.; McIntyre, A.; Mutton, C.; Parsons, G.; Syal, M. G.; Wilkinson, R.

    2014-09-01

    This project report details activities and results of the 'Market Characterization' project undertaken by the Cost Effective Energy Retrofit (CEER) team targeted toward the DOE goal of achieving 30%-50% reduction in existing building energy use. CEER consists of members from the Dow Chemical Company, Michigan State University, Ferris State University and Habitat for Humanity Kent County. The purpose of this market characterization project was to identify housing archetypes which are dominant within Great Lakes region and therefore offer significant potential for energy-efficient retrofit research and implementation due to the substantial number of homes possessing similar characteristics. Understanding the characteristics of housing groups referred to as 'archetypes' by vintage, style, and construction characteristics can allow research teams to focus their retrofit research and develop prescriptive solutions for those structure types which are prevalent and offer high potential uptake within a region or market. Key research activities included; literature review, statistical analysis of national and regional data of the American Housing Survey (AHS) collected by the U.S. Census Bureau, analysis of Michigan specific data, development of a housing taxonomy of architectural styles, case studies of two local markets (i.e., Ann Arbor and Grand Rapids in Michigan) and development of a suggested framework (or process) for characterizing local markets. In order to gain a high level perspective, national and regional data from the U.S. Census Bureau was analyzed using cross tabulations, multiple regression models, and logistic regression to characterize the housing stock and determine dominant house types using 21 variables.

  5. Bayesian Monte Carlo analysis applied to regional-scale inverse emission modeling for reactive trace gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deguillaume, L.; Beekmann, M.; Menut, L.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this article is inverse modeling of emissions at regional scale for photochemical applications. The study is performed for the Ile-de-France region over a two summers (1998 and 1999) period. This area represents an ideal framework since concentrated anthropogenic emissions in the Paris region frequently lead to the formation of urban plumes. The inversion method is based on Bayesian Monte Carlo analysis applied to a regional-scale chemistry transport model, CHIMERE. This method consists in performing a large number of successive simulations with the same model but with a distinct set of model input parameters at each time. Then a posteriori weights are attributed to individual Monte Carlo simulations by comparing them with observations from the AIRPARIF network: urban NO and O3 concentrations and rural O3 concentrations around the Paris area. For both NO and O3 measurements, observations used for constraining Monte Carlo simulations are additionally averaged over the time period considered for analysis. The observational constraints strongly reduce the a priori uncertainties in anthropogenic NOx and volatile organic compounds (VOC) emissions: (1) The a posteriori probability density function (pdf) for NOx emissions is not modified in its average, but the standard deviation is decreased to around 20% (40% for the a priori one). (2) VOC emissions are enhanced (+16%) in the a posteriori pdf's with a standard deviation around 30% (40% for the a priori one). Uncertainties in the simulated urban NO, urban O3, and O3 production within the plume are reduced by a factor of 3.2, 2.4, and 1.7, respectively.

  6. Regional frequency analysis conditioned on large-scale atmospheric or oceanic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Benjamin; Lall, Upmanu

    2014-12-01

    Many studies report that hydrologic regimes are modulated by large-scale modes of climate variability such as the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) or the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). Climate-informed frequency analysis models have therefore been proposed to condition the distribution of hydrologic variables on climate indices. However, standard climate indices may be poor predictors in some regions. This paper therefore describes a regional frequency analysis framework that conditions the distribution of hydrologic variables directly on atmospheric or oceanic fields, as opposed to predefined climate indices. This framework is based on a two-level probabilistic model describing both climate and hydrologic data. The climate data set (predictor) is typically a time series of atmospheric of oceanic fields defined on a grid over some area, while the hydrologic data set (predictand) is typically a regional data set of station data (e.g., annual average flow at several gauging stations). A Bayesian estimation framework is used, so that a natural quantification of uncertainties affecting hydrologic predictions is available. A case study aimed at predicting the number of autumn flood events in 16 catchments located in Mediterranean France using geopotential heights at 500 hPa over the North-Atlantic region is presented. The temporal variability of hydrologic data is shown to be associated with a particular spatial pattern in the geopotential heights. A cross-validation experiment indicates that the resulting probabilistic climate-informed predictions are skillful: their reliability is acceptable and they are much sharper than predictions based on standard climate indices and baseline predictions that ignore climate information.

  7. Regional frequency analysis conditioned on large-scale atmospheric or oceanic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Benjamin; Lall, Upmanu

    2015-04-01

    Many studies report that hydrologic regimes are modulated by large-scale modes of climate variability such as the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) or the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). Climate-informed frequency analysis models have therefore been proposed to condition the distribution of hydrologic variables on climate indices. However, standard climate indices may be poor predictors in some regions. This paper therefore describes a regional frequency analysis framework that conditions the distribution of hydrologic variables directly on atmospheric or oceanic fields, as opposed to predefined climate indices. This framework is based on a 2-level probabilistic model describing both climate and hydrologic data. The climate dataset (predictor) is typically a time series of atmospheric of oceanic fields defined on a grid over some area, while the hydrologic dataset (predictand) is typically a regional dataset of station data (e.g. annual peak flow at several gauging stations). A Bayesian estimation framework is used, so that a natural quantification of uncertainties affecting hydrologic predictions is available. A case study aimed at predicting the number of autumn flood events in 16 catchments located in Mediterranean France using geopotential heights at 500 hPa over the North-Atlantic region is presented. The temporal variability of hydrologic data is shown to be associated with a particular spatial pattern in the geopotential heights. A cross-validation experiment indicates that the resulting probabilistic climate-informed predictions are skillful: their reliability is acceptable and they are much sharper than predictions based on standard climate indices and baseline predictions that ignore climate information.

  8. Structural survey and faults kinematics analysis of the eastern Thaumasia Region, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borraccini, F.; di Achille, G.

    Thaumasia Region, Mars F. Borraccini (1), G. Di Achille (2) (1) Institute of Environmental Dynamics, University of Urbino, Italy, (2) Int'l Research School of Planetary Sciences, Pescara, Italy (borraccini@uniurb.it / Fax: +39 0722 304295 / Phone: +39 0722 304295) Thaumasia plateau is a tectonically uplifted area buonded by outward-verging ridges (Thaumasia Highlands and Coprates Rise) and by extensional features (Valles Marineris and Claritas Fossae). Since the geodynamic and tectonic evolution of Thaumasia is still debated, we have undertaken a detailed tectonic mapping of a key-sector (of about 2.400.000 km2 ) in order to provide new constraints for the reconstruction of the geodynamic evolution of the whole Thaumasia Region. The study area encompasses the Coprates Chasma and Thaumasia Planum and is bordered by Melas Dorsae and by Nectaris Fossae to the West and East, respectively. In addition to previous Martian data sets (MOC, Themis, and Viking), we also used the HRSC images which made possible a detailed structural analysis. The area shows tectonic features characterized by different kinematics, origins and ages. In particular, horst and graben structures are arranged in two main WNW-ESE and NW-SE trending sets. A further set of normal faults is E-W oriented and dissects the Coprates Rise. This is affected by intense scarp retreat processes probably associated to wind and/or fluvial activities. E-W oriented right-lateral strike-slip faults postdates the extensional features and locally shows associated pull-apart basins. A compressive tectonic phase is recorded by NNE-SSW trending wrinkle ridges and by N-S oriented, east-verging regional buckling folds. We also investigated the relationship between the kinematics of those sets of structures and of major features like Valles Marineris and Coprates Rise. The analysis of crosscutting relationships between observed tectonic trends allowed the identification of the main deformational events occurred in the

  9. Online Time Series Analysis of Land Products over Asia Monsoon Region via Giovanni

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Suhung; Leptoukh, Gregory G.; Gerasimov, Irina

    2011-01-01

    Time series analysis is critical to the study of land cover/land use changes and climate. Time series studies at local-to-regional scales require higher spatial resolution, such as 1km or less, data. MODIS land products of 250m to 1km resolution enable such studies. However, such MODIS land data files are distributed in 10ox10o tiles, due to large data volumes. Conducting a time series study requires downloading all tiles that include the study area for the time period of interest, and mosaicking the tiles spatially. This can be an extremely time-consuming process. In support of the Monsoon Asia Integrated Regional Study (MAIRS) program, NASA GES DISC (Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center) has processed MODIS land products at 1 km resolution over the Asia monsoon region (0o-60oN, 60o-150oE) with a common data structure and format. The processed data have been integrated into the Giovanni system (Goddard Interactive Online Visualization ANd aNalysis Infrastructure) that enables users to explore, analyze, and download data over an area and time period of interest easily. Currently, the following regional MODIS land products are available in Giovanni: 8-day 1km land surface temperature and active fire, monthly 1km vegetation index, and yearly 0.05o, 500m land cover types. More data will be added in the near future. By combining atmospheric and oceanic data products in the Giovanni system, it is possible to do further analyses of environmental and climate changes associated with the land, ocean, and atmosphere. This presentation demonstrates exploring land products in the Giovanni system with sample case scenarios.

  10. Functional MRI Preprocessing in Lesioned Brains: Manual Versus Automated Region of Interest Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Garrison, Kathleen A.; Rogalsky, Corianne; Sheng, Tong; Liu, Brent; Damasio, Hanna; Winstein, Carolee J.; Aziz-Zadeh, Lisa S.

    2015-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has significant potential in the study and treatment of neurological disorders and stroke. Region of interest (ROI) analysis in such studies allows for testing of strong a priori clinical hypotheses with improved statistical power. A commonly used automated approach to ROI analysis is to spatially normalize each participant’s structural brain image to a template brain image and define ROIs using an atlas. However, in studies of individuals with structural brain lesions, such as stroke, the gold standard approach may be to manually hand-draw ROIs on each participant’s non-normalized structural brain image. Automated approaches to ROI analysis are faster and more standardized, yet are susceptible to preprocessing error (e.g., normalization error) that can be greater in lesioned brains. The manual approach to ROI analysis has high demand for time and expertise, but may provide a more accurate estimate of brain response. In this study, commonly used automated and manual approaches to ROI analysis were directly compared by reanalyzing data from a previously published hypothesis-driven cognitive fMRI study, involving individuals with stroke. The ROI evaluated is the pars opercularis of the inferior frontal gyrus. Significant differences were identified in task-related effect size and percent-activated voxels in this ROI between the automated and manual approaches to ROI analysis. Task interactions, however, were consistent across ROI analysis approaches. These findings support the use of automated approaches to ROI analysis in studies of lesioned brains, provided they employ a task interaction design. PMID:26441816

  11. FFT analysis on NDVI annual cycle and climatic regionality in Northeast Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negrón Juárez, Robinson I.; Liu, William T.

    2001-11-01

    By considering that the climate of Northeast Brazil (NEB) has distinct wet and dry seasons, the mixed radix fast Fourier transform (mrFFT) algorithm, developed at the National Aerospace Centre of the Netherlands, was applied to a monthly Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) time series from July 1981 to June 1993, to generate phase, amplitude and mean NDVI data using a 1-year frequency in order to improve the analysis of its spatial variation.The NDVI mean values varied from >0.7, which occurred in northwest and southeast regions, to <0.3 in the northeast and 0.4 in the southwest regions of the NEB. The 90° phase month at its maximum amplitude occurred in August and was observed in both southeastern and northwestern coasts, located at 10.5°S-37.5°W and 4°S-46°W, respectively. It changed rapidly from August, June to May, moved inland and changed gradually from May through to April and from March to February, then moved towards the centre Dry Polygon area. Then it changed gradually from February to January and ended up in December, and moved further southwards. The annual cycle amplitude varied from <0.075 in northwest and southeast regions to >0.25 in the northeast region. By using spatial variations of phase, amplitude and mean NDVI values, 15 climate types were delineated for the NEB.The spatial distribution of climate types in the NEB delineated by the NDVI FFT analysis agreed mostly with the climatic types presented by Hargreaves (Precipitation dependability and potentials for agricultural production in Northeast Brazil. Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuária-EMBRAPA, Brazil, 1974), except regions with higher spatial variability and limited surface meteorological data. Among the three components: phase, amplitude and mean NDVI, the phase image, informing the initiation and duration of rainy season, was the most important component for climate-type delineation. Nevertheless, while the extreme values of amplitude, inferring a high wet

  12. Regional magnetic resonance imaging measures for multivariate analysis in Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Westman, Eric; Aguilar, Carlos; Muehlboeck, J-Sebastian; Simmons, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Automated structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) processing pipelines are gaining popularity for Alzheimer's disease (AD) research. They generate regional volumes, cortical thickness measures and other measures, which can be used as input for multivariate analysis. It is not clear which combination of measures and normalization approach are most useful for AD classification and to predict mild cognitive impairment (MCI) conversion. The current study includes MRI scans from 699 subjects [AD, MCI and controls (CTL)] from the Alzheimer's disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). The Freesurfer pipeline was used to generate regional volume, cortical thickness, gray matter volume, surface area, mean curvature, gaussian curvature, folding index and curvature index measures. 259 variables were used for orthogonal partial least square to latent structures (OPLS) multivariate analysis. Normalisation approaches were explored and the optimal combination of measures determined. Results indicate that cortical thickness measures should not be normalized, while volumes should probably be normalized by intracranial volume (ICV). Combining regional cortical thickness measures (not normalized) with cortical and subcortical volumes (normalized with ICV) using OPLS gave a prediction accuracy of 91.5 % when distinguishing AD versus CTL. This model prospectively predicted future decline from MCI to AD with 75.9 % of converters correctly classified. Normalization strategy did not have a significant effect on the accuracies of multivariate models containing multiple MRI measures for this large dataset. The appropriate choice of input for multivariate analysis in AD and MCI is of great importance. The results support the use of un-normalised cortical thickness measures and volumes normalised by ICV. PMID:22890700

  13. Regionalization of hydrologic response in the Great Lakes basin: Considerations of temporal scales of analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kult, Jonathan M.; Fry, Lauren M.; Gronewold, Andrew D.; Choi, Woonsup

    2014-11-01

    Methods for predicting streamflow in areas with limited or nonexistent measures of hydrologic response commonly rely on regionalization techniques, where knowledge pertaining to gauged watersheds is transferred to ungauged watersheds. Hydrologic response indices have frequently been employed in contemporary regionalization research related to predictions in ungauged basins. In this study, we developed regionalization models using multiple linear regression and regression tree analysis to derive relationships between hydrologic response and watershed physical characteristics for 163 watersheds in the Great Lakes basin. These models provide an empirical means for simulating runoff in ungauged basins at a monthly time step without implementation of a rainfall-runoff model. For the dependent variable in these regression models, we used monthly runoff ratio as the indicator of hydrologic response and defined it at two temporal scales: (1) treating all monthly runoff ratios as individual observations, and (2) using the mean of these monthly runoff ratios for each watershed as a representative observation. Application of the models to 62 validation watersheds throughout the Great Lakes basin indicated that model simulations were far more sensitive to the temporal characterization of hydrologic response than to the type of regression technique employed, and that models conditioned on individual monthly runoff ratios (rather than long term mean values) performed better. This finding is important in light of the increased usage of hydrologic response indices in recent regionalization studies. Models using individual observations for the dependent variable generally simulated monthly runoff with reasonable skill in the validation watersheds (median Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency = 0.53, median R2 = 0.66, median magnitude of the deviation of runoff volume = 13%). These results suggest the viability of empirical approaches to simulate runoff in ungauged basins. This finding is

  14. Regional analysis of drought and heat impacts on forests: current and future science directions.

    PubMed

    Law, Beverly E

    2014-12-01

    Accurate assessments of forest response to current and future climate and human actions are needed at regional scales. Predicting future impacts on forests will require improved analysis of species-level adaptation, resilience, and vulnerability to mortality. Land system models can be enhanced by creating trait-based groupings of species that better represent climate sensitivity, such as risk of hydraulic failure from drought. This emphasizes the need for more coordinated in situ and remote sensing observations to track changes in ecosystem function, and to improve model inputs, spatio-temporal diagnosis, and predictions of future conditions, including implications of actions to mitigate climate change. PMID:24909650

  15. PREPRO: a computer program for encoding regional exploration data for use in characteristic analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bridges, N.J.; Hanley, J.T.; McCammon, R.B.

    1985-01-01

    The preprocessor (PREPRO) computer program offers the exploration geologist a variety of options for encoding regional exploration data into ternary form for use in characteristic analysis. PREPRO's options include variable-input formats, cursor input, ordering among a set of input variables, and selectable ternary transformations. Moreover, the program provides for the display of results which, in turn, makes possible review, reselection, and retransformation of variables. Most important, the performance of the listed steps in an interactive computing environment results in rapid and efficient preprocessing of the data.

  16. Bottomside sinusoidal irregularities in the equatorial F region. II - Cross-correlation and spectral analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cragin, B. L.; Hanson, W. B.; Mcclure, J. P.; Valladares, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    Equatorial bottomside sinusoidal (BSS) irregularities have been studied by applying techniques of cross-correlation and spectral analysis to the Atmosphere Explorer data set. The phase of the cross-correlations of the plasma number density is discussed and the two drift velocity components observed using the retarding potential analyzer and ion drift meter on the satellite are discussed. Morphology is addressed, presenting the geographical distributions of the occurrence of BSS events for the equinoxes and solstices. Physical processes including the ion Larmor flux, interhemispheric plasma flows, and variations in the lower F region Pedersen conductivity are invoked to explain the findings.

  17. Molecular analysis of 16S-23S spacer regions of Acetobacter species.

    PubMed

    Kretová, M; Grones, J

    2005-01-01

    16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS) similarities were determined in 8 Acetobacter and 1 Gluconacetobacter strains. ITS-PCR amplification of the 16S-23S spacers showed 2 products of similar size in 7 strains; only 1 product of similar size was found in the 2 remaining strains. Analysis of the PCR products using restriction endonucleases HaeIII, HpaII and AluI revealed 3 different restriction groups of A. pasteurianus for AluI and HaeIII, and 4 restriction groups for HpaII. ITS nucleotide sequences of all studied strains exhibited a 52-98% similarity. PMID:16408846

  18. THE SOUTHWEST REGIONAL GAP PROJECT: A DATABASE MODEL FOR REGIONAL LANDSCAPE ASSESSMENT, RESOURCE PLANNING, AND VULNERABILITY ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Gap Analysis Program (GAP) is a national interagency program that maps the distribution of plant communities and selected animal species and compares these distributions with land stewardship to identify biotic elements at potential risk of endangerment. Acquisition of primar...

  19. An analysis of region-of-influence methods for flood regionalization in the Gulf-Atlantic Rolling Plains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eng, K.; Tasker, Gary D.; Milly, P.C.D.

    2005-01-01

    Region-of-influence (RoI) approaches for estimating streamflow characteristics at ungaged sites were applied and evaluated in a case study of the 50-year peak discharge in the Gulf-Atlantic Rolling Plains of the southeastern United States. Linear regression against basin characteristics was performed for each ungaged site considered based on data from a region of influence containing the n closest gages in predictor variable (PRoI) or geographic (GRoI) space. Augmentation of this count based cutoff by a distance based cutoff also was considered. Prediction errors were evaluated for an independent (split-sampled) dataset. For the dataset and metrics considered here: (1) for either PRoI or GRoI, optimal results were found when the simpler count based cutoff, rather than the distance augmented cutoff, was used; (2) GRoI produced lower error than PRoI when applied indiscriminately over the entire study region; (3) PRoI performance improved considerably when RoI was restricted to predefined geographic subregions.

  20. An analysis of the DuPage County Regional Office of Education physics exam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muehsler, Hans

    In 2009, the DuPage County Regional Office of Education (ROE) tasked volunteer physics teachers with creating a basic skills physics exam reflecting what the participants valued and shared in common across curricula. Mechanics, electricity & magnetism (E&M), and wave phenomena emerged as the primary constructs. The resulting exam was intended for first-exposure physics students. The most recently completed version was psychometrically assessed for unidimensionality within the constructs using a robust WLS structural equation model and for reliability. An item analysis using a 3-PL IRT model was performed on the mechanics items and a 2-PL IRT model was performed on the E&M and waves items; a distractor analysis was also performed on all items. Lastly, differential item functioning (DIF) and differential test functioning (DTF) analyses, using the Mantel-Haenszel procedure, were performed using gender, ethnicity, year in school, ELL, physics level, and math level as groupings.

  1. The analysis of temporal variations in regional models of the Sargasso Sea from GEOS-3 altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, R. S.; Coleman, R.; Hirsch, B.

    1978-01-01

    The dense coverage of short pulse mode GEOS-3 altimeter data in the western North Atlantic provides a basis for studying time variations in the sea surface heights in the Sargasso Sea. Two techniques are utilized: the method of regional models, and the analysis of overlapping passes. An 88 percent correlation is obtained between the location of cyclonic eddies obtained from infrared imagery and sea surface height minima in the altimeter models. This figure drops to 59 percent in the case of correlations with maxima and minima of surface temperature fields. The analysis of overlapping passes provides a better picture of instantaneous sea state through wavelengths greater than 30 km. The variability of the Sargasso Sea through wavelengths between 150 km and 5000 km is estimated at + or - 28 cm. This value is in reasonable agreement with oceanographic estimates and is compatible with the eddy kinetic energy of a wind driven circulation.

  2. Trypanosoma cruzi: sequence analysis of the variable region of kinetoplast minicircles.

    PubMed

    Telleria, Jenny; Lafay, Bénédicte; Virreira, Myrna; Barnabé, Christian; Tibayrenc, Michel; Svoboda, Michal

    2006-12-01

    The comparisons of 170 sequences of kinetoplast DNA minicircle hypervariable region obtained from 19 stocks of Trypanosoma cruzi and 2 stocks of Trypanosoma cruzi marenkellei showed that only 56% exhibited a significant homology one with other sequences. These sequences could be grouped into homology classes showing no significant sequence similarity with any other homology group. The 44% remaining sequences thus corresponded to unique sequences in our data set. In the DTU I ("Discrete Typing Units") 51% of the sequences were unique. In contrast, in the DTU IId, 87.5% of sequences were distributed into three classes. The results obtained for T. cruzi marinkellei, showed that all sequences were unique, without any similarity between them and T. cruzi sequences. Analysis of palindromes in all sequence sets show high frequency of the EcoRI site. Analysis of repetitive sequences suggested a common ancestral origin of the kDNA. The editing mechanism that occurs in kinetoplastidae is discussed. PMID:16730709

  3. Monoexponential analysis of /sup 133/Xe clearance curves for regional cerebral blood flow measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ryding, E.

    1984-06-01

    The theoretical properties of a monoexponential flow index, analogous to the one used earlier by other investigators for regional CBF (rCBF) measured after intraarterial injection, were investigated after the administration of /sup 133/Xe intraarterially, intravenously, and by inhalation under high and low flow conditions. The sensitivity of the flow index to changes in fast flow components or changes in the weight ratio between the fast and the slow flow compartments was found to be dependent on whichever part of the /sup 133/Xe clearance curve was used for the flow calculation and on the shape of the input function for /sup 133/Xe. Since biexponential analysis of the clearance curves includes a monoexponential approximation for each of the two components of the clearance curve corresponding to the high and the low flow ''families'' in the brain, the limitations of the monoexponential flow index observed are in principle also valid for the results of biexponential analysis of the clearance curves.

  4. Temperature Analysis of an Active Region Core Loop Using AIA and XRT Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garst, Jennifer W.; Schmelz, J.; Kimble, J.

    2012-05-01

    Data obtained on December 10, 2010 by both the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the X-Ray Telescope (XRT) are co-aligned and appropriately scaled in order to do a differential emission measure analysis of the combined data. This project uses Hybrid abundances from Fludra & Schmelz and atomic data from the CHIANTI atomic physics database to analyze an active region core loop and report on the multithermal analysis of the combined data set. The loop being analyzed is visible in the 94, 131, 171, 193, 211, 335 Å passbands on AIA; and the Al-thick, Ti-poly, Al-mesh, Al-poly/Ti-poly, C-Poly/Ti-poly, C-poly, Be-thin, Be-med, Al-med, and Al-poly filters on XRT. Solar physics research at the University of Memphis is supported by NSF ATM-0402729 as well as a Hinode subcontract from NASA/SAO.

  5. Regional tectonic analysis of Venus equatorial highlands and comparison with Earth-based Magellan radar images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David R.; Wetherill, George

    1993-01-01

    Research on regional tectonic analysis of Venus equatorial highlands and comparison with earth-based and Magellan radar images is presented. Over the past two years, the tectonic analysis of Venus performed centered on global properties of the planet, in order to understand fundamental aspects of the dynamics of the mantle and lithosphere of Venus. These include studies pertaining to the original constitutive and thermal character of the planet, as well as the evolution of Venus through time, and the present day tectonics. Parameterized convection models of the Earth and Venus were developed. The parameterized convection code was reformulated to model Venus with an initially hydrous mantle to determine how the cold-trap could affect the evolution of the planet.

  6. Genomic analysis of the Xp21 region around the RP3 locus

    SciTech Connect

    Navia, B.A.; Eisenman, R.E.; Bruns, G.A.

    1994-09-01

    One form of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa has been localized by deletion and linkage analysis to proximal Xp21 near the OTC locus and the proximal breakpoint of the BB deletion. A deletion junction clone, previously isolated from this region, was used to initiate a series of bidirectional walks in a human genomic library in EMBL3A. A phage contig of nearly 70 kb has been cloned and systematically searched for conserved sequences and CA repeats. A number of unique sequences around the breakpoint have been sequenced and analyzed with exon identification programs. An HTF island was identified approximately 35 kb distal to the centromeric breakpoint of the BB deletion and several CA repeat-containing areas were found in the contig. Two YACs that contain the breakpoint and surrounding region were isolated. A phage sublibrary was constructed from one of the YACs and is being used to extend the contig map further centromeric. To isolate transcripts from the region, two rounds of cDNA selection from a combined short insert human retinal and fetal brain library were performed against the pooled phage clones from the contig and against the pooled phage from the YAC derived sublibrary. Among the selected cDNAs, several unique sequences have been identified and are currently being mapped and sequenced.

  7. Statistical analysis of the MODIS atmosphere products for the Tomsk region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afonin, Sergey V.; Belov, Vladimir V.; Engel, Marina V.

    2005-10-01

    The paper presents the results of using the MODIS Atmosphere Products satellite information to study the atmospheric characteristics (the aerosol and water vapor) in the Tomsk Region (56-61°N, 75-90°E) in 2001-2004. The satellite data were received from the NASA Goddard Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) through the INTERNET.To use satellite data for a solution of scientific and applied problems, it is very important to know their accuracy. Despite the results of validation of the MODIS data have already been available in the literature, we decided to carry out additional investigations for the Tomsk Region. The paper presents the results of validation of the aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and total column precipitable water (TCPW), which are in good agreement with the test data. The statistical analysis revealed some interesting facts. Thus, for example, analyzing the data on the spatial distribution of the average seasonal values of AOT or TCPW for 2001-2003 in the Tomsk Region, we established that instead of the expected spatial homogeneity of these distributions, they have similar spatial structures.

  8. Analysis of genomic regions of Trichoderma harzianum IOC-3844 related to biomass degradation.

    PubMed

    Crucello, Aline; Sforça, Danilo Augusto; Horta, Maria Augusta Crivelente; dos Santos, Clelton Aparecido; Viana, Américo José Carvalho; Beloti, Lilian Luzia; de Toledo, Marcelo Augusto Szymanski; Vincentz, Michel; Kuroshu, Reginaldo Massanobu; de Souza, Anete Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Trichoderma harzianum IOC-3844 secretes high levels of cellulolytic-active enzymes and is therefore a promising strain for use in biotechnological applications in second-generation bioethanol production. However, the T. harzianum biomass degradation mechanism has not been well explored at the genetic level. The present work investigates six genomic regions (~150 kbp each) in this fungus that are enriched with genes related to biomass conversion. A BAC library consisting of 5,760 clones was constructed, with an average insert length of 90 kbp. The assembled BAC sequences revealed 232 predicted genes, 31.5% of which were related to catabolic pathways, including those involved in biomass degradation. An expression profile analysis based on RNA-Seq data demonstrated that putative regulatory elements, such as membrane transport proteins and transcription factors, are located in the same genomic regions as genes related to carbohydrate metabolism and exhibit similar expression profiles. Thus, we demonstrate a rapid and efficient tool that focuses on specific genomic regions by combining a BAC library with transcriptomic data. This is the first BAC-based structural genomic study of the cellulolytic fungus T. harzianum, and its findings provide new perspectives regarding the use of this species in biomass degradation processes. PMID:25836973

  9. Comparative Analysis of the Shared Sex-Determination Region (SDR) among Salmonid Fishes

    PubMed Central

    Faber-Hammond, Joshua J.; Phillips, Ruth B.; Brown, Kim H.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonids present an excellent model for studying evolution of young sex-chromosomes. Within the genus, Oncorhynchus, at least six independent sex-chromosome pairs have evolved, many unique to individual species. This variation results from the movement of the sex-determining gene, sdY, throughout the salmonid genome. While sdY is known to define sexual differentiation in salmonids, the mechanism of its movement throughout the genome has remained elusive due to high frequencies of repetitive elements, rDNA sequences, and transposons surrounding the sex-determining regions (SDR). Despite these difficulties, bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library clones from both rainbow trout and Atlantic salmon containing the sdY region have been reported. Here, we report the sequences for these BACs as well as the extended sequence for the known SDR in Chinook gained through genome walking methods. Comparative analysis allowed us to study the overlapping SDRs from three unique salmonid Y chromosomes to define the specific content, size, and variation present between the species. We found approximately 4.1 kb of orthologous sequence common to all three species, which contains the genetic content necessary for masculinization. The regions contain transposable elements that may be responsible for the translocations of the SDR throughout salmonid genomes and we examine potential mechanistic roles of each one. PMID:26112966

  10. Analysis of climate projections for the Carpathian Region using dynamical downscaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartholy, Judit; Pongracz, Rita; Pieczka, Ildiko; Andre, Karolina

    2015-04-01

    Hungarian national climate and adaptation strategies have been recently revised, and a National Adaptation Geo-information System (NAGIS) is currently under development. This platform will serve as a central data collection for various end-users, impact researchers, and decision makers on national level in Hungary. In order to satisfy the demands for climate projection inputs within this framework, RegCM4.3 is one of the regional climate models used to provide results for detailed regional scale analysis and specific impact studies. RegCM is a 3-dimensional, sigma-coordinate, primitive equation model, originally developed by Giorgi et al. Currently, it is available from the ICTP (Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics). We have already completed experiments with 50 km horizontal resolution covering both the second half of the past century (1951-2005), and the future (i.e., the 21st century, 2006-2100) using HadGEM2 global model outputs as initial and lateral boundary conditions. The outputs of the 50 km runs drive the further downscaling experiments using 10 km as a horizontal resolution for a smaller domain covering Central Europe with special focus on the Carpathian Region. For the future, RCP4.5 scenario run is analysed in this poster, and moreover, preliminary results of the RCP8.5 scenario run are also presented.

  11. DeepBlue epigenomic data server: programmatic data retrieval and analysis of epigenome region sets.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Felipe; List, Markus; Bock, Christoph; Lengauer, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Large amounts of epigenomic data are generated under the umbrella of the International Human Epigenome Consortium, which aims to establish 1000 reference epigenomes within the next few years. These data have the potential to unravel the complexity of epigenomic regulation. However, their effective use is hindered by the lack of flexible and easy-to-use methods for data retrieval. Extracting region sets of interest is a cumbersome task that involves several manual steps: identifying the relevant experiments, downloading the corresponding data files and filtering the region sets of interest. Here we present the DeepBlue Epigenomic Data Server, which streamlines epigenomic data analysis as well as software development. DeepBlue provides a comprehensive programmatic interface for finding, selecting, filtering, summarizing and downloading region sets. It contains data from four major epigenome projects, namely ENCODE, ROADMAP, BLUEPRINT and DEEP. DeepBlue comes with a user manual, examples and a well-documented application programming interface (API). The latter is accessed via the XML-RPC protocol supported by many programming languages. To demonstrate usage of the API and to enable convenient data retrieval for non-programmers, we offer an optional web interface. DeepBlue can be openly accessed at http://deepblue.mpi-inf.mpg.de. PMID:27084938

  12. Analysis of Genomic Regions of Trichoderma harzianum IOC-3844 Related to Biomass Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Crucello, Aline; Sforça, Danilo Augusto; Horta, Maria Augusta Crivelente; dos Santos, Clelton Aparecido; Viana, Américo José Carvalho; Beloti, Lilian Luzia; de Toledo, Marcelo Augusto Szymanski; Vincentz, Michel; Kuroshu, Reginaldo Massanobu; de Souza, Anete Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Trichoderma harzianum IOC-3844 secretes high levels of cellulolytic-active enzymes and is therefore a promising strain for use in biotechnological applications in second-generation bioethanol production. However, the T. harzianum biomass degradation mechanism has not been well explored at the genetic level. The present work investigates six genomic regions (~150 kbp each) in this fungus that are enriched with genes related to biomass conversion. A BAC library consisting of 5,760 clones was constructed, with an average insert length of 90 kbp. The assembled BAC sequences revealed 232 predicted genes, 31.5% of which were related to catabolic pathways, including those involved in biomass degradation. An expression profile analysis based on RNA-Seq data demonstrated that putative regulatory elements, such as membrane transport proteins and transcription factors, are located in the same genomic regions as genes related to carbohydrate metabolism and exhibit similar expression profiles. Thus, we demonstrate a rapid and efficient tool that focuses on specific genomic regions by combining a BAC library with transcriptomic data. This is the first BAC-based structural genomic study of the cellulolytic fungus T. harzianum, and its findings provide new perspectives regarding the use of this species in biomass degradation processes. PMID:25836973

  13. Reduction, analysis, and properties of electric current systems in solar active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, G. Allen; Demoulin, Pascal

    1995-01-01

    The specific attraction and, in large part, the significance of solar magnetograms lie in the fact that they give the most important data on the electric currents and the nonpotentiality of active regions. Using the vector magnetograms from the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), we employ a unique technique in the area of data analysis for resolving the 180 deg ambiguity in order to calculate the spatial structure of the vertical electric current density. The 180 deg ambiguity is resolved by applying concepts from the nonlinear multivariable optimization theory. The technique is shown to be of particular importance in very nonpotential active regions. The characterization of the vertical electric current density for a set of vector magnetograms using this method then gives the spatial scale, locations, and magnitude of these current systems. The method, which employs an intermediate parametric function which covers the magnetogram and which defines the local `preferred' direction, minimizes a specific functional of the observed transverse magnetic field. The specific functional that is successful is the integral of the square of the vertical current density. We find that the vertical electric current densities have common characteristics for the extended bipolar (beta) (gamma) (delta)-regions studied. The largest current systems have j(sub z)'s which maximizes around 30 mA/sq m and have a linear decreasing distribution to a diameter of 30 Mn.

