Science.gov

Sample records for regional science contribute

  1. Geographic intersections of regional science: Reflections on Walter Isard's contributions to geography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasmeier, Amy

    . In his writing, analyses, and commentaries, Walter Isard contributed significantly to economic geography, inspiring a generation of economic geographers with seminal texts on industrial location and spatial economics and methods of regional analysis - a line of argumentation that explicitly incorporated economic reasoning into an otherwise largely descriptive and inventory-based subdiscipline of geography. His circumscribed view of regional development and industrial location helped precipitate the emergence of the critical turn in economic geography in the late 1970s. He was the one early modern 20th century economics author to successfully wed economics and a certain perspective on space.

  2. Contribution to the knowledge of the veterinary science and of the ethnobotany in Calabria region (Southern Italy)

    PubMed Central

    Passalacqua, Nicodemo G; De Fine, Giuseppe; Guarrera, Paolo Maria

    2006-01-01

    Background A series of preliminary research projects on plants used in Calabria (Southern Italy) in veterinary science and in other ethno-botanical fields (minor nourishment, domestic and handicraft sector) was carried out in the last twenty years. From the ethno-botanical point of view, Calabria is one of the most interesting region, since in the ancient times it was subject to the dominant cultures of several people (Greeks, Romans, Byzantines, Arabs, Normans etc.). Until some decades ago the road network was poorly developed and villages were isolated, so that the culture of the "subsistence" and some archaic customs were kept. Methods Data were collected by means of "open" interviews to farmers, shepherds and housewives in the last twenty years. More than 100 informants were interviewed, mostly over 50 years old. Plants were identified by local informants through gathering in the area or through examination of the fresh plants collected by the researchers. The collected data were compared with pharmacobotanical papers mainly of southern Italy and with other studies, in order to highlight novelties or concordances of uses. Results The use of 62 taxa distributed into 34 families are described. Among these, 8 are or were employed in veterinary science, 8 as anti-parasitic agents, 19 in minor nourishment, 5 as seasoning, 38 for other uses. Some toxic species for cattle are also mentioned. Conclusion Among the major findings: the use of Helleborus bocconei for bronchitis of bovines and of Scrophularia canina for lameness in veterinary science; Nerium oleander and Urginea maritima as anti-parasitic agents; Epilobium angustifolium, Centaurea napifolia L. and C. sphaerocephala L. in minor nourishment. PMID:17156472

  3. Romanticism and Romantic Science: Their Contribution to Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadzigeorgiou, Yannis; Schulz, Roland

    2014-01-01

    The unique contributions of romanticism and romantic science have been generally ignored or undervalued in history and philosophy of science studies and science education. Although more recent research in history of science has come to delineate the value of both topics for the development of modern science, their merit for the educational field…

  4. Romanticism and Romantic Science: Their Contribution to Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadzigeorgiou, Yannis; Schulz, Roland

    2014-10-01

    The unique contributions of romanticism and romantic science have been generally ignored or undervalued in history and philosophy of science studies and science education. Although more recent research in history of science has come to delineate the value of both topics for the development of modern science, their merit for the educational field has not been explored. Romanticism was not only an obvious historical period, but a particular state of mind with its own extraordinary emotional sensitivity towards nature. It is especially the latter which we hope to revisit and reclaim for science education. After discussing several key historical contributions, we describe nine characteristics of `Romantic Science' in order to focus on six ideas/possibilities that we believe hold much value for transforming current science education: (1) the emotional sensitivity toward nature, (2) the centrality of sense experience, (3) the importance of "holistic experience", (4) the importance of the notions of mystery and wonder, (5) the power of science to transform people's outlook on the natural world, and (6) the importance of the relationship between science and philosophy. It is argued that in view of a pragmatist/utilitarian conception of school science prevalent today the aforementioned ideas (especially the notion of wonder and the poetic/non-analytical mode of knowledge), can provide food for thought for both science teachers and researchers seeking to work out an aesthetic conception, one that complements current approaches such as inquiry science and conceptual change.

  5. Romanticism and Romantic Science: Their Contribution to Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadzigeorgiou, Yannis; Schulz, Roland

    2014-09-01

    The unique contributions of romanticism and romantic science have been generally ignored or undervalued in history and philosophy of science studies and science education. Although more recent research in history of science has come to delineate the value of both topics for the development of modern science, their merit for the educational field has not been explored. Romanticism was not only an obvious historical period, but a particular state of mind with its own extraordinary emotional sensitivity towards nature. It is especially the latter which we hope to revisit and reclaim for science education. After discussing several key historical contributions, we describe nine characteristics of `Romantic Science' in order to focus on six ideas/possibilities that we believe hold much value for transforming current science education: (1) the emotional sensitivity toward nature, (2) the centrality of sense experience, (3) the importance of "holistic experience", (4) the importance of the notions of mystery and wonder, (5) the power of science to transform people's outlook on the natural world, and (6) the importance of the relationship between science and philosophy. It is argued that in view of a pragmatist/utilitarian conception of school science prevalent today the aforementioned ideas (especially the notion of wonder and the poetic/non-analytical mode of knowledge), can provide food for thought for both science teachers and researchers seeking to work out an aesthetic conception, one that complements current approaches such as inquiry science and conceptual change.

  6. Minority Contributions to Science, Engineering, and Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Funches, Peggy; And Others

    Offering an historical perspective on the development of science, engineering, medicine, and technology and providing current role models for minority students, the bulletin lists the outstanding contributions made by: (1) Blacks - medicine, chemistry, architecture, engineering, physics, biology, and exploration; (2) Hispanos - biomedical…

  7. Physical sciences contribute 22% to Australian economy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dineley, Jude

    2015-05-01

    Advances in the physical and mathematical sciences over the last two decades contributed some A292bn (about £151bn) to the Australian economy each year, according to a report carried out by the Centre for International Economics, an economic consultancy.

  8. THOR contribution to space weather science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaivads, Andris; Opgenoorth, Hermann; Retinò, Alessandro; Khotyaintsev, Yuri; Soucek, Jan; Valentini, Francesco; Escoubet, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    Turbulence Heating ObserveR - THOR is a mission proposal to study energy dissipation and particle acceleration in turbulent space plasma. THOR will focus on turbulent plasma in pristine solar wind, bow shock and magnetosheath. The orbit of THOR is tuned to spend long times in those regions allowing THOR to obtain high resolution data sets that can be used also for space weather science. In addition, THOR is designed with enough propellant to reach L1 in the second phase of the mission if necessary. Here we will discuss the space weather science questions that can be addressed and significantly advanced using THOR. Link to THOR: http://thor.irfu.se.

  9. Professor Barry Fraser's Contributions to Science Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aldridge, Jill M.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, I endeavour to convey the depth of Barry Fraser's contributions to science education research, including his tireless endeavours to promote and advance research, especially the field of learning environments, the realisation of his vision to create one of the largest doctoral programs in science and mathematics education in the…

  10. Social Issues: The Potential Contribution of Primary Science and Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skamp, Keith

    1987-01-01

    While the secondary curriculum is often considered an appropriate focus for future-directed studies, elementary science and technology education can contribute significantly to the socialization process. Science education can also help shape youngsters' attitudes and capacity to understand and influence scientific and technological impacts on…

  11. Jim Pollack's Contributions to Planetary Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haberle, Robert M.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Jim Pollack was an extraordinary scientist. Since receiving his Ph.D. from Harvard in 1965, he published hundreds of papers in scientific journals, encyclopedias, popular magazines, and books. The sheer volume of this kind of productivity is impressive enough, but when considering the diversity and detail of his work, these accomplishments seem almost superhuman. Jim studied and wrote about every planet in the solar system. For, this he was perhaps the most distinguished planetary scientist of his generation. He successfully identified the composition of Saturn's rings and Venus's clouds. With his collaborators, he created the first detailed models for the formation of the outer planets, and the general circulation of the Martian atmosphere. His interest in Mars dust storms provided a foundation for the "nuclear winter" theory that ultimately helped shape foreign policy in the cold war era. Jim's creative talents brought him many awards including the Kuiper Award of the Division of Planetary Sciences, the Leo Szilard Award of the American Physical Society, H. Julian Allen award of the Ames Research Center, and several NASA medals for exceptional scientific achievement.

  12. Contribution of laser ranging to Earth's sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Exertier, Pierre; Bonnefond, Pascal; Deleflie, Florent; Barlier, François; Kasser, Michel; Biancale, Richard; Ménard, Yves

    2006-11-01

    Satellite and Lunar Laser Ranging (SLR and LLR, respectively) are based on a direct measurement of a distance by exactly measuring the time transit of a laser beam between a station and a space target. These techniques have proven to be very efficient methods for contributing to the tracking of both artificial satellites and the Moon, and for determining accurately their orbit and the associated geodynamical parameters, although hampered by the non-worldwide coverage and the meteorological conditions. Since more than 40 years, the French community (today 'Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur', CNES, 'Observatoire de Paris', and IGN) is largely involved in the technological developments as well as in the scientific achievements. The role of the laser technique has greatly evolved thanks to the success of GPS and DORIS; the laser technique teams have learnt to focus their effort in fields where this technique is totally specific and irreplaceable. The role of SLR data in the determination of terrestrial reference systems and in the modelling of the first terms of the gravity field (including the terrestrial constant GM that defines the scale of orbits) has to be emphasized, which is of primary importance in orbitography, whatever the tracking technique used. In addition, the role of LLR data (with two main stations, at Mac Donald (United States) and Grasse (France), since 30 years) has been of particular importance for improving solar system ephemeris and contributing to some features of fundamental physics (equivalence principle). Today, the role of the SLR technique is ( i) to determine and to maintain the scale factor of the global terrestrial reference frame, ( ii) to strengthen the vertical component (including velocity) of the positioning, which is crucial for altimetry missions and tectonic motions, ( iii) to locate the geocenter with respect to the Earth's crust, ( iv) to avoid any secular and undesirable drift of geodetic systems thanks to a very good accuracy

  13. Argonne's contribution to regional development : successful examples.

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y. I.

    2000-11-14

    Argonne National Laboratory's mission is basic research and technology development to meet national goals in scientific leadership, energy technology, and environmental quality. In addition to its core missions as a national research and development center, Argonne has exerted a positive impact on its regional economic development, has carried out outstanding educational programs not only for college/graduate students but also for pre-college students and teachers, and has fostered partnerships with universities for research collaboration and with industry for shaping the new technological frontiers.

  14. PM science and regional haze

    SciTech Connect

    Casuccio, G.; Watson, J.

    1999-07-01

    Excessive levels of suspended particle are measured in many urban areas throughout the world. The U.S. EPA has promulgated new ambient air quality standards for PM2.5 and PM10 (particles with aerodynamic diameters less than 10 and 2.5 microns, respectively). The new PM10 standards are less stringent than the prior standards, setting targets of 3-year average 98th percentiles for 24-hour PM2.5 averages, 99th percentiles for 24-hour PM10 averages, and three-year averages in place of annual averages. This means that infrequent events, such as fires or industrial upsets, will not greatly influence compliance status. The acceptable PM2.5 levels are strict for the annual average at 15 {micro}g/m{sup 3}, but compliance will be determined by a spatial average from several monitors rather than for a single monitor. Carbon, ammonium, sulfate, and nitrate are the major PM2.5 components in most areas, with geological material constituting only 5% to 15% of the mass. Chemical concentrations in the PM2.5 size fraction are also the major cause of urban and regional haze. This haze results from both the scattering and absorption of light by small particles. PM2.5 will use only population-oriented monitors to determine attainment, and ``fence line'' sites located to determine maximum impact from a facility will not be used to determine compliance as they have been in the past. Primary particles and precursor gases from fuel combustion in vehicles, homes, and industries will become the pollutants under greatest scrutiny in non-attainment areas.

  15. Why Women Contribute Less to the Arts, Sciences, and Humanities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Helen S.

    Women do not contribute to the arts, sciences, and humanities commensurate with their talents and potential nor in proportion to the opportunities available to them. This study investigated variables or combinations of variables which best predict lower achievement and career motivation in women: self-esteem, fear of success, vicarious achievement…

  16. Claude Claremont's Contribution to the History of Science and Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallenberg, Harvey R.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the contributions of Claude Claremont to science education for children and his 1937 book, "Spanning Space," which outlines the building of models of bridges and other structures out of paper. Also describes how children and their teachers can build a model strut tower and a steam engine. (MDM)

  17. Merlin C. Wittrock's Enduring Contributions to the Science of Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Richard E.

    2010-01-01

    Among his many accomplishments in educational psychology, Merlin C. Wittrock is perhaps best remembered for his enduring contributions to the science of learning. His vision of how learning works is best explicated in articles published in "Educational Psychologist" (Wittrock, 1974, 1978, 1989, 1991, 1992), beginning with his classic 1974 article,…

  18. Science in Africa: UNESCO's Contribution to Africa's Plan for Science and Technology to 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneegans, Susan, Ed.; Candau, Anne, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) has put together this brochure on its contribution to Africa's Plan for Science and Technology to 2010 in the lead up to the forthcoming African Union Summit, in January 2007, and the meeting of African Ministers of Science and Technology November 23-24, 2006. The theme…

  19. System for Contributing and Discovering Derived Mission and Science Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallick, Michael N.; Powell, Mark W.; Shams, Khawaja S.; Mickelson, Megan C.; Ohata, Darrick M.; Kurien, James A.; Abramyan, Luch

    2013-01-01

    A system was developed to provide a new mechanism for members of the mission community to create and contribute new science data to the rest of the community. Mission tools have allowed members of the mission community to share first order data (data that is created by the mission s process in command and control of the spacecraft or the data that is captured by the craft itself, like images, science results, etc.). However, second and higher order data (data that is created after the fact by scientists and other members of the mission) was previously not widely disseminated, nor did it make its way into the mission planning process.

  20. Korean Contribution to the Progress of Science and Humanity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Dong-Pil

    2012-03-01

    Science has problems yet to solve those global issues as the climate change, nuclear waste, water pollution, etc, although science and technology have been major contributors to human progress and will continue to open new doors to economic, medical and environmental advancement. Furthermore the benefits of scientific knowledge are not readily and evenly allocated across the globe. Korea will contribute to the progress of science by providing cooperative opportunities of the future research on the pure and applied scientific issues. Recently Korea launches a project of construction of the rare isotope accelerator, KoRIA, and Institute of Basic Science. Plans are set also to help develop the appropriate technology for developing countries. In this talk two aspects of science policy of Korean government are introduced, which are related to the accelerator KoRIA and to the thought on the establishment of Common Technology Platform. The former is to help the world science society for the expansion of our knowledge on the universe and matter, while the latter is to help the transfer of our knowledge to make our planet more flat.

  1. Impact of contributions of Glenn T. Seaborg on nuclear science

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, Darleane C.

    2000-12-26

    Glenn Theodore Seaborg (1912-199) was a world-renowned nuclear chemist, a Nobel Laureate in chemistry in 1951, co-discoverer of plutonium and nine other transuranium elements, Chairman of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission from 1961-71, scientific advisor to ten U.S. presidents, active in national and international professional societies, an advocate for nuclear power as well as for a comprehensive nuclear test ban treaty, a prolific writer, an avid hiker, environmentalist, and sports enthusiast. He was known and esteemed not only by chemists and other scientists throughout the world, but also by lay people, politicians, statesmen, and students of all ages. This memorial includes a brief glimpse of Glenn Seaborg's early life and education, describes some of his major contributions to nuclear science over his long and fruitful career, and highlights the profound impact of his contributions on nuclear science, both in the U.S. and in the international community.

  2. Professor Barry Fraser's contributions to science education research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldridge, Jill M.

    2011-09-01

    In this article, I endeavour to convey the depth of Barry Fraser's contributions to science education research, including his tireless endeavours to promote and advance research, especially the field of learning environments, the realisation of his vision to create one of the largest doctoral programs in science and mathematics education in the world, his leadership capacity in terms of guiding and leading an internationally renowned centre and large-scale cross-national and cross-cultural studies, his dedication towards human capacity building in Africa, Asia and elsewhere, his capacity as a mentor and editor that have seen the publication of numerous journal articles and books and the ongoing success of science education research journals.

  3. Crowd science user contribution patterns and their implications.

    PubMed

    Sauermann, Henry; Franzoni, Chiara

    2015-01-20

    Scientific research performed with the involvement of the broader public (the crowd) attracts increasing attention from scientists and policy makers. A key premise is that project organizers may be able to draw on underused human resources to advance research at relatively low cost. Despite a growing number of examples, systematic research on the effort contributions volunteers are willing to make to crowd science projects is lacking. Analyzing data on seven different projects, we quantify the financial value volunteers can bring by comparing their unpaid contributions with counterfactual costs in traditional or online labor markets. The volume of total contributions is substantial, although some projects are much more successful in attracting effort than others. Moreover, contributions received by projects are very uneven across time--a tendency toward declining activity is interrupted by spikes typically resulting from outreach efforts or media attention. Analyzing user-level data, we find that most contributors participate only once and with little effort, leaving a relatively small share of users who return responsible for most of the work. Although top contributor status is earned primarily through higher levels of effort, top contributors also tend to work faster. This speed advantage develops over multiple sessions, suggesting that it reflects learning rather than inherent differences in skills. Our findings inform recent discussions about potential benefits from crowd science, suggest that involving the crowd may be more effective for some kinds of projects than others, provide guidance for project managers, and raise important questions for future research. PMID:25561529

  4. Crowd science user contribution patterns and their implications

    PubMed Central

    Sauermann, Henry; Franzoni, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    Scientific research performed with the involvement of the broader public (the crowd) attracts increasing attention from scientists and policy makers. A key premise is that project organizers may be able to draw on underused human resources to advance research at relatively low cost. Despite a growing number of examples, systematic research on the effort contributions volunteers are willing to make to crowd science projects is lacking. Analyzing data on seven different projects, we quantify the financial value volunteers can bring by comparing their unpaid contributions with counterfactual costs in traditional or online labor markets. The volume of total contributions is substantial, although some projects are much more successful in attracting effort than others. Moreover, contributions received by projects are very uneven across time—a tendency toward declining activity is interrupted by spikes typically resulting from outreach efforts or media attention. Analyzing user-level data, we find that most contributors participate only once and with little effort, leaving a relatively small share of users who return responsible for most of the work. Although top contributor status is earned primarily through higher levels of effort, top contributors also tend to work faster. This speed advantage develops over multiple sessions, suggesting that it reflects learning rather than inherent differences in skills. Our findings inform recent discussions about potential benefits from crowd science, suggest that involving the crowd may be more effective for some kinds of projects than others, provide guidance for project managers, and raise important questions for future research. PMID:25561529

  5. Crowd science user contribution patterns and their implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauermann, Henry; Franzoni, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    Scientific research performed with the involvement of the broader public (the crowd) attracts increasing attention from scientists and policy makers. A key premise is that project organizers may be able to draw on underused human resources to advance research at relatively low cost. Despite a growing number of examples, systematic research on the effort contributions volunteers are willing to make to crowd science projects is lacking. Analyzing data on seven different projects, we quantify the financial value volunteers can bring by comparing their unpaid contributions with counterfactual costs in traditional or online labor markets. The volume of total contributions is substantial, although some projects are much more successful in attracting effort than others. Moreover, contributions received by projects are very uneven across time-a tendency toward declining activity is interrupted by spikes typically resulting from outreach efforts or media attention. Analyzing user-level data, we find that most contributors participate only once and with little effort, leaving a relatively small share of users who return responsible for most of the work. Although top contributor status is earned primarily through higher levels of effort, top contributors also tend to work faster. This speed advantage develops over multiple sessions, suggesting that it reflects learning rather than inherent differences in skills. Our findings inform recent discussions about potential benefits from crowd science, suggest that involving the crowd may be more effective for some kinds of projects than others, provide guidance for project managers, and raise important questions for future research.

  6. Contribution of large region joint associations to complex traits genetics.

    PubMed

    Paré, Guillaume; Asma, Senay; Deng, Wei Q

    2015-04-01

    A polygenic model of inheritance, whereby hundreds or thousands of weakly associated variants contribute to a trait's heritability, has been proposed to underlie the genetic architecture of complex traits. However, relatively few genetic variants have been positively identified so far and they collectively explain only a small fraction of the predicted heritability. We hypothesized that joint association of multiple weakly associated variants over large chromosomal regions contributes to complex traits variance. Confirmation of such regional associations can help identify new loci and lead to a better understanding of known ones. To test this hypothesis, we first characterized the ability of commonly used genetic association models to identify large region joint associations. Through theoretical derivation and simulation, we showed that multivariate linear models where multiple SNPs are included as independent predictors have the most favorable association profile. Based on these results, we tested for large region association with height in 3,740 European participants from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) study. Adjusting for SNPs with known association with height, we demonstrated clustering of weak associations (p = 2x10-4) in regions extending up to 433.0 Kb from known height loci. The contribution of regional associations to phenotypic variance was estimated at 0.172 (95% CI 0.063-0.279; p < 0.001), which compared favorably to 0.129 explained by known height variants. Conversely, we showed that suggestively associated regions are enriched for known height loci. To extend our findings to other traits, we also tested BMI, HDLc and CRP for large region associations, with consistent results for CRP. Our results demonstrate the presence of large region joint associations and suggest these can be used to pinpoint weakly associated SNPs. PMID:25856144

  7. "Contributions of Piaget to Science Education." Science Education. Science Curriculum Concept Paper #2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    This paper discusses the implications of Piaget's theory to science education. The first section of the paper, "What Science Teachers Need To Know: Scientific Knowledge and Its Source," describes three sources of students' knowledge and corresponding educational practices. The second section, "Functions of Intelligence," discusses the concept of…

  8. Potential contribution to Earth System Science: Oceans and Cryosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johannessen, Johnny A.

    2010-05-01

    Measurements by satellites are critical in monitoring the state of the ocean and the cryosphere. However, observation limitations, knowledge gaps and deficiencies in quantitative understanding exist. These are, among others, related to mesoscale/submesoscale ocean dynamics, air-sea-ice interactions, coupled physical-biological processes, Arctic sea level change, sea ice rheology and deformation, permafrost changes, snow-water equivalent and global water cycle. Provision of reliable modeland data-based assessments and predictions of many of the elements of the state of the ocean and the cryosphere are consequently severely hampered. The Sentinel-1 and -3 missions will ensure continuity and generation of longer time series (> 20 years) of data from synthetic aperture radar, altimetry, infrared radiometry and spectrometry. They will moreover sustain and strengthen the growing and important use of sensor synergy. As such advances in interpretation capabilities and development of physical-based retrieval methods are expected to strengthen ocean and cryosphere science. This may, in turn, benefit execution of existing services such as wave, oil spill and sea ice monitoring as well as stimulate new services for global monitoring for environment and security, for instance, regarding ocean swell tracking, eddy tracking, and extreme events of air-sea interactions. The Sentinel-1 and -3 missions may also offer possible complementary use with Earth Explorer satellites such as the Cryosat, SMOS and GOCE missions, providing different and balanced observations. Expecting that data from the Sentinels are made easily available to the science community, the potential contribution of the Sentinel-1 and -3 missions to ocean and cryopshere science is therefore promising.

  9. Did you feel it? : citizens contribute to earthquake science

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wald, David J.; Dewey, James W.

    2005-01-01

    Since the early 1990s, the magnitude and location of an earthquake have been available within minutes on the Internet. Now, as a result of work by the U.S. Geological Survey and with the cooperation of various regional seismic networks, people who experience an earthquake can go online and share information about its effects to help create a map of shaking intensities and damage. Such “Community Internet Intensity Maps” (CIIMs) contribute greatly toward the quick assessment of the scope of an earthquake emergency and provide valuable data for earthquake research.

  10. NSTX Contributions to the FESAC Fusion Energy Sciences Development Plan*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Y.-K. M.

    2003-10-01

    The Spherical Torus configuration, together with other Innovative Confinement Concepts (ICCs) such as the Reversed Field Pinch and the Compact Stellarator, were identified as an integral part of a recent FESAC Fusion Energy Sciences Development Plan (March 2003), which aims to generate net electricity in 35 years. In the next 5 years, the NSTX National Research Team proposes to carry out research in the regime of order-unity beta and strong toroidicity and make contributions to this plan. The NSTX research plans to produce the physics database needed for the design of a Performance Extension stage ST (Next Step Spherical Torus, NSST) capable of testing solenoid-free plasma operations, transport and turbulence, MHD, heating and current drive, and boundary physics at 5 - 10 MA in plasma current. An ST-based Component Test Facility (CTF), with similar plasma conditions and capable of high steady-state neutron wall loading and accumulated dose, can then focus on nuclear technology development. These contributions, together with those from theory and simulation, burning plasmas (ITER), and materials testing, will in time establish the needed physics and technology basis for a Demonstration Power Plant. *Work supported by DoE Contract Nos. DE-AC02-76CH03073 and DE-AC05-96OR22464.

  11. Urbanization and the carbon cycle: Contributions from social science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcotullio, Peter J.; Hughes, Sara; Sarzynski, Andrea; Pincetl, Stephanie; Sanchez Peña, Landy; Romero-Lankao, Patricia; Runfola, Daniel; Seto, Karen C.

    2014-10-01

    This paper outlines the contributions of social science to the study of interactions between urbanization patterns and processes and the carbon cycle, and identifies gaps in knowledge and priority areas for future social scientific research contributions. While previously studied as a unidimensional process, we conceptualize urbanization as a multidimensional, social and biophysical process driven by continuous changes across space and time in various subsystems including biophysical, built environment, and socio-institutional (e.g., economic, political, demographic, behavioral, and sociological). We review research trends and findings focused on the socio-institutional subsystem of the urbanization process, and particularly the dynamics, relationships, and predictions relevant to energy use and greenhouse gas emissions. Our findings suggest that a multidimensional perspective of urbanization facilitates a wider spectrum of research relevant to carbon cycle dynamics, even within the socio-institutional subsystem. However, there is little consensus around the details and mechanisms underlying the relationship between urban socio-institutional subsystems and the carbon cycle. We argue that progress in understanding the relationship between urbanization and the carbon cycle may be achieved if social scientists work collaboratively with each other as well as with scientists from other disciplines. From this review, we identify research priorities where collaborative social scientific efforts are necessary in conjunction with other disciplinary approaches to generate a more complete understanding of urbanization as a process and its relationship to the carbon cycle.

  12. Addiction and Its Sciences: What economics can contribute to the addiction sciences

    PubMed Central

    Caulkins, Jonathan P.; Nicosia, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    The addiction sciences are intrinsically multidisciplinary, and economics is among the disciplines that offer useful perspectives on the complex behaviors surrounding substance abuse. The focus of this article is on the contributions economics has made in the past and could make in the future towards understanding how illegal markets operate, how prices affect use, how use generates various consequences, and how policy shapes all three. We concentrate on illegal drugs as insights concerning markets are particularly salient, though we also mention relevant studies from the alcohol and tobacco fields. We argue that economics’ value to the addiction sciences goes far beyond the ability to monetize non-monetary outcomes or to calculate a benefit-cost ratio. Economics offers tools and topical expertise that usefully complement other disciplines traditionally associated with the addiction sciences. PMID:20331545

  13. [The contributions of local authorities to regional public health policy].

    PubMed

    de Maria, Florence; Grémy, Isabelle

    2009-01-01

    Local authorities in France are key players in shaping public health policy by their action on the determinants of health and through their actions aimed at specific population groups. Since the public health act of 9 August 2004 establishing the first regional public health plans, their level of involvement and role continues to grow as coordinators, funders and project managers within the greater Paris metropolitan region. Their active participation in regional policy to improve population health and reduce inequalities in health has led to a better organization of the public health programs implemented (in terms of visibility, dialogue, coordination, transparency, and better awareness of context and integration of local issues). Their participation is also a source of innovation resulting in the proposal and use of new approaches (such as the development of health surveillance and observation for advising the local decision-making process). Within the current context of the "Hospitals, patients, health and territories" bill, which entrusts the governance of regional health policy to a specific agency, the role given to local authorities in this new organizational structure must be clearly defined to take into account all of their existing and potential contributions to public health policy. PMID:20218412

  14. BALTEX - A science broker for the Baltic Sea Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reckermann, M.; von Storch, H.; Langner, J.; Omstedt, A. T.

    2010-12-01

    BALTEX (the Baltic Sea Experiment) is an interdisciplinary research network of scientists involved in environmental research dedicated to the Baltic Sea drainage basin (including disciplines such as meteorology, hydrology, oceanography, biogeochemistry and climate research). Originally founded in 1992 as a Continental Scale Experiment in GEWEX (the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment within the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) of the World Meteorological Organization, WMO), it was intended to form a common science, communication and data platform with the overall goal to integrate efforts to gain a better understanding of the water and energy cycle in the Baltic Sea basin. BALTEX Phase II (since 2003) has extended the scope to research on regional climate change and variability, climate change impacts on biogeochemistry and water management, but also made first steps towards overarching social and political issues as cross-cutting activities in the context of the scientific objectives. An important aspect of BALTEX Phase II is a more holistic approach towards observing, understanding and modelling major environmental relevant for the entire Baltic Sea region. Parts of the BALTEX Phase II research activities thus contribute to the establishment of a high resolution integrated modelling system for Northern Europe, embedded in an Earth System Model. An outstanding product of BALTEX as a “knowledge broker” for regional political institutions is the BACC report. Following to a large extent the method of IPCC, a regional assessment report on climate change in the Baltic Sea basin was compiled, which summarizes the published scientifically legitimate knowledge on regional climate change in the Baltic Sea basin and its impacts. The assessment, known as the BACC report (BALTEX Assessment of Climate Change for the Baltic Sea Basin; BACC author team 2008, Reckermann et al., 2008) was published in 2008 as a book. A survey among climate researchers in the area

  15. Astro-H: science goals, development status, and European contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guainazzi, M.; Astro-H Mission

    2014-07-01

    The joint JAXA/NASA ASTRO-H mission is the sixth X-ray mission initiated by the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS). ASTRO-H allows a combination of wide band X-ray spectroscopy (5-80 keV) provided by multilayer coating, focusing hard X-ray mirrors and hard X-ray imaging detectors, and high energy-resolution soft X-ray spectroscopy (0.3-12 keV) provided by thin-foil X-ray optics and a micro-calorimeter array. The mission will also carry a X-ray CCD camera as a focal plane detector for a soft X-ray telescope (0.4-12 keV) and a non-focusing soft gamma-ray detector (40-600 keV). ASTRO-H is expected to provide breakthrough results in the large-scale structure of the Universe and its evolution, the behaviour of matter in the gravitational strong field regime, the physical conditions in sites of cosmic-ray acceleration, and the distribution of dark matter in galaxy clusters at different redshifts. I will also review the European contribution to Astro-H, both in terms of hardware development as well as in terms of prospective support for the European community.

  16. Do fair weather regions contribute to the global circuit support?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mareev, Evgeny

    2014-05-01

    The role of different generators (thunderstorm clouds, mesoscale convective systems, electrified shower clouds etc.) in the maintaining the ionospheric potential (IP) of the global electric circuit (GEC) and its variation is still insufficiently understood. This paper considers possible approaches to the modeling of GEC generators with particular focus on the planetary boundary layer (PBL), or Austausch, generator, operating in the fair weather regions. It is well known that turbulent convection leads to intensive mixing of charged particles in the PBL and, consequently, to the generation of the vertical electric current. As a rule, this current is directed upward if the positive charge is accumulated near the Earth's surface particularly due to the electrode effect. There is still a great uncertainty concerning the contribution of the PBL generator into the global circuit. This is not only for a lack of data, but also due to the difficulties of theory: the intensity of the generator depends upon the IP, so the search for its contribution into the GEC requires solving a self-consistent problem. We suggest an analytical approach for the calculation of the IP induced by the given electric currents in the atmosphere. The obtained expressions and numerical calculations show that convection amplifies the contributions of thunderstorm/shower-cloud sources, while the value of this amplification varies likely from 10 to 20% depending mainly on the square occupied by intensive convection and the mean thickness of the PBL. It is important that the diurnal motion of the convection area on the Earth's surface may cause regular variations into the IP diurnal variation (reflected in the Carnegie curve), superimposed with the thunderstorm/shower-cloud contributions. It is suggested that the contribution of PBL generator into the GEC potential maximizes when the Pacific ocean surface is sunlit because at this time both conditions of its operation are satisfied: the PBL is unstable

  17. EPA Regional Science Workshop on Stormwater Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    This workshop is being held at Region 2. It will provide a great opportunity for collaboration with Regions 1 and 3 as well as ORD. Topics to be discussed include: National Research Council's report, the new Administration's serious interest in stormwater management, issueanc...

  18. Factors Contributing to Adult Knowledge of Science and Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falk, John H.; Needham, Mark D.

    2013-01-01

    Historically, most efforts to improve public knowledge of science and technology have focused on improvements in K-12 schooling, although post-secondary education and informal education have also been mentioned as important factors. Currently, little empirical data exist to determine how or when to best leverage science and technology education…

  19. EMERGING SCIENCE: EPA'S ORD SUPPORTS REGIONAL HAZE PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    A series of presentations from EPA's Board of Science Councilors review in April 2005 and the Science Forum in May 2005 are being made available to the Regional Planning Organization conference on June 9-10, 2005. Attendees will be able to review the materials during the confere...

  20. Collecting Science Materials from Developing Regions: Universal Dilemma, Collaborative Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Milton T.

    This paper discusses problems related to library collection of science materials from developing regions, including price increases leading to cancellation of peripheral titles. The importance of access and preservation of such materials is noted. The International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) Science Research…

  1. The Roles of Regional Partners in Supporting an International Earth Science Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penuel, William R.; Shear, Linda; Korbak, Christine; Sparrow, Elena

    2005-01-01

    This study explores the roles that regional partners play in helping to support implementation of the GLOBE program, an international earth science and education initiative. Researchers at SRI International conducted case studies of two GLOBE partners' practices in an effort to identify the factors that contribute to effective implementation of…

  2. Supporting and Structuring "Contributing Student Pedagogy" in Computer Science Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falkner, Katrina; Falkner, Nickolas J. G.

    2012-01-01

    Contributing student pedagogy (CSP) builds upon social constructivist and community-based learning principles to create engaging and productive learning experiences. What makes CSP different from other, related, learning approaches is that it involves students both learning from and also explicitly valuing the contributions of other students. The…

  3. How Can Statistical Mechanics Contribute to Social Science?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durlauf, Steven N.

    1999-09-01

    A model of interdependent decision making has been developed to understand group differences in socioeconomic behavior such as nonmarital fertility, school attendance, and drug use. The statistical mechanical structure of the model illustrates how the physical sciences contain useful tools for the study of socioeconomic phenomena.

  4. Microelectronics in the Curriculum--The Science Teacher's Contribution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Science Education, Cambridge (England).

    Rapid advances in microelectronics over the past few years have generally been beneficial, but they have also created some problems, and questions must be asked about the philosophy for including aspects of the new technology in the school curriculum. This statement, prepared by the Microelectronics and Science Education Subcommittee of the…

  5. NASA SSERVI Contributions to Lunar Science and Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Brad; Pendleton, Yvonne; Schmidt, Gregory

    2015-04-01

    NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI) represents a close collaboration between science, technology and exploration that will enable deeper understanding of the Moon and other airless bodies as we move further out of low-Earth orbit. The new Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI) will focus on the scientific aspects of exploration as they pertain to the Moon, Near Earth Asteroids (NEAs) and the moons of Mars. The Institute focuses on interdisciplinary, exploration-related science centered around all airless bodies targeted as potential human destinations. Areas of study reported here will represent the broad spectrum of lunar, NEA, and Martian moon sciences encompassing investigations of the surface, interior, exosphere, and near-space environments as well as science uniquely enabled from these bodies. We will provide a detailed look at research being conducted by each of the 9 domestic US teams as well as our 7 international partners. The research profile of the Institute integrates investigations of plasma physics, geology/geochemistry, technology integration, solar system origins/evolution, regolith geotechnical properties, analogues, volatiles, ISRU and exploration potential of the target bodies.

  6. Penicillin for Education: How Cognitive Science Can Contribute to Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruer, John T.

    1995-01-01

    Education can benefit from knowledge derived from cognitive and developmental psychology. Family demographics have actually improved between 1970 and 90 and so have NAEP scores. Three innovative programs demonstrating cognitive science applications include the Teaching Number Sense elementary math program, reciprocal teaching (reading strategy),…

  7. NASA SSERVI Contributions to Lunar Science and Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendleton, Yvonne J.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI) represents a close collaboration between science, technology and exploration that will enable deeper understanding of the Moon and other airless bodies as we move further out of low-Earth orbit. The new Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI) will focus on the scientific aspects of exploration as they pertain to the Moon, Near Earth Asteroids (NEAs) and the moons of Mars. The Institute focuses on interdisciplinary, exploration-related science centered around all airless bodies targeted as potential human destinations. Areas of study reported here will represent the broad spectrum of lunar, NEA, and Martian moon sciences encompassing investigations of the surface, interior, exosphere, and near-space environments as well as science uniquely enabled from these bodies. We will provide a detailed look at research being conducted by each of the 9 domestic US teams as well as our 7 international partners. The research profile of the Institute integrates investigations of plasma physics, geology/geochemistry, technology integration, solar system origins/evolution, regolith geotechnical properties, analogues, volatiles, ISRU and exploration potential of the target bodies.

  8. The Ohio Partnership for the Far East Region Science Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beiersdorfer, Raymond; Sturrus, W. Gregg

    2008-03-01

    The Ohio Partnership for Far East Region Science Teachers (OPFERST) is a three-year project funded by Federal Math Science Partnership Funds through a grant to the Ohio Dept. of Education. OPFERST is a partnership (opferst.ysu.edu) of Youngstown State University science and education faculty, trained facilitators and the county and city science consultants. Every (47) school district in the region signed on and during the first year 32 districts participated. During the first two years, 198 teachers representing Ashtabula, Columbiana, Mahoning and Trumbull Counties, as well as Warren City and Youngstown City schools have participated. The vision of OPFERST is to improve the teaching and learning of the Ohio Science Academic Content Standards. Project goals are: 1) Increase science content knowledge of teachers; 2) Implement effective instructional practices; 3) Improve students performance in science; and 4) Develop professional learning communities which will lead to programmatic changes within districts. Goals one through three are met by modeling inquiry-based methods for teaching science content standards. Goal four is met by ongoing meetings through-out the school year, classroom visits by YSU faculty and fieldtrips to the YSU Campus by classes led by OPFERST teachers. Evaluation of OPFERST includes demographic and classroom practice data, pre- and post-tests of participants, journals, homework and the administration of evaluation instruments with some OPFERST participants' students.

  9. Roleplays in Middle School Science Textbooks: A Significant Contribution to the History of Science Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carvalho, Wanderley; Carvalho, Carmen Aparecida Basso

    Over decades, a number of researchers in science curriculum and science teaching and learning have pointed out that the history of science plays a pivotal role in the achievement of science literacy. However, recent studies have shown that both practitioners and textbook writers often fail to deal with subjects such as history and philosophy of…

  10. 100 years of semiconductor science. The Ukrainian contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lytovchenko, V. G.; Strikha, M. V.

    2014-01-01

    How old is semiconductor science? The answer is not obvious even for researchers who worked in this field for their whole life. Mankind has been dealing with semiconductors like silicon for centuries - although not with their electrical properties. The first electrical experiments with semiconductors were performed more than 200 years ago. However, the concept of semiconductors as a separate class of materials, between conductors and insulators, appeared rather late - in the first two decades of the 20th century.

  11. EMERGING SCIENCE: EPA'S ORD SUPPORTS REGIONAL HAZE PROGRAM; POSTERS FROM BOSC REVIEW AND SCIENCE FORUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    A series of presentations from EPA's Board of Science Councilors review in April 2005 and the Science Forum in May 2005 are being made available to the Regional Planning Organization conference on June 9-10, 2005. Attendees will be able to review the materials during the confere...

  12. Understanding processes contributing to regional sea level change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stammer, Detlef; Gregory, Jonathan

    2011-09-01

    WCRP/IOC Workshop on Regional Sea-Level Change; Paris, France, 7-9 February 2011 . A joint World Climate Research Programme (WCRP)/Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) workshop was held to discuss regional changes of sea level. The workshop was attended by 41 experts from the world over who compared observed regional sea level changes with those inferred from numerical simulations and compared future predictions and their analyses in terms of processes. Satellite altimetry observations continue to be essential in revealing that sea level is changing prominently on a regional scale. However, existing climate models are largely in disagreement about patterns and magnitudes of observed sea level variability, and it is unclear how accurate they may be in predicting regional sea level.

  13. APDA's Contribution to Current Research and Citizen Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Thurburn; Castelaz, M. W.; Cline, J. D.; Hudec, R.

    2010-01-01

    The Astronomical Photographical Data Archive (APDA) is dedicated to the collection, restoration, preservation, and digitization of astronomical photographic data that eventually can be accessed via the Internet by the global community of scientists, researchers and students. Located on the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute campus, APDA now includes collections from North America totaling more than 100,000 photographic plates and films. Two new large scale research projects, and one citizen science project have now been developed from the archived data. One unique photographic data collection covering the southern hemisphere contains the signatures of diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) within the stellar spectra on objective prism plates. We plan to digitize the spectra, identify the DIBs, and map out the large scale spatial extent of DIBS. The goal is to understand the Galactic environment suitable to the DIB molecules. Another collection contains spectra with nearly the same dispersion as the GAIA Satellite low dispersion slitless spectrophotometers, BP and RP. The plates will be used to develop standards for GAIA spectra. To bring the data from APDA to the general public, we have developed the citizen science project called Stellar Classification Online - Public Exploration (SCOPE). SCOPE allows the citizen scientist to classify up to a half million stars on objective prism plates. We will present the status of each of these projects.

  14. Citizen Scientists Contribute National-Scale Phenology Data for Science, Conservation and Resource Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weltzin, J. F.; Rosemartin, A.; Crimmins, T. M.; Posthumus, E.

    2015-12-01

    The USA National Phenology Network (USA-NPN; www.usanpn.org) serves science and society by promoting a broad understanding of plant and animal phenology and the relationships among phenological patterns and all aspects of environmental change. Data maintained by USA-NPN is being used for applications related to science, conservation and resource management. The majority of the data have been provided by "citizen scientists" participating in a national-scale, multi-taxa phenology observation program, Nature's Notebook. Since 2008, more than 5,500 active participants registered with Nature's Notebook have contributed over 5.5 million observation records for plants and animals. This presentation will demonstrate several types of questions that can be addressed by engaging citizen scientists in a standardized national monitoring system focused on field observations of biodiversity. Because the proof is often in the pudding, we will feature a diversity of recently published studies, but will also highlight several new and ongoing local- to continental-scale projects. Projects include continental bioclimatic indices, regional assessments of historical and potential future trends in phenology, sub-regional assessments of temperate deciduous forest response to recent variability in spring-time heat accumulation, state- and management unit- level foci on spatio-temporal variation in organismal activity at both the population and community level, and local monitoring for invasive species detection across platforms from ground to satellite. Additional data-mining and exploration by interested researchers and/or resource managers will likely further demonstrate the value of these data. The bottom line is that "citizen science" represents a viable approach to collect data across spatiotemporal scales often unattainable to research scientists under typical resource constraints.

  15. Contributions of Cnn to Bio-Robotics and Brain Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arena, Paolo; Patané, Luca

    2013-01-01

    The paradigm of Cellular Non-linear Networks is ubiquitously applied in different research fields. In this chapter the breakthrough in bio-robotics and brain science research is focused. In particular the implementation of CNN-based CPGs is discussed proposing different implementations on bio-inspired robots: hexapods, lamprey-like structures, crab-inspired platforms and others. Furthermore the locomotion control system has been extended following a bottom-up procedure to include higher cognitive capabilities. The CNN paradigm was applied to design and implement perceptual architecture inspired by the insect world. Reaction-Diffusion CNN systems have been used to model the arousal of behavioral solution optimized to the on-going environmental conditions. An approach based on Turing patterns is illustrated including experimental results on navigation control with a roving robot. Finally, interesting works based on the olfactory system of insects, modeled with the Winner-less Competition principle, are reported and discussed.

  16. Ocean to outback: Léonie Rennie's contribution to science education in Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venville, Grady

    2009-06-01

    In this article I initially borrow a metaphor from an art exhibition, Ocean to Outback, as a way to express my perspective on the contribution that Léonie Rennie has made to science education in Australia. I then consider Léonie's contributions as overlapping themes. In particular, Léonie's well-known research on gender and issues of equity in science education is explored as well as her highly regarded work on learning science in out-of-school settings. Curriculum integration is a less well-known aspect of Léonie's research that also is considered. Léonie's important contributions to research training and policy in science education are briefly described and commented on. Finally, I return to the metaphor of Ocean to Outback that reflects the enormity of the contribution that Léonie has made but also gives insight into her personal journey and qualities.

  17. The Health Sciences Library's Contributions to Patient Care *

    PubMed Central

    Dragonette, Dorothy B.

    1973-01-01

    The medical librarian in a hospital contributes to the quality of patient care by building a library which can provide promptly the information needed by all members of the treatment team, including medical and paramedical persons. The librarian is meeting his responsibility to the patient when he performs the duties of selecting materials, cataloging these materials speedily and thoroughly, and giving reference service to library users. An excellent hospital library and the services of a knowledgeable librarian can be a significant factor in the medical team's ability to provide superior patient care. PMID:4691333

  18. Supporting and structuring "contributing student pedagogy" in Computer Science curricula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falkner, Katrina; Falkner, Nickolas J. G.

    2012-12-01

    Contributing student pedagogy (CSP) builds upon social constructivist and community-based learning principles to create engaging and productive learning experiences. What makes CSP different from other, related, learning approaches is that it involves students both learning from and also explicitly valuing the contributions of other students. The creation of such a learning community builds upon established educational psychology that encourages deep learning, reflection and engagement. Our school has recently completed a review and update of its curriculum, incorporating student content-creation and collaboration into the design of key courses across the curriculum. Our experiences, based on several years of experimentation and development, support CSP-based curriculum design to reinforce the value of the student perspective, the clear description of their own transformative pathway to knowledge and the importance of establishing student-to-student networks in which students are active and willing participants. In this paper, we discuss the tools and approaches that we have employed to guide, support and structure student collaboration across a range of courses and year levels. By providing an account of our intentions, our approaches and tools, we hope to provide useful and transferrable knowledge that can be readily used by other academics who are considering this approach.

  19. Mendel in Genetics Teaching: Some Contributions from History of Science and Articles for Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Hani, Charbel N.

    2015-01-01

    School science descriptions about Mendel and his story are problematic because several statements that are controversial among historians of science are repeated over and over again as if they were established facts. Another problem is the neglect of other scientists working on inheritance in the second half of the nineteenth century, including Darwin, Spencer, Galton, Nägeli, Brooks, Weismann and de Vries, who paved the way for the reinterpretation of Mendel's work in 1900. These problems are often found in textbooks and are likely to be present in school science throughout the world. Here, we discuss the contributions that history of science and papers published in journals that target teachers may bring to improve how school science deals with Mendel and his contributions. Evidently the idea is not that school teachers could solve problems still under discussion in the historical literature. The point is, rather, that it is important to avoid treating Mendel's contributions as uncontroversial, mentioning, for instance, that there are ongoing debates on whether he proposed the laws named after him by appealing to invisible factors underlying phenotypic traits that are seen as the heritable potentials for those traits, and would in due time be known as genes. History of science can contribute to put the mythic Mendel into question in the science classroom, bringing school science closer to the controversies around the interpretation of his work.

  20. Perspectives on the Contribution of Social Science to Adapted Physical Activity: Looking Forward, Looking Back

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Causgrove Dunn, Janice; Cairney, John; Zimmer, Chantelle

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we reflect on the contributions of the social sciences to the field of adapted physical activity by examining the theories and methods that have been adopted from the social science disciplines. To broaden our perspective on adapted physical activity and provide new avenues for theoretical and empirical exploration, we discuss and…

  1. The Contribution of Cognitive and Metacognitive Strategy Use to Students' Science Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akyol, Gulsum; Sungur, Semra; Tekkaya, Ceren

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the differences in the level of 7th-grade Turkish students' cognitive and metacognitive strategy use (rehearsal, elaboration, organization, critical thinking, and metacognitive self-regulation) in science and investigated the contribution of cognitive and metacognitive strategy use to students' science achievement. The present…

  2. Astro-H: science goals, development status, and European contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Fernandez, C.

    2015-07-01

    The joint JAXA/NASA ASTRO-H mission is the sixth X-ray mission initiated by the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS). ASTRO-H allows a combination of wide band X-ray spectroscopy (5-80 keV) provided by multilayer coating, focusing hard X-ray mirrors and hard X-ray imaging detectors, and high energy-resolution soft X-ray spectroscopy (0.3-12 keV) provided by thin-foil X-ray optics and a micro-calorimeter array. The mission will also carry a X-ray CCD camera as a focal plane detector for a soft X-ray telescope (0.4-12 keV) and a non-focusing soft gamma-ray detector (40-600 keV). ASTRO-H is expected to provide breakthrough results in the studies of the large-scale structure of the Universe and its evolution, the behaviour of matter in the strong gravitational field regime, providing time-resolved spectra from material approaching the event horizon of a black hole, the physical conditions in sites of cosmic-ray acceleration, and the distribution of dark matter in galaxy clusters at different redshifts. ASTRO-H will be launched into low-Earth orbit from the Tanegashima Space Center, Japan, by a JAXA H-IIA rocket.

  3. Computers in Science and Mathematics Education in the ASEAN Region.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talisayon, Vivien M.

    1989-01-01

    Compares policies and programs on computers in science and mathematics education in the six ASEAN countries: Brunei, Indonesia; Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand. Limits discussion to the computer as a teaching aid and object of study, attendant problems, and regional cooperation. (MVL)

  4. Science Data System Contribution to Calibrating and Validating SMAP Data Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuddy, D.

    2015-12-01

    NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission retrieves global surface soil moisture and freeze/thaw state using measurements acquired by a radiometer and a synthetic aperture radar that fly on an Earth orbiting satellite. The SMAP observatory launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base on January 31, 2015 into a near-polar, sun-synchronous orbit. This paper describes the contribution of the SMAP Science Data System (SDS) to the calibration and on-going validation of the radar backscatter and radiometer brightness temperatures. The Science Data System designed, implemented and operated the software that generates data products that contain various geophysical parameters including soil moisture and freeze/thaw states, daily maps of these geophysical parameters, as well as modeled analyses of global soil moisture and carbon flux in Boreal regions. The SDS is a fully automated system that processes the incoming raw data from the instruments, incorporates spacecraft and instrument engineering data, and uses both dynamic and static ancillary products provided by the scientific community. The standard data products appear in Hierarchical Data Format-5 (HDF5) format. These products contain metadata that conform to the ISO 19115 standard. The Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF) hosts and distributes SMAP radar data products. The National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) hosts and distributes all of the other SMAP data products.

  5. Source regional contributions to PM2.5 in a megacity in China using an advanced source regional apportionment method.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ying-Ze; Chen, Gang; Wang, Hai-Ting; Huang-Fu, Yan-Qi; Shi, Guo-Liang; Han, Bo; Feng, Yin-Chang

    2016-03-01

    To quantify contributions of individual source categories from diverse regions to PM2.5, PM2.5 samples were collected in a megacity in China and analyzed through a newly developed source regional apportionment (SRA) method. Levels, compositions and seasonal variations of speciated PM2.5 dataset were investigated. Sources were determined by Multilinear Engine 2 (ME2) model, and results showed that the PM2.5 in Tianjin was mainly influenced by secondary sulphate & secondary organic carbon SOC (percent contribution of 26.2%), coal combustion (24.6%), crustal dust & cement dust (20.3%), secondary nitrate (14.9%) and traffic emissions (14.0%). The SRA method showed that northwest region R2 was the highest regional contributor to secondary sources, with percent contributions to PM2.5 being 9.7% for secondary sulphate & SOC and 6.0% for secondary nitrates; the highest coal combustion was from local region R1 (6.2%) and northwest R2 (8.0%); the maximum contributing region to crustal & cement dust was southeast region R4 (5.0%); and contributions of traffic emissions were relatively spatial homogeneous. The seasonal variation of regional source contributions was observed: in spring, the crustal and cement dust contributed a higher percentage and the R4 was an important contributor; the secondary process attributed an increase fraction in summer; the mixed coal combustion from southwest R5 enhanced in autumn. PMID:26766363

  6. Ocean to Outback: Leonie Rennie's Contribution to Science Education in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venville, Grady

    2009-01-01

    In this article I initially borrow a metaphor from an art exhibition, "Ocean to Outback," as a way to express my perspective on the contribution that Leonie Rennie has made to science education in Australia. I then consider Leonie's contributions as overlapping themes. In particular, Leonie's well-known research on gender and issues of equity in…

  7. Catalyzing Effective Science Education: Contributions from the NASA Science Education and Public Outreach Forums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Denise A.; Bartolone, L.; Eisenhamer, B.; Lawton, B. L.; Schultz, G. R.; Peticolas, L.; Schwerin, T.; Shipp, S.; Astrophysics E/PO Community, NASA; NASA Astrophysics Forum Team

    2013-06-01

    Advancing scientific literacy and strengthening the Nation’s future workforce through stimulating, informative, and effective learning experiences are core principles of the NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) education and public outreach (E/PO) program. To support and coordinate its E/PO community in offering a coherent suite of activities and experiences that effectively meet the needs of the education community, NASA SMD has created four Science Education and Public Outreach Forums (Astrophysics, Planetary Science, Heliophysics, Earth Science). Forum activities include: professional development to raise awareness of the existing body of best practices and educational research; analysis and cataloging of SMD-funded education materials with respect to AAAS Benchmarks for Science Literacy; Working Groups that assemble needs assessment and best practices data relevant to Higher Education, K-12 Formal Education, and Informal Science Education audiences; and community collaborations that enable SMD E/PO community members to develop new partnerships and to learn and share successful strategies and techniques. This presentation will highlight examples of Forum and community-based activities related to astronomy education and teacher professional development, within the context of the principles articulated within the NRC Framework for K-12 Science Education and the Next Generation Science Standards. Among these are an emerging community of practice for K-12 educators and online teacher professional development and resources that incorporate misconception research and authentic experiences with NASA Astrophysics data.

  8. Modelling the thermosteric contribution to global and regional sea-level rise during the last interglacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singarayer, Joy; Stone, Emma; Whipple, Matthew; Lunt, Dan; Bouttes, Nathaelle; Gregory, Jonathan

    2014-05-01

    Global sea level during the last interglacial is likely to have been between 5.5 and 9m above present (Dutton and Lambeck, 2012). Recent calculations, taking into account latest NEEM ice core information, suggest that Greenland would probably not have contributed more than 2.2m to this (Stone et al, 2013), implying a considerable contribution from Antarctica. Previous studies have suggested a significant loss from the West Antarctic ice-sheet (e.g. Holden et al, 2010), which could be initiated following a collapse of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) and resultant warming in the Southern Ocean. Here, model simulations with FAMOUS and HadCM3 have been performed of the last interglacial under various scenarios of reduced Greenland and Antarctic ice-sheet configurations, and with and without collapsed AMOC. Thermal expansion and changes in regional density structure (resulting from ocean circulation changes) can also influence sea level, in addition to ice mass effects discussed thus far. The HadCM3 and FAMOUS simulations will be used to estimate the contribution to global and regional sea level change in interglacials from the latter two factors using a similar methodology to the IPCC TAR/AR4 estimations of future sea level rise (Gregory and Lowe, 2000). The HadCM3 and FAMOUS both have a rigid lid in their ocean model, and consequently a fixed ocean volume. Thermal expansion can, however, be calculated as a volume change from in-situ density (a prognostic variable from the model). Relative sea surface topography will then be estimated from surface pressure gradients and changes in atmospheric pressure. Dutton A., and Lambeck K., 2013. Ice Volume and Sea Level During the Last Interglacial. Science, 337, 216-219 Gregory J.M. and Lowe J.A., 2000. Predictions of global and regional sea-level using AOGCMs with and without flux adjustment. GRL, 27, 3069-3072 Holden P. et al., 2010. Interhemispheric coupling, the West Antarctic Ice Sheet and warm

  9. Science and Technology to Advance Regional Security in Central Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, N

    2002-07-05

    This morning I will describe a program that we refer to as STARS, for Science and Technology to Advance Regional Security, in Central Asia. It is a program that is based on cooperative, bilateral and multilateral, science and technology projects. It is our premise that such cooperative projects provide an opportunity for engagement while addressing real problems that could otherwise lead to destabilizing tensions in the region. The STARS program directly supports USCENTCOM's activities and objectives in environmental security. In fact, we think that STARS is a great vehicle for implementing and amplifying USCENTCOM's environmental security objectives and activities. We are very grateful and very pleased to have General DeLong's support in this matter. I am going to briefly describe the program. I want to stress again that it is a cooperative program. We would like to get input, suggestions, and feedback from the Central Asians here today so we can move forward together.

  10. Historical Contribution of Otorhinolaryngology in Split Region till 1923.

    PubMed

    Ivanisević, Petar; Ivanisević, Milan; Kontić, Mirko; Klancnik, Marisa

    2016-04-01

    The beginnings of the modern otorhinolaryngology in Croatia started in the second half of the 19th century. Before that, there were only rare attempts of some doctors who published medical papers touching the frame of otorhinolaryngology. Mainly those were the PhD's disertations at Vienna, Budapest and Padua University. Among them there was dr Ivo Manola from Split, who in Padua in 1834 took a doctor's degree dealing with otologic diseases. Dr Nikola Fertilio (Nerezisća the island of Brac, 1861--Trieste, 1928) was the first otorhinolaryngologist out of a hospital in Split and Dalmatia. He studied medicine partly in Graz and Vienna, where he graduated in 1890. During 1903 he finished severeal otorhinolaryngological courses which were held by professors Viktor Urbantschitsch and Alfred Bing and by private doctor assistant professor Markus Hajek. During the winter 1903/04 he attended the "Semestralkurs über praktische Orhenheilkunde" at professor Adam Politzer, founder and managing director of the first Otology Clinic in Vienna and the world in 1873. He worked in Trieste, where he practiced otorhinolaryngology. Dr. Fertilio a specialist for diseases of nose, ear and throat, occasionally, usually during his holidays, came from Trieste to Dalmatia (Split, Zadar, Sibenik, Dubrovnik and Kotor) to treat and operate patients. He was comming to Split from 1904 till 1914. He published and announced his commings in the local newpapers. He used to come in summer, most often in August and stayed from several days till two weeks. He stayed and had a practice in Hotel Bellevue. As there wasn't an otorhinolaryngologist in the regional hospital of Split till 1923, otorhinolaryngological operations were occasionally performed by doctors of other surgical branches. Otorhinolaryngologist dr Aleksandar Dorsner came to Split hospital in 1923 and organized otorhinolaryngological service that he led till 1934. PMID:27301241

  11. Spectral regions contributing to melanoma: a personal view.

    PubMed

    Setlow, R B

    1999-09-01

    Although human cutaneous melanoma is a complicated disease, the principal etiologic agent for its incidence in fair skin individuals is exposure to sunlight. In order to understand the epidemiology of melanoma - temporal effects, latitude effects, sunscreen effects, albino susceptibility, and differences from nonmelanoma skin cancer -one must approach the problem by obtaining clues indicating which wavelengths in sunlight are effective in inducing melanomas. One way is to use an animal model. At present, the only suitable model is a backcross hybrid of small tropical fish of the genus Xiphophorus, bred to have only one tumor suppressor gene. Single UV exposures to 7-d-old fish induce melanomas readily observable by 4 mo. The initial slopes of dose-response curves for exposures at 302, 313, 365, 405, 436, and 547 nm yield sensitivity as a function of wavelength. This action spectrum does not look like the spectrum for light absorption by DNA (mostly in the UVB), but has appreciable sensitivities in the UVA and visible regions, and looks like a direct effect of light on DNA plus a large indirect effect on DNA by absorption of light by the intracellular melanin. Because the UVB is only a fraction of solar irradiance, one may calculate that 90% of melanoma induction in humans arises from UVA and visible, assuming the human spectrum is similar to the fish spectrum. The implications of this calculation are that (i) depletion of stratospheric ozone will not affect melanoma incidence, (ii) an increase in sun exposure time as a result of using UVB sunscreens could increase the risk of melanoma, and (iii) the use of high UVA sun tanning devices could increase the risk of melanoma. PMID:10537007

  12. Meta-Theoretical Contributions to the Constitution of a Model-Based Didactics of Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariza, Yefrin; Lorenzano, Pablo; Adúriz-Bravo, Agustín

    2016-07-01

    There is nowadays consensus in the community of didactics of science (i.e. science education understood as an academic discipline) regarding the need to include the philosophy of science in didactical research, science teacher education, curriculum design, and the practice of science education in all educational levels. Some authors have identified an ever-increasing use of the concept of `theoretical model', stemming from the so-called semantic view of scientific theories. However, it can be recognised that, in didactics of science, there are over-simplified transpositions of the idea of model (and of other meta-theoretical ideas). In this sense, contemporary philosophy of science is often blurred or distorted in the science education literature. In this paper, we address the discussion around some meta-theoretical concepts that are introduced into didactics of science due to their perceived educational value. We argue for the existence of a `semantic family', and we characterise four different versions of semantic views existing within the family. In particular, we seek to contribute to establishing a model-based didactics of science mainly supported in this semantic family.

  13. The contribution of the Estonian Soil Sciences Society to the science, society and education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossner, Helis; Reintam, Endla; Astover, Alar; Shanskiy, Merrit

    2015-04-01

    Predecessor of todays Estonian Soil Science Society was Estonian Branch of All-Union Soil Society of Soil Scientist which acted from 1957 to 1991. In 1957-1964 Estonian Branch was leaded by prof. Osvald Hallik and in 1964-1991 by prof. Loit Reintam. After re-independence of Estonia in 1991 the society acted in informal way and was leaded by prof. L. Reintam. Non-profit organization "Estonian Soil Science Society" was officially (re)established in 10.23.2009. Estonian Soil Science Society (ESSS) is aimed to: • coordinate collaboration between institutions and individuals intrested of soil science, conservation and sustainable use of soils; • promoting soil science education and research, raising awareness of publicity on topics relating to soils in Estonia; • cooperation between local and foreign unions and associations. In recent years the ESSS had managed to reunite the number of soil scientist from different research institutions of Estonia and of related institutions. Also, the ESSS had provided numerous of materials based on later scientific findings. One of most important activity leaded by ESSS is the organizing Soil Day in Estonia with relevant seminar, where the speakers are sharing latest information with target group (researchers, teachers, policy makers, farmers, students etc.). In a frames of Soil Day the Soil of the Year is selected for Estonia. In 2015, the soil of the year is Leptosol. For current, International Year of the Soil ESSS had planned numerous activities to introduce the importance of soils to wider audience. In current presentation we would like to share the soil science researchers experience through- out the decades of soil science research in Estonia, show our latest findings and designed activities for the International Year of SOIL.

  14. Future of Applied Watershed Science at Regional Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benda, Lee; Miller, Daniel; Lanigan, Steve; Reeves, Gordon

    2009-05-01

    The Internet-driven evolution of communication and science technologies coincides with a parallel evolution in environmental policy and natural resource management. Resource managers must deal increasingly with land use and conservation plans applied at large spatial scales (watersheds, landscapes, states, regions) involving multiple interacting agencies and stakeholders. Many federal, state, and private organizations have similar objectives, questions, and data and analysis needs. This is motivating the development of community-supported watershed databases and analysis systems of common structure and function across large geographic areas. Numerous state and regional analysis systems are targeting natural resource issues involving management of forests, freshwater fishes, wildlife, and water quality and supply.

  15. National, Regional and Global Perspectives of Higher Education and Science Policies in the Arab Region

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nour, Samia Satti Osman Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the interaction between science policies (and particularly in the area of scientific research) and higher education policies in Gulf and Mediterranean Arab countries. Our analysis reveals a discrepancy between the two sub-regions with respect to integration in the global market, cooperation in scientific research and…

  16. Human Resources Contributions to U.S. Science and Engineering from China. SRS Issue Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jean M.

    This issue brief presents trends in the flow of Chinese graduate students in science and engineering to U.S. universities, their contribution to U.S. academic research, and their subsequent employment in the U.S. highly skilled labor force in postdoctoral appointments and other employment. While graduate students, Chinese students who earned a…

  17. Independent naturalists make matchless contributions to science and resource management (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crimmins, T. M.; Crimmins, M.; Bertelsen, C. D.

    2013-12-01

    proposed for designation as a Research Natural Area (RNA), on the basis of the extensive data collection effort that has already taken in place over the past three decades as well as the demonstrated scientific value of these data. This would represent the first RNA to be established primarily for documenting climate change response, and underscores the immense contributions that independent naturalists can make to the advancement of science and resource management.

  18. Translating psychological science: Highlighting the media's contribution to contagion in mass shootings: Comment on Kaslow (2015).

    PubMed

    Perrin, Paul B

    2016-01-01

    In her presidential address, N. J. Kaslow (see record 2015-33530-002) argued that psychologists have a responsibility to translate psychological science to the public and identifies various platforms for doing so. In this comment on her article, I advocate that psychology as a field immediately heed her call in the area of psychological science highlighting the media's contribution to contagion in mass shootings. I point out the psychological science documenting media contagion for suicide and mass shootings, the World Health Organization's (2008) guidelines for media in reporting suicide deaths to prevent that contagion, and discuss ways-based on Dr. Kaslow's suggestions-that psychologists can disseminate psychological science to prevent similar tragedies in the future. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26766766

  19. North Central Region 4-H Volunteers: Documenting Their Contributions and Volunteer Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nippolt, Pamela Larson; Pleskac, Sue; Schwartz, Vicki; Swanson, Doug

    2012-01-01

    Documenting volunteer contributions strengthens Extension partnerships with volunteers. A team of North Central Region 4-H volunteer specialists collaborated to conduct a study of 4-H volunteer contributions and impacts related to working with youth within the 4-H program. Over three thousand (3,332) 4-H volunteers from throughout the 12-state…

  20. Oak woodlands and forests fire consortium: A regional view of fire science sharing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grabner, Keith W.; Stambaugh, Michael C.; Marschall, Joseph M.; Abadir, Erin R.

    2013-01-01

    The Joint Fire Science Program established 14 regional fire science knowledge exchange consortia to improve the delivery of fire science information and communication among fire managers and researchers. Consortia were developed regionally to ensure that fire science information is tailored to meet regional needs. In this paper, emphasis was placed on the Oak Woodlands and Forests Fire Consortium to provide an inside view of how one regional consortium is organized and its experiences in sharing fire science through various social media, conference, and workshop-based fire science events.

  1. Baltic Earth - Earth System Science for the Baltic Sea Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Markus; Rutgersson, Anna; Lehmann, Andreas; Reckermann, Marcus

    2014-05-01

    The Baltic Sea region, defined as its river catchment basin, spans different climate and population zones, from a temperate, highly populated, industrialized south with intensive agriculture to a boreal, rural north. It encompasses most of the Scandinavian Peninsula in the west; most of Finland and parts of Russia, Belarus, and the Baltic states in the east; and Poland and small parts of Germany and Denmark in the south. The region represents an old cultural landscape, and the Baltic Sea itself is among the most studied sea areas of the world. Baltic Earth is the new Earth system research network for the Baltic Sea region. It is the successor to BALTEX, which was terminated in June 2013 after 20 years and two successful phases. Baltic Earth stands for the vision to achieve an improved Earth system understanding of the Baltic Sea region. This means that the research disciplines of BALTEX continue to be relevant, i.e. atmospheric and climate sciences, hydrology, oceanography and biogeochemistry, but a more holistic view of the Earth system encompassing processes in the atmosphere, on land and in the sea as well as in the anthroposphere shall gain in importance in Baltic Earth. Specific grand research challenges have been formulated, representing interdisciplinary research questions to be tackled in the coming years. A major means will be scientific assessments of particular research topics by expert groups, similar to the BACC approach, which shall help to identify knowledge gaps and develop research strategies. Preliminary grand challenges and topics for which Working Groups have been installed include: • Salinity dynamics in the Baltic Sea • Land-Sea biogeochemical feedbacks in the Baltic Sea region • Natural hazards and extreme events in the Baltic Sea region • Understanding sea level dynamics in the Baltic Sea • Understanding regional variability of water and energy exchange • Utility of Regional Climate Models • Assessment of Scenario Simulations

  2. Contributions of Active Regions, Sunspots, Quiet Sun to the Solar UV Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrill, J. S.; McMullin, D. R.; Cookson, A.; Chapman, G. A.

