Science.gov

Sample records for regional case study

  1. Mapping Regional Drought Vulnerability: a Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamouz, M.; Zeynolabedin, A.; Olyaei, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Drought is among the natural disaster that causes damages and affects many people's life in many part of the world including in Iran. Recently, some factors such as climate variability and the impact of climate change have influenced drought frequency and intensity in many parts of the world. Drought can be divided into four categories of meteorological, hydrological, agricultural and social-economic. In meteorological the important feature is lack of rainfall. In hydrological drought river flows and dam storage are considered. Lack of soil moisture is the key factor in agricultural droughts while in social-economic type of drought the relation between supply and demand and social-economic damages due to water deficiency is studied. While the first three types relates to the lack of some hydrological characteristics, social-economic type of drought is actually the consequence of other types expressed in monetary values. Many indices are used in assessing drought; each has its own advantages and disadvantages and can be used for specific types of drought. Therefore knowing the types of drought can provide a better understanding of shortages and their characteristics. Drought vulnerability is a concept which shows the likelihood of damages from hazard in a particular place by focusing on the system status prior to the disaster. Drought vulnerability has been viewed as a potential for losses in the region due to water deficiency at the time of drought. In this study the application of vulnerability concept in drought management in East Azarbaijan province in Iran is investigated by providing vulnerability maps which demonstrates spatial characteristics of drought vulnerability. In the first step, certain governing parameters in drought analysis such as precipitation, temperature, land use, topography, solar radiation and ground water elevation have been investigated in the region. They are described in details and calculated in suitable time series. Vulnerabilities

  2. Confidence region estimation techniques for nonlinear regression :three case studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Swiler, Laura Painton (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Sullivan, Sean P. (University of Texas, Austin, TX); Stucky-Mack, Nicholas J. (Harvard University, Cambridge, MA); Roberts, Randall Mark; Vugrin, Kay White

    2005-10-01

    This work focuses on different methods to generate confidence regions for nonlinear parameter identification problems. Three methods for confidence region estimation are considered: a linear approximation method, an F-test method, and a Log-Likelihood method. Each of these methods are applied to three case studies. One case study is a problem with synthetic data, and the other two case studies identify hydraulic parameters in groundwater flow problems based on experimental well-test results. The confidence regions for each case study are analyzed and compared. Although the F-test and Log-Likelihood methods result in similar regions, there are differences between these regions and the regions generated by the linear approximation method for nonlinear problems. The differing results, capabilities, and drawbacks of all three methods are discussed.

  3. Health region development from the perspective of system theory - an empirical cross-regional case study.

    PubMed

    Volgger, Michael; Mainil, Tomas; Pechlaner, Harald; Mitas, Ondrej

    2015-01-01

    Governments are increasingly establishing health regions to deal with current challenges of public health service. These regions are seen as instruments to balance public and private stakeholders, and offer health care to regional citizens as well as to medical/health tourists. However, it is still unclear how the development of such health regions as well as their governance may be conceptualized. We apply Luhmann's system theory approach in the context of a cross-regional case study that compares health region developments in the Autonomous Province of Bolzano-South Tyrol (Italy) with particular regard to the Eastern Dolomites and in the province of Zeeland (the Netherlands). We suggest that Luhmann's system theory provides a useful set of criteria to evaluate and judge health region development. Fully developed health regions can be understood as auto-poietic systems. By emphasizing programs, personnel, and communication channels, these case studies illustrate the suitability of the system theory toolset to analyze the governance and spatial embeddedness of health regions. Additionally, the study contributes to literature by indicating that health regions are closely related to identity issues and to decision making in regions. PMID:24923839

  4. DIAGNOSTIC TOOL DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION THROUGH REGIONAL CASE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Case studies are a useful vehicle for developing and testing conceptual models, classification systems, diagnostic tools and models, and stressor-response relationships. Furthermore, case studies focused on specific places or issues of interest to the Agency provide an excellent ...

  5. EVOLUTION OF A REGIONAL WATER SUPPLY: A CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was done to describe the development of a regional water supply system around the City of Dallas, Texas, and to summarize the issues surrounding the regionalization process. Data were gathered from written histories of Dallas, the City of Dallas Water Utilities Department...

  6. Regional University Access: A Case Study from the South West.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eversole, Robyn

    A study examined university service delivery in an isolated, inland region of south Western Australia. Surveys, focus groups, and interviews with students and former students found that many pre-university youths leave the area because education is only offered through year 10. Therefore, college students in the area tend to be mature-aged. Key…

  7. Regional aspects of the energy crisis: East European case study

    SciTech Connect

    Merkin, V.O.

    1985-01-01

    The energy crisis occurring in Eastern Europe owes much to the Stalinist model of energy-intensive industrialization applied to a basically energy short region still partially isolated from the world energy market. Systemic factors are thus much more important than in the West. Due to this, solutions to the energy crisis in the East of Europe, be it through supply augmentation or conservation, belong as much in the sphere of politics and ideology as they do in the sphere of economics. The dissertation examines in a systematic manner the evolution and prospects of the energy economy in the region (Chapter 1), the present sectoral pattern of energy consumption (Chapter 2), and conversion (thermo-electric conversion in Chapter 3 and oil refining in Chapter 4). Four subsequent chapters are devoted to individual energy-consuming sectors such as industry, transportation, agriculture, and households. Finally, the potential and problems of energy conservation in Eastern Europe are analyzed in the context of broader economic policies and concerns of the states of the region. In the conclusion, topics in the energy economy of Eastern Europe requiring further study are outlined.

  8. Suprathermal helium associated with corotating interaction regions: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J.; Berger, L.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Hilchenbach, M.; Kallenbach, R.; Klecker, B.; Guo, J.

    2016-03-01

    Enhancements of suprathermal particles observed at 1AU often can be related to Corotating Interaction Regions (CIRs). The compression regions associated with CIRs and their driven shocks which typically form at a few AU distance to the Sun can efficiently accelerate particles. If accelerated at the trailing edge of a CIR these particles can travel sunward along the ambient magnetic field and thus enhanced fluxes can be observed even if the acceleration region has passed over the spacecraft. We have analysed a CIR that has been observed at L1 by ACE/SWICS and SOHO/CELIAS/STOF on days 207 and 208 in 2003. The combination of SWICS and STOF data allowed us to study suprathermal Helium ranging from its onset at solar wind bulk energies up to 330 keV/nuc. Here we present our results for the temporal evolution of the flux, energy spectra and the He+/He++ ratio. In particular we present observational evidence for a turnover of the energy spectra at lower energies after the CIR passage which has been theoretically predicted but never been observed so far.

  9. Geophysical analysis for the Ada Tepe region (Bulgaria) - case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifonova, Petya; Metodiev, Metodi; Solakov, Dimcho; Simeonova, Stela; Vatseva, Rumiana

    2013-04-01

    According to the current archeological investigations Ada Tepe is the oldest gold mine in Europe with Late Bronze and Early Iron age. It is a typical low-sulfidation epithermal gold deposit and is hosted in Maastrichtian-Paleocene sedimentary rocks above a detachment fault contact with underlying Paleozoic metamorphic rocks. Ada Tepe (25o.39'E; 41o.25'N) is located in the Eastern Rhodope unit. The region is highly segmented despite the low altitude (470-750 m) due to widespread volcanic and sediment rocks susceptible to torrential erosion during the cold season. Besides the thorough geological exploration focused on identifying cost-effective stocks of mineral resources, a detailed geophysical analysis concernig diferent stages of the gold extraction project was accomplished. We present the main results from the geophysical investigation aimed to clarify the complex seismotectonic setting of the Ada Tepe site region. The overall study methodology consists of collecting, reviewing and estimating geophysical and seismological information to constrain the model used for seismic hazard assessment of the area. Geophysical information used in the present work consists of gravity, geomagnetic and seismological data. Interpretation of gravity data is applied to outline the axes of steep gravity transitions marked as potential axes of faults, flexures and other structures of dislocation. Direct inverse techniques are also utilized to estimate the form and depth of anomalous sources. For the purposes of seismological investigation of the Ada Tepe site region an earthquake catalogue is compiled for the time period 510BC - 2011AD. Statistical parameters of seismicity - annual seismic rate parameter, ?, and the b-value of the Gutenberg-Richter exponential relation for Ada Tepe site region, are estimated. All geophysical datasets and derived results are integrated using GIS techniques ensuring interoperability of data when combining, processing and visualizing obtained

  10. Education and Regional Development: An Irish Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Buachalla, Seamus P.

    Among the range of resources in the Mid-West Region of Ireland, higher education is an important, if costly, element. Five university institutions, eight colleges of education, two colleges of technology, and since 1970 nine regional technical colleges offer a higher education. The very large second level student body of the Limerick region was…

  11. Case study of a complex active-region filament eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, X. L.; Qu, Z. Q.; Kong, D. F.; Deng, L. H.; Xue, Z. K.

    2013-09-01

    Context. We investigated a solar active-region filament eruption associated with a C6.6 class flare and a coronal mass ejection (CME) in NOAA active region 08858 on 2000 February 9. Aims: We aim to better understand the relationship between filament eruptions and the associated flares and CMEs. Methods: Using BBSO, SOHO/EIT, and TRACE observational data, we analyzed the process of the active-region filament eruption in the chromosphere and the corona. Using the SOHO/MDI magnetograms, we investigated the change of the magnetic fields in the photosphere. Using the GOES soft X-ray flux and the SOHO/LASCO images, we identified the flare and CME, which were associated with this active-region filament eruption. Results: The brightenings in the chromosphere are a precursor of the filament expansion. The eruption itself can be divided into four phases: In the initial phase, the intertwined bright and dark strands of the filament expand. Then, the bright strands are divided into three parts with different expansion velocity. Next, the erupting filament-carrying flux rope expands rapidly and combines with the lower part of the expanding bright strands. Finally, the filament erupts accompanied by other dark strands overlying the filament.The overlying magnetic loops and the expansion of the filament strands can change the direction of the eruption. Conclusions: The time delay between the velocity peaks of the filament and that of the two parts of the bright strands clearly demonstrates that the breakup of the bright loops tying on the filament into individual strands is important for its eruption. The eruption is a collection of multiple processes that are physically coupled rather than a single process.

  12. Regional conditions during the 25 October 1986 FIRE cirrus/altocumulus case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starr, David; Sassen, Kenneth

    1990-01-01

    The regional cloud and meteorological conditions are described for this case using satellite imagery (GOES), dual polarization lidar data, NWS radar, NMC analyses, rawinsonde data including special soundings, and analyzed vertical motions. These observations are interpreted with respect to relationships between the observed cloud characteristics and corresponding atmospheric structure. Similarities with the 27 to 28 Oct. FIRE Cirrus Case Study are noted.

  13. Regional Consortia for E-Resources: A Case Study of Deals in the South China Region

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chunrong, Luo; Jingfen, Wang; Zhinong, Zhou

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to analyse the current situation and the social and economic benefits from the consortia acquisitions of electronic resources by the China Academic Library and Information System (CALIS) South China Regional Centre and to recommend improvements for consortia acquisitions. Design/methodology/approach: Analyses…

  14. Collected Case Study Evaluations of the Appalachian Regional Commission's Educational Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartfai, Nicole; Kleiner, Brian; Nyre, Glenn; Plishker, Laurie; Silverstein, Gary; Snow, Kyle

    As part of an evaluation of educational projects funded by the Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC) during the 1990s, case studies were conducted at eight sites in four Appalachian states. The sites reflected a range of project types, including school programs, adult literacy, distance education, and dropout prevention. Site visits allowed for a…

  15. Social Capital and Economic Development in Regional Australia: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodhouse, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a case study of social capital and economic development conducted in two towns in regional Australia between 2001 and 2002. The hypothesis driving the research states that a town displaying a high level of social capital will also display a high level of economic development, while a town with a low level of…

  16. Regional Networks in Education: A Case Study of an Austrian Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rauch, Franz

    2013-01-01

    This case study presents the development of networks in education, using the Austrian IMST (Innovations Make Schools Top) project as illustration. The regional networks are coordinated in every Austrian federal province by groups made up of teachers, representatives of the educational authorities, and members of academia. In the framework of the…

  17. SITE-SPECIFIC SOCIOECONOMIC IMPACTS: SEVEN CASE STUDIES IN THE OHIO RIVER BASIN ENERGY STUDY REGION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report was prepared as part of the Ohio River Basin Energy Study (ORBES), a multidisciplinary policy research program. The general project focus is on the regional impacts of various alternative energy development futures in the study region, which consists of all of Kentuck...

  18. Risk Factors for Primary Pulmonary TB in Almaty Region, Kazakhstan: A Matched Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    ZHUSSUPOV, Baurzhan; HERMOSILLA, Sabrina; TERLIKBAYEVA, Assel; AIFAH, Angela; MA, Xin; ZHUMADILOV, Zhaxybay; ABILDAYEV, Tleukhan; DARISHEVA, Meruyert; BERIKKHANOVA, Kulzhan

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study examined the association between incident pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) and social and behavioral characteristics in Almaty Oblast, Kazakhstan from 2012 to 2013. Methods: We used a matched case-control design to estimate the role of factors for acquiring pulmonary TB. Totally 324 individuals were recruited from Sep 2012 to Mar 2013. Participants included 110 TB index cases with newly detected pulmonary TB. Each case was matched with one household and one community control. A total of 107 household and 107 community controls were included to the study. Adjusted odds ratios measuring associations between TB and risk factors were calculated by using a conditional multiple logistic regression analysis. Results: TB cases were more likely to be younger, recent smokers and have diabetes, when compared to household controls. Between TB cases and community controls, TB was significantly associated with age, non-married family status, living in a rented home, recent smoker, and having diabetes. Comparing TB cases with community controls, we found that foreign birth was marginally associated with incident TB case status. Conclusion: Our findings confirm the role of modifiable risk factors for TB in Kazakhstan; highlighting the importance of developing interventions addressing social determinants and proximate risk factors for high TB burden regions. PMID:27252913

  19. Modeling for regional ecosystem sustainable development under uncertainty--A case study of Dongying, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, K; Li, Y P; Huang, G H; You, L; Jin, S W

    2015-11-15

    In this study, a superiority-inferiority two-stage stochastic programming (STSP) method is developed for planning regional ecosystem sustainable development. STSP can tackle uncertainties expressed as fuzzy sets and probability distributions; it can be used to analyze various policy scenarios that are associated with different levels of economic penalties when the promised targets are violated. STSP is applied to a real case of planning regional ecosystem sustainable development in the City of Dongying, where ecosystem services valuation approaches are incorporated within the optimization process. Regional ecosystem can provide direct and indirect services and intangible benefits to local economy. Land trading mechanism is introduced for planning the regional ecosystem's sustainable development, where wetlands are buyers who would protect regional ecosystem components and self-organization and maintain its integrity. Results of regional ecosystem activities, land use patterns, and land trading schemes have been obtained. Results reveal that, although large-scale reclamation projects can bring benefits to the local economy development, they can also bring with negative effects to the coastal ecosystem; among all industry activities oil field is the major contributor with a large number of pollutant discharges into local ecosystem. Results also show that uncertainty has an important role in successfully launching such a land trading program and trading scheme can provide more effective manner to sustain the regional ecosystem. The findings can help decision makers to realize the sustainable development of ecological resources in the process of rapid industrialization, as well as the integration of economic and ecological benefits. PMID:26179784

  20. Cysts in Periradicular Region of Deciduous Molars in Mixed Dentition: Retrospective Study of Five Cases

    PubMed Central

    Chavan, Ankush; Wadde, Kavita; Dewalwar, Vishal

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT% The cyst in mixed dentition stage cause expansion of buccal cortex, displacement of teeth and may present as case of infection. The cyst in periradicular region of deciduous molar are of frequent occurrence. The differential diagnosis of this lesion is radicular cysts of deciduous molar: developmental or infammatory dentigerous cyst of corresponding unerupted premolar. After going through the available literature of radicular cyst of deciduous molars and dentigerous cysts of developing premolars in mixed dentition we studied the five cases of cyst in periradicular region of deciduous molars in mixed dentition retrospectively for the diagnostic dilemma of radicular cyst verses dentigerous cyst. In conclusion, we can set some criteria for the diagnosis which is particularly important for treatment and for conservation of developing premolar. How to cite this article: Manekar VS, Chavan A, Wadde K, Dewalwar V. Cysts in Periradicular Region of Deciduous Molars in Mixed Dentition: Retrospective Study of Five Cases. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(3):229-235. PMID:25709310

  1. The South: Birmingham Case Study, and The South as a Region. Grade Five (Unit IV). Resource Unit. Project Social Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. Project Social Studies Curriculum Center.

    A case study on Birmingham is presented in the first part of this resource unit on regional studies designed for fifth graders. The objective of the sequent occupance unit is to illustrate the impact which the discovery and utilization of a large natural resource, namely, iron ore, can have on the development of a city, in the hope that students…

  2. New debris flow mitigation measures in southern Gansu, China: a case study of the Zhouqu Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Muqi; Meng, Xingmin; Li, Yajun

    2014-05-01

    A devastating debris flow occurred in Zhouqu of Gansu Province, China, on 8th August 2010, resulting in a catastrophic disaster, with 1463 people being perished. The debris flow valleys, as other numerous debris valleys in the mountainous region, had preventive engineering constructions, such as check dames, properly designed based on common engineering practices for safe guiding the town located right on the debris flow fan. However, failures of such preventive measures often cause even heavier disasters than those that have no human interactions, as the mitigations give a false safety impression. Given such a weird situation and in order to explore a much more effective disaster prevention strategy against debris flows in the mountainous region, this paper makes a comparative study based on two cases in the area of which one had preventive structures and one hasn't. The result shows that inappropriate mitigation measures that have commonly been applying in the disaster reduction practices in the region are of questionable. It is concluded that going with the nature and following with the natural rules are the best strategy for disaster reduction in the region. Key words: debris flow disasters, disaster reduction strategy, preventive measures

  3. Extending the temporal context of ethnobotanical databases: the case study of the Campania region (southern Italy)

    PubMed Central

    De Natale, Antonino; Pezzatti, Gianni Boris; Pollio, Antonino

    2009-01-01

    Background Ethnobotanical studies generally describe the traditional knowledge of a territory according to a "hic et nunc" principle. The need of approaching this field also embedding historical data has been frequently acknowledged. With their long history of civilization some regions of the Mediterranean basin seem to be particularly suited for an historical approach to be adopted. Campania, a region of southern Italy, has been selected for a database implementation containing present and past information on plant uses. Methods A relational database has been built on the basis of information gathered from different historical sources, including diaries, travel accounts, and treatises on medicinal plants, written by explorers, botanists, physicians, who travelled in Campania during the last three centuries. Moreover, ethnobotanical uses described in historical herbal collections and in Ancient and Medieval texts from the Mediterranean Region have been included in the database. Results 1672 different uses, ranging from medicinal, to alimentary, ceremonial, veterinary, have been recorded for 474 species listed in the data base. Information is not uniformly spread over the Campanian territory; Sannio being the most studied geographical area and Cilento the least one. About 50 plants have been continuously used in the last three centuries in the cure of the same affections. A comparison with the uses reported for the same species in Ancient treatises shows that the origin of present ethnomedicine from old learned medical doctrines needs a case-by-case confirmation. Conclusion The database is flexible enough to represent a useful tool for researchers who need to store and compare present and previous ethnobotanical uses from Mediterranean Countries. PMID:19228384

  4. [Prevention in times of economic crisis and spending review. The Lazio Region as a study case].

    PubMed

    Di Marco, Marco; Marzuillo, Carolina; De Vito, Corrado; Matarazzo, Azzurra; Massimi, Azzurra; Villari, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    With cutbacks being implemented across a wide range of social and government programs throughout Europe and the rest of the world, preventive services have become more vulnerable. In this context, it is essential to properly focus the debate on public healthcare expenditure, stressing that financing preventive services is not merely a cost, but an investment in citizen well-being as well as economic stability and development. In Italy indeed all seem to agree on three priorities: i) strengthening prevention activities; ii) reorganization of hospital care; and iii) reinforcement of primary care. A plenty of data are available in Italy from some recently published authoritative reports. Given that health policies should be driven by a solid evidence base, it is important to look at the available data to understand if these priorities are justified. The Lazio Region, which is particularly under pressure since it is one of the regions with a formal regional recovery plan (Piano di Rientro), was chosen as a case-study. In the Lazio Region public health care expenditure is particularly high, but the health care expenditure for prevention activities is among the lowest of the Italian Regions. Major weakness points documented by the essential levels of care indicators included recommended vaccinations coverage, oncological screening programs, residential beds for the elderly and persons with disability and hospital care efficiency. Avoidable mortality is higher in the Lazio than in the rest of the country, as well as the prevalence of some major behavioral risk factors. Even if all data available support the choice to consider prevention activities as a priority, it is essential to increasing the value of prevention, investing money in preventive interventions of proven effectiveness and cost-effectiveness and promoting synergies with institutions outside the health care sector, implementing in a more efficient way the principle of Health in All Policies. PMID:24548905

  5. Constructing Perceptions of Climate Change: a case study of regional political decision makers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, D.

    2012-12-01

    This case study of climate change communications assesses the salient means of communication and the message adopted by regional political decision makers on the German Baltic coast. Realizing that cultural factors and local values (and not simply knowledge) are significant influences in explaining attitudes towards climate change, this analysis draws from the records of regional weather, from scientists with a specific focus on the region, from the political decision makers for that region, and the media message reaching the decision makers, ensuring all elements of the analysis are drawn from the same socioeconomic, geophysical, political and cultural context. This is important as the social dynamics surrounding the trust in science is of critical importance and, as such, all elements of the case study are specifically contained within a common context. If the utility of climate change knowledge is to prompt well conceived adaptation/mitigation strategies then the political decision process, or at least the perceptions shaping it, can best be understood by locating it within the world view of the decision makers involved in the production process. Using the results of two survey questionnaires, one of regional climate scientists and one of regional political decision makers, ten years of local weather records, and a summary of the message from mass media circulation, the discord in perceptions of regional climate change are quantitatively explored. The conclusions drawn from the analysis include, compared to the scientific assessment: The decision makers' perceptions of recent past differ from actual observations. The decision makers' perceptions of the future differ from scientific assessments. The decision makers tend to over estimate the magnitude of regional climate change and its impacts. The decision makers tend to over estimate the sense of immediacy for adaptation measures. The conclusions drawn suggest that in the regional political realm, it is often a

  6. Prediction of Frost Risks and Plagues using WRF model: a Port Wine region case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, M. A.; Rocha, A.; Monteiro, A.; Quénol, H.; de Freitas, J. R.

    2012-04-01

    In viticulture where the quality of the wine, the selection of the grapevines or even the characteristics of the farming soil, also depending from local soil features like topography, proximity of a river or water body, will act locally on the weather. Frosts are of significant concern to growers of many cultures crops such as winegrapes. Because of their high latitude and some altitude, the vineyards of the Demarcated Douro Region (DDR) are subjected to the frost, which cause serious damages. But the hazards of vineyard don't confine to the incidents of the fortuitous and meteorological character. The illnesses and plagues affect frequently the vineyards of Demarcated Douro Region due, namely to the weather, to the high power of the regional stocks, to the dense vegetation badly drained and favourable to the setting of numberless fungi, viruses and/or poisonous insects. In the case of DDR it is worth noticing the meteorological conditions due to the weather characteristics. Although there are several illnesses and plagues the most important enemies for the vine in the DDR are the mildew, oidium, grey rottenness, grape moth,. . . , if the climatic conditions favour their appearance and development. For this study, we selected some months for different periods, at the 16 weather stations of the Region of Douro. We use the Weather Research and Forecast Model (WRF) to study and possibly predict the occurrence of risk and plagues (mildew) episodes. The model is first validated with the meteorological data obtained at the weather stations. The knowledge of frost and plagues occurrence allows one to decrease its risks not only by selecting the cultural species and varieties but also the places of growth and the planting and sowing dates.

  7. Case study modeling of turbulent and mesoscale fluxes over the BOREAS region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vidale, P.L.; Pielke, R.A., Sr.; Steyaert, L.T.; Barr, A.

    1997-01-01

    Results from aircraft and surface observations provided evidence for the existence of mesoscale circulations over the Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) domain. Using an integrated approach that included the use of analytical modeling, numerical modeling, and data analysis, we have found that there are substantial contributions to the total budgets of heat over the BOREAS domain generated by mesoscale circulations. This effect is largest when the synoptic flow is relatively weak, yet it is present under less favorable conditions, as shown by the case study presented here. While further analysis is warranted to document this effect, the existence of mesoscale flow is not surprising, since it is related to the presence of landscape patches, including lakes, which are of a size on the order of the local Rossby radius and which have spatial differences in maximum sensible heat flux of about 300 W m-2. We have also analyzed the vertical temperature profile simulated in our case study as well as high-resolution soundings and we have found vertical profiles of temperature change above the boundary layer height, which we attribute in part to mesoscale contributions. Our conclusion is that in regions with organized landscapes, such as BOREAS, even with relatively strong synoptic winds, dynamical scaling criteria should be used to assess whether mesoscale effects should be parameterized or explicitly resolved in numerical models of the atmosphere.

  8. Transport of anthropogenic emissions during ARCTAS-A: a climatology and regional case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrigan, D. L.; Fuelberg, H. E.; Simpson, I. J.; Blake, D. R.; Carmichael, G. R.; Diskin, G. S.

    2011-02-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) conducted the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) mission during 2008 as a part of the International Polar Year (IPY). The purpose of ARCTAS was to study the factors responsible for changes in the Arctic's atmospheric composition and climate. A major emphasis was to investigate Arctic haze, which is most pronounced during winter and early spring. This study focuses on the spring phase of ARCTAS (ARCTAS-A) that was based in Alaska during April 2008. Although anthropogenic emissions historically have been associated with Arctic haze, biomass burning dominated the ARCTAS-A period and has been the focus of many ARCTAS related studies. This study determines the common pathways for anthropogenic emissions during ARCTAS-A. Trajectories (air parcels) are released each day from three historically significant regions of anthropogenic emissions (Asia, North America, and Europe). These fifteen day forward trajectories are calculated using data from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model at 45 km horizontal resolution. The trajectories then are examined to determine: origins of emissions that reach the Arctic (defined as north of 70° N) within fifteen days, pathways of the emissions reaching the Arctic, Arctic entry locations, and altitudes at which the trajectories enter the Arctic. These results serve as regional "climatologies" for the ARCTAS-A period. Three cases during the ARCTAS-A period (one for each of the regions above) are examined using backward trajectories and chemical fingerprinting based on in situ data sampled from the NASA DC-8. The fingerprinting utilizes volatile organic compounds that represent pure anthropogenic tracers, Asian anthropogenic pollution, incomplete combustion, and natural gas emissions. We determine flight legs containing anthropogenic emissions and the pathways travelled by these emissions. Results show that the DC-8

  9. Toward modeling regionally specific human security using GIS: case study Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Owen, Taylor; Slaymaker, Olav

    2005-08-01

    A new methodology for measuring human security is presented. The three stages of the methodology are: i) threat assessment, ii) data collection and organization, and iii) data visualization and analysis, using Geographic Information Systems. Results from a Cambodia case study are highlighted. The United Nations Development Program's notion of human security, which gives equal weight to economic, health, food, political, personal, and environmental factors, is used. Country-specific threats in each category are determined, and local, spatially referenced data are collected. In this paper, poverty, dengue fever, and tuberculosis are used as examples of the analytic process. Regions of Cambodia exposed to all three of these threats ("hot spots") are located, and spatial correlation between poverty, dengue fever, and tuberculosis is calculated. The methodology i) advances a broad concept of human security, ii) will potentially assist policy and decision makers, and iii) identifies research questions that cannot be resolved using single-sector analysis. PMID:16201215

  10. Methodology for Elaborating Regional Susceptibility Maps of Slope Instability: the State of Guerrero (mexico) Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Huesca, A. E.; Ferrés, D.; Domínguez-M, L.

    2013-05-01

    Numerous cases of different types of slope instability occur every year in the mountain areas of México. Sometimes these instabilities severely affect the exposed communities, roads and infrastructure, causing deaths and serious material damage, mainly in the states of Puebla, Veracruz, Oaxaca, Guerrero and Chiapas, at the central and south sectors of the country. The occurrence of the slope instability is the result of the combination of climatic, geologic, hydrologic, geomorphologic and anthropogenic factors. The National Center for Disaster Prevention (CENAPRED) is developing several projects in order to offer civil protection authorities of the Mexican states some methodologies to address the hazard assessment for different natural phenomena in a regional level. In this framework, during the past two years, a methodology was prepared to construct susceptibility maps for slope instability at regional (≤ 1:100 000) and national (≤ 1:1 000 000) levels. This research was addressed in accordance to the criteria established by the International Association of Engineering Geology, which is the highest international authority in this topic. The state of Guerrero has been taken as a pilot scheme to elaborate the susceptibility map for slope instability at a regional level. The major constraints considered in the methodology to calculate susceptibility are: a) the slope of the surface, b) the geology and c) the land use, which were integrated using a Geographic Information System (GIS). The arithmetic sum and weighting factors to obtain the final susceptibility map were based on the average values calculated in the individual study of several cases of slope instability occurred in the state in the past decade. For each case, the evaluation format proposed by CENAPRED in 2006 in the "Guía Básica para la elaboración de Atlas Estatales y Municipales de Peligros y Riesgos" to evaluate instabilities in a local level, was applied. The resulting susceptibility map shows

  11. Anthropogenic emissions during Arctas-A: mean transport characteristics and regional case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrigan, D. L.; Fuelberg, H. E.; Simpson, I. J.; Blake, D. R.; Carmichael, G. R.; Diskin, G. S.

    2011-08-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) conducted the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) mission during 2008 as a part of the International Polar Year (IPY). The purpose of ARCTAS was to study the factors responsible for changes in the Arctic's atmospheric composition and climate. A major emphasis was to investigate Arctic haze, which is most pronounced during winter and early spring. This study focuses on the spring phase of ARCTAS (ARCTAS-A) that was based in Alaska during April 2008. Although anthropogenic emissions historically have been associated with Arctic haze, biomass burning emissions dominated the ARCTAS-A period and have been the focus of many ARCTAS related studies. This study determines mean transport characteristics of anthropogenic emissions during ARCTAS-A. Trajectories are initiated each day from three significant regions of anthropogenic emissions (Asia, North America, and Europe). The fifteen day forward trajectories are calculated using data from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model at 45 km horizontal resolution. The trajectory calculations indicate: origins of emissions that reach the Arctic (defined as north of 70° N) within fifteen days, pathways of these emissions, Arctic entry locations, and altitudes at which the trajectories enter the Arctic. Three cases during the ARCTAS-A period (one for each of the regions above) are examined using backward trajectories and chemical fingerprinting based on in situ data sampled from the NASA DC-8. The fingerprinting utilizes volatile organic compounds that represent pure anthropogenic tracers, Asian anthropogenic pollution, incomplete combustion, and natural gas emissions. We determine flight legs containing anthropogenic emissions and the pathways travelled by these emissions. Results show that the DC-8 sampled anthropogenic emissions from Asia, North America, and Europe during the spring phase of ARCTAS. The

  12. Mitochondrial haplogroups and hypervariable region polymorphisms in schizophrenia: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guo-xia; Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Yun-tao; Dong, Yu-shu; Lv, Zhuang-wei; Sun, Mao; Wu, Dan; Wu, Yuan-ming

    2013-10-30

    Previous studies have detected associations between mitochondrial haplogroups and schizophrenia (SZ). However, no study has examined the relationship between major mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups and SZ in the Chinese population. The aim of this study was to assess the association between mtDNA haplogroups and SZ genesis in the Chinese Han population. We used a case-control study and sequenced the mtDNA hypervariable regions (HVR1, HVR2, and HVR3) in the Han population. We analyzed mtDNA haplogroups and HVR polymorphisms in 298 SZ patients and 298 controls. The haplotypes were classified into 10 major haplogroups: A, B, CZ, D, F, G, M, N, N9a, and R. Statistical analysis revealed that only N9a showed a nominally significant association with protection from SZ [1.68% vs. 6.38%, p=0.004, OR=0.251 (0.092-0.680); after adjustment for age and sex: p=0.006, OR=0.246 (0.090-0.669)]. Three HVR polymorphisms were found to be nominally significantly different between subjects with SZ and controls, and all except one (m.204T>C) are linked to the N9a haplogroup. Our results indicate that mtDNA haplogroup N9a might be a protective factor for SZ. PMID:23374981

  13. The hidden regional costs of improving irrigation efficiency: a case study from India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grogan, D. S.; Frolking, S. E.; Lammers, R. B.; Wisser, D.; Proussevitch, A. A.; Glidden, S.

    2013-12-01

    Indian agriculture depends heavily on groundwater pumping. These water withdrawals are not all consumed directly by the crops they irrigate; estimated irrigation inefficiencies indicate that two thirds of irrigation water withdrawals in India are 'lost'. Withdrawals lost through leaky canals and flood irrigation systems become runoff and re-enter the surface water system. This mechanism causes irrigation inefficiencies to re-distribute water across basins, and can significantly alter the amount of surface water available both locally and downstream. In this study we used a gridded water balance model to track the path of groundwater from its pumping location, through irrigation systems, and to its downstream consumption or discharge from river mouths. We find that nearly half of all groundwater pumped at rates higher than recharge are re-used downstream. Furthermore, increasing the efficiency of irrigation systems has the potential to decrease surface water levels downstream. We used the water balance model to simulate scenarios of increased irrigation efficiency and find that doubling efficiency does not reduce India's dependence on pumping deep groundwater by half as would be expected from standard measures of irrigation efficiency, but rather by only 38%. Increasing irrigation efficiency to 100% (i.e., no irrigation water losses) causes a decrease in modeled river discharge in both the Indus and the Ganges. The water balance model can also simulate scenarios in which groundwater pumping is limited to recharge rates. In this case, increasing irrigation efficiency to 100% results in a decrease in available surface water across large regions of eastern India, revealing the region's dependence on surface water that was originally sourced from deep groundwater pumping upstream. These results have two important implications. First, they raise questions about the strategy of increasing irrigation efficiency as a strategy for reducing water stress. Second, they show

  14. Impact of Water Availability on Regional Power System Operations - A Case Study of ERCOT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, T.; Zhou, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Impact of water availability on regional power system operations - A case study of ERCOT Thermal power plants are the largest single source of water withdrawals in the United States, mainly for cooling purposes. The amount of water that is required for cooling is highly dependent on a number of factors including the generation technologies being used, the temperature of the input water, and the total electricity load in the system. During summer months, many of these factors coincide to greatly increase the demand for water in a power system. Electricity demand typically reaches its annual peak when temperatures are high due to increased air conditioning loads. Ambient water temperatures also increase, meaning that greater quantities of water are required to provide the same amount of cooling at thermal generation plants. Finally, water availability is generally constrained due to seasonal effects and potential droughts. This raises concerns that water scarcity may lead to forced de-rating at some power plants during periods of peak demand, resulting in a more vulnerable and less reliable energy system. While increasing attention has recently been given to the inexorable link between water and energy, most commercial power models do not explicitly account for water use when optimizing system operation. We apply the AURORAxmp power modeling software to a case study analysis of the ERCOT power system to determine the water requirements of the system during periods of peak power demand. We then analyze water availability by location and time to identify potential supply shortages, which may reduce actual power generation availability. These data are fed back into the power systems model and specific generation units are de-rated as necessitated by water constraints. We then analyze these results to determine how the optimal generation mix, system reliability, and wholesale electricity prices may be affected by when the ERCOT power system is operated under water

  15. CO{sub 2} storage possibilities in karstik regions: A case study from southwestern Turkey

    SciTech Connect

    Sener, M.; Tufekci, K.

    2008-07-01

    In Turkey, the three power plants (Yataan, Yenikoy, and Kemerkoy) in the southwestern part of Anatolia use Upper Miocene-Pliocene coal and cause environmental pollution in the winter. For this reason, some considerations have been given to the injection of CO{sub 2} from the power plants into the crust. A research project has been put into the practice for decreasing of global warming. Karstification and geological features, which are included in very thick carbonate rocks (a thickness over 2,000 m and limestone, dolomite, and marble from Paleozoic to Pliocene), and faults-lineaments have been considered as very important agents that will affect the injection of CO{sub 2}. The micro- and macro-karstification and lineament of the region have been studied, and the rocks of the area have been grouped into two classes based on the appropriateness of karstification as suitable and unsuitable rocks. Karstic and geological features (rocks and dislocation lines) have been compared together in a Geographic Information Systems (GIS); thus, by taking note of the geological-geomorphological characteristics of the area, a case study has been proposed for the CO{sub 2} injection from the Gokova power plant emissions with GIS applications, and suitable areas for the injection have been determined for further research.

  16. Modeling transport of energetic particles in corotating interaction regions: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lulu; Li, Gang; Ebert, R. W.; Dayeh, M. A.; Desai, M. I.; Mason, G. M.; Wu, Z.; Chen, Y.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate energetic particle transport in corotating interaction regions (CIRs) through a case study. The CIR event we study occurred on 8 February 2008 and was observed by both the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) and the twin Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO) B spacecraft. An in situ reverse shock was observed by STEREO B (1.0 AU) but not ACE (0.98 AU). Using STEREO B observations and assuming the CIR structure does not vary significantly in the corotating frame, we estimate the shock location at later times for both the STEREO B and ACE observations. Further assuming the accelerated particle spectral shape at the shock does not vary with shock location, we calculate the particle differential intensities as observed by ACE and STEREO B at two different times by solving the focused transport equation using a Monte Carlo simulation. We assume that particles move along Parker's field and experience no cross-field diffusion. We find that the modulation of sub-MeV/nucleon particles is significant. To obtain reasonable comparisons between the simulations and the observations by both ACE and STEREO B, one has to assume that the CIR shock can accelerate more particles at a larger heliocentric distance than at a smaller heliocentric distance.