  14. Reduction, Analysis, and Properties of Electric Current Systems in Solar Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, G. Allen; Demoulin, Pascal

    1995-01-01

    The specific attraction and, in large part, the significance of solar vector magnetograms lie in the fact that they give the most important data on the electric currents and the nonpotentiality of active regions. Using the vector magnetograms from the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), we employ a unique technique in the area of data analysis for resolving the 180 degree ambiguity in order to calculate the spatial structure of the vertical electric current density. The 180 degree ambiguity is resolved by applying concepts from the nonlinear multivariable optimization theory. The technique is shown to be of particular importance in very nonpotential active regions. The characterization of the vertical electric current density for a set of vector magnetograms using this method then gives the spatial scale, locations, and magnitude of these current systems. The method, which employs an intermediate parametric function which covers the magnetogram and which defines the local "preferred" direction, minimizes a specific functional of the observed transverse magnetic field. The specific functional that is successful is the integral of the square of the vertical current density. We find that the vertical electric current densities have common characteristics for the extended bipolar beta gamma delta-regions studied. The largest current systems have j(sub z)'s which maximizes around 30 mA per square meter and have a linear decreasing distribution to a diameter of 30 Mm.

  15. Comparative Analysis of the Shared Sex-Determination Region (SDR) among Salmonid Fishes.

    PubMed

    Faber-Hammond, Joshua J; Phillips, Ruth B; Brown, Kim H

    2015-07-01

    Salmonids present an excellent model for studying evolution of young sex-chromosomes. Within the genus, Oncorhynchus, at least six independent sex-chromosome pairs have evolved, many unique to individual species. This variation results from the movement of the sex-determining gene, sdY, throughout the salmonid genome. While sdY is known to define sexual differentiation in salmonids, the mechanism of its movement throughout the genome has remained elusive due to high frequencies of repetitive elements, rDNA sequences, and transposons surrounding the sex-determining regions (SDR). Despite these difficulties, bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library clones from both rainbow trout and Atlantic salmon containing the sdY region have been reported. Here, we report the sequences for these BACs as well as the extended sequence for the known SDR in Chinook gained through genome walking methods. Comparative analysis allowed us to study the overlapping SDRs from three unique salmonid Y chromosomes to define the specific content, size, and variation present between the species. We found approximately 4.1 kb of orthologous sequence common to all three species, which contains the genetic content necessary for masculinization. The regions contain transposable elements that may be responsible for the translocations of the SDR throughout salmonid genomes and we examine potential mechanistic roles of each one. PMID:26112966

  16. DeepBlue epigenomic data server: programmatic data retrieval and analysis of epigenome region sets

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Felipe; List, Markus; Bock, Christoph; Lengauer, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Large amounts of epigenomic data are generated under the umbrella of the International Human Epigenome Consortium, which aims to establish 1000 reference epigenomes within the next few years. These data have the potential to unravel the complexity of epigenomic regulation. However, their effective use is hindered by the lack of flexible and easy-to-use methods for data retrieval. Extracting region sets of interest is a cumbersome task that involves several manual steps: identifying the relevant experiments, downloading the corresponding data files and filtering the region sets of interest. Here we present the DeepBlue Epigenomic Data Server, which streamlines epigenomic data analysis as well as software development. DeepBlue provides a comprehensive programmatic interface for finding, selecting, filtering, summarizing and downloading region sets. It contains data from four major epigenome projects, namely ENCODE, ROADMAP, BLUEPRINT and DEEP. DeepBlue comes with a user manual, examples and a well-documented application programming interface (API). The latter is accessed via the XML-RPC protocol supported by many programming languages. To demonstrate usage of the API and to enable convenient data retrieval for non-programmers, we offer an optional web interface. DeepBlue can be openly accessed at http://deepblue.mpi-inf.mpg.de. PMID:27084938

  17. Seismicity and earthquake hazard analysis of the Teton-Yellowstone region, Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Bonnie J. Pickering; Smith, Robert B.; Husen, Stephan; Farrell, Jamie M.; Wong, Ivan

    2009-11-01

    hypocenters, unified magnitudes, and seismotectonic analysis helped refine the characterization of the background seismicity that was used as input into a probabilistic seismic hazards analysis. Our results reveals the highest seismic hazard is associated with the Teton fault because of its high slip-rate of approximately 1.3 mm/yr compared to the highest rate of 1.4 mm/yr in southern Yellowstone on the Mt. Sheridan fault. This study demonstrates that the Teton-Yellowstone area is among the regions highest seismic hazard in the western U.S.

  18. Analysis of Stakeholder's Behaviours for an Improved Management of an Agricultural Coastal Region in Oman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatri, Ayisha Al; Jens, Grundmann; der Weth Rüdiger, van; Niels, Schütze

    2015-04-01

    Al Batinah coastal area is the main agricultural region in Oman. Agriculture is concentrated in Al Batinah, because of more fertile soils and easier access to water in the form of groundwater compared to other administrative areas in the country. The region now is facing a problem as a result of over abstraction of fresh groundwater for irrigation from the main aquifer along the coast. This enforces the inflow of sea water into the coastal aquifer and causes salinization of the groundwater. As a consequence the groundwater becomes no longer suitable for irrigation which impacts the social and economical situation of farmers as well as the environment. Therefore, the existing situation generates conflicts between different stakeholders regarding water availability, sustainable aquifer management, and profitable agricultural production in Al Batinah region. Several management measures to maintain the groundwater aquifer in the region, were implemented by the government. However, these solutions showed only limited successes for the existing problem. The aim of this study now is to evaluate the implementation potential of several management interventions and their combinations by analysing opinions and responses of all relevant stakeholders in the region. This is done in order to identify potential conflicts among stakeholders to a participatory process within the frame of an integrated water resources management and to support decision makers in taking more informed decisions. Questionnaires were designed for collecting data from different groups of stakeholders e.g. water professionals, farmers from the study area and decision makers of different organizations and ministries. These data were analysed statistically for each group separately as well as regarding relations amongst groups by using the SPSS (Statistical Package for Social Science) software package. Results show, that the need to improve the situation is supported by all groups. However, significant

  19. EURO-CORDEX regional climate model analysis for the Greater Alpine Region: Performance and expected future change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smiatek, Gerhard; Kunstmann, Harald; Senatore, Alfonso

    2016-07-01

    Simulations from 13 highly resolved regional climate models run within the Coordinated Downscaling Experiment initiative at 0.11° resolution with boundary forcings from five different Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 global models are employed to derive future climate change signal for the Greater Alpine Region (GAR) and four smaller investigation areas. Evaluation statistics include mean temperature and precipitation, frequency of days with precipitation over 1 mm and over 15 mm, 90% quantile of the frequency distribution, and maximum number of consecutive dry days. The evaluation for the period from 1971 to 2000 indicates that the models reproduce spatial seasonal precipitation patterns. In general, the simulations underestimate the seasonal mean temperature and overestimate the mean precipitation values. In GAR the ensemble seasonal mean temperature bias ranges from -0.8 to -1.9°C. The bias in precipitation varies between +14.8% in summer and +41.6% in the winter season. Larger errors are found for other statistics and in the investigated regions. In general, no significant gains in the quality of reproduction of the observed precipitation and temperature statistics compared to previous experiments can be identified. The temperature calculations for 2071-2100 related to the period from 1971 to 2000 in the GAR area show ensemble mean increases in the seasonal mean 2 m temperature of 2.5°C in fall and winter, 2.4°C in summer, and 1.9°C in spring. In the same area, precipitation is simulated to increase up to 12.3% in winter and 5.7% in spring. Only minor changes of the ensemble mean are predicted with +2.3% in fall and -1.7% in summer.

  20. Multi-criteria decision analysis for bioenergy in the Centre Region of Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteves, T. C. J.; Cabral, P.; Ferreira, A. J. D.; Teixeira, J. C.

    2012-04-01

    With the consumption of fossil fuels, the resources essential to Man's survival are being rapidly contaminated. A sustainable future may be achieved by the use of renewable energies, allowing countries without non-renewable energy resources to guarantee energetic sovereignty. Using bioenergy may mean a steep reduction and/or elimination of the external dependency, enhancing the countries' capital and potentially reducing of the negative effects that outcome from the use of fossil fuels, such as loss of biodiversity, air, water, and soil pollution, … This work's main focus is to increase bioenergy use in the centre region of Portugal by allying R&D to facilitate determination of bioenergy availability and distribution throughout the study area.This analysis is essential, given that nowadays this knowledge is still very limited in the study area. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) was the main tool used to asses this study, due to its unseeingly ability to integrate various types of information (such as alphanumerical, statistical, geographical, …) and various sources of biomass (forest, agricultural, husbandry, municipal and industrial residues, shrublands, used vegetable oil and energy crops) to determine the bioenergy potential of the study area, as well as their spatial distribution. By allying GIS with multi-criteria decision analysis, the initial table-like information of difficult comprehension is transformed into tangible and easy to read results: both intermediate and final results of the created models will facilitate the decision making process. General results show that the major contributors for the bioenergy potential in the Centre Region of Portugal are forest residues, which are mostly located in the inner region of the study area. However, a more detailed analysis should be made to analyze the viability to use energy crops. As a main conclusion, we can say that, although this region may not use only this type of energy to be completely

  1. Regional land salinization assessment and simulation through cellular automaton-Markov modeling and spatial pattern analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, De; Lin, Zhulu; Liu, Liming

    2012-11-15

    Land salinization and desalinization are complex processes affected by both biophysical and human-induced driving factors. Conventional approaches of land salinization assessment and simulation are either too time consuming or focus only on biophysical factors. The cellular automaton (CA)-Markov model, when coupled with spatial pattern analysis, is well suited for regional assessments and simulations of salt-affected landscapes since both biophysical and socioeconomic data can be efficiently incorporated into a geographic information system framework. Our hypothesis set forth that the CA-Markov model can serve as an alternative tool for regional assessment and simulation of land salinization or desalinization. Our results suggest that the CA-Markov model, when incorporating biophysical and human-induced factors, performs better than the model which did not account for these factors when simulating the salt-affected landscape of the Yinchuan Plain (China) in 2009. In general, the CA-Markov model is best suited for short-term simulations and the performance of the CA-Markov model is largely determined by the availability of high-quality, high-resolution socioeconomic data. The coupling of the CA-Markov model with spatial pattern analysis provides an improved understanding of spatial and temporal variations of salt-affected landscape changes and an option to test different soil management scenarios for salinity management. PMID:23085467

  2. Low frequency azimuthal stability of the ionization region of the Hall thruster discharge. I. Local analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Escobar, D.; Ahedo, E.

    2014-04-15

    Results based on a local linear stability analysis of the Hall thruster discharge are presented. A one-dimensional azimuthal framework is used including three species: neutrals, singly charged ions, and electrons. A simplified linear model is developed with the aim of deriving analytical expressions to characterize the stability of the ionization region. The results from the local analysis presented here indicate the existence of an instability that gives rise to an azimuthal oscillation in the +E × B direction with a long wavelength. According to the model, the instability seems to appear only in regions where the ionization and the electric field make it possible to have positive gradients of plasma density and ion velocity at the same time. A more complex model is also solved numerically to validate the analytical results. Additionally, parametric variations are carried out with respect to the main parameters of the model to identify the trends of the instability. As the temperature increases and the neutral-to-plasma density ratio decreases, the growth rate of the instability decreases down to a limit where azimuthal perturbations are no longer unstable.

  3. An analysis of consanguineous marriage in the Muslim population of India at regional and state levels.

    PubMed

    Bittles, A H; Hussain, R

    2000-01-01

    Consanguineous marriage is widely favoured in a large majority of the world's Islamic populations. According to recent estimates, the resident Muslim population of India is over 100 million. However, apart from a few numerically small or geographically defined surveys, little is known about their patterns of marriage preferences since partition of the Indian Subcontinent in 1947. This study seeks to determine the prevalence and patterns of consanguineous marriages contracted among Indian Muslims at regional and state levels during the last two generations. Data from the 1992/93 Indian National Family Health Survey (NFHS) were used in the analysis. The NFHS was a nationally-representative survey of ever-married women aged 13-49 years, conducted across 25 states of India. Of the initial 9845 respondents, 8436 were included in the final weighted analysis sample. Overall, 22.0% of marriages were found to be contracted between spouses related as second cousins or closer, ranging from 15.9% in the eastern states to 32.9% in the western states of India. In all parts of the country first cousin marriages were the preferred form of consanguineous union, and in four of the five regions paternal first cousin marriages predominated. Despite predictions to the contrary, there was no evidence of a significant change in the prevalence of consanguineous unions over the course of the study period, which extended from the late 1950s to the early 1990s. PMID:10768421

  4. Multiple DNA variant association analysis: Application to the insulin gene region in type I diabetes

    SciTech Connect

    Julier, C.; Delepine, M.; Lathrop, G.M. |; Villedieu, P.; Froguel, P.; Levy-Marchal, C.; Boitard, C.; Bell, J.; Danze, P.M.; Bianchi, F.

    1994-12-01

    Association and linkage studies have shown that at least one of the genetic factors involved in susceptibility to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) is contained within a 4.1-kb region of the insulin gene. Sequence analysis has led to the identification of 10 DNA variants in this region that are associated with increased risk for IDDM. These variants are in strong linkage disequilibrium with each other, and previous studies have failed to distinguish between the variant(s) that cause increased susceptibility to IDDM and others that are associated with the disease because of linkage disequilibrium. To address this problem, we have undertaken a large population study of French diabetics and controls and have analyzed genotype patterns for several of the variant sites simultaneously. This has led to the identification of a subset consisting of four variants (-2733AC, -23HphI, -365VNTR, and +1140AC), at least one of which appears to be directly implicated in disease susceptibility. The multiple-DNA-variant association-analysis approach that is applied here to the problem of identifying potential susceptibility variants in IDDM is likely to be important in studies of many other multifactorial diseases.

  5. Analysis of spatial-temporal gene expression patterns reveals dynamics and regionalization in developing mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Shen-Ju; Wang, Chindi; Sintupisut, Nardnisa; Niou, Zhen-Xian; Lin, Chih-Hsu; Li, Ker-Chau; Yeang, Chen-Hsiang

    2016-01-01

    Allen Brain Atlas (ABA) provides a valuable resource of spatial/temporal gene expressions in mammalian brains. Despite rich information extracted from this database, current analyses suffer from several limitations. First, most studies are either gene-centric or region-centric, thus are inadequate to capture the superposition of multiple spatial-temporal patterns. Second, standard tools of expression analysis such as matrix factorization can capture those patterns but do not explicitly incorporate spatial dependency. To overcome those limitations, we proposed a computational method to detect recurrent patterns in the spatial-temporal gene expression data of developing mouse brains. We demonstrated that regional distinction in brain development could be revealed by localized gene expression patterns. The patterns expressed in the forebrain, medullary and pontomedullary, and basal ganglia are enriched with genes involved in forebrain development, locomotory behavior, and dopamine metabolism respectively. In addition, the timing of global gene expression patterns reflects the general trends of molecular events in mouse brain development. Furthermore, we validated functional implications of the inferred patterns by showing genes sharing similar spatial-temporal expression patterns with Lhx2 exhibited differential expression in the embryonic forebrains of Lhx2 mutant mice. These analysis outcomes confirm the utility of recurrent expression patterns in studying brain development. PMID:26786896

  6. [GENOTYPING OF THE BURKHOLDERIA MALLEI STRAINS BASED ON DIFFERENT REGION ANALYSIS].

    PubMed

    Bondareva, O S; Savchenko, S S; Tkachenko, G A; Ledeneva, M L; Lemasova, L V; Antonov, V A

    2016-01-01

    Development of the genotyping methods of glanders agent is urgent due to its high pathogenicity, lack of effective preventive measures and threat of the use of Burkholderia mallei as a biological weapon. In this work we proposed a scheme for the typing of the B. mallei strains based on different region analysis (DFR). The choice of variable loci differentially presented in various strains of glanders agents was performed by analyzing annotated whole-genome sequences of the B. mallei strains. Primers and fluorescence probes were designed for 9 selected loci. The amplification conditions for different regions were optimized in two variants: with electrophoretic detection and hybridization-fluorescence detection in the strip format. The possibility of applying the DFR analysis to genetic characterization of strains was assessed in 14 B. mallei strains. The genetic profiles of the studied B. mallei strains revealed that the developed DFR-typing scheme was characterized by high discrimination power (Hunter-Gaston index value was 0.92), reproducibility, rapidity, easy interpretation, and applicability for epidemiological surveillance of glanders. PMID:27183720

  7. Regional movement patterns of a small-bodied shark revealed by stable-isotope analysis.

    PubMed

    Munroe, S E M; Heupel, M R; Fisk, A T; Logan, M; Simpfendorfer, C A

    2015-05-01

    This study used stable-isotope analysis to define the nearshore regional residency and movements of the small-bodied Australian sharpnose shark Rhizoprionodon taylori. Plasma and muscle δ(13) C and δ(15) N of R. taylori were collected from across five embayments and compared with values of seagrass and plankton from each bay. Linear distances between adjacent bays ranged from 30 to 150 km. There was a positive geographic correlation between R. taylori tissue and environmental δ(13) C values. Populations with the highest tissue δ(15) N were collected from bays that had the highest environmental δ(15) N values. These results suggest that R. taylori did not forage more than 100 km away from their capture location within 6 months to 1 year. The successful application of isotope analysis to define R. taylori movement demonstrates that this technique may be used in addition to traditional methods to study the movement of sharks, even within similar habitats across regionally small spatial scales (<100 km). PMID:25846994

  8. Transcriptional analysis of highly syntenic regions between Medicago truncatula and Glycine max using tiling microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; He, Hang; Zhang, Juan; Wang, Xiangfeng; Bai, Sulan; Stolc, Viktor; Tongprasit, Waraporn; Young, Nevin D; Yu, Oliver; Deng, Xing-Wang

    2008-01-01

    Background Legumes are the third largest family of flowering plants and are unique among crop species in their ability to fix atmospheric nitrogen. As a result of recent genome sequencing efforts, legumes are now one of a few plant families with extensive genomic and transcriptomic data available in multiple species. The unprecedented complexity and impending completeness of these data create opportunities for new approaches to discovery. Results We report here a transcriptional analysis in six different organ types of syntenic regions totaling approximately 1 Mb between the legume plants barrel medic (Medicago truncatula) and soybean (Glycine max) using oligonucleotide tiling microarrays. This analysis detected transcription of over 80% of the predicted genes in both species. We also identified 499 and 660 transcriptionally active regions from barrel medic and soybean, respectively, over half of which locate outside of the predicted exons. We used the tiling array data to detect differential gene expression in the six examined organ types and found several genes that are preferentially expressed in the nodule. Further investigation revealed that some collinear genes exhibit different expression patterns between the two species. Conclusion These results demonstrate the utility of genome tiling microarrays in generating transcriptomic data to complement computational annotation of the newly available legume genome sequences. The tiling microarray data was further used to quantify gene expression levels in multiple organ types of two related legume species. Further development of this method should provide a new approach to comparative genomics aimed at elucidating genome organization and transcriptional regulation. PMID:18348734

  9. Network analysis of mesoscale optical recordings to assess regional, functional connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Diana H.; LeDue, Jeffrey M.; Murphy, Timothy H.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. With modern optical imaging methods, it is possible to map structural and functional connectivity. Optical imaging studies that aim to describe large-scale neural connectivity often need to handle large and complex datasets. In order to interpret these datasets, new methods for analyzing structural and functional connectivity are being developed. Recently, network analysis, based on graph theory, has been used to describe and quantify brain connectivity in both experimental and clinical studies. We outline how to apply regional, functional network analysis to mesoscale optical imaging using voltage-sensitive-dye imaging and channelrhodopsin-2 stimulation in a mouse model. We include links to sample datasets and an analysis script. The analyses we employ can be applied to other types of fluorescence wide-field imaging, including genetically encoded calcium indicators, to assess network properties. We discuss the benefits and limitations of using network analysis for interpreting optical imaging data and define network properties that may be used to compare across preparations or other manipulations such as animal models of disease. PMID:26158019

  10. [Topological Conflicts in Phylogenetic Analysis of Different Regions of the Sable (Martes zibellina L.) Mitochondrial Genome].

    PubMed

    Malyarchuk, B A; Derenko, M V; Denisova, G A; Litvinov, A N

    2015-08-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of different regions of the mitochondrial genome of the sable showed the presence of several topologies of phylogenetic trees, but the most statistically significant topology is A-BC, which was obtained as a result of the analysis of the mitochondrial genome as a whole, as well as of the individual CO1, ND4, and ND5 genes. Analysis of the intergroup divergence of the mtDNA haplotypes (Dxy) indicated that the maximum Dxy values between A and BC groups were accompanied by minimum differences between B and C groups only for six genes showing the A-BC topology (12S rRNA; CO1, CO2, ND4, ND5, and CYTB). It is assumed that the topological conflicts observed in the analysis of individual sable mtDNA genes are associated with the uneven distribution of mutations along the mitochondrial genome and the mitochondrial tree. This may be due to random causes, as well as the nonuniform effect of selection. PMID:26601491

  11. Bayesian Belief Network to support conflict analysis for groundwater protection: the case of the Apulia region.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Raffaele; D'Agostino, Daniela; Apollonio, Ciro; Lamaddalena, Nicola; Vurro, Michele

    2013-01-30

    Water resource management is often characterized by conflicts, as a result of the heterogeneity of interests associated with a shared resource. Many water conflicts arise on a global scale and, in particular, an increasing level of conflicts can be observed in the Mediterranean basin, characterized by water scarcity. In the present work, in order to assist the conflict analysis process, and thus outline a proper groundwater management, stakeholders were involved in the process and suitable tools were used in a Mediterranean area (the Apulia region, in Italy). In particular, this paper seeks to elicit and structure farmers' mental models influencing their decision over the main water source for irrigation. The more crucial groundwater is for farmers' objectives, the more controversial is the groundwater protection strategy. Bayesian Belief Networks were developed to simulate farmers' behavior with regard to groundwater management and to assess the impacts of protection strategy. These results have been used to calculate the conflict degree in the study area, derived from the introduction of policies for the reduction of groundwater exploitation for irrigation purposes. The less acceptable the policy is, the more likely it is that conflict will develop between farmers and the Regional Authority. The results of conflict analysis were also used to contribute to the debate concerning potential conflict mitigation measures. The approach adopted in this work has been discussed with a number of experts in groundwater management policies and irrigation management, and its main strengths and weaknesses have been identified. Increasing awareness of the existence of potential conflicts and the need to deal with them can be seen as an interesting initial shift in the Apulia region's water management regime, which is still grounded in merely technical approaches. PMID:23246906

  12. Automated Classification of Usual Interstitial Pneumonia using Regional Volumetric Texture Analysis in High-Resolution CT

    PubMed Central

    Depeursinge, Adrien; Chin, Anne S.; Leung, Ann N.; Terrone, Donato; Bristow, Michael; Rosen, Glenn; Rubin, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We propose a novel computational approach for the automated classification of classic versus atypical usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP). Materials and Methods 33 patients with UIP were enrolled in this study. They were classified as classic versus atypical UIP by a consensus of two thoracic radiologists with more than 15 years of experience using the American Thoracic Society evidence–based guidelines for CT diagnosis of UIP. Two cardiothoracic fellows with one year of subspecialty training provided independent readings. The system is based on regional characterization of the morphological tissue properties of lung using volumetric texture analysis of multiple detector CT images. A simple digital atlas with 36 lung subregions is used to locate texture properties, from which the responses of multi-directional Riesz wavelets are obtained. Machine learning is used to aggregate and to map the regional texture attributes to a simple score that can be used to stratify patients with UIP into classic and atypical subtypes. Results We compared the predictions based on regional volumetric texture analysis with the ground truth established by expert consensus. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the proposed score was estimated to be 0.81 using a leave-one-patient-out cross-validation, with high specificity for classic UIP. The performance of our automated method was found to be similar to that of the two fellows and to the agreement between experienced chest radiologists reported in the literature. However, the errors of our method and the fellows occurred on different cases, which suggests that combining human and computerized evaluations may be synergistic. Conclusions Our results are encouraging and suggest that an automated system may be useful in routine clinical practice as a diagnostic aid for identifying patients with complex lung disease such as classic UIP, obviating the need for invasive surgical lung biopsy and its

  13. HydroApps: An R package for statistical simulation to use in regional analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganora, D.

    2013-12-01

    The HydroApps package is a newborn R extension initially developed to support the use of a recent model for flood frequency estimation developed for applications in Northwestern Italy; it also contains some general tools for regional analyses and can be easily extended to include other statistical models. The package is currently at an experimental level of development. The HydroApps is a corollary of the SSEM project for regional flood frequency analysis, although it was developed independently to support various instances of regional analyses. Its aim is to provide a basis for interplay between statistical simulation and practical operational use. In particular, the main module of the package deals with the building of the confidence bands of flood frequency curves expressed by means of their L-moments. Other functions include pre-processing and visualization of hydrologic time series, analysis of the optimal design-flood under uncertainty, but also tools useful in water resources management for the estimation of flow duration curves and their sensitivity to water withdrawals. Particular attention is devoted to the code granularity, i.e. the level of detail and aggregation of the code: a greater detail means more low-level functions, which entails more flexibility but reduces the ease of use for practical use. A balance between detail and simplicity is necessary and can be resolved with appropriate wrapping functions and specific help pages for each working block. From a more general viewpoint, the package has not really and user-friendly interface, but runs on multiple operating systems and it's easy to update, as many other open-source projects., The HydroApps functions and their features are reported in order to share ideas and materials to improve the ';technological' and information transfer between scientist communities and final users like policy makers.

  14. Analysis of the acceleration region in a circulating fluidized bed riser operating above fast fluidization velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Monazam, E.R.; Shadle, L.J.

    2008-11-05

    In commercial circulating fluidized bed (CFB) processes the acceleration zone greatly contributes to solids mixing, gas and solids dispersion, and particle residence times. A new analysis was developed to describe the relative gas-solids concentration in the acceleration region of a transport system with air as the fluidizing agent for Geldart-type B particles. A theoretical expression was derived from a drag relationship and momentum and continuity equations to describe the evolution of the gas-solids profile along the axial direction. The acceleration zone was characterized using nondimensional analysis of the continuum equations (balances of masses and momenta) that described multiphase flows. In addition to acceleration length, the boundary condition for the solids fraction at the bottom of the riser and the fully developed regions were measured using an industrial scale CFB of 0.3 m diameter and 15 m tall. The operating factors affecting the flow development in the acceleration region were determined for three materials of various sizes and densities in core annular and dilute regimes of the riser. Performance data were taken from statistically designed experiments over a wide range of Fr (0.5-39), Re (8-600), Ar (29-3600), load ratio (0.2-28), riser to particle diameter ratio (375-5000), and gas to solids density ratio (138-1381). In this one-dimensional system of equations, velocities and solid fractions were assumed to be constant over any cross section. The model and engineering correlations were compared with literature expressions to assess their validity and range of applicability. These expressions can be used as tools for simulation and design of a CFB riser and can also be easily coupled to a kinetics model for process simulation.

  15. Adjuvant radiotherapy of regional lymph nodes in breast cancer - a meta-analysis of randomized trials

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Radiotherapy (RT) improves overall survival (OS) of breast cancer patients after breast conserving surgery and after mastectomy in patients with involved lymph nodes (LN). The contribution of RT to the regional LN to this survival benefit was poorly understood. Recently, the results of three large randomized trials addressing this question have become available. Material and methods The published abstracts (full publication pending) of the MA.20 (n=1832) and the EORTC 22922–10925 (EORTC) (n=4004) trial and the full publication of the French trial (n=1334) were basis of the meta-analysis. Main eligibility criteria were positive axillary LN (all trials), LN negative disease with high risk for recurrence (MA.20), and medial/central tumor location (French, EORTC). The MA.20 and the EORTC trial tested the effect of additional regional RT to the internal mammary (IM) LN and medial supraclavicular (MS) LN, whereas in the French trial all patients received RT to the MS-LN and solely RT to the IM-LN was randomized. Primary endpoint was OS. Secondary endpoints were disease-free survival (DFS) and distant metastasis free survival (DMFS). Results Regional RT of the MS-LN and the IM-LN (MA.20 and EORTC) resulted in a significant improvement of OS (Hazard Ratio (HR) 0.85 (95% CL 0.75 - 0.96)). Adding the results of the French trial and using the random effects model to respect the different design of the French trial, the effect on OS of regional radiotherapy was still significant (HR 0.88 (95% CL 0.80 - 0.97)). The absolute benefits in OS were 1.6% in the MA.20 trial at 5 years, 1.6% in the EORTC trial at 10 years, and 3.3% in the French trial at 10 years (not significant in single trials). Regional radiotherapy of the MS-LN and the IM-LN (MA.20 and EORTC) was associated with a significant improvement of DFS (HR 0.85 (95% CL 0.77 - 0.94)) and DMFS (HR 0.82 (95% CL 0.73 - 0.92)). The effect sizes were not significantly different between trials for any end point

  16. Analysis of the seismicity in the region of Mirovo salt mine after 8 years monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrova, Liliya; Solakov, Dimcho; Simeonova, Stela; Aleksandrova, Irena; Georgieva, Gergana

    2015-04-01

    Mirovo salt deposit is situated in the NE part of Bulgaria and 5 kilometers away from the town of Provadiya. The mine is in operation since 1956. The salt is produced by dilution and extraction of the brine to the surface. A system of chambers-pillars is formed within the salt body as a result of the applied technology. The mine is situated in a seismically quiet part of the state. The region is characterized with complex geological structure and several faults. During the last 3 decades a large number of small and moderate earthquakes (M<4.5) are realized in the close vicinity of the salt deposit. Local seismological network (LSN) is deployed in the region to monitor the local seismicity. It consists of 6 three component digital stations. A real-time data transfer from LSN stations to National Data Center (in Sofia) is implemented using the VPN and MAN networks of the Bulgarian Telecommunication Company. Common processing and interpretation of the data from LSN and the national seismic network is performed. Real-time and interactive data processing are performed by the Seismic Network Data Processor (SNDP) software package. More than 700 earthquakes are registered by the LSN within 30km region around the mine during the 8 years monitoring. First we processed the data and compile a catalogue of the earthquakes occur within the studied region (30km around the salt mine). Spatial pattern of seismicity is analyzed. A large number of the seismic events occurred within the northern and north-western part of the salt body. Several earthquakes occurred in close vicinity of the mine. Concerning that the earthquakes could be tectonic and/or induced an attempt is made to find criteria to distinguish natural from induced seismicity. To characterize and distinguish the main processes active in the area we also made waveform and spectral analysis of a number of earthquakes.

  17. RE-ANALYSIS OF THE RADIO LUMINOSITY FUNCTION OF GALACTIC H II REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Paladini, R.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Carey, S. J.; DeZotti, G.