    2013-12-01

    During the declining phase of the most recent solar cycle, the full disk solar UV spectrum was measured by several space-based instruments, including the SOLSTICE and SIM instruments on the SORCE satellite and the SUSIM instrument on the UARS satellite. These results show distinctively different behavior and have implications for our understanding of the contributions played by various surface features in producing the disk integrated UV spectrum as well as the impact of solar UV emissions on climate. The primary goal of this study is to determine the impact of regions of increased activity (e.g. plage and sunspots) during the recent solar cycle and how this relates to variability of the solar spectrum. Two important results from this study will be the plage and sunspot UV contrast compared to the quiet as well as the center to limb variability of plage, sunspots, and the quiet sun at UV wavelengths. This study will estimate the solar spectrum by utilizing the recently digitized UV spectral radiance observations of plage, sunspots, the quiet sun made by the S082B spectrograph on Skylab, Ca II K images collected at San Fernando Observatory during the recent solar cycle, and a solar spectral model developed under a previous NASA grant. Once generated, these spectra will be compared to the UV observations produced by the above instruments. An important step in the estimation process involves the calibration of the Skylab data for a valid comparison between model and observed spectra. This will require separate calibration curves for SUSIM and SORCE observations. These will be generated from days of no or minimal activity. The determination of separate calibrations will allow any subtle contributions due to variations in instrument performance to be accounted for in the comparison of model and observed spectra. Also, changes in instrumental behavior over time will be separable from real changes in the solar spectrum which are due to contributions of active solar

  3. Contributions of Active Regions, Sunspots, Quiet Sun to the Solar UV Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrill, J. S.; McMullin, D. R.; Cookson, A.; Chapman, G. A.

    2011-12-01

    During the declining phase of the most recent solar cycle, the full disk solar UV spectrum was measured by several space-based instruments, including the SOLSTICE and SIM instruments on the SORCE satellite and the SUSIM instrument on the UARS satellite. These results show distinctively different behavior and have implications for our understanding of the contributions played by various surface features in producing the disk integrated UV spectrum as well as the impact of solar UV emissions on climate. The primary goal of this study is to determine the impact of regions of increased activity (e.g. plage and sunspots) during the recent solar cycle and how this relates to variability of the solar spectrum. Two important results from this study will be the plage and sunspot UV contrast compared to the quiet as well as the center to limb variability of plage, sunspots, and the quiet sun at UV wavelengths. This study will estimate the solar spectrum by utilizing the recently digitized UV spectral radiance observations of plage, sunspots, the quiet sun made by the S082B spectrograph on Skylab, Ca II K images collected at San Fernando Observatory during the recent solar cycle, and a solar spectral model developed under a previous NASA grant. Once generated, these spectra will be compared to the UV observations produced by the above instruments. An important step in the estimation process involves the calibration of the Skylab data for a valid comparison between model and observed spectra. This will require separate calibration curves for SUSIM and SORCE observations. These will be generated from days of no or minimal activity. The determination of separate calibrations will allow any subtle contributions due to variations in instrument performance to be accounted for in the comparison of model and observed spectra. Also, changes in instrumental behavior over time will be separable from real changes in the solar spectrum which are due to contributions of active solar

  4. Imaging Enceladus' Exotic South Polar Regions: Imaging Science Team Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, T.

    2005-12-01

    The Cassini spacecraft had a close (175 km altitute) encounter with Saturn's moon Enceladus on 14 July 2005, resulting in a major discovery: evidence from multiple experiments show that there is a large `plume' of water vapor and particles emanating from the satellite's south polar region. Infrared data from the CIRS instrument showed that this area is also anomalously warm, providing evidence for internal heat. High resolution images taken by the Imaging Science System during the encounter show that the warm region associated with water vapor venting is a unique area on this icy world. The region has very few if any detectable impact craters, making it the youngest surface seen on Enceladus, or any of the other icy Saturnian satellites; estimates from cratering models place its age at less than 10-100 million years. It is surrounded by tectonic features suggesting a global stress pattern that may be associated with a change in spin rate. Long, parallel fractures, informally dubbed `tiger stripes', cross the region and are correlated with at least some of the thermal anomalies, making them good candidates for the source regions of the water venting. Spectral data and photometric studies also show that the whole area and the tiger stripes in particular have fewer fine grained particles on the surface than most of the moon's surface, in agreement with a young surface and crystalinity and grain size interpretations of data from the Visual and Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer experiment. Tidal forces and radioactive heating are probably responsible for the activity, although generating such intense internal heating is challenging for current models. Portions of this work were done at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with NASA.

  5. Regional contribution to PM1 pollution during winter haze in Yangtze River Delta, China.

    PubMed

    Tang, Lili; Yu, Hongxia; Ding, Aijun; Zhang, Yunjiang; Qin, Wei; Wang, Zhuang; Chen, Wentai; Hua, Yan; Yang, Xiaoxiao

    2016-01-15

    To quantify regional sources contributing to submicron particulate matter (PM1) pollution in haze episodes, on-line measurements combining two modeling methods, namely, positive matrix factorization (PMF) and backward Lagrangian particle dispersion modeling (LPDM), were conducted for the period of one month in urban Nanjing, a city located in the western part of Yangtze River Delta (YRD) region of China. Several multi-day haze episodes were observed in December 2013. Long-range transport of biomass burning from the southwestern YRD region largely contributed to PM1 pollution with more than 25% of total organics mass in a lasting heavy haze. The LPDM analysis indicates that regional transport is a main source contributing to secondary low-volatility production. The high-potential source regions of secondary low-volatility production are mainly located in areas to the northeast of the city. High aerosol pollution was mainly contributed by regional transport associated with northeastern air masses. Such regional transport on average accounts for 46% of total NR-PM1 with sulfate and aged low-volatility organics being the largest fractions (>65%). PMID:26414850

  6. Examination of factors which may contribute to the underrepresentation of African American teachers certified in science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Rita C. F.

    Throughout this country the student population is becoming increasingly diverse, yet the teacher population does not reflect this diversity. This lack of diversity in the teacher population deprives students of color from having role models of the same race/ethnicity who look like them and who might have experiences which are similar to theirs (Epstein, 2005; Nettles & Perna, 1997). Having role models from their own race in the classroom could have a positive impact on students' attitudes about science (Perine, 2003), and facilitate their learning of the subject matter, and give students an incentive to do well in school (Vegas, Murnane, & Willett, 2001). In 2000, a national survey study of math and science teachers was conducted (Horizon Research, 2001). The majority of biology (90%), chemistry (93%), and physics (94%) teachers who participated in the study were White. Findings of the study revealed that only 55% to 60% of these teachers considered themselves well prepared to effectively teach a culturally diverse student population (Banilower, 2002; Smith, 2002; Wood, 2002). The majority of the teacher pool, which is White, prefer not to teach in urban communities as they have a preference for teaching jobs in the nonurban communities that are similar to those in which they were raised (Boyd, Lankford, Loeb, & Wyckoff, 2005; Epstein, 2005). The purpose of this quantitative study was to examine factors that may contribute to the underrepresentation of African American teachers certified in science. More specifically, it was decided to examine the high school experiences of in-service teachers. Study participants were teachers and other certificated faculty in two school districts located in the southern portion of the United States. Findings of the study revealed a statistically significant relationship between a teacher's decision to become certified in science and the following high school experiences: teachers and guidance counselors encouraging students to

  7. Contributions OF SAGE II Instrument to NASA Earth Science Enterprise Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaye, J. A.

    2002-05-01

    NASA's Earth Science Enterprise (ESE) has a research strategy based on a hierarchy of questions that are both scientifically and societally important. These questions are organized into five categories - variability, forcing, response, consequence, and prediction. The 17 years of data from the second Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE II) instrument have contributed to ESE's progress in all of these categories, and had significant impacts on several of the 23 questions that constitute the most detailed level of the ESE Science Research Strategy. In this talk, the major contributions of SAGE II to these areas will be reviewed, and lessons learned from the SAGE II experience that can be incorporated into planning for future satellite missions will be reviewed.

  8. Science and the education of physicians: Sigerist's contribution to American medical reform.

    PubMed

    Brickman, J P

    1994-01-01

    This paper seeks to place Henry E. Sigerist within a generation of American scientists who saw science as an intellectual bulwark against burgeoning fascism and nationalism. It responds to a recent critique of scientific positivism and the medical reform ethos of the 1930s and 1940s. Critics argue that faith in scientific medicine led health activists to choose medical care, guaranteed by insurance, rather than social reform. The paper focuses on the place Sigerist assigned to science in medicine and argues that his embrance of scientific medicine must be qualified by his historical perspective. Sigerist's singular contribution to the dialogue of medical reform came from his projection of an educational prototype that he believed might reconcile science with the imperatives of an industrial society. While embodying much of the spirit of reformers of the 1930s and 1940s, Sigerist also foreshadowed our own. PMID:8063896

  9. DOI Climate Science Centers--Regional science to address management priorities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Malley, Robin

    2012-01-01

    Our Nation's lands, waters, and ecosystems and the living and cultural resources they contain face myriad challenges from invasive species, the effects of changing land and water use, habitat fragmentation and degradation, and other influences. These challenges are compounded by increasing influences from a changing climate—higher temperatures, increasing droughts, floods, and wildfires, and overall increasing variability in weather and climate. The Department of the Interior (DOI) has established eight regional Climate Science Centers (CSC) (fig. 1) that will provide scientific information and tools to natural and cultural resource managers as they plan for conserving these resources in a changing world. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center (NCCWSC) is managing the CSCs on behalf of the DOI.

  10. Regional Queensland Parents' Views of Science Education: Some Unexpected Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boon, Helen J.

    2012-01-01

    Low post-compulsory science enrolments for secondary students have been a growing concern across the Western world. Research has examined factors relating to science curricula and students' attitudes about science, but parental views of science education remain largely unexplored in Australia. Because parents have a strong role in shaping their…

  11. Professor Gheorghe Bilaşcu's contribution to the development of science and culture in Romania.

    PubMed

    Rotaru, Alexandru; Petrovai, Ion; Rotaru, Horatiu

    2016-01-01

    When speaking about Professor Gheorghe Bilaşcu (1863-1926) and his major contribution to the establishment of Romanian medical education in Cluj, he should be considered not only in terms of scientist and creator of the Dental School, but also through his commitment to the development of science and culture in Romania. A wealthy dentist in Budapest where he graduated from the Dental School, he supported a lot of Romanian students to attend schools and universities in the Budapest, thus contributing to the development of culture in his own country. Finally, he left his private practice in the Capital of Hungary to come to Cluj to support the efforts of building the Dental School and profession in Romania. This paper illustrates the contribution that Professor Gheorghe Bilaşcu made to the development of higher education in Romania, as well as his support of the local culture. PMID:27547068

  12. Report on a Boston University Conference December 7-8, 2012 on How Can the History and Philosophy of Science Contribute to Contemporary US Science Teaching?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garik, Peter; Benétreau-Dupin, Yann

    2014-09-01

    This is an editorial report on the outcomes of an international conference sponsored by a grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) (REESE-1205273) to the School of Education at Boston University and the Center for Philosophy and History of Science at Boston University for a conference titled: How Can the History and Philosophy of Science Contribute to Contemporary US Science Teaching? The presentations of the conference speakers and the reports of the working groups are reviewed. Multiple themes emerged for K-16 education from the perspective of the history and philosophy of science. Key ones were that: students need to understand that central to science is argumentation, criticism, and analysis; students should be educated to appreciate science as part of our culture; students should be educated to be science literate; what is meant by the nature of science as discussed in much of the science education literature must be broadened to accommodate a science literacy that includes preparation for socioscientific issues; teaching for science literacy requires the development of new assessment tools; and, it is difficult to change what science teachers do in their classrooms. The principal conclusions drawn by the editors are that: to prepare students to be citizens in a participatory democracy, science education must be embedded in a liberal arts education; science teachers alone cannot be expected to prepare students to be scientifically literate; and, to educate students for scientific literacy will require a new curriculum that is coordinated across the humanities, history/social studies, and science classrooms.

  13. Contributions, Controversies, and Credibility: Citizen Science and Understandings of Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirk, J.; Bonney, R.

    2011-12-01

    Studying the impacts of global climate change on earth systems requires data to be gathered at vast spatial and temporal scales. Numerous citizen science projects, including the National Audubon Society Christmas Bird Count and the Cooperative Observer Program of the National Weather Service, engage volunteers in collecting environmental information. Some projects span countries or even continents and have been operating for decades, meaning long-term and geographically distributed data are already available for analysis. Citizen science projects have made significant contributions to understanding the effects of climate change by revealing changing patterns in phenology, shifts in species' ranges and distributions, and trends in temperature and rainfall patterns. In addition, citizen science presents opportunities for developing public understanding of climate change and its consequences. According to the Yale Project on Climate Change Communication (YPCCC), public responses to this issue can be categorized into six groups - from alarmed to dismissive - with each group characterized as much by attitudes about climate change as by understandings of the topic. Participants in citizen science projects run by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, who tend to be highly educated and hold positive views towards the environment, exhibit an unexpected degree of skepticism and misunderstandings regarding climate science. This parallels findings by YPCCC suggesting that, on the issue of climate change, the American public is more meaningfully segmented by ideology and cultural affiliation than by educational background and economic status. No matter how they are segmented, if the public perceives a controversy, individuals often decide what to believe based on who they trust to impart credible information. Citizen science has long endured - and in most fields, has largely overcome - questions of credibility. With refined and sophisticated measures to ensure data quality, the

  14. The contribution of behavioural science to primary care research: development and evaluation of behaviour change interventions.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Stephen

    2011-10-01

    Behavioural science is concerned with predicting, explaining and changing behaviour. Taking a personal perspective, this article aims to show how behavioural science can contribute to primary care research, specifically in relation to the development and evaluation of interventions to change behaviour. After discussing the definition and measurement of behaviour, the principle of compatibility and theories of behaviour change, the article outlines two examples of behaviour change trials (one on medication adherence and the other on physical activity), which were part of a research programme on prevention of chronic disease and its consequences. The examples demonstrate how, in a multidisciplinary context, behavioural science can contribute to primary care research in several important ways, including posing relevant research questions, defining the target behaviour, understanding the psychological determinants of behaviour, developing behaviour change interventions and selection or development of measures. The article concludes with a number of recommendations: (i) whether the aim is prediction, explanation or change, defining the target behaviour is a crucial first step; (ii) interventions should be explicitly based on theories that specify the factors that need to be changed in order to produce the desired change in behaviour; (iii) intervention developers need to be aware of the differences between different theories and select a theory only after careful consideration of the alternatives assessed against relevant criteria; and (iv) developers need to be aware that interventions can never be entirely theory based. PMID:22284944

  15. Regional Cortical Surface Area in Adolescents: A Preliminary MRI Twin Study of Genetic and Environmental Contributions.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xingshun; Eyler, Lisa T; Hu, Xiaomei; Hou, Xiao; Deng, Wei; Zhang, Xiaowei; Lin, Yin; Lei, Wei; Li, Mingli; Kang, Line; Huang, Yongfeng; Wang, Na; Qiu, Tian; Li, Xiao; He, Qian; Fu, Yixiao; Meng, Huaqing; Li, Tao

    2016-03-01

    Cortical surface area (CSA) has particular relevance for understanding development, behavior, and the connection between brain structure and function. Little is known about genetic and environmental determinants of CSA during development. We utilized bivariate twin methods to identify global and regionally specific genetic factors which influence CSA in a preliminary sample of typically-developing adolescents, with hypotheses based on findings in middle-aged adults. Similar to previous findings, we observed high heritability for total CSA. There was also significant evidence for genetic influences on regional CSA, particularly when these were not adjusted for total CSA, with highest heritability in frontal cortex and relatively fewer genetic contributions to medial temporal cortical structures. Adjustment for total CSA reduced regional CSA heritability dramatically, but a moderate influence of genetic factors remained in some regions. Both global and regionally-specific genetic factors influence regional CSA during adolescence. PMID:26519369

  16. Nurse engagement and contributions to the clinical and translational science awards initiative.

    PubMed

    Sampselle, Carolyn M; Knafl, Kathleen A; Jacob, Jacqueline Dunbar; McCloskey, Donna Jo

    2013-06-01

    CTSAs are mandated to follow a multidisciplinary model. Requests for applications direct responsive applications to "integrate clinical and translational science across multiple departments, schools," listing disciplines in addition to medicine such as engineering, nursing, and public health. This inventory of nurse engagement in CTSAs describes the extent of nursing's CTSA engagement from the perspective of participating nurse scientists within individual CTSAs, including institutional/national contributions and best practices that foster a multidisciplinary model. Of the 50 CTSAs affiliated with a nursing school, 44 responded (88% response rate). Of the ten CTSAs not affiliated with a nursing school, four responded (40% response rate). Overall funding success rates of nurse applicants are: TL1 fellowships 81%, KL2 fellowships 54%, and nurse-led pilots 58%. At most CTSAs nursing is contributing to the accomplishment of the CTSA mandate. The strongest categories of contribution are community engagement, implementation science, and training. Best practices to enhance multidisciplinary collaboration are: (1) inclusion of multiple disciplines on key committees who meet regularly to guide individual core and overall CTSA strategic planning and implementation; (2) required multidisciplinary co-mentors (ideally from different schools within the CTSA) on training grants and as co-investigators on pilot projects; and (3) documentation of multidisciplinary activity in annual reports. PMID:23751023

  17. Local and inter-regional contributions to PM2.5 nitrate and sulfate in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Qi; Wu, Li; Zhang, Hongliang

    2014-09-01

    Emissions of NOx, SO2 and primary nitrate and sulfate from seven regions in China (North, Northeast, East, Central, South, Southwest and Northwest) were separately tracked in a source-oriented Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model to quantify the local and inter-regional contributions to PM2.5 nitrate and sulfate concentrations in different cities and provinces. In January, high concentrations of nitrate (∼30 μg m-3) occurred in the North China Plain (NCP) and the Middle and Lower Yangtze Plain (MLYP), as well as the Sichuan Basin. NOx emissions from North, Central and East China were transported over long distances to form rather uniform concentration of nitrate in the NCP and MLYP regions and significantly impacted nitrate concentrations in downwind regions as far as the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region in South China. Wintertime sulfate concentrations demonstrated a more significant inter-regional southward transport pattern and wider spatial distributions than nitrate. The top-five ranked provinces with combined nitrate and sulfate concentrations (Chongqing, Sichuan, Guizhou, Anhui and Hunan) were all affected by emissions from the North, Central and East China, in addition to their local region emissions. In August, slower northerly and northeasterly wind reduced inter-regional transport. Nitrate and sulfate concentrations peaked in North China as dilution was more severely restricted by mountain ranges further north. Three of the top five high concentration provinces (Tianjin, Hebei and Beijing) were located in North China and had more than 55% of local region contributions. Emissions from North China accounted for ∼20% in the remaining two provinces (Shandong in East China and Henan in Central China). In addition to emissions from North China, ∼30% or more of the nitrate and sulfate concentrations in four of the top five high concentration provinces (Tianjin, Henan, Hebei and Shandong) were due to emissions from East China. Time series of daily

  18. School Readiness of Children from Immigrant Families: Contributions of Region of Origin, Home, and Childcare

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koury, Amanda S.; Votruba-Drzal, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Children from immigrant families make up a growing proportion of young children in the United States. This study highlights the heterogeneity in early academic skills related to parental region of origin. It also considers the contributions of early home and nonparental care settings to the diversity in early academic performance. Using nationally…

  19. Source Sector and Region Contributions to BC and PM2.5 in Central Asia

    EPA Science Inventory

    Particulate matter (PM) mass concentrations, seasonal cycles, source sector and source region contributions in Central Asia (CA) are analyzed for the period April 2008-July 2009 using the STEM chemical transport model and modeled meteorology from the WRF model. Predicted AOD valu...

  20. [Turkish exile of women and their contribution to the science of Turkey from 1933 to 1945].

    PubMed

    Erichsen, Regine

    2005-12-01

    When the National-Socialists from the year 1933 forced Jewish civil-servants and professionals to leave their jobs with restrictive laws against different professional groups, among those who left the country in order do find new openings were many women. For many of them the exile meant the break up of their academic career. However, those who found a new occupation in the Turkish university reform the Turkish state started in 1933 made an important contribution to a successful project of science transfer the large group of emigrants from Germany and Austria carried out in Turkey between 1933 and 1945. The article shows how exiled German and Austrian women especially in the medical professions took part in the innovational shift of science and learning of the Turkish universities and the clinical practice in the institutions of public health. PMID:17153363

  1. Evaluation of the contributions of four components of gross domestic product in various regions in China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sanmang; Lei, Yalin; Li, Li

    2015-01-01

    Four major components influence the growth of the gross domestic product in Chinese provinces: consumption, investment, transnational exports, and inter-provincial exports. By splitting a competitive input-output table into a non-competitive input-output table, this study used an input-output model to measure the contributions of the four components of gross domestic product in various regions in China. We found that international exports drove the growth of the gross domestic product more strongly in the eastern region than in other regions. Investment and inter-provincial exports were the major impetus for gross domestic product growth in the central and western regions. We also found that consumption played a minimal role in driving the growth of the gross domestic product in all regions in China. According to these findings, although various regions can share much in terms of policies to transform the impetus for economic growth, there should be different foci for different regions. Their shared policy is to increase the role of final consumption in stimulating economic growth. Region-specific policies mandate that the eastern region should strengthen the driving force provided by international exports and that the central and western regions should strengthen indigenous growth capabilities by improving scientific innovation, industrial support, and institutional innovation. PMID:25915927

  2. Evaluation of the Contributions of Four Components of Gross Domestic Product in Various Regions in China

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Sanmang; Lei, Yalin; Li, Li

    2015-01-01

    Four major components influence the growth of the gross domestic product in Chinese provinces: consumption, investment, transnational exports, and inter-provincial exports. By splitting a competitive input-output table into a non-competitive input-output table, this study used an input-output model to measure the contributions of the four components of gross domestic product in various regions in China. We found that international exports drove the growth of the gross domestic product more strongly in the eastern region than in other regions. Investment and inter-provincial exports were the major impetus for gross domestic product growth in the central and western regions. We also found that consumption played a minimal role in driving the growth of the gross domestic product in all regions in China. According to these findings, although various regions can share much in terms of policies to transform the impetus for economic growth, there should be different foci for different regions. Their shared policy is to increase the role of final consumption in stimulating economic growth. Region-specific policies mandate that the eastern region should strengthen the driving force provided by international exports and that the central and western regions should strengthen indigenous growth capabilities by improving scientific innovation, industrial support, and institutional innovation. PMID:25915927

  3. Contribution Assessment of Regional Air Pollution over Northeast Asia using CMAQ Source Apportionment Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, K.; Woo, J.; Kim, H.; Lee, J.; Kim, C.

    2011-12-01

    East Asia is one of the largest emission source regions in the world because of the large population and fast economic growth for several decades. Recent observation from space also demonstrates that emissions in East Asia - especially China - have been increased impressively since 1995. A number of regional scale transport studies using comprehensive 3D modeling system such as CMAQ have been conducted to understand transboundary air pollution. The contribution assessment using such a comprehensive modeling system, however, was not extensively investigated in this region. Air pollution contributions from multiple source types and regions over East Asia were examined using CMAQ based source apportionment tool off-line coupled with a meteorological model (WRF). The simulation was conducted for the entire year of 2009. The CMAQ ozone & particle precursor tagging methodologies (OPTM) source apportionment tool were applied in our study. An anthropogenic emissions inventory and processing methodology have been developed in support of the source-receptor modeling study in East Asia region. Emissions from open biomass burning and biogenic source were also estimated to support air quality contributions assessment from various sources and source types. Remote sensing-based atmosphere information and ground based monitoring data has been included to evaluate the simulation results. The results of our analysis will be presented at the conference.

  4. Contributions from research on irradiated ferritic/martensitic steels to materials science and engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelles, D. S.

    1990-05-01

    Ferritic and martensitic steels are finding increased application for structural components in several reactor systems. Low-alloy steels have long been used for pressure vessels in light water fission reactors. Martensitic stainless steels are finding increasing usage in liquid metal fast breeder reactors and are being considered for fusion reactor applications when such systems become commercially viable. Recent efforts have evaluated the applicability of oxide dispersion-strengthened ferritic steels. Experiments on the effect of irradiation on these steels provide several examples where contributions are being made to materials science and engineering. Examples are given demonstrating improvements in basic understanding, small specimen test procedure development, and alloy development.

  5. Sources and contributions of wood smoke during winter in London: assessing local and regional influences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crilley, L. R.; Bloss, W. J.; Yin, J.; Beddows, D. C. S.; Harrison, R. M.; Allan, J. D.; Young, D. E.; Flynn, M.; Williams, P.; Zotter, P.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Heal, M. R.; Barlow, J. F.; Halios, C. H.; Lee, J. D.; Szidat, S.; Mohr, C.

    2014-10-01

    Determining the contribution of wood smoke to air pollution in large cities such as London is becoming increasingly important due to the changing nature of domestic heating in urban areas. During winter, biomass burning emissions can exceed the contributions from traffic emissions, and have been identified as a major cause of exceedences of European air quality limits. The aim of this work was to quantify the contribution of biomass burning in London to concentrations of PM2.5 and determine whether local emissions or regional contributions were the main source of biomass smoke. To achieve this, a number of biomass burning chemical tracers were analysed at a site within central London and two sites in surrounding rural areas. Concentrations of levoglucosan, elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC) and K+ were generally well correlated across the three sites. At all the sites, biomass burning was found to be a source of OC and EC, with the largest contribution of EC from traffic emissions, while for OC the dominant fraction likely included contributions from secondary organic aerosols, primary biogenic and cooking sources. Source apportionment of the EC and OC using average source ratios from published data was found to give reasonable estimation of the total carbon from non-fossil and fossil fuel sources based upon comparison with estimates derived from 14C analysis. Black carbon (BC) data from 2 and 7 wavelength Aethalometers were also apportioned into the contributions from biomass burning and traffic, based upon the enhanced absorption of wood smoke at UV wavelengths compared to BC. While the source apportionment of BC using this approach found similar trends to that observed for EC, higher percentage contributions of wood burning to BC were estimated. Based on a wood smoke mass conversion factor for levoglucosan, mean wood smoke mass at the sites was found to range from 0.78-1.0 μg m-3 during the campaign in January-February 2012. Measurements on a 160 m

  6. Improving SLCF Science in the Himalayan Region: ICIMOD's Atmosphere Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panday, A. K.; Pradhan, B. B.; Surapipith, V.

    2013-12-01

    What fraction of the black carbon arriving on Yala Glacier in Langtang, Nepal, is from cooking fires in the houses in the valley below? What fraction is from elsewhere in rural Nepal? What fraction is from industrial and transport sources in Kathmandu? What fraction is from northern India and beyond? What fraction is from the high altitude forest fires that take place during March or April? Effectively mitigating the impacts of black carbon and other short-lived climate forcers requires detailed understanding not just of emissions and impacts, but also of the atmospheric transport pathways that connect the two. In mountainous areas of the Hindu-Kush Himalaya detailed quantitative knowledge about emissions, atmospheric processes, and impacts is still largely missing. The International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD) is an intergovernmental organization covering Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, Nepal, China, Bhutan, Bangladesh, and Myanmar. ICIMOD's recently established Atmosphere Initiative not only assesses mitigation options and contributes to policy and capacity building in the region, but also works actively to promote collaboration among researchers in the region, while building up an in-house team whose research will address key questions about SLCF. In Spring 2013 ICIMOD's Atmosphere Initiative, in collaboration with the Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS) in Potsdam, Germany, carried out the largest field campaign to date in Nepal, hosting instruments belonging to dozens of institutions around the world, at nine field site within and upwind of the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal. The dataset that has been collected gives unprecedented insights into the emissions and atmospheric processes taking place downwind of and within the largest urban agglomeration in the Himalaya region. Meanwhile, in collaboration with national partner institutions, ICIMOD is in the process of setting up one atmospheric observatory each in Bhutan and in

  7. Managing the Junior Science & Humanities Symposium: Management and Operation of the Pacific Region Junior Science & Humanities Symposium, 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This publication provides administrative, management, supervisory guidance, and other information necessary for successful conduct and support of grades 7-12 science symposia. Originally the text was developed as the operations manual for the Pacific Region Junior Science and Humanities Symposium (PJSHS). It contains information necessary to…

  8. Source contributions and regional transport of primary particulate matter in China.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianlin; Wu, Li; Zheng, Bo; Zhang, Qiang; He, Kebin; Chang, Qing; Li, Xinghua; Yang, Fumo; Ying, Qi; Zhang, Hongliang

    2015-12-01

    A source-oriented CMAQ was applied to determine source sector/region contributions to primary particulate matter (PPM) in China. Four months were simulated with emissions grouped to eight regions and six sectors. Predicted elemental carbon (EC), primary organic carbon (POC), and PPM concentrations and source contributions agree with measurements and have significant spatiotemporal variations. Residential is a major contributor to spring/winter EC (50-80%), POC (60%-90%), and PPM (30-70%). For summer/fall, industrial contributes 30-50% for EC/POC and 40-60% for PPM. Transportation is more important for EC (20-30%) than POC/PPM (<5%). Open burning is important in summer/fall of Guangzhou and Chongqing. Dust contributes to 1/3-1/2 in spring/fall of Beijing, Xi'an and Chongqing. Based on sector-region combination, local residential/transportation and residential/industrial from Heibei are major contributors to spring PPM in Beijing. In summer/fall, local industrial is the largest. In winter, residential/industrial from local and Hebei account for >90% in Beijing. PMID:26340297

  9. Contribution of Monthly and Regional Rainfall to the Strength of Indian Summer Monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y.; Ali, M.; Bourassa, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall (ISMR: June-September) has both temporal and spatial variability causing floods/droughts in different seasons/locations leading to a strong or weak monsoon. Here, we present the contribution of all-India monthly, seasonal and regional rainfall to the ISMR, with special reference to the strong and weak monsoons. For this purpose, rainfall data provided by the India Meteorological Department (IMD: http://www.imd.gov.in/section/nhac/dynamic/Monsoon_frame.htm) for 1901-2013 have been used. The IMD divided the Indian sub-continent into four homogeneous regions of northwest India (NWI), northeast India (NEI), central India (CI), and south peninsula India (SPIN). Rainfall during July-August contributes the most to the total seasonal rainfall, whether it is a strong or weak monsoon. Although the NEI has the maximum area-weighted rainfall, its contribution is the least toward a strong or weak monsoon. The rainfall in the remaining three regions (NWI, CI, and SPIN) controls whether an ISMR is strong or weak. Compared to the monthly rainfall, the regional rainfall dominates the strong or weak rainfall periods.

  10. Patterns of contribution to citizen science biodiversity projects increase understanding of volunteers' recording behaviour.

    PubMed

    Boakes, Elizabeth H; Gliozzo, Gianfranco; Seymour, Valentine; Harvey, Martin; Smith, Chloë; Roy, David B; Haklay, Muki

    2016-01-01

    The often opportunistic nature of biological recording via citizen science leads to taxonomic, spatial and temporal biases which add uncertainty to biodiversity estimates. However, such biases may also give valuable insight into volunteers' recording behaviour. Using Greater London as a case-study we examined the composition of three citizen science datasets - from Greenspace Information for Greater London CIC, iSpot and iRecord - with respect to recorder contribution and spatial and taxonomic biases, i.e. when, where and what volunteers record. We found most volunteers contributed few records and were active for just one day. Each dataset had its own taxonomic and spatial signature suggesting that volunteers' personal recording preferences may attract them towards particular schemes. There were also patterns across datasets: species' abundance and ease of identification were positively associated with number of records, as was plant height. We found clear hotspots of recording activity, the 10 most popular sites containing open water. We note that biases are accrued as part of the recording process (e.g. species' detectability) as well as from volunteer preferences. An increased understanding of volunteer behaviour gained from analysing the composition of records could thus enhance the fit between volunteers' interests and the needs of scientific projects. PMID:27619155

  11. [Benchmarks for interdisciplinary health and social sciences research: contributions of a research seminar].

    PubMed

    Kivits, Joëlle; Fournier, Cécile; Mino, Jean-Christophe; Frattini, Marie-Odile; Winance, Myriam; Lefève, Céline; Robelet, Magali

    2013-01-01

    This article proposes a reflection on an interdisciplinary seminar, initiated by philosophy and sociology researchers and public health professionals. The objective of this seminar was to explore the mechanisms involved in setting up and conducting interdisciplinary research, by investigating the practical modalities of articulating health and human and social sciences research in order to more clearly understand the conditions, tensions and contributions of collaborative research. These questions were discussed on the basis of detailed analysis of four recent or current research projects. Case studies identified four typical epistemological or methodological issues faced by researchers in the fields of health and human and social sciences: institutional conditions and their effects on research; deconstruction of the object; the researcher's commitment in his/her field; the articulation of research methods. Three prerequisites for interdisciplinary research in social and human sciences and in health were identified: mutual questioning of research positions and fields of study; awareness of the tensions related to institutional positions and disciplinary affiliation; joint elaboration and exchanges between various types of knowledge to ensure an interdisciplinary approach throughout all of the research process. PMID:24418420

  12. How the science and engineering of spaceflight contribute to understanding the plasticity of spinal cord injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgerton, V. Reggie; Roy, Roland R.; Hodgson, John A.; Day, M. Kathleen; Weiss, James; Harkema, Susan J.; Dobkin, Bruce; Garfinkel, Alan; Konigsberg, E.; Koslovskaya, Inessa

    2000-07-01

    Space programs support experimental investigations related to the unique environment of space and to the technological developments from many disciplines of both science and engineering that contribute to space studies. Furthermore, interactions between scientists, engineers and administrators, that are necessary for the success of any science mission in space, promote interdiscipline communication, understanding and interests which extend well beyond a specific mission. NASA-catalyzed collaborations have benefited the spinal cord rehabilitation program at UCLA in fundamental science and in the application of expertise and technologies originally developed for the space program. Examples of these benefits include: (1) better understanding of the role of load in maintaining healthy muscle and motor function, resulting in a spinal cord injury (SCI) rehabilitation program based on muscle/limb loading; (2) investigation of a potentially novel growth factor affected by spaceflight which may help regulate muscle mass; (3) development of implantable sensors, electronics and software to monitor and analyze long-term muscle activity in unrestrained subjects; (4) development of hardware to assist therapies applied to SCI patients; and (5) development of computer models to simulate stepping which will be used to investigate the effects of neurological deficits (muscle weakness or inappropriate activation) and to evaluate therapies to correct these deficiencies.

  13. How the science and engineering of spaceflight contribute to understanding the plasticity of spinal cord injury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgerton, V. R.; Roy, R. R.; Hodgson, J. A.; Day, M. K.; Weiss, J.; Harkema, S. J.; Dobkin, B.; Garfinkel, A.; Konigsberg, E.; Koslovskaya, I.

    2000-01-01

    Space programs support experimental investigations related to the unique environment of space and to the technological developments from many disciplines of both science and engineering that contribute to space studies. Furthermore, interactions between scientists, engineers and administrators, that are necessary for the success of any science mission in space, promote interdiscipline communication, understanding and interests which extend well beyond a specific mission. NASA-catalyzed collaborations have benefited the spinal cord rehabilitation program at UCLA in fundamental science and in the application of expertise and technologies originally developed for the space program. Examples of these benefits include: (1) better understanding of the role of load in maintaining healthy muscle and motor function, resulting in a spinal cord injury (SCI) rehabilitation program based on muscle/limb loading; (2) investigation of a potentially novel growth factor affected by spaceflight which may help regulate muscle mass; (3) development of implantable sensors, electronics and software to monitor and analyze long-term muscle activity in unrestrained subjects; (4) development of hardware to assist therapies applied to SCI patients; and (5) development of computer models to simulate stepping which will be used to investigate the effects of neurological deficits (muscle weakness or inappropriate activation) and to evaluate therapies to correct these deficiencies.

  14. Education in Sustainable Development: How Can Science Education Contribute to the Vulnerability Perception?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Education for human development within the constraints of sustainability is problematic for schools. On one hand, it is a political idea that continues to evolve with successive compromises between social groups with differing or even conflicting interests. ESD is therefore inherently `non-disciplinary' and cannot be the basis of a single school subject if we wish to keep the creativity that results from the dynamics at work. On the other hand, SD leads us to think collectively about solutions that ensure a future of our choosing that preserves the biological capacity of the planet and to reduce our vulnerability. The sciences thus have a key role: their ability to question the world and to model the consequences of collective and individual choices. But there is a risk of technocratic drift and SD leads us to think about society's values and aims. A new link is established between sciences and humanities with a democratic model in sight. This paper presents what is possible out of the prospective scenarios method within general and compulsory education by seeking, through an empirical approach, to determine its feasibility, its contributions, its limits, and to locate the place of science education in the elaboration of the perception of "vulnerability". Both primary and secondary schools are concerned.

  15. Sources and contributions of wood smoke during winter in London: assessing local and regional influences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crilley, L. R.; Bloss, W. J.; Yin, J.; Beddows, D. C. S.; Harrison, R. M.; Allan, J. D.; Young, D. E.; Flynn, M.; Williams, P.; Zotter, P.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Heal, M. R.; Barlow, J. F.; Halios, C. H.; Lee, J. D.; Szidat, S.; Mohr, C.

    2015-03-01

    Determining the contribution of wood smoke to air pollution in large cities such as London is becoming increasingly important due to the changing nature of domestic heating in urban areas. During winter, biomass burning emissions have been identified as a major cause of exceedances of European air quality limits. The aim of this work was to quantify the contribution of biomass burning in London to concentrations of PM2.5 and determine whether local emissions or regional contributions were the main source of biomass smoke. To achieve this, a number of biomass burning chemical tracers were analysed at a site within central London and two sites in surrounding rural areas. Concentrations of levoglucosan, elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC) and K+ were generally well correlated across the three sites. At all the sites, biomass burning was found to be a source of OC and EC, with the largest contribution of EC from traffic emissions, while for OC the dominant fraction included contributions from secondary organic aerosols, primary biogenic and cooking sources. Source apportionment of the EC and OC was found to give reasonable estimation of the total carbon from non-fossil and fossil fuel sources based upon comparison with estimates derived from 14C analysis. Aethalometer-derived black carbon data were also apportioned into the contributions from biomass burning and traffic and showed trends similar to those observed for EC. Mean wood smoke mass at the sites was estimated to range from 0.78 to 1.0 μg m-3 during the campaign in January-February 2012. Measurements on a 160 m tower in London suggested a similar ratio of brown to black carbon (reflecting wood burning and traffic respectively) in regional and London air. Peaks in the levoglucosan and K+ concentrations were observed to coincide with low ambient temperature, consistent with domestic heating as a major contributing local source in London. Overall, the source of biomass smoke in London was concluded to be a

  16. Two-photon exchange contribution to proton form factors in the time-like region

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D. Y.; Dong, Y. B.; Zhou, H. Q.

    2008-10-15

    We estimate the two-photon exchange contribution to the process e{sup +}+e{sup -}{yields}p+p . The two-photon exchange corrections to double spin polarization observables and form factors in the time-like region are calculated. The corrections are found to be small in magnitude but with a strong angular dependence at fixed momentum transfer. These two features are the same as those in the space-like region. In future experiments, the double spin polarization observable P{sub z} deserves to be considered.

  17. Anthropogenic and natural contributions to regional trends in aerosol optical depth, 1980-2006.

    SciTech Connect

    Streets, D. G.; Yan, F.; Chin, M.; Diehl, T.; Mahowald, N.; Schultz, M.; Wild, M.; Wu, Y.; Yu, C.; Decision and Information Sciences; Univ. of Illinois; NASA; Cornell Univ.; Forschungszentrum; Inst.for Atmospheric and Climate Science; Tsinghua Univ.

    2009-07-28

    Understanding the roles of human and natural sources in contributing to aerosol concentrations around the world is an important step toward developing efficient and effective mitigation measures for local and regional air quality degradation and climate change. In this study we test the hypothesis that changes in aerosol optical depth (AOD) over time are caused by the changing patterns of anthropogenic emissions of aerosols and aerosol precursors. We present estimated trends of contributions to AOD for eight world regions from 1980 to 2006, built upon a full run of the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport model for the year 2001, extended in time using trends in emissions of man-made and natural sources. Estimated AOD trends agree well (R > 0.5) with observed trends in surface solar radiation in Russia, the United States, south Asia, southern Africa, and East Asia (before 1992) but less well for Organization for Economic Co-operative Development (OECD) Europe (R < 0.5). The trends do not agree well for southeast Asia and for East Asia (after 1992) where large-scale inter- and intraannual variations in emissions from forest fires, volcanic eruptions, and dust storms confound our approach. Natural contributions to AOD, including forest and grassland fires, show no significant long-term trends (<1%/a), except for a small increasing trend in OECD Europe and a small decreasing trend in South America. Trends in man-made contributions to AOD follow the changing patterns of industrial and economic activity. We quantify the average contributions of key source types to regional AOD over the entire time period.

  18. Single cell lineage tracing reveals that oriented cell division contributes to trabecular morphogenesis and regional specification

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jingjing; Miao, Lianjie; Shieh, David; Spiotto, Ernest; Li, Jian; Zhou, Bin; Paul, Antoni; Schwartz, Robert J.; Firulli, Anthony B.; Singer, Harold A.; Huang, Guoying; Wu, Mingfu

    2016-01-01

    Summary The cardiac trabeculae are sheet-like structures extending from the myocardium that function to increase surface area. A lack of trabeculation causes embryonic lethality due to compromised cardiac function. To understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms of trabecular formation, we genetically labeled individual cardiomyocytes prior to trabeculation via the brainbow multicolor system, and traced and analyzed the labeled cells during trabeculation by whole-embryo clearing and imaging. The clones derived from labeled single cells displayed four different geometric patterns that are derived from different patterns of oriented cell division (OCD) and migration. Of the four types of clones, the inner, transmural, and mixed clones contributed to trabecular cardiomyocytes. Further studies showed that perpendicular OCD is an extrinsic asymmetric cell division that putatively contributes to trabecular regional specification. Furthermore, N-Cadherin deletion in labeled clones disrupted the clonal patterns. In summary, our data demonstrate that OCD contributes to trabecular morphogenesis and specification. PMID:27052172

  19. Contributions of regional and intercontinental transport to surface ozone in Tokyo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshitomi, M.; Wild, O.; Akimoto, H.

    2011-04-01

    Japan lies downwind of the Asian continent and for much of the year air quality is directly influenced by emissions of ozone precursors over these heavily-populated and rapidly-industrializing regions. This study examines the extent to which oxidant transport from regional and distant anthropogenic sources influences air quality in Japan in springtime, when these contributions are largest. We find that European and North American contributions to surface ozone over Japan in spring are persistent, averaging 3.5±1.1 ppb and 2.8±0.5 ppb respectively, and are greatest in cold continental outflow conditions following the passage of cold fronts. Contributions from China are larger, 4.0±2.8 ppb, and more variable, as expected for a closer source region, and are generally highest near cold fronts preceding the influence of more distant sources. The stratosphere provides a varying but ever-present background of ozone of about 11.2±2.5 ppb during spring. Local sources over Japan and Korea have a relatively small impact on mean ozone, 2.4±7.6 ppb, but this masks a strong diurnal signal, and local sources clearly dominate during episodes of high daytime ozone. By examining the meteorological mechanisms that favour transport from different source regions, we demonstrate that while maximum foreign influence generally does not occur at the same time as the greatest buildup of oxidants from local sources, it retains a significant influence under these conditions. It is thus clear that while meteorological boundaries provide some protection from foreign influence during oxidant outbreaks in Tokyo, these distant sources still make a substantial contribution to exceedance of the Japanese ozone air quality standard in springtime.

  20. Contributions of regional and intercontinental transport to surface ozone in the Tokyo area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshitomi, M.; Wild, O.; Akimoto, H.

    2011-08-01

    Japan lies downwind of the Asian continent and for much of the year air quality is directly influenced by emissions of ozone precursors over these heavily-populated and rapidly-industrializing regions. This study examines the extent to which oxidant transport from regional and distant anthropogenic sources influences air quality in Japan in springtime, when these contributions are largest. We find that European and North American contributions to surface ozone over Japan in spring are persistent, averaging 3.5±1.1 ppb and 2.8±0.5 ppb respectively, and are greatest in cold continental outflow conditions following the passage of cold fronts. Contributions from China are larger, 4.0±2.8 ppb, and more variable, as expected for a closer source region, and are generally highest near cold fronts preceding the influence of more distant sources. The stratosphere provides a varying but ever-present background of ozone of about 11.2±2.5 ppb during spring. Local sources over Japan and Korea have a relatively small impact on mean ozone, 2.4±7.6 ppb, but this masks a strong diurnal signal, and local sources clearly dominate during episodes of high daytime ozone. By examining the meteorological mechanisms that favour transport from different source regions, we demonstrate that while maximum foreign influence generally does not occur at the same time as the greatest buildup of oxidants from local sources, it retains a significant influence under these conditions. It is thus clear that while meteorological boundaries provide some protection from foreign influence during oxidant outbreaks in Tokyo, these distant sources still make a substantial contribution to exceedance of the Japanese ozone air quality standard in springtime.

  1. A National contribution to the GEO Science and Technology roadmap: GIIDA Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nativi, Stefano; Mazzetti, Paolo; Guzzetti, Fausto; Oggioni, Alessandro; Pirrone, Nicola; Santolieri, Rosalia; Viola, Angelo; Tartari, Gianni; Santoro, Mattia

    2010-05-01

    The GIIDA (Gestione Integrata e Interoperativa dei Dati Ambientali) project is an initiative of the Italian National Research Council (CNR) launched in 2008 as an inter-departmental project, aiming to design and develop a multidisciplinary e-infrastructure (cyber-infrastructure) for the management, processing, and evaluation of Earth and Environmental resources -i.e. data, services, models, sensors, best practices. GIIDA has been contributing to the implementation of the GEO (Group of Earth Observation) Science and Technology (S&T) roadmap by: (a) linking relevant S&T communities to GEOSS (GEO System of Systems); (b) ensuring that GEOSS is built based on state-of-the-art science and technology. GIIDA co-ordinates the CNR's digital infrastructure development for Earth Observation resources sharing and cooperates with other national agencies and existing projects pursuing the same objective. For the CNR, GIIDA provides an interface to European and international interoperability programmes (e.g. INSPIRE, and GMES). It builds a national network for dialogue and resolution of issues at varying scientific and technical levels. To achieve such goals, GIIDA introduced a set of guidance principles: • To shift from a "traditional" data centric approach to a more advanced service-based solution for Earth System Science and Environmental information. • To shift the focus from Data to Information Spatial Infrastructures in order to support decision-making. • To be interoperable with analogous National (e.g. SINAnet, and the INSPIRE National Infrastructure) and international initiatives (e.g. INSPIRE, GMES, SEIS, and GEOSS). • To reinforce the Italian presence in the European and international programmes concerning digital infrastructures, geospatial information, and the Mega-Science approach. • To apply the National and International Information Technology (IT) standards for achieving multi-disciplinary interoperability in the Earth and Space Sciences (e.g. ISO, OGC

  2. Assessing Energetic Contributions to Binding from a Disordered Region in a Protein-Protein Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    S Cho; C Swaminathan; D Bonsor; M Kerzic; R Guan; J Yang; C Kieke; P Anderson; D Kranz; et al.

    2011-12-31

    Many functional proteins are at least partially disordered prior to binding. Although the structural transitions upon binding of disordered protein regions can influence the affinity and specificity of protein complexes, their precise energetic contributions to binding are unknown. Here, we use a model protein-protein interaction system in which a locally disordered region has been modified by directed evolution to quantitatively assess the thermodynamic and structural contributions to binding of disorder-to-order transitions. Through X-ray structure determination of the protein binding partners before and after complex formation and isothermal titration calorimetry of the interactions, we observe a correlation between protein ordering and binding affinity for complexes along this affinity maturation pathway. Additionally, we show that discrepancies between observed and calculated heat capacities based on buried surface area changes in the protein complexes can be explained largely by heat capacity changes that would result solely from folding the locally disordered region. Previously developed algorithms for predicting binding energies of protein-protein interactions, however, are unable to correctly model the energetic contributions of the structural transitions in our model system. While this highlights the shortcomings of current computational methods in modeling conformational flexibility, it suggests that the experimental methods used here could provide training sets of molecular interactions for improving these algorithms and further rationalizing molecular recognition in protein-protein interactions.

  3. Contributions of local and regional sources of NO x to ozone concentrations in Southeast Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongliang; Ying, Qi

    2011-06-01

    The Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) model with a modified SAPRC-99 photochemical mechanism was used to investigate the contributions of local and upwind NO x sources to O 3 concentrations in Southeast Texas during the 2000 Texas Air Quality Study (TexAQS 2000) from August 25 to September 5, 2000. Contributions from eight different local NO x source types and eight different source regions to the 8-h average daytime O 3 concentrations from 1100 to 1800 CST (referred to as AD O 3 hereafter) are determined. Both diesel engines and highway gasoline vehicles account for 25 ppb of AD O 3 in the urban Houston area. NO x from natural gas combustion produces 35 ppb of AD O 3 in the industrial area of Houston. Contributions from industrial sources and coal combustion to AD O 3 have comparatively less broad spatial distribution with maximum values of 14 ppb and 20 ppb, respectively. Although the local sources are the most important sources, upwind sources have non-negligible influences (20-50%) on AD O 3 in the entire domain, with a maximum of 50 ppb in rural and coastal areas and 20 ppb in urban and industrial areas. To probe the origins of upwind sources contributions, NO x emissions in the entire eastern United States are divided into eight different regions and their contributions to O 3 concentrations in the Houston-Galveston-Brazoria (HGB) and Beaumont-Port Arthur (BPA) areas are determined. Among the various NO x source regions resolved in this study, other Texas counties near the HGB and BPA areas and southeastern states are the most important non-local sources of O 3. Under favorable transport conditions, emissions from neighbor states and northeastern states could also contribute to non-negligible O 3 concentrations (7-15%) in the HGB and BPA areas. This indicates that in addition to reduce local emissions, regional NO x emission controls, especially from the neighbor counties and states, are also necessary to improve O 3 air quality in Southeast Texas.

  4. NEPTUNE Canada Regional Cabled Observatory: Transforming Ocean Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, M.; Barnes, C.; Bornhold, B.; Johnson, F.; Phibbs, P.; Pirenne, B.

    2008-12-01

    NEPTUNE Canada is installing a regional cabled ocean observatory across the northern Juan de Fuca Plate in the northeastern Pacific. When installation of the first suite of instruments and connectivity equipment is completed in 2009, this system will provide the continuous power and bandwidth to collect integrated data on physical, chemical, geological, and biological gradients at temporal resolutions relevant to the dynamics of the earth-ocean system. The building of this facility integrates hardware, software, and people networks. Hardware progress to date includes: installation of the 800km powered fiber-optic backbone in the Fall of 2007; development of Nodes and Junction Boxes that are currently being manufactured; acquisition/development and testing of Instruments; development of mobile instrument platforms such as a) a Vertical Profiler which has completed FAT and will be delivered in the Fall of 2008 and b) a Crawler (University of Bremmen) field tested in June 2008 for investigation of exposed hydrate deposits. An integrated test platform is being deployed on the operational VENUS observatory in September 2008, which includes a module developed by Ifremer. In parallel, software and hardware systems are built to acquire, archive, and deliver the continuous real-time data - already in operation for VENUS. A web environment to combine this data access with analysis and visualization, collaborative tools, interoperability, and instrument control is under construction. Finally, a network of scientists and technicians are contributing to the process in every phase. Initial experiments were planned through a series of workshops and international proposal competitions. At inshore Folger Passage, Barkley Sound, understanding controls on biological productivity will help evaluate the effects that marine processes have on fish and marine mammals. Experiments around Barkley Canyon will allow quantification of changes in biological and chemical activity associated with

  5. Contributions of Behavioral Systems Science to Leadership for a New Progressive Movement.

    PubMed

    Mattaini, Mark A; Aspholm, Roberto

    2016-05-01

    We argue in this paper that we are in the midst of a period in which fundamental global change will be required if societies and many species, perhaps even our own, are to survive. The realities are inescapable, and the potential implications are likely to affect nearly every dimension of human life in the USA and globally. Current trends are discouraging and will be extraordinarily difficult to shift, given global structural realities. It is hard to imagine a time when effective leadership is more necessary or will be more challenging. Our thesis here is that behavioral systems science can contribute in meaningful ways to shaping and sustaining such leadership, leadership required to advance a new progressive movement. PMID:27606185

  6. Homi Jehangir Bhabha: remembering a scientist and celebrating his contributions to science, technology, and education in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidya, Sheila

    2010-06-01

    The focus of this paper is on the current developments in science education occurring in the posthumously built Homi Bhabha Centre for Science Education in Mumbai and to offer context for various indigenous developments that are shaping science education in India today. In this paper, I describe the story of Homi Bhabha and his rich legacy of India's atomic energy program. Specifically, I focus on the institutions built by Homi Bhabha, including the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research and the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) and I examine how these institutions have enabled Indian scientists to contribute to the advancement of science knowledge in the world.

  7. The Development of Science Education Research in Brazil and Contributions from the History and Philosophy of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villani, Alberto; Dias, Valeria Silva; Valadares, Juarez Melgaco

    2010-01-01

    Over the last 50 years a new research area, science education research, has arisen and undergone singular development worldwide. In the specific case of Brazil, research in science education first appeared systematically 40 years ago, as a consequence of an overall renovation in the field of science education. This evolution was also related to…

  8. Invited contributions of 2013 geoscience laureates of the French Academy of Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtillot, Vincent

    2014-11-01

    Each year, the French Academy of Sciences gives out a number of prizes and medals to recognize the contributions and achievements of outstanding colleagues in all fields of Science. In 2013, for the first time, laureates have been invited to make short presentations at the Academy. This resulted in a special session that generated enthusiasm from participants, including many members of the Academy. The editorial team of Comptes rendus Geoscience has felt that it could be of interest to the scientific community to have access to presentations by these scientists in the geoscience series of the Comptes rendus. Six laureates of the 2013 Academy Awards responded positively to the invitation. Because these were invited papers, an Associate Editor and the Chief Editor played the role normally attributed to reviewers, in addition to their normal editorial duties. In some cases, external reviewers were also involved upon invitation by the Editors. We are thankful to the authors and happy to present readers of Comptes rendus Geoscience with this first series that, if successful, could be followed by others in the coming years.

  9. A landmark contribution to poultry science--prophylactic control of coccidiosis in poultry.

    PubMed

    Chapman, H D

    2009-04-01

    "Continuous feeding of low concentrations of sulfaquinoxaline for the control of coccidiosis in poultry" by L. C. Grumbles, J. P. Delaplane, and T. C. Higgins [Poult. Sci. (1948) 27:605-608] was the first paper to demonstrate that it was possible to control coccidiosis by the continuous inclusion of a low level of a drug in the feed of chickens. The principle involved (prevention or prophylaxis) has had a profound impact on our ability to grow chickens and turkeys under intensive conditions. Indeed, it is possible that the modern poultry industry could never have developed to its present extent without the advent of drugs used prophylactically to control coccidiosis. One particular insight was that use of a compound in this manner did not necessarily prevent the acquisition of immunity, an important principle that helps explain the continued efficacy of ionophorous antibiotics used today. The significance of this work to the poultry industry and individuals involved in research, whether employed by government, academia, or pharmaceutical companies, cannot be overstated. Economic benefits, in terms of improved productivity, have been demonstrated in numerous studies published in Poultry Science. In addition, the livelihoods of many poultry farmers have been helped by the control of a disease that in the past caused substantial morbidity and mortality in their flocks. The paper is brief and contains no critical science involving novel procedures but has had a profound influence on the health of poultry for the last 6 decades. For this reason, it is nominated as a landmark contribution from the first 100 yr of Poultry Science. PMID:19276426

  10. John Tyndall and his pioneering contributions to climate science and scientific outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somerville, R. C.

    2011-12-01

    2011 marks the 150th anniversary of the publication of John Tyndall's seminal 1861 paper, "On the absorption and radiation of heat by gases and vapours, and on the physical connexion of radiation, absorption and conduction." Tyndall (1820-1893) was one of the most eminent experimental physicists of his time. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1852. Born in Ireland, he worked mainly in England, becoming a professor of natural philosophy at the Royal Institution and succeeding Michael Faraday as its superintendent. Building on earlier theoretical and conceptual work by Fourier and others, Tyndall, in his pioneering laboratory research reported in the above paper, was the first to put the concept of the greenhouse effect on a firm empirical foundation. Using an instrument of his own design, he carefully measured the relative ability of water vapor, carbon dioxide, and other atmospheric gases to absorb infrared radiation. Tyndall immediately realized the potential implications of his discoveries for climate change. He concluded that water vapor and carbon dioxide were such powerful absorbers of infrared radiation that even slight changes in the amounts of these atmospheric gases "in fact may have produced all the mutations of climate which the researches of geologists reveal." In addition to his original research in experimental physics, John Tyndall was a superb lecturer and author who spent a significant amount of his time communicating science to the general public. He wrote many popular books and articles and gave hundreds of public lectures. The income from these widely praised educational efforts made Tyndall a wealthy man, and he gave significant sums to support science. This paper traces the highlights of John Tyndall's scientific career with emphasis on his contributions to atmospheric and climate science through both research and outreach.

  11. Discovery of non-volcanic tremor and contribution to earth science by NIED Hi-net

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obara, K.

    2015-12-01

    Progress of seismic observation network brings breakthroughs in the earth science at each era. High sensitivity seismograph network (Hi-net) was constructed by National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED) as a national project in order to improve the detection capability of microearthquake after disastrous 1995 Kobe earthquake. Hi-net has been contributing to not only monitoring of seismicity but also producing many research results like as discoveries of non-volcanic tremor and other slow earthquakes. More important thing is that we have continued to make efforts to monitor all of data visually and effectively. The discovery of tremor in southwest Japan stimulated PGC researchers to search similar seismic signature in Cascadia because of a couple of common features in the tremor in Japan and slow slip event (SSE) they already discovered in Cascadia. At last, episodic tremor and slip (ETS) was discovered, then the SSE associated with tremor was also detected in Japan by using the tilting data measured by high-sensitivity accelerometer attached with the Hi-net. This coupling phenomena strengthened the connection between seismology and geodesy. Widely separated spectrum of tremor and SSE motivated us to search intervened phenomena, then we found very low frequency earthquake during ETS episode. These slow earthquakes obey a scaling law different from ordinary earthquake. This difference is very important to resolve the earthquake physics. Hi-net is quite useful for not only three-dimensional imaging of underground structure beneath the Japan Islands, but also resolving deep Earth interior by using teleseismic events or ambient noises and source rupture process of large earthquakes by using back-projection analysis as a remote array. Hi-net will continue to supply unexpected new discoveries. I expect that multiple installation of similar dense seismic array in the world will give us great opportunity to discover more important and

  12. Developing a Regionally-Based "Next Generation" High School Climate Science Curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, M.; Clark, J.; Getty, S. R.; Marks, J.; Hungate, B. A.; Kaufman, D. S.; Coles, R.; Haden, C.; Cooley, N.

    2012-12-01

    Colorado Plateau Carbon Connections is a regionally relevant, culturally responsive, technology-rich high school climate science curriculum for the Colorado Plateau/Four Corners region. Funded by an NSF Climate Change Education Partnership grant, the 10-lesson curriculum supplement is the result of collaboration between Northern Arizona University climate scientists, social scientists and educators and the NASA-funded Biological Sciences Curriculum Study Carbon Connections project. The curriculum includes disciplinary core ideas in Earth Science from A Framework for K-12 Science Education. It integrates cross-cutting relationships and science and engineering practices. Students are introduced to regional and global effects of climate change, and build their understanding of climate science using simulations and climate models. The models are based on authentic data and allow students to explore the roles of carbon dioxide, volcanic forcing, El Niño effects, solar variability, and anthropogenic inputs to the climate system. Students also negate climate misconceptions using climate science, and analyze personal connections to the climate system. They examine their own carbon footprints and propose regionally based solutions for mitigating the effects of climate change. The curriculum was field tested in Spring 2012 with 384 students and ten teachers in seven schools. The evaluation shows strong student engagement and increased knowledge of climate science and solutions. This curriculum also serves as a model for integrating regional issues into climate science education.

  13. Food security: contributions from science to a new and greener revolution

    PubMed Central

    Beddington, John

    2010-01-01

    There is an intrinsic link between the challenge we face to ensure food security through the twenty-first century and other global issues, most notably climate change, population growth and the need to sustainably manage the world's rapidly growing demand for energy and water. Our progress in reducing global poverty and achieving the Millennium Development Goals will be determined to a great extent by how coherently these long-term challenges are tackled. A key question is whether we can feed a future nine billion people equitably, healthily and sustainably. Science and technology can make a major contribution, by providing practical solutions. Securing this contribution requires that high priority be attached both to research and to facilitating the real world deployment of existing and emergent technologies. Put simply, we need a new, ‘greener revolution’. Important areas for focus include: crop improvement; smarter use of water and fertilizers; new pesticides and their effective management to avoid resistance problems; introduction of novel non-chemical approaches to crop protection; reduction of post-harvest losses; and more sustainable livestock and marine production. Techniques and technologies from many disciplines, ranging from biotechnology and engineering to newer fields such as nanotechnology, will be needed. PMID:20008386

  14. The Radio Jove Project: Citizen Science Contributes to Jupiter Decametric Radio Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thieman, J.; Higgins, C. A.; Sky, J.; Cecconi, B.; Garcia, L. N.

    2014-12-01

    The Radio Jove Project is a hands-on educational activity in which students, teachers, and the general public build a simple radio telescope, usually from a kit, to observe single frequency decameter wavelength radio emissions from Jupiter, the Sun, the galaxy, and the Earth. Regular monitoring of Jupiter and solar radio storms is typical, and Radio Jove amateur observations have improved in their scientific utility. Some observers have upgraded their equipment to make spectroscopic observations in the frequency band from 15-30 MHz. These observations can be particularly useful when made in conjunction with professional telescopes such as the Long Wavelength Array (LWA), the Nancay Decametric Array, the Ukrainian UTR-2 Radio Telescope, etc. The coming Juno mission to Jupiter will observe the radio emissions while in orbit at Jupiter and will benefit from the Earth-based perspective provided by frequent monitoring of the emissions. With these goals in mind work is now underway to provide simple methods of archiving the Radio Jove observations for use by the amateur and professional radio science community in scientifically useful and easily analyzed formats. The data will be ingested to both Radio Jove specific databases and to archives containing a variety of "waves" data. Methods are being developed to assure the scientific validity of contributed data such as certification of the observers. Amateur scientists have made overwhelming contributions to optical astronomy and we believe the same is possible within the radio astronomy community as well.

  15. Species-area curves indicate the importance of habitats' contributions to regional biodiversity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chong, G.W.; Stohlgren, T.J.

    2007-01-01

    We examined species-area curves, species composition and similarity (Jaccard's coefficients), and species richness in 17 vegetation types to develop a composite index of a vegetation type's contribution to regional species richness. We collected data from 1 to 1000 m2 scales in 147 nested plots in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado, USA to compare three species-area curve models' abilities to estimate the number of species observed in each vegetation type. The log(species)-log(area) curve had the largest adjusted coefficients of determination (r2 values) in 12 of the 17 types, followed by the species-log(area) curve with five of the highest values. When the slopes of the curves were corrected for species overlap among plots with Jaccard's coefficients, the species-log(area) curves estimated values closest to those observed. We combined information from species-area curves and measures of heterogeneity with information on the area covered by each vegetation type and found that the types making the greatest contributions to regional biodiversity covered the smallest areas. This approach may provide an accurate and relatively rapid way to rank hotspots of plant diversity within regions of interest.

  16. The contribution of locational factors to regional variations in office-based physicians in Germany.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Verena

    2016-02-01

    There is considerable literature showing that regional variation in the number of office-based physicians is rather explained by factors such as financial attractiveness of a region or employment opportunities for spouses than by health care needs of the population. It remains unclear, however, how much of the variation is explained by each of these determinants. The aim of the present study is to estimate the percentage contribution of a variety of determinants to the measured variation in Germany. Physician density is regressed on a well-defined set of explanatory variables that were identified as determinants of physician location. Regression-based decomposition was applied to decompose the variation in physician density into the percentage contribution of each of the determinants. The results show that varying health care needs of the population explained less than 5.2% of the variation in physician density. Percentage of population with private health insurance explained 14% of the variation in GP density and between 2% and 6% of the variation in specialists' density. For specialists, a higher share of variance was attributable to the variables measuring sociocultural amenities of a region compared to GPs. PMID:26819141

  17. Research contribution of different world regions in the top 50 biomedical journals (1995-2002).

    PubMed

    Soteriades, Elpidoforos S; Rosmarakis, Evangelos S; Paraschakis, Konstantinos; Falagas, Matthew E

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated all articles published by different world regions in the top 50 biomedical journals in the database of the Journal Citation Reports-Institute for Scientific Information for the period between 1995 and 2002. The world was divided into 9 regions [United States of America (the U.S.), Western Europe, Japan, Canada, Asia, Oceania, Latin America, and the Caribbean, Eastern Europe, and Africa] based on a combination of geographic, economic and scientific criteria. The number of articles published by each region, the mean impact factor, and the product of the above two parameters were our main indicators. The above numbers were also adjusted for population size, gross national income per capita of each region, and other factors. Articles published from the U.S. made up about two-thirds of all scientific papers published in the top 50 biomedical journals between 1995 and 2002. Western Europe contributed approximately a quarter of the published papers while the remaining one-tenth of articles came from the rest of the world. Canada, however, ranked second when number of articles was adjusted for population size. The U.S. is by far the highest-ranking country/region in publications in the top 50 biomedical journals even after adjusting for population size, gross national product, and other factors. Canada and Western Europe share the second place while the rest of the world is far behind. PMID:16394264

  18. EMERGE - ESnet/MREN Regional Science Grid Experimental NGI Testbed

    SciTech Connect

    Mambretti, Joe; DeFanti, Tom; Brown, Maxine

    2001-07-31

    This document is the final report on the EMERGE Science Grid testbed research project from the perspective of the International Center for Advanced Internet Research (iCAIR) at Northwestern University, which was a subcontractor to this UIC project. This report is a compilation of information gathered from a variety of materials related to this project produced by multiple EMERGE participants, especially those at Electronic Visualization Lab (EVL) at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC), Argonne National Lab and iCAIR. The EMERGE Science Grid project was managed by Tom DeFanti, PI from EVL at UIC.