  17. Flow-type landslides magnitude evaluation: the case study of the Campania Region (Southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santo, Antonio; De Falco, Melania; Di Crescenzo, Giuseppe

    2015-04-01

    In the last years studies concerning the triggering and the run-out susceptibility for different kind of landslides have become more and more precise. In the most of the cases the methodological approach involve the production of detailed thematic maps (at least 1:5000 scale) which represent a very useful tool for territorial planning, especially in urbanized areas. More recently these researches were accompanied by the growth of other studies dealing with landslide magnitude evaluation (especially in terms of volume and velocity estimate). In this paper the results of a flow-type landslides magnitude evaluation are presented. The study area is located in Southern Italy and is very wide (1,500 square kilometres) including all the Campania region. In this context flow type landslides represent the most frequent instabilities as shown by the large number of victims and the huge economic damage caused in the last few centuries. These shallow landslides involve thin cohesionless, unsaturated pyroclastic soils found over steep slopes around Somma-Vesuvio and Phlegrean district, affecting a wide area where over 100 towns are located. Since the potential volume of flow-type landslides is a measure of event magnitude we propose to estimate the potential volume at the scale of slope or basin for about 90 municipalities affecting 850 hierarchized drainage basins and 900 regular slopes. An empirical approach recently proposed in literature (De Falco et al., 2012), allows to estimate the volume of the pyroclastic cover that can be displaced along the slope. The method derives from the interpretation of numerous geological and geomorphological data gathered from a vast amount of case histories on landslides in volcanic and carbonatic contexts and it is based on determining the thickness of the pyroclastic cover and the width of the detachment and erosion-transport zone. Thickness can be evaluated with a good degree of approximation since, in these landslides, the failure

  18. An Institutional Case Study of Colleges and Universities Associated with Sea Grant in the Pacific Region of the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrmann, Adelheid C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine fishery degree programs at colleges and universities associated with the Sea Grant program in the Pacific region of the United States and to describe how each addresses protecting, rebuilding, and maintaining healthy oceans. Methodology: The study was a qualitative institutional case study that…

  19. Space geodiversity review: a case study in the southwestern region of Paraná State, Brazil.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manosso, Fernando; Tauana Basso, Bruna; Alcindo Da Roza, Douglas; Souza dos Santos, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    types, landforms, occurrence of fossils, drainage system, soil and other processes that outline the geodiversity. In addition to the wealth index number, which presents a quantity and area ratio, another way of analyzing the geodiversity of a case study is the abundance, dominance or the relative frequency of geodiversity (Carcavilla et al, 2007). As for the southwestern region of Paraná State case study, we used a set of cartographic databases at the 1:250.000 scale; for example: geomorphological and soil compartments, rivers, geological formations, structural lineaments, as well as temperature, rainfall and humidity average maps. The maps were organized relating the attribute tables, quantifying the sum of different elements each sample cell contained in a regular grid of 4km2. As a result, a map of the geodiversity wealth index of the region has been generated. High geodiversity wealth index comprises more carved valleys with steep slopes on some structural lines; on the other hand, less wealthy areas are located on softer relief plateaus with large hills, more homogeneous soils and lower relief structural control. These results, as well as adjustments and efficiency of the method seem to indicate an important tool for area management, especially regarding the selection of priority areas for nature conservation.

  20. Assessment of Regional Sustainability Based on Modified Ecological Footprint: A Case Study of Suzhou, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Haizhen; Li, Aimei; Ye, Tian

    2010-11-01

    Ecological Footprint (EF) is an effective method to measure quantitatively sustainable development. However original EF analysis of sustainability at the regional scale provides easily misinterpreted information, which could not reflect truly the pressure of the regional population on the local ecosystem due to the regional import and export. A regional ecosystem could support the local population consumption entirely depending on import, while shift the ecological pressure to other regions and the local ecosystems is thus well preserved. To assess sustainability of a region exactly, two concepts of the consumptive EF and productive EF were put forward. As we acknowledged that original EF only measures human demand for biological goods and services, and does not capture other aspects of social or economic sustainability. Therefore, to assess comprehensively regional sustainability, we attempted to combine several social indicators including unit GDP (Gross Domestic Product) EF, integrated development satisfaction, comprehensive pressure index with the indicator of EF. Also the application to a municipal was discussed. The time series of EF of study area were accounted and the sustainable development status were assessed from 1993 to 2002. Based on the result of EF analysis and the realities of study area, the feasibility of amendments proposed were assessed. Results showed that the amendments proposed were reasonable and feasible, and the resized model could better evaluate the sustainability of a region.

  1. Observations about chemical composition of aerosols in the Brazilian Amazon region - Case study: Biomass burning in the subequatorial Amazon region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gioda, A.; Monteiro, I. L.; Almeida, A. C.; Hacon, S. S.; Dallacort, R.; Ignotti, E.; Godoy, J. M.; Loureiro, A. L.; Morais, F.; Artaxo, P.

    2012-04-01

    The study was carried out in two cities in the Brazilian Amazon region, Tangará da Serra (14 ° 37'10 "S, 57 ° 29'09" W, 427 m asl), located in a transition area between the Amazon biome and the Cerrado and has the characteristics of urban area in Amazon region; and Alta Floresta (9 ° 52 '32 "S, 56 ° 5' 10" W, 283 m asl) situated in the extreme north of the state of Mato Grosso (MT), both in the subequatorial Amazon region. Tangara da Serra has the largest production of sugar cane in the subequatorial Amazon region. They are located 800 km from each other. These two regions are inserted in a region with typical cycles of drought and rain that alter air pollution levels, and lies in the dispersion path of the pollution plume resulting from burnings in the Brazilian Amazon and pollution emanating from neighboring countries. Both cities have wet tropical climate with two well defined seasons: rainy summer (November to May) and dry winter (June to October). During the dry winter, biomass burnings are frequent in these regions. In 2008, the Department of the Environment has banned fires in the period from July 15 to September 15 throughout the State. In this study chemical characterization was performed for approximately 100 aerosol samples collected in each site during 2008. Fine and coarse aerosol samples collected in SFUs were analyzed by ion chromatography for determination of cations (Na+, K+, NH3+, Ca2+ and Mg2+), anions (SO42-, Cl- and NO3-) and organic acids (acetate and formiate) and also measures of black carbon (BC) (Aethalometer). The results showed that for both sites the average concentrations were quite similar for PM2.5 (16 µg/m3), PM10 (11 and 13 µg/m3) and black carbon (1.4 µg/m3 for PM2.5 and 1.6 µg/m3 for PM10). Sulfate was the predominant species in fine (45%) and coarse (26%) particles in both sites. The sulfate concentrations ranged from 0.01-1.92 µg/m3 in PM2.5 and 0.01-1.66 µg/m3 in PM10 in Tangará da Serra and 0.01-2.93 µg/m3 in PM2

  2. Proceedings of the workshop on regionalization of aquatic impacts using the Adirondacks as a case study

    SciTech Connect

    Dailey, N.S.; Olson, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    Alternative approaches to applying aquatic data from specific sites and surveys to additional areas within a region or to broader regions for analysis and assessment were examined. Studies conducted within the Adirondack Region of New York provided the principal information base for evaluating regional extrapolation. Primary data bases for the Adirondacks were reviewed and statistical and process modeling approaches were discussed as methodologies for regionalization. Small working groups of data analysts and modelers developed approaches moving toward regional extrapolation of Adirondack data sets, based on either estimating current impacts or predicting future impacts. This report outlines suggested approaches, recommendations for future research, and existing data needs. The discussions emphasized (1) the lack of information on the extent and mechanics of aquatic impacts in the Adirondack Region and across the United States as a whole, (2) the need for increased information exchanges, and (3) the need to develop modeling approaches for regionalization. Recommended approaches included the development of a classification system for surface waters and watersheds, based on select criteria and the development of second generation models which would incorporate select features from both simple and complex models.

  3. Developing and implementing a service charter for an integrated regional stroke service: an exploratory case study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Based on practices in commercial organizations and public services, healthcare organizations are using service charters to inform patients about the quality of service they can expect and to increase patient-centeredness. In the Netherlands, an integrated regional stroke service involving five organizations has developed and implemented a single service charter. The purpose of this study is to determine the organizational enablers for the effective development and implementation of this service charter. Methods We have conducted an exploratory qualitative study using Grounded Theory to determine the organizational enablers of charter development and implementation. Individual semi-structured interviews were held with all members of the steering committee and the taskforce responsible for the service charter. In these twelve interviews, participants were retrospectively asked for their opinions of the enablers. Interview transcripts have been analysed using Glaser’s approach of substantive coding consisting of open and selective coding in order to develop a framework of these enablers. A tabula rasa approach was used without any preconceived frameworks used in the coding process. Results We have determined seven categories of enablers formed of a total of 27 properties. The categories address a broad spectrum of enablers dealing with the basic foundations for cooperation, the way to manage the project’s organization and the way to implement the service charter. In addition to the enablers within each individual organization, enablers that reflect the whole chain seem to be important for the effective development and implementation of this service charter. Strategic alignment of goals within the chain, trust between organizations, willingness to cooperate and the extent of process integration are all important properties. Conclusions This first exploratory study into the enablers of the effective development and implementation was based on a single

  4. Carbon and Nitrogen Cycling in Urban Landscapes: Global, Regional Dynamics and Case Studies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svirejeva-Hopkins, A.; Nardoto, G. B.; Schellnhuber, H.

    2008-12-01

    The urban population has been growing rapidly in the last decades and is predicted to continue its exponential trend, especially in the developing countries, which would create additional pressure on the environment by overpopulated unsustainable cities and will continue to substantially change the main Biogeochemical cycles. Such disturbances in the main driving cycle of the Biosphere (global carbon cycle) and the nitrogen cycle, induced by sprawling urban human activities, lead to global, regional and local environmental problems, i.e. global warming, photochemical smog, stratospheric ozone depletion, soil acidification, nitrate pollution of surface and ground water, coastal ecosystem disturbances. Since urban areas are expected to continue their rapid expansion in the 21st century, accompanied by growing energy production, increased food demand, expanding transportation and industrialization it becomes more and more important to be able to describe and forecast the dynamics of biogeochemical functioning of these landscapes (which have altered characteristics compared to the natural ecosystems). Moreover, from the environmental policy perspective, a high density of people makes cities focal points of vulnerability to global environmental change. The model based on the forecasting the dynamics of urban area growth, allows us to forecast the dynamics of Carbon and Nitrogen on the urban territories at different scales. However, nitrogen cycle is very complex and is closely interlinked with the other major biogeochemical cycles, such as oxygen and water. The system of water supply and liquid waste carried by water out of the system 'city' is investigated. In order to better understand the mechanisms of cycling, we consider the case studies, when we investigated the detailed fluxes of Carbon and Nitrogen in Sao Paolo (Brazil) and Paris (France). When we know the yearly amounts of carbon and nitrogen, produced by a city, we should be capable of coming up with what

  5. Challenges of becoming a regional referral system: the University of Kentucky as a case study.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Robert L; Lofgren, Richard P; Birdwhistell, Mark D; Zembrodt, James W; Karpf, Michael

    2014-02-01

    The U.S. health care system must change because of unsustainable costs and limited access to care. Health care legislation and the recognition that health care costs must be curbed have accelerated the change process. How should academic medical centers (AMCs) respond? Teaching hospitals are a heterogeneous group, and the leaders of each must understand their institution's goals and the necessary resources to achieve them. Clinical leaders and staff at one AMC, the University of Kentucky (UK), committed to transforming the AMC into a regional referral center. To achieve this goal, UK leaders integrated the clinical enterprise, focused recruitment on advanced subspecialists, and initiated productive relationships with other providers. Attracting adequate numbers of destination patients with complex illnesses required UK to have a "market space" of five to seven million people. The resources required to effect such progress have been daunting. Relationships with providers and payers have been necessary to forge a network. These relationships have been challenging to establish and manage and have evolved over time. Most AMCs are not-for-profit public good entities that nevertheless exist in an industry driven by competition in quality and cost, and therefore scale and access to capital are paramount. AMC leaders must understand their institutions as both part of an industry and as a public good in order to adapt to the changing health care system. Although the experience of any particular AMC is inherently unique, UK's journey provides a useful case study in establishing institutional goals, outlining a strategy, and identifying required resources. PMID:24362394

  6. Immigrants from the Appalachian Region to the City of Columbus, Ohio: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rico-Velasco, Jesus Antonio

    The major purpose of the study was to provide information and test specific hypotheses about the causes and nature of the process of migration and the adjustment of Appalachian migrants to the city of Columbus, Ohio. In the study, the Appalachian region was approached not only as a geographic area but also as an ecological structure, a cultural…

  7. Blueprint for the development of low carbon society scenarios for Asian regions- case study of Iskandar Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, C. S.; Matsuoka, Y.; Chau, L. W.; Teh, B. T.; Simson, J. J.; Gomi, K.

    2013-06-01

    Malaysian government aims to reduce 40% reduction of carbon emission intensity by the year 2020 using 2005 as the base year. Several mitigation and adaptation strategies in addressing environmental and climate change are formulated at national, regional and local level to mitigate greenhouse gases. This paper aims to examine local and regional resilient policy actions to reduce greenhouse gases using the empirical case of Iskandar Malaysia. The study case is selected because it is one of the fast developing economic corridor regions in Malaysia. In this study, a low carbon society blueprint is initiated to guide the rapid development of this economic corridor towards low carbon green growth. The blueprint provides the sustainable green growth roadmap with major 12 actions for the region. It is done through a bottom-up approach where stakeholder discussions are carried out to allow local communities participation in the plan formulation.

  8. Assessing the regional ecological security: methodology and a case study for the western Jilin Province, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoyan; Xue, Linfu; Wang, Xikui

    2008-10-01

    Ecological security can be investigated in both broad sense and narrow sense. Because of the wide area and regional discrepancy in influencing factors and ecological background, the investigation on regional environment hasn't been done systematically. Assessment on regional security in fragile region is important content of sustainable development. The western Jilin Province lines in the semi-arid agro-pastoral interweaving belt (APIB),within which agriculture and animal husbandry interplay or frequently alternate with each other. Study on the regional ecological security of this region offer the scientific support for protecting the regional environment and sustainability. This article set up the Pressure-State-Response model according to the interaction between human and environmental system, and assessed the ecological safety degree in the western part of Jilin Province in year 2000, using compound model and Grid method based on GIS and RS. The Ecological Security Index (ESI) was calculated by multilayer synthesis with liner weighting function method, which divided the area into the following five different conditions: highly damaged, moderately damaged, early stages of damage, relative safely, and safety, regarding change of environmental key point as the threshold value that varied under the stress of human activity. The results show that eco-environment in study area is at medial level. The early stage of damage and relative safely level occupies the largest area proportion accounting for 68.61%. Furthermore, the condition in the eastern part is better than that of the western part and the most serious degradation is found in the middle part of the study area. When talking about the ten counties in the region, highly damaged area accounts for a very small percentage. The county that has the widest area of relatively secured area is Qian'an, and that of the smallest is Da'an. The areas of highly damaged area in Tongyu, Zhenlai and Da'an have exceeded 10% and

  9. Regional analysis of wind climatic erosivity factor: a case study in fars province, southwest Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouyan, S.; Ganji, A.; Behnia, P.

    2011-10-01

    Wind erosion climatic erosivity is a measure of the climatic tendency to produce conditions conducive to wind erosion. This research develops a method to determine the regional climate's tendency to cause wind erosion on the basis of a physically based climatic factor (CE) and linear moment analysis (L-moments) in Fars province, southwest Iran. CE is calculable from wind speed quantiles and other available meteorological data. The wind quantiles can be estimated by a frequency analysis of the available wind data. Wind speed data are often either not available or are of short record length, and thus, CE estimates from such data have large standard errors. In such a situation, data from several sites can be used to estimate wind speed quantiles at each site based on a regional frequency analysis. Monthly averages of maximum daily wind speed of 19 meteorological stations in Fars province were used for regional analysis. Based on L-moment analysis, two homogeneous regions were determined. Regional wind speed quantiles were calculated, and the results were used to calculate CE values for two 6-month wet and dry periods for each homogeneous region. Furthermore, CE values were estimated for each station in the study area using a Weibull distribution, and the results were compared with the regional-based CE values. It showed that CE values estimated using the regional-based approach have smaller sampling variance compared to those obtained from the Weibull method. The proposed method can be used to evaluate the regional risk of wind erosion in arid and semi-arid environments.

  10. Multilayer perceptron neural network for downscaling rainfall in arid region: A case study of Baluchistan, Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Kamal; Shahid, Shamsuddin; Haroon, Sobri Bin; Xiao-jun, Wang

    2015-08-01

    Downscaling rainfall in an arid region is much challenging compared to wet region due to erratic and infrequent behaviour of rainfall in the arid region. The complexity is further aggregated due to scarcity of data in such regions. A multilayer perceptron (MLP) neural network has been proposed in the present study for the downscaling of rainfall in the data scarce arid region of Baluchistan province of Pakistan, which is considered as one of the most vulnerable areas of Pakistan to climate change. The National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) reanalysis datasets from 20 grid points surrounding the study area were used to select the predictors using principal component analysis. Monthly rainfall data for the time periods 1961-1990 and 1991-2001 were used for the calibration and validation of the MLP model, respectively. The performance of the model was assessed using various statistics including mean, variance, quartiles, root mean square error (RMSE), mean bias error (MBE), coefficient of determination (R 2) and Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE). Comparisons of mean monthly time series of observed and downscaled rainfall showed good agreement during both calibration and validation periods, while the downscaling model was found to underpredict rainfall variance in both periods. Other statistical parameters also revealed good agreement between observed and downscaled rainfall during both calibration and validation periods in most of the stations.

  11. The Permeability of Dialect Boundaries: A Case Study of the Region Surrounding Erie, Pennsylvania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evanini, Keelan

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation presents a dialectological study of the city of Erie, Pennsylvania, and the neighboring towns in the boundary area between the North and Midland dialect regions. Erie occupies a unique place in the dialect geography of North America, in that it appears to have switched status from the North to the Midland. Since the dialect…

  12. What Makes "Good" Literacy and Numeracy Provision? Case Study Research of Regional Australia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guenther, John

    The question of what makes 'good' literacy and numeracy provision was examined by reviewing interview data from a project on the role of vocational education and training that was conducted by the University of Tasmania's Centre for Research and Learning in Regional Australia. The study dataset included the findings from 541 structured interviews…

  13. Bulgaria, Romania, and Poland: Case Studies of a Changing Region. Fulbright-Hays Summer Seminar Abroad 1996 (Bulgaria and Romania).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallory-Boyle, Nancy

    This paper presents a unit for government and economics and one for world history on the dramatic regional changes which have occurred in Central and Eastern Europe since the late 1980s. The units can be taught cohesively covering 2-3 weeks or as modules integrated into relevant themes in the curriculum. The "case studies" approach allows students…

  14. Integrating Education for Sustainability in Preservice Teacher Education: A Case Study from a Regional Australian University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Reece; Tomas, Louisa

    2013-01-01

    Education for Sustainability (EfS) has been prioritised in the School of Education at James Cook University (JCU), Townsville, Australia. This article presents a case study that explores the ways in which teacher educators integrate EfS in their teaching in the Bachelor of Education (BEd) (Primary) at JCU, and their perceptions of enablers and…

  15. A Community Organizes for Action: A Case Study of the Mon-Yough Region in Pennsylvania.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avery, Robert W.; Chesler, Herbert A.

    This case study examines the development and problems of the Mon-Yough Community Action Committee, Inc. (MYCAC), one of the local anti-poverty agencies in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. The agency's major effort is to overcome problems created by the decline of the local steel industry by supporting existing welfare agencies, and through such…

  16. Literacy and Numeracy Needs and Priorities: A Case Study of Regional TAFE Courses in Western Australia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Anne; Pyvis, David

    Rural Technical and Further Education (TAFE) students making the transition from rural and remote areas of Australia to urban university environments are likely to face educational challenges. Different understandings of literacy and numeracy held by the TAFE and tertiary sectors intensify these challenges. Case studies of four Western Australia…

  17. The Regional Accreditation Process at Community Colleges: A Case Study of Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Alissa L.

    2013-01-01

    This companion dissertation reports the findings of applied case study research on four community college organizational units that consistently meet or exceed standard performance measures. In addition, prior ample evidence confirms that performance extended significantly beyond what might be explained by available tangible resources alone. The…

  18. Systems Science, Catastrophe Theory, and Sub-regional Climate Change: 5 Case Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vickrey, G.

    2015-12-01

    We have performed 5 studies utilizing catastrophe theory to analyze several anthropogenic and broader biological factors in order to ascertain current and future climate changes for sub-regions generally characterized by the following: Appalachian Tennessee; South Southeastern Alaska; Sierra Nevada California; Ohio River Basin; North Central Illinois. Research to date has demonstrated a direct correlation to IPCC and external data sources; an ability to refine feedback predictions; and accuracy through modeling past-to-present structures. Further verification of process is being pursued. Should the data continue to register as verifiable, the finery will enable accurate analysis of current and future climate conditions in various sub-regions, with the model being replicable and distributable globally through web mechanisms for localized use. Analysis may then be employed as a driver for sub-regional mitigation and adaptation policy-making and programs.

  19. Geopotential field anomalies and regional tectonic features - two case studies: southern Africa and Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korte, Monika; Mandea, Mioara

    2016-05-01

    Maps of magnetic and gravity field anomalies provide information about physical properties of the Earth's crust and upper mantle, helpful in understanding geological conditions and tectonic structures. Depending on data availability, whether from the ground, airborne, or from satellites, potential field anomaly maps contain information on different ranges of spatial wavelengths, roughly corresponding to sources at different depths. Focussing on magnetic data, we compare amplitudes and characteristics of anomalies from maps based on various available data and as measured at geomagnetic repeat stations. Two cases are investigated: southern Africa, characterized by geologically old cratons and strong magnetic anomalies, and the smaller region of Germany with much younger crust and weaker anomalies. Estimating lithospheric magnetic anomaly values from the ground stations' time series (repeat station crustal biases) reveals magnetospheric field contributions causing time-varying offsets of several nT in the results. Similar influences might be one source of discrepancy when merging anomaly maps from different epochs. Moreover, we take advantage of recently developed satellite potential field models and compare magnetic and gravity gradient anomalies of ˜ 200 km resolution. Density and magnetization represent independent rock properties and thus provide complementary information on compositional and structural changes. Comparing short- and long-wavelength anomalies and the correlation of rather large-scale magnetic and gravity anomalies, and relating them to known lithospheric structures, we generally find a better agreement in the southern African region than the German region. This probably indicates stronger concordance between near-surface (down to at most a few km) and deeper (several kilometres down to Curie depth) structures in the former area, which can be seen to agree with a thicker lithosphere and a lower heat flux reported in the literature for the southern

  20. Offshore Wind Mapping Mediterranean area using SAR. A case study of retrieval around peninsular regions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calaudi, Rosamaria; Arena, Felice; Badger, Merete; Sempreviva, Anna Maria

    2013-04-01

    Satellite observations like Scatterometers e.g. QuickScat, and Synthetic Aperture Radars (SAR) of the ocean surface provide information about the spatial wind variability over large areas. This is very valuable, for mapping offshore wind resources for offshore wind farm installation, where the most suitable locations within a given region must be identified using at least 5 year wind data over the whole domain. This is a special issue in the Mediterranean, where spatial information is not readily available because buoys or masts are sparse, with long periods of missing data, and measurements represent only one point. Here, we focus on the SAR images that have the advantage of high spatial resolution (down to 100m) allowing to derive information close to the coast but with the disadvantage of low time resolution causing lack of information on regimes with low time scale. We retrieved SAR (ENVISAT ASAR scenes acquired in Wide Swath Mode-WSM-) wind speed in the Mediterranean from March 2002 to April 2012 using the Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) software APL/NOAA SAR Wind Retrieval System (ANSWRS version 2.0) (Monaldo 2000; Monaldo et al. 2006). The ANSWRS software produces per default wind speed fields initialized using wind directions determined by the Navy Operational Global Atmospheric Prediction System (NOGAPS) models interpolated in time and space to match the satellite data. NOGAPS data are available at 6-hour intervals mapped to a 1° latitude/longitude grid. Here, we present a case study in Calabria, a long, narrow and mountainous peninsula in South Italy that causes a significant wind conditions variability from one coast to the other. We considered a 10m mast, measuring hourly wind speed and direction located at the coastline at the harbor of the town Crotone, belonging to the marine network of sensors of ISPRA (Institute for Environmental Protection and Research). Three points of the SAR images were chosen at offshore

  1. Identifying induced seismicity in active tectonic regions: A case study of the San Joaquin Basin, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminzadeh, F.; Göbel, T.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the connection between petroleum-industry activities, and seismic event occurrences is essential to monitor, quantify, and mitigate seismic risk. While many studies identified anthropogenically-induced seismicity in intraplate regions where background seismicity rates are generally low, little is known about how to distinguish naturally occurring from induced seismicity in active tectonic regions. Further, it is not clear how different oil and gas operational parameters impact the frequency and magnitude of the induced seismic events. Here, we examine variations in frequency-size and spatial distributions of seismicity within the Southern Joaquin basin, an area of both active petroleum production and active fault systems. We analyze a newly available, high-quality, relocated earthquake catalog (Hauksson et al. 2012). This catalog includes many seismic events with magnitudes up to M = 4.5 within the study area. We start by analyzing the overall quality and consistence of the seismic catalog, focusing on temporal variations in seismicity rates and catalog completeness which could indicate variations in network sensitivity. This catalog provides relatively homogeneous earthquake recordings after 1981, enabling us to compare seismicity rates before and after the beginning of more pervasive petroleum-industry activities, for example, hydraulic-fracturing and waste-water disposals. We conduct a limited study of waste-water disposal wells to establish a correlation between seismicity statistics (i.e. rate changes, fractal dimension, b-value) within specific regions and anthropogenic influences. We then perform a regional study, to investigate spatial variations in seismicity statistics which are then correlated to oil field locations and well densities. In order to distinguish, predominantly natural seismicity from induced seismicity, we perform a spatial mapping of b-values and fractal dimensions of earthquake hypocenters. Seismic events in the proximity to

  2. An assessment of landscape changes in Mediterranean region. A case study of Algarve, southern Portugal.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Helena; Martins, Fernando; Valín, Maria Isabel; Moreno, Ângela; Pedras, Celestina

    2014-05-01

    Currently, the application of remote sensing techniques is a key factor for the planning and land management to ensure a sustainable development of the regions. Algarve, the most southern region of Portugal is characterized by its Mediterranean climate. This climate is described by irregular precipitation throughout the year with drought during summer months. The regional climate has a profound influence on its particular vegetation and wildlife turning it in a unique habitat for many species. Since the 1970s, increases in tourism have greatly affected the coastal region. This has led to great landscape pressure and urban growth, resulting in population increases due to local economic prosperity. Across Algarve, in recent decades, lawns areas have grown dramatically. Landscape water use has increased mainly because homeowners seldom pay the 'true' cost of water. Continued expansion of water supply is not, therefore, a viable management option in the future, particularly given the anticipated increase in the frequency and severity of droughts in Portugal. There's a need to change the perception of landscape relative to water consumption. Algarve needs a sustainable, 'demand-led' approach to water resource management, focusing on conserving water and using it more efficiently. The water resources available in the Algarve are limited, and decisions regarding sustainability must consider the environment. The aim of this study is to apply the remote sensing techniques to analyse the landscape changes in three municipalities of Algarve (Portugal): Albufeira, Loulé and Faro. The three Landsat images, from April 9th 1973 (Landsat1), March 23th 1989 (Landsat5) and April 26th 2013 (Landsat8) were used. The images were classified based on the radiometric information and the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). These range of dates of the Landsat images used allowed for the differentiation between classes of the landscape. Land use and water resources are closely

  3. Economic valuation of landslide damage in hilly regions: a case study from Flanders, Belgium.

    PubMed

    Vranken, Liesbet; Van Turnhout, Pieter; Van Den Eeckhaut, Miet; Vandekerckhove, Liesbeth; Poesen, Jean

    2013-03-01

    Several regions around the globe are at risk of incurring damage from landslides, but only few studies have concentrated on a quantitative estimate of the overall damage caused by landslides at a regional scale. This study therefore starts with a quantitative economic assessment of the direct and indirect damage caused by landslides in a 2,910 km study area located west of Brussels, a low-relief region susceptible to landslides. Based on focus interviews as well as on semi-structured interviews with homeowners, civil servants and the owners and providers of lifelines such as electricity and sewage, a quantitative damage assessment is provided. For private properties (houses, forest and pasture land) we estimate the real estate and production value losses for different damage scenarios, while for public infrastructure the costs of measures to repair and prevent landslide induced damage are estimated. In addition, the increase in amenity value of forests and grasslands due to the occurrence of landslides is also calculated. The study illustrates that a minority of land (only 2.3%) within the study area is used for dwellings, roads and railway lines, but that these land use types are responsible for the vast majority of the economic damage due to the occurrence of landslides. The annual cost of direct damage due to landsliding amounts to 688,148 €/year out of which 550,740 €/year for direct damage to houses, while the annual indirect damage augments to 3,020,049 €/year out of which 2,007,375 €/year for indirect damage to real estate. Next, the study illustrates that the increase of the amenity value of forests and grasslands outweighs the production value loss. As such the study does not only provide quantitative input data for the estimation of future risks, but also important information for government officials as it clearly informs about the costs associated with certain land use types in landslide areas. PMID:23391898

  4. Mapping extreme rainfall in a mountainous region using geostatistical techniques: a case study in Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudhomme, Christel; Reed, Duncan W.

    1999-10-01

    The spatial pattern of precipitation is known to be highly dependent on meteorological conditions and relief. However, the relationships between precipitation and topography in mountainous areas are not very well known, partly because of the complex topography in these regions, and partly because of the sparsity of information available to study such relationships in high elevation areas. The purpose of the investigation was to find a method of mapping extreme rainfall in the mountainous region of Scotland, which was easy to use and to understand, and which gave satisfactory results both in terms of statistical performance and consistency with meteorological mechanisms.Among the interpolation methods described in the literature, ordinary kriging and modified residual kriging have been found attractive by reason of their simplicity and ease of use. Both methods have been applied to map an index of extreme rainfall, the median of the annual maximum daily rainfall (RMED), in the mountainous region of Scotland. Rainfall records from a network of 1003 raingauges are used, covering Scotland with uneven density. A 4-parameter regression equation developed in a previous study, relating a transformed variable of RMED to topographical variables, is used in the modified residual kriging method. Comparing the relative performances of ordinary kriging and modified residual kriging shows that the use of topographical information helps to compensate for the lack of local data from which any interpolation method, such as ordinary kriging, might suffer, thus improving the final mapping.

  5. Urban impacts on regional carbonaceous aerosols: case study in central Texas.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Tate E; Sheesley, Rebecca J

    2014-08-01

    Rural and background sites provide valuable information on the concentration and optical properties of organic, elemental, and water-soluble organic carbon (OC, EC, and WSOC), which are relevant for understanding the climate forcing potential of regional atmospheric aerosols. To quantify climate- and air quality-relevant characteristics of carbonaceous aerosol in the central United States, a regional background site in central Texas was chosen for long-term measurement. Back trajectory (BT) analysis, ambient OC, EC, and WSOC concentrations and absorption parameters are reported for the first 15 months of a long-term campaign (May 2011-August 2012). BT analysis indicates consistent north-south airflow connecting central Texas to the Central Plains. Central Texas aerosols exhibited seasonal trends with increased fine particulate matter (< 2.5 microm aerodynamic diameter, PM2.5) and OC during the summer (PM2.5 = 10.9 microg m(-3) and OC = 3.0 microg m(-3)) and elevated EC during the winter (0.22 microg m(-3)). When compared to measurements in Dallas and Houston, TX, central Texas OC appears to have mixed urban and rural sources. However central Texas EC appears to be dominated by transport of urban emissions. WSOC averaged 63% of the annual OC, with little seasonal variability in this ratio. To monitor brown carbon (BrC), absorption was measured for the aqueous WSOC extracts. Light absorption coefficients for EC and BrC were highest during summer (EC MAC = 11 m2 g(-1) and BRC MAE365 = 0.15 m2 g(-1)). Results from optical analysis indicate that regional aerosol absorption is mostly due to EC with summertime peaks in BrC attenuation. This study represents the first reported values of WSOC absorption, MAE365, for the central United States. Implications: Background concentration and absorption measurements are essential in determining regional potential radiative forcing due to atmospheric aerosols. Back trajectory, chemical, and optical analysis of PM2.5 was used to

  6. REGIONAL ASSESSMENT OF LANDSCAPE AND DEMOGRAPHIC CHANGE EFFECTS IN THE MEDITERRANEAN REGION, THE MOROCCO CASE STUDY (1981 - 2003)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of changes in landscape factors on socioeconomics was analyzed

    locally and regionally. The method presented here allows mapping changes in vegetation cover

    trends over large areas quickly and inexpensively, thus providing policy-makers with a technical

  7. [Regional ecosecurity pattern in urban area based on land use analysis: a case study in Lanzhou].

    PubMed

    Fang, Shubo; Xiao, Dunin; An, Shuqing

    2005-12-01

    Mid-scale regional ecosecurity, which takes practical ecosecurity issues as its priority, should be viewed as the core of the multi-scale concept of ecosecurity. For urban area, a special region taking ecological infrastructure as its core mission, the construction of regional ecosecurity pattern may provide a good chance to realize its sustainable development. Based on land use analysis, a qualitative and quantitative research on the landscape pattern, ecovalue evaluation, and driving force analysis of social economy could provide an effective approach to construct the ecosecurity pattern in urban area. This study showed that in Lanzhou, the ecosecurity pattern consisted of three parts, i.e., eco-safeguarding system, eco-buffering system and eco-percolating system, among which, eco-buffering system was the decisive part determining ecosecurity pattern construction. The quantitative analysis of urban spatial expansion pattern was taken as the decisive function to determine the security level of the ecosecurity pattern, which was divided into low, middle and high levels. PMID:16515173

  8. Environmental Radioactivity : a case study in HHP granitic region of Tusham ring complex Haryana, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajwa B., S.; Singh, H.; Singh, J.; Singh, S.; Sonikawade R., G.

    2010-05-01

    The paper presents the results of investigations of radon levels in the soil-gas, groundwater and indoor-air in the dwellings of the high heat producing (HHP)-granitic region of Tusham ring complex, Bhiwani District, Haryana. Radon release from soil and groundwater was found to be comparatively higher than the values observed in the nearby non-HHP/non-granitic regions of Punjab. The soil-gas and the groundwater radon concentration of HHP region of Tusham ring conmplex varies from 42.8±0.7 - 71.5±3.2 kBq m-3 with an average value of 61 kBq m-3, and 17.4±1.3 - 49.7±1.7 Bq l-1 with an average of 26.2 Bq l-1respectively, whereas in non-granitic/non-HHP regions the average value 31.5 (16.3±0.8-44.1±1.8) kBq m-3 and 7.9 (4.7±0.7-14.0±1.2) Bql-1 respectively have been observed. Indoor radon concentration in around 155 traditional dwellings in a wide range of villages situated in this HHP region has also been measured using the SSNTDs (LR-115) for two continuous years. Indoor radon levels in these dwellings in these dwellings have been found to be varying from 109 ± 80 to 1006 ± 55 Bq m-3 whereas the annual average radon values vary from 60 ±37 to 235 ±55 Bq m-3 for the dwellings of the villages studied in a non-HHP region of Amritsar District, Punjab. A positive correlation has been observed between the soil-gas and indoor radon levels particularly in the periphery of the exposed HHP rock formations, which may likely be the result of the imfluence of imbeded and exposed HHP granitic rocks and thus the active-soil formations. In the present study, uranium concentration and radon exhalation rate in the wide range of soil/rock samples collected from this region, known to be composed of acid volcanics & associated HHP granites have been estimated. For comparative analysis, the soil samples from some districts of Punjab have also been analyzed for uranium estimation and radon exhalation rate. The ‘ CAN ' technique using plastic track detector LR-115 type-II has

  9. Adaptability of ESR dating of fault gouge in aseismic region: A case study on Hangzhou region, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Qi; Chen, Han-Lin; Zhang, Wei; Ye, Jian-Qing; Liu, Jing-Wei; Zhao, Dong; Niu, Jia-Wen; Liao, Lin

    2008-05-01

    ESR dating has been widely used in seismic assessment. In this paper, we collected fault gouge samples system-atically for ESR (Electron Spin Resonance) dating, and sediment samples of overlying strata, and offset strata for OSL (Optically Stimulated Luminescence) dating along Xiaoshan-Qiuchuan fault (XQF) trending NE-SW, Xiaofeng-Sanmen fault (XSF) trending NW-SE, and Changhua-Putuo fault (CPF) trending E-W. In the same fault outcrop, the ESR data of fault gouge is greater than the OSL data of the strata offset by fault. Therefore, the ESR data of fault gouge colleted in Hangzhou region do not represent the time of weak fault movement in Late Quaternary region, but represent the strong fault movements in Late Cenozoic. The episode of fault movement in Late Cenozoic could be speculated according to the ESR data: 1.00 0.58 Ma, there were strong fault movements along the XSF, XQF and CPF in Hangzhou region; 0.58 0.45 Ma, the fault movements of all faults became weaker and did not zero ESR signals significantly for ESR dating of fault movements; 0.45 0.20 Ma, there were strong fault movements along part of XQF; 0.1 0.01 Ma, there were fault movements along the XSF only, but the fault movements were not strong enough to reset the ESR signal; Since 0.01 Ma, the Hangzhou region tends to be stable. In addition, the XSF might be the division line of fault segmentation of XQF; there were strong fault movements along the southwest segment of XQF during 0.45 Ma to 0.20 Ma; while the fault movements along the northeast segment of XQF mainly occurred during 1.00 0.58 Ma.

  10. Total Electron Content Monitoring over South America Region: Validation and Case Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negreti, P. M. D. S.; Paula, E. R.; Otsuka, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The Total Electron Content (TEC) is being extensively used to monitor the ionospheric behavior under geomagnetically quiet and disturbed conditions. The complex effects of magnetospheric convection and geomagnetic disturbances on ionospheric electric fields and currents in middle and low latitudes were documented in several studies. Under disturbed conditions the two main sources of electric fields, which are responsible for changes in the plasma drifts and for current perturbations, are the short-lived prompt penetration electric fields (PPEFs) and the longer lasting ionospheric disturbance dynamo (DD) electric fields, and both modulate the TEC around the globe. In this work we present the validation of a computational tool to calculate TEC maps over the low latitude of South America region. We used two methods to calculate the absolute VTEC: TECMAP-Nagoya tool and Magic (NOAA) tool. Their results were compared to the TEC measured by an Allen Osborne receiver placed at São José dos Campos (Brazil) and show a good agreement. The results were performed considering quiet and disturbed conditions, and also HILDCAAs events. Data from the RBMC/IBGE (Brazil), IGS and RAMSAC (Argentina) networks were used to calculate TEC over the South America. The expansion of RBMC and RAMSAC networks is providing a good coverage and understanding of TEC behavior at this complex low latitude region.