    2009-09-10

    We have re-analyzed continuum and recombination lines radio data available in the literature in order to derive the luminosity function (LF) of Galactic H II regions. The study is performed by considering the first and fourth Galactic quadrants independently. We estimate the completeness level of the sample in the fourth quadrant at 5 Jy, and the one in the first quadrant at 2 Jy. We show that the two samples (fourth or first quadrant) include, as well as giant and supergiant H II regions, a significant number of subgiant sources. The LF is obtained, in each Galactic quadrant, with a generalized Schmidt's estimator using an effective volume derived from the observed spatial distribution of the considered H II regions. The re-analysis also takes advantage of recently published ancillary absorption data allowing to solve the distance ambiguity for several objects. A single power-law fit to the LFs retrieves a slope equal to -2.23 {+-} 0.07 (fourth quadrant) and to -1.85 {+-} 0.11 (first quadrant). We also find marginal evidence of a luminosity break at L{sub knee} = 10{sup 23.45} erg s{sup -1} Hz{sup -1} for the LF in the fourth quadrant. We convert radio luminosities into equivalent H{alpha} and Lyman continuum luminosities to facilitate comparisons with extragalactic studies. We obtain an average total H II regions Lyman continuum luminosity of 0.89 {+-} 0.23 x 10{sup 53} s{sup -1}, corresponding to 30% of the total ionizing luminosity of the Galaxy.

  18. Region Templates: Data Representation and Management for High-Throughput Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Tony; Kurc, Tahsin; Kong, Jun; Cooper, Lee; Klasky, Scott; Saltz, Joel

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a region template abstraction and framework for the efficient storage, management and processing of common data types in analysis of large datasets of high resolution images on clusters of hybrid computing nodes. The region template abstraction provides a generic container template for common data structures, such as points, arrays, regions, and object sets, within a spatial and temporal bounding box. It allows for different data management strategies and I/O implementations, while providing a homogeneous, unified interface to applications for data storage and retrieval. A region template application is represented as a hierarchical dataflow in which each computing stage may be represented as another dataflow of finer-grain tasks. The execution of the application is coordinated by a runtime system that implements optimizations for hybrid machines, including performance-aware scheduling for maximizing the utilization of computing devices and techniques to reduce the impact of data transfers between CPUs and GPUs. An experimental evaluation on a state-of-the-art hybrid cluster using a microscopy imaging application shows that the abstraction adds negligible overhead (about 3%) and achieves good scalability and high data transfer rates. Optimizations in a high speed disk based storage implementation of the abstraction to support asynchronous data transfers and computation result in an application performance gain of about 1.13×. Finally, a processing rate of 11,730 4K×4K tiles per minute was achieved for the microscopy imaging application on a cluster with 100 nodes (300 GPUs and 1,200 CPU cores). This computation rate enables studies with very large datasets. PMID:26139953

  19. a Region-Based Multi-Scale Approach for Object-Based Image Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavzoglu, T.; Yildiz Erdemir, M.; Tonbul, H.

    2016-06-01

    Within the last two decades, object-based image analysis (OBIA) considering objects (i.e. groups of pixels) instead of pixels has gained popularity and attracted increasing interest. The most important stage of the OBIA is image segmentation that groups spectrally similar adjacent pixels considering not only the spectral features but also spatial and textural features. Although there are several parameters (scale, shape, compactness and band weights) to be set by the analyst, scale parameter stands out the most important parameter in segmentation process. Estimating optimal scale parameter is crucially important to increase the classification accuracy that depends on image resolution, image object size and characteristics of the study area. In this study, two scale-selection strategies were implemented in the image segmentation process using pan-sharped Qickbird-2 image. The first strategy estimates optimal scale parameters for the eight sub-regions. For this purpose, the local variance/rate of change (LV-RoC) graphs produced by the ESP-2 tool were analysed to determine fine, moderate and coarse scales for each region. In the second strategy, the image was segmented using the three candidate scale values (fine, moderate, coarse) determined from the LV-RoC graph calculated for whole image. The nearest neighbour classifier was applied in all segmentation experiments and equal number of pixels was randomly selected to calculate accuracy metrics (overall accuracy and kappa coefficient). Comparison of region-based and image-based segmentation was carried out on the classified images and found that region-based multi-scale OBIA produced significantly more accurate results than image-based single-scale OBIA. The difference in classification accuracy reached to 10% in terms of overall accuracy.

  20. Surface Wave Analysis of Regional Earthquakes in the Eastern Rift System (Africa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliva, S. J. C.; Guidarelli, M.; Ebinger, C. J.; Roecker, S. W.; Tiberi, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Northern Tanzania Divergence (NTD), the youngest part of the East African Rift System, presents the opportunity to obtain insights about the birth and early stages of rifting before it progresses to mature rifting and seafloor spreading. This region is particularly interesting because the Eastern rift splits into three arms in this area and develops in a region of thick and cold lithosphere, amid the Archaean Tanzanian craton and the Proterozoic orogenic belt (the Masai block). We analyzed about two thousand seismic events recorded by the 39 broadband stations of the CRAFTI network during its two-year deployment in the NTD area in 2013 to 2014. We present the results of surface wave tomographic inversion obtained from fundamental-mode Rayleigh waves for short periods (between 4 to 14 seconds). Group velocity dispersion curves obtained via multiple filter analysis are path-averaged and inverted to produce 0.1º x 0.1º nodal grid tomographic maps for discrete periods using a 2D generalization of the Backus and Gilbert method. To quantify our results in terms of S-wave velocity structure the average group velocity dispersion curves are then inverted, using a linearized least-squares inversion scheme, in order to obtain the shear wave velocity structure for the upper 20 km of the crust. Low velocity anomalies are observed in the region 50 km south of Lake Natron, as well as in the area of the Ngorongoro crater. The implications of our results for the local tectonics and the development of the rifting system will be discussed in light of the growing geophysical database from this region.

  1. Rational sub-division of plant trypanosomes (Phytomonas spp.) based on minicircle conserved region analysis.

    PubMed

    Sturm, Nancy R; Dollet, Michel; Lukes, Julius; Campbell, David A

    2007-09-01

    The sequences of minicircle conserved regions from various plant trypanosomatids have been determined and analyzed. The goal of this study was to add another tool to the arsenal of molecular probes for distinguishing between the different trypanosomatids occurring in plants: systemic trypanosomatids multiplying in the sap, those from the laticiferous tubes, and those developing in fruits, seeds or flowers but not in the plant itself and that are frequently considered as opportunistic insect trypanosomatids. As some plant intraphloemic trypanosomatids are the causative agents of important diseases, a clear definition of the different types of trypanosomatids is critical. The conserved region of the mitochondrial minicircle provides several specific features in a small sequence region containing three functionally elements required for minicircle replication. Trees generated from the analysis recapitulated trees drawn from analyses of isoenzymes, RAPD, and particular gene sequences, supporting the validity of the small region used in this work. Three groups of isolates were significant and in accordance with previous work. The peculiarity of phloem-restricted trypanosomatids associated with wilts of coconut and oil palm in Latin America - group H - is confirmed. In agreement with previous studies on their biological and serological properties the results highlighted this group called 'phloemicola'. It always differentiated from all other latex and fruit isolates or opportunistic trypanosomatids, like insect trypanosomatids. We can assert that phloemicola is the only well-defined taxon among all plant trypanosomatids. A group of non-pathogenic latex isolates from South American euphorbs (G), and a heterogenous group (A) including one fruit, one possible latex and one insect isolate are clearly distinct groups. The group of Mediterranean isolates from latex (D), even with a low boostrap, stood out well from other groups. The remainder of the isolates fell into a

  2. Regional inequalities in child malnutrition in Egypt, Jordan, and Yemen: a Blinder-Oaxaca decomposition analysis.

    PubMed

    Sharaf, Mesbah Fathy; Rashad, Ahmed Shoukry

    2016-12-01

    There is substantial evidence that on average, urban children have better health outcomes than rural children. This paper investigates the underlying factors that account for the regional disparities in child malnutrition in three Arab countries, namely; Egypt, Jordan, and Yemen. We use data on a nationally representative sample from the most recent rounds of the Demographic and Health Survey. A Blinder-Oaxaca decomposition analysis is conducted to decompose the rural-urban differences in child nutrition outcomes into two components; one that is explained by regional differences in the level of the determinants (covariate effects), and another component that is explained by differences in the effect of the determinants on the child nutritional status (coefficient effects). Results show that the under-five stunting rates are 20 % in Egypt, 46.5 % in Yemen, and 7.7 % in Jordan. The rural- urban gap in child malnutrition was minor in the case of Egypt (2.3 %) and Jordan (1.5 %), while the regional gap was significant in the case of Yemen (17.7 %). Results of the Blinder-Oaxaca decomposition show that the covariate effect is dominant in the case of Yemen while the coefficients effect dominates in the case of Jordan. Income inequality between urban and rural households explains most of the malnutrition gap. Results were robust to the different decomposition weighting schemes. By identifying the underlying factors behind the rural- urban health disparities, the findings of this paper help in designing effective intervention measures aimed at reducing regional inequalities and improving population health outcomes. PMID:27271178

  3. 2-Dimensional Strain Analysis of Regional Change in Right Ventricular Function after Treadmill Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Se-Jung; Park, Sujung; Chung, Wook-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Background Function of right ventricle (RV) influences on symptoms and prognosis in various diseases. However the regional RV function analyzed with 2-dimensional (2D) strain echocardiography before and just after treadmill test has not been evaluated. The aim of this study was to show the change of regional RV function just after treadmill exercise with strain analysis. Methods A total of thirty eight patients who visited hospital for hypertension, chest pain or dyspnea between January 2007 and December 2010 were retrospectively analyzed (men, 47.4%; mean age, 54.9 ± 7.2 years). Treadmill exercise test and pre and post echocardiography were performed. 2D strain echocardiography was analyzed off line in RV free wall and septum. Results Mean exercise duration was 737 ± 132 sec. Tissue velocity in lateral tricuspid annulus is significantly increased in post exercise (initial, 10.5 ± 2.4 cm/sec vs. post exercise, 12.2 ± 1.8 cm/sec, p = 0.006). Systolic strain of RV free wall apex and mid portion were significantly changed in post exercise stage (free wall apex, -18.2 ± 7.6% vs. -22.3 ± 5.8%, p = 0.010; free wall mid, -14.1 ± 6.7% vs. -22.6 ± 6.8%, p = 0.022). Conclusion 2D strain imaging provides a precise tool to quantify regional RV function and reveals a characteristic regional pattern of RV after treadmill exercise. PMID:27081442

  4. Regional biomass burning trends in India: Analysis of satellite fire data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, L. K.; Sheel, Varun; Pandey, Kumud; Yadav, Ravi; Saxena, P.; Gunthe, Sachin

    2015-10-01

    The results based on the analysis of satellite fire counts detected by the Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (ATSR) sensors over different regions of India during 1998-2009 have been presented. Generally, the activities of open biomass burning show large spatial and temporal variations in India. The highest and lowest values of monthly fire counts were detected during the periods of March-May and July-September, respectively over different regions of India. The activities of biomass burning in two central states of Madhya Pradesh and Maharashtra were the highest and together accounted for about 25-45% of total annual fire counts detected over India during the study period. However, in opposite phases, the rainfall and fire count data show strong seasonal variation. In addition to large regional and seasonal variations, the fire data also show significant year-to-year variation. The higher annual fire counts exceeding the mean of entire period by about 16% and 43% were detected during the two periods of 1998-2000 and 2007-2009, respectively. We have estimated normalized anomaly of annual fire count data which shows large positive departures from long-term mean for the years 1999, 2007, 2008 and 2009, while negative departures for the years 2002, 2003 and 2005. Consistently, the mixing ratio of carbon monoxide (CO) typical peaks during winter but extended to pre-monsoon season during extensive fire years. The annual data over the entire region of India show lesser positive trend of about 3% yr-1. The inter-annual variation of fire count over entire India follows the trend in the ENSO Precipitation Index (ESPI) but shows opposite trend to the multivariate ENSO Index (MEI).

  5. Comparative Genomic Sequence Analysis of the Human Chromosome 21 Down Syndrome Critical Region

    PubMed Central

    Toyoda, Atsushi; Noguchi, Hideki; Taylor, Todd D.; Ito, Takehiko; Pletcher, Mathew T.; Sakaki, Yoshiyuki; Reeves, Roger H.; Hattori, Masahira

    2002-01-01

    Comprehensive knowledge of the gene content of human chromosome 21 (HSA21) is essential for understanding the etiology of Down syndrome (DS). Here we report the largest comparison of finished mouse and human sequence to date for a 1.35-Mb region of mouse chromosome 16 (MMU16) that corresponds to human chromosome 21q22.2. This includes a portion of the commonly described “DS critical region,” thought to contain a gene or genes whose dosage imbalance contributes to a number of phenotypes associated with DS. We used comparative sequence analysis to construct a DNA feature map of this region that includes all known genes, plus 144 conserved sequences ≥100 bp long that show ≥80% identity between mouse and human but do not match known exons. Twenty of these have matches to expressed sequence tag and cDNA databases, indicating that they may be transcribed sequences from chromosome 21. Eight putative CpG islands are found at conserved positions. Models for two human genes, DSCR4 and DSCR8, are not supported by conserved sequence, and close examination indicates that low-level transcripts from these loci are unlikely to encode proteins. Gene prediction programs give different results when used to analyze the well-conserved regions between mouse and human sequences. Our findings have implications for evolution and for modeling the genetic basis of DS in mice. [Sequence data described in this paper have been submitted to the DDBJ/GenBank under accession nos. AP003148 through AP003158, and AB066227. Supplemental material is available at http://www.genome.org.] PMID:12213769

  6. Global and regional estimates of COPD prevalence: Systematic review and meta–analysis

    PubMed Central

    Adeloye, Davies; Chua, Stephen; Lee, Chinwei; Basquill, Catriona; Papana, Angeliki; Theodoratou, Evropi; Nair, Harish; Gasevic, Danijela; Sridhar, Devi; Campbell, Harry; Chan, Kit Yee; Sheikh, Aziz; Rudan, Igor

    2015-01-01

    Background The burden of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) across many world regions is high. We aim to estimate COPD prevalence and number of disease cases for the years 1990 and 2010 across world regions based on the best available evidence in publicly accessible scientific databases. Methods We conducted a systematic search of Medline, EMBASE and Global Health for original, population–based studies providing spirometry–based prevalence rates of COPD across the world from January 1990 to December 2014. Random effects meta–analysis was conducted on extracted crude prevalence rates of COPD, with overall summaries of the meta–estimates (and confidence intervals) reported separately for World Health Organization (WHO) regions, the World Bank's income categories and settings (urban and rural). We developed a meta–regression epidemiological model that we used to estimate the prevalence of COPD in people aged 30 years or more. Findings Our search returned 37 472 publications. A total of 123 studies based on a spirometry–defined prevalence were retained for the review. From the meta–regression epidemiological model, we estimated about 227.3 million COPD cases in the year 1990 among people aged 30 years or more, corresponding to a global prevalence of 10.7% (95% confidence interval (CI) 7.3%–14.0%) in this age group. The number of COPD cases increased to 384 million in 2010, with a global prevalence of 11.7% (8.4%–15.0%). This increase of 68.9% was mainly driven by global demographic changes. Across WHO regions, the highest prevalence was estimated in the Americas (13.3% in 1990 and 15.2% in 2010), and the lowest in South East Asia (7.9% in 1990 and 9.7% in 2010). The percentage increase in COPD cases between 1990 and 2010 was the highest in the Eastern Mediterranean region (118.7%), followed by the African region (102.1%), while the European region recorded the lowest increase (22.5%). In 1990, we estimated about 120.9 million COPD cases

  7. Definition of the thermographic regions of interest in cycling by using a factor analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priego Quesada, Jose Ignacio; Lucas-Cuevas, Angel Gabriel; Salvador Palmer, Rosario; Pérez-Soriano, Pedro; Cibrián Ortiz de Anda, Rosa M.a.

    2016-03-01

    Research in exercise physiology using infrared thermography has increased in the last years. However, the definition of the Regions of Interest (ROIs) varies strongly between studies. Therefore, the aim of this study was to use a factor analysis approach to define highly correlated groups of thermographic ROIs during a cycling test. Factor analyses were performed based on the moment of measurement and on the variation of skin temperatures as a result of the cycling exercise. 19 male participants cycled during 45 min at 50% of their individual peak power output with a cadence of 90 rpm. Infrared thermography was used to measure skin temperatures in sixteen ROIs of the trunk and lower limbs at three moments: before, immediately after and 10 min after the cycling test. Factor analyses were used to identify groups of ROIs based on the skin absolute temperatures at each moment of measurement as well as on skin temperature variations between moments. All the factor analyses performed for each moment and skin temperature variation explained more than the 80% of the variance. Different groups of ROIs were obtained when the analysis was based on the moment of measurement or on the effect of exercise on the skin temperature. Furthermore, some ROIs were grouped in the same way in both analyses (e.g. the ROIs of the trunk), whereas other regions (legs and their joints) were grouped differently in each analysis. Differences between groups of ROIs are related to their tissue composition, muscular activity and capacity of sweating. In conclusion, the resultant groups of ROIs were coherent and could help researchers to define the ROIs in future thermal studies.

  8. Systematic Receiver Function Analysis of the Moho Geometry in the Southern California Plate-Boundary Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozakin, Yaman; Ben-Zion, Yehuda

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the geometry of the Moho interface in the southern California region including the San Andreas fault (SAF), San Jacinto fault zone (SJFZ), Elsinore fault (EF) and Eastern California Shear Zone with systematic analysis of receiver functions. The data set consists of 145 teleseismic events recorded at 188 broadband stations throughout the region. The analysis utilizes a 3D velocity model associated with detailed double-difference tomographic results for the seismogenic depth section around the SAF, SJFZ, and EF combined with a larger scale community model. A 3D ray tracing algorithm is used to produce effective 1D velocity models along each source-receiver teleseismic ray. Common Conversion Point (CCP) stacks are calculated using the set of velocity models extracted for each ray. The CCP stacks are analyzed with volumetric plots, maps of maximum CCP stack values, and projections along profiles that cross major faults and other features of interest. The results indicate that the Moho geometry in the study area is very complex and characterized by large prominent undulations along the NE-SW direction. A zone of relatively deep Moho (~35-40 km) with overall N-S direction crosses the SAF, SJFZ, and EF. A section of very shallow Moho (~10 km) below and to the SE of the Salton Trough, likely associated with a young oceanic crust, produces large Moho offsets at its margins. Locations with significant changes of Moho depth appear to be correlated with fault complexity in the brittle crust. The observations also show vertical Moho offsets of ~8 km across the SAF and SJFZ close to Cajon pass, and sections with no clear Moho phase underneath Cajon pass and adjacent to the SJFZ near Anza likely produced by complex local velocity structures in the brittle upper crust. These features are robust with respect to various parameters of the analysis procedure.

  9. Analysis of surface-water data network in Kansas for effectiveness in providing regional streamflow information

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Medina, K.D.; Tasker, Gary D.

    1985-01-01

    The surface water data network in Kansas was analyzed using generalized least squares regression for its effectiveness in providing regional streamflow information. The correlation and time-sampling error of the streamflow characteristic are considered in the generalized least squares method. Unregulated medium-flow, low-flow and high-flow characteristics were selected to be representative of the regional information that can be obtained from streamflow gaging station records for use in evaluating the effectiveness of continuing the present network stations, discontinuing some stations; and/or adding new stations. The analysis used streamflow records for all currently operated stations that were not affected by regulation and discontinued stations for which unregulated flow characteristics , as well as physical and climatic characteristics, were available. The state was divided into three network areas, western, northeastern, and southeastern Kansas, and analysis was made for three streamflow characteristics in each area, using three planning horizons. The analysis showed that the maximum reduction of sampling mean square error for each cost level could be obtained by adding new stations and discontinuing some of the present network stations. Large reductions in sampling mean square error for low-flow information could be accomplished in all three network areas, with western Kansas having the most dramatic reduction. The addition of new stations would be most beneficial for man- flow information in western Kansas, and to lesser degrees in the other two areas. The reduction of sampling mean square error for high-flow information would benefit most from the addition of new stations in western Kansas, and the effect diminishes to lesser degrees in the other two areas. Southeastern Kansas showed the smallest error reduction in high-flow information. A comparison among all three network areas indicated that funding resources could be most effectively used by

  10. Depth-to-magnetic source analysis of the Arctic Ocean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovacs, L. C.; Vogt, P. R.

    1982-10-01

    Approximately 400,000 line kilometers of high quality, low level Arctic aeromagnetic data collected by the Naval Research Laboratory, the Naval Oceanographic Office and the Naval Ocean Reseach and Development Activity from 1972 through 1978 have been analyzed for depth to magnetic source. This data set covers much of the Canada Basin, the Alpha Ridge, the central part of the Makarov Basin, the Lincoln Sea, the Eurasia Basin west and south of the 55°E meridian and the Norwegian-Greenland Sea north of the Jan Mayen Fracture Zone. The analysis uses the autocorrelation algorithm developed by Phillips (1975, 1978) and based on the maximum entropy method of Burg (1967, 1968, 1975). The method is outlined, examples of various error analysis techniques shown and final results presented. Where possible, magnetic source depth estimates are compared with basement depths derived from seismic and bathymetric data. All major known bathymetric features, including Vesteris Bank and the Greenland, Molloy and Spitsbergen fracture zones, as well as the Mohns, Knipovich and Nansen spreading ridges and the Alpha Cordillera appear as regional highs in the calculated magnetic basement topography. Shallow basement was also found under the northeastern Yermak Plateau, the Morris Jesup Rise and under the southern (Greenland-Ellesmere Island) end of the Lomonsosov Ridge. Regional magnetic source deeps are associated with such bathymetric depressions as the Canada, Makarov, Amundsen, Nansen, Greenland and Lofoten basins; more localized magnetic basement deeps are found over the Molloy F.Z. deep and over the Mohns, Knipovich and Nansen rift valleys. A linear magnetic basement deep follows the extension of Nares Strait through the Lincoln Sea toward the Morris Jesup Rise, suggesting the continuation of the Nares Strait or Wegener F.Z. into the Lincoln Sea. A sharp drop in the regional magnetic source depths to the southeast of the Alpha Ridge suggests the Alpha Ridge is not connected to

  11. Spatiotemporal Filtering Using Principal Component Analysis and Karhunen-Loeve Expansion Approaches for Regional GPS Network Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dong, D.; Fang, P.; Bock, F.; Webb, F.; Prawirondirdjo, L.; Kedar, S.; Jamason, P.

    2006-01-01

    Spatial filtering is an effective way to improve the precision of coordinate time series for regional GPS networks by reducing so-called common mode errors, thereby providing better resolution for detecting weak or transient deformation signals. The commonly used approach to regional filtering assumes that the common mode error is spatially uniform, which is a good approximation for networks of hundreds of kilometers extent, but breaks down as the spatial extent increases. A more rigorous approach should remove the assumption of spatially uniform distribution and let the data themselves reveal the spatial distribution of the common mode error. The principal component analysis (PCA) and the Karhunen-Loeve expansion (KLE) both decompose network time series into a set of temporally varying modes and their spatial responses. Therefore they provide a mathematical framework to perform spatiotemporal filtering.We apply the combination of PCA and KLE to daily station coordinate time series of the Southern California Integrated GPS Network (SCIGN) for the period 2000 to 2004. We demonstrate that spatially and temporally correlated common mode errors are the dominant error source in daily GPS solutions. The spatial characteristics of the common mode errors are close to uniform for all east, north, and vertical components, which implies a very long wavelength source for the common mode errors, compared to the spatial extent of the GPS network in southern California. Furthermore, the common mode errors exhibit temporally nonrandom patterns.

  12. Cloning and functional analysis of 5'-upstream region of the Pokemon gene.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yutao; Zhou, Xiaowei; Zhu, Xudong; Zhang, Chuanfu; Yang, Zhixin; Xu, Long; Huang, Peitang

    2008-04-01

    Pokemon, the POK erythroid myeloid ontogenic factor, not only regulates the expression of many genes, but also plays an important role in cell tumorigenesis. To investigate the molecular mechanism regulating expression of the Pokemon gene in humans, its 5'-upstream region was cloned and analyzed. Transient analysis revealed that the Pokemon promoter is constitutive. Deletion analysis and a DNA decoy assay indicated that the NEG-U and NEG-D elements were involved in negative regulation of the Pokemon promoter, whereas the POS-D element was mainly responsible for its strong activity. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays suggested that the NEG-U, NEG-D and POS-D elements were specifically bound by the nuclear extract from A549 cells in vitro. Mutation analysis demonstrated that cooperation of the NEG-U and NEG-D elements led to negative regulation of the Pokemon promoter. Moreover, the NEG-U and NEG-D elements needed to be an appropriate distance apart in the Pokemon promoter in order to cooperate. Taken together, our results elucidate the mechanism underlying the regulation of Pokemon gene transcription, and also define a novel regulatory sequence that may be used to decrease expression of the Pokemon gene in cancer gene therapy. PMID:18355317

  13. ZWD time series analysis derived from NRT data processing. A regional study of PW in Greece.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikridas, Christos; Balidakis, Kyriakos; Katsougiannopoulos, Symeon

    2015-04-01

    ZWD (Zenith Wet/non-hydrostatic Delay) estimates are routinely derived Near Real Time from the new established Analysis Center in the Department of Geodesy and Surveying of Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (DGS/AUT-AC), in the framework of E-GVAP (EUMETNET GNSS water vapour project) since October 2014. This process takes place on an hourly basis and yields, among else, station coordinates and tropospheric parameter estimates for a network of 90+ permanent GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) stations. These are distributed at the wider part of Hellenic region. In this study, temporal and spatial variability of ZWD estimates were examined, as well as their relation with coordinate series extracted from both float and fixed solution of the initial phase ambiguities. For this investigation, Bernese GNSS Software v5.2 was used for the acquisition of the 6 month dataset from the aforementioned network. For time series analysis we employed techniques such as the Generalized Lomb-Scargle periodogram and Burg's maximum entropy method due to inefficiencies of the Discrete Fourier Transform application in the test dataset. Through the analysis, interesting results for further geophysical interpretation were drawn. In addition, the spatial and temporal distributions of Precipitable Water vapour (PW) obtained from both ZWD estimates and ERA-Interim reanalysis grids were investigated.

  14. PCA Analysis of the Geomagnetic Field at Mid-Latitude Regions during High Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natali, Maria Paula; Meza, Amalia Margarita

    2016-07-01

    Our study is focused on the analysis of the geomagnetic variability of the H, D and Z components in the Northern hemisphere at mid-latitudes. We analyze two different local times, noon and night, recorded by 22 permanent observatories distributed over Europe and North America during a period of four years of high solar activity comprising 2000-2003. We used Principal Component Analysis (PCA) in order to identify the spatial and temporal variations of the geomagnetic field components. This technique produces a quite compact representation of the data by defining an orthonormal base derived from correlation within the data set. This helps us to identify possible causes of seasonal variations and anomalies, linking them with already observed currents. In fact, the analysis of PCA amplitudes and modes support our interpretation of the spectral and statistical features of the geomagnetic field. Using the first two modes we reconstruct more than 90% of the original signal for the European and North American region. The obtained results reconfirm the existence of a latitudinal dependence in the geomagnetic components during nighttime hours, associated with the ring current. During noon, the first mode represent the dominant component of the current originated by the ionosphere, while the second mode show the presence of a longitudinal variation at both sides of the longitudes with zero declination for Europe and North America.

  15. Immunochip analysis identifies association of the RAD50/IL13 region with human longevity.

    PubMed

    Flachsbart, Friederike; Ellinghaus, David; Gentschew, Liljana; Heinsen, Femke-Anouska; Caliebe, Amke; Christiansen, Lene; Nygaard, Marianne; Christensen, Kaare; Blanché, Hélène; Deleuze, Jean-François; Derbois, Céline; Galan, Pilar; Büning, Carsten; Brand, Stephan; Peters, Anette; Strauch, Konstantin; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Hoffmann, Per; Nöthen, Markus M; Lieb, Wolfgang; Franke, Andre; Schreiber, Stefan; Nebel, Almut

    2016-06-01

    Human longevity is characterized by a remarkable lack of confirmed genetic associations. Here, we report on the identification of a novel locus for longevity in the RAD50/IL13 region on chromosome 5q31.1 using a combined European sample of 3208 long-lived individuals (LLI) and 8919 younger controls. First, we performed a large-scale association study on 1458 German LLI (mean age 99.0 years) and 6368 controls (mean age 57.2 years) by targeting known immune-associated loci covered by the Immunochip. The analysis of 142 136 autosomal single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) revealed an Immunochip-wide significant signal (PI mmunochip  = 7.01 × 10(-9) ) for the SNP rs2075650 in the TOMM40/APOE region, which has been previously described in the context of human longevity. To identify novel susceptibility loci, we selected 15 markers with PI mmunochip  < 5 × 10(-4) for replication in two samples from France (1257 LLI, mean age 102.4 years; 1811 controls, mean age 49.1 years) and Denmark (493 LLI, mean age 96.2 years; 740 controls, mean age 63.1 years). The association at SNP rs2706372 replicated in the French study collection and showed a similar trend in the Danish participants and was also significant in a meta-analysis of the combined French and Danish data after adjusting for multiple testing. In a meta-analysis of all three samples, rs2706372 reached a P-value of PI mmunochip+Repl  = 5.42 × 10(-7) (OR = 1.20; 95% CI = 1.12-1.28). SNP rs2706372 is located in the extended RAD50/IL13 region. RAD50 seems a plausible longevity candidate due to its involvement in DNA repair and inflammation. Further studies are needed to identify the functional variant(s) that predispose(s) to a long and healthy life. PMID:27004735

  16. Comparative structural analysis of Bru1 region homeologs in Saccharum spontaneum and S. officinarum

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Jisen; Sharma, Anupma; Yu, Qingyi; Wang, Jianping; Li, Leiting; Zhu, Lin; Zhang, Xingtan; Chen, Youqiang; Ming, Ray

    2016-06-10

    Here, sugarcane is a major sugar and biofuel crop, but genomic research and molecular breeding have lagged behind other major crops due to the complexity of auto-allopolyploid genomes. Sugarcane cultivars are frequently aneuploid with chromosome number ranging from 100 to 130, consisting of 70-80 % S. officinarum, 10-20 % S. spontaneum, and 10 % recombinants between these two species. Analysis of a genomic region in the progenitor autoploid genomes of sugarcane hybrid cultivars will reveal the nature and divergence of homologous chromosomes. As a result, to investigate the origin and evolution of haplotypes in the Bru1 genomic regions in sugarcanemore » cultivars, we identified two BAC clones from S. spontaneum and four from S. officinarum and compared to seven haplotype sequences from sugarcane hybrid R570. The results clarified the origin of seven homologous haplotypes in R570, four haplotypes originated from S. officinarum, two from S. spontaneum and one recombinant.. Retrotransposon insertions and sequences variations among the homologous haplotypes sequence divergence ranged from 18.2 % to 60.5 % with an average of 33. 7 %. Gene content and gene structure were relatively well conserved among the homologous haplotypes. Exon splitting occurred in haplotypes of the hybrid genome but not in its progenitor genomes. Tajima's D analysis revealed that S. spontaneum hapotypes in the Bru1 genomic regions were under strong directional selection. Numerous inversions, deletions, insertions and translocations were found between haplotypes within each genome. In conclusion, this is the first comparison among haplotypes of a modern sugarcane hybrid and its two progenitors. Tajima's D results emphasized the crucial role of this fungal disease resistance gene for enhancing the fitness of this species and indicating that the brown rust resistance gene in R570 is from S. spontaneum. Species-specific InDel, sequences similarity and phylogenetic analysis of homologous genes can

  17. Sulcus-Based MR Analysis of Focal Cortical Dysplasia Located in the Central Region

    PubMed Central

    Roca, Pauline; Mellerio, Charles; Chassoux, Francine; Rivière, Denis; Cachia, Arnaud; Charron, Sylvain; Lion, Stéphanie; Mangin, Jean-François; Devaux, Bertrand; Meder, Jean-François; Oppenheim, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Objective Focal cortical dysplasias (FCDs) are mainly located in the frontal region, with a particular tropism for the central sulcus. Up to 30% of lesions are undetected (magnetic resonance [MR]-negative FCD patients) or belatedly diagnosed by visual analysis of MR images. We propose an automated sulcus-based method to analyze abnormal sulcal patterns associated with central FCD, taking into account the normal interindividual sulcal variability. Methods We retrospectively studied 29 right-handed patients with FCD in the central region (including 12 MR negative histologically-confirmed cases) and 29 right-handed controls. The analysis of sulcal abnormalities from T1-weighted MR imaging (MRI) was performed using a graph-based representation of the cortical folds and an automated sulci recognition system, providing a new quantitative criterion to describe sulcal patterns, termed sulcus energy. Results Group analysis showed that the central sulcus in the hemisphere ipsilateral to the FCD exhibited an abnormal sulcal pattern compared with controls (p = 0.032). FCDs were associated with abnormal patterns of the central sulci compared with controls (p = 0.006), a result that remained significant when MR-negative and MR-positive patients were considered separately, while the effects of sex, age and MR-field were not significant. At the individual level, sulcus energy alone failed to detect the FCD lesion. We found, however, a significant association between maximum z-scores and the site of FCD (p = 0.0046) which remained significant in MR-negative (p = 0.024) but not in MR-positive patients (p = 0.058). The maximum z-score pointed to an FCD sulcus in four MR-negative and five MR-positive patients. Conclusions We identified abnormal sulcal patterns in patients with FCD of the central region compared with healthy controls. The abnormal sulcal patterns ipsilateral to the FCD and the link between sulcus energy and the FCD location strengthen the interest of sulcal

  18. Multi-model analysis of precipitation-related climatological extremes for the Carpathian Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kis, Anna; Pongracz, Rita; Bartholy, Judit

    2015-04-01

    the 21st century. Before the thorough analysis of several drought- and precipitation-related climate indices (i.e., describing drought events, or intensity of precipitation exceeding different percentile-based or absolute threshold values, respectively), a percentile-based bias correction method was applied to the raw RCM output data, for which the homogenized daily gridded CarpatClim database (1961-2010) served as a reference. Absolute and relative seasonal mean changes of the climate indices are calculated for two future time periods (2021-2050 and 2071-2100) and for three subregions (i.e., Slovakia, Hungary, and Romania) within the entire Carpathian Region. According to our results, longer dry periods are estimated for the summer season, mainly in the southern parts of the domain, while precipitation intensity is likely to increase. Heavy precipitation days and high percentile values are projected to increase in the Carpathian Region, especially, in winter and autumn.