  19. Particulate Matter Contributions from Agricultural Tilling Operations in an Irrigated Desert Region.

    PubMed

    Qi, Meilan; Lin, Kairong; Li, Xiangzhen; Sammis, Ted W; Miller, David R; Wang, Junming

    2015-01-01

    Sources of regional particulate matter (PM), particularly agricultural operations, must be understood in order to manage the air quality in irrigated dry climates. Direct monitoring measurements alone are useful, but not sufficient, to estimate regional PM source concentrations. This paper combines modeling with ground (point) and airplane (spatial) measurement methods to estimate regional PM10 (PM diameter≤10 μm) contributions from agricultural operations. Hourly data from three air quality monitoring stations positioned at a 2-m height located on the west and east mesas of New Mexico's Mesilla Valley and in the valley at Anthony, NM were acquired from the New Mexico Air Quality Bureau. The study spanned the agricultural tilling season, March 1 to April 30, for the years 2008 to 2012. One- second spatial PM10 concentrations at 200 m above the valley floor were measured during a two-hour controlled field tilling operation on April 1, 2008. The HYSPLIT 4.0 (Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory version 4) model was run at the corresponding times and heights, outputting PM10 concentrations from all potential agricultural tilling operations. The calculated percentage contribution (modeled PM10 concentration/measured PM10 concentration) indicated that the near-surface (2-m height) proportion from the agricultural operations for five seasonal averages ranged from 0.7% to 1.5% on the west and east mesas and 1.3% for the valley site at Anthony. There were 71 hourly high values of contribution ratios ranging from 30 to 100% at the three sites, depending on the wind speed and direction. PMID:26422232

  20. Particulate Matter Contributions from Agricultural Tilling Operations in an Irrigated Desert Region

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiangzhen; Sammis, Ted W.; Miller, David R.; Wang, Junming

    2015-01-01

    Sources of regional particulate matter (PM), particularly agricultural operations, must be understood in order to manage the air quality in irrigated dry climates. Direct monitoring measurements alone are useful, but not sufficient, to estimate regional PM source concentrations. This paper combines modeling with ground (point) and airplane (spatial) measurement methods to estimate regional PM10 (PM diameter≤10 μm) contributions from agricultural operations. Hourly data from three air quality monitoring stations positioned at a 2-m height located on the west and east mesas of New Mexico’s Mesilla Valley and in the valley at Anthony, NM were acquired from the New Mexico Air Quality Bureau. The study spanned the agricultural tilling season, March 1 to April 30, for the years 2008 to 2012. One- second spatial PM10 concentrations at 200 m above the valley floor were measured during a two-hour controlled field tilling operation on April 1, 2008. The HYSPLIT 4.0 (Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory version 4) model was run at the corresponding times and heights, outputting PM10 concentrations from all potential agricultural tilling operations. The calculated percentage contribution (modeled PM10 concentration/measured PM10 concentration) indicated that the near-surface (2-m height) proportion from the agricultural operations for five seasonal averages ranged from 0.7% to 1.5% on the west and east mesas and 1.3% for the valley site at Anthony. There were 71 hourly high values of contribution ratios ranging from 30 to 100% at the three sites, depending on the wind speed and direction. PMID:26422232

  1. Alaska Native Elders' Contribution to Education: The Fairbanks AISES Science Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Claudette; Reyes, Maria Elena

    The Fairbanks American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES) Science Camp was designed for Alaska Native middle school students from 11 school districts. The camp enables students to learn from Native Elders while completing hands-on science projects; stimulates interest and confidence in mathematics, science, and engineering among Alaska…

  2. Contribution of Afforestation Practices to Changing Hydrology in Arid and Semi-arid Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, X.; Meng, S.; Li, J.

    2014-12-01

    Arid and semi-arid regions are generally susceptible to land degeneration due to limited precipitation and high potential evapotranspiration (ET). Afforestation has been assumed to be a feasible strategy to conserve water and to improve ecological environment. For example, the Northern China, as a typical arid and semi-arid region has experienced large-scale and long-term afforestation practices since the early 1980s. The land cover has been altered to some degree as tree planting with increasing greenness. However, the effectiveness of afforestation might not be as expected due to the interference of climate change. In this study, we attempted to quantify the contribution of afforestation practices to the hydrological system in the Northern China. A macro-scale hydrological model, i.e., the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC), was employed to simulate ET, soil moisture and runoff for the period 1959 - 2009. Fractional simulation scenarios were designed regarding different conditions of land cover and climate changes. The results indicate that the land cover has minor impact on the variability of hydrological variables at regional scale, comparing with the climate change. Particularly, the decreasing precipitation plays a dominant role in shaping the trends of ET, soil moisture and runoff. The findings have significant implications for the implementation of the afforestation practices and for the management of water resources in arid and semi-arid regions.

  3. A multivariate receptor modeling study of air-borne particulate PAHs: Regional contributions in a roadside environment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bong Mann; Lee, Seung-Bok; Kim, Jin Young; Kim, Sunwha; Seo, Jihoon; Bae, Gwi-Nam; Lee, Ji Yi

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the geographic source contributions by particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is important for the Korean peninsula due to its downwind location from source areas. Regional influence of particulate PAHs was previously identified using diagnostic ratios applied to mobile source dominated roadside sampling data (Kim et al., 2012b). However, no study has yet been conducted to quantify the regional source contributions. We applied a multivariate receptor modeling tool to identify and quantify the regional source contributions to particulate PAHs in Seoul. Sampling of roadside particulate PAHs was conducted in Seoul, Korea for four years between May 2005 and April 2009, and data analysis was performed with a new multivariate receptor model, Solver for Mixture Problem (SMP). The SMP model identified two sources, local mobile source and transported regional source, and quantified their source contributions. Analysis of the particulate PAHs data reveals three types of episodic periods: a high regional source contribution period with one case, a high mobile source contribution period with three cases, and a normal contribution period with eight cases. Four-year average particulate PAHs source contributions from the two sources are 4.6 ng m(-3) and 10.7 ng m(-3) for regional and mobile sources, respectively and equivalent to 30% and 70% of the total estimated contribution from each of these sources. PMID:26473551

  4. Citizen science contributes to our knowledge of invasive plant species distributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crall, Alycia W.; Jarnevich, Catherine S.; Young, Nicholas E.; Panke, Brendon; Renz, Mark; Stohlgren, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Citizen science is commonly cited as an effective approach to expand the scale of invasive species data collection and monitoring. However, researchers often hesitate to use these data due to concerns over data quality. In light of recent research on the quality of data collected by volunteers, we aimed to demonstrate the extent to which citizen science data can increase sampling coverage, fill gaps in species distributions, and improve habitat suitability models compared to professionally generated data sets used in isolation. We combined data sets from professionals and volunteers for five invasive plant species (Alliaria petiolata, Berberis thunbergii, Cirsium palustre, Pastinaca sativa, Polygonum cuspidatum) in portions of Wisconsin. Volunteers sampled counties not sampled by professionals for three of the five species. Volunteers also added presence locations within counties not included in professional data sets, especially in southern portions of the state where professional monitoring activities had been minimal. Volunteers made a significant contribution to the known distribution, environmental gradients sampled, and the habitat suitability of P. cuspidatum. Models generated with professional data sets for the other four species performed reasonably well according to AUC values (>0.76). The addition of volunteer data did not greatly change model performance (AUC > 0.79) but did change the suitability surface generated by the models, making them more realistic. Our findings underscore the need to merge data from multiple sources to improve knowledge of current species distributions, and to predict their movement under present and future environmental conditions. The efficiency and success of these approaches require that monitoring efforts involve multiple stakeholders in continuous collaboration via established monitoring networks.

  5. Human Resources for Science & Technology: The European Region. Surveys of Science Resources Series Special Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jean M.

    The countries discussed in this report are mainly Western European and are those from which modern science, analytical methods, and inductive and deductive reasoning arose in the 17th and 18th centuries. This report has been prepared to provide as consistent a database as possible on human resources for science in the specified European countries.…

  6. Global diversity and genetic contributions of chicken populations from African, Asian and European regions.

    PubMed

    Lyimo, C M; Weigend, A; Msoffe, P L; Eding, H; Simianer, H; Weigend, S

    2014-12-01

    Genetic diversity and population structure of 113 chicken populations from Africa, Asia and Europe were studied using 29 microsatellite markers. Among these, three populations of wild chickens and nine commercial purebreds were used as reference populations for comparison. Compared to commercial lines and chickens sampled from the European region, high mean numbers of alleles and a high degree of heterozygosity were found in Asian and African chickens as well as in Red Junglefowl. Population differentiation (FST ) was higher among European breeds and commercial lines than among African, Asian and Red Junglefowl populations. Neighbour-Net genetic clustering and structure analysis revealed two main groups of Asian and north-west European breeds, whereas African populations overlap with other breeds from Eastern Europe and the Mediterranean region. Broilers and brown egg layers were situated between the Asian and north-west European clusters. structure analysis confirmed a lower degree of population stratification in African and Asian chickens than in European breeds. High genetic differentiation and low genetic contributions to global diversity have been observed for single European breeds. Populations with low genetic variability have also shown a low genetic contribution to a core set of diversity in attaining maximum genetic variation present from the total populations. This may indicate that conservation measures in Europe should pay special attention to preserving as many single chicken breeds as possible to maintain maximum genetic diversity given that higher genetic variations come from differentiation between breeds. PMID:25315897

  7. Delay-dependent contributions of medial temporal lobe regions to episodic memory retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Ritchey, Maureen; Montchal, Maria E; Yonelinas, Andrew P; Ranganath, Charan

    2015-01-01

    The medial temporal lobes play an important role in episodic memory, but over time, hippocampal contributions to retrieval may be diminished. However, it is unclear whether such changes are related to the ability to retrieve contextual information, and whether they are common across all medial temporal regions. Here, we used functional neuroimaging to compare neural responses during immediate and delayed recognition. Results showed that recollection-related activity in the posterior hippocampus declined after a 1-day delay. In contrast, activity was relatively stable in the anterior hippocampus and in neocortical areas. Multi-voxel pattern similarity analyses also revealed that anterior hippocampal patterns contained information about context during item recognition, and after a delay, context coding in this region was related to successful retention of context information. Together, these findings suggest that the anterior and posterior hippocampus have different contributions to memory over time and that neurobiological models of memory must account for these differences. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05025.001 PMID:25584461

  8. Assessing the contribution of natural sources to regional atmospheric mercury budgets

    SciTech Connect

    Gustin, M.S.; Lindberg, S.E.

    1997-12-31

    Contributions to the global atmospheric mercury budget originate from natural and anthropogenic sources. Constraining inputs from anthropogenic point sources has been the emphasis of past research leaving the contribution from diffuse natural and anthropogenic mercury enriched landscapes poorly constrained and underestimated. From September 1--4, 1997 mercury researchers convened in Reno, NV, US to intercompare methods used to determine in situ mercury flux from a naturally enriched landscape. Data collected indicate that naturally mercury-enriched areas constitute a significant atmospheric Hg source term. Mercury fluxes of 30 to 2,000 ng/m{sup 2} h were measured at the Steamboat springs Geothermal Area. These values are one to three orders of magnitude greater than that applied for natural sources in global mercury budgets. Air concentrations measured in the area indicate that natural sources can increase ambient levels above background concentrations. Assessment of these and other data indicate that natural sources constitute a significant source of atmospheric mercury that is available to the global mercury budget, and that the strength of the source is influenced significantly by environmental factors. Determining the contribution of mercury to the atmosphere from diffuse terrestrial sources is necessary to develop local and regional baselines for environmental regulations and risk assessments, and valid emission inventories. A scaling up mercury fluxes measured for diffuse terrestrial surfaces suggests that the natural atmospheric mercury source term in the US is comparable to the anthropogenic source term.

  9. 2003 FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Buckeye Regional Robotics Com

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    2003 FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Buckeye Regional Robotics Competition Recognition Ceremony - Robot Demonstration by James Ford Rhodes High School and East Technical High School

  10. U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Western Region; Santa Barbara Channel Coastal and Ocean Science

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Samuel Y.

    2009-01-01

    USGS coastal and ocean science in the Western United States and the Pacific integrates scientific expertise in geology, water resources, biology, and geography. Operating from 10 major science centers in the Western Region, the USGS is addressing a broad geographic and thematic range of important coastal and marine issues. In California, the Santa Barbara Channel represents one area of focus.

  11. Assessment of Factors Contributing to Health Outcomes in the Eight States of the Mississippi Delta Region

    PubMed Central

    Jovaag, Amanda; Catlin, Bridget B.; Rodock, Matthew; Park, Hyojun

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The objective of this observational study was to examine the key contributors to health outcomes and to better understand the health disparities between Delta and non-Delta counties in 8 states in the Mississippi River Delta Region. We hypothesized that a unique set of contributors to health outcomes in the Delta counties could explain the disparities between Delta and non-Delta counties. Methods Data were from the 2014 County Health Rankings for counties in 8 states (Alabama, Arkansas, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, and Tennessee). We used the Delta Regional Authority definition to identify the 252 Delta counties and 468 non-Delta counties or county equivalents. Information on health factors (eg, health behaviors, clinical care) and outcomes (eg, mortality) were derived from 38 measures from the 2014 County Health Rankings. The contributions of health factors to health outcomes in Delta and non-Delta counties were examined using path analysis. Results We found similarities between Delta counties and non-Delta counties in the health factors (eg, tobacco use, diet and exercise) that significantly predicted the health outcomes of self-rated health and low birthweight. The most variation was seen in predictors of mortality; however, Delta counties shared 2 of the 3 significant predictors (ie, community safety and income) of mortality with non-Delta counties. On average across all measures, values in the Delta were 16% worse than in the non-Delta and 22% worse than in the rest of the United States. Conclusion The health status of Delta counties is poorer than that of non-Delta counties because the health factors that contribute to health outcomes in the entire region are worse in the Delta counties, not because of a unique set of health predictors. PMID:26940300

  12. Working with Science Teachers to Transform the Opportunity Landscape for Regional and Rural Youth: A Qualitative Evaluation of the Science in Schools Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheehan, Grania R.; Mosse, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on a qualitative evaluation of the Science in Schools program; a suite of science based activities delivered by staff of a regional university campus and designed to provide professional development for science teachers working in non-metropolitan schools in a socioeconomically disadvantaged region of Australia. The research…

  13. Amazonian dark Earth and plant species from the Amazon region contribute to shape rhizosphere bacterial communities.

    PubMed

    Barbosa Lima, Amanda; Cannavan, Fabiana Souza; Navarrete, Acacio Aparecido; Teixeira, Wenceslau Geraldes; Kuramae, Eiko Eurya; Tsai, Siu Mui

    2015-05-01

    Amazonian Dark Earths (ADE) or Terra Preta de Índio formed in the past by pre-Columbian populations are highly sustained fertile soils supported by microbial communities that differ from those extant in adjacent soils. These soils are found in the Amazon region and are considered as a model soil when compared to the surrounding and background soils. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of ADE and its surrounding soil on the rhizosphere bacterial communities of two leguminous plant species that frequently occur in the Amazon region in forest sites (Mimosa debilis) and open areas (Senna alata). Bacterial community structure was evaluated using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and bacterial community composition by V4 16S rRNA gene region pyrosequencing. T-RFLP analysis showed effect of soil types and plant species on rhizosphere bacterial community structure. Differential abundance of bacterial phyla, such as Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, and Firmicutes, revealed that soil type contributes to shape the bacterial communities. Furthermore, bacterial phyla such as Firmicutes and Nitrospira were mostly influenced by plant species. Plant roots influenced several soil chemical properties, especially when plants were grown in ADE. These results showed that differences observed in rhizosphere bacterial community structure and composition can be influenced by plant species and soil fertility due to variation in soil attributes. PMID:25103911

  14. Higher Education in Balkan Region and its Contribution to the Earth Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisec, A.; Fras, M. K.

    2012-07-01

    The needs for spatial data as well as techniques of Earth Observation are changing, and new professional areas are developing very rapidly. In addition, scientific work and its connection with the teaching process have influenced the introduction of new cognitions into the higher education programs in general. Considering these facts, in the period shorter than one decade, the higher education institutions in the Balkan region, which have study programs in the fields of spatial data acquisition, analysis and spatial decisions, have made significant changes of the curricula. In our research, we have analyzed the current higher education programs in the Balkan region having focused on curricula related to the Earth Observation. Due to historical reasons, these curricula have its roots in surveying study programs in the most Balkan countries. The competences of classical surveying higher educational programs have been changing and nowadays include the wider area of spatial data acquisition, geoinformatics. In parallel, we present the current Earth Observation activities in the selected countries from the Balkan region. Based on the results of our research in the framework of the European program Observe, which aims to establish a new Balkan Earth Observation (EO) community of multilevel stakeholders that will make use of state of the art technological developments, products and knowhow from the existing European EO community and industry, we estimate the contribution of advanced higher educational programs to the Earth Observation activities in the selected countries.

  15. Addressing sustainable contributions to GEO/GEOSS from Science and Technology Communities: the EGIDA Methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzetti, P.; Nativi, S.

    2012-04-01

    The European Project EGIDA (Coordinating Earth and Environmental cross-disciplinary projects to promote GEOSS) co-funded by the European Commission under the Seventh Framework programme, has started in September 2010. It aims to prepare a sustainable process of contribution to GEO/GEOSS promoting coordination of activities carried out by: the GEO Science & Technology (S&T) Committee; S&T national and European initiatives; and other S&T Communities. This will be done by supporting broader implementation and effectiveness of the GEOSS S&T Roadmap and the GEOSS mission through coherent and interoperable networking of National and European projects, and International initiatives. The definition of a general methodology for a sustainable contribution to GEO/GEOSS through the implementation of a System-of-System (re-) engineering process is one of the objectives of the EGIDA Project in order to consolidate the results of the actions carried out in support of the GEO Science and Technology Committee (STC) Road Map. The EGIDA Methodology is based on several sources including GEO activities and documents, activities of the EGIDA project in support of the GEO STC Road Map, lessons learned from the initiatives and projects already contributing, in different ways, to the building of advanced infrastructures as direct or indirect part to GEO/GEOSS. The design of the EGIDA Methodology included several steps: a) an operational definition of the EGIDA Methodology, b) the identification of the target audience for the EGIDA Methodology, c) the identification of typical scenarios for the application of the EGIDA Methodology. Basing on these design activities the EGIDA Methodology is defined as a set of two activities running in parallel: Networking Activities - to identify and address the relevant S&T community(-ies) and actors (Community Engagement) - and Technical Activities: - to guide the infrastructure development and align it with the GEO/GEOSS interoperability principles

  16. Identifying and communicating the contributions of library and information services in hospitals and academic health sciences centers

    PubMed Central

    Abels, Eileen G.; Cogdill, Keith W.; Zach, Lisl

    2004-01-01

    Objective: This article introduces a systematic approach to identifying and communicating the value of library and information services (LIS) from the perspective of their contributions to achieving organizational goals. Methods: The contributions of library and information services (CLIS) approach for identifying and communicating the value of LIS draws on findings from a multimethod study of hospitals and academic health sciences centers. Results: The CLIS approach is based on the concept that an individual unit's value to an organization can be demonstrated by identifying and measuring its contributions to organizational goals. The CLIS approach involves seven steps: (1) selecting appropriate organizational goals that are meaningful in a specific setting; (2) linking LIS contributions to organizational goals; (3) obtaining data from users on the correspondence between LIS contributions and LIS services; (4) selecting measures for LIS services; (5) collecting and analyzing data for the selected measures; (6) planning and sustaining communication with administrators about LIS contributions; and (7) evaluating findings and revising selected goals, contributions, and services as necessary. Conclusions: The taxonomy of LIS contributions and the CLIS approach emerged from research conducted in hospitals and academic health sciences centers and reflect the mission and goals common in these organizations. However, both the taxonomy and the CLIS approach may be adapted for communicating the value of LIS in other settings. PMID:14762462

  17. Recent Contributions of Information Sciences Research at RAND to Modeling- and Simulation-Based Policy Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donohue, G. L.; And Others

    This report presents examples of Rand's current research in the information sciences and illustrates the application of information science tools to specific policy studies. The projects discussed depict Rand's success with using corporate seed money to bridge the gap between the research and development of new information science tools and…

  18. The Contribution of Trade Books to Early Science Literacy: In and out of School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schroeder, Meadow; Mckeough, Anne; Graham, Susan; Stock, Hayli; Bisanz, Gay

    2009-01-01

    Lifelong science literacy begins with attitudes and interests established early in childhood. The use of trade books (i.e., a literary work intended for sale to the general public) in North American school classrooms to support the development of science literacy invites an examination of the quality of science content disseminated to students. A…

  19. Findings of the Mars Special Regions Science Analysis Group

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beaty, D.W.; Buxbaum, K.L.; Meyer, M.A.; Barlow, N.; Boynton, W.; Clark, B.; Deming, J.; Doran, P.T.; Edgett, K.; Hancock, S.; Head, J.; Hecht, M.; Hipkin, V.; Kieft, T.; Mancinelli, R.; McDonald, E.; McKay, C.; Mellon, M.; Newsom, H.; Ori, G.; Paige, D.; Schuerger, A.C.; Sogin, M.; Spry, J.A.; Steele, A.; Tanaka, K.; Voytek, M.

    2006-01-01

    In summary, within the upper 5 m most of Mars is either too cold or too dry to support the propagation of terrestrial life. However, there are regions that are in disequilibrium, naturally or induced, and could be classified as "special" or, if enough uncertainty exist, could not be declared as "non-special." ?? Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

  20. U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Western Region: Coastal and Ocean Science

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kinsinger, Anne E.

    2009-01-01

    USGS Western Region Coastal and Ocean Science is interdisciplinary, collaborative, and integrates expertise from all USGS Disciplines, and ten of its major Science Centers, in Alaska, Hawai'i, California, Washington, and Oregon. The scientific talent, laboratories, and research vessels in the Western Region and across the Nation, strategically position the USGS to address broad geographic and oceanographic research topics. USGS information products inform resource managers and policy makers who must balance conservation mandates with increasing demands for resources that sustain the Nation's economy. This fact sheet describes but a few examples of the breadth of USGS science conducted in coastal, nearshore, and ocean environments along our Nation's West Coast and Pacific Islands.

  1. Exploring what contributes to the knowledge development of secondary physics and physical science teachers in a continuous professional development context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelms, April Wagnon

    This dissertation used qualitative methodologies, specifically phenomenological research, to investigate what contributes to the development of pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) of physics and physical science teachers who participate in a content-specific continuous professional development program. There were five participants in this study. The researcher conducted participant observations and interviews, rated participants degree of reformed teaching practices using the Reformed Teaching Observation Protocol, surveyed participants' self-efficacy beliefs using the Science Teacher Efficacy Belief Instrument "A," and rated participants'' level of PCK using the PCK Rubrics.. All data were analyzed, and a composite description of what contributes to physics and physical science teachers' PCK development through a continuous professional development program emerged. A theory also emerged from the participants' experiences pertaining to how teachers' assimilate new conditions into their existing teaching schema, how conditions change teachers' perceptions of their practice, and outcomes of teachers' new ideas towards their practice. This study contributed to the literature by suggesting emergent themes and a theory on the development of physics and physical science teachers' PCK. PCK development is theorized to be a spiral process incorporating new conditions into the spiral as teachers employ new science content knowledge and pedagogical practices in their individual classroom contexts.

  2. Disturbance to desert soil ecosystems contributes to dust-mediated impacts at regional scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pointing, Stephen B.; Belnap, Jayne

    2014-01-01

    This review considers the regional scale of impacts arising from disturbance to desert soil ecosystems. Deserts occupy over one-third of the Earth’s terrestrial surface, and biological soil covers are critical to stabilization of desert soils. Disturbance to these can contribute to massive destabilization and mobilization of dust. This results in dust storms that are transported across inter-continental distances where they have profound negative impacts. Dust deposition at high altitudes causes radiative forcing of snowpack that leads directly to altered hydrological regimes and changes to freshwater biogeochemistry. In marine environments dust deposition impacts phytoplankton diazotrophy, and causes coral reef senescence. Increasingly dust is also recognized as a threat to human health.

  3. Global CO2-consumption by chemical weathering: What is the contribution of highly active weathering regions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Jens; Jansen, Nils; Dürr, Hans H.; Kempe, Stephan; Köhler, Peter

    2010-05-01

    CO2-consumption by chemical weathering of silicates and resulting silicate/carbonate weathering ratios influences the terrestrial lateral inorganic carbon flux to the ocean and long-term climate changes. However, little is known of the spatial extension of highly active weathering regions and their proportion of global CO2-consumption. As those regions may be of significant importance for global climate change, global CO2-consumption is calculated here at high resolution, to adequately represent them. In previous studies global CO2-consumption is estimated using two different approaches: i) a reverse approach based on hydrochemical fluxes from large rivers and ii) a forward approach applying spatially explicit a function for CO2-consumption. The first approach results in an estimate without providing a spatial resolution for highly active regions and the second approach applied six lithological classes while including three sediment classes (shale, sandstone and carbonate rock) based at a 1° or 2° grid resolution. It remained uncertain, if the applied lithological classification schemes represent adequately CO2-consumption from sediments on a global scale (as well as liberation of other elements like phosphorus or silicon by chemical weatheirng). This is due to the large variability of sediment properties, their diagenetic history and the contribution from carbonates apparent in silicate dominated lithological classes. To address these issues, a CO2-consumption model, trained at high-resolution data, is applied here to a global vector based lithological map with 15 lithological classes. The calibration data were obtained from areas representing a wide range of weathering rates. Resulting global CO2-consumption by chemical weathering is similar to earlier estimates (237 Mt C a-1) but the proportion of silicate weathering is 63%, and thus larger than previous estimates (49 to 60%). The application of the enhanced lithological classification scheme reveals that it

  4. Clear as Crystal: The Story of the Braggs--How X-Ray Crystallography Has Contributed to Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Robert; Patterson, John

    2014-01-01

    Here is a brief history of the work of two of Australia's most famous scientists, Sir William Bragg and his son Sir Lawrence Bragg. Jointly awarded the Nobel Prize in 1915 for their groundbreaking research into the use of X-rays to study the chemical structure and function of molecules, they have contributed to our heritage and to science at…

  5. Source contributions to 2012 summertime aerosols in the Euro-Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rea, G.; Turquety, S.; Menut, L.; Briant, R.; Mailler, S.; Siour, G.

    2015-07-01

    In the Mediterranean area, aerosols may originate from anthropogenic or natural emissions (biogenic, mineral dust, fire and sea salt) before undergoing complex chemistry. In case of a huge pollution event, it is important to know whether European pollution limits are exceeded and, if so, whether the pollution is due to anthropogenic or natural sources. In this study, the relative contribution of emissions to surface PM10, surface PM2.5 and total aerosol optical depth (AOD) is quantified. For Europe and the Mediterranean regions and during the summer of 2012, the WRF and CHIMERE models are used to perform a sensitivity analysis on a 50 km resolution domain (from -10° W to 40° E and from 30° N to 55° N): one simulation with all sources (reference) and all others with one source removed. The reference simulation is compared to data from the AirBase network and two ChArMEx stations, and from the AERONET network and the MODIS satellite instrument, to quantify the ability of the model to reproduce the observations. It is shown that the correlation ranges from 0.19 to 0.57 for surface particulate matter and from 0.35 to 0.75 for AOD. For the summer of 2012, the model shows that the region is mainly influenced by aerosols due to mineral dust and anthropogenic emissions (62 and 19 %, respectively, of total surface PM10 and 17 and 52 % of total surface PM2.5). The western part of the Mediterranean is strongly influenced by mineral dust emissions (86 % for surface PM10 and 44 % for PM2.5), while anthropogenic emissions dominate in the northern Mediterranean basin (up to 75 % for PM2.5). Fire emissions are more sporadic but may represent 20 % of surface PM2.5, on average, during the period near local sources. Sea salt mainly contributes for coastal sites (up to 29 %) and biogenic emissions mainly in central Europe (up to 20 %). The same analysis was undertaken for the number of daily exceedances of the European Union limit of 50 μg m-3 for PM10 (over the stations), and

  6. Towards a More Authentic Science Curriculum: The contribution of out-of-school learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braund, Martin; Reiss, Michael

    2006-10-01

    In many developed countries of the world, pupil attitudes to school science decline progressively across the age range of secondary schooling while fewer students are choosing to study science at higher levels and as a career. Responses to these developments have included proposals to reform the curriculum, pedagogy, and the nature of pupil discussion in science lessons. We support such changes but argue that far greater use needs to be made of out-of-school sites in the teaching of science. Such usage will result in a school science education that is more valid and more motivating. We present an “evolutionary model” of science teaching that looks at where learning and teaching take place, and draws together thinking about the history of science and developments in the nature of learning over the past 100 years or so. Our contention is that laboratory-based school science teaching needs to be complemented by out-of-school science learning that draws on the actual world (e.g., through fieldtrips), the presented world (e.g., in science centres, botanic gardens, zoos and science museums), and the virtual worlds that are increasingly available through information technologies.

  7. Source sector and region contributions to BC and PM2.5 in Central Asia

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kulkarni, S.; Sobhani, N.; Miller-Schulze, J. P.; Shafer, M. M.; Schauer, J. J.; Solomon, P. A.; Saide, P. E.; Spak, S. N.; Cheng, Y. F.; Denier van der Gon, H. A. C.; et al

    2015-02-18

    Particulate matter (PM) mass concentrations, seasonal cycles, source sector, and source region contributions in Central Asia (CA) are analyzed for the period April 2008–July 2009 using the Sulfur Transport and dEposition Model (STEM) chemical transport model and modeled meteorology from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Predicted aerosol optical depth (AOD) values (annual mean value ~0.2) in CA vary seasonally, with lowest values in the winter. Surface PM2.5 concentrations (annual mean value ~10 μg m-3) also exhibit a seasonal cycle, with peak values and largest variability in the spring/summer, and lowest values and variability in the winter (hourly valuesmore » from 2 to 90 μg m-3). Surface concentrations of black carbon (BC) (mean value ~0.1 μg m-3) show peak values in the winter. The simulated values are compared to surface measurements of AOD as well as PM2.5, PM10, BC, and organic carbon (OC) mass concentrations at two regional sites in Kyrgyzstan (Lidar Station Teplokluchenka (LST) and Bishkek). The predicted values of AOD and PM mass concentrations and their seasonal cycles are fairly well captured. The carbonaceous aerosols are underpredicted in winter, and analysis suggests that the winter heating emissions are underestimated in the current inventory. Dust, from sources within and outside CA, is a significant component of the PM mass and drives the seasonal cycles of PM and AOD. On an annual basis, the power and industrial sectors are found to be the most important contributors to the anthropogenic portion of PM2.5. Residential combustion and transportation are shown to be the most important sectors for BC. Biomass burning within and outside the region also contributes to elevated PM and BC concentrations. The analysis of the transport pathways and the variations in particulate matter mass and composition in CA demonstrates that this region is strategically located to characterize regional and intercontinental transport of

  8. Northwest Climate Science Center: Integrating Regional Research, Conservation and Natural Resource Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mote, P.; Bisbal, G.

    2012-12-01

    The Northwest Climate Science Center (NW CSC) was established in 2010, among the first three of eight regional Climate Science Centers created by the Department of the Interior (DOI). The NW CSC is supported by an academic consortium (Oregon State University, University of Idaho, and the University of Washington), which has the capacity to generate and coordinate decision-relevant science related to climate, thus serving stakeholders across the Pacific Northwest region. The NW CSC has overlapping boundaries with three Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCCs): the Great Northern, the Great Basin, and the North Pacific. Collaboration between the NW CSC and these three LCCs addresses the highest priority regional climate science needs of Northwest natural and cultural resource managers. Early in 2012, the NW CSC released its first Strategic Plan for the period 2012-2015. The plan offers a practical blueprint for operation and describes five core services that the NW CSC provides to the Northwest community. These core services emphasize (a) bringing together the regional resource management and science communities to calibrate priorities and ensure efficient integration of climate science resources and tools when addressing practical issues of regional significance; (b) developing and implementing a stakeholder-driven science agenda which highlights the NW CSC's regional leadership in generating scenarios of the future environment of the NW; (c) supporting and training graduate students at the three consortium universities, including through an annual 'Climate science boot camp'; (d) providing a platform for effective climate-change-related communication among scientists, resource managers, and the general public; and (e) national leadership in data management and climate scenario development.

  9. Supporting and Resourcing Secondary Science Teachers in Rural and Regional Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenny, John; Seen, Andrew; Purser, John

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on the outcomes of a pilot project to support secondary teachers of science in rural and regional Tasmania. The pilot project involved eight regional schools and was based on the provision of a kit of materials and an associated learning program that used brine shrimp or "sea-monkeys" to test for water quality. The unit was…

  10. Celebrating Jhumki Basu's contributions to science education as a scholar and an activist: voices from the field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milne, Catherine; Rubel, Laurie; Rodriguez, Alberto J.; Emdin, Christopher; Maulucci, Maria Rivera; Locke, Donyagay; Tan, Edna; Clairmont, Neil; Upadhyay, Bhaskar

    2009-06-01

    This metalogue addresses the ways Sreyashi Jhumki Basu mediated our practices in science education and life. We focus on Basu's uses of critical science agency, democratic science classrooms, and critical feminist ethnography to transform the possibilities for all participants in her research and educational practices. We also examine her use of cases and pedagogical strategies to support youth set practice goals based on conceptions of self and preferred learning trajectories. These strategies allow youth to develop power through the use of disciplinary knowledge and modes of inquiry to support their understanding of themselves as powerful, able to change their position in the world, and make the world more socially just. This (Key Contributors) article acknowledges a life cut short through disease, reflects our personal loss of a friend and colleague, and expresses determination to ensure that her contributions to science education are sustained and continued.

  11. An Earth System Science Program for the Baltic Sea Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, H. E. M.; Rutgersson, A.; Reckermann, M.

    2014-04-01

    From Russia in the east to Sweden, Denmark, and Germany in the west, reaching south to the tips of the Czech Republic, Slovakia, and Ukraine, the Baltic Sea watershed drains nearly 20% of Europe (see Figure 1). In the highly populated south, the temperate climate hosts intensive agriculture and industry. In the north, the landscape is boreal and rural. In the Baltic Sea itself, complex bathymetry and stratification patterns as well as extended hypoxic and anoxic deep waters add to the diversity. Yet in recent history, the differences across the Baltic Sea region have been more than physical: In the mid-20th century, the watershed was split in two.

  12. Practical Environmental Education and Local Contribution in the Environmental Science Laboratory Circle in the College of Science and Technology in Nihon University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniai, Tetsuyuki; Ito, Ken-Ichi; Sakamaki, Hiroshi

    In this paper, we presented a method and knowledge about a practical and project management education and local contribution obtained through the student activities of “Environmental science laboratory circle in the College of Science and technology in Nihon University” from 1991 to 2001. In this circle, four major projects were acted such as research, protection, clean up and enlightenment projects. Due to some problems from inside or outside of this circle, this circle projects have been stopped. The diffusion and popularization of the internet technology will help to resolve some of these problems.

  13. Contributions to Public Understanding of Science by the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory (I): Programs and Workshops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passow, M. J.; Turrin, M.; Kenna, T. C.; Newton, R.; Buckley, B.

    2009-12-01

    The Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University (LDEO) continues its long history of contributions to public understanding of Science through “live” and web-based programs that provide teachers, students, and the other access to new discoveries and updates on key issues. We highlight current activities in paired posters. Part 1 focuses on events held at the Palisades, NY, campus. "Earth2Class (E2C)" is a unique program integrating science content with increased understanding about classroom learning and technology. Monthly workshops allow K-14 participants to combine talks by researchers about cutting-edge investigations with acquisition of background knowledge and classroom-ready applications. E2C has sponsored 100 workshops by more than 60 LDEO scientists for hundreds of teachers. A vast array of resources on includes archived versions of workshops, comprehensive sets of curriculum units, and professional development opportunities. It has been well received by both workshop participants and others who have only accessed the web site. "Hudson River Snapshot Day" celebrates the Hudson River Estuary and educates participants on the uniqueness of our nearby estuary as part of the annual National Estuaries Week. The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation Hudson River Estuary Program and Hudson Basin River Watch coordinate the event. LDEO scientists help coordinate annual data collection by school classes to create a day-in-the-life picture all along the river. LDEO researchers also participate in "River Summer," bringing together participants from a variety of perspectives to look at the Hudson River and foster better understanding of how the same features can appear very differently to artists, writers, political scientists, economists, or scientists. These perspectives aid in recognizing the Hudson’s unique characteristics and history by identifying cross-disciplinary relationships and fostering new

  14. Science Engagement at the Museum School: Teacher Perspectives on the Contribution of Museum Pedagogy to Science Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watermeyer, Richard

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the accounts of science teachers working within the UK's only "museum school" and what they perceive as the benefits and shortcomings of "museum pedagogy" as a process of object-based teaching (and learning). Museum pedagogy is in this context considered for its potential in harmonising informal and formal…

  15. Exploring Climate Science with WV Educators: A Regional Model for Teacher Professional Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruberg, L. F.; Calinger, M.

    2014-12-01

    The National Research Council Framework for K-12 Science Literacy reports that children reared in rural agricultural communities, who experience regular interactions with plants and animals, develop more sophisticated understanding of ecology and biological systems than do urban and suburban children of the same age. West Virginia (WV) is a rural state. The majority of its residents live in communities of fewer than 2,500 people. Based on the features of the population being served and their unique strengths, this presentation focuses on a regional model for teacher professional development that addresses agricultural and energy vulnerabilities and adaptations to climate change in WV. The professional development model outlined shows how to guide teachers to use a problem-based learning approach to introduce climate data and analysis techniques within a scenario context that is locally meaningful. This strategy engages student interest by focusing on regional and community concerns. Climate science standards are emphasized in the Next Generation Science Standards, but WV has not provided its teachers with appropriate instructional resources to meet those standards. The authors addressed this need by offering a series of climate science education workshops followed by online webinars offered to WV science educators free of charge with funding by the West Virginia Space Grant Consortium. The authors report on findings from this series of professional development workshops conducted in partnership with the West Virginia Science Teachers Association. The goal was to enhance grades 5-12 teaching and learning about climate change through problem-based learning. Prior to offering the climate workshops, all WV science educators were asked to complete a short questionnaire. As Figure 1 shows, over 40% of the teacher respondents reported being confident in teaching climate science content. For comparison post workshops surveys measure teacher confidence in climate science

  16. Contribution of regional sources to atmospheric methane over the Amazon Basin in 2010 and 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Chris; Gloor, Manuel; Gatti, Luciana V.; Miller, John B.; Monks, Sarah A.; McNorton, Joey; Bloom, A. Anthony; Basso, Luana S.; Chipperfield, Martyn P.

    2016-03-01

    We present an assessment of methane (CH4) atmospheric concentrations over the Amazon Basin for 2010 and 2011 using a 3-D atmospheric chemical transport model, two wetland emission models, and new observations made during biweekly flights made over four locations within the basin. We attempt to constrain basin-wide CH4 emissions using the observations, and since 2010 was an unusually dry year, we assess the effect of this drought on Amazonian methane emissions. We find that South American emissions contribute up to 150 ppb to concentrations at the sites, mainly originating from within the basin. Our atmospheric model simulations agree reasonably well with measurements at three of the locations (0.28 ≤ r2 ≤ 0.63, mean bias ≤ 9.5 ppb). Attempts to improve the simulated background CH4 concentration through analysis of simulated and observed sulphur hexafluoride concentrations do not improve the model performance, however. Through minimisation of seasonal biases between the simulated and observed atmospheric concentrations, we scale our prior emission inventories to derive total basin-wide methane emissions of 36.5-41.1 Tg(CH4)/yr in 2010 and 31.6-38.8 Tg(CH4)/yr in 2011. These totals suggest that the Amazon contributes significantly (up to 7%) to global CH4 emissions. Our analysis indicates that factors other than precipitation, such as temperature variations or tree mortality, may have affected microbial emission rates. However, given the uncertainty of our emission estimates, we cannot say definitively whether the noncombustion emissions from the region were different in 2010 and 2011, despite contrasting meteorological conditions between the two years.

  17. Math and Science Social Cognitive Variables in College Students: Contributions of Contextual Factors in Predicting Goals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byars-Winston, Angela M.; Fouad, Nadya A.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of two contextual factors, parental involvement and perceived career barriers, on math/science goals. Using social cognitive career theory (SCCT; Lent, Brown, & Hackett, 1994), a path model was tested to investigate hypothesized relationships between math- and science-related efficacy beliefs (i.e., task and…

  18. Towards a More Authentic Science Curriculum: The Contribution of Out-of-School Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braund, Martin; Reiss, Michael

    2006-01-01

    In many developed countries of the world, pupil attitudes to school science decline progressively across the age range of secondary schooling while fewer students are choosing to study science at higher levels and as a career. Responses to these developments have included proposals to reform the curriculum, pedagogy, and the nature of pupil…

  19. Graphical support for comprehending science texts: The contributions of diagram design and text directives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McTigue, Erin M.

    The present study examined the combined effect of diagram design and text directives on the comprehension of explanatory science texts for middle school readers. Three types of diagram designs were compared. Each design contained the same graphical representation of a cycle but differed in the labels. The labels indicated either the (a) parts of the, cycle, (b) steps of the cycle, or (c) both the parts and steps. Additionally, there were two conditions of text, both with and without embedded directives. The directives guided the reader to the diagram to help readers integrate the two sources of information. Finally, each of the 189 sixth grade participants read two texts---a life-science text and a physical-science text. Results indicated that for the life-science text both the parts diagrams and the steps diagrams facilitated the readers' comprehension, but that the parts & steps diagram did not. Overall, the directives assisted readers in the life-science text, when they were viewing the complex diagrams: the steps diagram, and the parts & steps diagrams, but not the parts diagram. Directives also helped girls who were reading at the below- and on-grade level, but not the girls reading above-grade level. Neither the diagrams nor directives facilitated comprehension of the physical science text. There was a gender difference favoring boys on the physical science but no gender difference on the life-science text.

  20. Mendel in Genetics Teaching: Some Contributions from History of Science and Articles for Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El-Hani, Charbel N.

    2015-01-01

    School science descriptions about Mendel and his story are problematic because several statements that are controversial among historians of science are repeated over and over again as if they were established facts. Another problem is the neglect of other scientists working on inheritance in the second half of the nineteenth century, including…

  1. The Contribution of Trade Books to Early Science Literacy: In and Out of School

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Meadow; McKeough, Anne; Graham, Susan; Stock, Hayli; Bisanz, Gay

    2009-03-01

    Lifelong science literacy begins with attitudes and interests established early in childhood. The use of trade books (i.e., a literary work intended for sale to the general public) in North American school classrooms to support the development of science literacy invites an examination of the quality of science content disseminated to students. A total of 116 trade books were examined to: (a) determine the degree to which science trade books complement expected science knowledge outcomes outlined in school curricula, and (b) compare trade book content to the goals of scientific literacy. Analysis across four science topics, Dinosaurs, Space, Inheritance, and Growth and Life Properties, revealed that this body of children’s literature is inconsistent in its coverage of curricular goals and elements of scientific literacy. Because trade books represent children’s first exposure to science, these shortcomings should be addressed if these books are to be maximally effective in promoting science literacy. Implications for using trade books in the classroom are discussed.

  2. Towards a Social Science of the Social: The Contribution of Praxeological Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Formosinho, Joao; Formosinho, Julia Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Educational research developed initially using the natural science model based on the positivist tradition. Education was then seen as an application of the positivist science thus produced. This research could predict some effects but not explain the processes through which these effects came about. This exclusively numerical representation of…

  3. Understanding the Regional Contribution of Higher Education Institutions: A Literature Review. OECD Education Working Papers, No. 9

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arbo, Peter; Benneworth, Paul

    2007-01-01

    The contribution of higher education institutions to regional development is a theme that has attracted growing attention in recent years. Knowledge institutions are increasingly expected not only to conduct education and research, but also to play an active role in the economic, social and cultural development of their regions. The extent to…

  4. Source contributions to the regional distribution of secondary particulate matter in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Qi; Kleeman, Michael J.

    Source contributions to PM2.5 nitrate, sulfate and ammonium ion concentrations in California's San Joaquin Valley (SJV) (4-6 January 1996) and South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB) surrounding Los Angeles (23-25 September 1996) were predicted using a three-dimensional source-oriented Eulerian air quality model. The air quality model tracks the formation of PM2.5 nitrate, sulfate and ammonium ion from primary particles and precursor gases emitted from different sources though a mathematical simulation of emission, chemical reaction, gas-to-particle conversion, transport and deposition. The observed PM2.5 nitrate, sulfate and ammonium ion concentrations, and the mass distribution of nitrate, sulfate and ammonium ion as a function of particle size have been successfully reproduced by the model simulation. Approximately 45-57% of the PM2.5 nitrate and 34-40% of the PM2.5 ammonium ion in the SJV is formed from precursor gaseous species released from sources upwind of the valley. In the SoCAB, approximately 83% of the PM2.5 nitrate and 82% of the PM2.5 ammonium ion is formed from precursor gaseous species released from sources within the air basin. In the SJV, transportation related sources contribute approximately 24-30% of the PM2.5 nitrate (diesel engines ˜13.5-17.0%, catalyst equipped gasoline engines ˜10.2-12.8% and non-catalyst equipped gasoline engines ˜0.3-0.4%). In the SoCAB, transportation related sources directly contribute to approximately 67% of the PM2.5 nitrate (diesel engines 34.6%, non-catalyst equipped gasoline engine 4.7% and catalyst equipped gasoline engine 28.1%). PM2.5 ammonium ion concentrations in the SJV were dominated by area (including animal) NH 3 sources (16.7-25.3%), soil (7.2-10.9%), fertilizer NH 3 sources (11.4-17.3%) and point NH 3 sources (14.3-21.7%). In the SoCAB, ammonium ion is mainly associated with animal sources (28.2%) and catalyst equipped gasoline engines (16.2%). In both regions, the majority of the relatively low PM2.5 sulfate

  5. Science-Economy-Technology Concordance Matrix for Development and Implementation of Regional Smart Specializations in the Silesian Voivodeship, Poland

    PubMed Central

    Smoliński, Adam; Bondaruk, Jan; Pichlak, Magdalena; Trząski, Leszek; Uszok, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    The regional smart specializations include the innovative activities within a common science-economy-technology sector, which open the opportunities to gain a competitive advantage. The original procedure of science-economy-technology concordance matrix development on an example of smart specializations of the Silesian Voivodeship was presented in the paper. The procedure developed includes recognition of the research and economic components of the regional smart specialization and the connection between the economic components of the regional specialization and the technological innovation through the international patent classification. It also comprises recognition of key enabling technologies (KETs) and high technologies (of high R&D intensity) other than KET in the economic and technological dimensions of innovation as well as the high R&D intensity services in the economic dimension of innovation. The in-depth expert analyses with the application of the Delphi method were also taken into account. The methodological approach developed and the visualization method applied are both of cognitive and practical importance since they contribute significantly to the creation of efficient development policies, to the enhancement and facilitation of cross-sectoral cooperation, and to the focusing on the fields of key importance in terms of the competitive advantage of a region. PMID:26697528

  6. Science-Economy-Technology Concordance Matrix for Development and Implementation of Regional Smart Specializations in the Silesian Voivodeship, Poland.

    PubMed

    Smoliński, Adam; Bondaruk, Jan; Pichlak, Magdalena; Trząski, Leszek; Uszok, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    The regional smart specializations include the innovative activities within a common science-economy-technology sector, which open the opportunities to gain a competitive advantage. The original procedure of science-economy-technology concordance matrix development on an example of smart specializations of the Silesian Voivodeship was presented in the paper. The procedure developed includes recognition of the research and economic components of the regional smart specialization and the connection between the economic components of the regional specialization and the technological innovation through the international patent classification. It also comprises recognition of key enabling technologies (KETs) and high technologies (of high R&D intensity) other than KET in the economic and technological dimensions of innovation as well as the high R&D intensity services in the economic dimension of innovation. The in-depth expert analyses with the application of the Delphi method were also taken into account. The methodological approach developed and the visualization method applied are both of cognitive and practical importance since they contribute significantly to the creation of efficient development policies, to the enhancement and facilitation of cross-sectoral cooperation, and to the focusing on the fields of key importance in terms of the competitive advantage of a region. PMID:26697528

  7. Hydrologic connectivity and the contribution of stream headwaters to ecological integrity at regional scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Freeman, Mary C.; Pringle, C.M.; Jackson, C.R.

    2007-01-01

    Cumulatively, headwater streams contribute to maintaining hydrologic connectivity and ecosystem integrity at regional scales. Hydrologic connectivity is the water-mediated transport of matter, energy and organisms within or between elements of the hydrologic cycle. Headwater streams compose over two-thirds of total stream length in a typical river drainage and directly connect the upland and riparian landscape to the rest of the stream ecosystem. Altering headwater streams, e.g., by channelization, diversion through pipes, impoundment and burial, modifies fluxes between uplands and downstream river segments and eliminates distinctive habitats. The large-scale ecological effects of altering headwaters are amplified by land uses that alter runoff and nutrient loads to streams, and by widespread dam construction on larger rivers (which frequently leaves free-flowing upstream portions of river systems essential to sustaining aquatic biodiversity). We discuss three examples of large-scale consequences of cumulative headwater alteration. Downstream eutrophication and coastal hypoxia result, in part, from agricultural practices that alter headwaters and wetlands while increasing nutrient runoff. Extensive headwater alteration is also expected to lower secondary productivity of river systems by reducing stream-system length and trophic subsidies to downstream river segments, affecting aquatic communities and terrestrial wildlife that utilize aquatic resources. Reduced viability of freshwater biota may occur with cumulative headwater alteration, including for species that occupy a range of stream sizes but for which headwater streams diversify the network of interconnected populations or enhance survival for particular life stages. Developing a more predictive understanding of ecological patterns that may emerge on regional scales as a result of headwater alterations will require studies focused on components and pathways that connect headwaters to river, coastal and

  8. U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Western Region: Alaska Coastal and Ocean Science

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holland-Bartels, Leslie

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), a bureau of the Department of the Interior (DOI), is the Nation's largest water, earth, and biological science and mapping agency. The bureau's science strategy 'Facing Tomorrow's Challenges - U.S. Geological Survey Science in the Decade 2007-2017' describes the USGS vision for its science in six integrated areas of societal concern: Understanding Ecosystems and Predicting Ecosystem Change; Climate Variability and Change; Energy and Minerals; Hazards, Risk, and Resilience; Environment and Wildlife in Human Health; and Water Census of the United States. USGS has three Regions that encompass nine geographic Areas. This fact sheet describes examples of USGS science conducted in coastal, nearshore terrestrial, and ocean environments in the Alaska Area.

  9. Student Engagement with Science in Early Adolescence: The Contribution of Enjoyment to Students' Continuing Interest in Learning about Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ainley, Mary; Ainley, John

    2011-01-01

    Recent research has expanded understanding of the contribution of emotions to student engagement and achievement. Achievement emotions can be conceptualized as general ways of responding to achievement settings or specific emotional states aroused during a specific learning activity. Emotion processes can be distinguished as positive or negative,…

  10. Discrete annular regions of texture contribute independently to the analysis of shape from texture.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ken W S; Dickinson, J Edwin; Badcock, David R

    2016-09-01

    Radial frequency (RF) textures (created by applying a sinusoidal modulation of orientation to an otherwise circular texture) have been shown to be globally processed. RF textures differ from RF patterns (paths deformed from circular by a sinusoidal modulation in radius) in that the elements need not be constrained to a specific path. In the natural environment, objects differ from their background in texture, and a bounding contour can mark this textural change. This study examines the extent to which modulation of texture sums across space and whether the inclusion of a boundary between two areas provides a segmentation cue that limits the area over which summation occurs. RF textures were split into two annular regions and signal introduced to inner, outer, or both annuli Thresholds for the detection of RF modulation of orientation were not affected by the presence of a boundary. Further, it was found that the thresholds matched predictions for the independent contribution of the inner and outer areas to performance and that changing the relative phase of the modulation in the inner and outer annuli had no impact on performance, implying independent integration within the two annuli. Finally, integration of modulation information within the annuli was confirmed to ensure these results do apply to textures that are globally processed. PMID:27627734

  11. Cerebellar control of saccade dynamics: contribution of the fastigial oculomotor region

    PubMed Central

    Quinet, Julie

    2015-01-01

    The fastigial oculomotor region is the output by which the medioposterior cerebellum influences the generation of saccades. Recent inactivation studies reported observations suggesting an involvement in their dynamics (velocity and duration). In this work, we tested this hypothesis in the head-restrained monkey with the electrical microstimulation technique. More specifically, we studied the influence of duration, frequency, and current on the saccades elicited by fastigial stimulation and starting from a central (straight ahead) position. The results show ipsilateral or contralateral saccades whose amplitude and dynamics depend on the stimulation parameters. The duration and amplitude of their horizontal component increase with the duration of stimulation up to a maximum amplitude. Varying the stimulation frequency mostly changes their latency and the peak velocity (for contralateral saccades). Current also influences the metrics and dynamics of saccades: the horizontal amplitude and peak velocity increase with the intensity, whereas the latency decreases. The changes in peak velocity and in latency observed in contralateral saccades are not correlated. Finally, we discovered that contralateral saccades can be evoked at sites eliciting ipsilateral saccades when the stimulation frequency is reduced. However, their onset is timed not with the onset but with the offset of stimulation. These results corroborate the hypothesis that the fastigial projections toward the pontomedullary reticular formation (PMRF) participate in steering the saccade, whereas the fastigiocollicular projections contribute to the bilateral control of visual fixation. We propose that the cerebellar influence on saccade generation involves recruiting neurons and controlling the size of the active population in the PMRF. PMID:25744890

  12. Teaching the Nature of Science in Physics Courses: The Contribution of Classroom Historical Inquiries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurines, Laurence; Beaufils, Daniel

    2013-06-01

    Physics and chemistry programs at the secondary school level in France recommend introducing components of the history of science (HS). Emphasis is placed on a `cultural' dimension, which is poorly defined but essentially refers to elements of epistemological nature. Moreover, the few examples of activities based on HS suggested by the programs and science textbooks are means to learn scientific content and convey a reductive and false image of the nature of science (NoS). Our main issue is to examine the possibility to communicate a more authentic image of NoS with HS. We begin by demonstrating how our historical and epistemological analysis led us to distinguish different learning goals about NoS. We then show how these goals can generate classroom activities involving collective inquiry based on the implementation of documents. These documents may or may not be paired with experiments. Finally, we discuss the tensions that our choices created with science curricula and among teachers.

  13. Knowledge, Belief, and Science Education - A Contribution from the Epistemology of Testimony

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Tiago Alfredo S.; El-Hani, Charbel N.; da Silva-Filho, Waldomiro José

    2016-07-01

    This article intends to show that the defense of "understanding" as one of the major goals of science education can be grounded on an anti-reductionist perspective on testimony as a source of knowledge. To do so, we critically revisit the discussion between Harvey Siegel and Alvin Goldman about the goals of science education, especially where it involves arguments based on the epistemology of testimony. Subsequently, we come back to a discussion between Charbel N. El-Hani and Eduardo Mortimer, on the one hand, and Michael Hoffmann, on the other, striving to strengthen the claim that rather than students' belief change, understanding should have epistemic priority as a goal of science education. Based on these two lines of discussion, we conclude that the reliance on testimony as a source of knowledge is necessary to the development of a more large and comprehensive scientific understanding by science students.

  14. Regional centres for space science and technology education (affiliated to the united nations): education curricula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haubold, H.

    Since 1988, the United Nations, through the Programme on Space Applications, is supporting the establishment and operation of regional Centres for Space Science and Technology Education in Africa, Asia and the Pacific, Latin America and the Caribbean, and Western Asia. Simultaneously, education curricula have been developed for remote sensing, satellite communications, satellite meteorology, and space science. The paper reviews briefly these developments and highlights the most recent updated education curricula in the four disciplines that will be made available in 2002, in the six official languages of the United Nations, for implementation at the regional Centres and beyond. WWW: http://www.oosa.unvienna.org/SAP/centres/centres.htm

  15. The contribution of Niels Daan to fisheries science: Changing the perspective from single-species to the ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijnsdorp, Adriaan D.; Dekker, Willem; Heessen, Henk J. L.

    We describe the career of Professor Niels Daan at the governmental Netherlands Institute for Fisheries Research (RIVO) and analyse his role in the development of fisheries science, in the Netherlands as well as in the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES). Major contributions are (i) his research on the interactions between cod and its prey; (ii) the standardization, data base development and quality control of the ICES International Bottom Trawl Survey; (iii) his role as editor-in-chief of the ICES Journal of Marine Science; (iv) his role in stimulating new approaches and critically questioning the science behind the advice; (v) his often silent support to a wide group of young fisheries scientists.

  16. LOS ALAMOS NEUTRON SCIENCE CENTER CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF FUTURE POWER REACTORS

    SciTech Connect

    GAVRON, VICTOR I.; HILL, TONY S.; PITCHER, ERIC J.; TOVESSON, FREDERIK K.

    2007-01-09

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is a large spallation neutron complex centered around an 800 MeV high-currently proton accelerator. Existing facilities include a highly-moderated neutron facility (Lujan Center) where neutrons between thermal and keV energies are produced, and the Weapons Neutron Research Center (WNR), where a bare spallation target produces neutrons between 0.1 and several hundred MeV.The LANSCE facility offers a unique capability to provide high precision nuclear data over a large energy region, including that for fast reactor systems. In an ongoing experimental program the fission and capture cross sections are being measured for a number of minor actinides relevant for Generation-IV reactors and transmutation technology. Fission experiments makes use of both the highly moderated spallation neutron spectrum at the Lujan Center, and the unmoderated high energy spectrum at WNR. By combininb measurements at these two facilities the differential fission cross section is measured relative to the {sup 235}U(n,f) standard from subthermal energies up to about 200 MeV. An elaborate data acquisition system is designed to deal with all the different types of background present when spanning 10 energy decades. The first isotope to be measured was {sup 237}Np, and the results were used to improve the current ENDF/B-VII evaluation. Partial results have also been obtained for {sup 240}Pu and {sup 242}Pu, and the final results are expected shortly. Capture cross sections are measured at LANSCE using the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE). This unique instrument is highly efficient in detecting radiative capture events, and can thus handle radioactive samples of half-lives as low as 100 years. A number of capture cross sections important to fast reaction applications have been measured with DANCE. The first measurement was on {sup 237}Np(n,{gamma}), and the results have been submitted for publication. Other capture

  17. The Armutlu Network - a contribution to seismic hazard assessment in the Marmara region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lühr, B.-G.; Bariş, Ş.; Grosser, H.; Irmak, T. S.; Woith, H.; Donner, S.; Özer, M. F.; Çaka, D.; Zschau, J.

    2009-04-01

    The North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ) represents one of the most prominent continental transforms and slips at an average rate of 20-30 mm/yr. During the 20th century, the NAFZ has ruptured over about 900 km of its more than 1,500 km length by ten devastating earthquakes with magnitudes above Ms > 6.5. Today, a segment inside the Marmara Sea just south of the megacity of Istanbul represents a seismic gap that is believed being capable of generating a M ≥7 earthquake within the next decades. East of this segment the western end of the 1999 Kocaeli earthquake rupture is located next to the northern shoreline of the Armutlu Peninsula depicted by distinct clusters of micro-seismic activity. As a contribution to hazard assessment the local seismic network ARMNET had been set-up in 2005 in co-operation between Kocaeli University, and GFZ, to monitor the chronological evolution of seismicity, and to investigate the deformation of the Armutlu Peninsula, as well as possible interactions between seismic waves and pore-pressure variations in geothermal systems. The installation was strongly supported by local governments, and lead to a strong interest and an increasing knowledge transfer to local authorities. The ARMNET contributes to the implementation of an Anatolian plate boundary observatory (PBO) belonging to a series of GFZ-operated Earth System Observatories to systemically study coupled Earth processes, and is imbedded in the framework of the CEDIM (CEnter for DIsaster Management and Risk Reduction Technology) project "Megacity Istanbul", which involves the analysis of the seismicity of the Greater Istanbul region. At present, ARMNET consist of 12 short period and 10 broadband stations. Additionally, a borehole seismometer has been installed in a 100 m borehole close to Yalova. Most of the detected events occurred in a depth range of 5 to 15 km, and determined duration magnitudes are in a range 0.4 and 5.3 with a magnitude of completeness of 1.3. Besides seismic

  18. Science and Technology Education Newsletter, No. 7, September 1976. A Supplement to the Bulletin of the Regional Office of Science and Technology for Africa. "Special Issue" Environmental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibukun, Olu, Ed.

    This publication is a collaborative effort between the science and education sections of UNESCO and particularly between UNESCO Regional Office for Science and Technology for Africa (Nairobi) and the UNESCO Regional Office for Education in Africa (Dakar). Articles in this issue focus on Africa: (1) The Belgrade Charter - A Guide to Environmental…

  19. Temporal characterization and regional contribution to O3 and NOx at an urban and a suburban site in Nanjing, China.

    PubMed

    Xie, Min; Zhu, Kuanguang; Wang, Tijian; Chen, Pulong; Han, Yong; Li, Shu; Zhuang, Bingliang; Shu, Lei

    2016-05-01

    To improve our understanding of the interplay among local and regional photochemical pollutants in the typical city of the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) region, the concurrent observation of O3 and NOx concentrations at an urban and a suburban site in Nanjing during 2008 is presented. In general, the annual mean O3 concentration is 2.35ppbv lower in the downtown than at suburban due to higher NOx pollution levels correlated with heavy traffic. At both sites, O3 shows a distinct seasonality with the spring maximum and the winter minimum, while the minimum concentration of NOx appears in summertime. Besides the chemical processes of O3 sensitivity in the daytime and the NOx titration at night, meteorological conditions also play an essential role in these monthly and diurnal variations. The ozone weekend effect that can be attributed to the weekly routine of human activities is observed in the urban atmosphere of Nanjing as well, with O3 concentrations 2.09ppbv higher and NOx concentrations 6.20ppbv lower on weekends than on weekdays. The chemical coupling of NO, NO2 and O3 is investigated to show that the OX-component (O3 and NO2) partitioning point occurs at about 35ppbv for NOx, with O3 being the dominant form at lower levels and NO2 dominating at higher levels. And it is also discovered that the level of OX is made up of two contributions, including the regional contribution affected by regional background O3 level and the local contribution correlated with the level of primary pollution. The diurnal peak of regional contribution appears 2-5h after the peak of local contribution, implying that OX in Nanjing might prominently affected by the pollutants from a short distance. The highest regional contribution and the second highest local contribution lead to the spring peak of O3 observed in Nanjing, whereas the highest local contribution and the moderate regional contribution make the O3 concentrations in summer higher than those in autumn and winter. Our results

  20. Multimodal representation contributes to the complex development of science literacy in a college biology class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, William Drew

    This study is an investigation into the science literacy of college genetics students who were given a modified curriculum to address specific teaching and learning problems from a previous class. This study arose out of an interest by the professor and researcher to determine how well students in the class Human Genetics in the 21st Century responded to a reorganized curriculum to address misconceptions that were prevalent after direct instruction in the previous year's class. One of the components to the revised curriculum was the addition of a multimodal representation requirement as part of their normal writing assignments. How well students performed in these writing assignments and the relationship they had to student learning the rest of the class formed the principle research interest of this study. Improving science literacy has been a consistent goal of science educators and policy makers for over 50 years (DeBoer, 2000). This study uses the conceptualization of Norris and Phillips (2003) in which science literacy can be organized into both the fundamental sense (reading and writing) and the derived sense (experience and knowledge) of science literacy. The fundamental sense of science literacy was investigated in the students' ability to understand and use multimodal representations as part of their homework writing assignments. The derived sense of science literacy was investigated in how well students were able to apply their previous learning to class assessments found in quizzes and exams. This study uses a mixed-methods correlational design to investigate the relationship that existed between students' writing assignment experiences connected to multimodal representations and their academic performance in classroom assessments. Multimodal representations are pervasive in science literature and communication. These are the figures, diagrams, tables, pictures, mathematical equations, and any other form of content in which scientists and science

  1. The Contribution of Local and Regional Sources to Particulate Matter in European Megacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skyllakou, Ksakousti; Megaritis, Athanasios; Fountoukis, Christos; Murphy, Benjamin; Pandis, Spyros

    2013-04-01

    The ongoing urbanization over the past decade has led to an increasing number of Megacities around the world, now hosting more than half of the world's population (UN 2007). These large urban centers are substantial sources of anthropogenic pollutants having adverse effects on human health, visibility and ecosystems (Seinfeld and Pandis, 2006). In order to improve air quality in those urban areas we need to quantify the fraction of the pollution originating from local and regional sources and to determine the response of the system to emission controls. Three-dimensional chemical transport models (CTMs) are well suited to help address these source receptor questions since they model all the necessary processes that impact air pollution concentrations and transport in the domain. In this study we applied PMCAMx (Fountoukis et al., 2011) a three dimensional CTM over Europe to study the influence that emissions in large European urban areas (eg. Paris, London, etc.) might have on the concentration of the major PM2.5 components during a summer and a winter period. We combined PMCAMx with the Particulate Source Apportionment Technology (PSAT) (Wagstrom et al., 2011) which directly computes the contribution of different emission areas or source types. The contributions of local, short, medium, and long range transport and different source categories (e.g., transport, fires, etc.) were quantified. Local emission sources are predicted to have a significant effect on primary pollutant levels, like black carbon (BC) while secondary pollutants concentrations are dominated by sources outside the major urban areas. The PSAT results were compared with those of an "annihilation" scenario zeroing out all anthropogenic emissions over an urban area. The results of these simulations suggest that the two methods show a good agreement with each other, but PSAT is a lot more computationally efficient. References Fountoukis C., Racherla P. N., Denier van der Gon H. A. C., Polymeneas P

  2. Promoting Science Outdoor Activities for Elementary School Children: Contributions from a research laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boaventura, Diana; Faria, Cláudia; Chagas, Isabel; Galvão, Cecília

    2013-03-01

    The purposes of the study were to analyse the promotion of scientific literacy through practical research activities and to identify children's conceptions about scientists and how they do science. Elementary school children were engaged in two scientific experiments in a marine biology research laboratory. A total of 136 students answered a questionnaire about their previous habits towards science and carried out the following actions: (1) a guided visit to the laboratory, (2) a brief presentation of the research theme, (3) the development of two experiments, and (4) a questionnaire about the experiments and science conceptions. The research methods included observation, document analysis, and content analysis of the answers to the questionnaires. Additionally, each visit was video recorded in order to design learning materials. The results revealed that most of the pupils were able to follow every stage of experimentation. However, some of them misinterpreted results and conclusions. One implication of the study is that this type of outdoor activity is extremely important to promote meaningful science learning in children, but more care should be taken in practical science activities so that children can overcome some common difficulties when performing scientific inquiry.

  3. The Contribution of Equitation Science to Minimising Horse-Related Risks to Humans

    PubMed Central

    Starling, Melissa; McLean, Andrew; McGreevy, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Simple Summary Equitation science describes an approach to horse training and riding that focuses on embracing the cognitive abilities of horses, their natural behaviour, and how human riders can use signalling and rewards to best effect. This approach is concerned with both horse welfare and rider safety, and this review discusses how equitation science can minimise risk to humans around horses and enhance horse welfare. Abstract Equitation science is an evidence-based approach to horse training and riding that focuses on a thorough understanding of both equine ethology and learning theory. This combination leads to more effective horse training, but also plays a role in keeping horse riders and trainers safe around horses. Equitation science underpins ethical equitation, and recognises the limits of the horse’s cognitive and physical abilities. Equitation is an ancient practice that has benefited from a rich tradition that sees it flourishing in contemporary sporting pursuits. Despite its history, horse-riding is an activity for which neither horses nor humans evolved, and it brings with it significant risks to the safety of both species. This review outlines the reasons horses may behave in ways that endanger humans and how training choices can exacerbate this. It then discusses the recently introduced 10 Principles of Equitation Science and explains how following these principles can minimise horse-related risk to humans and enhance horse welfare. PMID:26907354

  4. Relative contributions of regional, urban, and local sources of atmospheric aerosol pollution in regions with different levels of anthropogenic load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emilenko, Alexander S.; Isakov, Andrey A.; Kopeikin, Vladimir M.; Gengchen, Wang

    2015-11-01

    Results of simultaneous round-the-clock measurements of the angular scattering coefficient and black carbon concentration carried out in 1984-2014 in the regions of Moscow, Moscow Suburbs, Caucasian Minvody, Beijing, and Xinglong Observatory are analyzed.

  5. Regional Water Security in the Hindu Kush Himalayan Region: Role of Geospatial Science and Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahid, S. M.; Shrestha, A. B.; Murthy, M. S. R.; Matin, M.; Zhang, J.; Siddiqui, O.

    2014-11-01

    The Hindu Kush Himalayan (HKH) region is the source of ten large Asian river systems - the Amu Darya, Indus, Ganges, Brahmaputra (Yarlungtsanpo), Irrawaddy, Salween (Nu), Mekong (Lancang), Yangtse (Jinsha), Yellow River (Huanghe), and Tarim (Dayan), - and provides water, ecosystem services, and the basis for livelihoods to a population of around 0.2 billion people in the region. The river basins of these rivers provide water to 1.3 billion people, a fifth of the world's population. Against this background, a comprehensive river basin program having current focus on the Koshi and Indus basins is launched at the International Center for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD) as a joint scientific endeavour of several participating institutions from four regional countries of the HKH region. The river basin approach aims is to maximize the economic and social benefits derived from water resources in an equitable manner while conserving and, where necessary, restoring freshwater ecosystems, and improved understanding of upstream-downstream linkages. In order to effectively support river basin management satellite based multi sensor and multi temporal data is used to understand diverse river basin related aspects. We present here our recent experiences and results on satellite based rainfall and run off assessments, land use and land cover change and erosion dynamics, multi thematic water vulnerability assessments, space based data streaming systems for dynamic hydrological modelling, and potential applications of agent based models in effective local water use management.