  11. Impact of regional afforestation on climatic conditions in metropolitan areas: case study of Copenhagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stysiak, Aleksander Andrzej; Bergen Jensen, Marina; Mahura, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Like most other places, European metropolitan areas will face a range of climate-related challenges over the next decades that may influence the nature of urban life across the continent. Under future urbanization and climate change scenarios the well-being and comfort of the urban population might become progressively compromised. In urban areas, the effects of the warming climate will be accelerated by combination of Urban Heat Island effect (UHI) and extreme heat waves. The land cover composition directly influences atmospheric variability, and can either escalate or downscale the projected changes. Vegetation, forest ecosystems in particular, are anticipated to play an important role in modulating local and regional climatic conditions, and to be vital factor in the process of adapting cities to warming climate. This study investigates the impact of forest and land-cover change on formation and development of temperature regimes in the Copenhagen Metropolitan Area (CPH-MA). Potential to modify the UHI effect in CPH-MA is estimated. Using 2009 meteorological data, and up-to-date 2012 high resolution land-cover data we employed the online integrated meteorology-chemistry/aerosols Enviro-HIRLAM (Environment - High Resolution Limited Area Model) modeling system to simulate air temperature (at 2 meter height) fields for a selected period in July 2009. Employing research tools (such as METGRAF meteorological software and Geographical Information Systems) we then estimated the influence of different afforestation and urbanization scenarios with new forests being located after the Danish national afforestation plan, after proximity to the city center, after dominating wind characteristics, and urbanization taking place as densification of the existing conurbation. This study showed the difference in temperature up to 3.25°C, and the decrease in the spatial extent of temperature fields up to 68%, depending on the selected scenario. Performed simulations demonstrated

  12. Regional Governance in Education: A Case Study of the Metro Area Learning Community in Omaha, Nebraska

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holme, Jennifer Jellison; Diem, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the first regional governance reform in public education, created in the Omaha, Nebraska metropolitan area in 2007. The legislation creating this regional reform, which is called the Learning Community, established a regional governing body, the Learning Community Coordinating Council, consisting of an elected 21-member…

  13. Magnetic properties of soils in boreal regions. Case study from Ukraine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menshov, Oleksandr; Kruglov, Oleksandr; Sukhorada, Anatoliy

    2014-05-01

    The investigation of soil magnetism is a part of the general soil researching for solving soil science and agronomy tasks. Soils are rather magnetic and sometimes they are the main near-surface object, which generates local magnetic anomalies. Soils have been studied within the main soil-climatic zones of Ukraine: Polesie, Forest Steppe, Steppe, Dry Steppe, Crimean and Carpathian mountains. The investigated soils types are: soddy-podsolic, gray forest, chestnut, chernozems leached, typical, ordinary, southern, and meadow, turf, bog soils, brawn and mountains soils. A part of Ukraine soils are from boreal regions. Among them are chernozems of Polesie soil-climatic zone. This territory was under influence of ice age. Another part of Ukraine boreal region is Carpathian maintains with special type of climate, landscapes and soils. The comprehensive analyze of Ukraine soils from the boreal territories and other parts is presented. Soil magnetism increases from North to South in the transition between the soil-climatic zones of Ukraine. The most magnetic are ordinary and south chernozems. The least magnetic are soddy-podzolic, meadaw and bog soils. The maximal values of the magnetic parameters are fixed in the watersheds, plateaus of the landscapes, minimal values are fixed in the floods, ravines, bor terraces. Magnetic susceptibility mapping is useful for agricultural mapping of lands, investigation of erosion, soil fertility, the necessity for mineral and organic fertilizers. Magnetic methods of investigations are high speed, effective and low-cost. Moreover, the magnetic methods a very important if the dangerous soil processes could not be fixed with visual image. In the same time, these hazards effect on the conditioning and the productivity of agricultural land. We have marked the decreasing of the magnetic susceptibility values within the risk of erosion sections of the catena.

  14. Evaluating climate variables, indexes and thresholds governing Arctic urban sustainability: case study of Russian permafrost regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisimov, O. A.; Kokorev, V.

    2013-12-01

    Addressing Arctic urban sustainability today forces planners to deal with the complex interplay of multiple factors, including governance and economic development, demography and migration, environmental changes and land use, changes in the ecosystems and their services, and climate change. While the latter can be seen as a factor that exacerbates the existing vulnerabilities to other stressors, changes in temperature, precipitation, snow, river and lake ice, and the hydrological regime also have direct implications for the cities in the North. Climate change leads to reduced demand for heating energy, on one hand, and heightened concerns about the fate of the infrastructure built upon thawing permafrost, on the other. Changes in snowfall are particularly important and have direct implications for the urban economy, as together with heating costs, expenses for snow removal from streets, airport runways, roofs and ventilation corridors underneath buildings erected on pile foundations on permafrost constitute the bulk of the city's maintenance budget. Many cities are located in river valleys and are prone to flooding that leads to enormous economic losses and casualties, including human deaths. The severity of the northern climate has direct implications for demographic changes governed by regional migration and labor flows. Climate could thus be viewed as an inexhaustible public resource that creates opportunities for sustainable urban development. Long-term trends show that climate as a resource is becoming more readily available in the Russian North, notwithstanding the general perception that globally climate change is one of the challenges facing humanity in the 21st century. In this study we explore the sustainability of the Arctic urban environment under changing climatic conditions. We identify key governing variables and indexes and study the thresholds beyond which changes in the governing climatic parameters have significant impact on the economy

  15. Analysing Regional Land Surface Temperature Changes by Satellite Data, a Case Study of Zonguldak, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekertekin, A.; Kutoglu, S.; Kaya, S.; Marangoz, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, climate change is one of the most important problems that the ecological system of the world has been encountering. Global warming and climate change have been studied frequently by all disciplines all over the world and Geomatics Engineering also contributes to such studies by means of remote sensing, global positioning system etc. Monitoring Land Surface Temperature (LST) via remote sensing satellites is one of the most important contributions to climatology. LST is an important parameter governing the energy balance on the Earth and there are lots of algorithms to obtain LST by remote sensing techniques. The most commonly used algorithms are split-window algorithm, temperature/emissivity separation method, mono-window algorithm and single channel method. Generally three algorithms are used to obtain LST by using Landsat 5 TM data. These algorithms are radiative transfer equation method, single channel method and mono-window algorithm. Radiative transfer equation method is not applicable because during the satellite pass, atmospheric parameters must be measured in-situ. In this research, mono window algorithm was implemented to Landsat 5 TM image. Besides, meteorological data such as humidity and temperature are used in the algorithm. Acquisition date of the image is 28.08.2011 and our study area is Zonguldak, Turkey. High resolution images are used to investigate the relationships between LST and land cover type. As a result of these analyses, area with vegetation cover has approximately 5 ºC lower temperature than the city center and arid land. Because different surface properties like reinforced concrete construction, green zones and sandbank are all together in city center, LST differs about 10 ºC in the city center. The temperature around some places in thermal power plant region Çatalağzı, is about 5 ºC higher than city center. Sandbank and agricultural areas have highest temperature because of land cover structure. Thanks to this

  16. A rare case of amelanotic malignant melanoma in the oral region: Clinical investigation and immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    OHNISHI, YUICHI; WATANABE, MASAHIRO; FUJII, TOMOKO; SUNADA, NORIKO; YOSHIMOTO, HITOSHI; KUBO, HIROHITO; WATO, MASAHIRO; KAKUDO, KENJI

    2015-01-01

    Amelanotic malignant melanoma (AMM) is rare in the oral region. The present study examined the clinical features of this tumor in an attempt to establish diagnostic criteria. The expression of three melanocytic differentiation markers, HMB-45, S-100 and Melan-A, was also measured in primary oral AMMs in order to determine whether the markers could be used to diagnose primary oral AMMs and to find out which marker was the most sensitive. It may be particularly difficult to correctly diagnose AMM that lacks a radial growth phase without immunohistochemical assistance. In the present study, mixtures of polygonal and spindle cells at different ratios were observed in the tumors with and without a radial growth phase. Immunohistochemistry was used to examine the HMB-45, S-100 and Melan-A expression in the formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimens of primary oral AMMs. Comparison of staining intensities (SIs) and labeling indices (LIs) of the markers was also performed. The immunostaining results revealed that the SI of Melan-A was significantly higher than that of S-100 (P=0.0011). HMB-45, S-100 and Melan-A also exhibited high positive rates and LIs in AMMs and, therefore, may be good markers for the immunohistochemical diagnosis of primary oral AMMs. Furthermore, Melan-A may be a more sensitive marker than S-100 and HMB-45, as it has a higher SI. PMID:26788204

  17. Sand resources, regional geology, and coastal processes for shoreline restoration: case study of Barataria shoreline, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kindinger, Jack G.; Flocks, James G.; Kulp, Mark; Penland, Shea; Britsch, Louis D.

    2002-01-01

    The Louisiana barrier shoreline of Barataria Basin, which lies within the western Mississippi River delta, has undergone significant retreat during the past 100 years. The most practical restoration method to rebuild these shorelines is sand nourishment. Seismic and sonar interpretations verified with geologic samples (vibracores and borings) indicate that there are nine sand targets within the Barataria study area that meet or exceed the minimum criteria for potential resource sites. However, the near surface lithology in the basin is typically silts and clays. Locating suitable sand resources for shoreline restoration is challenging. The sand units are associated with geologic depositional systems such as ebb-tidal deltas, distributary mouth bars, and channel fill (undifferentiated fluvial or tidal inlet channels). The nine potential sand targets consist primarily of fine sand and can be delineated into three surficial and six buried features. The surficial features contain approximately 10% of the total sand resources identified. At least 90% of the sand resources need overburden sediment removed prior to use; almost 570 million yd3 (438.5 mil m3) of overburden will need to be removed if the entire resource is mined. In this study, we identified 396 to 532 mil yd3 (305.8 to 410.8 mil m3) of potential sand deposits for shoreline restoration. Previous studies using less dense survey methods greatly over-estimated sand resources available in this area. Many fluvial channels reported previously as sand-filled are mud-filled. Contrary to these previous studies, few fluvial subsystems in this region have abundant sand resources.

  18. A Sensitivity Study of the Urban Effect on a Regional-Scale Model: An Idealized Case

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, H.N.S.; Leach, M.J.; Brown, M.J.

    2000-05-30

    Urban infrastructure impacts the surface and atmospheric properties, such as wind, temperature, turbulence and radiation budgets. The well-recognized urban heat island phenomenon, characterized by the temperature contrast between the city and the surrounding rural area, is one such impact. Many field experiments have been conducted to study the urban heat island effect, which is typically most intense under clear sky and weak ambient wind conditions at night. In some cases, a cool island may even exist during the day. To consider these urban effects in a numerical model with horizontal grid resolution on the order of kilometers, some sort of parameterization is required to account for the sub-grid building impacts on these effects. To this end, Brown and Williams (1998) have developed an urban parameterization by extending Yamada's (1982) forest canopy scheme to include drag, turbulent production, anthropogenic and rooftop heating effects, and radiation balance in a mesoscale model. In this study, we further modify this urban parameterization by adding the rooftop surface energy equation to eliminate a simplifying assumption that the rooftop is at the same temperature as the air. The objective of this work is to assess the impact of individual process of this modified urban canopy parameterization for the urban heat island phenomenon.

  19. Stochastic Assessment of Regional Groundwater Nonpoint Source Pollution with Spatially Variable, Transient Forcing: Conceptual Framework and Nitrate Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harter, T.; van der Schans, M. L.; Leijnse, A.

    2003-12-01

    We introduce a general stochastic concept of regional groundwater nonpoint source pollution in production wells or other groundwater discharge areas; present an efficient numerical procedure for its implementation; and validate the approach using a case study. Our principal hypothesis is that regional variability of and uncertainty about well pollution from nonpoint sources is primarily caused by the spatio-temporal variability of the nonpoint source strength (recharge rate and recharge pollutant concentration) and the variable spatial distribution of pumping wells, pumping rates, and other groundwater discharge relative to the location of the nonpoint sources. We describe a conceptual model of random space functions (RSFs) for nonpoint sources and wells. The resulting stochastic flow and transport equations are subject to random forcing in the nonpoint source and pumping boundary conditions (external variability). The stochastic forcing analysis yields a transient probability distribution function of water quality (water quality pdf) in a regional set of randomly distributed, discrete production wells and other groundwater discharge areas. We introduce a novel three-step numerical approach for the stochastic forcing analysis and apply the method to determine the 150-year (1910-2060) nitrate pdf for an irrigated, semi-arid region with a history of high groundwater nitrate. Comparison of the simulated nitrate pdfs with results from regional and domestic well water surveys in 1970, 1986 and 2001 shows that stochastic forcing indeed accounts for the observed temporal nitrate dynamics (mean concentration) and for 70% of the spatial variability observed in domestic well water nitrate in that region.

  20. Process-based image analysis for agricultural mapping: A case study in Turkgeldi region, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damla Uca Avci, Z.; Sunar, Filiz

    2015-10-01

    The need for timely, accurate, and interoperable geospatial information is steadily increasing. In this context, process-based image processing systems will be the initial segment for future's automatic systems. A process-based system is believed to be a good approach for agricultural purpose because agricultural activities are carried out according to a periodic (annual) cycle. Therefore, a process-based image analysis procedure was designed for routine crop classification for an agricultural region in Kırklareli, Turkey. The process tree developed uses a multi-temporal image data set as an input and gives the final crop classification as an output by using an incremental rule set. The test data set was composed of five images of Satellite Pour l'Observation de la Terre 4 (SPOT 4) data acquired in 2007. Basically, image objects were first extracted and then classified. A rule set was structured depending on class definitions. A decision-based process was executed and formed a multilevel image classification system. The final classification was obtained by merging classes from the appropriate levels where they were extracted. To evaluate the success of the application the accuracy of the classification was assessed. The overall accuracy and kappa index of agreement was found to be 80% and 0.78, respectively. At the end of the study, problems of segmentation and classification operations were discussed and solution approaches were outlined. To assess the process in terms of its scope for automation, the efficiency and success of the rule set were also discussed.

  1. Satellite radiance assimilation using 3D-Var: A case study of thunderstorm over Indian Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Kumar, Krishan; Mohanty, U. C.

    Severe thunderstorms are the most frequent weather phenomenon during the pre-monsoon months of April and May over east and northeast India. Dry convective systems such as sand storms, dust storms/ thunderstorms are prominent over northwestern India during pre-monsoon season. Prediction of local severe storms is a challenging task due to non-linear nature of the convective system. Part of the problem is due to small time scales of these disturbances which enable only short lead times for forecasting. The initiation, intensification and propagation of thunderstorms are mostly governed by the synoptic situation and localized thermodynamic conditions of the atmosphere. The topography of the region also plays a significant role in initiation of convective activities over the region during the period. Prediction of these severe thunderstorms in advance is vital as it would minimize the damages associated with them. Over the last decade, high resolution mesoscale models with three dimensional variational technique (3DVAR) are being increasingly applied for studying severe weather phenomena as these models possess the capability of generating reasonably good forecast of severe weather phenomena. However the numerical simulations are hampered by inappropriate representation of initial and boundary conditions used from a global model output of courser resolution, this issue is addressed by assimilating observations from various platforms into the model initial condition which would give way for better prediction of these events. The satellite radiance is an important data source for mesoscale/microscale weather analysis and forecasting. Currently, the variational techniques have received considerable attention for assimilation of satellite radiance. Satellite radiance assimilation has more impact on the moisture and temperature. It is observed that the model initial condition improved significantly after assimilation of satellite radiance observation as compared to the

  2. Overview of the 1988 GCE/CASE/WATOX Studies of biogeochemical cycles in the North Atlantic region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pszenny, Alexander A. P.; Galloway, James N.; Artz, Richard S.; Boatman, Joseph F.

    1990-06-01

    The 1988 Global Change Expedition/Coordinated Air-Sea Experiment/Western Atlantic Ocean Experiment (GCE/CASE/WATOX) was a multifaceted research program designed to study atmospheric and oceanic processes affecting the biogeochemical cycles of carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, and trace metals in the North Atlantic Ocean region. Field work included (1) a 49-day research cruise aboard NOAA ship Mt. Mitchell (Global Change Expedition) from Norfolk, Virginia, to Bermuda, Iceland, the Azores, and Barbados, (2) eight flights of the NOAA King Air research aircraft, four off the Virginia Capes and four near Bermuda (CASE/WATOX), and (3) a research cruise aboard the yacht Fleurtie near Bermuda (WATOX). Objectives of GCE/CASE/WATOX were (1) to examine processes controlling the mesoscale distributions of productivity, chlorophyll, and phytoplankton growth rates in Atlantic surface waters, (2) to identify factors controlling the distribution of ozone in the North Atlantic marine boundary layer, and (3) to estimate the contributions of sources on surrounding continents to the biogeochemical cycles of sulfur, nitrogen, and trace metals over the North Atlantic region during the boreal summer season. The individual papers in this and the next two issues of Global Biogeochemical Cycles provide details on the results and analyses of the individual measurement efforts. This paper provides a brief overview of GCE/CASE/WATOX.

  3. The identification of functional regions based on lifetime migration data: a case study of Iran.

    PubMed

    Hemmasi, M

    1980-01-01

    "This paper presents the results of a national functional regionalization [in Iran] utilizing factor-analytic techniques and migration data. An analysis of gross migration flow data along with information concerning existing road linkages resulted in eleven distinct macro-regional subsystems." Similarities with previous schemes are discussed. Data were obtained from information gathered for 146 counties as a part of the 1966 general census PMID:12263199

  4. Linkage disequilibrium patterns vary with chromosomal location: A case study from the von Willebrand factor region

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, W.S.; Zenger, R.; O'Brien, E.; Jorde, L.B. ); Nyman, D. ); Eriksson, A.W. ); Renlund, M.

    1994-08-01

    Linkage disequilibrium analysis has been used as a tool for analyzing marker order and locating disease genes. Under appropriate circumstances, disequilibrium patterns reflect recombination events that have occurred throughput a population's history. As a result, disequilibrium mapping may be useful in genomic regions of <1 cM where the number of informative meioses needed to detect recombinant individuals within pedigrees is exceptionally high. Its utility for refining target areas for candidate disease genes before initiating chromosomal walks and cloning experiments will be enhanced as the relationship between linkage disequilibrium and physical distance is better understood. To address this issue, the authors have characterized linkage disequilibrium in a 144-kb region of the von Willebrand factor gene on chromosome 12. Sixty CEPH and 12 von Willebrand disease families were genotypes for five PCR-based markers, which include two microsatellite repeats and three single-base-pair substitutions. Linkage disequilibrium and physical distance between polymorphisms are highly correlated (r[sub m] = -.76; P<.05) within this region. None of the five markers showed significant disequilibrium with the von Willebrand disease phenotype. The linkage disequilibrium/physical distance relationship was also analyzed as a function of chromosomal location for this and eight previously characterized regions. This analysis revealed a general trend in which linkage disequilibrium dissipates more rapidly with physical distance in telomeric regions than in centromeric regions. This trend is consistent with higher recombination rates near telomeres. 52 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. A case-control study on the risk factors of urinary calculus in Uyghur children in the Kashi region.

    PubMed

    Wang, H C; Liu, C; He, H Y; Wang, M X

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of urinary calculus (UC) is very high in Uyghur children in the Kashi region of Xinjiang, China, which seriously affects the growth and life quality of these children. This study was aimed at investigating the risk factors of UC in Uyghur children in Kashi region. One hundred fifteen Uyghur children (age <7 years) with UC who were treated in First People's Hospital in Kashi were enrolled in the case group. A 1:1 case-control study with a questionnaire was performed. The results showed that, among the 115 UC patients, there were more boys (71.3%) than girls (28.7%), and most cases had an onset age of 1-3 years (75.7%). A lower than primary school education in the mother, drinking unboiled water, water intake <500 mL/day, and eating too much sweets were risk factors [odds ratio (OR) = 2.385, 9.160, 3.263, and 8.945, respectively], whereas vegetable intake and exposure to summer sunshine of <2 h/day were protective factors against UC onset (OR = 0.154 and 0.344, respectively). Analysis of UC-related factors in 99 cases of <3-year-old children revealed that breastfeeding was also a protective factor (OR = 0.007), whereas frequent cow's milk intake within 5 months (OR = 2.414) and frequent "panada" intake (OR = 2.529) were risk factors. The occurrence of UC in Uyghur children in the Kashi region is mainly affected by maternal educational background, quality of drinking water, water intake volume, and dietary pattern. Furthermore, geography may also have a role. PMID:26125785

  6. Prospection of Portland cement raw material: A case study in the Marmara region of Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özgüner, A. M.

    2014-09-01

    Representative sampling of the raw materials used to make Portland cement, correct calculations for the possible clinker mixtures, sufficient reserves of the raw materials and selection of the correct infrastructure for the location of a cement factory are essential to the protection of the great investment in the factory. The results of chemical analyses of pipe samples taken in the field at right angles to the strikes of favourable limestone, clay, shale, and marl outcrops were used in Kind's lime saturation formula for clinker calculations of the possible mixtures. The cement modulus values were calculated using the corresponding clinker oxide ratios and were confirmed to be within the standard intervals for positive cement raw material mixtures. The most promising raw material source, a double lithologic mixture of limestone and mudstone was found during the prospection in north of Bilecik Province, where rhyolitic tuff outcrops with pozzolanic properties also exist. Some marble quarries nearby have been inclined to dispose of their marble wastes for use in cement production to prevent polluting the environment with them. The nearby Gemlik fertiliser factory provides inexpensive waste gypsum that can be used as a cool cement mixing material. The limestone, mudstone and trass raw material reserves in this area were calculated to be sufficient for the factory's requirements for more than 100 years of operation as results of the detailed geological mapping. The regional infrastructure is most suitable for distribution and marketing of cement products. The cement factory described in this study has been producing cement for the last 3 years, after coring and testing of the raw material reserves.

  7. Integrated water and renewable energy management: the Acheloos-Peneios region case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukouvinos, Antonios; Nikolopoulos, Dionysis; Efstratiadis, Andreas; Tegos, Aristotelis; Rozos, Evangelos; Papalexiou, Simon-Michael; Dimitriadis, Panayiotis; Markonis, Yiannis; Kossieris, Panayiotis; Tyralis, Christos; Karakatsanis, Georgios; Tzouka, Katerina; Christofides, Antonis; Karavokiros, George; Siskos, Alexandros; Mamassis, Nikos; Koutsoyiannis, Demetris

    2015-04-01

    Within the ongoing research project "Combined Renewable Systems for Sustainable Energy Development" (CRESSENDO), we have developed a novel stochastic simulation framework for optimal planning and management of large-scale hybrid renewable energy systems, in which hydropower plays the dominant role. The methodology and associated computer tools are tested in two major adjacent river basins in Greece (Acheloos, Peneios) extending over 15 500 km2 (12% of Greek territory). River Acheloos is characterized by very high runoff and holds ~40% of the installed hydropower capacity of Greece. On the other hand, the Thessaly plain drained by Peneios - a key agricultural region for the national economy - usually suffers from water scarcity and systematic environmental degradation. The two basins are interconnected through diversion projects, existing and planned, thus formulating a unique large-scale hydrosystem whose future has been the subject of a great controversy. The study area is viewed as a hypothetically closed, energy-autonomous, system, in order to evaluate the perspectives for sustainable development of its water and energy resources. In this context we seek an efficient configuration of the necessary hydraulic and renewable energy projects through integrated modelling of the water and energy balance. We investigate several scenarios of energy demand for domestic, industrial and agricultural use, assuming that part of the demand is fulfilled via wind and solar energy, while the excess or deficit of energy is regulated through large hydroelectric works that are equipped with pumping storage facilities. The overall goal is to examine under which conditions a fully renewable energy system can be technically and economically viable for such large spatial scale.

  8. H II Region Ionization of the Interstellar Medium: A Case Study of NGC 7538

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luisi, Matteo; Anderson, L. D.; Balser, Dana S.; Bania, T. M.; Wenger, Trey V.

    2016-06-01

    Using data from the Green Bank Telescope, we analyze the radio continuum (free–free) and radio recombination line (RRL) emission of the compact H ii region NGC 7538 (Sharpless 158). We detect extended radio continuum and hydrogen RRL emission beyond the photodissociation region (PDR) toward the north and east, but a sharp decrease in emission toward the south and west. This indicates that a non-uniform PDR morphology is affecting the amount of radiation “leaking” through the PDR. The strongest carbon RRL emission is found in the western PDR that appears to be dense. We compute a leaking fraction f R = 15 ± 5% of the radio continuum emission measured in the plane of the sky which represents a lower limit when accounting for the three-dimensional geometry of the region. We detect an average {}4{{{He}}}+/{{{H}}}+ abundance ratio by number of 0.088 ± 0.003 inside the H ii region and a decrease in this ratio with increasing distance from the region beyond the PDR. Using Herschel Space Observatory data, we show that small dust temperature enhancements to the north and east of NGC 7538 coincide with extended radio emission, but that the dust temperature enhancements are mostly contained within a second PDR to the east. Unlike the giant H ii region W43, the radiation leaking from NGC 7538 seems to only affect the local ambient medium. This suggests that giant H ii regions may have a large effect in maintaining the ionization of the interstellar medium.

  9. Decision Support system- DSS- for irrigation management in greenhouses: a case study in Campania Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaco, Eugenia; De Mascellis, Roberto; Riccardi, Maria; Basile, Angelo; D'Urso, Guido; Magliulo, Vincenzo; Tedeschi, Anna

    2016-04-01

    In Mediterranean Countries the proper management of water resources is important for the preservation of actual production systems. The possibility to manage water resources is possible especially in the greenhouses systems. The challenge to manage the soil in greenhouse farm can be a strategy to maintain both current production systems both soil conservation. In Campania region protected crops (greenhouses and tunnels) have a considerable economic importance both for their extension in terms of surface harvested and also for their production in terms of yields. Agricultural production in greenhouse is closely related to the micro-climatic condition but also to the physical and agronomic characteristics of the soil-crop system. The protected crops have an high level of technology compare to the other production systems, but the irrigation management is still carried out according to empirical criteria. The rational management of the production process requires an appropriate control of climatic parameters (temperature, humidity, wind) and agronomical inputs (irrigation, fertilization,). All these factors need to be monitored as well is possible, in order to identify the optimal irrigation schedule. The aim of this work is to implement a Decision Support system -DSS- for irrigation management in greenhouses focused on a smart irrigation control based on observation of the agro-climatic parameters monitored with an advanced wireless sensors network. The study is conducted in a greenhouse farm of 6 ha located in the district of Salerno were seven plots were cropped with rocket. Preliminary a study of soils proprieties was conducted in order to identify spatial variability of the soil in the farm. So undisturbed soil samples were collected to define chemical and physical proprieties; moreover soil hydraulic properties were determined for two soils profiles deemed representation of the farm. Then the wireless sensors, installed at different depth in the soils

  10. Magnetic field in Photodissociation Regions (PDRs) : A case study of PDR in NGC 2024

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anish Roshi, D.; Goss, Miller; Jeyakumar, S.

    2015-01-01

    We present images of C110α and H110α radio recombination line (RRL) emission at 4.8 GHz and images of H166α, C166α and X166α RRL emission at 1.4 GHz, observed toward the starforming region NGC 2024. The 1.4 GHz image with angular resolution ˜ 70 arcsec is obtained using VLA data. The 4.8 GHz image with angular resolution ˜ 17 arcsec is obtained by combining VLA and GBT data. These images reveal that the spatial distributions of C110α line emission is confined to the southern rim of the HII region close to the ionization front whereas the C166α line emission is extended in the north-south direction across the HII region. The LSR velocity of the C110α line is 10.3 kms similar to that of lines observed from molecular material located at the far side of the HII region. This similarity suggests that the photo dissociation region (PDR) responsible for C110α line emission is at the far side of the HII region. The LSR velocity of C166α is 8.8 kms. This velocity is comparable with the velocity of molecular absorption lines observed from the foreground gas, suggesting that the PDR is at the near side of the HII region. Non-LTE models for carbon line forming regions are presented. Typical properties of the foreground PDR are T_{PDR} ˜ 100 K, n_e^{PDR} ˜ 5 \\cm3, n_H ˜ 1.7 × 10^4 \\cm3, path length l ˜ 0.06 pc and those of the far side PDR are T_{PDR} ˜ 200 K, n_e^{PDR} ˜ 50 \\cm3, n_H ˜ 1.7 × 10^5 \\cm3, l ˜ 0.03 pc. Our modeling indicates that the far side PDR is located within the HII region. Using the method proposed by Roshi (2007), we estimate magnetic field strength in the foreground PDR to be 60 μG and that in the far side PDR to be 220 μG. Our field estimates compare well with the values obtained from OH Zeeman observations toward NGC 2024.

  11. The "Boom" and "Bust" Patterns of Communities within the Energy Rich Region of West Virginia: A Case Study of Moundsville

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiger, Brandon S.

    The increasing worldwide demand for energy will provide Energy Rich Regions (ERRs) the opportunity to increase their wealth and quality of living. However, a reoccurring pattern of boom and bust cycles in ERRs suggests the need for more sustainable development strategies. A mixed methods approach (case study) is employed to explore the "wicked human problems" occurring in one community, Moundsville, WV and to discover development patterns that might inform sustainable development strategies for the future. This study explores briefly the distant past development patterns, and in greater detail the pre-boom and most current boom in natural gas. First, data will be derived from a conceptual "Energy Rich Region Template" that explores the sustainability of development from the inclusive wealth forms of natural, human, and physical capital. The qualitative data analysis software (MAXQDA) is used to systematically collect and organize data and information into a community-wide knowledge base (specifically the seven years of city council minutes). This framework can assist future research dedicated to similar cases. Furthermore, this case may support communities and or policymakers in the development of a programming guide for converting the natural capital into other reproducible capital forms, thus avoiding the development cycle of boom and bust.

  12. A watershed-based method for environmental vulnerability assessment with a case study of the Mid-Atlantic region

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, Liem T.; O'Neill, Robert V.; Smith, Elizabeth R.

    2012-04-15

    The paper presents a method for environmental vulnerability assessment with a case study of the Mid-Atlantic region. The method is based on the concept of 'self-/peer-appraisal' of a watershed in term of vulnerability. The self-/peer-appraisal process is facilitated by two separate linear optimization programs. The analysis provided insights on the environmental conditions, in general, and the relative vulnerability pattern, in particular, of the Mid-Atlantic region. The suggested method offers a simple but effective and objective way to perform a regional environmental vulnerability assessment. Consequently the method can be used in various steps in environmental assessment and planning. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We present a method for regional environmental vulnerability assessment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is based on the self-/peer-appraisal concept in term of vulnerability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The analysis is facilitated by two separate linear optimization programs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method provides insights on the regional relative vulnerability pattern.

  13. The Regional Tutorial Services of the Open University: A Case Study. ZIFF Papiere 36.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keegan, Desmond J.

    The Open University of the United Kingdom is acknowledged as the most successful distance education program yet designed. High among the reasons for its success is the student support service provided by the Regional Tutorial Services, a department of the Open University administrative structure which has received little acclaim. This paper shows…

  14. Customer Relationship Management: A Case Study from a Metropolitan Campus of a Regional University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pember, Edward R.; Owens, Alison; Yaghi, Shazhi

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the users and uses of a centralised customer relationship management (CRM) system at a regional Australian university to improve the understanding of the staff experience of interacting with this customised technology. How and why the software is used by a cross section of university departments is explored through…

  15. Biophysical regions identification using an artificial neuronal network: A case study in the South Western Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraceno, Martin; Provost, Christine; Lebbah, Mustapha

    A classification method based on an artificial neuronal network is used to identify biophysical regions in the South Western Atlantic (SWA). The method comprises a probabilistic version of the Kohonen’s self-organizing map and a Hierarchical Ascending Clustering algorithm. It objectively defines the optimal number of classes and the class boundaries. The method is applied to ocean surface data provided by satellite: chlorophyll-a, sea surface temperature and sea surface temperature gradient, first to means and then, in an attempt to examine seasonal variations, to monthly climatologies. Both results reflect the presence of the major circulation patterns and frontal positions in the SWA. The provinces retrieved using mean fields are compared to previous results and show a more accurate description of the SWA. The classification obtained with monthly climatologies offers the flexibility to include the time dimension; the boundaries of biophysical regions established are not fixed, but vary in time. Perspectives and limitations of the methodology are discussed.

  16. Emergy measures of carrying capacity and sustainability of a target region for an ecological restoration programme: a case study in Loess Hilly Region, China.

    PubMed

    Dang, Xiaohu; Liu, Guobin

    2012-07-15

    Evaluating the sustainability of a target region for an ecological restoration programme is challenging because it involves different aspects of human society and environment as well as multiple disciplines. Carrying capacity provides a useful measure of the sustainability of a given region where an ecological restoration programme is implemented. In this article, the Yangou catchment, a geomorphic unit, was used as a case study in the Loess Hilly Region of China, where emergy synthesis was used to measure the environmental resources base. The specific standard of living in terms of emergy was employed to calculate carrying capacity over the period 1998-2005 and to assess the sustainability of the Yangou catchment where an ecological restoration programme was carried out. The results of the evaluation indicated that after implementing the ecological restoration programme, there was some improvement in the environmental aspects of the Yangou catchment during the study period, suggesting that the ecological restoration programme alleviated ecological degradation. However, several emergy-based indices and the support areas also illustrated that the ecological restoration programme was not successful enough in terms of preservation and utilisation of environmental resources to enhance sustainability. This indicates that further actions are necessary on conserving environmental resources, improving the emergy input structure for agricultural production and in lifestyle changes for the local people in living in the Yangou catchment. PMID:22425879

  17. Urban effects on regional climate: A case study in the Phoenix-Tucson Corridor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Z.; Dominguez, F.; Gupta, H. V.

    2014-12-01

    Human activity in urban environments impacts climate from the local to the global scale by changing the atmospheric composition and impacting components of the water and energy cycles. Specifically land use and land cover change due to urban expansion changes the surface albedo, heat capacity, and thermal conductivity of the surface. Consequently, the energy balance in urban region is different from that of natural surfaces. In this research, we apply the coupled WRF-NOAH-UCM, which includes a detailed urban radiation scheme, to evaluate the changes in regional climate that would arise due to projected urbanization in the Phoenix-Tucson corridor, in Arizona. We use the land cover data for 2005 and projections to 2050 (for areas north to Tucson from Maricopa Association of Governments (MAG) using the Red Dot Algorithm (RDA), and for areas around Tucson and South is from SLEUTH model) with historical North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) data as the lateral boundary condition. Result shows that temperature changes are well defined and reflect the urban heat island (UHI) effect within the areas experiencing LULCC. The heat index is also examined, the magnitude of change is similar to that of temperature change. The timing of the maximum and minimum temperature is delayed by approximately one hour. Precipitation was analyzed according to both the occurrence of rainfall and according to flow regime, however no clear evidence of changes in precipitation amount or occurrence was found due to urbanization.

  18. Patterns of diversification amongst tropical regions compared: a case study in Sapotaceae

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Kate E.; Stone, Graham N.; Nicholls, James A.; Valderrama, Eugenio; Anderberg, Arne A.; Smedmark, Jenny; Gautier, Laurent; Naciri, Yamama; Milne, Richard; Richardson, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Species diversity is unequally distributed across the globe, with the greatest concentration occurring in the tropics. Even within the tropics, there are significant differences in the numbers of taxa found in each continental region. Manilkara is a pantropical genus of trees in the Sapotaceae comprising c. 78 species. Its distribution allows for biogeographic investigation and testing of whether rates of diversification differ amongst tropical regions. The age and geographical origin of Manilkara are inferred to determine whether Gondwanan break-up, boreotropical migration or long distance dispersal have shaped its current disjunct distribution. Diversification rates through time are also analyzed to determine whether the timing and tempo of speciation on each continent coincides with geoclimatic events. Bayesian analyses of nuclear (ITS) and plastid (rpl32-trnL, rps16-trnK, and trnS-trnFM) sequences were used to reconstruct a species level phylogeny of Manilkara and related genera in the tribe Mimusopeae. Analyses of the nuclear data using a fossil-calibrated relaxed molecular clock indicate that Manilkara evolved 32–29 million years ago (Mya) in Africa. Lineages within the genus dispersed to the Neotropics 26–18 Mya and to Asia 28–15 Mya. Higher speciation rates are found in the Neotropical Manilkara clade than in either African or Asian clades. Dating of regional diversification correlates with known palaeoclimatic events. In South America, the divergence between Atlantic coastal forest and Amazonian clades coincides with the formation of drier Cerrado and Caatinga habitats between them. In Africa diversification coincides with Tertiary cycles of aridification and uplift of the east African plateaux. In Southeast Asia dispersal may have been limited by the relatively recent emergence of land in New Guinea and islands further east c. 10 Mya. PMID:25520736

  19. Integrated System Dynamics Modelling for water scarcity assessment: case study of the Kairouan region.

    PubMed

    Sušnik, Janez; Vamvakeridou-Lyroudia, Lydia S; Savić, Dragan A; Kapelan, Zoran

    2012-12-01

    A System Dynamics Model (SDM) assessing water scarcity and potential impacts of socio-economic policies in a complex hydrological system is developed. The model, simulating water resources deriving from numerous catchment sources and demand from four sectors (domestic, industrial, agricultural, external pumping), contains multiple feedback loops and sub-models. The SDM is applied to the Merguellil catchment, Tunisia; the first time such an integrated model has been developed for the water scarce Kairouan region. The application represents an early step in filling a critical research gap. The focus of this paper is to a) assess the applicability of SDM for assessment of the evolution of a water-scarce catchment and b) to analyse the current and future behaviour of the catchment to evaluate water scarcity, focusing on understanding trends to inform policy. Baseline results indicate aquifer over-exploitation, agreeing with observed trends. If current policy and social behaviour continue, serious aquifer depletion is possible in the not too distant future, with implications for the economy and environment. This is unlikely to occur because policies preventing depletion will be implemented. Sensitivity tests were carried out to show which parameters most impacted aquifer behaviour. Results show non-linear model behaviour. Some tests showed negligible change in behaviour. Others showed unrealistic exponential changes in demand, revenue and aquifer water volume. Policy-realistic parameters giving the greatest positive impact on model behaviour were those controlling per-capita domestic water demand and the pumped volume to coastal cities. All potentially beneficial policy options should be considered, giving the best opportunity for preservation of Kairouan aquifer water quantity/quality, ecologically important habitats and the agricultural socio-economic driver of regional development. SDM is a useful tool for assessing the potential impacts of possible policy measures

  20. Patterns of diversification amongst tropical regions compared: a case study in Sapotaceae.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Kate E; Stone, Graham N; Nicholls, James A; Valderrama, Eugenio; Anderberg, Arne A; Smedmark, Jenny; Gautier, Laurent; Naciri, Yamama; Milne, Richard; Richardson, James E

    2014-01-01

    Species diversity is unequally distributed across the globe, with the greatest concentration occurring in the tropics. Even within the tropics, there are significant differences in the numbers of taxa found in each continental region. Manilkara is a pantropical genus of trees in the Sapotaceae comprising c. 78 species. Its distribution allows for biogeographic investigation and testing of whether rates of diversification differ amongst tropical regions. The age and geographical origin of Manilkara are inferred to determine whether Gondwanan break-up, boreotropical migration or long distance dispersal have shaped its current disjunct distribution. Diversification rates through time are also analyzed to determine whether the timing and tempo of speciation on each continent coincides with geoclimatic events. Bayesian analyses of nuclear (ITS) and plastid (rpl32-trnL, rps16-trnK, and trnS-trnFM) sequences were used to reconstruct a species level phylogeny of Manilkara and related genera in the tribe Mimusopeae. Analyses of the nuclear data using a fossil-calibrated relaxed molecular clock indicate that Manilkara evolved 32-29 million years ago (Mya) in Africa. Lineages within the genus dispersed to the Neotropics 26-18 Mya and to Asia 28-15 Mya. Higher speciation rates are found in the Neotropical Manilkara clade than in either African or Asian clades. Dating of regional diversification correlates with known palaeoclimatic events. In South America, the divergence between Atlantic coastal forest and Amazonian clades coincides with the formation of drier Cerrado and Caatinga habitats between them. In Africa diversification coincides with Tertiary cycles of aridification and uplift of the east African plateaux. In Southeast Asia dispersal may have been limited by the relatively recent emergence of land in New Guinea and islands further east c. 10 Mya. PMID:25520736

  1. Uncertainty associated with regional landslide risk analysis - a case study in Buzau County, Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zumpano, Veronica; Ciurean, Roxana; Micu, Mihai; Balteanu, Dan; Glade, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    When analyzing the risk for a region where landslides constitute a threat for the society and the environment, a fully quantitative approach often becomes impracticable. The magnitude, frequency and location of landslides and a reasonably complete inventory of historical events is commonly not available. Likewise, a thorough investigation of the damaged assets and quantification of losses is rarely possible. Nevertheless, an alternative approach can be engaged in areas where information regarding the environmental conditions leading to the occurrence of landslides including their relative location, and the characteristics and distribution of elements at risk are known. This contribution proposes a methodology for a landslide risk analysis applicable at regional scale taking into account the spatial probability and consequences of past damaging events. Since the temporal information used to calculate the detailed hazard probability is missing, a susceptibility analysis is performed by using a data-driven Bayesian method (Weights of Evidence modeling technique) which analyzes the relation between a training set (past landslide events) and multiple predisposing factors (lithology, landuse, slope, aspect, internal relief, altitude), in order to predict areas that are less-to-more susceptible to landslide initiation. The consequence analysis is based on a generalized assessment of vulnerability, exposure and value of the elements at risk (i.e. buildings and roads) using cadastral and statistical data. For both components of the risk analysis (susceptibility analysis and consequence analysis) an estimation of uncertainty is performed by defining a central value (which represents the statistical mean) and a measure of value range (minimum and maximum) of the input parameters. As the procedure operates at a spatial level, the distribution of risk and the annual probability of expected losses are expressed numerically as well as spatially with the use of GIS. The developed

  2. Regional flow perturbation folding within an exhumation channel: A case study from the Cycladic Blueschists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xypolias, P.; Alsop, G. I.