  19. PIXE analysis of hair samples from artisanal mining communities in the Acupan region, Benguet, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemente, Eligia; Sera, K.; Futatsugawa, S.; Murao, S.

    2004-06-01

    The mountainous regions of Benguet Province in the Philippines is home to some 10,000 small-scale miners who make out a living by extracting gold. In these communities, the method of extraction still involves the use of mercury, via amalgamation. In the separation of gold from mercury the method involves the release of mercury vapor into the atmosphere. This is therefore expected to affect the people living in the nearby areas. This study involves the accumulation of baseline data on the extent of mercury contamination in humans through the analysis of their hair. In 1989, Hursh et al. [Arch. Environ. Health 44 (2) (1989) 120] studied human volunteers and found that uptake of mercury vapor through the skin is only about 1% of the uptake through inhalation [World Health Organization, IPCS, EHC118, Inorganic Mercury, Geneva, 1991, p. 42]. In this light, any residual mercury which might have deposited in human hair is speculated to give an indication of how much mercury vapor the subject could have actually inhaled. A high concentration of mercury in the sample can therefore be indicative of the high rate of intake of the mercury vapor through inhalation. A sampling of the community consisted of both male (83%) and female (17%) subjects who ranged in age from 8 to 66 years old. Hair analysis was done using particle induced X-ray emission at the Iwate Medical University through Dr. Sera. With Zn set as a standard element, the rest of the elements were determined using the standard-free method. In order to obtain the conversion coefficient for hair samples, many hair samples were analyzed by this method and the internal standard method which involves the preparation of the hair samples by chemical ashing. The results obtained were comparable. The PIXE results for these samples showed the analysis of 26 elements but for our purposes, however, only the mercury analysis will be considered. Results of the analysis showed the hair samples to contain 0-27 ppm, with only seven

  20. An integrative analysis of regional gene expression profiles in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Myers, Emma M; Bartlett, Christopher W; Machiraju, Raghu; Bohland, Jason W

    2015-02-01

    Studies of the brain's transcriptome have become prominent in recent years, resulting in an accumulation of datasets with somewhat distinct attributes. These datasets, which are often analyzed only in isolation, also are often collected with divergent goals, which are reflected in their sampling properties. While many researchers have been interested in sampling gene expression in one or a few brain areas in a large number of subjects, recent efforts from the Allen Institute for Brain Sciences and others have focused instead on dense neuroanatomical sampling, necessarily limiting the number of individual donor brains studied. The purpose of the present work is to develop methods that draw on the complementary strengths of these two types of datasets for study of the human brain, and to characterize the anatomical specificity of gene expression profiles and gene co-expression networks derived from human brains using different specific technologies. The approach is applied using two publicly accessible datasets: (1) the high anatomical resolution Allen Human Brain Atlas (AHBA, Hawrylycz et al., 2012) and (2) a relatively large sample size, but comparatively coarse neuroanatomical dataset described previously by Gibbs et al. (2010). We found a relatively high degree of correspondence in differentially expressed genes and regional gene expression profiles across the two datasets. Gene co-expression networks defined in individual brain regions were less congruent, but also showed modest anatomical specificity. Using gene modules derived from the Gibbs dataset and from curated gene lists, we demonstrated varying degrees of anatomical specificity based on two classes of methods, one focused on network modularity and the other focused on enrichment of expression levels. Two approaches to assessing the statistical significance of a gene set's modularity in a given brain region were studied, which provide complementary information about the anatomical specificity of a gene

  1. Demand-driven water withdrawals by Chinese industry: a multi-regional input-output analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo; Chen, Z. M.; Zeng, L.; Qiao, H.; Chen, B.

    2016-03-01

    With ever increasing water demands and the continuous intensification of water scarcity arising from China's industrialization, the country is struggling to harmonize its industrial development and water supply. This paper presents a systems analysis of water withdrawals by Chinese industry and investigates demand-driven industrial water uses embodied in final demand and interregional trade based on a multi-regional input-output model. In 2007, the Electric Power, Steam, and Hot Water Production and Supply sector ranks first in direct industrial water withdrawal (DWW), and Construction has the largest embodied industrial water use (EWU). Investment, consumption, and exports contribute to 34.6%, 33.3%, and 30.6% of the national total EWU, respectively. Specifically, 58.0%, 51.1%, 48.6%, 43.3%, and 37.5% of the regional EWUs respectively in Guangdong, Shanghai, Zhejiang, Jiangsu, and Fujian are attributed to international exports. The total interregional import/export of embodied water is equivalent to about 40% of the national total DWW, of which 55.5% is associated with the DWWs of Electric Power, Steam, and Hot Water Production and Supply. Jiangsu is the biggest interregional exporter and deficit receiver of embodied water, in contrast to Guangdong as the biggest interregional importer and surplus receiver. Without implementing effective water-saving measures and adjusting industrial structures, the regional imbalance between water availability and water demand tends to intensify considering the water impact of domestic trade of industrial products. Steps taken to improve water use efficiency in production, and to enhance embodied water saving in consumption are both of great significance for supporting China's water policies.

  2. [Principal component analysis of mineral elements and fatty acids composition in flaxseed from ten different regions].

    PubMed

    Xing, Li; Zhao, Feng-Min; Cao, You-Fu; Wang, Mei; Mei, Shuai; Li, Shao-Ping; Cai, Zhi-Yong

    2014-09-01

    Flaxseed is a kind of biomass with high edible and medical value. It is rich in many kinds of nutrients and mineral elements. China is one of the important producing places of flaxseed. In order to explore the main characteristic constituents of mineral elements and fatty acids in flaxseed, the study of analyzing the mineral elements and fatty acid composition from 10 different regions was carried out. The contents of seventeen kinds of mineral elements in flaxseed were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The contents of fatty acids of the flaxseed oil obtained under the same conditions were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC-MS). The principal component analysis (PCA) method was applied to the study of analyzing the mineral elements and fatty acid compositions in flaxseeds. The difference in mineral elements and fatty acids of flaxseed from different regions were discussed. The main characteristic constituents of mineral elements and fatty acids were analyzed. The results showed that K, Sr, Mg, Ni, Co, Cr, Cd, Se, Zn and Cu were the main characteristic constituents of the mineral elements. At the same time, C16:0, C18:0, C18: 2, C18:3, C20:0 and C20:1 were the main characteristic constituents of the fatty acids. The combination of ICP-MS, GS-MS and PCA can reveal the characteristics and difference of mineral elements and fatty acids from different regions. The results would provide important theoretical basis for the reasonable and effective utilization of flaxseed. PMID:25532360

  3. [Health education in the French Regional Health Agencies in 2012: observations and analysis].

    PubMed

    Baudier, François; Destaing, Lara; Michaud, Claude

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the role of health education in the French Agences régionales de santé (ARS, Regional Health Agencies) in 2012. A survey was conducted among public health managers working in the ARS. Most of the participants reported that health education plays an important role in their agency, notably through their regional health plan and the activities of the organizations responsible for promoting democracy in health care. This is also true of the links with the Institut national de prévention et d'education pour la santé (INPES, the National Institute for Health Prevention and Education) and the network of Instances régionales d'éducation et de promotion de la santé (IREPS, the Regional Authorities for Health Education and Promotion). However, the answers to the open-ended questions and the results of the interviews suggest that these results must be interpreted with caution. The study focuses on a number of factors that must be taken into account when considering the results of the quantitative analysis. These factors include: the subjective (or interpretive) dimension of the term "health education" emphasized by many of the participants (a term involving an emphasis on either health promotion or preventive medicine); the limited emphasis on health education in the ARS (beyond therapeutic patient education) compared to other issues such as health monitoring and security, health care and medico-social problems; the limited resources allocated to health education and the bleak budget outlook; the relationships with the main operators; and the need to develop, promote and apply knowledge of good practice. Finally, the study shows that the role of health education is dependent on individuals' willingness to promote it and, in particular, on the commitment of ARS managers. PMID:24313069

  4. A regional multilevel analysis: can skilled birth attendants uniformly decrease neonatal mortality?

    PubMed

    Singh, Kavita; Brodish, Paul; Suchindran, Chirayath

    2014-01-01

    Globally 40 % of deaths to children under-five occur in the very first month of life with three-quarters of these deaths occurring during the first week of life. The promotion of delivery with a skilled birth attendant (SBA) is being promoted as a strategy to reduce neonatal mortality. This study explored whether SBAs had a protective effect against neonatal mortality in three different regions of the world. The analysis pooled data from nine diverse countries for which recent Demographic and Health Survey data were available. Multilevel logistic regression was used to understand the influence of skilled delivery on two outcomes-neonatal mortality during the first week of life and during the first day of life. Control variables included age, parity, education, wealth, residence (urban/rural), geographic region (Africa, Asia and Latin America/Caribbean), antenatal care and tetanus immunization. The direction of the effect of skilled delivery on neonatal mortality was dependent on geographic region. While having a SBA at delivery was protective against neonatal mortality in Latin America/Caribbean, in Asia there was only a protective effect for births in the first week of life. In Africa SBAs were associated with higher neonatal mortality for both outcomes, and the same was true for deaths on the first day of life in Asia. Many women in Africa and Asia deliver at home unless a complication occurs, and thus skilled birth attendants may be seeing more women with complications than their unskilled counterparts. In addition there are issues with the definition of a SBA with many attendants in both Africa and Asia not actually having the needed training and equipment to prevent neonatal mortality. Considerable investment is needed in terms of training and health infrastructure to enable these providers to save the youngest lives. PMID:23504132

  5. Regional fracture analysis in western valley and ridge and adjoining plateau, West Virginia and Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, S.L.; Baranoski, M.; Bertoli, L.; Kribbs, G.; Stephens, T.; Kulander, B.; Lockman, D.; Mumpower, D.

    1983-03-01

    Approximately 2500 stations were occupied for joint analysis in the western Valley and Ridge and eastern Allegheny Plateau of West Virginia and Maryland. As many as eight different joint sets are present within the study area although only four to five major systematic sets are pervasive throughout the entire region. Consideration of joint crosscutting and offset relationships, tendential and transient features, fibrous mineralization, stylolites, and slickenlines has permitted the establishment of a consistent chronology of joint development throughout the region. Joint set I (N30/sup 0/ to 50/sup 0/W) formed first as extension fractures early in the lithification history of all formations, followed by a less commonly developed orthogonal set trending N40/sup 0/ to 60/sup 0/E. Joint set II(N55/sup 0/ to 70/sup 0/W) formed second in response to early Alleghenian compressive stress, coupled with continuous subsidence, before folding. Joint set III (N20/sup 0/ to 30/sup 0/E) formed as extension fractures parallel to fold axes, with fracture inception early in fold development. Joint set IV (N75/sup 0/E to N75/sup 0/W) shows slickenlines more commonly than other sets and formed late in the folding history, possibly as shear joints where structures were effectively locked. A moderately to poorly developed joint set V (N10/sup 0/E to N10/sup 0/W) formed last in the region as an orthogonal set to IV. Prediction for joint trends, and possible hydrocarbon migration timing at depth in potential fractured reservoirs, must consider this aspect as well as chronological development, especially in view of the different stress fields within lower and upper thin-skinned plates.

  6. Changes in the Arctic Ocean CO2 sink (1996-2007): A regional model analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manizza, M.; Follows, M. J.; Dutkiewicz, S.; Menemenlis, D.; Hill, C. N.; Key, R. M.

    2013-12-01

    The rapid recent decline of Arctic Ocean sea ice area increases the flux of solar radiation available for primary production and the area of open water for air-sea gas exchange. We use a regional physical-biogeochemical model of the Arctic Ocean, forced by the National Centers for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research atmospheric reanalysis, to evaluate the mean present-day CO2 sink and its temporal evolution. During the 1996-2007 period, the model suggests that the Arctic average sea surface temperature warmed by 0.04°C a-1, that sea ice area decreased by ˜0.1 × 106 km2 a-1, and that the biological drawdown of dissolved inorganic carbon increased. The simulated 1996-2007 time-mean Arctic Ocean CO2 sink is 58 ± 6 Tg C a-1. The increase in ice-free ocean area and consequent carbon drawdown during this period enhances the CO2 sink by ˜1.4 Tg C a-1, consistent with estimates based on extrapolations of sparse data. A regional analysis suggests that during the 1996-2007 period, the shelf regions of the Laptev, East Siberian, Chukchi, and Beaufort Seas experienced an increase in the efficiency of their biological pump due to decreased sea ice area, especially during the 2004-2007 period, consistent with independently published estimates of primary production. In contrast, the CO2 sink in the Barents Sea is reduced during the 2004-2007 period due to a dominant control by warming and decreasing solubility. Thus, the effect of decreasing sea ice area and increasing sea surface temperature partially cancel, though the former is dominant.

  7. Geospatial Information Systems Analysis of Regional Environmental Change along the Savannah River Basin of Georgia

    PubMed Central

    Twumasi, Yaw A.; Merem, Edmund C.

    2008-01-01

    This paper uses remote sensing and geographic information systems (GIS); and descriptive statistics in the assessment of environmental change along the Savannah River Basin of Georgia. Results of the study show that Savannah River basin side of Georgia has been experiencing environmental change due to several decades of relentless pressure induced by anthropocentric activities and host of other socio-economic factors. Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) analysis of the area also shows a decline in vegetation cover. The pace of ecological change showed some variations across time and space. Generally, the results point to a decline in water bodies, vegetation, and increase in population, loss of harvested cropland, farms and increasing threats to the environmental systems of the region. PMID:18441406

  8. Engineering graduates' skill sets in the MENA region: a gap analysis of industry expectations and satisfaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadi, Eric; Ramadi, Serge; Nasr, Karim

    2016-01-01

    This study explored gaps between industry expectations and perceptions of engineering graduates' skill sets in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. This study measured the importance that managers of engineers placed on 36 skills relevant to engineers. Also measured was managers' satisfaction with engineering graduates' skill sets. Importance and satisfaction were used to calculate skill gaps for each skill. A principal components analysis was then performed, consolidating the 36 skills into 8 categories. The means of importance, satisfaction, and skill gaps were ranked to determine the areas in which graduates needed improvement. Results showed significant gaps between managers' expectations of and satisfaction with all 36 skills. The areas in which managers felt that graduates needed most improvement were communication, time management, and continuous learning. Managers reported that recent engineering graduates exhibited low overall preparedness for employment. These findings may help to inform curricular reform in engineering education.

  9. Microscopic analysis of nuclear quantum phase transitions in the N{approx_equal}90 region

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z. P.; Niksic, T.; Vretenar, D.; Meng, J.; Lalazissis, G. A.; Ring, P.

    2009-05-15

    The analysis of shape transitions in Nd isotopes, based on the framework of relativistic energy-density functionals and restricted to axially symmetric shapes in T. Niksic, D. Vretenar, G. A. Lalazissis, and P. Ring [Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 092502 (2007)], is extended to the region Z=60,62,64 with N{approx_equal}90 and includes both {beta} and {gamma} deformations. Collective excitation spectra and transition probabilities are calculated starting from a five-dimensional Hamiltonian for quadrupole vibrational and rotational degrees of freedom, with parameters determined by constrained self-consistent relativistic mean-field calculations for triaxial shapes. The results reproduce available data and show that there is an abrupt change of structure at N=90 that can be approximately characterized by the X(5) analytic solution at the critical point of the first-order quantum phase transition between spherical and axially deformed shapes.

  10. Automated identification of mitochondrial regions in complex intracellular space by texture analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Tuan D.

    2014-01-01

    Automated processing and quantification of biological images have been rapidly increasing the attention of researchers in image processing and pattern recognition because the roles of computerized image and pattern analyses are critical for new biological findings and drug discovery based on modern high-throughput and highcontent image screening. This paper presents a study of the automated detection of regions of mitochondria, which are a subcellular structure of eukaryotic cells, in microscopy images. The automated identification of mitochondria in intracellular space that is captured by the state-of-the-art combination of focused ion beam and scanning electron microscope imaging reported here is the first of its type. Existing methods and a proposed algorithm for texture analysis were tested with the real intracellular images. The high correction rate of detecting the locations of the mitochondria in a complex environment suggests the effectiveness of the proposed study.

  11. [Analysis of the prevalence of psychic disorders in the metropolitan region of Recife].

    PubMed

    Paixão, Cíntia; Matias, Daniele; Alencar, Izabel; Nunes, Marina; Sales, Patrícia; Veiga, Paulo Henrique Altran

    2009-01-01

    Mental health is a state of well-being, in which the individual is aware of its capacities, capable of coping with the ordinary stress of everyday life, of working productively and of functioning in society. The purpose of the present work is a quantitative analysis of the prevalence of psychic disorders, using references such as sex, age, kind of disorder and care delivered to the carriers. Social assistants of three psychiatric hospitals of the Metropolitan Region of Recife - the Psychiatric Hospital Ulysses Pernambucano, the Nucleus for Psychosocial Care of Pernambuco (NAPPE) and the Hospital Colony Alcides Codeceira - answered an adapted version of the Self Reporting Questionnaire (SRQ-20). The results showed a higher incidence of disorders in women in the age group between 41 and 60 years. Schizophrenia was the most frequently observed kind of mental disorder. Among the different treatments offered were drug therapy and individual and group therapy, the latter showing better results. PMID:19142330

  12. D-region blunt probe data analysis using hybrid computer techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhard, W. J.

    1973-01-01

    The feasibility of performing data reduction techniques with a hybrid computer was studied. The data was obtained from the flight of a parachute born probe through the D-region of the ionosphere. A presentation of the theory of blunt probe operation is included with emphasis on the equations necessary to perform the analysis. This is followed by a discussion of computer program development. Included in this discussion is a comparison of computer and hand reduction results for the blunt probe launched on 31 January 1972. The comparison showed that it was both feasible and desirable to use the computer for data reduction. The results of computer data reduction performed on flight data acquired from five blunt probes are also presented.

  13. Coupled-channel analysis of K{lambda} production in the nucleon resonance region

    SciTech Connect

    Shklyar, V.; Lenske, H.; Mosel, U.

    2005-07-01

    A unitary coupled-channel effective Lagrangian model is applied to the combined analysis of the ({pi},{gamma})N{yields}K{lambda} reactions in the energy region up to 2 GeV. To constrain the resonance couplings to the K{lambda} final state the recent photoproduction data obtained by the SAPHIR, Spring-8, and CLAS groups are included in the calculations. The main resonance contributions to the process stem from the S{sub 11}(1650),P{sub 13}(1720), and P{sub 13}(1900) states. The second peak at 1.9 GeV seen in the photoproduction cross-section data is described as a coherent sum of the resonance and background contributions. The prediction for the beam polarization observable is presented.

  14. Large-scale data analysis of power grid resilience across multiple US service regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Chuanyi; Wei, Yun; Mei, Henry; Calzada, Jorge; Carey, Matthew; Church, Steve; Hayes, Timothy; Nugent, Brian; Stella, Gregory; Wallace, Matthew; White, Joe; Wilcox, Robert

    2016-05-01

    Severe weather events frequently result in large-scale power failures, affecting millions of people for extended durations. However, the lack of comprehensive, detailed failure and recovery data has impeded large-scale resilience studies. Here, we analyse data from four major service regions representing Upstate New York during Super Storm Sandy and daily operations. Using non-stationary spatiotemporal random processes that relate infrastructural failures to recoveries and cost, our data analysis shows that local power failures have a disproportionally large non-local impact on people (that is, the top 20% of failures interrupted 84% of services to customers). A large number (89%) of small failures, represented by the bottom 34% of customers and commonplace devices, resulted in 56% of the total cost of 28 million customer interruption hours. Our study shows that extreme weather does not cause, but rather exacerbates, existing vulnerabilities, which are obscured in daily operations.

  15. Analysis of maxillofacial prosthetics at university dental hospitals in the capital region of Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong-Ho

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to investigate the demographic patterns of maxillofacial prosthetic treatment to identify the characteristics and geographic distribution of patients with maxillofacial prosthetics in the capital region of Korea. MATERIALS AND METHODS This retrospective analytical multicenter study was performed by chart reviews. This study included patients who visited the department of prosthodontics at four university dental hospitals for maxillofacial prosthetic rehabilitation. Patients with facial and congenital defects or with insufficient medical data were excluded. The patients were classified into three categories based on the location of the defect. Patients' sex, age, and residential area were analyzed. Pearson's chi-square test with a significance level of 0.05 was used to analyze the variables. RESULTS Among 540 patients with maxillofacial prosthetics, there were 284 (52.59%) male patients and 256 (47.41%) female patients. The number of the patients varied greatly by hospital. Most patients were older than 70, and the most common defect was a hard palate defect. Chi-square analysis did not identify any significant differences in sex, age, and distance to hospital for any defect group (P>.05). CONCLUSION The results of this study indicated that there was imbalance in the distribution of patients with maxillofacial prosthetic among the hospitals in the capital region of Korea. Considerations on specialists and insurance policies for the improvement of maxillofacial prosthetics in Korea are required. PMID:27350859

  16. Diagnostic Prediction for Social Anxiety Disorder via Multivariate Pattern Analysis of the Regional Homogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenjing; Yang, Xun; Lui, Su; Meng, Yajing; Yao, Li; Xiao, Yuan; Deng, Wei; Zhang, Wei; Gong, Qiyong

    2015-01-01

    Although decades of efforts have been spent studying the pathogenesis of social anxiety disorder (SAD), there are still no objective biological markers that could be reliably used to identify individuals with SAD. Studies using multivariate pattern analysis have shown the potential value in clinically diagnosing psychiatric disorders with neuroimaging data. We therefore examined the diagnostic potential of regional homogeneity (ReHo) underlying neural correlates of SAD using support vector machine (SVM), which has never been studied. Forty SAD patients and pairwise matched healthy controls were recruited and scanned by resting-state fMRI. The ReHo was calculated as synchronization of fMRI signals of nearest neighboring 27 voxels. A linear SVM was then adopted and allowed the classification of the two groups with diagnostic accuracy of ReHo that was 76.25% (sensitivity = 70%, and specificity = 82.5%, P ≤ 0.001). Regions showing different discriminating values between diagnostic groups were mainly located in default mode network, dorsal attention network, self-referential network, and sensory networks, while the left medial prefrontal cortex was identified with the highest weight. These results implicate that ReHo has good diagnostic potential in SAD, and thus may provide an initial step towards the possible use of whole brain local connectivity to inform the clinical evaluation. PMID:26180811

  17. Comparative anatomical analysis of the cotyledonary region in three Mediterranean Basin Quercus (Fagaceae).

    PubMed

    Pascual, Gemma; Molinas, Marisa; Verdaguer, Dolors

    2002-03-01

    Anatomical changes at the cotyledonary node from the embryo to the seedling stage in Quercus coccifera, Q. ilex, and Q. humilis were investigated by light and scanning electron microscopy techniques. Mature embryos of Q. humilis possess 2-3 pairs of leaf primordia and a pair of cotyledonary buds, whereas in Q. coccifera and Q. ilex there are two incipient primordia, and cotyledonary buds are not observed until 1 wk after germination. In all three species the cotyledonary buds multiply, forming bud clusters, and a vascular connection is well established within 5-6 wk after germination. As development proceeds, the cotyledonary region becomes woody, but buds, which are exogenous in origin, never become embedded in the periderm. In comparison with Q. suber, another native Mediterranean Basin oak, the cotyledonary node is short and axillary buds are not present below the insertion of cotyledons. In addition, starch accumulation in the cotyledonary region is not observed from histological analysis in the three oaks. Therefore, in Q. coccifera, Q. ilex, and Q. humilis seedlings the cotyledonary node can be considered to be an important regenerative structure enabling them to resprout after the elimination of the shoot above the cotyledons, despite the absence of a lignotuberous structure. PMID:21665633

  18. Thermal Stability Analysis under Embankment with Asphalt Pavement and Cement Pavement in Permafrost Regions

    PubMed Central

    Jinping, Li; Xiaojuan, Quan

    2013-01-01

    The permafrost degradation is the fundamental cause generating embankment diseases and pavement diseases in permafrost region while the permafrost degradation is related with temperature. Based on the field monitoring results of ground temperature along G214 Highway in high temperature permafrost regions, both the ground temperatures in superficial layer and the annual average temperatures under the embankment were discussed, respectively, for concrete pavements and asphalt pavements. The maximum depth of temperature field under the embankment for concrete pavements and asphalt pavements was also studied by using the finite element method. The results of numerical analysis indicate that there were remarkable seasonal differences of the ground temperatures in superficial layer between asphalt pavement and concrete pavement. The maximum influencing depth of temperature field under the permafrost embankment for every pavement was under the depth of 8 m. The thawed cores under both embankments have close relation with the maximum thawed depth, the embankment height, and the service time. The effective measurements will be proposed to keep the thermal stabilities of highway embankment by the results. PMID:24027444

  19. Molecular analysis of mitochondrial hypervariable region 1 in 394 Japanese individuals.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hideaki; Maeno, Yoshitaka; Ohira, Hiroshi; Yamada, Yoshihiro; Nagao, Masataka

    2009-04-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a powerful tool for forensic casework when the resource is highly putrefied or very limited. It is important that mtDNA sequence databases continue to be generated and published, to extend mtDNA typing capability to additional populations and to increase the size of existing databases. The aim of this study was to analyze hypervariable region 1 (HV1) of mtDNA and establish a new database of mtDNA in Japanese population. Three hundred and ninety-four unrelated Japanese individuals were investigated. They were classified into 193 haplotypes based on HV1 sequence. Nucleotide substitutions were clustered in several positions and were 79% at 16,223, 50% at 16,362, and 29% at 16,189. Transition accounts for 81% of all the mutations and especially transition from cytosine to thymine (33%) was the most frequent substitution. 16,223-16,362 was observed in 34 individuals, following 16,129-16,223-16,362 in 29 individuals, and haplotype 16,223-16,278-16,362 in 14 individuals. Genetic diversity and random match probability in this population were estimated to 0.987% and 1.95%, respectively. In conclusion, HV1 of mitochondria sequence has a high discrimination power, but in addition to HV1, analysis of other region such as HV2 and HV3 are required in certain cases. PMID:19254861

  20. Utilizing ERTS-1 imagery for tectonic analysis through study of the Bighorn Mountains region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppin, R. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Comparisons of imagery of three seasons, late summer-fall, winter, and spring indicate that for this region fall imagery is the best for overall geologic analysis. Winter scenes with light to moderate snow cover provide excellent topographic detail owing to snow enhancement, lower sun angle, and clarity of the atmosphere. Spring imagery has considerable reduction of tonal contrast owing to the low reflecting heavy green grass cover which subdues lithologic effects; heavy snow cover in the uplands masks topography. Mapping of geologic formations is impractical in most cases. Separation into tonal units can provide some general clues on structure. A given tonal unit can include parts of several geologic formations and different stratigraphic units can have the same tonal signature. Drainage patterns and anomalies provide the most consistent clues for detecting folds, monoclines, and homoclines. Vegetation only locally reflects lithology and structure. False color infrared 9 x 9 transparencies are the most valuable single imagery. Where these can be supplemented by U-2 color infrared for more detailed work, a tremendous amount of information is available. Adequately field checking such a large area just in one scene is the major logistic problem even in a fairly well known region.

  1. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of Indonesia Solanaceae based on DNA sequences of internal transcribed spacer region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidayat, Topik; Priyandoko, Didik; Islami, Dina Karina; Wardiny, Putri Yunitha

    2016-02-01

    Solanaceae is one of largest family in Angiosperm group with highly diverse in morphological character. In Indonesia, this group of plant is very popular due to its usefulness as food, ornamental and medicinal plants. However, investigation on phylogenetic relationship among the member of this family in Indonesia remains less attention. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the phylogenetics relationship of the family especially distributed in Indonesia. DNA sequences of Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) region of 19 species of Solanaceae and three species of outgroup, which belongs to family Convolvulaceae, Apocynaceae, and Plantaginaceae, were isolated, amplified, and sequenced. Phylogenetic tree analysis based on parsimony method was conducted with using data derived from the ITS-1, 5.8S, and ITS-2, separately, and the combination of all. Results indicated that the phylogenetic tree derived from the combined data established better pattern of relationship than separate data. Thus, three major groups were revealed. Group 1 consists of tribe Datureae, Cestreae, and Petunieae, whereas group 2 is member of tribe Physaleae. Group 3 belongs to tribe Solaneae. The use of the ITS region as a molecular markers, in general, support the global Solanaceae relationship that has been previously reported.

  2. Systematic sequencing of the Escherichia coli genome: analysis of the 0-2.4 min region.

    PubMed Central

    Yura, T; Mori, H; Nagai, H; Nagata, T; Ishihama, A; Fujita, N; Isono, K; Mizobuchi, K; Nakata, A

    1992-01-01

    A contiguous 111,402-nucleotide sequence corresponding to the 0 to 2.4 min region of the E. coli chromosome was determined as a first step to complete structural analysis of the genome. The resulting sequence was used to predict open reading frames and to search for sequence similarity against the PIR protein database. A number of novel genes were found whose predicted protein sequences showed significant homology with known proteins from various organisms, including several clusters of genes similar to those involved in fatty acid metabolism in bacteria (e.g., betT, baiF) and higher organisms, iron transport (sfuA, B, C) in Serratia marcescens, and symbiotic nitrogen fixation or electron transport (fixA, B, C, X) in Azorhizobium caulinodans. In addition, several genes and IS elements that had been mapped but not sequenced (e.g., leuA, B, C, D) were identified. We estimate that about 90 genes are represented in this region of the chromosome with little spacer. Images PMID:1630901

  3. Critical anatomic region of nasopalatine canal based on tridimensional analysis: cone beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Alonso, Ana; Antonio Suárez-Quintanilla, Juan; Muinelo-Lorenzo, Juan; Varela-Mallou, Jesús; Smyth Chamosa, Ernesto; Mercedes Suárez-Cunqueiro, María

    2015-01-01

    The study aim of this was to define the critical anatomic region of the premaxilla by evaluating dimensions of nasopalatine canal, buccal bone plate (BBP) and palatal bone plate (PBP). 230 CBCTs were selected with both, one or no upper central incisors present (+/+, −/+, −/−) and periodontal condition was evaluated. T-student test, ANOVA, Pearson´s correlation and a multivariant-linear regression model (MLRM) were used. Regarding gender, significant differences at level 1 (lower NC) were found for: buccal-palatal, transversal and sagittal NC diameters, and NC length (NCL). Regarding dental status, significant differences were found for: total BBP length (tBL) and PBP width (PW2) at level 2 (NCL midpoint). NCL was correlated with PW2, tBL, and PBP length at level 3 (foramina of Stenson level). An MLRM had a high prediction value for NCL (69.3%). Gender is related to NC dimensions. Dental status has an influence on BBP dimensions, but does not influence on NC and PBP. Periodontal condition should be evaluated for precise premaxillae analysis NC diameters at the three anatomical planes are related to each other, while NCL is related to BBP and PBP lengths. A third of premaxilla is taken up by NC, thus, establishing the critical anatomic region. PMID:26245884

  4. Analysis of Glacial Change in the Northern Antarctic Peninsula Region Using Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, W.; Arkle, J.; Devillier, K.; Neely, N.; Velasco, A. A.

    2009-05-01

    Clearly and robustly documenting global climate change over this past century remains a key goal for researchers. Polar regions are an ideal place to study change, since they are particularly sensitive to temperature changes. As part of an International Polar Year (IPY) grant called IPY-ROAM (Research and Educational Opportunities in Antarctica for Minorities), faculty at the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) took 29 underrepresented minority students and teachers on a research expedition to Antarctica over winter break 2007. One goal of the program was to document glacial change along the Antarctic Peninsula over the past century using photogrammetry, a technique that uses photos to make accurate geographic measurements. Prior to embarkation, we gathered historic photos of glaciers along our travel route. During the expedition, new photos were taken within the old photo sites, where we made Global Positioning System (GPS) readings and accurately measurement angles to the geographic features. The geographic features (including top and bottom of a glacier) were then mapped onto a Geographical Information Systems (GIS) that allowed us to determine location, scale and distance to these features on the photos. With the angle and distance, the height difference between the old and current photo of the glacier was calculated using basic trigonometric functions. In one case, we determined a 14 m reduction in glacier height from 1934 to 2007. Future work will include analysis from more glaciers in the region, and to determine if there is a correlation between glacier retreat and climate change. ROAM/index.html

  5. Integrating disparate lidar datasets for a regional storm tide inundation analysis of hurricane katrina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoker, J.M.; Tyler, D.J.; Turnipseed, D.P.; Van Wilson, Jr., K.; Oimoen, M.J.