  6. Bridging Informatics and Earth Science: a Look at Gregory Leptoukh's Contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynnes, C.

    2012-12-01

    With the tragic passing this year of Gregory Leptoukh, the Earth and Space Sciences community lost a tireless participant in--and advocate for--science informatics. Throughout his career at NASA, Dr. Leptoukh established a theme of bridging the gulf between the informatics and science communities. Nowhere is this more evident than his leadership in the development of Giovanni (GES DISC Interactive Online Visualization ANd aNalysis Infrastructure). Giovanni is an online tool that serves to hide the often-complex technical details of data format and structure, making science data easier to explore and use by Earth scientists. To date Giovanni has been acknowledged as a contributor in 500-odd scientific articles. In recent years, Leptoukh concentrated his efforts on multi-sensor data inter-comparison, merging and fusion. This work exposed several challenges at the intersection of data and science. One of these was the ease with which a naive user might generate spurious comparisons, a potential hazard that was the genesis of the Multi-sensor Data Synergy Advisor (MDSA). The MDSA uses semantic ontologies and inference rules to organize knowledge about dataset quality and other salient characteristics in order to advise users on potential caveats for comparing or merging two datasets. Recently, Leptoukh also led the development of AeroStat, an online Giovanni instance to investigate aerosols via statistics from station and satellite comparisons and merged maps of data from more than one instrument. Aerostat offers a neural net based bias adjustment to "harmonize" the data by removing systematic offsets between datasets before merging. These examples exhibit Leptoukh's talent for adopting advanced computer technologies in the service of making science data more accessible to researchers. In this, he set an example that is at once both vital and challenging for the ESSI community to emulate.

  7. Bridging Informatics and Earth Science: a Look at Gregory Leptoukh's Contributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    With the tragic passing this year of Gregory Leptoukh, the Earth and Space Sciences community lost a tireless participant in--and advocate for--science informatics. Throughout his career at NASA, Dr. Leptoukh established a theme of bridging the gulf between the informatics and science communities. Nowhere is this more evident than his leadership in the development of Giovanni (GES DISC Interactive Online Visualization ANd aNalysis Infrastructure). Giovanni is an online tool that serves to hide the often-complex technical details of data format and structure, making science data easier to explore and use by Earth scientists. To date Giovanni has been acknowledged as a contributor in 500-odd scientific articles. In recent years, Leptoukh concentrated his efforts on multi-sensor data inter-comparison, merging and fusion. This work exposed several challenges at the intersection of data and science. One of these was the ease with which a naive user might generate spurious comparisons, a potential hazard that was the genesis of the Multi-sensor Data Synergy Advisor (MDSA). The MDSA uses semantic ontologies and inference rules to organize knowledge about dataset quality and other salient characteristics in order to advise users on potential caveats for comparing or merging two datasets. Recently, Leptoukh also led the development of AeroStat, an online Giovanni instance to investigate aerosols via statistics from station and satellite comparisons and merged maps of data from more than one instrument. Aerostat offers a neural net based bias adjustment to harmonize the data by removing systematic offsets between datasets before merging. These examples exhibit Leptoukh's talent for adopting advanced computer technologies in the service of making science data more accessible to researchers. In this, he set an example that is at once both vital and challenging for the ESSI community to emulate.

  8. Professor Gheorghe Bilaşcu’s contribution to the development of science and culture in Romania

    PubMed Central

    ROTARU, ALEXANDRU; PETROVAI, ION; ROTARU, HORATIU

    2016-01-01

    When speaking about Professor Gheorghe Bilaşcu (1863–1926) and his major contribution to the establishment of Romanian medical education in Cluj, he should be considered not only in terms of scientist and creator of the Dental School, but also through his commitment to the development of science and culture in Romania. A wealthy dentist in Budapest where he graduated from the Dental School, he supported a lot of Romanian students to attend schools and universities in the Budapest, thus contributing to the development of culture in his own country. Finally, he left his private practice in the Capital of Hungary to come to Cluj to support the efforts of building the Dental School and profession in Romania. This paper illustrates the contribution that Professor Gheorghe Bilaşcu made to the development of higher education in Romania, as well as his support of the local culture. PMID:27547068

  9. Commentary on the contributions and future role of occupational exposure science in a vision and strategy for the discipline of exposure science.

    PubMed

    Harper, Martin; Weis, Christopher; Pleil, Joachim D; Blount, Benjamin C; Miller, Aubrey; Hoover, Mark D; Jahn, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Exposure science is a holistic concept without prejudice to exposure source. Traditionally, measurements aimed at mitigating environmental exposures have not included exposures in the workplace, instead considering such exposures to be an internal affair between workers and their employers. Similarly, occupational (or industrial) hygiene has not typically accounted for environmental contributions to poor health at work. Many persons spend a significant amount of their lifetime in the workplace, where they maybe exposed to more numerous chemicals at higher levels than elsewhere in their environment. In addition, workplace chemical exposures and other exogenous stressors may increase epigenetic and germline modifications that are passed on to future generations. We provide a brief history of the development of exposure science from its roots in the assessment of workplace exposures, including an appendix where we detail current resources for education and training in exposure science offered through occupational hygiene organizations. We describe existing successful collaborations between occupational and environmental practitioners in the field of exposure science, which may serve as a model for future interactions. Finally, we provide an integrated vision for the field of exposure science, emphasizing interagency collaboration, the need for complete exposure information in epidemiological studies, and the importance of integrating occupational, environmental, and residential assessments. Our goal is to encourage communication and spur additional collaboration between the fields of occupational and environmental exposure assessment. Providing a more comprehensive approach to exposure science is critical to the study of the "exposome", which conceptualizes the totality of exposures throughout a person's life, not only chemical, but also from diet, stress, drugs, infection, and so on, and the individual response. PMID:25670022

  10. Commentary on the contributions and future role of occupational exposure science in a vision and strategy for the discipline of exposure science

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Martin; Weis, Christopher; Pleil, Joachim D.; Blount, Benjamin C.; Miller, Aubrey; Hoover, Mark D.; Jahn, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Exposure science is a holistic concept without prejudice to exposure source. Traditionally, measurements aimed at mitigating environmental exposures have not included exposures in the workplace, instead considering such exposures to be an internal affair between workers and their employers. Similarly, occupational (or industrial) hygiene has not typically accounted for environmental contributions to poor health at work. Many persons spend a significant amount of their lifetime in the workplace, where they maybe exposed to more numerous chemicals at higher levels than elsewhere in their environment. In addition, workplace chemical exposures and other exogenous stressors may increase epigenetic and germline modifications that are passed on to future generations. We provide a brief history of the development of exposure science from its roots in the assessment of workplace exposures, including an appendix where we detail current resources for education and training in exposure science offered through occupational hygiene organizations. We describe existing successful collaborations between occupational and environmental practitioners in the field of exposure science, which may serve as a model for future interactions. Finally, we provide an integrated vision for the field of exposure science, emphasizing interagency collaboration, the need for complete exposure information in epidemiological studies, and the importance of integrating occupational, environmental, and residential assessments. Our goal is to encourage communication and spur additional collaboration between the fields of occupational and environmental exposure assessment. Providing a more comprehensive approach to exposure science is critical to the study of the “exposome”, which conceptualizes the totality of exposures throughout a person’s life, not only chemical, but also from diet, stress, drugs, infection, and so on, and the individual response. PMID:25670022

  11. Junior Science and Humanities Symposium, January 1994-July 1995. Pacific Region Program Operations Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This informational packet contains the materials necessary to administer the annual Department of Defense Dependent Schools Pacific Region Junior Science and Humanities Symposium (JSHS) at the high school and middle school levels. The symposium program is a calendar year research program which includes one week symposium of students (grade 8-12)…

  12. The Science Education of the East Asian Regions--What We Can Learn from PISA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lau, Kwok Chi

    2014-01-01

    The study has integrated the data from PISA 2006 to 2012 to give an overall picture of the cognitive and affective performances and pedagogy of East Asian regions on PISA scientific literacy. Attempts are made to account for their performances based on the PISA data and cultural characteristics. The cognitive science performance of East Asian…

  13. Pacific Eisenhower Mathematics and Science Regional Consortium Final Performance Report, October 1, 1995-February 28, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacific Resources for Education and Learning, Honolulu, HI.

    The Pacific Eisenhower Mathematics and Science Regional Consortium was established at Pacific Resources for Education and Learning (PREL) in October, 1992 and completed its second funding cycle in February 2001. The Consortium is a collaboration among PREL, the Curriculum Research and Development Group (CRDG) at the University of Hawaii, and the…

  14. The NASA Airborne Astronomy Program: A perspective on its contributions to science, technology, and education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, Harold P.

    1995-01-01

    The scientific, educational, and instrumental contributions from NASA's airborne observatories are deduced from the program's publication record (789 citations, excluding abstracts, involving 580 authors at 128 institutions in the United States and abroad between 1967-1990).

  15. A new conceptual model for quantifying transboundary contribution of atmospheric pollutants in the East Asian Pacific rim region.

    PubMed

    Lai, I-Chien; Lee, Chon-Lin; Huang, Hu-Ching

    2016-03-01

    Transboundary transport of air pollution is a serious environmental concern as pollutant affects both human health and the environment. Many numerical approaches have been utilized to quantify the amounts of pollutants transported to receptor regions, based on emission inventories from possible source regions. However, sparse temporal-spatial observational data and uncertainty in emission inventories might make the transboundary transport contribution difficult to estimate. This study presents a conceptual quantitative approach that uses transport pathway classification in combination with curve fitting models to simulate an air pollutant concentration baseline for pollution background concentrations. This approach is used to investigate the transboundary transport contribution of atmospheric pollutants to a metropolitan area in the East Asian Pacific rim region. Trajectory analysis categorized pollution sources for the study area into three regions: East Asia, Southeast Asia, and Taiwan cities. The occurrence frequency and transboundary contribution results suggest the predominant source region is the East Asian continent. This study also presents an application to evaluate heavy pollution cases for health concerns. This new baseline construction model provides a useful tool for the study of the contribution of transboundary pollution delivered to receptors, especially for areas deficient in emission inventories and regulatory monitoring data for harmful air pollutants. PMID:26760713

  16. Teaching and Learning in Exercise Science: Contributing to the Health of the Nation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stavrianeas, Stasinos; Stewart, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Students of exercise science are well positioned to facilitate a shift of the nation's attitude on health care from disease treatment to disease prevention. This report chronicles our efforts toward transforming the exercise physiology core course from a lecture-based, instructor-centered class to a student-centered environment in which…

  17. Researchers' Perceptions of Statistical Significance Contribute to Bias in Health and Exercise Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Taylor L.; Lohse, Keith R.

    2016-01-01

    We surveyed researchers in the health and exercise sciences to explore different areas and magnitudes of bias in researchers' decision making. Participants were presented with scenarios (testing a central hypothesis with p = 0.06 or p = 0.04) in a random order and surveyed about what they would do in each scenario. Participants showed significant…

  18. An Analysis of World-Wide Contributions to "Nuclear Science Abstracts," Volume 22 (1968).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaden, William M.

    Beginning with volume 20, "Nuclear Science Abstracts" (NSA) citations, exclusive of abstracts, have been recorded on magnetic tape. The articles have been categorized by 34 elements of the citations such as title, author, source, journal, report number, etc. At the time of this report more than 130,000 citations had been stored for purposes of…

  19. Psychological Science's Contributions to a Sustainable Environment: Extending Our Reach to a Grand Challenge of Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazdin, Alan E.

    2009-01-01

    Climate change and degradation of the environment are global problems associated with many other challenges (e.g., population increases, reduction of glaciers, and loss of critical habitats). Psychological science can play a critical role in addressing these problems by fostering a sustainable environment. Multiple strategies for fostering a…

  20. Promoting Science Outdoor Activities for Elementary School Children: Contributions from a Research Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boaventura, Diana; Faria, Claudia; Chagas, Isabel; Galvao, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    The purposes of the study were to analyse the promotion of scientific literacy through practical research activities and to identify children's conceptions about scientists and how they do science. Elementary school children were engaged in two scientific experiments in a marine biology research laboratory. A total of 136 students answered a…

  1. Multimodal Representation Contributes to the Complex Development of Science Literacy in a College Biology Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, William Drew

    2011-01-01

    This study is an investigation into the science literacy of college genetics students who were given a modified curriculum to address specific teaching and learning problems from a previous class. This study arose out of an interest by the professor and researcher to determine how well students in the class Human Genetics in the 21st Century…

  2. Communication and the Foundations of the Social Sciences: Contributions of Peirce, Apel, and Habermas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanjirathinkal, Matthew

    1989-01-01

    It may be argued that what is considered to be knowledge is intimately related to the manner in which such knowledge is communicated. Thus some social scientists and scientists argue that science itself is a form of communication, and the scientific method it closely bound to the method of interpretation. An important vein of thinking in the…

  3. The Making of a Developmental Science: The Contributions and Intellectual Heritage of James Mark Baldwin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cairns, Robert B.

    1992-01-01

    James Baldwin's ideas, such as that of a genetic science, and their influence on later theorists such as Piaget, Vygotsky, and Kohlberg, are described. The further Baldwin moved from the study of infancy, the more speculative and the less empirically verifiable became his ideas. (BC)

  4. Negotiating Knowledge Contribution to Multiple Discourse Communities: A Doctoral Student of Computer Science Writing for Publication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Yongyan

    2006-01-01

    Despite the rich literature on disciplinary knowledge construction and multilingual scholars' academic literacy practices, little is known about how novice scholars are engaged in knowledge construction in negotiation with various target discourse communities. In this case study, with a focused analysis of a Chinese computer science doctoral…

  5. Constructing and Using Multimodal Narratives to Research in Science Education: Contributions Based on Practical Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopes, J. B.; Silva, A. A.; Cravino, J. P.; Santos, C. A.; Cunha, A.; Pinto, A.; Silva, A.; Viegas, C.; Saraiva, E.; Branco, M. J.

    2014-01-01

    This study deals with the problem of how to collect genuine and useful data about science classroom practices, and preserving the complex and holistic nature of teaching and learning. Additionally, we were looking for an instrument that would allow comparability and verifiability for teaching and research purposes. Given the multimodality of…

  6. The Study of LGBT Politics and Its Contributions to Political Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mucciaroni, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Although the study of LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender) politics appears to be widely accepted within political science, a recent survey of political scientists reported some skepticism about its legitimacy and scholarly worth (Novkov and Barclay 2010). This article examines potential concerns about LGBT studies and draws attention to the…

  7. Teaching the Nature of Science in Physics Courses: The Contribution of Classroom Historical Inquiries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maurines, Laurence; Beaufils, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Physics and chemistry programs at the secondary school level in France recommend introducing components of the history of science (HS). Emphasis is placed on a "cultural" dimension, which is poorly defined but essentially refers to elements of epistemological nature. Moreover, the few examples of activities based on HS suggested by the programs…

  8. Factors That Contribute to Persistence and Retention of Underrepresented Minority Undergraduate Students in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Sidney Kirk

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this research was to identify specific factors that contribute to underrepresented minority (African American, Hispanic, Native American) undergraduate students' success in STEM disciplines at a regional university during the 2007-2010 timeframe. As more underrepresented minority (URM) students complete STEM degrees, many will…

  9. Supporting the Contribution of Higher Education to Regional Development: Lessons Learned from an OECD Review of 14 Regions throughout 12 Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marmolejo, Francisco; Puukka, Jaana

    2006-01-01

    Following decades of expansion in higher education, policy attention in OECD countries has begun to focus on the outcomes of higher education including how universities and other higher education institutions contribute to regional development. With the processes of globalisation and localisation, the local availability of knowledge and skills and…

  10. NASA Earth Science Research Results for Improved Regional Crop Yield Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mali, P.; O'Hara, C. G.; Shrestha, B.; Sinclair, T. R.; G de Goncalves, L. G.; Salado Navarro, L. R.

    2007-12-01

    National agencies such as USDA Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS), Production Estimation and Crop Assessment Division (PECAD) work specifically to analyze and generate timely crop yield estimates that help define national as well as global food policies. The USDA/FAS/PECAD utilizes a Decision Support System (DSS) called CADRE (Crop Condition and Data Retrieval Evaluation) mainly through an automated database management system that integrates various meteorological datasets, crop and soil models, and remote sensing data; providing significant contribution to the national and international crop production estimates. The "Sinclair" soybean growth model has been used inside CADRE DSS as one of the crop models. This project uses Sinclair model (a semi-mechanistic crop growth model) for its potential to be effectively used in a geo-processing environment with remote-sensing-based inputs. The main objective of this proposed work is to verify, validate and benchmark current and future NASA earth science research results for the benefit in the operational decision making process of the PECAD/CADRE DSS. For this purpose, the NASA South American Land Data Assimilation System (SALDAS) meteorological dataset is tested for its applicability as a surrogate meteorological input in the Sinclair model meteorological input requirements. Similarly, NASA sensor MODIS products is tested for its applicability in the improvement of the crop yield prediction through improving precision of planting date estimation, plant vigor and growth monitoring. The project also analyzes simulated Visible/Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite (VIIRS, a future NASA sensor) vegetation product for its applicability in crop growth prediction to accelerate the process of transition of VIIRS research results for the operational use of USDA/FAS/PECAD DSS. The research results will help in providing improved decision making capacity to the USDA/FAS/PECAD DSS through improved vegetation growth monitoring from high

  11. Factors contributing to decreased protein stability when aspartic acid residues are in {beta}-sheet regions.

    SciTech Connect

    Pokkuluri, P. R.; Cai, X.; Raffen, R.; Gu, M.; Stevens, F. J.; Schiffer, M.

    2002-07-01

    Asp residues are significantly under represented in {beta}-sheet regions of proteins, especially in the middle of {beta}-strands, as found by a number of studies using statistical, modeling, or experimental methods. To further understand the reasons for this under representation of Asp, we prepared and analyzed mutants of a {beta}-domain. Two Gln residues of the immunoglobulin light-chain variable domain (V{sub L}) of protein Len were replaced with Asp, and then the effects of these changes on protein stability and protein structure were studied. The replacement of Q38D, located at the end of a {beta}-strand, and that of Q89D, located in the middle of a {beta}-strand, reduced the stability of the parent immunoglobulin VL domain by 2.0 kcal/mol and 5.3 kcal/mol, respectively. Because the Q89D mutant of the wild-type V{sub L}-Len domain was too unstable to be expressed as a soluble protein, we prepared the Q89D mutant in a triple mutant background, V{sub L}-Len M4L/Y27dD/T94H, which was 4.2 kcal/mol more stable than the wild-type V{sub L}-Len domain. The structures of mutants V{sub L}-Len Q38D and V{sub L}-Len Q89D/M4L/Y27dD/T94H were determined by X-ray diffraction at 1.6 A resolution. We found no major perturbances in the structures of these QD mutant proteins relative to structures of the parent proteins. The observed stability changes have to be accounted for by cumulative effects of the following several factors: (1) by changes in main-chain dihedral angles and in side-chain rotomers, (2) by close contacts between some atoms, and, most significantly, (3) by the unfavorable electrostatic interactions between the Asp side chain and the carbonyls of the main chain. We show that the Asn side chain, which is of similar size but neutral, is less destabilizing. The detrimental effect of Asp within a {beta}-sheet of an immunoglobulin-type domain can have very serious consequences. A somatic mutation of a {beta}-strand residue to Asp could prevent the expression of the

  12. Reflections on different governance styles in regulating science: a contribution to 'Responsible Research and Innovation'.

    PubMed

    Landeweerd, Laurens; Townend, David; Mesman, Jessica; Van Hoyweghen, Ine

    2015-01-01

    In European science and technology policy, various styles have been developed and institutionalised to govern the ethical challenges of science and technology innovations. In this paper, we give an account of the most dominant styles of the past 30 years, particularly in Europe, seeking to show their specific merits and problems. We focus on three styles of governance: a technocratic style, an applied ethics style, and a public participation style. We discuss their merits and deficits, and use this analysis to assess the potential of the recently established governance approach of 'Responsible Research and Innovation' (RRI). Based on this analysis, we reflect on the current shaping of RRI in terms of 'doing governance'. PMID:26260065

  13. The contribution of forensic science to crime analysis and investigation: forensic intelligence.

    PubMed

    Ribaux, Olivier; Walsh, Simon J; Margot, Pierre

    2006-01-27

    The debate in forensic science concentrates on issues such as standardisation, accreditation and de-contextualisation, in a legal and economical context, in order to ensure the scientific objectivity and efficiency that must guide the process of collecting, analysing, interpreting and reporting forensic evidence. At the same time, it is recognised that forensic case data is still poorly integrated into the investigation and the crime analysis process, despite evidence of its great potential in various situations and studies. A change of attitude is needed in order to accept an extended role for forensic science that goes beyond the production of evidence for the court. To stimulate and guide this development, a long-term intensive modelling activity of the investigative and crime analysis process that crosses the boundaries of different disciplines has been initiated. A framework that fully integrates forensic case data shows through examples the capital accumulated that may be put to use systematically. PMID:16099615

  14. Saving Human Lives: What Complexity Science and Information Systems can Contribute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helbing, Dirk; Brockmann, Dirk; Chadefaux, Thomas; Donnay, Karsten; Blanke, Ulf; Woolley-Meza, Olivia; Moussaid, Mehdi; Johansson, Anders; Krause, Jens; Schutte, Sebastian; Perc, Matjaž

    2015-02-01

    We discuss models and data of crowd disasters, crime, terrorism, war and disease spreading to show that conventional recipes, such as deterrence strategies, are often not effective and sufficient to contain them. Many common approaches do not provide a good picture of the actual system behavior, because they neglect feedback loops, instabilities and cascade effects. The complex and often counter-intuitive behavior of social systems and their macro-level collective dynamics can be better understood by means of complexity science. We highlight that a suitable system design and management can help to stop undesirable cascade effects and to enable favorable kinds of self-organization in the system. In such a way, complexity science can help to save human lives.

  15. The Contribution of Equitation Science to Minimising Horse-Related Risks to Humans.

    PubMed

    Starling, Melissa; McLean, Andrew; McGreevy, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Equitation science is an evidence-based approach to horse training and riding that focuses on a thorough understanding of both equine ethology and learning theory. This combination leads to more effective horse training, but also plays a role in keeping horse riders and trainers safe around horses. Equitation science underpins ethical equitation, and recognises the limits of the horse's cognitive and physical abilities. Equitation is an ancient practice that has benefited from a rich tradition that sees it flourishing in contemporary sporting pursuits. Despite its history, horse-riding is an activity for which neither horses nor humans evolved, and it brings with it significant risks to the safety of both species. This review outlines the reasons horses may behave in ways that endanger humans and how training choices can exacerbate this. It then discusses the recently introduced 10 Principles of Equitation Science and explains how following these principles can minimise horse-related risk to humans and enhance horse welfare. PMID:26907354

  16. Foreign scientists on the contribution of Serbian physician and scientist Dr. Lazar K. Lazarević to medical science.

    PubMed

    Draca, Sanja

    2016-01-01

    Dr. Lazar K. Lazarević (1851-1890, Julian calendar/1891, Gregorian calendar) was an exceptional Serbian physician, scientist, writer and translator. During his short life and his close to 11-year-long professional career (1879-1890), Dr. Lazarević authored 78 scientific papers and presentations in various branches of medicine. His greatest contribution to the field of neurology and to medical science in general is his description of the straight leg raising test.The article titled"Ischiac postica Cotunnii--One contribution to its differential diagnosis"was published in the Serbian language (in Cyrillic alphabet) in the Serbian Archives of Medicine in 1880.The article was translated to German and republished in Vienna in 1884 in Allgemeine Wiener medizinische Zeitung. The straight leg raising test is usually called Lasegue's test/sign, after the French clinician Charles Lasègue, although he never described it. However, there are numerous authors who admit that Lasègue never published the description of the straight leg raising test, and instead give full credits for its discovery to Dr. Lazarević. Our objective in this article is to highlight the major literature written by foreign scientists who give credit to Dr. Lazarević for his contribution to medical science. PMID:27276870

  17. TRIBUTE: In Goethe's Wake: Marvalee Wake's conceptual contributions to the development and evolution of a science of morphology.

    PubMed

    Hall, Brian K

    2005-01-01

    De-crying the typological approach in much of the teaching of morphology, from the outset of her career Marvalee Wake advocated a synthetic, mechanistic and pluralistic developmental and evolutionary morphology. In this short essay, I do not evaluate Wake's contributions to our knowledge of the morphology of caecilians, nor her contributions to viviparity, both of which are seminal and substantive, nor do I examine her role as mentor, supervisor and collaborator, but assess her broader conceptual contributions to the development and evolution of morphology as a science. One of the earliest morphologists to take on board the concept of constraint, she viewed constraint explicitly in relation to adaptation and diversity. Her approach to morphology as a science was hierarchical - measure form and function in a phylogenetic context; seek explanations at developmental, functional, ecological, evolutionary levels of the biological hierarchy; integrate those explanations to the other levels. The explanatory power of morphology thus practised allows morphology to inform evolutionary biology and evolutionary theory, and paves the way for the integrative biology Wake has long championed. PMID:16351975

  18. Contribution of Kobe University to the Regional Centre of Expertise (RCE) on Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) Hyogo-Kobe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Itoh, Masayuki; Suemoto, Makoto; Matsuoka, Koji; Ito, Atsushi; Yui, Kiyomitsu; Matsuda, Tsuyoshi; Ishikawa, Masanobu

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to introduce the Regional Centre of Expertise (RCE) on education for sustainable development (ESD) Hyogo-Kobe, and the contribution of Kobe University as a model case. An attempt to develop and implement a new ESD programme in higher education is also reported. Design/methodology/approach: A brief description…

  19. Genomic distance entrained clustering and regression modelling highlights interacting genomic regions contributing to proliferation in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Genomic copy number changes and regional alterations in epigenetic states have been linked to grade in breast cancer. However, the relative contribution of specific alterations to the pathology of different breast cancer subtypes remains unclear. The heterogeneity and interplay of genomic and epigenetic variations means that large datasets and statistical data mining methods are required to uncover recurrent patterns that are likely to be important in cancer progression. Results We employed ridge regression to model the relationship between regional changes in gene expression and proliferation. Regional features were extracted from tumour gene expression data using a novel clustering method, called genomic distance entrained agglomerative (GDEC) clustering. Using gene expression data in this way provides a simple means of integrating the phenotypic effects of both copy number aberrations and alterations in chromatin state. We show that regional metagenes derived from GDEC clustering are representative of recurrent regions of epigenetic regulation or copy number aberrations in breast cancer. Furthermore, detected patterns of genomic alterations are conserved across independent oestrogen receptor positive breast cancer datasets. Sequential competitive metagene selection was used to reveal the relative importance of genomic regions in predicting proliferation rate. The predictive model suggested additive interactions between the most informative regions such as 8p22-12 and 8q13-22. Conclusions Data-mining of large-scale microarray gene expression datasets can reveal regional clusters of co-ordinate gene expression, independent of cause. By correlating these clusters with tumour proliferation we have identified a number of genomic regions that act together to promote proliferation in ER+ breast cancer. Identification of such regions should enable prioritisation of genomic regions for combinatorial functional studies to pinpoint the key genes and interactions

  20. Some Contributions of the Behavioral Sciences to the Study of Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newcombe, Alan

    1978-01-01

    Discusses over 100 abstracts on the theme of peace and war since 1945 in the "Peace Research Abstracts Journal." Categories: contributions of physiology, causes of violence, action-reaction spirals, in- and out-groups, revolution, exploitation, causes of peace and war, resolving conflict. Journal available from Unipub, 345 Park Avenue South, New…

  1. Conceptual Growth in Children and in the Learning Sciences: Giyoo Hatano's Contributions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greeno, James G.; Saxe, Geoffrey B.

    2007-01-01

    In Giyoo Hatano's passing, we have lost an esteemed colleague and a treasured friend. Among his many contributions to our field, our work, and our lives, we honor and build on his and his colleagues' work on conceptual growth. We liken the view developed by Hatano and his colleagues to Toulmin's evolutionary scheme for understanding conceptual…

  2. Medico-Science and School Hygiene: A Contribution to a History of the Senses in Schooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milewski, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    This article takes as its inspiration Ian Grosvenor's conjectural essay presented for the symposium "Historiography of the Future: Looking Back to the Future" held at the International Standing Conference for History of Education (ISCHE) 33 in July 2011 in San Luis Potosi, Mexico. It contributes to a sensory history of schooling by…

  3. Mill and mental phenomena: critical contributions to a science of cognition.

    PubMed

    Bistricky, Steven L

    2013-06-01

    Attempts to define cognition preceded John Stuart Mill's life and continue to this day. John Stuart Mill envisioned a science of mental phenomena informed by associationism, empirical introspection, and neurophysiology, and he advanced specific ideas that still influence modern conceptions of cognition. The present article briefly reviews Mill's personal history and the times in which he lived, and it traces the evolution of ideas that have run through him to contemporary cognitive concepts. The article also highlights contemporary problems in defining cognition and supports specific criteria regarding what constitutes cognition. PMID:25379235

  4. Mill and Mental Phenomena: Critical Contributions to a Science of Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Bistricky, Steven L.

    2013-01-01

    Attempts to define cognition preceded John Stuart Mill’s life and continue to this day. John Stuart Mill envisioned a science of mental phenomena informed by associationism, empirical introspection, and neurophysiology, and he advanced specific ideas that still influence modern conceptions of cognition. The present article briefly reviews Mill’s personal history and the times in which he lived, and it traces the evolution of ideas that have run through him to contemporary cognitive concepts. The article also highlights contemporary problems in defining cognition and supports specific criteria regarding what constitutes cognition. PMID:25379235

  5. Academic health sciences librarians' contributions to institutional animal care and use committees.

    PubMed

    Steelman, Susan C; Thomas, Sheila L

    2014-07-01

    The study gathered data about librarians' membership in institutional animal care and use committees (IACUCs) and their professional activities supporting animal researchers. Libraries affiliated with medical schools that were members of the Association of American Medical Colleges were surveyed. A survey was distributed via library directors' email discussion lists and direct email messages. Sixty surveys were completed: 35 (58%) reported that librarians performed database searches for researchers, and 22 (37%) reported that a librarian currently serves on the IACUC. The survey suggests that academic health sciences librarians provide valuable, yet underutilized, services to support animal research investigators. PMID:25031565

  6. Student Contributions to Citizen Science Programs As a Foundation for Independent and Classroom-Based Undergraduate Research in the Earth Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guertin, L. A.

    2014-12-01

    Environmental monitoring projects on the grounds of a campus can serve as data collection sites for undergraduate research. Penn State Brandywine has utilized students in independent study projects to establish two citizen science programs and to begin collecting data, with the data sets serving as a foundation for authentic inquiry-based exercises in introductory-level Earth science courses. The first citizen science program is The Smithsonian Institution's Global Tree Banding Project, which contributes to research about tree biomass by tracking how trees respond to climate. We are going beyond the requirements of the Smithsonian project. Instead of only taking two measurements each in the spring and fall, undergraduate researchers are taking measurements every two weeks throughout the year. We started taking measurements of ten trees on campus in 2012 will continue until each tree outgrows its tree band. The data is available for download in Google Spreadsheets for students to examine changes in tree diameter within one or between growing seasons, supplemented with temperature and precipitation data (see http://sites.psu.edu/treebanding/). A second citizen science program we have begun on campus is the NASA-funded Digital Earth Watch (DEW) Picture Post Project, allowing students to monitor the environment and share observations through digital photography. We established four Picture Post sites on campus, with students taking weekly photos to establish an environmental baseline of the campus landscape and to document future environmental changes pre- and post-construction. We started taking digital photos on campus in 2014 will continue well past the completion of construction to continue to look for changes. The image database is less than a year old, but the images provide enough information for some early analyses, such as the variations in "greenness" over the seasons. We have created a website that shares the purpose of our participation in the Picture Post

  7. Contribution to the study of historical seismicity in the Maghrebian region, Catalogue of historiacal seismicity of the Maghreb region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmrabet, T.

    2009-04-01

    The seismic risk assessment in countries with moderate seismic activity is a very delicate action as well as a high priority one in land use management and urban rehabilitation. The credibility of this assessment is based mainly on the effects of destructive earthquakes whose maximum intensities become a reference for determining the level of protection. This knowledge requires a detailed study of the damage caused by major earthquakes over a long period of time. In this context, a broad scale research about past earthquakes started in the Geophysics Laboratory, now called the National Geophysics Institute (ING) within the National Center for Scientific and Technical Research in Rabat, Morocco. It supported a thorough study which included critical historical texts scattered in various local and foreign archives. The pursuit of this study, under the project called PAMERAR, which was launched in the early 80's aimed at reducing of earthquake risk in the Arab region, led us to investigate the origin of these texts according to various public and private libraries, as in Spain and France. The scientific interest in the historical seismicity in Morocco was highlighted at the beginning of the twentieth century in several reports and catalogs but with several gaps in time and space, further research was thus necessary especially to explore documents in particular from origin sources. This interest in historical archives is within the scope of understanding the natural hazards over long period to evaluate the recurrence of earthquakes. This study leads to significant results covering 11 centuries, from AD 846 to the present. We continued to study the effects of recent earthquakes on humans and buildings heritage, this work has led to a study in the footsteps of local seismic culture. Since earthquakes do not recognize the limits of political geography, since 1993 we have undertaken to extend the research to include the entire Maghreb region. We then used the database

  8. Space optics contributions by the College of Optical Sciences over the past 50 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breckinridge, James B.; Smith, Peter

    2014-10-01

    We present a review of the contributions by students, staff, faculty and alumni to the Nation's space program over the past 50 years. The balloon polariscope led the way to future space optics missions. The missions Pioneer Venus (large probe solar flux radiometer), Pioneer 10/11 (imaging photopolarimeter) to Jupiter and Saturn, Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and next generation large aperture space telescopes are discussed.

  9. Updating our understanding of "Special Regions" on Mars: The second MEPAG Special Regions Science Analysis Group (SR-SAG2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rummel, J. D.; Beaty, D. W.; Jones, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    A committee of the Mars Exploration Planning and Analysis Group (MEPAG) has reviewed and updated the description of Special Regions on Mars, defined in the COSPAR Planetary Protection Policy as places where Earth organisms might replicate (the basis of this study), or that have a high potential for the existence of extant martian life forms (not the basis of this study). The review and update was conducted by an international team, drawn from both the biological science and Mars exploration communities, to understand when and where Special Regions could, and likely do, occur. The study applied recently available data about Mars environments and about Earth organisms, building on a previous analysis of Mars Special Regions (2006) undertaken by a similar team. Since then, a large new body of highly relevant data has been generated from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (launched 2005), Phoenix (2007), and from Mars Express and the twin MER landers (all 2003). Additional results were also gleaned from the Mars Science Laboratory (2011). In addition to Mars data, there is a considerable body of new data regarding the known environmental limits to life on Earth—including the potential for terrestrial microbial life to survive and replicate under martian environmental conditions. The analysis of Mars Special Regions included: 1. An extensive analysis of both new and previously unavailable data regarding the environmental limits of life on Earth, including both experimental results and environmental observations; 2. An examination of extensive post-2006 observational data sets, including high spacial and temporal resolution data from orbit and new data from landed spacecraft; 3. New models of Mars relevant to natural environmental variation in water activity and temperature; 4. Review and reconsideration of the current parameters used to define Special Regions; and 5. Updated maps and descriptions of the Mars environments that are recommended for treatment as "uncertain

  10. Biomass burning contribution to ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the Chengdu-Chongqing Region (CCR), China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lingyu; Chen, Yuan; Zeng, Limin; Shao, Min; Xie, Shaodong; Chen, Wentai; Lu, Sihua; Wu, Yusheng; Cao, Wei

    2014-12-01

    Ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured intensively using an online gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/flame ionization detector (GC-MS/FID) at Ziyang in the Chengdu-Chongqing Region (CCR) from 6 December 2012 to 4 January 2013. Alkanes contributed the most (59%) to mixing ratios of measured non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs), while aromatics contributed the least (7%). Methanol was the most abundant oxygenated VOC (OVOC), contributing 42% to the total amount of OVOCs. Significantly elevated VOC levels occurred during three pollution events, but the chemical composition of VOCs did not differ between polluted and clean days. The OH loss rates of VOCs were calculated to estimate their chemical reactivity. Alkenes played a predominant role in VOC reactivity, among which ethylene and propene were the largest contributors; the contributions of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were also considerable. Biomass burning had a significant influence on ambient VOCs during our study. We chose acetonitrile as a tracer and used enhancement ratio to estimate the contribution of biomass burning to ambient VOCs. Biomass burning contributed 9.4%-36.8% to the mixing ratios of selected VOC species, and contributed most (>30% each) to aromatics, formaldehyde, and acetaldehyde.

  11. UNEP's Work to Implement Good Practice at a Regional Level: Contribution to the UNDESD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogbuigwe, Akpezi

    2010-01-01

    This paper outlines the contribution made by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) towards enhancing the integration of sustainable development concerns in Africa through its initiative, the Mainstreaming Environment and Sustainability in Africa (MESA) Universities Partnership, during the United Nations Decade of Education for…

  12. The University of Nebraska at Omaha's Contribution to the Omaha Regional Economy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corcoran, William J.

    2007-01-01

    Education is a primary mission of metropolitan universities. This article measures the value of education at the level of a student credit hour-the metric. It applies this metric to determine the value of education transmitted at the University of Nebraska at Omaha (UNO) for one academic year and the total contribution of UNO to the economy of the…

  13. Contributions of Hebb and Vygotsky to an integrated science of mind.

    PubMed

    Ghassemzadeh, Habibollah; Posner, Michael I; Rothbart, Mary K

    2013-01-01

    Hebb and Vygotsky are two of the most influential figures of psychology in the first half of the twentieth century. They represent cultural and biological approaches to explaining human development, and thus a number of their ideas remain relevant to current psychology and cognitive neuroscience. In this article, we examine similarities and differences between these two important figures, exploring possibilities for a theoretical synthesis between their two literatures, which have had little contact with each other. To pursue these goals, the following topics are discussed: (a) Hebb and Vygotsky's lives and training; (b) their innovations in theory building relating to an "objective psychology" and objective science of mind; (c) their developmental approach; (d) their treatment of mediation and neuropsychology; and (e) their current relevance and possible integration of their views. We argue that considering the two together improves prospects for a more complete and integrated approach to mind and brain in society. PMID:23679195

  14. CONTRIBUTIONS OF HEBB AND VYGOTSKY TO AN INTEGRATED SCIENCE OF MIND

    PubMed Central

    Ghassemzadeh, Habibollah; Posner, Michael I.; Rothbart, Mary K.

    2013-01-01

    Hebb and Vygotsky are two of the most influential figures of psychology in the first half of the 20th century. They represent cultural and biological approaches to explaining human development, and thus a number of their ideas remain relevant to current psychology and cognitive neuroscience. In this paper we examine similarities and differences between these two important figures, exploring possibilities for a theoretical synthesis between their two literatures, which have had little contact each other. To pursue these goals the following topics are discussed: 1) Hebb and Vygotsky’s lives and training; 2) their innovations in theory building relating to an “objective psychology” and objective science of mind, 3) their developmental approach, 4) their treatment of mediation and neuropsychology and 5) their current relevance and possible integration of their views. We argue that considering the two together improves prospects for a more complete and integrated approach to mind and brain in society. PMID:23679195

  15. Contributions from sociology of science to mathematics education in Brazil: logic as a system of beliefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Andrade, Thales Haddad Novaes; Vilela, Denise Silva

    2013-09-01

    In Brazil, mathematics education was associated with Jean Piaget's theory. Scholars in the field of education appropriated Piaget's work in different ways, but usually emphasized logical aspects of thought, which probably lead to an expansion of mathematics education influenced by psychology. This study attempts to extend the range of interlocutions and pose a dialogue between the field of mathematics education in Brazil and the sociology of science proposed by David Bloor. The main point of Bloor's theory is that logical-mathematical knowledge is far from being true and universal and is socially conditioned. In particular we will be discussing the first principle of the strong program, which deals with conditions that generate beliefs promoted by education policies in Brazil, such as the MEC/USAID treaties. In this case the "naturalization of logic" was stimulated by a widespread diffusion of both Piaget studies and the Modern Mathematics Movement.

  16. Glann Seaborg's Contributions to Heavy Element Science and the Periodic Table

    SciTech Connect

    Hobart, David E.

    2012-08-17

    In celebrating the centennial anniversary of the birth of Glenn T. Seaborg it is fitting that we recount and pay tribute to his legacy. Many know of the scientific accomplishments of this man who became a legend and anyone who has attended his lectures can attest to how informative, educational, and entertaining he was. He had a beguiling and whimsical sense of humor and used this to drive home his points and share his passion and quest for discovery. The periodic table is a fundamental cornerstone of science and remains a central unifying principal. Seaborg was the architect of the actinide series of elements and their proper placement in the periodic table and co-discoverer of ten transuranium elements - one of which bears his name, element 106, seaborgium. The work and achievements of this Nobel laureate have touched the lives of many and his legacy will continue for generations to come.

  17. The Contribution of Applied Social Sciences to Obesity Stigma-Related Public Health Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Bombak, Andrea E.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is viewed as a major public health concern, and obesity stigma is pervasive. Such marginalization renders obese persons a “special population.” Weight bias arises in part due to popular sources' attribution of obesity causation to individual lifestyle factors. This may not accurately reflect the experiences of obese individuals or their perspectives on health and quality of life. A powerful role may exist for applied social scientists, such as anthropologists or sociologists, in exploring the lived and embodied experiences of this largely discredited population. This novel research may aid in public health intervention planning. Through these studies, applied social scientists could help develop a nonstigmatizing, salutogenic approach to public health that accurately reflects the health priorities of all individuals. Such an approach would call upon applied social science's strengths in investigating the mundane, problematizing the “taken for granted” and developing emic (insiders') understandings of marginalized populations. PMID:24782921

  18. Proceedings: International Symposium on Thermal Engineering and Science for Cold Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunardini, V. J.; Bowen, S. L.

    This document contains a collection of papers from the Fourth International Symposium on Thermal Engineering and Science for Cold Regions. Topics covered include: some topics on melting heat transfer problems; osmotic model of ice segregation; thermosyphon applications in cold regions; an analytic study of liquid solidification in low Peclet number forced flows inside a parallel plate channel concerning axial heat conduction; freezing within laminar fast-growing thermally developing region of a uniform heat flux cooled parallel plate duct; the morphology of ice layers in curved rectangular channels; effect of heat conductor plates on ice formation near a wall; freezing characteristics of water flow in a horizontal cooled tube with the separated region; stability of thick ice formation in pipes; experiments and analysis of pipe freezing; experimental study of freezing of water in a closed circular tube with pressure increasing; and effects of a porous medium in a flow passage with miter bend.

  19. The contribution of the Science Technology Programme to low-cost planetary missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnasco, G.; Giulicchi, L.; Pablos, P.; Airey, S.; Boscagli, G.; Mancuso, S.; Nicolini, D.; Plancke, P.; Rueda-Boldo, P.; Schautz, M.

    2003-11-01

    Since its unanimous approval in December 2000 by the Industrial Policy Committee, the Technology Programme of the Science Directorate in support to its Future Missions has been inspired by two overwhelming considerations: innovation and timeliness. As a matter of fact the variety and complexity of the scientific challenges posed by these missions, requires the development of a large number of new, innovative technologies, before the beginning of the Implementation Phase of these missions, at a readiness level up to an Electrical Model, tested in the relevant environment, with the ultimate aim of minimising schedule delays and cost increases. With an overall investment, which exceeds eighty million Euro, the more than one hundred-and-ten development activities which make up the Technology Programme, cover all the three main domains of the Science Programme: Fundamental Physics, Astrophysics, Solar and Planetary Exploration. Particularly within this latter domain, innovation is equivalent to miniaturisation. This is the main underlying theme for most of the thirty-plus technology activities presently under development, since, without a significant reduction in mass and in power consumption of their space segment, planetary missions like BepiColombo and Solar Orbiter or any future low-cost planetary missions would not be feasible. For this reason, a substantial technological effort, supported by a total investment of more than twenty-five million Euro, has been focused not only on sensors and instrumentations, but also on several spacecraft subsystems. They range from the Attitude & Orbit Control, to Navigation for Planetary Approach & Landing; from Data Handling to Avionics Electronics; from Power Distribution to Low Thrust Propulsion and Spacecraft-to-Lander Communications.

  20. The contribution of the science technology programme to low-cost planetary missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnasco, G.; Giulicchi, L.; Pablos, P.; Airey, S.; Boscagli, G.; Mancuso, S.; Nicolini, D.; Plancke, P.; Rueda-Boldo, P.; Schautz, M.; Nicolini, D.

    2006-10-01

    Since its unanimous approval in December 2000 by the Industrial Policy Committee, the Technology Programme of the Science Directorate in support of its Future Missions has been inspired by two overwhelming considerations: innovation and timeliness. As a matter of fact, the variety and complexity of the scientific challenges posed by these missions require the development of a large number of new, innovative technologies, before the beginning of the implementation phase of these missions, at a readiness level up to an electrical model, tested in the relevant environment, with the ultimate aim of minimizing schedule delays and cost increases. With an overall investment, which exceeds 80 million Euro, the more than 110 development activities which make up the Technology Programme, cover all the 3 main domains of the Science Programme: Fundamental Physics, Astrophysics, Solar and Planetary Exploration. Particularly within this latter domain, innovation is equivalent to miniaturization. This is the main underlying theme for most of the thirty-plus technology activities presently under development, since, without a significant reduction in mass and in power consumption of their space segment, planetary missions like BepiColombo and solar orbiter or any future low-cost planetary missions would not be feasible. For this reason, a substantial technological effort, supported by a total investment of more than 25 million Euro, has been focused not only on sensors and instrumentations, but also on several spacecraft subsystems. They range from the attitude and orbit control to navigation for planetary approach and landing; from data handling to avionics electronics; from power distribution to low thrust propulsion and spacecraft-to-lander communications.

  1. Contribution to regulatory science and a next challenge of the Japanese Environmental Mutagen Society (JEMS).

    PubMed

    Uno, Yoshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Many members of The Japanese Environmental Mutagen Society (JEMS) have significantly contributed to guidelines on chemical genotoxicity. The guidelines have been useful for the hazard identification and risk assessment of genotoxic chemicals. However, risk assessors and developers of drugs and other commercial products might eliminate beneficial chemicals from further development simply based on positive results of genotoxicity testing. Experts in the field of genotoxicity should better characterize the biological significance of genotoxicants and more correctly assess human risk. I hope that one of the next challenges undertaken by JEMS will be to assess the human risk of genotoxic chemicals more correctly based on the precise analysis of their mechanisms of action. PMID:27588156

  2. The Southern African Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI 2000). Dry-Season Campaign: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swap, R. J.; Annegarn, H. J.; Suttles, J. T.; Haywood, J.; Hely, C.; Hobbs, P. V.; Holben, B. N.; Ji, J.; King, M. D.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Southern African Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI 2000) is an international science project investigating the southern African earth-atmosphere-human system. The experiment was conducted over a two-year period March 1999 - March 2001. The dry season field campaign (August-Steptember 2000) was the most intensive activity and involving over 200 scientists from 18 different nations. The main objectives of this campaign were to characterize and quantify the biogenic, pyrogenic and anthropogenic aerosol and trace gas emissions and their transport and transformations in the atmosphere and to validate the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) satellite Terra within a scientific context. Five aircraft, namely two South African Weather Service aircraft, University of Washington CV-580, the UK Meteorological Office C-130 and the NASA ER-2, with different altitude capabilities, participated in the campaign. Additional airborne sampling of southern African air masses that had moved downwind of the subcontinent was conducted by the CSIRO over Australia. Multiple observations were taken in various sectors for a variety of synoptic conditions. Flight missions were designed to maximize synchronous over-flights of the NASA TERRA satellite platform, above regional ground validation and science targets. Numerous smaller-scale ground validation activities took place throughout the region during the campaign period.

  3. Social and ethical dimension of the natural sciences, complex problems of the age, interdisciplinarity, and the contribution of education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Develaki, Maria

    2008-09-01

    In view of the complex problems of this age, the question of the socio-ethical dimension of science acquires particular importance. We approach this matter from a philosophical and sociological standpoint, looking at such focal concerns as the motivation, purposes and methods of scientific activity, the ambivalence of scientific research and the concomitant risks, and the conflict between research freedom and external socio-political intervention. We then point out the impediments to the effectiveness of cross-disciplinary or broader meetings for addressing these complex problems and managing the associated risks, given the difficulty in communication between experts in different fields and non-experts, difficulties that education is challenged to help resolve. We find that the social necessity of informed decision-making on the basis of cross-disciplinary collaboration is reflected in the newer curricula, such as that of Greece, in aims like the acquisition of cross-subject knowledge and skills, and the ability to make decisions on controversial issues involving value conflicts. The interest and the reflections of the science education community in these matters increase its—traditionally limited—contribution to the theoretical debate on education and, by extension, the value of science education in the education system.

  4. Source sector and region contributions to concentration and direct radiative forcing of black carbon in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ke; Liao, Hong; Mao, Yuhao; Ridley, David A.

    2016-01-01

    We quantify the contributions from five domestic emission sectors (residential, industry, transportation, energy, and biomass burning) and emissions outside of China (non-China) to concentration and direct radiative forcing (DRF) of black carbon (BC) in China for year 2010 using a nested-grid version of the global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) coupled with a radiative transfer model. The Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollution (HTAP) anthropogenic emissions of BC for year 2010 are used in this study. Simulated surface-layer BC concentrations in China have strong seasonal variations, which exceed 9 μg m-3 in winter and are about 1-5 μg m-3 in summer in the North China Plain and the Sichuan Basin. Residential sector is simulated to have the largest contribution to surface BC concentrations, by 5-7 μg m-3 in winter and by 1-3 μg m-3 in summer, reflecting the large emissions from winter heating and the enhanced wet deposition during summer monsoon. The contribution from industry sector is the second largest and shows relatively small seasonal variations; the emissions from industry sector contribute 1-3 μg m-3 to BC concentrations in the North China Plain and the Sichuan Basin. The contribution from transportation sector is the third largest, followed by that from biomass burning and energy sectors. The non-China emissions mainly influence the surface-layer concentrations of BC in western China; about 70% of surface-layer BC concentration in the Tibet Plateau is attributed to transboundary transport. Averaged over all of China, the all-sky DRF of BC at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) is simulated to be 1.22 W m-2. Sensitivity simulations show that the TOA BC direct radiative forcings from the five domestic emission sectors of residential, industry, energy, transportation, biomass burning, and non-China emissions are 0.44, 0.27, 0.01, 0.12, 0.04, and 0.30 W m-2, respectively. The domestic and non-China emissions contribute 75% and 25% to BC DRF in China

  5. Regional centres for space science and technology education affiliated to the United Nations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadimova, Sharafat

    Capacity-building efforts in space science and technology are a major focus of the activities of the Office of Outer Space Affairs. Such efforts include providing support to the regional centres for space science and technology education, affiliated to the United Nations, whose goal is to develop, through in-depth education, an indigenous capability for research and applications in the core disciplines of: (a) remote sensing and geographical information systems; (b) satellite communications; (c) satellite meteorology and global climate; and (d) space and atmospheric sciences and data management. The regional centres are located in Morocco and Nigeria for Africa, in Brazil and Mexico for Latin America and the Caribbean and in India for Asia and the Pacific. The overall policy-making body of each Centre is its Governing Board and consists of member States (within the region where the Centre is located), that have agreed, through their endorsement of the Centre's agreement, to the goals and objectives of the Centre. The United Nations Programme on Space Applications, with the support of prominent educators, has developed standard education curricula, which were adopted by the Centres for teaching each of the four core disciplines. Within the framework of the International Committee on global navigation satellite systems (ICG), which is established as an informal body for the purpose of promoting the use and application of global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) on a global basis, the Regional Centres will also be acting as the ICG Information Centres. The ICG Information Centres aim to foster a more structured approach to information exchange in order to fulfil the reciprocal expectations of a network between ICG and Regional Centres.

  6. The NASA airborne astronomy program - A perspective on its contributions to science, technology, and education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, Harold P.

    1992-01-01

    The publication records from NASA's airborne observatories are examined to evaluate the contribution of the airborne astronomy program to technological development and scientific/educational progress. The breadth and continuity of program is detailed with reference to its publication history, discipline representation, literature citations, and to the ability of such a program to address nonrecurring and unexpected astronomical phenomena. Community involvement in the airborne-observation program is described in terms of the number of participants, institutional affiliation, and geographic distribution. The program utilizes instruments including heterodyne and grating spectrometers, high-speed photometers, and Fabry-Perot spectrometers with wide total spectral ranges, resolutions, and numbers of channels. The potential of the program for both astronomical training and further scientific, theoretical, and applied development is underscored.

  7. Constructing and Using Multimodal Narratives to Research in Science Education: Contributions Based on Practical Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, J. B.; Silva, A. A.; Cravino, J. P.; Santos, C. A.; Cunha, A.; Pinto, A.; Silva, A.; Viegas, C.; Saraiva, E.; Branco, M. J.

    2014-06-01

    This study deals with the problem of how to collect genuine and useful data about science classroom practices, and preserving the complex and holistic nature of teaching and learning. Additionally, we were looking for an instrument that would allow comparability and verifiability for teaching and research purposes. Given the multimodality of teaching and learning processes, we developed the multimodal narrative (MN), which describes what happens during a task and incorporates data such as examples of students' work, photos, diagrams, etc. Also, it describes teachers' intentions, preserving the nature of teaching practice in natural settings and it is verifiable and comparable. In this paper, we show how the MN was developed and present the protocol that was used for its construction. We identify the main characteristics of the MN and place it in the context of international research. We explore the potential of the MN for research purposes, illustrating its use in a research study that we carried out. We find that the MN provides a way to gather, organize and transform data, avoiding confusing and time-consuming manipulation of data, while minimizing the natural subjectivity of the narrator. The same MN can be used by the same or by different researchers for different purposes. Furthermore, the same MN can be used with different analysis techniques. It is also possible to study research practices on a large scale using MNs from different teachers and lessons. We propose that MNs can also be useful for teachers' professional development.

  8. Responding to violence against women: social science contributions to legal solutions.

    PubMed

    Portwood, Sharon G; Heany, Julia Finkel

    2007-01-01

    Violence against women represents a serious problem in America. Not only does intimate partner violence represent a significant threat to women, but it also counts among its victims, children living in the violent household. By its very nature, intimate partner or domestic violence may be approached as either a legal or a social problem. However, there is a shortage of legal approaches that have been informed by sound social science research. One promising framework for developing such integrated responses to intimate partner violence is therapeutic jurisprudence, which encourages legal professionals to work closely with social scientists to develop system responses based on empirical data. Such an approach contrasts sharply with the current practice of developing law based on assumptions, which frequently reflect traditional paternalistic and sexist attitudes toward women. This paper begins by examining the current theories and scientific knowledge on domestic violence with particular emphasis on the supporting data. A theoretical framework for conceptualizing domestic violence characterized as patriarchal terrorism as distinct from common couple violence is examined and offered as a means of explaining inconsistencies in research findings. Following a review of current legal responses to domestic violence, the paper concludes by outlining alternative strategies and recommendations for future efforts that are supported by current theory and research. PMID:17445896

  9. Development of the Simbol-X science verification model and its contribution for the IXO Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Daniel; Aschauer, Florian; Dick, Jürgen; Distratis, Giuseppe; Gebhardt, Henry; Herrmann, Sven; Kendziorra, Eckhard; Lauf, Thomas; Lechner, Peter; Santangelo, Andrea; Schanz, Thomas; Strüder, Lothar; Tenzer, Chris; Treis, Johannes

    2010-07-01

    Like the International X-ray Observatory (IXO) mission, the Simbol-X mission is a projected X-ray space telescope with spectral and imaging capabilities covering the energy range from 500 eV up to 80 keV. To detect photons within this wide range of energies, a silicon based "Depleted P-channel Field Effect Transistor" (DePFET)- matrix is used as the Low Energy Detector (LED) on top of an array of CdTe-Caliste modules, which act as the High Energy Detector (HED). A Science Verification Model (SVM) consisting of one LED quadrant in front of one Caliste module will be set up at our institute (IAAT) and operated under laboratory conditions that approximate the expected environment in space. As a first step we use the SVM to test and optimize the performance of the LED operation and data acquisition chain, consisting of an ADC, an event-preprocessor, a sequencer, and an interface controller. All these components have been developed at our institute with the objective to handle the high readout rate of approximately 8000 frames per second. The second step is to study the behaviour and the interactions of LED and HED operating as a combined detector system. We report on the development status of the SVM and its associated electronics and present first results of the currently achieved spectral performance.

  10. Forensic aspects of digital evidence: contributions and initiatives by the National Center for Forensic Science (NCFS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitcomb, Carrie M.

    2002-07-01

    Digital evidence is information of probative value that is either stored or transmitted in a digital form. Digital evidence can exist as words (text), sound (audio), or images (video or still pictures). Law enforcement and forensic scientists are faced with collecting and analyzing these new forms of evidence that previously existed on paper or on magnetic tapes. They must apply the law and science to the processes they use. Extrapolating the old processes into the new formats has been proceeding since the 1980's. Regardless of the output format, all digital evidence has a certain commonality. One would assume that the rules of evidence and the scientific approach would also have some common characteristics. Obviously, there is also a divergence due to the differences in outputs. It is time to approach the issues regarding digital evidence in a more deliberate, organized, and scientific manner. The program outlined by the NCFS would explore these various formats, the features common to traditional types of forensic evidence, and their divergent features and explore the scientific basis for handling of digital evidence. Our web site, www.ncfs.org, describes our programs.

  11. Forensic aspects of digital evidence: contributions and initiatives by the National Center for Forensic Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitcomb, Carrie M.

    2002-08-01

    Digital evidence is information of probative value that is either stored or transmitted in a digital form. Digital evidence can exist as words (text), sound (audio), or images (video or still pictures). Law enforcement and forensic scientists are faced with collecting and analyzing these new forms of evidence that previously existed on paper or on magnetic tapes. They must apply the law and science to the processes they use. Extrapolating the old processes into the new formats has been proceeding since the 1980's. Regardless of the output format, all digital evidence has a certain commonality. One would assume that the rules of evidence and the scientific approach would also have some common characteristics. Obviously, there is also a divergence due to the differences in outputs. It is time to approach the issues regarding digital evidence in a more deliberate, organized, and scientific manner. The program outlined by the NCFS would explore these various formats, their features common to traditional types of forensic evidence, and their divergent features and explore the scientific basis for handling of digital evidence. Our web site, www.ncfs.org, describes our programs.

  12. A Contribution to Regional Bibliography: Alaska; A Pilot Study in Indexing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Margaret P.

    A pilot study to develop a feasible multi-media index to regional material has just been completed. Its primary objective is to develop a tool for general user access to information in various formats by combining old and new methods and techniques of information retrieval. Simple computer programs manipulate the information on 106 sample items to…

  13. Hippocampal Region-Specific Contributions to Memory Performance in Normal Elderly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Karren H. M.; Chuah, Lisa Y. M.; Sim, Sam K. Y.; Chee, Michael W. L.

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between regional hippocampal volume and memory in healthy elderly, 147 community-based volunteers, aged 55-83 years, were evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging, the Groton Maze Learning Test, Visual Reproduction and the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test. Hippocampal volumes were determined by interactive…

  14. Deep sequencing of the MHC region in the Chinese population contributes to studies of complex disease.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fusheng; Cao, Hongzhi; Zuo, Xianbo; Zhang, Tao; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Liu, Xiaomin; Xu, Ricong; Chen, Gang; Zhang, Yuanwei; Zheng, Xiaodong; Jin, Xin; Gao, Jinping; Mei, Junpu; Sheng, Yujun; Li, Qibin; Liang, Bo; Shen, Juan; Shen, Changbing; Jiang, Hui; Zhu, Caihong; Fan, Xing; Xu, Fengping; Yue, Min; Yin, Xianyong; Ye, Chen; Zhang, Cuicui; Liu, Xiao; Yu, Liang; Wu, Jinghua; Chen, Mengyun; Zhuang, Xuehan; Tang, Lili; Shao, Haojing; Wu, Longmao; Li, Jian; Xu, Yu; Zhang, Yijie; Zhao, Suli; Wang, Yu; Li, Ge; Xu, Hanshi; Zeng, Lei; Wang, Jianan; Bai, Mingzhou; Chen, Yanling; Chen, Wei; Kang, Tian; Wu, Yanyan; Xu, Xun; Zhu, Zhengwei; Cui, Yong; Wang, Zaixing; Yang, Chunjun; Wang, Peiguang; Xiang, Leihong; Chen, Xiang; Zhang, Anping; Gao, Xinghua; Zhang, Furen; Xu, Jinhua; Zheng, Min; Zheng, Jie; Zhang, Jianzhong; Yu, Xueqing; Li, Yingrui; Yang, Sen; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Jian; Liu, Jianjun; Hammarström, Lennart; Sun, Liangdan; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Xuejun

    2016-07-01

    The human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region has been shown to be associated with numerous diseases. However, it remains a challenge to pinpoint the causal variants for these associations because of the extreme complexity of the region. We thus sequenced the entire 5-Mb MHC region in 20,635 individuals of Han Chinese ancestry (10,689 controls and 9,946 patients with psoriasis) and constructed a Han-MHC database that includes both variants and HLA gene typing results of high accuracy. We further identified multiple independent new susceptibility loci in HLA-C, HLA-B, HLA-DPB1 and BTNL2 and an intergenic variant, rs118179173, associated with psoriasis and confirmed the well-established risk allele HLA-C*06:02. We anticipate that our Han-MHC reference panel built by deep sequencing of a large number of samples will serve as a useful tool for investigating the role of the MHC region in a variety of diseases and thus advance understanding of the pathogenesis of these disorders. PMID:27213287

  15. [Contribution of teacher MEI Jian-Han to modern acup-moxibustion science].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-Bin

    2008-09-01

    Acup-moxibustion experts are indispensable for probing into establishment of modern higher education and academic system of acupuncture and moxibustion. Among them, teacher MEI made a great distribution, mainly including: summarizing the outline of indications of acupoints of 14 channels, raising making prescription law of acupoints and indications law of acupoints, expounding the relationship between channels running and disease symptoms, summing up characteristics of theories of the twelve divergent meridians and the twelve muscle regions, drawing an indications diagram of acupoints of the 14 meridians and a schematic diagram of relation between the running of meridians and disease symptoms, a schematic diagram of running of the twelve divergent meridians, and a diagram of the relations between running of the twelve muscle regions and disease symptoms, inventing acupoint location method with finger-equal division, expounding Xiaheshu, simplifying the calculation of Ziwuliuzhu and inventing a calculation scale and simple acupoints selection table. In his later years, he systematically studied on the theories of eight extra meridians and clinical application, and raised theorem of meridians, etc. PMID:18822991

  16. Contributions to Climate Research Using the AIRS Science Team Version-5 Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel; Molnar, Gyula; Iredell, Lena

    2011-01-01

    This paper compares recent spatial anomaly time series of OLR (Outgoing Longwave Radiation) and OLRCLR (Clear Sky OLR) as determined using CERES and AIRS observations over the time period September 2002 through June 2010. We find excellent agreement in OLR anomaly time series of both data sets in almost every detail, down to the 1 x 1 spatial grid point level. This extremely close agreement of OLR anomaly time series derived from observations by two different instruments implies that both sets of results must be highly stable. This agreement also validates to some extent the anomaly time series of the AIRS derived products used in the computation of the AIRS OLR product. The paper then examines anomaly time series of AIRS derived products over the extended time period September 2002 through April 2011. We show that OLR anomalies during this period are closely in phase with those of an El Nino index, and that recent global and tropical mean decreases in OLR and OLR(sub CLR) are a result of a transition from an El Nino condition at the beginning of the data record to La Nina conditions toward the end of the data period. This relationship can be explained by temporal changes of the distribution of mid-tropospheric water vapor and cloud cover in two spatial regions that are in direct response to El Nino/La Nina activity which occurs outside these spatial regions

  17. The Left Fusiform Gyrus is a Critical Region Contributing to the Core Behavioral Profile of Semantic Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Junhua; Chen, Keliang; Chen, Yan; Fang, Yuxing; Yang, Qing; Lv, Yingru; Lin, Nan; Bi, Yanchao; Guo, Qihao; Han, Zaizhu

    2016-01-01

    Given that extensive cerebral regions are co-atrophic in semantic dementia (SD), it is not yet known which critical regions (SD-semantic-critical regions) are really responsible for the semantic deficits of SD. To identify the SD-semantic-critical regions, we explored the relationship between the degree of cerebral atrophy in the whole brain and the severity of semantic deficits in 19 individuals with SD. We found that the gray matter volumes (GMVs) of two regions [left fusiform gyrus (lFFG) and left parahippocampal gyrus (lPHG)] significantly correlated with the semantic scores of patients with SD. Importantly, the effects of the lFFG remained significant after controlling for the GMVs of the lPHG. Moreover, the effects of the region could not be accounted for by the total GMV, general cognitive ability, laterality of brain atrophy, or control task performance. We further observed that each atrophic portion of the lFFG along the anterior–posterior axis might dedicate to the loss of semantic functions in SD. These results reveal that the lFFG could be a critical region contributing to the semantic deficits of SD. PMID:27242479

  18. A review of the contributions of Albert Einstein to earth sciences--in commemoration of the World Year of Physics.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Frías, Jesús; Hochberg, David; Rull, Fernando

    2006-02-01

    The World Year of Physics (2005) is an international celebration to commemorate the 100th anniversary of Einstein's "Annus Mirabilis." The United Nations has officially declared 2005 as the International Year of Physics. However, the impact of Einstein's ideas was not restricted to physics. Among numerous other disciplines, Einstein also made significant and specific contributions to Earth Sciences. His geosciences-related letters, comments, and scientific articles are dispersed, not easily accessible, and are poorly known. The present review attempts to integrate them as a tribute to Einstein in commemoration of this centenary. These contributions can be classified into three basic areas: geodynamics, geological (planetary) catastrophism, and fluvial geomorphology. Regarding geodynamics, Einstein essentially supported Hapgood's very controversial theory called Earth Crust Displacement. With respect to geological (planetary) catastrophism, it is shown how the ideas of Einstein about Velikovsky's proposals evolved from 1946 to 1955. Finally, in relation to fluvial geodynamics, the review incorporates the elegant work in which Einstein explains the formation of meandering rivers. A general analysis of his contributions is also carried out from today's perspective. Given the interdisciplinarity and implications of Einstein's achievements to multiple fields of knowledge, we propose that the year 2005 serve, rather than to confine his universal figure within a specific scientific area, to broaden it for a better appreciation of this brilliant scientist in all of his dimensions. PMID:16453104

  19. A Contribution to the Understanding of the Regional Seismic Structure in the Eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Luccio, F.; Thio, H.; Pino, N.

    2001-12-01

    Regional earthquakes recorded by two digital broadband stations (BGIO and KEG) located in the Eastern Mediterranean have been analyzed in order to study the seismic structure in this region. The area consists of different tectonic provinces, which complicate the modeling of the seismic wave propagation. We have modeled the Pnl arrivals using the FK-integration technique (Saikia, 1994) along different paths at the two stations, at several distances, ranging from 400 to 1500 km. Comparing the synthetics obtained by using several models compiled by other authors, we have constructed a velocity model, considering the informations deriving from group velocity distribution, in order to determine the finer structure in the analyzed paths. The model has been perturbed by trial and error until a compressional velocity profile has been found producing the shape of the observed waveforms. The crustal thickness, upper mantle P-wave velocity and 410-km discontinuity determine the shape of the observed waveform portions.