    2014-05-01

    Kilometre-scale cylindrical folds and associated parasitic folds that trend at small angles to the transport lineation are analysed along a 100-km-long transport-normal segment of the Cycladic Blueschists in an attempt to reconstruct the 3D structural architecture within an exhumation channel. Reversals in the polarity of both fold vergence and the hinge/lineation obliquity occur in a flow-normal direction, defining transport-parallel culmination and depression surfaces that root downwards onto an underlying detachment. Fold patterns generated around culmination and depression surfaces support models of flow-perturbation folding where folds initiate at small angles or sub-parallel to transport in response to wrench-dominated differential shearing. Successive culmination and depression surfaces are separated from one another by along strike distances of ˜20 km, although atypical fold geometries developed in the flanks of major culmination and depressions follow their own patterns, revealing that smaller perturbations occur within the larger scheme. Major culminations are interpreted to reflect regions of surging flow marked by increased velocity during exhumation, whilst the opposite is true for depressions. This behaviour implies that on a regional scale, differential shear varies laterally in an irregular-sinusoidal manner defining areas of relative high and relative low displacement within the exhumation channel.

  3. Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritter, Lois A., Ed.; Sue, Valerie M., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents two case studies using online surveys for evaluation. The authors begin with an example of a needs assessment survey designed to measure the amount of help new students at a university require in their first year. They then discuss the follow-up survey conducted by the same university to measure the effectiveness of the…

  4. Iran: A Case Study on Stimulation and Improvement or Establishment of Locally-Based Materials or Elements Production, in the Luristan & Caspian Regions. Report Studies ... C89.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, John

    The first part of the case study describes the establishment of kilns to produce fired bricks in the Luristan region of Iran and utilization of local skills and resources to meet local needs. The emphasis is on providing job opportunities to supplement the existing agricultural economic base and on supporting the local building industry, both of…

  5. Coupling socioeconomic and lake systems for sustainability: a conceptual analysis using Lake St. Clair region as a case study.

    PubMed

    Mavrommati, Georgia; Baustian, Melissa M; Dreelin, Erin A

    2014-04-01

    Applying sustainability at an operational level requires understanding the linkages between socioeconomic and natural systems. We identified linkages in a case study of the Lake St. Clair (LSC) region, part of the Laurentian Great Lakes system. Our research phases included: (1) investigating and revising existing coupled human and natural systems frameworks to develop a framework for this case study; (2) testing and refining the framework by hosting a 1-day stakeholder workshop and (3) creating a causal loop diagram (CLD) to illustrate the relationships among the systems' key components. With stakeholder assistance, we identified four interrelated pathways that include water use and discharge, land use, tourism and shipping that impact the ecological condition of LSC. The interrelationships between the pathways of water use and tourism are further illustrated by a CLD with several feedback loops. We suggest that this holistic approach can be applied to other case studies and inspire the development of dynamic models capable of informing decision making for sustainability. PMID:23949895

  6. Regionalized LCA-based optimization of building energy supply: method and case study for a Swiss municipality.

    PubMed

    Saner, Dominik; Vadenbo, Carl; Steubing, Bernhard; Hellweg, Stefanie

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents a regionalized LCA-based multiobjective optimization model of building energy demand and supply for the case of a Swiss municipality for the minimization of greenhouse gas emissions and particulate matter formation. The results show that the environmental improvement potential is very large: in the optimal case, greenhouse gas emissions from energy supply could be reduced by more than 75% and particulate emissions by over 50% in the municipality. This scenario supposes a drastic shift of heat supply systems from a fossil fuel dominated portfolio to a portfolio consisting of mainly heat pump and woodchip incineration systems. In addition to a change in heat supply technologies, roofs, windows and walls would need to be refurbished in more than 65% of the municipality's buildings. The full potential of the environmental impact reductions will hardly be achieved in reality, particularly in the short term, for example, because of financial constraints and social acceptance, which were not taken into account in this study. Nevertheless, the results of the optimization model can help policy makers to identify the most effective measures for improvement at the decision making level, for example, at the building level for refurbishment and selection of heating systems or at the municipal level for designing district heating networks. Therefore, this work represents a starting point for designing effective incentives to reduce the environmental impact of buildings. While the results of the optimization model are specific to the municipality studied, the model could readily be adapted to other regions. PMID:24865977

  7. Pesticide exposure and lymphohaematopoietic cancers: a case-control study in an agricultural region (Larissa, Thessaly, Greece)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The causality of lymphohaematopoietic cancers (LHC) is multifactorial and studies investigating the association between chemical exposure and LHC have produced variable results. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between exposure to pesticides and LHC in an agricultural region of Greece. Methods A structured questionnaire was employed in a hospital-based case control study to gather information on demographics, occupation, exposure to pesticides, agricultural practices, family and medical history and smoking. To control for confounders, backward conditional and multinomial logistic regression analyses were used. To assess the dose-response relationship between exposure and disease, the chi-square test for trend was used. Results Three hundred and fifty-four (354) histologically confirmed LHC cases diagnosed from 2004 to 2006 and 455 sex- and age-matched controls were included in the study. Pesticide exposure was associated with total LHC cases (OR 1.46, 95% CI 1.05-2.04), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) (OR 1.87, 95% CI 1.00-3.51) and leukaemia (OR 2.14, 95% CI 1.09-4.20). A dose-response pattern was observed for total LHC cases (P = 0.004), MDS (P = 0.024) and leukaemia (P = 0.002). Pesticide exposure was independently associated with total LHC cases (OR 1.41, 95% CI 1.00 - 2.00) and leukaemia (OR 2.05, 95% CI 1.02-4.12) after controlling for age, smoking and family history (cancers, LHC and immunological disorders). Smoking during application of pesticides was strongly associated with total LHC cases (OR 3.29, 95% CI 1.81-5.98), MDS (OR 3.67, 95% CI 1.18-12.11), leukaemia (OR 10.15, 95% CI 2.15-65.69) and lymphoma (OR 2.72, 95% CI 1.02-8.00). This association was even stronger for total LHC cases (OR 18.18, 95% CI 2.38-381.17) when eating simultaneously with pesticide application. Conclusions Lymphohaematopoietic cancers were associated with pesticide exposure after controlling for confounders. Smoking and eating during pesticide

  8. Satellite imaging coral reef resilience at regional scale. A case-study from Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Rowlands, Gwilym; Purkis, Sam; Riegl, Bernhard; Metsamaa, Liisa; Bruckner, Andrew; Renaud, Philip

    2012-06-01

    We propose a framework for spatially estimating a proxy for coral reef resilience using remote sensing. Data spanning large areas of coral reef habitat were obtained using the commercial QuickBird satellite, and freely available imagery (NASA, Google Earth). Principles of coral reef ecology, field observation, and remote observations, were combined to devise mapped indices. These capture important and accessible components of coral reef resilience. Indices are divided between factors known to stress corals, and factors incorporating properties of the reef landscape that resist stress or promote coral growth. The first-basis for a remote sensed resilience index (RSRI), an estimate of expected reef resilience, is proposed. Developed for the Red Sea, the framework of our analysis is flexible and with minimal adaptation, could be extended to other reef regions. We aim to stimulate discussion as to use of remote sensing to do more than simply deliver habitat maps of coral reefs. PMID:22480935

  9. Hydrodynamic simulation of river Yamuna for riverbed assessment: a case study of Delhi region.

    PubMed

    Vijay, Ritesh; Sargoankar, Aabha; Gupta, Apurba

    2007-07-01

    A well known river hydrodynamic model RiverCAD has been used to simulate and visualize flood scenarios for different designated flood flows under complex riverbed geometry with several man made structures like bridges and barrages. The model applied successfully for the stretch of 23 km in the Yamuna floodplain of Delhi region from Wazirabad barrage in the upstream to Okhla barrage. Flood flows for various return periods namely once in 10, 25, 50 and 100 years were estimated based on recorded flow data for the period of 1963 to 2003 using standard flood frequency analysis techniques. The simulation results were compared and the model was calibrated with water surface elevation records of the previous floods at various barrage and bridge locations. Simulation results enabled prediction of maximum water levels, submergence scenarios and land availability under different designated flood flows for riverbed assessment, development and management. PMID:17131082

  10. Improving microcystin monitoring relevance in recreative waters: A regional case-study (Brittany, Western France, Europe).

    PubMed

    Pitois, Frédéric; Vezie, Chantal; Thoraval, Isabelle; Baurès, Estelle

    2016-05-01

    Cyanobacteria and their toxins are known as a health hazard in recreative and distributed waters. Monitoring data from 2004 to 2011 were collected at regional scale to characterize exposition parameters to microcystins in Brittany (Western France). The data show that cyanobacteria populations are experiencing a composition shift leading to a longer duration of cell densities higher than WHO alert levels 2 and 3. Microcystins however appear to be more frequently detected with subacute concentrations in low cell density samples than in high cell density samples or during bloom episodes. Positive relations are described between microcystin concentrations, detection frequencies and cyanobacteria biovolumes, allowing for a novel definition of alert levels and decision framework following WHO recommendations. PMID:26765088

  11. Comparing regional modeling (CHIMERE) and satellite observations of aerosols (PARASOL): Methodology and case study over Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stromatas, Stavros

    2010-05-01

    S. Stromatas (1), S. Turquety (1), H. Chepfer (1), L. Menut (1), B. Bessagnet (2), JC Pere (2), D. Tanré (3) . (1) Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique, CNRS/IPSL, École Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex, France, (2) INERIS, Institut National de l'Environnement Industriel et des Risques, Parc technologique ALATA, 60550 Verneuil en Halatte, FRANCE, (3) Laboratoire d'Optique Atmosphérique/CNRS Univ. des Sciences et Tech. de Lille, 59650 - Villeneuve d'Ascq, France. Atmospheric suspended particles (aerosols) have significant radiative and environmental impacts, affecting human health, visibility and climate. Therefore, they are regulated by air quality standards worldwide, and monitored by regional observation networks. Satellite observations vastly improve the horizontal and temporal coverage, providing daily distributions. Aerosols are currently estimated using aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrievals, a quantitative measure of the extinction of solar radiation by aerosol scattering and absorption between the point of observation and the top of the atmosphere. Even though remarkable progresses in aerosol modeling by chemistry-transport models (CTM) and measurement experiments have been made in recent years, there is still a significant divergence between the modeled and observed results. However, AOD retrievals from satellites remains a highly challenging task mostly because it depends on a variety of different parameters such as cloud contamination, surface reflectance contributions and a priori assumptions on aerosol types, each one of them incorporating its own difficulties. Therefore, comparisons between CTM and observations are often difficult to interpret. In this presentation, we will discuss comparisons between regional modeling (CHIMERE CTM) over Mexico and satellite observations obtained by the POLDER instrument embarked on PARASOL micro-satellite. After a comparison of the model AOD with the retrieved L2 AOD, we will present an alternative

  12. The association between campylobacteriosis, agriculture and drinking water: a case-case study in a region of British Columbia, Canada, 2005-2009.

    PubMed

    Galanis, E; Mak, S; Otterstatter, M; Taylor, M; Zubel, M; Takaro, T K; Kuo, M; Michel, P

    2014-10-01

    We studied the association between drinking water, agriculture and sporadic human campylobacteriosis in one region of British Columbia (BC), Canada. We compared 2992 cases of campylobacteriosis to 4816 cases of other reportable enteric diseases in 2005-2009 using multivariate regression. Cases were geocoded and assigned drinking water source, rural/urban environment and socioeconomic status (SES) according to the location of their residence using geographical information systems analysis methods. The odds of campylobacteriosis compared to enteric disease controls were higher for individuals serviced by private wells than municipal surface water systems (odds ratio 1·4, 95% confidence interval 1·1-1·8). In rural settings, the odds of campylobacteriosis were higher in November (P = 0·014). The odds of campylobacteriosis were higher in individuals aged ⩾15 years, especially in those with higher SES. In this region of BC, campylobacteriosis risk, compared to other enteric diseases, seems to be mediated by vulnerable drinking water sources and rural factors. Consideration should be given to further support well-water users and to further study the microbiological impact of agriculture on water. PMID:24892423

  13. Diagnosis of partial complex regional pain syndrome type 1 of the hand: retrospective study of 16 cases and literature review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The partial form of the complex regional pain syndrome of the hand type 1 (CRPS 1), involving only 1 to 3 fingers, is a rare condition first described in 1972. The aim of the study is to define more precisely the diagnosis workup and the prognosis of this clinical entity. Methods Retrospective study of CRPS1 partial form observed during five years in a rehabilitation ward. Application of The Budapest criteria, evaluation of radiological exams, therapeutic results and vocational outcomes. Comparison with cases from literature review. Results 132 patients were hospitalized with the diagnosis of CRPS type 1 of the hand. 16 partial forms were isolated: 11 men, 5 women with a mean age of 43 years. Among these patients, 14 (88%) met The Budapest criteria and the two remaining cases were diagnosed by using the three phase bone scintigraphy. Only moderate improvement was obtained in the majority of the patients. At the maximal time of follow-up (4 to 9 years), 50% of the patients hadn’t returned to work. From the literature review, 19 cases were eligible for clinical comparisons. The main differences between our series and the literature were: more men involved, later diagnosis and worst prognosis in term of return to work. Conclusions This is the largest series of consecutive partial form of CRPS. The Budapest criteria are sufficient for the diagnosis in 88% of cases. As in complete form of CRPS1 of the hand, three phase bone scintigraphy should only be used in doubtful cases in the first six months of the illness. Partial form of CRPS1 of the hand is rare and its prevalence remains unknown. Long term prognosis (4 to 9 years) is poor in our series, 50% of patients didn’t returned to work. PMID:23506090

  14. Measuring flood footprint of a regional economy - A case study for the UK flooding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, D.

    2013-12-01

    Analysis of the urban economy and society is central to understanding the broad impacts of flooding and to identify cost-effective adaptation and mitigation measures. Assessments of the flooding impacts on cities have traditionally focused on the initial impact on people and assets. These initial estimates (so-called ';direct damage') are useful both in understanding the immediate implications of damage, and in marshalling the pools of capital and supplies required for re-building after an event. Since different economies as well as societies are coupled, especially under the current economic crisis, any small-scale damage may be multiplied and cascaded throughout wider economic systems and social networks. The direct and indirect damage is currently not evaluated well and could be captured by quantification of what we call the flood footprint. Flooding in one location can impact the whole UK economy. Neglecting these knock-on costs (i.e. the true footprint of the flood) means we might be ignoring the economic benefits and beneficiaries of flood risk management interventions. In 2007, for example, floods cost the economy about £3.2 bn directly, but the wider effect might actually add another 50% to 250% to that. Flood footprint is a measure of the exclusive total socioeconomic impact that is directly and indirectly caused by a flood event to the flooding region and wider economic systems and social networks. We adopt the UK 2012 flooding. An input-output basic dynamic inequalities (BDI) model is used to assess the impact of the floodings on the level of a Yorkshire economy, accounting for interactions between industries through demand and supply of intermediate consumption goods with a circular flow. After the disaster the economy will be unbalanced. The recovery process finishes when the economy is completely balance, i.e., when labour production capacity equals demands and production and all the variables reach pre-disaster levels. The analysis is carried out

  15. Demand Characteristics of Post-Secondary Education: Evidence from Grande Prairie Regional College Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comeau, Ken J.; Belassi, Walid; Musila, Jacob

    2004-01-01

    Post secondary enrolment demand has received increasing attention over the last few decades as numerous studies have attempted to provide accurate explanatory models for strategic enrolment management purposes. However, these studies typically make the assumption that enrolment is a homogeneous commodity where the demand within a post-secondary…

  16. Optimal groundwater management using surrogate models: a case study for an arid coastal region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schütze, Niels; Roy, Tirthankar; Marco, Brettschneider; Jens, Grundmann

    2013-04-01

    Optimal water management is an indispensible need for the arid coastal regions. Due to the high water demand in various consumption sectors, excess water is often driven out from the aquifer resulting into water table drawdown and seawater intrusion. While applied in irrigation, the excess salinity level in the pumped water jeopardizes the agricultural production. Robust management strategies are required to combat this problem taking into consideration the profit from agriculture as well as the sustainability of the aquifer. For optimal groundwater resources management, a two-dimensional transient density dependent groundwater flow and salt transport model was developed with the help of the simulation package OpenGeoSys (OGS) and then it was replaced by trained approximate surrogates i.e. Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and Gaussian Process Model (GPM). The relatively new GPM showed satisfactory performance with a little compromise in the computational time. With the surrogate groundwater model mono-criteria and multi/criteria optimization runs over a period of more than 60 years are conducted using the evolutionary algorithm CMA-ES. The proposed methodology has significant applicability in the decision making for groundwater and agriculture related issues in the arid coastal aquifers since it offers high effectiveness and efficiency.

  17. Regionally contaminated aquifers--toxicological relevance and remediation options (Bitterfeld case study).

    PubMed

    Heidrich, Susanne; Schirmer, Mario; Weiss, Holger; Wycisk, Peter; Grossmann, Jochen; Kaschl, Arno

    2004-12-15

    Large-scale contaminated megasites like Bitterfeld in eastern Germany are characterized by a regional contamination of soil, surface water and groundwater as a result of a long and varied history of chemical production. While the contaminants in soils and sediments mostly represent a localized problem, pollutants in groundwater may spread to uncontaminated areas and endanger receptors like surface water and drinking water wells according to the site-specific hydrologic regime. From the toxicological point of view, the contaminants at the Bitterfeld megasite represent a dangerous cocktail of various harmful substances coming from a multitude of sources. Appropriate remediation techniques must be able to remedy the specific problems arising from hot spot areas within the megasite in addition to preventing a further extension of the contaminated zone towards uncontaminated compartments. Therefore, a combination of specifically designed remediation technologies based on the pump and treat-principle with in situ technologies, such as reactive walls and monitored/enhanced natural attenuation, is necessary to efficiently address the miscellaneous challenges at this megasite. In this paper, the currently known contaminant distribution, the associated problems for human health and the environment and possible remediation strategies are presented for the Bitterfeld megasite. PMID:15464625

  18. Lumbar Sympathetic Block with Botulinum Toxin Type B for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eunjoo; Cho, Chan Woo; Kim, Hye Young; Lee, Pyung Bok; Nahm, Francis Sahngun

    2015-01-01

    Lumbar sympathetic block (LSB) is an effective method for relief of sympathetically mediated pain in the lower extremities. To prolong the sympathetic blockade, sympathetic destruction with alcohol or radiofrequency has been used. The pre-ganglionic sympathetic nerves are cholinergic, and botulinum toxin (BTX) has been found to inhibit the release of acetylcholine at the cholinergic nerve terminals. Moreover, BTX type B (BTX-B) is more convenient to use than BTX type A. Based on these findings, we performed LSB on the 2 patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) in the lower extremity. Levobupivacaine 0.25% 5 mL mixed with BTX-B 5,000 IU was given under fluoroscopic guidance. Two months after LSB with BTX-B, pain intensity and the Leeds assessment of neuropathic symptoms and signs (LANSS) score were significantly reduced. Allodynia and coldness disappeared and skin color came back to normal. In conclusion, BTX-B can produce an efficacious and durable sympathetic blocking effect on patients with CRPS. PMID:26431145

  19. Floodplain Modulation of Solute Fluxes from Mountainous Regions: the Amazonian Madre de Dios River Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, M. A.; West, A. J.; Baronas, J. J.; Ponton, C.; Clark, K. E.; Feakins, S. J.; Galy, V.

    2015-12-01

    In many large river systems, solutes released by chemical weathering in mountainous regions are transported through floodplains before being discharged into the ocean. Chemical reactions within floodplains can both add and remove solutes, significantly modulating fluxes. Despite their importance in the relationship between tectonic uplift and solute fluxes to the ocean, many aspects of floodplain processes are poorly constrained since the chemistry of large rivers is also significantly affected by the mixing between multiple tributaries, which makes the separation and quantification of floodplain processes challenging. Here we explore how floodplain processes affect a suite of major and trace elements in the Madre de Dios River system in Peru. To separate floodplain processes from conservative mixing, we developed a tributary mixing model that uses water isotopic ratios and chloride concentrations measured in each tributary and upstream and downstream of each tributary confluence for all major tributaries along a floodplain reach. The results of the tributary mixing model allow for the chemical composition of the mainstem of the Madre de Dios River to be modeled assuming completely conservative mixing. Differences between the modeled and measured chemical composition of the mainstem are then used to identify and quantify the effects of floodplain processes on different solutes. Our results show that during both the wet and dry seasons, Li is removed and Ca, Mg, and Sr are added to the dissolved load during floodplain transit. Other solutes, like Na and SO4, appear to behave conservatively during floodplain transit. Likely, the removal of Li from the dissolved load reflects the precipitation of secondary silicate minerals in the floodplain. The release of Ca, Mg, and Sr likely reflects the dissolution of detrital carbonate minerals. Our analyses also show that tributaries with Andean headwaters contribute disproportionately to solute budgets while the water budget

  20. 3D Airborne Electromagnetic Inversion: A case study from the Musgrave Region, South Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, L. H.; Wilson, G. A.; Zhdanov, M. S.; Sunwall, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    Geophysicists know and accept that geology is inherently 3D, and is resultant from complex, overlapping processes related to genesis, metamorphism, deformation, alteration, weathering, and/or hydrogeology. Yet, the geophysics community has long relied on qualitative analysis, conductivity depth imaging (CDIs), 1D inversion, and/or plate modeling. There are many reasons for this deficiency, not the least of which has been the lack of capacity for historic 3D AEM inversion algorithms to invert entire surveys so as to practically affect exploration decisions. Our recent introduction of a moving sensitivity domain (footprint) methodology has been a paradigm shift in AEM interpretation. The basis of this method is that one needs only to calculate the responses and sensitivities for that part of the 3D earth model that is within the AEM system's sensitivity domain (footprint), and then superimpose all sensitivity domains into a single, sparse sensitivity matrix for the entire 3D earth model which is then updated in a regularized inversion scheme. This has made it practical to rigorously invert entire surveys with thousands of line kilometers of AEM data to mega-cell 3D models in hours using multi-processor workstations. Since 2010, over eighty individual projects have been completed for Aerodat, AEROTEM, DIGHEM, GEOTEM, HELITEM, HoisTEM, MEGATEM, RepTEM, RESOLVE, SkyTEM, SPECTREM, TEMPEST, and VTEM data from Australia, Brazil, Canada, Finland, Ghana, Peru, Tanzania, the US, and Zambia. Examples of 3D AEM inversion have been published for a variety of applications, including mineral exploration, oil sands exploration, salinity, permafrost, and bathymetry mapping. In this paper, we present a comparison of 3D inversions for SkyTEM, SPECTREM, TEMPET and VTEM data acquired over the same area in the Musgrave region of South Australia for exploration under cover.

  1. Student Retention in an Era of Globalization: A Case Study of IGNOU Regional Centre, Mumbai

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rajesh, M.

    2011-01-01

    Student Retention is a function of a number of factors, the most important among them being--the academic response mechanism of an institution, effectiveness in handling administrative queries, counseling at learner support centres, effectiveness in handling practical session and so on. The current paper is an attempt to study the effectiveness of…

  2. North Country Successes: Case Studies of Successful Entrepreneurs in the ANCA Region.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chugh, Ram L.; Gandhi, Prem P.

    This study identifies the characteristics of both successful small businesses and their entrepreneurial owners in a 14-county area of the Adirondack North Country Association (ANCA). Of the 100 survey respondents representing successful small businesses, 50% had been in business for less than 14 years; 38% were in manufacturing; 48% employed more…

  3. FURTHER CASE STUDIES ON THE IMPACT OF MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE SYSTEMS ON REGIONAL OZONE AND HAZE DISTRIBUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is a continuation of an earlier effort to study the impact of mesoscale convective precipitation systems upon distributions of aerosol and photochemical oxidant pollutants in the planetary boundary layer (PBL). Analyses of surface visibility and ozone data revealed a d...

  4. Linking slope stability and climate change: the Nordfjord region, western Norway, case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasskog, K.; Waldmann, N.; Ariztegui, D.; Simpson, G.; Støren, E.; Chapron, E.; Nesje, A.

    2009-12-01

    Valleys, lakes and fjords are spectacular features of the Norwegian landscape and their sedimentary record recall past climatic, environmental and glacio-isostatic changes since the late glacial. A high resolution multi-proxy study is being performed on three lakes in western Norway combining different geophysical methods and sediment coring with the aim of reconstructing paleoclimate and to investigate how the frequency of hazardous events in this area has changed through time. A very high resolution reflection seismic profiling revealed a series of mass-wasting deposits. These events, which have also been studied in radiocarbon-dated cores, suggest a changing impact of slope instability on lake sedimentation since the late glacial. A specially tailored physically-based mathematical model allowed a numerical simulation of one of these mass wasting events and related tsunami, which occurred during a devastating rock avalanche in 1936 killing 74 persons. The outcome has been further validated against historical, marine and terrestrial information, providing a model that can be applied to comparable basins at various temporal and geographical scales. Detailed sedimentological and geochemical studies of selected cores allows characterizing the sedimentary record and to disentangle each mass wasting event. This combination of seismic, sedimentary and geophysical data permits to extend the record of mass wasting events beyond historical times. The geophysical and coring data retrieved from these lakes is a unique trace of paleo-slope stability generated by isostatic rebound and climate change, thus providing a continuous archive of slope stability beyond the historical record. The results of this study provide valuable information about the impact of climate change on slope stability and source-to-sink processes.

  5. GIS and the Analytic Hierarchy Process for Regional Landfill Site Selection in Transitional Countries: A Case Study From Serbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenović Vasiljević, Tamara; Srdjević, Zorica; Bajčetić, Ratko; Vojinović Miloradov, Mirjana

    2012-02-01

    The Serbian National Waste Management Strategy for the Period 2010-2019, harmonized with the European Union Directives, mandates new and very strict requirements for landfill sites. To enable analysis of a number of required qualitative and quantitative factors for landfill site selection, the traditional method of site selection must be replaced with a new approach. The combination of GIS and the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) was selected to solve this complex problem. The Srem region in northern Serbia, being one of the most environmentally sensitive areas, was chosen as a case study. Seventeen factors selected as criteria/sub-criteria were recognized as most important, divided into geo-natural, environmental, social and techno-economic factors, and were evaluated by experts from different fields using an AHP extension in Arc GIS. Weighted spatial layers were combined into a landfill suitability map which was then overlapped with four restriction maps, resulting in a final suitability map. According to the results, 82.65% of the territory of Srem is unsuitable for regional landfill siting. The most suitable areas cover 9.14%, suitable areas 5.24%, while areas with low and very low suitability cover 2.21 and 0.76% of the territory, respectively. Based on these findings, five sites close to two large urban agglomerations were suggested as possible locations for a regional landfill site in Srem. However, the final decision will require further field investigation, a public acceptance survey, and consideration of ownership status and price of the land.

  6. Conservation of Socioculturally Important Local Crop Biodiversity in the Oromia Region of Ethiopia: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balemie, Kebu; Singh, Ranjay K.

    2012-09-01

    In this study, we surveyed diversity in a range of local crops in the Lume and Gimbichu districts of Ethiopia, together with the knowledge of local people regarding crop uses, socio-economic importance, conservation, management and existing threats. Data were collected using semistructured interviews and participant observation. The study identified 28 farmers' varieties of 12 crop species. Among these, wheat ( Triticum turgidum) and tef ( Eragrostis tef) have high intra-specific diversity, with 9 and 6 varieties respectively. Self-seed supply or seed saving was the main (80 %) source of seeds for replanting. Agronomic performance (yield and pest resistance), market demand, nutritional and use diversity attributes of the crop varieties were highlighted as important criteria for making decisions regarding planting and maintenance. Over 74 % of the informants grow a combination of "improved" and farmers' varieties. Of the farmers' varieties, the most obvious decline and/or loss was reported for wheat varieties. Introduction of improved wheat varieties, pest infestation, shortage of land, low yield performance and climate variability were identified as the principal factors contributing to this loss or decline. Appropriate interventions for future conservation and sustainable use of farmers' varieties were suggested.

  7. Conservation of socioculturally important local crop biodiversity in the Oromia region of Ethiopia: a case study.

    PubMed

    Balemie, Kebu; Singh, Ranjay K

    2012-09-01

    In this study, we surveyed diversity in a range of local crops in the Lume and Gimbichu districts of Ethiopia, together with the knowledge of local people regarding crop uses, socio-economic importance, conservation, management and existing threats. Data were collected using semistructured interviews and participant observation. The study identified 28 farmers' varieties of 12 crop species. Among these, wheat (Triticum turgidum) and tef (Eragrostis tef) have high intra-specific diversity, with 9 and 6 varieties respectively. Self-seed supply or seed saving was the main (80 %) source of seeds for replanting. Agronomic performance (yield and pest resistance), market demand, nutritional and use diversity attributes of the crop varieties were highlighted as important criteria for making decisions regarding planting and maintenance. Over 74 % of the informants grow a combination of "improved" and farmers' varieties. Of the farmers' varieties, the most obvious decline and/or loss was reported for wheat varieties. Introduction of improved wheat varieties, pest infestation, shortage of land, low yield performance and climate variability were identified as the principal factors contributing to this loss or decline. Appropriate interventions for future conservation and sustainable use of farmers' varieties were suggested. PMID:22729809

  8. Production of biofuels and biomolecules in the framework of circular economy: A regional case study.

    PubMed

    Jacquet, Nicolas; Haubruge, Eric; Richel, Aurore

    2015-12-01

    Faced to the economic and energetic context of our society, it is widely recognised that an alternative to fossil fuels and oil-based products will be needed in the nearest future. In this way, development of urban biorefinery could bring many solutions to this problem. Study of the implementation of urban biorefinery highlights two sustainable configurations that provide solutions to the Walloon context by promoting niche markets, developing circular economy and reducing transport of supply feedstock. First, autonomous urban biorefineries are proposed, which use biological waste for the production of added value molecules and/or finished products and are energetically self-sufficient. Second, integrated urban biorefineries, which benefit from an energy supply from a nearby industrial activity. In the Walloon economic context, these types of urban biorefineries could provide solutions by promoting niche markets, developing a circular economy model, optimise the transport of supply feedstock and contribute to the sustainable development. PMID:26574581

  9. Rethinking Snowstorms as Snow Events: A Regional Case Study from Upstate New York.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Call, David A.

    2005-12-01

    Major snowstorms affecting Buffalo, Rochester, Syracuse, and Albany, New York from 1888 to 2003 were studied to discern changes in the response to urban snow events. These cities managed snow poorly in the past, but are generally adept today thanks to lessons learned from past snowstorms and improved technology. Nonetheless, modern snowstorms can still disrupt life and business. This potential for disruption obligates a collaboration among city government, meteorologists, and the general public to minimize the negative impacts of snow.A snowstorm's impact is determined by much more than simply the amount of snow that falls. While storms with large accumulations are disruptive, factors such as snow intensity and storm timing are often just as influential. Additionally, nonmeteorological factors such as governmental response, actions by the general public, and weather forecasting and dissemination influence the impact of a snowstorm.Both meteorological and non-meteorological influences can be considered by rethinking snowstorms as snow events. Using the word "event" in place of "storm" reminds us that a snowstorm's disruption is affected by much more than variations in the storm itself; humans play an important role as well. Ultimately, both forecasters and others involved in snow prediction and preparation should consider the range of social and physical factors when planning for snow events.

  10. Historical carbon footprinting and implications for sustainability planning: a case study of the Pittsburgh region.

    PubMed

    Hoesly, Rachel; Blackhurst, Mike; Matthews, H Scott; Miller, Jeffrey F; Maples, Amy; Pettit, Matthew; Izard, Catherine; Fischbeck, Paul

    2012-04-17

    This study estimates fossil-based CO(2) emissions and energy use from 1900-2000 for Allegheny County, PA. Total energy use and emissions increased from 1900 to 1970, reflecting the significant industrial, economic, and population growth that occurred in Allegheny County. From 1970 to 2000, Allegheny County experienced a 30% decrease in total emissions and energy use from peak values, primarily because of a decline in industrial activity (40% decrease in value added) and the loss of a quarter of its population. Despite these dramatic economic and demographic transitions, per capita emissions remained stable from 1970 to 2000, buoyed by relatively stable or slightly increasing emissions in the commercial and transportation sectors. Allegheny County's history suggests the scale of change needed to achieve local emissions reductions may be significant; given years of major technological, economic, and demographic changes, per capita emissions in 1940 were nearly the same in 2000. Most local governments are planning emissions reductions rates that exceed 1% per year, which deviate significantly from historical trends. Our results suggest additional resources and improved planning paradigms are likely necessary to achieve significant emissions reductions, especially for areas where emissions are still increasing. PMID:22458634

  11. Effect of ENSO on regional monsoonal rains -- a case study for central India

    SciTech Connect

    Sastri, A.S.R.A.S.

    1996-12-31

    The regular onset of warm ocean temperatures off Peru during the calendar months of December and January has long been known as El Nino. Years with abnormally warm ocean surface temperatures along the Peruvian coast are associated with abnormally warm ocean surface temperatures up and down the Pacific coast. The changes in the equatorial Pacific ocean surface temperatures influence the distribution of precipitation and give rise to a pattern of abnormal surface pressures that spans the tropics, the Southern Oscillation. These two phenomena, i.e., El Nino and Southern oscillation combined are known as ENSO which emphasize the importance of the interaction between the oceans and atmosphere. It has been found that ENSO has a great influence on Indian summer monsoons. However, there are several studies to examine the influence of ENSO and sea surface temperatures (SST) on the quantum and distribution of monsoonal rainfall. It was observed that during the El Nino years the monsoonal rainfall gets reduced and causes drought conditions in some parts of India.

  12. Assessing the Economic Cost of Landslide Damage in Low-Relief Regions: Case Study Evidence from the Flemish Ardennes (Belgium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vranken, L.; Van Turnhout, P.; Van Den Eeckhaut, M.; Vandekerckhove, L.; Vantilt, G.; Poesen, J.