    2009-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina was one of the largest natural disasters in U.S. history. Due to the sheer size of the affected areas, an unprecedented regional analysis at very high resolution and accuracy was needed to properly quantify and understand the effects of the hurricane and the storm tide. Many disparate sources of lidar data were acquired and processed for varying environmental reasons by pre- and post-Katrina projects. The datasets were in several formats and projections and were processed to varying phases of completion, and as a result the task of producing a seamless digital elevation dataset required a high level of coordination, research, and revision. To create a seamless digital elevation dataset, many technical issues had to be resolved before producing the desired 1/9-arc-second (3meter) grid needed as the map base for projecting the Katrina peak storm tide throughout the affected coastal region. This report presents the methodology that was developed to construct seamless digital elevation datasets from multipurpose, multi-use, and disparate lidar datasets, and describes an easily accessible Web application for viewing the maximum storm tide caused by Hurricane Katrina in southeastern Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama. ?? 2009 Coastal Education and Research Foundation.

  6. Crystal Structure Analysis and the Identification of Distinctive Functional Regions of the Protein Elicitor Mohrip2.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mengjie; Duan, Liangwei; Wang, Meifang; Zeng, Hongmei; Liu, Xinqi; Qiu, Dewen

    2016-01-01

    The protein elicitor MoHrip2, which was extracted from Magnaporthe oryzae as an exocrine protein, triggers the tobacco immune system and enhances blast resistance in rice. However, the detailed mechanisms by which MoHrip2 acts as an elicitor remain unclear. Here, we investigated the structure of MoHrip2 to elucidate its functions based on molecular structure. The three-dimensional structure of MoHrip2 was obtained. Overall, the crystal structure formed a β-barrel structure and showed high similarity to the pathogenesis-related (PR) thaumatin superfamily protein thaumatin-like xylanase inhibitor (TL-XI). To investigate the functional regions responsible for MoHrip2 elicitor activities, the full length and eight truncated proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and were evaluated for elicitor activity in tobacco. Biological function analysis showed that MoHrip2 triggered the defense system against Botrytis cinerea in tobacco. Moreover, only MoHrip2M14 and other fragments containing the 14 amino acids residues in the middle region of the protein showed the elicitor activity of inducing a hypersensitive response and resistance related pathways, which were similar to that of full-length MoHrip2. These results revealed that the central 14 amino acid residues were essential for anti-pathogenic activity. PMID:27507984

  7. Geothermal direct heat use: Market potential/penetration analysis for Federal Region 9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, W. (Editor); Tang, K. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    A preliminary study was made of the potential for geothermal direct heat use in Arizona, California, Hawaii, and Nevada (Federal Region 9). An analysis was made of each state to: (1) define the resource, based on the latest available data; (2) assess the potential market growth for geothermal energy; and (3) estimate the market penetration, projected to 2020. Findings of the study include the following: (1) Potentially economical hydrothermal resources exist in all four states of the Region: however, the resource data base is largely incomplete, particularly for low to moderate temperature resources. (2) In terms of beneficial heat, the total hydrothermal resource identified so far for the four states is on the order of 43 Quads, including an estimated 34 Quads of high temperature resources which are suitable for direct as well as electrical applications. (3) In California, Hawaii, and Nevada, the industrial market sector has somewhat greater potential for penetration than the residential/commercial sector. In Arizona, however, the situation is reversed, due to the collocation of two major metropolitan areas (Phoenix and Tucson) with potential geothermal resources.

  8. Deriving PWV from BDS Observations with PPP approach and Precision Analysis in China Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Min

    2014-05-01

    The precipitable water vapour (PWV) is the key parameter of the weather analysis and numerical weather prediction. And it is now widely adopted to derive PWV with the zenithtropospheric delay (ZTD) estimated from GNSS observations. The BeiDou System (BDS) now has 14 satellites in service and provides a good coverage over the China region with its GEO and IGSO constellations. In this contribution, we concentrate on PWV inversion using only BDS observations and its precision evaluation with the PANDA software developed at Wuhan University. The BDS/GPS dual-frequency dual-mode data from June 1 to September 1 2013 are collected at 8 stations in the China region. By the PPP approach, the ZTDs are estimated every 2-hour at each station using a piecewise constant model with BDS precise orbit and clock products, which are generated from the BETS(BeiDou Experiment Tracking Stations) network with 14 stations distributed globally. Then the PWVs are obtained by the conversion factor and zenith wet delays (ZWDs) retrieved from the estimated ZTDs. Firstly the PPP-inferred BDS-PWV is compared to that provided by the AERONET. And then the 3-month GPS-PWV at these 8 stations isalso estimatedin the same way, and used as reference values for BDS-PWV comparison.Their precision differences are further discussed.

  9. Oesophageal cancer treatment in North East Thames region, 1981: medical audit using Hospital Activity Analysis data.

    PubMed Central

    Earlam, R

    1984-01-01

    Figures from the Hospital Activity Analysis in the North East Thames region in 1981 were used to perform a medical audit on oesophageal cancer treatment. Four hundred and forty four patients were admitted with this diagnosis; 80 had been intubated without a thoracotomy or laparotomy, and 73 had had surgery (two thirds radical and one third palliative) with an overall operative mortality of 33%. Fifty five patients had had radiotherapy and 179 patients had no recorded operation or investigation. One hundred and seventy seven different consultants had looked after all these inpatients, most being general surgeons. Only five consultants had looked after 10 or more patients each year. From a calculated estimate of a total 286 patients in the region, 28% had palliative intubation and 25% had surgery; 20% of all the patients had radiotherapy either as a radical or palliative treatment, the remainder having no recorded therapeutic procedure. One hundred and eighty seven patients (66% of the calculated total) died in hospital. Investigation and treatment do not seem to be limited by lack of money, but money is being wasted by admitting patients for terminal care into acute hospital beds. It would be more humane for these patients to die at home or in a hospice if they wished. PMID:6203599

  10. Bibliography of Regional Aquifer-System Analysis Program of the US Geological Survey, 1978-96

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sun, Ren Jen; Weeks, John B.; Grubb, Hayes F.

    1997-01-01

    The Regional Aquifer-System Analysis (RASA) Program of the U.S. Geological Survey was initiated in 1978 and was completed in 1995. The purpose of this program was to define the regional geohydrology and establish a framework of background information on geology, hydrology, and geochemistry of the Nation's important aquifer systems. This information is critically needed to develop an understanding of the Nation's major ground-water flow systems and to support better management of ground-water resources. Twenty-five of the Nation's major aquifer systems were studied under this program. Starting in 1988, the program devoted part of its resources to compilation of a National Ground Water Atlas that presets a comprehensive summary of the Nation's major ground-water resources. The atlas, which is designed in a graphical format supported by descriptive text, serves as a basic reference for the location, geography, geology, and hydrologic characteristics of the major aquifers in the Nation. This bibliography lists 1,105 reports that result from various studies of the program. The list of reports for each study follows a brief description of that study.

  11. An analysis of scientific potential of northern Oceanus Procellarum region for sample return

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Liu, J.; Li, C.

    2012-12-01

    We evaluate the science potential of northern Oceanus Procellarum as a candidate site for future Chang'e sample return mission. This region is characterized by relatively young basaltic lavas, estimated at approximately 2.5-3.75 Ga [e.g., 1], thus may potentially yield information on mare evolution and cratering rate not retrievable from Apollo and Lunar samples. Mons Rümker, a large (65 km diameter) volcanic edifice centered at 40.8°N 58.1°W, consists of multiple mare domes. Previous modeling suggests low effusion rates and varied lava eruption temperatures and varied degrees of crystallization for these domes [2]. Samples from Mons Rümker would provide information on its composition, eruption style, rheological properties, and evolution. In addition, Rima Sharp (46.7°N 50.5°W), a 107 km long, approximate 1 km wide rille, winds through this region. We present stratigraphical and compositional study of northern Oceanus Procellarum based on Kaguya and Chang'e 2 multispectral and image data. We will also present analysis on elevation, rock abundance and other engineering parameters of importance to landing safety. References: [1] Heisinger et al. J. Geophys. Res., 108, E7, 1-27, 2003. [2] Wöhler et al. Lunar Planet. Sci., XXXVIII, #1091, 2007.

  12. Crystal Structure Analysis and the Identification of Distinctive Functional Regions of the Protein Elicitor Mohrip2

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mengjie; Duan, Liangwei; Wang, Meifang; Zeng, Hongmei; Liu, Xinqi; Qiu, Dewen

    2016-01-01

    The protein elicitor MoHrip2, which was extracted from Magnaporthe oryzae as an exocrine protein, triggers the tobacco immune system and enhances blast resistance in rice. However, the detailed mechanisms by which MoHrip2 acts as an elicitor remain unclear. Here, we investigated the structure of MoHrip2 to elucidate its functions based on molecular structure. The three-dimensional structure of MoHrip2 was obtained. Overall, the crystal structure formed a β-barrel structure and showed high similarity to the pathogenesis-related (PR) thaumatin superfamily protein thaumatin-like xylanase inhibitor (TL-XI). To investigate the functional regions responsible for MoHrip2 elicitor activities, the full length and eight truncated proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and were evaluated for elicitor activity in tobacco. Biological function analysis showed that MoHrip2 triggered the defense system against Botrytis cinerea in tobacco. Moreover, only MoHrip2M14 and other fragments containing the 14 amino acids residues in the middle region of the protein showed the elicitor activity of inducing a hypersensitive response and resistance related pathways, which were similar to that of full-length MoHrip2. These results revealed that the central 14 amino acid residues were essential for anti-pathogenic activity. PMID:27507984

  13. Regional investigations of soil and overburden analysis and plant uptake of metals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gough, L.P.

    1984-01-01

    Regional studies on the bioavailability of metals at native and disturbed sites were conducted over the past seven years by the USGS. The work was concentrated in the Fort Union, Powder River, and Green River coal resource regions where measures of extractable metals in soils were found to have limited use in predicting metal levels in plants. Correlations between Cu, Fe, and Zn in plants and extractable (DTPA, EDTA, and oxalate) or total levels in native A- and C-horizons of soil were occasionally significant. A simple linear model is generally not adequate, however, in estimating element uptake by plants. Prediction capabilities were improved when a number of soil chemical and physical parameters were included as independent variables in a stepwise linear multiple regression analysis; however, never more than 54% of the total variability in the data was explained by the equations for these metals. Soil pH was the most important variable relating soil chemistry to plant chemistry. This relation was always positive and apparently a response to soil levels of metal carbonates and not Fe and Mn oxides. Studies that compared the metal uptake by rehabilitation species to extractable (DTPA) metal levels in mice soils produced similar results. ?? 1984 Science and Technology Letters.

  14. Sequence analysis of two genomic regions containing the KIT and the FMS receptor tyrosine kinase genes

    SciTech Connect

    Andre, C.; Hampe, A.; Lachaume, P.

    1997-01-15

    The KIT and FMS tyrosine kinase receptors, which are implicated in the control of cell growth and differentiation, stem through duplications from a common ancestor. We have conducted a detailed structural analysis of the two loci containing the KIT and FMS genes. The sequence of the {approximately}90-kb KIT locus reveals the position and size of the 21 introns and of the 5{prime} regulatory region of the KIT gene. The introns and the 3{prime}-untranslated parts of KIT and FMS have been analyzed in parallel. Comparison of the two sequences shows that, while introns of both genes have extensively diverged in size and sequence, this divergence is, at least in part, due to intron expansion through internal duplications, as suggested by the discrete extant analogies. Repetitive elements as well as exon predictions obtained using the GRAIL and GENEFINDER programs are described in detail. These programs led us to identify a novel gene, designated SMF, immediately downstream of FMS, in the opposite orientation. This finding emphasizes the gene-rich characteristic of this genomic region. 49 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs.

  15. Molecular Analysis of Fungal Populations in Patients with Oral Candidiasis Using Internal Transcribed Spacer Region

    PubMed Central

    Ieda, Shinsuke; Moriyama, Masafumi; Takashita, Toru; Maehara, Takashi; Imabayashi, Yumi; Shinozaki, Shoichi; Tanaka, Akihiko; Hayashida, Jun-Nosuke; Furukawa, Sachiko; Ohta, Miho; Yamashita, Yoshihisa; Nakamura, Seiji

    2014-01-01

    Oral candidiasis is closely associated with changes in the oral fungal flora and is caused primarily by Candida albicans. Conventional methods of fungal culture are time-consuming and not always conclusive. However, molecular genetic analysis of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of fungal rRNA is rapid, reproducible and simple to perform. In this study we examined the fungal flora in patients with oral candidiasis and investigated changes in the flora after antifungal treatment using length heterogeneity-polymerization chain reaction (LH-PCR) analysis of ITS regions. Fifty-two patients with pseudomembranous oral candidiasis (POC) and 30 healthy controls were included in the study. Fungal DNA from oral rinse was examined for fungal species diversity by LH-PCR. Fungal populations were quantified by real-time PCR and previously-unidentified signals were confirmed by nucleotide sequencing. Relationships between the oral fungal flora and treatment-resistant factors were also examined. POC patients showed significantly more fungal species and a greater density of fungi than control individuals. Sixteen fungi were newly identified. The fungal populations from both groups were composed predominantly of C. albicans, though the ratio of C. dubliniensis was significantly higher in POC patients than in controls. The diversity and density of fungi were significantly reduced after treatment. Furthermore, fungal diversity and the proportion of C. dubliniensis were positively correlated with treatment duration. These results suggest that C. dubliniensis and high fungal flora diversity might be involved in the pathogenesis of oral candidiasis. We therefore conclude that LH-PCR is a useful technique for diagnosing and assessing the severity of oral candidal infection. PMID:24979710

  16. Trends in floods in West Africa: analysis based on 11 catchments in the region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nka, B. N.; Oudin, L.; Karambiri, H.; Paturel, J. E.; Ribstein, P.

    2015-11-01

    After the drought of the 1970s in West Africa, the variability in rainfall and land use changes mostly affected flow, and recently flooding has been said to be an increasingly common occurrence throughout the whole of West Africa. These changes have raised many questions about the impact of climate change on the flood regimes in West African countries. This paper investigates whether floods are becoming more frequent or more severe and to what extent climate patterns have been responsible for these changes. We analyzed the trends in the floods occurring in 11 catchments within West Africa's main climate zones. The methodology includes two methods for sampling flood events, namely the AM (annual maximum) method and the POT (peak over threshold), and two perspectives of analysis are presented: long-term analysis based on two long flood time series and a regional perspective involving 11 catchments with shorter series. The Mann-Kendall trend test and the Pettitt break test were used to detect nonstationarities in the time series. The trends detected in flood time series were compared to the rainfall index trends and vegetation indices using contingency tables in order to identify the main driver of change in flood magnitude and flood frequency. The relation between the flood index and the physiographic index was evaluated through a success criterion and the Cramer criterion calculated from the contingency tables. The results show the existence of trends in flood magnitude and flood frequency time series, with two main patterns. Sahelian floods show increasing flood trends and one Sudanian. catchment presents decreasing flood trends. For the overall catchments studied, trends in the maximum 5-day consecutive rainfall index (R5d) show good coherence with trends in flood, while the trends in normalized difference vegetation indices (NDVIs) do not show a significant agreement with flood trends, meaning that this index has possibly no impact on the behavior of floods in

  17. Statistical analysis of the horizontal divergent flow in emerging solar active regions

    SciTech Connect

    Toriumi, Shin; Hayashi, Keiji; Yokoyama, Takaaki

    2014-10-10

    Solar active regions (ARs) are thought to be formed by magnetic fields from the convection zone. Our flux emergence simulations revealed that a strong horizontal divergent flow (HDF) of unmagnetized plasma appears at the photosphere before the flux begins to emerge. In our earlier study, we analyzed HMI data for a single AR and confirmed presence of this precursor plasma flow in the actual Sun. In this paper, as an extension of our earlier study, we conducted a statistical analysis of the HDFs to further investigate their characteristics and better determine the properties. From SDO/HMI data, we picked up 23 flux emergence events over a period of 14 months, the total flux of which ranges from 10{sup 20} to 10{sup 22} Mx. Out of 23 selected events, 6 clear HDFs were detected by the method we developed in our earlier study, and 7 HDFs detected by visual inspection were added to this statistic analysis. We found that the duration of the HDF is on average 61 minutes and the maximum HDF speed is on average 3.1 km s{sup –1}. We also estimated the rising speed of the subsurface magnetic flux to be 0.6-1.4 km s{sup –1}. These values are highly consistent with our previous one-event analysis as well as our simulation results. The observation results lead us to the conclusion that the HDF is a rather common feature in the earliest phase of AR emergence. Moreover, our HDF analysis has the capability of determining the subsurface properties of emerging fields that cannot be directly measured.

  18. Joint NASA/EPA AVIRIS Analysis in the Chesapeake Bay Region: Plans and Initial Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Lee; Stokely, Peter; Lobitz, Brad; Shelton, Gary

    1998-01-01

    NASA's Ames Research Center is performing an AVIRIS demonstration project in conjunction with the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (Region 3). NASA and EPA scientists have jointly defined a Study Area in eastern Virginia to include portions of the Chesapeake Bay, southern Delmarva Peninsula, and the mouths of the York and James Rivers. Several environmental issues have been identified for study. These include, by priority: 1) water constituent analysis in the Chesapeake Bay, 2) mapping of submerged aquatic vegetation in the Bay, 3) detection of vegetation stress related to Superfund sites at the Yorktown Naval Weapons Station, and 4) wetland species analysis in the York River vicinity. In support of this project, three lines of AVIRIS data were collected during the Wallops Island deployment on 17 August 1997. The remote sensing payload included AVIRIS, MODIS Airborne Simulator and an RC-10 color infrared film camera. The AVIRIS data were delivered to Ames from the JPL AVIRIS Data Facility, on 29 September 1997. Quicklook images indicate nominal data acquisition, and at the current time an atmospheric correction is being applied. Water constituent analysis of the Bay is our highest priority based on EPA interest and available collateral data, both from the surface and from other remote sensing instruments. Constituents of interest include suspended sediments, chlorophyll-a and accessory pigments, Analysis steps will include: verification of data quality, location of study sites in imagery, incorporation of relevant field data from EPA and other Chesapeake Bay cooperators, processing of imagery to show phenomenon of interest, verification of results with cooperators. By 1st quarter CY98 we plan to circulate initial results to NASA and EPA management for review. In the longer term we will finalize documentation, prepare results for publication, and complete any needed technology transfer to EPA remote sensing personnel.

  19. Statistical Analysis of the Horizontal Divergent Flow in Emerging Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toriumi, Shin; Hayashi, Keiji; Yokoyama, Takaaki

    2014-10-01

    Solar active regions (ARs) are thought to be formed by magnetic fields from the convection zone. Our flux emergence simulations revealed that a strong horizontal divergent flow (HDF) of unmagnetized plasma appears at the photosphere before the flux begins to emerge. In our earlier study, we analyzed HMI data for a single AR and confirmed presence of this precursor plasma flow in the actual Sun. In this paper, as an extension of our earlier study, we conducted a statistical analysis of the HDFs to further investigate their characteristics and better determine the properties. From SDO/HMI data, we picked up 23 flux emergence events over a period of 14 months, the total flux of which ranges from 1020 to 1022 Mx. Out of 23 selected events, 6 clear HDFs were detected by the method we developed in our earlier study, and 7 HDFs detected by visual inspection were added to this statistic analysis. We found that the duration of the HDF is on average 61 minutes and the maximum HDF speed is on average 3.1 km s-1. We also estimated the rising speed of the subsurface magnetic flux to be 0.6-1.4 km s-1. These values are highly consistent with our previous one-event analysis as well as our simulation results. The observation results lead us to the conclusion that the HDF is a rather common feature in the earliest phase of AR emergence. Moreover, our HDF analysis has the capability of determining the subsurface properties of emerging fields that cannot be directly measured.

  20. A First-Stage Approximation to Identify New Imprinted Genes through Sequence Analysis of Its Coding Regions

    PubMed Central

    Daura-Oller, Elias; Cabré, Maria; Montero, Miguel A.; Paternáin, José L.; Romeu, Antoni

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, a positive training set of 30 known human imprinted gene coding regions are compared with a set of 72 randomly sampled human nonimprinted gene coding regions (negative training set) to identify genomic features common to human imprinted genes. The most important feature of the present work is its ability to use multivariate analysis to look at variation, at coding region DNA level, among imprinted and non-imprinted genes. There is a force affecting genomic parameters that appears through the use of the appropriate multivariate methods (principle components analysis (PCA) and quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA)) to analyse quantitative genomic data. We show that variables, such as CG content, [bp]% CpG islands, [bp]% Large Tandem Repeats, and [bp]% Simple Repeats, are able to distinguish coding regions of human imprinted genes. PMID:19360135

  1. Regional Analysis of the Hazard Level of Glacial Lakes in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisolm, Rachel E.; Jhon Sanchez Leon, Walter; McKinney, Daene C.; Cochachin Rapre, Alejo

    2016-04-01

    The Cordillera Blanca mountain range is the highest in Peru and contains many of the world's tropical glaciers. This region is severely impacted by climate change causing accelerated glacier retreat. Secondary impacts of climate change on glacier retreat include stress on water resources and the risk of glacial lake outburst floods (GLOFs) from the many lakes that are forming and growing at the base of glaciers. A number of GLOFs originating from lakes in the Cordillera Blanca have occurred over the last century, several of which have had catastrophic impacts on cities and communities downstream. Glaciologists and engineers in Peru have been studying the lakes of the Cordillera Blanca for many years and have identified several lakes that are considered dangerous. However, a systematic analysis of all the lakes in the Cordillera Blanca has never before been attempted. Some methodologies for this type of systematic analysis have been proposed (eg. Emmer and Vilimek 2014; Wang, et al. 2011), but as yet they have only been applied to a few select lakes in the Cordillera Blanca. This study uses remotely sensed data to study all of the lakes of the Glacial Lake Inventory published by the Glaciology and Water Resources Unit of Peru's National Water Authority (UGRH 2011). The objective of this study is to assign a level of potential hazard to each glacial lake in the Cordillera Blanca and to ascertain if any of the lakes beyond those that have already been studied might pose a danger to nearby populations. A number of parameters of analysis, both quantitative and qualitative, have been selected to assess the hazard level of each glacial lake in the Cordillera Blanca using digital elevation models, satellite imagery, and glacier outlines. These parameters are then combined to come up with a preliminary assessment of the hazard level of each lake; the equation weighting each parameter draws on previously published methodologies but is tailored to the regional characteristics

  2. Population analysis of Vibrio parahaemolyticus originating from different geographical regions demonstrates a high genetic diversity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Vibrio parahaemolyticus is frequently isolated from environmental and seafood samples and associated with gastroenteritis outbreakes in American, European, Asian and African countries. To distinguish between different lineages of V. parahaemolyticus various genotyping techniques have been used, incl. multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Even though some studies have already applied MLST analysis to characterize V. parahaemolyticus strain sets, these studies have been restricted to specific geographical areas (e.g. U.S. coast, Thailand and Peru), have focused exclusively on pandemic or non-pandemic pathogenic isolates or have been based on a limited strain number. Results To generate a global picture of V. parahaemolyticus genotype distribution, a collection of 130 environmental and seafood related V. parahaemolyticus isolates of different geographical origins (Sri Lanka, Ecuador, North Sea and Baltic Sea as well as German retail) was subjected to MLST analysis after modification of gyrB and recA PCRs. The V. parahaemolyticus population was composed of 82 unique Sequence Types (STs), of which 68 (82.9%) were new to the pubMLST database. After translating the in-frame nucleotide sequences into amino acid sequences, less diversity was detectable: a total of 31 different peptide Sequence Types (pSTs) with 19 (61.3%) new pSTs were generated from the analyzed isolates. Most STs did not show a global dissemination, but some were supra-regionally distributed and clusters of STs were dependent on geographical origin. On peptide level no general clustering of strains from specific geographical regions was observed, thereby the most common pSTs were found on all continents (Asia, South America and Europe) and rare pSTs were restricted to distinct countries or even geographical regions. One lineage of pSTs associated only with strains from North and Baltic Sea strains was identified. Conclusions Our study reveals a high genetic diversity in the analyzed V

  3. Regional economic analysis of current and proposed management alternatives for Rappahannock River Valley National Wildlife Refuge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koontz, Lynne; Sexton, Natalie; Donovan, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    The National Wildlife Refuge System Improvement Act of 1997 requires all units of the National Wildlife Refuge System to be managed under a Comprehensive Conservation Plan. The Comprehensive Conservation Plan must describe the desired future conditions of a refuge and provide long-range guidance and management direction to achieve refuge purposes. The Rappahannock River Valley National Wildlife Refuge (refuge) is in the process of developing a range of management goals, objectives, and strategies for the Comprehensive Conservation Plan. The Comprehensive Conservation Plan for the refuge must contain an analysis of expected effects associated with current and proposed refuge management strategies. The purpose of this study was to assess the regional economic implications associated with draft Comprehensive Conservation Plan management strategies. Special interest groups and local residents often criticize a change in refuge management, especially if there is a perceived negative impact to the local economy. Having objective data on economic impacts may show that these fears are overstated. Quite often, the extent of economic benefits a refuge provides to a local community is not fully recognized, yet at the same time the effects of negative changes is overstated. Spending associated with refuge recreational activities, such as wildlife viewing and hunting, can generate considerable tourist activity for surrounding communities. Additionally, refuge personnel typically spend considerable amounts of money purchasing supplies in local stores, repairing equipment and purchasing fuel at the local service stations, and reside and spend their salaries in the local community. For refuge Comprehensive Conservation Plan planning, a regional economic assessment provides a means of estimating how current management (no action alternative) and proposed management activities (alternatives) could affect the local economy. This type of analysis provides two critical pieces of

  4. Floristic composition and vegetation analysis in Hail region north of central Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    El-Ghanim, Wafaa M; Hassan, Loutfy M; Galal, Tarek M; Badr, Abdelfattah

    2010-04-01

    In this study, 19 sites representing different habitats in Hail region were regularly visited for two years, in each site 2-5 stands were selected for investigating floristic composition and vegetation types in the area. A total of 124 species representing 34 families were recorded. The family Asteraceae is represented by the highest number of species (21 species) followed by the Poaceae (17 species) and the Brassicaceae (10 species) whereas, 15 families including Acanthaceae, Convolvulaceae, Moraceae, Nyctaginaceae and Primulaceae, are represented by a single species each. Chronological analysis of the vegetation in the area revealed the domination of Saharo-Sindian elements in the wild vegetations and of weedy species in the cultivated plots. Therophytes and chamaephytes are the dominating life forms of the vegetation spectra; therophytes represent 49.20% and chamaephytes represent 29.00% of the total species in the study area. Application of TWINISPAN and DECORANA classification and ordination techniques to the data produced seven vegetation groups. Ruderal habitats comprised two small groups A and F dominated by Phragmites australis and Imperata cylindrical (A), Euphorbia peplus and Sisymbrium irio (F), respectively. Two vegetation groups (B and G) have been recognized in the mountains and slopes dominated by Launaea mucronata, Trigonella stellata (B) and Ficus palmate and Fagonia bruguieri (G). Other two groups (C and E) inhabit the desert and mountainous wadies; these are represented by Gymnocarpos decandrus and Ochradenus baccatus (C) and Senecio glaucus subsp. coronopifolius and Rumex equisetiforme (E). On the other hand, one group (D) inhabits the cultivated plots and is represented by Plantago albicans and Rumex vesicarius, the last group also includes species restricted to the sand dune habitat of the Al-Nafud desert north of Hail city and represented by Calligonum polygonoides and Halyxolon salicornicum. The vegetation analysis indicated the invasion of

  5. Floristic composition and vegetation analysis in Hail region north of central Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    El-Ghanim, Wafaa M.; Hassan, Loutfy M.; Galal, Tarek M.; Badr, Abdelfattah

    2010-01-01

    In this study, 19 sites representing different habitats in Hail region were regularly visited for two years, in each site 2–5 stands were selected for investigating floristic composition and vegetation types in the area. A total of 124 species representing 34 families were recorded. The family Asteraceae is represented by the highest number of species (21 species) followed by the Poaceae (17 species) and the Brassicaceae (10 species) whereas, 15 families including Acanthaceae, Convolvulaceae, Moraceae, Nyctaginaceae and Primulaceae, are represented by a single species each. Chronological analysis of the vegetation in the area revealed the domination of Saharo-Sindian elements in the wild vegetations and of weedy species in the cultivated plots. Therophytes and chamaephytes are the dominating life forms of the vegetation spectra; therophytes represent 49.20% and chamaephytes represent 29.00% of the total species in the study area. Application of TWINISPAN and DECORANA classification and ordination techniques to the data produced seven vegetation groups. Ruderal habitats comprised two small groups A and F dominated by Phragmites australis and Imperata cylindrical (A), Euphorbia peplus and Sisymbrium irio (F), respectively. Two vegetation groups (B and G) have been recognized in the mountains and slopes dominated by Launaea mucronata, Trigonella stellata (B) and Ficus palmate and Fagonia bruguieri (G). Other two groups (C and E) inhabit the desert and mountainous wadies; these are represented by Gymnocarpos decandrus and Ochradenus baccatus (C) and Senecio glaucus subsp. coronopifolius and Rumex equisetiforme (E). On the other hand, one group (D) inhabits the cultivated plots and is represented by Plantago albicans and Rumex vesicarius, the last group also includes species restricted to the sand dune habitat of the Al-Nafud desert north of Hail city and represented by Calligonum polygonoides and Halyxolon salicornicum. The vegetation analysis indicated the invasion

  6. Precipitation recycling in West Africa - regional modeling, evaporation tagging and atmospheric water budget analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnault, Joel; Kunstmann, Harald; Knoche, Hans-Richard

    2015-04-01

    Many numerical studies have shown that the West African monsoon is highly sensitive to the state of the land surface. It is however questionable to which extend a local change of land surface properties would affect the local climate, especially with respect to precipitation. This issue is traditionally addressed with the concept of precipitation recycling, defined as the contribution of local surface evaporation to local precipitation. For this study the West African monsoon has been simulated with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model using explicit convection, for the domain (1°S-21°N, 18°W-14°E) at a spatial resolution of 10 km, for the period January-October 2013, and using ERA-Interim reanalyses as driving data. This WRF configuration has been selected for its ability to simulate monthly precipitation amounts and daily histograms close to TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission) data. In order to investigate precipitation recycling in this WRF simulation, surface evaporation tagging has been implemented in the WRF source code as well as the budget of total and tagged atmospheric water. Surface evaporation tagging consists in duplicating all water species and the respective prognostic equations in the source code. Then, tagged water species are set to zero at the lateral boundaries of the simulated domain (no inflow of tagged water vapor), and tagged surface evaporation is considered only in a specified region. All the source terms of the prognostic equations of total and tagged water species are finally saved in the outputs for the budget analysis. This allows quantifying the respective contribution of total and tagged atmospheric water to atmospheric precipitation processes. The WRF simulation with surface evaporation tagging and budgets has been conducted two times, first with a 100 km2 tagged region (11-12°N, 1-2°W), and second with a 1000 km2 tagged region (7-16°N, 6°W -3°E). In this presentation we will investigate hydro

  7. Functional Signatures as the Basis for Hydrologic Similarity: Regional Analysis Across the Continental United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaeger, M. A.; Ye, S.; Coopersmith, E. J.; Cheng, L.; Sivapalan, M.