  20. Two genomic regions contribute disproportionately to geographic differentiation in wild barley.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zhou; Gonzales, Ana M; Clegg, Michael T; Smith, Kevin P; Muehlbauer, Gary J; Steffenson, Brian J; Morrell, Peter L

    2014-07-01

    Genetic differentiation in natural populations is driven by geographic distance and by ecological or physical features within and between natural habitats that reduce migration. The primary population structure in wild barley differentiates populations east and west of the Zagros Mountains. Genetic differentiation between eastern and western populations is uneven across the genome and is greatest on linkage groups 2H and 5H. Genetic markers in these two regions demonstrate the largest difference in frequency between the primary populations and have the highest informativeness for assignment to each population. Previous cytological and genetic studies suggest there are chromosomal structural rearrangements (inversions or translocations) in these genomic regions. Environmental association analyses identified an association with both temperature and precipitation variables on 2H and with precipitation variables on 5H. PMID:24760390

  1. Two Genomic Regions Contribute Disproportionately to Geographic Differentiation in Wild Barley

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Zhou; Gonzales, Ana M.; Clegg, Michael T.; Smith, Kevin P.; Muehlbauer, Gary J.; Steffenson, Brian J.; Morrell, Peter L.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic differentiation in natural populations is driven by geographic distance and by ecological or physical features within and between natural habitats that reduce migration. The primary population structure in wild barley differentiates populations east and west of the Zagros Mountains. Genetic differentiation between eastern and western populations is uneven across the genome and is greatest on linkage groups 2H and 5H. Genetic markers in these two regions demonstrate the largest difference in frequency between the primary populations and have the highest informativeness for assignment to each population. Previous cytological and genetic studies suggest there are chromosomal structural rearrangements (inversions or translocations) in these genomic regions. Environmental association analyses identified an association with both temperature and precipitation variables on 2H and with precipitation variables on 5H. PMID:24760390

  2. Contribution of collagen fiber undulation to regional biomechanical properties along porcine thoracic aorta.

    PubMed

    Zeinali-Davarani, Shahrokh; Wang, Yunjie; Chow, Ming-Jay; Turcotte, Raphaël; Zhang, Yanhang

    2015-05-01

    As major extracellular matrix components, elastin, and collagen play crucial roles in regulating the mechanical properties of the aortic wall and, thus, the normal cardiovascular function. The mechanical properties of aorta, known to vary with age and multitude of diseases as well as the proximity to the heart, have been attributed to the variations in the content and architecture of wall constituents. This study is focused on the role of layer-specific collagen undulation in the variation of mechanical properties along the porcine descending thoracic aorta. Planar biaxial tensile tests are performed to characterize the hyperelastic anisotropic mechanical behavior of tissues dissected from four locations along the thoracic aorta. Multiphoton microscopy is used to image the associated regional microstructure. Exponential-based and recruitment-based constitutive models are used to account for the observed mechanical behavior while considering the aortic wall as a composite of two layers with independent properties. An elevated stiffness is observed in distal regions compared to proximal regions of thoracic aorta, consistent with sharper and earlier collagen recruitment estimated for medial and adventitial layers in the models. Multiphoton images further support our prediction that higher stiffness in distal regions is associated with less undulation in collagen fibers. Recruitment-based models further reveal that regardless of the location, collagen in the media is recruited from the onset of stretching, whereas adventitial collagen starts to engage with a delay. A parameter sensitivity analysis is performed to discriminate between the models in terms of the confidence in the estimated model parameters. PMID:25612301

  3. Contribution of regional transport to the black carbon aerosol during winter haze period in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiyuan; Huang, Ru-Jin; Cao, Junji; Tie, Xuexi; Shen, Zhenxing; Zhao, Shuyu; Han, Yongming; Li, Guohui; Li, Zhengqiang; Ni, Haiyan; Zhou, Yaqing; Wang, Meng; Chen, Yang; Su, Xiaoli

    2016-05-01

    The mass concentrations of atmospheric refractory black carbon (rBC), an important absorber of solar radiation, were continuously measured with a single particle soot photometer (SP2) during wintertime haze period to investigate the transport of pollution to Beijing. The average mass concentration of rBC was 6.1 ± 3.9 μg m-3 during hazy periods, which was 4.7 times higher than it during non-hazy periods. Cluster analysis showed that the air parcels arriving at Beijing mainly originated from the northwest, passed through the south and brought the most polluted air to Beijing. Concentration-weighted trajectory analyses indicated that the central North China Plain were the most likely source region for the rBC that impacted Beijing. Furthermore, the Weather Research and Forecasting-Black Carbon model showed that 71.4-82.0% of the rBC at Beijing was from regional transport during the high rBC episodes and that 47.9-56.8% of the rBC can be attributed to sources in the central North China Plain. These results suggest that regional transport from the central North China Plain, rather than local emissions, was a more important source for rBC pollution in Beijing.

  4. Contribution of regional transport to the black carbon aerosol during winter haze period in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiyuan; Huang, Ru-Jin; Cao, Junji; Tie, Xuexi; Shen, Zhenxing; Zhao, Shuyu; Han, Yongming; Li, Guohui; Li, Zhengqiang; Ni, Haiyan; Zhou, Yaqing; Wang, Meng; Chen, Yang; Su, Xiaoli

    2016-05-01

    The mass concentrations of atmospheric refractory black carbon (rBC), an important absorber of solar radiation, were continuously measured with a single particle soot photometer (SP2) during wintertime haze period to investigate the transport of pollution to Beijing. The average mass concentration of rBC was 6.1 ± 3.9 μg m-3 during hazy periods, which was 4.7 times higher than it during non-hazy periods. Cluster analysis showed that the air parcels arriving at Beijing mainly originated from the northwest, passed through the south and brought the most polluted air to Beijing. Concentration-weighted trajectory analyses indicated that the central North China Plain were the most likely source region for the rBC that impacted Beijing. Furthermore, the Weather Research and Forecasting-Black Carbon model showed that 71.4-82.0% of the rBC at Beijing was from regional transport during the high rBC episodes and that 47.9-56.8% of the rBC can be attributed to sources in the central North China Plain. These results suggest that regional transport from the central North China Plain, rather than local emissions, was a more important source for rBC pollution in Beijing.

  5. Contributions of Rocky Flats releases to the total plutonium in regional soils.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, S A; Webb, S B; Whicker, F W

    1997-01-01

    Total 239,240Pu and the 240Pu:239Pu atom ratio were measured in soil samples from around the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) during 1992-1994. Mass isotopic data provided a sensitive technique to resolve low levels of RFETS 239,240Pu superimposed on plutonium from global fallout. Concentrations of 239,240Pu within this sample set ranged from 1.1 Bq kg(-1) offsite to 57 Bq kg(-1) onsite, and the 240Pu:239Pu atom ratio increased from 0.055 onsite to 0.123 at approximately 19 km east of the RFETS boundary. The relationship between 24OPu:239Pu atom ratios and distance indicated that a measurable RFETS contribution may have extended to > or = 19 km offsite in the easterly direction. Although the RFETS contribution to total plutonium at the offsite locations ranged from 24-90%, the overall inventory was relatively small. Total inventory estimates, for one transect, based on 239,240Pu and from 240Pu:239Pu atom ratio measurements were not significantly different. PMID:8972825

  6. Science and Technology to Advance Regional Security in the Middle East and Central Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Tompson, A F B; Richardson, J H; Ragaini, R C; Knapp, R B; Rosenberg, N D; Smith, D K; Ball, D Y

    2002-10-09

    This paper is concerned with the promotion and advancement of regional security in the Middle East and Central Asia through the development of bilateral and multilateral cooperation on targeted scientific and technical projects. It is widely recognized that increasing tensions and instability in many parts of the world emphasize--or reemphasize--a need to seek and promote regional security in these areas. At the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), a national security research facility operated for the US Department of Energy, we are pursuing an effort to use science and technology as a ''low risk'' means of engagement in regions of strategic importance to the United States. In particular, we are developing collaborations and cooperative projects among (and between) national laboratory scientists in the US and our various counterparts in the countries of interest.

  7. USGS contributions to earthquake and tsunami monitoring in the Caribbean Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, D.; Caribbean Project Team, U.; Partners, C.

    2007-05-01

    USGS Caribbean Project Team: Lind Gee, Gary Gyure, John Derr, Jack Odum, John McMillan, David Carver, Jim Allen, Susan Rhea, Don Anderson, Harley Benz Caribbean Partners: Christa von Hillebrandt-Andrade-PRSN, Juan Payero ISU-UASD,DR, Eduardo Camacho - UPAN, Panama, Lloyd Lynch - SRU,Gonzalo Cruz - UNAH,Honduras, Margaret Wiggins-Grandison - Jamaica, Judy Thomas - CERO Barbados, Sylvan McIntyre - NADMA Grenada, E. Bermingham - STRI. The magnitude-9 Sumatra-Andaman Islands earthquake of December 26, 2004, increased global awareness of the destructive hazard posed by earthquakes and tsunamis. In response to this tragedy, the US government undertook a collaborative project to improve earthquake and tsunami monitoring along a major portion of vulnerable coastal regions, in the Caribbean Sea, the Gulf of Mexico, and the Atlantic Ocean. Seismically active areas of the Caribbean Sea region pose a tsunami risk for Caribbean islands, coastal areas along the Gulf of Mexico, and the Atlantic seaboard of North America. Nearly 100 tsunamis have been reported for the Caribbean region in the past 500 years, including 14 tsunamis reported in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Partners in this project include the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the Smithsonian Institute, the National Oceanic and Aeronautic Administration (NOAA), and several partner institutions in the Caribbean region. This presentation focuses on the deployment of nine broadband seismic stations to monitor earthquake activity in the Caribbean region that are affiliated with the Global Seismograph Network (GSN). By the end of 2006, five stations were transmitting data to the USGS National Earthquake Information Service (NEIS), and regional partners through Puerto Rico seismograph network (PRSN) Earthworm systems. The following stations are currently operating: SDDR - Sabaneta Dam Dominican Republic, BBGH - Gun Hill Barbados, GRGR - Grenville, Grenada, BCIP - Barro Colorado, Panama, TGUH - Tegucigalpa

  8. Geographic information science: Contribution to understanding salt and sodium affected soils in the Senegal River Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ndiaye, Ramatoulaye

    The Senegal River valley and delta (SRVD) are affected by long term climate variability. Indicators of these climatic shifts include a rainfall deficit, warmer temperatures, sea level rise, floods, and drought. These shifts have led to environmental degradation, water deficits, and profound effects on human life and activities in the area. Geographic Information Science (GIScience), including satellite-based remote sensing methods offer several advantages over conventional ground-based methods used to map and monitor salt-affected soil (SAS) features. This study was designed to assess the accuracy of information on soil salinization extracted from Landsat satellite imagery. Would available imagery and GIScience data analysis enable an ability to discriminate natural soil salinization from soil sodication and provide an ability to characterize the SAS trend and pattern over 30 years? A set of Landsat MSS (June 1973 and September 1979), Landsat TM (November 1987, April 1994 and November 1999) and ETM+ (May 2001 and March 2003) images have been used to map and monitor salt impacted soil distribution. Supervised classification, unsupervised classification and post-classification change detection methods were used. Supervised classifications of May 2001 and March 2003 images were made in conjunction field data characterizing soil surface chemical characteristics that included exchange sodium percentage (ESP), cation exchange capacity (CEC) and the electrical conductivity (EC). With this supervised information extraction method, the distribution of three different types of SAS (saline, saline-sodic, and sodic) was mapped with an accuracy of 91.07% for 2001 image and 73.21% for 2003 image. Change detection results confirmed a decreasing trend in non-saline and saline soil and an increase in saline-sodic and sodic soil. All seven Landsat images were subjected to the unsupervised classification method which resulted in maps that separate SAS according to their degree of

  9. Seasonal and regional variations of source contributions for PM10 and PM2.5 in urban environment.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ying-Ze; Shi, Guo-Liang; Huang-Fu, Yan-Qi; Song, Dan-Lin; Liu, Jia-Yuan; Zhou, Lai-Dong; Feng, Yin-Chang

    2016-07-01

    To characterize the sources of to PM10 and PM2.5, a long-term, speciate and simultaneous dataset was sampled in a megacity in China during the period of 2006-2014. The PM concentrations and PM2.5/PM10 were higher in the winter. Higher percentages of Al, Si, Ca and Fe were observed in the summer, and higher concentrations of OC, NO3(-) and SO4(2-) occurred in the winter. Then, the sources were quantified by an advanced three-way model (defined as an ABB three-way model), which estimates different profiles for different sizes. A higher percentage of cement and crustal dust was present in the summer; higher fractions of coal combustion and nitrate+SOC were observed in the winter. Crustal and cement contributed larger portion to coarse part of PM10, whereas vehicular and secondary source categories were enriched in PM2.5. Finally, potential source contribution function (PSCF) and source regional apportionment (SRA) methods were combined with the three-way model to estimate geographical origins. During the sampling period, the southeast region (R4) was an important region for most source categories (0.6%-11.5%); the R1 (centre region) also played a vital role (0.3-6.9%). PMID:27037891

  10. Science and Technology in Regional Flood Disaster Pilots: A GEOSS Capacity Building Imperative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frye, S. W.; Cappelaere, P. G.; Mandl, D.

    2009-12-01

    This paper describes activities and results of melding basic scientific research in remote sensing with applied science and technology development and infusion to implement regional flood pilot programs in Sub-Saharan Africa and the Caribbean Region. These regional flood pilots support local and national agency involvement in emergency response and humanitarian assistance activities using orbital, sub-orbital, and in-situ sensors combined with predictive models and socio-economic data to form a cohesive, interoperable set of systems that cover the full cycle of disaster mitigation, warning, response, and recovery for societal benefit. Global satellite coverage is coordinated through the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) in conjunction with the United Nations Space Platform for Space-based Information for Disaster Management and Emergency Response (UN-SPIDER). Other international non-government organizations plus regional and local agencies all play individual roles in exploring the science results, applying the observations and model outputs to form geo-referenced maps that provide improved situational awareness and environmental intelligence for disaster management. The improvements to flood forecast and nowcast outputs include higher resolution drainage and hydrology mapping, improved retrievals for microwave data for soil moisture, plus improved validation from regional ground truth databases. Flow gauge and river depth archive data from local assets provide improved validation of flood model results. Incorporation of atmospheric correction using ground truth data from calibration and validation sites enables better detection and classification of plant species identification and plant stress. Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standards for Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) are implemented to provide internet access to satellite tasking, data processing, and distribution/notification in addition to model outputs and other local and regional data sets

  11. Overview of the RFX-mod contribution to the international Fusion Science Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puiatti, M. E.; Dal Bello, S.; Marrelli, L.; Martin, P.; Agostinetti, P.; Agostini, M.; Antoni, V.; Auriemma, F.; Barbisan, M.; Barbui, T.; Baruzzo, M.; Battistella, M.; Belli, F.; Bettini, P.; Bigi, M.; Bilel, R.; Boldrin, M.; Bolzonella, T.; Bonfiglio, D.; Brombin, M.; Buffa, A.; Canton, A.; Cappello, S.; Carraro, L.; Cavazzana, R.; Cester, D.; Chacon, L.; Chapman, B. E.; Chitarin, G.; Ciaccio, G.; Cooper, W. A.; Dalla Palma, M.; Deambrosis, S.; Delogu, R.; De Lorenzi, A.; De Masi, G.; Dong, J. Q.; Escande, D. F.; Esposito, B.; Fassina, A.; Fellin, F.; Ferro, A.; Finotti, C.; Franz, P.; Frassinetti, L.; Furno Palumbo, M.; Gaio, E.; Ghezzi, F.; Giudicotti, L.; Gnesotto, F.; Gobbin, M.; Gonzales, W. A.; Grando, L.; Guo, S. C.; Hanson, J. D.; Hirshman, S. P.; Innocente, P.; Jackson, J. L.; Kiyama, S.; Komm, M.; Laguardia, L.; Li, C.; Liu, S. F.; Liu, Y. Q.; Lorenzini, R.; Luce, T. C.; Luchetta, A.; Maistrello, A.; Manduchi, G.; Mansfield, D. K.; Marchiori, G.; Marconato, N.; Marocco, D.; Marcuzzi, D.; Martines, E.; Martini, S.; Matsunaga, G.; Mazzitelli, G.; Miorin, E.; Momo, B.; Moresco, M.; Okabayashi, M.; Olofsson, E.; Paccagnella, R.; Patel, N.; Pavei, M.; Peruzzo, S.; Pilan, N.; Pigatto, L.; Piovan, R.; Piovesan, P.; Piron, C.; Piron, L.; Predebon, I.; Rea, C.; Recchia, M.; Rigato, V.; Rizzolo, A.; Roquemore, A. L.; Rostagni, G.; Ruset, C.; Ruzzon, A.; Sajò-Bohus, L.; Sakakita, H.; Sanchez, R.; Sarff, J. S.; Sartori, E.; Sattin, F.; Scaggion, A.; Scarin, P.; Schmitz, O.; Sonato, P.; Spada, E.; Spagnolo, S.; Spolaore, M.; Spong, D. A.; Spizzo, G.; Stevanato, L.; Takechi, M.; Taliercio, C.; Terranova, D.; Trevisan, G. L.; Urso, G.; Valente, M.; Valisa, M.; Veranda, M.; Vianello, N.; Viesti, G.; Villone, F.; Vincenzi, P.; Visona', N.; Wang, Z. R.; White, R. B.; Xanthopoulos, P.; Xu, X. Y.; Yanovskiy, V.; Zamengo, A.; Zanca, P.; Zaniol, B.; Zanotto, L.; Zilli, E.; Zuin, M.

    2015-10-01

    The RFX-mod device is operated both as a reversed field pinch (RFP), where advanced regimes featuring helical shape develop, and as a tokamak. Due to its flexibility, RFX-mod is contributing to the solution of key issues in the roadmap to ITER and DEMO, including MHD instability control, internal transport barriers, edge transport and turbulence, isotopic effect, high density limit and three-dimensional (3D) non-linear MHD modelling. This paper reports recent advancements in the understanding of the self-organized helical states, featuring a strong electron transport barrier, in the RFP configuration; the physical mechanism driving the residual transport at the barrier has been investigated. Following the first experiments with deuterium as the filling gas, new results concerning the isotope effect in the RFP are discussed. Studies on the high density limit show that in the RFP it is related to a toroidal particle accumulation due to the onset of a convective cell. In the tokamak configuration, q(a) regimes down to q(a) = 1.2 have been pioneered, with (2,1) tearing mode (TM) mitigated and (2,1) resistive wall mode (RWM) stabilized: the control of such modes can be obtained both by poloidal and radial sensors. Progress has been made in the avoidance of disruptions due to the (2,1) TM by applying q(a) control, and on the general issue of error field control. The effect of externally applied 3D fields on plasma flow and edge turbulence, sawtooth control and runaway electron decorrelation has been analysed. The experimental program is supported by substantial theoretical activity: 3D non-linear visco-resistive MHD and non-local transport modelling have been advanced; RWMs have been studied by a toroidal MHD kinetic hybrid stability code.

  12. [What do functionally defined populations contribute to the explanation of regional differences in medical care?].

    PubMed

    Graf von Stillfried, D; Czihal, T

    2014-02-01

    Geographic variation in health care is increasingly subject to analysis and health policy aiming at the suitable allocation of resources and the reduction of unwarranted variation for the patient populations concerned. As in the case of area-level indicators, in most cases populations are geographically defined. The concept of geographically defined populations, however, may be self-limiting with respect to identifying the potential for improvement. As an alternative, we explored how a functional definition of populations would support defining the scope for reducing unwarranted geographical variations. Given that patients in Germany have virtually no limits in accessing physicians of their choice, we adapted a method that has been developed in the United States to create virtual networks of physicians based on commonly treated patients. Using the physician claims data under statutory insurance, which covers 90% of the population, we defined 43,006 populations-and networks-in 2010. We found that there is considerable variation between the population in terms of their risk structure and the share of the primary care practice in the total services provided. Moreover, there are marked differences in the size and structure of networks between cities, densely populated regions, and rural regions. We analyzed the variation for two area-level indicators: the proportion of diabetics with at least one HbA1c test per year for diabetics, and the proportion of patients with low back pain undergoing computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging. Variation at the level of functionally defined populations proved to be larger than for geographically defined populations. The pattern of distribution gives evidence on the degree to which consensus targets could be reached and which networks need to be addressed in order to reduce unwarranted regional variation. The concept of functionally defined populations needs to be further developed before implementation. PMID:24469283

  13. Noninvasive examination of endothelial, sympathetic, and myogenic contributions to regional differences in the human cutaneous microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Hodges, Gary J; Del Pozzi, Andrew T

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether there are regional differences in the cutaneous microvascular responses of the forearm and the leg. Utilizing a non-invasive measure (spectral analysis),we looked at the influence of the endothelial, sympathetic, and myogenic function between regions at thermoneutral conditions (33 °C) and in response to local skin warming (42 °C) using laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF). We recruited 18 young, healthy participants, who visited the lab on 2 separate occasions. Participants were instrumented with LDF probes and local skin heater probe-holders, placed on the forearm or the leg. Blood pressure was recorded by oscillometry. At both 33 °C and during local skin warming to 42 °C, skin vasomotion for the forearm and leg were evaluated using spectral analysis of the LDF recordings. There were significant differences among all frequencies of interest between the forearm and the leg. At 33 °C the leg presented with higher (P=0.003) activity for endothelial (0.009-0.021 Hz), sympathetic (P=0.002) (0.021-0.052 Hz), and myogenic (P=0.004) (0.052-0.145 Hz) activity when compared to the forearm. In contrast, following 35 min of local skin warming, the forearm had greater endothelial (P=0.019), sympathetic (P=0.006), and myogenic (P=0.005) vasomotion than the leg. These outcomes indicate regional differences in the cutaneous microcirculation. The current results are similar to our previous work using invasive methods and pharmacological agents, indicating that non-invasive analyses may be useful in the diagnoses and understanding of the mechanisms that control the microvascular function of pathological conditions. PMID:24742702

  14. Associations among Wine Grape Microbiome, Metabolome, and Fermentation Behavior Suggest Microbial Contribution to Regional Wine Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Bokulich, Nicholas A.; Collins, Thomas S.; Masarweh, Chad; Allen, Greg; Heymann, Hildegarde; Ebeler, Susan E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Regionally distinct wine characteristics (terroir) are an important aspect of wine production and consumer appreciation. Microbial activity is an integral part of wine production, and grape and wine microbiota present regionally defined patterns associated with vineyard and climatic conditions, but the degree to which these microbial patterns associate with the chemical composition of wine is unclear. Through a longitudinal survey of over 200 commercial wine fermentations, we demonstrate that both grape microbiota and wine metabolite profiles distinguish viticultural area designations and individual vineyards within Napa and Sonoma Counties, California. Associations among wine microbiota and fermentation characteristics suggest new links between microbiota, fermentation performance, and wine properties. The bacterial and fungal consortia of wine fermentations, composed from vineyard and winery sources, correlate with the chemical composition of the finished wines and predict metabolite abundances in finished wines using machine learning models. The use of postharvest microbiota as an early predictor of wine chemical composition is unprecedented and potentially poses a new paradigm for quality control of agricultural products. These findings add further evidence that microbial activity is associated with wine terroir. PMID:27302757

  15. Contributions to the moss flora of Giresun Region (Sebinkarahisar and Alucra district).

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, T; Batan, N

    2008-08-15

    The aim of the study was to obtain knowledge on the moss flora of the Giresun Region-rather than to identify the entire range moss flora of the region. After the identification of 287 moss specimens collected from the research area between June and August in 2007 and 2008, total 85 taxa were defined. These taxa belong to 17 families and 37 genera of Bryopsida (Musci). Among them, 14 taxa -Hygroamblystegium irriguum Hedw., Rhynchostegium confertum (Dicks.) B. S. G., Rhynchostegium alpinum Huds. ex With., Bryum dichotomum Hedw., Bryum laevifilum Syed., Hygrohypnum smithii (Sw.) Broth., Grimmia decipiens (Schultz) Lindb., Grimmia tergestina Tomm. Ex Bruch and Schimp., Schistidium flaccidum (DeNot.) Ochyra., Schistidium platyphyllum (Mitt.) Kindb., Palustriella decipens (De Not.) Ochyra., Desmatodon latifolius (Hedw.) Brid., Phascum curvicolle Hedw., Syntrichia princeps (De Not.) Mitt. new for A4 grid square (40 degrees- 42' N, 38 degrees -42' E) which was adopted by Henderson. Thirty six taxa are new for Giresun Province. All taxa are new for study area. For every each taxon, the habitat pattern and distribution data are presented. PMID:19266904

  16. The Contribution of Agricultural Trade for Saving Blue Water in Arid Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolinski, S.; Biewald, A.; Hoff, H.; Lotze-Campen, H.

    2011-12-01

    Trade can mitigate local water scarcity in water scarce regions, but does not always do so because of economic or other pressures to export water intensive products. To assess impacts of trade on blue and green water use in agriculture, we apply two dynamic, global and spatially explicit models. The vegetation and crop model LPJmL calculates water use and crop productivity. Based on the potential agricultural yield of LPJmL, the economic model MAgPIE_trade produces landuse pattern for the most important agricultural production in 10 economic world regions; bilateral trade is controlled by transport costs and trade barriers. We quantify the trade effect by comparing scenarios with and without trade for current and predicted future climatic conditions. The resulting differences in the spatial patterns (0.5° resolution) of agricultural production from MAgPIE_trade enables the quantification of the amount of goods produced for export. Using the consumptive green and blue water fluxes from LPJmL for each agricultural product, the export of virtual water uses are calculated so that water saving or consumption due to trade can be quantified. Although an interesting result in itself, an estimate for relaxation or intensification of water scarcity by trade is still missing. Here, the water shadow price from MAgPIE_trade as an indicator for water scarcity is related to the actual change in blue water usage. This relation is then taken as an indicator for the efficiency of trade on the local savings of blue water.

  17. [Medicine for the elderly or science of old age? Max Bürger's contribution to geriatric medicine and gerontology].

    PubMed

    Blumenthal, Sandra; Bruns, Florian

    2015-01-01

    The fact that, due to demographic changes, gerontology and geriatrics are gaining ever more importance gives rise to more questions regarding the history of the science of aging. Based on unpublished sources and relevant publications by Max Bürger, the doyen of gerontological research in Germany, our contributions trace the beginnings of age research in Germany. Our results confirm Bürger as the dominant expert in this field in the first decades of its emergence. Bürger was primarily interested in basic medical-scientific research, and less in clinical geriatrics. His scientific goal was not to establish a medicine for the elderly but a theory of life changes ("biomorphosis"). From the start, he saw aging as a physiological process--a view that is still valid today. His concept of "biomorphosis", however, did not catch on and reveals a constriction in Bürger's thinking, which was to some extent influenced by Hans Driesch's vitalism. Interdisciplinary approaches are noticeable in the natural sciences rather than the humanities or social sciences. Bürger's research was also influenced by the political system he lived in. During National Socialism, which Bürger joined--at least formally--in 1937, his research into labour economics and aging met with considerable interest in connection with the general mobilisation of resources. East Germany also had an interest in questions of labour productivity in old age and the extension of the working life, which meant that Bürger remained a sought-after physician and scientist up into the 1960s. As he grew older himself, Bürger's initially deficit-oriented view of old age gave way to a more positive presentation that attached greater weight to the resources of old age. PMID:26137644

  18. Simulations with the KNMI regional climate model RACMO2 in contribution to CORDEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Meijgaard, E.; Gleeson, E.; Lenaerts, J.

    2012-12-01

    The KNMI regional climate model RACMO2 is used for the regional downscaling of IPCC climate change scenarios with a focus on aspects of the hydrological cycle. In this paper we discuss results from present-day climate as well as transient climate simulations with RACMO2 for the CORDEX regions Africa (50km resolved), Antarctica (50km) and Europe (50 and 12km). The present-day climate simulations, referred to as the evaluation run, are forced with ERA-Interim re-analyses for the period 1979-2010. The climate change scenario calculations are forced with a realization of EC-EARTH2.3 (r1i1p1), utilizing historic GHG concentrations and aerosol loadings for the period 1950-2005, and assuming the RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 scenarios for the period 2006-2100. The baseline version of RACMO2 carries the package of physical parameterizations from the ECMWF model cycle 31r1 which is very similar to what is used in ERA-Interim and EC-EARTH. For the simulation of Antarctic conditions the model is equipped with an advanced multi-layer snow-refreezing module, a snow drift module and a snow grain size-albedo feedback module. For the simulations of Africa and Europe the hydrological component of the surface/soil scheme is adopted from HTESSEL (ECMWF cycle33r1) to account for spatial heterogeneity in soil hydraulic parameters. For the simulation of CORDEX-Africa the surface albedo is inferred from MODIS maps, allowing a much better estimate of 2-meter temperature patterns across the Sahara desert. For the simulation of CORDEX-Europe (instead of surface albedo) the leaf-area index is inferred from MODIS maps, permitting a much better seasonal forcing associated to this parameter. In addition to the Europe integration, the boundary-layer scheme was extended with a TKE-closure to better represent the diurnal evolution of boundary-layer clouds. Assessment of the simulations will focus on precipitation patterns and changes therein (Africa simulation), the temporal structure of the surface mass

  19. Resting-State Coupling between Core Regions within the Central-Executive and Salience Networks Contributes to Working Memory Performance

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Xiaojing; Zhang, Yuanchao; Zhou, Yuan; Cheng, Luqi; Li, Jin; Wang, Yulin; Friston, Karl J.; Jiang, Tianzi

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies investigated the distinct roles played by different cognitive regions and suggested that the patterns of connectivity of these regions are associated with working memory (WM). However, the specific causal mechanism through which the neuronal circuits that involve these brain regions contribute to WM is still unclear. Here, in a large sample of healthy young adults, we first identified the core WM regions by linking WM accuracy to resting-state functional connectivity with the bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dLPFC; a principal region in the central-executive network, CEN). Then a spectral dynamic causal modeling (spDCM) analysis was performed to quantify the effective connectivity between these regions. Finally, the effective connectivity was correlated with WM accuracy to characterize the relationship between these connections and WM performance. We found that the functional connections between the bilateral dLPFC and the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and between the right dLPFC and the left orbital fronto-insular cortex (FIC) were correlated with WM accuracy. Furthermore, the effective connectivity from the dACC to the bilateral dLPFC and from the right dLPFC to the left FIC could predict individual differences in WM. Because the dACC and FIC are core regions of the salience network (SN), we inferred that the inter- and causal-connectivity between core regions within the CEN and SN is functionally relevant for WM performance. In summary, the current study identified the dLPFC-related resting-state effective connectivity underlying WM and suggests that individual differences in cognitive ability could be characterized by resting-state effective connectivity. PMID:26941629

  20. Resting-State Coupling between Core Regions within the Central-Executive and Salience Networks Contributes to Working Memory Performance.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xiaojing; Zhang, Yuanchao; Zhou, Yuan; Cheng, Luqi; Li, Jin; Wang, Yulin; Friston, Karl J; Jiang, Tianzi

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies investigated the distinct roles played by different cognitive regions and suggested that the patterns of connectivity of these regions are associated with working memory (WM). However, the specific causal mechanism through which the neuronal circuits that involve these brain regions contribute to WM is still unclear. Here, in a large sample of healthy young adults, we first identified the core WM regions by linking WM accuracy to resting-state functional connectivity with the bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dLPFC; a principal region in the central-executive network, CEN). Then a spectral dynamic causal modeling (spDCM) analysis was performed to quantify the effective connectivity between these regions. Finally, the effective connectivity was correlated with WM accuracy to characterize the relationship between these connections and WM performance. We found that the functional connections between the bilateral dLPFC and the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and between the right dLPFC and the left orbital fronto-insular cortex (FIC) were correlated with WM accuracy. Furthermore, the effective connectivity from the dACC to the bilateral dLPFC and from the right dLPFC to the left FIC could predict individual differences in WM. Because the dACC and FIC are core regions of the salience network (SN), we inferred that the inter- and causal-connectivity between core regions within the CEN and SN is functionally relevant for WM performance. In summary, the current study identified the dLPFC-related resting-state effective connectivity underlying WM and suggests that individual differences in cognitive ability could be characterized by resting-state effective connectivity. PMID:26941629

  1. Testing necessary regional frontal contributions to value assessment and fixation-based updating.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Avinash R; Fellows, Lesley K

    2015-01-01

    Value-based decisions are biased by the time people spend viewing each option: Options fixated longer are chosen more often, even when previously rated as less appealing. This bias is thought to reflect 'value updating' as new evidence is accumulated. Prior work has shown that ventromedial prefrontal cortex (PFC) carries a fixation-dependent value comparison signal, while other studies implicate dorsomedial PFC in representing the value of alternative options. Here, we test whether these regions are necessary for fixation-related value updating in 33 people with frontal lobe damage and 27 healthy controls performing a simple choice task. We show that damage to dorsomedial PFC leads to an exaggerated influence of fixations on choice, while damage to ventromedial or lateral PFC has no effect on this bias. These findings suggest a critical role for dorsomedial, and not ventromedial PFC, in mediating the relative influence of current fixations and a priori value on choice. PMID:26658289

  2. Testing necessary regional frontal contributions to value assessment and fixation-based updating

    PubMed Central

    Vaidya, Avinash R.; Fellows, Lesley K.

    2015-01-01

    Value-based decisions are biased by the time people spend viewing each option: Options fixated longer are chosen more often, even when previously rated as less appealing. This bias is thought to reflect ‘value updating' as new evidence is accumulated. Prior work has shown that ventromedial prefrontal cortex (PFC) carries a fixation-dependent value comparison signal, while other studies implicate dorsomedial PFC in representing the value of alternative options. Here, we test whether these regions are necessary for fixation-related value updating in 33 people with frontal lobe damage and 27 healthy controls performing a simple choice task. We show that damage to dorsomedial PFC leads to an exaggerated influence of fixations on choice, while damage to ventromedial or lateral PFC has no effect on this bias. These findings suggest a critical role for dorsomedial, and not ventromedial PFC, in mediating the relative influence of current fixations and a priori value on choice. PMID:26658289

  3. Contribution of inorganic arsenic sources to population exposure risk on a regional scale.

    PubMed

    Chou, Wei-Chun; Chen, Jein-Wen; Liao, Chung-Min

    2016-07-01

    Chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs) in the human population is associated with various internal cancers and other adverse outcomes. The purpose of this study was to estimate a population-scale exposure risk attributable to iAs consumptions by linking a stochastic physiological-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model and biomonitoring data of iAs in urine. The urinary As concentrations were obtained from a total of 1,043 subjects living in an industrial area of Taiwan. The results showed that the study subjects had an iAs exposure risk of 27 % (the daily iAs intake for 27 % study subjects exceeded the WHO-recommended value, 2.1 μg iAs day(-1) kg(-1) body weight). Moreover, drinking water and cooked rice contributed to the iAs exposure risk by 10 and 41 %, respectively. The predicted risks in the current study were 4.82, 27.21, 34.69, and 64.17 %, respectively, among the mid-range of Mexico, Taiwan (this study), Korea, and Bangladesh reported in the literature. In conclusion, we developed a population-scale-based risk model that covered the broad range of iAS exposure by integrating stochastic PBPK modeling and reverse dosimetry to generate probabilistic distribution of As intake corresponding to urinary As measured from the cohort study. The model can also be updated as new urinary As information becomes available. PMID:27048329

  4. Frontier Science in the Polar Regions: Current Activities of the Polar Research Board

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, L. M.

    2011-12-01

    The National Academies (the umbrella term for the National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, Institute of Medicine, and National Research Council) is a private, nonprofit organization chartered by Congress in 1863. The Polar Research Board (PRB) is the focal point within the Academies for providing advice on issues related to the Arctic, Antarctic, and cold regions in general. Tasks within the PRB mission include: providing a forum for the polar science community to address research needs and policy issues; conducting studies and workshops on emerging scientific and policy issues in response to requests from federal agencies and others; providing program reviews, guidance, and assessments of priorities; and facilitating communication on polar issues among academia, industry, and government. The PRB also serves as the US National Committee to two international, nongovernmental polar science organizations: the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR) and the International Arctic Science Committee (IASC). The polar regions are experiencing rapid changes in environment and climate, and the PRB has a number of completed and ongoing studies that will enhance scientific understanding of these issues. This poster will illustrate current PRB activities as well as results from two recently released reports: Frontiers in Understanding Climate Change and Polar Ecosystems and Future Science Opportunities in Antarctica and the Southern Ocean. In the former, a set of frontier research questions are developed to help scientists understand the impacts of climate change on polar ecosystems. The report builds on existing knowledge of climate change impacts and highlights the next big topics to be addressed in the coming decades. In addition, a number of methods and technologies are identified that will be useful to advance future research in polar ecosystem science. In the latter, changes to important science conducted on Antarctica and the surrounding

  5. Teaching Science in Public Elementary Schools of the Plains, Rocky Mountain and Southeast Regions of the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Melvin Richard

    This research presents the science teaching practices for schools in the Plains, Rocky Mountain, and Southeast regions of the United States and the all-inclusive curricular events surrounding them, as they existed during the 1970-71 school year. Subproblems investigated were relationships between teacher characteristics and science teaching…

  6. The International Association of Hydrogeologists (IAH): reflecting on 60 years of contributions to groundwater science and water management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struckmeier, Willi; Howard, Ken; Chilton, John

    2016-08-01

    The 60th anniversary of the founding of the International Association of Hydrogeologists (IAH) is an important milestone that allows pause for reflection on how the association has evolved over the years and the contributions it has made to groundwater science and water management. IAH was founded in 1956 at the 20th International Geological Congress and developed rapidly during the 1980s and 1990s in response to a growing global interest in groundwater mapping and in sound approaches to resource protection and sustainable aquifer management. Incorporated in 2000, IAH has now secured its position as the world's leading international association specialising in groundwater with over 4,100 members in 131 countries. Much credit for this success must go to members, past and present, whose individual efforts and collaboration with sister institutions are documented here. These members have shaped the association's goals and contributed selflessly to its scientific programmes, publications and educational and charitable activities. Looking ahead to the next 60 years, it is essential that IAH does not rest on past achievements but listens and adjusts to the needs of members while continuing to pursue its mission of furthering the understanding, wise use and protection of groundwater resources throughout the world.

  7. Understanding the contribution of habitats and regional variation to long-term population trends in tricolored blackbirds

    PubMed Central

    Graves, Emily E; Holyoak, Marcel; Rodd Kelsey, T; Meese, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    Population trends represent a minimum amount of information required to assess the conservation status of a species. However, understanding and detecting trends can be complicated by variation among habitats and regions, and by dispersal connecting habitats through source-sink dynamics. We analyzed trends in breeding populations between habitats and regions to better understand the overall dynamics of a species' decline. Specifically, we analyzed historical trends in breeding populations of tricolored blackbirds (Agelaius tricolor) using breeding records from 1907 to 2009. The species breeds itinerantly and ephemerally uses multiple habitat types and breeding areas, which make interpretation of trends complex. We found overall abundance declines of 63% between 1935 and 1975. Since 1980 overall declines became nonsignificant and obscure despite large amounts of data from 1980 to 2009. Temporal trends differed between breeding habitat types and were associated with regional differences in population declines. A new habitat, triticale crops (a wheat-rye hybrid grain) produced colonies 40× larger, on average, than other breeding habitats, and contributed to a change in regional distribution since it primarily occurred in a single region. The mechanism for such an effect is not clear, but could represent the local availability of foodstuffs in the landscape rather than something specific to triticale crops. While variation in trends among habitats clearly occurred, they could not easily be ascribed to source-sink dynamics, ecological traps, habitat selection or other detailed ecological mechanisms. Nonetheless, such exchanges provide valuable information to guide management of dynamic systems. PMID:24101977

  8. Understanding the contribution of habitats and regional variation to long-term population trends in tricolored blackbirds.

    PubMed

    Graves, Emily E; Holyoak, Marcel; Rodd Kelsey, T; Meese, Robert J

    2013-09-01

    Population trends represent a minimum amount of information required to assess the conservation status of a species. However, understanding and detecting trends can be complicated by variation among habitats and regions, and by dispersal connecting habitats through source-sink dynamics. We analyzed trends in breeding populations between habitats and regions to better understand the overall dynamics of a species' decline. Specifically, we analyzed historical trends in breeding populations of tricolored blackbirds (Agelaius tricolor) using breeding records from 1907 to 2009. The species breeds itinerantly and ephemerally uses multiple habitat types and breeding areas, which make interpretation of trends complex. We found overall abundance declines of 63% between 1935 and 1975. Since 1980 overall declines became nonsignificant and obscure despite large amounts of data from 1980 to 2009. Temporal trends differed between breeding habitat types and were associated with regional differences in population declines. A new habitat, triticale crops (a wheat-rye hybrid grain) produced colonies 40× larger, on average, than other breeding habitats, and contributed to a change in regional distribution since it primarily occurred in a single region. The mechanism for such an effect is not clear, but could represent the local availability of foodstuffs in the landscape rather than something specific to triticale crops. While variation in trends among habitats clearly occurred, they could not easily be ascribed to source-sink dynamics, ecological traps, habitat selection or other detailed ecological mechanisms. Nonetheless, such exchanges provide valuable information to guide management of dynamic systems. PMID:24101977

  9. Conservation phylogeography: does historical diversity contribute to regional vulnerability in European tree frogs (Hyla arborea)?

    PubMed

    Dufresnes, Christophe; Wassef, Jérôme; Ghali, Karim; Brelsford, Alan; Stöck, Matthias; Lymberakis, Petros; Crnobrnja-Isailovic, Jelka; Perrin, Nicolas

    2013-11-01

    Documenting and preserving the genetic diversity of populations, which conditions their long-term survival, have become a major issue in conservation biology. The loss of diversity often documented in declining populations is usually assumed to result from human disturbances; however, historical biogeographic events, otherwise known to strongly impact diversity, are rarely considered in this context. We apply a multilocus phylogeographic study to investigate the late-Quaternary history of a tree frog (Hyla arborea) with declining populations in the northern and western part of its distribution range. Mitochondrial and nuclear polymorphisms reveal high genetic diversity in the Balkan Peninsula, with a spatial structure moulded by the last glaciations. While two of the main refugial lineages remained limited to the Balkans (Adriatic coast, southern Balkans), a third one expanded to recolonize Northern and Western Europe, loosing much of its diversity in the process. Our findings show that mobile and a priori homogeneous taxa may also display substructure within glacial refugia ('refugia within refugia') and emphasize the importance of the Balkans as a major European biodiversity centre. Moreover, the distribution of diversity roughly coincides with regional conservation situations, consistent with the idea that historically impoverished genetic diversity may interact with anthropogenic disturbances, and increase the vulnerability of populations. Phylogeographic models seem important to fully appreciate the risks of local declines and inform conservation strategies. PMID:24102652

  10. Salton Trough Post-seismic Afterslip, Viscoelastic Response, and Contribution to Regional Hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, J. W.; Donnellan, A.; Lyzenga, G. A.

    2012-12-01

    The El Mayor-Cucapah M7.2 April 4 2010 earthquake in Baja California may have affected accumulated hazard to Southern California cities due to loading of regional faults including the Elsinore, San Jacinto and southern San Andreas, faults which already have over a century of tectonic loading. We examine changes observed via multiple seismic and geodetic techniques, including micro seismicity and proposed seismicity-based indicators of hazard, high-quality fault models, the Plate Boundary Observatory GNSS array (with 174 stations showing post-seismic transients with greater than 1 mm amplitude), and interferometric radar maps from UAVSAR (aircraft) flights, showing a network of aseismic fault slip events at distances up to 60 km from the end of the surface rupture. Finite element modeling is used to compute the expected coseismic motions at GPS stations with general agreement, including coseismic uplift at sites ~200 km north of the rupture. Postseismic response is also compared, with GNSS and also with the CIG software "RELAX." An initial examination of hazard is made comparing micro seismicity-based metrics, fault models, and changes to coulomb stress on nearby faults using the finite element model. Comparison of seismicity with interferograms and historic earthquakes show aseismic slip occurs on fault segments that have had earthquakes in the last 70 years, while other segments show no slip at the surface but do show high triggered seismicity. UAVSAR-based estimates of fault slip can be incorporated into the finite element model to correct Coloumb stress change.

  11. Population Accessibility to Radiotherapy Services in New South Wales Region of Australia: a methodological contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Nagesh; Wickramasuriya, Rohan; Miller, Andrew; Perez, Pascal

    2015-05-01

    This paper proposes an integrated modelling process to assess the population accessibility to radiotherapy treatment services in future based on future cancer incidence and road network-based accessibility. Previous research efforts assessed travel distance/time barriers affecting access to cancer treatment services, as well as epidemiological studies that showed that cancer incidence rates vary with population demography. It is established that travel distances to treatment centres and demographic profiles of the accessible regions greatly influence the demand for cancer radiotherapy (RT) services. However, an integrated service planning approach that combines spatially-explicit cancer incidence projections, and the RT services accessibility based on patient road network have never been attempted. This research work presents this novel methodology for the accessibility assessment of RT services and demonstrates its viability by modelling New South Wales (NSW) cancer incidence rates for different age-sex groups based on observed cancer incidence trends; estimating the road network-based access to current NSW treatment centres; and, projecting the demand for RT services in New South Wales, Australia from year 2011 to 2026.

  12. ASAS Centennial Paper: contributions in the Journal of Animal Science to understanding cattle metabolic and digestive disorders.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, J T; Galyean, M L

    2008-07-01

    Acute and subacute ruminal acidosis, bloat, liver abscesses, and polioencephalomalacia (PEM) were reviewed with respect to contributions published in the Journal of Animal Science (JAS) regarding these metabolic and digestive disorders in beef cattle. Increased grain feeding and expansion of the feedlot industry in the 1960s led to considerable research on acidosis, and early publications defined ruminal changes with acute acidosis. The concept of subacute acidosis was developed in the 1970s. Significant research was published during the 1980s and 1990s on adaptation to high-grain diets, effects of ionophores, and the development of model systems to study ruminal and metabolic changes in acidosis. Since 2000, JAS publications on acidosis have largely focused on individual animal variability in response to acid loads and the role of management strategies in controlling acidosis. Increased grain feeding also was associated with an increase in the incidence of liver abscesses, which were quickly linked to insults to the ruminal epithelium associated with acidosis. The role of antibiotics, particularly tylosin, in decreasing the incidence and severity of liver abscesses was a significant contribution of JAS publications during the 1970s and 1980s. Papers on bloat were among the earliest published in JAS related to metabolic and digestive disorders in cattle. Noteworthy accomplishments in bloat research chronicled in JAS include the nature of ruminal contents in legume and feedlot bloat, the role of plant fractions and microbial populations in the development of bloat, and the efficacy of poloxalene, ionophores, and, more recently, condensed tannins in decreasing the incidence and severity of bloat. Although less research has been published on PEM in JAS, early publications highlighting the association between PEM and ruminal acidity and the role of thiaminase in certain forms of the disorder, as well as more recent publications related to the role of sulfur in the

  13. Autoimmunity contributes to nociceptive sensitization in a mouse model of complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Wu; Guo, Tian-Zhi; Shi, Xiaoyou; Czirr, Eva; Stan, Trisha; Sahbaie, Peyman; Wyss-Coray, Tony; Kingery, Wade S; Clark, J David

    2014-11-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a painful, disabling, chronic condition whose etiology remains poorly understood. The recent suggestion that immunological mechanisms may underlie CRPS provides an entirely novel framework in which to study the condition and consider new approaches to treatment. Using a murine fracture/cast model of CRPS, we studied the effects of B-cell depletion using anti-CD20 antibodies or by performing experiments in genetically B-cell-deficient (μMT) mice. We observed that mice treated with anti-CD20 developed attenuated vascular and nociceptive CRPS-like changes after tibial fracture and 3 weeks of cast immobilization. In mice with established CRPS-like changes, the depletion of CD-20+ cells slowly reversed nociceptive sensitization. Correspondingly, μMT mice, deficient in producing immunoglobulin M (IgM), failed to fully develop CRPS-like changes after fracture and casting. Depletion of CD20+ cells had no detectable effects on nociceptive sensitization in a model of postoperative incisional pain, however. Immunohistochemical experiments showed that CD20+ cells accumulate near the healing fracture but few such cells collect in skin or sciatic nerves. On the other hand, IgM-containing immune complexes were deposited in skin and sciatic nerve after fracture in wild-type, but not in μMT fracture/cast, mice. Additional experiments demonstrated that complement system activation and deposition of membrane attack complexes were partially blocked by anti-CD20+ treatment. Collectively, our results suggest that CD20-positive B cells produce antibodies that ultimately support the CRPS-like changes in the murine fracture/cast model. Therapies directed at reducing B-cell activity may be of use in treating patients with CRPS. PMID:25218828

  14. Autoimmunity contributes to nociceptive sensitization in a mouse model of complex regional pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wen-Wu; Guo, Tian-Zhi; Shi, Xiaoyou; Czirr, Eva; Stan, Trisha; Sahbaie, Peyman; Wyss-Coray, Tony; Kingery, Wade S.; Clark, J. David

    2014-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a painful, disabling, chronic condition whose etiology remains poorly understood. The recent suggestion that immunological mechanisms may underlie CRPS provides an entirely novel framework in which to study the condition and consider new approaches to treatment. Using a murine fracture/cast model of CRPS, we studied the effects of B-cell depletion using anti-CD20 antibodies or by performing experiments in genetically B-cell-deficient (µMT) mice. We observed that mice treated with anti-CD20 developed attenuated vascular and nociceptive CRPS-like changes after tibial fracture and 3 weeks of cast immobilization. In mice with established CRPS-like changes, the depletion of CD-20+ cells slowly reversed nociceptive sensitization. Correspondingly, µMT mice, deficient in producing immunoglobulin M (IgM), failed to fully develop CRPS-like changes after fracture and casting. Depletion of CD20+ cells had no detectable effects on nociceptive sensitization in a model of postoperative incisional pain, however. Immunohistochemical experiments showed that CD20+ cells accumulate near the healing fracture but few such cells collect in skin or sciatic nerves. On the other hand, IgM-containing immune complexes were deposited in skin and sciatic nerve after fracture in wild-type, but not in µMT fracture/cast, mice. Additional experiments demonstrated that complement system activation and deposition of membrane attack complexes were partially blocked by anti-CD20+ treatment. Collectively, our results suggest that CD20-positive B cells produce antibodies that ultimately support the CRPS-like changes in the murine fracture/cast model. Therapies directed at reducing B-cell activity may be of use in treating patients with CRPS. PMID:25218828

  15. The contribution of fronto-parietal regions to sentence comprehension: insights from the Moses illusion.

    PubMed

    Raposo, Ana; Marques, J Frederico

    2013-12-01

    To interpret a sentence, the reader must not only process the linguistic input, but many times has also to draw inferences about what is implicitly stated. In some cases, the generation and integration of inferred information may lead to semantic illusions. In these sentences, subjects fail to detect errors such as in "It was two animals of each kind that Moses took on the ark" despite knowing that the correct answer is Noah, not Moses. The relative inability to notice these errors raises questions about how people establish and integrate inferences and which conditions improve error detection. To unravel the neural processes underlying inference and error detection in language comprehension, we carried out an fMRI study in which participants read sentences containing true or false statements. The false statements either took the form of more obvious (i.e., clearly false) or subtle (i.e., semantic illusions) inconsistent relations. Participants had to decide if each statement was true or false. Processing semantic illusions relative to true and clearly false sentences significantly engaged the right inferior parietal lobule, suggesting higher demands in establishing coherence. Successful versus unsuccessful error detection revealed a network of regions, including right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, orbitofrontal, insula/putamen and anterior cingulate cortex. Such activation was significantly correlated with overall response accuracy to the illusions. These results suggest that to detect the semantic conflict, people must inhibit the tendency to draw pragmatic inferences. These findings demonstrate that fronto-parietal areas are involved in inference and inhibition processes necessary for establishing semantic coherence. PMID:23796543

  16. Snow Cover Contributes to Post-fire Vegetation Regeneration in Mediterranean Climate Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blauvelt, K. J.; Nolin, A. W.; Lintz, H. E.; Sproles, E. A.

    2012-12-01

    Predictions for the 21st century western United States climate include amplified fire regimes, earlier spring snowmelt and reduced snowpack. In the Pacific Northwest, burned area is projected to increase by as much as 300% by the end of this century. Continued declines in snowpack are also anticipated, especially at lower elevations. Previous research has established a link between declining snowpacks and wildfire. But what is the role of snow in the regeneration of vegetation after a fire? This investigation examines the relationship between post-fire vegetation and snowcover. We analyze the complex relationships between remotely sensed winter snow frequency and subsequent spring and summer vegetation biomass before and after large wildfires using a form of nonparametric multiplicative regression. We use snow cover and vegetation biomass data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). At each fire site, multiple physiographic predictor variables, (snow frequency, elevation, slope, aspect, vegetation type, and burn severity), are incorporated for the vegetation biomass response variable. For the Biscuit Fire (Klamath Mountains Ecoregion in SW Oregon), we see a negative correlation between winter snow frequency and subsequent spring EVI before the 2002 Biscuit Fire and a shift to a positive correlation after the fire during regeneration, while fires in other western ecoregions do not exhibit this shift. We also examine fire sites in the California Sierra Nevada and the Oregon Cascade Mountains. Snow cover frequency appears to be a valid predictor of post-fire biomass in climate regions where the summer dry period is relatively long. This research evaluates the relative importance of snowpack and other physiographic variables in post-fire vegetation regeneration across a latitudinal gradient of fire sites.

  17. Contributions of the Complementarity Determining Regions to the Thermal Stability of a Single-Domain Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Zabetakis, Dan; Anderson, George P.; Bayya, Nikhil; Goldman, Ellen R.

    2013-01-01

    Single domain antibodies (sdAbs) are the recombinantly-expressed variable domain from camelid (or shark) heavy chain only antibodies and provide rugged recognition elements. Many sdAbs possess excellent affinity and specificity; most refold and are able to bind antigen after thermal denaturation. The sdAb A3, specific for the toxin Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB), shows both sub-nanomolar affinity for its cognate antigen (0.14 nM) and an unusually high melting point of 85°C. Understanding the source of sdAb A3’s high melting temperature could provide a route for engineering improved melting temperatures into other sdAbs. The goal of this work was to determine how much of sdAb A3’s stability is derived from its complementarity determining regions (CDRs) versus its framework. Towards answering this question we constructed a series of CDR swap mutants in which the CDRs from unrelated sdAbs were integrated into A3’s framework and where A3’s CDRs were integrated into the framework of the other sdAbs. All three CDRs from A3 were moved to the frameworks of sdAb D1 (a ricin binder that melts at 50°C) and the anti-ricin sdAb C8 (melting point of 60°C). Similarly, the CDRs from sdAb D1 and sdAb C8 were moved to the sdAb A3 framework. In addition individual CDRs of sdAb A3 and sdAb D1 were swapped. Melting temperature and binding ability were assessed for each of the CDR-exchange mutants. This work showed that CDR2 plays a critical role in sdAb A3’s binding and stability. Overall, results from the CDR swaps indicate CDR interactions play a major role in the protein stability. PMID:24143255

  18. The Southern African Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI 2000): Overview of the Dry Season Field Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swap, R. J.; Annegarn, H. J.; Suttles, J. T.; Haywood, J.; Helmlinger, M. C.; Hely, C.; Hobbs, P. V.; Holben, B. N.; Ji, J.; King, M. D.

    2002-01-01

    The Southern African Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI 2000) is an international project investigating the earth atmosphere -human system in southern Africa. The programme was conducted over a two year period from March 1999 to March 2001. The dry season field campaign (August-September 2000) was the most intensive activity involved over 200 scientist from eighteen countries. The main objectives were to characterize and quantify biogenic, pyrogenic and anthropogenic aerosol and trace gas emissions and their transport and transformations in the atmosphere and to validate NASA's Earth Observing System's Satellite Terra within a scientific context. Five aircraft-- two South African Weather Service Aeorcommanders, the University of Washington's CV-880, the U.K. Meteorological Office's C-130, and NASA's ER-2 --with different altitude capabilities, participated in the campaign. Additional airborne sampling of southern African air masses, that had moved downwind of the subcontinent, was conducted by the CSIRO over Australia. Multiple Observations were made in various geographical sections under different synoptic conditions. Airborne missions were designed to optimize the value of synchronous over-flights of the Terra Satellite platform, above regional ground validation and science targets. Numerous smaller scale ground validation activities took place throughout the subcontinent during the campaign period.

  19. Regionally distinct cutaneous afferent populations contribute to reflex modulation evoked by stimulation of the tibial nerve during walking.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Shinya; Futatsubashi, Genki; Ohtsuska, Hiroyuki; Mezzarane, Rinaldo A; Barss, Trevor S; Klarner, Taryn; Zehr, E Paul; Komiyama, Tomoyoshi

    2016-07-01

    During walking, cutaneous reflexes in ankle flexor muscle [tibialis anterior (TA)] evoked by tibial nerve (TIB) stimulation are predominantly facilitatory at early swing phase but reverse to suppression at late swing phase. Although the TIB innervates a large portion of the skin of the foot sole, the extent to which specific foot-sole regions contribute to the reflex reversals during walking remains unclear. Therefore, we investigated regional cutaneous contributions from discrete portions of the foot sole on reflex reversal in TA following TIB stimulation during walking. Summation effects on reflex amplitudes, when applying combined stimulation from foot-sole regions with TIB, were examined. Middle latency responses (MLRs; 70-120 ms) after TIB stimulation were strongly facilitated during the late stance to mid-swing phases and reversed to suppression just before heel (HL) strike. Both forefoot-medial (f-M) and forefoot-lateral stimulation in the foot sole induced facilitation during stance-to-swing transition phases, but HL stimulation evoked suppression during the late stance to the end of swing phases. At the stance-to-swing transition, a summation of MLR amplitude occurred only for combined f-M&TIB stimulation. However, the same was not true for the combined HL&TIB stimulation. At the swing-to-stance transition, there was a suppressive reflex summation only for HL&TIB stimulation. In contrast, this summation was not observed for the f-M&TIB stimulation. Our results suggest that reflex reversals evoked by TIB stimulation arise from distinct reflex pathways to TA produced by separate afferent populations innervating specific regions of the foot sole. PMID:27075541

  20. Water deuteration in star-forming regions : Contribution of Herschel/HIFI spectroscopic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutens, Audrey

    2012-11-01

    HDO/H2O ratios as well as the D2O/HDO ratios determined in IRAS 16293-2422 enable to constrain the conditions of water formation in this kind of objects and in particular suggest that water would be formed before the gravitational collapse of the cloud. This study was then extended to other solar-type protostars NGC1333 IRAS4A and NGC1333 IRAS4B, for which I estimated the abundances of deuterated water and noticed that an extended absorbing layer also surrounds these sources. The high HDO/H2O ratios determined in IRAS 16293-2422 suggest that mechanisms are required between the Class 0 stage and the comets formation to decrease these isotopic ratios. It is however necessary to study a larger sample of protostars to know if this trend is observed in most of the sources. The HDO abundances obtained in NGC1333 IRAS4A and NGC1333 IRAS4B will consequently be useful to estimate their HDO/H2O ratios. Finally, I also studied deuterated water in protostellar objects more massive and more luminous than solar-type protostars and show here the case of the ultra-compact HII region G34.26+0.15.

  1. The Use of Atmospheric Science to Determine Optimal Air Quality Management Regions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauzerall, D. L.

    2002-05-01

    The Clean Air Act (CAA) has required that states meet the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) through the development of State Implementation Plans (SIPs). In the case of relatively long-lived pollutants such as tropospheric ozone and fine particulate matter it is often not possible for an individual state to attain compliance with the NAAQS simply by controlling its own emissions because of long-range transport of these pollutants and their precursors from outside the state. Recognizing this problem, the 1990 CAA amendments provided for the establishment of multi-state air quality management regions. One such region is the eleven northeastern states which form the Northeast Ozone Transport Region (OTR). These states have cooperated in the creation of a NOx emissions trading program among large stationary sources. However, cooperation has been problematic and numerous lawsuits have resulted. If federal authority existed to define non-attainment areas such that they included all sources which contributed to the violation, regardless of whether they were in different states, attainment of environmental goals would be facilitated. The use of atmospheric chemical tracer models in conjunction with measurements of ambient concentrations of pollutants could be used to determine the distribution of the sources that significantly contribute to the violation of the NAAQS in a given region and the spatial and temporal dependences of the air quality violations on the emission sources. With federal authority, a non-attainment region could then be defined and addressed in a scientifically coherent fashion rather than in a way determined by political jurisdictions. In this talk I will discuss how a national policy goal of determining appropriate scales for air quality control could catalyze additional scientific research including analysis of measurements of ambient pollutant concentrations, improvements in air quality models, and the development of chemical weather

  2. Altitude May Contribute to Regional Variation in Methamphetamine Use in the United States: A Population Database Study

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Douglas G; Kim, Namkug; Renshaw, Perry F

    2014-01-01

    Objective Methamphetamine (MA) use rates in the United States (US) have consistently demonstrated geographical variation and have been higher in the West and Midwest. This uneven pattern of use could be explained by regional differences in MA manufacturing and distribution, but may also result from differences in altitude. The hypobaric hypoxia found at high altitude alters neurotransmitter synthesis in the brain, which may contribute to MA use. The present study investigated the relationship between mean altitude and MA use rate in the 48 contiguous US states and the District of Columbia. Methods State-level estimates of past year MA use were extracted from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health report. The mean altitude of each state was calculated using the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission altitude data set. Results There was a significant positive correlation between mean state altitude and MA use rate (r=0.66, p<0.0001). Multivariate linear regression analysis showed that altitude remained a significant predictor for MA use rate (β=0.36, p=0.02), after adjusting for age, ethnicity, education, socioeconomic level, employment, MA laboratory incidents, subpopulations, and other substance use. Conclusion Altitude appears to a possible contributing factor for regional variation of MA use in the US. Further studies will be required to determine biological changes in neurotransmission resulting from chronic mild hypoxia at high altitude in MA users. PMID:25395974

  3. World Youth Polar conference" for sustainable developments in Polar Regions — an IPY contribution open for participation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatti, S.

    2006-12-01

    Drawing on our rich experience in cooperation with local schools we are offering an international role-play game for grade 11 or 12 students (age 16-18) focusing around the sustainable use of Polar Regions in times of global climate change. After regional, national and international runs of the game the activities will culminate during an international "World Youth Polar Conference" (WYPC) in fall 2007 in Germany. We offer the unique opportunity for researchers to actively contribute to a major outreach activity during IPY and participate in our role-play as national ambassadors. Currently opposing interests in Polar Regions are expressed by a number of interest groups and organizations. Among others there are indigenous people with a traditional use of Polar Regions facing growing activities from the energy industry, and increasing tourist activities. Additionally an extended use of i.e. the Arctic as a shorter shipping route may be possible, when ice-free periods extend. Also fishing and hunting activities in Polar Regions will change with a changing climate. For the role-play 3-4 students will represent one interest group. If the whole class joins the game, every interest group is represented by a student-team. A carefully balanced set of starting conditions gives room to several activities of the students. With the objective to develop a scenario for sustainable use of Polar Regions, students have to do research about the background of "their" own interests. Prior to talks resembling those for the Antarctic Treaty, students have to prepare thoroughly, to be ready for upcoming arguments of the other interest groups. Students and teachers will be supported by a network of scientists. Scientists will be ambassadors for their local/national run of the game, acting as a contact person. Teachers will be able to access relevant background information on the web. Test runs of the game will be performed in Germany to guarantee balanced starting conditions between all

  4. SEE-GRID eInfrastructure for Regional eScience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prnjat, Ognjen; Balaz, Antun; Vudragovic, Dusan; Liabotis, Ioannis; Sener, Cevat; Marovic, Branko; Kozlovszky, Miklos; Neagu, Gabriel

    -Infrastructure compatible with European developments, and empowering the scientists in the region in equal participation in the use of pan- European infrastructures, is materializing through the above initiatives. This model has a number of concrete operational and organizational guidelines which can be adapted to help e-Infrastructure developments in other world regions. In this paper we review the most important developments and contributions by the SEEGRID- SCI project.

  5. Assessment of the Contribution of BeiDou GEO, IGSO, and MEO Satellites to PPP in Asia-Pacific Region.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qile; Wang, Chen; Guo, Jing; Liu, Xianglin

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to the US Global Positioning System (GPS), the Russian Global Navigation Satellite System (GLONASS) and the European Galileo, the developing Chinese BeiDou satellite navigation system (BDS) consists of not only Medium Earth Orbit (MEO), but also Geostationary Orbit (GEO) as well as Inclined Geosynchronous Orbit (IGSO) satellites. In this study, the Precise Point Positioning (PPP) and PPP with Integer Ambiguity Resolution (IAR) are obtained. The contributions of these three different types of BDS satellites to PPP in Asia-Pacific region are assessed using data from selected 20 sites over more than four weeks. By using various PPP cases with different satellite combinations, in general, the largest contribution of BDS IGSO among the three kinds of BDS satellites to the reduction of convergence time and the improvement of positioning accuracy, particularly in the east direction, is identified. These PPP cases include static BDS only solutions and static/kinematic ambiguity-float and -fixed PPP with the combination of GPS and BDS. The statistical results demonstrate that the inclusion of BDS GEO and MEO satellites can improve the observation condition and result in better PPP performance as well. When combined with GPS, the contribution of BDS to the reduction of convergence time is, however, not as significant as that of GLONASS. As far as the positioning accuracy is concerned, GLONASS improves the accuracy in vertical component more than BDS does, whereas similar improvement in horizontal component can be achieved by inclusion of BDS IGSO and MEO as GLONASS. PMID:26633406

  6. Assessment of the Contribution of BeiDou GEO, IGSO, and MEO Satellites to PPP in Asia–Pacific Region

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qile; Wang, Chen; Guo, Jing; Liu, Xianglin

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to the US Global Positioning System (GPS), the Russian Global Navigation Satellite System (GLONASS) and the European Galileo, the developing Chinese BeiDou satellite navigation system (BDS) consists of not only Medium Earth Orbit (MEO), but also Geostationary Orbit (GEO) as well as Inclined Geosynchronous Orbit (IGSO) satellites. In this study, the Precise Point Positioning (PPP) and PPP with Integer Ambiguity Resolution (IAR) are obtained. The contributions of these three different types of BDS satellites to PPP in Asia–Pacific region are assessed using data from selected 20 sites over more than four weeks. By using various PPP cases with different satellite combinations, in general, the largest contribution of BDS IGSO among the three kinds of BDS satellites to the reduction of convergence time and the improvement of positioning accuracy, particularly in the east direction, is identified. These PPP cases include static BDS only solutions and static/kinematic ambiguity-float and -fixed PPP with the combination of GPS and BDS. The statistical results demonstrate that the inclusion of BDS GEO and MEO satellites can improve the observation condition and result in better PPP performance as well. When combined with GPS, the contribution of BDS to the reduction of convergence time is, however, not as significant as that of GLONASS. As far as the positioning accuracy is concerned, GLONASS improves the accuracy in vertical component more than BDS does, whereas similar improvement in horizontal component can be achieved by inclusion of BDS IGSO and MEO as GLONASS. PMID:26633406

  7. Using Local Climate Science to Educate "Key Influentials" and their Communities in the San Diego Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudrias, M. A.; Estrada, M.; Anders, S.; Silva-Send, N. J.; Yin, Z.; Schultz, P.; Young, E.

    2012-12-01

    The San Diego Regional Climate Education Partnership has formed an innovative and collaborative team whose mission is to implement a research-based climate science education and communications program to increase knowledge about climate science among highly-influential leaders and their communities and foster informed decision making based on climate science and impacts. The team includes climate scientists, behavioral psychologists, formal and informal educators and communication specialists. The Partnership's strategic plan has three major goals: (1) raise public understanding of the causes and consequences of climate change; (2) identify the most effective educational methods to educate non-traditional audiences (Key Influentials) about the causes and consequences of climate change; and (3) develop and implement a replicable model for regional climate change education. To implement this strategic plan, we have anchored our project on three major pillars: (1) Local climate science (causes, impacts and long-term consequences); (2) theoretical, research-based evaluation framework (TIMSI); and (3) Key! Influentials (KI) as primary audience for messages (working w! ith and through them). During CCEP-I, the Partnership formed and convened an advisory board of Key Influentials, completed interviews with a sample of Key Influentials, conducted a public opinion survey, developed a website (www.sandiego.edu/climate) , compiled inventories on literature of climate science education resources and climate change community groups and local activities, hosted stakeholder forums, and completed the first phase of on an experiment to test the effects of different messengers delivering the same local climate change message via video. Results of 38 KI Interviews provided evidence of local climate knowledge, strong concern about climate change, and deeply held values related to climate change education and regional leadership. The most intriguing result was that while 90% of Key

  8. Evaluation of the Appalachian Regional Commission Oak Ridge National Laboratory Summer Institute for Math/Science/Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simkin, Linda S.; Futch, Valerie

    2006-01-01

    This report describes some of the key immediate and long-term outcomes achieved by the Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC)-Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Summer Institute for Math/Science/Technology for student and teacher participants. This two-week summer program provides high school students and teachers from the Appalachian region the…

  9. In Our Opinion; Regional Hearing Before the National Commission on Libraries and Information Science, September 27, 1972, Chicago, Illinois.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trezza, Alphonse F., Comp.