    2012-04-01

    Several regions around the globe are at risk to incur damage from landslides. These landslides cause significant structural and functional damage to public and private buildings and infrastructure. Numerous studies investigated how natural factors and human activities control the (re-)activation of landslides. However, few studies have concentrated on a quantitative estimate of the overall damage caused by landslides at a regional scale. This study therefore starts with a quantitative economic assessment of the direct and indirect damage caused by landslides in the Flemish Ardennes (Belgium), a low-relief region (area=ca. 700 km2) susceptible to landslides. Based on focus interviews as well as on semi-structured interviews with homeowners, civil servants (e.g. from the technical services from the various towns), or with the owners and providers of lifelines such as electricity and sewage, we have quantitatively estimated the direct and indirect damage induced by landsliding and this for a 10 to 30 year period (depending on the type of infrastructure or buildings). Economic damage to public infrastructure and buildings was estimated for the entire region, while for private damage 10 cases with severe to small damage were quantified. For example, in the last 10 year, costs of road repair augmented to 814 560 €. Costs to repair damaged roads that have not yet been repaired, were estimated at 669 318 €. In the past 30 years, costs of measures to prevent road damage augmented to at least 14 872 380 €. More than 90% of this budget for preventive measures was spent 30 years ago, when an important freeway was damaged and had to be repaired. These preventive measures (building a grout wall and improving the drainage system) were effective as no further damage has been reported until present. To repair and prevent damage to waterworks and sewage systems, expenditures amounted to 551 044 € and this for the last 30 years. In the past 10 years, a new railway line

  13. Measuring the embodied energy in drinking water supply systems: a case study in the Great Lakes region.

    PubMed

    Mo, Weiwei; Nasiri, Fuzhan; Eckelman, Matthew J; Zhang, Qiong; Zimmerman, Julie B

    2010-12-15

    A sustainable supply of both energy and water is critical to long-term national security, effective climate policy, natural resource sustainability, and social wellbeing. These two critical resources are inextricably and reciprocally linked; the production of energy requires large volumes of water, while the treatment and distribution of water is also significantly dependent upon energy. In this paper, a hybrid analysis approach is proposed to estimate embodied energy and to perform a structural path analysis of drinking water supply systems. The applicability of this approach is then tested through a case study of a large municipal water utility (city of Kalamazoo) in the Great Lakes region to provide insights on the issues of water-energy pricing and carbon footprints. Kalamazoo drinking water requires approximately 9.2 MJ/m(3) of energy to produce, 30% of which is associated with indirect inputs such as system construction and treatment chemicals. PMID:21105699

  14. Multidate remote sensing approaches for digital zoning of terroirs at regional scales: case studies revisited and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaudour, Emmanuelle; Carey, Victoria A.; Gilliot, Jean-Marc

    2014-05-01

    Geospatial technologies prove more and more useful for characterizing terroirs and this, not only at the within-field scale: amongst innovating technologies revolutionizing approaches for digitally zoning viticultural areas, be they managed by individual or cooperative grape growers, or even unions of grape growers, multispectral satellite remote sensing data have been used for 15 years already at either regional or whole-vineyard scale, starting from single date-studies to multi-temporal processings. Regional remotely-sensed approaches for terroir mapping mostly use multispectral satellite images in conjunction with a set of ancillary morphometric and/or geomorphological and/or legacy soil data and time series data on grape/wine quality and climate. Two prominent case-studies of regional terroir mapping using SPOT satellite images with medium spatial resolution (20 m) were carried out in the Southern Rhone Valley (Côtes-du-Rhône controlled Appelation of origin) in Southern France and in the Stellenbosch-Paarl region (including 5 Wine of Origin wards: Simonsberg-Stellenbosch, Simonsberg-Paarl, Jonkershoek Valley, Banghoek and Papegaaiberg and portions of two further wards, namely, Franschoek and Devon Valley) in the South Western Cape of South Africa. In addition to emphasizing their usefulness for operational land management, our objective was to develop, compare and discuss both approaches in terms of formalization, spatial data handling and processing, sampling design, validation procedures and/or availability of uncertainty information. Both approaches essentially relied on supervised image classifiers based on the selection of reference training areas. For the Southern Rhone valley, viticultural terroirs were validated using an external sample of 91 vineyards planted with Grenache Noir and Syrah for which grape composition was available over a large 17 years-period: the validation procedure highlighted a strong vintage effect for each specific terroir. The

  15. The impact of flooding on people living with HIV: a case study from the Ohangwena Region, Namibia

    PubMed Central

    Anthonj, Carmen; Nkongolo, Odon T.; Schmitz, Peter; Hango, Johannes N.; Kistemann, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background Floods are a disaster situation for all affected populations and especially for vulnerable groups within communities such as children, orphans, women, and people with chronic diseases such as HIV and AIDS. They need functioning health care, sanitation and hygiene, safe water, and healthy food supply, and are critically dependent on their social care and support networks. A study carried out in the Ohangwena region, Namibia, where HIV prevalence is high and extensive flooding frequently occurs, aims to provide a deeper understanding of the impact that flooding has on people living with HIV (PLWHIV) as well as on HIV service providers in the region. Design The qualitative research applying grounded theory included semi-structured interviews with PLWHIV, focus group discussions with HIV service providers, and a national feedback meeting. The findings were interpreted using the sustainable livelihoods framework, the natural hazard research approach, and health behaviour theories. Results The study reveals that flooding poses major problems to PLWHIV in terms of their everyday lives, affecting livelihoods, work, income, and living conditions. The factors threatening them under normal conditions – poverty, malnutrition, unsafe water, sanitation and hygiene, limited access to health facilities, a weak health status, and stigma – are intensified by flood-related breakdown of infrastructure, insecurity, malnutrition, and diseases evolving over the course of a flood. A potential dual risk exists for their health: the increased risk both of infection and disease due to the inaccessibility of health services and antiretroviral treatment. A HIV and Flooding Framework was developed to display the results. Conclusions This study demonstrates that vulnerabilities and health risks of PLWHIV will increase in a disaster situation like flooding if access to HIV prevention, treatment, care and support are not addressed and ensured. The findings and the HIV and Flooding

  16. DUE PERMAFROST: A Circumpolar Remote Sensing Service for Permafrost - Evaluation Case Studies and Intercomparison with Regional Climate Model Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heim, Birgit; Bartsch, Annett; Elger, Kirsten; Rinke, Annette; Klehmet, Katharina; Matthes, Heidrun; Gellhorn, Catrin; Buchhorn, Marcel; Soliman, Aiman; Duguay, Claude

    2013-04-01

    The ESA Data User Element (DUE) Permafrost project provides a Circumpolar remote sensing service for permafrost-related applications. The data products are freely downloadable (http://www.ipf.tuwien.ac.at/permafrost) and published at the PANGAEA World Data Centre (DUE Permafrost Project Consortium, 2012). Remote sensing products are land surface temperature, surface soil moisture, ground frozen/non frozen state, terrain parameters, land cover parameters, and surface waters. Snow parameters (snow extent and snow water equivalent) can be derived from the DUE project GlobSnow (http://www.globsnow.info). The time series of Circumpolar land surface temperature and surface soil moisture offer weekly and monthly averaged data products from 2007 to 2010, Circumpolar ground frozen/non frozen state is provided as daily dataset. The ongoing service will also include the time series of 2011 and 2012. The Circumpolar terrain and land cover products are static, e.g. the first Circumpolar Digital Elevation Model (DEM) north of 55° N with a spatial resolution of 100 m (S. Maurizio & T. Strozzi, 2012). Evaluation is crucial to test the scientific validity of the DUE Permafrost data products for high-latitude permafrost landscapes. The primary programme providing ground data is the Global Terrestrial Network for Permafrost (GTN-P) initiated by the International Permafrost Association (IPA) in the 1990s. The involvement of scientific stakeholders and the IPA, and the ongoing evaluation of the remote sensing derived products make the DUE Permafrost products widely accepted by the scientific community. Evaluation case studies of DUE Permafrost remote-sensing derived products (e.g., land surface temperature and ground frozen/non frozen state) show good agreement with ground data from GTN-P monitoring sites in Alaska and Siberia. The Helmholtz Climate Initiative REKLIM (Regionale Klimaänderungen/Regional climate change) is a climate research program where regional observations and

  17. Better temperature predictions in geothermal modelling by improved quality of input parameters: a regional case study from the Danish-German border region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Sven; Bording, Thue S.; Balling, Niels

    2015-04-01

    Thermal modelling is used to examine the subsurface temperature field and geothermal conditions at various scales (e.g. sedimentary basins, deep crust) and in the framework of different problem settings (e.g. scientific or industrial use). In such models, knowledge of rock thermal properties is prerequisites for the parameterisation of boundary conditions and layer properties. In contrast to hydrogeological ground-water models, where parameterization of the major rock property (i.e. hydraulic conductivity) is generally conducted considering lateral variations within geological layers, parameterization of thermal models (in particular regarding thermal conductivity but also radiogenic heat production and specific heat capacity) in most cases is conducted using constant parameters for each modelled layer. For such constant thermal parameter values, moreover, initial values are normally obtained from rare core measurements and/or literature values, which raise questions for their representativeness. Some few studies have considered lithological composition or well log information, but still keeping the layer values constant. In the present thermal-modelling scenario analysis, we demonstrate how the use of different parameter input type (from literature, well logs and lithology) and parameter input style (constant or laterally varying layer values) affects the temperature model prediction in sedimentary basins. For this purpose, rock thermal properties are deduced from standard petrophysical well logs and lithological descriptions for several wells in a project area. Statistical values of thermal properties (mean, standard deviation, moments, etc.) are calculated at each borehole location for each geological formation and, moreover, for the entire dataset. Our case study is located at the Danish-German border region (model dimension: 135 x115 km, depth: 20 km). Results clearly show that (i) the use of location-specific well-log derived rock thermal properties and (i

  18. The KULTURisk Regional Risk Assessment methodology for water-related natural hazards - Part 2: Application to the Zurich case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronco, P.; Bullo, M.; Torresan, S.; Critto, A.; Olschewski, R.; Zappa, M.; Marcomini, A.

    2014-07-01

    The main objective of the paper is the application of the KULTURisk Regional Risk Assessment (KR-RRA) methodology, presented in the companion paper (Part 1, Ronco et al., 2014), to the Sihl River valley, in Switzerland. Through a tuning process of the methodology to the site-specific context and features, flood related risks have been assessed for different receptors lying on the Sihl River valley including the city of Zurich, which represents a typical case of river flooding in urban area. After characterizing the peculiarities of the specific case study, risk maps have been developed under a 300 years return period scenario (selected as baseline) for six identified relevant targets, exposed to flood risk in the Sihl valley, namely: people, economic activities (including buildings, infrastructures and agriculture), natural and semi-natural systems and cultural heritage. Finally, the total risk index map, which allows to identify and rank areas and hotspots at risk by means of Multi Criteria Decision Analysis tools, has been produced to visualize the spatial pattern of flood risk within the area of study. By means of a tailored participative approach, the total risk maps supplement the consideration of technical experts with the (essential) point of view of the relevant stakeholders for the appraisal of the specific scores and weights related to the receptor-relative risks. The total risk maps obtained for the Sihl River case study are associated with the lower classes of risk. In general, higher relative risks are concentrated in the deeply urbanized area within and around the Zurich city centre and areas that rely just behind to the Sihl River course. Here, forecasted injuries and potential fatalities are mainly due to high population density and high presence of old (vulnerable) people; inundated buildings are mainly classified as continuous and discontinuous urban fabric; flooded roads, pathways and railways, the majority of them referring to the Zurich main

  19. Cost comparison between private and public collection of residual household waste: Multiple case studies in the Flemish region of Belgium

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobsen, R.; Buysse, J.; Gellynck, X.

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The goal is to compare collection costs for residual household waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have clustered all municipalities in order to find mutual comparable pairs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Each pair consists of one private and one public operating waste collection program. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer All cases show that private service has lower costs than public service. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Municipalities were contacted to identify the deeper causes for the waste management program. - Abstract: The rising pressure in terms of cost efficiency on public services pushes governments to transfer part of those services to the private sector. A trend towards more privatizing can be noticed in the collection of municipal household waste. This paper reports the findings of a research project aiming to compare the cost between the service of private and public collection of residual household waste. Multiple case studies of municipalities about the Flemish region of Belgium were conducted. Data concerning the year 2009 were gathered through in-depth interviews in 2010. In total 12 municipalities were investigated, divided into three mutual comparable pairs with a weekly and three mutual comparable pairs with a fortnightly residual waste collection. The results give a rough indication that in all cases the cost of private service is lower than public service in the collection of household waste. Albeit that there is an interest in establishing whether there are differences in the costs and service levels between public and private waste collection services, there are clear difficulties in establishing comparisons that can be made without having to rely on a large number of assumptions and corrections. However, given the cost difference, it remains the responsibility of the municipalities to decide upon the service they offer their citizens, regardless the cost efficiency: public or private.

  20. Effects of virtual water flow on regional water resources stress: A case study of grain in China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shikun; Wang, Yubao; Engel, Bernie A; Wu, Pute

    2016-04-15

    Scarcity of water resources is one of the major challenges in the world, particularly for the main water consumer, agriculture. Virtual water flow (VWF) promotes water redistribution geographically and provides a new solution for resolving regional water shortage and improving water use efficiency in the world. Virtual water transfer among regions will have a significant influence on the water systems in both grain export and import regions. In order to assess the impacts of VWF related grain transfer on regional water resources conditions, the study takes mainland China as study area for a comprehensive evaluation of virtual water flow on regional water resources stress. Results show that Northeast China and Huang-Huai-Hai region are the major grain production regions as well as the major virtual water export regions. National water savings related to grain VWF was about 58Gm(3), with 48Gm(3) blue water and 10Gm(3) green water. VWF changes the original water distribution and has a significant effect on water resources in both virtual water import and export regions. Grain VWF significantly increased water stress in grain export regions and alleviated water stress in grain import regions. Water stress index (WSI) of Heilongjiang and Inner Mongolia has been increased by 138% and 129% due to grain export. Stress from water shortages is generally severe in export regions, and issues with the sustainability of grain production and VWF pattern are worthy of further exploration. PMID:26851759

  1. KULTURisk regional risk assessment methodology for water-related natural hazards - Part 2: Application to the Zurich case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronco, P.; Bullo, M.; Torresan, S.; Critto, A.; Olschewski, R.; Zappa, M.; Marcomini, A.

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this paper is the application of the KULTURisk regional risk assessment (KR-RRA) methodology, presented in the companion paper (Part 1, Ronco et al., 2014), to the Sihl River basin, in northern Switzerland. Flood-related risks have been assessed for different receptors lying on the Sihl River valley including Zurich, which represents a typical case of river flooding in an urban area, by calibrating the methodology to the site-specific context and features. Risk maps and statistics have been developed using a 300-year return period scenario for six relevant targets exposed to flood risk: people; economic activities: buildings, infrastructure and agriculture; natural and semi-natural systems; and cultural heritage. Finally, the total risk index map has been produced to visualize the spatial pattern of flood risk within the target area and, therefore, to identify and rank areas and hotspots at risk by means of multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) tools. Through a tailored participatory approach, risk maps supplement the consideration of technical experts with the (essential) point of view of relevant stakeholders for the appraisal of the specific scores weighting for the different receptor-relative risks. The total risk maps obtained for the Sihl River case study are associated with the lower classes of risk. In general, higher (relative) risk scores are spatially concentrated in the deeply urbanized city centre and areas that lie just above to river course. Here, predicted injuries and potential fatalities are mainly due to high population density and to the presence of vulnerable people; flooded buildings are mainly classified as continuous and discontinuous urban fabric; flooded roads, pathways and railways, most of them in regards to the Zurich central station (Hauptbahnhof) are at high risk of inundation, causing severe indirect damage. Moreover, the risk pattern for agriculture, natural and semi-natural systems and cultural heritage is relatively

  2. Using Peatland Archives to Assess Climate Forcing of Holocene Vegetational Changes: Case Studies From the Great Lakes Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, S. T.; Booth, R. K.; Andersen, J.; Hotchkiss, S.; Huang, Y.; Lesser, M.; Minckley, T.; Nichols, J.; Pendall, E.; Reeves, K.; Taylor, M.

    2006-12-01

    A dilemma has long confronted paleoecologists: pollen data are required to assess past vegetational changes, and at the same time pollen data serve as a primary source of paleoclimate inference. Paleoecologists have had to use the same data sets to infer past climate changes and the ecological responses to those changes. The emergence of independent paleoclimate proxies and archives is providing relief from this dilemma. Peatland archives are especially effective at providing independent paleoclimatic records, owing to their sensitivity to climate variation, their subcentennial to subdecadal temporal precision, and the multiplicity of available proxies. Pollen records can be obtained from the same stratigraphic levels as paleoclimate proxies, and peatland records can also be compared with lake-based pollen and macrofossil records at regional scales. Peatland records of mid- to late Holocene climate change and variability, together with pollen and macrofossil records from peatlands and lakes in the Great Lakes region of North America, resolve some long-standing questions and controversies concerning the causation of vegetational changes in the region. We present three case studies where peatlands have played a pivotal role. 1. Hemlock populations plummeted across eastern North America 5400 yr BP. The extent, rapidity, and synchrony of the event suggested that it resulted from a widespread pathogen outbreak, similar to the early 20th Century chestnut blight in the same region. However, some have argued for climate as a primary mechanism. Paleohydrological records from a kettle bog in northeastern Lower Michigan indicate an abrupt decline in water-table depth 5400 yr BP that persisted for the next 2500 years, coincident with the hemlock decline. Pathogens may have played a proximal role, but an abrupt climate shift was the ultimate driver of the hemlock decline. 2. Holocene expansions of yellow birch and beech in their northwestern ranges were episodic, alternating

  3. Evaluating Coupled Human-Hydrologic Systems in High Altitude Regions: A Case Study of the Arun Watershed, Eastern Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, K.; Bookhagen, B.; Tague, C.; Lopez-Carr, D.

    2014-12-01

    The Himalaya exhibit dynamic ecological, hydrological, and climatic extremes that magnify the variability and extent of natural hazards, resulting in destruction to both physical and human landscapes. Coupled with poverty, these factors intensify local communities' vulnerability to climate change. This study highlights the Arun watershed in eastern Nepal as a case study to evaluate how local communities in high altitude regions are managing their water for domestic and agricultural needs while coping with extreme events, such as floods and landslides. Remotely-sensed precipitation, snowpack and glacial extent data from the past decade are combined with preliminary results from extensive field-based community surveys in the Arun watershed. The analysis of remotely-sensed data will describe seasonal trends in water availability, glacial lake growth, and the spatial variation of these trends within the basin. These hydrologic changes will be linked to the human survey analysis, which will provide an understanding of locals' perceptions of water challenges and the current water management strategies within the basin. Particular attention will be given to a comparison between the eastern and western tributaries of the Arun River, where the catchments are mainly rain-fed (eastern) versus glacial-fed (western). This contrast will highlight how different hydrologic scenarios evidenced from remote-sensing data motivate diverse human water management responses as defined in field surveys. A particular focus will be given to management decisions related to agriculture expansion and hydropower development. This synthesis of remote-sensing and social research methodologies provides a valuable perspective on coupled human-hydrologic systems.

  4. Lung cancer risk and pollution in an industrial region of Northern Spain: a hospital-based case-control study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Asturias, an Autonomous Region in Northern Spain with a large industrial area, registers high lung cancer incidence and mortality. While this excess risk of lung cancer might be partially attributable to smoking habit and occupational exposure, the role of industrial and urban pollution also needs to be assessed. The objective was to ascertain the possible effect of air pollution, both urban and industrial, on lung cancer risk in Asturias. Methods This was a hospital-based case-control study covering 626 lung cancer patients and 626 controls recruited in Asturias and matched by ethnicity, hospital, age, and sex. Distances from the respective participants' residential locations to industrial facilities and city centers were computed. Using logistic regression, odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CIs) for categories of distance to urban and industrial pollution sources were calculated, with adjustment for sex, age, hospital area, tobacco consumption, family history of cancer, and occupation. Results Whereas individuals living near industries displayed an excess risk of lung cancer (OR = 1.49; 95%CI = 0.93-2.39), which attained statistical significance for small cell carcinomas (OR = 2.23; 95%CI = 1.01-4.92), residents in urban areas showed a statistically significant increased risk for adenocarcinoma (OR = 1.92; 95%CI = 1.09-3.38). In the Gijon health area, residents in the urban area registered a statistically significant increased risk of lung cancer (OR = 2.17; 95%CI = 1.25-3.76), whereas in the Aviles health area, no differences in risk were found by area of exposure. Conclusions This study provides further evidence that air pollution is a moderate risk factor for lung cancer. PMID:21266041

  5. Case Study: Testing with Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman

    2015-01-01

    This column provides original articles on innovations in case study teaching, assessment of the method, as well as case studies with teaching notes. This month's issue discusses using case studies to test for knowledge or lessons learned.

  6. Factors Contributing to the Accumulation of Primary Teacher's Debts to the Government of Tanzania: A Case Study for Dar Es Salaam Region

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kombo, Ibun

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of the study which was conducted to determine factors contributing to the accumulation of primary school teacher's debts to the Government of Tanzania, a case study of Dar es Salaam Region in its three municipalities namely, Ilala, Kinondoni and Temeke. Data was obtained through sampling method which also helped to…

  7. Numerical model to quantify biogenic volatile organic compound emissions: The Pearl River Delta region as a case study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuemei; Situ, Shuping; Chen, Weihua; Zheng, Junyu; Guenther, Alex; Fan, Qi; Chang, Ming

    2016-08-01

    This article compiles the actual knowledge of the biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions estimated using model methods in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region, one of the most developed regions in China. The developed history of BVOC emission models is presented briefly and three typical emission models are introduced and compared. The results from local studies related to BVOC emissions have been summarized. Based on this analysis, it is recommended that local researchers conduct BVOC emission studies systematically, from the assessment of model inputs, to compiling regional emission inventories to quantifying the uncertainties and evaluating the model results. Beyond that, more basic researches should be conducted in the future to close the gaps in knowledge on BVOC emission mechanisms, to develop the emission models and to refine the inventory results. This paper can provide a perspective on these aspects in the broad field of research associated with BVOC emissions in the PRD region. PMID:27521938

  8. Climate change adaptation & mitigation strategies for Water-Energy-Land Nexus management in Mediterranean region: Case study of Catalunya (Spain).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Vikas; Schuhmacher, Marta

    2016-04-01

    water where it is a scarce resource. Linkage of water & Energy to the land has been established through irrigated agriculture which has seen an increasing trend in the case study area. A detail scenario planning for regional water-energy demand and supply in conjunction with different climate change and economic growth scenarios are considered. For each future scenario of climate change, the goal is to obtain a ranking of a set of possible actions with regards to different types of indicators (costs, environmental etc.). The analytical method used is based on outranking models for decision aid with hierarchical structures of criteria and ranking alternatives using partial preorders based on pairwise preference relations. The proposed method has several advantages such as the management of heterogeneous scales of measurement without requiring any artificial transformation and the management of uncertainty by means of comparisons at a qualitative level in terms of the decision maker preferences. Result shows that such an integrated ("nexus") approach is likely to build resilience and reduces vulnerability to the combination of pressures acting upon the Mediterranean region's water systems, including climate-related shocks.

  9. Improving automatic earthquake locations in subduction zones: a case study for GEOFON catalog of Tonga-Fiji region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nooshiri, Nima; Heimann, Sebastian; Saul, Joachim; Tilmann, Frederik; Dahm, Torsten

    2015-04-01

    Automatic earthquake locations are sometimes associated with very large residuals up to 10 s even for clear arrivals, especially for regional stations in subduction zones because of their strongly heterogeneous velocity structure associated. Although these residuals are most likely not related to measurement errors but unmodelled velocity heterogeneity, these stations are usually removed from or down-weighted in the location procedure. While this is possible for large events, it may not be useful if the earthquake is weak. In this case, implementation of travel-time station corrections may significantly improve the automatic locations. Here, the shrinking box source-specific station term method (SSST) [Lin and Shearer, 2005] has been applied to improve relative location accuracy of 1678 events that occurred in the Tonga subduction zone between 2010 and mid-2014. Picks were obtained from the GEOFON earthquake bulletin for all available station networks. We calculated a set of timing corrections for each station which vary as a function of source position. A separate time correction was computed for each source-receiver path at the given station by smoothing the residual field over nearby events. We begin with a very large smoothing radius essentially encompassing the whole event set and iterate by progressively shrinking the smoothing radius. In this way, we attempted to correct for the systematic errors, that are introduced into the locations by the inaccuracies in the assumed velocity structure, without solving for a new velocity model itself. One of the advantages of the SSST technique is that the event location part of the calculation is separate from the station term calculation and can be performed using any single event location method. In this study, we applied a non-linear, probabilistic, global-search earthquake location method using the software package NonLinLoc [Lomax et al., 2000]. The non-linear location algorithm implemented in NonLinLoc is less

  10. Defining seascapes for marine unconsolidated shelf sediments in an eastern boundary upwelling region: The southern Benguela as a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karenyi, Natasha; Sink, Kerry; Nel, Ronel

    2016-02-01

    Marine unconsolidated sediment habitats, the largest benthic ecosystem, are considered physically controlled ecosystems driven by a number of local physical processes. Depth and sediment type are recognised key drivers of these ecosystems. Seascape (i.e., marine landscape) habitat classifications are based solely on consistent geophysical features and provide an opportunity to define unconsolidated sediment habitats based on processes which may vary in distribution through space and time. This paper aimed to classify unconsolidated sediment seascapes and explore their diversity in an eastern boundary upwelling region at the macro-scale, using the South African west coast as a case study. Physical variables such as sediment grain size, depth and upwelling-related variables (i.e., maximum chlorophyll concentration, austral summer bottom oxygen concentration and sediment organic carbon content) were included in the analyses. These variables were directly measured through sampling, or collated from existing databases and the literature. These data were analysed using multivariate Cluster, Principal Components Ordination and SIMPER analyses (in PRIMER 6 + with PERMANOVA add-in package). There were four main findings; (i) eight seascapes were identified for the South African west coast based on depth, slope, sediment grain size and upwelling-related variables, (ii) three depth zones were distinguished (inner, middle and outer shelf), (iii) seascape diversity in the inner and middle shelves was greater than the outer shelf, and (iv) upwelling-related variables were responsible for the habitat diversity in both inner and middle shelves. This research demonstrates that the inclusion of productivity and its related variables, such as hypoxia and sedimentary organic carbon, in seascape classifications will enhance the ability to distinguish seascapes on continental shelves, where productivity is most variable.

  11. A Case Study of Two Regional State Universities Qualifying as Learning Organizations Based on Administration and Staff Viewpoints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, Tammy Morrison

    2011-01-01

    This case study of 2 state universities qualifying as learning organizations, based on administration and staff viewpoints, was completed using a qualitative methodology. The idea of what a learning organization is can be different depending on who or what is being analyzed. For this study, the work of theorists including W. Edwards Deming,…

  12. Seismic hazard assessment for oil-and-gas-bearing shelf zones: A case study of the North Caspian region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krylov, A. A.; Ivashchenko, A. I.; Kovachev, S. A.

    2015-11-01

    Seismic hazard assessment is done for oil field areas in the North Caspian region by a method earlier successfully applied to other areas. The method involves general seismic zoning data, available regional databases on recurrence of seismic shaking, known models of ground motion attenuation in seismoactive regions, and data on geological and geophysical surveys in the studied area. The assigned level of seismic hazard of the region is refined using probabilistic analysis; additionally, disaggregation is made and accelerograms are synthesized (the latter are necessary for seismic microzoning of particular sites using the numerical nonlinear analysis of ground seismic response). The amplitude and spectral characteristics of ground motions are obtained which are necessary for seismic resistance design and construction of petroleum industry objects.

  13. Checking various vegetation indices for estimating vegetation in arid regions and Presented a model (Case Study:Sadough- Yazd)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalantari, Saeideh; Zehtabian, Gholamreza; Azarnivand, Hossein; Ahmadi, Hassan

    2013-04-01

    Vegetation is one of the natural recourses components and achieve Quantitative information of them have a major role in the management of land. Using satellite images is one of the new techniques in the field of qualitative and quantitative studies of the vegetation .Studies show that the use of spectral vegetation indices and ratios may serve as a useful approach in this area, especially in the desert zoon. In this study, using Landsat TM imagery sensors, to calculate different vegetation indices and their ability checking vegetation in arid regions. After multivariate regression analysis between the actual values and parameters, and validation of models optimal model was selected. The results showed that the index of ARVI with the corresponding coefficients is better results in estimating the amount of vegetation in arid regions. Keywords: vegetation, satellite images, vegetation index, arid region, Saduq

  14. Detection of critical LUCC indices and sensitive watershed regions related to lake algal blooms: a case study of Taihu Lake.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chen; Ma, Ronghua; Su, Zhihu; Zhu, Qing

    2015-02-01

    Taihu Lake in China has suffered from severe eutrophication over the past 20 years which is partly due to significant land use/cover change (LUCC). There is an increasing need to detect the critical watershed region that significantly affects lake water degradation, which has great significance for environmental protection. However, previous studies have obtained conflicting results because of non-uniform lake indicators and inadequate time periods. To identify the sensitive LUCC indices and buffer distance regions, three lake divisions (Meiliang Lake, Zhushan Lake and Western Coastal region) and their watershed region within the Taihu Lake basin were chosen as study sites, the algal area was used as a uniform lake quality indicator and modeled with LUCC indices over the whole time series. Results showed that wetland (WL) and landscape index such as Shannon diversity index (SHDI) appeared to be sensitive LUCC indices when the buffer distance was less than 5 km, while agricultural land (AL) and landscape fragmentation (Ci) gradually became sensitive indices as buffer distances increased to more than 5 km. For the relationship between LUCC and lake algal area, LUCC of the WC region seems to have no significant effect on lake water quality. Conversely, LUCC within ML and ZS region influenced algal area of corresponding lake divisions greatly, while the most sensitive regions were found in 3 km to 5 km, rather than the whole catchment. These results will be beneficial for the further understanding of the relationship between LUCC and lake water quality, and will provide a practical basis for the identification of critical regions for lake. PMID:25642691

  15. Detection of Critical LUCC Indices and Sensitive Watershed Regions Related to Lake Algal Blooms: A Case Study of Taihu Lake

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chen; Ma, Ronghua; Su, Zhihu; Zhu, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Taihu Lake in China has suffered from severe eutrophication over the past 20 years which is partly due to significant land use/cover change (LUCC). There is an increasing need to detect the critical watershed region that significantly affects lake water degradation, which has great significance for environmental protection. However, previous studies have obtained conflicting results because of non–uniform lake indicators and inadequate time periods. To identify the sensitive LUCC indices and buffer distance regions, three lake divisions (Meiliang Lake, Zhushan Lake and Western Coastal region) and their watershed region within the Taihu Lake basin were chosen as study sites, the algal area was used as a uniform lake quality indicator and modeled with LUCC indices over the whole time series. Results showed that wetland (WL) and landscape index such as Shannon diversity index (SHDI) appeared to be sensitive LUCC indices when the buffer distance was less than 5 km, while agricultural land (AL) and landscape fragmentation (Ci) gradually became sensitive indices as buffer distances increased to more than 5 km. For the relationship between LUCC and lake algal area, LUCC of the WC region seems to have no significant effect on lake water quality. Conversely, LUCC within ML and ZS region influenced algal area of corresponding lake divisions greatly, while the most sensitive regions were found in 3 km to 5 km, rather than the whole catchment. These results will be beneficial for the further understanding of the relationship between LUCC and lake water quality, and will provide a practical basis for the identification of critical regions for lake. PMID:25642691

  16. Sensitivity of pollutant concentrations towards anthropogenic emissions: A case study over Indian region using WRF/Chem model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, Tabish; Gunthe, Sachin S.

    2015-04-01

    Concentration of an air pollutant over a given region is generally associated with the emissions, regional meteorology, and topographic conditions in addition to the chemical transformation of the pollutant. In general, the role of meteorology is often relegated in policymaking and the entire narrative of air pollution mostly revolves around the emissions. However, there may be regions where the local meteorology, in some seasons or even perennially, may predominantly govern the overall concentration, and the emissions have a little role to play. For instance, the concentrations may be high in a region despite significantly reducing the emissions. Similarly, there may be other regions wherein the prevailing meteorology would cleanse the pollutant even with high emission rates. Thus, if we better understand the seasonal meteorology of smaller regions well and their role in dispersing various pollutants, it would lead to more robust policy formulations. Therefore, there is a need to study the contribution of meteorology as isolated from the emissions, over the pollutant concentrations. In the present study we have used the on-line coupled chemical transport model WRF/Chem to investigate the role of meteorology in determining pollutant concentrations over the Indian tropical region. By using the SEAC4RS emission for the months of April, July, and December, which represents three important meteorological seasons (summer, monsoon, and winter respectively) over India we have performed the simulations of ozone (O3), oxides of nitrogen (NOX), carbon monoxide (CO), and sulphur dioxide (SO2); representative scenario. Further, to assess the role of meteorology alone all the anthropogenic emissions were flattened over the entire continental India (given as one value); flat emission scenario. Our simulations show that during the month of April and December the concentration levels of the major pollutants are largely governed by the meteorology, whereas during the month of July

  17. Adoption of Web 2.0 Technology in Higher Education: A Case Study of Universities in National Capital Region, India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyagi, Sunil

    2012-01-01

    The present study was conducted in six (6) Indian Universities at NCR (National Capital Region) of India to explore the usage analysis of Web 2.0 technologies in learning environment by faculty members. The investigator conducted a survey with the help of structured questionnaire on 300 respondents. A total of 300 self-administered questionnaires…

  18. Eliciting climate experts' knowledge to address model uncertainties in regional climate projections: a case study of Guanacaste, Northwest Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossmann, I.; Steyn, D. G.

    2014-12-01

    Global general circulation models typically cannot provide the detailed and accurate regional climate information required by stakeholders for climate adaptation efforts, given their limited capacity to resolve the regional topography and changes in local sea surface temperature, wind and circulation patterns. The study region in Northwest Costa Rica has a tropical wet-dry climate with a double-peak wet season. During the dry season the central Costa Rican mountains prevent tropical Atlantic moisture from reaching the region. Most of the annual precipitation is received following the northward migration of the ITCZ in May that allows the region to benefit from moist southwesterly flow from the tropical Pacific. The wet season begins with a short period of "early rains" and is interrupted by the mid-summer drought associated with the intensification and westward expansion of the North Atlantic subtropical high in late June. Model projections for the 21st century indicate a lengthening and intensification of the mid-summer drought and a weakening of the early rains on which current crop cultivation practices rely. We developed an expert elicitation to systematically address uncertainties in the available model projections of changes in the seasonal precipitation pattern. Our approach extends an elicitation approach developed previously at Carnegie Mellon University. Experts in the climate of the study region or Central American climate were asked to assess the mechanisms driving precipitation during each part of the season, uncertainties regarding these mechanisms, expected changes in each mechanism in a warming climate, and the capacity of current models to reproduce these processes. To avoid overconfidence bias, a step-by-step procedure was followed to estimate changes in the timing and intensity of precipitation during each part of the season. The questions drew upon interviews conducted with the regions stakeholders to assess their climate information needs. This

  19. A Case Study on the Personal Constructs of How Stakeholders of a Regional Alternative Day School Facility Make Meaning of the Physical Plant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Penny D.

    2011-01-01

    This case study involved an examination of stakeholders' (parents, community members, staff members, students) perceptions of how they made meaning of a regional alternative day school located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. Individual interviews were conducted with the parents, community members, and students. One focus group interview was…

  20. Redefining University Roles in Regional Economies: A Case Study of University-Industry Relations and Academic Organization in Nanotechnology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sa, Creso M.

    2011-01-01

    The emerging field of nanotechnology has created a new frontier for the convergence of university and industrial research. In the United States, major federal investments provided a massive boom for this field over the decade. This paper reports on a case study of how the University at Albany came to establish the first college of nanotechnology…

  1. Role of deep convective in modulating tropospheric column ozone over Northern region of India: Case study of 2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Santosh; Ghude, Sachin; Beig, G.

    2012-07-01

    The present study is an attempt to examine some of the probable causes for the unusually low tropospheric column ozone observed over the Eastern India during the exceptional drought event in July 2002. The analysis presented here aimed to characterize the possible link of the convective transport and tropospheric ozone distribution over the highly polluted northern plain of India. We examined horizontal wind and omega (vertical velocity) anomalies over the Indian region to understand the large scale dynamical processes prevailed during July 2002. It was found that, instead of normal large scale ascent over the Indian region, the air was descending in the middle and lower troposphere over vast part of India. This configuration was apparently responsible for less convective upwelling of precursors and likely caused less photochemical ozone formation in the free troposphere over the Eastern Indian during July 2002. The deep convection during Indian summer monsoon may thus have a significant role in regulating the chemical cycles associated with the change in tropospheric ozone over the Indian region. This study has shown that anomalous low TOR values in July 2002 over the eastern Indian region can be linked to the reduced transport of the precursors in the free troposphere than in normal years. To examine this effect the study of climatology of ozone over the period 2000-2009 has been done using vertical profiles data from ozonosonde dataset over three stations in India. Keyword: Tropospheric ozone - Convection - South Asia - Pollution

  2. Uncertainty in drought monitoring by the Standardized Precipitation Index: the case study of the Abruzzo region (central Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergni, L.; Di Lena, B.; Todisco, F.; Mannocchi, F.

    2015-12-01

    As shown by several authors, drought monitoring by the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) presents some uncertainties, mainly dependent on the choice of the probability distribution used to describe the cumulative precipitation and on the characteristics (e.g., length and variability) of the dataset. In this paper, the uncertainty related to SPI estimates has been quantified and analyzed with regards to the case study of the Abruzzo region (Central Italy), by using monthly precipitation recorded at 75 stations during the period 1951-2009. First, a set of distributions suitable to describe the cumulative precipitation at the 3-, 6-, and 12-month time scales was identified by using L-moments ratio diagrams. The goodness-of-fit was evaluated by applying the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, and the Normality test on the derived SPI series. Then the confidence intervals of SPI have been calculated by applying a bootstrap procedure. The size of the confidence intervals has been considered as a measure of uncertainty, and its dependence on several factors such as the distribution type, the time scale, the record length, and the season has been examined. Results show that the distributions Pearson type III (PE3), Weibull (WEI), Generalized Normal (GNO), Generalized Extreme Value (GEV), and Gamma (GA2) are all suitable to describe the cumulative precipitation, with a slightly better performance of the PE3 and GNO distributions. As expected, the uncertainty increases as the record length and time scale decrease. The leading source of uncertainty is the record length while the effects due to seasonality and time scale are negligible. Two-parameter distributions make it possible to obtain confidence intervals of SPI (particularly for extreme values) narrower than those obtained by three-parameter distributions. Nevertheless, due to a poorer goodness of fit, two-parameter distributions can provide less reliable estimates of the precipitation probability. In any event, independently

  3. Micronucleus frequency in children exposed to biomass burning in the Brazilian Legal Amazon region: a control case study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Amazon represents an area of 61% of Brazilian territory and is undergoing major changes resulting from disorderly economic development, especially the advance of agribusiness. Composition of the atmosphere is controlled by several natural and anthropogenic processes, and emission from biomass burning is one with the major impact on human health. The aim of this study was to evaluate genotoxic potential of air pollutants generated by biomass burning through micronucleus assay in exfoliated buccal cells of schoolchildren in the Brazilian Amazon region. Methods The study was conducted during the dry seasons in two regions of the Brazilian Amazon. The assay was carried out on buccal epithelial cells of 574 schoolchildren between 6-16 years old. Results The results show a significant difference between micronucleus frequencies in children exposed to biomass burning compared to those in a control area. Conclusions The present study demonstrated that in situ biomonitoring using a sensitive and low cost assay (buccal micronucleus assay) may be an important tool for monitoring air quality in remote regions. It is difficult to attribute the increase in micronuclei frequency observed in our study to any specific toxic element integrated in the particulate matters. However, the contribution of the present study lies in the evidence that increased exposure to fine particulate matter generates an increased micronuclei frequency in oral epithelial cells of schoolchildren. PMID:22400801

  4. Assessing the potential of farming regions to fulfill agro-environmental functions: a case study in tuscany (Italy).

    PubMed

    Marraccini, Elisa; Rapey, Hélène; Galli, Mariassunta; Lardon, Sylvie; Bonari, Enrico

    2013-03-01

    The increasing interest in agro-environmental management entails having tools to assess, monitor and map agro-environmental functions (AEFs) in different regional contexts. In Europe, decision-making in agro-environmental policies generally targets single functions instead of multiple ones and rarely considers the regional variability of agricultural or geo-physical conditions that may influence the fulfillment of functions. We propose and test a method to assess the potential of farming regions to fulfill a set of AEFs. The method was applied in the "Collina interna grossetana" farming region (Italy) and concerned three functions: protection of surface water from nitrates, protection of soil from erosion, and conservation of landscape diversity. These functions were qualified and mapped using various geo-physical and land cover descriptors from common geographical datasets. All of the descriptors were combined using geographical cluster analysis to identify their contribution to the three functions, and thus to assess the potential of the farming region to fulfill these functions. Three levels of potential were calculated, according to the more or less favorable fulfillment of soil and water functions. No totally favorable contribution to the functions was identified in the studied area. Moreover, we mapped the spatial patterns obtained for the different levels of potential. The landscape diversity function was found to be the least variable in the study area, while different patterns were identified for the other functions. In fact, the northern and central sections of the study region were organized more in the form of large core areas of different levels of potential, whereas the southern section presented more boundary areas, small core areas and isolated pixels. The method may help to establish local priorities in agro-environmental management pointing out where the set of functions is completely or partially fulfilled, as well as where and how it is more or

  5. The direct impact of landslides on household income in tropical regions: A case study from the Rwenzori Mountains in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Mertens, K; Jacobs, L; Maes, J; Kabaseke, C; Maertens, M; Poesen, J; Kervyn, M; Vranken, L

    2016-04-15

    Landslides affect millions of people worldwide, but theoretical and empirical studies on the impact of landslides remain scarce, especially in Sub-Saharan Africa. This study proposes and applies a method to estimate the direct impact of landslides on household income and to investigate the presence of specific risk sharing and mitigation strategies towards landslides in a tropical and rural environment. An original cross-sectional household survey is used in combination with geographical data to acquire detailed information on livelihoods and on hazards in the Rwenzori mountains, Uganda. Ordinary least square regressions and probit estimations with village fixed effects are used to estimate the impact of landslides and the presence of mitigation strategies. Geographical information at household level allows to disentangle the direct impact from the indirect effects of landslides. We show that the income of affected households is substantially reduced during the first years after a landslide has occurred. We find that members of recently affected households participate more in wage-employment or in self-employed activities, presumably to address income losses following a landslide. Yet, we see that these jobs do not provide sufficient revenue to compensate for the loss of income from agriculture. Given that landslides cause localized shocks, finding a significant direct impact in our study indicates that no adequate risk sharing mechanisms are in place in the Rwenzori sub-region. These insights are used to derive policy recommendations for alleviating the impact of landslides in the region. By quantifying the direct impact of landslides on household income in an agricultural context in Africa this study draws the attention towards a problem that has been broadly underestimated so far and provides a sound scientific base for disaster risk reduction in the region. Both the methodology and the findings of this research are applicable to other tropical regions with high

  6. Sensing Slow Mobility and Interesting Locations for Lombardy Region (italy): a Case Study Using Pointwise Geolocated Open Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brovelli, M. A.; Oxoli, D.; Zurbarán, M. A.