    2011-12-01

    Catchment signatures quantify hydrologic responses to rainfall inputs; by distilling catchment behavior into a few signatures, classification of variable behavior across many different catchments can be made. One such signature, the regime curve (RC), shows the intra-annual variability of monthly or even daily average streamflows. Another, the flow duration curve (FDC), plots daily streamflow magnitude as a function of the probability of its exceedance. Encoded within these signatures are the combined impacts of climate, geology, topography, ecology, and even human activities. In this study we analyze regional variations of the RC and the FDC across the continental United States and interpret these using a simple bucket model in order to better understand the climatic and landscape controls. The four parameter functional model used treats a catchment as a nonlinear, two-stage filter. In the first stage, precipitation events are filtered nonlinearly into fast runoff and wetting (infiltration). In the second stage, the infiltrated water is again filtered, more linearly, governed by a competition between subsurface drainage and evapotranspiration. In this filtering process, the FDC associated with the precipitation itself cascades through the catchment system, transformed first into the FDC of fast runoff, and then into the FDC of slow runoff. The FDC of total runoff is therefore a convolution of the two components. Using this partitioning, both the RC and the FDC can be separated into two components, one for the fast runoff, and one for the slow, subsurface runoff. The analysis is repeated for 200 catchments from the MOPEX long-term dataset, spatially ranged across the entire continental United States. The variations in the FDCs are evaluated on the basis of the model parameters for each filter, enabling assessment of the relative contributions of climate (from the FDCs of precipitation and relative seasonality of precipitation and potential evaporation) and

  8. Regional Flood Frequency Analysis using Support Vector Regression under historical and future climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gizaw, Mesgana Seyoum; Gan, Thian Yew

    2016-07-01

    Regional Flood Frequency Analysis (RFFA) is a statistical method widely used to estimate flood quantiles of catchments with limited streamflow data. In addition, to estimate the flood quantile of ungauged sites, there could be only a limited number of stations with complete dataset are available from hydrologically similar, surrounding catchments. Besides traditional regression based RFFA methods, recent applications of machine learning algorithms such as the artificial neural network (ANN) have shown encouraging results in regional flood quantile estimations. Another novel machine learning technique that is becoming widely applicable in the hydrologic community is the Support Vector Regression (SVR). In this study, an RFFA model based on SVR was developed to estimate regional flood quantiles for two study areas, one with 26 catchments located in southeastern British Columbia (BC) and another with 23 catchments located in southern Ontario (ON), Canada. The SVR-RFFA model for both study sites was developed from 13 sets of physiographic and climatic predictors for the historical period. The Ef (Nash Sutcliffe coefficient) and R2 of the SVR-RFFA model was about 0.7 when estimating flood quantiles of 10, 25, 50 and 100 year return periods which indicate satisfactory model performance in both study areas. In addition, the SVR-RFFA model also performed well based on other goodness-of-fit statistics such as BIAS (mean bias) and BIASr (relative BIAS). If the amount of data available for training RFFA models is limited, the SVR-RFFA model was found to perform better than an ANN based RFFA model, and with significantly lower median CV (coefficient of variation) of the estimated flood quantiles. The SVR-RFFA model was then used to project changes in flood quantiles over the two study areas under the impact of climate change using the RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 climate projections of five Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) GCMs (Global Climate Models) for the 2041

  9. Introducing comparative analysis to the LEED system: A case forrational and regional application

    SciTech Connect

    Eijadi, David; Vaidya, Prausad; Reinertsen, James; Kumar, Satish

    2002-06-01

    The LEED(TM) system awards points for prescriptive andperformance based environmental strategies; rightly giving more weight todecisions affecting building operations, since environmental impacts overthe life of a building exceed the one-time environmental impacts affectedby the building s construction. The environmental benefits of LEED(TM)strategies are considered implicit and the point system is not a metricof environmental performance. Thus, guideline strategies that achieve thesame points may not have analogous environmental performance. This paperdraws from our LEED(TM) project experience as certified consultants to anumber of design teams. We applied analysis to those experiences andargue that -The relative environmental value of the same LEED(TM)strategy may vary by geographical region and by building type. -Scoringsuccessive LEED(TM) points beyond a 'standard practice design'significantly increases design effort and capital costs for construction.-Without comparative analysis of the costs of alternate LEED(TM)strategies and their corresponding environmental benefit, designers willnot necessarily invest capital in strategies that most profoundlyminimize the environmental impacts of a building. -For design teams andowners interested in the least expensive LEED(TM) certification, gamingthe point system could drive investment away from sound environmentalperformance strategies such as energy efficiency. Using these arguments,this paper makes a case to enhance the LEED(TM) system by -CategorizingLEED(TM) strategies by their direct or indirect value towardsEnvironmental Benefit, Healthy Buildings (Places), and Profitability.-Reformulating prescriptive requirements into performance basedrequirements wherever possible. -Customizing LEED(TM) guidelines byregion.

  10. [Syntaxonomic analysis of restorative successions after cutting down light coniferous forests of South Ural Region].

    PubMed

    Martynenko, V B; Shirokhikh, P S; Mirkin, B M; Naumova, L G

    2014-01-01

    Discussed are the possibilities of using syntaxa from floristic classification for the analysis of secondary restorative successions after forest cutting in South Ural Region. Peculiarities of secondary forest communities classification that may be viewed as subjects of indigenous vegetation syntaxa forming, sub-associations or could be systematized according to 'deductive' classification introduced by K. Kopecky and S. Heiny are considered. An example is presented of an analysis of communities succession system formed after cutting down hemiboreal pine and birch-pine herbaceous forests of Bupleuro-Pinetum association. Within this system the processes of divergence and convergence of succession series take place. Divergence occur as a result of lifting of the influence caused by dominants edificating role and manifestation of differences in soil humidification, also as a consequence of soil enrichment by mineral elements after burning down the felling debris. The reason behind convergence is grading influence of renewed forest stand. Trends in species richness changes during restorative successions may differ depending on ecotope features. In course of a succession, models of tolerance and inhibition become apparent. PMID:25782280

  11. Geospatial Analysis of Near-Surface Soil Moisture Time Series Data Over Indian Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berwal, P.; Murthy, C. S.; Raju, P. V.; Sesha Sai, M. V. R.

    2016-06-01

    The present study has developed the time series database surface soil moisture over India, for June, July and August months for the period of 20 years from 1991 to 2010, using data products generated under Climate Change Initiative Programme of European Space Agency. These three months represent the crop sowing period in the prime cropping season in the country and the soil moisture data during this period is highly useful to detect the drought conditions and assess the drought impact. The time series soil moisture data which is in 0.25 degree spatial resolution was analyzed to generate different indicators. Rainfall data of same spatial resolution for the same period, generated by India Meteorological Department was also procured and analyzed. Geospatial analysis of soil moisture and rainfall derived indicators was carried out to study (1) inter annual variability of soil moisture and rainfall, (2) soil moisture deviations from normal during prominent drought years, (3) soil moisture and rainfall correlations and (4) drought exposure based on soil moisture and rainfall variability. The study has successfully demonstrated the potential of these soil moisture time series data sets for generating regional drought surveillance information products, drought hazard mapping, drought exposure analysis and detection of drought sensitive areas in the crop planting period.

  12. Fractal Analysis and the Diagnostic Usefulness of Silver Staining Nucleolar Organizer Regions in Prostate Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Stepan, Alex; Simionescu, Cristiana; Pirici, Daniel; Ciurea, Raluca; Margaritescu, Claudiu

    2015-01-01

    Pathological diagnosis of prostate adenocarcinoma often requires complementary methods. On prostate biopsy tissue from 39 patients including benign nodular hyperplasia (BNH), atypical adenomatous hyperplasia (AAH), and adenocarcinomas, we have performed combined histochemical-immunohistochemical stainings for argyrophilic nucleolar organizer regions (AgNORs) and glandular basal cells. After ascertaining the pathology, we have analyzed the number, roundness, area, and fractal dimension of individual AgNORs or of their skeleton-filtered maps. We have optimized here for the first time a combination of AgNOR morphological denominators that would reflect best the differences between these pathologies. The analysis of AgNORs' roundness, averaged from large composite images, revealed clear-cut lower values in adenocarcinomas compared to benign and atypical lesions but with no differences between different Gleason scores. Fractal dimension (FD) of AgNOR silhouettes not only revealed significant lower values for global cancer images compared to AAH and BNH images, but was also able to differentiate between Gleason pattern 2 and Gleason patterns 3–5 adenocarcinomas. Plotting the frequency distribution of the FDs for different pathologies showed clear differences between all Gleason patterns and BNH. Together with existing morphological classifiers, AgNOR analysis might contribute to a faster and more reliable machine-assisted screening of prostatic adenocarcinoma, as an essential aid for pathologists. PMID:26366372

  13. Hierarchical and joint site-edge methods for medicare hospice service region boundary analysis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Haijun; Carlin, Bradley P; Banerjee, Sudipto

    2010-06-01

    Hospice service offers a convenient and ethically preferable health-care option for terminally ill patients. However, this option is unavailable to patients in remote areas not served by any hospice system. In this article, we seek to determine the service areas of two particular cancer hospice systems in northeastern Minnesota based only on death counts abstracted from Medicare billing records. The problem is one of spatial boundary analysis, a field that appears statistically underdeveloped for irregular areal (lattice) data, even though most publicly available human health data are of this type. In this article, we suggest a variety of hierarchical models for areal boundary analysis that hierarchically or jointly parameterize both the areas and the edge segments. This leads to conceptually appealing solutions for our data that remain computationally feasible. While our approaches parallel similar developments in statistical image restoration using Markov random fields, important differences arise due to the irregular nature of our lattices, the sparseness and high variability of our data, the existence of important covariate information, and most importantly, our desire for full posterior inference on the boundary. Our results successfully delineate service areas for our two Minnesota hospice systems that sometimes conflict with the hospices' self-reported service areas. We also obtain boundaries for the spatial residuals from our fits, separating regions that differ for reasons yet unaccounted for by our model. PMID:19645704

  14. Hierarchical and Joint Site-Edge Methods for Medicare Hospice Service Region Boundary Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Haijun; Carlin, Bradley P.; Banerjee, Sudipto

    2011-01-01

    Summary Hospice service offers a convenient and ethically preferable health care option for terminally ill patients. However, this option is unavailable to patients in remote areas not served by any hospice system. In this paper we seek to determine the service areas of two particular cancer hospice systems in northeastern Minnesota based only on death counts abstracted from Medicare billing records. The problem is one of spatial boundary analysis, a field that appears statistically underdeveloped for irregular areal (lattice) data, even though most publicly available human health data are of this type. In this paper, we suggest a variety of hierarchical models for areal boundary analysis that hierarchically or jointly parameterize both the areas and the edge segments. This leads to conceptually appealing solutions for our data that remain computationally feasible. While our approaches parallel similar developments in statistical image restoration using Markov random fields, important differences arise due to the irregular nature of our lattices, the sparseness and high variability of our data, the existence of important covariate information, and most importantly, our desire for full posterior inference on the boundary. Our results successfully delineate service areas for our two Minnesota hospice systems that sometimes conflict with the hospices' self-reported service areas. We also obtain boundaries for the spatial residuals from our fits, separating regions that differ for reasons yet unaccounted for by our model. PMID:19645704

  15. Radiation and Thermal Analysis of Superconducting Quadrupoles in the Interaction Region of Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Drozhdin, A.I.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Lopes, M.L.; Mokhov, N.V.; Zlobin, A.V.; Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC

    2011-10-14

    Radiation heat deposition in the superconducting magnets of the Interaction Region (IR) of a linear collider can be a serious issue that limits the magnet operating margins and shortens the material lifetime. Radiation and thermal analyses of the IR quadrupoles in the incoming and extraction beam lines of the ILC are performed in order to determine the magnet limits. This paper presents an analysis of the radial, azimuthal and longitudinal distributions of heat deposition in the incoming and disrupted beam doublets. Operation margins of the magnets based on NbTi superconductor are calculated and compared. The radiation and thermal analysis of the ILC IR quadrupoles based on Rutherford type cables was performed. It was found that the peak radiation heat deposition takes place in the second extraction quadrupole QFEX2. The maximum power density in the coil is {approx}17mW/g. This is rather high, comparing to the proton machines (LHC). However, the fast radial decay of the heat deposition together with the high thermal conductivity of the Rutherford type cable limits the coil temperatures to a moderate level. It was determined that both 2-layer and 4-layer QFEX2 magnet designs have thermal margins of a factor of {approx}4 at the nominal gradient of 31.3 T/m. Because of the large margins, these magnets can easily accommodate possible changes in the IR optics and heat deposition levels.

  16. Regional flood frequency analysis using spatial proximity and basin characteristics: Quantile regression vs. parameter regression technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Kuk-Hyun; Palmer, Richard

    2016-09-01

    Despite wide use of regression-based regional flood frequency analysis (RFFA) methods, the majority are based on either ordinary least squares (OLS) or generalized least squares (GLS). This paper proposes 'spatial proximity' based RFFA methods using the spatial lagged model (SLM) and spatial error model (SEM). The proposed methods are represented by two frameworks: the quantile regression technique (QRT) and parameter regression technique (PRT). The QRT develops prediction equations for flooding quantiles in average recurrence intervals (ARIs) of 2, 5, 10, 20, and 100 years whereas the PRT provides prediction of three parameters for the selected distribution. The proposed methods are tested using data incorporating 30 basin characteristics from 237 basins in Northeastern United States. Results show that generalized extreme value (GEV) distribution properly represents flood frequencies in the study gages. Also, basin area, stream network, and precipitation seasonality are found to be the most effective explanatory variables in prediction modeling by the QRT and PRT. 'Spatial proximity' based RFFA methods provide reliable flood quantile estimates compared to simpler methods. Compared to the QRT, the PRT may be recommended due to its accuracy and computational simplicity. The results presented in this paper may serve as one possible guidepost for hydrologists interested in flood analysis at ungaged sites.

  17. Geometric analysis of phase bunching in the central region of cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyawaki, Nobumasa; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro; Kurashima, Satoshi; Kashiwagi, Hirotsugu; Okumura, Susumu; Arakawa, Kazuo; Kamiya, Tomihiro

    2013-07-01

    An optimum condition for realizing phase bunching in the central region of a cyclotron was quantitatively clarified by a simplified geometric trajectory analysis of charged particles from the first to the second acceleration gap. The phase bunching performance was evaluated for a general case of a cyclotron. The phase difference of incident particles at the second acceleration gap depends on the combination of four parameters: the acceleration harmonic number h, the span angle θD of the dee electrode, the span angle θF from the first to the second acceleration gap, the ratio RV of the peak acceleration voltage between the cyclotron and ion source. Optimum values of θF for phase bunching were limited by the relationship between h and θD, which is 90°/h+θD/2≤θF≤180°/h+θD/2, and sin θF>0. The phase difference with respect to the reference particle at the second acceleration gap is minimized for voltage-ratios between two and four for an initial phase difference within 40 RF degrees. Although the slope of the first acceleration gap contributes to the RF phase at which the particles reach the second acceleration gap, phase bunching was not affected. An orbit simulation of the AVF cyclotron at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency verifies the evaluation based on geometric analysis.

  18. Local and Regional Interactions Between Air Quality and Climate in New Delhi -- a Sector Based Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrapu, P.; Cheng, Y.; Carmichael, G. R.; Beig, G.; Spak, S.; Lin, M.; Decker, M.; Schultz, M. G.; Winiwarter, W.

    2011-12-01

    Out of the 26 mega-cities in the world, 13 of them are affected by atmospheric brown clouds with high aerosol loadings and 5 of them are in South Asia. New Delhi (India) is one of the world's most polluted megacities. In this study we evaluate the air pollution levels in Delhi and their impacts on weather and climate. The two way interactions between pollution and meteorology are evaluated using the WRF-Chem model. The analysis period is focused on October 2010, the time period of the Commonwealth Games. The model is compared to BC and PM2.5 measurements at 11 sites. A sector based analysis is performed to assess the contributions to pollution and direct radiative forcing from transport, residential, power and industrial emissions. The contributions from emissions outside of Delhi are also evaluated to see the extent that regional emissions need to be controlled to meet air quality targets in Delhi. Results of simulations for emission scenarios generated by the GAINS model that address air quality and climate strategies are also discussed

  19. Efficiency Analysis of Basic Health Units: A Comparison of Developed and Deprived Regions in Azad Jammu and Kashmir

    PubMed Central

    Razzaq, Sadia; Ali Chaudhary, Amjad; Razzaq Khan, Abdul

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background The current study aims to measure the efficiency of primary health care units completed in health sector of rural Azad Jammu and Kashmir (AJK) and to compare it across developed and deprived regions. Methods Operational efficiency and beneficiary efficiency of a total of 32 Basic Health Units (BHUs) were measured through Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) by using different input and output variables. Independent sample T-test was applied to compare these efficiencies across developed and deprived regions. Results The study could find no significant difference of operational efficiency across developed and deprived regions, however a significant difference was found across regions from beneficiary perspective (P= 0.044). Conclusion The study concludes that BHUs of deprived region are more efficient from beneficiary perspective, however there is no significant difference of operational efficiency across the regions. PMID:26171334

  20. Planning report for the southwest alluvial basins (east) regional aquifer-system analysis, parts of Colorado, New Mexico, and Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilkins, D.W.; Scott, W.B.; Kaehler, C.A.

    1980-01-01

    The study of the Southwest alluvial basins (east) will involve an analysis of the regional aquifer system in parts of Colorado, New Mexico, and Texas. This area has been divided into 22 basins. The study of the alluvial aquifer-system will be made in the following stages: (1) project planning, (2) literature searches, (3) compiling existing data, (4) data collection, (5) basin modeling, (6) regional aquifer modeling, and (7) reports. The regional aquifer study will be accomplished through studying each of the 22 basins. Data compilation and limited data collection will be part of each basin study. Digital computer models will be made for those basins where data are sufficient. A regional aquifer model will be developed from the basin models. In addition to this report, there will be basin hydrology reports and the final regional report. Included in the final report will be a description of the regional hydrology and geology. (USGS)

  1. A Ten Step Protocol and Plan for CCS Site Characterization, Based on an Analysis of the Rocky Mountain Region, USA

    SciTech Connect

    McPherson, Brian; Matthews, Vince

    2013-09-15

    This report expresses a Ten-Step Protocol for CO2 Storage Site Characterization, the final outcome of an extensive Site Characterization analysis of the Rocky Mountain region, USA. These ten steps include: (1) regional assessment and data gathering; (2) identification and analysis of appropriate local sites for characterization; (3) public engagement; (4) geologic and geophysical analysis of local site(s); (5) stratigraphic well drilling and coring; (6) core analysis and interpretation with other data; (7) database assembly and static model development; (8) storage capacity assessment; (9) simulation and uncertainty assessment; (10) risk assessment. While the results detailed here are primarily germane to the Rocky Mountain region, the intent of this protocol is to be portable or generally applicable for CO2 storage site characterization.

  2. Performance analysis of landslide early warning systems at regional scale: the EDuMaP method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piciullo, Luca; Calvello, Michele

    2016-04-01

    Landslide early warning systems (LEWSs) reduce landslide risk by disseminating timely and meaningful warnings when the level of risk is judged intolerably high. Two categories of LEWSs, can be defined on the basis of their scale of analysis: "local" systems and "regional" systems. LEWSs at regional scale (ReLEWSs) are used to assess the probability of occurrence of landslides over appropriately-defined homogeneous warning zones of relevant extension, typically through the prediction and monitoring of meteorological variables, in order to give generalized warnings to the public. Despite many studies on ReLEWSs, no standard requirements exist for assessing their performance. Empirical evaluations are often carried out by simply analysing the time frames during which significant high-consequence landslides occurred in the test area. Alternatively, the performance evaluation is based on 2x2 contingency tables computed for the joint frequency distribution of landslides and alerts, both considered as dichotomous variables. In all these cases, model performance is assessed neglecting some important aspects which are peculiar to ReLEWSs, among which: the possible occurrence of multiple landslides in the warning zone; the duration of the warnings in relation to the time of occurrence of the landslides; the level of the warning issued in relation to the landslide spatial density in the warning zone; the relative importance system managers attribute to different types of errors. An original approach, called EDuMaP method, is proposed to assess the performance of landslide early warning models operating at regional scale. The method is composed by three main phases: Events analysis, Duration Matrix, Performance analysis. The events analysis phase focuses on the definition of landslide (LEs) and warning events (WEs), which are derived from available landslides and warnings databases according to their spatial and temporal characteristics by means of ten input parameters. The

  3. Regional-scale landslide risk analysis in the Swiss canton of Vaud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabemanantsoa, Andrianantenaina; Nicolet, Pierrick; Derron, Marc-Henri; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Michoud, Clément; Sonnleitner, Marion

    2014-05-01

    Shallow and deep-seated landslides are common natural hazards in the Swiss Canton of Vaud, inducing damage to the infrastructures. Many studies have been done in the Canton about these phenomena, including a landslide inventory, preliminary hazard maps and hazard maps. The biggest challenge to estimate the risk is the uncertainty on the events frequencies and the different approaches used to map the existing and potential landslides. In disaster risk analysis, the events frequency is a very sensitive parameter that has a major influence on the expected mean annual damage costs. However, deep-seated landslides (generally slow-moving) and shallow landslides (which can't be considered as repetitive on a given location, but only over a large area), can't be easily related to a frequency. For this study, we combine different data sources in order to perform a regional risk analysis for the two types of landslides. These maps come from different types of analysis such as manual mapping based on aerial photos and ALS, modelling, and field visits. On some of these maps, the landslides have been given a return period deduced from their morphology or other characteristics, often judged by the expert. The analyses are based on incertitude weighting with simulations of possible scenarios using information on the buildings locations and characteristics obtained from the building database of the Canton. The main observation is that among around 200,000 buildings, 6% are located on permanent landslide. Among these, 69% are located on slow moving landslides. To improve these results, two additional data sources will be used in a further step, namely an insurance database, in order to improve the frequency and the vulnerability, and a velocity map for permanent landslides based on radar interferometry.

  4. Preliminary Analysis of Observations on the Ultra-Low Frequency Electric Field in the Beijing Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Jiancang; Vere-Jones, David; Guan, Huaping; Ogata, Yosihiko; Ma, Li

    2005-06-01

    This paper presents a preliminary analysis of observations on ultra-low frequency ground electric signals from stations operated by the China Seismological Bureau over the last 20 years. A brief description of the instrumentation, operating procedures and data processing procedures is given. The data analyzed consists of estimates of the total strengths (cumulated amplitudes) of the electric signals during 24-hour periods. The thresholds are set low enough so that on most days a zero observation is returned. Non-zero observations are related to electric and magnetic storms, occasional man-made electrical effects, and, apparently, some pre-, co-, or postseismic signals. The main purpose of the analysis is to investigate the extent that the electric signals can be considered as preseismic in character. For this purpose the electric signals from each of five stations are jointly analyzed with the catalogue of local earthquakes within circular regions around the selected stations. A version of Ogata’s Lin-Lin algorithm is used to estimate and test the existence of a pre-seismic signal. This model allows the effect of the electric signals to be tested, even after allowing for the effects of earthquake clustering. It is found that, although the largest single effect influencing earthquake occurrence is the clustering tendency, there remains a significant preseismic component from the electrical signals. Additional tests show that the apparent effect is not postseismic in character, and persists even under variations of the model and the time periods used in the analysis. Samples of the data are presented and the full data sets have been made available on local websites.

  5. Using back trajectories and process analysis to investigate photochemical ozone production in the Puget Sound region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Guangfeng; Lamb, Brian; Westberg, Hal

    A photochemical Eulerian grid modeling system, consisting of MM5/CALMET/CALGRID, was modified to include a process analysis scheme, and a back trajectory method using the CALPUFF model in a reverse diffusion mode was implemented to define the air mass transport path reaching a downwind receptor from urban Seattle, WA. Process analysis was used to determine the relative importance of chemical production, advection, diffusion and deposition within the receptor grid cell and also along the air mass transport path from the urban source area to the receptor. This analysis was applied to an ozone episode occurring during 11-14 July 1996, in the Puget Sound region of Washington State. Within the receptor grid, the process analysis showed that ozone concentrations increase during the day as chemical production exceeds the net effects of deposition and vertical diffusion. Concentrations decrease after mid-afternoon when horizontal advection begins to dominate the other processes. When applied along the air mass transport path, process analysis shows that during most of the day, chemical production is larger than the other processes and causes the air mass ozone concentration to steadily increase during transport downwind of the urban core. Maximum ozone production rates equaled 20-25 ppb/h along the trajectory to the rural monitoring site where peak ozone levels occurred approximately 40 km downwind of urban Seattle, WA. The chemical production rates during this ozone evolution process play an important role in the peak ozone values. Higher peak ozone concentrations that occurred on Sunday, 14 July 1996 (118 ppbv), compared to those on Friday, 12 July 1996 (80 ppbv), were due, in part, to the higher ozone production rates along the trajectory to the rural monitoring site on 14 July compared to 12 July. These differences in chemical production appear to be related to differences in VOC/NO x ratios within the urban air mass for each day. The importance of VOC/NO x effects on

  6. A Genetic and Molecular Analysis of the 46c Chromosomal Region Surrounding the Fmrfamide Neuropeptide Gene in Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, M. A.; Roberts, M. S.; Taghert, P. H.

    1994-01-01

    We have analyzed the FMRFamide neuropeptide gene region of Drosophila melanogaster. This gene maps to the 46C region of chromosome 2R; this interval previously was not well characterized. For this genetic and molecular analysis, we have used X-ray mutagenesis, EMS mutagenesis, and the recently reported local P element transposition method. We identified four overlapping deletions, two of which have proximal breakpoints that define a 50-60-kb region surrounding the FMRFamide gene in 46C. To this small region, we mapped three lethal complementation groups; 10 additional lethal complementation groups were mapped to more distal regions of 46CD. One of these groups corresponds to even-skipped, the other 12 are previously unidentified. Using various lines of evidence we excluded the possibility that FMRFamide corresponds to any of the three lethal complementation groups mapping to its immediate 50-60-kb vicinity. The positions of two of the three lethal complementation groups were identified with P elements using a local transposition scheme. The third lethal complementation group was excluded as being FMRFamide mutants by sequence analysis and by immunocytochemistry with proFMRFamide precursor-specific antibodies. This analysis has (1) provided a genetic map of the 46CD chromosomal region and a detailed molecular map of a portion of the 46C region and (2) provided additional evidence of the utility of local transposition for targeting nearby genes. PMID:8056304

  7. Regional-specific Stochastic Simulation of Spatially-distributed Ground-motion Time Histories using Wavelet Packet Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, D.; Wang, G.

    2014-12-01

    Stochastic simulation of spatially distributed ground-motion time histories is important for performance-based earthquake design of geographically distributed systems. In this study, we develop a novel technique to stochastically simulate regionalized ground-motion time histories using wavelet packet analysis. First, a transient acceleration time history is characterized by wavelet-packet parameters proposed by Yamamoto and Baker (2013). The wavelet-packet parameters fully characterize ground-motion time histories in terms of energy content, time- frequency-domain characteristics and time-frequency nonstationarity. This study further investigates the spatial cross-correlations of wavelet-packet parameters based on geostatistical analysis of 1500 regionalized ground motion data from eight well-recorded earthquakes in California, Mexico, Japan and Taiwan. The linear model of coregionalization (LMC) is used to develop a permissible spatial cross-correlation model for each parameter group. The geostatistical analysis of ground-motion data from different regions reveals significant dependence of the LMC structure on regional site conditions, which can be characterized by the correlation range of Vs30 in each region. In general, the spatial correlation and cross-correlation of wavelet-packet parameters are stronger if the site condition is more homogeneous. Using the regional-specific spatial cross-correlation model and cokriging technique, wavelet packet parameters at unmeasured locations can be best estimated, and regionalized ground-motion time histories can be synthesized. Case studies and blind tests demonstrated that the simulated ground motions generally agree well with the actual recorded data, if the influence of regional-site conditions is considered. The developed method has great potential to be used in computational-based seismic analysis and loss estimation in a regional scale.

  8. Spectral data analysis of rock and mineral in Hatu Western Junggar Region, Xinjiang

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shanshan; Zhou, Kefa; Zhang, Nannan; Wang, Jinlin

    2014-11-01

    Mineral resources are important material basis for the survival and development of human society. The development of hyperspectral remote sensing technology, which has made direct identification of minerals or mineral aggregates become possible, paves a new way for the application of remote sensing geology. The West Junggar region is located Xinjiang west verge of Junggar, with ore-forming geological conditions be richly endowed by nature and huge prospecting potentiality. The area has very good outcrop exposure with almost no vegetation cover, which is a natural test new method of remote sensing geological exploration. The characteristic of rock and mineral spectrum is not only the physical base of geological remote sensing technical application but also the base of the quantificational analysis of geological remote sensing, and the study of reflectance spectrum is the main content in the basic research of remote sensing. In this study, we collected the outdoor and indoor reflectance spectrum of rocks and minerals by using a spectroradiometer (ASD FieldSpec FR, ASD, USA), which band extent varied from 350 to 2,500 nm. Basin on a great deal of spectral data for different kinds of rocks and minerals, we have analyzed the spectrum characteristics and change of seven typical mineral rocks. According to the actual conditions, we analyzed the data noise characteristic of the spectrum and got rid of the noise. Meanwhile, continuum removed technology was used to remove the environmental background influence. Finally, in order to take full advantage of multi-spectrum data, ground information is absolutely necessary, and it is important to build a representative spectral library. We build the spectral library of rocks and minerals in Hatu, which can be used for features investigation, mineral classification, mineral mapping and geological prospecting in Hatu Western Junggar region by remote sensing. The result of this research will be significant to the research of

  9. Molecular analysis of human argininosuccinate lyase: mutant characterization and alternative splicing of the coding region.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, D C; McCloskey, D A; Simard, L R; McInnes, R R

    1990-01-01

    Argininosuccinic acid lyase (ASAL) deficiency is a clinically heterogeneous autosomal recessive urea cycle disorder. We previously established by complementation analysis that 28 ASAL-deficient patients have heterogeneous mutations in a single gene. To prove that the ASAL structural gene is the affected locus, we sequenced polymerase chain reaction-amplified ASAL cDNA of a representative mutant from the single complementation group. Fibroblast strain 944 (approximately 1% of residual ASAL activity), from a late-onset patient who was the product of a consanguineous mating, had only a single base-pair change in the coding region, a C-283----T transition at a CpG dinucleotide in exon 3. This substitution converts Arg-95 to Cys (R95C), occurs in a stretch of 13 residues that is identical in yeast and human ASAL, and was present in both of the patient's alleles but not in 14 other mutant or 10 normal alleles. Expression in COS cells demonstrated that the R95C mutation produces normal amounts of ASAL mRNA but little protein and less than 1% ASAL activity. We observed that amplified cDNA from mutant 944 and normal cells (liver, keratinocytes, lymphoblasts, and fibroblasts) contained, in addition to the expected 5' 513-base-pair band, a prominent 318-base-pair ASAL band formed by the splicing of exon 2 from the transcript. The short transcript maintains the ASAL reading frame but removes Lys-51, a residue that may be essential for catalysis, since it binds the argininosuccinate substrate. We conclude (i) that the identification of the R95C mutation in strain 944 demonstrates that virtually all ASAL deficiency results from defects in the ASAL structural gene and (ii) that minor alternative splicing of the coding region occurs at the ASAL locus. Images PMID:2263616

  10. Assimilation of SCIAMACHY total column CO observations: Global and regional analysis of data impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tangborn, Andrew; Stajner, Ivanka; Buchwitz, Michael; Khlystova, Iryna; Pawson, Steven; Burrows, John; Hudman, Rynda; Nedelec, Philippe

    2009-04-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) total column observations from the Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Cartography (SCIAMACHY) on board Envisat-1 are assimilated into the Global Modeling and Assimilation Office constituent assimilation system for the period 1 April to 20 December 2004. The impact of the assimilation on CO distribution is evaluated using independent surface flask observations from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)/ESRL global cooperative air sampling network and Measurement of Ozone and Water Vapor by Airbus In-Service Aircraft (MOZAIC) in situ CO profiles. Assimilation of SCIAMACHY data improves agreement of CO assimilation with both of these data sets on both global and regional scales compared to the free-running model. Regional comparisons with MOZAIC profiles made in western Europe, the northeastern United States, and the Arabian Peninsula show improvements at all three locations in the free troposphere and into the boundary layer over Arabia and the northeastern United States. Comparisons with NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory data improve at about two thirds of the surface observation sites. The systematic model errors related to the uncertainty of CO surface sources and the chemistry of CO losses are investigated through experiments with increased surface CO emissions over the Arabian Peninsula and/or globally reduced hydroxyl radical (OH) concentrations. Both model changes decrease mean CO errors at all altitudes in comparison to MOZAIC data over Dubai and Abu Dhabi. In contrast, errors in the assimilated CO are reduced by the increased emissions for pressures ≥800 hPa and by the reduced OH for pressures ≤600 hPa. Our analysis suggests that CO emissions over Dubai in 2004 are more than double those in the 1998 emissions inventory.

  11. Analysis on fuel breeding capability of FBR core region based on minor actinide recycling doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Permana, Sidik; Novitrian, Waris, Abdul; Ismail, Suzuki, Mitsutoshi; Saito, Masaki

    2014-09-01

    Nuclear fuel breeding based on the capability of fuel conversion capability can be achieved by convertion rasio of some fertile materials into fissile materials during nuclear reaction processes such as main fissile materials of U-233, U-235, Pu-239 and Pu-241 and for fertile materials of Th-232, U-238, and Pu-240 as well as Pu-238. Minor actinide (MA) loading option which consists of neptunium, americium and curium will gives some additional contribution from converted MA into plutonium such as conversion Np-237 into Pu-238 and it's produced Pu-238 converts to Pu-239 via neutron capture. Increasing composition of Pu-238 can be used to produce fissile material of Pu-239 as additional contribution. Trans-uranium (TRU) fuel (Mixed fuel loading of MOX (U-Pu) and MA composition) and mixed oxide (MOX) fuel compositions are analyzed for comparative analysis in order to show the effect of MA to the plutonium productions in core in term of reactor criticality condition and fuel breeding capability. In the present study, neptunium (Np) nuclide is used as a representative of MAin trans-uranium (TRU) fuel composition as Np-MOX fuel type. It was loaded into the core region gives significant contribution to reduce the excess reactivity in comparing to mixed oxide (MOX) fuel and in the same time it contributes to increase nuclear fuel breeding capability of the reactor. Neptunium fuel loding scheme in FBR core region gives significant production of Pu-238 as fertile material to absorp neutrons for reducing excess reactivity and additional contribution for fuel breeding.