    The State Library of Illinois presents the written testimony given at the regional hearings of the National Commission on Libraries and Information Science at Chicago, Illinois, September 27, 1972. Witnesses include librarians from academic, regional, public, special, state, school children's, and audiovisual libraries, as well as legislators,…

  10. Plasticity in the contribution of T cell receptor variable region residues to binding of peptide-HLA-A2 complexes

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sheena N.; Sommermeyer, Daniel; Piepenbrink, Kurt H.; Blevins, Sydney J.; Bernhard, Helga; Uckert, Wolfgang; Baker, Brian M.; Kranz, David M.

    2013-01-01

    One hypothesis to account for MHC-restriction by T cell receptors (TCRs) holds that there are several evolutionary-conserved residues in TCR variable regions that contact MHC. While this ‘germline-codon’ hypothesis is supported by various lines of evidence, it has been difficult to test. The difficulty stems in part from the fact that TCRs exhibit low affinities for pep/MHC, thus limiting the range of binding energies that can be assigned to these key interactions using mutational analyses. To measure the magnitude of binding energies involved, here we used high-affinity TCRs engineered by mutagenesis of CDR3. The TCRs included a high-affinity, MART-1/HLA-A2-specific single-chain TCR and two other high-affinity TCRs that all contain the same Vα (HLA-A2), with different peptides and Vβ regions. Mutational analysis of residues in CDR1 and CDR2 of the three Vα2 regions showed the importance of the key ‘germline codon” residue Y51. However, two other proposed key residues showed significant differences among the TCRs in their relative contributions to binding. Using single-position, yeast-display libraries in two of the key residues, MART-1/HLA-A2 selections also revealed strong preferences for wild-type ‘germline codon’ residues, but several alternative residues could also accommodate binding and hence, MHC-restriction. Thus, although a single residue (Y51) could account for a proportion of the energy associated with positive selection (i.e. MHC-restriction), there is significant plasticity in requirements for particular side-chains in CDR1 and CDR2 and in their relative binding contributions among different TCRs. PMID:23954306

  11. A Science Mission for QSAT Project: Study of FACs in the Polar and Equatorial Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Akiko; Ueno, Tamiki; Yumoto, Kiyohumi

    2009-04-01

    Kyushu University, Kyushu Institute of Technology and Fukuoka Institute of Technology are now designing, developing and building a micro-satellite called “QSAT”. The primary objective of QSAT is understanding the mechanism of spacecraft charging, which can be achieved with the onboard magnetometer, high-frequency probe (HP) and Langmuir probe (LP). The magnetometer measures the magnetic field variations caused by field-aligned currents (FACs) in the polar and equatorial regions. Polar FACs are well understood, while equatorial FACs are not. The science goals are as follows: (1) to better understand FACs in the polar region, (2) to compare the FACs observed in orbit with ground-based MAGDAS observations, (3) to investigate spatial distribution of FACs in the equatorial region. FACs play a crucial role in the coupling between solar wind, magnetosphere and ionosphere in terms of energy transfer. Also if we understand the relationship between the space and ground-based FACs data, then we can conduct long-term study on the solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling in the future by mainly using data from ground-based magnetometer arrays.

  12. Gray and white matter structures in the midcingulate cortex region contribute to body mass index in Chinese young adults.

    PubMed

    He, Qinghua; Chen, Chuansheng; Dong, Qi; Xue, Gui; Chen, Chunhui; Lu, Zhong-Lin; Bechara, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    Overweight and obesity are rapidly becoming a central public health challenge around the world. Previous studies have suggested that elevated Body Mass Index (BMI) might be associated with structural changes in both gray and white matter, but this association is still not well understood. The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between BMI and brain structure with a relatively large sample of young adults (N = 336) in a small age range (20 ± 1 years). Voxel-based morphometry results showed significant negative correlations between BMI and gray-matter volumes in the midcingulate cortex (MCC), left orbital frontal cortex, and left ventromedial prefrontal cortex. There was also a significant negative correlation between BMI and white matter integrity as indexed by fractional anisotropy in bilateral cingulum. Further tractography analysis showed a significant negative correlation between BMI and the number of fibers passing the MCC region. Regression analysis showed that gray matter and white matter in these regions both contributed to the variance of BMI. These results remained significant even when analysis was restricted to the subjects with normal weights. Finally, we found that decision-making ability (as assessed by the Iowa Gambling Task) mediated the association between the structure of the MCC (a region responsible for impulse control and decision making) and BMI. These results shed light on the structural neural basis of weight variations. PMID:24146133

  13. Gray and White Matter Structures in the Midcingulate Cortex Region Contribute to Body Mass Index in Chinese Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    He, Qinghua; Chen, Chuansheng; Dong, Qi; Xue, Gui; Chen, Chunhui; Lu, Zhong-Lin; Bechara, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    Overweight and obesity are rapidly becoming a central public health challenge around the world. Previous studies have suggested that elevated Body Mass Index (BMI) might be associated with structural changes in both gray and white matter, but this association is still not well understood. The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between BMI and brain structure with a relatively large sample of young adults (N = 336) in a small age range (20 ± 1 years). VBM results showed significant negative correlations between BMI and Gray Matter Volumes (GMV) in the MCC, left OFC, and left VMPFC. There was also a significant negative correlation between BMI and white matter integrity as indexed by fractional anisotropy (FA) in bilateral cingulum. Further tractography analysis showed a significant negative correlation between BMI and the number of fibers passing the MCC region. Regression analysis showed that gray matter and white matter in these regions both contributed to the variance of BMI. These results remained significant even when analysis was restricted to the subjects with normal-weights. Finally, we found that decision making ability (as assessed by the Iowa Gambling Task) mediated the association between the structure of the MCC (a region responsible for impulse control and decision making) and BMI. These results shed light on the structural neural basis of weight variations. PMID:24146133

  14. In-Situ U–Pb Dating of Apatite by Hiroshima-SHRIMP: Contributions to Earth and Planetary Science

    PubMed Central

    Terada, Kentaro; Sano, Yuji

    2012-01-01

    The Sensitive High Resolution Ion MicroProbe (SHRIMP) is the first ion microprobe dedicated to geological isotopic analyses, especially in-situ analyses related to the geochronology of zircon. Such a sophisticated ion probe, which can attain a high sensitivity at a high mass resolution, based on a double focusing high mass-resolution spectrometer, designed by Matsuda (1974), was constructed at the Australian National University. In 1996, such an instrument was installed at Hiroshima University and was the first SHRIMP to be installed in Japan. Since its installation, our focus has been on the in-situ U–Pb dating of the mineral apatite, as well as zircon, which is a more common U-bearing mineral. This provides the possibility for extending the use of in-situ U–Pb dating from determining the age of formation of volcanic, granitic, sedimentary and metamorphic minerals to the direct determination of the diagenetic age of fossils and/or the crystallization age of various meteorites, which can provide new insights into the thermal history on the Earth and/or the Solar System. In this paper, we review the methodology associated with in-situ apatite dating and our contribution to Earth and Planetary Science over the past 16 years. PMID:24349912

  15. An examination of key experiences which contribute to a positive change in attitude toward science in two elementary education teacher candidates at the University of Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cason, Maggie A.

    This investigation utilized life history methodology (Armstrong, 1987; Bogdan & Biklen, 1998; Lawrence-Lightfoot, 1977; Marshall & Rossman, 1995; Patton, 1987; Taylor & Bogdan; 1984) to examine lifelong science experiences of two elementary education teacher candidates at a land grant institution with a large, undergraduate teacher education program. Purposive sampling techniques (Bogdan & Biklen, 1998) led to the selection of two teacher candidates who reported high science anxiety when they began university coursework. The investigation focused on five broad questions: (a) What were key experiences in the elementary teacher education program which contributed to a positive change in attitude toward science? (b) What science experiences, in and out of school, did the teacher candidates encounter while they were in elementary school, junior high school, high school, and college? (c) How did the elementary education program's science course structure, professors, and field experiences contribute to the change in attitude toward science? (d) How much time was involved in the change in attitude toward science? and (e) What were the effects of the change in attitude on the teaching of science in the elementary classroom? Each candidate completed approximately twenty hours of interviews yielding rich descriptions of their lifelong science experiences. Data also included interviews with science and science education professors, journaling, and observations of student teaching experiences. Data analysis revealed four over-arching themes with implications for teacher educators. First, data showed the importance of relationship building between professors and teacher candidates. Professors must know and work with teacher candidates, and provide a structure that encourages question asking. Second, course structure including hands-on teaching strategies and students working in small groups over an extended period of time was vital. Third, integrating language arts with

  16. How much can disaster and climate science contribute to loss and damage mechanisms in international climate policy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huggel, Christian; Allen, Simon; Eicken, Hajo; Hansen, Gerrit; Stone, Dáithí

    2015-04-01

    proposals for mechanisms of financing suggested a role of causation and thus attribution of L&D to (anthropogenic) climate change. Yet, causation mechanisms are particularly delicate in terms of climate justice, development and implications of legal liabilities. Here, we outline potential contributions of science to L&D mechanisms in greater specificity, in particular for (i) threshold based mechanisms, and (ii) causation related mechanisms. We draw on recent concepts of L&D attribution suggesting a more comprehensive attribution framework based on risk concepts. We present a first-order proof-of-concept for the above mechanisms (i) and (ii), using case studies of recent disasters (both related to extreme events and gradual climate change) in the Indian Himalayas, Colombia, Alaska and Australia. We analyze whether science is in a position to substantially contribute to the different L&D policy proposals, including the question whether currently available data and datasets on climate and hazards, exposure and vulnerability are in line with such support, in particular with regards to developing country contexts. We conclude with a perspective on critical research and data needs to further strengthen L&D science and policy.

  17. Thermodynamic and dynamic contributions to future changes in regional precipitation variance: focus on the Southeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Laifang; Li, Wenhong

    2015-07-01

    The frequency and severity of extreme events are tightly associated with the variance of precipitation. As climate warms, the acceleration in hydrological cycle is likely to enhance the variance of precipitation across the globe. However, due to the lack of an effective analysis method, the mechanisms responsible for the changes of precipitation variance are poorly understood, especially on regional scales. Our study fills this gap by formulating a variance partition algorithm, which explicitly quantifies the contributions of atmospheric thermodynamics (specific humidity) and dynamics (wind) to the changes in regional-scale precipitation variance. Taking Southeastern (SE) United States (US) summer precipitation as an example, the algorithm is applied to the simulations of current and future climate by phase 5 of Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) models. The analysis suggests that compared to observations, most CMIP5 models (~60 %) tend to underestimate the summer precipitation variance over the SE US during the 1950-1999, primarily due to the errors in the modeled dynamic processes (i.e. large-scale circulation). Among the 18 CMIP5 models analyzed in this study, six of them reasonably simulate SE US summer precipitation variance in the twentieth century and the underlying physical processes; these models are thus applied for mechanistic study of future changes in SE US summer precipitation variance. In the future, the six models collectively project an intensification of SE US summer precipitation variance, resulting from the combined effects of atmospheric thermodynamics and dynamics. Between them, the latter plays a more important role. Specifically, thermodynamics results in more frequent and intensified wet summers, but does not contribute to the projected increase in the frequency and intensity of dry summers. In contrast, atmospheric dynamics explains the projected enhancement in both wet and dry summers, indicating its importance in understanding

  18. Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis. An overview of the Working Group 1 contribution to the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, S. K.; Plattner, G.; Nauels, A.; Xia, Y.; Qin, D.; Stocker, T. F.

    2013-12-01

    Climate change 2013: The Physical Science Basis, is the Working Group I (WGI) contribution to the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The WGI contribution extends from observations and paleoclimate information regarding past changes in the climate system, a comprehensive evaluation of climate models, the detection and attribution of observed changes to natural or anthropogenic forcing, through to projected future changes on both near-term and long-term time scales. Human influence on the climate system is now detected with increased certainty, both globally and in most regions. Since the mid-20th century, the increase in anthropogenic greenhouse gas concentrations has led to surface warming over almost the entire globe, while at the same time, the ocean has continued to warm and store energy. Satellite based observations reveal with improved precision that summer sea ice extent is declining rapidly in the Arctic, glaciers are retreating world-wide, and global mean sea level continues to rise. Concurrent with a continued increase in atmospheric CO2 concentrations, the oceanic uptake of CO2 has resulted in decreasing pH of seawater since the beginning of the industrial era. Projections of future changes in the climate system to the end of the 21st century are based on a series of new climate models and new scenarios, but are broadly consistent with previous assessment findings, confirming widespread and significant changes across the climate system. Greater warming is projected to occur over land than ocean, with the most rapid warming in the Arctic region. Based on modeled changes in seasonal mean precipitation, the contrast between wet and dry regions, and wet and dry seasons is projected to increase as global temperatures rise. Confidence in projections of global mean sea level rise has increased since the previous IPCC assessment report, and projections now include future rapid ice-sheet dynamical changes. On long time

  19. Saudi Arabia: A future regional hub for advanced education, research, science and technology.

    PubMed

    Meo, Sultan Ayoub

    2015-10-01

    Saudi Arabia is the largest country of the Arabian Peninsula, blessed with significant natural resources, including oil, gas and minerals. Saudi Arabia has recognised the importance of education in social and economic transformation, and has established a large number of universities, research and advanced technical institutes which have broken the metropolitan boundaries and have been extended to the far-flung areas of the country. There are 68 universities and degree-awarding institutes. The educational budget reached its highest-ever level of $56.56 billion for the year 2014. About 124,000 Saudi students are pursuing higher education in about 500 universities around the world. Saudi Arabia produced 177826 research papers in Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) database and in the year 2014 alone, 26168 research papers were published in indexed science journals with a rising h-index of 144. The country is turning into a regional hub for advanced education, research, science and technology while swiftly shifting from an oil-based to a knowledge-based economy. PMID:26440844

  20. Celebrating Jhumki Basu's Contributions to Science Education as a Scholar and an Activist: Voices from the Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milne, Catherine; Rubel, Laurie; Rodriguez, Alberto J.; Emdin, Christopher; Maulucci, Maria Rivera; Locke, Donyagay; Tan, Edna; Clairmont, Neil; Upadhyay, Bhaskar

    2009-01-01

    This metalogue addresses the ways Sreyashi Jhumki Basu mediated our practices in science education and life. We focus on Basu's uses of critical science agency, democratic science classrooms, and critical feminist ethnography to transform the possibilities for all participants in her research and educational practices. We also examine her use of…

  1. Homi Jehangir Bhabha: Remembering a Scientist and Celebrating His Contributions to Science, Technology, and Education in India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaidya, Sheila

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this paper is on the current developments in science education occurring in the posthumously built Homi Bhabha Centre for Science Education in Mumbai and to offer context for various indigenous developments that are shaping science education in India today. In this paper, I describe the story of Homi Bhabha and his rich legacy of…

  2. Science-specialist Student-teachers Consider Promoting Technological Design Projects: Contributions of Multi-media Case Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bencze, Larry; Hewitt, Jim; Pedretti, Erminia; Yoon, Susan; Perris, Kirk; van Oostveen, Roland

    2003-01-01

    Reports on science-specialist student teachers' conceptions about science and technology and corresponding priorities for school science. Students' conceptions were measured after interacting with a case documentary that depicted students collaborating in the development and evaluation of pneumatic-controlled robotic arms. Indicates that many…

  3. Regional Collaborations to Combat Climate Change: The Climate Science Centers as Strategies for Climate Adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morelli, T. L.; Palmer, R. N.

    2014-12-01

    The Department of Interior Northeast Climate Science Center (NE CSC) is part of a federal network of eight Climate Science Centers created to provide scientific information, tools, and techniques that managers and other parties interested in land, water, wildlife and cultural resources can use to anticipate, monitor, and adapt to climate change. The consortium approach taken by the CSCs allows the academic side of the Centers to gather expertise across departments, disciplines, and even institutions. This interdisciplinary approach is needed for successfully meeting regional needs for climate impact assessment, adaptive management, education, and stakeholder outreach. Partnership with the federal government facilitates interactions with the key on-the-ground stakeholders who are able to operationalize the results and conclusions of that research, monitor the progress of management actions, and provide feedback to refine future methodology and decisions as new information on climate impacts is discovered. For example, NE CSC researchers are analyzing the effect of climate change on the timing and volume of seasonal and annual streamflows and the concomitant effects on ecological and cultural resources; developing techniques to monitor tree range dynamics as affected by natural disturbances which can enable adaptation of projected climate impacts; studying the effects of changes in the frequency and magnitude of drought and stream temperature on brook trout habitats, spatial distribution and population persistence; and conducting assessments of northeastern regional climate projections and high-resolution downscaling. Project methods are being developed in collaboration with stakeholders and results are being shared broadly with federal, state, and other partners to implement and refine effective and adaptive management actions.

  4. The contribution of the GRAV-D airborne gravity to geoid determination in the Great Lakes region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaopeng; Crowley, John W.; Holmes, Simon A.; Wang, Yan-Ming

    2016-05-01

    The current official North American Vertical Datum of 1988 (NAVD 88) and the International Great Lakes Datum of 1985 (IGLD 85) will be replaced by a new geoid-based vertical datum in 2022. The Gravity for the Redefinition of the American Vertical Datum (GRAV-D) project collects high-quality airborne gravity data to improve the quality of the gravitational model that underpins the geoid model. This paper validates the contribution of GRAV-D data in the Great Lakes region. Using the lake surface height measured by satellite altimetry as an independent data set, Global Gravity Models (GGMs) with/without the GRAV-D data are compared. The comparisons show that the improvement reaches decimeters over Lake Michigan where the historic gravity data have significant errors. Over all lakes, except Lake Erie, the GRAV-D data improve the accuracy of the gravitational model to 1-3 cm.

  5. Source sector and region contributions to BC and PM2.5 in Central Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, S.; Sobhani, N.; Miller-Schulze, J. P.; Shafer, M. M.; Schauer, J. J.; Solomon, P. A.; Saide, P. E.; Spak, S. N.; Cheng, Y. F.; Denier van der Gon, H. A. C.; Lu, Z.; Streets, D. G.; Janssens-Maenhout, G.; Wiedinmyer, C.; Lantz, J.; Artamonova, M.; Chen, B.; Imashev, S.; Sverdlik, L.; Deminter, J. T.; Adhikary, B.; D'Allura, A.; Wei, C.; Carmichael, G. R.

    2015-02-18

    Particulate matter (PM) mass concentrations, seasonal cycles, source sector, and source region contributions in Central Asia (CA) are analyzed for the period April 2008–July 2009 using the Sulfur Transport and dEposition Model (STEM) chemical transport model and modeled meteorology from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Predicted aerosol optical depth (AOD) values (annual mean value ~0.2) in CA vary seasonally, with lowest values in the winter. Surface PM2.5 concentrations (annual mean value ~10 μg m-3) also exhibit a seasonal cycle, with peak values and largest variability in the spring/summer, and lowest values and variability in the winter (hourly values from 2 to 90 μg m-3). Surface concentrations of black carbon (BC) (mean value ~0.1 μg m-3) show peak values in the winter. The simulated values are compared to surface measurements of AOD as well as PM2.5, PM10, BC, and organic carbon (OC) mass concentrations at two regional sites in Kyrgyzstan (Lidar Station Teplokluchenka (LST) and Bishkek). The predicted values of AOD and PM mass concentrations and their seasonal cycles are fairly well captured. The carbonaceous aerosols are underpredicted in winter, and analysis suggests that the winter heating emissions are underestimated in the current inventory. Dust, from sources within and outside CA, is a significant component of the PM mass and drives the seasonal cycles of PM and AOD. On an annual basis, the power and industrial sectors are found to be the most important contributors to the anthropogenic portion of PM2.5. Residential combustion and transportation are shown to be the most important sectors for BC. Biomass burning within and outside the region also contributes to elevated PM and BC concentrations. The analysis of the transport pathways and the variations in particulate matter mass and composition in CA demonstrates that this region is strategically located

  6. A science plan for a comprehensive assessment of water supply in the region underlain by fractured rock in Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleming, Brandon J.; Hammond, Patrick A.; Stranko, Scott A.; Duigon, Mark T.; Kasraei, Saeid

    2012-01-01

    The fractured rock region of Maryland, which includes land areas north and west of the Interstate 95 corridor, is the source of water supply for approximately 4.4 million Marylanders, or approximately 76 percent of the State's population. Whereas hundreds of thousands of residents rely on wells (both domestic and community), millions rely on surface-water sources. In this region, land use, geology, topography, water withdrawals, impoundments, and other factors affect water-flow characteristics. The unconfined groundwater systems are closely interconnected with rivers and streams, and are affected by seasonal and climatic variations. During droughts, groundwater levels drop, thereby decreasing well yields, and in some cases, wells have gone dry. Low ground-water levels contribute to reduced streamflows, which in turn, can lead to reduced habitat for aquatic life. Increased demand, over-allocation, population growth, and climate change can affect the future sustainability of water supplies in the region of Maryland underlain by fractured rock. In response to recommendations of the 2008 Advisory Committee on the Management and Protection of the State's Water Resources report, the Maryland Department of the Environment's Water Supply Program, the Maryland Geological Survey, the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, Monitoring and Non-Tidal Assessment (MANTA) Division, and the U.S. Geological Survey have developed a science plan for a comprehensive assessment that will provide new scientific information, new data analysis, and new tools for the State to better manage water resources in the fractured rock region of Maryland. The science plan lays out five goals for the comprehensive assessment: (1) develop tools for the improved management and investigation of groundwater and surface-water resources; (2) characterize factors affecting reliable yields of individual groundwater and surface-water supplies; (3) investigate impacts on nearby water withdrawal users caused

  7. Solar Spectral Radiative Forcing During the Southern African Regional Science Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilewskie, P.; Pommier, J.; Bergstrom, R.; Gore, W.; Howard, S.; Rabbette, M.; Schmid, B.; Hobbs, P. V.; Tsay, S. C.

    2003-01-01

    During the dry season component of the Southern African Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI) in late winter 2000, the net solar spectral irradiance was measured at flight levels throughout biomass burning haze layers. From these measurements, the flux divergence, fractional absorption, instantaneous heating rate, and absorption efficiency were derived. Two cases are examined: on 24 August 2000 off the coast of Mozambique in the vicinity of Inhaca Island and on 6 September 2000 in a very thick continental haze layer over Mongu, Zambia. The measured absolute absorption was substantially higher for the case over Mongu where the measured midvisible optical depth exceeded unity. Instantaneous heating from aerosol absorption was 4 K d(sup -1) over Mongu, Zambia and 1.5 K d(sup -1) near Inhaca Island, Mozambique. However, the spectral absorption efficiency was nearly identical for both cases. Although the observations over Inhaca Island preceded the river of smoke from the southern African continent by nearly 2 weeks, the evidence here suggests a continental influence in the lower tropospheric aerosol far from source regions of burning.

  8. The Micronesia Challenge: Assessing the Relative Contribution of Stressors on Coral Reefs to Facilitate Science-to-Management Feedback.

    PubMed

    Houk, Peter; Camacho, Rodney; Johnson, Steven; McLean, Matthew; Maxin, Selino; Anson, Jorg; Joseph, Eugene; Nedlic, Osamu; Luckymis, Marston; Adams, Katrina; Hess, Don; Kabua, Emma; Yalon, Anthony; Buthung, Eva; Graham, Curtis; Leberer, Trina; Taylor, Brett; van Woesik, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Fishing and pollution are chronic stressors that can prolong recovery of coral reefs and contribute to ecosystem decline. While this premise is generally accepted, management interventions are complicated because the contributions from individual stressors are difficult to distinguish. The present study examined the extent to which fishing pressure and pollution predicted progress towards the Micronesia Challenge, an international conservation strategy initiated by the political leaders of 6 nations to conserve at least 30% of marine resources by 2020. The analyses were rooted in a defined measure of coral-reef-ecosystem condition, comprised of biological metrics that described functional processes on coral reefs. We report that only 42% of the major reef habitats exceeded the ecosystem-condition threshold established by the Micronesia Challenge. Fishing pressure acting alone on outer reefs, or in combination with pollution in some lagoons, best predicted both the decline and variance in ecosystem condition. High variances among ecosystem-condition scores reflected the large gaps between the best and worst reefs, and suggested that the current scores were unlikely to remain stable through time because of low redundancy. Accounting for the presence of marine protected area (MPA) networks in statistical models did little to improve the models' predictive capabilities, suggesting limited efficacy of MPAs when grouped together across the region. Yet, localized benefits of MPAs existed and are expected to increase over time. Sensitivity analyses suggested that (i) grazing by large herbivores, (ii) high functional diversity of herbivores, and (iii) high predator biomass were most sensitive to fishing pressure, and were required for high ecosystem-condition scores. Linking comprehensive fisheries management policies with these sensitive metrics, and targeting the management of pollution, will strengthen the Micronesia Challenge and preserve ecosystem services that coral

  9. The Micronesia Challenge: Assessing the Relative Contribution of Stressors on Coral Reefs to Facilitate Science-to-Management Feedback

    PubMed Central

    Houk, Peter; Camacho, Rodney; Johnson, Steven; McLean, Matthew; Maxin, Selino; Anson, Jorg; Joseph, Eugene; Nedlic, Osamu; Luckymis, Marston; Adams, Katrina; Hess, Don; Kabua, Emma; Yalon, Anthony; Buthung, Eva; Graham, Curtis; Leberer, Trina; Taylor, Brett; van Woesik, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Fishing and pollution are chronic stressors that can prolong recovery of coral reefs and contribute to ecosystem decline. While this premise is generally accepted, management interventions are complicated because the contributions from individual stressors are difficult to distinguish. The present study examined the extent to which fishing pressure and pollution predicted progress towards the Micronesia Challenge, an international conservation strategy initiated by the political leaders of 6 nations to conserve at least 30% of marine resources by 2020. The analyses were rooted in a defined measure of coral-reef-ecosystem condition, comprised of biological metrics that described functional processes on coral reefs. We report that only 42% of the major reef habitats exceeded the ecosystem-condition threshold established by the Micronesia Challenge. Fishing pressure acting alone on outer reefs, or in combination with pollution in some lagoons, best predicted both the decline and variance in ecosystem condition. High variances among ecosystem-condition scores reflected the large gaps between the best and worst reefs, and suggested that the current scores were unlikely to remain stable through time because of low redundancy. Accounting for the presence of marine protected area (MPA) networks in statistical models did little to improve the models’ predictive capabilities, suggesting limited efficacy of MPAs when grouped together across the region. Yet, localized benefits of MPAs existed and are expected to increase over time. Sensitivity analyses suggested that (i) grazing by large herbivores, (ii) high functional diversity of herbivores, and (iii) high predator biomass were most sensitive to fishing pressure, and were required for high ecosystem-condition scores. Linking comprehensive fisheries management policies with these sensitive metrics, and targeting the management of pollution, will strengthen the Micronesia Challenge and preserve ecosystem services that coral

  10. 14,000 Miles Between Us: Linking Polar Regions and Climate Change Science with Classrooms and Communities Around the World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roop, H. A.

    2011-12-01

    Understanding environmental change in the polar regions is a key research topic for thousands of scientists around the world. Despite the wealth of research and knowledge the scientific community has about these highly sensitive regions, this knowledge is rarely shared directly in classrooms or with the public. In order to increase awareness and engagement in polar science, the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) Divide Ice Core Project focused heavily on outreach and education during the 2009-2010 and 2010-2011 field campaigns. With the support of two National Science Foundation-funded outreach projects, including PolarTREC (Teachers and Researchers Exploring and Collaborating) and the Exploratorium's "Ice Stories", thousands of elementary- to college-aged students were direct participants in this Antarctic ice core science. WAIS Divide research was communicated using online journals, short video clips, live webinars from the field, and scientist visits to classrooms. Using the platform of ice core science, and linking the similarities between everyday life at home and in the field, allowed for the effective communication of the excitement and importance of polar science research. Examples of this educational content, classroom ideas, and creative field techniques will help demonstrate the utility of using exciting field science to increase engagement in science and research. Ultimately, by creatively using a model similar to that of the PolarTREC and Ice Stories programs, polar scientists can easily incorporate meaningful education and outreach into their field programs.

  11. Charged Residues at the First Transmembrane Region Contribute to the Voltage Dependence of the Slow Gate of Connexins.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Bernardo I; García, Isaac E; Pupo, Amaury; Retamal, Mauricio A; Martínez, Agustín D; Latorre, Ramón; González, Carlos

    2016-07-22

    Connexins (Cxs) are a family of membrane-spanning proteins that form gap junction channels and hemichannels. Connexin-based channels exhibit two distinct voltage-dependent gating mechanisms termed slow and fast gating. Residues located at the C terminus of the first transmembrane segment (TM-1) are important structural components of the slow gate. Here, we determined the role of the charged residues at the end of TM-1 in voltage sensing in Cx26, Cx46, and Cx50. Conductance/voltage curves obtained from tail currents together with kinetics analysis reveal that the fast and slow gates of Cx26 involves the movement of two and four charges across the electric field, respectively. Primary sequence alignment of different Cxs shows the presence of well conserved glutamate residues in the C terminus of TM-1; only Cx26 contains a lysine in that position (lysine 41). Neutralization of lysine 41 in Cx26 increases the voltage dependence of the slow gate. Swapping of lysine 41 with glutamate 42 maintains the voltage dependence. In Cx46, neutralization of negative charges or addition of a positive charge in the Cx26 equivalent region reduced the slow gate voltage dependence. In Cx50, the addition of a glutamate in the same region decreased the voltage dependence, and the neutralization of a negative charge increased it. These results indicate that the charges at the end of TM-1 are part of the slow gate voltage sensor in Cxs. The fact that Cx42, which has no charge in this region, still presents voltage-dependent slow gating suggests that charges still unidentified also contribute to the slow gate voltage sensitivity. PMID:27143357

  12. Contribution of large submarine landslide to tsunami potential in the NE Atlantic region: The Gorringe Bank case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramalho, Inês; Omira, Rachid; Baptista, Maria Ana; Miranda, Miguel; Terrinha, Pedro; Batista, Luis; Roque, Cristina

    2015-04-01

    ; iv) simulations of tsunami propagation and coastal impact; and v) analysis of the contribution of the submarine landslides to tsunami potential in the NE Atlantic. Results show that, using the VSW model for landslide motion, we obtain a good agreement between the sediment deposits simulated and observed. We also find that the submarine mass-failures can significantly contribute to the tsunami hazard in the NE Atlantic region, in particular when they are combined with an initial earthquake-induced tsunami. This work is supported by the FCT project CONDRIBER, Ref. PTDC/GEO-GEO/4430/2012 and ASTARTE - Assessment, Strategy And Risk Reduction for Tsunamis in Europe. Grant 603839, 7th FP (ENV.2013,6,4-3).

  13. Report on a Boston University Conference December 7-8, 2012 on "How Can the History and Philosophy of Science Contribute to Contemporary US Science Teaching?"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garik, Peter; Benétreau-Dupin, Yann

    2014-01-01

    This is an editorial report on the outcomes of an international conference sponsored by a grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) (REESE-1205273) to the School of Education at Boston University and the Center for Philosophy and History of Science at Boston University for a conference titled: "How Can the History and Philosophy of…

  14. Estimation of the contribution of exports to the provincial economy: an analysis based on China's multi-regional input-output tables.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sanmang; Li, Shantong; Lei, Yalin

    2016-01-01

    This paper developed an estimation model for the contribution of exports to a country's regional economy based on the Chenery-Moses model and conducted an empirical analysis using China's multi-regional input-output tables for 1997, 2002, and 2007. The results indicated that China's national exports make significantly different contributions to the provincial economy in various regions, with the greatest contribution being observed in the eastern region and the smallest in the central region. The provinces are also subjected to significantly different export spillover effects. The boosting effect for the eastern provinces is primarily generated from local exports, whereas the western provinces primarily benefit from the export spillover effect from the eastern provinces. The eastern provinces, such as Guangdong, Zhejiang, Jiangsu, and Shanghai, are the primary sources of export spillover effects, and Guangdong is the largest source of export spillover effects for almost all of the provinces in China. PMID:27006865

  15. Dielectric Constant of Titan's South Polar Region from Cassini Radio Science Bistatic Scattering Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marouf, E.; Rappaport, N.; French, R.; Simpson, R.; Kliore, A.; McGhee, C.; Schinder, P.; Anabtawi, A.

    2008-12-01

    Four out of six Radio Science bistatic scattering (bistatic-radar) observations of Titan's surface completed during the Cassini nominal mission yielded detectable quasi-specular 3.6 cm-λ (X-band) surface echoes, making Titan the most distant solar system object for which bistatic echoes have been successfully detected. Right circularly polarized sinusoidal signal was transmitted by Cassini and both the right and left circularly polarized (RCP and LCP) surface reflected components were observed at the 70-m stations of NASA Deep Space Network. Cassini was maneuvered continuously to track the region of Titan's surface where mirror-like (quasi-specular) reflected signals may be observed. The experiments were designed for incidence angles θ close to the Brewster, or polarization, angle of likely surface compositions. Careful measurement of the system noise temperature allowed determination of the absolute power in each polarized echo component and hence their ratio. The polarization ratio, the known observation geometry, and Fresnel reflection theory were then used to determine the dielectric constant ɛ. Three near-equatorial (~ 5 to 15° S) observations on flyby T14 inbound and outbound and on flyby T34 inbound yielded weak but clearly detectable echoes. The echoes were intermittent along the ground track, indicating mostly rough terrain occasionally interrupted by patches of relatively flat areas. For the two observations on T14, polarization ratio measurements for two localized but widely separated surface regions (~ 15° S, ~ 14 and 140° W) conducted at angles θ ~ 56° and 64°, close to the Brewster angle for ices, imply ɛ ~ 1.6 for both regions, suggesting liquid hydrocarbons although alternative interpretations are possible (Marouf et al., 2006 Fall AGU, P11A- 07). In sharp contrast, a single high latitude (~81-86° S, ~ 45-155° W) observation on T27 inbound yielded much stronger surface echoes that lasted for almost the full duration of the experiment

  16. Education Curricula of the Regional Centres for Space Science and Technology Education (affiliated to the United Nations)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haubold, H. J.

    Since 1988, the United Nations, through the Programme on Space Applications, is supporting the establishment and operation of regional Centres for Space Science and Technology Education in Africa, Asia and the Pacific, Latin America and the Caribbean, and Western Asia. Simultaneously, education curricula have been developed for remote sensing and geographic information system, satellite communications, satellite meteorology and global climate, and space and atmospheric science. The paper reviews briefly these developments and highlights the most recent updated education curricula in the four disciplines that are made available in 2002, in the six official languages of the United Nations, for implementation at the regional Centres and beyond.

  17. The lower Triassic microbiolites in Chaohu region, East China and their contribution to the early Triassic recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Zhihai; Zhang, Liwei; Hong, Tianqiu

    2010-05-01

    been found in the middle and upper Nanlinghu Formation. The macro fossil association of the lower Triassic in Chaohu region is quite different in different Formations. Ammonoids and bivalves can be found in the whole lower Triassic strata, and they are especially dominant in the Yinkeng Formation and lower Helongshan Formaiton, worms and borrowing animals can be found in the middle Helongshan Formation, fishes can be found in the uppermost Helongshan Formation and the lower Nanlinghu Formation, and the oldest ichthyosaurus in the world can be found in the upper Nanlinghu Formation. According to the changing characters of the fossil association in this area, it is indicated that the high-level ecosystem had been formed in this area in the late early Triassic, and the appearance of the microbiolites in the Helongshan Formation might be the milestone for the early Triassic recovery. Though the global recovery process after the Permian-Triassic mass extinction might be postponed to the end of the early Triassic, regional recovery process in Chaohu region might start at the end Smithian and actualized at the middle Spathian. The microbioilites might be the original impetus for the early Triassic recovery. Key words: microbiolites, early Triassic, regional recovery, Chaohu region Acknowledgments This work is supported by the grants from National Natural Science Fundation of China (No. 40902096 and No.J0830522) and the IGCP 572 program. * Corresponding author: zhihai.jia@gmail.com

  18. NOAA tools to support CSC and LCC regional climate science priorities in the western Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, D. P.; Marcy, D.; Robbins, K.; Shafer, M.; Stiller, H.

    2012-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is an active regional partner with the Department of Interior (DOI) in supplying and supporting the delivery of climate science and services. A primary mechanism for NOAA-DOI coordination at the regional scale is the Landscape Conservation Cooperative (LCC) network, which is supported in part by DOI Climate Science Centers (CSC). Together, the CSCs and LCCs provide a framework to identify landscape-scale science and services priorities for conservation and management. As a key partner of the CSCs and an active member of many LCCs, NOAA is working to ensure its own regional product and service delivery efforts will help address these conservation and management challenges. Two examples of NOAA's regional efforts are highlighted here, with a focus on the coastal and interior geographies of the western Gulf of Mexico where NOAA partners with the South Central CSC and participates as a member of the Gulf Coast Prairie LCC. Along the Texas coastline, a sea level rise and coastal flooding impacts viewer, produced by NOAA's Coastal Services Center and available via its Digital Coast interface, allows constituents to visualize estimates of sea level rise, measures of uncertainty, flood frequencies, and environmental (e.g., marsh migration) and socioeconomic (e.g., tidal flooding of built environments) impacts. In the interior of Texas and Louisiana, NOAA's Southern Regional Climate Center is leading a consortium of partners in the development of a unified source of regional water reservoir information, including current conditions, a historical database, and web-based visualization tools to illustrate spatio-temporal variations in water availability to a broad array of hydrological, agricultural, and other customers. These two examples of NOAA products can, in their existing forms, support regional conservation and management priorities for CSCs and LCCs by informing vulnerability assessments and adaptation

  19. The National Science Foundation's Coupling, Energetics and Dynamics of Atmospheric Regions (CEDAR) Student Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sox, L.; Duly, T.; Emery, B.

    2014-12-01

    The National Science Foundation sponsors Coupling, Energetics, and Dynamics of Atmospheric Regions (CEDAR) Workshops, which have been held every summer, for the past 29 years. CEDAR Workshops are on the order of a week long and at various locations with the goal of being close to university campuses where CEDAR type scientific research is done. Although there is no formal student group within the CEDAR community, the workshops are very student-focused. Roughly half the Workshop participants are students. There are two Student Representatives on the CEDAR Science Steering Committee (CSSC), the group of scientists who organize the CEDAR Workshops. Each Student Representative is nominated by his or her peers, chosen by the CSSC and then serves a two year term. Each year, one of the Student Representatives is responsible for organizing and moderating a day-long session targeted for students, made up of tutorial talks, which aim to prepare both undergraduate and graduate students for the topics that will be discussed in the main CEDAR Workshop. The theme of this session changes every year. Past themes have included: upper atmospheric instrumentation, numerical modeling, atmospheric waves and tides, magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling, equatorial aeronomy and many others. Frequently, the Student Workshop has ended with a panel of post-docs, researchers and professors who discuss pressing questions from the students about the next steps they will take in their careers. As the present and past CSSC Student Representatives, we will recount a brief history of the CEDAR Workshops, our experiences serving on the CSSC and organizing the Student Workshop, a summary of the feedback we collected about the Student Workshops and what it's like to be student in the CEDAR community.

  20. A Bilateral U.S. - Russia Contribution to Disaster Risk Reduction in the Asia-Pacific Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichelberger, J. C.; Gordeev, E.; Bratton, J.; Ismail-Zadeh, A.

    2012-12-01

    collaboration in dealing with the geohazards of the Russian Far East - Alaska region. Subduction within this segment of the Pacific Rim has produced 50% of the top 30 earthquakes recorded instrumentally worldwide, numerous Pacific-crossing tsunamis, and the largest ash eruption in almost 200 years. Recognizing that Russia and the United States need to develop a whole-region perspective of disaster risk, scientists and program managers from several Russian and U.S. government agencies met at the Russian Academy of Sciences in Moscow in July to identify bilateral steps that would improve safety for communities of the Kuril-Kamchatka-Aleutian-Alaska region. Significantly, the meeting included disaster preparation and response agencies EMERCOM and FEMA. Participants proposed development of a standing committee to advocate and facilitate bilateral collaboration, expanded exchange of real-time monitoring data, development of a strategy for monitoring currently unmonitored sections of plate and micro-plate boundaries, and holding of an inclusive, all-stakeholders meeting in the U.S. next year.

  1. An integrated system for the determination of the local, regional and long-transport contributions to Particulate Matter concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amodio, M.; Andriani, E.; Daresta, B. E.; de Gennaro, G.; di Gilio, A.; Ielpo, P.,; Placentino, C. M.; Trizio, L.; Tutino, M.

    2010-05-01

    Several epidemiological studies have shown the negative effects of air pollution on human health, which range from respiratory and cardiovascular disease to neurotoxic effects, and cancer. Most recent investigations have been focused on health toxicological features of Particulate Matter (PM) and its interactions with other pollutants: it was found that fine particles (PM2.5) could be an effective media to transport these pollutants deeply into the lung and to cause many kind of reactions which include oxidative stress, local pulmonary and systemic inflammatory responses (Künzli and Perez, 2009). Based on these implications on public health, many countries have developed plans to suggest effective control strategies which involve the identification of Particulate Matter sources, the quantitative estimation of the emission rates of the pollutants, the understanding of PM transport, mixing and transformation processes and the identification of main factors influencing PM concentrations. In this field, receptor models can be useful tools to estimate sources contributions to PM collected in an area under investigations. Different approaches to receptor model analysis can be distinguished on basis of whether chemical characteristics of emission sources are required to be known before the source apportionment. The multivariate approach could be preferred when a lack of information concerning sources profiles occurred (Hopke, 2003). In this work, the results obtained by applying an integrated approach in the monitoring of PM using several typologies of instrumentations will be shown. A prototype for the determination of the contributions of a single source (‘fugitive emission') on the fine PM concentrations has been developed: it consists of a Swam dual-channel sampler, an OPC Monitor, a sonic anemometer and a PBL Mixing monitor. The investigated site chosen for the application of prototype will be the iron and steel pole of Taranto (Apulia Region, South of Italy

  2. Oxidation of the cysteine-rich regions of parkin perturbs its E3 ligase activity and contributes to protein aggregation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Accumulation of aberrant proteins to form Lewy bodies (LBs) is a hallmark of Parkinson's disease (PD). Ubiquitination-mediated degradation of aberrant, misfolded proteins is critical for maintaining normal cell function. Emerging evidence suggests that oxidative/nitrosative stress compromises the precisely-regulated network of ubiquitination in PD, particularly affecting parkin E3 ligase activity, and contributes to the accumulation of toxic proteins and neuronal cell death. Results To gain insight into the mechanism whereby cell stress alters parkin-mediated ubiquitination and LB formation, we investigated the effect of oxidative stress. We found significant increases in oxidation (sulfonation) and subsequent aggregation of parkin in SH-SY5Y cells exposed to the mitochondrial complex I inhibitor 1-methyl-4-phenlypyridinium (MPP+), representing an in vitro cell-based PD model. Exposure of these cells to direct oxidation via pathological doses of H2O2 induced a vicious cycle of increased followed by decreased parkin E3 ligase activity, similar to that previously reported following S-nitrosylation of parkin. Pre-incubation with catalase attenuated H2O2 accumulation, parkin sulfonation, and parkin aggregation. Mass spectrometry (MS) analysis revealed that H2O2 reacted with specific cysteine residues of parkin, resulting in sulfination/sulfonation in regions of the protein similar to those affected by parkin mutations in hereditary forms of PD. Immunohistochemistry or gel electrophoresis revealed an increase in aggregated parkin in rats and primates exposed to mitochondrial complex I inhibitors, as well as in postmortem human brain from patients with PD with LBs. Conclusion These findings show that oxidative stress alters parkin E3 ligase activity, leading to dysfunction of the ubiquitin-proteasome system and potentially contributing to LB formation. PMID:21595948

  3. Conserved Region 3 of Human Papillomavirus 16 E7 Contributes to Deregulation of the Retinoblastoma Tumor Suppressor

    PubMed Central

    Todorovic, Biljana; Hung, Katherine; Massimi, Paola; Avvakumov, Nikita; Dick, Frederick A.; Shaw, Gary S.; Banks, Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) E7 oncoprotein binds cellular factors, preventing or retargeting their function and thereby making the infected cell conducive for viral replication. A key target of E7 is the product of the retinoblastoma susceptibility locus (pRb). This interaction results in the release of E2F transcription factors and drives the host cell into the S phase of the cell cycle. E7 binds pRb via a high-affinity binding site in conserved region 2 (CR2) and also targets a portion of cellular pRb for degradation via the proteasome. Evidence suggests that a secondary binding site exists in CR3, and that this interaction influences pRb deregulation. Additionally, evidence suggests that CR3 also participates in the degradation of pRb. We have systematically analyzed the molecular mechanisms by which CR3 contributes to deregulation of the pRb pathway by utilizing a comprehensive series of mutations in residues predicted to be exposed on the surface of HPV16 E7 CR3. Despite differences in the ability to interact with cullin 2, all CR3 mutants degrade pRb comparably to wild-type E7. We identified two specific patches of residues on the surface of CR3 that contribute to pRb binding independently of the high-affinity CR2 binding site. Mutants within CR3 that affect pRb binding are less effective than the wild-type E7 in overcoming pRb-induced cell cycle arrest. This demonstrates that the interaction between HPV16 E7 CR3 and pRb is functionally important for alteration of the cell cycle. PMID:23015707

  4. Science-specialist Student-teachers Consider Promoting Technological Design Projects: Contributions of Multi-media Case Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bencze, Larry; Hewitt, Jim; Pedretti, Erminia; Yoon, Susan; Perris, Kirk; van Oostveen, Roland

    2003-04-01

    In school science, students often experience simplistic representations of knowledge-building practices in science and technology - which, in reality, are complex, unpredictable and theory-limited. While there are a great variety of reasons (many of which are beyond teachers' direct control), this occurs partly because teachers of science generally have not had such realistic experiences. While student-teachers can develop this kind of meta-scientific literacy in university-based science teacher education programmes, this depends on the extent to which activities are legitimised through close associations with authentic school contexts. In this paper, we report effects on science-specialist student-teachers' conceptions about science and technology, and corresponding priorities for school science, after interacting with a case documentary that depicted students collaborating in development and evaluation of pneumatic-controlled robotic arms. Data, including video footage of student-teachers' interactions with cases and audio recordings of interviews with them and their teacher, indicated that many student-teachers developed more naturalistic perspectives on knowledge development in science and technology and corresponding pedagogical priorities. At the same time, most also recommended an apprenticeship for students, gradually moving them from unrealistic (e.g., following a linear model for technological design) to more realistic (e.g., accommodating flexibility in design, while pointing out such limits to creativity as techno-determinism) problem solving contexts.

  5. Professional Development of Science Teachers: History of Reform and Contributions of the STS-Based Iowa Chautauqua Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dass, Pradeep M.; Yager, Robert E.

    2009-01-01

    During the last quarter of a century, it became abundantly clear that the desired reforms in science teaching and learning could not be accomplished without significant professional development of in-service science teachers. Yet, there was a dearth of effective professional development models that could lead to the kind of instructional reforms…

  6. Developing a Rural and Regional Science Challenge to Utilise Community and Industry-Based Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blake, Damian; Campbell, Coral

    2009-01-01

    Interest and participation in science in schools has been declining for many years and there is a genuine need to rejuvenate interest in science at the high school level. One possible solution is the completion of challenging science projects which fulfill an authentic purpose in the community. This paper discusses the results of ongoing research…

  7. Can the History of Science Contribute to Modelling in Physics Teaching? - The Case of Galilean Studies and Mario Bunge's Epistemology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, Juliana; Braga, Marco Antônio Barbosa

    2016-07-01

    A characterization of the modelling process in science is proposed for science education, based on Mario Bunge's ideas about the construction of models in science. Galileo's Dialogues are analysed as a potentially fruitful starting point to implement strategies aimed at modelling in the classroom in the light of that proposal. It is argued that a modelling process for science education can be conceived as the evolution from phenomenological approaches towards more representational ones, emphasizing the role of abstraction and idealization in model construction. The shift of reference of theories—from sensible objects to conceptual objects—and the black-box models construction process, which are both explicitly presented features in Galileo's Dialogues, are indicated as highly relevant aspects for modelling in science education.

  8. Predictions of U.K. regulated power station contributions to regional air pollution and deposition: a model comparison exercise.

    PubMed

    Chemel, Charles; Sokhi, Ranjeet S; Dore, Anthony J; Sutton, Paul; Vincent, Keith J; Griffiths, Stephen J; Hayman, Garry D; Wright, Raymond D; Baggaley, Matthew; Hallsworth, Stephen; Prain, H Douglas; Fisher, Bernard E A

    2011-11-01

    Contributions of the emissions from a U.K. regulated fossil-fuel power station to regional air pollution and deposition are estimated using four air quality modeling systems for the year 2003. The modeling systems vary in complexity and emphasis in the way they treat atmospheric and chemical processes, and include the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system in its versions 4.6 and 4.7, a nested modeling system that combines long- and short-range impacts (referred to as TRACK-ADMS [Trajectory Model with Atmospheric Chemical Kinetics-Atmospheric Dispersion Modelling System]), and the Fine Resolution Atmospheric Multi-pollutant Exchange (FRAME) model. An evaluation of the baseline calculations against U.K. monitoring network data is performed. The CMAQ modeling system version 4.6 data set is selected as the reference data set for the model footprint comparison. The annual mean air concentration and total deposition footprints are summarized for each modeling system. The footprints of the power station emissions can account for a significant fraction of the local impacts for some species (e.g., more than 50% for SO2 air concentration and non-sea-salt sulfur deposition close to the source) for 2003. The spatial correlation and the coefficient of variation of the root mean square error (CVRMSE) are calculated between each model footprint and that calculated by the CMAQ modeling system version 4.6. The correlation coefficient quantifies model agreement in terms of spatial patterns, and the CVRMSE measures the magnitude of the difference between model footprints. Possible reasons for the differences between model results are discussed. Finally, implications and recommendations for the regulatory assessment of the impact of major industrial sources using regional air quality modeling systems are discussed in the light of results from this case study. PMID:22168107

  9. The contribution of sub-grid, plume-scale nucleation to global and regional aerosol and CCN concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, R.; Pierce, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    New-particle formation in the plumes of coal-fired power plants and other anthropogenic sulphur sources may be an important source of particles in the atmosphere. It has been unclear, however, how best to reproduce this formation in global and regional aerosol models with grid-box lengths that are 10s of kilometres and larger. The predictive power of these models is thus limited by the resultant uncertainties in aerosol size distributions. Based on the results of the System for Atmospheric Modelling (SAM), a Large-Eddy Simulation/Cloud-Resolving Model (LES/CRM) with online TwO Moment Aerosol Sectional (TOMAS) microphysics, we develop the Predicting Particles Produced in Power-Plant Plumes (P6) parameterization: a computationally-efficient, but physically-based, parameterization that predicts the characteristics of aerosol formed within sulphur-rich plumes based on parameters commonly available in global- and regional-scale models. Given large-scale mean meteorological parameters, emissions from the source, the desired distance from the source, and the mean background SO2, NOx, and condensation sink, the parameterization will predict the fraction of the emitted SO2 that is oxidized to H2SO4, the fraction of that H2SO4 that forms new particles instead of condensing onto preexisting particles, the median diameter of the newly-formed particles, and the number of newly-formed particles per kilogram SO2 emitted. We implement the P6 parameterization in the GEOS-Chem global chemical-transport model in order to evaluate the contributions of coal-fired power plants globally to particle number and CCN concentrations.

  10. The early evolution of southwestern Pennsylvania's regional math/science collaborative from the leadership perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunt, Nancy R.

    Designed as a regional approach to the coordination of efforts and focusing of resources in fragmented southwestern Pennsylvania, the Collaborative's story is narrated by its founding director. Drawing from office archives, including letters of invitation, meeting notes, and participant evaluations of each event, the study describes the genesis of the Collaborative. It begins with identification of the problem and the resulting charge by a founding congress. It details the building of an organizational framework, the creation of a shared vision, the development of a blueprint for action, and the decision-making involved in determining how to strengthen mathematics and science education in the region. The study notes several influences on the Collaborative's leadership. Considering the role of other collaboratives, the study notes that knowledge of the Los Angeles Educational Partnership's LA SMART jump-started the Collaborative's initial planning process. Knowledge of San Francisco's SEABA influenced the size and naming of the Collaborative's Journal. Fred Newmann's definition of authentic instruction, learning and assessment are reflected in the shared vision and belief statements of the Collaborative. The five disciplines of Peter Senge influenced the nature of the organizational framework as well as the day-to-day operations of the Collaborative. The study also notes that the five organizational tensions identified in Ann Lieberman's work on "intentional learning communities" were present in every aspect of the evolution of the Collaborative. The study suggests that leaders of evolving collaboratives: (1) engage all relevant stakeholders in assessing the current situation and defining a desired future state, (2) take advantage of the lessons learned by others and the resources available at the state and national levels to design strategies and build action plans, (3) model the practices to be inspired in the learning community, (4) constantly gather feedback on

  11. Analyse des attitudes envers les sciences chez des eleves du secondaire d'origine haitienne de milieux defavorises de la region de Montreal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fils-Aime, Nestor

    Having in perspective the slight representativeness of students, from Haitian background, from the most unprivileged sections of the great region of Montreal in the scientific fields in High School and in the choices of career, this study intends to examine the effect of the individual characteristics as well as the associated factors related to the familial, scholastic, socio-economic, and cultural environment upon the attitudes of those students toward sciences. The analysis of the datum is based on the results of a questionnaire focusing on the socio-demographic profile of a group of students from fourth and fifth year attending two multiethnic High Schools of the North-Crown of Montreal as well as on the interviews with fifteen of those students who are from a haitian background. There were also interviews with some parents, a member of a community organism, some staff members of some schools as well as some Haitian-Quebecer professionals and scientists, in order to have a critical viewpoint upon the different positions expressed by the fifteen students. The Bronfenbrenner's ecosystemic model (1979, 1986) has been used as scope of reference allowing to draw the prominent aspects from the attitudes toward science in the students, from haitian background. The synthesis of ideas expressed by different interviewee reveals the existence of a environment not much enhancing the value of sciences around of students, from Haitian background. The socio-economic conditions, the familial practices, the ethnocultural status as well as some individual representations of sciences contribute to create and maintain some attitudes very little committed to sciences in those students. The study shows how much it is urgent to demystify the sciences by breaking with some stereotypes that prevent some categories of students from acceding to sciences. It also commands to politicians, concerning education, to be more open to ethnocultural differences and to explore some dynamic ways in

  12. U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Western Region: Seabirds Coastal and Ocean Science

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kinsinger, Anne E.

    2009-01-01

    From the cold, high Arctic area of Alaska to the warm, tropical Pacific area of Hawai'i, a diverse array of seabird species numbering in the millions of individuals live off the bounty of the Pacific Ocean. Many come to land only to nest and raise their young - these are species supremely adapted for life on the water, whether it be near the coast or hundreds of miles at sea. Those seabirds that reside in the North Pacific year-round are joined each summer by millions of migrant birds that leave the southern hemisphere in winter for better feeding conditions in the north. Seabirds in the Pacific remain one of the great wildlife spectacles on the earth. Yet, seabirds face a number of threats such as oil spills, introduction of predators to their nesting islands, and conflicts with fisheries. State and Federal agencies require increasingly sophisticated information on population dynamics, breeding biology, and feeding ecology to successfully manage these species and their ecosystems. Within the Western Region of the USGS, scientists from the Alaska Science Center (ASC), Western Ecological Research Center (WERC), and Pacific Islands Ecosystems Research Center are leading the way in conducting research on many of these little known species. Their aim is to improve our understanding of seabirds in the Pacific and to provide information to support informed management of the birds and their ecosystems.

  13. Functional multilayer coated long period grating tuned in transition region for life science applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilla, P.; Malachovská, V.; Borriello, A.; Giordano, M.; Ambrosio, L.; Cutolo, A.; Cusano, A.

    2010-09-01

    We report preliminary results on the development of multilayer coated long period gratings (LPGs) for life science applications. The dip-coating technique and a solvent/nonsolvent strategy were exploited to deposit double-layer polymeric film onto a LPG. A primary coating of atactic polystyrene was used as high refractive index layer to tune the working point of the device in the so-called transition region thus achieving remarkable surrounding medium refractive index sensitivity. A secondary layer of atactic poly(methyl methacrylate-co-methacrylic acid) containing functional carboxyl groups, characterized by a lower refractive index, was deposited onto the primary coating in order to have the desired functional groups on the surface of the device. Commonly used covalent immobilization procedure, NHS/EDC coupling method, was exploited to link streptavidin on the surface of the functionalized coated device. Finally, real-time detection of biotinylated bovine serum albumin affinity binding on immobilized streptavidin was performed by monitoring the shift of the LPG attenuation bands.

  14. A Site-Related Suitability Analysis for the Production of Biomass as a Contribution to Sustainable Regional Land-Use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förster, Michael; Helms, Yvonne; Herberg, Alfred; Köppen, Antje; Kunzmann, Kathrin; Radtke, Dörte; Ross, Lutz; Itzerott, Sibylle

    2008-04-01

    The use of renewable energy in Europe offers the possibility of reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and contributes to energy security and independence. With the reform of the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) and a variety of recently introduced national directives supporting renewable energy sources in the European Union, the economic attractiveness of bioenergy production has distinctly increased. This article combines an economic evaluation of biomass production with site-related natural conditions of the Havelland region, situated in the north-east area of Germany. Two methods for evaluating site-specific potential biomass yields were compared. For three example biomass crops, evaluations of yield estimations at agricultural lots for site-optimized suitability (SOS) and conventional suitability (CS) were carried out. Both modelling approaches were compared. The results of the GIS modelling indicate that the financial support for increasing the use of renewable energy with the German feed-in system, called Erneuerbare-Energien-Gesetz (EEG), will possibly lead to an increased cultivation of crops with high biomass output. This monocultural orientation of farming practices and the negative effects on the ecosystem could act in opposition to other environmental initiatives of the EU. The outputs of the SOS analysis show that high biomass production could be integrated into environmental policy proposals. Therefore, new EU policy should take modified subsidies into consideration in order to avoid developing conflicts between small-scale changes in landscape ecosystems caused by large-scale transformations in energy policy.

  15. Contribution of the C-Terminal Region of a Group II Chaperonin to its Interaction with Prefoldin and Substrate Transfer.

    PubMed

    Zako, Tamotsu; Sahlan, Muhamad; Fujii, Sayaka; Yamamoto, Yohei Y; Tai, Phan The; Sakai, Kotaro; Maeda, Mizuo; Yohda, Masafumi

    2016-06-01

    Prefoldin is a molecular chaperone that captures an unfolded protein substrate and transfers it to a group II chaperonin. Previous studies have shown that the interaction sites for prefoldin are located in the helical protrusions of group II chaperonins. However, it does not exclude the possibility of the existence of other interaction sites. In this study, we constructed C-terminal truncation mutants of a group II chaperonin and examined the effects of these mutations on the chaperone's function and interaction with prefoldin. Whereas the mutants with up to 6 aa truncation from the C-terminus retained more than 90% chaperone activities for protecting citrate synthase from thermal aggregation and refolding of green fluorescent protein and isopropylmalate dehydrogenase, the truncation mutants showed decreased affinities for prefoldin. Consequently, the truncation mutants showed reduced transfer efficiency of the denatured substrate protein from prefoldin and subsequent chaperonin-dependent refolding. The results clearly show that the C-terminal region of group II chaperonins contributes to their interactions with prefoldin, the transfer of the substrate protein from prefoldin and its refolding. PMID:27079363

  16. A functional variant in miR-155 regulation region contributes to lung cancer risk and survival.

    PubMed

    Xie, Kaipeng; Ma, Hongxia; Liang, Cheng; Wang, Cheng; Qin, Na; Shen, Wei; Gu, Yayun; Yan, Caiwang; Zhang, Kai; Dai, Ningbin; Zhu, Meng; Wu, Shuangshuang; Wang, Hui; Dai, Juncheng; Jin, Guangfu; Shen, Hongbing; Hu, Zhibin

    2015-12-15

    Emerging evidence suggested that upregulation of miR-155 could serve as a promising marker for the diagnosis and prognosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In the present study, we genotyped rs767649 (A > T) located in miR-155 regulation region in 1341 cases and 1982 controls, and analyzed the associations of rs767649 with NSCLC risk and survival. Consequently, rs767649 exhibited the significant associations with the risk (adjusted OR = 1.12, 95% CI = 1.01-1.24, P = 0.031) and prognosis of NSCLC (adjusted HR = 1.17, 95% CI = 1.03-1.32, P = 0.014). Meanwhile, rs767649 specifically interacted with radio-chemotherapy (P(int) = 0.013), and patients with both the rs767649-TT genotype and radio-chemotherapy had the highest hazard ratio (adjusted HR = 1.65, 95% CI = 1.26-2.16, P < 0.001). Furthermore, using functional assays and The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Lung Adenocarcinoma (LUAD) dataset, we found that rs767649 variant allele could increase the transcriptional activity of miR-155, which in turn facilitated tumor growth and metastasis by inhibiting HBP1, TJP1, SMAD5 and PRKAR1A expression. Our findings suggested that rs767649 A > T might contribute to the increased risk and poor prognosis of NSCLC, highlighting the importance of rs767649 in the prevention and therapy of NSCLC. PMID:26543233

  17. A functional variant in miR-155 regulation region contributes to lung cancer risk and survival

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cheng; Qin, Na; Shen, Wei; Gu, Yayun; Yan, Caiwang; Zhang, Kai; Dai, Ningbin; Zhu, Meng; Wu, Shuangshuang; Wang, Hui; Dai, Juncheng; Jin, Guangfu; Shen, Hongbing; Hu, Zhibin

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggested that upregulation of miR-155 could serve as a promising marker for the diagnosis and prognosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In the present study, we genotyped rs767649 (A > T) located in miR-155 regulation region in 1341 cases and 1982 controls, and analyzed the associations of rs767649 with NSCLC risk and survival. Consequently, rs767649 exhibited the significant associations with the risk (adjusted OR = 1.12, 95% CI = 1.01–1.24, P = 0.031) and prognosis of NSCLC (adjusted HR = 1.17, 95% CI = 1.03–1.32, P = 0.014). Meanwhile, rs767649 specifically interacted with radio-chemotherapy (Pint = 0.013), and patients with both the rs767649-TT genotype and radio-chemotherapy had the highest hazard ratio (adjusted HR = 1.65, 95% CI = 1.26–2.16, P < 0.001). Furthermore, using functional assays and The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Lung Adenocarcinoma (LUAD) dataset, we found that rs767649 variant allele could increase the transcriptional activity of miR-155, which in turn facilitated tumor growth and metastasis by inhibiting HBP1, TJP1, SMAD5 and PRKAR1A expression. Our findings suggested that rs767649 A > T might contribute to the increased risk and poor prognosis of NSCLC, highlighting the importance of rs767649 in the prevention and therapy of NSCLC. PMID:26543233

  18. Contribution of the North Atlantic subtropical high to regional climate model (RCM) skill in simulating southeastern United States summer precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Laifang; Li, Wenhong; Jin, Jiming

    2015-07-01

    This study assesses the skill of advanced regional climate models (RCMs) in simulating southeastern United States (SE US) summer precipitation and explores the physical mechanisms responsible for the simulation skill at a process level. Analysis of the RCM output for the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program indicates that the RCM simulations of summer precipitation show the largest biases and a remarkable spread over the SE US compared to other regions in the contiguous US. The causes of such a spread are investigated by performing simulations using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, a next-generation RCM developed by the US National Center for Atmospheric Research. The results show that the simulated biases in SE US summer precipitation are due mainly to the misrepresentation of the modeled North Atlantic subtropical high (NASH) western ridge. In the WRF simulations, the NASH western ridge shifts 7° northwestward when compared to that in the reanalysis ensemble, leading to a dry bias in the simulated summer precipitation according to the relationship between the NASH western ridge and summer precipitation over the southeast. Experiments utilizing the four dimensional data assimilation technique further suggest that the improved representation of the circulation patterns (i.e., wind fields) associated with the NASH western ridge substantially reduces the bias in the simulated SE US summer precipitation. Our analysis of circulation dynamics indicates that the NASH western ridge in the WRF simulations is significantly influenced by the simulated planetary boundary layer (PBL) processes over the Gulf of Mexico. Specifically, a decrease (increase) in the simulated PBL height tends to stabilize (destabilize) the lower troposphere over the Gulf of Mexico, and thus inhibits (favors) the onset and/or development of convection. Such changes in tropical convection induce a tropical-extratropical teleconnection pattern, which modulates the

  19. Guidebook to Excellence 1995: A Directory of Federal Resources for Mathematics and Science Education Improvement for the Pacific Region.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenhower National Clearinghouse for Mathematics and Science Education, Columbus, OH.

    This document is a comprehensive directory of Federal offices, programs and facilities for K-12 education in mathematics and science for the Pacific Region. The purpose of this directory is to assist educators, parents, and students in attaining the National Education Goals, particularly Goal 4: "By the year 2000, U.S. students will be first in…

  20. Analysis of Title IIB Mathematics and Science Partnerships in the Northwest Region. Issues & Answers. REL 2007-No. 008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gummer, Edith; Stepanek, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    This report describes the first year of the funded professional development activities in the Title IIB Math and Science Partnership (MSP) projects in the Northwest Region and the evaluation models. The analysis is structured around the factors of professional development associated with changes in teacher knowledge and practice. This study is…

  1. A Second Chance: What can informal science learning institutions uniquely contribute to public inquiry about climate change? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, D.

    2009-12-01

    The science of climate change is complicated. Even for adult audiences, scientific ideas such as non-linear modeling, probability and uncertainty, complexity and multivariate relationships, and the dynamic relationship between physical and human systems were not part of the typical curriculum for most of us in school. Moreover, many adults are invested in the myth that the aim of scientists is “truth-seeking” as opposed to finding the best interpretation that fits the best available empirical data. Science too often is presented even to adults as sets of answers and certainties. The forthcoming “Green Book” from the NSF Advisory Committee on Environmental Research and Education makes a novel recommendation that in these times adult environmental science literacy is as critical as education programs for K-12 and university students. Its reasoning is the stakes regarding the most pressing global environmental issues of our day—climate change chief among them—likely require such significant change in human behavior in the immediate term that it cannot wait for another generation of children to grow up. Practices and behaviors must change immediately. The report identifies the approximately 15,000 informal science learning institutions across the United States as the perfect adult science education delivery system to address this challenge. However, for the informal science learning community to engage this challenge most effectively, it must take care in its response given the complexity of the science, even for adults. It cannot perpetuate the idea of science as static and certain or separate itself from the social sciences. Yet the scientific community has very important stories to tell which have an immediate urgency to humankind. How do you explain the importance of uncertainty and science as a process while at the same time conveying confidence about scientific consensus where it exists? We will discuss ways of framing these important questions about

  2. Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Linda E., Ed.

    This document contains the following papers on science instruction and technology: "A 3-D Journey in Space: A New Visual Cognitive Adventure" (Yoav Yair, Rachel Mintz, and Shai Litvak); "Using Collaborative Inquiry and Interactive Technologies in an Environmental Science Project for Middle School Teachers: A Description and Analysis" (Patricia…

  3. Community-Based Participatory Research Contributions to Intervention Research: The Intersection of Science and Practice to Improve Health Equity

    PubMed Central

    Duran, Bonnie

    2010-01-01

    Community-based participatory research (CBPR) has emerged in the last decades as a transformative research paradigm that bridges the gap between science and practice through community engagement and social action to increase health equity. CBPR expands the potential for the translational sciences to develop, implement, and disseminate effective interventions across diverse communities through strategies to redress power imbalances; facilitate mutual benefit among community and academic partners; and promote reciprocal knowledge translation, incorporating community theories into the research. We identify the barriers and challenges within the intervention and implementation sciences, discuss how CBPR can address these challenges, provide an illustrative research example, and discuss next steps to advance the translational science of CBPR. PMID:20147663

  4. Contribution of the North Atlantic Subtropical High to Regional Climate Model (RCM) Skill in Simulating Southeastern United States Summer Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Li, W.; Jin, J.