    2016-06-01

    During the past years Web 2.0 technologies have caused the emergence of platforms where users can share data related to their activities which in some cases are then publicly released with open licenses. Popular categories for this include community platforms where users can upload GPS tracks collected during slow travel activities (e.g. hiking, biking and horse riding) and platforms where users share their geolocated photos. However, due to the high heterogeneity of the information available on the Web, the sole use of these user-generated contents makes it an ambitious challenge to understand slow mobility flows as well as to detect the most visited locations in a region. Exploiting the available data on community sharing websites allows to collect near real-time open data streams and enables rigorous spatial-temporal analysis. This work presents an approach for collecting, unifying and analysing pointwise geolocated open data available from different sources with the aim of identifying the main locations and destinations of slow mobility activities. For this purpose, we collected pointwise open data from the Wikiloc platform, Twitter, Flickr and Foursquare. The analysis was confined to the data uploaded in Lombardy Region (Northern Italy) - corresponding to millions of pointwise data. Collected data was processed through the use of Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) in order to organize them into a suitable database. This allowed to run statistical analyses on data distribution in both time and space by enabling the detection of users' slow mobility preferences as well as places of interest at a regional scale.

  7. Development of relative risk model for regional groundwater risk assessment: a case study in the lower Liaohe River Plain, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianbo; Zuo, Rui; Teng, Yanguo; Wang, Jinsheng; Wang, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Increasing pressure on water supply worldwide, especially in arid areas, has resulted in groundwater overexploitation and contamination, and subsequent deterioration of the groundwater quality and threats to public health. Environmental risk assessment of regional groundwater is an important tool for groundwater protection. This study presents a new approach for assessing the environmental risk assessment of regional groundwater. It was carried out with a relative risk model (RRM) coupled with a series of indices, such as a groundwater vulnerability index, which includes receptor analysis, risk source analysis, risk exposure and hazard analysis, risk characterization, and management of groundwater. The risk map is a product of the probability of environmental contamination and impact. The reliability of the RRM was verified using Monte Carlo analysis. This approach was applied to the lower Liaohe River Plain (LLRP), northeastern China, which covers 23604 km2. A spatial analysis tool within GIS which was used to interpolate and manipulate the data to develop environmental risk maps of regional groundwater, divided the level of risk from high to low into five ranks (V, IV, III, II, I). The results indicate that areas of relative risk rank (RRR) V cover 2324 km2, covering 9.8% of the area; RRR IV covers 3986 km2, accounting for 16.9% of the area. It is a new and appropriate method for regional groundwater resource management and land use planning, and is a rapid and effective tool for improving strategic decision making to protect groundwater and reduce environmental risk. PMID:26020518

  8. Development of Relative Risk Model for Regional Groundwater Risk Assessment: A Case Study in the Lower Liaohe River Plain, China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xianbo; Zuo, Rui; Teng, Yanguo; Wang, Jinsheng; Wang, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Increasing pressure on water supply worldwide, especially in arid areas, has resulted in groundwater overexploitation and contamination, and subsequent deterioration of the groundwater quality and threats to public health. Environmental risk assessment of regional groundwater is an important tool for groundwater protection. This study presents a new approach for assessing the environmental risk assessment of regional groundwater. It was carried out with a relative risk model (RRM) coupled with a series of indices, such as a groundwater vulnerability index, which includes receptor analysis, risk source analysis, risk exposure and hazard analysis, risk characterization, and management of groundwater. The risk map is a product of the probability of environmental contamination and impact. The reliability of the RRM was verified using Monte Carlo analysis. This approach was applied to the lower Liaohe River Plain (LLRP), northeastern China, which covers 23604 km2. A spatial analysis tool within GIS which was used to interpolate and manipulate the data to develop environmental risk maps of regional groundwater, divided the level of risk from high to low into five ranks (V, IV, III, II, I). The results indicate that areas of relative risk rank (RRR) V cover 2324 km2, covering 9.8% of the area; RRR IV covers 3986 km2, accounting for 16.9% of the area. It is a new and appropriate method for regional groundwater resource management and land use planning, and is a rapid and effective tool for improving strategic decision making to protect groundwater and reduce environmental risk. PMID:26020518

  9. Perspectives and Challenges for Water Desalination - A Socio-Economic Multi-Regional Analysis and a Case Study for Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziolkowska, J. R.; Scanlon, B. R.; Young, M.

    2013-12-01

    Water desalination is anticipated to become a prospective solution for mitigating future water shortages in Texas. As of 2010, 46 municipal brackish water desalination plants were operating in Texas with an estimated total desalination capacity of about 120 million gallons per day (2.3% of state water use) (TWDB 2010; TWDB 2013). In 2011, 99% of the State of Texas suffered extreme drought, with large portions suffering through exceptional drought. This event was classified as the one-year drought of record. Moreover, the growing population of Texas and the subsequent growing water demand create an immediate need for long-term planning for a reliable and efficient water supply. Desalination, even though acknowledged as a reliable option in many countries in the world, requires high investment costs and energy inputs. Current costs of desalinated water can range between US1.09/1,000 gallons and US3.7/1,000 gallons (Arroyo and Shirazi 2012), which are about two to three times higher than water costs from conventional sources (San Antonio Water System 2012; AustinTexas.gov 2013). Economic efficiency is still the main factor determining future developments of desalination investments in Texas, and the technology is still emerging. While currently only investment, maintenance and total capital costs per unit water are considered as factors determining viability of a desalination plant, this study aims at depicting a broader picture of socio-economic impacts related to the construction project itself, both in the immediate region and adjacent communities and interlinked sectors. This study presents an Input-Output model for the brackish water desalination plant in San Antonio, with the first stage expected to be completed in 2016. By using multi-regional and sectoral multipliers, the analysis shows that constructing the desalination plant can create 2,050 jobs in the San Antonio region, while it will add 316 more jobs in other regions in Texas by 2016. Construction will

  10. Molecular identification of poisonous mushrooms using nuclear ITS region and peptide toxins: a retrospective study on fatal cases in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Parnmen, Sittiporn; Sikaphan, Sujitra; Leudang, Siriwan; Boonpratuang, Thitiya; Rangsiruji, Achariya; Naksuwankul, Khwanruan

    2016-02-01

    Cases of mushroom poisoning in Thailand have increased annually. During 2008 to 2014, the cases reported to the National Institute of Health included 57 deaths; at least 15 died after ingestion of amanitas, the most common lethal wild mushrooms inhabited. Hence, the aims of this study were to identify mushroom samples from nine clinically reported cases during the 7-year study period based on nuclear ITS sequence data and diagnose lethal peptide toxins using a reversed phase LC-MS method. Nucleotide similarity was identified using BLAST search of the NCBI database and the Barcode of Life Database (BOLD). Clade characterization was performed by maximum likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic approaches. Based on BLAST and BOLD reference databases our results yielded high nucleotide similarities of poisonous mushroom samples to A. exitialis and A. fuliginea. Detailed phylogenetic analyses showed that all mushroom samples fall into their current classification. Detection of the peptide toxins revealed the presence of amatoxins and phallotoxins in A. exitialis and A. fuliginea. In addition, toxic α-amanitin was identified in a new provisional species, Amanita sp.1, with the highest toxin quantity. Molecular identification confirmed that the mushrooms ingested by the patients were members of the lethal amanitas in the sections Amanita and Phalloideae. In Thailand, the presence of A. exitialis was reported here for the first time and all three poisonous mushroom species provided new and informative data for clinical studies. PMID:26763394

  11. Thermal Adaptation Methods of Urban Plaza Users in Asia's Hot-Humid Regions: A Taiwan Case Study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chen-Fa; Hsieh, Yen-Fen; Ou, Sheng-Jung

    2015-10-01

    Thermal adaptation studies provide researchers great insight to help understand how people respond to thermal discomfort. This research aims to assess outdoor urban plaza conditions in hot and humid regions of Asia by conducting an evaluation of thermal adaptation. We also propose that questionnaire items are appropriate for determining thermal adaptation strategies adopted by urban plaza users. A literature review was conducted and first hand data collected by field observations and interviews used to collect information on thermal adaptation strategies. Item analysis--Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA) and Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA)--were applied to refine the questionnaire items and determine the reliability of the questionnaire evaluation procedure. The reliability and validity of items and constructing process were also analyzed. Then, researchers facilitated an evaluation procedure for assessing the thermal adaptation strategies of urban plaza users in hot and humid regions of Asia and formulated a questionnaire survey that was distributed in Taichung's Municipal Plaza in Taiwan. Results showed that most users responded with behavioral adaptation when experiencing thermal discomfort. However, if the thermal discomfort could not be alleviated, they then adopted psychological strategies. In conclusion, the evaluation procedure for assessing thermal adaptation strategies and the questionnaire developed in this study can be applied to future research on thermal adaptation strategies adopted by urban plaza users in hot and humid regions of Asia. PMID:26516881

  12. Thermal Adaptation Methods of Urban Plaza Users in Asia’s Hot-Humid Regions: A Taiwan Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chen-Fa; Hsieh, Yen-Fen; Ou, Sheng-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Thermal adaptation studies provide researchers great insight to help understand how people respond to thermal discomfort. This research aims to assess outdoor urban plaza conditions in hot and humid regions of Asia by conducting an evaluation of thermal adaptation. We also propose that questionnaire items are appropriate for determining thermal adaptation strategies adopted by urban plaza users. A literature review was conducted and first hand data collected by field observations and interviews used to collect information on thermal adaptation strategies. Item analysis—Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA) and Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA)—were applied to refine the questionnaire items and determine the reliability of the questionnaire evaluation procedure. The reliability and validity of items and constructing process were also analyzed. Then, researchers facilitated an evaluation procedure for assessing the thermal adaptation strategies of urban plaza users in hot and humid regions of Asia and formulated a questionnaire survey that was distributed in Taichung’s Municipal Plaza in Taiwan. Results showed that most users responded with behavioral adaptation when experiencing thermal discomfort. However, if the thermal discomfort could not be alleviated, they then adopted psychological strategies. In conclusion, the evaluation procedure for assessing thermal adaptation strategies and the questionnaire developed in this study can be applied to future research on thermal adaptation strategies adopted by urban plaza users in hot and humid regions of Asia. PMID:26516881

  13. Interannual variability of regional evapotranspiration under precipitation extremes: A case study of the Youngsan River basin in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Youngkeun; Ryu, Youngryel; Jeon, Soohyun

    2014-11-01

    Understanding basin-scale evapotranspiration (ET) is an important issue for the management of regional water resources, especially with the recent trend of intensified precipitation (P). This study assessed the spatial and temporal variations of regional ET in response to P extremes, for various types of land-cover across the Youngsan River basin in Korea. The spatial distribution of monthly P and ET from 2001 to 2009 were estimated using rainfall records from 40 weather stations located across the basin and a satellite-derived, process-based ET model Breathing Earth System Simulator (BESS) (Ryu et al., 2011), respectively. The study periods were focused on the recent years with abnormally large, small and normal P, which were identified from anomalies in the z-sores of long-term (1973-2011) rainfall records. The variation of regional ET was assessed in terms of: (1) the controlling factors, using the statistics of related meteorological and geographical data, (2) a water-energy balance, using Budyko's framework, and (3) the water balance of four selected watersheds in the region, using the partitioning of annual P into ET and riverflow discharge (Q). The total annual ET of this region decreased in abnormally large-P year and increased in small-P year, because the ET in July to August (which accounts for more than 36% of annual ET) was limited by the available energy rather than available water due to the summer monsoon. In terms of land cover types, forests showed larger interannual variability in ET than paddy fields or cropland, with the differences in ET between large and small-P years being 108 and 82 mm yr-1, respectively. The sensitivity of annual ET to P extremes was significantly related to the leaf area index (LAI), rather than soil properties, topography, or specific land-cover type (p < 0.05, generalized linear model). However, the interannual variations of ET were not large (15-18%) compared to those of annual P (51-62%) and Q (108-232%) during 2002

  14. Can small earthquakes help understand lithospheric deformation in slowly deforming regions? A case study from Portugal, western Europe.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custódio, Susana; Carrilho, Fernando; Gongóra, Eva; Marreiros, Célia; Rio, Inês; Silveira, Graça; Arroucau, Pierre; Dias, Nuno

    2015-04-01

    Portugal lies on the south-westernmost tip of Europe, next to the boundary between Eurasia and Africa. The slow oblique convergence between Iberia and Nubia is accommodated along a broad region of diffuse deformation rather than along a single plate boundary. Individual faults have low loading rates, which results in long time intervals between earthquakes. Mainland Portugal lays on stable continental crust, however it has been repeatedly affected by moderate to high magnitude earthquakes in historical times, including some of the largest earthquakes in stable continental crust on the European historical catalog. The adjacent offshore also presents interesting seismicity, being the source region of the largest European historical earthquake (the 1755 Lisbon earthquake), and with a number of earthquakes occurring on old and cold lithospheric mantle, down to ˜60 km. The seismicity of mainland Portugal and its adjacent offshore has been repeatedly classified as diffuse. In this paper we show that although the plate boundary south of Portugal is diffuse, in that deformation is accommodated along several faults rather than along one long linear plate boundary, the seismicity itself is not diffuse, just grossly mislocated in current catalogs. When carefully re-located, earthquakes collapse into well-defined clusters and alignments. This work presents a contribution to understanding the Portuguese seismo-tectonics by analyzing the location of small earthquakes occurred between 1961 and 2013 in mainland Portugal and adjacent offshore. Earthquakes occurred between 2010 and 2012 were recorded by a dense broadband seismic deployment, and their locations show a significant improvement with respect to previous locations. New maps of seismicity show clustering and alignments, both onshore and offshore, which allow for a new interpretation of the regional seismo-tectonics. We conclude that the study of small earthquakes using dense seismic deployments is one of the few powerful

  15. Isotope Tracers as Tools for Identifying Water Sources in Developing Regions: Case of Study in Southern Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosquera, G.; Lazo, P.; Crespo, P.; Célleri, R.

    2014-12-01

    Páramo ecosystems are widely recognized for their high water regulation capacity and as the main source of runoff generation in the Andean region. Understanding the hydrological functioning of the fragile wet Andean páramo ecosystems is critical in the mountainous regions of South America given their high susceptibility to global and local stressors such as land use change and climate change and variability . Despite this, most of the basins in the Andean mountain range are still ungauged, resulting in a currently hindered hydrologic analysis of the water sources contributing to runoff generation in the high-elevation páramo ecosystems. To improve this situation and provide a baseline for future tracer-based hydrologic studies, the isotopic signature of water samples collected within the Zhurucay River experimental basin (7.53 km2) was analyzed. The study area is located in the southern Ecuador and stretches over an altitudinal range of 3200 and 3900 m a.s.l. Water samples in rainfall, streamflow, and soils were collected between May 2011 and May 2013. Streamflow hydrometric and isotopic information within the study site was collected using a nested monitoring system. The main soils in the study site are the Andosols mainly located in the steep slopes, and the Histosols (Andean páramo wetlands) predominantly located at the bottom of the valley. Results reveal that the Andosols drain the infiltrated rainfall water to the Histosols. The Histosols on their turn feed creeks and small rivers. Pre-event water stored in the Histosols is the primary source of runoff generation throughout the year. Defining the water sources contributing to runoff generation is the first step towards the establishment of scientifically-based programs of management and conservation of water resources in the Andean region; and the monitoring of isotopic information has proven useful to improve the understanding of the ecosystem's hydrologic behavior.

  16. Case Study: Writing a Journal Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prud'homme-Genereux, Annie

    2016-01-01

    This column provides original articles on innovations in case study teaching, assessment of the method, as well as case studies with teaching notes. This month's issue describes incorporating a journal article into the classroom by first converting it into a case study.

  17. Surface Soil Moisture Retrieval Using SSM/I and Its Comparison with ESTAR: A Case Study Over a Grassland Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, T.; Hsu, A. Y.; ONeill, P. E.

    1999-01-01

    This study extends a previous investigation on estimating surface soil moisture using the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) over a grassland region. Although SSM/I is not optimal for soil moisture retrieval, it can under some conditions provide information. Rigorous analyses over land have been difficult due to the lack of good validation data sets. A scientific objective of the Southern Great Plains 1997 (SGP97) Hydrology Experiment was to investigate whether the retrieval algorithms for surface soil moisture developed at higher spatial resolution using truck-and aircraft-based passive microwave sensors can be extended to the coarser resolutions expected from satellite platform. With the data collected for the SGP97, the objective of this study is to compare the surface soil moisture estimated from the SSM/I data with those retrieved from the L-band Electronically Scanned Thinned Array Radiometer (ESTAR) data, the core sensor for the experiment, using the same retrieval algorithm. The results indicated that an error of estimate of 7.81% could be achieved with SSM/I data as contrasted to 2.82% with ESTAR data over three intensive sampling areas of different vegetation regimes. It confirms the results of previous study that SSM/I data can be used to retrieve surface soil moisture information at a regional scale under certain conditions.

  18. Influential factors on debris flow events and hillslope-channel connectivity in Alpine regions: case studies from two Alpine regions in Styria, Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traper, Sandra; Pöppl, Ronald; Rascher, Eric; Sass, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    In recent times different types of natural disasters like debris flow events have attracted increasing attention worldwide, since they can cause great damage and loss of infrastructure or even lives is not unusual when it comes to such an event. The engagement with debris flows is especially important in mountainous areas like Austria, since Alpine regions have proved to be particularly prone to the often harmful consequences of such events because of increasing settlement of previously uninhabited regions. Due to those frequently damaging effects of debris flows, research on this kind of natural disaster often focuses on mitigation and recovery measures after an event and on how to restore the initial situation. However, a view on the situation of an area, where severe debris flows recently occurred and are well documented, before the actual event can aid in discovering important preparatory factors that contribute to initiating debris flows and hillslope-channel connectivity in the first place. Valuable insights into the functioning and preconditions of debris flows and their potential connectivity to the main channel can be gained. The study focuses on two geologically different areas in the Austrian Alps, which are both prone to debris flows and have experienced rather severe events recently. Based on data from debris flow events in two regions in Styria (Austria), the Kleinsölk and the Johnsbach valleys, the aim of the study is to identify factors which influence the development of debris flows and the potential of such debris flows to reach the main channel potentially clogging up the river (hillslope-channel connectivity). The degree of hillslope-channel coupling was verified in extensive TLS and ALS surveys, resulting in DEMs of different resolution and spatial extension. Those factors are obtained, analyzed and evaluated with DEM-based GIS- and statistical analyses. These include factors that are attributed to catchment topography, such as slope angle

  19. An eco-sustainable green approach for heavy metals management: two case studies of developing industrial region.

    PubMed

    Rai, Prabhat Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Multifaceted issues or paradigm of sustainable development should be appropriately addressed in the discipline of environmental management. Pollution of the biosphere with toxic metals has accelerated dramatically since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution. In present review, comparative assessment of traditional chemical technologies and phytoremediation has been reviewed particularly in the context of cost-effectiveness. The potential of phytoremediation and green chemicals in heavy metals management has been described critically. Further, the review explores our work on phytoremediation as green technology during the last 6 years and hand in hand addresses the various ecological issues, benefits and constraints pertaining to heavy metal pollution of aquatic ecosystems and its phytoremediation as first case study. Second case study demonstrates the possible health implications associated with use of metal contaminated wastewater for irrigation in peri-urban areas of developing world. Our researches revealed wetland plants/macrophytes as ideal bio-system for heavy metals removal in terms of both ecology and economy, when compared with chemical treatments. However, there are several constraints or limitations in the use of aquatic plants for phytoremediation in microcosm as well as mesocosm conditions. On the basis of our past researches, an eco-sustainable model has been proposed in order to resolve the certain constraints imposed in two case studies. In relation to future prospect, phytoremediation technology for enhanced heavy metal accumulation is still in embryonic stage and needs more attention in gene manipulation area. Moreover, harvesting and recycling tools needs more extensive research. A multidisciplinary research effort that integrates the work of natural sciences, environmental engineers and policy makers is essential for greater success of green technologies as a potent tool of heavy metals management. PMID:21465134

  20. Regional health workforce planning through action research: lessons for commissioning health services from a case study in Far North Queensland.

    PubMed

    Panzera, Annette June; Murray, Richard; Stewart, Ruth; Mills, Jane; Beaton, Neil; Larkins, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Creating a stable and sustainable health workforce in regional, rural and remote Australia has long been a challenge to health workforce planners, policy makers and researchers alike. Traditional health workforce planning is often reactive and assumes continuation of current patterns of healthcare utilisation. This demonstration project in Far North Queensland exemplifies how participatory regional health workforce planning processes can accurately model current and projected local workforce requirements. The recent establishment of Primary Health Networks (PHNs) with the intent to commission health services tailored to individual healthcare needs underlines the relevance of such an approach. This study used action research methodology informed by World Health Organization (WHO) systems thinking. Four cyclical stages of health workforce planning were followed: needs assessment; health service model redesign; skills-set assessment and workforce redesign; and development of a workforce and training plan. This study demonstrated that needs-based loco-regional health workforce planning can be achieved successfully through participatory processes with stakeholders. Stronger health systems and workforce training solutions were delivered by facilitating linkages and planning processes based on community need involving healthcare professionals across all disciplines and sectors. By focusing upon extending competencies and skills sets, local health professionals form a stable and sustainable local workforce. Concrete examples of initiatives generated from this process include developing a chronic disease inter-professional teaching clinic in a rural town and renal dialysis being delivered locally to an Aboriginal community. The growing trend of policy makers decentralising health funding, planning and accountability and rising health system costs increase the future utility of this approach. This type of planning can also assist the new PHNs to commission health services

  1. Intra-permafrost water and hydrological chronology; a case study of aufeis and spring hydrology in continuous permafrost regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, K.; Romanovsky, V.; Hinzman, L.; Zheleznyak, M.; Romanovsky, N.; Buldovich, S.

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify and characterize groundwater infiltration and discharge processes in continuous permafrost regions between the Lena River in Siberia and the Mackenzie River in Canada. The source and heat content of the intra-, or sub- permafrost groundwater is being studied. Intra permafrost (30- 40m below ground surface) taliks, which serve as groundwater reservoirs, are widely observed in the cold continuous permafrost regions of Siberia, Alaska and Canada. These talik formations are often located at favorable sites in glacial outwash or sandy flood plains. The areas have densely-distributed closed system pingos and/or alas formations, which are useful to understand the subsurface talik environments. Stable isotope results from these alas lakes provide indications of aquifer connections to the intra-, or sub- permafrost groundwater. Radio active isotopes (36Cl, 14C, 3H, and 129I), stable isotopes (18O, 2H, 13C, 87/86Sr), chemical compositions and discharge measurements were used to detect areas of infiltration of surface water, residence time and bedrock interactions. The residence time of the groundwater was determined to be several months to several decades depending on study site. The same infiltration process was observed for the last 20 years in the headwaters of the Mackenzie River. The preliminary results show a large amount of the groundwater could be held in storage in the intra permafrost talik layers. Talik permeability is an important parameter for an existing aquifer system in cold permafrost. Conclusions from this study were that the perennial intra permafrost groundwater has four different types of flow: 1) sub-alas talik network flow in sandy sediments, 2) relict stream talik flow, 3) relict aquifer flow systems in glaciated areas, and 4) limestone related bedrock controlled flow systems. Each of these flow paths plays a critical role in aufeis and spring formations in permafrost-dominated watersheds. This study presents

  2. The Image of the 1967 War in Israeli History Textbooks as Test Case: Studying an Active Past in a Protracted Regional Conflict

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yogev, Esther

    2012-01-01

    This article seeks to shed light on the dilemma facing history education in regions beset by a protracted, and as yet unresolved ethno-political conflict. The article will examine this issue by means of a unique test case that observes a dramatic war event in Israeli textbooks. The event in question is the Six-Day War of 1967 and the study of its…

  3. Regional assessment of CO2-solubility trapping potential: a case study of the coastal and offshore Texas Miocene interval.

    PubMed

    Yang, Changbing; Treviño, Ramón H; Zhang, Tongwei; Romanak, Katherine D; Wallace, Kerstan; Lu, Jiemin; Mickler, Patrick J; Hovorka, Susan D

    2014-07-15

    This study presents a regional assessment of CO2-solubility trapping potential (CSTP) in the Texas coastal and offshore Miocene interval, comprising lower, middle, and upper Miocene sandstone. Duan's solubility model [Duan et al. Mar. Chem. 2006, 98, 131-139] was applied to estimate carbon content in brine saturated with CO2 at reservoir conditions. Three approaches (simple, coarse, and fine) were used to calculate the CSTP. The estimate of CSTP in the study area varies from 30 Gt to 167 Gt. Sensitivity analysis indicated that the CSTP in the study area is most sensitive to storage efficiency, porosity, and thickness and is least sensitive to background carbon content in brine. Comparison of CSTP in our study area with CSTP values for seven other saline aquifers reported in the literature showed that the theoretical estimate of CO2-solubility trapping potential (TECSTP) has a linear relationship with brine volume, regardless of brine salinity, temperature, and pressure. Although more validation is needed, this linear relationship may provide a quick estimate of CSTP in a saline aquifer. Results of laboratory experiments of brine-rock-CO2 interactions and the geochemical model suggest that, in the study area, enhancement of CSTP caused by interactions between brine and rocks is minor and the storage capacity of mineral trapping owing to mineral precipitation is relatively trivial. PMID:24956931

  4. Hydrothermal alteration as a trigger mechanism for earthquake swarms: the Vogtland/NW Bohemia region as a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinicke, J.; Fischer, T.; Gaupp, R.; Götze, J.; Koch, U.; Konietzky, H.; Stanek, K.-P.

    2009-07-01

    Earthquake swarms occur mostly in regions with CO2-enriched pore fluids. It is generally accepted that both geodynamic stress accumulation and critical pore fluid pressures act as a triggering mechanism for most seismic events. The new thesis presented here is that hydrothermal alteration processes in fault zones help facilitate the shear failure propagation due to mechanical weakening and dissolution of the wall rock, in addition to the normal shear stress and fluid overpressure. The basic idea that stress corrosion cracking results from chemical weakening and comminution has been discussed for many years. However, it has not yet been applied to explain the earthquake swarm phenomenon. Studies of extensive alteration as well as the latest investigations of CO2 sequestration give evidence that these high dissolution rates of wall rock in contact with an acid fluid phase exist in seismogenic fault zones. Several indications support the assumption that in the Vogtland/NW Bohemia region, the weakening of stressed fault zones by hydrothermal alteration could take place at seismogenic depths and could generate earthquake swarms. Investigations of quartz samples from the fracture zones by means of cathodoluminescence as well as spatiotemporal analysis of seismicity and numerical modelling of alteration-induced earthquake swarms support this hypothesis.

  5. Object-based change detection in rapid urbanization regions with remotely sensed observations: a case study of Shenzhen, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Lihuang; Dong, Guihua; Wang, Wei-Min; Yang, Lijun; Liang, Hong

    2013-10-01

    China, the most populous country on Earth, has experienced rapid urbanization which is one of the main causes of many environmental and ecological problems. Therefore, the monitoring of rapid urbanization regions and the environment is of critical importance for their sustainable development. In this study, the object-based classification is employed to detect the change of land cover in Shenzhen, which is located in South China and has been urbanized rapidly in recent three decades. First, four Landsat TM images, which were acquired on 1990, 2000 and 2010, respectively, are selected from the image database. Atmospheric corrections are conducted on these images with improved dark-object subtraction technique and surface meteorological observations. Geometric correction is processed with ground control points derived from topographic maps. Second, a region growing multi-resolution segmentation and a soft nearest neighbour classifier are used to finish object-based classification. After analyzing the fraction of difference classes over time series, we conclude that the comparison of derived land cover classes with socio-economic statistics demonstrates the strong positive correlation between built-up classes and urban population as well as gross GDP and GDPs in second and tertiary industries. Two different mechanisms of urbanization, namely new land development and redevelopment, are revealed. Consequently, we found that, the districts of Shenzhen were urbanized through different mechanisms.

  6. The 27-28 October 1986 FIRE cirrus case study - Meteorology and clouds. [First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project Regional Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starr, David O'C.; Wylie, Donald P.

    1990-01-01

    A detailed case study is conducted of cirrus clouds that were observed intensely over a 36-h period from 1200 UTC October 27 to 0000 UTC October 29, 1986. The clouds varied in density and structure as synoptic and mesoscale features passed through the region. The study seeks to provide a meteorological overview including a synoptic and regional perspective; to document the rawinsonde-resolved atmospheric structure and large-scale forcing associated with the observed cloud systems; and to provide understanding of the relationship between atmospheric structure and the character of the corresponding cloud fields. Regional analyses of the static stability structure and vertical motion are presented and interpreted with respect to the characteristics of the corresponding cloud fields as deduced from satellite and lidar observations. It is suggested that mesoscale organization must be taken into account in parametric treatments of cirrus for large-scale atmospheric models. It is shown that cloud generation typically occurred at multiple levels.

  7. Land-use change, deforestation, and peasant farm systems: A case study of Mexico's Southern Yucatan Peninsular Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vance, Colin James

    This dissertation develops spatially explicit econometric models by linking Thematic Mapper (TM) satellite imagery with household survey data to test behavioral propositions of semi-subsistence farmers in the Southern Yucatan Peninsular Region (SYPR) of Mexico. Covering 22,000 km2, this agricultural frontier contains one of the largest and oldest expanses of tropical forests in the Americas outside of Amazonia. Over the past 30 years, the SYPR has undergone significant land-use change largely owing to the construction of a highway through the region's center in 1967. These landscape dynamics are modeled by exploiting a spatial database linking a time series of TM imagery with socio-economic and geo-referenced land-use data collected from a random sample of 188 farm households. The dissertation moves beyond the existing literature on deforestation in three principal respects. Theoretically, the study develops a non-separable model of land-use that relaxes the assumption of profit maximization almost exclusively invoked in studies of the deforestation issue. The model is derived from a utility-maximizing framework that explicitly incorporates the interdependency of the household's production and consumption choices as these affect the allocation of resources. Methodologically, the study assembles a spatial database that couples satellite imagery with household-level socio-economic data. The field survey protocol recorded geo-referenced land-use data through the use of a geographic positioning system and the creation of sketch maps detailing the location of different uses observed within individual plots. Empirically, the study estimates spatially explicit econometric models of land-use change using switching regressions and duration analysis. A distinguishing feature of these models is that they link the dependent and independent variables at the level of the decision unit, the land manager, thereby capturing spatial and temporal heterogeneity that is otherwise

  8. The propagation of ULF waves from the Earth's foreshock region to ground: the case study of 15 February 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regi, Mauro; De Lauretis, Marcello; Francia, Patrizia; Villante, Umberto

    2014-12-01

    A long-duration upstream ultralow frequency (ULF) wave event was detected on 15 February 2009 by Cluster satellites, close to the bow shock nose. A clear wave activity was identified when the interplanetary magnetic field orientation was favorable to the local generation. We examined the wave properties in both the solar wind and the spacecraft frame during a selected time interval and found that foreshock waves were essentially Alfven waves propagating at a small angle with respect to the interplanetary magnetic field. A comparison of Cluster observations with those on the ground, in the polar cap and at low-latitude stations, confirms the results of previous studies, indicating that upstream waves can reach different ground regions along different paths.

  9. Assessment of groundwater quality using DEA and AHP: a case study in the Sereflikochisar region in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kavurmaci, Murat; Üstün, A Korkut

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the spatial distribution of groundwater quality in Sereflikochisar Basin, in the Central Anatolian region of Turkey using different hydrochemical, statistical, and geostatistical methods. A total of 51 groundwater samples were collected from the observation wells in the study area to evaluate the characteristics of the groundwater quality. As a relatively simple and practical method, a groundwater quality index (GWQI) was developed to evaluate the overall groundwater quality. In this process, complex decision-making techniques such as analytic hierarchy process (AHP) and data envelopment analysis (DEA) were used. Based on these models, two new indices (A-GWQI and D-GWQI) were proposed. According to the D-GWQI score (from 0.6 to 1), water quality was classified in four categories as unsuitable (0.6-0.7), permissible (0.7-0.8), good (0.8-0.9), and excellent (0.9-1). The spatial distribution maps of the groundwater quality were created using the Kriging method. For each map, seven different semivariogram models were tested and the best-fitted model was chosen based on their root mean square standardized error. These maps showed that the areas with high groundwater quality were in the eastern and southern parts of the study area where the D-GWQI scores were greater than 0.8. Depending on the distance from the Salt Lake, the characteristics of groundwater changed from NaCl to NaHCO3 and CaHCO3 facies. This study shows how to determine the spatial distribution of the groundwater quality and identify the impact of salt lakes on the groundwater quality in inland aquifers. The findings of this study can be applied to ensure the quality of groundwater used for drinking and irrigation purposes in the study area. PMID:27034240

  10. Assessment of groundwater quality using DEA and AHP: a case study in the Sereflikochisar region in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kavurmaci, Murat; Üstün, A Korkut

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the spatial distribution of groundwater quality in Sereflikochisar Basin, in the Central Anatolian region of Turkey using different hydrochemical, statistical, and geostatistical methods. A total of 51 groundwater samples were collected from the observation wells in the study area to evaluate the characteristics of the groundwater quality. As a relatively simple and practical method, a groundwater quality index (GWQI) was developed to evaluate the overall groundwater quality. In this process, complex decision-making techniques such as analytic hierarchy process (AHP) and data envelopment analysis (DEA) were used. Based on these models, two new indices (A-GWQI and D-GWQI) were proposed. According to the D-GWQI score (from 0.6 to 1), water quality was classified in four categories as unsuitable (0.6–0.7), permissible (0.7–0.8), good (0.8–0.9), and excellent (0.9–1). The spatial distribution maps of the groundwater quality were created using the Kriging method. For each map, seven different semivariogram models were tested and the best-fitted model was chosen based on their root mean square standardized error. These maps showed that the areas with high groundwater quality were in the eastern and southern parts of the study area where the D-GWQI scores were greater than 0.8. Depending on the distance from the Salt Lake, the characteristics of groundwater changed from NaCl to NaHCO3 and CaHCO3 facies. This study shows how to determine the spatial distribution of the groundwater quality and identify the impact of salt lakes on the groundwater quality in inland aquifers. The findings of this study can be applied to ensure the quality of groundwater used for drinking and irrigation purposes in the study area. PMID:27359000

  11. Genetic variation of the Turnip mosaic virus population of Vietnam: a case study of founder, regional and local influences.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Huy Duc; Tran, Hoa Thi Nhu; Ohshima, Kazusato

    2013-01-01

    Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) is one of the most important viruses infecting a wide range of plant species, primarily from the family Brassicaceae. Thirty TuMV isolates were collected from Brassica and Raphanus plants in Vietnam during 2006-2008. Host reaction studies showed that many of the isolates belonged to Brassica/Raphanus (BR) host-infecting type. Sequence-based phylogenetic and population genetic analyses were made of the complete polyprotein gene sequences, and of four non-recombinogenic regions of those sequences (i.e. genes of the helper-component proteinase protein, protein 3, nuclear inclusion b protein and coat protein). These were used to assess the subpopulation differentiation and divergence between Vietnamese TuMV populations and those of nearby Asian countries. Nine inter- and intralineage recombination type patterns were identified in the genomes of the Vietnamese isolates, of which seven were novel. All the Vietnamese non-recombinant isolates fell into the world-B group of TuMV and clustered with Chinese isolates. The estimates of genetic differentiation and gene flow reveal that the TuMV populations of Vietnam, China and Japan are genetically linked but have clear local founder effects. This, the first population genetic study of a TuMV population in Southeast Asia, indicates the importance of such studies for providing the scientific basis of control strategies. PMID:23201192

  12. Impact of possible climate and land use changes in the semi arid regions: A case study from North Eastern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montenegro, Suzana; Ragab, Ragab

    2012-04-01

    SummaryThis paper combines hydrological observations and modelling results of a semi arid catchment in Brazil that could lead to a better understanding of the hydrology of similar catchments in semi-arid regions. The Tapacurá catchment (area 470.5 km2) in the Northeast of Brazil was selected for this study. The Distributed Catchment Scale Model, DiCaSM, was calibrated and validated for the stream flows of the Tapacurá catchment. The model performance was further tested by comparing simulated and observed scaled soil moisture. The results showed the ability of the model to simulate the stream flow and the scaled soil moisture. The simulated impacts of climate change of low emission (B1) scenarios, on the worst perspective, indicated the possibility of reduction in surface water availability by -13.90%, -22.63% and -32.91% in groundwater recharge and by -4.98%, -14.28% and -20.58% in surface flows for the time spans 2010-2039, 2040-2069, 2070-2099, respectively. This would cause severe impacts on water supply in the region. Changing the land use, for example by reforestation of part of the catchment area which is currently arable land, would lead to a decrease in both groundwater recharge by -4.2% and stream flow by -2.7%. Changing land use from vegetables to sugar cane would result in decreasing groundwater recharge by almost -11%, and increasing stream flow by almost 5%. The combination of possible impacts of climate change and land use requires a proper plan for water resources management and mitigation strategies.