  12. Analysis on fuel breeding capability of FBR core region based on minor actinide recycling doping

    SciTech Connect

    Permana, Sidik; Novitrian,; Waris, Abdul; Ismail; Suzuki, Mitsutoshi; Saito, Masaki

    2014-09-30

    Nuclear fuel breeding based on the capability of fuel conversion capability can be achieved by conversion ratio of some fertile materials into fissile materials during nuclear reaction processes such as main fissile materials of U-233, U-235, Pu-239 and Pu-241 and for fertile materials of Th-232, U-238, and Pu-240 as well as Pu-238. Minor actinide (MA) loading option which consists of neptunium, americium and curium will gives some additional contribution from converted MA into plutonium such as conversion Np-237 into Pu-238 and it's produced Pu-238 converts to Pu-239 via neutron capture. Increasing composition of Pu-238 can be used to produce fissile material of Pu-239 as additional contribution. Trans-uranium (TRU) fuel (Mixed fuel loading of MOX (U-Pu) and MA composition) and mixed oxide (MOX) fuel compositions are analyzed for comparative analysis in order to show the effect of MA to the plutonium productions in core in term of reactor criticality condition and fuel breeding capability. In the present study, neptunium (Np) nuclide is used as a representative of MAin trans-uranium (TRU) fuel composition as Np-MOX fuel type. It was loaded into the core region gives significant contribution to reduce the excess reactivity in comparing to mixed oxide (MOX) fuel and in the same time it contributes to increase nuclear fuel breeding capability of the reactor. Neptunium fuel loading scheme in FBR core region gives significant production of Pu-238 as fertile material to absorp neutrons for reducing excess reactivity and additional contribution for fuel breeding.

  13. Crustal Structure in the Chile Ridge Subduction Region, Northern Patagonia: Results from Receiver Function Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, R. M.; Comte, D.; Mocanu, V. I.; Gallego, A.; Murdie, R. E.; VanDecar, J. C.

    2013-05-01

    The actively spreading Chile ridge subducts beneath South America, creating an extensive slab window - a gap between the leading edge of the Antarctic plate and the trailing edge of the Nazca plate. Body wave tomography, analysis of surface waves, and shear wave splitting observations show that the slab window extends from crustal depths to well below 350 km, and that asthenospheric upper mantle flows through the gap from the Pacific side, displacing the upper mantle wedge beneath continental South America. Receiver functions - deconvolutions of vertical component P wave coda from corresponding radial component signals - yield an estimate of the times, polarities, and amplitudes of P-to-S converted phases generated at high-impedance contrast boundaries like the Moho. We determined 1982 such receiver functions at 41 stations deployed in the Chile Ridge subduction region (2004-2007) to determine crustal structure there. Arrival times of Ps, the S wave generated by mode conversion at the Moho, vary significantly across the study region: in the west, stations on the Taitao Peninsula, the southern Los Chonos islands, and along Canal Baker, P-Ps times incidate the crust of overlying South America is thinnest. Complexity in these receiver functions may be due to the either the presence of the Nazca slab at shallow depths beneath the forearc, or due to shallow asthenosphere of the slab window. Moho depths appear to be significantly greater east of the Liquiñe-Ofqui fault zone and the active Southern Volcanic Zone. South American crustal thickness in the study area is greatest immediately north of the slab window.

  14. Do university hospitals perform better than general hospitals? A comparative analysis among Italian regions

    PubMed Central

    Grillo Ruggieri, Tommaso; Podetti, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this research was to investigate how university hospitals (UHs) perform compared with general hospitals (GHs) in the Italian healthcare system. Design and setting 27 indicators of overall performance were selected and analysed for UHs and GHs in 10 Italian regions. The data refer to 2012 and 2013 and were selected from two performance evaluation systems based on hospital discharge administrative data: the Inter-Regional Performance Evaluation System developed by the Management and Health Laboratory of the Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna of Pisa and the Italian National Outcome Evaluation Programme developed by the National Agency for Healthcare Services. The study was conducted in 2 stages and by combining 2 statistical techniques. In stage 1, a non-parametric Mann-Whitney U test was carried out to compare the performance of UHs and GHs on the selected set of indicators. In stage 2, a robust equal variance test between the 2 groups of hospitals was carried out to investigate differences in the amount of variability between them. Results The overall analysis gave heterogeneous results. In general, performance was not affected by being in the UH rather than the GH group. It is thus not possible to directly associate Italian UHs with better results in terms of appropriateness, efficiency, patient satisfaction and outcomes. Conclusions Policymakers and managers should further encourage hospital performance evaluations in order to stimulate wider competition aimed at assigning teaching status to those hospitals that are able to meet performance requirements. In addition, UH facilities could be integrated with other providers that are responsible for community, primary and outpatient services, thereby creating a joint accountability for more patient-centred and integrated care. PMID:27507233

  15. Molecular analysis of human argininosuccinate lyase: Mutant characterization and alternative splicing of the coding region

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.C. ); McCloskey, D.A.; Simard, L.R.; McInnes, R.R. )

    1990-12-01

    Argininosuccinic acid lyase (ASAL) deficiency is a clinically heterogeneous autosomal recessive urea cycle disorder. The authors previously established by complementation analysis that 29 ASAL-deficient patients have heterogeneous mutations in a single gene. To prove that the ASAL structural gene is the affected locus, they sequenced polymerase chain reaction-amplified ASAL cDNA of a representative mutant from the single complementation group. Fibroblast strain 944 from a late-onset patient who was the product of a consanguineous mating, had only a single base-pair change in the coding region, a C-283{r arrow} T transition at a CpG dinucleotide in exon 3. This substitution converts Arg-95 to Cys (R95C), occurs in a stretch of 13 residues that is identical in yeast and human ASAL, and was present in both of the patient's alleles but not in 14 other mutant or 10 normal alleles. They observed that amplified cDNA from mutant 944 and normal cells (liver, keratinocytes, lymphoblasts, and fibroblasts) contained, in addition to the expected 5{prime} 513-base-pair band, a prominent 318-base-pair ASAL band formed by the splicing of exon 2 from the transcript. The short transcript maintains the ASAL reading frame but removes Lys-51, a residue that may be essential for catalysis, since it binds the argininosuccinate substrate. They conclude (i) that the identification of the R95C mutation in strain 944 demonstrates that virtually all ASAL deficiency results from defects in the ASAL structural gene and (ii) that minor alternative splicing of the coding region occurs at the ASAL locus.

  16. High beta and second stability region transport and stability analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, M.H.; Phillps, M.W.; Todd, A.M.M.; Krishnaswami, J.; Hartley, R.

    1992-09-01

    This report describes ideal and resistive studies of high-beta plasmas and of the second stability region. Emphasis is focused on ``supershot`` plasmas in TFIR where MHD instabilities are frequently observed and which spoil their confinement properties. Substantial results are described from the analysis of these high beta poloidal plasmas. During these studies, initial pressure and safety factor profiles were obtained from the TRANSP code, which is used extensively to analyze experimental data. Resistive MBD stability studies of supershot equilibria show that finite pressure stabilization of tearing modes is very strong in these high {beta}p plasmas. This has prompted a detailed re-examination of linear tearing mode theory in which we participated in collaboration with Columbia University and General Atomics. This finite pressure effect is shown to be highly sensitive to small scale details of the pressure profile. Even when an ad hoc method of removing this stabilizing mechanism is implemented, however, it is shown that there is only superficial agreement between resistive MBD stability computation and the experimental data. While the mode structures observed experimentally can be found computationally, there is no convincing correlation with the experimental observations when the computed results are compared with a large set of supershot data. We also describe both the ideal and resistive stability properties of TFIR equilibria near the transition to the second region. It is shown that the highest {beta} plasmas, although stable to infinite-n ideal ballooning modes, can be unstable to the so called ``infernal`` modes associated with small shear. The sensitivity of these results to the assumed pressure and current density profiles is discussed. Finally, we describe results from two collaborative studies with PPPL. The first involves exploratory studies of the role of the 1/1 mode in tokamaks and, secondly, a study of sawtooth stabilization using ICRF.

  17. Immunohistochemical analysis of hippocampal butyrylcholinesterase: Implications for regional vulnerability in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Mizukami, Katsuyoshi; Akatsu, Hiroyasu; Abrahamson, Eric E; Mi, Zhiping; Ikonomovic, Milos D

    2016-04-01

    Studies of acetylcholine degrading enzymes acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) in Alzheimer's disease (AD) have suggested their potential role in the development of fibrillar amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques (amyloid plaques). A recent genome-wide association study analysis identified a novel association between genetic variations in the BCHE locus and amyloid burden. We studied BChE immunoreactivity in hippocampal tissue sections from AD and control cases, and examined its relationship with amyloid plaques, neurofibrillary tangles (NFT), dystrophic neurites (DN) and neuropil threads (NT). Compared to controls, AD cases had greater BChE immunoreactivity in hippocampal neurons and neuropils in CA2/3, but not in the CA1, CA4 and dentate gyrus. The majority of amyloid plaques (> 80%, using a pan-amyloid marker X-34) contained discrete neuritic clusters which were dual-labeled with antibodies against BChE and phosphorylated tau (clone AT8). There was no association between overall regional BChE immunoreaction intensity and amyloid plaque burden. In contrast to previous reports, BChE was localized in only a fraction (~10%) of classic NFT (positive for X-34). A similar proportion of BChE-immunoreactive pyramidal cells were AT8 immunoreactive. Greater NFT and DN loads were associated with greater BChE immunoreaction intensity in CA2/3, but not in CA1, CA4 and dentate gyrus. Our results demonstrate that in AD hippocampus, BChE accumulates in neurons and plaque-associated neuritic clusters, but only in a small proportion of NFT. The association between greater neurofibrillary pathology burden and markedly increased BChE immunoreactivity, observed selectively in CA2/3 region, could reflect a novel compensatory mechanism. Since CA2/3 is generally considered more resistant to AD pathology, BChE upregulation could impact the cholinergic modulation of glutamate neurotransmission to prevent/reduce neuronal excitotoxicity in AD hippocampus. PMID:26293308

  18. Dynamical investigation and parameter stability region analysis of a flywheel energy storage system in charging mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei-Ya; Li, Yong-Li; Chang, Xiao-Yong; Wang, Nan

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, the dynamic behavior analysis of the electromechanical coupling characteristics of a flywheel energy storage system (FESS) with a permanent magnet (PM) brushless direct-current (DC) motor (BLDCM) is studied. The Hopf bifurcation theory and nonlinear methods are used to investigate the generation process and mechanism of the coupled dynamic behavior for the average current controlled FESS in the charging mode. First, the universal nonlinear dynamic model of the FESS based on the BLDCM is derived. Then, for a 0.01 kWh/1.6 kW FESS platform in the Key Laboratory of the Smart Grid at Tianjin University, the phase trajectory of the FESS from a stable state towards chaos is presented using numerical and stroboscopic methods, and all dynamic behaviors of the system in this process are captured. The characteristics of the low-frequency oscillation and the mechanism of the Hopf bifurcation are investigated based on the Routh stability criterion and nonlinear dynamic theory. It is shown that the Hopf bifurcation is directly due to the loss of control over the inductor current, which is caused by the system control parameters exceeding certain ranges. This coupling nonlinear process of the FESS affects the stability of the motor running and the efficiency of energy transfer. In this paper, we investigate into the effects of control parameter change on the stability and the stability regions of these parameters based on the averaged-model approach. Furthermore, the effect of the quantization error in the digital control system is considered to modify the stability regions of the control parameters. Finally, these theoretical results are verified through platform experiments.

  19. A Development of Nonstationary Regional Frequency Analysis Model with Large-scale Climate Information: Its Application to Korean Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin-Young; Kwon, Hyun-Han; Kim, Hung-Soo

    2015-04-01

    The existing regional frequency analysis has disadvantages in that it is difficult to consider geographical characteristics in estimating areal rainfall. In this regard, this study aims to develop a hierarchical Bayesian model based nonstationary regional frequency analysis in that spatial patterns of the design rainfall with geographical information (e.g. latitude, longitude and altitude) are explicitly incorporated. This study assumes that the parameters of Gumbel (or GEV distribution) are a function of geographical characteristics within a general linear regression framework. Posterior distribution of the regression parameters are estimated by Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method, and the identified functional relationship is used to spatially interpolate the parameters of the distributions by using digital elevation models (DEM) as inputs. The proposed model is applied to derive design rainfalls over the entire Han-river watershed. It was found that the proposed Bayesian regional frequency analysis model showed similar results compared to L-moment based regional frequency analysis. In addition, the model showed an advantage in terms of quantifying uncertainty of the design rainfall and estimating the area rainfall considering geographical information. Finally, comprehensive discussion on design rainfall in the context of nonstationary will be presented. KEYWORDS: Regional frequency analysis, Nonstationary, Spatial information, Bayesian Acknowledgement This research was supported by a grant (14AWMP-B082564-01) from Advanced Water Management Research Program funded by Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport of Korean government.

  20. Quantitative analysis of properties and spatial relations of fuzzy image regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnapuram, Raghu; Keller, James M.; Ma, Yibing

    1992-01-01

    Properties of objects and spatial relations between objects play an important role in rule-based approaches for high-level vision. The partial presence or absence of such properties and relationships can supply both positive and negative evidence for region labeling hypotheses. Similarly, fuzzy labeling of a region can generate new hypotheses pertaining to the properties of the region, its relation to the neighboring regions, and finally, the labels of the neighboring regions. In this paper, we present a unified methodology to characterize properties and spatial relationships of object regions in a digital image. The proposed methods can be used to arrive at more meaningful decisions about the contents of the scene.

  1. An analysis of seasonal forecasts from POAMA and SCOPIC in the Pacific region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottrill, Andrew; Charles, Andrew; Kuleshov, Yuriy

    2013-04-01

    The Australian Bureau of Meteorology (BoM), as part of the Pacific Island Climate Prediction Project (PI-CPP), has developed seasonal forecasts for ten National Meteorological Services (NMS) in the Pacific region for nearly a decade, to improve seasonal forecast services to local communities and industry. As part of this project, a new statistical model called SCOPIC (Seasonal Climate Outlooks for Pacific Island Countries) was developed to provide partner countries with the ability to produce their own seasonal climate outlooks. In 2010, as part of the Pacific Adaptation Strategy and Assistance Programme (PASAP), the BoM developed a seasonal outlook portal for Pacific NMS as an alternative source of seasonal forecasts based on the Bureau's dynamical model POAMA (Predictive Ocean-Atmosphere Model for Australia). This dynamical model is a coupled ocean-atmosphere model, which has been developed by the Bureau for over ten years for forecasting research in Australia. However, no formal assessment of the skill of the two forecast systems (POAMA and SCOPIC) has been carried out using a number of skill metrics for the Pacific region. Although the skill of POAMA in the Australian region is now well documented, the forecast skill is even higher in the Pacific region due to its proximity to the tropical ocean, where the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) provides the main source of tropical climate variability and predictability on seasonal time scales. The statistical model (SCOPIC) uses discriminant analysis (multiple linear regression) and the relationships of sea surface temperatures (SST) or the Southern Oscillation Index (predictors) and monthly rainfall (predictands) to predict rainfall at various lead times. In contrast, POAMA uses the current state of the climate (initial ocean and atmospheric conditions) and model physics to predict forecasts of many climate variables at all locations across the globe and also at various lead times. Here we demonstrate the skill

  2. Crustal Structure of the Hudson Bay Region: Insights from Receiver Function Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, D. A.; Helffrich, G.; Bastow, I. D.; Kendall, J.; Wookey, J.; Eaton, D.; Snyder, D.

    2009-05-01

    Cratons are vast areas of continental lithosphere that have remained relatively intact and stable since the Precambrian. They tend to be underlain by deep roots, characterized by anomalously fast seismic velocities (˜3%), which tomographic images show can extend to depths of ˜350km. The process by which these roots are formed is presently not well understood, but is believed to be associated with the accretion and imbrication of subducted oceanic material during the Archean. In order to test hypotheses on Precambrian crustal and lithospheric evolution in the North American craton and its influence on the intracratonic Hudson Bay basin, we undertake a study of P-to-S receiver functions to obtain estimates of crustal thickness and Vp/Vs ratio. Our high quality data come from the POLARIS, CHASME and CNSN networks, and the recently deployed HuBLE-UK broadband network of ten stations presently recording in northern Hudson Bay. Receiver functions from stations on Archean basement exhibit a sharp Moho Ps phase and clear subsequent reverberations, in contrast to those in the Trans-Hudson, which show much more complexity. Our results indicate Moho depths in Archean domains are consistent with other cratons worldwide (35-40km), with significant crustal thickening occurring within the Proterozoic Trans-Hudson Orogen (up to 52km). Increased crustal thickness (>40km) is also seen on Baffin Island, another region dominated by Proterozoic geology. Variations in Vp/Vs ratio appear to characterise certain geological regions, with elevated values (>1.74) in the Hearne craton, northern Hudson Bay and Southern Baffin Island regions, possibly due to reworking during Hudsonian collision. The lowest Vp/Vs ratios (˜1.70) are found within the Rae Craton, indicative of a felsic to intermediate lower crust. Combining results from the H-κ analysis with the nature of the crust-mantle transition zone will provide insights into the composition of the lower crust, and also shed light onto

  3. Analysis of energetic radiation associated with thunderstorms in the Ebro delta region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabró, Ferran; Montanyà, Joan; Pineda, Nicolau; Argemí, Oriol; van der Velde, Oscar; Romero, David; Soula, Serge

    2016-04-01

    We have analysed increments of background radiation during thunderstorm in the energy range 0.1 - 2 MeV in the Ebro delta region in the northeast of Spain. We present 8 episodes, 3 summer cases and 5 winter cases. The increments of the measured high-energy radiation have been analysed and compared with measurements of electric field, precipitation, radar reflectivity, lightning activity a charge regions altitude. For the first time, measurements of high-energy radiation associated with thunderstorms are compared with radar reflectivity and lightning detected by a LMA network. The aim of this paper is to discern if the high-energy radiation increments measured are related with the storm electrification, like reported in previous publications, or other factors like precipitation. As summary these are the main results: • The comparative of energy spectra of 1 hour period with rain and 1 hour period without rain shows that radon-ion daughters are quite important in the increase of the measured high-energy radiation. • The analysis of the time normalized cumulative curves of radiation counts, radar reflectivity and lightning activity (LINET and LMA detections) shows that that high-energy radiation increments are time related with radar reflectivity rather than lightning activity. • The calculated altitude of the negative charge regions of the different thunderstorms analayzed is too high for the photons produced at those altitudes by Bremmstrahlung effect to overcome atmospheric attenuation and reach the scintillator placed at sea level. These results lead us to conclude, as a contribution in addition to previous works, that the measured increments of high-energy analysed on this paper are associated with radon-ion daughters rather than storm electrification. However, the use of a detector in an energy from 0.1 MeV to 2 Mev does not allow to completely exclude the possibility that part of the high-energy radiation reported should be related storm electrification

  4. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of Xq critical regions in premature ovarian failure

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background One of the frequent reasons for unsuccessful conception is premature ovarian failure/primary ovarian insufficiency (POF/POI) that is defined as the loss of functional follicles below the age of 40 years. Among the genetic causes the most common one involves the X chromosome, as in Turner syndrome, partial X deletion and X-autosome translocations. Here we report a case of a 27-year-old female patient referred to genetic counselling because of premature ovarian failure. The aim of this case study to perform molecular genetic and cytogenetic analyses in order to identify the exact genetic background of the pathogenic phenotype. Results For premature ovarian failure disease diagnostics we performed the Fragile mental retardation 1 gene analysis using Southern blot technique and Repeat Primed PCR in order to identify the relationship between the Fragile mental retardation 1 gene premutation status and the premature ovarion failure disease. At this early onset, the premature ovarian failure affected patient we detected one normal allele of Fragile mental retardation 1 gene and we couldn’t verify the methylated allele, therefore we performed the cytogenetic analyses using G-banding and fluorescent in situ hybridization methods and a high resolution molecular cytogenetic method, the array comparative genomic hybridization technique. For this patient applying the G-banding, we identified a large deletion on the X chromosome at the critical region (ChrX q21.31-q28) which is associated with the premature ovarian failure phenotype. In order to detect the exact breakpoints, we used a special cytogenetic array ISCA plus CGH array and we verified a 67.355 Mb size loss at the critical region which include total 795 genes. Conclusions We conclude for this case study that the karyotyping is definitely helpful in the evaluation of premature ovarian failure patients, to identify the non submicroscopic chromosomal rearrangement, and using the array CGH technique we can

  5. Risk prediction of Critical Infrastructures against extreme natural hazards: local and regional scale analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosato, Vittorio; Hounjet, Micheline; Burzel, Andreas; Di Pietro, Antonio; Tofani, Alberto; Pollino, Maurizio; Giovinazzi, Sonia

    2016-04-01

    . The regional output of cascading effects can be used as an input model for more detailed analyses within urban areas for instance. The DSS weights the overall expected Crisis Scenario by also considering, through an appropriate Consequences Analysis, the number of citizens affected by the Service(s) outages, the expected economic losses of the major industrial activities hit by the unavailability of relevant Services (electricity, water, telecommunications etc.) and the influence of outages of the availability of Public Services (hospitals, schools, public offices etc.) [1] S.Giovinazzi, S. Lagomarsino: A macroseismic method for the vulnerability assessment of buildings. 13th World Conference on Earthquake Engineering, Vancouver, BC, Canada (2004) [2] S. Lagomarsino, S.Giovinazzi: Macroseismic and mechanical models for the vulnerability and damage assessment of current buildings. Bull Earthquake Eng., 4:415-443 (2006)

  6. Correlates of physician burnout across regions and specialties: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Health care organizations globally realize the need to address physician burnout due to its close linkages with quality of care, retention and migration. The many functions of health human resources include identifying and managing burnout risk factors for health professionals, while also promoting effective coping. Our study of physician burnout aims to show: (1) which correlates are most strongly associated with emotional exhaustion (EE) and depersonalization (DP), and (2) whether the associations vary across regions and specialties. Methods Meta-analysis allowed us to examine a diverse range of correlates. Our search yielded 65 samples of physicians from various regions and specialties. Results EE was negatively associated with autonomy, positive work attitudes, and quality and safety culture. It was positively associated with workload, constraining organizational structure, incivility/conflicts/violence, low quality and safety standards, negative work attitudes, work-life conflict, and contributors to poor mental health. We found a similar but weaker pattern of associations for DP. Physicians in the Americas experienced lower EE levels than physicians in Europe when quality and safety culture and career development opportunities were both strong, and when they used problem-focused coping. The former experienced higher EE levels when work-life conflict was strong and they used ineffective coping. Physicians in Europe experienced lower EE levels than physicians in the Americas with positive work attitudes. We found a similar but weaker pattern of associations for DP. Outpatient specialties experienced higher EE levels than inpatient specialties when organization structures were constraining and contributors to poor mental health were present. The former experienced lower EE levels when autonomy was present. Inpatient specialties experienced lower EE levels than outpatient specialties with positive work attitudes. As above, we found a similar but weaker

  7. Hydrochemical analysis of groundwater using multivariate statistical methods - The Volta region, Ghana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Banoeng-Yakubo, B.; Yidana, S.M.; Nti, E.

    2009-01-01

    Q and R-mode multivariate statistical analyses were applied to groundwater chemical data from boreholes and wells in the northern section of the Volta region Ghana. The objective was to determine the processes that affect the hydrochemistry and the variation of these processes in space among the three main geological terrains: the Buem formation, Voltaian System and the Togo series that underlie the area. The analyses revealed three zones in the groundwater flow system: recharge, intermediate and discharge regions. All three zones are clearly different with respect to all the major chemical parameters, with concentrations increasing from the perceived recharge areas through the intermediate regions to the discharge areas. R-mode HCA and factor analysis (using varimax rotation and Kaiser Criterion) were then applied to determine the significant sources of variation in the hydrochemistry. This study finds that groundwater hydrochemistry in the area is controlled by the weathering of silicate and carbonate minerals, as well as the chemistry of infiltrating precipitation. This study finds that the ??D and ??18O data from the area fall along the Global Meteoric Water Line (GMWL). An equation of regression derived for the relationship between ??D and ??18O bears very close semblance to the equation which describes the GMWL. On the basis of this, groundwater in the study area is probably meteoric and fresh. The apparently low salinities and sodicities of the groundwater seem to support this interpretation. The suitability of groundwater for domestic and irrigation purposes is related to its source, which determines its constitution. A plot of the sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) and salinity (EC) data on a semilog axis, suggests that groundwater serves good irrigation quality in the area. Sixty percent (60%), 20% and 20% of the 67 data points used in this study fall within the medium salinity - low sodicity (C2-S1), low salinity -low sodicity (C1-S1) and high salinity - low

  8. Climatic Data Integration and Analysis - Regional Approaches to Climate Change for Pacific Northwest Agriculture (REACCH PNA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seamon, E.; Gessler, P. E.; Flathers, E.; Sheneman, L.; Gollberg, G.

    2013-12-01

    The Regional Approaches to Climate Change for Pacific Northwest Agriculture (REACCH PNA) is a five-year USDA/NIFA-funded coordinated agriculture project to examine the sustainability of cereal crop production systems in the Pacific Northwest, in relationship to ongoing climate change. As part of this effort, an extensive data management system has been developed to enable researchers, students, and the public, to upload, manage, and analyze various data. The REACCH PNA data management team has developed three core systems to encompass cyberinfrastructure and data management needs: 1) the reacchpna.org portal (https://www.reacchpna.org) is the entry point for all public and secure information, with secure access by REACCH PNA members for data analysis, uploading, and informational review; 2) the REACCH PNA Data Repository is a replicated, redundant database server environment that allows for file and database storage and access to all core data; and 3) the REACCH PNA Libraries which are functional groupings of data for REACCH PNA members and the public, based on their access level. These libraries are accessible thru our https://www.reacchpna.org portal. The developed system is structured in a virtual server environment (data, applications, web) that includes a geospatial database/geospatial web server for web mapping services (ArcGIS Server), use of ESRI's Geoportal Server for data discovery and metadata management (under the ISO 19115-2 standard), Thematic Realtime Environmental Distributed Data Services (THREDDS) for data cataloging, and Interactive Python notebook server (IPython) technology for data analysis. REACCH systems are housed and maintained by the Northwest Knowledge Network project (www.northwestknowledge.net), which provides data management services to support research. Initial project data harvesting and meta-tagging efforts have resulted in the interrogation and loading of over 10 terabytes of climate model output, regional entomological data

  9. InSAR and GPS time series analysis: Crustal deformation in the Yucca Mountain, Nevada region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z.; Hammond, W. C.; Blewitt, G.; Kreemer, C. W.; Plag, H.

    2010-12-01

    Several previous studies have successfully demonstrated that long time series (e.g. >5 years) of GPS measurements can be employed to detect tectonic signals with a vertical rate greater than 0.3 mm/yr (e.g. Hill and Blewitt, 2006; Bennett et al. 2009). However, GPS stations are often sparse, with spacing from a few kilometres to a few hundred kilometres. Interferometric SAR (InSAR) can complement GPS by providing high horizontal spatial resolution (e.g. meters to tens-of metres) over large regions (e.g. 100 km × 100 km). A major source of error for repeat-pass InSAR is the phase delay in radio signal propagation through the atmosphere. The portion of this attributable to tropospheric water vapour causes errors as large as 10-20 cm in deformation retrievals. InSAR Time Series analysis with Atmospheric Estimation Models (InSAR TS + AEM), developed at the University of Glasgow, is a robust time series analysis approach, which mainly uses interferograms with small geometric baselines to minimise the effects of decorrelation and inaccuracies in topographic data. In addition, InSAR TS + AEM can be used to separate deformation signals from atmospheric water vapour effects in order to map surface deformation as it evolves in time. The principal purposes of this study are to assess: (1) how consistent InSAR-derived deformation time series are with GPS; and (2) how precise InSAR-derived atmospheric path delays can be. The Yucca Mountain, Nevada region is chosen as the study site because of its excellent GPS network and extensive radar archives (>10 years of dense and high-quality GPS stations, and >17 years of ERS and ENVISAT radar acquisitions), and because of its arid environment. The latter results in coherence that is generally high, even for long periods that span the existing C-band radar archives of ERS and ENVISAT. Preliminary results show that our InSAR LOS deformation map agrees with GPS measurements to within 0.35 mm/yr RMS misfit at the stations which is the

  10. Haplotype analysis of the COMT-ARVCF gene region in Israeli anorexia nervosa family trios.

    PubMed

    Michaelovsky, Elena; Frisch, Amos; Leor, Shani; Stein, Daniel; Danziger, Yardena; Carel, Cynthia; Fennig, Silvana; Mimouni, Marc; Klauck, Sabine M; Benner, Axel; Poustka, Annemarie; Apter, Alan; Weizman, Abraham

    2005-11-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a severe and complex psychiatric disorder with a significant genetic contribution. Previously, we found an association between AN and the 158Val/Met polymorphism of the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene in a family-based study of 51 Israeli AN trios. In the present study, we extended the original sample to include 85 family trios [66 AN restricting (AN-R) and 19 bingeing/purging (AN-BP) subtype] and performed a family-based transmission disequilibrium test (TDT) analysis for five SNPs in the COMT and two in the adjacent ARVCF gene. Association was found between AN-R and several SNPs in the COMT-ARVCF region including the 158Val/Met polymorphism. TDT analysis of 5-SNP haplotypes in AN-R trios revealed an overall statistically significant transmission disequilibrium (P < 0.001). Specifically, haplotype B [COMT-186C-408G-472G(158Val)-ARVCF-659C(220Pro)-524T(175Val)] was preferentially transmitted (P < 0.001) from parents of AN-R patients to their affected daughters, while haplotype A [COMT-186T-408C-472A(158Met)-ARVCF-659T(220Leu)-524C(175Ala)] was preferentially (P = 0.01) not transmitted. Haplotype B was associated with increased risk (RR 3.38; 0.95CI 1.98-6.43) while haplotype A exhibited a protective effect (RR 0.40; 0.95CI 0.21-0.70) for AN-R. Preferential transmission of the risk alleles and haplotypes from the parents was mostly contributed by the fathers. No significant transmission disequilibrium of alleles or haplotypes was found for AN-BP trios. The risk and protective haplotypes may carry molecular variations in the COMT gene or its vicinity that are relevant to the pathophysiology of restrictive anorexia nervosa in the Israeli-Jewish population. PMID:16118784

  11. Array analysis of regional Pn and Pg wavefields from the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, M.A. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1991-06-01

    Small-aperture high-frequency seismic arrays with dimensions of a few kilometers or less, can improve our ability to seismically monitor compliance with a low-yield Threshold Test Ban Treaty. This work studies the characteristics and effectiveness of array processing of the regional Pn and Pg wavefields generated by underground nuclear explosions at the Nevada Test Site. Waveform data from the explosion HARDIN (m{sub b} = 5.5) is recorded at a temporary 12-element, 3-component, 1.5 km-aperture array sited in an area of northern Nevada. The explosions VILLE (m{sub b} = 4.4) and SALUT (m{sub b} = 5.5) are recorded at two arrays sited in the Mojave desert, one a 96-element vertical-component 7 km-aperture array and the other a 155-element vertical-component 4 km-aperture array. Among the mean spectra for the m{sub b} = 5.5 events there are significant differences in low-frequency spectral amplitudes between array sites. The spectra become nearly identical beyond about 6 Hz. Spectral ratios are used to examine seismic source properties and the partitioning of energy between Pn and Pg. Frequency-wavenumber analysis at the 12-element array is used to obtain estimates of signal gain, phase velocity, and source azimuth. This analysis reveals frequency-dependent biases in velocity and azimuth of the coherent Pn and Pg arrivals. Signal correlation, the principal factor governing array performance, is examined in terms of spatial coherence estimates. The coherence is found to vary between the three sites. In all cases the coherence of Pn is greater than that for Pg. 81 refs., 92 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Analysis of Regionally Detected Icequakes Using the STEEP Network, South-Central AK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neel, S.; Leblanc, L.; Larsen, C.; Truffer, M.; Hansen, R.; Rupert, N.; Pavlis, G.; None, N.