    2014-12-01

    This study assesses the skill of advanced regional climate models (RCMs) in simulating Southeastern United States (SE US) summer precipitation and explores the mechanisms responsible for the simulation skill at a process level. Analysis of the RCM output for the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP) indicates that the RCM simulations of summer precipitation show large biases and a remarkable spread over the SE US. The causes of such a spread are investigated by performing simulations using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, a next-generation RCM developed by the US National Center for Atmospheric Research. The results show that the simulated biases in SE US summer precipitation are due mainly to the misrepresentation of the modeled North Atlantic Subtropical High (NASH) western ridge. In WRF simulations, the NASH western ridge shifts 7-deg northwestward compared to that in the reanalysis ensemble, leading to a dry bias in the simulated precipitation according to the "NASH western ridge - Southeast summer precipitation" relationship. Experiments utilizing the Four Dimensional Data Assimilation technique further suggest that the improved representation of the circulation patterns associated with the NASH western ridge substantially reduces the bias in simulating SE US summer precipitation. Our analysis of circulation dynamics indicates that the NASH western ridge in the WRF simulations is significantly influenced by planetary boundary layer (PBL) processes over the Gulf of Mexico. Specifically, a decrease (increase) in the simulated PBL height tends to stabilize (destabilize) the lower troposphere over the Gulf of Mexico, and thus inhibits (favors) the onset and/or development of convection. The changes in tropical convecton induce a tropical-extratropical teleconnection pattern, which modulates the circulation along the NASH western ridge in the WRF simulations and contributes to the precipitation biases over the SE US

  5. Reality is broken to be rebuilt: how a gamer's mindset can show science educators new ways of contribution to science and world?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhangi, Sanaz

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents a review of Jane McGonigal's book, "Reality is broken" (Reality is broken: why games make us better and how they can change the world. Penguin Press, New York, 2011). As the book subtitle suggests it is a book about "why games make us better and how they can change the world", written by a specialist in computer game design. I will try to show the relevance this book might have to science educators through emphasizing the points that the author offers as the fixes to rebuild reality on the image of gaming world. Using cultural-historical activity theory, I will explore how taking up a gamer mindset can challenge one to consider shortcomings in current approaches to the activity of teaching-learning science and how using this mindset can open our minds to think of new ways of engaging in the activity of doing science. I hope this review will encourage educators to explore the worldview presented in the book and use it to transform our thinking about science education.

  6. Young Science Journalism: Writing Popular Scientific Articles May Contribute to an Increase of High-School Students' Interest in the Natural Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Uwe K.; Steindl, Hanna; Larcher, Nicole; Kulac, Helga; Hotter, Annelies

    2016-01-01

    Far too few high-school students choose subjects from the natural sciences (NaSc) for their majors in many countries. Even fewer study biology, chemistry or physics at university. Those, that do, often lack training to present and discuss scientific results and ideas in texts. To meet these challenges the center for didactics of biology of Graz…

  7. Acid-sensing ion channels in trigeminal ganglion neurons innervating the orofacial region contribute to orofacial inflammatory pain.

    PubMed

    Fu, Hui; Fang, Peng; Zhou, Hai-Yun; Zhou, Jun; Yu, Xiao-Wei; Ni, Ming; Zheng, Jie-Yan; Jin, You; Chen, Jian-Guo; Wang, Fang; Hu, Zhuang-Li

    2016-02-01

    Orofacial pain is a common clinical symptom that is accompanied by tooth pain, migraine and gingivitis. Accumulating evidence suggests that acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), especially ASIC3, can profoundly affect the physiological properties of nociception in peripheral sensory neurons. The aim of this study is to examine the contribution of ASICs in trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons to orofacial inflammatory pain. A Western blot (WB), immunofluorescence assay of labelled trigeminal ganglion neurons, orofacial formalin test, cell preparation and electrophysiological experiments are performed. This study demonstrated that ASIC1, ASIC2a and ASIC3 are highly expressed in TG neurons innervating the orofacial region of rats. The amplitude of ASIC currents in these neurons increased 119.72% (for ASIC1-like current) and 230.59% (for ASIC3-like current) in the formalin-induced orofacial inflammatory pain model. In addition, WB and immunofluorescence assay demonstrated a significantly augmented expression of ASICs in orofacial TG neurons during orofacial inflammation compared with the control group. The relative protein density of ASIC1, ASIC2a and ASIC3 also increased 58.82 ± 8.92%, 45.30 ± 11.42% and 55.32 ± 14.71%, respectively, compared with the control group. Furthermore, pharmacological blockade of ASICs and genetic deletion of ASIC1 attenuated the inflammation response. These findings indicate that peripheral inflammation can induce the upregulation of ASICs in TG neurons, causing orofacial inflammatory pain. Additionally, the specific inhibitor of ASICs may have a significant analgesic effect on orofacial inflammatory pain. PMID:26510178

  8. Contribution of land use changes to future flood damage along the river Meuse in the Walloon region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckers, A.; Dewals, B.; Erpicum, S.; Dujardin, S.; Detrembleur, S.; Teller, J.; Pirotton, M.; Archambeau, P.

    2013-09-01

    Managing flood risk in Europe is a critical issue because climate change is expected to increase flood hazard in many european countries. Beside climate change, land use evolution is also a key factor influencing future flood risk. The core contribution of this paper is a new methodology to model residential land use evolution. Based on two climate scenarios ("dry" and "wet"), the method is applied to study the evolution of flood damage by 2100 along the river Meuse. Nine urbanization scenarios were developed: three of them assume a "current trend" land use evolution, leading to a significant urban sprawl, while six others assume a dense urban development, characterized by a higher density and a higher diversity of urban functions in the urbanized areas. Using damage curves, the damage estimation was performed by combining inundation maps for the present and future 100 yr flood with present and future land use maps and specific prices. According to the dry scenario, the flood discharge is expected not to increase. In this case, land use changes increase flood damages by 1-40%, to €334-462 million in 2100. In the wet scenario, the relative increase in flood damage is 540-630%, corresponding to total damages of €2.1-2.4 billion. In this extreme scenario, the influence of climate on the overall damage is 3-8 times higher than the effect of land use change. However, for seven municipalities along the river Meuse, these two factors have a comparable influence. Consequently, in the "wet" scenario and at the level of the whole Meuse valley in the Walloon region, careful spatial planning would reduce the increase in flood damage by no more than 11-23%; but, at the level of several municipalities, more sustainable spatial planning would reduce future flood damage to a much greater degree.

  9. Oct4/Sox2 Binding Sites Contribute to Maintaining Hypomethylation of the Maternal Igf2/H19 Imprinting Control Region

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, David L.; Boddy, Craig S.; Schoenherr, Christopher S.

    2013-01-01

    A central question in genomic imprinting is how parental-specific DNA methylation of imprinting control regions (ICR) is established during gametogenesis and maintained after fertilization. At the imprinted Igf2/H19 locus, CTCF binding maintains the unmethylated state of the maternal ICR after the blastocyst stage. In addition, evidence from Beckwith-Wiedemann patients and cultured mouse cells suggests that two Sox-Oct binding motifs within the Igf2/H19 ICR also participate in maintaining hypomethylation of the maternal allele. We found that the Sox and octamer elements from both Sox-Oct motifs were required to drive hypomethylation of integrated transgenes in mouse embryonic carcinoma cells. Oct4 and Sox2 showed cooperative binding to the Sox-Oct motifs, and both were present at the endogenous ICR. Using a mouse with mutations in the Oct4 binding sites, we found that maternally transmitted mutant ICRs acquired partial methylation in somatic tissues, but there was little effect on imprinted expression of H19 and Igf2. A subset of mature oocytes also showed partial methylation of the mutant ICR, which suggested that the Sox-Oct motifs provide some protection from methylation during oogenesis. The Sox-Oct motifs, however, were not required for erasure of paternal methylation in primordial germ cells, which indicated that the oocyte methylation was acquired post-natally. Maternally inherited mutant ICRs were unmethylated in blastocysts, which suggested that at least a portion of the methylation in somatic tissues occurred after implantation. These findings provide evidence that Sox-Oct motifs contribute to ICR hypomethylation in post-implantation embryos and maturing oocytes and link imprinted DNA methylation with key stem cell/germline transcription factors. PMID:24324735

  10. Local and regional contributions of fine particulate mass to urban areas in the Mid-Atlantic and Southwestern US. Report for November 1997--September 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Schichtel, B.A.

    1999-03-29

    This work examined the seasonal local and regional contributions of PM2.5 to urban areas in the Mid-Atlantic States: Baltimore, MD, Washington, DC, and Philadelphia, PA and Phoenix, AZ in the Southwest. This was accomplished using two different methods. The first method estimated urban excesses by comparing seasonal PM2.5 trends at the urban monitors to nearby rural monitors. The second approach used a simple model based on the PM2.5 dependence on wind speed and wind direction to classify a site as being dominated by local or regional source contributions. The method also quantifies the regional contributions during high wind speed conditions. The wind vectors were derived from surface observations and air mass histories. All monitoring sites in the urban centers were dominated by local sources during the cold season.

  11. Active science as a contribution to the trauma recovery process: preliminary indications with orphans from the 1994 genocide in Rwanda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrier, Frédéric; Nsengiyumva, Jean-Baptiste

    2003-09-01

    Constructivist, hands-on, inquiry-based, science activities may have a curative potential that could be valuable in a psychological assistance programme for child victims of violence and war. To investigate this idea, pilot sessions were performed in an orphanage located in Ruhengeri, Rwanda, with seven young adults and two groups of 11 children aged from 9 to 16 years. Despite a number of imperfections in this attempt, significant observations have been made. First, a sound communication was established with all, even with the young adults who at the beginning were not as enthusiastic as the children. Furthermore, some children, originally isolated, silent and sad, displayed a high degree of happiness during the activities, and an overall increasing positive change of attitude. In addition, they appropriated well some principles of experimental science. This suggests that a joint development of science literacy and joy may be an interesting approach, both in education and therapy.

  12. Popularization of Science. Report of a Commonwealth Regional Workshop (Lusaka, Zambia, April 15-19, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commonwealth Secretariat, London (England).

    The workshop on the popularization of science was the first of what the organizing institutions hoped would be a series of workshops on this important theme. It was held to complement the efforts of various institutions and organizations in the whole area of technological acculturation so that the benefits of science may be understood by and…

  13. Science for All. Report of a Regional Meeting (Bangkok, September 20-26, 1983).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Asian Centre for Educational Innovation for Development.

    This report discusses the development and implementation of programs in Asia and the Pacific which focus on "Science for All." The major objective of "Science for All" is to provide everyone in these areas with the scientific competencies, knowledge, and skills appropriate to their immediate needs to help eradicate poverty, provide proper…

  14. Physics and Science Education through Project Activities of University Students and Regional Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Makoto

    A project team "Rika-Kobo" organized by university students has actively performed various science education activities at primary and secondary schools and other educational facilities as well as in science events in local areas. The activities of this student project team are related to various fields of physics and sciences. In order to provide more attractive activities, the student members prepare original experiment tools and easily-understandable presentation and explanation. Through such activities, the members can have opportunities of obtaining new knowledge and refreshing their already-obtained understandings in related fields of physics and sciences. They can also have chances of improving their skills and abilities such as presentation, problem-finding and solving, which are useful for realizing their career development. The activities of the student project team have been also welcomed by children, parents, teachers and other people in local areas because the activities provide them with opportunities of knowing and learning new knowledge in physics and sciences.

  15. A new analysis of Mars "Special Regions": findings of the second MEPAG Special Regions Science Analysis Group (SR-SAG2).

    PubMed

    Rummel, John D; Beaty, David W; Jones, Melissa A; Bakermans, Corien; Barlow, Nadine G; Boston, Penelope J; Chevrier, Vincent F; Clark, Benton C; de Vera, Jean-Pierre P; Gough, Raina V; Hallsworth, John E; Head, James W; Hipkin, Victoria J; Kieft, Thomas L; McEwen, Alfred S; Mellon, Michael T; Mikucki, Jill A; Nicholson, Wayne L; Omelon, Christopher R; Peterson, Ronald; Roden, Eric E; Sherwood Lollar, Barbara; Tanaka, Kenneth L; Viola, Donna; Wray, James J

    2014-11-01

    A committee of the Mars Exploration Program Analysis Group (MEPAG) has reviewed and updated the description of Special Regions on Mars as places where terrestrial organisms might replicate (per the COSPAR Planetary Protection Policy). This review and update was conducted by an international team (SR-SAG2) drawn from both the biological science and Mars exploration communities, focused on understanding when and where Special Regions could occur. The study applied recently available data about martian environments and about terrestrial organisms, building on a previous analysis of Mars Special Regions (2006) undertaken by a similar team. Since then, a new body of highly relevant information has been generated from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (launched in 2005) and Phoenix (2007) and data from Mars Express and the twin Mars Exploration Rovers (all 2003). Results have also been gleaned from the Mars Science Laboratory (launched in 2011). In addition to Mars data, there is a considerable body of new data regarding the known environmental limits to life on Earth-including the potential for terrestrial microbial life to survive and replicate under martian environmental conditions. The SR-SAG2 analysis has included an examination of new Mars models relevant to natural environmental variation in water activity and temperature; a review and reconsideration of the current parameters used to define Special Regions; and updated maps and descriptions of the martian environments recommended for treatment as "Uncertain" or "Special" as natural features or those potentially formed by the influence of future landed spacecraft. Significant changes in our knowledge of the capabilities of terrestrial organisms and the existence of possibly habitable martian environments have led to a new appreciation of where Mars Special Regions may be identified and protected. The SR-SAG also considered the impact of Special Regions on potential future human missions to Mars, both as locations of

  16. A new analysis of Mars "Special Regions": findings of the Second MEPAG Special Regions Science Analysis Group (SR-SAG2)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rummel, John D.; Beaty, David W.; Jones, Melissa A.; Bakermans, Corien; Barlow, Nadine G.; Boston, Penelope J.; Chevrier, Vincent F.; Clark, Benton C.; de Vera, Jean-Pierre P.; Gough, Raina V.; Hallsworth, John E.; Head, James W.; Hipkin, Victoria J.; Kieft, Thomas L.; McEwen, Alfred S.; Mellon, Michael T.; Mikucki, Jill A.; Nicholson, Wayne L.; Omelon, Christopher R.; Peterson, Ronald; Roden, Eric E.; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood; Tanaka, Kenneth L.; Viola, Donna; Wray, James J.

    2014-01-01

    A committee of the Mars Exploration Program Analysis Group (MEPAG) has reviewed and updated the description of Special Regions on Mars as places where terrestrial organisms might replicate (per the COSPAR Planetary Protection Policy). This review and update was conducted by an international team (SR-SAG2) drawn from both the biological science and Mars exploration communities, focused on understanding when and where Special Regions could occur. The study applied recently available data about martian environments and about terrestrial organisms, building on a previous analysis of Mars Special Regions (2006) undertaken by a similar team. Since then, a new body of highly relevant information has been generated from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (launched in 2005) and Phoenix (2007) and data from Mars Express and the twin Mars Exploration Rovers (all 2003). Results have also been gleaned from the Mars Science Laboratory (launched in 2011). In addition to Mars data, there is a considerable body of new data regarding the known environmental limits to life on Earth—including the potential for terrestrial microbial life to survive and replicate under martian environmental conditions. The SR-SAG2 analysis has included an examination of new Mars models relevant to natural environmental variation in water activity and temperature; a review and reconsideration of the current parameters used to define Special Regions; and updated maps and descriptions of the martian environments recommended for treatment as "Uncertain" or "Special" as natural features or those potentially formed by the influence of future landed spacecraft. Significant changes in our knowledge of the capabilities of terrestrial organisms and the existence of possibly habitable martian environments have led to a new appreciation of where Mars Special Regions may be identified and protected. The SR-SAG also considered the impact of Special Regions on potential future human missions to Mars, both as locations

  17. Teachers' Ideas about the Nature of Science: A Critical Analysis of Research Approaches and Their Contribution to Pedagogical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerra-Ramos, Maria Teresa

    2012-01-01

    This paper looks into research aimed to elicit teachers' ideas about science through the development of resources as questionnaires, problematic tasks and interviews. It is focused on how those ideas are conceptualised and how such conceptualisations have been reflected in the methodological approaches adopted and the advantages and disadvantages…

  18. U.S. Biomedical Science and Technology: The Contribution of New Knowledge to the Nation's Economic Competitiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, Christopher; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Discussion of biomedical science and technology focuses on factors important to a vital health care industry. Topics addressed include high expectations about health care, spending for health care, aspects related to international competitiveness, constraints on growth in the biomedical industry, the role of research, and research and employment…

  19. Math and Science Education with English Language Learners: Contributions of the DR K-12 Program. Targeted Study Group Working Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Alina; Rhodes, Hilary; Copson, Elizabeth; Tiano, Megan; DellaRocco, Nicole; Donoghue, Nathaniel; Marco, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    Although educational leaders, policy makers, and researchers have long emphasized the importance of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) for the country's continued prosperity, increasing participation in STEM has remained a challenge for both the education and scientific communities (Pearson & Fechter, 1994; National…

  20. From the Contribution to the Action Approach: White Teachers' Experiences Influencing the Development of Multicultural Science Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suriel, Regina L.; Atwater, Mary M.

    2012-01-01

    In this exploratory case study, we sought to understand teacher's integration of multicultural curricula in science curriculum units, and how personal experiences influenced the level of integration in light of Bank's typology of ethnic content integration into school curricula. Five research participants volunteered and were selected so as to be…

  1. Active Science as a Contribution to the Trauma Recovery Process: Preliminary Indications with Orphans from the 1994 Genocide in Rwanda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perrier, Frederic; Nsengiyumva, Jean-Baptiste

    2003-01-01

    Constructivist, hands-on, inquiry-based, science activities may have a curative potential that could be valuable in a psychological assistance programme for child victims of violence and war. To investigate this idea, pilot sessions were performed in an orphanage located in Ruhengeri, Rwanda, with seven young adults and two groups of 11 children…

  2. Toward a Critique of the Information Age: Herbert Marcuse's Contribution to Information Science's Conceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cibangu, Sylvain K.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Just as we have created them, the new social media technologies have shaped every aspect of our societies. Meanwhile, information science has hardly addressed the ways in which these information technologies have shaped humans, and vice-versa. The major reason is the tendency and pressure to adjust (the needs of) humans to the ever…

  3. Examining Key Factors that Contribute to African Americans' Pursuit of Computing Science Degrees: Implications for Cultivating Career Choice and Aspiration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charleston, LaVar Jovan

    2010-01-01

    As a result of decreasing degree attainment in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields, the United States is undergoing a shortage in the STEM workforce that it has not encountered since the mid-1950s (ACT, 2006; Gilbert & Jackson, 2007). Moreover, as computer usage cuts across diverse aspects of modern culture, the…

  4. School-Related Factors Contributing to the Delivery Enhancement of the Special Science Program in Western Visayas, Philippines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bangcaya, Porferio S.; Alejandro, Grecebio Jonathan D.

    2015-01-01

    In this mixed-method study, the secondary schools in Western Visayas, Philippines offering special science program (SSP) were assessed as basis for delivery enhancement. The SSP along student-related factors and the extent of implementation in the areas of curriculum and instruction, laboratory facilities, and administration in terms of the…

  5. Approaching Science by Watching TV: What Do Entertainment Programs Contribute to Viewers' Competence in Genetic Engineering?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinmann, Carina; Löb, Charlotte; Mattheiß, Tamara; Vorderer, Peter

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the potential of entertainment-education (E-E) for promoting engagement with a science issue. It was assumed that certain entertaining features of a media experience increase viewers' perceived knowledge about an issue. Drawing on different theoretical models of E-E and on persuasive effects of narrative media messages,…

  6. Factors that contribute to Hispanic English Language Learners' high academic performance in high school science in the Rio Grande Valley of Texas: A multicase study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elizondo, Antonio

    The purpose of this multicase study was to discover factors that contribute to Hispanic English language learners' (ELL) high academic performance in high school science in the Rio Grande Valley of Texas. Participants were high school seniors enrolled in college-level classes who had scored commended on the science exit-level Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills and ranked toward the top of their class. One student from each of four different high schools in south Texas were selected to participate. Schools identified students meeting the participant criteria and provided consent documents. In this qualitative research study, students were interviewed on three different dates. Administrators and science teachers were also interviewed for triangulation. Significant findings showed that intrinsic qualities were mainly responsible for factors contributing to high academic performance. Hispanic ELL students need meaningful responsibilities to internalize self-esteem and self-efficacy to realize high academic performance. Self-motivation, a contributing factor, provides students with a positive outlook on high academic performance and the ability to defer more immediate undermining rewards. Students expect to contribute to society by helping others. This helps their self-esteem as well as their self-worth and supports high academic performance. Parental and teacher support are critical for high academic performance. Low socioeconomic status alone is not a causal factor for poor academic performance. School administrations should assign willing and enthusiastic teachers as mentors to target students and provide skills to parents that promote, inspire, and motivate students' intrinsic qualities. Future studies should examine different leadership styles that maximize teachers' ability to influence students' high academic performance. Finally, students should be given guidance in setting career goals and demonstrating that high academic achievement is attainable and

  7. Regional and local contributions to ambient non-methane volatile organic compounds at a polluted rural/coastal site in Pearl River Delta, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, H.; Wang, T.; Blake, D. R.; Simpson, I. J.; Kwok, Y. H.; Li, Y. S.

    Identification of major sources of airborne pollutants and their contribution to pollutant loadings are critical in developing effective pollution control and mitigation strategies. In this study, a comprehensive dataset of non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) collected from August 2001 to December 2002 at a polluted rural/coastal site in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) is analyzed to assess the relative contributions of major pollution sources to ambient NMVOC mixing ratios. A unique approach based on emission ratios of individual chemical species was used to classify the bulk air samples in order to apportion regional and local source contributions to the measured mixing ratios. The collected air samples fell into four major groups, including air masses from the inner PRD region and Hong Kong (HK) urban area. To estimate the source apportionment of NMVOCs, a principal component analysis/absolute principal component scores receptor model was applied to the classified data points. The results indicate that the regional and local source contributions to ambient NMVOC levels at the site were significantly different due to the differences in local versus regional energy use and industrial activities. For air masses originating from HK, vehicular emissions accounted for approximately 39% of the total NMVOC levels, followed by industrial emissions (35%), gasoline evaporation (14%) and commercial/domestic liquefied petroleum gas/natural gas use (12%). By contrast, for air masses originating from the PRD the industrial emissions accounted for 43% of the total NMVOC burden, followed by vehicular emissions (32%) and biomass burning (25%). In particular, the higher regional contribution of biomass burning found in this study as compared to existing emission inventories suggests that further efforts are necessary to refine the emission inventories of NMVOCs in the PRD region.

  8. Young science journalism: writing popular scientific articles may contribute to an increase of high-school students' interest in the natural sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Uwe K.; Steindl, Hanna; Larcher, Nicole; Kulac, Helga; Hotter, Annelies

    2016-03-01

    Far too few high-school students choose subjects from the natural sciences (NaSc) for their majors in many countries. Even fewer study biology, chemistry or physics at university. Those, that do, often lack training to present and discuss scientific results and ideas in texts. To meet these challenges the center for didactics of biology of Graz University has set up the program Young Science Journalism. This new workshop-based interdisciplinary concept was tested in an exploratory study with grade 10 students of one Austrian high school, engaging both the biology and the German teacher of the class. It was our aim to raise students' interest in the NaSc by encouraging them to write popular scientific articles about self-chosen topics, and to help them improve their writing competence. In this paper we focus on interest development through writing. Results from this pilot study were promising. Using a mixed-method approach (comparing pre- and post-test questionnaires and semi-structured interviews from different time points analyzed qualitatively), we found that almost all students valued the project-related work highly. Most of them showed higher interest in the NaSc at project end with girls, in average, seeming to profit more from project participation. We thus recommend integrating such writing tasks into school curricula to increase students' interest in NaSc or to even create new interest. Additionally, we introduce a network presentation of questionnaire data as a powerful tool to visualize the effect of an intervention on individual students and student profile groups. This paper is part of a series accompanying the Austrian Young Science Journalism program. Additional Supporting Information may be found in the online version of this article at the publisher's web-site.

  9. A methodology for incorporating web technologies into a computer-based patient record, with contributions from cognitive science.

    PubMed

    Webster, Charles

    2002-12-18

    Cognitive science is a rich source of insight for creative use of new Web technologies by medical informatics workers. I outline a project to Web-enable an existing computer-based patient record (CPR) in the context of ideas from philosophy, linguistics, artificial intelligence, and cognitive psychology. Web prototypes play an important role (a) because Web technology lends itself to rapid prototype development, and (b) because prototypes help team members bridge among disparate medical, computing, and business ontologies. Six Web-enabled CPR prototypes were created and ranked. User scenarios were generated using a user communication matrix. Resulting prototypes were compared according to the degree to which they satisfied medical, computing, and business constraints. In a different organization, or at different time, candidate prototypes and their ranking might have been different. However, prototype generation and comparison are fundamentally influenced by factors usefully understood in a cognitive science framework. PMID:12467789

  10. A methodology for web-enabling a computer-based patient record with contributions from cognitive science.

    PubMed

    Webster, C

    2001-01-01

    Cognitive science is a rich source of insight for creative use of new Web technologies by medical informatics workers. I outline a project to Web-enable an existing computer-based patient record (CPR) in the context of ideas from philosophy, linguistics, artificial intelligence, and cognitive psychology. Web prototypes play an important role (a) because Web technology lends itself to rapid prototype development, and (b) because prototypes help team members bridge among disparate medical, computing, and business ontologies. Six Web-enabled CPR prototypes were created and ranked. User scenarios were generated using a user communication matrix. Resulting prototypes were compared according to the degree to which they satisfied medical, computing, and business constraints. In a different organization, or at different time, candidate prototypes and their ranking might have been different. However, prototype generation and comparison are fundamentally influenced by factors usefully understood in a cognitive science framework. PMID:11604718

  11. Lagrangian Sampling of 3-D Air Quality Model Results for Regional Transport Contributions to Sulfate Aerosol Concentrations at Baltimore, MD in Summer of 2004

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Lagrangian method provides estimates of the chemical and physical evolution of air arriving in the daytime boundary layer at Baltimore. Study results indicate a dominant role for regional transport contributions of those days when sulfate air pollution is highest in Baltimor...

  12. Contribution of regional-scale fire events to ozone and PM2.5 air quality estimated by photochemical modeling approaches

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two specific fires from 2011 are tracked for local to regional scale contribution to ozone (O3) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) using a freely available regulatory modeling system that includes the BlueSky wildland fire emissions tool, Spare Matrix Operator Kernel Emissions (...

  13. Factors Contributing to the Accumulation of Primary Teacher's Debts to the Government of Tanzania: A Case Study for Dar Es Salaam Region

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kombo, Ibun

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of the study which was conducted to determine factors contributing to the accumulation of primary school teacher's debts to the Government of Tanzania, a case study of Dar es Salaam Region in its three municipalities namely, Ilala, Kinondoni and Temeke. Data was obtained through sampling method which also helped to…

  14. The Potential for Cubesats to Determine Black Holes Masses in Nearby Active Galactic Nuclei and Contribute to Other Time Domain Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorjian, Varoujan; Ardila, David R.; Barth, Aaron J.; Janson, Siegfried; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Malkan, Matthew Arnold; Peterson, Bradley M.; Rowen, Darren; Seager, Sara; Shkolnik, Evgenya L.

    2016-01-01

    A 3U (30cmx10cmx10cm) CubeSat with a 9cm diameter aperture telescope can deliver unprecedented time domain coverage in the ultraviolet (UV) for the purposes of Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) reverberation mapping to determine supermassive black hole (SMBH) masses. SMBH's reside at the centers of most, if not all, massive galaxies and accretion onto those black holes generates a great deal of emission peaking in the UV. These accretion disks are also surrounded by a nearby, fast moving gas region called the Broad Line Region (BLR). As light pulses generated near the black hole spread out, they first illuminate the accretion disk, and then the BLR. For a sample of bright AGN, a dedicated cubesat can follow these changes in brightness on a daily basis for up to 100 days from low Earth orbit. With such monitoring of changes in the accretion disk and then the BLR, an accurate distance between the two regions can be determined. Combining this UV coverage with optical emission-line spectroscopy from the ground allows for a direct measurement of the mass of the central black hole. This exchange of time resolution for spatial resolution can also be used to determine the structure of the central region of the AGN. Ground-based photometric and spectroscopic measurements will complement the UV by tracing the optically emitting and hence cooler regions of the AGN to provide one of the best measurements of supermassive black hole masses.In addition to the primary science mission, the long observing campaigns and the large field of view required to get comparison stars for relative photometry allow for other competitive science. We have identified UV activity in M dwarfs as ancillary science that can be addressed with such a cubesat. This activity will have a strong impact on the habitability of any possible planet around the star.

  15. The Contribution of Latino Studies to Social Science Research on Immigration. JSRI Occasional Paper No. 36. Latino Studies Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedraza, Silvia

    This paper offers a conceptual "map" of issues and approaches in immigration research and illustrates features of the map with the significant contributions of Latino Studies to immigration research. One axis of the map concerns the time line of various waves of immigration. Although research on immigrants and immigration processes was a…

  16. The Distribution of Ice in Lunar Permanently Shadowed Regions: Science Enabling Exploration (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, D.; Elphic, R. C.; Bussey, B.; Hibbitts, C.; Lawrence, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    Recent prospecting indicates that water ice occurs in enhanced abundances in some lunar PSRs. That water constitutes a resource that enables lunar exploration if it can be harvested for fuel and life support. Future lunar exploration missions will need detailed information about the distribution of volatiles in lunar permanently shadowed regions (PSRs). In addition, the volatiles also offer key insights into the recent and distant past, as they have trapped volatiles delivered to the moon over ~2 Gyr. This comprises an unparalleled reservoir of past inner solar system volatiles, and future scientific missions are needed to make the measurements that will reveal the composition of those volatiles. These scientific missions will necessarily have to acquire and analyze samples of volatiles from the PSRs. For both exploration and scientific purposes, the precise location of volatiles will need to be known. However, data indicate that ice is distributed heterogeneously on the Moon. It is unlikely that the distribution will be known a priori with enough spatial resolution to guarantee access to volatiles using a single point sample. Some mechanism for laterally or vertically distributed access will increase the likelihood of acquiring a rich sample of volatiles. Trade studies will need to be conducted to anticipate the necessary range and duration of missions to lunar PSRs that will be needed to accomplish the mission objectives. We examine the spatial distribution of volatiles in lunar PSRs reported from data analyses and couple those with models of smaller scale processes. FUV and laser data from PSRs that indicate the average surface distribution is consistent with low abundances on the extreme surface in most PSRs. Neutron and radar data that probe the distribution at depth show heterogeneity at broad spatial resolution. We consider those data in conjunction with the model to understand the full, 3-D nature of the heterogeneity. A Monte Carlo technique simulates the

  17. How a geomorphosite inventory can contribute to regional sustainable development? The case of the Simen Mountains National Park, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauerhofer, Lukas; Reynard, Emmanuel; Asrat, Asfawossen; Hurni, Hans; Wildlife Conservation Authority, Ethiopian

    2016-04-01

    vulnerable to human encroachment. The educational interest of most sites is high but interpretation facilities are absent. With some minor adjustments, the application of the inventory method (Reynard et al., 2015) to the SMNP has proven successful and can be recommended for application to other areas in developing countries of similar well-documented geomorphology. However, the method could prove too complex for areas where basic knowledge on geomorphology is poor, as is often the case in developing countries. Based on previous studies (in particular Asrat et al. 2012) and results of the current inventory, a road map for SMNP geomorphosite management was proposed. Eight strategic objectives and working tasks were considered, which include the development of geotourism products such as geotourist maps, geo-trails and guidebooks, geo-trekking, geo-sightseeing tours, and interpretive panels as well as the training of geo-guides and capacity building of the park staff and specific management of the Lemalemo site, one of the most accessible geosites in the park. The overall goal is to raise awareness on the rich geomorphological heritage through geotourism development and empowerment of locals and thus to contribute to long-term protection of the geomorphosites. In conclusion the study revealed important potential for sustainable rural development in the Simen. Applied research will be necessary on how exactly the promotion products should be developed. References Asrat, A., Demissie, M., Mogessie, A. (2008). Geotourism in Ethiopia: archaelogical and ancient cities, religious and cultural centres: Yeha, Axum, Wukro, and Lalibela. Addis Ababa: Shama Books. Asrat, A., Demissie, M., Mogessie, A. (2012). Geoheritage conservation in Ethiopia: the case of the Simien Mountains. Quaestiones Geographicae, 31(1), 7-23. doi:10.2478/v10117-012-0001-0. Reynard E., Perret A., Bussard J., Grangier L., Martin S. (2015). Integrated approach for the inventory and management of geomorphological

  18. A modeling study of coarse particulate matter pollution in Beijing: regional source contributions and control implications for the 2008 summer Olympics

    SciTech Connect

    Litao Wang; Jiming Hao; Kebin He

    2008-08-15

    In the last 10 yr, Beijing has made a great effort to improve its air quality. However, it is still suffering from regional coarse particulate matter (PM10) pollution that could be a challenge to the promise of clean air during the 2008 Olympics. To provide scientific guidance on regional air pollution control, the Mesoscale Modeling System Generation 5 (MM5) and the Models-3/Community Multiscale Air Quality Model (CMAQ) air quality modeling system was used to investigate the contributions of emission sources outside the Beijing area to pollution levels in Beijing. The contributions to the PM10 concentrations in Beijing were assessed for the following sources: power plants, industry, domestic sources, transportation, agriculture, and biomass open burning. In January, it is estimated that on average 22% of the PM10 concentrations can be attributed to outside sources, of which domestic and industrial sources contributed 37 and 31%, respectively. In August, as much as 40% of the PM10 concentrations came from regional sources, of which approximately 41% came from industry and 31% from power plants. However, the synchronous analysis of the hourly concentrations, regional contributions, and wind vectors indicates that in the heaviest pollution periods the local emission sources play a more important role. The implications are that long-term control strategies should be based on regional-scale collaborations, and that emission abatement of local sources may be more effective in lowering the PM10 concentration levels on the heavy pollution days. Better air quality can be attained during the Olympics by placing effective emission controls on the local sources in Beijing and by controlling emissions from industry and power plants in the surrounding regions. 44 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Earthquake and Tsunami Disaster Mitigation in The Marmara Region and Disaster Education in Turkey (SATREPS Project: Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development by JICA-JST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneda, Yoshiyuki

    2015-04-01

    Earthquake and Tsunami Disaster Mitigation in The Marmara Region and Disaster Education in Turkey (SATREPS Project: Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development by JICA-JST) Yoshiyuki KANEDA Disaster mitigation center Nagoya University/ Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) Mustafa ELDIK Boğaziçi University, Kandilli Observatory and       Earthquake Researches Institute (KOERI) and Members of SATREPS Japan-Turkey project The target of this project is the Marmara Sea earthquake after the Izmit (Kocaeli) Earthquake 1999 along to the North Anatolian fault. According to occurrences of historical Earthquakes, epicenters have moved from East to West along to the North Anatolian Fault. There is a seismic gap in the Marmara Sea. In Marmara region, there is Istanbul with high populations such as Tokyo. Therefore, Japan and Turkey can share our own experiences during past damaging earthquakes and we can prepare for future large Earthquakes and Tsunamis in cooperation with each other in SATREPS project. This project is composed of Multidisciplinary research project including observation researches, simulation researches, educational researches, and goals are as follows, ① To develop disaster mitigation policy and strategies based on Multidisciplinary research activities. ② To provide decision makers with newly found knowledge for its implementation to the current regulations. ③ To organize disaster education programs in order to increase disaster awareness in Turkey. ④ To contribute the evaluation of active fault studies in Japan. In this SATREPS project, we will integrate Multidisciplinary research results for disaster mitigation in Marmara region and .disaster education in Turkey.

  20. The University of Warwick and Its Region: Deepening the Engagement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobe, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the contribution to the regional economy made by the University of Warwick through the regional involvement of its science park, business school, manufacturing group, and other initiatives. (JOW)

  1. A method to estimate the contribution of regional genetic associations to complex traits from summary association statistics

    PubMed Central

    Pare, Guillaume; Mao, Shihong; Deng, Wei Q.

    2016-01-01

    Despite considerable efforts, known genetic associations only explain a small fraction of predicted heritability. Regional associations combine information from multiple contiguous genetic variants and can improve variance explained at established association loci. However, regional associations are not easily amenable to estimation using summary association statistics because of sensitivity to linkage disequilibrium (LD). We now propose a novel method, LD Adjusted Regional Genetic Variance (LARGV), to estimate phenotypic variance explained by regional associations using summary statistics while accounting for LD. Our method is asymptotically equivalent to a multiple linear regression model when no interaction or haplotype effects are present. It has several applications, such as ranking of genetic regions according to variance explained or comparison of variance explained by two or more regions. Using height and BMI data from the Health Retirement Study (N = 7,776), we show that most genetic variance lies in a small proportion of the genome and that previously identified linkage peaks have higher than expected regional variance. PMID:27273519

  2. 76 FR 60564 - President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology; Notice of Meeting: Open Regional...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-29

    ... government create a fertile environment for innovation and make investments to ensure that new technologies... sharing. Policies that could create a fertile innovation environment. Please note that because PCAST... issues where understandings from the domains of science, technology, and innovation may bear on...

  3. Developing Capacities for Teaching Responsible Science in the MENA Region: Refashioning Scientific Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academies Press, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Spurred on by new discoveries and rapid technological advances, the capacity for life science research is expanding across the globe-and with it comes concerns about the unintended impacts of research on the physical and biological environment, human well-being, or the deliberate misuse of knowledge, tools, and techniques to cause harm. This…

  4. Research and Development Centres for Science Education in the South East Asian and Australasian Region.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dekkers, John; Treagust, David F.

    1983-01-01

    Provides the status (as of February 1982) of institutions active in curriculum development and/or science education research in Australia, Fiji, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Paupau New Guinea, Philippines, Malaysia, New Zealand, Singapore, Solomon Islands, and Thailand. Includes institutional title/address and name of contact person. (JN)

  5. Sequence Variability in Viral Genome Non-coding Regions Likely Contribute to Observed Differences in Viral Replication Amongst MARV Strains

    PubMed Central

    ALONSO, JESUS A.; PATTERSON, JEAN L.

    2013-01-01

    The Marburg viruses Musoke (MARV-Mus) and Angola (MARV-Ang) have highly similar genomic sequences. Analysis of viral replication using various assays consistently identified MARV-Ang as the faster replicating virus. Non-coding genomic regions of negative sense RNA viruses are known to play a role in viral gene expression. A comparison of the six non-coding regions using bicistronic minigenomes revealed that the first two non-coding regions (NP / VP35 and VP35 / VP40) differed significantly in their transcriptional regulation. Deletion mutation analysis of the MARV-Mus NP / VP35 region further revealed that the MARV polymerase (L) is able to initiate production of the downstream gene without the presence of highly conserved regulatory signals. Bicistronic minigenome assays also identified the VP30 mRNA 5′ untranslated region as an rZAP-targeted RNA motif. Overall, our studies indicate that the high variation of MARV non-coding regions may play a significant role in observed differences in transcription and/or replication. PMID:23510675

  6. The Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments (RISA) Program, Climate Services, and Meeting the National Climate Change Adaptation Challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overpeck, J. T.; Udall, B.; Miles, E.; Dow, K.; Anderson, C.; Cayan, D.; Dettinger, M.; Hartmann, H.; Jones, J.; Mote, P.; Ray, A.; Shafer, M.; White, D.

    2008-12-01

    The NOAA-led RISA Program has grown steadily to nine regions and a focus that includes both natural climate variability and human-driven climate change. The RISAs are, at their core, university-based and heavily invested in partnerships, particularly with stakeholders, NOAA, and other federal agencies. RISA research, assessment and partnerships have led to new operational climate services within NOAA and other agencies, and have become important foundations in the development of local, state and regional climate change adaptation initiatives. The RISA experience indicates that a national climate service is needed, and must include: (1) services prioritized based on stakeholder needs; (2) sustained, ongoing regional interactions with users, (3) a commitment to improve climate literacy; (4) support for assessment as an ongoing, iterative process; (5) full recognition that stakeholder decisions are seldom made using climate information alone; (6) strong interagency partnership; (7) national implementation and regional in focus; (8) capability spanning local, state, tribal, regional, national and international space scales, and weeks to millennia time scales; and (9) institutional design and scientific support flexible enough to assure the effort is nimble enough to respond to rapidly-changing stakeholder needs. The RISA experience also highlights the central role that universities must play in national climate change adaptation programs. Universities have a tradition of trusted regional stakeholder partnerships, as well as the interdisciplinary expertise - including social science, ecosystem science, law, and economics - required to meet stakeholder climate-related needs; project workforce can also shift rapidly in universities. Universities have a proven ability to build and sustain interagency partnerships. Universities excel in most forms of education and training. And universities often have proven entrepreneurship, technology transfer and private sector

  7. Ice sheets viewed from the ocean: the contribution of marine science to understanding modern and past ice sheets.

    PubMed

    Ó Cofaigh, Colm

    2012-12-13

    Over the last two decades, marine science, aided by technological advances in sediment coring, geophysical imaging and remotely operated submersibles, has played a major role in the investigation of contemporary and former ice sheets. Notable advances have been achieved with respect to reconstructing the extent and flow dynamics of the large polar ice sheets and their mid-latitude counterparts during the Quaternary from marine geophysical and geological records of landforms and sediments on glacier-influenced continental margins. Investigations of the deep-sea ice-rafted debris record have demonstrated that catastrophic collapse of large (10(5)-10(6) km(2)) ice-sheet drainage basins occurred on millennial and shorter time scales and had a major influence on oceanography. In the last few years, increasing emphasis has been placed on understanding physical processes at the ice-ocean interface, particularly at the grounding line, and on determining how these processes affect ice-sheet stability. This remains a major challenge, however, owing to the logistical constraints imposed by working in ice-infested polar waters and ice-shelf cavities. Furthermore, despite advances in reconstructing the Quaternary history of mid- and high-latitude ice sheets, major unanswered questions remain regarding West Antarctic ice-sheet stability, and the long-term offshore history of the East Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets remains poorly constrained. While these are major research frontiers in glaciology, and ones in which marine science has a pivotal role to play, realizing such future advances will require an integrated collaborative approach between oceanographers, glaciologists, marine geologists and numerical modellers. PMID:23129711

  8. [The contribution of L.G. Ramensky theoretical legacy to modern vegetation science (to the 130 anniversary of the scientist's birth)].

    PubMed

    Mirkin, B M; Naumova, L G

    2015-01-01

    L.G. Ramensky (1884-1953) was an outstanding Soviet geobotanist of the first part of XX century. Considered is his theoretical legacy and its contribution to modern vegetation science. L.G. Ramensky formulated the principle of vegetation continuum based on which the modern paradigm of vegetation science has been put into shape. The scientist made a contribution to the development of such important theoretical conceptions as types of plant strategy, coenosis and coenobiosis (coexistence of species), patterns of interannual variability in plant communities, ecological successions. The unique ecological scales were established by L.G. Ramensky that characterize the distribution of 1400 species over the gradients of soil moistening, richness, and salinization as well as moistening variability, pastoral digression, and alluvial intensity. He came out against mechanistic notions by V.N. Sukachev on a biogeocoenosis structure. The scientist did not offer his own method of plant communities classification but his well-reasoned criticism of dominant classification played a great role in adoption of floristical classification principles (Braun-Blanquet approach) by phytocenology in our country. PMID:26201220

  9. A landmark contribution to poultry science--a possible mode of action of sulfamethazine on the reproductive system of Leghorn cockerels.

    PubMed

    Kuenzel, W J

    2009-04-01

    The paper "The effect of sulfamethazine feeding on the thyroids, combs and testes of Single Comb White Leghorn cockerels" was published early in the career of Ari van Tienhoven when he was an assistant professor. The current manuscript pays tribute to that study submitted to the journal, Poultry Science, over 5 decades ago. In addition, the review examines the academic lineage of van Tienhoven to show that his line of descent produced several scientists who have contributed significantly to the success of the Poultry Science Association in the discipline of neuroendocrinology and avian physiology during most of its first 100 yr. In a quiet, unassuming manner, van Tienhoven has had a major effect on basic research addressing reproductive endocrinology in vertebrates, particularly in the domestic fowl, Gallus gallus. Biographical information, his academic pedigree, students produced, research areas pursued, and the landmark contribution selected for review are highlighted. A link to an electronic archive of a recorded interview with van Tienhoven in preparation for the symposium can be accessed using the link given in the first footnote. PMID:19276428

  10. Individual and Regional-level Factors Contributing to Variation in Length of Stay After Cerebral Infarction in Six European Countries.

    PubMed

    Peltola, Mikko; Seppälä, Timo T; Malmivaara, Antti; Belicza, Éva; Numerato, Dino; Goude, Fanny; Fletcher, Eilidh; Heijink, Richard

    2015-12-01

    Using patient-level data for cerebral infarction cases in 2007, gathered from Finland, Hungary, Italy, the Netherlands, Scotland and Sweden, we studied the variation in risk-adjusted length of stay (LoS) of acute hospital care and 1-year mortality, both within and between countries. In addition, we analysed the variance of LoS and associations of selected regional-level factors with LoS and 1-year mortality after cerebral infarction. The data show that LoS distributions are surprisingly different across countries and that there is significant deviation in the risk-adjusted regional-level LoS in all of the countries studied. We used negative binomial regression to model the individual-level LoS, and random intercept models and ordinary least squares regression for the regional-level analysis of risk-adjusted LoS, variance of LoS, 1-year risk-adjusted mortality and crude mortality for a period of 31-365 days. The observed variations between regions and countries in both LoS and mortality were not fully explained by either patient-level or regional-level factors. The results indicate that there may exist potential for efficiency gains in acute hospital care of cerebral infarction and that healthcare managers could learn from best practices. PMID:26633867

  11. The politics of Piketty: what political science can learn from, and contribute to, the debate on Capital in the twenty-first century.

    PubMed

    Hopkin, Jonathan

    2014-12-01

    Thomas Piketty's imposing volume has brought serious economics firmly into the mainstream of public debate on inequality, yet political science has been mostly absent from this debate. This article argues that political science has an essential contribution to make to this debate, and that Piketty's important and powerful book lacks a clear political theory. It develops this argument by first assessing and critiquing the changing nature of political science and its account of contemporary capitalism, and then suggesting how Piketty's thesis can be complemented, extended and challenged by focusing on the ways in which politics and collective action shape the economy and the distribution of income and wealth. Although Capital's principal message is that 'capital is back' and that without political interventions active political interventions will continue to grow, a political economy perspective would suggest another rather more fundamental critique: the very economic forces Piketty describes are embedded in institutional arrangements which can only be properly understood as political phenomena. In a sense capital itself - the central concept of the book - is almost meaningless without proper consideration of its political foundations. Even if the fact of capital accumulation may respond to an economic logic, the process is embedded in a very political logic. The examples of housing policy and the regulation, and failure to regulate, financial markets are used to illustrate these points. PMID:25516346

  12. Science for All and the Quality of Life. Report of the UNESCO/APEID Regional Workshop on Science and Technology Education at Lower Secondary Level (Kathmandu, Nepal, March 12-21, 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Asian Centre for Educational Innovation for Development.

    This book is the report of the UNESCO/APEID Regional Workshop on Science and Technology Education at Lower Secondary Level. Part I is the Source Book which has three chapters. Chapter 1 is on emerging policy and strategy aspects for science and technology education at the lower secondary level. Chapter 2 discusses the implications for teacher…

  13. Some Activities in the Regional Collaborative for Excellence in Science Teaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Jim; Crocker, Betty

    2012-10-01

    Select activities that are ``teacher and student engaging,'' will be presented along with a discussion of the goals and objectives of the program. Science and mathematics teachers are recruited from high minority low socio-economic schools to learn science content in an engaging environment of hands-on activities to develop an understanding of basic chemistry, biological cycles, effective teaching strategies, state standards, and how scientific and technological devices work. Participants are taught how to design 5E lesson plans, design pre and post-tests of lessons, and incorporate research based effective teaching models into their class rooms. Prior Collaborative teachers are recruited to act as participants, recruiters, and as mentor teachers for teachers who are joining each cycle of the program.

  14. Space life sciences pilot user development program for the midwest region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The use of space for research by the life science community was promoted through a series of informal one-day seminars with personal follow-up as circumstances dictated. The programs were planned to: (1) describe the space shuttle vehicle and some of its intended uses; (2) discuss problems of manned space flight; (3) stimulate ideas for biological research in space; (4) discuss costs and potential for industrial and; government sponsorship; and (5) show the researcher or corporate planner how to become an active participant in life sciences research in space. An outline of seminar topics is included along with a description of the seminar organization and lists of participants and materials used.

  15. Apollo 17 preliminary science report. [Apollo 17 investigation of Taurus-Littrow lunar region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    An analysis of the Apollo 17 flight is presented in the form of a preliminary science report. The subjects discussed are: (1) Apollo 17 site selection, (2) mission description, (3) geological investigation of landing site, (4) lunar experiments, (5) visual flight flash phenomenon, (6) volcanic studies, (7) mare ridges and related studies, (8) remote sensing and photogrammetric studies, and (9) astronomical photography. Extensive photographic data are included for all phases of the mission.

  16. John Lubbock's early contribution to the understanding of river terraces and their importance to Geography, Archaeology and Earth Science

    PubMed Central

    Bridgland, David R.

    2014-01-01

    In his writings John Lubbock expounded views on the understanding of past climates, prehistoric faunas, early humans, and the evolution of landscape and river systems. His contributions on some of these related topics are scarcely remembered, despite comparison with modern thinking showing them frequently to have been prescient. He visited the Somme valley, observing river terrace gravels and Palaeolithic artefacts in the company of the leading geologists and archaeologists of his day, visits that furnished knowledge of the early archaeological record and were also formative in terms of his understanding of river-valley and landscape evolution. He noted that terraces represented former valley-floor levels and that rivers had deepened their valleys in response to uplift of the land, something that is often not fully grasped at the present time. He was also an early believer in interglacial–glacial climatic fluctuation, an idea not widely accepted in Britain until after his death.

  17. Opportunities and Challenges for the Contribution of Citizen Science to High-Quality, Traceable Indicators of Biodiversity in the Context of Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weltzin, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    environmental variation and climate change, (2) how citizen science can address these challenges within suitable domains or disciplines, and (3) minimal requirements for citizen science projects to maximize their contribution to the production of high-quality, traceable indicators of biodiversity.

  18. Trajectory and contribution of geoscientists (1906-1961) to dinosaur research in the Bauru Group (Cretaceous) in the Triângulo Mineiro region of Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peyerl, Drielli; Candeiro, Carlos Roberto A.; Mendonça Figueirôa, Silvia Fernanda

    2015-08-01

    The present study discusses geological and paleontological research conducted by geoscientists in the Late Cretaceous Bauru Group, of the Triângulo Mineiro region, Brazil. This analysis based largely on historical documentary sources focuses on the pioneering work of geoscientists, who made numerous discoveries of dinosaur fossils. This work contributes to a chronological survey that has been compiled on the geological studies in the Bauru Group, and describes the importance of the paleontological discoveries made during the twentieth century.

  19. Regional variation of the inwardly rectifying potassium current in the canine heart and the contributions to differences in action potential repolarization.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Jonathan M; Zeina, Tanya; Goodrow, Robert; Kaplan, Aaron D; Thomas, Lini M; Nesterenko, Vladislav V; Treat, Jacqueline A; Hawel, Leo; Byus, Craig; Bett, Glenna C; Rasmusson, Randall L; Panama, Brian K

    2015-07-01

    The inward rectifier potassium current, IK1, contributes to the terminal phase of repolarization of the action potential (AP), as well as the value and stability of the resting membrane potential. Regional variation in IK1 has been noted in the canine heart, but the biophysical properties have not been directly compared. We examined the properties and functional contribution of IK1 in isolated myocytes from ventricular, atrial and Purkinje tissue. APs were recorded from canine left ventricular midmyocardium, left atrial and Purkinje tissue. The terminal rate of repolarization of the AP in ventricle, but not in Purkinje, depended on changes in external K(+) ([K(+)]o). Isolated ventricular myocytes had the greatest density of IK1 while atrial myocytes had the lowest. Furthermore, the outward component of IK1 in ventricular cells exhibited a prominent outward component and steep negative slope conductance, which was also enhanced in 10 mM [K(+)]o. In contrast, both Purkinje and atrial cells exhibited little outward IK1, even in the presence of 10 mM [K(+)]o, and both cell types showed more persistent current at positive potentials. Expression of Kir2.1 in the ventricle was 76.9-fold higher than that of atria and 5.8-fold higher than that of Purkinje, whereas the expression of Kir2.2 and Kir2.3 subunits was more evenly distributed in Purkinje and atria. Finally, AP clamp data showed distinct contributions of IK1 for each cell type. IK1 and Kir2 subunit expression varies dramatically in regions of the canine heart and these regional differences in Kir2 expression likely underlie regional distinctions in IK1 characteristics, contributing to variations in repolarization in response to in [K(+)]o changes. PMID:25889894

  20. Considerations for the composition of visual scene displays: potential contributions of information from visual and cognitive sciences.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Krista M; Light, Janice; Drager, Kathryn

    2012-09-01

    Aided augmentative and alternative (AAC) interventions have been demonstrated to facilitate a variety of communication outcomes in persons with intellectual disabilities. Most aided AAC systems rely on a visual modality. When the medium for communication is visual, it seems likely that the effectiveness of intervention depends in part on the effectiveness and efficiency with which the information presented in the display can be perceived, identified, and extracted by communicators and their partners. Understanding of visual-cognitive processing - that is, how a user attends, perceives, and makes sense of the visual information on the display - therefore seems critical to designing effective aided AAC interventions. In this Forum Note, we discuss characteristics of one particular type of aided AAC display, that is, Visual Scene Displays (VSDs) as they may relate to user visual and cognitive processing. We consider three specific ways in which bodies of knowledge drawn from the visual cognitive sciences may be relevant to the composition of VSDs, with the understanding the direct research with children with complex communication needs is necessary to verify or refute our speculations. PMID:22946989

  1. Considerations for the Composition of Visual Scene Displays: Potential Contributions of Information from Visual and Cognitive Sciences (Forum Note)

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Krista M.; Light, Janice; Drager, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    Aided augmentative and alternative (AAC) interventions have been demonstrated to facilitate a variety of communication outcomes in persons with intellectual disabilities. Most aided AAC systems rely on a visual modality. When the medium for communication is visual, it seems likely that the effectiveness of intervention depends in part on the effectiveness and efficiency with which the information presented in the display can be perceived, identified, and extracted by communicators and their partners. Understanding of visual-cognitive processing – that is, how a user attends, perceives, and makes sense of the visual information on the display – therefore seems critical to designing effective aided AAC interventions. In this Forum Note, we discuss characteristics of one particular type of aided AAC display, that is, Visual Scene Displays (VSDs) as they may relate to user visual and cognitive processing. We consider three specific ways in which bodies of knowledge drawn from the visual cognitive sciences may be relevant to the composition of VSDs, with the understanding the direct research with children with complex communication needs is necessary to verify or refute our speculations. PMID:22946989

  2. Quantifying the respective contribution of wind stress and diabatic forcing to decadal temperature changes and regional sea level trends over 1993-2010 based on ECCO solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llovel, W.; Fukumori, I.; Wang, O.

    2013-12-01

    Since 1993 and based on satellite altimetry data, sea level trends display a large regional variability. Some regions experience a sea level rise (e.g., the west tropical Pacific Ocean, the subpolar north Atlantic Ocean...) whereas other regions experience a drop (e.g., the east tropical Pacific Ocean, golf of Alaska...). Those sea level trends appear to be steric in nature. Moreover, steric changes appear to be mainly thermosteric, although halosteric effects can reduce or enhance thermosteric changes in some specific regions (Stammer et al., 2013). Understanding and quantifying the processes involved in regional sea level changes are important tasks to better constrain and ascertain the physical processes involved in regional sea level changes and then, to improve predictions to anticipate potential impacts. In this study, we analyze the ocean heat content change and its origin by analyzing Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean estimates (ECCO, Wunsch et al., 2009). We run numerical experiments to estimate and quantify the respective contribution of each atmospheric forcing (e.g., wind stress and diabatic forcing) to heat content change and regional sea level trends.

  3. Southeast Regional Assessment Project for the National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center, U.S. Geological Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dalton, Melinda S.; Jones, Sonya A.

    2010-01-01

    expanded to address climate change-related impacts on all Department of the Interior (DOI) resources. The NCCWSC will establish a network of eight DOI Regional Climate Science Centers (RCSCs) that will work with a variety of partners to provide natural resource managers with tools and information that will help them anticipate and adapt conservation planning and design for projected climate change. The forecasting products produced by the RCSCs will aid fish, wildlife, and land managers in designing suitable adaptive management approaches for their programs. The DOI also is developing Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCCs) as science and conservation action partnerships at subregional scales. The USGS is working with the Southeast Region of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) to develop science collaboration between the future Southeast RCSC and future LCCs. The NCCWSC Southeast Regional Assessment Project (SERAP) will begin to develop regional downscaled climate models, land cover change models, regional ecological models, regional watershed models, and other science tools. Models and data produced by SERAP will be used in a collaborative process between the USGS, the FWS (LCCs), State and federal partners, nongovernmental organizations, and academia to produce science at appropriate scales to answer resource management questions. The SERAP will produce an assessment of climate change, and impacts on land cover, ecosystems, and priority species in the region. The predictive tools developed by the SERAP project team will allow end users to better understand potential impacts of climate change and sea level rise on terrestrial and aquatic populations in the Southeastern United States. The SERAP capitalizes on the integration of five existing projects: (1) the Multi-State Conservation Grants Program project "Designing Sustainable Landscapes," (2) the USGS multidisciplinary Science Thrust project "Water Availability for Ecological Needs," (3) the USGS Southeast Pilot

  4. Alloy synthesis using the mach stem region in an axial symmetric implosive shock: Understanding the pressure strain-temperature contributions

    SciTech Connect

    Staudhammer, Karl P.

    2004-01-01

    The Mach stem region in an axial symmetric shock implosion has generally been avoided in the dynamic consolidation of powders for a number of reasons. The prime reason being that the convergence of the shock waves in the cylindrical axis produce enormous pressures and concomitant temperatures that have melted tungsten. This shock wave convergence consequently results in a discontinuity in the hydro-code calculations. Dynamic deformation experiments on gold plated 304L stainless steel powders were undertaken. These experiments utilized pressures of 0.08 to 1.0 Mbar and contained a symmetric radial melt region along the central axis of the sample holder. To understand the role of deformation in a porous material, the pressure, and temperature as well as the deformation heat and associated defects must be accounted for. When the added heat of consolidation deformation exceeds the melt temperature of the 304 powders, a melt zone results that can consume large regions of the compact while still under the high-pressure pulse. As the shock wave traverses the sample and is removed in a momentum trap, its pressure/temperature are quenched. It is within this region that very high diffusion/alloying occurs and has been observed in the gold plated powders. Anomalous increases of gold diffusion into 304 stainless steel have been observed via optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and EDAX measurements. Values exceeding 1200 m/sec have been measured and correlated to the powder sizes, size distribution and packing density, concomitant with sample container strains ranging from 2.0% to 26%.

  5. Systems Science, Catastrophe Theory, and Sub-regional Climate Change: 5 Case Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vickrey, G.

    2015-12-01

    We have performed 5 studies utilizing catastrophe theory to analyze several anthropogenic and broader biological factors in order to ascertain current and future climate changes for sub-regions generally characterized by the following: Appalachian Tennessee; South Southeastern Alaska; Sierra Nevada California; Ohio River Basin; North Central Illinois. Research to date has demonstrated a direct correlation to IPCC and external data sources; an ability to refine feedback predictions; and accuracy through modeling past-to-present structures. Further verification of process is being pursued. Should the data continue to register as verifiable, the finery will enable accurate analysis of current and future climate conditions in various sub-regions, with the model being replicable and distributable globally through web mechanisms for localized use. Analysis may then be employed as a driver for sub-regional mitigation and adaptation policy-making and programs.

  6. U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Western Region Kasatochi Volcano Coastal and Ocean Science

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeGange, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Alaska is noteworthy as a region of frequent seismic and volcanic activity. The region contains 52 historically active volcanoes, 14 of which have had at least one major eruptive event since 1990. Despite the high frequency of volcanic activity in Alaska, comprehensive studies of how ecosystems respond to volcanic eruptions are non-existent. On August 7, 2008, Kasatochi Volcano, in the central Aleutian Islands, erupted catastrophically, covering the island with ash and hot pyroclastic flow material. Kasatochi Island was an annual monitoring site of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge (AMNWR); therefore, features of the terrestrial and nearshore ecosystems of the island were well known. In 2009, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), AMNWR, and University of Alaska Fairbanks began long-term studies to better understand the effects of the eruption and the role of volcanism in structuring ecosystems in the Aleutian Islands, a volcano-dominated region with high natural resource values.

  7. Contribution of Amino Acid Region 334−335 from Factor Va Heavy Chain to the Catalytic Efficiency of Prothrombinase†

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    We have demonstrated that amino acids E323, Y324, E330, and V331 from the factor Va heavy chain are required for the interaction of the cofactor with factor Xa and optimum rates of prothrombin cleavage. We have also shown that amino acid region 332−336 contains residues that are important for cofactor function. Using overlapping peptides, we identified amino acids D334 and Y335 as contributors to cofactor activity. We constructed recombinant factor V molecules with the mutations D334 → K and Y335 → F (factor VKF) and D334 → A and Y335 → A (factor VAA). Kinetic studies showed that while factor VaKF and factor VaAA had a KD for factor Xa similar to the KD observed for wild-type factor Va (factor VaWT), the clotting activities of the mutant molecules were impaired and the kcat of prothrombinase assembled with factor VaKF and factor VaAA was reduced. The second-order rate constant of prothrombinase assembled with factor VaKF or factor VaAA for prothrombin activation was ∼10-fold lower than the second-order rate constant for the same reaction catalyzed by prothrombinase assembled with factor VaWT. We also created quadruple mutants combining mutations in the amino acid region 334–335 with mutations at the previously identified amino acids that are important for factor Xa binding (i.e., E323Y324 and E330V331). Prothrombinase assembled with the quadruple mutant molecules displayed a second-order rate constant up to 400-fold lower than the values obtained with prothrombinase assembled with factor VaWT. The data demonstrate that amino acid region 334–335 is required for the rearrangement of enzyme and substrate necessary for efficient catalysis of prothrombin by prothrombinase. PMID:18537263

  8. Contribution of the aquitard to the regional groundwater hydrochemistry of the underlying confined aquifer in the Pearl River Delta, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya; Jiao, Jiu Jimmy; Cherry, John A; Lee, Chun Ming

    2013-09-01

    Aquitards are capable of generating and preserving large amounts of chemicals. The release of the chemicals from the aquitards poses a potential contamination risk to groundwater that may be used as a drinking water source. This work aimed to identify the contribution of hydrogeochemical processes in the aquitards to groundwater hydrochemistry in the underlying confined basal aquifer by studying the coastal Quaternary aquifer-aquitard system of the Pearl River Delta, China. The system was submerged by paleo-seawater in the early Holocene and mainly receives infiltration of precipitation at present, as indicated by investigations on stable isotopes (δ(2)H, δ(18)O), water chemistry (SO4(2-) and Cl(-)) and salinity. Significant correlations between total dissolved solids in the basal aquifer and the thickness of the overlying aquitard further suggested the contribution of the aquitard to the groundwater hydrochemistry in the aquifer. Significant correlations between the chloride concentrations in aquitard porewater and that in groundwater in the aquifer, and between the thickness of the aquitard and the chloride concentrations in groundwater indicated the strong influence of the aquitard on the chloride in the aquifer. This is probably because the low-permeability aquitard is capable of preserving the paleo-seawater in the aquifer and releasing the salinity from the aquitard down to the aquifer via downward flow or diffusion. Isotopic and geochemical studies revealed that the aquitard is also responsible for generating and preserving large amounts of naturally occurring ammonium. Analysis between the concentrations of ammonium in groundwater in the basal aquifer and the total available ammonium in aquitard sediments suggested that the former is significantly controlled by the latter. PMID:23770547

  9. Identification of two distinct structural regions in a human porcine endogenous retrovirus receptor, HuPAR2, contributing to function for viral entry

    PubMed Central

    Marcucci, Katherine T; Argaw, Takele; Wilson, Carolyn A; Salomon, Daniel R

    2009-01-01

    Background Of the three subclasses of Porcine Endogenous Retrovirus (PERV), PERV-A is able to infect human cells via one of two receptors, HuPAR1 or HuPAR2. Characterizing the structure-function relationships of the two HuPAR receptors in PERV-A binding and entry is important in understanding receptor-mediated gammaretroviral entry and contributes to evaluating the risk of zoonosis in xenotransplantation. Results Chimeras of the non-permissive murine PAR and the permissive HuPAR2, which scanned the entire molecule, revealed that the first 135 amino acids of HuPAR2 are critical for PERV-A entry. Within this critical region, eighteen single residue differences exist. Site-directed mutagenesis used to map single residues confirmed the previously identified L109 as a binding and infectivity determinant. In addition, we identified seven residues contributing to the efficiency of PERV-A entry without affecting envelope binding, located in multiple predicted structural motifs (intracellular, extracellular and transmembrane). We also show that expression of HuPAR2 in a non-permissive cell line results in an average 11-fold higher infectivity titer for PERV-A compared to equal expression of HuPAR1, although PERV-A envelope binding is similar. Chimeras between HuPAR-1 and -2 revealed that the region spanning amino acids 152–285 is responsible for the increase of HuPAR2. Fine mapping of this region revealed that the increased receptor function required the full sequence rather than one or more specific residues. Conclusion HuPAR2 has two distinct structural regions. In one region, a single residue determines binding; however, in both regions, multiple residues influence receptor function for PERV-A entry. PMID:19144196

  10. SCIENCE RESULTS INTEGRATION. BRINGING MOLECULAR BIOLOGY TECHNIQUES TO REGIONAL WATER MONITORING PROGRAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's Office of Research and Development (ORD) develops innovative methods for use in environmental monitoring and assessment by scientists in Regions, states, and Tribes. Molecular-biology-based methods are not yet established in the environmental monitoring "tool box". SRI (Sci...

  11. Introducing Multicultural Science into the Chemistry Curriculum in the Mexican-American Border Region

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, K. Christopher; Cardenas, Angelica

    2012-01-01

    Traditional beliefs in the Mexican-American border region were compiled by students in an introductory general chemistry course. A subset of these traditional beliefs was used to develop a survey administered in later chemistry courses and as the basis for short research studies conducted by students in these later chemistry courses. The data…

  12. A method for apportionment of natural and anthropogenic contributions to heavy metal loadings in the surface soils across large-scale regions.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yuanan; Cheng, Hefa

    2016-07-01

    Quantification of the contributions from anthropogenic sources to soil heavy metal loadings on regional scales is challenging because of the heterogeneity of soil parent materials and high variability of anthropogenic inputs, especially for the species that are primarily of lithogenic origin. To this end, we developed a novel method for apportioning the contributions of natural and anthropogenic sources by combining sequential extraction and stochastic modeling, and applied it to investigate the heavy metal pollution in the surface soils of the Pearl River Delta (PRD) in southern China. On the average, 45-86% of Zn, Cu, Pb, and Cd were present in the acid soluble, reducible, and oxidizable fractions of the surface soils, while only 12-24% of Ni, Cr, and As were partitioned in these fractions. The anthropogenic contributions to the heavy metals in the non-residual fractions, even the ones dominated by natural sources, could be identified and quantified by conditional inference trees. Combination of sequential extraction, Kriging interpolation, and stochastic modeling reveals that approximately 10, 39, 6.2, 28, 7.1, 15, and 46% of the As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn, respectively, in the surface soils of the PRD were contributed by anthropogenic sources. These results were in general agreements with those obtained through subtraction of regional soil metal background from total loadings, and the soil metal inputs through atmospheric deposition as well. In the non-residual fractions of the surface soils, the anthropogenic contributions to As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn, were 48, 42, 50, 51, 49, 24, and 70%, respectively. PMID:27108044

  13. Comparison of glacial isostasy contribution to the sea level changes during the Holocene in West and East Antarctic regions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poleshchuk, Ksenia; Verkulich, Sergey; Pushina, Zina

    2016-04-01

    Antarctica as geographically completed and tectonically compound continent is an interesting object for study of glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) and sea level changes in the Holocene. The analysis of relative sea level curves is one of the most indicative approaches for glacio-isostasy estimation. The present study focuses on two different regions of Antarctic margin which sea-level changes are well researched. We compare our relative sea-level curves for Bunger Oasis (East Antarctica) and King George Island (West Antarctica) that were obtained from new geomorphological, paleogeographical and micropaleontological data. The results showed notable difference: the maximum relative water altitude had occurred between 8 000 - 6 000 yr BP and had reached 12 m a. s. l. in the Bunger Oasis and 18-20 m a. s. l. in King George Island. Furthermore, the research of other Antarctic regions revealed significant differences in sea-level altitudes. Following analysis of constructed curves and computative GIA models allow us to estimate the possible extent of glacial isostatic adjustment. Besides, this observation has indicated the importance of deglaciation rates and local tectonic features. The reported study was funded by RFBR according to the research project No. 16-35-00346 mol_a.