  13. Iran: A Case Study on Research and Development of the Indigenous Building Methods, Materials, Local Skills and Resources in Selseleh, Luristan; in the Caspian Region; Training Workshop for Local Builders. Report Studies ... C 90.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, John

    Two case studies, one conducted in the Luristan region of Iran in 1974, the other in the Caspian region in 1978, outline a methodology for assessing the problems and potentials of indigenous building methods. They illustrate how the methods can be used and developed to meet present shelter needs and how the problems that exist can be overcome…

  14. Near-infrared study of southern massive star formation regions. The case of IRAS 16571-4029 source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman-Lopes, A.

    2007-09-01

    Context: We present the results of a near-infrared survey of the young stellar cluster associated with the IRAS 16571-4029 source. Aims: The main purpose of this survey is to study the cluster members and find the ionizing sources of the associated HII region. Methods: The stellar population was studied by using color-color and color-magnitude diagrams, as well as by analysing the spectral energy distributions in the near- and mid-infrared wavelengths. The extended emission was studied by the construction of contour diagrams, which were compared with near- and mid-infrared images. We computed the corresponding number of Lyman continuum photons (using the integrated Brγ flux density) and compared it with that obtained from the 5 GHz flux density to derive a mean visual extinction. Results: NIR observations in the direction of RCW116B reveal the presence of a young cluster of massive stars coincident with the IRAS 16571-4029 source. These observations, together with published radio data, MSX, and Spitzer images were used to determine some of the physical parameters of the region. We found 102 cluster member candidates in an area of about 3 × 3 square arcmin, the majority of them showing excess emission in the NIR. We found that IRAS 16571-4029 is formed by multiple infrared sources, all but one are associated with small groups of stars. This suggests that the fragmentation of massive molecular clouds generates the massive sub-clusters. We derived a mean visual extinction of A_V=12.8± 4.73.2. This result is independent of the assumed distance and agrees with the mean visual extinction A_V=14.4, as obtained by previous spectroscopic observations of two NIR sources in the direction of the IRAS 16571-4029 source. We also compare the results obtained in this study with those obtained in previous papers in this series finding a very good correlation between the number of cluster members Ns and the cluster radius r_c. The cluster radius varies from 0.2-0.3 pc (IRAS 15411

  15. Self-Assessment of Adherence to Medication: A Case Study in Campania Region Community-Dwelling Population

    PubMed Central

    Menditto, Enrica; Guerriero, Francesca; Orlando, Valentina; Crola, Catherine; Di Somma, Carolina; Illario, Maddalena; Morisky, Donald E.; Colao, Annamaria

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of the study was to assess self-reported medication adherence measure in patients selected during a health education and health promotion focused event held in the Campania region. The study also assessed sociodemographic determinants of adherence. Methods. An interviewer assisted survey was conducted to assess adherence using the Italian version of the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8). Participants older than 18 years were interviewed by pharmacists while waiting for free-medical checkup. Results. A total of 312 participants were interviewed during the Health Campus event. A total of 187 (59.9%) had low adherence to medications. Pearson's bivariate correlation showed positive association between the MMAS-8 score and gender, educational level and smoking (P < 0.05). A multivariable analysis showed that the level of education and smoking were independent predictors of adherence. Individuals with an average level of education (odds ratio (OR), 2.21, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.08–4.52) and nonsmoker (odds ratio (OR) 1.87, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.04–3.35) were found to be more adherent to medication than those with a lower level of education and smoking. Conclusion. The analysis showed very low prescription adherence levels in the interviewed population. The level of education was a relevant predictor associated with that result. PMID:26346487

  16. Simwe model application on susceptibility analysis to linear erosion: a case study in Alto Douro wine region.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Joana; Bateira, Carlos; Soares, Laura; Faria, Ana; Moura, Rui; Gonçalves, José

    2016-04-01

    The wine production in Alto Douro Wine Region - one of the world's oldest regulated and demarcated wine region - is based on a slope system organized in agricultural terraces once supported exclusively by dry stone walls. It has been undergoing the necessary changes for the introduction of technological innovations partially associated to the mechanization of vineyards work. In this sense, different forms of terrain framing have been implemented, namely the substitution of stone walls by earth embankments. This evolution raises a group of problems related to the hydric soil erosion and landscape preservation, since Alto Douro Wine Region is classified as UNESCO World Heritage Site since 2001. The study area is mostly occupied by vineyards planted in the agriculture terraces without continuous vegetation, the flow proceeds superficially influenced by the weak infiltration capacity and hydraulic conductivity. So, because of this conditioning factor the erosive features present non-significant depth, and the length thereof is limited essentially by the slope of the land, where was registered 64 gullies and 78 rills This paper focuses on the evaluation of susceptibility to linear erosion, through the application of SIMWE (SIMulated Water Erosion), (Mitas and Mitasova, 1998), using a digital elevation model, with pixel of one square meter of spatial resolution, created through detail aerial photographs, (side pixel of 50 cm), submitted to automatic stereo-correlation procedures in Agisoft PhotoScan software. The results provided by the model are compared with hydrological characteristics of the soil, (infiltration capacity, and hydraulic conductivity), soil texture, and soil structure parameters (identified by electrical resistivity measurement) where obtained from field monitoring. This approach demonstrates an association between the spatial distribution of erosive features with high values of soil saturation, and reduced water discharge (10-110 cm3/s), that are

  17. Biomonitoring polluted sediments in Arctic regions - possibilities and challenges using benthic foraminifera. Case studies from northern Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skirbekk, Kari; Dijkstra, Noortje; Junttila, Juho; Sternal, Beata; Pedersen, Kristine Bondo; Forwick, Matthias; Carroll, JoLynn

    2016-04-01

    Biomonitoring pollution in marine environments using benthic foraminifera assemblages have proven to be a valid method for many regions. Two important reasons for their suitability are their sensitivity to changes in the environment and their rapid response time due to short life cycles. In addition, they are preserved in the sedimentary record, allowing for baseline studies of conditions prior to introduction of contaminants. Species of benthic foraminifera that appear to tolerate polluted sediments are referred to as opportunistic species. This notion is in general used for species able to dominate environments that are too stressful for most species. The high latitude setting of the northern Norwegian coastal zone experience high seasonality and, hence, largely changing conditions throughout a year: variations in water mass domination, freshwater influence, temperature and current velocity. It is possible that an environment like this is inhibited by a higher amount of opportunistic species generally thriving under high stress conditions. This might make the use of benthic foraminifera for biomonitoring more challenging, as the faunal compositions may be a result of a complex set of processes. Consequently, large datasets are necessary in order to make reliable conclusions, which in time may be used as generalized guidelines for biomonitoring in this geographical area. Here, we present preliminary results of benthic foraminiferal assemblages from two sites in Finnmark, northern Norway, which have been exposed to pollution. The main site is Repparfjorden, where the inner parts of the fjord were used as a submarine waste deposal site for mine tailings from a local copper mine during the 1970´s. Results from four marine sediment cores (10-20 cm long) containing sediments classified to be in moderate to very bad state (according to Norwegian sediment quality criteria) are presented. The contamination is seen in intervals of elevated copper content dated to the 1970

  18. Urban effects on regional climate: a case study in the Phoenix and Tucson ‘sun’ corridor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhao Yang; Francina Dominguez; Hoshin Gupta; Xubin Zeng; Norman, Laura M.

    2016-01-01

    Land use and land cover change (LULCC) due to urban expansion alter the surface albedo, heat capacity, and thermal conductivity of the surface. Consequently, the energy balance in urban regions is different from that of natural surfaces. To evaluate the changes in regional climate that could arise due to projected urbanization in the Phoenix-Tucson corridor, Arizona, we applied the coupled WRF-NOAH-UCM (which includes a detailed urban radiation scheme) to this region. Land cover changes were represented using land cover data for 2005 and projections to 2050, and historical North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) data were used to specify the lateral boundary conditions. Results suggest that temperature changes will be well defined, reflecting the urban heat island (UHI) effect within areas experiencing LULCC. Changes in precipitation are less robust, but seem to indicate reductions in precipitation over the mountainous regions northeast of Phoenix and decreased evening precipitation over the newly-urbanized area.

  19. Integrating wastewater reuse in water resources management for hotels in arid coastal regions - Case Study of Sharm El Sheikh, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Lamei, A; van der Zaag, P; Imam, E

    2009-01-01

    Hotels in arid coastal areas use mainly desalinated water (using reverse osmosis) for their domestic water supply, and treated wastewater for irrigating green areas. Private water companies supply these hotels with their potable and non-potable water needs. There is normally a contractual agreement stating a minimum amount of water that has to be supplied by the water company and that the hotel management has to pay for regardless of its actual consumption ("contracted-for water supply"). Hotels have to carefully analyse their water requirements in order to determine which percentage of the hotel's peak water demand should be used in the contract in order to reduce water costs and avoid the risk of water shortage. This paper describes a model to optimise the contracted-for irrigation water supply with the objective function to minimise total water cost to hotels. It analyses what the contracted-for irrigation water supply of a given hotel should be, based on the size of the green irrigated area on one hand and the unit prices of the different types of water on the other hand. An example from an arid coastal tourism-dominated city is presented: Sharm El Sheikh (Sharm), Egypt. This paper presents costs of wastewater treatment using waste stabilisation ponds, which is the prevailing treatment mechanism in the case study area for centralised plants, as well as aerobic/anaerobic treatment used for decentralised wastewater treatment plants in the case study area. There is only one centralised wastewater treatment plant available in the city exerting monopoly and selling treated wastewater to hotels at a much higher price than the actual cost that a hotel would bear if it treated its own wastewater. Contracting for full peak irrigation demand is the highest total cost option. Contracting for a portion of the peak irrigation demand and complementing the rest from desalination water is a cheaper option. A better option still is to complement the excess irrigation demand

  20. Identification of Environmental Factors Associated with Inflammatory Bowel Disease in a Southwestern Highland Region of China: A Nested Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yuan; Nan, Qiong; Liu, Yan; Yang, Gang; Dong, Xiangqian; Huang, Qi; Xia, Shuxian; Wang, Kunhua; Miao, Yinglei

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to examine environmental factors associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in Yunnan Province, a southwestern highland region of China. Methods In this nested case-control study, newly diagnosed ulcerative colitis (UC) cases in 2 cities in Yunnan Province and Crohn’s disease (CD) cases in 16 cities in Yunnan Province were recruited between 2008 and 2013. Controls were matched by geography, sex and age at a ratio of 1:4. Data were collected using the designed questionnaire. Conditional logistic regression models were used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (ORs). Results A total of 678 UC and 102 CD cases were recruited. For UC, various factors were associated with an increased risk of developing UC: dietary habits, including frequent irregular meal times; consumption of fried foods, salty foods and frozen dinners; childhood factors, including intestinal infectious diseases and frequent use of antibiotics; and other factors, such as mental labor, high work stress, use of non-aspirin non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and allergies (OR > 1, p < 0.05). Other factors showed a protective effect: such as consumption of fruits, current smoking, physical activity, and drinking tea (OR < 1, p < 0.05). For CD, appendectomy and irregular meal times increased the disease risk (OR >1, p < 0.05), whereas physical activity may have reduced this risk (OR < 1, p < 0.05). Conclusions This study is the first nested case-control study to analyze the association between environmental factors and IBD onset in a southwestern highland region of China. Certain dietary habits, lifestyles, allergies and childhood factors may play important roles in IBD, particularly UC. PMID:27070313

  1. Interactive analysis and evaluation of ERTS data for regional planning and urban development: A Los Angeles Basin case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raje, S.; Economy, R.; Willoughby, G.; Mcknight, J.

    1974-01-01

    The progression endemic to the ERTS Data Use Experiment SR 124 in data quality, analysis sophistication and applications responsiveness is reviewed. The roles of the variety of ERTS products, including the supporting underflight aircraft imagery at various scales, are discussed in the context of this investigation. The versatility of interpretation techniques and outputs developed and implemented via the General Electric Multispectral Information Extraction Systems is described and exemplified by both system-expository and applications-explanatory products. The wide-ranging and in-depth applications studied in the course of this experiment can be characterized as community-oriented and agency-directed. In the former, generic category, which is primarily data-contextual, problems analyzed dealt with agricultural systems, surface water bodies, snow cover, brush fire burns, forestry, grass growth, parks - golf courses - cemeteries, dust storms, grading sites, geological features and coastal water structure. The ERTS MSS band selectivity and measurements thresholds were of primary interest here. The agency-directed application areas have been user-evaluational in nature. Beginning with overall urbanized regional analysis of land cover density-development intensity, residential areas were analyzed for ascertaining if housing types could be aggregated with any degree of reliability.

  2. Simulation of regionally ecological land based on a cellular automation model: a case study of Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hualin; Kung, Chih-Chun; Zhang, Yanting; Li, Xiubin

    2012-08-01

    Ecological land is like the "liver" of a city and is very useful to public health. Ecological land change is a spatially dynamic non-linear process under the interaction between natural and anthropogenic factors at different scales. In this study, by setting up natural development scenario, object orientation scenario and ecosystem priority scenario, a Cellular Automation (CA) model has been established to simulate the evolution pattern of ecological land in Beijing in the year 2020. Under the natural development scenario, most of ecological land will be replaced by construction land and crop land. But under the scenarios of object orientation and ecosystem priority, the ecological land area will increase, especially under the scenario of ecosystem priority. When considering the factors such as total area of ecological land, loss of key ecological land and spatial patterns of land use, the scenarios from priority to inferiority are ecosystem priority, object orientation and natural development, so future land management policies in Beijing should be focused on conversion of cropland to forest, wetland protection and prohibition of exploitation of natural protection zones, water source areas and forest parks to maintain the safety of the regional ecosystem. PMID:23066410

  3. Modeling Airborne Gravity Data with Local Functions for Regional Geoid Enhancement ---- A Case Study in Puerto Rico Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaopeng

    2016-04-01

    Airborne gravimetry has been used as the primary method to quickly and economically obtain updated gravity field information over a region, targeted specifically. Thus, unlike the satellite missions that provide global or near global data coverage, the observables from airborne campaigns are apparently space limited. Moreover, they are also band limited in the frequency domain, considering that various filter banks and/or de-noising techniques have to be applied to overcome the low signal to noise ratio problem that are presented in the airborne systems due to mechanical and mathematical limitations in computing the accelerations, both the kinematic one and the dynamic one. As a result, in this study, a band-limited local function system based on the point mass model is used to process these airborne gravity data that have both a limited frequency domain and a limited space domain in the target area: Puerto Rico Island and its nearby ocean areas. The resulting geoid model show obvious middle to short wavelength geoid changes due to airborne gravity data contribution. In the land area, these changes improved the geoid precision from 3.27cm to 2.09cm at the local GNSS/Leveling bench marks. More importantly, the error trend in the geoid models is largely reduced if not completely removed. Various oceanographic models will be used to validate the geoid changes in the nearby open sea areas.

  4. Simulation of Regionally Ecological Land Based on a Cellular Automation Model: A Case Study of Beijing, China

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Hualin; Kung, Chih-Chun; Zhang, Yanting; Li, Xiubin

    2012-01-01

    Ecological land is like the “liver” of a city and is very useful to public health. Ecological land change is a spatially dynamic non-linear process under the interaction between natural and anthropogenic factors at different scales. In this study, by setting up natural development scenario, object orientation scenario and ecosystem priority scenario, a Cellular Automation (CA) model has been established to simulate the evolution pattern of ecological land in Beijing in the year 2020. Under the natural development scenario, most of ecological land will be replaced by construction land and crop land. But under the scenarios of object orientation and ecosystem priority, the ecological land area will increase, especially under the scenario of ecosystem priority. When considering the factors such as total area of ecological land, loss of key ecological land and spatial patterns of land use, the scenarios from priority to inferiority are ecosystem priority, object orientation and natural development, so future land management policies in Beijing should be focused on conversion of cropland to forest, wetland protection and prohibition of exploitation of natural protection zones, water source areas and forest parks to maintain the safety of the regional ecosystem. PMID:23066410

  5. Groundwater quality and management in arid and semi-arid regions: Case study, Central Eastern Desert of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amer, Reda; Ripperdan, Robert; Wang, Tao; Encarnación, John

    2012-07-01

    This study presents a model budget for groundwater in the Central Eastern Desert of Egypt. The stable isotopic composition and hydrochemistry of groundwater samples collected from different aquifers were determined to identify recharge sources and water quality. Stable isotopic values suggest that shallow alluvial and fracture zone aquifers are recharged from seasonal precipitation, while groundwater in deeper sedimentary sub-basins is paleowater that was recharged during periods of less arid regional climate. Hydrochemical analysis indicates elevated salinity in each aquifer type, which is attributed to leaching and dissolution of terrestrial salts and to mixing with marine water. Groundwater from sedimentary sub-basin aquifers can be treated and used for drinking and domestic purposes. Groundwater from shallow alluvial and fracture zone wells is suitable for animal husbandry and mineral ore dressing. A model water budget shows that approximately 4.8 × 109 m3 of recoverable groundwater is stored in sedimentary sub-basin aquifers, or approximately 550 years of water at present utilization rates.

  6. Quantification and multivariate analysis of water erosion in the Mediterranean region. A case study of the Isser basin. northern Algeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeggane, Houari; Boutoutaou, Djamel

    2016-07-01

    In the Mediterranean region, the specifisity of erosion stems from a particularly contrasted climate, drought, and from summer and autumn severe thunderstorms. The process of erosion generates substantial loss of soil and affects any kind of crop. The adopted approach aims to establish regression models in order to highlight the relationship between solid and liquid flows at four measurement stations in the Isser catchement area, northern Ageria. The Power Model seems to explain this relationship. The quantification and temporal analysis of solid matter transport showed that the rates of erosion are high along the study area. The annual mean solid matter transport for the whole basin is about 2 200 t/km2.year, of which the main part is recorded in autumn during peak flows. The different factors involved in the process of water erosion are determined in advance in order to establish a model between the predictand variable, which is the specific erosion, and other predictors. Besides, a functional relationship has been highlighted between water erosion and the mean slope, the drainage density and the lithology index.

  7. Post-tsunami Assessment in the Coastal Region Between Kanyakumari and Ovari, Tamil Nadu—A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saravanan, S.; Chandrasekar, N.; Hentry, C.; Rajamanickam, M.; Immanuel, J. Loveson; Subramanian, P. Siva

    Coastal zones are dynamic areas that are constantly undergoing change in response to a multitude of factors including sea level rise, wave and current patterns, hurricanes and human influences. On 26th December 2004, huge waves smashed across the shore between Kanyakumari and Ovari. As they crossed the beach, the waves up to 30 feet tall. Many people are dead due to crush and pull to sea and drowned as the mighty waves withdraw. Many villages have been obliterated, the death tale could exceed 300 but the damage to the property is very high. The size of the tsunami is related to the area that moves on the ocean bottom and how far it moves. This region is manifested with marine terrace, sand dunes, beach ridges, estuaries, floodplains, beaches, mangroves, peneplains, uplands, sea cliff, etc. We have attempted the shoreline dynamics using beach profile survey, and coastal environment changes through online survey, governmental, records and coastal geomorphological studies using remote sensing technique. The major destructions are identified in this paper.

  8. Case Study Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman

    2011-01-01

    This chapter describes the history of case study teaching, types of cases, and experimental data supporting their effectiveness. It also describes a model for comparing the efficacy of the various case study methods. (Contains 1 figure.)

  9. A generic regional spatio-temporal co-occurrence pattern mining model: a case study for air pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari, Mohammad; Samadzadegan, Farhad; Weibel, Robert

    2015-07-01

    Spatio-temporal co-occurrence patterns represent subsets of object types which are located together in both space and time. Existing algorithms for co-occurrence pattern mining cannot handle complex applications such as air pollution in several ways. First, the existing models assume that spatial relationships between objects are explicitly represented in the input data, while the new method allows extracting implicitly contained spatial relationships algorithmically. Second, instead of extracting co-occurrence patterns of only point data, the proposed method deals with different feature types that is with point, line and polygon data. Thus, it becomes relevant for a wider range of real applications. Third, it also allows mining a spatio-temporal co-occurrence pattern simultaneously in space and time so that it illustrates the evolution of patterns over space and time. Furthermore, the proposed algorithm uses a Voronoi tessellation to improve efficiency. To evaluate the proposed method, it was applied on a real case study for air pollution where the objective is to find correspondences of air pollution with other parameters which affect this phenomenon. The results of evaluation confirm not only the capability of this method for co-occurrence pattern mining of complex applications, but also it exhibits an efficient computational performance.

  10. Assessing food security in water scarce regions by Life Cycle Analysis: a case study in the Gaza strip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recanati, Francesca; Castelletti, Andrea; Melià, Paco; Dotelli, Giovanni

    2013-04-01

    Food security is a major issue in Palestine for both political and physical reasons, with direct effects on the local population living conditions: the nutritional level of people in Gaza is classified by FAO as "insecure". As most of the protein supply comes from irrigated agricultural production and aquaculture, freshwater availability is a limiting factor to food security, and the primary reason for frequent conflicts among food production processes (e.g. aquaculture, land livestock or different types of crops). In this study we use Life Cycle Analysis to assess the environmental impacts associated to all the stages of water-based protein production (from agriculture and aquaculture) in the Gaza strip under different agricultural scenarios and hydroclimatic variability. As reported in several recent studies, LCA seems to be an appropriate methodology to analyze agricultural systems and assess associated food security in different socio-economic contexts. However, we argue that the inherently linear and static nature of LCA might prove inadequate to tackle with the complex interaction between water cycle variability and the food production system in water-scarce regions of underdeveloped countries. Lack of sufficient and reliable data to characterize the water cycle is a further source of uncertainty affecting the robustness of the analysis. We investigate pros and cons of LCA and LCA-based option planning in an average size farm in Gaza strip, where farming and aquaculture are family-based and integrated by reuse of fish breeding water for irrigation. Different technological solutions (drip irrigation system, greenhouses etc.) are evaluated to improve protein supply and reduce the pressure on freshwater, particularly during droughts. But this use of technology represent also a contribution in increasing sustainability in agricultural processes, and therefore in economy, of Gaza Strip (reduction in chemical fertilizers and pesticides etc.).

  11. Interactions between urban vegetation and surface urban heat islands: a case study in the Boston metropolitan region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melaas, Eli K.; Wang, Jonathan A.; Miller, David L.; Friedl, Mark A.

    2016-05-01

    Many studies have used thermal data from remote sensing to characterize how land use and surface properties modify the climate of cities. However, relatively few studies have examined the impact of elevated temperature on ecophysiological processes in urban areas. In this paper, we use time series of Landsat data to characterize and quantify how geographic variation in Boston’s surface urban heat island (SUHI) affects the growing season of vegetation in and around the city, and explore how the quality and character of vegetation patches in Boston affect local heat island intensity. Results from this analysis show strong coupling between Boston’s SUHI and vegetation phenology at the scale of both individual landscape units and for the region as a whole, with significant detectable signatures in both surface temperature and growing season length extending 15 km from Boston’s urban core. On average, land surface temperatures were about 7 °C warmer and the growing season was 18–22 days longer in Boston relative to adjacent rural areas. Within Boston’s urban core, patterns of temperature and timing of phenology in areas with higher vegetation amounts (e.g., parks) were similar to those in adjacent rural areas, suggesting that vegetation patches provide an important ecosystem service that offsets the urban heat island at local scales. Local relationships between phenology and temperature were affected by the intensity of urban land use surrounding vegetation patches and possibly by the presence of exotic tree species that are common in urban areas. Results from this analysis show how species composition, land cover configuration, and vegetation patch sizes jointly influence the nature and magnitude of coupling between vegetation phenology and SUHIs, and demonstrate that urban vegetation provides a significant ecosystem service in cities by decreasing the local intensity of SUHIs.

  12. Modeling, Analysis, and Preservation Techniques for Historic Reinforced Concrete Structures in Seismic Prone Regions Case Study: Augusta Airship Hangar, Sicily

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronin, Kelly; Reiner, Tom; Whyte, Catherine

    2008-07-01

    Throughout the world there are hundreds of historic monuments and structures considered to be invaluable and irreplaceable. They are symbols of cultural identity and a means of educating people about history. Preservation of historic monuments and structures is therefore an important part of safeguarding these cultural heritage sites so that they retain their value for future generations. This report discusses a procedure for the investigation of seismic hazards in existing buildings and possible steps that can be taken to avoid damage caused by these hazards. The Augusta Airship Hangar located in Sicily, will be used as a case study however the topics addressed in this paper can be applied to other structures of historic value around the world. First state-of-the-art scanning procedures were used to create scale digital models that were imported into a structural analysis program. Within this program dynamic analyses were performed on the model based on actual ground motions taken close to the site. This data was used to determine the period and mode shapes of the structure. Then a nonlinear analysis, including a static pushover analysis, was implemented on a two-dimensional model of the structural frame. From this analysis the failure mechanisms of the structure were revealed with relation to an allowable roof displacement. The structural integrity of the structure was evaluated based on pre-defined performance goals. Finally multiple suggestions were made how the Augusta Airship Hangar might be repaired and strengthened so that this structure will not be destroyed should an earthquake occur. The results of our study show that historic structures, despite their age, can still be strong and ductile. Also there are a multitude of effective preservation and retrofit techniques that can be used to strengthen these historic structures, should an earthquake occur. Through this study, the Augusta Airship Hangar has proven to be not only a historic symbol for Sicily but

  13. Modeling, Analysis, and Preservation Techniques for Historic Reinforced Concrete Structures in Seismic Prone Regions Case Study: Augusta Airship Hangar, Sicily

    SciTech Connect

    Cronin, Kelly; Whyte, Catherine; Reiner, Tom

    2008-07-08

    Throughout the world there are hundreds of historic monuments and structures considered to be invaluable and irreplaceable. They are symbols of cultural identity and a means of educating people about history. Preservation of historic monuments and structures is therefore an important part of safeguarding these cultural heritage sites so that they retain their value for future generations.This report discusses a procedure for the investigation of seismic hazards in existing buildings and possible steps that can be taken to avoid damage caused by these hazards. The Augusta Airship Hangar located in Sicily, will be used as a case study however the topics addressed in this paper can be applied to other structures of historic value around the world.First state-of-the-art scanning procedures were used to create scale digital models that were imported into a structural analysis program. Within this program dynamic analyses were performed on the model based on actual ground motions taken close to the site. This data was used to determine the period and mode shapes of the structure. Then a nonlinear analysis, including a static pushover analysis, was implemented on a two-dimensional model of the structural frame. From this analysis the failure mechanisms of the structure were revealed with relation to an allowable roof displacement. The structural integrity of the structure was evaluated based on pre-defined performance goals. Finally multiple suggestions were made how the Augusta Airship Hangar might be repaired and strengthened so that this structure will not be destroyed should an earthquake occur.The results of our study show that historic structures, despite their age, can still be strong and ductile. Also there are a multitude of effective preservation and retrofit techniques that can be used to strengthen these historic structures, should an earthquake occur. Through this study, the Augusta Airship Hangar has proven to be not only a historic symbol for Sicily but

  14. Mapping local microseismicity using short-term tripartite small array installations — Case study: Coy region (SE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häge, Martin; Joswig, Manfred

    2009-06-01

    One major tectonic feature in the southern part of Spain is the Crevillente Fault Zone (CFZ) which can be traced over 600 km. A short-term microseismic feasibility study was carried out in the area around Coy to investigate the seismic activity of the CFZ by mapping the local seismicity distribution. The area under investigation is of high interest because three moderate earthquakes have occurred nearby since 1999. The measurements were performed with two small arrays, whereas one array was relocated every day to increase the spatial resolution. In the measurement period of 14 nights, including 4 daytime records, 189 events in the magnitude range - 1.8 ≤ ML ≤ 1.3 were detected, of them 133 events could also be located. According to the bulletin of the Instituto Geográfico Nacional, the local network recorded 1 event in the area under investigation in the same period. The results of this short-term measurement show an increased detectability by using small arrays for event recording and prove that there is a high rate of microseismicity below the detection threshold of the local network. For event location, the regional velocity model had to be adapted to our small scale, short epicentral distance application by reducing vP to 4 km/s using a homogenous half space model. The distribution of the events does not indicate a seismic activity along the CFZ. It is rather concentrated to the south around the epicentral zone of the La Paca earthquake that occurred 114 days before our measurement campaign. Some events show a high waveform similarity. They can be attributed to the same fault segment.

  15. Incorporating global warming risks in power sector planning: A case study of the New England region. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, F.; Busch, J.; Koomey, J.

    1992-11-01

    Growing international concern over the threat of global climate change has led to proposals to buy insurance against this threat by reducing emissions of carbon (short for carbon dioxide) and other greenhouse gases below current levels. Concern over these and other, non-climatic environmental effects of electricity generation has led a number of states to adopt or explore new mechanisms for incorporating environmental externalities in utility resource planning. For example, the New York and Massachusetts utility commissions have adopted monetized surcharges (or adders) to induce emission reductions of federally regulated air pollutants (notably, SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and particulates) beyond federally mandated levels. These regulations also include preliminary estimates of the cost of reducing carbon emissions, for which no federal regulations exist at this time. Within New England, regulators and utilities have also held several workshops and meetings to discuss alternative methods of incorporating externalities as well as the feasibility of regional approaches. This study examines the potential for reduced carbon emissions in the New England power sector as well as the cost and rate impacts of two policy approaches: environmental externality surcharges and a target- based approach. We analyze the following questions: Does New England have sufficient low-carbon resources to achieve significant reductions (10% to 20% below current levels) in fossil carbon emissions in its utility sector? What reductions could be achieved at a maximum? What is the expected cost of carbon reductions as a function of the reduction goal? How would carbon reduction strategies affect electricity rates? How effective are environmental externality cost surcharges as an instrument in bringing about carbon reductions? To what extent could the minimization of total electricity costs alone result in carbon reductions relative to conventional resource plans?

  16. Assessment of groundwater contamination by nitrates associated with wastewater irrigation: A case study in Shijiazhuang region, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, C.; Chen, J.; Shindo, S.; Sakura, Y.; Zhang, W.; Shen, Y.

    2004-08-01

    In arid and semi-arid regions there is usually a shortage of irrigation water; thus, wastewater water, as well as other low-quality water resources, may become an important source of water and nutrients. However, (pre)treated wastewater may contain elements and compounds that can damage the environment. It also has the potential to affect water quality adversely in an aquifer that may be the source of drinking water in the area. In order to assess the impacts of wastewater on the environment, groundwater samples were taken and analysed in typical croplands in the North China Plain, where urban wastewater or groundwater have been used for irrigation for several decades. Concentrations of nitrate (NO3-) in groundwater in the study area varied from 50 to 130 mg l-1 in the croplands irrigated by wastewater, but in the croplands irrigated by pumping wells, away from the Dongming Canal, NO3- concentrations are less than 35 mg l-1. It was found that values of 15N ranged from +5 to +13, and dominantly from +7 to +11, and the NO3- concentration in most wells with depths of less than 40 m was higher than the drinking water standard set by the WHO. Cluster analysis was used to classify the spatial distribution of nitrates resulting from the wastewater. Identification of chemical patterns is found to be effective for the comprehensive assessment of the spatial distribution of groundwater quality. It is also emphasized that the wastewater in this area controls the NO3- distribution in the groundwater, and should be used carefully to protect both soil and groundwater from NO3- pollution.

  17. Water quality assessment of carbonate aquifers in southern Latium region, Central Italy: a case study for irrigation and drinking purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sappa, Giuseppe; Ergul, Sibel; Ferranti, Flavia

    2014-06-01

    In southern Latium region, Central Italy, groundwater and spring water resources in the carbonate aquifers are the major contributors of drinking and irrigation water supply. The aim of this study was to review hydrochemical processes that control the groundwater chemistry and to determine the suitability of springs and groundwater for irrigation and drinking purposes on the basis of the water quality indices. Physical (pH, electrical conductivity, total dissolved solids) and hydrochemical characteristics (Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, HCO3 -, Cl-, and SO4 -) of springs and groundwater were determined. To assess the water quality, chemical parameters like sodium adsorption ratio (SAR), total hardness, Mg-hazard (MH), sodium percentage (Na %), salinity hazard, permeability index, and Kelly's ratio were calculated based on the analytical results. A Durov diagram plot revealed that the groundwater has been evolved from Ca to HCO3 recharge water, followed by mixing and reverse ion exchange processes, due to the respective dominance of Na-Cl and Ca-Cl water types. According to Gibbs's diagram plots, chemical weathering of rock forming minerals is the major driving force controlling water chemistry in this area. Groundwater and spring samples were grouped into six categories according to irrigation water quality assessment diagram of US Salinity Laboratory classification and most of the water samples distributed in category C2-S1 and C3-S1 highlighting medium to high salinity hazard and low sodium content class. The results of hydrochemical analyses and the calculated water quality parameters suggest that most of the water samples are suitable for irrigation and drinking purposes, except for the samples influenced by seawater and enhanced water-rock interaction. High values of salinity, Na %, SAR, and MH at certain sites, restrict the suitability for agricultural uses.

  18. Implications of climate change scenarios for agriculture in alpine regions--a case study in the Swiss Rhone catchment.

    PubMed

    Fuhrer, J; Smith, P; Gobiet, A

    2014-09-15

    Coping with climate change in agriculture requires knowledge of trends in agro-climatic conditions with a focus at the smaller scales where decisions are taken. As part of the EU FP7 ACQWA project, the situation was analyzed for agriculture in the case of the Swiss Rhone catchment (Valais) where cultivation of permanent crops (orchards and vineyards) and livestock production are the most important agro-economic activities. The aim of this study was to use daily data from four downscaled and bias corrected transient climate change scenarios to analyze changes in water and temperature related indices over the period 1951-2050 for three locations (Aigle, Sion, Montana) that are representative of different production zones in the catchment. The results indicate that most relevant implications are caused by projected changes in temperature and not in precipitation. They indicate an extension of the thermal growing season with potentially positive effects on pasture and livestock production, most pronounced at the mountain site (Montana), but a trend towards increasing risks of frost in permanent crops and in heat stress for livestock at the valley bottom (Aigle, Sion). The increase in water requirement for irrigation in 2021-2050 relative to 1981-2009 is moderate (4-16%, depending on location). However, in years with low amounts of snow and rain, in small catchments with a nival regime, reduced water supply by rivers could restrict the surface area of grassland that can be irrigated, particularly during springtime. It is concluded that coping with heat-related risks may be most needed at the lower cropland and pasture sites while water-related issues would become more relevant in more elevated locations where pasture-based livestock production is the dominant type of agricultural land use. PMID:23830922

  19. Modulation of Cloud Optical Properties by Vertical Circulations Associated with a Jet Streak Exit Region: The November 26 FIRE Cirrus Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mace, Gerald G.; Starr, David OC.; Minnis, Patrick; Ackerman, Thomas P.

    1994-01-01

    The period from 18 UTC 26 November 1991 to roughly 23 UTC 26 November 1991 has become a focal case study of the FIRE (First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Regional Experiment) Cirrus-11 field campaign. The middle and upper tropospheric cloud data that were collected have allowed FIRE scientists to learn a great deal about the morphological structure and microphysical and radiative characteristics of the mid-latitude cirrus that occurred during that time. An important component of this effort in determining the synoptic scale forcing that existed during this time. By forcing, we mean the coupling between the background vertical air motions and the large scale moisture budget that initiated and maintained cirrus cloud in the study region. Defining the synoptic scale forcing is one of the stated scientific objectives of the FIRE program.

  20. Contribution of large submarine landslide to tsunami potential in the NE Atlantic region: The Gorringe Bank case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramalho, Inês; Omira, Rachid; Baptista, Maria Ana; Miranda, Miguel; Terrinha, Pedro; Batista, Luis; Roque, Cristina

    2015-04-01

    Tsunami is recognized as a natural hazard, and it is now widely accepted that submarine mass-failures are one of possible tsunami sources. Various studies on tsunami-induced by submarine landslides were carried out based on a spontaneous trigger of the mass-failure. In this study we focus on the deep-water submarine landslide in the Gorringe Bank (GB) area, NE Atlantic. In particular, we investigate the contribution of such mass-failure, as an additional source, to tsunami potential. We assume that an initial tsunami is generated by a large earthquake in the south west Iberia margin area that also initiates the failure of the GB landslide. This mass-failure can play the role of a secondary source of tsunami and contribute to tsunami potential. We simulate the tsunami generation as combination between the sea free surface perturbation caused instantaneously by the earthquake and the initial wave generated progressively due to the slide motion. Okada's equations are employed to compute the initial tsunami induced by the earthquake. While, a multi-layers viscous shallow water (VSW) model is used to simulate the flow of the submarine mass failure and the resulting tsunami wave. To model the propagation and coastal impact of the tsunami resulted from a combination of earthquake and landslide, we use a non-linear shallow water model and a nested grid system that allow estimating properly near-shore wave heights and inundation. We consider a 1755-like earthquake of magnitude Mw8.5, and a landslide of an approximate volume of about 60 km3. The characteristics of the landslide come from the analysis of detailed marine geological data including the erosional area (dimensions and scarps) and the seismic profiles. The results are presents in terms of: i) evidences of submarine mass failures in the area of GB; ii) simulations of the slide motion and the resulting tsunami wave; iii) simulations of the tsunami generated by a combination of two triggers: earthquake and landslide

  1. The Challenges and Opportunities of Hydrologic Remote Sensing in Data-Poor Regions: Case Study of Nile River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, E.; Kirstetter, P.; Zhang, K.; Hong, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The Nile River Basin (NRB) is one of the largest trans-boundary watercourses; it is the lifeline for more than 300 million people belonging to 11 African nations sharing the NRB. The riparian countries are challenged by their infirm relationships, lack of information sharing and insufficient monitoring stations. Thus, to understand the water future along the NRB under the changing climate, reliable, and sufficient information are needed. This to assess and understand: whether will be more rainfall and induced flooding events, or the drought conditions with less surface runoff will be dominant over the Nile Basin? In addition, to what extent the available remote sensing and model reanalysis data can substitute the lack of detailed ground information, and help to determine the size and risk associated to the climatic impact on the Nile Basin? In the current study, we utilizing multi-scale remote sensing, and model reanalysis datasets for hydrologic monitoring along the NRB in Africa. The list of remote sensing, and model reanalysis datasets that implemented: several MODIS satellite products such as the NDVI, LAI, LST, and LULC datasets. Three GRACE satellite derivative products: TWS, EWT, and DTWS, and TRMM satellite precipitation product. In addition to number of model reanalysis datasets including Global Precipitation Climatological Center (GPCC) datasets, Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) products, Climate Research Unit (CRU) datasets, Physical Science Division (PSD) gridded climate dataset, and in situ Global Runoff Data Centre (GRDC) datasets. The main objective of our research is to monitor the hydrological changes and the variation in water balance along the NRB. The study approach accomplished through: (1) developing a distributed storage changes based grid, (2) trend analysis and inter-annual variability shift detections using regime shift analysis, (3) define the water stress and water deficit periods along the Nile Basins, (4) applying multi

  2. Impact of cattle grazing on soil and vegetation - a case study in a mountainous region of Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohner, Andreas; Foldal, Cecilie; Jandl, Robert

    2015-04-01

    In mountainous regions of Austria and of many other European countries, climate change may cause a further intensification of grassland management. Therefore, the effects of intensive cattle grazing on selected soil chemical and physical properties, above- and below-ground phytomass, forage quality, plant species composition and plant species richness at the scale of a representative paddock in a mountainous region of Austria were investigated. At the study site (Styrian Enns valley; 675 m a.s.l.), climate is relatively cool and humid, with a mean annual air temperature of 6.7°C and a mean annual precipitation of 970 mm, of which 66% falls during the vegetation period (April-October). The soil is a deep, base-rich Cambisol with a loamy sand texture. The paddock investigated has a total area of about 2 ha and had been grazed by dairy cows (Brown Swiss) five times per grazing season. The stocking density was 4 cows ha-1 during 180 days from early May to the end of October with a grazing time of about 8 hours per day. The strip grazed permanent pasture was manured annually for a long time, mostly with cattle slurry. Vegetation surveys were carried out using the method of Braun-Blanquet. Above- and below-ground phytomass, forage quality and mineral element concentration in the harvestable above-ground plant biomass were determined by using standard methods. During the grazing season surface soil samples (0-10 cm depth) for chemical analyses were collected before each grazing period (5 analyses of composite samples per site). At the beginning and the end of the grazing season also soil samples for physical analyses were taken from the topsoil (0-15 cm depth). Heavy cattle treading led to a substantial soil compaction especially in the 5-10 cm layer and to a deterioration of topsoil structure. The porous crumb structure was replaced by a compact platy structure. The topsoil was enriched with nutrients (mainly nitrogen, potassium, phosphorus and boron). The degree of

  3. Anastomosing Hemangiomas Arising in Unusual Locations: A Clinicopathologic Study of 17 Soft Tissue Cases Showing a Predilection for the Paraspinal Region.