    2007-12-01

    Glaciers produce seismic energy that is detectable from local to teleseismic distances. Glaciolgical processes including calving, surface crevassing, basal sliding and other, yet unresolved source processes are capable of producing recordable seismicity. Twenty-two broadband sensors deployed in south-central Alaska during the SainT Elias TEctonics and Erosion Project (STEEP) provide an excellent means to study glacier-generated seismicity at regional distances. These instruments surround over 7500 km2 of glacier area including the Bering Glacier, Bagley Icefield and the tidewater calving glaciers of Icy Bay (Yahtse, Guyot, Tyndal). Our analysis shows that icequakes nominally occur several times hourly, and can be separated from tectonic seismicity using their unique spectral characteristics and hypocenter locations. The events typically propagate over 50-75 km distances, but occasionally are recorded at stations over 150 km away from the energy source. Hypocenters for more than 1000 events were manually calculated through a 26-day interval during October 2006, and suggest that a majority of the icequakes are associated with calving at tidewater glaciers that terminate in Icy Bay. Events with similar time and frequency domain characteristics also occur at locations away from calving fronts, but less often, and their mechanical origin remains undetermined. Automated detections from a frequency domain event detector exhibit strong correlation with the handpicked time series, and extend our analysis to all available data collected during 2006. We present the time distribution of several categories of icequakes and compare these distributions to environmental variables such as precipitation, temperature and tides to explore potential forcing for observed variability in icequake occurrence.

  13. An Analysis of the Economic Structure and Industrial Potential of the Four Corners Region. Summary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minshall, Charles W.; And Others

    The overall objective of this 4-phase study was to provide the Four Corners Regional Commission with an evaluation of industries best suited for the region. In order to satisfy this objective, 100 industries and products were identified which have the highest potential for development in the total region, as well as in specific subregions. The…

  14. [Structure analysis of mtDNA control region of spotted halibut (Verasper variegatus) and its related species].

    PubMed

    He, Chong-Bo; Cao, Jie; Liu, Wei-Dong; Zhou, Zun-Chun; Ge, Long-Li; Gao, Xiang-Gang; Wang, Xiao-Min

    2007-07-01

    Spotted halibut (Verasper variegatus) is the only species of Genus Verasper in China. The fish was naturally distributed in Yellow Sea and Bohai Sea in northern China and Kyushu in Japan and in Korean sea area. Using PCR product direct sequencing, mitochondrial control region sequences of 24 individuals of spotted halibut was confirmed and analyzed. 4 control region haplotypes, resulting from length heteroplamy of the tandem repeat region, was obtained from these 24 fish. Sequence analysis demonstrated that there were four similar structures in the control region, i.e., extended terminal associated sequences (ETAS), central conserved sequence block (CSB), conserved sequence block (CSB), and repeat region, in V. moseri, Limanda ferruginea, Reinhardtius hippoglossoides, Heppoglossoides platessoides, Paralichthys olivaceous, Solea solea, S. senegalensis, and S. lascari. By comparing with other vertebrates, we found that there were similar repeated sequences immediately after the CSB-3 in all of the anuran species. PMID:17646149

  15. [EPIDEMIOLOGIC ANALYSIS OF OUTBREAKS OF DISEASES CAUSED BY AMERICAN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS CAUSATIVE AGENTS IN ENDEMIC REGIONS].

    PubMed

    Petrov, A A; Lebedev, V N; Kulish, V S; Pyshnaya, N S; Stovba, L F; Borisevich, S V

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiologic analysis of epidemic outbreaks caused by American equine encephalitis causative agents is carried out in the review. Eastern equine encephalomyelitis (EEE), Western equine encephalomyelitis (WEE) and Venezuela equine encephalomyelitis (VEE) viruses are etiologic agents of dangerous transmissive diseases that are usually accompanied by fever and neurologic symptoms. Among the New World alphaviruses, VEE virus has the most potential danger for humans and domestic animals. Currently, enzootic strains of VEE play an increasing role as etiologic agents of human diseases. Most of the VEE cases in humans in endemic regions during inter-epidemic period are caused by infection with VEE subtype ID virus. A possibility of emergence of novel epidemic outbreaks of VEE is determined by mutations of ID subtype strains into IC subtype, and those currently pose a potential threat as an etiologic agent of the disease. Despite low morbidity, EEE and WEE are a problem for healthcare due to a relatively high frequency of lethal outcomes of the disease. PMID:26829861

  16. Multi-Region Boundary Element Analysis for Coupled Thermal-Fracturing Processes in Geomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Baotang; Kim, Hyung-Mok; Park, Eui-Seob; Kim, Taek-Kon; Wuttke, Manfred W.; Rinne, Mikael; Backers, Tobias; Stephansson, Ove

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a boundary element code development on coupled thermal-mechanical processes of rock fracture propagation. The code development was based on the fracture mechanics code FRACOD that has previously been developed by Shen and Stephansson (Int J Eng Fracture Mech 47:177-189, 1993) and FRACOM (A fracture propagation code—FRACOD, User's manual. FRACOM Ltd. 2002) and simulates complex fracture propagation in rocks governed by both tensile and shear mechanisms. For the coupled thermal-fracturing analysis, an indirect boundary element method, namely the fictitious heat source method, was implemented in FRACOD to simulate the temperature change and thermal stresses in rocks. This indirect method is particularly suitable for the thermal-fracturing coupling in FRACOD where the displacement discontinuity method is used for mechanical simulation. The coupled code was also extended to simulate multiple region problems in which rock mass, concrete linings and insulation layers with different thermal and mechanical properties were present. Both verification and application cases were presented where a point heat source in a 2D infinite medium and a pilot LNG underground cavern were solved and studied using the coupled code. Good agreement was observed between the simulation results, analytical solutions and in situ measurements which validates an applicability of the developed coupled code.

  17. Documentation of revisions to the regional aquifer system analysis model of the New Jersey coastal plain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Voronin, Lois M.

    2004-01-01

    The model, which simulates flow in the New Jersey Coastal Plain sediments, developed for the U.S. Geological Survey Regional Aquifer System Analysis (RASA) program was revised. The RASA model was revised with (1) a rediscretization of the model parameters with a finer cell size, (2) a spatially variable recharge rate that is based on rates determined by recent studies and, (3) ground-water withdrawal data from 1981 to 1998. The RASA model framework, which subdivided the Coastal Plain sediments into 10 aquifers and 9 confining units, was preserved in the revised model. A transient model that simulates flow conditions from January 1, 1968 to December 31, 1998, was constructed using 21 stress periods. The model was calibrated by attempting to match the simulated results with (1) estimated base flow for five river basins, (2) measured water levels in long-term hydrographs for 28 selected observation wells, and (3) potentiometric surfaces in the model area for 1978, 1983, 1998, 1993, and 1998 conditions. The estimated and simulated base flow in the five river basins compare well. In general, the simulated water levels matched the interpreted potentiometric surfaces and the measured water levels of the hydrographs within 25 feet.

  18. Simultaneous Factor Analysis of Coupled Aerosol and VOC Mass Spectra in Regions of Biogenic Influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slowik, Jay; Chang, Rachel; Hayden, Katherine; Li, Shao-Meng; Liggio, John; Sjostedt, Steven; Vlasenko, Alexander; Leaitch, Richard; Abbatt, Jonathan

    2010-05-01

    Recent studies suggest that the traditional binary treatments of atmospheric organics as either gases or particles may be inadequate, highlighting the need for analytical techniques capable of simultaneously considering particle and gas-phase species. Organic mass spectra of particles and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were collected using an Aerodyne time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (C-ToF-AMS), and a proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometer (PTR-MS), respectively. The particle and VOC mass spectra were combined into a single dataset, which was analyzed using the positive matrix factorization (PMF) receptor modeling technique. The relative weights of the AMS and PTR-MS data were balanced in the PMF analysis according to the criteria that the scaled residuals within a solution be independent of the measuring instrument. Instrument relative weight is controlled by the application of a scaling factor to the PTR-MS uncertainties. The AMS and PTR-MS instruments were deployed from mid-May to mid-June at two sites in Canada: (1) Egbert, ON (2007), a semirural site ~70 km north of Toronto, and (2) Whistler, BC (2008), a remote site ~120 km north of Vancouver. The Egbert site is influenced by anthropogenic emissions from Toronto and populated regions to the south, biogenic emissions from boreal forests to the north, and biomass burning emissions. The Whistler site is strongly influenced by boreal forest terpene emissions, with lesser contributions from long-range transport and anthropogenic emissions.

  19. Evaluation of VIIRS SST fields through the analysis of overlap regions between consecutive orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cayula, Jean-François P.; May, Douglas A.; Arnone, Robert A.; Vandermeulen, Ryan A.

    2015-05-01

    Full-swath Sea Surface Temperature (SST) derived from data acquired by the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) sensor on-board the Suomi-National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) satellite produces significant overlap between consecutive orbits at all latitudes. In this study, we use those overlap regions to evaluate VIIRS SST, as inconsistencies between SST values from consecutive orbits are indications of likely degraded quality. The studies investigate two sources of inconsistencies: those resulting from the response of the SST equations when observing a scene from differing view angles and those caused by undetected data contamination. This study will present results for two VIIRS SST products: one from the Naval Oceanographic Office (NAVOCEANO), which is assimilated in the Navy Ocean Models, and the Advanced Clear-Sky Processor for Oceans (ACSPO) product from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Center for Satellite Applications and Research (STAR). Global statistics based on drifting buoys for both NAVOCEANO and NOAA products complete the analysis.

  20. Analysis of rotation-driven electrokinetic flow in microscale gap regions of rotating disk systems.

    PubMed

    Soong, C Y; Wang, S H

    2004-01-15

    In the present study, a novel theoretical model is developed for the analysis of rotating thermal-fluid flow characteristics in the presence of electrokinetic effects in the microscale gap region between two parallel disks under specified electrostatic, rotational, and thermal boundary conditions. The major flow configuration considered is a rotor-stator disk system. Axisymmetric Navier-Stokes equations with consideration of electric body force stemming from streaming potential are employed in the momentum balance. Variations of the fluid viscosity and permittivity with the local fluid temperature are considered. Between two disks, the axial distribution of the electric potential is determined by the Poisson equation with the concentration distributions of positive and negative ions obtained from Nernst-Planck equations for convection-diffusion of the ions in the flow field. Effects of disk rotation and electrostatic and thermal conditions on the electrokinetic flow and thermal characteristics are investigated. The electrohydrodynamic mechanisms are addressed with an interpretation of the coupling nature of the electric and flow fields. Finally, solutions with electric potential determined by employing nonlinear or linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation and/or invoking assumptions of constant properties are compared with the predictions of the present model for justification of various levels of approximation in solution of the electrothermal flow behaviors in rotating microfluidic systems. PMID:14654411

  1. [Analysis of heavy metals distribution characteristics and pollution assessment in agricultural region soils of Huaihe basin].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xue; Zhao, Nan-Jing; Yuan, Jing; Ma, Ming-Jun; Fang, Li; Wang, Yin; Meng, De-Shuo; Yu, Yang; Tang, Jie; Zhang, Xiao-Ling; Dai, Yuan; Zhang, Yu-Jun; Liu, Jian-Guo; Liu, Wen-Qing

    2014-07-01

    By means of field sampling and laboratory analysis, the content distribution characteristics of Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn in agricultural region soils of Huaihe basin in Anhui province were analyzed. Assessment of heavy metal pollutions was conducted using enrichment factor, geoaccumulation index and potential ecological risk index. The results showed that the average mass fraction of Cd and Cu was 0.113 5 and 22.09 mg x kg(-1) respectively in the study area soil, which were above the background values 0.097 and 20.4 mg x kg(-1) in Anhui Province. The average mass fraction of other four heavy metals did not exceed the average values of Anhui Province. The results of the evaluations from geoaccumulation index and ecological risk assessment discovered that Cd is the strongest pollution metal among six heavy metals in the study area soil. For some samples of the study soil, Cd was slight risk for the ecosystem. The ecosystem risks caused by the other five heavy metals were not obviously for the sampling points. The entire study area soils were mid integrated potential ecological risk. PMID:25269280

  2. Regional L-Moment-Based Flood Frequency Analysis in the Upper Vistula River Basin, Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutkowska, A.; Żelazny, M.; Kohnová, S.; Łyp, M.; Banasik, K.

    2016-05-01

    The Upper Vistula River basin was divided into pooling groups with similar dimensionless frequency distributions of annual maximum river discharge. The cluster analysis and the Hosking and Wallis (HW) L-moment-based method were used to divide the set of 52 mid-sized catchments into disjoint clusters with similar morphometric, land use, and rainfall variables, and to test the homogeneity within clusters. Finally, three and four pooling groups were obtained alternatively. Two methods for identification of the regional distribution function were used, the HW method and the method of Kjeldsen and Prosdocimi based on a bivariate extension of the HW measure. Subsequently, the flood quantile estimates were calculated using the index flood method. The ordinary least squares (OLS) and the generalised least squares (GLS) regression techniques were used to relate the index flood to catchment characteristics. Predictive performance of the regression scheme for the southern part of the Upper Vistula River basin was improved by using GLS instead of OLS. The results of the study can be recommended for the estimation of flood quantiles at ungauged sites, in flood risk mapping applications, and in engineering hydrology to help design flood protection structures.

  3. Process-based image analysis for agricultural mapping: A case study in Turkgeldi region, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damla Uca Avci, Z.; Sunar, Filiz

    2015-10-01

    The need for timely, accurate, and interoperable geospatial information is steadily increasing. In this context, process-based image processing systems will be the initial segment for future's automatic systems. A process-based system is believed to be a good approach for agricultural purpose because agricultural activities are carried out according to a periodic (annual) cycle. Therefore, a process-based image analysis procedure was designed for routine crop classification for an agricultural region in Kırklareli, Turkey. The process tree developed uses a multi-temporal image data set as an input and gives the final crop classification as an output by using an incremental rule set. The test data set was composed of five images of Satellite Pour l'Observation de la Terre 4 (SPOT 4) data acquired in 2007. Basically, image objects were first extracted and then classified. A rule set was structured depending on class definitions. A decision-based process was executed and formed a multilevel image classification system. The final classification was obtained by merging classes from the appropriate levels where they were extracted. To evaluate the success of the application the accuracy of the classification was assessed. The overall accuracy and kappa index of agreement was found to be 80% and 0.78, respectively. At the end of the study, problems of segmentation and classification operations were discussed and solution approaches were outlined. To assess the process in terms of its scope for automation, the efficiency and success of the rule set were also discussed.

  4. Thermal/structural analysis of the shaft-disk region of a fan drive system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Peyton B.; Holland, Anne D.

    1990-01-01

    In January 1989, a mishap occurred in the National Transonic Facility wind tunnel at NASA-Langley. It is believed that the failure of an insulation retainer holding foam insulation around the exterior of the fan drive shaft resulted in the subsequent damage to other components in the tunnel. The effect was determined of removing the external thermal insulation on the shaft would have on the stresses on the shaft, disk and bolts holding the two together. To accomplish this, a detailed thermal/structural finite element analysis of the shaft-disk interface was performed. The maximum stresses on the three components were determined for several configurations and conditions with and without the external thermal insulation, and then these results were compared to the original analyses to access the effect of removing the external thermal insulation on the proposed future operation of the shaft/disk structures of the fan drive system. Although the stresses were higher without the external insulation, the stresses did meet all stress criteria. In addition, all stresses were within the infinite life regime of the Modified Goodman diagram. Therefore, it was determined that the structural integrity of the shaft-disk region is not compromised if the external insulation is removed.

  5. Comparative Analysis of Aerosol Retrievals from MODIS, OMI and MISR Over Sahara Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyapustin, A.; Wang, Y.; Hsu, C.; Terres, O.; Leptoukh, G.; Kalashnikova, O.; Korkin, S.

    2011-01-01

    MODIS is a wide field-of-view sensor providing daily global observations of the Earth. Currently, global MODIS aerosol retrievals over land are performed with the main Dark Target algorithm complimented with the Deep Blue (DB) Algorithm over bright deserts. The Dark Target algorithm relies on surface parameterization which relates reflectance in MODIS visible bands with the 2.1 micrometer region, whereas the Deep Blue algorithm uses an ancillary angular distribution model of surface reflectance developed from the time series of clear-sky MODIS observations. Recently, a new Multi-Angle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC) algorithm has been developed for MODIS. MAIAC uses a time series and an image based processing to perform simultaneous retrievals of aerosol properties and surface bidirectional reflectance. It is a generic algorithm which works over both dark vegetative surfaces and bright deserts and performs retrievals at 1 km resolution. In this work, we will provide a comparative analysis of DB, MAIAC, MISR and OMI aerosol products over bright deserts of northern Africa.

  6. Pion-Nucleon Scattering and Analysis from threshold to the N*(1440) Resonance Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadler, Michael; Watson, Shon; Stahov, Jugoslav

    2008-10-01

    Many measurements for pion-nucleon scattering from threshold to the N*(1440) resonance region have been made since 1980, when the landmark Karlsruhe-Helsinki (KH) and Carnegie Mellon-Berkeley (CMB) partial wave analyses (PWA) were completed. These measurements consist of differential cross sections and analyzing powers for elastic scattering and charge exchange. Spin rotation parameters for elastic scattering in the momentum interval 0.4 -- 0.7 GeV/c have also been obtained. The program culminated with measurements of π-p -> Neutrals (charge exchange, multiple pi-zero final states, eta production, and inverse photoproduction) using the Crystal Ball at BNL. Resonance parameters for the N*(1440) in the Review of Particle Physics by the Particle Data Group have been obtained from the KH and CMB analyses. The 2006 edition also includes the analysis by George Washington University (GWU) ``for averages, fits, limits, etc.'', but the parameters were unchanged. An overview of the data will be presented along with comparisons to PWA.

  7. Statistical analysis of content of Cs-137 in soils in Bansko-Razlog region

    SciTech Connect

    Kobilarov, R. G.

    2014-11-18

    Statistical analysis of the data set consisting of the activity concentrations of {sup 137}Cs in soils in Bansko–Razlog region is carried out in order to establish the dependence of the deposition and the migration of {sup 137}Cs on the soil type. The descriptive statistics and the test of normality show that the data set have not normal distribution. Positively skewed distribution and possible outlying values of the activity of {sup 137}Cs in soils were observed. After reduction of the effects of outliers, the data set is divided into two parts, depending on the soil type. Test of normality of the two new data sets shows that they have a normal distribution. Ordinary kriging technique is used to characterize the spatial distribution of the activity of {sup 137}Cs over an area covering 40 km{sup 2} (whole Razlog valley). The result (a map of the spatial distribution of the activity concentration of {sup 137}Cs) can be used as a reference point for future studies on the assessment of radiological risk to the population and the erosion of soils in the study area.

  8. Cognitive task analysis for instruction in single-injection ultrasound guided-regional anesthesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gucev, Gligor V.

    Cognitive task analysis (CTA) is methodology for eliciting knowledge from subject matter experts. CTA has been used to capture the cognitive processes, decision-making, and judgments that underlie expert behaviors. A review of the literature revealed that CTA has not yet been used to capture the knowledge required to perform ultrasound guided regional anesthesia (UGRA). The purpose of this study was to utilize CTA to extract knowledge from UGRA experts and to determine whether instruction based on CTA of UGRA will produce results superior to the results of traditional training. This study adds to the knowledge base of CTA in being the first one to effectively capture the expert knowledge of UGRA. The derived protocol was used in a randomized, double blinded experiment involving UGRA instruction to 39 novice learners. The results of this study strongly support the hypothesis that CTA-based instruction in UGRA is more effective than conventional clinical instruction, as measured by conceptual pre- and post-tests, performance of a simulated UGRA procedure, and time necessary for the task performance. This study adds to the number of studies that have proven the superiority of CTA-informed instruction. Finally, it produced several validated instruments that can be used in instructing and evaluating UGRA.

  9. Utilizing ERTS-A imagery for tectonic analysis through study of Big Horn Mountains region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppin, R. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. MSS scene 1085-17294 of the Big Horn region has been subjected to detailed structural analysis. Band 7 is particularly good for revealing structural and drainage patterns because of enhance topographic detail and the subdued vegetational contrasts. Considerable stereo coverage through sidelap with adjoining scenes adds to the effectiveness of the study and has been used on both positive transparencies and enlarged prints. Negative prints of Band 7 positive transparencies have proven to be much more useful than positive prints because the higher resolution of the positive transparencies can be maintained. The Bighorn Mountains are crisscrossed by a number of prominent topographic linears, most of which can be correlated with known fault and shear zones in the Precambrian crystalline core. Many of these do not appear to continue into the flanking sedimentary rocks and a few that do (Tensleep, Tongue River lineaments) are very difficult to trace farther out into the basins. The Tongue River lineament, long a source of speculation and uncertainty as to its existence, appears as a very prominent discontinuity in the imagery.

  10. Probabilistic tsunami hazard analysis (PTHA) of Taiwan region by stochastic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y. S.; Chen, P. F.; Chen, C. C.

    2014-12-01

    We conduct probabilistic tsunami hazard analysis (PTHA) of Taiwan region for earthquake sources in the Ryukyu trench. The PTHA estimates the probabilities of a site hit by tsunamis with certain amplitudes threshold. The probabilities were integrated over earthquakes of various magnitudes from potential fault zones in the Ryukyu trench. The annual frequencies of earthquakes in a fault zone are determined or extrapolated by magnitude-frequency distributions of earthquakes (Gutenberg-Richter law) of the zone. Given moment (or magnitude) of an earthquake, we first synthesize patterns of differently complex and heterogeneous slip distributions on the fault using stochastic model. Assuming the slip and stress drop distribution are processes of fractional Brownian motion and described by Hurt exponent. According to ω-2 model of earthquakes and following Fourier transform, slip distributions of earthquake are determined by randomly distributing phase spectrum of those with greater than corner wave number kc. Finally, the vertical seafloor displacements induced by each slip distribution are used by COMCOT for simulation of tsunami to assess the impacts on various coasts in Taiwan.

  11. Identification of hydrological neighborhoods for regional flood frequency analysis using statistical depth function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wazneh, H.; Chebana, F.; Ouarda, T. B. M. J.

    2016-08-01

    The adoption of hydrological neighborhoods is one of the common approaches employed for the delineation step in regional frequency analysis (RFA). Traditional methods proposed for building hydrological neighborhoods are mainly based on distance metrics. These methods have some limitations. They are not robust against outliers, they are not affine invariant and they require site characteristics to be normally distributed. To overcome these limitations, the present paper aims to propose a new robust method to identify the neighborhood of a target site. The proposed method is based on the statistical notion of depth function. More precisely, a similarity measure derived from depth functions is used to compute the similarities between the target sites and the gauged ones. A data set from the southern part of the province of Quebec (Canada) is used to compare the proposed method with traditional ones. The obtained results indicate that the depth-based method leads to neighborhoods that are more homogeneous and more efficient for quantile estimation, than those obtained by traditional methods. The triangular shape of neighborhoods obtained by the proposed approach makes it practical and flexible.

  12. Gene identification and DNA sequence analysis in the GC-poor 20 megabase region of human chromosome 21.

    PubMed

    Yu, J; Tong, S; Shen, Y; Kao, F T

    1997-06-24

    In contrast to the distal half of the long arm of chromosome 21, the proximal half of approximately 20 megabases of DNA, including 21q11-21 bands, is low in GC content, CpG islands, and identified genes. Despite intensive searches, very few genes and cDNAs have been found in this region. Since the 21q11-21 region is associated with certain Down syndrome pathologies like mental retardation, the identification of relevant genes in this region is important. We used a different approach by constructing microdissection libraries specifically for this region and isolating unique sequence microclones for detailed molecular analysis. We found that this region is enriched with middle and low-copy repetitive sequences, and is also heavily methylated. By sequencing and homology analysis, we identified a significant number of genes/cDNAs, most of which appear to belong to gene families. In addition, we used unique sequence microclones in direct screening of cDNA libraries and isolated 12 cDNAs for this region. Thus, although the 21q11-21 region is gene poor, it is not completely devoid of genes/cDNAs. The presence of high proportions of middle and low-copy repetitive sequences in this region may have evolutionary significance in the genome organization and function of this region. Since 21q11-21 is heavily methylated, the expression of genes in this region may be regulated by a delicate balance of methylation and demethylation, and the presence of an additional copy of chromosome 21 may seriously disturb this balance and cause specific Down syndrome anomalies including mental retardation. PMID:9192657

  13. Climate Risk Informed Decision Analysis: A Hypothetical Application to the Waas Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilroy, Kristin; Mens, Marjolein; Haasnoot, Marjolijn; Jeuken, Ad

    2016-04-01

    More frequent and intense hydrologic events under climate change are expected to enhance water security and flood risk management challenges worldwide. Traditional planning approaches must be adapted to address climate change and develop solutions with an appropriate level of robustness and flexibility. The Climate Risk Informed Decision Analysis (CRIDA) method is a novel planning approach embodying a suite of complementary methods, including decision scaling and adaptation pathways. Decision scaling offers a bottom-up approach to assess risk and tailors the complexity of the analysis to the problem at hand and the available capacity. Through adaptation pathway,s an array of future strategies towards climate robustness are developed, ranging in flexibility and immediacy of investments. Flexible pathways include transfer points to other strategies to ensure that the system can be adapted if future conditions vary from those expected. CRIDA combines these two approaches in a stakeholder driven process which guides decision makers through the planning and decision process, taking into account how the confidence in the available science, the consequences in the system, and the capacity of institutions should influence strategy selection. In this presentation, we will explain the CRIDA method and compare it to existing planning processes, such as the US Army Corps of Engineers Principles and Guidelines as well as Integrated Water Resources Management Planning. Then, we will apply the approach to a hypothetical case study for the Waas Region, a large downstream river basin facing rapid development threatened by increased flood risks. Through the case study, we will demonstrate how a stakeholder driven process can be used to evaluate system robustness to climate change; develop adaptation pathways for multiple objectives and criteria; and illustrate how varying levels of confidence, consequences, and capacity would play a role in the decision making process, specifically

  14. A regional analysis of elements at risk exposed to mountain hazards in the Eastern European Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Sven; Zischg, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    We present a method to quantify the number and value of buildings exposed to torrents and snow avalanches in the Austrian Alps, as well as the number of exposed people. Based on a unique population and building register dataset, a relational SQL database was developed that allows in combination with GIS data a rule-based nation-wide automated analysis. Furthermore, possibilities and challenges are discussed with respect to the use of such data in vulnerability assessment and with respect to resilience measures. We comprehensively address the challenge of data accuracy, scale and uncertainties. From the total of approximately 2.4 million buildings with a clearly attributable geographical location, around 120,000 are exposed to torrent processes (5 %) and snow avalanches (0.4 %); exposition was defined here as located within the digitally available hazard maps of the Austrian Torrent and Avalanche Control Service. Around 5 % of the population (360,000 out of 8.5 million inhabitants), based on those people being compulsory listed in the population register, are located in these areas. The analysis according to the building category resulted in 2.05 million residential buildings in Austria (85 %), 93,000 of which (4.5 %) are exposed to these hazards. In contrast, 37,300 buildings (1.6 %) throughout the country belong to the category of accommodation facilities, 5,600 of which are exposed (15 %). Out of the 140,500 commercial buildings, 8,000 (5 %) are exposed. A considerable spatial variation was detectable within the communities and Federal States. In general, an above-average exposition of buildings to torrent process and snow avalanches was detectable in communities located in the Federal State of Salzburg, Styria and Vorarlberg (torrents), and Tyrol and Vorarlberg (snow avalanches). In the alpine part of Austria, the share of exposed accommodation buildings was two times (Salzburg) and three times (Vorarlberg) higher than the regional average of exposed buildings

  15. Challenges in precipitation observation and analysis over the cold/mountain regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, D.; Zhang, Y.; Ma, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Precipitation is one of the most important variables for climate, hydrology, glacier, and ecosystem research at local, regional, and global scales. It is a great challenge to compile regional precipitation datasets and to develop reliable products for various research activities over the cold regions, i.e. the high altitudes and high latitudes. The TPE program has recognized the urgent need and critical importance for accurate regional precipitation datasets and products. This presentation will show new results from regional analyses of surface and remote sensing precipitation datasets for the TPE. It will also discuss key issues in cold region precipitation research, such as compatibility of data/observations over the national borders, bias-correction methods and results, and common challenges and linkages between high-latitude and high-altitude regions.

  16. Characterizing the interaction between uranyl ion and fulvic acid using regional integration analysis (RIA) and fluorescence quenching.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bingqi; Ryan, David K

    2016-03-01

    The development of chemometric methods has substantially improved the quantitative usefulness of the fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) in the analysis of dissolved organic matter (DOM). In this study, Regional Integration Analysis (RIA) was used to quantitatively interpret EEMs and assess fluorescence quenching behavior in order to study the binding between uranyl ion and fulvic acid. Three fulvic acids including soil fulvic acid (SFA), Oyster River fulvic acid (ORFA) and Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA) were used and investigated by the spectroscopic techniques. The EEM spectra obtained were divided into five regions according to fluorescence structural features and two distinct peaks were observed in region III and region V. Fluorescence quenching analysis was conducted for these two regions with the stability constants, ligand concentrations and residual fluorescence values calculated using the Ryan-Weber model. Results indicated a relatively strong binding ability between uranyl ion and fulvic acid samples at low pH (log K value varies from 4.11 to 4.67 at pH 3.50). Fluorophores in region III showed a higher binding ability with fewer binding sites than in region V. Stability constants followed the order, SFA > ORFA > SRFA, while ligand concentrations followed the reverse order, SRFA > ORFA > SFA. A comparison between RIA and Parallel Factor Analysis (PARAFAC) data treatment methods was also performed and good agreement between these two methods (less than 4% difference in log K values) demonstrates the reliability of the RIA method in this study. PMID:26736183

  17. Attenuation of seismic waves obtained by coda waves analysis in the West Bohemia earthquake swarm region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachura, Martin; Fischer, Tomas

    2014-05-01

    with depth, where 1/Qc seems to be frequency independent in depth range of upper lithosphere. Lateral changes of 1/Qc were also reported - it decreases in the south-west direction from the Novy Kostel focal zone, where the attenuation is the highest. Results from more advanced methods that allow for separation of scattering and intrinsic loss show that intrinsic loss is a dominant factor for attenuating of seismic waves in the region. Determination of attenuation due to scattering appears ambiguous due to small hypocentral distances available for the analysis, where the effects of scattering in frequency range from 1 to 24 Hz are not significant.

  18. Cost analysis of ground-water supplies in the North Atlantic region, 1970

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cederstrom, Dagfin John

    1973-01-01

    The cost of municipal and industrial ground water (or, more specifically, large supplies of ground water) at the wellhead in the North Atlantic Region in 1970 generally ranged from 1.5 to 5 cents per thousand gallons. Water from crystalline rocks and shale is relatively expensive. Water from sandstone is less so. Costs of water from sands and gravels in glaciated areas and from Coastal Plain sediments range from moderate to very low. In carbonate rocks costs range from low to fairly high. The cost of ground water at the wellhead is low in areas of productive aquifers, but owing to the cost of connecting pipe, costs increase significantly in multiple-well fields. In the North Atlantic Region, development of small to moderate supplies of ground water may offer favorable cost alternatives to planners, but large supplies of ground water for delivery to one point cannot generally be developed inexpensively. Well fields in the less productive aquifers may be limited by costs to 1 or 2 million gallons a day, but in the more favorable aquifers development of several tens of millions of gallons a day may be practicable and inexpensive. Cost evaluations presented cannot be applied to any one specific well or specific site because yields of wells in any one place will depend on the local geologic and hydrologic conditions; however, with such cost adjustments as may be necessary, the methodology presented should have wide applicability. Data given show the cost of water at the wellhead based on the average yield of several wells. The cost of water delivered by a well field includes costs of connecting pipe and of wells that have the yields and spacings specified. Cost of transport of water from the well field to point of consumption and possible cost of treatment are not evaluated. In the methodology employed, costs of drilling and testing, pumping equipment, engineering for the well field, amortization at 5% percent interest, maintenance, and cost of power are considered. The

  19. Comparative analysis of chicken chromosome 28 provides new clues to the evolutionary fragility of gene-rich vertebrate regions

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Laurie; Yang, Shan; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; Baggott, Dan; Christensen, Mari; Hamilton, Aaron; Crooijmans, Richard; Groenen, Martien; Lucas, Susan; Ovcharenko, Ivan; Stubbs, Lisa

    2007-01-01

    The chicken genome draft sequence has provided a valuable resource for studies of an important agricultural and experimental model species and an important data set for comparative analysis. However, some of the most gene-rich segments are missing from chicken genome draft assemblies, limiting the analysis of a substantial number of genes and preventing a closer look at regions that are especially prone to syntenic rearrangements. To facilitate the functional and evolutionary analysis of one especially gene-rich, rearrangement-prone genomic region, we analyzed sequence from BAC clones spanning chicken microchromosome GGA28; as a complement we also analyzed a gene-sparse, stable region from GGA11. In these two regions we documented the conservation and lineage-specific gain and loss of protein-coding genes and precisely mapped the locations of 31 major human-chicken syntenic breakpoints. Altogether, we identified 72 lineage-specific genes, many of which are found at or near syntenic breaks, implicating evolutionary breakpoint regions as major sites of genetic innovation and change. Twenty-two of the 31 breakpoint regions have been reused repeatedly as rearrangement breakpoints in vertebrate evolution. Compared w