  14. Region-Specific Cis- and Trans-Acting Factors Contribute to Genetic Variability in Meiotic Recombination in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Timmermans, MCP.; Das, O. P.; Bradeen, J. M.; Messing, J.

    1997-01-01

    Understanding the genetic basis for variability in recombination rates is important for general genetic studies and plant-breeding efforts. Earlier studies had suggested increased recombination frequencies in particular F(2) populations derived from the maize inbred A188. A detailed phenotypic and molecular analysis was undertaken to extend these observations and dissect the responsible factors. A heritable increase in recombination in the sh1-bz1 interval was observed in these populations. A factor causing an approximate twofold increase mapped to the A188 Sh1-Bz1 region, behaved as a dominant, cis-acting factor, affected recombination equally in male and female sporogenesis and did not reduce the wellstudied complete interference in the adjacent bz1-wx interval. This factor also did not increase recombination frequencies in the c1-sh1 and bz1-wx intervals, demonstrating independent control of recombination in adjacent intervals. Additional phenotypic analysis of recombination in the c1-sh1 and bz1-wx intervals and RFLP analysis of recombination along chromosomes 7 and 5 suggested that heritable factors controlling recombination in these intervals act largely independently and in trans. Our results show that recombination in these populations, and possibly maize in general, is controlled by both cis- and transacting factors that affect specific chromosomal regions. PMID:9215911

  15. Spread of Coxiella burnetii between dairy cattle herds in an enzootic region: modelling contributions of airborne transmission and trade.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Pranav; Hoch, Thierry; Ezanno, Pauline; Beaudeau, François; Vergu, Elisabeta

    2016-01-01

    Q fever, a worldwide zoonotic disease caused by Coxiella burnetii, is a looming concern for livestock and public health. Epidemiological features of inter-herd transmission of C. burnetii in cattle herds by wind and trade of cows are poorly understood. We present a novel dynamic spatial model describing the inter-herd regional spread of C. burnetii in dairy cattle herds, quantifying the ability of airborne transmission and animal trade in C. burnetii propagation in an enzootic region. Among all the new herd infections, 92% were attributed to airborne transmission and the rest to cattle trade. Infections acquired following airborne transmission were shown to cause relatively small and ephemeral intra-herd outbreaks. On the contrary, disease-free herds purchasing an infectious cow experienced significantly higher intra-herd prevalence. The results also indicated that, for short duration, both transmission routes were independent from each other without any synergistic effect. The model outputs applied to the Finistère department in western France showed satisfactory sensitivity (0.71) and specificity (0.80) in predicting herd infection statuses at the end of one year in a neighbourhood of 3 km around expected incident herds, when compared with data. The model developed here thus provides important insights into the spread of C. burnetii between dairy cattle herds and paves the way for implementation and assessment of control strategies. PMID:27048416

  16. Contribution to knowledge of the genus Chydaeus in Xizang Autonomous Region [Tibet] and Yunnan Province, China (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Harpalini)

    PubMed Central

    Kataev, Boris M.; Liang, Hongbin; Kavanaugh, David H.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Five new species of the genus Chydaeus Chaudoir, 1854 are described from China: Chydaeus fugongensis sp. n. (Shibali, Fugong County, Yunnan Province), Chydaeus gutangensis sp. n. (Gutang, Medog County, Xizang Autonomous Region [Tibet]), Chydaeus hanmiensis sp. n. (Hanmi, Medog County, Xizang Autonomous Region [Tibet]), Chydaeus asetosus sp. n. (NE of Fugong, Yunnan Province), and Chydaeus baoshanensis sp. n. (N of Baoshan, Yunnan Province). Taxonomic and faunistic notes on eleven other species occurring in Xizang and Yunnan are also provided. Chydaeus shunichii Ito, 2006 is re-described, based on specimens from Lushui County, Yunnan. Chydaeus kumei Ito, 1992 is treated as a subspecies of Chydaeus andrewesi Schauberger, 1932 [NEW STATUS]. The taxonomic status of Chydaeus guangxiensis Ito, 2006 is discussed. The following taxa are recorded from China for the first time: Chydaeus obtusicollis Schauberger, 1932 (Xizang and Yunnan), Chydaeus malaisei Kataev & Schmidt, 2006 (Yunnan), Chydaeus semenowi (Tschitschérine, 1899) (Xizang and Yunnan), Chydaeus andrewesi andrewesi Schauberger, 1932 (Xizang and Yunnan), Chydaeus andrewesi kumei Ito (Yunnan), Chydaeus bedeli interjectus Kataev & Schmidt, 2002 (Xizang), and Chydaeus bedeli vietnamensis Kataev & Schmidt, 2002 (Yunnan). PMID:22423195

  17. The contribution of the Global Change Observatory Central Asia to seismic hazard and risk assessment in the Central Asian region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parolai, S.; Bindi, D.; Haberland, C. A.; Pittore, M.; Pilz, M.; Rosenau, M.; Schurr, B.; Wieland, M.; Yuan, X.

    2012-12-01

    Central Asia has one of the world's highest levels of earthquake hazard, owing to its exceptionally high deformation rates. Moreover, vulnerability to natural disasters in general is increasing, due to rising populations and a growing dependence on complex lifelines and technology. Therefore, there is an urgent need to undertake seismic hazard and risk assessment in this region, while at the same time improving upon existing methodologies, including the consideration of temporal variability in the seismic hazard, and in structural and social vulnerability. Over the last few years, the German Research Center for Geosciences (GFZ), in collaboration with local partners, has initiated a number of scientific activities within the framework of the Global Change Observatory Central Asia (GCO-CA). The work is divided into projects with specific concerns: - The installation and maintenance of the Central-Asian Real-time Earthquake MOnitoring Network (CAREMON) and the setup of a permanent wireless mesh network for structural health monitoring in Bishkek. - The TIPAGE and TIPTIMON projects focus on the geodynamics of the Tien-Shan, Pamir and Hindu Kush region, the deepest and most active intra-continental subduction zone in the world. The work covers time scales from millions of years to short-term snapshots based on geophysical measurements of seismotectonic activity and of the physical properties of the crust and upper mantle, as well as their coupling with other surface processes (e.g., landslides). - Existing risk analysis methods assume time-independent earthquake hazard and risk, although temporal changes are likely to occur due to, for example, co- and post-seismic changes in the regional stress field. We therefore aim to develop systematic time-dependent hazard and risk analysis methods in order to undertake the temporal quantification of earthquake activity (PROGRESS). - To improve seismic hazard assessment for better loss estimation, detailed site effects studies

  18. On the importance for climate science communication - the climate office for polar regions and sea level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treffeisen, Renate; Lemke, Peter; Dethloff, Klaus

    2010-05-01

    Climate change presents a major challenge for national and international action and cooperation. A wide variation in the vulnerability is to be expected across different regions, due to regional differences in local environmental conditions, preexisting stresses to ecosystems, current resource-use patterns, and the framework of factors affecting decision-making including government policies, prices, preferences, and values. Thus, considerable regional impact differences will be faced as a result of climate change. Being aware will help to prepare for these inevitable consequences in time. Climate change is nowhere more strongly expressed than in the polar regions which respond to even small changes in climate. Given the major role played by these regions within the Earth's climate system the climate office for polar regions and sea level rise is hosted by the Foundation Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) which conducts research in the Arctic, the Antarctic and at temperate latitudes since 1980. The major goal of the climate office is to encourage the communication and dialogue between science and public. Primarily, this is done by the unique close contact and cooperation to the research center scientists. A continuous exchange is supported beyond the research center towards universities and authorities at state and federal level. The climate office represents polar aspects of climate related research based on the scientific expertise from the hosting research institute e.g. the understanding of the ocean-ice-atmosphere interactions, the animal and plant kingdoms of the Arctic and Antarctic, and the evolution of the polar continents and seas. The climate office translates the scientific work into English, making complex issues accessible to policymakers and the public. It compiles, evaluates, comprehensively process and transparently communicate the latest findings from polar related climate research. The paper will present different

  19. `I Actually Contributed to Their Research': The influence of an abbreviated summer apprenticeship program in science and engineering for diverse high-school learners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgin, Stephen R.; McConnell, William J.; Flowers, Alonzo M., III

    2015-02-01

    This study describes an investigation of a research apprenticeship program that we developed for diverse high-school students often underrepresented in similar programs and in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) professions. Through the apprenticeship program, students spent 2 weeks in the summer engaged in biofuels-related research practices within working university chemistry and engineering laboratories. The experience was supplemented by discussions and activities intended to impact nature of science (NOS) and inquiry understandings and to allow for an exploration of STEM careers and issues of self-identity. Participants completed a NOS questionnaire before and after the experience, were interviewed multiple times, and were observed while working in the laboratories. Findings revealed that as a result of the program, participants (1) demonstrated positive changes in their understandings of certain NOS aspects many of which were informed by their laboratory experiences, (2) had an opportunity to explore and strengthen STEM-related future plans, and (3) examined their self-identities. A majority of participants also described a sense of belonging within the laboratory groups and believed that they were making significant contributions to the ongoing work of those laboratories even though their involvement was necessarily limited due to the short duration of the program. For students who were most influenced by the program, the belonging they felt was likely related to issues of identity and career aspirations.

  20. Population inhalation exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and associated lung cancer risk in Beijing region: Contributions of indoor and outdoor sources and exposures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Bin; Zhao, Bin

    2012-12-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are among the most toxic air pollutants in China. Efforts in assessing population inhalation exposure to PAHs, and its contribution to lung cancer risk for Chinese residents, have been limited due to insufficient data on measured indoor concentrations. A mass-balance model to predict indoor PAH concentrations was developed, along with estimated exposures and attributable lung cancer risks for residents in the Beijing region in 2006, with a 2-stage Monte Carlo simulation framework. The exposures and risks were split into three parts, based on the sources and places of exposure, to estimate the contributions of indoor and outdoor PAH sources and exposures, in order to better understand the source and place pattern of PAH exposure. PAHs bring considerable lung cancer risk to the population of Beijing region. The population attributable fraction (PAF) of lung cancer for Beijing's overall population is 2.99% [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.71%-4.26%]. Median contribution of indoor exposure to outdoor-originated PAHs (OUT-in) is 78% (CI: 73%-81%) in the overall population, for 97% (CI: 94%-99%) of whom OUT-in is the largest contributor. Rural residents are facing considerable exposure to indoor-originated PAHs (IN-in), which dominates the total exposure in 12% (CI: 2%-24%) of the rural population. This model framework could be used in quantitative comparison of different interventions on exposure to PAHs as well as other airborne pollutants.

  1. A highly conserved region of the Sendai virus nucleocapsid protein contributes to the NP-NP binding domain.

    PubMed

    Myers, T M; Pieters, A; Moyer, S A

    1997-03-17

    The nucleocapsid protein (NP) of Sendai virus is an essential component of both the nucleocapsid template and the NP-NP and NP0-P protein complexes required for viral RNA replication. When expressed alone in mammalian cells NP self-assembles into nucleocapsid-like particles which appear to contain cellular RNA. To identify putative NP-NP binding domains, fusions between the monomeric maltose-binding protein (MBP) and portions of NP were constructed. The fusion proteins which contain the central conserved region (CCR) (amino acids 258-357, MBP-NP1) and the N-terminal 255 amino acids (MBP-NP2) of NP both oligomerized, suggesting that these regions contain sequences important for NP-NP self-assembly. In addition, the MBP-NP1 fusion protein can function as an inhibitor of viral RNA replication. Complementary studies involving site-directed mutagenesis of the full-length NP protein have identified specific residues in the CCR which are essential for viral RNA replication in vitro. Two such replication-negative mutants, F324V and F324I, were defective in self-assembly, suggesting that the Phe residue at amino acid 324 is essential for the NP-NP interaction. A third mutant, NP260-1 (Y260D), self-assembled to form aberrant oligomers which exhibit an unusual helical structure and appear to lack any associated RNA. The mutants NP299-5 (L299I and I300V) and NP313-2 (I313F), in contrast, appear to form all the required protein complexes, but were inactive in viral RNA replication, suggesting that interactions specifically with Sendai RNA were disrupted. These data have thus identified specific residues in the CCR of the native NP protein which appear to be important for NP-NP or NP-RNA interactions and for genome replication. PMID:9126246

  2. The Contribution of Water Ice Clouds to the Water Cycle in the North Polar Region of Mars: Preliminary Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bass, D. S.; Tamppari, L. K.

    2000-01-01

    While it has long been known that Mars' north residual polar cap and the Martian regolith are significant sources of atmospheric water vapor, the amount of water vapor observed in the northern spring season by the Viking Mars Atmospheric Water Detector instrument (MAWD) cannot be attributed to cap and regolith sources alone. Kahn suggested that ice hazes may be the mechanism by which additional water is supplied to the Martian atmosphere. Additionally, a significant decrease in atmospheric water vapor was observed in the late northern summer that could not be correlated with the return of the cold seasonal C02 ice. While the detection of water ice clouds on Mars indicate that water exists in Mars' atmosphere in several different phases, the extent to which water ice clouds play a role in moving water through the Martian atmosphere remains uncertain. Work by Bass et. al. suggested that the time dependence of water ice cap seasonal variability and the increase in atmospheric water vapor depended on the polar cap center reaching 200K, the night time saturation temperature. Additionally, they demonstrated that a decrease in atmospheric water vapor may be attributed to deposition of water ice onto the surface of the polar cap; temperatures were still too warm at this time in the summer for the deposition of carbon dioxide. However, whether water ice clouds contribute significantly to this variability is unknown. Additional information is contained in original extended abstract.

  3. Atmospheric fallout of (129)I in Japan before the Fukushima accident: regional and global contributions (1963-2005).

    PubMed

    Toyama, Chiaki; Muramatsu, Yasuyuki; Igarashi, Yasuhito; Aoyama, Michio; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki

    2013-08-01

    Atmospheric (129)I deposition was studied in different locations of Japan (Akita, Tsukuba, Tokyo, and Ishigaki Island) with samples collected between 1963 and 2005 in order to understand the distribution and sources of this nuclide and provide a reference deposition level prior to the Fukushima accident. Over this time period, the deposition pattern of (129)I in Tsukuba and Tokyo (on the Pacific side) differed from that of Akita (on the Japan Sea side). The primary source of deposition in Tsukuba and Tokyo is related to the (129)I discharge from domestic reprocessing in Tokai-mura. In contrast, the time-series pattern of deposition in Akita seems to have been influenced by (129)I discharges from reprocessing facilities in Europe and the transport of this radionuclide by westerly winds to coastlines of the Japan Sea. The (129)I deposition in Ishigaki (one of the southernmost islands in Japan) is influenced primarily by oceanic air masses (easterly winds), and deposition was 1 order of magnitude lower than that observed in Tsukuba and Tokyo. Cumulative (129)I deposition in Tokyo before the Fukushima accident was estimated at 13 mBq/m(2). The results of this study on deposition contribute to understanding the deposition levels of (129)I prior to the accident. PMID:23829385

  4. Source Contributions of Urban PM2.5 in the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei Region: Changes between 2006 and 2013 and Relative Impacts of Emissions and Meteorology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Zhang, Q.; Zhang, Y.; Zheng, B.; Li, M.; Wang, K.; Chen, Y.; Wallington, T. J.; Han, W.; Shen, W.; Zhang, X.; He, K.

    2015-12-01

    Anthropogenic emissions in China have been controlled for years to improve ambient air quality. However, severe haze events caused by atmospheric aerosols with aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to 2.5 μm (PM2.5) have continued to occur, especially in the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei (BTH) region. The Chinese government has set an ambitious goal to reduce urban PM2.5 concentrations by 25% in BTH by 2017 relative to the 2012 levels. Source apportionment (SA) is necessary to the development of the effective emission control strategies. In this work, the Comprehensive Air Quality Model with extensions (CAMx) with the Particulate Source Apportionment Technology (PSAT) is applied to the China domain for the years 2006 and 2013. Ambient surface concentrations of PM2.5 and its components are generally well reproduced. To quantify the contributions of each emission category or region to PM2.5 in BTH, the total emissions are divided into 7 emission categories and 11 source regions. The source contributions determined in this work are generally consistent with results from previous work. In 2013, the industrial (44%) and residential (27%) sectors are the dominant contributors to urban PM2.5 in BTH. The residential sector is the largest contributor in winter; the industry sector dominates in other seasons. A slight increasing trend (+3% for industry and +6% for residential) is found in 2013 relative to 2006, necessitating more attention to these two sectors. Local emissions make the largest contribution (40%-60%) for all receptors. Change of source contribution of PM2.5 in Beijing and northern Hebei are dominate by change of local emission. However, for Tianjin, and central and southern Hebei, change of meteorology condition are as important as change of emission, because regional inflow in these areas is more important than in Beijing and northern Hebei and can increase under unfavorable weather conditions, indicating a strong need for regional joint emission control efforts

  5. Source contributions of urban PM2.5 in the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region: Changes between 2006 and 2013 and relative impacts of emissions and meteorology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, Yang; Zheng, Bo; Wang, Kai; Chen, Ying; Wallington, Timothy J.; Han, Weijian; Shen, Wei; Zhang, Xiaoye; He, Kebin

    2015-12-01

    Anthropogenic emissions in China have been controlled for years to improve ambient air quality. However, severe haze events caused by atmospheric aerosols with aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to 2.5 μm (PM2.5) have continued to occur, especially in the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei (BTH) region. The Chinese government has set an ambitious goal to reduce urban PM2.5 concentrations by 25% in BTH by 2017 relative to the 2012 levels. Source apportionment (SA) is necessary to the development of the effective emission control strategies. In this work, the Comprehensive Air Quality Model with extensions (CAMx) with the Particulate Source Apportionment Technology (PSAT) is applied to the China domain for the years 2006 and 2013. Ambient surface concentrations of PM2.5 and its components are generally well reproduced. To quantify the contributions of each emission category or region to PM2.5 in BTH, the total emissions are divided into 7 emission categories and 11 source regions. The source contributions determined in this work are generally consistent with results from previous work. In 2013, the industrial (44%) and residential (27%) sectors are the dominant contributors to urban PM2.5 in BTH. The residential sector is the largest contributor in winter; the industry sector dominates in other seasons. A slight increasing trend (+3% for industry and +6% for residential) is found in 2013 relative to 2006, necessitating more attention to these two sectors. Local emissions make the largest contribution (40%-60%) for all receptors. Change of source contribution of PM2.5 in Beijing and northern Hebei are dominate by change of local emission. However, for Tianjin, and central and southern Hebei, change of meteorology condition are as important as change of emission, because regional inflow in these areas is more important than in Beijing and northern Hebei and can increase under unfavorable weather conditions, indicating a strong need for regional joint emission control efforts

  6. Contribution of Amino Acid Region 659−663 of Factor Va Heavy Chain to the Activity of Factor Xa within Prothrombinase†,‡

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Factor Va, the cofactor of prothrombinase, is composed of heavy and light chains associated noncovalently in the presence of divalent metal ions. The COOH-terminal region of the heavy chain contains acidic amino acid clusters that are important for cofactor activity. In this work, we have investigated the role of amino acid region 659−663, which contains five consecutive acidic amino acid residues, by site-directed mutagenesis. We have generated factor V molecules in which all residues were mutated to either lysine (factor V5K) or alanine (factor V5A). We have also constructed a mutant molecule with this region deleted (factor VΔ659−663). The recombinant molecules along with wild-type factor V (factor VWT) were transiently expressed in mammalian cells, purified, and assessed for cofactor activity. Two-stage clotting assays revealed that the mutant molecules had reduced clotting activities compared to that of factor VaWT. Kinetic analyses of prothrombinase assembled with the mutant molecules demonstrated diminished kcat values, while the affinity of all mutant molecules for factor Xa was similar to that for factor VaWT. Gel electrophoresis analyses of plasma-derived and recombinant mutant prothrombin activation demonstrated delayed cleavage of prothrombin at both Arg320 and Arg271 by prothrombinase assembled with the mutant molecules, resulting in meizothrombin lingering throughout the activation process. These results were confirmed after analysis of the cleavage of FPR-meizothrombin. Our findings provide new insights into the structural contribution of the acidic COOH-terminal region of factor Va heavy chain to factor Xa activity within prothrombinase and demonstrate that amino acid region 659−663 from the heavy chain of the cofactor contributes to the regulation of the rate of cleavage of prothrombin by prothrombinase. PMID:20722419

  7. Identifying Watershed Regions Sensitive to Soil Erosion and Contributing to Lake Eutrophication—A Case Study in the Taihu Lake Basin (China)

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chen; Ma, Ronghua; He, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Taihu Lake in China is suffering from severe eutrophication partly due to non-point pollution from the watershed. There is an increasing need to identify the regions within the watershed that most contribute to lake water degradation. The selection of appropriate temporal scales and lake indicators is important to identify sensitive watershed regions. This study selected three eutrophic lake areas, including Meiliang Bay (ML), Zhushan Bay (ZS), and the Western Coastal region (WC), as well as multiple buffer zones next to the lake boundary as the study sites. Soil erosion intensity was designated as a watershed indicator, and the lake algae area was designated as a lake quality indicator. The sensitive watershed region was identified based on the relationship between these two indicators among different lake divisions for a temporal sequence from 2000 to 2012. The results show that the relationship between soil erosion modulus and lake quality varied among different lake areas. Soil erosion from the two bay areas was more closely correlated with water quality than soil erosion from the WC region. This was most apparent at distances of 5 km to 10 km from the lake, where the r2 was as high as 0.764. Results indicate that soil erosion could be used as an indicator for identifying key watershed protection areas. Different lake areas need to be considered separately due to differences in geographical features, land use, and the corresponding effects on lake water quality. PMID:26712772

  8. Contributions for repositioning a regional strategy for Healthy Municipalities, Cities and Communities (HM&C): results of a pan-American survey.

    PubMed

    Meresman, Sergio; Rice, Marilyn; Vizzotti, Carlos; Frassia, Romina; Vizzotti, Pablo; Akerman, Marco

    2010-09-01

    This article presents the results of the 1st Regional Survey of Healthy Municipalities, Cities and Communities (HM&C) carried out in 2008 by the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) and ISALUD University of Argentina. It discusses the responses obtained from 12 countries in the Americas Region. Key informants in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Mexico, Paraguay, Peru, and Uruguay were selected and encouraged to answer the survey, while informants from Canada and Honduras answered voluntarily and were included in this analysis. The discussion of the results of the Survey provides insight into the current status of HM&C in the Region and suggests key topics for repositioning the Regional strategy relative to: (1) the conceptual identity and tools for HM&C; (2) challenging areas in the implementation process (scale, legal framework, and development of capacities); (3) related strategies and participatory processes such as the ways citizen empowerment in governance is supported; (4) the need to monitor and assess the impact of the HM&C strategy on the health and quality of life of the populations involved; and (5) the need for developing a strategic research and training agenda. The analysis and discussion of these results aims to provide useful input for repositioning the strategy in the Region and contributing to the emergence of a second generation of concepts and tools capable of meeting the developing priorities and needs currently faced by the HM&C strategy. PMID:20532989

  9. Contributions for Repositioning a Regional Strategy for Healthy Municipalities, Cities and Communities (HM&C): Results of a Pan-American Survey

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Marilyn; Vizzotti, Carlos; Frassia, Romina; Vizzotti, Pablo; Akerman, Marco

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the results of the 1st Regional Survey of Healthy Municipalities, Cities and Communities (HM&C) carried out in 2008 by the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) and ISALUD University of Argentina. It discusses the responses obtained from 12 countries in the Americas Region. Key informants in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Mexico, Paraguay, Peru, and Uruguay were selected and encouraged to answer the survey, while informants from Canada and Honduras answered voluntarily and were included in this analysis. The discussion of the results of the Survey provides insight into the current status of HM&C in the Region and suggests key topics for repositioning the Regional strategy relative to: (1) the conceptual identity and tools for HM&C; (2) challenging areas in the implementation process (scale, legal framework, and development of capacities); (3) related strategies and participatory processes such as the ways citizen empowerment in governance is supported; (4) the need to monitor and assess the impact of the HM&C strategy on the health and quality of life of the populations involved; and (5) the need for developing a strategic research and training agenda. The analysis and discussion of these results aims to provide useful input for repositioning the strategy in the Region and contributing to the emergence of a second generation of concepts and tools capable of meeting the developing priorities and needs currently faced by the HM&C strategy. PMID:20532989

  10. Identifying Watershed Regions Sensitive to Soil Erosion and Contributing to Lake Eutrophication--A Case Study in the Taihu Lake Basin (China).

    PubMed

    Lin, Chen; Ma, Ronghua; He, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Taihu Lake in China is suffering from severe eutrophication partly due to non-point pollution from the watershed. There is an increasing need to identify the regions within the watershed that most contribute to lake water degradation. The selection of appropriate temporal scales and lake indicators is important to identify sensitive watershed regions. This study selected three eutrophic lake areas, including Meiliang Bay (ML), Zhushan Bay (ZS), and the Western Coastal region (WC), as well as multiple buffer zones next to the lake boundary as the study sites. Soil erosion intensity was designated as a watershed indicator, and the lake algae area was designated as a lake quality indicator. The sensitive watershed region was identified based on the relationship between these two indicators among different lake divisions for a temporal sequence from 2000 to 2012. The results show that the relationship between soil erosion modulus and lake quality varied among different lake areas. Soil erosion from the two bay areas was more closely correlated with water quality than soil erosion from the WC region. This was most apparent at distances of 5 km to 10 km from the lake, where the r² was as high as 0.764. Results indicate that soil erosion could be used as an indicator for identifying key watershed protection areas. Different lake areas need to be considered separately due to differences in geographical features, land use, and the corresponding effects on lake water quality. PMID:26712772

  11. National Commission on Libraries and Information Science Mid-Atlantic States Regional Hearing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, May 21, 1975. Volume One. Scheduled Witnesses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Commission on Libraries and Information Science, Washington, DC.

    This is the first of two volumes of written testimony presented to the National Commission on Libraries and Information Science (NCLIS) at its Mid-Atlantic States Regional Hearing held May 21, 1975 at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Statements are provided by public, academic, research, special, regional, state, and school librarians, as well as by…

  12. The Science of Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia (VCID): A Framework for Advancing Research Priorities in the Cerebrovascular Biology of Cognitive Decline.

    PubMed

    Corriveau, Roderick A; Bosetti, Francesca; Emr, Marian; Gladman, Jordan T; Koenig, James I; Moy, Claudia S; Pahigiannis, Katherine; Waddy, Salina P; Koroshetz, Walter

    2016-03-01

    The World Health Organization reports that 47.5 million people are affected by dementia worldwide. With aging populations and 7.7 million new cases each year, the burden of illness due to dementia approaches crisis proportions. Despite significant advances in our understanding of the biology of Alzheimer's disease (AD), the leading dementia diagnosis, the actual causes of dementia in affected individuals are unknown except for rare fully penetrant genetic forms. Evidence from epidemiology and pathology studies indicates that damage to the vascular system is associated with an increased risk of many types of dementia. Both Alzheimer's pathology and cerebrovascular disease increase with age. How AD affects small blood vessel function and how vascular dysfunction contributes to the molecular pathology of Alzheimer's are areas of intense research. The science of vascular contributions to cognitive impairment and dementia (VCID) integrates diverse aspects of biology and incorporates the roles of multiple cell types that support the function of neural tissue. Because of the proven ability to prevent and treat cardiovascular disease and hypertension with population benefits for heart and stroke outcomes, it is proposed that understanding and targeting the biological mechanisms of VCID can have a similarly positive impact on public health. PMID:27095366

  13. Contribution to the faunistics of shore bugs (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Leptopodomorpha) in the Palaearctic Region and the Himalayas.

    PubMed

    Vinokurov, Nikolay N; Kment, Petr

    2015-01-01

    New distributional data on 33 species of the infraorder Leptopodomorpha (3 species of the family Leptopodidae and 30 species and subspecies of Saldidae) from the Palaearctic Region and Himalayas are provided. The following new or confirmed records are listed: Chartoscirta cocksii (Curtis, 1835) from Kosovo; Halosalda halophila (Jakovlev, 1876), Saldula amplicollis (Reuter, 1891) and Saldula xanthochila (Fieber, 1859) from Iran; Macrosaldula jakowleffi (Reuter, 1891) from Nepal and Pakistan; Macrosaldula scotica (Curtis, 1835) from Uzbekistan; Macrosaldula variabilis (Herrich-Schaeffer, 1835), Saldula lindskogi Vinokurov, 2004, Saldula opacula (Zetterstedt, 1838) from Afghanistan; Micracanthia ornatula (Reuter, 1881) from Oman; Saldula fucicola (J. Sahlberg, 1870) from Bosnia and Herzegovina and Bulgaria; Saldula lindbergi Lindskog, 1975 from Lebanon; Saldula melanoscela (Fieber, 1859) from Iran and Montenegro; Saldula palustris (Douglas, 1874) and Saldula pilosella hirsuta (Reuter, 1888) from Montenegro; Saldula orthochila (Fieber, 1859) from Afghanistan and Pakistan; Saldula pallipes (Fabricius, 1794) from Montenegro and Nepal; Saldula pilosella pilosella (Thomson, 1871) from Libya; and Saldula saltatoria (Linnaeus, 1758) from Iran and Nepal. A tabular checklist of Leptopodomorpha of Afghanistan, Iran and Pakistan is also provided. PMID:26624315

  14. Contribution to the Study of Regional Magnetization of Satellite Magnetic Measurement: Magsat, Orsted, and Champ (with Gravity Field)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Patrick T.

    2004-01-01

    A discussion of and introduction to satellite-altitude geopotential field studies and their interpretation with emphasis on results from metalliferous regions will be given. The magnetic and gravimetric measurements from satellite altitudes show heterogeneity in deeper parts of the lithosphere. These patterns of magnetic anomalies do not only reveal the largest iron ore deposits such as Kiruna, Sweden, Kursk, Russia, and Banugi, Central African Republic but also linear features indicating structural discontinuities. Changes of magnetic amplitude of these patterns are caused by intersecting transverse fractures localizing magmatism and concentration of metals. In addition satellite altitude data are related to variations in crustal thickness and heat flow. Deep-rooted structural discontinuities, defined by combination of geological and geophysical criteria, with spacing of several hundred kilometers, reveal a quite uniform pattern in the deeper parts of the lithosphere. As these structures provide favorable pathways for the ascent of heat, magmas and ore-forming fluids, their recognition is of crucial importance and can be used in the compilation of a new type of mineral prognosis map. An example from Europe includes a pattern of east west trending structural discontinuities or belts and their junction with the NW-trending Tornqvist-Teisseyre Line. The Upper Silesian-Cracovian Zn-Pb district occurs along one of the latitudinal belts. Leslaw Teper of the University of Silesia has been invited to show the fractures in crystalline basement beneath the sediments hosting the Zn-Pb ores.

  15. Identification of a nucleotide in 5' untranslated region contributing to virus replication and virulence of Coxsackievirus A16.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhaolong; Liu, Xin; Wang, Shaohua; Li, Jingliang; Hou, Min; Liu, Guanchen; Zhang, Wenyan; Yu, Xiao-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Coxsackievirus A16 (CA16) and enterovirus 71 (EV71) are two main causative pathogens of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). Unlike EV71, virulence determinants of CA16, particularly within 5' untranslated region (5'UTR), have not been investigated until now. Here, a series of nucleotides present in 5'UTR of lethal but not in non-lethal CA16 strains were screened by aligning nucleotide sequences of lethal circulating Changchun CA16 and the prototype G10 as well as non-lethal SHZH05 strains. A representative infectious clone based on a lethal Changchun024 sequence and infectious mutants with various nucleotide alterations in 5'UTR were constructed and further investigated by assessing virus replication in vitro and virulence in neonatal mice. Compared to the lethal infectious clone, the M2 mutant with a change from cytosine to uracil at nucleotide 104 showed weaker virulence and lower replication capacity. The predicted secondary structure of the 5'UTR of CA16 RNA showed that M2 mutant located between the cloverleaf and stem-loop II, affected interactions between the 5'UTR and the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) and A1 (hnRNP A1) that are important for translational activity. Thus, our research determined a virulence-associated site in the 5'UTR of CA16, providing a crucial molecular target for antiviral drug development. PMID:26861413

  16. Identification of a nucleotide in 5′ untranslated region contributing to virus replication and virulence of Coxsackievirus A16

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhaolong; Liu, Xin; Wang, Shaohua; Li, Jingliang; Hou, Min; Liu, Guanchen; Zhang, Wenyan; Yu, Xiao-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Coxsackievirus A16 (CA16) and enterovirus 71 (EV71) are two main causative pathogens of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). Unlike EV71, virulence determinants of CA16, particularly within 5′ untranslated region (5′UTR), have not been investigated until now. Here, a series of nucleotides present in 5′UTR of lethal but not in non-lethal CA16 strains were screened by aligning nucleotide sequences of lethal circulating Changchun CA16 and the prototype G10 as well as non-lethal SHZH05 strains. A representative infectious clone based on a lethal Changchun024 sequence and infectious mutants with various nucleotide alterations in 5′UTR were constructed and further investigated by assessing virus replication in vitro and virulence in neonatal mice. Compared to the lethal infectious clone, the M2 mutant with a change from cytosine to uracil at nucleotide 104 showed weaker virulence and lower replication capacity. The predicted secondary structure of the 5′UTR of CA16 RNA showed that M2 mutant located between the cloverleaf and stem-loop II, affected interactions between the 5′UTR and the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) and A1 (hnRNP A1) that are important for translational activity. Thus, our research determined a virulence-associated site in the 5′UTR of CA16, providing a crucial molecular target for antiviral drug development. PMID:26861413

  17. Precursory enhancement of EIA in the morning sector: Contribution from mid-latitude large earthquakes in the north-east Asian region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Kwangsun; Oyama, Koh-Ichiro; Bankov, Ludmil; Chen, Chia-Hung; Devi, Minakshi; Liu, Huixin; Liu, Jann-Yenq

    2016-01-01

    To investigate whether the link between seismic activity and EIA (equatorial ionization anomaly) enhancement is valid for mid-latitude seismic activity, DEMETER observations around seven large earthquakes in the north-east Asian region were fully analyzed (M ⩾ 6.8). In addition, statistical analysis was performed for 35 large earthquakes (M ⩾ 6.0) that occurred during the DEMETER observation period. The results suggest that mid-latitude earthquakes do contribute to EIA enhancement, represented as normalized equatorial Ne , and that ionospheric change precedes seismic events, as has been reported in previous studies. According to statistical studies, the normalized equatorial density enhancement is sensitive and proportional to both the magnitude and the hypocenter depth of an earthquake. The mechanisms that can explain the contribution of mid-latitude seismic activity to EIA variation are briefly discussed based on current explanations of the geochemical and ionospheric processes involved in lithosphere-ionosphere interaction.

  18. Assessing global, regional, national and sub–national capacity for public health research: a bibliometric analysis of the Web of ScienceTM in 1996–2010

    PubMed Central

    Badenhorst, Anna; Mansoori, Parisa; Chan, Kit Yee

    2016-01-01

    Background The past two decades have seen a large increase in investment in global public health research. There is a need for increased coordination and accountability, particularly in understanding where funding is being allocated and who has capacity to perform research. In this paper, we aim to assess global, regional, national and sub–national capacity for public health research and how it is changing over time in different parts of the world. Methods To allow comparisons of regions, countries and universities/research institutes over time, we relied on Web of ScienceTM database and used Hirsch (h) index based on 5–year–periods (h5). We defined articles relevant to public health research with 98% specificity using the combination of search terms relevant to public health, epidemiology or meta–analysis. Based on those selected papers, we computed h5 for each country of the world and their main universities/research institutes for these 5–year time periods: 1996–2000, 2001–2005 and 2006–2010. We computed h5 with a 3–year–window after each time period, to allow citations from more recent years to accumulate. Among the papers contributing to h5–core, we explored a topic/disease under investigation, “instrument” of health research used (eg, descriptive, discovery, development or delivery research); and universities/research institutes contributing to h5–core. Results Globally, the majority of public health research has been conducted in North America and Europe, but other regions (particularly Eastern Mediterranean and South–East Asia) are showing greater improvement rate and are rapidly gaining capacity. Moreover, several African nations performed particularly well when their research output is adjusted by their gross domestic product (GDP). In the regions gaining capacity, universities are contributing more substantially to the h–core publications than other research institutions. In all regions of the world, the topics of articles

  19. Regional analysis of drought and heat impacts on forests: current and future science directions.

    PubMed

    Law, Beverly E

    2014-12-01

    Accurate assessments of forest response to current and future climate and human actions are needed at regional scales. Predicting future impacts on forests will require improved analysis of species-level adaptation, resilience, and vulnerability to mortality. Land system models can be enhanced by creating trait-based groupings of species that better represent climate sensitivity, such as risk of hydraulic failure from drought. This emphasizes the need for more coordinated in situ and remote sensing observations to track changes in ecosystem function, and to improve model inputs, spatio-temporal diagnosis, and predictions of future conditions, including implications of actions to mitigate climate change. PMID:24909650

  20. Orbital-science investigation: Part F: regional geology of Hadley Rille

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howard, Keith A.; Head, James W.

    1972-01-01

    Study of the sinuous Hadley Rille (fig. 25-45) was a primary goal of the Apollo 15 mission. Local geology of the rille near the landing site is described in section 5 of this report. Preliminary study of orbital photography from Hasselblad, metric, and panoramic cameras makes possible a description of some regional relationships of the rille. Considerable use is also made of a preliminary topographic map (10-m contour interval) of part of the rille (part C of this section). Contours in the mare area generalized from the map (fig. 25-35(a)) are shown in figure 25-46.

  1. Regions of government science: John Wesley Powell in Washington and the American west.

    PubMed

    Kirsch, S

    1999-01-01

    Best known as the first down the Colorado River through the Grand Canyon, John Wesley Powell built his extraordinary career as geographer, geologist, anthropologist, bureaucrat, and conservationist from his knowledge of the arid region of the American West. Yet as much as Powell's scientific work, and his prescriptions for land reform, were grounded in the western landscape, they were equally situated in the booming Gilded Age capital of Washington, DC, where a new community of government scientists was gelling as part of an increasingly centralized federal state. PMID:10643132

  2. Global and regional factors contributing to the past and future sea level rise in the Northern Adriatic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarascia, Luca; Lionello, Piero

    2013-07-01

    This study aims at discussing evolution of Sea Level (SL) in the Northern Adriatic Sea for the 20th and 21st century. A Linear Regression Model (LRM) which aims at describing the effect of regional processes, is built and validated. This LRM computes the North Adriatic mean SL variations using three predictors: the Mean Sea Level Pressure (MSLP) in the Gulf of Venice, the mean Sea Temperature (ST) of the water column in the South Adriatic and the Upper Level Salinity (ULS) in the central part of the basin. SL data are provided by monthly values recorded at 7 tide gauges distributed along the Italian and Croatian coasts (available at the PSMSL, Permanent Service of Mean Sea Level). MSLP data are provided by the EMULATE data set. Mediterranean ST and ULS data are extracted from the MEDATLAS/2002 database. The study shows that annual SL variations at Northern Adriatic stations are very coherent, so that the Northern Adriatic SL can be reconstructed since 1905 on the basis of only two stations: Venice and Trieste. The LRM is found to be robust, very successful at explaining interannual SL variations and consistent with the physical mechanisms responsible for SL evolution. Results show that observed SL in the 20th century has a large trend, which cannot be explained by this LRM, and it is interpreted as the superposition of land movement and a remote cause (such as polar ice melting). When the LRM is used with the MSLP, ST and ULS from climate model projections for the end of the 21st century (A1B scenario), it produces an SL rise in the range from 2.3 to 14.1 cm, with a best estimate of 8.9 cm. However, results show that the behavior of the remotely forced SL rise is the main source of future SL uncertainty and extrapolating its present trend to the future would expand the range of SL uncertainty from 14 to 49 cm.

  3. River Boats Contribute to the Regional Spread of the Dengue Vector Aedes aegypti in the Peruvian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Guagliardo, Sarah Anne; Morrison, Amy C.; Barboza, Jose Luis; Requena, Edwin; Astete, Helvio; Vazquez-Prokopec, Gonzalo; Kitron, Uriel

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives The dramatic range expansion of the dengue vector Aedes aegypti is associated with various anthropogenic transport activities, but little is known about the underlying mechanisms driving this geographic expansion. We longitudinally characterized infestation of different vehicle types (cars, boats, etc.) to estimate the frequency and intensity of mosquito introductions into novel locations (propagule pressure). Methods Exhaustive adult and immature Ae. aegypti collections were performed on six different vehicle types at five ports and two bus/ taxi departure points in the Amazonian city of Iquitos, Peru during 2013. Aquatic vehicles included 32 large and 33 medium-sized barges, 53 water taxis, and 41 speed boats. Terrestrial vehicles sampled included 40 buses and 30 taxis traveling on the only highway in the region. Ae. aegypti adult infestation rates and immature indices were analyzed by vehicle type, location within vehicles, and sampling date. Results Large barges (71.9% infested) and medium barges (39.4% infested) accounted for most of the infestations. Notably, buses had an overall infestation rate of 12.5%. On large barges, the greatest number of Ae. aegypti adults were found in October, whereas most immatures were found in February followed by October. The vast majority of larvae (85.9%) and pupae (76.7%) collected in large barges were produced in puddles formed in cargo holds. Conclusions Because larges barges provide suitable mosquito habitats (due to dark, damp cargo storage spaces and ample oviposition sites), we conclude that they likely serve as significant contributors to mosquitoes’ propagule pressure across long distances throughout the Peruvian Amazon. This information can help anticipate vector population mixing and future range expansions of dengue and other viruses transmitted by Ae. aegypti. PMID:25860352

  4. SPLASH: the Southern Parkes Large-Area Survey in Hydroxyl - first science from the pilot region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, J. R.; Walsh, A. J.; Jones, P. A.; Breen, S. L.; Cunningham, M. R.; Lowe, V.; Jones, C.; Purcell, C.; Caswell, J. L.; Carretti, E.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Green, J. A.; Gómez, J. F.; Krishnan, V.; Dickey, J. M.; Imai, H.; Gibson, S. J.; Hennebelle, P.; Lo, N.; Hayakawa, T.; Fukui, Y.; Mizuno, A.

    2014-04-01

    The Southern Parkes Large-Area Survey in Hydroxyl (SPLASH) is a sensitive, unbiased, and fully sampled survey of the southern Galactic plane and Galactic Centre in all four ground-state transitions of the hydroxyl (OH) radical. The survey provides a deep census of 1612-, 1665-, 1667-, and 1720-MHz OH absorption and emission from the Galactic interstellar medium, and is also an unbiased search for maser sources in these transitions. We present here first results from the SPLASH pilot region, which covers Galactic longitudes 334° to 344° and latitudes ±2°. Diffuse OH is widely detected in all four transitions, with optical depths that are always small (averaged over the Parkes beam), and with departures from local thermodynamic equilibrium common even in the 1665- and 1667-MHz main lines. To a 3σ sensitivity of ˜30 mK, we find no evidence of OH envelopes extending beyond the CO-bright regions of molecular cloud complexes, and conclude that the similarity of the OH excitation temperature and the level of the continuum background is at least partly responsible for this. We detect masers and maser candidates in all four transitions, approximately 50 per cent of which are new detections. This implies that SPLASH will produce a substantial increase in the known population of ground-state OH masers in the southern Galactic plane.

  5. Contributions of regional air pollutant emissions to ozone and fine particulate matter-related mortalities in eastern U.S. urban areas.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xiangting; Strickland, Matthew J; Liao, Kuo-Jen

    2015-02-01

    Ground-level ozone and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) are associated with adverse human health effects such as lung structure dysfunction, inflammation and infection, asthma, and premature deaths. This study estimated contributions of emissions of anthropogenic nitrogen oxides (NOx), volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and sulfur dioxides (SO2) from four regions to summertime (i.e., June, July, and August) ozone and PM2.5-related mortalities in seven major Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs with more than 4 million people) in the eastern United States (U.S.). A photochemical transport model, Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) with sensitivity analyses, was applied to quantify the contribution of the regional anthropogenic emissions to ambient ozone and PM2.5 concentrations in the seven MSAs. The results of the sensitivity analysis, along with estimates of concentration-response from published epidemiologic studies, were used to estimate excess deaths associated with changes in ambient daily 8-h average ozone and daily PM2.5 concentrations during the summer of 2007. The results show that secondary PM2.5 (i.e., PM2.5 formed in the atmosphere) had larger effects on mortality (95% confidence interval (C.I.) ranged from 700 to 3854) than ambient ozone did (95% C.I. was 470-1353) in the seven MSAs. Emissions of anthropogenic NOx, VOCs and SO2 from the northeastern U.S. could cause up to about 2500 ozone and PM2.5-related deaths in the urban areas examined in this study. The results also show that the contributions of emissions from electrical generating units (EGUs) and anthropogenic non-EGU sources to ozone-related mortality in the MSAs were similar. However, emissions from EGUs had a more significant impact on PM2.5-related deaths than anthropogenic emissions from non-EGUs sources did. Anthropogenic NOx and VOCs emissions from the regions where the MSAs are located had the most significant contributions to ozone-related mortalities in the eastern U.S. urban

  6. The contribution of soil biogenic NO and HONO emissions from a managed hyperarid ecosystem to the regional NOx emissions during growing season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamtimin, Buhalqem; Meixner, Franz X.; Behrendt, Thomas; Badawy, Moawad; Wagner, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    A study was carried out to understand the contributions of soil biogenic NO emissions from managed (fertilized and irrigated) hyperarid ecosystems in NW China to the regional NOx emissions during the growing season. Soil biogenic net potential NO fluxes were quantified by laboratory incubation of soil samples from the three dominating ecosystems (desert, cotton, and grape fields). Regional biogenic NO emissions were calculated bottom-up hourly for the entire growing season (April-September 2010) by considering corresponding land use, hourly data of soil temperature, gravimetric soil moisture, and fertilizer enhancement factors. The regional HONO emissions were estimated using the ratio of the optimum condition ((FN,opt(HONO) to FN,opt (NO)). Regional anthropogenic NOx emissions were calculated bottom-up from annual statistical data provided by regional and local government bureaus which have been downscaled to monthly value. Regional top-down emission estimates of NOx were derived on the monthly basis from satellite observations (OMI) of tropospheric vertical NO2 column densities and prescribed values of the tropospheric NOx lifetime. In order to compare the top-down and bottom-up emission estimates, all emission estimates were expressed in terms of mass of atomic nitrogen. Consequently, monthly top-down NOx emissions (total) were compared with monthly bottom-up NOx emissions (biogenic + anthropogenic) for the time of the satellite overpass (around 13:00 LT) with the consideration of the diurnal cycle of bottom-up estimates. Annual variation in total Tohsun Oasis NOx emissions is characterized by a strong peak in winter (December-February) and a secondary peak in summer (June-August). During summer, soil biogenic emissions were from equal to double that of related anthropogenic emissions, and grape soils were the main contributor to soil biogenic emissions, followed by cotton soils, while emissions from the desert were negligible. The top-down and bottom

  7. A contribution to the seismic hazard of the Apulia Region (Southern Italy): environmental effects triggered by historical earthquakes in last centuries.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porfido, Sabina; Alessio, Giuliana; Nappi, Rosa; De Lucia, Maddalena; Gaudiosi, Germana

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is a critical revision of the historical and recent seismicity of the Apulia and surrounding seismogenetic areas, for re-evaluating the macroseismic effects in MCS scale and ground effects in natural environment according to the ESI 2007 scale (Michetti et al., 2007) as a contribution to the seismic hazard of the region. The most important environmental effect due to historical earthquakes in the Apulia was the tsunami occurrence, followed by landslides, liquefaction phenomena, hydrological changes and ground cracks. The Apulia (Southern Italy) has been hit by several low energy and a few high energy earthquakes in the last centuries. In particular, the July 30, 1627 earthquake (I=X MCS, Rovida et al., 2011) and the May 5, 1646 event (I=X MCS), the strongest earthquakes of the Gargano promontory have been reviewed, together with the March 20, 1731 earthquake (I=IX MCS, Mw=6.5, Rovida et al., 2011), the most relevant of the Foggia province, and the February 20, 1743 earthquake (I=IX MCS, Mw= 7.1, Rovida et al., 2011, I ESI=X, Nappi et al, 2015), the strongest of the Salento area,. The whole Apulia region has also been struck by strong earthquakes of neighboring seismogenetic areas located in the Southern Apennines, Adriatic and Ionian Sea, Albania and Greece, well propagated throughout the Italian peninsula, and in particular in the southern regions, where the intensity degrees are higher, sometimes exceeding the limit of damage. Some well documented examples of Greek earthquakes strongly felt in the whole Apulia region were: the August 27, 1886 earthquake (Peloponnesus, Greece); the May 28, 1897 earthquake (Creta-Cypro); the June 26, 1926 earthquake (Creta and Cipro, Imax=X MCS), felt all over the Southern Italy; the August 28, 1962 earthquake (epicenter in Peloponnesus area). It is noteworthy that earthquakes located in the Southern Apennines were powerfully felt in the whole Apulia region; among the strongest historical events of the

  8. Characterization of atmospheric aerosols in the Po valley during the supersito campaigns - Part 3: Contribution of wood combustion to wintertime atmospheric aerosols in Emilia Romagna region (Northern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrogrande, Maria Chiara; Bacco, Dimitri; Ferrari, Silvia; Kaipainen, Jussi; Ricciardelli, Isabella; Riekkola, Marja-Liisa; Trentini, Arianna; Visentin, Marco

    2015-12-01

    This paper investigates the influence of wood combustion on PM in fall/winter that are the most favorable seasonal periods with presumed intense biomass burning for residential heating due to low temperatures. As a part of the Supersito project, nearly 650 PM2.5 samples were daily collected at urban and rural sites in Emilia Romagna (Northern Italy) in five intensive experimental campaigns throughout the years from 2011 to 2014. From specific compounds related to wood combustion a set of 58 organic compounds was determined, such as anhydrosugars, primary biological sugars, low-molecular-weight carboxylic acids, methoxylated phenols, PAHs and carbonaceous components (EC/OC). Levoglucosan was by far the most dominant anhydrosugar, both on a relative and an absolute basis (35-1043 ng m-3), followed by mannosan (7-121 ng m-3) and galactosan (4-52 ng m-3), indicating that wood burning for domestic heating is a diffuse regional source during the seasons studied. Different diagnostic ratios between anhydrosugars and methoxylated phenols were computed to discriminate the prevalent contribution of hardwood as combustion fuel. The investigated 19 high molecular weight PAHs were more abundant at the urban than at the rural site, with mean total value of 4.3 and 3.2 ng m-3 at MS and SP, respectively. The strong contribution of wood combustion to atmospheric PAHs was indicated by the positive correlation between levoglucosan and the most abundant PAHs (R2 = 0.71÷0.79) and individually with benzo(a)pyrene (R2 = 0.79). By using this correlation, it was estimated that wood burning contributed nearly 77% to BaP concentration in the winter months. Based on the ratio between levoglucosan and OC data, it could be concluded that the wood burning contributed about 35% to OC during the cold November-February periods and the contribution was similar at both sampling sites.

  9. [The Baltic countries as the birthplace of embryology. Contingencies of a transnational region of science].

    PubMed

    Riha, Ortrun; Schmuck, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Modern embryology is grounded on the research of Pander (theory of germ-layers), von Baer (human egg) and Rathke (branchial arches in mammals). All these scientists lived and worked in the Baltic region. They held professorships at the universities of Koenigsberg and Dorpat and at the Imperial Academy of St. Petersburg, thus moving between the Kingdom of Prussia and the Russian Czardom. Since the Baltic countries are not commonly considered to be predestined as a birthplace of embryology, special attention is turned to the coincidences that, there of all places, made those people focus on that special field of research. Considering the peripheral position of the Baltic, the paper examines personal relations, national identities, cultural exchange, and local working conditions, including room for development as well as formidable obstacles. PMID:21563375

  10. The Global Youth Service Team: students applying science and technology in remote, developing region of the world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollinger, Doug

    2012-03-01

    Eh Kalu, director of the Karen Department of Health and Welfare along the border region between Thailand and Burma said, ``It is very difficult to attend to a medical emergency at night when all you have are candles for light.'' The Global Youth Service Team (GYST) provides high school and college students with the opportunity to apply science that they have learned in the performance of international humanitarian service. Volunteers with the GYST build solar powered electrical systems, ultraviolet water purifiers, provide training and education to people who are most in need due to energy poverty, lack access to resources, natural disasters or human rights violations. GYST volunteers train with photovoltaic materials and equipment to become solar energy technicians. They then travel to remote communities in developing countries where we are able to catalyze improvements in education and health care, promote sustainable energy initiatives and help communities develop the capacity to use their own resources by which to create opportunity.

  11. Citizen Science for Post-disaster Sustainable Community Development in Ecologically Fragiel Regions - A Case from China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Ming, Meng; Lu, Ye; Jin, Wei

    2016-04-01

    The world's mountains host some of the most complex, dynamic, and diverse ecosystems and are also hotspots for natural disasters, such as earthquake, landslide and flood. One factor that limits the mountain communities to recover from disasters and pursue sustainable development is the lack of locally relevant scientific knowledge, which is hard to gain from global and regional scale observations and models. The rapid advances in ICT, computing, communication technologies and the emergence of citizen science is changing the situation. Here we report a case from Sichuan Giant Panda Sanctuary World Natural Heritage in China on the application of citizen science in a community reconstruction project. Dahe, a mountainous community (ca. 8000 ha in size) is located covering part of the World Heritage's core and buffer zones, with an elevation range of 1000-3000 meters. The community suffered from two major earthquakes of 7.9 and 6.9 Mw in 2008 and 2013 respectively. Landslides and flooding threat the community and significantly limit their livelihood options. We integrated participatory disaster risk mapping (e.g., community vulnerability and capacity assessment) and mobile assisted natural hazards and natural resources mapping (e.g., using free APP GeoODK) into more conventional community reconstruction and livelihood building activities. We showed that better decisions are made based on results from these activities and local residents have a high level of buy-in in these new knowledge. We suggest that initiatives like this, if successfully scale-up, can also help generate much needed data and knowledge in similar less-developed and data deficient regions of the world.

  12. Contributions to Public Understanding of Science by the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory (II): Web-Based Projects for Teachers and Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passow, M. J.; Kastens, K. A.; Goodwillie, A. M.; Brenner, C.

    2009-12-01

    The Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University (LDEO) continues its long history of contributions to public understanding of Science. Highlights of current efforts are described in paired posters. Part 2 focuses on web-based activities that foster access to LDEO cutting-edge research for worldwide audiences. “Geoscience Data Puzzles" are activities that purposefully present a high ratio of insight-to-effort for students. Each Puzzle uses selected authentic data to illuminate fundamental Earth processes typically taught in Earth Science curricula. Data may be in the form of a graph, table, map, image or combination of the above. Some Puzzles involve downloading a simple Excel file, but most can be worked from paper copies. Questions guide students through the process of data interpretion. Most Puzzles involve calculations, with emphasis on the too-seldom-taught skill of figuring out what math process is useful to answer an unfamiliar question or solve a problem. Every Puzzle offers "Aha" insights, when the connection between data and process or data and problem comes clear in a rewarding burst of illumination. Time needed to solve a Puzzle is between 15 minutes and an hour. “GeoMapApp” is a free, map-based data exploration and visualization application from the LDEO Marine Geoscience Data System group. GeoMapApp provides direct access to hundreds of data sets useful to geoscience educators, including continuously-updated Global Multi-Resolution Topography compilations that incorporates high-resolution bathymetry in the oceans and Space Shuttle elevations over land. A new User Guide, multi-media tutorials and webinar offer follow-along help and examples. “Virtual Ocean” integrates GeoMapApp functionality with NASA World Wind code to provide a powerful new 3-D platform for interdisciplinary geoscience research and education. Both GeoMapApp and Virtual Ocean foster scientific understanding and provide training in new data visualization

  13. Marine Science in Support for Sustainable Development of the Indian Ocean Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visbeck, Martin

    2014-05-01

    The Indian Ocean rim is home to a significant part of the global population. Its large heat capacity and ocean circulation responds to and regulates seasonal to multi-decadal and long term climate change. In particular the monsoon type circulation regulates rain and drought patterns over India, Africa and Southern Asia. Fishing and more recently resource extraction of energy and materials make the ocean economically important. Global trade and ocean related hazards (such as ocean warming, ocean acidification, ocean de-oxygenation, loss of biodiversity, sea level rise and earth quakes and tsunamis) have important other economic impacts on all societies. On the other hand our current scientific understanding, ability to continually observe changes in the marine environment, model all aspects of the connected ocean system and develop plausible scenarios for the Indian Ocean of the future are still in its infancy. The possibility for a decade long comprehensive Indian Ocean Study in support of providing the information needed for sustainable development of the region is explored.

  14. ASAS centennial paper: Contributions in the Journal of Animal Science to the development of protocols for breeding management of cattle through synchronization of estrus and ovulation.

    PubMed

    Lauderdale, J W

    2009-02-01

    American Society of Animal Science members, publishing in Journal of Animal Science (JAS), completed research that resulted in understanding the estrous cycle of cattle, which led to the ability to inseminate cattle on a given day with pregnancy rates similar to those achieved by 21-d breeding by a fertile and sound bull. Research published in JAS led to understanding estrus, ovulation, the estrous cycle, and postpartum interval for cattle (1930s through 1960s) and hormonal factors affecting corpus luteum lifespan of cattle (1950s through 1980s). Research during the 1940s to 1960s, using gonadotropins and progesterone to manage the estrous cycle of cattle, established the concepts for estrous synchronization and stimulated commercial research directed at developing cost-effective progestogen estrous synchronization products, leading to commercially available products from 1967 through today (Repromix, melengestrol acetate, Syncro-Mate-B, controlled internal drug release). Prostaglandin F(2alpha) products were approved for estrous synchronization (1970s, 1980s), and GnRH products were approved for use in cattle to treat ovarian follicular cysts (1970s, 1980s). Research published in JAS was essential for understanding the biology of and potential value of both PGF(2alpha) and GnRH and contributed both to new knowledge and scientific bases for future Food and Drug Administration Center for Veterinary Medicine approval of those products. Research during the1980s through 2000s led to understanding ovarian follicular waves and described the timing of follicular recruitment, selection, dominance, and atresia; this research was essential for the ability to effectively manage follicles to achieve success with timed AI. The knowledge gained through research published in JAS resulted in development of the numerous estrous synchronization and breeding management protocols that are cost-effective and meet the breeding management needs of most beef and dairy enterprises. PMID

  15. A multi-isotope approach for estimating industrial contributions to atmospheric nitrogen deposition in the Athabasca oil sands region in Alberta, Canada.

    PubMed

    Proemse, Bernadette C; Mayer, Bernhard; Fenn, Mark E; Ross, Christopher S

    2013-11-01

    Industrial nitrogen (N) emissions in the Athabasca oil sands region (AOSR), Alberta, Canada, affect nitrate (NO3) and ammonium (NH4) deposition rates in close vicinity of industrial emitters. NO3-N and NH4-N open field and throughfall deposition rates were determined at various sites between 3 km and 113 km distance to the main oil sand operations between May 2008 and May 2009. NO3 and NH4 were analyzed for δ(15)N-NO3, δ(18)O-NO3, Δ(17)O-NO3 and δ(15)N-NH4. Marked differences in the δ(18)O and Δ(17)O values between industrial emissions and background deposition allowed for the estimation of minimum industrial contributions to atmospheric NO3 deposition. δ(15)N-NH4 values also allowed for estimates of industrial contributions to atmospheric NH4 deposition. Results revealed that particularly sites within ~30 km radius from the main oil sands developments are significantly affected by industrial contributions to atmospheric NO3 and NH4 deposition. PMID:23896680

  16. Orbital-science investigation: Part O: regional variations in the magnitude of heiligenschein and causal connections

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wildey, Robert L.

    1972-01-01

    Approximately 35 reasonably good candidates for specialized photometric studies were found during a thorough examination of the frames exposed by the Apollo 15 metric camera. Of these, the majority was of value in heiligenschein studies (refs. 25-36 to 25-38). A few were of value for limited-interval delineation of the photometric functions of crater walls, wherein it is now known from past Apollo Program studies that younger craters have walls much more Lambertian in reflective properties than those of the standard lunar surface (ref. 25-39). It has now become apparent that some difficulty exists in such crater-wall studies with regard to varying the domain of mathematical definition over which such photometric functions are delineated to encompass much more of phase-angle-brightness-longitude space than has already been carried out Nearer to zero-phase angle, the brightness of the illuminated wall becomes so intense compared with the general luminance of the surrounding lunar terrain that it approaches the saturated region of the D/log E curve of the photograph where D is density and E is exposure. Conversely, for phase angles approaching 180°, most of the illuminated wall is seen so obliquely that the image size is small and reliable photometry is difficult. Also, difficulties inherent in the methodology exist—the descriptive geometry used to extract configurations begins to fail as craters become either too old or are imaged too near a vertical view Nevertheless, some useful candidates for crater-wall studies have been found in the Apollo 15 data, although their analysis is too lengthy for incorporation in this preliminary report.

  17. FIRST SCIENCE RESULTS FROM SOFIA/FORCAST: THE MID-INFRARED VIEW OF THE COMPACT H II REGION W3A

    SciTech Connect

    Salgado, F.; Berne, O.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Adams, J. D.; Herter, T. L.; Gull, G.; Schoenwald, J.; Keller, L. D.; De Buizer, J. M.; Vacca, W. D.; Becklin, E. E.; Shuping, R. Y.; Zinnecker, H.

    2012-04-20

    The massive star-forming region W3 was observed with the faint object infrared camera for the SOFIA telescope as part of the Short Science program. The 6.4, 6.6, 7.7, 19.7, 24.2, 31.5, and 37.1 {mu}m bandpasses were used to observe the emission of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules, very small grains, and big grains. Optical depth and color temperature maps of W3A show that IRS2 has blown a bubble devoid of gas and dust of {approx}0.05 pc radius. It is embedded in a dusty shell of ionized gas that contributes 40% of the total 24 {mu}m emission of W3A. This dust component is mostly heated by far-ultraviolet, rather than trapped Ly{alpha} photons. This shell is itself surrounded by a thin ({approx}0.01 pc) photodissociation region where PAHs show intense emission. The infrared spectral energy distribution (SED) of three different zones located at 8'', 20'', and 25'' from IRS2 shows that the peak of the SED shifts toward longer wavelengths, when moving away from the star. Adopting the stellar radiation field for these three positions, DUSTEM model fits to these SEDs yield a dust-to-gas mass ratio in the ionized gas similar to that in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM). However, the ratio of the IR-to-UV opacity of the dust in the ionized shell is increased by a factor of {approx_equal}3 compared to the diffuse ISM.

  18. Geospatial and machine learning techniques for wicked social science problems: analysis of crash severity on a regional highway corridor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Effati, Meysam; Thill, Jean-Claude; Shabani, Shahin

    2015-04-01

    The contention of this paper is that many social science research problems are too "wicked" to be suitably studied using conventional statistical and regression-based methods of data analysis. This paper argues that an integrated geospatial approach based on methods of machine learning is well suited to this purpose. Recognizing the intrinsic wickedness of traffic safety issues, such approach is used to unravel the complexity of traffic crash severity on highway corridors as an example of such problems. The support vector machine (SVM) and coactive neuro-fuzzy inference system (CANFIS) algorithms are tested as inferential engines to predict crash severity and uncover spatial and non-spatial factors that systematically relate to crash severity, while a sensitivity analysis is conducted to determine the relative influence of crash severity factors. Different specifications of the two methods are implemented, trained, and evaluated against crash events recorded over a 4-year period on a regional highway corridor in Northern Iran. Overall, the SVM model outperforms CANFIS by a notable margin. The combined use of spatial analysis and artificial intelligence is effective at identifying leading factors of crash severity, while explicitly accounting for spatial dependence and spatial heterogeneity effects. Thanks to the demonstrated effectiveness of a sensitivity analysis, this approach produces comprehensive results that are consistent with existing traffic safety theories and supports the prioritization of effective safety measures that are geographically targeted and behaviorally sound on regional highway corridors.

  19. Embryonic Nkx2.1-expressing neural precursor cells contribute to the regional heterogeneity of adult V-SVZ neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Ryan N; Lim, Daniel A

    2015-11-15

    The adult ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ) of the lateral ventricle produces several subtypes of olfactory bulb (OB) interneurons throughout life. Neural stem cells (NSCs) within this zone are heterogeneous, with NSCs located in different regions of the lateral ventricle wall generating distinct OB interneuron subtypes. The regional expression of specific transcription factors appears to correspond to such geographical differences in the developmental potential of V-SVZ NSCs. However, the transcriptional definition and developmental origin of V-SVZ NSC regional identity are not well understood. In this study, we found that a population of NSCs in the ventral region of the V-SVZ expresses the transcription factor Nkx2.1 and is derived from Nkx2.1-expressing (Nkx2.1+) embryonic precursors. To follow the fate of Nkx2.1+ cells and their progeny in vivo, we used mice with an Nkx2.1-CreER "knock-in" allele. Nkx2.1+ V-SVZ NSCs labeled in adult mice generated interneurons for the deep granule cell layer of the OB. Embryonic brain Nkx2.1+ precursors labeled at embryonic day 12.5 gave rise to Nkx2.1+ NSCs of the ventral V-SVZ in postnatal and adult mice. Thus, embryonic Nkx2.1+ neural precursors give rise to a population of Nkx2.1+ NSCs in the ventral V-SVZ where they contribute to the regional heterogeneity of V-SVZ NSCs. PMID:26387477

  20. The contribution of soil biogenic NO emissions from a managed hyper-arid ecosystem to the regional NO2 emissions during growing season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamtimin, B.; Badawy, M.; Behrendt, T.; Meixner, F. X.; Wagner, T.

    2015-12-01

    A study was carried out to understand the contributions of soil biogenic NO emissions from managed (fertilized and irrigated) hyper-arid ecosystem in NW-China to the regional NO2 emissions during growing season. Soil biogenic NO emissions were quantified by laboratory incubation of corresponding soil samples. We have developed the Geoscience General Tool Package (GGTP) to obtain soil temperature, soil moisture and biogenic soil NO emission at oasis scale. Bottom-up anthropogenic NO2 emissions have been scaled down from annual to monthly values to compare mean monthly soil biogenic NO2 emissions. The top-down emission estimates have been derived from satellite observations compared then with the bottom-up emission estimates (anthropogenic and biogenic). The results show that the soil biogenic emissions of NO2 during the growing period are (at least) equal until twofold of the related anthropogenic sources. We found that the grape soils are the main summertime contributor to the biogenic NO emissions of study area, followed by cotton soils. The top-down and bottom-up emission estimates were shown to be useful methods to estimate the monthly/seasonal cycle of the total regional NO2 emissions. The resulting total NO2 emissions show a strong peak in winter and a secondary peak in summer, providing confidence in the method. These findings provide strong evidence that biogenic emissions from soils of managed drylands (irrigated and fertilized) in the growing period can be much more important contributors to the regional NO2 budget (hence to regional photochemistry) of dryland regions than thought before.