    PubMed

    John, Ivy; Folpe, Andrew L

    2016-08-01

    Anastomosing hemangioma, a recently recognized benign vascular neoplasm originally described in the kidney, may be confused with well-differentiated angiosarcoma. Rare cases of anastomosing hemangiomas have been described in the liver and in nonrenal genitourinary sites. We report a series of 17 anastomosing hemangiomas occurring in unusual locations, in particular in the paravertebral soft tissues. The 17 tumors occurred in 10 male and 6 female patients, ranging in age from 2 to 85 years. One patient had bilateral, synchronous tumors involving the right paracaval and left para-aortic soft tissues. Thirteen (76%) cases involved the soft tissues near the vertebral column, including the paravertebral region (n=4), the psoas muscle (n=2), the costovertebral angle (n=2), para-aortic soft tissue (n=2), and the paracaval, parasacral, and retroperitoneal soft tissues (n=1 each). Other locations included the anterior mediastinum, uterine cornu, infundibular pelvic ligament, and upper arm (n=1 each). Imaging studies, available in 13 cases, were not felt to be diagnostic of a hemangioma. The tumors ranged from 1.5 to 7.5 cm (median, 3.6 cm) in size and were grossly well demarcated. All cases showed typical morphologic features of anastomosing hemangiomas, including a nonlobular architecture, an anastomosing proliferation of capillary-sized vessels with mild endothelial cell nuclear variability, scattered hobnailed endothelial cells, and small fibrin thrombi. Mitotic activity was rare or absent. Adipocytic metaplasia and extramedullary hematopoiesis were present in subsets of cases. When performed, immunohistochemical studies showed expression of endothelial markers (eg, CD31, CD34). In only 1 case did the submitting pathologist favor a diagnosis of anastomosing hemangioma; 4 cases were submitted specifically to exclude a well-differentiated angiosarcoma. Clinical follow-up available in 13 cases has not revealed any local recurrences or metastases. This series, the first

  4. An evaluation method of the sustainability of water resource in karst region: a case study of Zunyi, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bo; Wang, Ganlu; Ding, Hanghang; Chen, Yulong

    2015-11-01

    Water resource is of great significance to the survival and development of human. However, the water resource system in karst regions is sensitive to external interference owing to the special geological processes which cause soil impoverishment, severe rocky desertification and large topographic height difference. Therefore, evaluating the sustainability of the water resource in karst regions is beneficial to reasonably use and protect water resource. This paper puts forward to evaluate the water resource from four aspects, including water resources system, water requirement system, ecosystem and social economic system. Moreover, on this basis, 18 evaluation indexes were selected to construct the sustainability evaluation index system and method. This method was used to evaluate the sustainability of the water resource in the typical karst region—Zunyi, Guizhou province, China, and was verified according to the actual situation in the research area. All these provide reference for the evaluation of the sustainability of the water resource in similar regions.

  5. Evaluation of SEVIRI Thermal Infra-Red data for airborne dust detection in an arid regions: the UAE case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gherboudj, I.; Parajuli, S. P.; Ghedira, H.

    2011-12-01

    Our interest in the study of the dust emission cycle over arid area results from the impacts that they have on the climate and atmospheric processes. Large dust concentration emitted even naturally or anthropogenic may reduce surface insolation by extinction of solar radiation. In addition, the knowledge of its spatio-temporal distribution is essential for monitoring several applications such as solar energy potential and health effect. Satellite-based remote sensing is an efficient tool to improve our understanding of the interaction of the desert dust and surrounding climate over regional and global scales with high frequency measurements. Thermal infrared (TIR) channels (3μm -15μm) of different satellites (MVIRI, AVHRR, MODIS, ADEOS-2/POLDER, TOMS, and MSG/SERIVI) were widely used for dust detection. Several dust detection and forecasting algorithms have been proposed based on these satellite data. However, the spatial and temporal variability of the physical characteristics of dust (concentrations, particle size distribution, location in the atmosphere, and chemical composition) has limited their estimations particularly with the dependence of the dust emission on the wind, soil water content, vegetation, and sediment availability. This study focuses on the analysis of the sensitivity of the MSG/SEVIRI TIR observation to dust generation, surface wind, soil moisture, and surface emissivity over the United Arab Emirates (UAE). SEVIRI observations were acquired in 2009 with temporal and spatial resolutions of 30 minutes and about 3km respectively. While the soil moisture is extracted from the AMSR-E data (1:30 AM and 1:30 PM) at spatial resolution of 25 km, the surface emissivity and Aerosol Optical Thickness were extracted from the MODIS products at spatial resolutions of 1 km and 100 km respectively. In coincidence with the satellites acquisitions, meteorological measurements were collected from seven met stations distributed over the selected study area (wind

  6. Reducing asthma disparities by addressing environmental inequities: a case study of regional asthma management and prevention's advocacy efforts.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Anne Kelsey; Ervice, Joel; Lorenzen, Kathryn; Prentice, Bob; White, Shannon

    2011-01-01

    Regional Asthma Management and Prevention describes its collaborative approach to address a social determinant of health--air quality--and the associated inequities that have led to asthma disparities impacting African American and Latino communities in the San Francisco Bay Area. The strategies, aimed at decreasing diesel pollution in disproportionately impacted communities, span the levels of the socioecological model, with an emphasis on policy outcomes. Regional Asthma Management and Prevention describes how this work fits within a larger comprehensive approach to address asthma disparities encompassing several components, ranging from clinical management to environmental protection. PMID:21160331

  7. A Paternally Inherited Duplication in the Prader-Willi/Angelman Syndrome Critical Region: A Case and Family Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veltman, Marijcke W. M.; Thompson, Russell J.; Craig, Ellen E.; Dennis, Nicholas R.; Roberts, Sian E.; Moore, Vanessa; Brown, Josie A.; Bolton, Patrick F.

    2005-01-01

    The Prader-Willi/Angelman Critical Region (PWACR; Chromosome 15q11-13) is of interest as a potential locus for genes conferring susceptibility to autism spectrum disorders (ASD). This report describes a female proband referred for evaluation of a possible ASD. Genetic analyses indicated that the proband, her father and one of her sisters, carried…

  8. Modeling Hydrological Services in Shade Grown Coffee Systems: Case Study of the Pico Duarte Region of the Dominican Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, J. D.; Gross, L.; Agosto Filion, N.; Bagstad, K.; Voigt, B. G.; Johnson, G.

    2010-12-01

    The modification of hydrologic systems in coffee-dominated landscapes varies widely according to the degree of shade trees incorporated in coffee farms. Compared to mono-cropping systems, shade coffee can produce both on- and off-farm benefits in the form of soil retention, moderation of sediment transport, and lower hydropower generating costs. The Pico Duarte Coffee Region and surrounding Madres de Las Aguas (Mother of Waters) Conservation Area in the Dominican Republic is emblematic of the challenges and opportunities of ecosystem service management in coffee landscapes. Shade coffee poly-cultures in the region play an essential role in ensuring ecosystem function to conserve water resources, as well as provide habitat for birds, sequester carbon, and provide consumptive resources to households. To model the provision, use, and flow of ecosystem services from coffee farms in the region, an application of the Artificial Intelligence for Ecosystem Services (ARIES) model was developed with particular focus on sediment regulation. ARIES incorporates an array of techniques from data mining, image analysis, neural networks, Bayesian statistics, information theory, and expert systems to model the production, delivery, and demand for ecosystem services. Geospatial data on slope, soils, and vegetation cover is combined with on-farm data collection of coffee production, tree diversity, and intercropping of household food. Given hydropower production and river recreation in the region, the management of sedimentation through on-farm practices has substantial, currently uncompensated value that has received recent attention as the foundation for a payment for ecosystem services system. Scenario analysis of the implications of agro-forestry management choices on farmer livelihoods and the multiple beneficiaries of farm-provided hydrological services provide a foundation for ongoing discussions in the region between local, national, and international interests.

  9. Establishing a mountain flash flood forecasting/warning strategy through case studies in different climatic regions in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Qinghua; Yang, Dawen

    2015-04-01

    Flash flood is one of the most common natural hazards in China, particularly in mountainous areas, causing heavy damages and casualties. However, mountain flash flood forecast remains challenging due to its short response time and the limited monitoring capacity over ungauged regions. This paper aims at assessing the predictability of flash flood in mountainous watersheds in humid, semi-humid and semi-arid regions of China. To access the applicability of flood forecast based on the rain-gauge network, we implement a distributed hydrological model (GBHM) over several mountainous catchments in China with drainage area of 5 to 2882 km2. The response time of flood is first derived using typical rainstorm, and the low limit of catchment area for flash flood forecast based on the rain-gauge network is determined through the intercomparison over different spatial scales. For those catchments smaller than the lowest limit, people can only escape from the flash floods by warning rather than by forecast due to the short response time. Hence the flash flood warning (FFN) method is introduced. Implement of the FFN needs to determine the rainfall threshold that may be different due to the antecedent soil moisture status. Based on the GBHM simulation using the historical rainfall data, we introduced an appropriate method to determine the FFN rainfall threshold in different climatic regions in China. The results show that the rainfall threshold decreases significantly with the antecedent soil moisture in the humid regions, while it keeps constant approximately in different soil wet conditions in the semi-arid regions.

  10. Impact of source region on the δ18O signal in snow: A case study from Mount Wrangell Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Kent; Field, Robert; Benson, Carl

    2016-04-01

    The stable isotopic composition of water in ice cores is an important source of information on past climate variability. At its simplest level, the underlying assumption is that there is an empirical relationship between the normalized difference in the concentration for these stable isotopes and a specified local temperature at the ice core site. There are however non-local processes, such as a change in source region or a change in the atmospheric pathway, that can impact the stable isotope signal thereby complicating its use as a proxy for temperature. Here we investigate the importance of these non-local processes through the analysis of the synoptic-scale circulation during a snowfall event at the summit of Mount Wrangell, in south-central Alaska just to the east of the Gulf of Alaska. During this event there was, over a one-day period in which the local temperature was approximately constant, a change in δ18O that exceeded half that normally seen to occur between summer and winter in the region. As we shall show, this arose from a change in the source region, from the sub-tropical eastern Pacific to northeastern Asia for the snow that fell on Mount Wrangell during the event. The recognition that non-local processes play a role in the stable isotope record from the Gulf of Alaska region suggests that these records, in addition to a local temperature signal, also contain signals of large-scale modes of climate variability that impact the North Pacific region such as the Pacific North America teleconnection and the El-Nino Southern Oscillation.

  11. Genotoxicity evaluation of effluents from textile industries of the region Fez-Boulmane, Morocco: a case study.

    PubMed

    Giorgetti, Lucia; Talouizte, Hakima; Merzouki, Mohammed; Caltavuturo, Leonardo; Geri, Chiara; Frassinetti, Stefania

    2011-11-01

    In order to investigate the biological hazard of effluents from textile industries of Fez-Boulmane region in Morocco, mutagenicity and phytotoxicity tests were performed on different biological systems. Moreover, the efficiency of a Sequencing Batch Reactor (SBR) system, working by activated sludge on a laboratory scale, was estimated by comparing the ecotoxicity results observed before and after wastewater treatment. Evaluation of the genotoxic potential was investigated by means of classic mutagenicity tests on D7 strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and by phytotoxicity tests on Allium sativum L., Vicia faba L. and Lactuca sativa L., estimating micronuclei presence, mitotic index and cytogenetic anomalies. The results obtained by testing untreated wastewater demonstrated major genotoxicity effects in S. cerevisiae and various levels of phytotoxicity in the three plant systems, while after SBR treatment no more ecotoxicological consequences were observed. These data confirm the effectiveness of the SBR system in removing toxic substances from textile wastewaters in Fez-Boulmane region. PMID:21840051

  12. MEDCAN-GRO: Medical Capacity for African Nations - Growing Regional Operability A Case Study in Special Operations Forces Capacity Building.

    PubMed

    Givens, Melissa L; Verlo, April

    2015-01-01

    Medical Capacity for African Nations-Growing Regional Operability (MEDCAN-GRO) is a framework for addressing healthcare engagements that are intended to provide sustainable capacity building with partner nations. MEDCAN-GRO provides SOF units with a model that can be scaled to partner nation needs and aligned with the goals of the TSOC in an effort to enhance partner nation security. PMID:25770807

  13. Stress-drop heterogeneity within tectonically complex regions: a case study of San Gorgonio Pass, southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goebel, T. H. W.; Hauksson, E.; Shearer, P. M.; Ampuero, J. P.

    2015-07-01

    In general, seismic slip along faults reduces the average shear stress within earthquake source regions, but stress drops of specific earthquakes are observed to vary widely in size. To advance our understanding of variations in stress drop, we analysed source parameters of small-magnitude events in the greater San Gorgonio area, southern California. In San Gorgonio, the regional tectonics are controlled by a restraining bend of the San Andreas fault system, which results in distributed crustal deformation, and heterogeneous slip along numerous strike-slip and thrust faults. Stress drops were estimated by fitting a Brune-type spectral model to source spectra obtained by iteratively stacking the observed amplitude spectra. The estimates have large scatter among individual events but the median of event populations shows systematic, statistically significant variations. We identified several crustal and faulting parameters that may contribute to local variations in stress drop including the style of faulting, changes in average tectonic slip rates, mineralogical composition of the host rocks, as well as the hypocentral depths of seismic events. We observed anomalously high stress drops (>20 MPa) in a small region between the traces of the San Gorgonio and Mission Creek segments of the San Andreas fault. Furthermore, the estimated stress drops are higher below depths of ˜10 km and along the San Gorgonio fault segment, but are lower both to the north and south away from San Gorgonio Pass, showing an approximate negative correlation with geologic slip rates. Documenting controlling parameters of stress-drop heterogeneity is important to advance regional hazard assessment and our understanding of earthquake rupture processes.

  14. Regional impact assessment of land use scenarios in developing countries using the FoPIA approach: findings from five case studies.

    PubMed

    König, Hannes Jochen; Uthes, Sandra; Schuler, Johannes; Zhen, Lin; Purushothaman, Seema; Suarma, Utia; Sghaier, Mongi; Makokha, Stella; Helming, Katharina; Sieber, Stefan; Chen, Le; Brouwer, Floor; Morris, Jake; Wiggering, Hubert

    2013-09-01

    The impact of land use changes on sustainable development is of increasing interest in many regions of the world. This study aimed to test the transferability of the Framework for Participatory Impact Assessment (FoPIA), which was originally developed in the European context, to developing countries, in which lack of data often prevents the use of data-driven impact assessment methods. The core aspect of FoPIA is the stakeholder-based assessment of alternative land use scenarios. Scenario impacts on regional sustainability are assessed by using a set of nine regional land use functions (LUFs), which equally cover the economic, social and environmental dimensions of sustainability. The cases analysed in this study include (1) the alternative spatial planning policies around the Merapi volcano and surrounding areas of Yogyakarta City, Indonesia; (2) the large-scale afforestation of agricultural areas to reduce soil erosion in Guyuan, China; (3) the expansion of soil and water conservation measures in the Oum Zessar watershed, Tunisia; (4) the agricultural intensification and the potential for organic agriculture in Bijapur, India; and (5) the land degradation and land conflicts resulting from land division and privatisation in Narok, Kenya. All five regions are characterised by population growth, partially combined with considerable economic development, environmental degradation problems and social conflicts. Implications of the regional scenario impacts as well as methodological aspects are discussed. Overall, FoPIA proved to be a useful tool for diagnosing regional human-environment interactions and for supporting the communication and social learning process among different stakeholder groups. PMID:23218733

  15. Impact of Source Region on the delta18 O signal in snow: A case study from Mount Wrangell Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, G.W.K.; Field, Robert D.; Benson, Carl S.

    2016-01-01

    The stable isotopic composition of water in ice cores is an important source of information on past climate variability. At its simplest level, the underlying assumption is that there is an empirical relationship between the normalized difference in the concentration for these stable isotopes and a specified local temperature at the ice core site. There are, however, nonlocal processes, such as a change in source region or a change in the atmospheric pathway, which can impact the stable isotope signal, thereby complicating its use as a proxy for temperature. In this paper, the importance of these nonlocal processes are investigated through the analysis of the synoptic-scale circulation during a snowfall event at the summit of Mount Wrangell (62 deg N, 144 deg W; 4300 m MSL) in south-central Alaska. During this event there was, over a 1-day period in which the local temperature was approximately constant, a change in delta18 O that exceeded half that normally seen to occur in the region between summer and winter. As shall be shown, this arose from a change in the source region, from the subtropical eastern Pacific to northeastern Asia, for the snow that fell on Mount Wrangell during the event.

  16. A comparison of dairy cattle systems in an irrigated perimeter and in a suburban region: case study from Morocco.

    PubMed

    Sraïri, Mohamed Taher; Kiade, Najat; Lyoubi, Rachid; Messad, Samir; Faye, Bernard

    2009-06-01

    Multivariate analyses were used to compare dairy production practices and their consequences on milk yield and profitability in cattle farms from two representative regions of Morocco. A regular follow-up of 118 farms (48 in the Rabat-Salé suburban belt and 70 in the Gharb irrigated perimeter) was undertaken to obtain accurate data. Results show significant differences between the two regions. Intensive milk production was more frequent in the suburban zone (more concentrates and better annual milk yield per cow). When conducting a "within-region" principal components analysis, farms' discrimination appeared to take into account all management variables (feeding, cattle sales, profitability), with no reference to farms' structural parameters (arable land and number of cattle). A typology of farms was then established using cluster analysis, with 4 distinct groups, namely: a) concentrates wasters, b) farms with a relatively important milk yield per cow, c) deficit dairy farms and d) beef oriented farms. The last group included almost exclusively farms from the irrigated perimeter (5 out of 7). These results indicate that dairy production promotion in Morocco requires more than just the intensification of forage production, but should focus also on improving management practices. The extension of complete and balanced dairy rations is urgently needed to enhance milk yield and profitability. PMID:18987985

  17. Quantitative Assessment of Desertification Using Landsat Data on a Regional Scale – A Case Study in the Ordos Plateau, China

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Duanyang; Kang, Xiangwu; Qiu, Dongsheng; Zhuang, Dafang; Pan, Jianjun

    2009-01-01

    Desertification is a serious threat to the ecological environment and social economy in our world and there is a pressing need to develop a reasonable and reproducible method to assess it at different scales. In this paper, the Ordos Plateau in China was selected as the research region and a quantitative method for desertification assessment was developed by using Landsat MSS and TM/ETM+ data on a regional scale. In this method, NDVI, MSDI and land surface albedo were selected as assessment indicators of desertification to represent land surface conditions from vegetation biomass, landscape pattern and micrometeorology. Based on considering the effects of vegetation type and time of images acquired on assessment indictors, assessing rule sets were built and a decision tree approach was used to assess desertification of Ordos Plateau in 1980, 1990 and 2000. The average overall accuracy of three periods was higher than 90%. The results showed that although some local places of Ordos Plateau experienced an expanding trend of desertification, the trend of desertification of Ordos Plateau was an overall decrease in from 1980 to 2000. By analyzing the causes of desertification processes, it was found that climate change could benefit for the reversion of desertification from 1980 to 1990 at a regional scale and human activities might explain the expansion of desertification in this period; however human conservation activities were the main driving factor that induced the reversion of desertification from 1990 to 2000. PMID:22573984

  18. Quantitative assessment of desertification using landsat data on a regional scale - a case study in the ordos plateau, china.

    PubMed

    Xu, Duanyang; Kang, Xiangwu; Qiu, Dongsheng; Zhuang, Dafang; Pan, Jianjun

    2009-01-01

    Desertification is a serious threat to the ecological environment and social economy in our world and there is a pressing need to develop a reasonable and reproducible method to assess it at different scales. In this paper, the Ordos Plateau in China was selected as the research region and a quantitative method for desertification assessment was developed by using Landsat MSS and TM/ETM+ data on a regional scale. In this method, NDVI, MSDI and land surface albedo were selected as assessment indicators of desertification to represent land surface conditions from vegetation biomass, landscape pattern and micrometeorology. Based on considering the effects of vegetation type and time of images acquired on assessment indictors, assessing rule sets were built and a decision tree approach was used to assess desertification of Ordos Plateau in 1980, 1990 and 2000. The average overall accuracy of three periods was higher than 90%. The results showed that although some local places of Ordos Plateau experienced an expanding trend of desertification, the trend of desertification of Ordos Plateau was an overall decrease in from 1980 to 2000. By analyzing the causes of desertification processes, it was found that climate change could benefit for the reversion of desertification from 1980 to 1990 at a regional scale and human activities might explain the expansion of desertification in this period; however human conservation activities were the main driving factor that induced the reversion of desertification from 1990 to 2000. PMID:22573984

  19. Resource allocation for mitigating regional air pollution–related mortality: A summertime case study for five cities in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Kuo-Jen; Hou, Xiangting; Strickland, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT An important issue of regional air quality management is to allocate air quality management funds to maximize environmental and human health benefits. In this study, we use an innovative approach to tackle this air quality management issue. We develop an innovative resource allocation model that allows identification of air pollutant emission control strategies that maximize mortality avoidances subject to a resource constraint. We first present the development of the resource allocation model and then a case study to show how the model can be used to identify resource allocation strategies that maximize mortality avoidances for top five Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs) (i.e., New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Dallas-Fort Worth, and Philadelphia) in the continental United States collectively. Given budget constraints in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Clean Air Act assessment, the results of the case study suggest that controls of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and primary carbon (PC) emissions from EPA Regions 2, 3, 5, 6, and 9 would have significant health benefits for the five selected cities collectively. Around 30,800 air pollution–related mortalities could be avoided during the selected 2-week summertime episode for the five cities collectively if the budget could be allocated based on the results of the resource allocation model. Although only five U.S. cities during a 2-week episode are considered in the case study, the resource allocation model can be used by decision-makers to plan air pollution mitigation strategies to achieve the most significant health benefits for other seasons and more cities over a region or the continental U.S.Implications: Effective allocations of air quality management resources are challenging and complicated, and it is desired to have a tool that can help decision-makers better allocate the funds to maximize health benefits of air pollution mitigation. An innovative resource allocation model developed in

  20. reservoir operation and hydropower generation schemes for regional scale hydrological models: case study in the northeastern united states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehsani, N.; Vorosmarty, C. J.; Fekete, B. M.; Rosenzweig, B.

    2013-12-01

    As part of the development of the Northeast Regional Earth System Model (NE-RESM), we are developing an integrated hydrologic modeling framework that incorporates various aspects of the coupled human-hydrologic system, from supply to demand, into a single framework. This framework provides temporally and spatially explicit information on the regional water system under different scenarios of climate, population, and land use/ land cover change. To support these efforts, we have incorporated two new modules into the Water Balance Model (WBM) that simulate reservoir operation and calculate the hydropower production from dams. Dams and reservoirs are key characteristics of the modern hydrologic system, with a particular impact on natural stream flow, sediment flux, thermal characteristics and biogeochemical fluxes of rivers. In the Northeast Region of the United States alone, the National Inventory of Dams (NID) lists over 12000 reservoirs. Depending on site-specific characteristics of the dam, its watershed and its intended purpose, each will have a specific optimum operating rule. Since no comprehensive dataset of these operating rules exists, we have to simulate them. We developed an Artificial Neural Network and used data from 35 dams for calibration. Approximately 60 % of the dataset was dedicated to training process, 20 % to validation and the other 20 % used for testing. If (t) represents current time, we use three sets of inputs; inflow [It , It-1 , It-2], release in previous months [Rt-1 , Rt-2] and month (Mt), to calculate release from reservoir (Rt). We also used a simple continuity equation for reservoirs by considering the maximum (from NID) and minimum reservoir storage to improve the model's performance in extreme wet and dry events. Using results from WBM we show how reservoirs regionally alter discharge in streams of Northeast United States compared to their natural state. We also are assessing the effects of climate change on water availability and

  1. Can epidemic detection systems at the hospital level complement regional surveillance networks: Case study with the influenza epidemic?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Early knowledge of influenza outbreaks in the community allows local hospital healthcare workers to recognise the clinical signs of influenza in hospitalised patients and to apply effective precautions. The objective was to assess intra-hospital surveillance systems to detect earlier than regional surveillance systems influenza outbreaks in the community. Methods Time series obtained from computerized medical data from patients who visited a French hospital emergency department (ED) between June 1st, 2007 and March 31st, 2011 for influenza, or were hospitalised for influenza or a respiratory syndrome after an ED visit, were compared to different regional series. Algorithms using CUSUM method were constructed to determine the epidemic detection threshold with the local data series. Sensitivity, specificity and mean timeliness were calculated to assess their performance to detect community outbreaks of influenza. A sensitivity analysis was conducted, excluding the year 2009, due to the particular epidemiological situation related to pandemic influenza this year. Results The local series closely followed the seasonal trends reported by regional surveillance. The algorithms achieved a sensitivity of detection equal to 100% with series of patients hospitalised with respiratory syndrome (specificity ranging from 31.9 and 92.9% and mean timeliness from −58.3 to 20.3 days) and series of patients who consulted the ED for flu (specificity ranging from 84.3 to 93.2% and mean timeliness from −32.3 to 9.8 days). The algorithm with the best balance between specificity (87.7%) and mean timeliness (0.5 day) was obtained with series built by analysis of the ICD-10 codes assigned by physicians after ED consultation. Excluding the year 2009, the same series keeps the best performance with specificity equal to 95.7% and mean timeliness equal to −1.7 day. Conclusions The implementation of an automatic surveillance system to detect patients with influenza or

  2. Groundwater recharge estimation in semi-arid zone: a study case from the region of Djelfa (Algeria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali Rahmani, S. E.; Chibane, Brahim; Boucefiène, Abdelkader

    2016-03-01

    Deficiency of surface water resources in semi-arid area makes the groundwater the most preferred resource to assure population increased needs. In this research we are going to quantify the rate of groundwater recharge using new hybrid model tack in interest the annual rainfall and the average annual temperature and the geological characteristics of the area. This hybrid model was tested and calibrated using a chemical tracer method called Chloride mass balance method (CMB). This hybrid model is a combination between general hydrogeological model and a hydrological model. We have tested this model in an aquifer complex in the region of Djelfa (Algeria). Performance of this model was verified by five criteria [Nash, mean absolute error (MAE), Root mean square error (RMSE), the coefficient of determination and the arithmetic mean error (AME)]. These new approximations facilitate the groundwater management in semi-arid areas; this model is a perfection and amelioration of the model developed by Chibane et al. This model gives a very interesting result, with low uncertainty. A new recharge class diagram was established by our model to get rapidly and quickly the groundwater recharge value for any area in semi-arid region, using temperature and rainfall.

  3. Early Indians Use Jones Valley. (Reading for "The South: Birmingham Case Study and the South as a Region". Grade Five (Unit IV) Project Social Studies.)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. Project Social Studies Curriculum Center.

    Readings designed to accompany Unit IV, (ED 069 562) which is intended for fifth grade students, describe the Birmingham region from 1812 to 1872. Nine themes in the study illustrate settlement in the valley, early growth in Birmingham, and the changing use of the area in terms of different perceptions of natural resources. Technical advancement…

  4. Case studies, cross-site comparisons, and the challenge of generalization: comparing agent-based models of land-use change in frontier regions

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Dawn C.; Entwisle, Barbara; Rindfuss, Ronald R.; Vanwey, Leah K.; Manson, Steven M.; Moran, Emilio; An, Li; Deadman, Peter; Evans, Tom P.; Linderman, Marc; Rizi, S. Mohammad Mussavi; Malanson, George

    2009-01-01

    Cross-site comparisons of case studies have been identified as an important priority by the land-use science community. From an empirical perspective, such comparisons potentially allow generalizations that may contribute to production of global-scale land-use and land-cover change projections. From a theoretical perspective, such comparisons can inform development of a theory of land-use science by identifying potential hypotheses and supporting or refuting evidence. This paper undertakes a structured comparison of four case studies of land-use change in frontier regions that follow an agent-based modeling approach. Our hypothesis is that each case study represents a particular manifestation of a common process. Given differences in initial conditions among sites and the time at which the process is observed, actual mechanisms and outcomes are anticipated to differ substantially between sites. Our goal is to reveal both commonalities and differences among research sites, model implementations, and ultimately, conclusions derived from the modeling process. PMID:19960107

  5. Case studies, cross-site comparisons, and the challenge of generalization: comparing agent-based models of land-use change in frontier regions.

    PubMed

    Parker, Dawn C; Entwisle, Barbara; Rindfuss, Ronald R; Vanwey, Leah K; Manson, Steven M; Moran, Emilio; An, Li; Deadman, Peter; Evans, Tom P; Linderman, Marc; Rizi, S Mohammad Mussavi; Malanson, George

    2008-01-01

    Cross-site comparisons of case studies have been identified as an important priority by the land-use science community. From an empirical perspective, such comparisons potentially allow generalizations that may contribute to production of global-scale land-use and land-cover change projections. From a theoretical perspective, such comparisons can inform development of a theory of land-use science by identifying potential hypotheses and supporting or refuting evidence. This paper undertakes a structured comparison of four case studies of land-use change in frontier regions that follow an agent-based modeling approach. Our hypothesis is that each case study represents a particular manifestation of a common process. Given differences in initial conditions among sites and the time at which the process is observed, actual mechanisms and outcomes are anticipated to differ substantially between sites. Our goal is to reveal both commonalities and differences among research sites, model implementations, and ultimately, conclusions derived from the modeling process. PMID:19960107

  6. DUST CONTINUUM AND POLARIZATION FROM ENVELOPE TO CORES IN STAR FORMATION: A CASE STUDY IN THE W51 NORTH REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Ya-Wen; Guilloteau, Stephane; Dutrey, Anne; Ho, Paul T. P.; Koch, Patrick M.

    2013-02-15

    We present the first high-angular resolution (up to 0.''7, {approx}5000 AU) polarization and thermal dust continuum images toward the massive star-forming region W51 North. The observations were carried out with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) in both the subcompact (SMA-SubC) and extended (SMA-Ext) configurations at a wavelength of 870 {mu}m. W51 North is resolved into four cores (SMA1 to SMA4) in the 870 {mu}m continuum image. The associated dust polarization exhibits more complex structures than seen at lower angular resolution. We analyze the inferred morphologies of the plane-of-sky magnetic field (B ) in the SMA1 to SMA4 cores and in the envelope using the SMA-Ext and SMA-SubC data. These results are compared with the B archive images obtained from the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) and James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT). The polarization percentage is about 1% to 4%, and it is found to decrease with higher intensity in our SMA images, which is a similar trend to that previously reported in the CSO and JCMT data. A correlation between dust intensity gradient position angles ({phi}{sub {nabla}I}) and magnetic field position angles ({phi}{sub B}) is found in the CSO, JCMT, and both SMA data sets. This correlation is further analyzed quantitatively. A systematically tighter correlation between {phi}{sub {nabla}I} and {phi}{sub B} is found in the cores, whereas the correlation decreases in outside-core regions. Magnetic field-to-gravity force ratio ({Sigma}{sub B}) maps are derived using the newly developed polarization-intensity gradient method by Koch et al. We find that the force ratios tend to be small ({Sigma}{sub B} {approx}< 0.5) in the cores in all four data sets. In regions outside of the cores, the ratios increase or the field is even dominating gravity ({Sigma}{sub B} > 1). This possibly provides a physical explanation of the tightening correlation between {phi}{sub {nabla}I} and {phi}{sub B} in the cores: The more the B field lines are

  7. Impact Of Landslides Along Road Network And Direct Cost Estimation: A Case Study In Marche Region, Central Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvati, P.; Donnini, M.; Guzzetti, F.; Ardizzone, F.; Cardinali, M.; Bucci, F.; Fiorucci, F.; Alvioli, M.; Santangelo, M.

    2014-12-01

    In November and December 2013, the Marche region (Central Italy) was hit by three severe, but not rare, meteorological events. The maximum value of the three days cumulative rainfall (499 mm) was recorded at the rain gauge of Pintura di Bolognola. The intense rainfall caused floods along the rivers and triggered numerous landslides, mostly located in the hilly and mountainous terrain of the region. The territory is crossed by a large number of roads connecting small rural settlements. After the events, the Regional Civil Protection Office requested to the Research Institute for the geo-hydrological Protection (IRPI-CNR) a technical support to evaluate the hazard condition for different sites affected by landslides. For an area of approximately 200 km2, in the Municipalities of Acquasanta Terme and Roccafluvione, field surveys were carried out to identify the rainfall-induced landslides and to produce an event inventory map. More than 1,500 slope failures were mapped including earth flows, slide-earth flows, slides, rock-falls and complex slides. Field surveys were focused also to estimate qualitatively damages along the roads. Roads were classified in two classes: the main roads under the State responsibility and the secondary roads under the Municipality responsibility. The different types of damage were classified in three classes: i) aesthetic (minor), where the road functionality was not compromised; ii) functional (medium), where the functionality was compromised and iii) structural (severe) where roads are severely or completely damaged. Immediately after the event, the technicians of the Municipalities of Acquasanta Terme and Roccafluvione spent major efforts to partially restore the functionality of the secondary roads in order to guarantee the primary human needs. In the following ten days, they compiled a list of interventions, associated with the relative direct costs, aimed to the total restoration of the roads functionality. In collaboration with the

  8. A case study of a density structure over a vertical magnetic field region in the Martian ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duru, F.; Gurnett, D. A.; Diéval, C.; Morgan, D. D.; Pisa, D.; Lundin, R.

    2016-05-01

    One of the discoveries made by the radar sounder on the Mars Express spacecraft is the existence of magnetically controlled structures in the ionosphere of Mars, which result in bulges in the ionospheric electron density contours. These bulges lead in turn to oblique echoes, which show up as hyperbola-shaped features in the echograms. A hyperbola-shaped feature observed over an isolated region of strong crustal magnetic field is associated with a plasma cavity in the upper ionosphere and a corresponding density enhancement in the lower levels of the ionosphere. We suggest that along open magnetic field lines, the solar wind electrons are accelerated downward and the ionospheric ions are accelerated upward in a manner similar to the field line-driven auroral acceleration at Earth. This heating due to precipitating electrons may cause an increase in the scale height and may drive a loss of ionospheric plasma at high altitudes.

  9. A numerical model simulation of the regional air pollution meteorology of the greater Chesapeake Bay area - Summer day case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segal, M.; Pielke, R. A.; Mcnider, R. T.; Mcdougal, D. S.

    1982-01-01

    The mesoscale numerical model of the University of Virginia (UVMM), has been applied to the greater Chesapeake Bay area in order to provide a detailed description of the air pollution meteorology during a typical summer day. This model provides state of the art simulations for land-sea thermally induced circulations. The model-predicted results agree favorably with available observed data. The effects of synoptic flow and sea breeze coupling on air pollution meteorological characteristics in this region, are demonstrated by a spatial and temporal presentation of various model predicted fields. A transport analysis based on predicted wind velocities indicated possible recirculation of pollutants back onto the Atlantic coast due to the sea breeze circulation.

  10. From regional to site specific SPTHA through inundation simulations: a case study for three test sites in Central Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selva, Jacopo; Tonini, Roberto; Romano, Fabrizio; Volpe, Manuela; Brizuela, Beatriz; Piatanesi, Alessio; Basili, Roberto; Lorito, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    We propose a procedure that enables the quantification of tsunami hazard at specific target sites through numerical simulations, accounting for the full variability of potential seismic sources. To this end, we developed a method that reduces the computational effort required by a very large number of detailed inundation simulations by adopting the offshore tsunami propagation patterns used for regional Seismic PTHA (SPTHA) as a proxy for the subsequent hazard estimate. The reduction of the computational effort is based on a two steps filtering procedure of the offshore SPTHA, through which a reduced number of scenarios to be modelled for inundation is selected. Each scenario represents a larger set of sources that form a cluster of potential tsunamis with similar impact on the target area. This filtering procedure is completely based on the tsunami profiles offshore, and it represents a generalization of the method proposed in Lorito et al. (2015) allowing i) to consider a much larger set of input linear simulations, and ii) to control the within-cluster variance of each selected cluster of seismic sources (thence, indirectly the artificial uncertainty introduced in probabilistic inundation maps by this filtering process). Here we present the preliminary results obtained for three test sites in central Mediterranean (Milazzo and Siracusa, Southern Italy, and Thessaloniki, Northern Greece). We preliminary perform a regional SPTHA covering the whole Mediterranean, in which the aleatory variability is quantified considering about 2 × 107 different seismic sources, and epistemic uncertainty is explored through an ensemble model based on more than ×105 alternative model implementations. For each site, separately, few hundreds of "representative scenarios" are filtered out of all the potential seismic sources. Then, the inundations caused by such scenarios is explicitly modelled and the site-specific SPTHA obtained, allowing a complete characterization of the tsunami